WorldWideScience

Sample records for analysis center fy

  1. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1991 activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-06-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specially publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, factsheets, specially publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  2. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1991 activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.

    1992-06-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specially publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC's staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC's staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC's response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, factsheets, specially publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC's information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center: FY 1992 activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Stoss, F.W. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center

    1993-03-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIACs staff also provides technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC during the period October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. As analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of numeric data packages, computer model packages, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints is provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also described.

  4. Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

  5. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment, and Resources Center

    1994-01-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC`s staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC`s staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC`s response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC`s information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented.

  6. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: FY 1993 activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, R.M.; Stoss, F.W.; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

    1994-01-01

    During the course of a fiscal year, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) distributes thousands of specialty publications-numeric data packages (NDPs), computer model packages (CMPs), technical reports, public communication publications, newsletters, article reprints, and reference books-in response to requests for information related to global environmental issues, primarily those pertaining to climate change. CDIAC's staff also provide technical responses to specific inquiries related to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), other trace gases, and climate. Hundreds of referrals to other researchers, policy analysts, information specialists, or organizations are also facilitated by CDIAC's staff. This report provides an account of the activities accomplished by CDIAC (including World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases) during the period October 1, 1992, to September 30, 1993. An organizational overview of CDIAC and its staff is supplemented by a detailed description of inquiries received and CDIAC's response to those inquiries. An analysis and description of the preparation and distribution of NDPS, CMPS, technical reports, newsletters, fact sheets, specialty publications, and reprints are provided. Comments and descriptions of CDIAC's information management systems, professional networking, and special bilateral agreements are also presented

  7. FY16 Analysis report: Financial systems dependency on communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyeler, Walter E.

    2017-03-01

    Within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Office of Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis (OCIA)'s National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) develops capabilities to support the DHS mission and the resilience of the Nation’s critical infrastructure. At Sandia National Laboratories, under DHS/OCIA direction, NISAC is developing models of financial sector dependence on communications. This capability is designed to improve DHS's ability to assess potential impacts of communication disruptions to major financial services and the effectiveness of possible mitigations. This report summarizes findings and recommendations from the application of that capability as part of the FY2016 NISAC program plan.

  8. Joint Logistics Systems Center's Financial Statements for FY 1993

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Shelton

    1994-01-01

    The initial audit objectives were to determine whether the FY 1993 financial statements for the JLSC were presented fairly in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for Federal agencies...

  9. Exploration Laboratory Analysis FY13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, Michael; Perusek, Gail P.; Fung, Paul P.; Shaw, Tianna, L.

    2013-01-01

    The Exploration Laboratory Analysis (ELA) project supports the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) risk, which is stated as the Risk of Inability to Adequately Treat an Ill or Injured Crew Member, and ExMC Gap 4.05: Lack of minimally invasive in-flight laboratory capabilities with limited consumables required for diagnosing identified Exploration Medical Conditions. To mitigate this risk, the availability of inflight laboratory analysis instrumentation has been identified as an essential capability in future exploration missions. Mission architecture poses constraints on equipment and procedures that will be available to treat evidence-based medical conditions according to the Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), and to perform human research studies on the International Space Station (ISS) that are supported by the Human Health and Countermeasures (HHC) element. Since there are significant similarities in the research and medical operational requirements, ELA hardware development has emerged as a joint effort between ExMC and HHC. In 2012, four significant accomplishments were achieved towards the development of exploration laboratory analysis for medical diagnostics. These achievements included (i) the development of high priority analytes for research and medical operations, (ii) the development of Level 1 functional requirements and concept of operations documentation, (iii) the selection and head-to-head competition of in-flight laboratory analysis instrumentation, and (iv) the phase one completion of the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects under the topic Smart Phone Driven Blood-Based Diagnostics. To utilize resources efficiently, the associated documentation and advanced technologies were integrated into a single ELA plan that encompasses ExMC and HHC development efforts. The requirements and high priority analytes was used in the selection of the four in-flight laboratory analysis performers. Based upon the

  10. Organic analysis progress report FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauss, S.A.; Grant, K.E.; Hoopes, V.; Mong, G.M.; Steele, R.; Bellofatto, D.; Sharma, A.

    1998-04-01

    The Organic Analysis and Methods Development Task is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as part of the Organic Tank Waste Safety Project. The objective of the task is to apply developed analytical methods to identify and/or quantify the amount of particular organic species in tank wastes. In addition, this task provides analytical support for the Gas Generation Studies Task, Waste Aging, and Solubility Studies. This report presents the results from analyses of tank waste samples archived at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and received from the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC), which included samples associated with both the Flammable Gas and Organic Tank Waste Safety Programs. The data are discussed in Section 2.0. In addition, the results of analytical support for analyzing (1) simulated wastes for Waste Aging, (2) tank waste samples for Gas Generation, and (3) simulated wastes associated with solubility studies discussed in Sections 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0, respectively. The latter part of FY 1997 was devoted to documenting the analytical procedures, including derivation gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and GC/FID for quantitation, ion-pair chromatography (IPC), IC, and the cation exchange procedure for reducing the radioactivity of samples. The documentation of analytical procedures is included here and discussed in Section 6.0 and Section 7.0 discusses other analytical procedures. The references are listed in Section 8.0 and future plans are discussed in Section 9.0. Appendix A is a preprint of a manuscript accepted for publication. Appendix B contains the cc mail messages and chain-of-custody forms for the samples received for analyses. Appendix C contains the test plan for analysis of tank waste samples.

  11. Organic analysis progress report FY 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, S.A.; Grant, K.E.; Hoopes, V.; Mong, G.M.; Steele, R.; Bellofatto, D.; Sharma, A.

    1998-04-01

    The Organic Analysis and Methods Development Task is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as part of the Organic Tank Waste Safety Project. The objective of the task is to apply developed analytical methods to identify and/or quantify the amount of particular organic species in tank wastes. In addition, this task provides analytical support for the Gas Generation Studies Task, Waste Aging, and Solubility Studies. This report presents the results from analyses of tank waste samples archived at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and received from the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC), which included samples associated with both the Flammable Gas and Organic Tank Waste Safety Programs. The data are discussed in Section 2.0. In addition, the results of analytical support for analyzing (1) simulated wastes for Waste Aging, (2) tank waste samples for Gas Generation, and (3) simulated wastes associated with solubility studies discussed in Sections 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0, respectively. The latter part of FY 1997 was devoted to documenting the analytical procedures, including derivation gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and GC/FID for quantitation, ion-pair chromatography (IPC), IC, and the cation exchange procedure for reducing the radioactivity of samples. The documentation of analytical procedures is included here and discussed in Section 6.0 and Section 7.0 discusses other analytical procedures. The references are listed in Section 8.0 and future plans are discussed in Section 9.0. Appendix A is a preprint of a manuscript accepted for publication. Appendix B contains the cc mail messages and chain-of-custody forms for the samples received for analyses. Appendix C contains the test plan for analysis of tank waste samples

  12. Carbon Dioxide Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases fiscal year 1997 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, M.D. [comp.; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

    1998-03-01

    Fiscal year (FY) 1997 was another exciting and productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. During FY 1997, CDIAC launched the Quality Systems Science Center for the North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone (NARSTO). The purpose of NARSTO--a US-Canada-Mexico initiative of government agencies, industry, and the academic research community--is to improve the understanding of the formation and transport of tropospheric ozone.

  13. Compilation of the FY 1997 Navy General Fund Financial Statements at the Defense Finance and Accounting Service Cleveland Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    Audit Report on tile Compilation of the FY 1997 Navy General Fund Financial Statements at the Defense Finance and Accounting Service Cleveland Center Our objective was to determine whether the DFAS...

  14. Compilation of the FY 1998 Army General Fund Financial Statements at the Defense Finance and Accounting Service Indianapolis Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether the DFAS Indianapolis Center consistently and accurately compiled financial data from field activities and other sources for the FY 1998 Army General Fund financial statements...

  15. Compilation of the FY 1996 Army Financial Statements at the Defense Finance and Accounting Service Indianapolis Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lane, F

    1998-01-01

    ... Consolidated Financial Statements of the Army General Fund. We evaluated the processes, including internal controls and methods that the DFAS Indianapolis Center used to compile the Army FY 1996 General Fund financial statements...

  16. FY2015 Analysis of the Teamwork USA Program. Memorandum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Research and Evaluation (DRE) has completed an analysis of the performance of students who participated in the Teamwork USA Program, administered in FY2014 at three District schools. Teamwork USA hopes to improve student achievement at select Title I elementary schools via its Instrumental Music Program grant. This memorandum to…

  17. Argonne Laboratory Computing Resource Center - FY2004 Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bair, R.

    2005-04-14

    In the spring of 2002, Argonne National Laboratory founded the Laboratory Computing Resource Center, and in April 2003 LCRC began full operations with Argonne's first teraflops computing cluster. The LCRC's driving mission is to enable and promote computational science and engineering across the Laboratory, primarily by operating computing facilities and supporting application use and development. This report describes the scientific activities, computing facilities, and usage in the first eighteen months of LCRC operation. In this short time LCRC has had broad impact on programs across the Laboratory. The LCRC computing facility, Jazz, is available to the entire Laboratory community. In addition, the LCRC staff provides training in high-performance computing and guidance on application usage, code porting, and algorithm development. All Argonne personnel and collaborators are encouraged to take advantage of this computing resource and to provide input into the vision and plans for computing and computational analysis at Argonne. Steering for LCRC comes from the Computational Science Advisory Committee, composed of computing experts from many Laboratory divisions. The CSAC Allocations Committee makes decisions on individual project allocations for Jazz.

  18. FY17 Transportation and Hydrogen Systems Center Journal Publication Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-12-08

    NREL's Transportation and Hydrogen Systems Center published 39 journal articles in fiscal year 2017 highlighting recent research in advanced vehicle technology, alternative fuels, and hydrogen systems.

  19. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  20. Environmental Systems Research and Analysis FY 2000 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L. Miller; Castle, Peter Myer; Steven J. Piet

    2001-01-01

    The Environmental Systems Research (ESR) Program, a part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the INEEL. Strengthening the Technical capabilities of the INEEL will provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Office of Environmental Management (EM). This is a progress report for the third year of the ESR Program (FY 2000). A report of activities is presented for the five ESR research investment areas: (1) Transport Aspects of Selective Mass Transport Agents, (2) Chemistry of Environmental Surfaces, (3) Materials Dynamics, (4) Characterization Science, and (5) Computational Simulation of Mechanical and Chemical Systems. In addition to the five technical areas, the report describes activities in the Science and Technology Foundations element of the program, e.g., interfaces between ESR and the EM Science Program (EMSP) and the EM Focus Areas. The five research areas are subdivided into 18 research projects. FY 2000 research in these 18 projects has resulted in more than 50 technical papers that are in print, in press, in review, or in preparation. Additionally, more than 100 presentations were made at professional society meetings nationally and internationally. Work supported by this program was in part responsible for one of our researchers, Dr. Mason Harrup, receiving the Department of Energy’s “Bright Light” and “Energy at 23” awards. Significant accomplishments were achieved. Non-Destructive Assay hardware and software was deployed at the INEEL, enhancing the quality and efficiency of TRU waste characterization for shipment. The advanced tensiometer has been employed at numerous sites around the complex to determine hydrologic gradients in variably saturated vadose zones. An ion trap, secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS) was designed and fabricated to deploy at the INEEL site to measure the

  1. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program: FY2011 Project Descriptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Geoffrey W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States). Indian Head Division; Whinnery, LeRoy L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reyes, Jose A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-02-03

    This document provides brief descriptions of research topics for consideration by the IDCA for potential funding in funding in FY 2011. The topics include the utilization of the results from the Proficiency Test developed during FY 2010 to start populating the small-scale safety and thermal testing (SSST) Testing Compendium and revising results from methods modifications. Other research topics were also developed for FY 2011 from issues that arose in the Proficiency Test.

  2. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Warren, Glen A.

    2012-09-28

    .g. Pb stack size, neutron source location) of an LSDS for the purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Sensitivity studies were conducted that provide insight as to how the LSDS instrument can be improved by making it more sensitive to the center of the fuel assemblies. In FY2013, PNNL will continue efforts to develop and refine design requirements of an LSDS for the ultimate purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Future efforts will be directed toward more extensive experimental benchmarking of currently implemented time-spectra analysis algorithms.

  3. Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data. Annual report, 1994-FY 95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-07-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) has published reports of its activities since 1984. The first report covered January through June of 1984, and the second report covered July through December 1984. Since those first two semiannual reports, AEOD has published annual reports of its activities from 1985 through 1993. Beginning with the report for 1986, AEOD Annual Reports have been published as NUREG-1272. Beginning with the report for 1987, NUREG-1272 has been published in two parts, No. 1 covering power reactors and No. 2 covering nonreactors (changed to {open_quotes}nuclear materials{close_quotes} with the 1993 report). The 1993 AEOD Annual Report was NUREG-1272, Volume 8. AEOD has changed its annual report from a calendar year to a fiscal year report to be consistent with the NRC Annual Report and to conserve staff resources. NUREG-1272, Volume 9, No. 1 and No. 2, therefore, are combined calendar year 1994 (1994) and fiscal year 1995 (FY 95) reports which describe activities conducted between January 1, 1994, and September 30, 1995. Certain data which have historically been reported on a calendar year basis, however, are complete through calendar year 1995. Throughout this report, whenever information is presented for fiscal year 1995, it is designated as FY 95 data. Calendar year information is always designated by the four digits of the calendar year. This report, NUREG-1272, Volume 9, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns associated with the use of licensed material in non-power reactor applications. A new part has been added, NUREG-1272, Volume 9, No. 3, which covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in FY 95 in support of the NRC`s mission.

  4. Mississippi State University Center for Air Sea Technology FY95 Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeske, Lanny; Corbin, James H.

    1995-01-01

    The Mississippi State University (MSU) Center for Air Sea Technology (CAST) evolved from the Institute for Naval Oceanography's (INO) Experimental Center for Mesoscale Ocean Prediction (ECMOP) which was started in 1989. MSU CAST subsequently began operation on 1 October 1992 under an Office of Naval Research (ONR) two-year grant which ended on 30 September 1994. In FY95 MSU CAST was successful in obtaining five additional research grants from ONR, as well as several other research contracts from the Naval Oceanographic Office via NASA, the Naval Research Laboratory, the Army Corps of Engineers, and private industry. In the past, MSU CAST technical research and development has produced tools, systems, techniques, and procedures that improve efficiency and overcome deficiency for both the operational and research communities residing with the Department of Defense, private industry, and university ocean modeling community. We continued this effort with the following thrust areas: to develop advanced methodologies and tools for model evaluation, validation and visualization, both oceanographic and atmospheric; to develop a system-level capability for conducting temporally and ; spatially scaled ocean simulations driven by or are responsive to ocean models, and take into consideration coupling to atmospheric models; to continue the existing oceanographic/atmospheric data management task with emphasis on distributed databases in a network environment, with database optimization and standardization, including use of Mosaic and World Wide Web (WWW) access; and to implement a high performance parallel computing technology for CAST ocean models

  5. Compilation of FY 1995 and FY 1996 DOD Financial Statements at the Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Indianapolis Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    The audit objective was to determine whether the Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Indianapolis Center, consistently and accurately compiled financial data from field entities and other sources...

  6. Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1994-FY 95 annual report. Volume 9, Number 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during CY 1994 and FY 1995. The report is published in three parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from 1980 through FY 1995. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 3, covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in support of the NRC`s mission.

  7. Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1994-FY 95 annual report. Volume 9, Number 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during CY 1994 and FY 1995. The report is published in three parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC's Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from 1980 through FY 1995. NUREG-1272, Vol. 9, No. 3, covers technical training and presents the activities of the Technical Training Center in support of the NRC's mission

  8. Italy INAF Analysis Center Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activity of the Italian INAF VLBI Analysis Center. Our Analysis Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics. IRA runs the observatories of Medicina and Noto, where two 32-m VLBI AZ-EL telescopes are situated. This report contains the AC's VLBI data analysis activities and shortly outlines the investigations into the co-locations of space geodetic instruments.

  9. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  10. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minty, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  11. RHIC FY15 pp Run RHIC and AGS polarization analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adams, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-20

    The polarization information is important for the spin physics program in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). There are discrepancies between AGS and RHIC polarization measurements. First, the face value of AGS polarization is higher than RHIC ones in general. Second, the measured polarization profile (described by the profile ratio R) is stronger in AGS than in RHIC. This note analyzes the polarization data from FY15 pp run period. The results show that the differences between AGS and RHIC polarization measurements are reasonable, but the R value difference is puzzling. The difference between blue and yellow ring is worth of spin simulation to explain.

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis for the 2nd Quarter FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of events for the 2nd Qtr FY-15.

  13. Nonlinear bias analysis and correction of microwave temperature sounder observations for FY-3C meteorological satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Taiyang; Lv, Rongchuan; Jin, Xu; Li, Hao; Chen, Wenxin

    2018-01-01

    The nonlinear bias analysis and correction of receiving channels in Chinese FY-3C meteorological satellite Microwave Temperature Sounder (MWTS) is a key technology of data assimilation for satellite radiance data. The thermal-vacuum chamber calibration data acquired from the MWTS can be analyzed to evaluate the instrument performance, including radiometric temperature sensitivity, channel nonlinearity and calibration accuracy. Especially, the nonlinearity parameters due to imperfect square-law detectors will be calculated from calibration data and further used to correct the nonlinear bias contributions of microwave receiving channels. Based upon the operational principles and thermalvacuum chamber calibration procedures of MWTS, this paper mainly focuses on the nonlinear bias analysis and correction methods for improving the calibration accuracy of the important instrument onboard FY-3C meteorological satellite, from the perspective of theoretical and experimental studies. Furthermore, a series of original results are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and significance of the methods.

  14. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis - 1st Quarter FY2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 73 reportable events (27 from the 1St Qtr FY-15 and 46 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 38 other issue reports (including nine not reportable events and Significant Category A and B conditions reported during the1st Qtr FY-15) identified at INL during the past 12 months.

  15. Optimizing Federal Fleet Vehicle Acquisitions: An Eleven-Agency FY 2012 Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Daley, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report focuses on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) fiscal year (FY) 2012 effort that used the NREL Optimal Vehicle Acquisition (NOVA) analysis to identify optimal vehicle acquisition recommendations for eleven diverse federal agencies. Results of the study show that by following a vehicle acquisition plan that maximizes the reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, significant progress is also made toward the mandated complementary goals of acquiring alternative fuel vehicles, petroleum use reduction, and alternative fuel use increase.

  16. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center – Summary of Activities Conducted in FY15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hong, Bonnie Colleen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center (NEKVaC) is a new initiative by the Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory to coordinate and focus the resources and expertise that exist with the DOE Complex toward solving issues in modern nuclear code validation. In time, code owners, users, and developers will view the Center as a partner and essential resource for acquiring the best practices and latest techniques for validating codes, for guidance in planning and executing experiments, for facilitating access to, and maximizing the usefulness of, existing data, and for preserving knowledge for continual use by nuclear professionals and organizations for their own validation needs. The scope of the center covers many inter-related activities which will need to be cultivated carefully in the near-term and managed properly once the Center is fully functional. Three areas comprise the principal mission: 1) identification and prioritization of projects that extend the field of validation science and its application to modern codes, 2) adapt or develop best practices and guidelines for high fidelity multiphysics/multiscale analysis code development and associated experiment design, and 3) define protocols for data acquisition and knowledge preservation and provide a portal for access to databases currently scattered among numerous organizations. These mission areas, while each having a unique focus, are inter-dependent and complementary. Likewise, all activities supported by the NEKVaC, both near-term and long-term), must possess elements supporting all three. This cross-cutting nature is essential to ensuring that activities and supporting personnel do not become ‘stove-piped’, i.e. focused so much on a specific function that the activity itself becomes the objective rather than the achieving the larger vision. Achieving the broader vision will require a healthy and accountable level of activity in each of the areas. This will take time and

  17. Nuclear Facilities Management Section Mutsu Office, Aomori Research and Development Center operations report. FY 2012 and 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Yoshihiro; Kuwabara, Jun; Oyokawa, Atsushi; Kabuto, Shoji; Araya, Naoyuki; Kikuchi, Kaoru; Miyamoto, Shingo; Nemoto, Hideyuki; Ohe, Osamu

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Facilities Management Section implements the operation, maintenance and decommissioning of the first nuclear ship “MUTSU” and the operation and maintenance of the liquid waste facility and the solid waste facility where a small amount of nuclear fuel is used. This is the report on the operations of the Nuclear Facilities Management Section for FY 2012 and FY 2013. (author)

  18. RISMC advanced safety analysis project plan: FY2015 - FY2019. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H; Smith, Curtis L; Youngblood, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In this report, the Advanced Safety Analysis Program (ASAP) objectives and value proposition is described. ASAP focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. The set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. As part of the discussion, we have identified three sets of stakeholders, the nuclear industry, the Department of Energy (DOE), and associated oversight organizations. These three groups would benefit from ASAP in different ways. For example, within the DOE complex, the possible applications that are seen include the safety of experimental reactors, facility life extension, safety-by-design in future generation advanced reactors, and managing security for the storage of nuclear material. This report provides information in five areas: (1) A value proposition (@@@why is this important?@@@) that will make the case for stakeholder's use of the ASAP research and development (R&D) products; (2) An identification of likely end users and pathway to adoption of enhanced tools by the end-users; (3) A proposed set of practical and achievable @@use case@@@ demonstrations; (4) A proposed plan to address ASAP verification and validation (V&V) needs; and (5) A proposed schedule for the multi-year ASAP.

  19. RISMC Advanced Safety Analysis Project Plan – FY 2015 - FY 2019

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Youngblood, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    In this report, a project plan is developed, focused on industry applications, using Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) tools and methods applied to realistic, relevant, and current interest issues to the operating nuclear fleet. RISMC focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. This set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. The proposed plan will focus on application of the RISMC toolkit, in particular, solving realistic problems of important current issues to the nuclear industry, in collaboration with plant owners and operators to demonstrate the usefulness of these tools in decision making.

  20. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center Summary of Activities Conducted in FY16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center (NEKVaC) is a new initiative by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to coordinate and focus the resources and expertise that exist with the DOE toward solving issues in modern nuclear code validation and knowledge management. In time, code owners, users, and developers will view the NEKVaC as a partner and essential resource for acquiring the best practices and latest techniques for validating codes, providing guidance in planning and executing experiments, facilitating access to and maximizing the usefulness of existing data, and preserving knowledge for continual use by nuclear professionals and organizations for their own validation needs. The scope of the NEKVaC covers many interrelated activities that will need to be cultivated carefully in the near term and managed properly once the NEKVaC is fully functional. Three areas comprise the principal mission: (1) identify and prioritize projects that extend the field of validation science and its application to modern codes, (2) develop and disseminate best practices and guidelines for high-fidelity multiphysics/multiscale analysis code development and associated experiment design, and (3) define protocols for data acquisition and knowledge preservation and provide a portal for access to databases currently scattered among numerous organizations. These mission areas, while each having a unique focus, are interdependent and complementary. Likewise, all activities supported by the NEKVaC, both near term and long term, must possess elements supporting all three areas. This cross cutting nature is essential to ensuring that activities and supporting personnel do not become “stove piped” (i.e., focused a specific function that the activity itself becomes the objective rather than achieving the larger vision). This report begins with a description of the mission areas; specifically, the role played by each major committee and the types

  1. Volpe Center Office of Research and Technology Applications (ORTA) : FY 2013 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Technology transfer activities performed by the Volpe National Transportation Systems Center during fiscal year 2013 in fulfillment of statutory Office of Research and Technology Applications (ORTA) responsibilities are summarized in this report. Dur...

  2. Program strategy document for the nuclear materials. Transportation Technology Center (FY 80)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, R.M.

    1980-04-01

    The TTC's program is divided into four principal areas, Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues. These areas are broken into activities, elements, and subelements which are delineated in this document

  3. Kennedy Space Center Spaceport Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wary, Samantha A.

    2013-01-01

    Until the Shuttle Atlantis' final landing on July 21, 2011, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) served as NASA's main spaceport, which is a launch and landing facility for rockets and spacecraft that are attempting to enter orbit. Many of the facilities at KSC were created to assist the Shuttle Program. One of the most important and used facilities is the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), This was the main landing area for the return of the shuttle after her mission in space. · However, the SLF has also been used for a number of other projects including straight-line testing by Gibbs Racing, weather data collection by NOAA, and an airfield for the KSC helicopters. This runway is three miles long with control tower at midfield and a fire department located at the end in care of an emergency. This facility, which was part of the great space race, will continue to be used for historical events as Kennedy begins to commercialize its facilities. KSC continues to be an important spaceport to the government, and it will transform into an important spaceport for the commercial industry as well. During my internship at KSC's Center Planning and Development Directorate, I had the opportunity to be a part of the negotiation team working on the agreement for Space Florida to control the Shuttle Landing Facility. This gave me the opportunity to learn about all the changes that are occurring here at Kennedy Space Center. Through various meetings, I discovered the Master Plan and its focus is to transform the existing facilities that were primarily used for the Shuttle Program, to support government operations and commercial flights in the future. This. idea is also in a new strategic business plan and completion of a space industry market analysis. All of these different documentations were brought to my attention and I. saw how they came together in the discussions of transitioning the SLF to a commercial operator, Space Florida. After attending meetings and partaking in discussions for

  4. FY2017 Pilot Project Plan for the Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Weiju [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-30

    To prepare for technical development of computational code validation under the Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center (NEKVAC) initiative, several meetings were held by a group of experts of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop requirements of, and formulate a structure for, a transient fuel database through leveraging existing resources. It was concluded in discussions of these meetings that a pilot project is needed to address the most fundamental issues that can generate immediate stimulus to near-future validation developments as well as long-lasting benefits to NEKVAC operation. The present project is proposed based on the consensus of these discussions. Analysis of common scenarios in code validation indicates that the incapability of acquiring satisfactory validation data is often a showstopper that must first be tackled before any confident validation developments can be carried out. Validation data are usually found scattered in different places most likely with interrelationships among the data not well documented, incomplete with information for some parameters missing, nonexistent, or unrealistic to experimentally generate. Furthermore, with very different technical backgrounds, the modeler, the experimentalist, and the knowledgebase developer that must be involved in validation data development often cannot communicate effectively without a data package template that is representative of the data structure for the information domain of interest to the desired code validation. This pilot project is proposed to use the legendary TREAT Experiments Database to provide core elements for creating an ideal validation data package. Data gaps and missing data interrelationships will be identified from these core elements. All the identified missing elements will then be filled in with experimental data if available from other existing sources or with dummy data if nonexistent. The resulting hybrid

  5. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Aaron [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-08-04

    This award provided partial support for the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics to host two workshops "Beyond the Standard Model 2016" in October 2016, and the "5th MCTP Symposium: Foundations of String Cosmology" in April 2017 on the University of Michigan campus.

  6. The Center for Community Development Annual Report, FY 1984-85. Volume II, Addendum 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Tom

    A variety of information is included in this 1984-85 annual report of Humboldt State University's Center for Community Development (California), which has been instrumental in establishing a wide range of community services and has worked extensively to preserve the language and culture of four northwestern California tribes--Hupa, Karuk, Tolowa,…

  7. Systems Studies Department FY 78 activity report. Volume 2. Systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, T.S.

    1979-02-01

    The Systems Studies Department at Sandia Laboratories Livermore (SLL) has two primary responsibilities: to provide computational and mathematical services and to perform systems analysis studies. This document (Volume 2) describes the FY Systems Analysis highlights. The description is an unclassified overview of activities and is not complete or exhaustive. The objective of the systems analysis activities is to evaluate the relative value of alternative concepts and systems. SLL systems analysis activities reflect Sandia Laboratory programs and in 1978 consisted of study efforts in three areas: national security: evaluations of strategic, theater, and navy nuclear weapons issues; energy technology: particularly in support of Sandia's solar thermal programs; and nuclear fuel cycle physical security: a special project conducted for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Highlights of these activities are described in the following sections. 7 figures

  8. Technology transfer program at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center: FY 87 program report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.A.; Lessing, K.B.

    1987-10-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), located in Morgantown, West Virginia, is an energy research center of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fossil Energy. The research and development work is different from research work conducted by other Government agencies. In DOE research, the Government is not the ultimate ''customer'' for the technologies developed; the ''customer'' is business and industry in the private sector. Thus, tehcnology transfer is a fundamental goal of the DOE. The mission of the Fossil Energy program is to enhance the use of the nations's fossil energy resources. METC's mission applies to certain technologies within the broad scope of technologies encompassed by the Office of Fossil Energy. The Government functions as an underwriter of risk and as a catalyst to stimulate the development of technologies and technical information that might otherwise proceed at a slower pace because of the high-risk nature of the research involved. The research programs and priorities are industry driven; the purpose is to address the perceived needs of industry such that industry will ultimately bring the technologies to the commercial market. As evidenced in this report, METC has an active and effective technology transfer program that is incorporated into all aspects of project planning and execution. Technology transfer at METC is a way of life---a part of everyday activities to further this goal. Each person has a charge to communicate the ideas from within METC to those best able to utilize that information. 4 figs., 20 tabs.

  9. Annual report of the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Center. FY 2008. April 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    The JMTR, one of the most high flux test reactors in the world, has been used for the irradiation experiments of fuels and materials related to LWRs, fundamental research and radioisotope productions. The JMTR was stopped at the beginning of August 2006 to conduct refurbishment works, and the reoperation will be planned from FY 2011. After reoperation, the JMTR will contribute to many fields, such as the lifetime extension of LWRs, expansion of industrial use, progress of science and technology. This report summarizes the activities on refurbishment works, development of new irradiation techniques, enhancement of reactor availability, etc. in FY 2008. (author)

  10. Annual Status Report (FY2013 Composite Analysis of Low Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-03-25

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE O 435.1, 3 Chg. 11, and as implemented by DOE/RL-2000-29, Rev. 22, the DOE Richland Operations 4 Office (DOE-RL) has prepared this annual summary of the Hanford Site Composite Analysis 5 for fiscal year (FY) 2013.

  11. Engineering, Analysis and Technology FY 1995 Site Support Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    The vision of the Engineering, Analysis and Technology organization is to be recognized as the cost-effective supplier of specialized, integrated, multi-disciplined engineering teams to support Hanford missions. The mission of the Engineering, Analysis and Technology organization is to provide centralized engineering services. These services are focused on supplying technical design, analytical engineering and related support services that support Hanford's environmental restoration mission. These services include engineering analysis, design and development of systems and engineered equipment, supplying multi-disciplined engineering teams to all Hanford programs and project organizations, engineering document release, and site-wide leadership in the development and implementation of engineering standards, engineering practices, and configuration management processes

  12. INL FY2014 1st Quarterly Performance Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinghorn, Loran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2 “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 76 occurrence reports and over 16 other deficiency reports (including not reportable events) identified at the INL during the period of October 2013 through December 2013. Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) operates the INL under contract DE AC 07 051D14517

  13. DOE FY 2010 Budget Request and Recovery Act Funding for Energy Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment: Analysis and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anadon, Laura Diaz; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Bunn, Matthew

    2009-06-01

    short-term. Energy storage may play a crucial role in the future of the power and transportation systems, which together consume two thirds of primary energy in the United States. A recent National Academy of Science report recommended carrying out detailed scenario assessments of the penetration of unconventional fuels from coal and coal and biomass with CCS. And the research plan provided for nuclear fission does not justify spending as many funds as were requested. The proposed funding for FY 2010 and the resources from ARRA, however, do not guarantee that the United States will finally enjoy the predictable and consistent publicly-funded energy technology innovation effort that it needs. The Obama administration must put in place a comprehensive energy technology innovation strategy that will ensure that an expanded ERD3 effort is both sustainable and efficient. This commission would be charged with, inter alia, developing a strategy that optimizes the integration of the various stages of innovation (research, development, demonstration, early deployment), as well as integrates efforts across technology areas. The database upon which this analysis is based may be downloaded in Excel format at: http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/publication/19119/ .

  14. Nuclear fusion systems analysis research. FY 1975 annual report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weatherwax, R.K. (ed.)

    1975-12-31

    This report summarizes research conducted during FY 1975 on the parametric systems analysis of fusion central power stations. As described in the report the methodology being pursued provides for a phased analysis starting with simple ''nominal'' parameters and associated computer codes and progressing to more complex functional models and then to physically based mathematical models for the systems of major significance in future power station viability. The nominal parameter analysis for preliminary screening only derives from consideration of extant reactor point designs and defines a nominal 5000 MWt reactor with either a 900 or 1250 K peak blanket coolant temperature. Functionalized performance and cost models are described for helium Brayton cycle, steam Rankine cycle and binary cycle electric power generation systems.

  15. Nuclear fusion systems analysis research. FY 1975 annual report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weatherwax, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted during FY 1975 on the parametric systems analysis of fusion central power stations. As described in the report the methodology being pursued provides for a phased analysis starting with simple ''nominal'' parameters and associated computer codes and progressing to more complex functional models and then to physically based mathematical models for the systems of major significance in future power station viability. The nominal parameter analysis for preliminary screening only derives from consideration of extant reactor point designs and defines a nominal 5000 MWt reactor with either a 900 or 1250 K peak blanket coolant temperature. Functionalized performance and cost models are described for helium Brayton cycle, steam Rankine cycle and binary cycle electric power generation systems

  16. Interactive reliability analysis project. FY 80 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmuson, D.M.; Shepherd, J.C.

    1981-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress to date in the interactive reliability analysis project. Purpose is to develop and demonstrate a reliability and safety technique that can be incorporated early in the design process. Details are illustrated in a simple example of a reactor safety system

  17. Tank Waste Remediation System Tank Waste Analysis Plan. FY 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, C.S.; Dove, T.H.

    1994-01-01

    This documents lays the groundwork for preparing the implementing the TWRS tank waste analysis planning and reporting for Fiscal Year 1995. This Tank Waste Characterization Plan meets the requirements specified in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, better known as the Tri-Party Agreement

  18. Annual Research Progress Report (William Beaumont Army Medical Center) FY 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-23

    the Clinical Pharmacist of the Hematology/Oncology Service, WBAMC (see attached report). It would appear that this apparatus/technique approaches almost...intravenous antibiotics is treating febrile UTIs . Technical Approach: All patients with febrile UTI’s will be admitted to the pediatric inpatient service...ANALYSIS of RISKS and BENEFITS to SUBJECTS and RISKS to those CONDUCTIJNG RESEARCH to read: All patients will benefit by having the UTI treated under

  19. Risk Analysis and Decision Making FY 2013 Milestone Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Dale, Crystal; Jones, Edward; Thompson, J.

    2013-06-01

    Risk analysis and decision making is one of the critical objectives of CCSI, which seeks to use information from science-based models with quantified uncertainty to inform decision makers who are making large capital investments. The goal of this task is to develop tools and capabilities to facilitate the development of risk models tailored for carbon capture technologies, quantify the uncertainty of model predictions, and estimate the technical and financial risks associated with the system. This effort aims to reduce costs by identifying smarter demonstrations, which could accelerate development and deployment of the technology by several years.

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Occurrence Analysis - 3rd Quarter FY-2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 73 reportable events (23 from the 3rd Qtr FY-16 and 50 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 45 other issue reports (including events found to be not reportable and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL during the past 12 months (16 from this quarter and 29 from the prior three quarters).

  1. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Occurrence Analysis for the 1st Quarter FY2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 82 reportable events (13 from the 1st quarter (Qtr) of fiscal year (FY) 2017 and 68 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 31 other issue reports (including events found to be not reportable and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL during the past 12 months (seven from this quarter and 24 from the prior three quarters).

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Occurrence Analysis - 1st Quarter FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 74 reportable events (16 from the 1st Qtr FY-16 and 58 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 35 other issue reports (including events found to be not reportable and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL during the past 12 months (15 from this quarter and 20 from the prior three quarters).

  3. Analysis of hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel FY17 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Richard M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Luzi, Francesco [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilcox Freeburg, Eric D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-09-30

    This report summarizes the results of literature reviews, surveys and analyses performed to evaluate the potential of hydrogen-fueled vehicles to be an economically viable transportation alternative. Five existing and important drivers of expanding hydrogen-fueled transportation adoption are multi-billion dollar sales reservations of Nikola Class 8 trucks, CALSTART viability analysis of hybrid-hydrogen drayage trucks in the shipyard cargo application, analysis showing economic advantages of Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEV)s over Battery Electric Vehicles (BEV)s beginning at 150-mile ranges, the announcement of a commercial 5kg electrolyzer, and commercial plans or vehicle availability by nine vehicle manufacturers of FCEV passenger vehicles. But hydrogen infrastructure availability needed to support broad adoption of hydrogen-fueled vehicles is limited to less than 50 publicly-available refueling stations, primarily in California. The demand side (consumer) economics associated with FCEV adoption showed strong economic sensitivity to the original vehicle’s fuel economy (mpg), distance traveled, and hydrogen (H2) generation costs. Seven use cases were used to evaluate the broad range of potential FCEV purchasers, including autonomous vehicle applications. Each consumer use case analysis resulted in a different hydrogen fuel cost that would be equivalent to the current fuel cost being paid by the consumer. The H2 generation costs (supply side) were sensitive to the volume of H2 supplied and H2 production costs needed to repay H2 supply facility capital costs and produce competitively-priced energy. H2FAST was used to more accurately incorporate capital, maintenance and production costs into a viable H2 supply cost to the consumer. When the H2 generation and consumer economics were combined, several applications with positive economics became clear. The availability of low-cost hydrogen pipeline connections, and therefore low-cost hydrogen, greatly benefits the

  4. Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for FY 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SASAKI, L.M.

    1999-01-01

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for grab samples obtained to address waste compatibility. It is written in accordance with requirements identified in Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (Mulkey et al. 1999) and Tank Farm Waste Transfer Compatibility Program (Fowler 1999). In addition to analyses to support Compatibility, the Waste Feed Delivery program has requested that tank samples obtained for Compatibility also be analyzed to confirm the high-level waste and/or low-activity waste envelope(s) for the tank waste (Baldwin 1999). The analytical requirements to confirm waste envelopes are identified in Data Quality Objectives for TWRS Privatization Phase I: Confirm Tank T is an Appropriate Feed Source for Low-Activity Waste Feed Batch X (Nguyen 1999a) and Data Quality Objectives for RPP Privatization Phase I: Confirm Tank T is an Appropriate Feed Source for High-Level Waste Feed Batch X (Nguyen 1999b)

  5. Generic repository design concepts and thermal analysis (FY11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, Robert; Dupont, Mark; Blink, James A.; Fratoni, Massimiliano; Greenberg, Harris; Carter, Joe; Hardin, Ernest L.; Sutton, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Reference concepts for geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the U.S. are developed, including geologic settings and engineered barriers. Repository thermal analysis is demonstrated for a range of waste types from projected future, advanced nuclear fuel cycles. The results show significant differences among geologic media considered (clay/shale, crystalline rock, salt), and also that waste package size and waste loading must be limited to meet targeted maximum temperature values. In this study, the UFD R and D Campaign has developed a set of reference geologic disposal concepts for a range of waste types that could potentially be generated in advanced nuclear FCs. A disposal concept consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. Mature repository concepts have been developed in other countries for disposal of spent LWR fuel and HLW from reprocessing UNF, and these serve as starting points for developing this set. Additional design details and EBS concepts will be considered as the reference disposal concepts evolve. The waste inventory considered in this study includes: (1) direct disposal of SNF from the LWR fleet, including Gen III+ advanced LWRs being developed through the Nuclear Power 2010 Program, operating in a once-through cycle; (2) waste generated from reprocessing of LWR UOX UNF to recover U and Pu, and subsequent direct disposal of used Pu-MOX fuel (also used in LWRs) in a modified-open cycle; and (3) waste generated by continuous recycling of metal fuel from fast reactors operating in a TRU burner configuration, with additional TRU material input supplied from reprocessing of LWR UOX fuel. The geologic setting provides the natural barriers, and establishes the boundary conditions for performance of engineered barriers. The composition and physical properties of the host medium dictate design and construction approaches, and determine hydrologic and thermal responses of

  6. Generic repository design concepts and thermal analysis (FY11).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Dupont, Mark (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Blink, James A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Fratoni, Massimiliano (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Greenberg, Harris (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Carter, Joe (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Hardin, Ernest L.; Sutton, Mark A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA)

    2011-08-01

    Reference concepts for geologic disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the U.S. are developed, including geologic settings and engineered barriers. Repository thermal analysis is demonstrated for a range of waste types from projected future, advanced nuclear fuel cycles. The results show significant differences among geologic media considered (clay/shale, crystalline rock, salt), and also that waste package size and waste loading must be limited to meet targeted maximum temperature values. In this study, the UFD R&D Campaign has developed a set of reference geologic disposal concepts for a range of waste types that could potentially be generated in advanced nuclear FCs. A disposal concept consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. Mature repository concepts have been developed in other countries for disposal of spent LWR fuel and HLW from reprocessing UNF, and these serve as starting points for developing this set. Additional design details and EBS concepts will be considered as the reference disposal concepts evolve. The waste inventory considered in this study includes: (1) direct disposal of SNF from the LWR fleet, including Gen III+ advanced LWRs being developed through the Nuclear Power 2010 Program, operating in a once-through cycle; (2) waste generated from reprocessing of LWR UOX UNF to recover U and Pu, and subsequent direct disposal of used Pu-MOX fuel (also used in LWRs) in a modified-open cycle; and (3) waste generated by continuous recycling of metal fuel from fast reactors operating in a TRU burner configuration, with additional TRU material input supplied from reprocessing of LWR UOX fuel. The geologic setting provides the natural barriers, and establishes the boundary conditions for performance of engineered barriers. The composition and physical properties of the host medium dictate design and construction approaches, and determine hydrologic and thermal responses of the

  7. ASSERT FY16 Analysis of Feedstock Companion Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamers, Patrick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hansen, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jacobson, Jacob J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nguyen, Thuy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nair, Shyam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Searcy, Erin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    task by experts in feedstock supply chain analysis, market economics, and System Dynamics from the Idaho National Laboratory and MindsEye Computing.

  8. ASSERT FY16 Analysis of Feedstock Companion Markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamers, Patrick; Hansen, Jason; Jacobson, Jacob J.; Nguyen, Thuy; Nair, Shyam; Searcy, Erin; Hess, J. Richard

    2016-01-01

    task by experts in feedstock supply chain analysis, market economics, and System Dynamics from the Idaho National Laboratory and MindsEye Computing.

  9. FY11 Report on Metagenome Analysis using Pathogen Marker Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Shea N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Allen, Jonathan E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McLoughlin, Kevin S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Slezak, Tom [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-06-02

    detection probability appears to be a function of both coverages. Multiple species could be detected simultaneously in a simulated low-coverage, complex metagenome, and the largest PML gave no false negative species and no false positive genera. The presence of multiple species was predicted in a complex metagenome from a human gut microbiome with 1.9 GB of short reads (75 nt); the species predicted were reasonable gut flora and no biothreat agents were detected, showing the feasibility of PML analysis of empirical complex metagenomes.

  10. Transportation Research & Analysis Computing Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The technical objectives of the TRACC project included the establishment of a high performance computing center for use by USDOT research teams, including those from...

  11. Prelaunch calibrations and on-orbit performance analysis of FY-2D SVISSR infrared channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Chen, Fuchun

    2014-10-01

    Meteorological satellites have become an irreplaceable weather and ocean-observing tool in China. These satellites are used to monitor natural disasters and improve the efficiency of many sectors of Chinese national economy. FY-2 series satellites are one of the key components of Chinese meteorological observing system and application system. In this paper, the operational satellite- FY-2D's infrared channels were focused and analyzed. The instruments' background was introduced briefly. The main payload SVISSR specifications were compared with its ancestral VISSR. The optical structure of the SVISSR was also expressed. FY-2D prelaunch calibrations methodology was introduced and the accuracies of the absolute radiometric calibration were analyzed. Some key optics on-orbit performance of FY-2D SVISSR were analyzed include onboard blackbody, cold FPA and detector noise level. All of these works show that FY- 2D's main payload SVISSR was in a healthy status.

  12. Analysis of Well ER-EC-2a Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-2a during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-2a Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  13. Analysis of well ER-18-2 testing, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley FY 2000 testing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-18-2 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-18-2 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  14. Analysis of Well ER-EC-7 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-7 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program was documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-7 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  15. Analysis of Well ER-EC-8 testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 testing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-8 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-8 Data Report for development and Hydraulic Testing.

  16. Analysis of Well ER-EC-4 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-4 during the Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-4 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  17. Analysis of Well ER-EC-5 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-5 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-5 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  18. Analysis of Well ER-EC-6 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-6 during the Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-6 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  19. Analysis of Well ER-EC-1 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-1 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-1 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  20. Annual report of the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Center. FY 2008. April 1, 2008 - March 31, 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-09-01

    The JMTR, one of the most high flux test reactors in the world, has been used for the irradiation experiments of fuels and materials related to LWRs, fundamental research and radioisotope productions. The JMTR was stopped at the beginning of August 2006 to conduct refurbishment works, and the reoperation will be planned from FY 2011. After reoperation, the JMTR will contribute to many fields, such as the lifetime extension of LWRs, expansion of industrial use, progress of science and technology. This report summarizes the activities on refurbishment works, development of new irradiation techniques, enhancement of reactor availability, etc. (author)

  1. FY2017 Updates to the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Safety Analysis Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanning, T. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-09-30

    The SAS4A/SASSYS-1 safety analysis software is used to perform deterministic analysis of anticipated events as well as design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents for advanced fast reactors. It plays a central role in the analysis of U.S. DOE conceptual designs, proposed test and demonstration reactors, and in domestic and international collaborations. This report summarizes the code development activities that have taken place during FY2017. Extensions to the void and cladding reactivity feedback models have been implemented, and Control System capabilities have been improved through a new virtual data acquisition system for plant state variables and an additional Block Signal for a variable lag compensator to represent reactivity feedback for novel shutdown devices. Current code development and maintenance needs are also summarized in three key areas: software quality assurance, modeling improvements, and maintenance of related tools. With ongoing support, SAS4A/SASSYS-1 can continue to fulfill its growing role in fast reactor safety analysis and help solidify DOE’s leadership role in fast reactor safety both domestically and in international collaborations.

  2. Organic Tanks Safety Program: Advanced organic analysis FY 1996 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    Major focus during the first part of FY96 was to evaluate using organic functional group concentrations to screen for energetics. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy would be useful screening tools for determining C-H and COO- organic content in tank wastes analyzed in a hot cell. These techniques would be used for identifying tanks of potential safety concern that may require further analysis. Samples from Tanks 241-C-106 and -C-204 were analyzed; the major organic in C-106 was B2EHPA and in C-204 was TBP. Analyses of simulated wastes were also performed for the Waste Aging Studies Task; organics formed as a result of degradation were identified, and the original starting components were monitored quantitatively. Sample analysis is not routine and required considerable methods adaptation and optimization. Several techniques have been evaluated for directly analyzing chelator and chelator fragments in tank wastes: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection using Cu complexation. Although not directly funded by the Tanks Safety Program, the success of these techniques have implications for both the Flammable Gas and Organic Tanks Safety Programs

  3. Advanced organic analysis and analytical methods development: FY 1995 progress report. Waste Tank Organic Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.; Clauss, S.A.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during FY 1995 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory in developing and optimizing analysis techniques for identifying organics present in Hanford waste tanks. The main focus was to provide a means for rapidly obtaining the most useful information concerning the organics present in tank waste, with minimal sample handling and with minimal waste generation. One major focus has been to optimize analytical methods for organic speciation. Select methods, such as atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, were developed to increase the speciation capabilities, while minimizing sample handling. A capillary electrophoresis method was developed to improve separation capabilities while minimizing additional waste generation. In addition, considerable emphasis has been placed on developing a rapid screening tool, based on Raman and infrared spectroscopy, for determining organic functional group content when complete organic speciation is not required. This capability would allow for a cost-effective means to screen the waste tanks to identify tanks that require more specialized and complete organic speciation to determine tank safety

  4. Materials and Methods for Streamlined Laboratory Analysis of Environmental Samples, FY 2016 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addleman, Raymond S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Naes, Benjamin E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McNamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olsen, Khris B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chouyyok, Wilaiwan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Willingham, David G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spigner, Angel C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) relies upon laboratory analysis of environmental samples (typically referred to as “swipes”) collected during on-site inspections of safeguarded facilities to support the detection and deterrence of undeclared activities. Unfortunately, chemical processing and assay of the samples is slow and expensive. A rapid, effective, and simple extraction process and analysis method is needed to provide certified results with improved timeliness at reduced costs (principally in the form of reduced labor), while maintaining or improving sensitivity and efficacy. To address these safeguard needs the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) explored and demonstrated improved methods for environmental sample (ES) analysis. Improvements for both bulk and particle analysis were explored. To facilitate continuity and adoption, the new sampling materials and processing methods will be compatible with existing IAEA protocols for ES analysis. PNNL collaborated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which performed independent validation of the new bulk analysis methods and compared performance to traditional IAEA’s Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) protocol. ORNL efforts are reported separately. This report describes PNNL’s FY 2016 progress, which was focused on analytical application supporting environmental monitoring of uranium enrichment plants and nuclear fuel processing. In the future the technology could be applied to other safeguard applications and analytes related to fuel manufacturing, reprocessing, etc. PNNL’s FY 2016 efforts were broken into two tasks and a summary of progress, accomplishments and highlights are provided below. Principal progress and accomplishments on Task 1, Optimize Materials and Methods for ICP-MS Environmental Sample Analysis, are listed below. • Completed initial procedure for rapid uranium extraction from ES swipes based upon carbonate-peroxide chemistry (delivered to ORNL for

  5. FY 2016 Grant Announcement: FY 2016 Technical Analysis and Programmatic Evaluation Support to the Chesapeake Bay Program Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Chesapeake Bay Program Office is announcing a Request for Proposals for applicants to provide the Chesapeake Bay Program partners with a proposal(s) for providing technical analysis and programmatic evaluation

  6. Rehabilitation centers: marketing analysis and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ashish; Stroube, William B; Willis, William K

    2014-01-01

    A rehabilitation center is another form of health care organization that specializes in providing care for particular conditions of patients. Patients admitted in rehab centers range from being accident victims to those suffering with a specific illness. These organizations are becoming extremely valuable in providing patient care services. However, they have not marketed themselves as aggressively as other health care organizations. This article provides an insight regarding rehab centers and examines marketing issues using a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis. It further provides some future prospects and challenges for marketers of these organizations.

  7. Research of the cost-benefit analysis for FR cycle research and development. The annual report of the FY 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiotani, Hiroki; Shinoda, Yoshihiko; Hirao, Kazunori

    2002-07-01

    This report is intended to explain the outline of the research and development (R and D) in the FY 2001 on cost-benefit analysis of FR (Fast Reactor) cycle system concepts. The work was conducted as a part of the JNC's Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems (the F/S)'. In the FY 2001, the work conducted in the JNC was summed up as the followings: Conceptual study on cost-benefit analysis for FR cycle R and D. Refinement on the evaluation procedure and improvement over operation efficiency. Cost-benefit analysis of the reference FR cycle and sensitivity analysis with the revised system. Cost-benefit analyses of R and Ds for various FR cycle candidate concepts including FR cycle concepts studied in the F/S phase 1. The work made it possible to evaluate the cost effectiveness of various FR cycle systems efficiently. The cost-benefit analysis, which is often used for the policy evaluation, is considered to be applicable to FR cycle system concepts in the F/S. (author)

  8. Cluster analysis for determining distribution center location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari Widaningrum, Dyah; Andika, Aditya; Murphiyanto, Richard Dimas Julian

    2017-12-01

    Determination of distribution facilities is highly important to survive in the high level of competition in today’s business world. Companies can operate multiple distribution centers to mitigate supply chain risk. Thus, new problems arise, namely how many and where the facilities should be provided. This study examines a fast-food restaurant brand, which located in the Greater Jakarta. This brand is included in the category of top 5 fast food restaurant chain based on retail sales. There were three stages in this study, compiling spatial data, cluster analysis, and network analysis. Cluster analysis results are used to consider the location of the additional distribution center. Network analysis results show a more efficient process referring to a shorter distance to the distribution process.

  9. GNEP Material Transportation, Storage and Disposal Analysis FY-08 Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsey, W

    2009-01-15

    This report provides a summary for FY-2008 of activities, analyses and products from the Material Transportation, Storage and Disposal (M-TSD) sub-task of Systems Analysis within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Research & Development area of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. The objective of this work is to evaluate near-term material management requirements for initial GNEP facilities and activities, long-term requirements for large-scale GNEP technology deployment, and alternatives and paths forward to meet these needs. For FY-08, the work expanded to include the Integrated Waste Management Strategy as well as integration with the newly formed Waste Forms Campaign. The M-TSD team was expanded with the addition of support from Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) to the existing team of Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL), Argonne National Lab (ANL), Idaho National Lab (INL), Sandia National Lab (SNL) and University of Nevada - Reno (UN-R). During the first half of the year, analysis was focused on providing supporting technical analysis and documentation to support anticipated high-level decisions on program direction. A number of analyses were conducted and reports prepared as program deliverables. This work is briefly summarized in this report. Analyses provided informally to other program efforts are included in this report to provide documentation. This year-end summary was planned primarily as a compilation of activities following the anticipated programmatic decisions. These decisions were deferred beyond the end of the year, and funds were reallocated in a number of areas, thus reducing the M-TSD activities. This report summarizes the miscellaneous 'ad-hoc' work conducted during the later part of the year, such as support to the draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), and support to other program studies. Major programmatic contributions from the M-TSD team during the year included: (1) Completion of the IWMS in March 2008 as the

  10. GNEP Material Transportation, Storage and Disposal Analysis FY-08 Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsey, W.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides a summary for FY-2008 of activities, analyses and products from the Material Transportation, Storage and Disposal (M-TSD) sub-task of Systems Analysis within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Research and Development area of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. The objective of this work is to evaluate near-term material management requirements for initial GNEP facilities and activities, long-term requirements for large-scale GNEP technology deployment, and alternatives and paths forward to meet these needs. For FY-08, the work expanded to include the Integrated Waste Management Strategy as well as integration with the newly formed Waste Forms Campaign. The M-TSD team was expanded with the addition of support from Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) to the existing team of Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL), Argonne National Lab (ANL), Idaho National Lab (INL), Sandia National Lab (SNL) and University of Nevada - Reno (UN-R). During the first half of the year, analysis was focused on providing supporting technical analysis and documentation to support anticipated high-level decisions on program direction. A number of analyses were conducted and reports prepared as program deliverables. This work is briefly summarized in this report. Analyses provided informally to other program efforts are included in this report to provide documentation. This year-end summary was planned primarily as a compilation of activities following the anticipated programmatic decisions. These decisions were deferred beyond the end of the year, and funds were reallocated in a number of areas, thus reducing the M-TSD activities. This report summarizes the miscellaneous 'ad-hoc' work conducted during the later part of the year, such as support to the draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), and support to other program studies. Major programmatic contributions from the M-TSD team during the year included: (1) Completion of the IWMS in March 2008 as the baseline

  11. An Analysis of the FY-1C, Iridium 33, and Cosmos 2251 Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J.-C.

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of the year 2013 marks the sixth anniversary of the destruction of the Fengyun-1C (FY-1C) weather satellite as the result of an anti-satellite test conducted by China in January 2007 and the fourth anniversary of the accidental collision between Cosmos 2251 and the operational Iridium 33 in February 2009. These two events represent the worst satellite breakups in history. A total of 5579 fragments have been cataloged by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN), and almost 5000 of them were still in orbit in January 2013. In addition to these cataloged objects, hundreds of thousands (or more) of fragments down to the millimeter size regime were also generated during the breakups. These fragments are too small to be tracked by the SSN, but are large enough to be a safety concern for human space activities and robotic missions in low Earth orbit (LEO, the region below 2000 km altitude). Like their cataloged siblings, many of them remain in orbit today. These two breakup events dramatically changed the landscape of the orbital debris environment in LEO. The spatial density of the cataloged population in January 2013 is shown as the top blue curve. The combined FY-1C, Iridium 33, and Cosmos 2251 fragments (black curve) account for about 50 percent of the cataloged population below an altitude of 1000 km. They are also responsible for the concentrations at 770 km and 850 km, altitudes at which the collisions occurred. The effects of the FY-1C, Iridium 33, and Cosmos 2251 fragments will continue to be felt for decades to come. For example, approximately half of the generated FY-1C fragments will remain in orbit 20 years from now. In general, the Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 fragments will decay faster than the FY-1C fragments because of their lower altitudes. Of the Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 fragments, the former have much shorter orbital lifetimes than the latter, because lightweight composite materials were heavily used in the construction of the Iridium

  12. FY 1999 report on the results on analysis of protein functions; 1999 nendo tanpakushitsu kino kaiseki seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This project is aimed at construction of the intellectual infrastructures for biotechnologies, in order to accelerate development of the Japanese technologies and activate their application to industries. Described herein are the FY 1999 results. These infrastructures are for functional analysis of protein which will be one of the key issues in genome analysis, and collection and analysis of biological information. This project includes a total of 9 research and development themes for four research categories: frequency analysis of gene expression (development of the gene expression profile database system for functional analysis of human genome, and analysis of the gene expression and protein functions by the ECA chip technology), function analysis by the biological model (high-performance analysis by the bio-project, database system for drug metabolizing enzymes, analysis of gene functions using mutant mice, and simple genome function analysis of murine individuals using the RNAi effect), protein expression (function validation of unknown human genes based on the useful biological model, and protein function analysis using multi-purpose destination vectors), and protein function prediction by the information science method. (NEDO)

  13. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Rogers, A.Z.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethrope, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels

  14. FY 1994 Report on the results of the joint research project for optimum introduction of development of fuel cell technologies for urban energy centers; 1994 nendo toshi energy center nado nenryo denchi gijutsu kaihatsu saiteki donyu chosa seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    Described herein are the FY 1994 results of the joint research project for optimum introduction of development of fuel cell technologies for urban energy centers or the like. The necessary economic conditions for introduction of a fuel cell system to be competitive with the conventional system which individually supplies electric power and heat are 250,000 yen/kW as the construction unit cost, 0.10m{sup 2}/kW as the installation area, 5 years as the cell body life, use of an inexpensive fuel gas (2 to 6 yen/Mcal). Moreover, it is an indoor system which shall have the operational characteristics to follow daily demand fluctuations while operating under the optimum conditions in the urban redevelopment area considered. A 5,000kW-class fuel cell plant burning fuel gas (2 yen/Mcal) will need a total floor area of approximately 400,000 m{sup 2} in an energy-intensive office type demand area. These conditions shall be met in order to economically introduce the 5,000kW-class plant. It is also necessary to compare the plant with the competitive cogeneration plants. The specifications for the prototype now under consideration are sufficient for the energy-saving effect, and it is premised that these specifications and characteristics are secured. (NEDO)

  15. LANL12-RS-107J PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool (PyRAT). Mid-Year Deliverable Report for FY15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temple, Brian Allen; Armstrong, Jerawan Chudoung

    2015-01-01

    This document is a mid-year report on a deliverable for the PYTHON Radiography Analysis Tool (PyRAT) for project LANL12-RS-107J in FY15. The deliverable is deliverable number 2 in the work package and is titled ''Add the ability to read in more types of image file formats in PyRAT''. Right now PyRAT can only read in uncompressed TIF files (tiff files). It is planned to expand the file formats that can be read by PyRAT, making it easier to use in more situations. A summary of the file formats added include jpeg, jpg, png and formatted ASCII files.

  16. Annual report of STACY operation in F.Y. 1997. 280mm thickness slab core {center_dot} 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Seiji; Sono, Hiroki; Hirose, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-06-01

    Fifty-three times critical experiments (run number R0104 to R0156) with STACY in NUCEF, were performed in F.Y. 1997. During these experiments, 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution was used as fuel, and core configuration was 280mm thickness and 1.5m height slab core tank with various rectangular solid reflectors; ordinary or borated concrete, polyethylene and so on, to measure mainly reactivity worth by changes of reflecting material and its thickness. Operation data of STACY in F.Y. 1997 are summarized in this report. (author)

  17. ACES MWL data analysis center at SYRTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynadier, F.; Delva, P.; le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Guerlin, C.; Laurent, P.; Wolf, P.

    2017-12-01

    The ACES-PHARAO mission aims at operating a cold-atom caesium clock on board the International Space Station, and performs two-way time transfer with ground terminals, in order to allow highly accurate and stable comparisons of its internal timescale with those found in various metrology institutes. Scientific goals in fundamental physics include tests of the gravitational redshift with unprecedented accuracy, and search for a violation of the Lorentz local invariance. As launch is coming closer we are getting ready to process the data expected to come from ACES Microwave Link (MWL) once on board the International Space Station. Several hurdles have been cleared in our software in the past months, as we managed to implement algorithms that reach target accuracy for ground/space desynchronisation measurement. I will present the current status of data analysis preparation, as well as the activities that will take place at SYRTE in order to set up its data processing center.

  18. HTGR process heat program design and analysis. Final report, FY-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of concept design studies at General Atomic Company during FY-79 for an 842-MW(t) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) utilizing an intermediate helium heat transfer loop to provide thermal energy for the production of hydrogen or reducing gas (H 2 + CO) by steam-reforming of a light hydrocarbon. Basic carbon sources may be coal, residual oil, or oil shale. The report summarizes conceptual design tasks conducted on the prestressed concrete reactor vessel, thermal barrier, intermediate heat exchanger, reformer, and steam generator. The substantial completion of first generation programming for a performance/optimization code and the preparation of a topical safety report and other safety evaluation studies are reported. The completion of balance of plant criteria specifications and a balance of plant cost estimate is also reported

  19. FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis: Volume 1, Scientific Bases and Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Dobson, David

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for development as a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. To facilitate public review and comment, in May 2001 the DOE released the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S and ER) (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. The report summarizes the results of more than 20 years of scientific and engineering studies. A decision to recommend the site has not been made: the DOE has provided the S and ER and its supporting documents as an aid to the public in formulating comments on the possible recommendation. When the S and ER (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]) was released, the DOE acknowledged that technical and scientific analyses of the site were ongoing. Therefore, the DOE noted in the Federal Register Notice accompanying the report (66 FR 23013 [DIRS 155009], p. 2) that additional technical information would be released before the dates, locations, and times for public hearings on the possible recommendation were announced. This information includes: (1) the results of additional technical studies of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain, contained in this FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 1, Scientific Bases and Analyses; and FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 2, Performance Analyses (McNeish 2001 [DIRS 155023]) (collectively referred to as the SSPA) and (2) a preliminary evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site's preclosure and postclosure performance against the DOE's proposed site suitability guidelines (10 CFR Part 963 [64 FR 67054 [DIRS 124754

  20. FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis: Volume 1,Scientific Bases and Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Dobson, David

    2001-05-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for development as a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. To facilitate public review and comment, in May 2001 the DOE released the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S&ER) (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. The report summarizes the results of more than 20 years of scientific and engineering studies. A decision to recommend the site has not been made: the DOE has provided the S&ER and its supporting documents as an aid to the public in formulating comments on the possible recommendation. When the S&ER (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]) was released, the DOE acknowledged that technical and scientific analyses of the site were ongoing. Therefore, the DOE noted in the Federal Register Notice accompanying the report (66 FR 23013 [DIRS 155009], p. 2) that additional technical information would be released before the dates, locations, and times for public hearings on the possible recommendation were announced. This information includes: (1) the results of additional technical studies of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain, contained in this FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 1, Scientific Bases and Analyses; and FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 2, Performance Analyses (McNeish 2001 [DIRS 155023]) (collectively referred to as the SSPA) and (2) a preliminary evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site's preclosure and postclosure performance against the DOE's proposed site suitability guidelines (10 CFR Part 963 [64 FR 67054 [DIRS 124754

  1. Defense Finance and Accounting Service Work on the Navy Defense Business Operations Fund FY 1995 Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    lane, F

    1996-01-01

    ... Financial Statements of the Navy Defense Business Operations Fund. We also planned to determine whether FY 1995 ending balances reported by DFAS Cleveland Center are usable as beginning balances for FY 1996 financial statements...

  2. Review of the all Source Analysis System as a Part of the Audit of the Effectiveness of the Defense Acquisition Board Review Process-FY 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-20

    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL REVIEW OF THE ALL SOURCE ANALYSIS SYSTEM AS A PART OF THE AUDIT OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE DEFENSE...System as a Part of the Audit of the Effectiveness of the Defense Acquisition Board Review Process--FY 1993 (Report No. 93-087) We are providing...appreciate the courtesies extended to the audit staff. If you have questions on this report, please contact Program Director Russell A. Rau at (703) 693

  3. Automated Clean Chemistry for Bulk Analysis of Environmental Swipe Samples - FY17 Year End Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ticknor, Brian W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Metzger, Shalina C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McBay, Eddy H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hexel, Cole R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tevepaugh, Kayron N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bostick, Debra A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-11-30

    Sample preparation methods for mass spectrometry are being automated using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment to shorten lengthy and costly manual chemical purification procedures. This development addresses a serious need in the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Network of Analytical Laboratories (IAEA NWAL) to increase efficiency in the Bulk Analysis of Environmental Samples for Safeguards program with a method that allows unattended, overnight operation. In collaboration with Elemental Scientific Inc., the prepFAST-MC2 was designed based on COTS equipment. It was modified for uranium/plutonium separations using renewable columns packed with Eichrom TEVA and UTEVA resins, with a chemical separation method based on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) NWAL chemical procedure. The newly designed prepFAST-SR has had several upgrades compared with the original prepFAST-MC2. Both systems are currently installed in the Ultra-Trace Forensics Science Center at ORNL.

  4. CAES Annual Report FY 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortny Rolston

    2011-10-01

    The Center for Advanced Energy Studies was created to lead research programs important to the nation, attract students and faculty to the Idaho universities and act as a catalyst for technology-based economic development. CAES is striving to meet those goals by continuing to develop its infrastructure and equipment capabilities, expand its research portfolio and bolster Idaho's energy workforce. This Annual Report details the progress CAES made in FY 2011 toward fulfilling its research, education and economic development missions.

  5. Understanding wellness center loyalty through lifestyle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Satya; Ravichandran, Swathi; P, Ganesan

    2011-01-01

    Many changes taking place at a macro-level in Indian society along with the popularity of services that are native to India, such as Yoga and Ayurveda, have generated significant interest in wellness services. To assist wellness centers in gaining loyal clients, the goal of this study was to understand the influence of customer lifestyle factors on wellness center loyalty. The activities, interests, and opinions model was used to understand the lifestyles of wellness center clients. Data were collected from clients of five wellness centers. Regression results indicate that overworked individuals and those seeking a balance between work and family life would be the most loyal to wellness centers. Managerial implications of results are discussed.

  6. FY 1998 survey report. Petroleum substituting energy metering analysis survey; 1998 nendo chosa hokokusho. Sekiyu daitai energy keiryo bunseki chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In this survey, metering models in the Asian/Pacific region where energy demand is rapidly increasing were constructed which are used for the comprehensive analysis of the relations between changes in social structure such as economic growth, change in industrial structure, and progress in energy conservation technology and new energy technology, and the energy supply/demand structure. The survey was carried out aiming at contributing to the international development of Japan's energy policy in future by quantitatively analyzing/evaluating influences of various energy policies/economic policies on the economy and energy supply/demand, through various kinds of simulation models. In FY 1998, information collection for modeling was made in China and Korea out of the Asian/Pacific region. At the same time, pilot models were constructed, and simulation was made for the standard case. Moreover, an analysis was conducted of the relation between economic growth and motorization in each country of the world as the basic data preparation on energy consumption in the transportation sector. (NEDO)

  7. FY 1998 survey report. Petroleum substituting energy metering analysis survey; 1998 nendo chosa hokokusho. Sekiyu daitai energy keiryo bunseki chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In this survey, metering models in the Asian/Pacific region where energy demand is rapidly increasing were constructed which are used for the comprehensive analysis of the relations between changes in social structure such as economic growth, change in industrial structure, and progress in energy conservation technology and new energy technology, and the energy supply/demand structure. The survey was carried out aiming at contributing to the international development of Japan's energy policy in future by quantitatively analyzing/evaluating influences of various energy policies/economic policies on the economy and energy supply/demand, through various kinds of simulation models. In FY 1998, information collection for modeling was made in China and Korea out of the Asian/Pacific region. At the same time, pilot models were constructed, and simulation was made for the standard case. Moreover, an analysis was conducted of the relation between economic growth and motorization in each country of the world as the basic data preparation on energy consumption in the transportation sector. (NEDO)

  8. Color centers in KCN: a structural analysis of crystalline domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmo, L.C.S. do.

    1976-03-01

    Pure singlecrystals of KCN exposed to X-rays showed several color centers detected by EPR. The F center was identified through the correlation of its optical absorption band which satisfies the Ivey law for the KCN lattice parameter and the EPR spectrum typical of a center in an anionic site. Two other color centers were identified: N - 2 and HCN - . Two centers assigned to hydrogen atoms have their models proposed: U 2 and U 3 centers. Two other centers remain unidentified: an anionic and an extrinsic centers. The orthorhombic character of the N - 2 center EPR parameters allowed an structural analysis of the crystal line domains in the orthorhombic phase. The optical absorption spectrum of the HCN - center in KCl matrix was investigated and showed a set of resolved bands with a constant energy splitting; this splitting was associated to a vibrational mode of the excited state of this molecular ion. (author) [pt

  9. A Statistical Analysis of the Relationship of Distance and Mode of Transportation on Length of Stay at Brooke Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hagen, John

    1997-01-01

    .... Transportation Command's (TRANSCOM) aeromedical evacuation system, to determine their influence on length of hospital stay at Brooke Army Medical Center in FY 1996 in order to better understand the irnpact these patients have on utilization management...

  10. 77 FR 7183 - Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2011 Service Contract...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Public Availability of Analysis of the FY 2010 Service Contract Inventories and...

  11. FY2010 ANNUAL REVIEW E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND COMPOSITE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T.; Swingle, R.; Crapse, K.; Millings, M.; Sink, D.

    2011-01-01

    The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) consists of a number of disposal units described in the Performance Assessment (PA)(WSRC, 2008b) and Composite Analysis (CA)(WSRC, 1997; WSRC, 1999): Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (IL) Vault, Trenches (Slit Trenches [STs], Engineered Trenches [ETs], and Component-in-Grout [CIG] Trenches), and Naval Reactor Component Disposal Areas (NRCDAs). This annual review evaluates the adequacy of the approved 2008 ELLWF PA along with the Special Analyses (SAs) approved since the PA was issued. The review also verifies that the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 low-level waste (LLW) disposal operations were conducted within the bounds of the PA/SA baseline, the Savannah River Site (SRS) CA, and the Department of Energy (DOE) Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS). Important factors considered in this review include waste receipts, results from monitoring and research and development (R&D) programs, and the adequacy of controls derived from the PA/SA baseline. Sections 1.0 and 2.0 of this review are a summary of the adequacy of the PA/SA and CA, respectively. An evaluation of the FY2010 waste receipts and the resultant impact on the ELLWF is summarized in Section 3.1. The results of the monitoring program, R&D program, and other relevant factors are found in Section 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4, respectively. Section 4.0 contains the CA annual determination similarly organized. SRS low-level waste management is regulated under DOE Order 435.1 (DOE, 1999a) and is authorized under a DAS as a federal permit. The original DAS was issued by the DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) on September 28, 1999 (DOE, 1999b) for the operation of the ELLWF and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The 1999 DAS remains in effect for the regulation of the SDF. Those portions of that DAS applicable to the ELLWF were superseded by revision 1 of the DAS on July 15, 2008 (DOE, 2008b). The 2008 PA and DAS were officially implemented by the facility on October 31, 2008

  12. Hybrid Threat Center of Gravity Analysis: Cutting the Gordian Knot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 04/04/2016 Master’s Thesis 22-7-2015 to 04-04-2016 HYBRID THREAT CENTER OF GRAVITY ANALYSIS: CUTTING THE...CENTER OF GRAVITY ANALYSIS: CUTTING THE GORDIAN KNOT By Michael D. Reilly LtCol, USMC Intentionally left blank...HYBRID THREAT CENTER OF GRAVITY ANALYSIS: CUTTING THE GORDIAN KNOT By Michael D. Reilly LtCol, USMC A paper submitted to the Faculty of the Joint Advanced

  13. Environmental Analysis of the Groningen City Center

    OpenAIRE

    GÓMEZ BUGEDA, RICARDO SANTIAGO

    2017-01-01

    This final thesis project is part of the research that is carrying out by the Gemeente Groningen in order to make the city center more sustainable and livable. The municipality of Groningen has recently published a conceptual development plan for improving the inner-city of Groningen, this report is called Bestemming Binnenstad 01/2016 . The main focus of this report is convert the city center to an environmental friendly downtown, reducing pollution, reroute public and private transpo...

  14. Annual Status Report (FY2009) Composite Analysis of Low-Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-02-10

    In accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and implemented by DOE/RL-2000-29, Maintenance Plan for the Composite Analysis of the Hanford Site, Southeast Washington, the DOE Richland Operations Office has prepared this annual status report for fiscal year (FY) 2009 of PNNL-11800, Composite Analysis for the Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200-Area Plateau of the Hanford Site, hereafter referred to as the Composite Analysis.

  15. Annual Status Report (FY2010) Composite Analysis of Low-Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-01-11

    In accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE O 435.1 Chg 1, Radioactive Waste Management, and implemented by DOE/RL-2000-29, Maintenance Plan for the Composite Analysis of the Hanford Site, Southeast Washington, the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), also known as RL, has prepared this annual status report for fiscal year (FY) 2010 of PNNL-11800, Composite Analysis for Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200 Area Plateau of the Hanford Site, hereafter referred to as the Composite Analysis.

  16. NREL Energy Storage Projects: FY2013 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A.; Ban, C.; Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; Ireland, J.; Keyser, M.; Kim, G. H.; Long, D.; Neubauer, J.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Smith, K.; Tenent, R.; Wood, E.; Han, T.; Hartridge, S.; Shaffer, C. E.

    2014-07-01

    In FY13, DOE funded NREL to make technical contributions to various R&D activities. This report summarizes NREL's R&D projects in FY13 in support of the USABC; Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design; ABR; and BATT program elements. The FY13 projects under NREL's Energy Storage R&D program are discussed in depth in this report.

  17. FY 1986 scientific and technical reports, articles, papers and presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joyce E. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Formal NASA technical reports, papers published in technical journals, and presentations by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel in FY-86 are presented. Also included are papers of MSFC contractors.

  18. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 1999 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2000-03-31

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global-change data and information analysis center of the Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has--since its inception in 1982--enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Acting Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC's FY 1999 budget was 2.2M dollars. CDIAC represents the DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System. Bobbi Parra, and Wanda Ferrell on an interim basis, is DOE's Program Manager with responsibility for CDIAC. CDIAC comprises three groups, Global Change Data, Computer Systems, and

  19. Break-even analysis in a nurse-managed center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBryde-Foster, Merry J

    2005-01-01

    The concept of break-even analysis as a financial assessment tool is defined and demonstrated in evaluation of a proposed nurse-managed center. The advantages of using break-even analysis during proposal development are explored.

  20. Alternatives to Center of Gravity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    20 Figure 11. SWOT Analysis ...COMPARISON BETWEEN COG ANALYSIS AND SMTS ......................................................22 Benefits of using SMT in COG Analysis ...Opportunities, and Threats ( SWOT ) analysis . SWOT identifies external and internal factors that impinge on the business (Figure 11). SWOT can be as

  1. FY 1999 research report on the evaluation/analysis of the data collected in the field test project for the photovoltaic power system for public facility use; 1999 nendo kokyo shisetsu nadoyo taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo ni okeru shushu data hyoka kaiseki kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    In this research, the photovoltaic power system is experimentally installed at various facilities (public facilities such as public hall, school and museum), and operated on a long term basis under the actual loads. Various kinds of data are collected/analyzed and used as the data useful for the full-scale introduction and spread. The photovoltaic power generation field test project for public facilities using the photovoltaic power system was started in FY 1992 by NEDO. Systems at 116 sites started operation by FY 1996, and in FY 1997 systems were installed at a total of 70 sites. The paper outlined the project and described the results of the collection/analyses of the operational data obtained at 145 sites where systems were installed from FY 1995 to FY 1997. The term of analysis in FY 1999 was made from April 1999 to December 1999, being different from usual, to avoid the Y2K problem on data collecting software, measuring use personal computer, etc. Further, since there are no sites where no systems were newly installed in and after FY 1998, there are no analyses of economical efficiency in and after FY 1999. The paper indicated a list of all the sites with system installation in FY 1995-1997 including the main items. (NEDO)

  2. Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs. FY 2005 - FY 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2004-05-01

    This report describes a benefits analysis undertaken by EERE to better understand the extent to which the technologies and market improvements funded by its FY 2005 budget request will make energy more affordable, cleaner, and more reliable. It summarizes the results of the analysis, which focused on economic, environmental, and security benefits related to energy. The report identifies specific measures or indicators of estimated benefits for FY 2005.

  3. Ethanol annual report FY 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Texeira, R.H.; Goodman, B.J. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the research progress and accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Ethanol from Biomass Program, field managed by the Solar Energy Research Institute, during FY 1990. The report includes an overview of the entire program and summaries of individual research projects. These projects are grouped into the following subject areas: technoeconomic analysis; pretreatment; cellulose conversion; xylose fermentation; and lignin conversion. Individual papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  4. 77 FR 14587 - FY 2012 Discretionary Livability Funding Opportunity: Alternatives Analysis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... alternatives analysis or to support additional technical tasks in an on-going alternatives analysis that will.... FTA will consider proposals for all areas of technical work that can better develop information about... analysis, or for work performed after the Locally Preferred Alternative (LPA) has been selected. There is...

  5. Benefits Analysis of Multi-Center Dynamic Weather Routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kapil; McNally, David; Morando, Alexander; Clymer, Alexis; Lock, Jennifer; Petersen, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic weather routes are flight plan corrections that can provide airborne flights more than user-specified minutes of flying-time savings, compared to their current flight plan. These routes are computed from the aircraft's current location to a flight plan fix downstream (within a predefined limit region), while avoiding forecasted convective weather regions. The Dynamic Weather Routes automation has been continuously running with live air traffic data for a field evaluation at the American Airlines Integrated Operations Center in Fort Worth, TX since July 31, 2012, where flights within the Fort Worth Air Route Traffic Control Center are evaluated for time savings. This paper extends the methodology to all Centers in United States and presents benefits analysis of Dynamic Weather Routes automation, if it was implemented in multiple airspace Centers individually and concurrently. The current computation of dynamic weather routes requires a limit rectangle so that a downstream capture fix can be selected, preventing very large route changes spanning several Centers. In this paper, first, a method of computing a limit polygon (as opposed to a rectangle used for Fort Worth Center) is described for each of the 20 Centers in the National Airspace System. The Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool, a nationwide simulation and analysis tool, is used for this purpose. After a comparison of results with the Center-based Dynamic Weather Routes automation in Fort Worth Center, results are presented for 11 Centers in the contiguous United States. These Centers are generally most impacted by convective weather. A breakdown of individual Center and airline savings is presented and the results indicate an overall average savings of about 10 minutes of flying time are obtained per flight.

  6. Security Engineering FY17 Systems Aware Cybersecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-07

    Security Engineering – FY17 Systems Aware Cybersecurity Technical Report SERC-2017-TR-114 December 7 2017 Principal Investigator: Dr...December 7, 2017 Copyright © 2017 Stevens Institute of Technology, Systems Engineering Research Center The Systems Engineering Research Center (SERC...supported, in whole or in part, by the U.S. Department of Defense through the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering (ASD

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis - 3rd Quarter FY2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisbeth A. Mitchell

    2014-09-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of occurrence reports and other non-reportable issues identified at INL from July 2013 through June 2014.

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Event Performance Analysis FY 2013 4th Quarter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-11-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2 “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable for the previous twelve months. This report is the analysis of occurrence reports and deficiency reports (including not reportable events) identified at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) during the period of October 2012 through September 2013.

  9. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Performance Analysis - 2nd Quarter FY2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisbeth A. Mitchell

    2014-06-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Performance Assurance Organization. The Department of Energy Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of occurrence reports and other deficiency reports (including not reportable events) identified at INL from January 2014 through March 2014.

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Quarterly Occurrence Analysis 4th Quarter FY 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Lisbeth Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report is published quarterly by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Quality and Performance Management Organization. The Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System, as prescribed in DOE Order 232.2, “Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information,” requires a quarterly analysis of events, both reportable and not reportable, for the previous 12 months. This report is the analysis of 84 reportable events (29 from the 4th quarter fiscal year 2016 and 55 from the prior three reporting quarters), as well as 39 other issue reports (including events found to be not reportable and Significant Category A and B conditions) identified at INL during the past 12 months (two from this quarter and 37 from the prior three quarters).

  11. Financing of certified centers: a willingness-to-pay analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Falk C; Scharl, Anton; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Kotziabassis, Efstratios; Schrauder, Michael G; Bani, Mayada R; Müller, Andreas; Hauzenberger, Tanja; Loehberg, Christian R; Jud, Sebastian M; Fasching, Peter A; Hartmann, Arndt; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Strnad, Vratislav; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lux, Michael Patrick

    2013-03-01

    Although care in certified breast centers is now established throughout Germany, numerous services are still not being reimbursed. This also affects other centers involved in the specialty of gynecology such as gynecological cancer centers, perinatal centers, and endometriosis centers. Although a certified center is entitled to charge additional fees, these are in most cases not reimbursed. Calculation of additional costs is limited by the fact that data from the Institute for the Hospital Reimbursement System (Institut für das Entgeltsystem im Krankenhaus, InEK) do not reflect interdisciplinary services and procedures. For decision-makers, society's willingness to pay is an important factor in guiding decisions on the basis of social priorities. A hypothetical maximum willingness to pay can be calculated using a willingness-to-pay analysis, making it possible to identify deficiencies in the arbitrary setting of health budgets at the macro-level. In a multicenter study conducted between November 2009 and December 2010, 2,469 patients at a university hospital and at a non-university hospital were asked about the extent of their awareness of certified centers, the influence of centers on hospital presentation, and about personal attitudes toward quality-oriented reimbursement. A subjective assessment of possible additional charges was calculated using a willingness-to-pay analysis. In the overall group, 53.4 % of the patients were aware of what a certified center is and 27.4 % had specific information (obstetrics 40.0/32.3 %; mastology 66.8/23.2 %; gynecological oncology 54.7/27.3 %; P < 0.001). For 43.8 %, a certified center was one reason or the major reason for presentation (obstetrics 26.2 %; mastology 66.8 %; gynecological oncology 46.6 %; P < 0.001). A total of 72.6 % were in favor of quality-oriented reimbursement and 69.7 % were in favor of an additional charge for a certified center amounting to €538.56 (mastology €643.65, obstetrics €474

  12. Overheads, Safety Analysis and Engineering FY 1995 Site Support Program Plan WBS 6.3.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiVincenzo, E.P.

    1994-09-27

    The Safety Analysis & Engineering (SA&E) department provides core competency for safety analysis and risk documentation that supports achievement of the goals and mission as described in the Hanford Mission Plan, Volume I, Site Guidance (DOE-RL 1993). SA&E operations are integrated into the programs that plan and conduct safe waste management, environmental restoration, and operational activities. SA&E personnel are key members of task teams assigned to eliminate urgent risks and inherent threats that exist at the Hanford Site. Key to ensuring protection of public health and safety, and that of onsite workers, are the products and services provided by the department. SA&E will continue to provide a leadership role throughout the DOE complex with innovative, cost-effective approaches to ensuring safety during environmental cleanup operations. The SA&E mission is to provide support to direct program operations through safety analysis and risk documentation and to maintain an infrastructure responsive to the evolutionary climate at the Hanford Site. SA&E will maintain the appropriate skills mix necessary to fulfill the customers need to conduct all operations in a safe and cost-effective manner while ensuring the safety of the public and the onsite worker.

  13. Overheads, Safety Analysis and Engineering FY 1995 Site Support Program Plan WBS 6.3.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiVincenzo, E.P.

    1994-01-01

    The Safety Analysis ampersand Engineering (SA ampersand E) department provides core competency for safety analysis and risk documentation that supports achievement of the goals and mission as described in the Hanford Mission Plan, Volume I, Site Guidance (DOE-RL 1993). SA ampersand E operations are integrated into the programs that plan and conduct safe waste management, environmental restoration, and operational activities. SA ampersand E personnel are key members of task teams assigned to eliminate urgent risks and inherent threats that exist at the Hanford Site. Key to ensuring protection of public health and safety, and that of onsite workers, are the products and services provided by the department. SA ampersand E will continue to provide a leadership role throughout the DOE complex with innovative, cost-effective approaches to ensuring safety during environmental cleanup operations. The SA ampersand E mission is to provide support to direct program operations through safety analysis and risk documentation and to maintain an infrastructure responsive to the evolutionary climate at the Hanford Site. SA ampersand E will maintain the appropriate skills mix necessary to fulfill the customers need to conduct all operations in a safe and cost-effective manner while ensuring the safety of the public and the onsite worker

  14. Information Analysis Centers in the Department of Defense. Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    Combat Data Information Center (CDIC) and the Aircraft Survivability Model Repository ( ASMR ) into the Survivability/Vulnerability Information Analysis...Information Center (CDIC) and the Aircraft Survivability Model Respository ( ASMR ). The CDIC was a central repository for combat and test data related to...and ASMR were operated under the technical monitorship of the Flight Dynamics Laboratory at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio and were located in Flight

  15. Annual Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis Review for the ICDF Landfill FY 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koslow, Karen; Rood, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    This report addresses low-level waste disposal operations at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) landfill from the start of operations in Fiscal Year 2003 through Fiscal Year 2008. The ICDF was authorized in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision for disposal of waste from the Idaho National Laboratory Site CERCLA environmental restoration activities. The ICDF has been operating since 2003 in compliance with the CERCLA requirements and the waste acceptance criteria developed in the CERCLA process. In developing the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision, U.S. Department of Energy Order (DOE) 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', was identified as a 'to be considered' requirement for the ICDF. The annual review requirement under DOE Order 435.1 was determined to be an administrative requirement and, therefore, annual reviews were not prepared on an annual basis. However, the landfill has been operating for 5 years and, since the waste forms and inventories disposed of have changed from what was originally envisioned for the ICDF landfill, the ICDF project team has decided that this annual review is necessary to document the changes and provide a basis for any updates in analyses that may be necessary to continue to meet the substantive requirements of DOE Order 435.1. For facilities regulated under DOE Order 435.1-1, U.S. DOE Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', IV.P.(4)(c) stipulates that annual summaries of low-level waste disposal operations shall be prepared with respect to the conclusions and recommendations of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Important factors considered in this review include facility operations, waste receipts, and results from monitoring and research and development programs. There have been no significant changes in operations at the landfill in respect to the disposal geometry, the verification of waste characteristics, and the

  16. Annual Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis Review for the ICDF Landfill FY 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen Koslow

    2009-08-31

    This report addresses low-level waste disposal operations at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) landfill from the start of operations in Fiscal Year 2003 through Fiscal Year 2008. The ICDF was authorized in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision for disposal of waste from the Idaho National Laboratory Site CERCLA environmental restoration activities. The ICDF has been operating since 2003 in compliance with the CERCLA requirements and the waste acceptance criteria developed in the CERCLA process. In developing the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision, U.S. Department of Energy Order (DOE) 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', was identified as a 'to be considered' requirement for the ICDF. The annual review requirement under DOE Order 435.1 was determined to be an administrative requirement and, therefore, annual reviews were not prepared on an annual basis. However, the landfill has been operating for 5 years and, since the waste forms and inventories disposed of have changed from what was originally envisioned for the ICDF landfill, the ICDF project team has decided that this annual review is necessary to document the changes and provide a basis for any updates in analyses that may be necessary to continue to meet the substantive requirements of DOE Order 435.1. For facilities regulated under DOE Order 435.1-1, U.S. DOE Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', IV.P.(4)(c) stipulates that annual summaries of low-level waste disposal operations shall be prepared with respect to the conclusions and recommendations of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Important factors considered in this review include facility operations, waste receipts, and results from monitoring and research and development programs. There have been no significant changes in operations at the landfill in respect to the disposal geometry, the verification of

  17. Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence FY 2016 Data Analysis Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enders, Alexander L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harris, Tyrone C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pope, Thomas C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patterson, Jeremy B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) has facilitated the installation of more than 3,500 radiation portal monitors (RPMs) at 606 sites in 56 countries worldwide. This collection of RPMs represents the world’s largest network of radiation detectors and provides one element in the defense-in-depth approach that supports the Global Nuclear Detection Architecture. These systems support NSDD’s mission to build partner country capability to deter, detect, and interdict the illicit transport of radiological and fissile material through strategic points of entry and exit at seaports, airports, and border crossings. NSDD works collaboratively with partner countries and international organizations to optimize the operation of these RPMs. The large amount of data provided by NSDD partner countries highlights the close cooperation and partnerships NSDD has built with 56 countries around the world. Thirty-seven of these countries shared at least some RPM-related data with NSDD in fiscal year 2016. This significant level of data sharing is a key element that distinguishes the NSDD office as unique among nuclear nonproliferation programs and initiatives: NSDD can provide specific, objective, data-driven decisions and support for sustaining the radiation detection systems it helped deploy. This data analysis report summarizes and aggregates the RPM data provided to the NSDD office for analysis and review in fiscal year 2016. The data can be used to describe RPM performance and characterize the wide diversity of NSDD deployment sites. For example, NSDD deploys detector systems across sites with natural background radiation levels that can vary by a factor of approximately six from site to site. Some lanes have few occupancies, whereas others have approximately 8,000 occupancies per day and the different types of cargo that travel through a site can result in site-wide alarm rates that range from near 0% at

  18. Disability Compensation and Patient Expenditures: FY2000 to FY2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report contains FY2000 through FY2013 data on disability compensation expenditures and recipients and on VA healthcare system patients and patient expenditures.

  19. Early failure analysis of machining centers: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yiqiang; Jia Yazhou; Jiang Weiwei

    2001-01-01

    To eliminate the early failures and improve the reliability, nine ex-factory machining centers are traced under field conditions in workshops. Their early failure information throughout the ex-factory run-in test is collected. The field early failure database is constructed based on the collection of field early failure data and the codification of data. Early failure mode and effects analysis is performed to indicate the weak subsystem of a machining center or the troublemaker. The distribution of the time between early failures is analyzed and the optimal ex-factory run-in test time for machining center that may expose sufficiently the early failures and cost minimum is discussed. Suggestions how to arrange ex-factory run-in test and how to take actions to reduce early failures for machining center is proposed

  20. 77 FR 19408 - Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2013 U.S. Refugee Admissions Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7836] Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2013 U.S. Refugee Admissions Program There will be a meeting on the President's FY 2013 U.S. Refugee Admissions Program on Tuesday, May 1, 2012 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Refugee Processing Center, 1401...

  1. 76 FR 19176 - Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2012 Refugee Admissions Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7409] Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2012 Refugee Admissions Program There will be a meeting on the President's FY 2012 U.S. Refugee Admissions Program on Thursday, May 12, 2011 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Refugee Processing Center, 1401...

  2. 75 FR 20031 - Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2011 Refugee Admissions Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 6954] Notice of Public Meeting on FY 2011 Refugee Admissions Program There will be a meeting on the President's FY 2011 Refugee Admissions Program on Tuesday, May 4, 2010 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Refugee Processing Center, 1401 Wilson...

  3. Annual Performance Report - FY 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes OIG activity, performance, results, and challenges, and provides a financial accounting of resources for fiscal year (FY) 2011 compared to our FY 2011 annual performance targets.

  4. FY 10 Multifamily Initial Endorsements

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — In FY 2010, HUD's Multifamily's 18 Hubs initially endorsed 1011 loans totaling $11.3 billion and providing 170,672 units/ beds. FY 10's $11.3 billion is the highest...

  5. Statistical Analysis of Research Data | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent advances in cancer biology have resulted in the need for increased statistical analysis of research data. The Statistical Analysis of Research Data (SARD) course will be held on April 5-6, 2018 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the National Institutes of Health's Natcher Conference Center, Balcony C on the Bethesda Campus. SARD is designed to provide an overview on the general principles of statistical analysis of research data.  The first day will feature univariate data analysis, including descriptive statistics, probability distributions, one- and two-sample inferential statistics.

  6. A framework for intelligent reliability centered maintenance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Zhonghua; Jia Xisheng; Gao Ping; Wu Su; Wang Jianzhao

    2008-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) analysis, case-based reasoning (CBR), as a kind of artificial intelligence (AI) technology, was successfully introduced into RCM analysis process, and a framework for intelligent RCM analysis (IRCMA) was studied. The idea for IRCMA is based on the fact that the historical records of RCM analysis on similar items can be referenced and used for the current RCM analysis of a new item. Because many common or similar items may exist in the analyzed equipment, the repeated tasks of RCM analysis can be considerably simplified or avoided by revising the similar cases in conducting RCM analysis. Based on the previous theory studies, an intelligent RCM analysis system (IRCMAS) prototype was developed. This research has focused on the description of the definition, basic principles as well as a framework of IRCMA, and discussion of critical techniques in the IRCMA. Finally, IRCMAS prototype is presented based on a case study

  7. Appendix C: Biomass Program inputs for FY 2008 benefits estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  8. FY 1994 Annual Work Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This is the third Office of Inspector General (OIG)Annual Work Plan. Its purpose is to summarize work completed in Fiscal Year (FY) 1993, identify ongoing projects from previous fiscal years which the OIG intends to continue into FY 1994, and announce planned projects which the OIG intends to begin in FY 19994.

  9. Research report of FY 1997 on the clean coal technology promotion project and region model survey. Measures for environmental load reduction: feasibility survey on the environmental load reduction-type utilization Energy Center (interim report); 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho. Clean coal technology suishin jigyo chiiki model chosa `kankyo fuka teigen taisaku: kankyo fuka teigengata sekitan riyo energy center feasibility chosa` chosa hokokusho (chukan hokoku)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The survey has given an eye to the coal that it can be easily burnt together with combustible waste and supplements unstable generation of waste. Thus, the establishment of the Energy Center at the place where infrastructure of coal will be arranged, a lot of combustible waste will be expected to generate and a considerable aniybt if energy will be used, has been planned, and this survey is intended to study the scale of Energy Center, its economy and the problems to be solved. In power plant project using RDF for above-mentioned local governments, the construction of power plant and the renewal time of the existing incinerator to RDF facility can be planned separately in this system. The power plant will be economically constructed and the amount of coal can be decreased in accordance with increased RDF to meet wide range of refuse treatment. In FY 1997, the actual situation of the waste treatment and the infrastructure of coal supply was surveyed, and selection of the place suitable for the Energy Center and its scale was studied. 69 figs., 50 tabs.

  10. Secondary Waste Considerations for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center FY-2001 Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, A.K.; Kirkham, R.J.; Losinski, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes from the melter off-gas clean up systems. Projected secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates

  11. Secondary Waste Considerations for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center FY-2001 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.; Kirkham, R.J.; Losinski, S.J.

    2002-09-26

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes from the melter off-gas clean up systems. Projected secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates.

  12. Secondary Waste Considerations for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Techology and Engineering Center FY-2001 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Kirkham, Robert John; Losinski, Sylvester John

    2001-09-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes from the melter off-gas clean up systems. Projected secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates.

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Executive Biographies Organizations History Budget and Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency ... Applications VA Forms State and Local Resources Strat Plan FY 2014-2020 VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA ...

  14. Structural Analysis Peer Review for the Static Display of the Orbiter Atlantis at the Kennedy Space Center Visitors Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minute, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Mr. Christopher Miller with the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) NASA Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) office requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center's (NESC) technical support on March 15, 2012, to review and make recommendations on the structural analysis being performed for the Orbiter Atlantis static display at the KSC Visitor Center. The principal focus of the assessment was to review the engineering firm's structural analysis for lifting and aligning the orbiter and its static display configuration

  15. Non-linguistic analysis of call center conversations

    CERN Document Server

    Kopparapu, Sunil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The book focuses on the part of the audio conversation not related to language such as speaking rate (in terms of number of syllables per unit time) and emotion centric features. This text examines using non-linguistics features to infer information from phone calls to call centers. The author analyzes 'how' the conversation happens and not 'what' the conversation is about by audio signal processing and analysis.

  16. A Data Analysis Center for Electromagnetic and Hadronic Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briscoe, William John [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Studies; Strakovsky, Igor I. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Studies; Workman, Ronald L. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Studies

    2015-05-31

    The GW Data Analysis Center (DAC) has made significant progress in its program to enhance and expand the partial-wave and multipole analyses of fundamental reactions, while maintaining and expanding each associated database. These efforts provide guidance to national and international experimental and theoretical efforts, and are an important link between theory and experiment. Our principal goals are focused on baryon and meson physics programs and related topics.

  17. Center Line Slope Analysis in Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    ?anda, Franti?ek; Perl?k, V?clav; Lincoln, Craig N.; Hauer, J?rgen

    2015-01-01

    Center line slope (CLS) analysis in 2D infrared spectroscopy has been extensively used to extract frequency?frequency correlation functions of vibrational transitions. We apply this concept to 2D electronic spectroscopy, where CLS is a measure of electronic gap fluctuations. The two domains, infrared and electronic, possess differences: In the infrared, the frequency fluctuations are classical, often slow and Gaussian. In contrast, electronic spectra are subject to fast spectral diffusion and...

  18. NCPV FY 1998 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, R. D.; Hansen, A.

    1999-07-19

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R and D) activities under the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) from October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998 (FY 1998). The NCPV is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE National Photovoltaics Program Plan for 1996-2000. The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to make PV a significant part of the domestic economy--as an industry and as an energy resource. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the U.S. industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the U.S. industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NCPV provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals.

  19. NCPV FY 1998 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, R. D.; Hansen, A.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R and D) activities under the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) from October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998 (FY 1998). The NCPV is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE National Photovoltaics Program Plan for 1996-2000. The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to make PV a significant part of the domestic economy--as an industry and as an energy resource. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the U.S. industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the U.S. industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NCPV provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals

  20. SWOT analysis in Sina Trauma and Surgery Research Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamati, Payman; ashraf Eghbali, Ali; Zarghampour, Manijeh

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted with the aim of identifying and evaluating the internal and external factors, affecting the Sina Trauma and Surgery Research Center, affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences and propose some of related strategies to senior managers. We used a combined quantitative and qualitative methodology. Our study population consisted of personnel (18 individuals) at Sina Trauma and Surgery Research Center. Data-collection tools were the group discussions and the questionnaires. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and SWOT (Strength, Weakness, Opportunities and Threats) analysis. 18 individuals participated in sessions, consisting of 8 women (44.4%) and 10 men (55.6%). The final scores were 2.45 for internal factors (strength-weakness) and 2.17 for external factors (opportunities-threats). In this study, we proposed 36 strategies (10 weakness-threat strategies, 10 weakness-opportunity strategies, 7 strength-threat strategies, and 9 strength-opportunity strategies). The current status of Sina Trauma and Surgery Research Center is threatened weak. We recommend the center to implement the proposed strategies.

  1. NEAMS Software Licensing, Release, and Distribution: Implications for FY2013 Work Package Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernholdt, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The vision of the NEAMS program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M and S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the analysis of nuclear systems. NEAMS anticipates issuing in FY 2018 a full release of its computational 'Fermi Toolkit' aimed at advanced reactor and fuel cycles. The NEAMS toolkit involves extensive software development activities, some of which have already been underway for several years, however, the Advanced Modeling and Simulation Office (AMSO), which sponsors the NEAMS program, has not yet issued any official guidance regarding software licensing, release, and distribution policies. This motivated an FY12 task in the Capability Transfer work package to develop and recommend an appropriate set of policies. The current preliminary report is intended to provide awareness of issues with implications for work package planning for FY13. We anticipate a small amount of effort associated with putting into place formal licenses and contributor agreements for NEAMS software which doesn't already have them. We do not anticipate any additional effort or costs associated with software release procedures or schedules beyond those dictated by the quality expectations for the software. The largest potential costs we anticipate would be associated with the setup and maintenance of shared code repositories for development and early access to NEAMS software products. We also anticipate an opportunity, with modest associated costs, to work with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) to clarify export control assessment policies for software under development.

  2. Compilation of the FY 1999 Department of the Navy Working Capital Fund Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ...) Cleveland Center consistently and accurately compiled and consolidated financial data received from Navy field organizations and other sources to prepare the FY 1999 Navy Working Capital Fund financial statements...

  3. Business of Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, Nuclear Technology Test Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Masahiko

    1981-01-01

    The Nuclear Technology Test Center established the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office to execute newly the works concerning nuclear safety analysis in addition to the works related to the proving tests of nuclear machinery and equipments. The regulations for the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office concerning its organization, business and others were specially decided, and it started the business formally in August, 1980. It is a most important subject to secure the safety of nuclear facilities in nuclear fuel cycle as the premise of developing atomic energy. In Japan, the strict regulation of safety is executed by the government at each stage of the installation, construction, operation and maintenance of nuclear facilities, based on the responsibility for the security of installers themselves. The Nuclear Safety Analysis Office was established as the special organ to help the safety examination related to the installation of nuclear power stations and others by the government. It improves and puts in order the safety analysis codes required for the cross checking in the safety examination, and carries out safety analysis calculation. It is operated by the cooperation of the Science and Technology Agency and the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy. The purpose of establishment, the operation and the business of the Nuclear Safety Analysis Office, the plan of improving and putting in order of analysis codes, and the state of the similar organs in foreign countries are described. (Kako, I.)

  4. Tanks focus area multiyear program plan - FY96-FY98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP) presents the recommended TFA technical program. The recommendation covers a 3-year funding outlook (FY96-FY98), with an emphasis on FY96 and FY97. In addition to defining the recommended program, this document also describes the processes used to develop the program, the implementation strategy for the program, the references used to write this report, data on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank site baselines, details on baseline assumptions and the technical elements, and a glossary

  5. Building a Prototype of LHC Analysis Oriented Computing Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Della Ricca, G.; Donvito, G.; Paganoni, M.

    2012-12-01

    A Consortium between four LHC Computing Centers (Bari, Milano, Pisa and Trieste) has been formed in 2010 to prototype Analysis-oriented facilities for CMS data analysis, profiting from a grant from the Italian Ministry of Research. The Consortium aims to realize an ad-hoc infrastructure to ease the analysis activities on the huge data set collected at the LHC Collider. While “Tier2” Computing Centres, specialized in organized processing tasks like Monte Carlo simulation, are nowadays a well established concept, with years of running experience, site specialized towards end user chaotic analysis activities do not yet have a defacto standard implementation. In our effort, we focus on all the aspects that can make the analysis tasks easier for a physics user not expert in computing. On the storage side, we are experimenting on storage techniques allowing for remote data access and on storage optimization on the typical analysis access patterns. On the networking side, we are studying the differences between flat and tiered LAN architecture, also using virtual partitioning of the same physical networking for the different use patterns. Finally, on the user side, we are developing tools and instruments to allow for an exhaustive monitoring of their processes at the site, and for an efficient support system in case of problems. We will report about the results of the test executed on different subsystem and give a description of the layout of the infrastructure in place at the site participating to the consortium.

  6. Building a Prototype of LHC Analysis Oriented Computing Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Della Ricca, G; Donvito, G; Paganoni, M

    2012-01-01

    A Consortium between four LHC Computing Centers (Bari, Milano, Pisa and Trieste) has been formed in 2010 to prototype Analysis-oriented facilities for CMS data analysis, profiting from a grant from the Italian Ministry of Research. The Consortium aims to realize an ad-hoc infrastructure to ease the analysis activities on the huge data set collected at the LHC Collider. While “Tier2” Computing Centres, specialized in organized processing tasks like Monte Carlo simulation, are nowadays a well established concept, with years of running experience, site specialized towards end user chaotic analysis activities do not yet have a defacto standard implementation. In our effort, we focus on all the aspects that can make the analysis tasks easier for a physics user not expert in computing. On the storage side, we are experimenting on storage techniques allowing for remote data access and on storage optimization on the typical analysis access patterns. On the networking side, we are studying the differences between flat and tiered LAN architecture, also using virtual partitioning of the same physical networking for the different use patterns. Finally, on the user side, we are developing tools and instruments to allow for an exhaustive monitoring of their processes at the site, and for an efficient support system in case of problems. We will report about the results of the test executed on different subsystem and give a description of the layout of the infrastructure in place at the site participating to the consortium.

  7. Report for 2011 from the Bordeaux IVS Analysis Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlot, Patrick; Bellanger, Antoine; Bourda, Geraldine; Collioud, Arnaud; Baudry, Alain

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Bordeaux IVS Analysis Center during the year 2011. The work focused on (i) regular analysis of the IVS-R1 and IVS-R4 sessions with the GINS software package; (ii) systematic VLBI imaging of the RDV sessions and calculation of the corresponding source structure index and compactness values; (iii) imaging of the sources observed during the 2009 International Year of Astronomy IVS observing session; and (iv) continuation of our VLBI observational program to identify optically-bright radio sources suitable for the link with the future Gaia frame. Also of importance is the enhancement of the IVS LiveWeb site which now comprises all IVS sessions back to 2003, allowing one to search past observations for session-specific information (e.g. sources or stations).

  8. Report for 2012 from the Bordeaux IVS Analysis Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlot, Patrick; Bellanger, Antoine; Bouffet, Romuald; Bourda, Geraldine; Collioud, Arnaud; Baudry, Alain

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Bordeaux IVS Analysis Center during the year 2012. The work focused on (i) regular analysis of the IVS-R1 and IVS-R4 sessions with the GINS software package; (ii) systematic VLBI imaging of the RDV sessions and calculation of the corresponding source structure index and compactness values; (iii) investigation of the correlation between astrometric position instabilities and source structure variations; and (iv) continuation of our VLBI observational program to identify optically-bright radio sources suitable for the link with the future Gaia frame. Also of importance is the 11th European VLBI Network Symposium, which we organized last October in Bordeaux and which drew much attention from the European and International VLBI communities.

  9. Follow on Research for Multi-Utility Technology Test Bed Aircraft at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center (FY13 Progress Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2013-01-01

    Modern aircraft employ a significant fraction of their weight in composite materials to reduce weight and improve performance. Aircraft aeroservoelastic models are typically characterized by significant levels of model parameter uncertainty due to the composite manufacturing process. Small modeling errors in the finite element model will eventually induce errors in the structural flexibility and mass, thus propagating into unpredictable errors in the unsteady aerodynamics and the control law design. One of the primary objectives of Multi Utility Technology Test-bed (MUTT) aircraft is the flight demonstration of active flutter suppression, and therefore in this study, the identification of the primary and secondary modes for the structural model tuning based on the flutter analysis of MUTT aircraft. The ground vibration test-validated structural dynamic finite element model of the MUTT aircraft is created in this study. The structural dynamic finite element model of MUTT aircraft is improved using the in-house Multi-disciplinary Design, Analysis, and Optimization tool. In this study, two different weight configurations of MUTT aircraft have been improved simultaneously in a single model tuning procedure.

  10. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center - A for atmospheric trace gases. Fiscal year 1996, annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B. [and others

    1997-02-01

    Fiscal year 1996 was especially productive for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report describes publications and statistical data from the CDIAC.

  11. FY 2005 Scientific and Technical Reports, Articles, Papers, and Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narmore, K. A. (Compiler)

    2007-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) presents formal NASA technical reports, papers published in technical journals, and presentations by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel in FY 2005. It also includes papers of MSFC contractors. The information in this TM may be of value to the scientific and engineering community in determining what information has been published and what is available.

  12. FY 1989 scientific and technical reports, articles, papers, and presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joyce E. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    A compendium of bibliographic references to papers presented by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel and contractors during FY 1989 is provided. The papers include formal NASA technical reports, memoranda, papers which were published in technical journals, and presentations by MSFC personnel. The formal NASA technical reports and memoranda have abstracts included. Sources for obtaining these documents are also included.

  13. FY 1994 scientific and technical reports, articles, papers, and presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joyce E. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This document presents formal NASA technical reports, papers published in technical journals, and presentations by Marshall Space Flight Center personnel in FY94. It also includes papers of MSFC contractors and author indexes. The information in this report may be of value to the scientific and engineering community in determining what information has been published and what is available.

  14. FY 1985 scientific and technical reports, articles, papers and presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joyce E. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    This document presents formal NASA technical reports, papers published in technical journals, and presentations by Marshal Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel in FY 85. It also includes papers of MSFC contractors. After being announced in STAR, all of the NASA series reports may be obtained from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Va. 22161.

  15. NASA Occupational Health Program FY98 Self-Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbin, Steven G.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Functional Management Review process requires that each NASA Center conduct self-assessments of each functional area. Self-Assessments were completed in June 1998 and results were presented during this conference session. During FY 97 NASA Occupational Health Assessment Team activities, a decision was made to refine the NASA Self-Assessment Process. NASA Centers were involved in the ISO registration process at that time and wanted to use the management systems approach to evaluate their occupational health programs. This approach appeared to be more consistent with NASA's management philosophy and would likely confer status needed by Senior Agency Management for the program. During FY 98 the Agency Occupational Health Program Office developed a revised self-assessment methodology based on the Occupational Health and Safety Management System developed by the American Industrial Hygiene Association. This process was distributed to NASA Centers in March 1998 and completed in June 1998. The Center Self Assessment data will provide an essential baseline on the status of OHP management processes at NASA Centers. That baseline will be presented to Enterprise Associate Administrators and DASHO on September 22, 1998 and used as a basis for discussion during FY 99 visits to NASA Centers. The process surfaced several key management system elements warranting further support from the Lead Center. Input and feedback from NASA Centers will be essential to defining and refining future self assessment efforts.

  16. FY 2001 study report on the evaluation/analysis of the data collected in the field test project on the photovoltaic power generation for public facilities, etc.; 2001 nendo kenkyu seika hokokusho. Kokyo shisetsu you taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo ni okeru shushu data hyoka kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    As a field test project on the photovoltaic power generation, collection/analysis/evaluation of the operational data were made about photovoltaic power systems installed at 73 places in FY 2001. As to the analysis of deterioration with age and yearly changes of the system, analysis was made of operation hours of the equivalent system, system output coefficient and inverter performance efficiency in FY 1999, FY 2000 and FY 2001, and it was confirmed that there was few deterioration with age. Relating to the evaluation of reliability of the system, evaluation was made for the record of failures of photovoltaic power systems at 73 places, and the results were not very good as follows: average failure cycle: 1.06 y/system; average failure repair period: 14.9 d/system; rough opportunity loss electric energy: 81,548 kWh/y x 73 sites. Concerning the analysis of economical efficiency, the system cost decreased year by year to 1,102,000 yen/kW in FY 1997, and the power generation cost became 91.8 yen/kWh. The fund recovery year was 35.3 years, assuming the following: unit price of selling electricity: 15 yen/kWh, durable years: 20 years, and public subsidiary rate: 1/2. (NEDO)

  17. Scientist, Single Cell Analysis Facility | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Research Technology Program (CRTP) develops and implements emerging technology, cancer biology expertise and research capabilities to accomplish NCI research objectives.  The CRTP is an outward-facing, multi-disciplinary hub purposed to enable the external cancer research community and provides dedicated support to NCI’s intramural Center for Cancer Research (CCR).  The dedicated units provide electron microscopy, protein characterization, protein expression, optical microscopy and nextGen sequencing. These research efforts are an integral part of CCR at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR).  CRTP scientists also work collaboratively with intramural NCI investigators to provide research technologies and expertise. KEY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES We are seeking a highly motivated Scientist II to join the newly established Single Cell Analysis Facility (SCAF) of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at NCI. The SCAF will house state of the art single cell sequencing technologies including 10xGenomics Chromium, BD Genomics Rhapsody, DEPPArray, and other emerging single cell technologies. The Scientist: Will interact with close to 200 laboratories within the CCR to design and carry out single cell experiments for cancer research Will work on single cell isolation/preparation from various tissues and cells and related NexGen sequencing library preparation Is expected to author publications in peer reviewed scientific journals

  18. Analysis of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Shaw, Peter; Przekop, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid wing body center section test article is an all-composite structure made of crown, floor, keel, bulkhead, and rib panels utilizing the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) design concept. The primary goal of this test article is to prove that PRSEUS components are capable of carrying combined loads that are representative of a hybrid wing body pressure cabin design regime. This paper summarizes the analytical approach, analysis results, and failure predictions of the test article. A global finite element model of composite panels, metallic fittings, mechanical fasteners, and the Combined Loads Test System (COLTS) test fixture was used to conduct linear structural strength and stability analyses to validate the specimen under the most critical combination of bending and pressure loading conditions found in the hybrid wing body pressure cabin. Local detail analyses were also performed at locations with high stress concentrations, at Tee-cap noodle interfaces with surrounding laminates, and at fastener locations with high bearing/bypass loads. Failure predictions for different composite and metallic failure modes were made, and nonlinear analyses were also performed to study the structural response of the test article under combined bending and pressure loading. This large-scale specimen test will be conducted at the COLTS facility at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  19. Analysis of suffering at work in Family Health Support Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Débora Dupas Gonçalves do; Oliveira, Maria Amélia de Campos

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the work process in the Family Health Support Center. An exploratory, descriptive case study using a qualitative approach. Focus groups were conducted with 20 workers of a Family Health Support Center, and the empirical material was subjected to content analysis technique and analyzed in light of Work Psychodynamics. The category of suffering is presented herein as arising from the dialectical contradiction between actual work and prescribed work, from resistance to the Family Health Support Center's proposal and a lack of understanding of their role; due to an immediatist and curative culture of the users and the Family Health Strategy; of the profile, overload and identification with work. The dialectical contradiction between expectations from Family Health Strategy teams and the work in the Family Health Support Center compromises its execution and creates suffering for workers. Analisar o processo de trabalho no Núcleo de Apoio à Saúde da Família. Estudo de caso exploratório, descritivo e de abordagem qualitativa. Grupos focais foram realizados com 20 trabalhadores do Núcleo de Apoio à Saúde da Família, o material empírico foi submetido à técnica de análise de conteúdo e analisado à luz da Psicodinâmica do Trabalho. Apresenta-se aqui a categoria sofrimento que neste estudo decorre da contradição dialética entre o trabalho real e o trabalho prescrito, da resistência à proposta do Núcleo de Apoio à Saúde da Família e da falta de compreensão de seu papel; da cultura imediatista e curativa do usuário e da Estratégia Saúde da Família; do perfil, sobrecarga e identificação com o trabalho. A contradição dialética entre expectativas das equipes da Estratégia Saúde da Família e o trabalho no Núcleo de Apoio à Saúde da Família compromete sua efetivação e gera sofrimento aos trabalhadores.

  20. Photometric Analysis in the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twicken, Joseph D.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Wu, Hayley; Jenkins, Jon M.; Girouard, Forrest; Klaus, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the Photometric Analysis (PA) software component and its context in the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) pipeline. The primary tasks of this module are to compute the photometric flux and photocenters (centroids) for over 160,000 long cadence (thirty minute) and 512 short cadence (one minute) stellar targets from the calibrated pixels in their respective apertures. We discuss the science algorithms for long and short cadence PA: cosmic ray cleaning; background estimation and removal; aperture photometry; and flux-weighted centroiding. We discuss the end-to-end propagation of uncertainties for the science algorithms. Finally, we present examples of photometric apertures, raw flux light curves, and centroid time series from Kepler flight data. PA light curves, centroid time series, and barycentric timestamp corrections are exported to the Multi-mission Archive at Space Telescope [Science Institute] (MAST) and are made available to the general public in accordance with the NASA/Kepler data release policy.

  1. Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center multi-year plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, R.G.; Das, S.; Walsh, T.E.

    1992-09-01

    An information analysis center (IAC) is a federal resource that provides technical information for a specific technology field. An IAC links an expert technical staff with an experienced information specialist group, supported by in-house or external data bases to provide technical information and maintain a corporate knowledge in a technical area. An IAC promotes the rapid transfer of technology among its users and provides assistance in adopting new technology and predicting and assessing emerging technology. This document outlines the concept, requirements, and proposed development of an Environmental Quality IAC (EQIAC). An EQIAC network is composed of several nodes, each of which has specific technology capabilities. This document outlines strategic and operational objectives for the phased development of one such node of an EQIAC network

  2. Systems analysis support to the waste management technology center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, A.L.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; DePaoli, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a systems analysis concept being developed in support of waste management planning and analysis activities for Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), sites. This integrated systems model serves as a focus for the accumulation and documentation of technical and economic information from current waste management practices, improved operations projects, remedial actions, and new system development activities. The approach is generic and could be applied to a larger group of sites. This integrated model is a source of technical support to waste management groups in the Energy Systems complex for integrated waste management planning and related technology assessment activities. This problem-solving methodology for low-level waste (LLW) management is being developed through the Waste Management Technology Center (WMTC) for the Low-Level Waste Disposal, Development, and Demonstration (LLWDDD) Program. In support of long-range planning activities, this capability will include the development of management support tools such as specialized systems models, data bases, and information systems. These management support tools will provide continuing support in the identification and definition of technical and economic uncertainties to be addressed by technology demonstration programs. Technical planning activities and current efforts in the development of this system analysis capability for the LLWDDD Program are presented in this paper

  3. The Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC): Providing Analysis and Insights on Clean Technology Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Nicholi S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) provides objective analysis and up-to-date data on global supply chains and manufacturing of clean energy technologies. Policymakers and industry leaders seek CEMAC insights to inform choices to promote economic growth and the transition to a clean energy economy.

  4. The FY2011 Federal Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    long been the largest source of federal revenues, followed by social insurance (payroll) taxes. Federal individual and corporate income tax revenues...915 billion (6.4% of GDP). Corporate income tax revenues fell from $304 billion in FY2008 to $138 billion in FY2009. Federal revenues from other

  5. Subject-centered free-response ROC (FROC) analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bandos, Andriy I.; Rockette, Howard E.; Gur, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an approach of estimating subject-centered free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve for providing patient-centered inferences regarding detection-localization characteristics of a diagnostic system.

  6. Program Analysis and Design Requirements for tne National Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    shell of an old exposition building with secondhand furniture to display exhibit items, to the Ontario Science Center, which is a more modem building...Storage Area Pigeonhole storage cabinets for children’s school books , coats, and boots are provided at the Indianapolis Center. The Ontario center...used shopping carts for school groups to store their coats and books . They do not work well according to center staff and are cumbersome and unsightly

  7. Center-Specific Factors Associated with Peritonitis Risk-A Multi-Center Registry Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau-Fredette, Annie-Claire; Johnson, David W; Hawley, Carmel M; Pascoe, Elaine M; Cho, Yeoungjee; Clayton, Philip A; Borlace, Monique; Badve, Sunil V; Sud, Kamal; Boudville, Neil; McDonald, Stephen P

    ♦ Previous studies have reported significant variation in peritonitis rates across dialysis centers. Limited evidence is available to explain this variability. The aim of this study was to assess center-level predictors of peritonitis and their relationship with peritonitis rate variations. ♦ All incident peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients treated in Australia between October 2003 and December 2013 were included. Data were accessed through the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry. The primary outcome was peritonitis rate, evaluated in a mixed effects negative binomial regression model. Peritonitis-free survival was assessed as a secondary outcome in a Cox proportional hazards model. ♦ Overall, 8,711 incident PD patients from 51 dialysis centers were included in the study. Center-level predictors of lower peritonitis rates included smaller center size, high proportion of PD, low peritoneal equilibration test use at PD start, and low proportion of hospitalization for peritonitis. In contrast, a low proportion of automated PD exposure, high icodextrin exposure and low or high use of antifungal prophylaxis at the time of peritonitis were associated with a higher peritonitis rate. Similar results were obtained for peritonitis-free survival. Overall, accounting for center-level characteristics appreciably decreased peritonitis variability among dialysis centers (p = 0.02). ♦ This study identified specific center-level characteristics associated with the variation in peritonitis risk. Whether these factors are directly related to peritonitis risk or surrogate markers for other center characteristics is uncertain and should be validated in further studies. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  8. FY97 ICCS prototype specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, J.

    1997-01-01

    The ICCS software team will implement and test two iterations of their software product during FY97. This document specifies the products to be delivered in that first prototype and projects the direction that the second prototype will take. Detailed specification of the later iteration will be written when the results of the first iteration are complete. The selection of frameworks to be implemented early is made on a basis of risk analysis from the point of view of future development in the ICCS project. The prototype will address risks in integration of object- oriented components, in refining our development process, and in emulation testing for FEP devices. This document is a specification that identifies products and processes to undertake for resolving these risks. The goals of this activity are to exercise our development process at a modest scale and to probe our architecture plan for fundamental limits and failure modes. The product of the iterations will be the framework software which will be useful in future ICCS code. Thus the FY97 products are intended for internal usage by the ICCS team and for demonstration to the FEP software developers of the strategy for integrating supervisory software with FEP computers. This will be the first of several expected iterations of the software development process and the performance measurements that ICCS will demonstrate, intended to support confidence in our ability to meet project RAM goals. The design of the application software is being carried out in a separate WBS 1.5.2 activity. The design activity has as its FY97 product a series of Software Design Documents that will specify the functionality of the controls software of ICCS. During the testing of this year''s prototypes, the application functionality needed for test will be provided by sample maintenance controls. These are early precursors of controls that can be used for low level device control. Since the devices under test will be represented by

  9. Directory of Federally Supported Information Analysis Centers, 1979. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Information Center (UERPIC) ........ 69 107. Water Resources Center .................................... ......... . 69 108. X-Ray and Ionizing Radiation Data...evaluates this material economics; conservation of minerals; water , to determine the most reliable data on for- power, transportation, manpower, etc...Clearinghouse for Poison Control Centers (mon- mining company annual reports to stockholder,.; thly). data bases, including the minerals Availabilit

  10. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program. Annual report, FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1992 progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts project, the Polycrystalline Thin Films project, Amorphous Silicon Research project, the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, PV Module and System Performance and Engineering project, and the PV Analysis and Applications Development project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1992, and future research directions.

  11. Data acquisition and analysis at the Structural Biology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbrook, M.L.; Coleman, T.A.; Daly, R.T.; Pflugrath, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Structural Biology Center (SBC), a national user facility for macromolecular crystallography located at Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source, is currently being built and commissioned. SBC facilities include a bending-magnet beamline, an insertion-device beamline, laboratory and office space adjacent to the beamlines, and associated instrumentation, experimental apparatus, and facilities. SBC technical facilities will support anomalous dispersion phasing experiments, data collection from microcrystals, data collection from crystals with large molecular structures and rapid data collection from multiple related crystal structures for protein engineering and drug design. The SBC Computing Systems and Software Engineering Group is tasked with developing the SBC Control System, which includes computing systems, network, and software. The emphasis of SBC Control System development has been to provide efficient and convenient beamline control, data acquisition, and data analysis for maximal facility and experimenter productivity. This paper describes the SBC Control System development, specifically data acquisition and analysis at the SBC, and the development methods used to meet this goal

  12. A plan for administrative computing at ANL FY1991 through FY1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruthers, L.E. (ed.); O' Brien, D.E.; Bretscher, M.E.; Hischier, R.C.; Moore, N.J.; Slade, R.G.

    1990-10-01

    In July of 1988, Argonne National Laboratory management approved the restructuring of Computing Services into the Computing and Telecommunications Division, part of the Physical Research area of the Laboratory. One major area of the Computing and Telecommunications Division is Management Information Systems (MIS). A significant aspect of Management Information Systems' work is the development of proposals for new and enhanced administrative computing systems based on an analysis of informational needs. This document represent the outcome of the planning process for FY1991 through FY1993. The introduction of the FY1991 through FY1993 Long-Range Plan assesses the state of administrative computing at ANL and the implications of FY1991 funding recommendations. It includes a history of MIS planning for administrative data processing. This document discusses the strategy and goals which are an important part of administrative data processing plans for the Laboratory. It also describes the management guidelines established by the Administrative Data Processing Oversight Committee for the proposal and implementation of administrative computing systems. Summaries of the proposals for new or enhanced administrative computing systems presented by individual divisions or departments with assistance of Management Information Systems, to the Administrative Data Processing Oversight Committee are given. The detailed tables in this paper give information on how much the resources to develop and implement a given systems will cost its users. The tables include development costs, computing/operations costs, software and hardware costs, and efforts costs. They include both systems funded by Laboratory General Expense and systems funded by the users themselves.

  13. Statement of Accountability Reconciliation Procedures for Defense Finance and Accounting Service Columbus Center, Disbursing Station 6551

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    .... Beginning in FY 1996, the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) Indianapolis Center became responsible for preparing the financial statements for the Department 97 general fund appropriations...

  14. Centering Pregnancy in Missouri: A System Level Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela K. Xaverius

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Centering Pregnancy (CP is an effective method of delivering prenatal care, yet providers have been slow to adopt the CP model. Our main hypothesis is that a site’s adoption of CP is contingent upon knowledge of the CP, characteristics health care personnel, anticipated patient impact, and system readiness. Methods. Using a matched, pretest-posttest, observational design, 223 people completed pretest and posttest surveys. Our analysis included the effect of the seminar on the groups’ knowledge of CP essential elements, barriers to prenatal care, and perceived value of CP to the patients and to the system of care. Results. Before the CP Seminar only 34% of respondents were aware of the model, while knowledge significantly after the Seminar. The three greatest improvements were in understanding that the group is conducted in a circle, the health assessment occurs in the group space, and a facilitative leadership style is used. Child care, transportation, and language issues were the top three barriers. The greatest improvements reported for patients included improvements in timeliness, patient-centeredness and efficiency, although readiness for adoption was influenced by costs, resources, and expertise. Discussion. Readiness to adopt CP will require support for the start-up and sustainability of this model.

  15. Performance of the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoss, F.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Environment, Energy, and Resources Center; Jones, S.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) provides information and data resources in support of the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program. CDIAC also serves as a resource of global change information for a broader international commonly of researchers, policymakers, managers, educators, and students. The number of requests for CDIAC`s data products, information services, and publications has grown over the years and represents multidisciplinary interests in the physical, life, and social sciences and from diverse work settings in government, business, and academia. CDIAC`s staff addresses thousands of requests yearly for data and information resources. In response to these requests, CDIAC has distributed tens of thousands of data products, technical reports, newsletters, and other information resources worldwide since 1982. This paper describes CDIAC, examines CDIAC`s user community, and describes CDIAC`s response to requests for information. The CDIAC Information System, which serves as a comprehensive PC-based inventory and information management tracking system, is also described.

  16. FY 2016 Research Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-23

    This fact sheet summarizes the research highlights for the Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) for Fiscal Year 2106. Topics covered include additive manufacturing for the wind industry, biomass-based chemicals substitutions, carbon fiber manufacturing facility siting, geothermal power plant turbines, hydrogen refueling stations, hydropower turbines, LEDs and lighting, light-duty automotive lithium-ion cells, magnetocaloric refrigeration, silicon carbide power electronics for variable frequency motor drives, solar photovoltaics, and wide bandgap semiconductor opportunities in power electronics.

  17. Defense Finance and Accounting Service Work on the FY 1993 Air Force Defense Business Operations Fund Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rau, Russell

    1995-01-01

    Our original audit objective was to determine whether the Air Force Consolidated Defense Business Operations Fund financial statements, prepared by the DFAS Denver Center for FY 1993, were presented...

  18. Defense Finance and Accounting Service Work on the Navy Defense Business Operations Fund FY 1995 Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    lane, F

    1996-01-01

    The primary audit objective was to determine whether the DFAS Cleveland Center consistently and accurately compiled financial data from field activities and other sources for the FY 1995 Consolidated...

  19. The Lightning Mapping Imager (LMI) on the FY-4 satellite and a typical application experiment using the LMI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Hui, W.; Li, X.; Liu, R.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Y.; Kang, N.

    2017-12-01

    The Lightning Mapping Imager (LMI) on the FY-4A satellite, which was launched successfully in December 2016, is the first satellite-based lightning detector from space independently developed in China, and one of the world's first two stationary satellite LMIs. The optical imaging technique with a 400x600 CCD array plane and a frequency of 500 frames/s is adopted in the FY-4A LMI to perform real-time and continuous observation of total lightening in the Chinese mainland and adjacent areas. As of July 2017, the in-orbit test shows that the lightening observation date could be accurately obtained by the FY-4A LMI, and that the geo-location could be verified by the ground lightening observation network over China. Since the beginning of the 2017 flood season, every process of strong thunderstorms has been monitored by the FY-4A LMI throughout the various areas of China, and of these are used as a typical application case in this talk. On April 8 and 9, 2017, a strong convective precipitation process occurred in the middle-lower reaches of the Yangtze River, China. The observation data of the FY-4A LMI are used to monitor the occurrence, development, shift and extinction of the thunderstorm track. By means of analyzing the station's synchronous precipitation observation data, it is indicated that the moving track of the thunderstorm is not completely consistent with that of the precipitation center, and while the distribution areas of thunderstorm and precipitation are consistent to a certain extent, a significant difference also exists. This difference is mainly caused by the convective precipitation and stratus precipitation area during the precipitation process. Through comparative analysis, the preliminary satellite and foundation lightening observation data show a higher consistency. However, the time of lightening activity observed by satellite is one hour earlier than that of the ground observation, which is likely related to the total lightning observation by

  20. Centers of structures in electromagnetism--a critical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1982-01-01

    Some principles for finding reference points or centers of structures in electromagnetism are outlined. It is pointed out that the centers which are found depend on arbitrary choices. Since some of the principles are based on Friis's transmission formula and the radar equation, these are given...

  1. The Relationship between Costs and Quality in Veterans Health Administration Community Living Centers: An Analysis Using Longitudinal Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, James F; Shwartz, Michael; Stolzmann, Kelly; Sullivan, Jennifer L

    2018-05-18

    To examine the relationship between cost and quality in Veterans Health Administration (VA) nursing homes (called Community Living Centers, CLCs) using longitudinal data. One hundred and thirty CLCs over 13 quarters (from FY2009 to FY2012) were studied. Costs, resident days, and resident severity (RUGs score) were obtained from the VA Managerial Cost Accounting System. Clinical quality measures were obtained from the Minimum Data Set, and resident-centered care (RCC) was measured using the Artifacts of Culture Change Tool. We used a generalized estimating equation model with facilities included as fixed effects to examine the relationship between total cost and quality after controlling for resident days and severity. The model included linear and squared terms for all independent variables and interactions with resident days. With the exception of RCC, all other variables had a statistically significant relationship with total costs. For most poorer performing smaller facilities (lower size quartile), improvements in quality were associated with higher costs. For most larger facilities, improvements in quality were associated with lower costs. The relationship between cost and quality depends on facility size and current level of performance. © Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Dynamical coupled-channel analysis at EBAC. (Excited Baryon Analysis Center)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.-S.H.; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA

    2008-01-01

    In this contribution, the author reports on the dynamical coupled-channels analysis being pursued at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of Jefferson Laboratory. EBAC was established in January 2006. Its objective is to extract the parameters associated with the excited states (N*) of the nucleon from the world data of meson production reactions, and to also develop theoretical interpretations of the extracted N* parameters

  3. Waste isolation safety assessment program. Summary of FY-77 progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkholder, H.C.; Greenborg, J.; Stottlemyre, J.A.; Bradley, D.J.; Raymond, J.R.; Serne, R.J.

    1977-11-01

    Objective is to provide long-term safety information for the National Waste Terminal Storage Program. Work in FY 77 supported the development of the generic assessment method (release scenario analysis, release consequence analysis) and of the generic data base (waste form release rate data, radionuclide geochemical interaction data)

  4. Successful Completion of FY18/Q1 ASC L2 Milestone 6355: Electrical Analysis Calibration Workflow Capability Demonstration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copps, Kevin D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The Sandia Analysis Workbench (SAW) project has developed and deployed a production capability for SIERRA computational mechanics analysis workflows. However, the electrical analysis workflow capability requirements have only been demonstrated in early prototype states, with no real capability deployed for analysts’ use. This milestone aims to improve the electrical analysis workflow capability (via SAW and related tools) and deploy it for ongoing use. We propose to focus on a QASPR electrical analysis calibration workflow use case. We will include a number of new capabilities (versus today’s SAW), such as: 1) support for the XYCE code workflow component, 2) data management coupled to electrical workflow, 3) human-in-theloop workflow capability, and 4) electrical analysis workflow capability deployed on the restricted (and possibly classified) network at Sandia. While far from the complete set of capabilities required for electrical analysis workflow over the long term, this is a substantial first step toward full production support for the electrical analysts.

  5. Environmental management compliance reengineering project, FY 1997 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanVliet, J.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    Through an integrated reengineering effort, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is successfully implementing process improvements that will permit safe and compliant operations to continue during the next 5 years, even though $80 million was removed from the Environmental Management (EM) program budget. A 2-year analysis, design, and implementation project will reengineer compliance-related activities and reduce operating costs by approximately $17 million per year from Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 through 2002, while continuing to meet the INEEL''s environment, safety, and health requirements and milestone commitments. Compliance reengineer''s focus is improving processes, not avoiding full compliance with environmental, safety, and health laws. In FY 1997, compliance reengineering used a three-phase approach to analyze, design, and implement the changes that would decrease operating costs. Implementation for seven specific improvement projects was completed in FY 1997, while five projects will complete implementation in FY 1998. During FY 1998, the three-phase process will be repeated to continue reengineering the INEEL

  6. Environmental management compliance reengineering project, FY 1997 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanVliet, J.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    Through an integrated reengineering effort, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is successfully implementing process improvements that will permit safe and compliant operations to continue during the next 5 years, even though $80 million was removed from the Environmental Management (EM) program budget. A 2-year analysis, design, and implementation project will reengineer compliance-related activities and reduce operating costs by approximately $17 million per year from Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 through 2002, while continuing to meet the INEEL`s environment, safety, and health requirements and milestone commitments. Compliance reengineer`s focus is improving processes, not avoiding full compliance with environmental, safety, and health laws. In FY 1997, compliance reengineering used a three-phase approach to analyze, design, and implement the changes that would decrease operating costs. Implementation for seven specific improvement projects was completed in FY 1997, while five projects will complete implementation in FY 1998. During FY 1998, the three-phase process will be repeated to continue reengineering the INEEL.

  7. A dimensional analysis of patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Jennifer Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care (PCC) is a poorly conceptualized phenomenon and can indicate anything from soothing room design, emotional support of patients, customization of meals, to support of patient decision making. This inconsistency across the clinical and research literature makes the application of PCC difficult. The objective of this study was to identify dimensions of PCC as found in the literature. A dimensional analysis of PCC was conducted from 69 clinical and research articles published from 2000 to 2006. Coding of the literature for the perspective, context, conditions, process, and consequences of PCC was completed. These codes were used to determine literature selected for inclusion, organize article content, and frame the delineation of PCC. Alleviating vulnerabilities, consisting of both compromised physiological states and threats to individual identity, was constant throughout the literature. Therapeutic engagement was the process sustaining the patient during an illness episode that necessitated service use and involved allocating time, carrying out information practices, knowing the patient, and developing a relationship. This process occurs during nurse-patient interaction, sustained during successive interactions, and reinforced by the information practices of a particular setting. The interaction between nurse and patient is central to the effective study and application of PCC. Appropriate use of PCC can improve study outcomes and measurements by clarifying the variables involved, and PCC holds great promise to frame patient outcome and satisfaction research by analyzing how and with what effect nurses alleviate patient vulnerability. Moreover, consideration of information practices as a critical supporting structure of nurse-patient interaction can be explored.

  8. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, progress report for FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 (October 1992 through September 1993). This annual report is the tenth for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has research programs in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require development or modification of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL is administratively within the Chemical Technology Division (CMT), its principal ANL client, but provides technical support for many of the technical divisions and programs at ANL. The ACL has four technical groups--Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis--which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL.

  9. A Historical Analysis of Crane Mishaps at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Crystal

    2014-01-01

    Cranes and hoists are widely used in many areas. Crane accidents and handling mishaps are responsible for injuries, costly equipment damage, and program delays. Most crane accidents are caused by preventable factors. Understanding these factors is critical when designing cranes and preparing lift plans. Analysis of previous accidents provides insight into current recommendations for crane safety. Cranes and hoists are used throughout Kennedy Space Center to lift everything from machine components to critical flight hardware. Unless they are trained crane operators, most NASA employees and contractors do not need to undergo specialized crane training and may not understand the safety issues surrounding the use of cranes and hoists. A single accident with a crane or hoist can injure or kill people, cause severe equipment damage, and delay or terminate a program. Handling mishaps can also have a significant impact on the program. Simple mistakes like bouncing or jarring a load, or moving the crane down when it should go up, can damage fragile flight hardware and cause major delays in processing. Hazardous commodities (high pressure gas, hypergolic propellants, and solid rocket motors) can cause life safety concerns for the workers performing the lifting operations. Most crane accidents are preventable with the correct training and understanding of potential hazards. Designing the crane with human factors taken into account can prevent many accidents. Engineers are also responsible for preparing lift plans where understanding the safety issues can prevent or mitigate potential accidents. Cranes are widely used across many areas of KSC. Failure of these cranes often leads to injury, high damage costs, and significant delays in program objectives. Following a basic set of principles and procedures during design, fabrication, testing, regular use, and maintenance can significantly minimize many of these failures. As the accident analysis shows, load drops are often caused

  10. Analysis of Business Center Implementation in Banyumas Regency

    OpenAIRE

    Lina Rifda Naufalin; Aldila Dinanti; Aldila Krisnaresanti

    2017-01-01

    The research aims to help the development of business center as an entrepreneurship laboratory for vocational students in order to increase the number of young entrepreneurs in Indonesia. This study is also to find out how the implementation of the existing Business Center program in SMK Banyumas District viewed from the aspects of learning, economics, organizational, and capital. Research method used qualitative method and techniques of collecting data used observation and interview. The pl...

  11. Climate Resilient Analysis of the Groningen City Center

    OpenAIRE

    MORALES LLAMAS, MÓNICA

    2017-01-01

    This final thesis project is part of the research that is carrying out by the Gemeente Groningen in order to make the city center more sustainable and livable. The municipality of Groningen has recently published a conceptual development plan for improving the inner-city of Groningen, this report is called Bestemming Binnenstad 01/2016 . The main focus of this report is convert the city center to an environmental friendly downtown, reducing pollution, reroute public and private transpo...

  12. Analysis of Business Center Implementation in Banyumas Regency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Rifda Naufalin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to help the development of business center as an entrepreneurship laboratory for vocational students in order to increase the number of young entrepreneurs in Indonesia. This study is also  to find out how the implementation of the existing Business Center program in SMK Banyumas District viewed from the aspects of learning, economics, organizational, and capital. Research method used qualitative method and techniques of collecting data used observation and interview. The place of research is in Vocational School 1 Purwokerto and Vocational School 2 Purwokerto. The sampling technique was purposive sampling technique. Validity of data in this research used data triangulation.The result of the research shows that the learning aspect of the implementation of the business center is effective because it becomes the student training center. Economic aspect of the business center is effective to carry out the activities of selling goods, goods production and service, business because it is supported by qualified human resources and internal audits conducted regularly. The aspect of the capital of the business center can be managed effectively.

  13. FY 2009 Public Libraries Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Dig into FY 2009 data on public library systems (referred to as administrative entities in the Public Libraries Survey) and main libraries, branches, and bookmobiles...

  14. FY 2010 Public Libraries Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Dig into FY 2010 data on public library systems (referred to as administrative entities in the Public Libraries Survey) and main libraries, branches, and bookmobiles...

  15. FY 2011 Public Libraries Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Dig into FY 2011 data on public library systems (referred to as administrative entities in the Public Libraries Survey) and main libraries, branches, and bookmobiles...

  16. FY 2008 Public Libraries Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Dig into FY 2008 data on public library systems (referred to as administrative entities in the Public Libraries Survey) and main libraries, branches, and bookmobiles...

  17. Event Sequence Analysis of the Air Intelligence Agency Information Operations Center Flight Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larsen, Glen

    1998-01-01

    This report applies Event Sequence Analysis, methodology adapted from aircraft mishap investigation, to an investigation of the performance of the Air Intelligence Agency's Information Operations Center (IOC...

  18. Fusion Reactor Safety Research program. Annual report, FY-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1981-06-01

    The report is in three sections. Outside contracts includes a report of newly-started study at the General Atomic Company to consider safety implications of low-activation materials, portions of two papers from ongoing work at PNL and ANL, reports of the lithium spill work at HEDL, the LITFIRE code development at MIT, and risk assessment at MIT, all of which are an expansion of FY-79 outside contracts. EG and G Activities includes adaptations of four papers of ongoing work in transient code development, tritium system risk assessment, heat transfer and fluid flow analysis, and fusion safety data base. Program Plan Development includes the Executive Summary of the Plan, which was completed in FY-80, and is accompanied by a list of publications and a brief outline of proposed FY-81 activities to be based on the Program Plan

  19. The Seismic Category I Structures Program results for FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, C.R.; Bennett, J.G.; Dunwoody, W.E.; Baker, W.E.

    1990-10-01

    The accomplishments of the Seismic Category I Structures Program for FY 1987 are summarized. These accomplishments include the quasi-static load cycle testing of large shear wall elements, an extensive analysis of previous data to determine if equivalent linear analytical models can predict the response of damaged shear wall structures, and code committee activities. In addition, previous testing and results that led to the FY 1987 program plan are discussed and all previous data relating to shear wall stiffness are summarized. Because separate reports have already summarized the experimental and analytical work in FY 1987, this report will briefly highlight this work and the appropriate reports will be references for a more detailed discussion. 12 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs

  20. FY 1993 task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipler, D.B.

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to individuals and populations. The primary objective of work to be performed in FY 1993 is to complete the source term estimates and dose estimates for key radionuclides for the air and river pathways. At the end of FY 1993, the capability will be in place to estimate doses for individuals in the extended (32-county) study area, 1944--1991. Native American research will continue to provide input for tribal dose estimates. In FY 1993, the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) will decide whether demographic and river pathways data collection should be extended beyond FY 1993 levels. The FY 1993 work scopes and milestones in this document are based on the work plan discussed at the TSP Budget/Fiscal Subcommittee meeting on August 19--20, 1991. Table 1 shows the FY 1993 milestones; Table 2 shows estimated costs. The subsequent work scope descriptions are based on the milestones. This document and the FY 1992 task plans will form the basis for a contract with Battelle and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The 2-year dose reconstruction contract is expected to begin in February 1992. This contract will replace the current arrangement, whereby the US Department of Energy directly funds the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct dose reconstruction work. In late FY 1992, the FY 1993 task plans will be more fully developed with detailed technical approaches, data quality objectives, and budgeted labor hours. The task plans will be updated again in July 1993 to reflect any scope, milestone, or cost changes directed during the year by the TSP. 2 tabs

  1. The Sandia MEMS passive shock sensor : FY07 maturation activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, Jack E.; Blecke, Jill; Mitchell, John Anthony; Wittwer, Jonathan W.; Crowson, Douglas A.; Clemens, Rebecca C.; Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Epp, David S.; Baker, Michael Sean

    2008-08-01

    This report describes activities conducted in FY07 to mature the MEMS passive shock sensor. The first chapter of the report provides motivation and background on activities that are described in detail in later chapters. The second chapter discusses concepts that are important for integrating the MEMS passive shock sensor into a system. Following these two introductory chapters, the report details modeling and design efforts, packaging, failure analysis and testing and validation. At the end of FY07, the MEMS passive shock sensor was at TRL 4.

  2. Sustainable NREL - Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-01-01

    NREL's Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 reports on sustainability plans for the lab for the year 2015 based on Executive Order Goals and provides the status on planned actions cited in the FY 2014 report.

  3. LSTA Allotments (FY 2003-2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Institute of Museum and Library Services — Review Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) allotments by state from FY 2003 to FY 2016. The Grants to States program is the largest source of federal funding...

  4. Stochastic ground-water flow analysis FY-81 status report. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kincaid, C.T.; Vail, L.W.; Devary, J.L.

    1983-07-01

    Research was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a research computational package for the stochastic analysis of ground-water flow. Both unsteady and steady-state analysis were examined, and a steady-state research code was developed for the study of stochastic processes. This report describes the theoretical development of both unsteady and steady analyses, and presents the preliminary studies undertaken to verify and exercise the encoded algorithm. The stochastic analysis of ground-water flow is a promising new method which can supply more comprehensive analyses of the ground-water environment. The work reported herein provided experience in the methodology while producing a research-oriented stochastic analysis capability. Single-layer aquifers of horizontal extent were selected for this effort. Kriging has been employed to describe the uncertainty in field data. The resulting stochastic parameters enter the problem physics through boundary conditions and Darcy's equation. The mean and variance of the piezometric head are estimated by the stochastic analysis

  5. Report on DOE analytical laboratory capacity available to meet EM environmental sampling and analysis needs for FY 93-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The DOE Analytical Laboratory Capacity Study was conducted to give EM-263 current information about existing and future analytical capacities and capabilities of site laboratories within the DOE Complex. Each DOE site may have one or more analytical laboratories in operation. These facilities were established to support site missions such as production, research and development, and personnel and environmental monitoring. With changing site missions and the DOE directives for environmental monitoring and cleanup, these laboratories are either devoting or planning to devote resources to support EM activities. The DOE site laboratories represent a considerable amount of capital investment and analytical capability, capacity, and expertise that can be applied to support the EM mission. They not only provide cost-effective high-volume analytical laboratory services, but are also highly recognized analytical research and development centers. Several sites have already transferred their analytical capability from traditional production support to environmental monitoring and waste management support. A model was developed to determine the analytical capacity of all laboratories in the DOE Complex. The model was applied at nearly all the major laboratories and the results collected from these studies are summarized in this report

  6. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases, Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2003-08-28

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including atmospheric concentrations and atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO(sub 2)) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO(sub 2) and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO(sub 2) on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels

  8. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2001-11-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels.

  9. Institutional Plan, FY1989--FY1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    This report discusses future plans of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Topics covered are: Laboratory Mission; Special Issues; Laboratory Strategic View; Scientific Program at SLAC; Initiatives; Education and Technology Transfer Programs; Site and Facilities; and Resource Projections. 9 tabs

  10. Appendix E: Wind Technologies Program inputs for FY 2008 benefits estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  11. Appendix B: Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program inputs for FY 2008 benefits estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  12. Appendix G: Building Technologies Program inputs for FY 2008 benefits estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  13. Appendix J: Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program (WIP) inputs for FY 2008 benefits estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  14. Appendix F: FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program inputs for FY 2008 benefits estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  15. Annual Status Report (FY 2017): Composite Analysis for Low Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M. C.; Nichols, W. E.; Lehman, L. L.

    2018-04-05

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE M 435.1 Chg. 1, and as implemented by DOE/RL-2009-29, the DOE Richland Operations Office has prepared this annual summary of the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for fiscal year 2017.

  16. Annual Status Report (FY2015) Composite Analysis for Low Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-24

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE O 435.1, and as implemented by DOE/RL-2000-29, the DOE Richland Operations Office has prepared this annual summary of the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for fiscal year 2015.

  17. Annual Status Report (FY2104) Composite Analysis of Low Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-24

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy requirements in DOE O 435.1 and as implemented by DOE/RL-2009-29, the DOE Richland Operations Office has prepared this annul summary of the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for fiscal year 2014.

  18. Annual Status Report (FY2016) Composite Analysis for Low Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau of the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M. C. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Nichols, W. E. [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-03-14

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE O 435.1 and as implemented by DOE/RL-2009-29, the DOE Richland Operations Office has prepared this annual summary of the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for fiscal year 2016.

  19. Electron Microscopy-Data Analysis Specialist | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Cancer Research Technology Program (CRTP) develops and implements emerging technology, cancer biology expertise and research capabilities to accomplish NCI research objectives.  The CRTP is an outward-facing, multi-disciplinary hub purposed to enable the external cancer research community and provides dedicated support to NCI’s intramural Center for

  20. Operating plan FY 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    This document is the first edition of Argonne`s new Operating Plan. The Operating Plan complements the strategic planning in the Laboratory`s Institutional Plan by focusing on activities that are being pursued in the immediate fiscal year, FY 1998. It reflects planning that has been done to date, and it will serve in the future as a resource and a benchmark for understanding the Laboratory`s performance. The heart of the Institutional Plan is the set of major research initiatives that the Laboratory is proposing to implement in future years. In contrast, this Operating Plan focuses on Argonne`s ongoing R&D programs, along with cost-saving measures and other improvements being implemented in Laboratory support operations.

  1. FY17 Strategic Themes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, Robert W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    I am pleased to present this summary of the FY17 Division 1000 Science and Technology Strategic Plan. As this plan represents a continuation of the work we started last year, the four strategic themes (Mission Engagement, Bold Outcomes, Collaborative Environment, and Safety Imperative) remain the same, along with many of the goals. You will see most of the changes in the actions listed for each goal: We completed some actions, modified others, and added a few new ones. As I’ve stated previously, this is not a strategy to be pursued in tension with the Laboratory strategic plan. The Division 1000 strategic plan is intended to chart our course as we strive to contribute our very best in service of the greater Laboratory strategy. I welcome your feedback and look forward to our dialogue about these strategic themes. Please join me as we move forward to implement the plan in the coming months.

  2. PIXE analysis of proteins from a photochemical center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís, C.; Oliver, A.; Andrade, E.

    1998-03-01

    In oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms, light is absorbed and its energy used for the conversion of chemical products in two photosystems: PSI and PSII. Each photosystem is composed of a protein core which binds a pigment antenna and a Reaction Center (RC). RC of PSI is considered an "Iron-Sulfur" type. There are six components that participate in the charge separation after light absorption occurs in PSI: the center chlorophyll P700, two acceptors A 0 and A 1 and three FeS centers F X, F A and F B. However, the exact number of polypeptides, their exact molecular weight, their relative abundances and the active components associated to those polypeptides remain still to be completely characterized. In particular the FeS centers have been difficult to detect in a direct way in a gel band, because the amount of centers involved is under the detection limits of the conventional techniques. This study has been under-taken to explore the capability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to detect in a qualitative way the presence of Fe in some of the protein bands obtained by Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) from the PSI complex. The complex was isolated from membranes of thermophilic cyanobacteria: Synechochoccus sp. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the complex shows eight subunits of 66, 60-65, 14, 13, 9, 8 and 7 KDa. In-air PIXE was performed at 2 MeV and proved to be an adequate tool for direct identification of the iron present in the gel bands.

  3. FY83 Posture Report: Research, Development, Engineering and Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    to provide staff management and con- fluids, corrosion preventives, chemistry , chemical trol of Belvoir R&D Center’s force structure through the...vialiing boith FV82 antI FY83 fundsi. Early mianagenlerit r atar refletotrs anti c4tint racting fair sei-imi-generat itir iietlingp estabrlisliedi the phi...ft) to accommodate boats such as the fabrics. paper chemistry , preservatives, fuels, optical LCU, LCM-8. Ribbon Bridge Erection Boat, Small Tug. and

  4. FY 2004 Scientific and Technical Reports, Articles, Papers, and Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, B. A. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) presents formal NASA technical reports, papers published in technical journals, and presentations by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel FY 2004. It also includes papers of MSFC contractors. After being announced in STAR, all NASA series reports may be obtained from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161. The information in this TM maybe of value to the scientific and engineering community in determining what information has been published and what is available.

  5. FY 1998 Scientific and Technical Reports, Articles, Papers, and Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waits, J. E. Turner (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document presents formal NASA technical reports, papers published in technical journals, and presentations by MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) personnel in FY98. It also includes papers of MSFC contractors. After being announced in STAR, all of the NASA series reports may be obtained from the National Technical Information Service. The information in this report may be of value to the scientific and engineering community in determining what information has been published and what is available.

  6. FY 1999 Scientific and Technical Reports, Articles, Papers, and Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waits, J.oyce E.Turner

    2000-01-01

    This document presents formal NASA technical reports, papers published in technical journals, and presentations by MSFC personnel in FY99. It also includes papers of MSFC contractors. All of the NASA series reports may be obtained from the NASA Center for AeroSpace Information (CASI), 7121 Standard Drive, Hanover, MD 21076-1320 The information in this report may be of value to the scientific and engineering community in determining what information has been published and what is available.

  7. Analysis of health in health centers area in Depok using correspondence analysis and scan statistic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basir, C.; Widyaningsih, Y.; Lestari, D.

    2017-07-01

    Hotspots indicate area that has a higher case intensity than others. For example, in health problems of an area, the number of sickness of a region can be used as parameter and condition of area that determined severity of an area. If this condition is known soon, it can be overcome preventively. Many factors affect the severity level of area. Some health factors to be considered in this study are the number of infant with low birth weight, malnourished children under five years old, under five years old mortality, maternal deaths, births without the help of health personnel, infants without handling the baby's health, and infant without basic immunization. The number of cases is based on every public health center area in Depok. Correspondence analysis provides graphical information about two nominal variables relationship. It create plot based on row and column scores and show categories that have strong relation in a close distance. Scan Statistic method is used to examine hotspot based on some selected variables that occurred in the study area; and Correspondence Analysis is used to picturing association between the regions and variables. Apparently, using SaTScan software, Sukatani health center is obtained as a point hotspot; and Correspondence Analysis method shows health centers and the seven variables have a very significant relationship and the majority of health centers close to all variables, except Cipayung which is distantly related to the number of pregnant mother death. These results can be used as input for the government agencies to upgrade the health level in the area.

  8. Manufacturing Technology Information Analysis Center: Knowledge Is Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safar, Michal

    1992-01-01

    The Center's primary function is to facilitate technology transfer within DoD, other government agencies and industry. The DoD has recognized the importance of technology transfer, not only to support specific weapon system manufacture, but to strengthen the industrial base that sustains DoD. MTIAC uses an experienced technical staff of engineers and information specialists to acquire, analyze, and disseminate technical information. Besides ManTech project data, MTIAC collects manufacturing technology from other government agencies, commercial publications, proceedings, and various international sources. MTIAC has various means of disseminating this information. Much of the technical data is on user accessible data bases. The Center researches and writes a number of technical reports each year and publishes a newsletter monthly. Customized research is performed in response to specific inquiries from government and industry. MTIAC serves as a link between Government and Industry to strengthen the manufacturing technology base through the dissemination of advanced manufacturing information.

  9. Location of radiotherapy centers: An exploratory geographic analysis for Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotteels, C.; Peeters, D.; Coucke, P.A.; Thomas, I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - The distance between the patient's home and a radiotherapy department may represent a hurdle for the patient and influence treatment choice. Therefore, it is necessary to check whether the geographical distribution of radiotherapy centers is in accordance with cancer incidence, taking also into account the cost of travelling to the radiotherapy department. The objective of this study is double; first, to map the current locations of radiotherapy centers across the country and second, to evaluate the observed spatial disparities with appropriate tools. Materials and methods. - A model of operational research (P-median) is used to suggest the optimal locations and allocations and to compare them with the current situation. This is an exploratory study with simple inputs. It helps to better understand the current geographical distribution of radiotherapy centers in Belgium as well as its possible limitations. Results-conclusion. - It appears that the current situation is on the average acceptable in terms of accessibility to the service and that the method presents huge potentialities for decision making so as to yield a spatial system that is both efficient and equitable. (authors)

  10. A Partial Swot Analysis of the Turkish Bank Call Centers: The Actual and the Assumed Weaknesses

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZKAN, Ahmet Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The bank call centers of Turkey are seen as a tool of perceiving the threats and evaluating opportunities in the SWOT analysis. By the way they are evaluated as a factor of strength. However, the weaknesses of the call centers which must be taken into account in a SWOT analysis, are so various that they cannot be ignored. The weaknesses of the call centers are elaborated with this research. The ways the call centers harm the corporations or the ways they might harm are revised.

  11. Staff roster for 1979: National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of resumes from the current staff of the National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems. The Center, founded in January 1976, is one of four areas within the Department of Energy and Environment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The emphasis of programs at the Center is on energy policy and planning studies at the regional, national, and international levels, involving quantitative, interdisciplinary studies of the technological, economic, social, and environmental aspects of energy systems. To perform these studies the Center has assembled a staff of experts in the areas of science, technology, economics planning, health and safety, information systems, and quantitative analysis.

  12. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, K.A. (ed.)

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaics Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The SERI subcontracted PV research and development represents most of the subcontracted R D that is funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program. This report covers fiscal year (FY) 1990: October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990. During FY 1990, the SERI PV program started to implement a new DOE subcontract initiative, entitled the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project.'' Excluding (PVMaT) because it was in a start-up phase, in FY 1990 there were 54 subcontracts with a total annualized funding of approximately $11.9 million. Approximately two-thirds of those subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of over $3.3 million. Cost sharing by industry added another $4.3 million to that $11.9 million of SERI PV subcontracted R D. The six technical sections of this report cover the previously ongoing areas of the subcontracted program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, and the University Participation Program. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs discuss approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1990, and future research directions. Another section introduces the PVMaT project and reports the progress since its inception in FY 1990. Highlights of technology transfer activities are also reported.

  13. Multi-center analysis of glucocerebrosidase mutations in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidransky, Ellen; Nalls, Michael A.; Aasly, Jan O.; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Annesi, Grazia; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Bar-Shira, Anat; Berg, Daniela; Bras, Jose; Brice, Alexis; Chen, Chiung-Mei; Clark, Lorraine N.; Condroyer, Christel; De Marco, Elvira Valeria; Dürr, Alexandra; Eblan, Michael J.; Fahn, Stanley; Farrer, Matthew; Fung, Hon-Chung; Gan-Or, Ziv; Gasser, Thomas; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Giladi, Nir; Griffith, Alida; Gurevich, Tanya; Januario, Cristina; Kropp, Peter; Lang, Anthony E.; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Lesage, Suzanne; Marder, Karen; Mata, Ignacio F.; Mirelman, Anat; Mitsui, Jun; Mizuta, Ikuko; Nicoletti, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Catarina; Ottman, Ruth; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Pereira, Lygia V.; Quattrone, Aldo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Rolfs, Arndt; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Rozenberg, Roberto; Samii, Ali; Samaddar, Ted; Schulte, Claudia; Sharma, Manu; Singleton, Andrew; Spitz, Mariana; Tan, Eng-King; Tayebi, Nahid; Toda, Tatsushi; Troiano, André; Tsuji, Shoji; Wittstock, Matthias; Wolfsberg, Tyra G.; Wu, Yih-Ru; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Zhao, Yi; Ziegler, Shira G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies indicate an increased frequency of mutations in the gene for Gaucher disease, glucocerebrosidase (GBA), among patients with Parkinson disease. An international collaborative study was conducted to ascertain the frequency of GBA mutations in ethnically diverse patients with Parkinson disease. Methods Sixteen centers participated, including five from the Americas, six from Europe, two from Israel and three from Asia. Each received a standard DNA panel to compare genotyping results. Genotypes and phenotypic data from patients and controls were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models and the Mantel Haenszel procedure to estimate odds ratios (ORs) across studies. The sample included 5691 patients (780 Ashkenazi Jews) and 4898 controls (387 Ashkenazi Jews). Results All 16 centers could detect GBA mutations, L444P and N370S, and the two were found in 15.3% of Ashkenazi patients with Parkinson disease (ORs = 4.95 for L444P and 5.62 for N370S), and in 3.2% of non-Ashkenazi patients (ORs = 9.68 for L444P and 3.30 for N370S). GBA was sequenced in 1642 non-Ashkenazi subjects, yielding a frequency of 6.9% for all mutations, demonstrate that limited mutation screens miss half the mutant alleles. The presence of any GBA mutation was associated with an OR of 5.43 across studies. Clinically, although phenotypes varied, subjects with a GBA mutation presented earlier, and were more likely to have affected relatives and atypical manifestations. Conclusion Data collected from sixteen centers demonstrate that there is a strong association between GBA mutations and Parkinson disease. PMID:19846850

  14. Nuclear Power Plant Cyber Security Discrete Dynamic Event Tree Analysis (LDRD 17-0958) FY17 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Timothy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Denman, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Williams, R. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Nevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jankovsky, Zachary Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Instrumentation and control of nuclear power is transforming from analog to modern digital assets. These control systems perform key safety and security functions. This transformation is occurring in new plant designs as well as in the existing fleet of plants as the operation of those plants is extended to 60 years. This transformation introduces new and unknown issues involving both digital asset induced safety issues and security issues. Traditional nuclear power risk assessment tools and cyber security assessment methods have not been modified or developed to address the unique nature of cyber failure modes and of cyber security threat vulnerabilities. iii This Lab-Directed Research and Development project has developed a dynamic cyber-risk in- formed tool to facilitate the analysis of unique cyber failure modes and the time sequencing of cyber faults, both malicious and non-malicious, and impose those cyber exploits and cyber faults onto a nuclear power plant accident sequence simulator code to assess how cyber exploits and cyber faults could interact with a plants digital instrumentation and control (DI&C) system and defeat or circumvent a plants cyber security controls. This was achieved by coupling an existing Sandia National Laboratories nuclear accident dynamic simulator code with a cyber emulytics code to demonstrate real-time simulation of cyber exploits and their impact on automatic DI&C responses. Studying such potential time-sequenced cyber-attacks and their risks (i.e., the associated impact and the associated degree of difficulty to achieve the attack vector) on accident management establishes a technical risk informed framework for developing effective cyber security controls for nuclear power.

  15. Detection and quantitative analysis of chemical species in Hanford tank materials using Raman spectroscopy technology: FY94, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickers, T.J.; Mann, C.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides a summary of work completed in FY-94 by FSU to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with Hanford tank waste materials. Raman performance impacts from sample morphology, including the effects of absorption, particle size, density, color and refractive index, are discussed. An algorithm for relative species concentration measurement from Raman data is presented. An Algorithm for applying Raman to tank waste core screening is presented and discussed. A library of absorption and Raman spectra are presented that support this work

  16. FY 1997 cost savings report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellards, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    With the end of the cold war, funding for the Environmental Management program increased rapidly as nuclear weapons production facilities were shut down, cleanup responsibilities increased, and facilities were transferred to the cleanup program. As funding for the Environmental Management (EM) program began to level off in response to Administration and Congressional efforts to balance the Federal budget, the program redoubled its efforts to increase efficiency and get more productivity out of every dollar. Cost savings and enhanced performance are an integral pair of Hanford Site operations. FY1997 was the third year of a cost savings program that was initially defined in FY 1995. The definitions and process remained virtually the same as those used in FY 1996

  17. A Comparative Analysis of Patient Access Modes at Wilford Hall United States Air Force Medical Center and Selected Civilian Medical Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    In A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PATIENT ACCESS MODES AT WILFORD HALL UNITED STATES AIR FORCE MEDICAL CENTER N AND SELECTED CIVILIAN MEDICAL CENTERS0 N...current patient access modes at WHMC and several civilian medical centers of comparable size. This project has pursued the subject of patient access in...selected civilian medical centers which are comparable to WHMC in size, specialty mix, workload, and mission, providing responsive and efficient patient

  18. Projected Benefits of Federal Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Programs - FY 2008 Budget Request

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-03-01

    This document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE's programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and for each of its nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs. Benefits for the FY 2008 budget request are estimated for the midterm (2008-2030) and long term (2030-2050).

  19. Management and performance features of cancer centers in Europe: A fuzzy-set analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Anke; Lobo, Mariana Fernandes; van Dijk, Joris; Lepage-Nefkens, Isabelle; Laranja-Pontes, Jose; da Conceicao Goncalves, Vitor; van Harten, Willem H.; Rocha-Goncalves, Francisco Nuno

    2016-01-01

    The specific aim of this study is to identify the performance features of cancer centers in the European Union by using a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA). The fsQCA method represents cases (cancer centers) as a combination of explanatory and outcome conditions. This study uses

  20. FY16 Strategic Themes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, Robert W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    I am pleased to present this summary of the Division 1000 Science and Technology Strategic Plan. This plan was created with considerable participation from all levels of management in Division 1000, and is intended to chart our course as we strive to contribute our very best in service of the greater Laboratory strategy. The plan is characterized by four strategic themes: Mission Engagement, Bold Outcomes, Collaborative Environment, and the Safety Imperative. Each theme is accompanied by a brief vision statement, several goals, and planned actions to support those goals throughout FY16. I want to be clear that this is not a strategy to be pursued in tension with the Laboratory strategic plan. Rather, it is intended to describe “how” we intend to show up for the “what” described in Sandia’s Strategic Plan. I welcome your feedback and look forward to our dialogue about these strategic themes. Please join me as we move forward to implement the plan in the coming year.

  1. Tank waste processing analysis: Database development, tank-by-tank processing requirements, and examples of pretreatment sequences and schedules as applied to Hanford Double-Shell Tank Supernatant Waste - FY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, N.G.; Orth, R.J.; Aitken, E.A.

    1994-09-01

    This report gives the results of work conducted in FY 1993 by the Tank Waste Processing Analysis Task for the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration. The main purpose of this task, led by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is to demonstrate a methodology to identify processing sequences, i.e., the order in which a tank should be processed. In turn, these sequences may be used to assist in the development of time-phased deployment schedules. Time-phased deployment is implementation of pretreatment technologies over a period of time as technologies are required and/or developed. The work discussed here illustrates how tank-by-tank databases and processing requirements have been used to generate processing sequences and time-phased deployment schedules. The processing sequences take into account requirements such as the amount and types of data available for the tanks, tank waste form and composition, required decontamination factors, and types of compact processing units (CPUS) required and technology availability. These sequences were developed from processing requirements for the tanks, which were determined from spreadsheet analyses. The spreadsheet analysis program was generated by this task in FY 1993. Efforts conducted for this task have focused on the processing requirements for Hanford double-shell tank (DST) supernatant wastes (pumpable liquid) because this waste type is easier to retrieve than the other types (saltcake and sludge), and more tank space would become available for future processing needs. The processing requirements were based on Class A criteria set by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Clean Option goals provided by Pacific Northwest Laboratory

  2. Contaminated Materials Treatment Program annual report for FY 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.A.; Powell, J.A.

    1990-08-01

    The Western New York Nuclear Services Center reprocessed nuclear fuel for five years until operations were terminated in 1972. Underground tanks at the site contain high-level waste (HLW) generated during the reprocessing operations. Based on original agreements, the state of New York has assumed responsibility for the wastes and the site. The Department of Energy (DOE) is assisting New York State, through the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), in processing and solidifying the HLW. The site contractor for the WVDP is West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc. (WVNS). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), through the West Valley Support Project, has been supporting WVNS and DOE in establishing vitrification and waste processing technology and capability at the West Valley Site. The specific objective of the West Valley Support Project during FY 1989 were to complete designs of remote equipment, assist in characterizing the WVNS feed, sampling, ceramic melter and off-gas systems, provide chemical analysis of the radioactive wastes and testing of future processes with actual radioactive wastes, provide testing and modeling studies of the reference WV waste product, and conduct special studies, such as evaluating corrosion of the waste tanks and supporting operation of the supernatant treatment system. 13 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. Progress report for FY 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996. This annual report is the thirteenth for the ACL. It describes effort on continuing and new projects and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The ACL operates in the ANL system as a full-cost-recovery service center, but has a mission that includes a complementary research and development component: The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory will provide high-quality, cost-effective chemical analysis and related technical support to solve research problems of our clients -- Argonne National Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and others -- and will conduct world-class research and development in analytical chemistry and its applications. Because of the diversity of research and development work at ANL, the ACL handles a wide range of analytical chemistry problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but the ACL usually works with commercial laboratories if our clients require high-volume, production-type analyses. It is common for ANL programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. Thus, much of the support work done by the ACL is very similar to our applied analytical chemistry research.

  4. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Progress Report for FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, D.W.; Boparai, A.S.; Bowers, D.L. [and others

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 (October 1993 through September 1994). This annual report is the eleventh for the ACL and describes continuing effort on projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost-recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. The ACL also has a research program in analytical chemistry, conducts instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems. Some routine or standard analyses are done, but it is common for the Argonne programs to generate unique problems that require significant development of methods and adaption of techniques to obtain useful analytical data. The ACL has four technical groups -- Chemical Analysis, Instrumental Analysis, Organic Analysis, and Environmental Analysis -- which together include about 45 technical staff members. Talents and interests of staff members cross the group lines, as do many projects within the ACL. The Chemical Analysis Group uses wet- chemical and instrumental methods for elemental, compositional, and isotopic determinations in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples and provides specialized analytical services. Major instruments in this group include an ion chromatograph (IC), an inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectrometer (ICP/AES), spectrophotometers, mass spectrometers (including gas-analysis and thermal-ionization mass spectrometers), emission spectrographs, autotitrators, sulfur and carbon determinators, and a kinetic phosphorescence uranium analyzer.

  5. Review of research on advanced computational science in FY2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-12-01

    Research on advanced computational science for nuclear applications, based on “Plan to Achieve Medium- to Long-term Objectives of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Medium- to Long-term Plan)”, has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (CCSE), Japan Atomic Energy Agency. CCSE established the committee consisting of outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes the followings. (1) Results of the R and D performed at CCSE in FY 2016 (April 1st, 2016 - March 31st, 2017), (2) Results of the evaluation on the R and D by the committee in FY 2016. (author)

  6. Review of research on advanced computational science in FY2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Research on advanced computational science for nuclear applications, based on 'Plan to Achieve Medium- to Long-term Objectives of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Medium- to Long-term Plan)', has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (CCSE), Japan Atomic Energy Agency. CCSE established the committee consisting of outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes the followings. (1) Results of the R and D performed at CCSE in FY 2015 (April 1st, 2015 - March 31st, 2016), (2) Results of the evaluation on the R and D by the committee in FY 2015 (April 1st, 2015 - March 31st, 2016). (author)

  7. Applying reliability centered maintenance analysis principles to inservice testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flude, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Federal regulations require nuclear power plants to use inservice test (IST) programs to ensure the operability of safety-related equipment. IST programs are based on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code requirements. Many of these plants also use Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) to optimize system maintenance. ASME Code requirements are hard to change. The process for requesting authority to use an alternate strategy is long and expensive. The difficulties of obtaining this authority make the use of RCM method on safety-related systems not cost effective. An ASME research task force on Risk Based Inservice Testing is investigating changing the Code. The change will allow plants to apply RCM methods to the problem of maintenance strategy selection for safety-related systems. The research task force is working closely with the Codes and Standards sections to develop a process related to the RCM process. Some day plants will be able to use this process to develop more efficient and safer maintenance strategies

  8. FY2011 Annual Report for NREL Energy Storage Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A.; Ban, C.; Dillon, A.; Gonder, J.; Ireland, J.; Keyser, M.; Kim, G. H.; Lee, K. J.; Long, D.; Neubauer, J.; Santhangopalan, S.; Smith, K.

    2012-04-01

    This report describes the work of NREL's Energy Storage group for FY2011. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) supports energy storage R&D under the Vehicle Technologies Program at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DOE Energy Storage program's charter is to develop battery technologies that will enable large market penetration of electric drive vehicles. These vehicles could have a significant impact on the nation's goal of reducing dependence on imported oil and gaseous pollutant emissions. DOE has established several program activities to address and overcome the barriers limiting the penetration of electric drive battery technologies: cost, performance, safety, and life. These programs are: (1) Advanced Battery Development [through the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC)]; (2) Testing, Design and Analysis (TDA); (3) Applied Battery Research (ABR); and (4) Focused Fundamental Research, or Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT). In FY11, DOE funded NREL to make technical contributions to all of these R&D activities. This report summarizes NREL's R&D projects in FY11 in support of the USABC, TDA, ABR, and BATT program elements. In addition, we continued the enhancement of NREL's battery testing facilities funded through the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) of 2009. The FY11 projects under NREL's Energy Storage R&D program are briefly described below. Each of these is discussed in depth in the main sections of this report.

  9. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Radiation Therapy Services at Tripler Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diehl, Diane S

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to examine the costs and benefits associated with continuance of "in-house" radiation therapy services to eligible beneficiaries at Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC...

  10. Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center Benchmark Report: Framework and Methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandor, Debra [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Chung, Donald [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mann, Margaret [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Engel-Cox, Jill [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-05-23

    This report documents the CEMAC methodologies for developing and reporting annual global clean energy manufacturing benchmarks. The report reviews previously published manufacturing benchmark reports and foundational data, establishes a framework for benchmarking clean energy technologies, describes the CEMAC benchmark analysis methodologies, and describes the application of the methodologies to the manufacturing of four specific clean energy technologies.

  11. Measuring the efficiency of dental departments in medical centers: a nonparametric analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Su-Chen; Tsai, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shun-Te; Hong, Yu-Jue

    2002-12-01

    Data envelopment analysis (DEA), a cross-sectional study design based on secondary data analysis, was used to evaluate the relative operational efficiency of 16 dental departments in medical centers in Taiwan in 1999. The results indicated that 68.7% of all dental departments in medical centers had poor performance in terms of overall efficiency and scale efficiency. All relatively efficient dental departments were in private medical centers. Half of these dental departments were unable to fully utilize available medical resources. 75.0% of public medical centers did not take full advantage of medical resources at their disposal. In the returns to scale, 56.3% of dental departments in medical centers exhibited increasing returns to scale, due to the insufficient scale influencing overall hospital operational efficiency. Public medical centers accounted for 77.8% of the institutions affected. The scale of dental departments in private medical centers was more appropriate than those in public medical centers. In the sensitivity analysis, the numbers of residents, interns, and published papers were used to assess teaching and research. Greater emphasis on teaching and research in medical centers has a large effect on the relative inefficiency of hospital operation. Dental departments in private medical centers had a higher mean overall efficiency score than those in public medical centers, and the overall efficiency of dental departments in non-university hospitals was greater than those in university hospitals. There was no information to evaluate the long-term efficiency of each dental department in all hospitals. A different combination of input and output variables, using common multipliers for efficiency value measurements in DEA, may help establish different pioneering dental departments in hospitals.

  12. Revitalizing Complex Analysis: A Transition-to-Proof Course Centered on Complex Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Robert

    2017-01-01

    A new transition course centered on complex topics would help in revitalizing complex analysis in two ways: first, provide early exposure to complex functions, sparking greater interest in the complex analysis course; second, create extra time in the complex analysis course by eliminating the "complex precalculus" part of the course. In…

  13. Joint Logistics Systems Center Reporting of Systems Development Costs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    ...." The Joint Logistics Systems Center (JLSC) was organized in FY 1992 to accomplish Corporate Information Management goals for the depot maintenance and supply management business areas of the DoD Working Capital Funds...

  14. 77 FR 12602 - Clinical Center Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ..., 2012. Time: 10 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Agenda: To review the FY13 Clinical Center Budget. Place: National... procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport...

  15. 76 FR 13196 - Clinical Center; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ..., 2011. Open: 10 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Agenda: To review the FY12 Clinical Center Budget. Place: National..., including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be inspected before being allowed on campus. Visitors...

  16. 75 FR 9912 - Clinical Center; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ..., 2010. Open: 10 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Agenda: To review the FY11 Clinical Center Budget. Place: National..., including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be inspected before being allowed on campus. Visitors...

  17. 78 FR 13880 - Clinical Center; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ..., 2013. Open: 10:00 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Agenda: To review the FY14 Clinical Center Budget. Place: National... campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be inspected before...

  18. LDRD FY 2014 Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anita Gianotto; Dena Tomchak

    2013-08-01

    As required by DOE Order 413.2B the FY 2014 Program Plan is written to communicate ares of investment and approximate amounts being requested for the upcoming fiscal year. The program plan also includes brief highlights of current or previous LDRD projects that have an opportunity to impact our Nation's current and future energy challenges.

  19. Fusion Safety Program. Annual report, FY 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, J.G.; Cohen, S.

    1983-07-01

    The Fusion Safety Program major activities for Fiscal Year 1982 are summarized in this report. The program was started in FY-79, with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) designated as lead laboratory and EG and G Idaho, Inc., named as prime contractor to implement this role. The report contains four sections: EG and G Idaho, Inc., Activities at INEL includes major portions of papers dealing with ongoing work in tritium implantation experiments, tritium risk assessment, transient code development, heat transfer and fluid flow analysis, and high temperature oxidation and mobilization of structural material experiments. The section Outside Contracts includes studies of superconducting magnet safety conducted by Argonne National Laboratory, experiments concerning superconductor safety issues performed by the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to verify analytical work, a continuation of safety and environmental studies by MIT, a summary of lithium safety experiments at Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, and the results of tritium gas conversion to oxide experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A List of Publications and Proposed FY-83 Activities are also presented

  20. DOE Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program: Annual report, FY 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyman, L.D.

    1987-05-01

    The activities of HAZWRAP for the past fiscal year were organized into seven principal areas: technical analysis and technology transfer; regulatory analysis; strategic planning;information systems; program administration; technology adaptation; and technology demonstration. The scope, major FY 1986 accomplishments, and future directions for each of these areas are described in the following sections of this report. Listings of reports produced through the SCO are given in Appendixes A and B for the current year and since the program started, respectively

  1. Horonobe underground research program. Research report of 2002 FY investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-06-01

    Main results of investigation about Horonobe deep underground research center in 2002 FY were reported. It consists of six chapters: introduction, main results, selection of research center area, underground science research, R and D of geological disposal, and the environmental survey and research center on the ground. The research center area at about 3 km north of Horonobe (B1) was selected in the four areas: A, B1, B2 and C on the basis of data, researches in the sky, aboveground and underground and other conditions. The model of geological environment was constructed by physical, geological, surface water supply researches. Development of geological environment monitoring techniques, investigation of long stabilization of geological environment and design of underground facilities are reported. The basic design of preparation of research center was investigated. (S.Y.)

  2. Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment - FY 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Robert W.; Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Nickola, Cheryl L.

    2001-04-30

    The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks science and technology development needs expressed by the five DOE tank waste sites. TFA's annual program development process is iterative and involves the following steps: Collection of site needs; Needs analysis; Development of technical responses and initial prioritization; Refinement of the program for the next fiscal year; Formulation of the Corporate Review Budget (CRB); Preparation of Program Execution Guidance (PEG) for the next FY Revision of the Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP). This document describes the outcomes of the first phase of this process, from collection of site needs to the initial prioritization of technical activities. The TFA received site needs in October - December 2000. A total of 170 site needs were received, an increase of 30 over the previous year. The needs were analyzed and integrated, where appropriate. Sixty-six distinct technical responses were drafted and prioritized. In addition, seven strategic tasks were approved to compete for available funding in FY 2002 and FY 2003. Draft technical responses were prepared and provided to the TFA Site Representatives and the TFA User Steering Group (USG) for their review and comment. These responses were discussed at a March 15, 2001, meeting where the TFA Management Team established the priority listing in preparation for input to the DOE Office of Science and Technology (OST) budget process. At the time of publication of this document, the TFA continues to finalize technical responses as directed by the TFA Management Team and clarify the intended work scopes for FY 2002 and FY 2003.

  3. Center of attention: A network text analysis of American Sniper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starling Hunter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Network Text Analysis (NTA is a term used to describe a variety of software - supported methods for modeling texts as networks of concepts. In this study we apply NTA to the screenplay of American Sniper, an Academy Award nominee for Best Adapted Screenplay in 2014. Specifically, we est ablish prior expectations as to the key themes associated with war films. We then empirically test whether words associated with the most influentially - positioned nodes in the network signify themes common to the war - film genre. As predicted, we find tha t words and concepts associated with the least constrained nodes in the text network were significantly more likely to be associated with the war genre and significantly less likely to be associated with genres to which the film did not belong.

  4. Electronics Engineering Research. Final report, FY 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenberger, S.

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments in Electronics Engineering Research (EER) during FY79 spanned a broad range of technologies, from high-speed microelectronics to digital image enhancement; from underground probing with electromagnetic waves to detecting neutrons with a small solid-state device; and from computer systems to aid engineers, to software tools to aid programmers. This report describes the overall EER program and its objectives, summarizes progress made in FY79, and outlines plans for FY80

  5. FY 1998 Report on development project of structural residence of the next generation. Attachment 4. Frame analysis system manual; 1998 nendo jisedai kozo jutaku kaihatsu jigyo shiryohen. 4. Kako kaiseki system manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Attachment 4 of the FY 1998 report on development project of structural residence of the next generation describes the frame analysis system manual. NAPISOS is a program for analyzing static and dynamic responses of three-dimensional structures. The dynamic response is calculated by numerical integration in the time region. Dynamic load can handle dynamic exciting force, uniform seismic input and forced displacement at a node, and analyze linear elasticity and non-linear properties. The static load can handle nodal force, static seismic coefficient and forced displacement at a node, and analyze linear elasticity and non-linear properties. The static analysis also can perform analysis based on the time history response displacement method as the special case. The program implementation procedures fall into 4 general steps; first: inputting/processing of structural data, second: eigen value analysis or equivalent nodal force calculation, third: response calculation by direct integration, preparation of equivalent damping matrix or pre-stress analysis, and fourth: outputting the results. The input data related to control, structure and load are also described. (NEDO)

  6. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California: Annual report FY95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    In FY95, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover's wooly-star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 674 preactivity surveys covering approximately 211 hectares (521 acres) were conducted in FY95. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY95, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was completed, and the results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In FY95, reclamation success was monitored on 50 sites reclaimed in 1985. An investigation of factors influencing the distribution and abundance of kit foxes at NPRC was initiated in FY94. Factors being examined include habitat disturbance, topography, grazing, coyote abundance, lagomorph abundance, and shrub density. This investigation continued in FY95 and a manuscript on this topic will be completed in FY96. Also, Eg and G/EM completed collection of field data to evaluate the effects of a well blow-out on plant and animal populations. A final report will be prepared in FY96. Finally, EG and G/EM completed a life table analysis on San Joaquin kit foxes at NPRC

  7. Institutional plan FY 2004 - FY 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beggs, S. D.

    2004-01-01

    Argonne's mission is to serve DOE and national security by advancing the frontiers of knowledge, by creating and operating forefront scientific user facilities, and by providing innovative and effective approaches and solutions to energy, environmental, and security challenges to national and global well-being, in the near and long term, as a contributing member of the DOE laboratory system. We contribute significantly to DOE's mission in science, energy resources, environmental stewardship, and national security, with lead roles in the areas of science, operation of scientific facilities, and energy. In accomplishing our mission, we partner with DOE, other federal laboratories and agencies, the academic community, and the private sector. Argonne is pursuing ten visionary strategic goals to deliver extraordinary science and technology with significant value to the nation: (1) Develop the technologies and infrastructure needed to produce, store, and distribute hydrogen fuel. (2) Close the nuclear fuel cycle, reducing the cost of nuclear waste disposal by billions of dollars and disposing of weapons-grade plutonium and actinides. (3) Develop advanced nuclear power technologies that are safe, economical, proliferation-resistant, and environmentally sustainable. (4) Plan, design, construct, and operate the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) and make fundamental discoveries in nuclear physics and astrophysics. (5) Construct and operate the Center for Nanoscale Materials and create innovative materials with valuable commercial properties. (6) Lead the Genomes to Life team that focuses on protein production and related proteomics; implement computational biology to build fundamental understanding of living systems. (7) Realize the full potential of scientific simulation to solve mission-related problems, through leading-edge research on systems architecture and software, parallel programming and numerical tools, distributed computing, and computational science applications

  8. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2001 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2002-10-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on climate and vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC represents DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS). Wanda Ferrell is DOE's Program Manager with overall responsibility for CDIAC. Roger Dahlman is responsible for CDIAC's AmeriFlux tasks, and Anna Palmisano for CDIAC's Ocean Data tasks. CDIAC is made

  9. Child-Centered Play Therapy in the Schools: Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Dee C.; Armstrong, Stephen A.; Balkin, Richard S.; Jayne, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    The authors conducted a meta-analysis and systematic review that examined 23 studies evaluating the effectiveness of child centered play therapy (CCPT) conducted in elementary schools. Meta-analysis results were explored using a random effects model for mean difference and mean gain effect size estimates. Results revealed statistically significant…

  10. Hydropower Manufacturing and Supply Chain Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotrell, Jason R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-02

    Hydropower Manufacturing and Supply Chain Analysis presentation from the WPTO FY14-FY16 Peer Review. The project objective is to provide data and insights to inform investment strategies, policy, and other decisions to promote economic growth and manufacturing.

  11. FY2017 Report on NISC Measurements and Detector Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Madison Theresa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meierbachtol, Krista Cruse [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jordan, Tyler Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-14

    FY17 work focused on automation, both of the measurement analysis and comparison of simulations. The experimental apparatus was relocated and weeks of continuous measurements of the spontaneous fission source 252Cf was performed. Programs were developed to automate the conversion of measurements into ROOT data framework files with a simple terminal input. The complete analysis of the measurement (which includes energy calibration and the identification of correlated counts) can now be completed with a documented process which involves one simple execution line as well. Finally, the hurdles of slow MCNP simulations resulting in low simulation statistics have been overcome with the generation of multi-run suites which make use of the highperformance computing resources at LANL. Preliminary comparisons of measurements and simulations have been performed and will be the focus of FY18 work.

  12. A Cost Estimation Analysis of U.S. Navy Ship Fuel-Savings Techniques and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Horngren , C. T., Datar, S . M., & Foster, G. (2006). Cost Accounting : A Managerial Emphasis. 12th ed. Saddle River, NJ: Pearson...COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Cost Estimation Analysis of U.S. Navy Ship Fuel-Savings Techniques and Technologies 6. AUTHOR( S ...FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 N P V   C u m   S a v i n g s   ( $ / y r / S D   s h i p s ) Time

  13. Analysis of Rotary Aircraft Alternatives for NATO SOF Organic Air Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    analysis with an assumed program start in 2013 and an end in 2019 to determine the impact of short program duration on platform selection. D...FY12 GO\\ LR,~itl\\ l Sli LABOR H13 (J()VI R\\\\iFI\\TSE I AROR FY14 GOVLR\\\\iLI\\ I Sl:. LABOR H15 SI:.PO CSS FY II SII’O CSS FY 12 SEI’() CSS fY 13

  14. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1991 (October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991) progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) -- formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, the University Participation Program, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1991, and future research directions.

  15. FY 1999 report on the comprehensive analysis of the geothermal development promotion survey. Forth. No.C-3 Akinomiya area; 1999 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa sogo kaiseki hokokusho. No. C-3 Akinomiya chiiki (Dai 4 ji)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    As part of the geothermal development promotion survey, the comprehensive analysis was made on the survey of the existence amount of geothermal resource in the Akinomiya area, Ogachi town, Akita prefecture, which was conducted in FY 1999. In the evaluation of reservoirs, the following were carried out: comprehensive analysis of various data on the surface survey, well exploration, etc., which were stored in surveys from the primary to the forth, modification/construction of geothermal system models, numerical simulation using 3D models, etc. In the long-term jetting test, production/reduction tests were conducted using N9-AY-3 and N10-AY-8 as production wells and N8-AY-1 and N10-AY-6 as reduction wells. The results of the comprehensive analysis were outlined as follows. The distribution of high temperature zones promising as areas for geothermal development was grasped. The distribution of the main fracture structure underground was grasped. A total amount of 124t/h steam was confirmed by short/long term jetting tests. In the simulation of prediction of production, the result was obtained that there was potential power generation of 30MW in the Akinomiya area alone and 60MW both in the Akinomiya area and the Wasabizawa area. (NEDO)

  16. Legislative Branch: FY2014 Appropriations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    for the renovation of the Cannon House Office Building and the condition of the Rayburn building, the effect of the sequester on overtime work, plans...provided by the Joint Committee on Taxation for all revenue legislation (Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, P.L. 99-177...Committee, the Joint Committee on Taxation , the Office of the Attending Physician, and the Office of Congressional Accessibility Services. The FY2012

  17. Environmental research program: FY 1987, annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. The Program's Annual Report contains summaries of research performed during FY 1987 in the areas of atmospheric aerosols, flue gas chemistry, combustion, membrane bioenergetics, and analytical chemistry. The main research interests of the Atmospheric Aerosol Research group concern the chemical and physical processes that occur in haze, clouds, and fogs. For their studies, the group is developing novel analytical and research methods for characterizing aerosol species. Aerosol research is performed in the laboratory and in the field. Studies of smoke emissions from fires and their possible effects on climatic change, especially as related to nuclear winter, are an example of the collaboration between the Atmospheric Aerosol Research and Combustion Research Groups

  18. Environmental research program: FY 1987, annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-03-01

    This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. The Program's Annual Report contains summaries of research performed during FY 1987 in the areas of atmospheric aerosols, flue gas chemistry, combustion, membrane bioenergetics, and analytical chemistry. The main research interests of the Atmospheric Aerosol Research group concern the chemical and physical processes that occur in haze, clouds, and fogs. For their studies, the group is developing novel analytical and research methods for characterizing aerosol species. Aerosol research is performed in the laboratory and in the field. Studies of smoke emissions from fires and their possible effects on climatic change, especially as related to nuclear winter, are an example of the collaboration between the Atmospheric Aerosol Research and Combustion Research Groups.

  19. Federal Research and Development Funding: FY2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-19

    1.12 billion for FY2014. The FY2014 request proposed $155 million to replace the agency’s Southeast Poultry Disease Research Laboratory in Athens...formula funding, and special grants. 94 U.S. Department of Agriculture, “Statement by Thomas J

  20. Annual Progress Report FY-82. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Comparison of Binaural Versus 316 Monaural Amplification. (FY-81PI) 2535 Development of Method for Generating 318 Individualized Aural Rehabilitation...Oncology Group. 428 (FY-74 I ) 4116 The Evaluation of Petal Systolic Time Intervals 429 and Beat interval Variation in Fetal heart Rate as Early

  1. Many multicenter trials had few events per center, requiring analysis via random-effects models or GEEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Brennan C; Harhay, Michael O

    2015-12-01

    Adjustment for center in multicenter trials is recommended when there are between-center differences or when randomization has been stratified by center. However, common methods of analysis (such as fixed-effects, Mantel-Haenszel, or stratified Cox models) often require a large number of patients or events per center to perform well. We reviewed 206 multicenter randomized trials published in four general medical journals to assess the average number of patients and events per center and determine whether appropriate methods of analysis were used in trials with few patients or events per center. The median number of events per center/treatment arm combination for trials using a binary or survival outcome was 3 (interquartile range, 1-10). Sixteen percent of trials had less than 1 event per center/treatment combination, 50% fewer than 3, and 63% fewer than 5. Of the trials which adjusted for center using a method of analysis which requires a large number of events per center, 6% had less than 1 event per center-treatment combination, 25% fewer than 3, and 50% fewer than 5. Methods of analysis that allow for few events per center, such as random-effects models or generalized estimating equations (GEEs), were rarely used. Many multicenter trials contain few events per center. Adjustment for center using random-effects models or GEE with model-based (non-robust) standard errors may be beneficial in these scenarios. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An ASEAN Ion Beam Analysis Center at Chiang Mai University, Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tippawan, U.; Kamwann, T.; Yu, L.D.; Intarasiri, S.; Puttaraksa, N.; Unai, S.; Thongleurm, C.; Singkarat, S.

    2014-01-01

    To contribute to the development of nuclear science and technology in Thailand, a comprehensive ion beam analysis center unique in the ASEAN region has recently been established at Chiang Mai University, Thailand. The center is equipped with a 1.7-MV Tandetron tandem accelerator with an ion beam analysis beam line. The beam line is currently capable of performing ion beam analysis techniques such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), RBS/channeling, Elastic BackScattering (EBS), Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Ionoluminescence (IL) with assistance of commercial and in-house-developed softwares. Micro ion beam for MeV-ion mapping using programmable aperture or capillary focusing techniques is being developed. Ion beam analysis experiments and applications have been vigorously developed, especially for novel materials analysis focused on archeological, gemological and biological materials besides other conventional materials.

  3. FY 1996 Congressional budget request: Budget highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The FY 1996 budget presentation is organized by the Department`s major business lines. An accompanying chart displays the request for new budget authority. The report compares the budget request for FY 1996 with the appropriated FY 1995 funding levels displayed on a comparable basis. The FY 1996 budget represents the first year of a five year plan in which the Department will reduce its spending by $15.8 billion in budget authority and by $14.1 billion in outlays. FY 1996 is a transition year as the Department embarks on its multiyear effort to do more with less. The Budget Highlights are presented by business line; however, the fifth business line, Economic Productivity, which is described in the Policy Overview section, cuts across multiple organizational missions, funding levels and activities and is therefore included in the discussion of the other four business lines.

  4. Review of research on simulation engineering in FY2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    Research on simulation engineering for nuclear applications, based on the plan for meeting the mid-term goal of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency', has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA). CCSE established the committee consisting outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes the result of the evaluation by the committee on the research on simulation engineering performed at CCSE/JAEA in FY2007. (author)

  5. Review of research on simulation engineering in FY2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-02-01

    Research on simulation engineering for nuclear applications, based on 'the plan for meeting the mid-term goal of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency', has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA). CCSE established the committee consisting outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes the result of the evaluation by the committee on the research on simulation engineering performed at CCSE/JAEA in FY2008. (author)

  6. FY 2003 Scientific and Technical Reports, Articles, Papers, and Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, B. A. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) presents formal NASA technical reports, papers published in technical journals, and presentations by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel in FY 2003. It also includes papers of MSFC contractors. After being announced in STAR, all NASA series reports may be obtained from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Spring.eld, VA 22161. The information in this TM may be of value to the scientific and engineering community in determining what information has been published and what is available.

  7. FY 1998 report on the comprehensive analysis in the geothermal development promotion survey. Tertiary. No.C-3 Akinomiya area; 1998 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa sogo kaiseki hokokusho. No.C-3 Akinomiya chiiki (Dai 3 ji)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    The geothermal development promotion survey was conducted in the Akinomiya area, Ogachi county, Akita prefecture, and the FY 1998 results were summed up. In the surface survey, geology/electromagnetism/precision gravity survey was made as supplementary survey, and re-analysis of 3D models was made. In the well survey, three wells of N10-AY-6 to N10-AY-8 were drilled to conduct the core examination, temperature/pressure logging, sampler logging, short-term jetting test, etc. Also conducted were the reservoir evaluation, environmental effect survey, etc. by pressure monitoring and water level observation. The results of the comprehensive analysis predict the following. In the Akinomiya area, there exists heat source in deep parts around Mt. Yamabushi-dake and Mt. Takamatsu-dake; Being given heat from this heat source, rocks, ground water and volcanic gas react on each other to form geothermal fluids. It is presumed that high temperature geothermal reservoirs exist in the east of the area. Moreover, the pressure distribution indicates that the Akinomiya reservoir and Wasabizawa reservoir can be a chain hydraulically. On the other hand, the west of the area is the low temperature and heat conductive area, and therefore, there seem to be no high temperature fluids there. (NEDO)

  8. FY 1998 achievement report on the R and D project on industrial science technology. Development of a functional biomolecule analysis/synthesis system; 1998 nendo kinosei seitai bunshi kaiseki gosei system no kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For the purpose of developing the technology required for the biotechnology industry, a study was made on proteins having ligand recognition function, and the FY 1998 results were reported. In the technology development of a system for various/diversified syntheses of functional molecules, a system was designed/trially manufactured which enables the simultaneous synthesis of various biological/functional substances (compound library) at high-efficiency. In the development of the structure analysis system of ligand recognized proteins, a high-efficient biopolymer analysis system was developed which is based on TOF (time-of-flight) mass spectrometer and analyzes proteins produced by recombined genes quickly and precisely. In the R and D of functional molecules using ligand recognized proteins, the cloning was successfully made of the human estrogen receptor gene hER {alpha}, which is composed of 1,785 bp, from MCF-7-BOS. Further, the bioassay system for estrogen-like substances using MCF-7 cells was established. (NEDO)

  9. Environmental Management System Objectives & Targets Results Summary - FY 2015.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, Douglas W

    2016-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Environmental Management System is the integrated approach for members of the workforce to identify and manage environmental risks. Each Fiscal Year (FY) SNL performs an analysis to identify environmental aspects, and the environmental programs associated with them are charged with the task of routinely monitoring and measuring the objectives and targets that are established to mitigate potential impacts of SNL's operations on the environment. An annual summary of the results achieved towards meeting established Sandia Corporation and SNL Site-specific objectives and targets provides a connection to, and rational for, annually revised environmental aspects. The purpose of this document is to summarize the results achieved and documented in FY 2015.

  10. A Cost Analysis of Day Care Centers in Pennsylvania. Center for Human Service Development Report No. 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Teh-Wei; Wise, Karl

    The purpose of this study is to provide day care center management and government funding agencies with empirical estimates of the costs of day care centers in Pennsylvania. Based on cost data obtained from the Department of Public Welfare and survey information from the Pennsylvania Day Care Study Project, average and marginal costs of day care…

  11. Conceptual design study of the hylife lithium fall laser fusion chamber. FY 1979 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In FY 1979, the basic configuration of FY 1978 was used as a reference point. Many studies were then made to either generate more design information concerning this design or to produce new concepts that would lead to a superior configuration. Among these activities were a detailed weight analysis, an assembly sequence, a chamber vibration analysis, a splash baffle stress study, and an analysis of first wall thermal stresses. Then some new concepts were introduced that pertained to the first wall, the lithium inlet nozzle, the chamber supports, the inlet piping, and pressure vessel

  12. NREL Energy Storage Projects. FY2014 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ban, Chunmei [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burton, Evan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gonder, Jeff [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Grad, Peter [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jun, Myungsoo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, Matt [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kim, Gi-Heon [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Neubauer, Jeremy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Santhanagopalan, Shriram [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saxon, Aron [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Shi, Ying [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Kandler [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sprague, Michael [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tenent, Robert [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wood, Eric [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yang, Chuanbo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Chao [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Han, Taeyoung [General Motors, Detroit, MI (United States); Hartridge, Steve [CD-adapco, Detroit, MI (United States); Shaffer, Christian E. [EC Power, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory supports energy storage R&D under the Office of Vehicle Technologies at the U.S. Department of Energy. The DOE Energy Storage Program’s charter is to develop battery technologies that will enable large market penetration of electric drive vehicles. These vehicles could have a significant impact on the nation’s goal of reducing dependence on imported oil and gaseous pollutant emissions. DOE has established several program activities to address and overcome the barriers limiting the penetration of electric drive battery technologies: cost, performance, safety, and life. These programs are; Advanced Battery Development through the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC); Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design; Applied Battery Research (ABR); and Focused Fundamental Research, or Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) In FY14, DOE funded NREL to make technical contributions to all of these R&D activities. This report summarizes NREL’s R&D projects in FY14 in support of the USABC; Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design; ABR; and BATT program elements. The FY14 projects under NREL’s Energy Storage R&D program are briefly described below. Each of these is discussed in depth in this report.

  13. Primary Trait Analysis to Assess a Learner-Centered, Upper-Level Mathematics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsardary, Salar; Pontiggia, Laura; Hamid, Mohammed; Blumberg, Phyllis

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a primary trait analysis of a learner-centered, discrete mathematics course based on student-to-student instruction. The authors developed a scoring rubric for the primary traits: conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, application of understanding, and mathematical communication skills. Eleven students took an exam…

  14. A Financial Ratio Analysis of For-Profit and Non-Profit Rural Referral Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Michael J.; Nayar, Preethy

    2009-01-01

    Context: National financial data show that rural referral center (RRC) hospitals have performed well financially. RRC hospitals' median cash flow margin ratio was 10.04% in 2002 and grew to 11.04% in 2004. Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare the ratio analysis of key operational and financial performance measures of for-profit RRCs to…

  15. Evaluation of formal methods in hip joint center assessment: an in vitro analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopomo, Nicola; Sun, Lei; Zaffagnini, Stefano; Giordano, Giovanni; Safran, Marc R

    2010-03-01

    The hip joint center is a fundamental landmark in the identification of lower limb mechanical axis; errors in its location lead to substantial inaccuracies both in joint reconstruction and in gait analysis. Actually in Computer Aided Surgery functional non-invasive procedures have been tested in identifying this landmark, but an anatomical validation is scarcely discussed. A navigation system was used to acquire data on eight cadaveric hips. Pivoting functional maneuver and hip joint anatomy were analyzed. Two functional methods - both with and without using the pelvic tracker - were evaluated: specifically a sphere fit method and a transformation techniques. The positions of the estimated centers with respect to the anatomical center of the femoral head, the influence of this deviation on the kinematic assessment and on the identification of femoral mechanical axis were analyzed. We found that the implemented transformation technique was the most reliable estimation of hip joint center, introducing a - Mean (SD) - difference of 1.6 (2.7) mm from the anatomical center with the pelvic tracker, whereas sphere fit method without it demonstrated the lowest accuracy with 25.2 (18.9) mm of deviation. Otherwise both the methods reported similar accuracy (<3mm of deviation). The functional estimations resulted in the best case to be in an average of less than 2mm from the anatomical center, which corresponds to angular deviations of the femoral mechanical axis smaller than 1.7 (1.3) degrees and negligible errors in kinematic assessment of angular displacements.

  16. Cost-income analysis of oral health units of health care centers in Yazd city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Fallahzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Increasing demands for health care's services on one hand and limited resources on the other hand brings about pressure over governments to find out a mechanism for fair and appropriate distribution of resources. Economic analysis is one of the appropriate tools for policy making on this priority. The aim of this study was to assess capital and consumption of oral health units of health care centers in Yazd city and comparing it with revenue of these centers and determining of cost effectiveness.Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross sectional study, all health care centers of Yazd city with active dentistry department were evaluated. The data has been extracted from current documents in health care center of county based issued receipts and daily information registers.Results: Expended cost for providing of oral hygiene services in second half of 2008 in 13 medical health centers of Yazd included active dentistry section was 557.887.500 Rials and revenue to cost ratio was about 34%. The most provided service was related to tooth extraction and the average of tooth restoration in each working day was 0.48.Conclusion: With attention to low tariffs of dentistry services in medical health centers and paying subsidy to target groups, expenses of oral hygiene are always more than its revenue.

  17. INL Cultural Resource Monitoring Report for FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, Brenda Ringe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, Christina Liegh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gilbert, Hollie Kae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Holmer, Marie Pilkington [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    of illegal removal of artifacts from INL lands. Goodale‘s Cutoff of the Oregon Trail showed evidence of heavy use associated with grazing. A number of previously reported Type 2 impacts were also once again documented at the EBR-I National Historic Landmark, including spalling and deterioration of bricks due to inadequate drainage, minimal maintenance, and rodent infestation. The ANP engines and locomotive on display at the EBR-I Visitors Center also exhibited impacts related to long term exposure. Finally, most of the Arco NPG properties monitored at Central Facilities Area exhibited problems with lack of timely and appropriate maintenance as well as inadequate drainage. No new Type 3 or Type 4 impacts that adversely affected significant cultural resources and threatened National Register eligibility were documented in FY 2015.

  18. Computational analysis of coupled fluid, heat, and mass transport in ferrocyanide single-shell tanks: FY 1994 interim report. Ferrocyanide Tank Safety Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrail, B.P.

    1994-11-01

    A computer modeling study was conducted to determine whether natural convection processes in single-shell tanks containing ferrocyanide wastes could generate localized precipitation zones that significantly concentrate the major heat-generating radionuclide, 137 Cs. A computer code was developed that simulates coupled fluid, heat, and single-species mass transport on a regular, orthogonal finite-difference grid. The analysis showed that development of a ''hot spot'' is critically dependent on the temperature dependence for the solubility of Cs 2 NiFe(CN) 6 or CsNaNiFe(CN) 6 . For the normal case, where solubility increases with increasing temperature, the net effect of fluid flow, heat, and mass transport is to disperse any local zones of high heat generation rate. As a result, hot spots cannot physically develop for this case. However, assuming a retrograde solubility dependence, the simulations indicate the formation of localized deposition zones that concentrate the 137 Cs near the bottom center of the tank where the temperatures are highest. Recent experimental studies suggest that Cs 2 NiFe(CN) 6 (c) does not exhibit retrograde solubility over the temperature range 25 degree C to 90 degree C and NaOH concentrations to 5 M. Assuming these preliminary results are confirmed, no natural mass transport process exists for generating a hot spot in the ferrocyanide single-shell tanks

  19. Supply and demand outlook for Japan's economic and energy up to FY2018

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoshima, Momoko; Yorita, Yasuo; Tsunoda, Miyuki

    2017-01-01

    Japan's economy has gradually expanded, with real GDP in the first quarter of 2017 becoming positive growth for five consecutive quarters for the first time since 2005 to 2006. Although the uncertain factors are increasing both in terms of politics and economy, the world economy is also growing moderately. As the main premises in the standard scenario, the following are supposed: (1) world economy grows moderately, with worldwide growth rate reaching 3.0% in FY2017 and 3.3% in FY2018, (2) exchange rate is about ¥115/$ in both FY2017 and FY2018 average, (3) as for nuclear power generation, cumulative restarted unit number reaches 10 basis until the end of FY2018, with average months of operation in FY2018 reaching 9 months, and with power generation amount reaching 65.6 billion kWh (7% of the power supply composition ratio), and (4) as for the supply and demand for power, the supply reserve ratio of 3% necessary for stable electric power supply can be secured nationwide. Thus, the supply and demand outlook for Japan's economic and energy up to FY2018 was made. The following various evaluation analyses were carried out: (1) macro economy, (2) production activities, (3) primary energy domestic supply, (4) final energy consumption, (5) electricity sales volume and power supply composition (electric power companies), (6) city gas sales volume (gas companies), fuel oil and LPG sales volume and crude oil throughput, and (7) in-depth analysis; demand trend of light oil, renewable energy power generation, and effects of restart of nuclear power plants. (A.O.)

  20. Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Activities for the Spent Fuel Nondestructive Assay Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trellue, Holly Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trahan, Alexis Chanel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McMath, Garrett Earl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hu, Jianwei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Grogan, Brandon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-11

    The main focus of research in the NA-241 spent fuel nondestructive assay (NDA) project in FY17 has been completing the fabrication and testing of two prototype instruments for upcoming spent fuel measurements at the Clab interim storage facility in Sweden. One is a passive instrument: Differential Die-away Self Interrogation-Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity (DDSI), and one is an active instrument: Differential Die-Away-Californium Interrogation with Prompt Neutron (DDA). DDSI was fabricated and tested with fresh fuel at Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY15 and FY16, then shipped to Sweden at the beginning of FY17. Research was performed in FY17 to simplify results from the data acquisition system, which is complex because signals from 56 different 3He detectors must be processed using list mode data. The DDA instrument was fabricated at the end of FY16. New high count rate electronics better suited for a spent fuel environment (i.e., KM-200 preamplifiers) were built specifically for this instrument in FY17, and new Tygon tubing to house electrical cables was purchased and installed. Fresh fuel tests using the DDA instrument with numerous configurations of fuel rods containing depleted uranium (DU), low enriched uranium (LEU), and LEU with burnable poisons (Gd) were successfully performed and compared to simulations.1 Additionally, members of the spent fuel NDA project team travelled to Sweden for a “spent fuel characterization and decay heat” workshop involving simulations of spent fuel and analysis of uncertainties in decay heat calculations.

  1. Cementitious Barriers Partnership FY2013 End-Year Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Burns, H. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Smith, F. G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Kosson, D. S. [Vanderbilt University, School of Engineering, Nashville, TN (United States); Brown, K. G. [Vanderbilt University, School of Engineering, Nashville, TN (United States); Samson, E. [SIMCO Technologies, Inc., Quebec (Canada); Meeussen, J. C.L. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (The Netherlands); van der Sloot, H. A. [Hans van der Sloot Consultancy, Langedijk (The Netherlands); Garboczi, E. J. [Materials & Construction Research Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2013-11-01

    In FY2013, the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) demonstrated continued tangible progress toward fulfilling the objective of developing a set of software tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. In November 2012, the CBP released “Version 1.0” of the CBP Software Toolbox, a suite of software for simulating reactive transport in cementitious materials and important degradation phenomena. In addition, the CBP completed development of new software for the “Version 2.0” Toolbox to be released in early FY2014 and demonstrated use of the Version 1.0 Toolbox on DOE applications. The current primary software components in both Versions 1.0 and 2.0 are LeachXS/ORCHESTRA, STADIUM, and a GoldSim interface for probabilistic analysis of selected degradation scenarios. The CBP Software Toolbox Version 1.0 supports analysis of external sulfate attack (including damage mechanics), carbonation, and primary constituent leaching. Version 2.0 includes the additional analysis of chloride attack and dual regime flow and contaminant migration in fractured and non-fractured cementitious material. The LeachXS component embodies an extensive material property measurements database along with chemical speciation and reactive mass transport simulation cases with emphasis on leaching of major, trace and radionuclide constituents from cementitious materials used in DOE facilities, such as Saltstone (Savannah River) and Cast Stone (Hanford), tank closure grouts, and barrier concretes. STADIUM focuses on the physical and structural service life of materials and components based on chemical speciation and reactive mass transport of major cement constituents and aggressive species (e.g., chloride, sulfate, etc.). THAMES is a planned future CBP Toolbox component focused on simulation of the microstructure of cementitious materials and calculation of resultant

  2. Task analysis and structure scheme for center manager station in large container inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zheng; Gao Wenhuan; Wang Jingjin; Kang Kejun; Chen Zhiqiang

    1997-01-01

    LCIS works as follows: the accelerator generates beam pulses which are formed into fan shape; the scanning system drags a lorry with a container passing through the beam in constant speed; the detector array detects the beam penetrating the lorry; the projection data acquisition system reads the projections and completes an inspection image of the lorry. All these works are controlled and synchronized by the center manage station. The author will describe the process of the projection data acquisition in scanning mode and the methods of real-time projection data processing. the task analysis and the structure scheme of center manager station is presented

  3. FY 1990/FY 1991 Biennial Budget Descriptive Summaries for the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    reduction in cryccooler size. o (U) Develop the first diamond ME_2 with monocrystalline , semiconductor quality thin-film diamcnd. o (U) Develop Atomic Layer...stiffness and dynamic response. A lightweight thermal radiator panel will also be fabricated and tested. Fabrication of tubes and sheets in gauges...FY 91 o Precision Gimbal Test IQ FY 91 C Cx:mlete Deveic..ent of Integrated Structures Model 2Q FY 91 c Light’weight Ccmpcsitas Radiator Panel Demo 2Q

  4. Safeguards and Security Technology Development Directory. FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    The Safeguards and Security Technology Development Directory is published annually by the Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), and is Intended to inform recipients of the full scope of the OSS R&D program. It is distributed for use by DOE headquarters personnel, DOE program offices, DOE field offices, DOE operating contractors, national laboratories, other federal agencies, and foreign governments. Chapters 1 through 7 of the Directory provide general information regarding the Technology Development Program, including the mission, program description, organizational roles and responsibilities, technology development lifecycle, requirements analysis, program formulation, the task selection process, technology development infrastructure, technology transfer activities, and current research and development tasks. These chapters are followed by a series of appendices which contain more specific information on aspects of the Program. Appendix A is a summary of major technology development accomplishments made during FY 1992. Appendix B lists S&S technology development reports issued during FY 1992 which reflect work accomplished through the OSS Technology Development Program and other relevant activities outside the Program. Finally, Appendix C summarizes the individual task statements which comprise the FY 1993 Technology Development Program.

  5. Annual report of nuclear technology and education center. April 1, 2002 - March 31, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Technology and Education Center (NuTEC) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in FY 2002. It includes the domestic educational activities in Tokyo Education Center in Komagome Tokyo for RI and radiation engineers and Tokai Education Center in Tokai for nuclear engineers, and the international training activities for Asia-Pacific region which were planned and administrated by International Technology Transfer Division. The new course so called 'Introductory Course for the Use and the Experiment of Neutron' was started with good appreciation by the participants. All scheduled course plan in Tokyo Education Center and Tokai Education Center was accomplished and the total number of the trainee of both Center was 1,297. The courses for RI and radiation engineers implemented in Tokyo Education Center were closed in this FY and transferred to Tokai Establishment in next FY where the course will be integrated with the ones at Tokai Education Center. The land of Tokyo Education Center will be returned to land-owner by the end of FY 2003 after dismantlement of the facilities. The equipments and instruments used in Tokyo Education Center were transferred to Tokai Education Center after finishing all courses in Tokyo in this FY. The improvement and re-arrangement of the facilities in Tokyo Education Center were proceeded to prepare the courses from Tokyo Education Center. (author)

  6. Human Factors Regulatory Research Program Plan, FY 1989--FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffman, F.; Persensky, J.; Ryan, T.; Ramey-Smith, A.; Goodman, C.; Serig, D.; Trager, E; Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC; Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC; Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC

    1989-10-01

    This report describes the currently ongoing (FY 1989) and planned (FY 1989-1992) Human Factors Regulatory Research Program in the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES). Examples of the influence of human factors on nuclear safety are presented, and the role of personnel is discussed. Current regulatory issues associated with human factors in the nuclear system and the purpose of the research plan are provided. The report describes the research process applied to the human factors research issues and the program activities: Personnel Performance Measurement, Personnel Subsystem, Human-System Interface. Organization and Management, and Reliability Assessment. The research being conducted within each activity is summarized along with the objectives, background information, and expected regulatory products. Budget and personnel forecasts are provided along with a summary of contractors performing some of the ongoing research. Appendices contain a chronology of human factors research at NRC, a description of the research approach, an update on human factors programs and initiatives in RES and other NRC offices, and the integration among these programs. 46 refs., 5 tabs

  7. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1984-FY 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-11-01

    In this plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continues to be committed to scientific and technological research that is based on technical excellence and innovation and that provides a foundation for and a stimulus to broader and more sustained economic growth. DOE is being asked to assist in establishing a new program for Laboratory cooperation with industry, beginning with an initial focus on materials science. The current Institutional Plan thus projects growth in the materials science area as well as in other basic physical science areas and suggests a new initiative designed to extend the various technology transfer activities and to make them more effective by using ORNL as the trial Laboratory for some of these different approaches. This Institutional Plan projects a stable future for ORNL, with only modest amounts of growth in selected areas of research for the FY 1984-FY 1989 planning cycle. Summaries of the overall picture of the proposed budget and personnel levels for the current planning cycle are included. Scientific programs, laboratory resource development, and private sector interactions are discussed

  8. Final Report Sustained Spheromak Physics Project FY 1997 - FY 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Hill, D.N.

    2000-01-01

    This is the final report on the LDRD SI-funded Sustained Spheromak Physics Project for the years FY1997-FY1999, during which the SSPX spheromak was designed, built, and commissioned for operation at LLNL. The specific LDRD project covered in this report concerns the development, installation, and operation of specialized hardware and diagnostics for use on the SSPX facility in order to study energy confinement in a sustained spheromak plasma configuration. The USDOE Office of Fusion Energy Science funded the construction and routine operation of the SSPX facility. The main distinctive feature of the spheromak is that currents in the plasma itself produce the confining toroidal magnetic field, rather than external coils, which necessarily thread the vacuum vessel. There main objective of the Sustained Spheromak Physics Project was to test whether sufficient energy confinement could be maintained in a spheromak plasma sustained by DC helicity injection. Achieving central electron temperatures of several hundred eV would indicate this. In addition, we set out to determine how the energy confinement scales with T c and to relate the confinement time to the level of internal magnetic turbulence. Energy confinement and its scaling are the central technical issues for the spheromak as a fusion reactor concept. Pending the outcome of energy confinement studies now under way, the spheromak could be the basis for an attractive fusion reactor because of its compact size, simply-connected magnetic geometry, and potential for steady-state current drive

  9. A Cost–Benefit Analysis to Assess the Effectiveness of Frontal Center Curtain Airbag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Kyeong Lee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Several new varieties of airbags are under consideration for development. However, their commercialization decision must be backed by a positive Cost–Benefit Analysis (CBA outcome. In this study, we propose a CBA framework for the frontal center curtain airbag, a newly designed safety system intended to reduce the injury risk of rear-seat passengers. The proposed CBA covers not only economic benefits of the producer but also the effectiveness in sustainable reduction of the fatal and injury rate. In this context, with accumulated field data on road traffic accidents, a forecasting method reflecting the reduced casualties and the market share of vehicle sales associated with frontal center curtain airbag is utilized. Our results suggest that the use of frontal center curtain airbags helps to reduce the number of casualties with a Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale (MAIS of 3 or above by 87.4%. Furthermore, both the initial market penetration rate and price of the frontal center curtain airbag significantly influence its socioeconomic benefits. By evaluating the effectiveness of the frontal center curtain airbag, our study can contribute to the decision making for its commercialization.

  10. Numerical analysis of thermal environment control in high density data center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Oh Kyung; Kim, Hyeon Joong; Cha, Dong An [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Increasing heat generation in CPUs can hamper effective recirculation and by pass because of the large temperature difference between the exhaust and the intake air through a server room. This increases the overall temperature inside a data center and decreases the efficiency of the data center's cooling system. The purpose of the data center's cooling system is to separate the intake and exhaust air by controlling the computer room air conditioner(CRAC). In this study, ICEPAK is used to conduct a numerical analysis of a data center's cooling system. The temperature distribution and the entire room are analyzed for different volumetric flow rates. The optimized volumetric flow rate is found for each CPU power. The heat removal and temperature distribution for CPU powers of 100, 120, and 140W are found to be the best for a volumetric flow rate of 0.15m'3'/s. The numerical analysis is verified through RTI indicators, and the results appear to be the most reliable when the RTI value is 81.

  11. Automated daily quality control analysis for mammography in a multi-unit imaging center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundell, Veli-Matti; Mäkelä, Teemu; Meaney, Alexander; Kaasalainen, Touko; Savolainen, Sauli

    2018-01-01

    Background The high requirements for mammography image quality necessitate a systematic quality assurance process. Digital imaging allows automation of the image quality analysis, which can potentially improve repeatability and objectivity compared to a visual evaluation made by the users. Purpose To develop an automatic image quality analysis software for daily mammography quality control in a multi-unit imaging center. Material and Methods An automated image quality analysis software using the discrete wavelet transform and multiresolution analysis was developed for the American College of Radiology accreditation phantom. The software was validated by analyzing 60 randomly selected phantom images from six mammography systems and 20 phantom images with different dose levels from one mammography system. The results were compared to a visual analysis made by four reviewers. Additionally, long-term image quality trends of a full-field digital mammography system and a computed radiography mammography system were investigated. Results The automated software produced feature detection levels comparable to visual analysis. The agreement was good in the case of fibers, while the software detected somewhat more microcalcifications and characteristic masses. Long-term follow-up via a quality assurance web portal demonstrated the feasibility of using the software for monitoring the performance of mammography systems in a multi-unit imaging center. Conclusion Automated image quality analysis enables monitoring the performance of digital mammography systems in an efficient, centralized manner.

  12. [Demographic Analysis of Patients with Osteosarcoma, Chonddrosarcoma, Ewing's Sarcoma from one Sarcoma Center in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodel, Sandro; Seeli, Franziska; Fuchs, Bruno

    2015-06-17

    Retrospective analysis of presentation, diagnosis and outcome of patients with osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma was performed for a single Sarcoma Center in Zurich at the University Hospital Balgrist. 201 patients were included. Overall survival at five and ten years were 74 ± 6%, 69 ± 7% for osteosarcoma (n = 85, since 2000), 85 ± 7%, 80 ± 9% for Ewing's sarcoma (n = 43, since 1990) and 86 ± 5%, 78 ± 9% for chondrosarcoma (n = 73, since 2000). The here presented overall survival rates from a single Sarcoma Center in Switzerland appear to be equivalent to other large international monocenter studies. The presentation and epidemiology of these patients are in accordance with large multicenter epidemiological studies. A nationwide sarcoma database (SwissSARCOS; www.sarcoma.ch) seems indispensable for more detailed analysis and quality management in such rare diseases.

  13. Campus Health Centers' Lack of Information Regarding Providers: A Content Analysis of Division-I Campus Health Centers' Provider Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Evan K

    2018-07-01

    Campus health centers are a convenient, and usually affordable, location for college students to obtain health care. Staffed by licensed and trained professionals, these providers can generally offer similar levels of care that providers at off-campus clinics can deliver. Yet, previous research finds students may forgo this convenient, on-campus option partially because of a lack of knowledge regarding the quality of providers at these campus clinics. This study sought to examine where this information deficit may come from by analyzing campus health centers' online provider information. All Division-I colleges or universities with an on-campus health center, which had information on their websites about their providers (n = 294), had their providers' online information analyzed (n = 2,127 providers). Results revealed that schools commonly offer professional information (e.g., provider specialties, education), but very little about their providers outside of the medical context (e.g., hobbies) that would allow a prospective student patient to more easily relate. While 181 different kinds of credentials were provided next to providers' names (e.g., MD, PA-C, FNP-BC), only nine schools offered information to help students understand what these different credentials meant. Most schools had information about their providers within one-click of the homepage. Recommendations for improving online information about campus health center providers are offered.

  14. Advantages and Disadvantages of the Patient-Centered Medical Home: A Critical Analysis and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budgen, Jacqueline; Cantiello, John

    This article provides a detailed examination of the pros and cons associated with patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs). Opinions and findings from those who have studied PCMHs and those who have been directly involved with this type of health care model are outlined. Key lessons from providers are detailed, and critical success factors are highlighted. This synthesized analysis serves to lend evidence to health care managers and providers who are considering implementation of the PCMH model.

  15. Cyberattack analysis through Malaysian Nuclear Agency experience as nuclear research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Dzul Aiman Aslan; Mohd Fauzi Haris; Saaidi Ismail; Nurbahyah Hamdan

    2011-01-01

    As a nuclear research center, Nuclear Malaysia is one of the Critical National Information Infrastructure (CNII) in the country. One of the easiest way to launch a malicious attack is through the online system, whether main web site or online services. Recently, we also under port scanning and hack attempts from various sources. This paper will discuss on analysis based on Nuclear Malaysia experience regarding these attempts which keep arising nowadays. (author)

  16. Space Operations Center system analysis. Volume 3, book 2: SOC system definition report, revision A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The Space Operations Center (SOC) orbital space station program operations are described. A work breakdown structure for the general purpose support equipment, construction and transportation support, and resupply and logistics support systems is given. The basis for the design of each element is presented, and a mass estimate for each element supplied. The SOC build-up operation, construction, flight support, and satellite servicing operations are described. Detailed programmatics and cost analysis are presented.

  17. Advanced Energy Projects FY 1990 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This report serves as a guide to prepare proposals and provides summaries of the research projects active in FY 1990, sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Division of Advanced Energy Projects, Department of Energy. (JF)

  18. Multifamily Hubs' Initial Endorsements FY12

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Describes the program, geographic & lender distribution of multifamily loans initially endorsed for FHA insurance or risk sharing in FY 12. A loan is initially...

  19. Outpatient imaging center valuations: do you need a fair-market value analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonsman, G S

    2001-01-01

    Typically, outpatient diagnostic imaging centers are formed as partnerships between radiologists, radiologists and hospitals, and/or radiologists and diagnostic imaging center management companies. As a result of these partnership structures, the question of equity valuation frequently arises. It is not only important to understand when an independent valuation would be required, but also what "type" of valuation needs to be performed. The type of valuation may vary based upon the use of the valuation. In partnerships that involve hospitals and physicians, the federal anti-kickback statutes (fraud and abuse laws) require that all transactions between referring physicians and hospitals be consummated at fair-market value. In addition, tax-exempt hospitals that enter into partnerships with physicians are required to enter into those transactions at fair-market value or risk losing their tax-exempt status. Fair-market value is also typically the standard of value that all partnerships strive to conduct equity transactions with shareholders. Qualifications required by those who perform independent fair-market value opinions include: Proper business valuation training and focus on valuations as a primary business Focus on the healthcare industry and specifically on the valuation of diagnostic imaging centers In order to perform a reasonable business valuation analysis, the appraiser must have access to a significant amount of financial, operational and legal information. The analyst must be able to understand the history of the imaging center as well as the projected future of the center. Ultimately, a valuation is a measurement of the estimated future cash flows of the center--risk adjusted--in order to quantify the present value of those cash flows.

  20. DOE Hydropower Program Annual Report for FY 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommers, Garold L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hunt, Richard T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cada, Glenn F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sale, Michael J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dauble, Dennis D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carlson, Thomas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ahlgrimm, James [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Acker, Tomas L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2005-02-01

    This report describes the progress of the R&D conducted in FY 2004 the under four program areas at the time: (1) Advanced Hydropower Technology (Large Turbine Field Testing, Water Use Optimization, and Improved Mitigation Practices); (2) Supporting Research and Testing (Environmental Performance Testing Methods, Computational and Physical Modeling, Instrumentation and Controls, and Environmental Analysis); (3) Systems Integration and Technology Acceptance (Hydro/Wind Integration, National Hydropower Collaborative, and Integration and Communications); and (4) Supporting Engineering and Analysis (Valuation Methods and Assessments and Characterization of Innovative Technology).

  1. DOE Hydropower Program Biennial Report for FY 2005-2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, Michael J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cada, Glenn F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Acker, Thomas L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Northern Arizona State Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Carlson, Thomas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dauble, Dennis D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hall, Douglas G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This report describes the progress of the R&D conducted in FY 2005-2006 the under four program areas at the time: (1) Advanced Hydropower Technology (Large Turbine Field Testing, Water Use Optimization, and Improved Mitigation Practices); (2) Supporting Research and Testing (Environmental Performance Testing Methods, Computational and Physical Modeling, Instrumentation and Controls, and Environmental Analysis); (3) Systems Integration and Technology Acceptance (Hydro/Wind Integration, National Hydropower Collaborative, and Integration and Communications); and (4) Supporting Engineering and Analysis (Valuation Methods and Assessments and Characterization of Innovative Technology).

  2. DOE Hydropower Program Annual Report for FY 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, Glenn F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carlson, Thomas J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dauble, Dennis D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hunt, Richard T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL); Sale, Michael J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sommers, Garold L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL)

    2004-02-01

    This report describes the progress of the R&D conducted in FY 2003 the under four program areas at the time: (1) Advanced Hydropower Technology (Large Turbine Field Testing, Testing of the Alden/NREC pilot scale runner, and Improved Mitigation Practices); (2) Supporting Research and Testing (Biological Design Criteria, Computer and Physical Modeling, Instrumentation and Controls, and Environmental Analysis); (3) Systems Integration and Technology Acceptance (Wind/Hydro Integration Studies and Technical Support and Outreach); and (4) Engineering and Analysis (Innovative Technology Characterization).

  3. Federal Research and Development Funding: FY2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    NSF’s offices in 54 Arden L. Bement, Jr., Transformative Research: The Artistry and Alchemy of the 21st... financing for the Technology Innovation Program (TIP) increases 14.3% over FY2010 funding to $79.9 million. The construction budget declines 15.1% to $124.8...Extension Partnership Program received $124.7 million, 13.4% more than FY2009, while financing for TIP increased 7.5% to $69.9 million. Construction

  4. PDX experimental results in FY82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.M.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.

    1983-08-01

    This report presents a detailed summary of the major experimental results of PDX in FY82 and represents the efforts of the entire PDX group. Topics covered include β-scaling and fishbone studies, fluctuations, disruptions, impurities and impurity transport, power handling, limiter conditioning, edge studies, plasma fueling, counter-injection, and diagnostic development. A less detailed version will appear as the FY82 PDX contribution to the PPPL Annual Report

  5. Accelerator/Experiment operations - FY 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brice, S.; Conrad, J.; Denisov, D.; Ginther, G.; Holmes, S.; James, C.; Lee, W.; Louis, W.; Moore, C.; Plunkett, R.; Raja, R.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2006. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2006 Run II at the Tevatron Collider, the MiniBooNE experiments running in the Booster Neutrino Beam in neutrino and antineutrino modes, MINOS using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), and SY 120 activities.

  6. FY 1999 Annual Self-Evaluation Report of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randy R. LaBarge

    1999-11-05

    This is a report of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (Pacific Northwest's) FY1999 Annual Self-Evaluation Report. This report summarizes our progress toward accomplishment of the critical outcomes, objectives, and performance indicators as delineated in the FY1999 Performance Evaluation & Fee Agreement. It also summarizes our analysis of the results of Pacific Northwest's Division and Directorate annual self-assessments, and the implementation of our key operational improvement initiatives. Together, these provide an indication of how well we have used our Integrated Assessment processes to identify and plan improvements for FY2000. As you review the report you will find areas of significantly positive progress; you will also note areas where I believe the Laboratory could make improvements. Overall, however, I believe you will be quite pleased to note that we have maintained, or exceeded, the high standards of performance we have set for the Laboratory.

  7. Finite Element Analysis and Test Results Comparison for the Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the comparison of test measurements and predictive finite element analysis results for a hybrid wing body center section test article. The testing and analysis efforts were part of the Airframe Technology subproject within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. Test results include full field displacement measurements obtained from digital image correlation systems and discrete strain measurements obtained using both unidirectional and rosette resistive gauges. Most significant results are presented for the critical five load cases exercised during the test. Final test to failure after inflicting severe damage to the test article is also documented. Overall, good comparison between predicted and actual behavior of the test article is found.

  8. OSU Reactor Sharing Program FY 1995 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginbotham, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    This is the annual report of the activities supported under the Oregon State University Reactor Sharing Program, award number DE-FG06-NE38137. The beginning date for the award was September, 30, 1995 and the end date was September 29, 1996. Work conducted under this award is internally administered at the Radiation Center through a project tasking system. This allows for excellent quality control for the work which is performed from the point of initial contact, through the reactor application, project report generation and financial accounting. For the current fiscal year, FY95, the total cost of the reactor sharing program, including Radiation Center contributions, was $66,323.20 of which $40,000.00 was supplied by the DOE Reactor Sharing Program. The details of individual project costs is given in Table 1. The work performed for the individual projects are described in the brief work descriptions given in Table 2

  9. Does the Planetree patient-centered approach to care pay off?: a cost-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulmont, Michel; Roy, Chantale; Dumas, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    Although the Planetree patient-centered approach to care is being implemented in many institutions around the world, its impact is still the subject of some debate. On the one hand, it is viewed as the most cost-effective way to provide care and create a positive work environment that reduces staff burnout. On the other hand, it is argued that it requires higher staffing ratios and a substantial infusion of financial resources and is time consuming, which in turn results in more work. The present study addresses the economic agenda of the Planetree patient-centered approach to care and has been designed to answer the following question: do the advantages of the Planetree patient-centered approach outweigh its costs? This question is of considerable interest for health care administrators and managers because the relevant authorities the world over have limited resources to allocate to health care organizations. Using a trend analysis approach to cost-benefit in a rehabilitation center, this study shows that the revenues the model generates are greater than the costs of implementing it. Fewer grievances and vacant positions, an improved employee retention rate, a better working atmosphere, and a high level of employee satisfaction (higher than in similar establishments) were also noted.

  10. Biofuels Program Plan, FY 1992--FY 1996. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    This five-year program plan describes the goals and philosophy of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Biofuels Systems Division (BSD) program and the BSD`s major research and development (R&D) activities for fiscal years (FY) 1992 through 1996. The plan represents a consensus among government and university researchers, fuel and automotive manufacturers, and current and potential users of alternative fuels and fuel additives produced from biomass. It defines the activities that are necessary to produce versatile, domestic, economical, renewable liquid fuels from biomass feedstocks. The BSD program focuses on the production of alternative liquid fuels for transportation-fuels such as ethanol, methanol, biodiesel, and fuel additives for reformulated gasoline. These fuels can be produced from many plant materials and from a significant portion of the wastes generated by municipalities and industry. Together these raw materials and wastes, or feedstocks, are called biomass.

  11. FY 2004 Supplement to the President`s Budget

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — ...This Supplement to the Presidents Budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 summarizes the NITRD agencies coordinated research activities and FY 2004 plans, as required by...

  12. FY2012 CoC Competition Grants (New and Renewal)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the FY2012 renewal and new homeless assistance projects awarded by HUD for the FY2012 Continuum of Care (CoC) Program competition. Approximately...

  13. EST Table: FY036659 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FY036659 rbmte13c09 11/12/09 GO hit GO:0047800(cysteamine dioxygenase activity)|GO:...f|XP_974899.1| PREDICTED: similar to 2-aminoethanethiol (cysteamine) dioxygenase [Tribolium castaneum] FY036659 bmte ...

  14. The America COMPETES Act and the FY2009 Budget

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stine, Deborah D

    2008-01-01

    .... An issue for Congress is whether FY2009 appropriations will. The Presidents s Office of Science and Technology Policy reports that the FY2009 budget request includes funding for America COMPETES Act initiatives at 88...

  15. Johnson Space Center's Risk and Reliability Analysis Group 2008 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Mark; Boyer, Roger; Cross, Bob; Hamlin, Teri; Roelant, Henk; Stewart, Mike; Bigler, Mark; Winter, Scott; Reistle, Bruce; Heydorn,Dick

    2009-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) Directorate s Risk and Reliability Analysis Group provides both mathematical and engineering analysis expertise in the areas of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) analysis, and data collection and analysis. The fundamental goal of this group is to provide National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) decisionmakers with the necessary information to make informed decisions when evaluating personnel, flight hardware, and public safety concerns associated with current operating systems as well as with any future systems. The Analysis Group includes a staff of statistical and reliability experts with valuable backgrounds in the statistical, reliability, and engineering fields. This group includes JSC S&MA Analysis Branch personnel as well as S&MA support services contractors, such as Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) and SoHaR. The Analysis Group s experience base includes nuclear power (both commercial and navy), manufacturing, Department of Defense, chemical, and shipping industries, as well as significant aerospace experience specifically in the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and Constellation Programs. The Analysis Group partners with project and program offices, other NASA centers, NASA contractors, and universities to provide additional resources or information to the group when performing various analysis tasks. The JSC S&MA Analysis Group is recognized as a leader in risk and reliability analysis within the NASA community. Therefore, the Analysis Group is in high demand to help the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) continue to fly safely, assist in designing the next generation spacecraft for the Constellation Program (CxP), and promote advanced analytical techniques. The Analysis Section s tasks include teaching classes and instituting personnel qualification processes to enhance the professional abilities of our analysts

  16. Reliability Evaluation of Machine Center Components Based on Cascading Failure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Zhi; Liu, Jin-Tong; Shen, Gui-Xiang; Long, Zhe; Sun, Shu-Guang

    2017-07-01

    In order to rectify the problems that the component reliability model exhibits deviation, and the evaluation result is low due to the overlook of failure propagation in traditional reliability evaluation of machine center components, a new reliability evaluation method based on cascading failure analysis and the failure influenced degree assessment is proposed. A direct graph model of cascading failure among components is established according to cascading failure mechanism analysis and graph theory. The failure influenced degrees of the system components are assessed by the adjacency matrix and its transposition, combined with the Pagerank algorithm. Based on the comprehensive failure probability function and total probability formula, the inherent failure probability function is determined to realize the reliability evaluation of the system components. Finally, the method is applied to a machine center, it shows the following: 1) The reliability evaluation values of the proposed method are at least 2.5% higher than those of the traditional method; 2) The difference between the comprehensive and inherent reliability of the system component presents a positive correlation with the failure influenced degree of the system component, which provides a theoretical basis for reliability allocation of machine center system.

  17. FY 1998 evaluation/analysis of the data collected in the field test project for photovoltaic power generation for public facilities; 1998 nendo kokyo shisetsu nadoyo taiyoko hatsuden field test jigyo ni okeru shushu data hyoka kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In the field test project for the photovoltaic power generation for public facilities, operational data were collected/analyzed on facilities at 158 sites installed from FY 1994 to FY 1997. As a result, the following were found out: Average values of the global radiation on an inclined surface, equivalent array operation time, equivalent system operation time, system operation time, inverter performance efficiency, inverter load factor, array power coefficient, and system power coefficient are 3.51 kWh/m{sup 2}/D, 2.72 h/D, 2.47 h/D, 10.3 h/D, 0.91, 0.30, 0.77 and 0.70, respectively. No deterioration with age was recognized in the 4-year operation data. As to the maintenance, the item, 'there are a lot of failures in the photovoltaic power system,' was 2% in rate. As to the inspection, times are mostly once a month. The annual maintenance cost was widely between about 360 yen/kW and about 30,000 yen/kW. Supposing annual expenses to be a total of capital expense, direct expense, and general administrative expense, the power generation cost dropped from approximately 240 yen/kWh in FY 1994 to 100 yen/kWh in FY 1997. (NEDO)

  18. What Are Cancer Centers Advertising to the Public? A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B.; Donohue, Julie M.; Arnold, Robert; White, Douglas B; Chu, Edward; Schenker, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Background Although critics have expressed concerns about cancer center advertising, the content of these advertisements has not been analyzed. Objective To characterize the informational and emotional content of cancer center advertisements. Design Systematic analysis of all cancer center advertisements in top U.S. consumer magazines (N=269) and television networks (N=44) in 2012. Measurements Using a standardized codebook, we assessed (1) types of clinical services promoted; (2) information provided about clinical services, including risks, benefits, and costs; (3) use of emotional advertising appeals; and (4) use of patient testimonials. Two investigators independently coded advertisements using ATLAS.ti. Kappa values ranged from 0.77 to 1.0. Results A total of 102 cancer centers placed 409 unique clinical advertisements in top media markets in 2012. Advertisements promoted treatments (88%) more often than screening (18%) or supportive services (13%; padvertised therapies were described more often than risks (27% vs. 2%; padvertisements mentioned insurance coverage or costs (5%). Emotional appeals were frequent (85%), most often evoking hope for survival (61%), describing cancer treatment as a fight or battle (41%), and evoking fear (30%). Nearly half of advertisements included patient testimonials, usually focused on survival or cure. Testimonials rarely included disclaimers (15%) and never described the results a typical patient might expect. Limitations Internet advertisements were not included. Conclusions Clinical advertisements by cancer centers frequently promote cancer therapy using emotional appeals that evoke hope and fear while rarely providing information about risks, benefits, or costs. Further work is needed to understand how these advertisements influence patient understanding and expectations of benefit from cancer treatments. PMID:24863081

  19. 75 FR 15686 - NOAA'S Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) Strategic Plan FY 2011-FY 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ...-01] NOAA'S Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) Strategic Plan FY 2011-FY 2015 AGENCY... and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of availability and request for public comment. [[Page 15687

  20. Results from the JPL IGS Analysis Center IGS14 Reprocessing Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, P. A.; Amiri, N.; Heflin, M. B.; Sakumura, C.; Sibois, A. E.; Sibthorpe, A.; David, M. W.

    2017-12-01

    The JPL IGS analysis center has begun a campaign to reprocess GPS orbits and clocks in the IGS14 reference frame. Though the new frame is only a few millimeters offset from the previous IGb08 frame, a reprocessing is required for consistent use of the new frame due to a change in the satellite phase center offsets between the frames. We will present results on the reprocessing campaign from 2002 to present in order to evaluate any effects caused by the new frame. We also create long-term time-series and periodograms of translation, rotation, and scale parameters to see if there is any divergence between the frames. We will also process long-term PPP time series and derived velocities for a well-distributed set of stations in each frame to compare with the published frame offsets.

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a patient-centered care model for management of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsi, Kory; Chambers, Cindy J; Armstrong, April W

    2012-04-01

    Cost-effectiveness analyses help policymakers make informed decisions regarding funding allocation of health care resources. Cost-effectiveness analysis of technology-enabled models of health care delivery is necessary to assess sustainability of novel online, patient-centered health care models. We sought to compare cost-effectiveness of conventional in-office care with a patient-centered, online model for follow-up treatment of patients with psoriasis. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from a societal perspective on a randomized controlled trial comparing a patient-centered online model with in-office visits for treatment of patients with psoriasis during a 24-week period. Quality-adjusted life expectancy was calculated using the life table method. Costs were generated from the original study parameters and national averages for salaries and services. No significant difference existed in the mean change in Dermatology Life Quality Index scores between the two groups (online: 3.51 ± 4.48 and in-office: 3.88 ± 6.65, P value = .79). Mean improvement in quality-adjusted life expectancy was not significantly different between the groups (P value = .93), with a gain of 0.447 ± 0.48 quality-adjusted life years for the online group and a gain of 0.463 ± 0.815 quality-adjusted life years for the in-office group. The cost of follow-up psoriasis care with online visits was 1.7 times less than the cost of in-person visits ($315 vs $576). Variations in travel time existed among patients depending on their distance from the dermatologist's office. From a societal perspective, the patient-centered online care model appears to be cost saving, while maintaining similar effectiveness to standard in-office care. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. FY 2005 Supplement to the President`s Budget

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — The Supplement to the President`s FY 2005 Budget reports on the FY 2004 research and development R and D activities and FY 2005 plans of the multiagency Networking...

  3. FY08 VPP Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossett, Sharon D.

    2008-01-01

    The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is a recognized third-party certification of worker safety and health program excellence, based on industry best practices that focus on management leadership and employee involvement, as well as other safety and health program elements. This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) VPP Program Evaluation is the FY-2008 report of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee regarding the status of VPP at PNNL. It is an update of the previous annual report dated January, 2007 and was completed in January 2008. An annual evaluation of the status of VPP is required of all sites that participate in the DOE-VPP. This report provides a detailed summary of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee’s evaluation of program performance and documents both strengths and improvement opportunities related to the various aspects of the VPP model.

  4. Geosciences projects FY 1985 listing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    This report, which updates the previous working group publication issued in February 1982, contains independent sections: (A) Summary Outline of DOE Geoscience and Related Studies, and (B) Crosscut of DOE Geoscience and Geoscience Related Studies. The FY 1985 funding levels for geoscience and related activities in each of the 11 programs within DOE are presented. The 11 programs fall under six DOE organizations: Energy Research Conservation and Renewable Energy; Fossil Energy; Defense Programs; Environmental, Safety, and Health; and Civilian radioactive Waste. From time to time, there is particular need for special interprogrammatic coordination within certain topical areas. section B of the report is intended to fill this need for a topical categorization of the Department's geoscience and related activities. These topical areas in Solid Earth Geosciences, Atmospheric Geosciences, Ocean Geosciences, Space and Solar/Terrestrial Geosciences, and Hydrological Geosciences are presented in this report.

  5. FY 1996 annual work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-30

    In April 1994, the Department of Energy (DOE) Strategic Plan was issued. This Plan presents the Department`s strategic outlook in response to a changing world. It discusses the Department`s unique capabilities; its mission, vision, and core values; and key customer and stakeholder considerations. The DOE Strategic Plan lists business strategies and critical success factors which are intended to aid the Department in accomplishing its mission and reaching its vision of itself in the future. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) has an important role in carrying out the goals and objectives of the Secretary`s Strategic Plan. The ultimate goal of the OIG is to facilitate positive change by assisting its customers, responsible Government officials, in taking actions to improve programs and operations. The Inspector General annually issues his own Strategic Plan that contains program guidance for the next fiscal year. As part of its responsibility in carrying out the OIG mission, the Office of the Deputy Inspector General for Audit Services (Office of Audit Services) publishes an Annual Work Plan that sets forth audits that are planned for the next fiscal year. Selection of these audits is based on the overall budget of the Department, analyses of trends in Departmental operations, guidance contained in the agency`s strategic plans, statutory requirements, and the expressed needs and audit suggestions of Departmental program managers and OIG managers and staff. This work plan includes audits that are carried over from FY 1995 and audits scheduled to start during FY 1996. Audits included in the plan will be performed by OIG staff.

  6. FY 2009 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Annual Report: A Year of Energy Transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-01-01

    This FY2009 Annual Report surveys the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) accomplishments in renewable energy and energy efficiency research and development, commercialization and deployment of technologies, and strategic energy analysis. It offers NREL's vision and progress in building a clean, sustainable research campus and reports on community involvement.

  7. Clean Energy Application Centers: Annual Metrics Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Between fiscal year (FY) 2010 and 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded nine Clean Energy Application Centers (CEACs) with national coverage to promote and assist in transforming the market for Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Waste Heat to Power CHP, and district energy (DE) with CHP1. Prior to that, similar services were provided by eight Regional Application Centers (RACs). The key services that the CEACs provided were market assessments, education and outreach, and technical assistance. There were eight regional CEACs, each of which served a specific area of the country, and a separate center operated by the International District Energy Association (IDEA) which supported the regional centers with technical assistance, education, training, publicity, and outreach related to district energy with CHP. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has performed four previous studies of CEAC activities. The first one examined what the centers had done each year from the initiation of the program through FY 2008; the second addressed center activities for FY 2009; the third one focused on what was accomplished in FY 2010; and the fourth looked at the CEACs’ FY 2011 accomplishments, with a heightened emphasis on the adoption of CHP\\DE technologies and the activities thought to be most closely related to CHP/DE development and use. The most recent study, documented in this report, examines CEAC activities in FY 2012.

  8. Nonlinear Analysis and Preliminary Testing Results of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2015-01-01

    A large test article was recently designed, analyzed, fabricated, and successfully tested up to the representative design ultimate loads to demonstrate that stiffened composite panels with through-the-thickness reinforcement are a viable option for the next generation large transport category aircraft, including non-conventional configurations such as the hybrid wing body. This paper focuses on finite element analysis and test data correlation of the hybrid wing body center section test article under mechanical, pressure and combined load conditions. Good agreement between predictive nonlinear finite element analysis and test data is found. Results indicate that a geometrically nonlinear analysis is needed to accurately capture the behavior of the non-circular pressurized and highly-stressed structure when the design approach permits local buckling.

  9. FY-2007 PNNL Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Isern, Nancy G.; Madson, Vernon J.; Meicenheimer, Russell L.; Pugh, Ray; Schneirla, Keri A.; Shockey, Loretta L.; Tinker, Mike R.

    2008-08-15

    This document reports the results of the FY-2007 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  10. FY-2007 PNNL Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Isern, Nancy G.; Madson, Vernon J.; Meicenheimer, Russell L.; Pugh, Ray; Schneirla, Keri A.; Shockey, Loretta L.; Tinker, Mike R.

    2008-01-01

    This document reports the results of the FY-2007 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  11. PNNL FY2005 DOE Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Patrick A.; Madson, Vernon J.; Isern, Nancy G.; Haney, Janice M.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Gulley, Susan E.; Reck, John J.; Collins, Drue A.; Tinker, Mike R.; Walker, Landon A.; Wynn, Clifford L.

    2005-01-31

    This document reports the results of the FY 2005 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  12. Clinical process analysis and activity-based costing at a heart center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderstolpe, Lisa; Johansson, Andreas; Skau, Tommy; Rutberg, Hans; Ahlfeldt, Hans

    2002-08-01

    Cost studies, productivity, efficiency, and quality of care measures, the links between resources and patient outcomes, are fundamental issues for hospital management today. This paper describes the implementation of a model for process analysis and activity-based costing (ABC)/management at a Heart Center in Sweden as a tool for administrative cost information, strategic decision-making, quality improvement, and cost reduction. A commercial software package (QPR) containing two interrelated parts, "ProcessGuide and CostControl," was used. All processes at the Heart Center were mapped and graphically outlined. Processes and activities such as health care procedures, research, and education were identified together with their causal relationship to costs and products/services. The construction of the ABC model in CostControl was time-consuming. However, after the ABC/management system was created, it opened the way for new possibilities including process and activity analysis, simulation, and price calculations. Cost analysis showed large variations in the cost obtained for individual patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. We conclude that a process-based costing system is applicable and has the potential to be useful in hospital management.

  13. Blunt traumatic injury during pregnancy: a descriptive analysis from a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Menyar, Ayman; Sathian, Brijesh; Mekkodathil, Ahammed; Thomas, Sam; Mollazehi, Monira; Al-Sulaiti, Maryam; Abdelrahman, Husham

    2018-03-27

    The precise incidence of trauma in pregnancy is not well-known, but trauma is estimated to complicate nearly 1 in 12 pregnancies and it is the leading non-obstetrical cause of maternal death. A retrospective study of all pregnant women presented to national level 1 trauma center from July 2013 to June 2015 was conducted. Descriptive and inferential statistics applied for data analysis. Across the study period, a total of 95 pregnant women were presented to the trauma center. The average incidence rate of traumatic injuries was 250 per 1000 women of childbearing age presented to the Hamad Trauma Center. The mean age of patients was 30.4 ± SD 5.6 years, with age ranging from 20 to 42 years. The mean gestational age at the time of injury was 24.7 ± 8.7 weeks which ranged from 5 to 37 weeks. The majority (47.7%) was in the third trimester of the pregnancy. In addition, the large majority of injuries was due to MVCs (74.7%) followed by falls (15.8%). Trauma during pregnancy is not an uncommon event particularly in the traffic-related crashes. As it is a complex condition for trauma surgeons and obstetrician, an appropriate management protocol and multidisciplinary team are needed to improve the outcome and save lives of both the mother and fetus.

  14. NASA-Langley Research Center's Aircraft Condition Analysis and Management System Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Mark W.; Bailey, Roger M.; Jessup, Artie D.

    2004-01-01

    This document describes the hardware implementation design and architecture of Aeronautical Radio Incorporated (ARINC)'s Aircraft Condition Analysis and Management System (ACAMS), which was developed at NASA-Langley Research Center (LaRC) for use in its Airborne Research Integrated Experiments System (ARIES) Laboratory. This activity is part of NASA's Aviation Safety Program (AvSP), the Single Aircraft Accident Prevention (SAAP) project to develop safety-enabling technologies for aircraft and airborne systems. The fundamental intent of these technologies is to allow timely intervention or remediation to improve unsafe conditions before they become life threatening.

  15. FY-1979 progress report. Hydrotransport plugging study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyler, L.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the Hydrotransport Plugging Study is to investigate phenomena associated with predicting the onset and occurrence of plugging in pipeline transport of coal. This study addresses large particle transport plugging phenomena that may be encountered in run-of-mine operations. The project is being conducted in four tasks: review and analysis of current capabilities and available data, analytical modeling, experimental investigations, and unplugging and static start-up. This report documents work completed in FY-1979 as well as work currently in progress. A review of currently available prediction methods was completed. Applicability of the methods to large particle hydrotransport and the prediction of plugging was evaluated. It was determined that available models were inadequate, either because they are empirical and tuned to a given solid or because they are simplified analytical models incapable of accounting for a wide range of parameters. Complicated regression curve fit models lacking a physical basis cannot be extrapolated with confidence. Several specific conclusions were reached: Recent developments in mechanistic modeling, describing flow conditions at the limit of stationary deposition, provide the best basis for prediction and extrapolation of large particle flow. Certain modeled phenomena require further analytical and experimental investigation to improve confidence levels. Experimental work needs to be performed to support modeling and to provide an adequate data base for comparison purposes. No available model permits treatment of solids mixtures such as coal and rock.

  16. ENERGY RESOURCES CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, Virginia

    1979-11-01

    First I will give a short history of this Center which has had three names and three moves (and one more in the offing) in three years. Then I will tell you about the accomplishments made in the past year. And last, I will discuss what has been learned and what is planned for the future. The Energy and Environment Information Center (EEIC), as it was first known, was organized in August 1975 in San Francisco as a cooperative venture by the Federal Energy Administration (FEA), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These three agencies planned this effort to assist the public in obtaining information about energy and the environmental aspects of energy. The Public Affairs Offices of FEA, ERDA and EPA initiated the idea of the Center. One member from each agency worked at the Center, with assistance from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Information Research Group (LBL IRG) and with on-site help from the EPA Library. The Center was set up in a corner of the EPA Library. FEA and ERDA each contributed one staff member on a rotating basis to cover the daily operation of the Center and money for books and periodicals. EPA contributed space, staff time for ordering, processing and indexing publications, and additional money for acquisitions. The LBL Information Research Group received funds from ERDA on a 189 FY 1976 research project to assist in the development of the Center as a model for future energy centers.

  17. What are cancer centers advertising to the public?: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vater, Laura B; Donohue, Julie M; Arnold, Robert; White, Douglas B; Chu, Edward; Schenker, Yael

    2014-06-17

    Although critics have expressed concerns about cancer center advertising, analyses of the content of these advertisements are lacking. To characterize the informational and emotional content of direct-to-consumer cancer center advertisements. Content analysis. Top U.S. consumer magazines (n = 269) and television networks (n = 44) in 2012. Types of clinical services promoted; information provided about clinical services, including risks, benefits, costs, and insurance availability; use of emotional advertising appeals; and use of patient testimonials were assessed. Two investigators independently coded advertisements using ATLAS.ti, and κ values ranged from 0.77 to 1.00. A total of 102 cancer centers placed 409 unique clinical advertisements in top media markets in 2012. Advertisements promoted treatments (88%) more often than screening (18%) or supportive services (13%). Benefits of advertised therapies were described more often than risks (27% vs. 2%) but were rarely quantified (2%). Few advertisements mentioned coverage or costs (5%), and none mentioned specific insurance plans. Emotional appeals were frequent (85%), evoking hope for survival (61%), describing cancer treatment as a fight or battle (41%), and inducing fear (30%). Nearly one half of advertisements included patient testimonials, which were usually focused on survival, rarely included disclaimers (15%), and never described the results that a typical patient may expect. Internet advertisements were not included. Clinical advertisements by cancer centers frequently promote cancer therapy with emotional appeals that evoke hope and fear while rarely providing information about risks, benefits, costs, or insurance availability. Further work is needed to understand how these advertisements influence patient understanding and expectations of benefit from cancer treatments. National Institutes of Health.

  18. Calculations and analysis of the radiation protection of PET/CT Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.; Artinyan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been available in number of centers for more than 25 years, but its use was not wide spread until 10 years ago. In Bulgarian PET/CT was installed for the first time in 2009 in Nuclear Medicine Department in University Hospital St. Marina in Varna, Bulgaria. As a physicists the aim for us was to consider and calculate the shielding so that to protect the people and the staff. The purpose of this paper is calculating and analysis of the radiation protection and shielding of Nuclear Medicine Center including PET/CT center situated in University Hospital St. Marina in Varna, Bulgaria. Following the Recommendation of International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) Report 60, Report 73, American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 108: PET and PET/CT Shielding Requirements, Medical Physics, DIN 6844-3, Installation of Nuclear Medicine; Radiation protection calculation and the Bulgarian regulations in NM, the new Department was made. The design of the Existing Department was renovated following the requirements for PET/CT Center. The shielding was calculated for imaging room as well as the uptake room, resting room, the PET control room, places above and under the facility, patient WCs and other surrounding laboratories and stuff cabinets. The radiotracer used for the examinations is fluoro-2-desixyglucose (FDG). FDG is labeled with F-18, whose time of flight is only 109min, but it is positron emitting. The energy of annihilation is 511keV. The aim was achieved. The Department was opened. It is working now with about 15 patients every day. The dose rates measured with personal TLD’s for the last 5 years for the stuff are under 3mSv. As the average dose is around 1mSv, and the doses over 1mSv are only for nurses who injected the FDG. (authors)

  19. CAPITAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF THE MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIC-CONSULTATIVE CENTERS IN VARNA (absolute indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubomira Koeva-Dimitrova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The capital structure analysis of medical institutions is related to the assessment of their financial sustainability. The degree of their financial sustainability indicates the extent to which the medical institution is exposed to financial risk. This financial risk is related to the use of foreign capital (debts, loans, etc. and it is defined as the probability of insolvency and possible bankruptcy due to the existence of debts which could not be repaid at some point in the foreseeable future. Objective: To analyze the capital structure of the medical diagnostic-consultative centers in Varna city and on this basis to assess their long-term solvency and existence of financial risk. Materials and Methods: The materials for the study are the published annual financial statements (up to 05. 01. 2016 in the Commercial Register for the period from year 2008 to 2014 of all MDCCs (Medical Diagnostic Consultative centers, registered in Varna - 9 in total. In the study are applied logical-mathematical methods (comparison, grouping, detail, graphical method; financial and accounting analysis (balance sheet analysis; analysis of absolute ratios for financial sustainability. Results: Upon analysis of the capital structure of MDCC's are studied the main absolute indicators characterizing the conditions for financial sustainability and the existence of financial risk regarding the solvency. A table represents the overall assessment of the degree of financial sustainability of the companies according to the type and structure of the fulfilled criteria. It was ascertained that for year 2014, DCC 3, 4, 5 and 8 have met all the conditions and according to them these hospitals have very high financial sustainability. DCC 7 has an average financial sustainability, DCC 1 and 2 are in a financial crisis and DCC 6 and 9 are facing bankruptcy. It must be emphasized that nearly half of the studied health care organizations (DCC 1, 2, 6 and 9 need urgent intervention by

  20. FY1983 HTGR summary level program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The major focus and priority of the FY1983 HTGR Program is the development of the HTGR-SC/C Lead Project through one of the candidate lead utilities. Accordingly, high priority will be given to work described in WBS 04 for site and user specific studies toward the development of the Lead Project. Asessment of advanced HTGR systems will continue during FY1983 in accordance with the High Temperature Process Heat (HTPH) Concept Evaluation Plan. Within the context of that plan, the assessment of the monolithic HTPH concepts has been essentially completed in FY1982 and FY1983 activities and will be limited to documentation only. the major advanced HTGR systems efforts in FY1983 will be focused on the further definition of the Modular Reactor Systems concepts in both the reforming (MRS-R) and Steam Cycle/Cogeneration 9MRS-SC/C) configurations in WBS 41. The effort will concentrate upon key technical issues and trade studies oriented to reduction in expected cost and schedule duration. With regard to the latter, the most significant will be trade study addressing the degree of modularization of reactor plant structures. particular attention will be given to the confinement building which currently defines the critical path for construction

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center FY97--FY98 work proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    Alcator C-Mod is the high-field, high-density divertor tokamak in the world fusion program. It is one of five divertor experiments capable of plasma currents exceeding one megamp. Because of its compact dimensions, Alcator C-Mod investigates an essential area in parameter space, which complements the world's larger experiments, in establishing the tokamak physics database. Three key areas of investigation have been called out in which Alcator C-Mod has a vital role to play: (1) divertor research on C-Mod takes advantage of the advanced divertor shaping, the very high scrap-off-layer power density, unique abilities in impurity diagnosis, and the High-Z metal wall, to advance the physics understanding of this critical topic; (2) in transport studies, C-Mod is making critical tests of both empirical scalings and theoretically based interpretations of tokamak transport, at dimensional parameters that are unique but dimensionless parameters often comparable to those in much larger experiments; (3) in the area of Advanced Tokamak research, so important to concept optimization, the high-field design of the device also provides long pulse length, compared to resistive skin time, which provides an outstanding opportunity to investigate the extent to which enhanced confinement and stability can be sustained in steady-state, using active profile control. In addition to these main programmatic emphasis, important enabling research is being performed in MHD stability and control, which has great significance for the immediate design of ITER, and in the physics and engineering of ICRF, which is the main auxiliary heating method on C-Mod

  2. Applicability of fiber model in seismic response analysis for center-clamp type bushings on transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Yoshinori; Sato, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    A bushing is a device for insulation and support of a conductor. Especially it is called center-clamp type when it is connected with a metal holder through clamping force. As a consequence of damage of center-clamp type bushings in Tohoku Earthquake in 2011, refinement of the response analysis method and review of the seismic design procedure became necessary. In the present report, the fiber model, which can evaluate non-linear behavior in the section subjected to axial force and bending moment, was implemented to the CRIEPI's finite element analysis program 'Mastrd' considering following characteristics of center-clamp type bushings. a) The gasket section between a porcelain tube and a metal holder has a torus shape. b) Springs around the top of the bushing give clamping force, but they lock in excessive base rotation. c) The gasket does not resist against tension. d) Local resistance against compression due to bending increases in use of very thin gaskets. The developed program was verified through comparison with the shaking table test result for real bushings whose voltage classes were 154 kV and 275 kV. Deformation indices as rotation angle and base opening due to bending were influenced by damping conditions. Though there was not the condition which brought about remarkable underestimation, reduction of damping for a fiber model element was preferable for safety. On the other hand, bending moment was consistent with experimental results because it tended not to fluctuate in the non-linear region. (author)

  3. Failure mode and effects analysis based risk profile assessment for stereotactic radiosurgery programs at three cancer centers in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Flavia C., E-mail: flavitiz@gmail.com [CNEN—Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22290-901, Brazil and LCR/UERJ—Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas/Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20550-013 (Brazil); Almeida, Carlos E. de [LCR/UERJ—Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas/Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20550-013 (Brazil); Saiful Huq, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and quality management program for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment processes at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil by using three industrial engineering tools (1) process mapping, (2) failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), and (3) fault tree analysis. Methods: The recommendations of Task Group 100 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine were followed to apply the three tools described above to create a process tree for SRS procedure for each radiotherapy center and then FMEA was performed. Failure modes were identified for all process steps and values of risk priority number (RPN) were calculated from O, S, and D (RPN = O × S × D) values assigned by a professional team responsible for patient care. Results: The subprocess treatment planning was presented with the highest number of failure modes for all centers. The total number of failure modes were 135, 104, and 131 for centers I, II, and III, respectively. The highest RPN value for each center is as follows: center I (204), center II (372), and center III (370). Failure modes with RPN ≥ 100: center I (22), center II (115), and center III (110). Failure modes characterized by S ≥ 7, represented 68% of the failure modes for center III, 62% for center II, and 45% for center I. Failure modes with RPNs values ≥100 and S ≥ 7, D ≥ 5, and O ≥ 5 were considered as high priority in this study. Conclusions: The results of the present study show that the safety risk profiles for the same stereotactic radiotherapy process are different at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil. Although this is the same treatment process, this present study showed that the risk priority is different and it will lead to implementation of different safety interventions among the centers. Therefore, the current practice of applying universal device-centric QA is not adequate to address all possible failures in clinical processes at different

  4. Failure mode and effects analysis based risk profile assessment for stereotactic radiosurgery programs at three cancer centers in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Flavia C.; Almeida, Carlos E. de; Saiful Huq, M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate the safety and quality management program for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment processes at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil by using three industrial engineering tools (1) process mapping, (2) failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), and (3) fault tree analysis. Methods: The recommendations of Task Group 100 of American Association of Physicists in Medicine were followed to apply the three tools described above to create a process tree for SRS procedure for each radiotherapy center and then FMEA was performed. Failure modes were identified for all process steps and values of risk priority number (RPN) were calculated from O, S, and D (RPN = O × S × D) values assigned by a professional team responsible for patient care. Results: The subprocess treatment planning was presented with the highest number of failure modes for all centers. The total number of failure modes were 135, 104, and 131 for centers I, II, and III, respectively. The highest RPN value for each center is as follows: center I (204), center II (372), and center III (370). Failure modes with RPN ≥ 100: center I (22), center II (115), and center III (110). Failure modes characterized by S ≥ 7, represented 68% of the failure modes for center III, 62% for center II, and 45% for center I. Failure modes with RPNs values ≥100 and S ≥ 7, D ≥ 5, and O ≥ 5 were considered as high priority in this study. Conclusions: The results of the present study show that the safety risk profiles for the same stereotactic radiotherapy process are different at three radiotherapy centers in Brazil. Although this is the same treatment process, this present study showed that the risk priority is different and it will lead to implementation of different safety interventions among the centers. Therefore, the current practice of applying universal device-centric QA is not adequate to address all possible failures in clinical processes at different

  5. Annual Status Report (FY2008) Composite Analysis of Low-Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, W. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-12-18

    In accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements in DOE 0 435.1, Radioactive to be considered or purposes of Waste Management, and implemented by DOE/RL-2000-292, Maintenance Plan for the Composite Analysis of the Hanford Site, Southeast Washington, the DOE Richland Operations Office has prepared this annual report for fiscal year 2008 of PNNL-1 1800, Composite Analysis for the Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200-Area Plateau of the Hanford Site, hereafter referred to as the Composite Analysis. The main emphasis of DOE/RL-2000-29 Is to identify additional data and information to enhance the Composite Analysis and the subsequent PNNL- 11800 Addendum, Addendum to Composite Analysis for Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200 Area Plateau of the Hanford Site, hereafter referred to as the Addendum, and to address secondary issues identified during the review of the Composite Analysis.

  6. Graviton mass bounds from an analysis of bright star trajectories at the Galactic Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In February 2016 the LIGO & VIRGO collaboration reported the discovery of gravitational waves in merging black holes, therefore, the team confirmed GR predictions about an existence of black holes and gravitational waves in the strong gravitational field limit. Moreover, in their papers the joint LIGO & VIRGO team presented an upper limit on graviton mass such as mg < 1.2 × 10−22 eV (Abbott et al. 2016. So, the authors concluded that their observational data do not show any violation of classical general relativity. We show that an analysis of bright star trajectories could constrain graviton mass with a comparable accuracy with accuracies reached with gravitational wave interferometers and the estimate is consistent with the one obtained by the LIGO & VIRGO collaboration. This analysis gives an opportunity to treat observations of bright stars near the Galactic Center as a useful tool to obtain constraints on the fundamental gravity law such as modifications of the Newton gravity law in a weak field approximation. In that way, based on a potential reconstruction at the Galactic Center we obtain bounds on a graviton mass.

  7. MABEL at IPAC: managing address books and email lists at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Megan; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Gelino, Dawn; O'Leary, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    The Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), located on the campus of the California Institute of Technology, is NASA's multi-mission data center for infrared astrophysics. Some of IPAC's services include administering data analysis funding awards to the astronomical community, organizing conferences and workshops, and soliciting and selecting fellowship and observing proposals. As most of these services are repeated annually or biannually, it becomes necessary to maintain multiple lists of email contacts associated with each service. MABEL is a PHP/MySQL web database application designed to facilitate this process. It serves as an address book containing up-to-date contact information for thousands of recipients. Recipients may be assigned to any number of email lists categorized by IPAC project and team. Lists may be public (viewable by all project members) or private (viewable only by team members). MABEL can also be used to send HTML or plain-text emails to multiple lists at once and prevents duplicate emails to a single recipient. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. Development of Distributed Research Center for analysis of regional climatic and environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordov, E.; Shiklomanov, A.; Okladnikov, I.; Prusevich, A.; Titov, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present an approach and first results of a collaborative project being carried out by a joint team of researchers from the Institute of Monitoring of Climatic and Ecological Systems, Russia and Earth Systems Research Center UNH, USA. Its main objective is development of a hardware and software platform prototype of a Distributed Research Center (DRC) for monitoring and projecting of regional climatic and environmental changes in the Northern extratropical areas. The DRC should provide the specialists working in climate related sciences and decision-makers with accurate and detailed climatic characteristics for the selected area and reliable and affordable tools for their in-depth statistical analysis and studies of the effects of climate change. Within the framework of the project, new approaches to cloud processing and analysis of large geospatial datasets (big geospatial data) inherent to climate change studies are developed and deployed on technical platforms of both institutions. We discuss here the state of the art in this domain, describe web based information-computational systems developed by the partners, justify the methods chosen to reach the project goal, and briefly list the results obtained so far.

  9. Analysis of the Service Quality of Medical Centers Using Servqual Model (Case:Shaheed Rahnemoon Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Zare Ahmadabadi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many organizations, especially service oriented ones, relative to their goals and mission, have a special view towards quality phenomena and its management. Methods: This paper analyzes medical service quality in one case; The internal section of Shaheed Rahnemoon Hospital Based on the basis of gap analysis model and Servqual technique. A questionnaire was designed and applied to measure expectations and perceptions of patients and personnel of the hospital. Results: On application of non-parametric statistical tests, we propose certain recommendations. These tests drive on five conceptual dimensions of service quality including intangibility, responsiveness, reliability, assurance and empathy. Results show that patients in this section were satisfied from the service provider’s responsiveness, but there are significant differences between expectations and perceptions in other dimensions. Conclusion: The service quality analysis models are useful for managers of medical centers to distinguish gaps between the two sides of service representation; patients and medical centers personnel. Ultimately, they can reinforce strengths and control weaknesses.

  10. Improvements to PATRIC, the all-bacterial Bioinformatics Database and Analysis Resource Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattam, Alice R.; Davis, James J.; Assaf, Rida; Boisvert, Sébastien; Brettin, Thomas; Bun, Christopher; Conrad, Neal; Dietrich, Emily M.; Disz, Terry; Gabbard, Joseph L.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Henry, Christopher S.; Kenyon, Ronald W.; Machi, Dustin; Mao, Chunhong; Nordberg, Eric K.; Olsen, Gary J.; Murphy-Olson, Daniel E.; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Parrello, Bruce; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Vonstein, Veronika; Warren, Andrew; Xia, Fangfang; Yoo, Hyunseung; Stevens, Rick L.

    2017-01-01

    The Pathosystems Resource Integration Center (PATRIC) is the bacterial Bioinformatics Resource Center (https://www.patricbrc.org). Recent changes to PATRIC include a redesign of the web interface and some new services that provide users with a platform that takes them from raw reads to an integrated analysis experience. The redesigned interface allows researchers direct access to tools and data, and the emphasis has changed to user-created genome-groups, with detailed summaries and views of the data that researchers have selected. Perhaps the biggest change has been the enhanced capability for researchers to analyze their private data and compare it to the available public data. Researchers can assemble their raw sequence reads and annotate the contigs using RASTtk. PATRIC also provides services for RNA-Seq, variation, model reconstruction and differential expression analysis, all delivered through an updated private workspace. Private data can be compared by ‘virtual integration’ to any of PATRIC's public data. The number of genomes available for comparison in PATRIC has expanded to over 80 000, with a special emphasis on genomes with antimicrobial resistance data. PATRIC uses this data to improve both subsystem annotation and k-mer classification, and tags new genomes as having signatures that indicate susceptibility or resistance to specific antibiotics. PMID:27899627

  11. Modeling and Analysis of Multidiscipline Research Teams at NASA Langley Research Center: A Systems Thinking Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois; Jones, Kenneth M.; Silcox, Richard J.; Silva, Walter A.; Nowaczyk, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Multidisciplinary analysis and design is inherently a team activity due to the variety of required expertise and knowledge. As a team activity, multidisciplinary research cannot escape the issues that affect all teams. The level of technical diversity required to perform multidisciplinary analysis and design makes the teaming aspects even more important. A study was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop a model of multidiscipline teams that can be used to help understand their dynamics and identify key factors that influence their effectiveness. The study sought to apply the elements of systems thinking to better understand the factors, both generic and Langley-specific, that influence the effectiveness of multidiscipline teams. The model of multidiscipline research teams developed during this study has been valuable in identifying means to enhance team effectiveness, recognize and avoid problem behaviors, and provide guidance for forming and coordinating multidiscipline teams.

  12. Bayesian analysis of heterogeneous treatment effects for patient-centered outcomes research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Nicholas C; Louis, Thomas A; Wang, Chenguang; Varadhan, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of heterogeneity of treatment effect (HTE) is an essential aspect of personalized medicine and patient-centered outcomes research. Our goal in this article is to promote the use of Bayesian methods for subgroup analysis and to lower the barriers to their implementation by describing the ways in which the companion software beanz can facilitate these types of analyses. To advance this goal, we describe several key Bayesian models for investigating HTE and outline the ways in which they are well-suited to address many of the commonly cited challenges in the study of HTE. Topics highlighted include shrinkage estimation, model choice, sensitivity analysis, and posterior predictive checking. A case study is presented in which we demonstrate the use of the methods discussed.

  13. Savannah River Site sample and analysis plan for Clemson Technical Center waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagstrom, T.

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this sampling and analysis plan is to determine the chemical, physical and radiological properties of the SRS radioactive Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) liquid waste stream, to verify that it conforms to Waste Acceptance Criteria of the Department of Energy (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) Incineration Facility. Waste being sent to the ETTP TSCA Incinerator for treatment must be sufficiently characterized to ensure that the waste stream meets the waste acceptance criteria to ensure proper handling, classification, and processing of incoming waste to meet the Waste Storage and Treatment Facility's Operating Permits. This sampling and analysis plan is limited to WSRC container(s) of homogeneous or multiphasic radioactive PCB contaminated liquids generated in association with a treatability study at Clemson Technical Center (CTC) and currently stored at the WSRC Solid Waste Division Mixed Waste Storage Facility (MWSF)

  14. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Controls Systems Design and Analysis Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center maintains a critical national capability in the analysis of launch vehicle flight dynamics and flight certification of GN&C algorithms. MSFC analysts are domain experts in the areas of flexible-body dynamics and control-structure interaction, thrust vector control, sloshing propellant dynamics, and advanced statistical methods. Marshall's modeling and simulation expertise has supported manned spaceflight for over 50 years. Marshall's unparalleled capability in launch vehicle guidance, navigation, and control technology stems from its rich heritage in developing, integrating, and testing launch vehicle GN&C systems dating to the early Mercury-Redstone and Saturn vehicles. The Marshall team is continuously developing novel methods for design, including advanced techniques for large-scale optimization and analysis.

  15. Caring for family caregivers: An analysis of a family-centered intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carme Ferré-Grau

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the effectiveness of Problem-Solving Therapy (PST on family caregivers through the use of scales to measure anxiety, depression and emotional distress; and to explore facilitating factors and obstacles for its use based on the narrative of nurses. Method A clinical trial and an exploratory focus group with the use of mixed analysis methodology. The study was conducted in a primary health care center in Tarragona, Spain, and the sample consisted of 122 family caregivers who were included in the home care service, and 10 nurses who participated in the intervention group. Family caregivers with evident symptoms of anxiety, depression and emotional distress received PST in the intervention group. The intervention group also consisted of a discussion with eight nurses, which was transcribed and submitted to content analysis. Conclusion Problem-Solving Therapy proved to be effective in reducing perceived anxiety, depression and emotional distress. We identified its strong points and obstacles as described by nurses.

  16. An Analysis of Medication Errors at the Military Medical Center: Implications for a Systems Approach for Error Reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scheirman, Katherine

    2001-01-01

    An analysis was accomplished of all inpatient medication errors at a military academic medical center during the year 2000, based on the causes of medication errors as described by current research in the field...

  17. Person-centered methods configural frequency analysis (CFA) and other methods for the analysis of contingency tables

    CERN Document Server

    Stemmler, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This book takes an easy-to-understand look at the statistical approach called the person-centered method. Instead of analyzing means, variances and covariances of scale scores as in the common variable-centered approach, the person-centered approach analyzes persons or objects grouped according to their characteristic patterns or configurations in contingency tables. The main focus of the book will be on Configural Frequency Analysis (CFA; Lienert and Krauth, 1975) which is a statistical method that looks for over and under-frequented cells or patterns. Over frequented means that the observations in this cell or configuration are observed more often than expected, under-frequented means that this cell or configuration is observed less often than expected. In CFA a pattern or configuration that contains more observed cases than expected is called a type; similarly, a pattern or configuration that is less observed than expected are called an antitype. CFA is similar to log-linear modeling. In log-linear modelin...

  18. Oak Ridge National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1992--FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    In operation for fifty years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). ORNL is one of DOE's major multiprogram national laboratories. Activities at the Laboratory are focused on basic and applied research, on technology development, and on other technological challenges that are important to DOE and to the nation. The Laboratory also performs research and development (R D) for non-DOE sponsors when such activities complement DOE missions and address important national or international issues. The Laboratory is committed to the pursuit of excellence in all its activities, including the commitment to carry out its missions in compliance with environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. The principal elements of the Laboratory's missions in support of DOE include activities in each of the following areas: (1) Energy production and conservation technologies; (2) physical and life sciences; (3) scientific and technical user facilities; (4) environmental protection and waste management; (5) science technology transfer; and, (6) education. This institutional plan for ORNL activities is for the next five years: FY 1992--1997.

  19. Theoretical Division annual report, FY 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carruthers, P.A.

    1976-02-01

    This report presents an overview of the activities in the Theoretical Division and a summary of research highlights during FY 1975. It is intended to inform a wide audience about the theoretical work of the LASL and, therefore, contains introductory material which places recent advances in a broader context. The report is organized into two special interest reports: reactor safety research and the Advanced Research Committee, and 11 reports from the T-Division group leaders on the work of their respective groups. Main interests and responsibilities are outlined including the relationship of the group's work to the work of other T-Division groups and other divisions at the Laboratory. The description of research highlights for FY 1975 explains in a fairly simple, straightforward manner the major recent advances and their significance. Each group report is followed by a publication list for FY 1975 (330 references) and a list of talks given outside the Laboratory (140 references). 29 figures

  20. Defense Energy Support Center Fact Book FY 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-21

    3 M 21 years Fort Monmouth, NJ Lighting Upgrade, HVAC Renovation , UESC Implementation, GHP, Cogeneration System Site Preparation/Feasibility Ameresco...behalf of Navy Installations in the Sicily, Sardinia and Campania regions of Italy . Awards were made to two companies, ENEL Energia and Energia y...funded $333 million for SRM projects to maintain and renovate military Services owned fuels facilities worldwide . This amount was nearly double the

  1. Center for Advanced Sensors, Year One Funding (FY2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-30

    retrieve data which is stored in a PostGRE database. Each base station executes custom software developed by C. Goodwin that generates OntoSensor...update using PostGRE ODBC drivers and retrieves updated tuples corresponding to raw sensor percepts. The retrieved tuples are then post-processed

  2. Hospital image and the positioning of service centers: an application in market analysis and strategy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S M; Clark, M

    1990-09-01

    The research confirms the coexistence of different images for hospitals, service centers within the same hospitals, and service programs offered by each of the service centers. The images of individual service centers are found not to be tied to the image of the host facility. Further, service centers and host facilities have differential rankings on the same service decision attributes. Managerial recommendations are offered for "image differentiation" between a hospital and its care centers.

  3. Viability analysis for use of hydrogen as fuel in logistics centers

    OpenAIRE

    Clemente Jul, María del Carmen; Fúnez Guerra, Carlos; Nieto Calderón, Beatriz; Jaén Caparros, María; Sendarrubias Carbonero, Vanessa; Reyes Bozo, Lorenzo; Godoy-faúndez, Álex; Vyhmeister, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    The electricity cost in battery logistic center is cheaper (access to electricity grid with three period contract) that green hydrogen cost in hydrogen logistic center (hydrogen production plant, hydrogen transport and hydrogen refueling station in logistic center). The investment cost of hydrogen logistic center is cheaper (hydrogen forklift) than battery logistic center (battery forklift, second battery, battery charger and batteries area). The operation and maintenance cost for hydrogen lo...

  4. Review of research on simulation engineering in FY2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    Research on simulation engineering for nuclear applications, based on 'the plan for meeting the mid-term goal of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency', has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA). CCSE established the committee consisting outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes results of the evaluation by the committee on the followings. (1) Research and development on simulation engineering performed at CCSE/JAEA in FY2009. (2) Research and development on simulation engineering performed at CCSE/JAEA in the period of the midterm plan (October 1st, 2005 - March 31st, 2010). (author)

  5. A Comprehensive Sensitivity Analysis of a Data Center Network with Server Virtualization for Business Continuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan Anh Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity assessment of availability for data center networks (DCNs is of paramount importance in design and management of cloud computing based businesses. Previous work has presented a performance modeling and analysis of a fat-tree based DCN using queuing theory. In this paper, we present a comprehensive availability modeling and sensitivity analysis of a DCell-based DCN with server virtualization for business continuity using stochastic reward nets (SRN. We use SRN in modeling to capture complex behaviors and dependencies of the system in detail. The models take into account (i two DCell configurations, respectively, composed of two and three physical hosts in a DCell0 unit, (ii failure modes and corresponding recovery behaviors of hosts, switches, and VMs, and VM live migration mechanism within and between DCell0s, and (iii dependencies between subsystems (e.g., between a host and VMs and between switches and VMs in the same DCell0. The constructed SRN models are analyzed in detail with regard to various metrics of interest to investigate system’s characteristics. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis of system availability is carried out in consideration of the major impacting parameters in order to observe the system’s complicated behaviors and find the bottlenecks of system availability. The analysis results show the availability improvement, capability of fault tolerance, and business continuity of the DCNs complying with DCell network topology. This study provides a basis of designing and management of DCNs for business continuity.

  6. Materials characterization center workshop on compositional and microstructural analysis of nuclear waste materials. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, J.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Shade, J.W.; Thomas, M.T.

    1981-06-01

    The purpose of the Workshop on Compositional and Microstructural Analysis of Nuclear Waste Materials, conducted November 11 and 12, 1980, was to critically examine and evaluate the various methods currently used to study non-radioactive, simulated, nuclear waste-form performance. Workshop participants recognized that most of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) test data for inclusion in the Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook will result from application of appropriate analytical procedures to waste-package materials or to the products of performance tests. Therefore, the analytical methods must be reliable and of known accuracy and precision, and results must be directly comparable with those from other laboratories and from other nuclear waste materials. The 41 participants representing 18 laboratories in the United States and Canada were organized into three working groups: Analysis of Liquids and Solutions, Quantitative Analysis of Solids, and Phase and Microstructure Analysis. Each group identified the analytical methods favored by their respective laboratories, discussed areas needing attention, listed standards and reference materials currently used, and recommended means of verifying interlaboratory comparability of data. The major conclusions from this workshop are presented

  7. FY16-20 Strategic Plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwell, Amber Suzanne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Welcome to our FY16–FY20 Strategic Plan, which both refects our continued dedication to the work we do and reinforces the importance of the integrated Laboratories’ strategic framework to our future. This document is the result of the leadership team’s journey over the past few years in response to the needs of our nation. In an external environment that continues to change, sometimes in unexpected ways, it is critical that our mission areas and our foundation become increasingly synergistic, forming a whole whose parts are interdependent.

  8. KEK Engineering Department -activity report FY 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This report includes all kinds of activities of the Engineering Department of KEK from 2002 to 2003 FY. There are fourteen chapters, which contain KEK Prize for engineering, KEK meeting of engineering technologies, Engineering Seminar, COACK (Component Oriented Advanced Control Kernel) for cooperation R and D project, Forum on engineering technologies from 1998 to 2003 FY, Engineering Department Symposium, service trainings, Engineering Department research study, English training, training for professional worker, training for technical expert, report on joint training for technical expert, training for middle school students, and the Engineering Department system and the main events from 1971 to 2003. (S.Y. )

  9. NREL Partnership Survey - FY 2016 Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts an annual partnership satisfaction survey in which we ask our clients to rate NREL in a number of areas. As a national laboratory, the principal areas we focus on include value, timeliness, quality, price, and capabilities. This fact sheet shows the results of a survey with 300 customers responding to 11 questions using ratings that vary from 'strongly agree' to 'strongly disagree.' In FY 16, 100% of the scores improved or were equal to FY 15 numbers.

  10. Accelerator/Experiment Operations - FY 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarapata, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); et al.

    2015-10-01

    This Technical Memorandum summarizes the Fermilab accelerator and experiment operations for FY 2015. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the FY 2015 NOvA, MINOS+ and MINERvA experiments using the Main Injector Neutrino Beam (NuMI), the activities in the SciBooNE Hall using the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB), and the SeaQuest experiment and Meson Test Beam (MTest) activities in the 120 GeV external Switchyard beam (SY120).

  11. Test plan for FY-94 digface characterization field experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josten, N.E.; Roybal, L.G.

    1994-08-01

    The digface characterization concept has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since fiscal year (FY) 1992 through the support of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program. A digface characterization system conducts continuous subsurface characterization simultaneously with retrieval of hazardous and radioactive waste from buried waste sites. The system deploys multiple sensors at the retrieval operation digface and collects data that provide a basis for detecting, locating, and classifying buried materials and hazardous conditions before they are disturbed by the retrieval equipment. This test plan describes ongoing efforts to test the digface characterization concept at the INEL's Cold Test Pit using a simplified prototype deployment apparatus and off-the-shelf sensors. FY-94 field experiments will explore problems in object detection and classification. Detection and classification of objects are fundamental to three of the four primary functions of digface characterization during overburden removal. This test plan establishes procedures for collecting and validating the digface characterization data sets. Analysis of these data will focus on testing and further developing analysis methods for object detection and classification during overburden removal

  12. Radon Research Program, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    The scientific information being sought in this program encompasses research designed to determine radon availability and transport outdoors, modeling transport into and within buildings, physics and chemistry of radon and radon progeny, dose response relationships, lung cancer risk, and mechanisms of radon carcinogenesis. The main goal of the DOE/OHER Radon Research Program is to develop information to reduce these uncertainties and thereby provide an improved health risk estimate of exposure to radon and its progeny as well as to provide information useful in radon control strategies. Results generated under the Program were highlighted in a National Research Council report on radon dosimetry. The study concluded that the risk of radon exposure is 30% less in homes than in mines. This program summary of book describes the OHER FY-1991 Radon Research Program. It is the fifth in an annual series of program books designed to provide scientific and research information to the public and to other government agencies on the DOE Radon Research Program

  13. Radon Research Program, FY-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has established a Radon Research Program with the primary objectives of acquiring knowledge necessary to improve estimates of health risks associated with radon exposure and also to improve radon control. Through the Radon Research Program, OHER supports and coordinates the research activities of investigators at facilities all across the nation. From this research, significant advances are being made in our understanding of the health effects of radon. OHER publishes this annual report to provide information to interested researchers and the public about its research activities. This edition of the report summarizes the activities of program researchers during FY90. Chapter 2 of this report describes how risks associated with radon exposure are estimated, what assumptions are made in estimating radon risks for the general public, and how the uncertainties in these assumptions affect the risk estimates. Chapter 3 examines how OHER, through the Radon Research Program, is working to gather information for reducing the uncertainties and improving the risk estimates. Chapter 4 highlights some of the major findings of investigators participating in the Radon Research Program in the past year. And, finally, Chapter 5 discusses the direction in which the program is headed in the future. 20 figs

  14. Los Alamos Waste Management FY96 and FY97 Tactical Plan, March 1, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Waste Management Program (WMP) began a transition to become a open-quotes best of classclose quotes waste management program during fiscal year 1995 (FY95). A best of class waste management program means that LANL will provide cost-effective and compliant management of the minimum amount of waste. In FY94, the WMP could be characterized as a level of effort program requiring several new facilities and new LANL-developed technologies to carry out its waste management responsibilities. By the end of FY95, significant progress had been made in the transition to best of class. The FY96 WMP is realigned and reorganized. Its budget and scope of work are built upon discrete work packages. It is committed to achieving improved cost-effectiveness, providing significant tangible technical results, and to having its performance measured. During FY95, over $11,000,000 in facility and operational costs were avoided. The need for three new major facilities was reexamined and lower cost solutions, not requiring the development of new facilities, were agreed to. Technology development activities were terminated and replaced with the use of commercial facilities to achieve aggressive reductions in the Low-Level Mixed Waste legacy inventory. In addition, over $14,000,000 in improved cost-effectiveness has been included in the FY96 Baseline. An overall WMP vision, specific milestones, performance measures, and commitments are in place for FY96 to ensure that LANL continues the transition to a best of class waste management program. The following table identifies the overall vision and success indicators for FY96

  15. Strategy for Self-Centered Development from the Perspective of an Historical Analysis of Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Pérez Sánchez

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available After acknowledging the three phases of historical analysis of development, and especially considering the research work done in the last twenty-five years by the Germans Dieter Sengcheus and Ulrich Mezel, the author presents the principle elements of a self-centered development strategy which highlights the following perspectives:dissociation, economic restructuring, and the new forms of an international division of labor among Third World economies.This document calls into question the underlying operation of the conventional theory of development and its current policy, which call for the increasing integration of the Third World in the world market as a means of going beyond development as it is commonly understood. Though being an integral element in the theory of self-centereddevelopment, temporary dissociation from the world market is proposed. The justification for the strategy of dissociation, excepting the recourse to some historical and paradigmatic reflections sketched by Friedrich List, has kept itself, of necessity, to the global and abstract level. This position is nothing, however, but a most direct analytical result deduced fromthe principle theoretical beginnings and the empirical observations of both the Theory of Dependence and Peripheral Capitalism. Although the review vents its criticism on (and mainly questions the practicality of the aforesaid conception, a more penetratingunderstanding of what the wager for such a strategy entails is found. Thus, the notion of self-centered development influences and gives impulse to a most extensive ideologicallymarked debate about the alternative conceptions of development.

  16. Analysis of crack opening stresses for center- and edge-crack tension specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Di-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate determination of crack opening stress is of central importance to fatigue crack growth analysis and life prediction based on the crack-closure model. This paper studies the crack opening behavior for center- and edge-crack tension specimens. It is found that the crack opening stress is affected by the crack tip element. By taking the crack tip element into account, a modified crack opening stress equation is given for the center-crack tension specimen. Crack surface displacement equations for an edge crack in a semi-infinite plate under remote uniform tension and partially distributed pressure are derived by using the weight function method. Based on these displacements, a crack opening stress equation for an edge crack in a semi-infinite plate under uniform tension has been developed. The study shows that the crack opening stress is geometry-dependent, and the weight function method provides an effective and reliable tool to deal with such geometry dependence.

  17. Information management for global environmental change, including the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

    1994-06-01

    The issue of global change is international in scope. A body of international organizations oversees the worldwide coordination of research and policy initiatives. In the US the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) was established in November of 1993 to provide coordination of science, space, and technology policies throughout the federal government. NSTC is organized into nine proposed committees. The Committee on Environmental and Natural Resources (CERN) oversees the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). As part of the USGCRP, the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program aims to improve the understanding of Earth systems and to strengthen the scientific basis for the evaluation of policy and government action in response to potential global environmental changes. This paper examines the information and data management roles of several international and national programs, including Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) global change information programs. An emphasis will be placed on the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which also serves as the World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases.

  18. Pilot project for a commercial buildings Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Center (EADC) program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capehart, B.L.

    1996-02-01

    Commercial energy use costs businesses around $70 billion annually. Many of these businesses are small and medium sized organizations that do not have the resources to help themselves, or to pay for professional engineering services to help reduce their energy costs and improve their economic competitiveness. Energy cost reduction actions with payback times of around two years could save the commercial sector 15--20%, or $10--$15 billion per year. This project was initially intended to evaluate the feasibility of performing commercial energy audits as an adjunct to the industrial audit program run by the US Department of Energy Industrial Office. This program is housed in 30 universities throughout the United States. Formerly known as Energy Analysis and Diagnostic Centers (EADC`s), the university programs are now called Industrial Assessment Centers (IAC`s) to reflect their expansion from energy use analyses to include waste and productivity analyses. The success of the EADC/IAC program in helping the manufacturing sector provides an excellent model for a similar program in the commercial buildings sector. This project has investigated using the EADC/IAC approach to performing energy audits for the commercial sector, and has determined that such an approach is feasible and cost effective.

  19. Appendices to report on DOE analytical laboratory capacity available to meet EM environmental sampling and analysis needs for FY 93-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The DOE Analytical Laboratory Capacity Study was conducted to give EM-263 current information about existing and future analytical capacities and capabilities of site laboratories within the DOE Complex. Each DOE site may have one or more analytical laboratories in operation. These facilities were established to support site missions such as production, research and development, and personnel and environmental monitoring. With changing site missions and the DOE directives for environmental monitoring and cleanup, these laboratories are either devoting or planning to devote resources to support EM activities. The DOE site laboratories represent a considerable amount of capital investment and analytical capability, capacity, and expertise that can be applied to support the EM mission. They not only provide cost-effective high-volume analytical laboratory services, but are also highly recognized analytical research and development centers. Several sites have already transferred their analytical capability from traditional production support to environmental monitoring and waste management support. A model was developed to determine the analytical capacity of all laboratories in the DOE Complex. The model was applied at nearly all the major laboratories and the results collected from these studies are summarized in this report

  20. High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor With Results from FY-2011 Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Pope

    2011-10-01

    The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450

  1. Measuring Efficiency of Knowledge Production in Health Research Centers Using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA): A Case Study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mohammad Meskarpour; Nasiri, Taha; Saadat, Seyed Hassan; Anabad, Hosein Amini; Ardakan, Payman Mahboobi

    2016-11-01

    Efficiency analysis is necessary in order to avoid waste of materials, energy, effort, money, and time during scientific research. Therefore, analyzing efficiency of knowledge production in health areas is necessary, especially for developing and in-transition countries. As the first step in this field, the aim of this study was the analysis of selected health research center efficiency using data envelopment analysis (DEA). This retrospective and applied study was conducted in 2015 using input and output data of 16 health research centers affiliated with a health sciences university in Iran during 2010-2014. The technical efficiency of health research centers was evaluated based on three basic data envelopment analysis (DEA) models: input-oriented, output-oriented, and hyperbolic-oriented. The input and output data of each health research center for years 2010-2014 were collected from the Iran Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHE) profile and analyzed by R software. The mean efficiency score in input-oriented, output-oriented, and hyperbolic-oriented models was 0.781, 0.671, and 0.798, respectively. Based on results of the study, half of the health research centers are operating below full efficiency, and about one-third of them are operating under the average efficiency level. There is also a large gap between health research center efficiency relative to each other. It is necessary for health research centers to improve their efficiency in knowledge production through better management of available resources. The higher level of efficiency in a significant number of health research centers is achievable through more efficient management of human resources and capital. Further research is needed to measure and follow the efficiency of knowledge production by health research centers around the world and over a period of time.

  2. Alternative Electrochemical Salt Waste Forms, Summary of FY11-FY12 Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mccloy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lepry, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rodriguez, Carmen P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Windisch, Charles F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Matyas, Josef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westman, Matthew P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rieck, Bennett T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lang, Jesse B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olszta, Matthew J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-01-17

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, is currently investigating alternative waste forms for wastes generated from nuclear fuel processing. One such waste results from an electrochemical separations process, called the “Echem” process. The Echem process utilizes a molten KCl-LiCl salt to dissolve the fuel. This process results in a spent salt containing alkali, alkaline earth, lanthanide halides and small quantities of actinide halides, where the primary halide is chloride with a minor iodide fraction. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is concurrently investigating two candidate waste forms for the Echem spent-salt: high-halide minerals (i.e., sodalite and cancrinite) and tellurite (TeO2)-based glasses. Both of these candidates showed promise in fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY2010 with a simplified nonradioactive simulant of the Echem waste. Further testing was performed on these waste forms in FY2011 and FY2012 to assess the possibility of their use in a sustainable fuel cycle. This report summarizes the combined results from FY2011 and FY2012 efforts.

  3. Distributed Research Center for Analysis of Regional Climatic Changes and Their Impacts on Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiklomanov, A. I.; Okladnikov, I.; Gordov, E. P.; Proussevitch, A. A.; Titov, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    Presented is a collaborative project carrying out by joint team of researchers from the Institute of Monitoring of Climatic and Ecological Systems, Russia and Earth Systems Research Center, University of New Hampshire, USA. Its main objective is development of a hardware and software prototype of Distributed Research Center (DRC) for monitoring and projecting of regional climatic and and their impacts on the environment over the Northern extratropical areas. In the framework of the project new approaches to "cloud" processing and analysis of large geospatial datasets (big geospatial data) are being developed. It will be deployed on technical platforms of both institutions and applied in research of climate change and its consequences. Datasets available at NCEI and IMCES include multidimensional arrays of climatic, environmental, demographic, and socio-economic characteristics. The project is aimed at solving several major research and engineering tasks: 1) structure analysis of huge heterogeneous climate and environmental geospatial datasets used in the project, their preprocessing and unification; 2) development of a new distributed storage and processing model based on a "shared nothing" paradigm; 3) development of a dedicated database of metadata describing geospatial datasets used in the project; 4) development of a dedicated geoportal and a high-end graphical frontend providing intuitive user interface, internet-accessible online tools for analysis of geospatial data and web services for interoperability with other geoprocessing software packages. DRC will operate as a single access point to distributed archives of spatial data and online tools for their processing. Flexible modular computational engine running verified data processing routines will provide solid results of geospatial data analysis. "Cloud" data analysis and visualization approach will guarantee access to the DRC online tools and data from all over the world. Additionally, exporting of data

  4. Argonne National Laboratory institutional plan FY 2002 - FY 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beggs, S. D.

    2001-01-01

    The national laboratory system provides a unique resource for addressing the national needs inherent in the mission of the Department of Energy. Argonne, which grew out of Enrico Fermi's pioneering work on the development of nuclear power, was the first national laboratory and, in many ways, has set the standard for those that followed. As the Laboratory's new director, I am pleased to present the Argonne National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2002 through FY 2007 on behalf of the extraordinary group of scientists, engineers, technicians, administrators, and others who re responsible for the Laboratory's distinguished record of achievement. Like our sister DOE laboratories, Argonne uses a multifaceted approach to advance U.S. R and D priorities. First, we assemble interdisciplinary teams of scientists and engineers to address complex problems. For example, our initiative in Functional Genomics will bring together biologists, computer scientists, environmental scientists, and staff of the Advanced Photon Source to develop complete maps of cellular function. Second, we cultivate specific core competencies in science and technology; this Institutional Plan discusses the many ways in which our core competencies support DOE's four mission areas. Third, we serve the scientific community by designing, building, and operating world-class user facilities, such as the Advanced Photon Source, the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, and the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System. This Plan summarizes the visions, missions, and strategic plans for the Laboratory's existing major user facilities, and it explains our approach to the planned Rare Isotope Accelerator. Fourth, we help develop the next generation of scientists and engineers through educational programs, many of which involve bright young people in research. This Plan summarizes our vision, objectives, and strategies in the education area, and it gives statistics on student and faculty participation. Finally, we

  5. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis: Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    The US Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. The FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), which is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted State(s) and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division (M ampersand A) is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, and quality assurance. To assure consistency, completeness, and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures manual is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets, and operations of the FRMAC M ampersand A and the content and preparation of the manual

  6. Illustrative Example of Distributed Analysis in ATLAS Spanish Tier-2 and Tier-3 centers

    CERN Document Server

    Oliver, E; The ATLAS collaboration; González de la Hoz, S; Kaci, M; Lamas, A; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Villaplana, M

    2011-01-01

    Data taking in ATLAS has been going on for more than one year. The necessity of a computing infrastructure for data storage, access for thousands of users and process of hundreds of million of events has been confirmed in this period. Fortunately, this task has been managed by the GRID infrastructure and the manpower that also has been developing specific GRID tools for the ATLAS community. An example of a physics analysis, searches for the decay of a heavy resonance into a ttbar pair, using this infrastructure is shown. Concretely using the ATLAS Spanish Tier-2 and the IFIC Tier-3. In this moment, the ATLAS Distributed Computing group is working to improve the connectivity among centers in order to be ready for the foreseen increase on the ATLAS activity in the next years.

  7. Analysis of Parallelogram Mechanism used to Preserve Remote Center of Motion for Surgical Telemanipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trochimczuk R.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of a parallelogram mechanism commonly used to provide a kinematic remote center of motion in surgical telemanipulators. Selected types of parallel manipulator designs, encountered in commercial and laboratory-made designs described in the medical robotics literature, will serve as the research material. Among other things, computer simulations in the ANSYS 13.0 CAD/CAE software environment, employing the finite element method, will be used. The kinematics of the solution of manipulator with the parallelogram mechanism will be determined in order to provide a more complete description. These results will form the basis for the decision regarding the possibility of applying a parallelogram mechanism in an original prototype of a telemanipulator arm.

  8. Service utilization in community health centers in China: a comparison analysis with local hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaohang

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being an important part of China's Urban Health Care Reform System, Community Health Centers (CHCs have been established throughout the entire country and are presently undergoing substantial reconstruction. However, the services being delivered by the CHCs are far from reaching their performance targets. In order to assess the role of the CHCs, we examined their performance in six cities located in regions of South-East China. The purpose of this investigation was to identify the utilization and the efficiency of community health resources that are able to provide basic medical and public health services. Methods The study was approved by Peking University Health Science Center Institutional Reviewing Board (NO: IRB00001052-T1. Data were collected from all the local health bureaux and processed using SPSS software. Methods of analysis mainly included: descriptive analysis, paired T-test and one-way ANOVA. Results The six main functions of the CHCs were not fully exploited and the surveys that were collected on their efficiency and utilization of resources indicate that they have a low level of performance and lack the trust of local communities. Furthermore, the CHCs seriously lack funding support and operate under difficult circumstances, and residents have less positive attitudes towards them. Conclusion The community health service must be adjusted according to the requirements of urban medical and health reform, taking into account communities' health needs. More research is required on the living standards and health needs of residents living within the CHC's range, taking into consideration the users' needs in expanding the newly implemented service, and at the same time revising the old service system so as to make the development of CHCs realistic and capable of providing a better service to patients. Several suggestions are put forward for an attainable scheme for developing a community health service.

  9. Centers responsible for the TL peaks of willemite mineral estimated by EPR analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundu Rao, T.K. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cano, Nilo F., E-mail: nilo.cano@unifesp.br [Departamento de Ciências do Mar, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Doutor Carvalho de Mendonça, 144, CEP 11070-102, Santos, SP (Brazil); Silva-Carrera, Betzabel N.; Ferreira, Reinaldo M. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Javier-Ccallata, Henry S., E-mail: henrysjc@gmail.com [Escuela Profesional de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Formales, Universidad Nacional de San Agustín (UNSA), Av. Independencia S/N, Arequipa (Peru); Watanabe, Shigueo, E-mail: watanabe@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão, Travessa R, 187, CEP 05508-090, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    The mineral willemite (Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) exhibits five thermoluminescence (TL) peaks approximately at 160, 225, 260, 310 and 400 °C. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies were carried out to study the defect centers induced in the mineral by gamma irradiation and also to identify the centers responsible for the TL process. Room temperature EPR spectrum of irradiated mineral is a superposition of at least four distinct centers. One of the centers (center I) with an isotropic g factor 2.0114 is attributable to an intrinsic O{sup −} type center and the center correlates with the TL peak at 160 °C. Center II exhibiting hyperfine lines is also tentatively assigned to an O{sup −} ion and is related to the low temperature TL peak at 160 °C. Center III is characterized by an axially symmetric g-tensor with principal values g{sub ||}=2.0451 and g{sub ⊥}=2.011 and is identified as an O{sub 2}{sup −} ion. This center appears to be related to 160, 225 and 260 °C TL peaks. Center IV with principal g-values g{sub ||}=2.0025 and g{sub ⊥}=2.0088 is attributed to an F{sup +}-type center (singly ionized oxygen vacancy) and is the likely recombination center for TL peaks between 160 and 310 °C.

  10. Investigating student communities with network analysis of interactions in a physics learning center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Brewe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing a sense of community among students is one of the three pillars of an overall reform effort to increase participation in physics, and the sciences more broadly, at Florida International University. The emergence of a research and learning community, embedded within a course reform effort, has contributed to increased recruitment and retention of physics majors. We utilize social network analysis to quantify interactions in Florida International University’s Physics Learning Center (PLC that support the development of academic and social integration. The tools of social network analysis allow us to visualize and quantify student interactions and characterize the roles of students within a social network. After providing a brief introduction to social network analysis, we use sequential multiple regression modeling to evaluate factors that contribute to participation in the learning community. Results of the sequential multiple regression indicate that the PLC learning community is an equitable environment as we find that gender and ethnicity are not significant predictors of participation in the PLC. We find that providing students space for collaboration provides a vital element in the formation of a supportive learning community.

  11. Investigating student communities with network analysis of interactions in a physics learning center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, Eric; Kramer, Laird; Sawtelle, Vashti

    2012-06-01

    Developing a sense of community among students is one of the three pillars of an overall reform effort to increase participation in physics, and the sciences more broadly, at Florida International University. The emergence of a research and learning community, embedded within a course reform effort, has contributed to increased recruitment and retention of physics majors. We utilize social network analysis to quantify interactions in Florida International University’s Physics Learning Center (PLC) that support the development of academic and social integration. The tools of social network analysis allow us to visualize and quantify student interactions and characterize the roles of students within a social network. After providing a brief introduction to social network analysis, we use sequential multiple regression modeling to evaluate factors that contribute to participation in the learning community. Results of the sequential multiple regression indicate that the PLC learning community is an equitable environment as we find that gender and ethnicity are not significant predictors of participation in the PLC. We find that providing students space for collaboration provides a vital element in the formation of a supportive learning community.

  12. Environmental Cost Analysis System (ECAS) Status and Compliance Requirements for EM Consolidated Business Center Contracts - 13204

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, P.C.; Moe, M.A.; Hombach, W.G.; Urdangaray, R.

    2013-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has developed a web-accessible database to collect actual cost data from completed EM projects to support cost estimating and analysis. This Environmental Cost Analysis System (ECAS) database was initially deployed in early 2009 containing the cost and parametric data from 77 decommissioning, restoration, and waste management projects completed under the Rocky Flats Closure Project. In subsequent years we have added many more projects to ECAS and now have a total of 280 projects from 8 major DOE sites. This data is now accessible to DOE users through a web-based reporting tool that allows users to tailor report outputs to meet their specific needs. We are using it as a principal resource supporting the EM Consolidated Business Center (EMCBC) and the EM Applied Cost Engineering (ACE) team cost estimating and analysis efforts across the country. The database has received Government Accountability Office review as supporting its recommended improvements in DOE's cost estimating process, as well as review from the DOE Office of Acquisition and Project Management (APM). Moving forward, the EMCBC has developed a Special Contract Requirement clause or 'H-Clause' to be included in all current and future EMCBC procurements identifying the process that contractors will follow to provide DOE their historical project data in a format compatible with ECAS. Changes to DOE O 413.3B implementation are also in progress to capture historical costs as part of the Critical Decision project closeout process. (authors)

  13. Analysis of the formation mechanism of the slug and jet center hole of axisymmetric shaped charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baoxiang, Ren; Gang, Tao; Peng, Wen; Changxing, Du; Chunqiao, Pang; Hongbo, Meng

    2018-06-01

    In the jet formation process of axisymmetric shaped charges, the slug is also formed. There is always a central hole in the symmetry axis of the jet and slug. The phenomenon was rarely mentioned and analyzed by the classical theory of shaped charges. For this problem, this paper attempts to explain the existence of the central hole in the jet and slug. Based on the analysis of recovery slug, we know that the jet and slug are in solid state in the process of formation. Through the analysis of X-flash radiographs of the stretching jet and particulation fracture, it is confirmed that the center holes in the jet are also present. Meanwhile, through the analysis of the microstructure of the recovered slug, it is found that there is a wave disturbance near the surface of the central hole. It can be speculated that the wave disturbance also exist in the jet. This effect may be one of the reasons for jet breakup. Due to the presence of the central hole in the jet, the density deficit of the jet obtained by other tests is very reasonable.

  14. Final report of the specific research. Investigations on the analysis of bio-protective factors against radiation. 1998-2000 FY (Research Group of NIRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    This report concerns investigations in the title conducted by 8 groups of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) during the period of 1998-2000. The groups are for investigation of: Effects of p53 tumor suppressor gene in radiation-induced leukemia, Role of atm-gene in dose rate effect of ionizing radiation, Function of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PK{sub cs}), Functional complementation of radiation-sensitive mutant M10 cell line by human XRCC4 cDNA expression, Role of radiation-induced apoptosis in digital defects in embryonic mice, Functional analysis of S-phase specific novel nuclear protein NP95 by gene targeting, Role of chemokine in T cell development and lymphomagenesis, and establishment of production techniques of gene-modified mice using embryonic stem cells for genetic analysis of radiation-sensitive genes. The groups describe summaries of their studies and published original articles are also given. (N.I.)

  15. Final report of the specific research. Investigations on the analysis of bio-protective factors against radiation. 1998-2000 FY (Research Group of NIRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    This report concerns investigations in the title conducted by 8 groups of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) during the period of 1998-2000. The groups are for investigation of: Effects of p53 tumor suppressor gene in radiation-induced leukemia, Role of atm-gene in dose rate effect of ionizing radiation, Function of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PK cs ), Functional complementation of radiation-sensitive mutant M10 cell line by human XRCC4 cDNA expression, Role of radiation-induced apoptosis in digital defects in embryonic mice, Functional analysis of S-phase specific novel nuclear protein NP95 by gene targeting, Role of chemokine in T cell development and lymphomagenesis, and establishment of production techniques of gene-modified mice using embryonic stem cells for genetic analysis of radiation-sensitive genes. The groups describe summaries of their studies and published original articles are also given. (N.I.)

  16. Sustainability Logistics Basing - Science and Technology Objective - Demonstration; 50, 300, 1000- Person Base Camp, Analysis of FY12 Operationally Relevant Technical Baseline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Moreover, while fuel and water consumption , waste generation, and Soldier Operational Quality of Life (QoL (O)) are key metrics in the design and...values shown do not include fuel used outside of the basecamp for missions. The water values shown do not include water for human consumption . The...for the analysis of materiel and non-materiel solutions that could reduce fuel and water consumption as well as generation and back-haul of waste in

  17. FY12 Final Report for PL10-Mod Separations-PD12: Electrochemically Modulated Separation of Plutonium from Dilute and Concentrated Dissolver Solutions for Analysis by Gamma Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Sandra H.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Duckworth, Douglas C.; Cloutier, Janet M.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-05-01

    Accurate and timely analysis of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel is critical in nuclear safeguards for detection of both protracted and rapid plutonium diversions. Gamma spectroscopy is a viable method for accurate and timely measurements of plutonium provided that the plutonium is well separated from the interfering fission and activation products present in spent nuclear fuel. Electrochemically modulated separation (EMS) is a method that has been used successfully to isolate picogram amounts of Pu from nitric acid matrices. With EMS, Pu adsorption may be turned “on” and “off” depending on the applied voltage, allowing for collection and stripping of Pu without the addition of chemical reagents. In this work, we have scaled up the EMS process to isolate microgram quantities of Pu from matrices encountered in spent nuclear fuel during reprocessing. Several challenges have been addressed including surface area limitations, radiolysis effects, electrochemical cell performance stability, and chemical interferences. After these challenges were resolved, 6 µg Pu was deposited in the electrochemical cell with approximately an 800-fold reduction of fission and activation product levels from a spent nuclear fuel sample. Modeling showed that these levels of Pu collection and interference reduction may not be sufficient for Pu detection by gamma spectroscopy. The main remaining challenges are to achieve a more complete Pu isolation and to deposit larger quantities of Pu for successful gamma analysis of Pu. If gamma analyses of Pu are successful, EMS will allow for accurate and timely on-site analysis for enhanced Pu safeguards.

  18. LANL FY11 activities(u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon, Ezekiel D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-06

    Briefings presenting W78 programmatic activities for FY11 and the status and plan for associated Hydro 3617, is included wherewith in support of the NNSA W78 Program Review Meetings scheduled for January 11 thru 13, 2011, at the Savannah River Plant, SC.

  19. Federal Research and Development Funding: FY2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    NIA ) 1,120 1,103 1,102 1,124 1,040 Arthritis/Musculoskeletal/Skin (NIAMS) 535 536 535 537 505 Deafness/Communication Disorders (NIDCD) 416 417...Secretary’s net transfer of $18.273 million for Alzheimer’s disease research to National Institute on Aging ( NIA ) from other ICs. FY2012 figures are shown on

  20. Audit and Evaluation Plan FY 2002

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... These projects also have been coordinated in the joint audit and inspection planning groups that address coverage in each major functional area. The plan also includes audit policy and oversight projects planned to start in FY 2002; however, intelligence coverage will be addressed separately.

  1. SERI Biomass Program. FY 1983 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corder, R.E.; Hill, A.M.; Lindsey, H.; Lowenstein, M.Z.; McIntosh, R.P.

    1984-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress and research accomplishments of the SERI Biomass Program during FY 1983. The SERI Biomass Program consists of three elements: Aquatic Species, Anaerobic Digestion, and Photo/Biological Hydrogen. Each element has been indexed separately. 2 references, 44 figures, 22 tables.

  2. Transmutation Fuels Campaign FY-09 Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lori Braase

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year 2009 (FY-08) accomplishments for the Transmutation Fuels Campaign (TFC). The emphasis is on the accomplishments and relevance of the work. Detailed description of the methods used to achieve the highlighted results and the associated support tasks are not included in this report.

  3. Advanced Energy Projects: FY 1993, Research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    AEP has been supporting research on novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, new uses for scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction, etc. The summaries are grouped according to projects active in FY 1993, Phase I SBIR projects, and Phase II SBIR projects. Investigator and institutional indexes are included

  4. FY2011 Budget Proposals and Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    and FY2009, and corporate income tax receipts fell even more sharply. Federal deficits, according to OMB and CBO projections, will likely be high...gains receipts can be especially sensitive to cyclical economic conditions. Asset values and corporate profits—and thus federal corporate income tax and

  5. Feedstock Interface Fy2017 Q3 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, Danny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Howe, Daniel [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westover, Tyler [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klinger, HJordan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hernandez, Sergio [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-10

    This report summarized the results obtained in FY2017 Q3 of a collaborative effort between researchers at NREL, PNNL, and INL to develop rapid screening methods and models to predict the fact pyrolysis conversion performance of a range of biomass materials.

  6. Institutional research and development, FY 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Lawler, G.M.; Crawford, R.B.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.M.; Prono, J.K.; Strack, B.S. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    The Institutional Research and Development program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory fosters exploratory work to advance science and technology, disciplinary research to develop innovative solutions to problems in various scientific fields, and long-term interdisciplinary research in support of defense and energy missions. This annual report describes research funded under this program for FY87. (DWL)

  7. Repository Technology Program activities, FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Thorpe, R.K.; Knapp, R.B.

    1989-07-01

    Our technical activities in FY 1988 included instrument selection and evaluation, calculational work, and simulator development. Near the end of the fiscal year, we began preparing several topical reports to document our results. This fiscal year, we continued developing three-dimensional numerical simulators to model coupled hydrologic-and mechanical-rock mass responses and, thus, to provide representative numerical tools for understanding and calculating these in situ processes. We also began scoping calculations in the second half of FY 1988 to evaluate ERE design criteria, but this work was redirected late in the year when the DOE/AECL Subsidiary Agreement was set aside. Our work in developing and evaluating experimental techniques focused on total pressure measurements, moisture content measurement, and tracer detection instrumentation for sealing experiments and for rock-mass-response field tests. At the end of the fiscal year, we completed a review of measurement technology for instrumenting migration/sorption tests to help define the technological requirements in these areas. By the end of FY 1988, we had completed a review of the existing codes for simulating reactive transport; we are using the results of this review to help formulate plans for future activities in this area. The following sections describe the major RTP tasks and activities at LLNL in more detail, and they include our FY 1988 accomplishments in these areas. 8 refs., 22 figs

  8. Institutional research and development, FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, G.L.; Lawler, G.M.; Crawford, R.B.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.M.; Prono, J.K.; Strack, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    The Institutional Research and Development program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory fosters exploratory work to advance science and technology, disciplinary research to develop innovative solutions to problems in various scientific fields, and long-term interdisciplinary research in support of defense and energy missions. This annual report describes research funded under this program for FY87

  9. Advanced Energy Projects: FY 1993, Research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    AEP has been supporting research on novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, new uses for scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction, etc. The summaries are grouped according to projects active in FY 1993, Phase I SBIR projects, and Phase II SBIR projects. Investigator and institutional indexes are included.

  10. FY 2012 Lightweight Materials Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-04-15

    The FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Lightweight Materials provides a detailed description of the activities and technical accomplishments which focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost.

  11. Tank Vapor Characterization Project: Annual status report for FY 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvers, K.L.; Fruchter, J.S.; Huckaby, J.L.; Almeida, T.L.; Evans, J.C. Jr.; Pool, K.H.; Simonen, C.A.; Thornton, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    In Fiscal Year 1996, staff at the Vapor Analytical Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed work in support of characterizing the vapor composition of the headspaces of radioactive waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Work performed included support for technical issues and sampling methodologies, upgrades for analytical equipment, analytical method development, preparation of unexposed samples, analyses of tank headspaces samples, preparation of data reports, and operation of the tank vapor database. Progress made in FY 1996 included completion and issuance of 50 analytical data reports. A sampling system comparison study was initiated and completed during the fiscal year. The comparison study involved the vapor sampling system (VSS), a truck-based system, and the in situ vapor sampling system (ISVS), a cart-based system. Samples collected during the study were characterized for inorganic, permanent gases, total non-methane organic compounds and organic speciation by SUMMA trademark and TST methods. The study showed comparable sampling results between the systems resulting in the program switching from the VSS to the less expensive ISVS methodology in late May 1996. A temporal study was initiated in January 1996 in order to understand the influences seasonal temperatures changes have on the vapors in the headspace of Hanford waste tanks. A holding time study was initiated in the fourth quarter of FY 1996. Samples were collected from tank S-102 and rushed to the laboratory for time zero analysis. Additional samples will be analyzed at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 weeks

  12. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update, FY 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, Joel Lawrence

    2001-08-01

    The Department of Energy's Geothermal Program serves two broad purposes: 1) to assist industry in overcoming near-term barriers by conducting cost-shared research and field verification that allows geothermal energy to compete in today's aggressive energy markets; and 2) to undertake fundamental research with potentially large economic payoffs. The four categories of work used to distinguish the research activities of the Geothermal Program during FY 2000 reflect the main components of real-world geothermal projects. These categories form the main sections of the project descriptions in this Research Update. Exploration Technology research focuses on developing instruments and techniques to discover hidden hydrothermal systems and to explore the deep portions of known systems. Research in geophysical and geochemical methods is expected to yield increased knowledge of hidden geothermal systems. Reservoir Technology research combines laboratory and analytical investigations with equipment development and field testing to establish practical tools for resource development and management for both hydrothermal reservoirs and enhanced geothermal systems. Research in various reservoir analysis techniques is generating a wide range of information that facilitates development of improved reservoir management tools. Drilling Technology focuses on developing improved, economic drilling and completion technology for geothermal wells. Ongoing research to avert lost circulation episodes in geothermal drilling is yielding positive results. Conversion Technology research focuses on reducing costs and improving binary conversion cycle efficiency, to permit greater use of the more abundant moderate-temperature geothermal resource, and on the development of materials that will improve the operating characteristics of many types of geothermal energy equipment. Increased output and improved performance of binary cycles will result from investigations in heat cycle research.

  13. FY1999 Meeting of The Society of Heating, Air-Conditioning and Sanitary Engineering of Japan. Air flow analysis II; 1999 nendo gakujutsu koenkai gaiyo. Kiryu kaiseki 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-05

    B-4 reported the result on particle size distribution experiment and numerical calculation with FEM and {kappa}- {epsilon} model using a welding simulation equipment for generation and removal of welding fume in a narrow site. Discussion was held on the position of an exhaust hood. B-5 reported the study results on indoor air flow conditions derived from a movable nozzle air conditioning system by model experiment and numerical analysis. Disagreement of both results between the experiment and calculation in the case of two diffusing nozzles attached at 30 degrees toward the inside was improved by shortening a sampling time for calculation. B-6 reported the study results on some parameters such as wind velocity, flow rate and inlet position, and the energy saving effect of an air curtain (wall outlet, floor inlet) to control air conditioning areas for a part of large spaces by numerical analysis of air flow. Discussion was held on calculation of 2-D flow and layered flow. B-7 is the 5th research report on measurement of air flow conditions such as measurement of large space environment by video camera and balloon. Study on the camera for automatic measurement, and the identification technique of balloon positions was reported. (translated by NEDO)

  14. FY 1998 report on the data processing of the geothermal development promotion survey. Secondary. No.B-5 Mt. Musadake area; 1998 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa data shori hokokusho. No. B-5 Musadake chiiki (Dai 2 ji)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    As part of the geothermal development promotion survey, the comprehensive analysis was made on the survey of the existence amount of geothermal resource in the Mt. Musadake area, Shibetsu county, Hokkaido, which was conducted in FY 1997 and FY 1998. In the surface survey, the following were carried out: survey of geology/alteration zone, geochemical survey, gravity exploration, wide-area gravity/magnetic structure analysis, seismic exploration, etc. In the well exploration, structural boreholes N10-MD-1 and N10-MD-2 were drilled, and the following were conducted: temperature logging/temperature recovery test, electric logging, water injection test and survey of core cuttings. For borehole N10-MD-2, the survey of geothermal water was made. In the survey of environmental effects, survey of flora/fauna and survey of hot spring variations were conducted. The results of the analysis were outlined as follows. At deep underground, the existence of the deep geothermal water forming geothermal reservoirs is presumed, and the deep geothermal water seems to be helped by the thermal conduction from the magma reservoir related to a series of volcanoes, centered on Mt. Musadake that is regarded as heat source. The geothermal water has a temperature of over 250 degrees C and a high Cl concentration. (NEDO)

  15. CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS PARTNERSHIP FY13 MID-YEAR REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, H.; Flach, G.; Langton, C.; KOSSON, D.; BROWN, K.; SAMSON, E.; MEEUSSEN, J.; SLOOT, H.; GARBOCZI, E.

    2013-05-01

    In FY2013, the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is continuing in its effort to develop and enhance software tools demonstrating tangible progress toward fulfilling the objective of developing a set of tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in nuclear applications. In FY2012, the CBP released the initial inhouse “Beta-version” of the CBP Software Toolbox, a suite of software for simulating reactive transport in cementitious materials and important degradation phenomena. The current primary software components are LeachXS/ORCHESTRA, STADIUM, and a GoldSim interface for probabilistic analysis of selected degradation scenarios. THAMES is a planned future CBP Toolbox component (FY13/14) focused on simulation of the microstructure of cementitious materials and calculation of resultant hydraulic and constituent mass transfer parameters needed in modeling. This past November, the CBP Software Toolbox Version 1.0 was released that supports analysis of external sulfate attack (including damage mechanics), carbonation, and primary constituent leaching. The LeachXS component embodies an extensive material property measurements database along with chemical speciation and reactive mass transport simulation cases with emphasis on leaching of major, trace and radionuclide constituents from cementitious materials used in DOE facilities, such as Saltstone (Savannah River) and Cast Stone (Hanford), tank closure grouts, and barrier concretes. STADIUM focuses on the physical and structural service life of materials and components based on chemical speciation and reactive mass transport of major cement constituents and aggressive species (e.g., chloride, sulfate, etc.). The CBP issued numerous reports and other documentation that accompanied the “Version 1.0” release including a CBP Software Toolbox User Guide and Installation Guide. These documents, as well as, the

  16. A Data Analysis Center for Electromagnetic and Hadronic Interaction. Products of the DAC members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briscoe, William John [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Strakovsky, Igor I. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Workman, Ronald L. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-08-31

    The Data Analysis Center (DAC) of the Center for Nuclear Studies (CNS) at the George Washington University (GW) has made significant progress in its program to enhance and expand the partial-wave (and multipole) analyses of fundamental two- and three-body reactions (such as pion-nucleon, photon-nucleon, and nucleon-nucleon scattering) by maintaining and augmenting the analysis codes and databases associated with these reactions. These efforts provide guidance to experimental groups at the international level, forming an important link between theory and experiment. A renaissance in light hadron spectroscopy is underway as a continuous stream of polarization data issues from existing precision electromagnetic facilities and the coming Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade. Our principal goals have been focused on supporting the national N* resonance physics program. We have also continued to study topics more generally related to the problems associated with partial-wave analysis. On the Experimental side of the CNS DAC. Its primary goal is the enhancement of the body of data necessary for our analyses of fundamental γ - N reactions. We perform experiments that study the dynamics responsible for the internal structure of the nucleon and its excitations. Our principal focus is on the N* programs at JLab and MAMI. At JLab we study spin-polarization observables using polarized photons, protons and neutrons and yielding charged final states. Similarly at MAMI we study neutral meson photoproduction off polarized protons and neutrons. We use the Crystal Ball and TAPS spectrometers (CBT) to detect photons and neutrons to measure the photoproduction of π0, η, 2π0, π0η, and K0 off the neutron. The CBT program complements our program at JLab, which studies reactions resulting in charged final states. We are also involved in a renewed effort to make neutral pion photoproduction measurements close to threshold at Mainz. In addition to the programs underway, we are contributing to

  17. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. Following a major radiological incident the FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted states and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis and quality assurance. This program includes: (1) Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed Wing and Helicopter, (2) Field Monitoring and Sampling, (3) Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories, (4) Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance, (5) Environmental Dosimetry, and (6) An integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures handbook is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets and operations of FRMAC monitoring and analysis and the content and preparation of this handbook

  18. Analiza efikasnosti funkcionalnih radio-komunikacionih centara / The efficiency analysis of functional radio communication centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša M. Devetak

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available U radu je prikazan jedan pristup u analizi efikasnosti radio-komunikacionih centara funkcionalnog telekomunikacionog sistema, kao što je vojni sistem veza. Radio-komunikacioni centar modelovan je kao sistem masovnog opsluživanja. Opisana su stanja sistema i parametri i izveden izraz za određivanje verovatnoće opsluživanja radio-komunikacionog centra, kao kriterijuma za ocenu efikasnosti. Predstavljen je, takođe, model, odnosno izrazi za kvantitativnu analizu efikasnosti radio- komunikacionih centara u uslovima elektronskih dejstava. / One approach in the analysis of efficiency of radio communication centers of functional telecommunication systems (for example Military Systems has been shown in this article. A radio communication centre has been presented as a model of mass service systems. The system states and its parameters have been described as well as the resulting formula for determining service probability as a criterion for efficiency evaluation. A model and the formulae for quantitative analysis of efficiency in electronic warfare have been presented as well.

  19. Applications of instrumental neutron activation analysis in the Analytical Division of the Research Center Juelich (KFA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdtmann, G.

    1991-12-01

    The Radioanalytical Chemistry Section, as a part of the Central Division of Chemical Analysis of the Research Center KFA Juelich, has the task to provide and to apply nuclear methods in the analytical service for the institutes and projects of the KFA and to customers outside. A great part of this service is trace element determinations by neutron activation analysis using the research reactor FRJ-2. The procedure for the instrumental technique is described and mainly practical aspects are reported in detail. It is based on the k 0 -method developed by Simonits and DeCorte. The results are calculated from the peak areas of the γ-lines and the corresponding k 0 -factors. A new variant of this procedure is required, if the program used for the deconvolution of the γ-spectra provides absolute decay rates of the radionuclides instead of the γ-emission rates. This variant is also described. Some examples of analyses carried out in the analytical service are presented and discussed mainly with respect to accuracy of the results and detection limits. (orig.) [de

  20. Application of NASA Kennedy Space Center system assurance analysis methodology to nuclear power plant systems designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) entered into an agreement with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to conduct a study to demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of applying the KSC System Assurance Analysis (SAA) methodology to nuclear power plant systems designs. In joint meetings of KSC and Duke Power personnel, an agreement was made to select to CATAWBA systems, the Containment Spray System and the Residual Heat Removal System, for the analyses. Duke Power provided KSC with a full set a Final Safety Analysis Reports as well as schematics for the two systems. During Phase I of the study the reliability analyses of the SAA were performed. During Phase II the hazard analyses were performed. The final product of Phase II is a handbook for implementing the SAA methodology into nuclear power plant systems designs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the SAA methodology as it applies to nuclear power plant systems designs and to discuss the feasibility of its application. The conclusion is drawn that nuclear power plant systems and aerospace ground support systems are similar in complexity and design and share common safety and reliability goals. The SAA methodology is readily adaptable to nuclear power plant designs because of it's practical application of existing and well known safety and reliability analytical techniques tied to an effective management information system

  1. Application of NASA Kennedy Space Center System Assurance Analysis methodology to nuclear power plant systems designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    In May of 1982, the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) entered into an agreement with the NRC to conduct a study to demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of applying the KSC System Assurance Analysis (SAA) methodology to nuclear power plant systems designs. North Carolina's Duke Power Company expressed an interest in the study and proposed the nuclear power facility at CATAWBA for the basis of the study. In joint meetings of KSC and Duke Power personnel, an agreement was made to select two CATAWBA systems, the Containment Spray System and the Residual Heat Removal System, for the analyses. Duke Power provided KSC with a full set of Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSAR) as well as schematics for the two systems. During Phase I of the study the reliability analyses of the SAA were performed. During Phase II the hazard analyses were performed. The final product of Phase II is a handbook for implementing the SAA methodology into nuclear power plant systems designs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the SAA methodology as it applies to nuclear power plant systems designs and to discuss the feasibility of its application. (orig./HP)

  2. NASA Johnson Space Center Usability Testing and Analysis facility (UTAF) Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Holden, Kritina L.

    2005-01-01

    The Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF) is part of the Space Human Factors Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The facility performs research for NASA's HumanSystems Integration Program, under the HumanSystems Research and Technology Division. Specifically, the UTAF provides human factors support for space vehicles, including the International Space Station, the Space Shuttle, and the forthcoming Crew Exploration Vehicle. In addition, there are ongoing collaborative research efforts with external corporations and universities. The UTAF provides human factors analysis, evaluation, and usability testing of crew interfaces for space applications. This includes computer displays and controls, workstation systems, and work environments. The UTAF has a unique mix of capabilities, with a staff experienced in both cognitive human factors and ergonomics. The current areas of focus are: human factors applications in emergency medical care and informatics; control and display technologies for electronic procedures and instructions; voice recognition in noisy environments; crew restraint design for unique microgravity workstations; and refinement of human factors processes and requirements. This presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities, and will address how the UTAF projects will evolve to meet new space initiatives.

  3. NASA Johnson Space Center Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (WAF) Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF) is part of the Space Human Factors Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The facility provides support to the Office of Biological and Physical Research, the Space Shuttle Program, the International Space Station Program, and other NASA organizations. In addition, there are ongoing collaborative research efforts with external businesses and universities. The UTAF provides human factors analysis, evaluation, and usability testing of crew interfaces for space applications. This includes computer displays and controls, workstation systems, and work environments. The UTAF has a unique mix of capabilities, with a staff experienced in both cognitive human factors and ergonomics. The current areas of focus are: human factors applications in emergency medical care and informatics; control and display technologies for electronic procedures and instructions; voice recognition in noisy environments; crew restraint design for unique microgravity workstations; and refinement of human factors processes. This presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities, and will address how the projects will evolve to meet new space initiatives.

  4. Tanks Focus Area (TFA) FY1999 Midyear Review Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlahta, Stephan N.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Midyear Review was to improve the quality and responsiveness of TFA technical solutions to identified user needs. This review goal was achieved through executing a multi-phased review approach. The first phase of the midyear review focused on the subset of FY99 work identified by Department of energy users as having continuing benefit in FY00-01. The TFA FY00-02 Technical Responses identified FY99 work that had continued applicability based on the most current set of site user needs. Each TFA FY00-02 Technical Response which included FY work scope was reviewed by the TFA Technical Advisory Group (TAG), in a meeting held in February 1999. Made up of technical experts from across the country, the TAG provides high-quality, short-turnaround, independent technical reviews for the TFA

  5. Critical hand ischemia treatment via orbital atherectomy-A single center observational retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahro, Abdul; Igyarto, Zsuzsanna; Martinsen, Brad

    2017-03-01

    Critical hand ischemia (CHI) can be devastating and may result in amputation. Distal vessel calcification has been shown to be a major factor in causing CHI. Atherectomy in the upper extremities is not typically considered due to the small anatomy; however, the Diamondback 360° Peripheral Orbital Atherectomy System (OAS) (Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.) can access treatment areas with a reference vessel diameter of 1.5mm. A retrospective, observational, single center (Merit Health Center, Jackson, MS) analysis of 11 CHI patients with calcific disease of the radial artery treated with orbital atherectomy (OAS) was completed. Demographics and procedural to 30-day outcomes were assessed. All patients had good blood flow to the hand after intervention and none experienced complications during or immediately post-procedure. At 30-days the freedom from revascularization and amputation was 100%, and all the wounds were healed. The following important principles were followed during the use of OAS for CHI: (1) ACT was therapeutic (~250s); (2) Gentle wire manipulation; (3) Utilization of a small OAS crown (1.25mm); (4) Aggressive vasodilator use-given through the exchange catheter; (5) Angioplasty balloon was matched to the size of the vessel and long and low pressure inflations were completed. Critical hand ischemia can be treated with endovascular techniques. Obtaining good outflow to the fingers is critical for wound healing and preventing amputation. Orbital atherectomy is a useful tool in preparing vessels for balloon angioplasty; particularly in cases where calcification is present. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of Conflict Centers in Projects Procured with Traditional and Integrated Methods in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin O. Dada

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Conflicts in any organization can either be functional or dysfunctional and can contribute to or detract from the achievement of organizational or project objectives. This study investigated the frequency and intensity of conflicts, using five conflict centers, on projects executed with either the integrated or traditional method in Nigeria. Questionnaires were administered through purposive and snowballing techniques on 274 projects located in twelve states of Nigeria and Abuja. 94 usable responses were obtained. The collected data were subjected to both descriptive and inferential statistical analysis. In projects procured with traditional methods, conflicts relating to resources for project execution had the greatest frequency, while conflicts around project/client goals had the least frequency. For projects executed with integrated methods, conflicts due to administrative procedures were ranked highest while conflicts due to project/client goals were ranked least. Regarding seriousness of conflict, conflicts due to administrative procedures and resources for project execution were ranked highest respectively for projects procured with traditional and integrated methods. Additionally, in terms of seriousness, personality issues and project/client goals were the least sources of conflict in projects executed with traditional and integrated methods. There were no significant differences in the incidence of conflicts, using the selected conflict centers, between the traditional and integrated procurement methods. There was however significant difference in the intensity or seriousness of conflicts between projects executed with the traditional method and those executed with integrated methods in the following areas: technical issues, administrative matters and personality issues. The study recommends that conscious efforts should be made at teambuilding on projects executed with integrated methods.

  7. Degree-based statistic and center persistency for brain connectivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Kwangsun; Lee, Peter; Chung, Moo K; Sohn, William S; Chung, Sun Ju; Na, Duk L; Ju, Daheen; Jeong, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Brain connectivity analyses have been widely performed to investigate the organization and functioning of the brain, or to observe changes in neurological or psychiatric conditions. However, connectivity analysis inevitably introduces the problem of mass-univariate hypothesis testing. Although, several cluster-wise correction methods have been suggested to address this problem and shown to provide high sensitivity, these approaches fundamentally have two drawbacks: the lack of spatial specificity (localization power) and the arbitrariness of an initial cluster-forming threshold. In this study, we propose a novel method, degree-based statistic (DBS), performing cluster-wise inference. DBS is designed to overcome the above-mentioned two shortcomings. From a network perspective, a few brain regions are of critical importance and considered to play pivotal roles in network integration. Regarding this notion, DBS defines a cluster as a set of edges of which one ending node is shared. This definition enables the efficient detection of clusters and their center nodes. Furthermore, a new measure of a cluster, center persistency (CP) was introduced. The efficiency of DBS with a known "ground truth" simulation was demonstrated. Then they applied DBS to two experimental datasets and showed that DBS successfully detects the persistent clusters. In conclusion, by adopting a graph theoretical concept of degrees and borrowing the concept of persistence from algebraic topology, DBS could sensitively identify clusters with centric nodes that would play pivotal roles in an effect of interest. DBS is potentially widely applicable to variable cognitive or clinical situations and allows us to obtain statistically reliable and easily interpretable results. Hum Brain Mapp 38:165-181, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. CoryneCenter – An online resource for the integrated analysis of corynebacterial genome and transcriptome data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüser Andrea T

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of high-throughput genome sequencing and post-genome analysis technologies, e.g. DNA microarray approaches, has created the potential to unravel and scrutinize complex gene-regulatory networks on a large scale. The discovery of transcriptional regulatory interactions has become a major topic in modern functional genomics. Results To facilitate the analysis of gene-regulatory networks, we have developed CoryneCenter, a web-based resource for the systematic integration and analysis of genome, transcriptome, and gene regulatory information for prokaryotes, especially corynebacteria. For this purpose, we extended and combined the following systems into a common platform: (1 GenDB, an open source genome annotation system, (2 EMMA, a MAGE compliant application for high-throughput transcriptome data storage and analysis, and (3 CoryneRegNet, an ontology-based data warehouse designed to facilitate the reconstruction and analysis of gene regulatory interactions. We demonstrate the potential of CoryneCenter by means of an application example. Using microarray hybridization data, we compare the gene expression of Corynebacterium glutamicum under acetate and glucose feeding conditions: Known regulatory networks are confirmed, but moreover CoryneCenter points out additional regulatory interactions. Conclusion CoryneCenter provides more than the sum of its parts. Its novel analysis and visualization features significantly simplify the process of obtaining new biological insights into complex regulatory systems. Although the platform currently focusses on corynebacteria, the integrated tools are by no means restricted to these species, and the presented approach offers a general strategy for the analysis and verification of gene regulatory networks. CoryneCenter provides freely accessible projects with the underlying genome annotation, gene expression, and gene regulation data. The system is publicly available at http://www.CoryneCenter.de.

  9. Twenty-Five Year Site Plan FY2013 - FY2037

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, William H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is the nation's premier national security science laboratory. Its mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the United States (U.S.) nuclear stockpile; reduce the threat of weapons of mass destruction, proliferation, and terrorism; and solve national problems in defense, energy, and the environment. The fiscal year (FY) 2013-2037 Twenty-Five Year Site Plan (TYSP) is a vital component for planning to meet the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) commitment to ensure the U.S. has a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear deterrent. The Laboratory also uses the TYSP as an integrated planning tool to guide development of an efficient and responsive infrastructure that effectively supports the Laboratory's missions and workforce. Emphasizing the Laboratory's core capabilities, this TYSP reflects the Laboratory's role as a prominent contributor to NNSA missions through its programs and campaigns. The Laboratory is aligned with Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) modernization activities outlined in the NNSA Strategic Plan (May 2011) which include: (1) ensuring laboratory plutonium space effectively supports pit manufacturing and enterprise-wide special nuclear materials consolidation; (2) constructing the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Nuclear Facility (CMRR-NF); (3) establishing shared user facilities to more cost effectively manage high-value, experimental, computational and production capabilities; and (4) modernizing enduring facilities while reducing the excess facility footprint. Th is TYSP is viewed by the Laboratory as a vital planning tool to develop an effi cient and responsive infrastructure. Long range facility and infrastructure development planning are critical to assure sustainment and modernization. Out-year re-investment is essential for sustaining existing facilities, and will be re-evaluated on an annual

  10. Three-dimensional analysis of future groundwater flow conditions and contaminant plume transport in the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1996 and 1997 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, C.R.; Wurstner, S.K.; Williams, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.; Bergeron, M.P.

    1997-12-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow and transport, based on the Coupled Fluid Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) code, was developed for the Hanford Site to support the Hanford Groundwater Project (HGWP), managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The model was developed to increase the understanding and better forecast the migration of several contaminant plumes being monitored by the HGWP, and to support the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200-Area Plateau. Recent modeling efforts have focused on continued refinement of an initial version of the three-dimensional model developed in 1995 and its application to simulate future transport of selected contaminant plumes in the aquifer system. This version of the model was updated using a more current version of the CFEST code called CFEST96. Prior to conducting simulations of contaminant transport with the three-dimensional model, a previous steady-state, two-dimensional model of the unconfined aquifer system was recalibrated to 1979 water-table conditions with a statistical inverse method implemented in the CFEST-INV computer code. The results of the recalibration were used to refine the three-dimensional conceptual model and to calibrate it with a conceptualization that preserves the two-dimensional hydraulic properties and knowledge of the aquifer`s three-dimensional properties for the same 1979 water-table conditions. The transient behavior of the three-dimensional flow model was also calibrated by adjusting model storage properties (specific yield) until transient water-table predictions approximated observed water-table elevations between 1979 and 1996.

  11. Three-dimensional analysis of future groundwater flow conditions and contaminant plume transport in the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer system: FY 1996 and 1997 status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, C.R.; Wurstner, S.K.; Williams, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.; Bergeron, M.P.

    1997-12-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow and transport, based on the Coupled Fluid Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) code, was developed for the Hanford Site to support the Hanford Groundwater Project (HGWP), managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The model was developed to increase the understanding and better forecast the migration of several contaminant plumes being monitored by the HGWP, and to support the Hanford Site Composite Analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200-Area Plateau. Recent modeling efforts have focused on continued refinement of an initial version of the three-dimensional model developed in 1995 and its application to simulate future transport of selected contaminant plumes in the aquifer system. This version of the model was updated using a more current version of the CFEST code called CFEST96. Prior to conducting simulations of contaminant transport with the three-dimensional model, a previous steady-state, two-dimensional model of the unconfined aquifer system was recalibrated to 1979 water-table conditions with a statistical inverse method implemented in the CFEST-INV computer code. The results of the recalibration were used to refine the three-dimensional conceptual model and to calibrate it with a conceptualization that preserves the two-dimensional hydraulic properties and knowledge of the aquifer's three-dimensional properties for the same 1979 water-table conditions. The transient behavior of the three-dimensional flow model was also calibrated by adjusting model storage properties (specific yield) until transient water-table predictions approximated observed water-table elevations between 1979 and 1996

  12. Environmental Cost Analysis System (ECAS) Status and Compliance Requirements for EM Consolidated Business Center Contracts - 13204

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, P.C. [Consultant, 11221 E. Cimmarron Dr., Englewood, CO 80111 (United States); Moe, M.A. [EMCBC Office of Cost Estimating and Analysis, United States Department of Energy, 250 E. 5th Street, Suite 500, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States); Hombach, W.G. [Team Analysis, Inc., 2 Cardinal Park Drive, Suite 105A, Leesburg, VA 20175 (United States); Urdangaray, R. [Project Performance Corporation, 1760 Old Meadow Road, McLean, VA 22102 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) has developed a web-accessible database to collect actual cost data from completed EM projects to support cost estimating and analysis. This Environmental Cost Analysis System (ECAS) database was initially deployed in early 2009 containing the cost and parametric data from 77 decommissioning, restoration, and waste management projects completed under the Rocky Flats Closure Project. In subsequent years we have added many more projects to ECAS and now have a total of 280 projects from 8 major DOE sites. This data is now accessible to DOE users through a web-based reporting tool that allows users to tailor report outputs to meet their specific needs. We are using it as a principal resource supporting the EM Consolidated Business Center (EMCBC) and the EM Applied Cost Engineering (ACE) team cost estimating and analysis efforts across the country. The database has received Government Accountability Office review as supporting its recommended improvements in DOE's cost estimating process, as well as review from the DOE Office of Acquisition and Project Management (APM). Moving forward, the EMCBC has developed a Special Contract Requirement clause or 'H-Clause' to be included in all current and future EMCBC procurements identifying the process that contractors will follow to provide DOE their historical project data in a format compatible with ECAS. Changes to DOE O 413.3B implementation are also in progress to capture historical costs as part of the Critical Decision project closeout process. (authors)

  13. FY13 Summary Report on the Augmentation of the Spent Fuel Composition Dataset for Nuclear Forensics: SFCOMPO/NF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady Raap, Michaele C.; Lyons, Jennifer A.; Collins, Brian A.; Livingston, James V.

    2014-03-31

    This report documents the FY13 efforts to enhance a dataset of spent nuclear fuel isotopic composition data for use in developing intrinsic signatures for nuclear forensics. A review and collection of data from the open literature was performed in FY10. In FY11, the Spent Fuel COMPOsition (SFCOMPO) excel-based dataset for nuclear forensics (NF), SFCOMPO/NF was established and measured data for graphite production reactors, Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) were added to the dataset and expanded to include a consistent set of data simulated by calculations. A test was performed to determine whether the SFCOMPO/NF dataset will be useful for the analysis and identification of reactor types from isotopic ratios observed in interdicted samples.

  14. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  15. 76 FR 5431 - Publication of FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Publication of FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Departmental Offices, Treasury. ACTION: Notice of publication of Fiscal Year 2010 Service Contract Inventory. [[Page 5432

  16. FY17 Status Report on NEAMS Neutronics Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jung, Y. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Smith, M. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-09-30

    Under the U.S. DOE NEAMS program, the high-fidelity neutronics code system has been developed to support the multiphysics modeling and simulation capability named SHARP. The neutronics code system includes the high-fidelity neutronics code PROTEUS, the cross section library and preprocessing tools, the multigroup cross section generation code MC2-3, the in-house meshing generation tool, the perturbation and sensitivity analysis code PERSENT, and post-processing tools. The main objectives of the NEAMS neutronics activities in FY17 are to continue development of an advanced nodal solver in PROTEUS for use in nuclear reactor design and analysis projects, implement a simplified sub-channel based thermal-hydraulic (T/H) capability into PROTEUS to efficiently compute the thermal feedback, improve the performance of PROTEUS-MOCEX using numerical acceleration and code optimization, improve the cross section generation tools including MC2-3, and continue to perform verification and validation tests for PROTEUS.

  17. Applied Science Division annual report, Environmental Research Program FY 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, E.J.; Novakov, T.

    1984-05-01

    The primary concern of the Environmental Research Program is the understanding of pollutant formation, transport, and transformation and the impacts of pollutants on the environment. These impacts include global, regional, and local effects on the atmosphere and hydrosphere, and on certain aspects of human health. This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. During FY 1983, research concentrated on atmospheric physics and chemistry, applied physics and laser spectroscopy, combustion theory and phenomena, environmental effects of oil shale processing, freshwater ecology and acid precipitation, trace element analysis for the investigation of present and historical environmental impacts, and a continuing survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring

  18. Department of the Navy FY 1993 Budget Estimates, DoD Base Closure and Realignment Program 2. Justification Data Submitted to Congress January 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    System Command (NAVSUP) Naval Regional Contracting Center (NRCC), and Oceanographer ( OCEANO ) Weather Det. Military Personnel: Fifty percent of the active...ON DD 1391C)* FOR1 PREVIOUS EDITIONS MAY BE USED INTERNALLYUNTIL EXHAUSTED PAGE NO. Sol 0102-0P -001 - 391041 1. COKOONENT 2. DATE FY 1993_MILITARY

  19. Practice Patterns Analysis of Ocular Proton Therapy Centers: The International OPTIC Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrbacek, Jan; Mishra, Kavita K.; Kacperek, Andrzej; Dendale, Remi; Nauraye, Catherine; Auger, Michel; Herault, Joel; Daftari, Inder K.; Trofimov, Alexei V.; Shih, Helen A.; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Denker, Andrea; Heufelder, Jens; Horwacik, Tomasz; Swakoń, Jan; Hoehr, Cornelia; Duzenli, Cheryl; Pica, Alessia; Goudjil, Farid; Mazal, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the planning, treatment, and follow-up strategies worldwide in dedicated proton therapy ocular programs. Methods and Materials: Ten centers from 7 countries completed a questionnaire survey with 109 queries on the eye treatment planning system (TPS), hardware/software equipment, image acquisition/registration, patient positioning, eye surveillance, beam delivery, quality assurance (QA), clinical management, and workflow. Results: Worldwide, 28,891 eye patients were treated with protons at the 10 centers as of the end of 2014. Most centers treated a vast number of ocular patients (1729 to 6369). Three centers treated fewer than 200 ocular patients. Most commonly, the centers treated uveal melanoma (UM) and other primary ocular malignancies, benign ocular tumors, conjunctival lesions, choroidal metastases, and retinoblastomas. The UM dose fractionation was generally within a standard range, whereas dosing for other ocular conditions was not standardized. The majority (80%) of centers used in common a specific ocular TPS. Variability existed in imaging registration, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rarely being used in routine planning (20%). Increased patient to full-time equivalent ratios were observed by higher accruing centers (P=.0161). Generally, ophthalmologists followed up the post–radiation therapy patients, though in 40% of centers radiation oncologists also followed up the patients. Seven centers had a prospective outcomes database. All centers used a cyclotron to accelerate protons with dedicated horizontal beam lines only. QA checks (range, modulation) varied substantially across centers. Conclusions: The first worldwide multi-institutional ophthalmic proton therapy survey of the clinical and technical approach shows areas of substantial overlap and areas of progress needed to achieve sustainable and systematic management. Future international efforts include research and development for imaging and planning software upgrades

  20. Practice Patterns Analysis of Ocular Proton Therapy Centers: The International OPTIC Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrbacek, Jan, E-mail: Jan.hrbacek@psi.ch [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Mishra, Kavita K. [Ocular Tumor Proton Therapy Program, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Kacperek, Andrzej [National Proton Therapy Centre, Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Dendale, Remi; Nauraye, Catherine; Auger, Michel [Centre de Protonthérapie d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Orsay (France); Herault, Joel [Centre Lacassagne, Nice (France); Daftari, Inder K. [Ocular Tumor Proton Therapy Program, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Trofimov, Alexei V.; Shih, Helen A.; Chen, Yen-Lin E. [F. H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Denker, Andrea [Protons for Therapy, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Heufelder, Jens [BerlinProtonen am HZB, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Horwacik, Tomasz; Swakoń, Jan [Institute of Nuclear Physic, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Hoehr, Cornelia; Duzenli, Cheryl [BC Cancer Agency – TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); Pica, Alessia [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Goudjil, Farid; Mazal, Alejandro [Centre de Protonthérapie d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Orsay (France); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the planning, treatment, and follow-up strategies worldwide in dedicated proton therapy ocular programs. Methods and Materials: Ten centers from 7 countries completed a questionnaire survey with 109 queries on the eye treatment planning system (TPS), hardware/software equipment, image acquisition/registration, patient positioning, eye surveillance, beam delivery, quality assurance (QA), clinical management, and workflow. Results: Worldwide, 28,891 eye patients were treated with protons at the 10 centers as of the end of 2014. Most centers treated a vast number of ocular patients (1729 to 6369). Three centers treated fewer than 200 ocular patients. Most commonly, the centers treated uveal melanoma (UM) and other primary ocular malignancies, benign ocular tumors, conjunctival lesions, choroidal metastases, and retinoblastomas. The UM dose fractionation was generally within a standard range, whereas dosing for other ocular conditions was not standardized. The majority (80%) of centers used in common a specific ocular TPS. Variability existed in imaging registration, with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rarely being used in routine planning (20%). Increased patient to full-time equivalent ratios were observed by higher accruing centers (P=.0161). Generally, ophthalmologists followed up the post–radiation therapy patients, though in 40% of centers radiation oncologists also followed up the patients. Seven centers had a prospective outcomes database. All centers used a cyclotron to accelerate protons with dedicated horizontal beam lines only. QA checks (range, modulation) varied substantially across centers. Conclusions: The first worldwide multi-institutional ophthalmic proton therapy survey of the clinical and technical approach shows areas of substantial overlap and areas of progress needed to achieve sustainable and systematic management. Future international efforts include research and development for imaging and planning software upgrades

  1. Analysis of Fleet Readiness Center Southwest Concept Integration: New-Employee Orientation and Communication Processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clemmons, Francini R; Falconieri, Holly M

    2007-01-01

    Fleet Readiness Center Southwest has embraced integration of personnel and processes from Aircraft Intermediate Maintenance Departments and Naval Aviation Depots supporting Naval Aviation Maintenance...

  2. LDRD Annual Report FY2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P; De Yoreo, J; Jackson, K; van Bibber, K

    2007-01-01

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Laboratory Science and Technology Office, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration in national security, energy security, environmental management, bioscience and technology to improve human health, and breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. The accomplishments described in this Annual Report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $92 million for FY2006 sponsored 188 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the brightest

  3. Institutional Plan FY 2003 - 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartock, Michael; Hansen, Todd

    2003-01-27

    The Fiscal Year (FY) 2003-2007 Institutional Plan describes the strategic directions and key issues that Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory management must address with the Department of Energy (DOE) in charting its future as a multiprogram national laboratory. The Plan provides an overview of the Laboratory's mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Plan facilitates the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to strengthen the Integrated Laboratory System. Preparation and review of the Institutional Plan is one element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, implemented through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the President's Management Agenda and the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993. The Plan complements the current performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California, and summarizes Best Management Practices for a potential future results-based contract as a basis for achieving DOE goals and the Laboratory's scientific and operations objectives. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the Plan is coordinated by the Planning and Strategic Development Office from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions and DOE comments on prior years' plans. The Laboratory Mission section identifies the specific strengths of Berkeley Lab that contribute to the mission in general and the Integrated Laboratory System in particular. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies the existing activities in support of DOE Office of Science and other sponsors; support for DOE goals; and the

  4. LDRD FY2004 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kline, K. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2005-02-28

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and the National Nuclear Security Administration in national security, homeland security, energy security, environmental management, bioscience and healthcare technology, and breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. The LDRD Program was authorized by Congress in 1991 and is administered by the Laboratory Science and Technology Office. The accomplishments described in this Annual Report demonstrate how the LDRD portfolio is strongly aligned with these missions and contributes to the Laboratory’s success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $69.8 million for FY2004 sponsored 220 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific and technical quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of meritorious proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a challenging one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the Nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory’s multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the Nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle

  5. Strategies in Using a Qualitative Database for the Analysis of Problem-centered Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kühn

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of several examples from our longitudinal study "Transitions to Employment," dealing with the shaping of biography of young adults and typical transition-patterns from education to employment, we discuss the use of a text databank in the evaluation of problem-centered interviews. First, we explain the structure of the project's "databank of biographical interviews with young adults" which is founded on a thematic and temporarily differentiating system of categories recording job- and family-related actions and orientations. We present different ways of using the databank in qualitative evaluation. The manner how certain cases and categories of the databank are selected and included in the analysis depends on the objective and the problem's complexity. Our examples show that the use of a databank is an important possibility to support the evaluation of qualitative interviews, facilitating a thematic directed access and thus allowing the handling of data which are particularly extensive. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0003183

  6. Failure analysis – basic step of applying Reliability Centered Maintenance in general aviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin BUGAJ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Performing a reliability analysis on a product or system can actually include a number of different analyses to determine how reliable the product or system is. A reliability centered maintenance program consists of a set of scheduled tasks generated on the basis of specific reliability characteristics of the equipment they are designed to protect. Complex equipment is composed of a vast number of parts and assemblies. All these items can be expected to fail at one time or another, but some of the failures have more serious consequences than others. Certain kinds of failures have a direct effect on operating safety, and others affect the operational capability of the equipment. The consequences of a particular failure depend on the design of the item and the equipment in which it is installed. Although the environment in which the equipment is operated is sometimes an additional factor, the impact of failures on the equipment, and hence their consequences for the operating organization, are established primarily by the equipment designer. Failure consequences are therefore a primary inherent reliability characteristic.

  7. Clinical factors affecting engraftment and transfusion needs in SCT: a single-center retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesveld, J; Pawlowski, J; Chen, R; Hyrien, O; Debolt, J; Becker, M; Phillips, G; Chen, Y

    2013-05-01

    Successful utilization of SCT modalities often requires utilization of both red cell and platelet transfusions. In this retrospective evaluation of clinical factors affecting transplant engraftment and transfusion utilization at a single transplant center in 505 patients from 2005 through 2009, we found that graft type, donor type and the conditioning regimen intensity significantly affected both the neutrophil engraftment time (PSCT patients required an average of 6.2 red cell units, and 7.9 platelet transfusions in the first 100 days with a wide s.d. Among auto-SCT patients, 5% required neither RBC nor platelet transfusions. Some reduced-intensity transplants were also associated with no transfusion need, and in allogeneic transplants, conditioning regimen intensity was positively correlated with platelet transfusion events as assessed by multivariate analysis. Other patient characteristics such as gender, graft type, donor type, underlying disease and use of TBI were all independently associated with transfusion needs in SCT patients. Further studies are required to understand the means to minimize transfusions and potential related complications in SCT patients.

  8. Family centered care of hospitalized children: A hybrid concept analysis in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Khajeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Family centered care of hospitalized children (FCCHC is a multidimensional concept, which is directly associated with the context and healthcare system. This study was conducted to analyze the concept of FCCHC in Iran.Methods: This concept analysis was conducted with the use of hybrid model in 3 phases: a literature review in the theoretical phase, semi-structured interviews and descriptive observations in the fieldwork phase, and combination of the results of 2 previous phases in the final analytical phase.Results: The 4 main themes extracted in theoretical phase included "family and healthcare professional participation", "information sharing with families", "family and healthcare professional relationship based on dignity and respect" and "individualized care of family".Moreover, 4 themes were emerged in the fieldwork phase, including "family as a nonparticipant visitor", "one-way education", "non-supportive interactions" and "non-specific care of family". In third phase with combination of the results of 2 phases, the final definition of the concept was presented.Conclusion: FCCHC is a comprehensive care that is affected by human and organizational factors and requires full participation of staff and family, effective interaction with family, education and information sharing with them, and individualized care of each family. By knowing the dimensions of the FCCHC, we will be able to run our activities to provide facilities and features for its optimal implementation in Iran.

  9. Cost analysis of living donor kidney transplantation in China: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenyu; Zhang, Lei; Han, Shu; Zhu, Youhua; Wang, Liming; Zhou, Meisheng; Zeng, Li

    2012-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most cost-effective option for the treatment of end-stage renal disease, but the financial aspects of kidney transplantation have not yet been fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the hospital cost of living donor kidney transplantation in China and to identify factors associated with the high cost. Demographic and clinical data of 103 consecutive patients who underwent living donor kidney transplantation from January 2007 to January 2011 at our center were reviewed, and detailed hospital cost of initial admission for kidney transplantation was analyzed. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was computed to determine predictors affecting the total hospital cost. The median total hospital cost was US $10,531, of which 69.2% was for medications, 13.2% for surgical procedures, 11.4% for para clinics, 3.7% for accommodations, 0.5% for nursing care, and 2.0% for other miscellaneous medical services. A multivariate stepwise logistic regression model for overall cost of transplantation revealed that the length of hospital stay, induction therapy, steroid-resistant rejection, maintenance therapy, infection status and body weight were independent predictors affecting the total hospitalization cost. Although the cost of living donor kidney transplantation in China is much lower than that in developed countries, it is a heavy burden for both the government and the patients. As medications formed the greater proportion of the total hospitalization cost, efforts to reduce the cost of drugs should be addressed.

  10. Cultural Assemblage as Genius Loci: Character Analysis of Medan City Center District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajaruddin Siregar Hari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The city of Medan was formed from a rapidly growing plantation industry in the 1800s. The area that was originally only a village called Medan Putri with a population of about 200 people slowly changed since the Dutch investors saw the prospect of tobacco plantations in this region (Sinar, 2006. The amount of manpower needed to manage the plantation resulted in the investors bringing labor from Java, China and also Tamil. Moving the central government of the Deli Sultanate to Medan in 1891 increasingly crowded Medan at that time. The Arabs, Mining, Mandailing, and Aceh began to arrive for trading purposes as Medan began to grow and become more crowded. The study focused on locating the genius loci of Medan City through tracing the historical meaning by adapting the method undertaken by Norberg Schultz in tracing the spirit of the place and genius loci. The result of the analysis shows the role of culture and economic background that plays a major role in the formation of the character of Medan City center. The city is formed from the history of the plantation industry as well as the diverse cultures that share the same attachment and goals in the economic field.

  11. Transportation Secure Data Center: Real-World Data for Planning, Modeling, and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2018-01-19

    The Transportation Secure Data Center (TSDC) at www.nrel.gov/tsdc provides free, web-based access to detailed transportation data from a variety of travel surveys conducted across the nation. While preserving the privacy of survey participants, this online repository makes vital transportation data broadly available to users from the comfort of their own desks via a secure online connection. Data Available through the TSDC: Maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in partnership with the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), the TSDC houses data from travel surveys and studies conducted using global positioning system (GPS) devices. It features millions of data points - second-by-second GPS readings, vehicle characteristics (if applicable), and demographics - for all modes of travel. NREL screens the initial data for quality control, translates each data set into a consistent format, and interprets the data for spatial analysis. NREL's processing routines add information on vehicle fuel economy and road grades and join data points to the road network.

  12. Python-Based Scientific Analysis and Visualization of Precipitation Systems at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    larger regional or national picture of precipitating weather systems. Composites, horizontal and vertical crosssections, and combinations thereof are easily displayed using as little as one line of code. MMM-Py can also write to the native MRMS binary format, and sub-sectioning of tiles (or multiple stitched tiles) is anticipated to be in place by the time of this meeting. Thus, MMM-Py also can be used to power the creation of custom mosaics for targeted regional studies. Overlays of other data (e.g., lightning observations) are easily accomplished. Demonstrations of MMM-Py, including the creation of animations, will be shown. Finally, Marshall has done significant work to interface Python-based analysis routines with the U.S. Department of Energy's Py-ART software package for radar data ingest, processing, and analysis. One example of this is the Python Turbulence Detection Algorithm (PyTDA), an MSFC-based implementation of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Turbulence Detection Algorithm (NTDA) for the purposes of convective-scale analysis, situational awareness, and forensic meteorology. PyTDA exploits Py-ART's radar data ingest routines and data model to rapidly produce aviation-relevant turbulence estimates from Doppler radar data. Work toward processing speed optimization and better integration within the Py-ART framework will be highlighted. Python-based analysis within the Py-ART framework is also being done for new research related to intercomparison of ground-based radar data with satellite estimates of ocean winds, as well as research on the electrification of pyrocumulus clouds.

  13. Human-centered modeling in human reliability analysis: some trends based on case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosneron-Dupin, F.; Reer, B.; Heslinga, G.; Straeter, O.; Gerdes, V.; Saliou, G.; Ullwer, W.

    1997-01-01

    As an informal working group of researchers from France, Germany and The Netherlands created in 1993, the EARTH association is investigating significant subjects in the field of human reliability analysis (HRA). Our initial review of cases from nuclear operating experience showed that decision-based unrequired actions (DUA) contribute to risk significantly on the one hand. On the other hand, our evaluation of current HRA methods showed that these methods do not cover such actions adequately. Especially, practice-oriented guidelines for their predictive identification are lacking. We assumed that a basic cause for such difficulties was that these methods actually use a limited representation of the stimulus-organism-response (SOR) paradigm. We proposed a human-centered model, which better highlights the active role of the operators and the importance of their culture, attitudes and goals. This orientation was encouraged by our review of current HRA research activities. We therefore decided to envisage progress by identifying cognitive tendencies in the context of operating and simulator experience. For this purpose, advanced approaches for retrospective event analysis were discussed. Some orientations for improvements were proposed. By analyzing cases, various cognitive tendencies were identified, together with useful information about their context. Some of them match psychological findings already published in the literature, some of them are not covered adequately by the literature that we reviewed. Finally, this exploratory study shows that contextual and case-illustrated findings about cognitive tendencies provide useful help for the predictive identification of DUA in HRA. More research should be carried out to complement our findings and elaborate more detailed and systematic guidelines for using them in HRA studies

  14. Analysis of periinterventional complications of intracranial angioplasty and stenting: A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silber, Toni; Ziemann, Ulf [Center of Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen (Germany); Ernemann, Ulrike [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, University of Tübingen (Germany); Bischof, Felix, E-mail: felix.bischof@uni-tuebingen.de [Center of Neurology, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, University of Tübingen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Periinterventional complications in 7.5% of patients with intracranial artery stenting. • 2.5% of periinterventional complications were perforator strokes. • 3.8% of patients developed a hemorrhagic stroke due to reperfusion injury. • Complications could be reduced by individualized measures to prevent perforator stroke or reperfusion injury. - Abstract: Background and purpose: Treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease by angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) is limited by a high rate of periinterventional strokes. We performed a detailed analysis of these strokes at our center in order to identify strategies to reduce the risk of periinterventional complications. Methods: Case records and imaging data of 80 patients with a symptomatic 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery treated with PTAS between July 2007 and December 2013 were reviewed. All patients had a sufficient response to aspirin and clopidogrel. Periinterventional strokes were categorized as either ischemic (perforator territory, distal embolic or delayed stent thrombosis) or hemorrhagic (intraparenchymal, subarachnoid). Results: Periinterventional complications occurred in 6/80 (7.5%) patients, consisting of 2 ischemic strokes (2.5%, both perforator territory), 3 hemorrhagic strokes (3.8%, 2 intraparenchymal due to reperfusion injury, 1 subarachnoid due to vessel rupture) and one death (1.3%) unrelated to stroke. All strokes occurred within 24 h after PTAS. Conclusion: Our retrospective data analysis suggests that the risk of periinterventional stroke after PTAS of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease might be reduced by sufficient antiplatelet therapy and optimized management of patients with high risk for reperfusion injury or perforator strokes, including selection of a stenting device adapted to individual vessel morphology.

  15. Analysis of periinterventional complications of intracranial angioplasty and stenting: A single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silber, Toni; Ziemann, Ulf; Ernemann, Ulrike; Bischof, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Periinterventional complications in 7.5% of patients with intracranial artery stenting. • 2.5% of periinterventional complications were perforator strokes. • 3.8% of patients developed a hemorrhagic stroke due to reperfusion injury. • Complications could be reduced by individualized measures to prevent perforator stroke or reperfusion injury. - Abstract: Background and purpose: Treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease by angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) is limited by a high rate of periinterventional strokes. We performed a detailed analysis of these strokes at our center in order to identify strategies to reduce the risk of periinterventional complications. Methods: Case records and imaging data of 80 patients with a symptomatic 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery treated with PTAS between July 2007 and December 2013 were reviewed. All patients had a sufficient response to aspirin and clopidogrel. Periinterventional strokes were categorized as either ischemic (perforator territory, distal embolic or delayed stent thrombosis) or hemorrhagic (intraparenchymal, subarachnoid). Results: Periinterventional complications occurred in 6/80 (7.5%) patients, consisting of 2 ischemic strokes (2.5%, both perforator territory), 3 hemorrhagic strokes (3.8%, 2 intraparenchymal due to reperfusion injury, 1 subarachnoid due to vessel rupture) and one death (1.3%) unrelated to stroke. All strokes occurred within 24 h after PTAS. Conclusion: Our retrospective data analysis suggests that the risk of periinterventional stroke after PTAS of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease might be reduced by sufficient antiplatelet therapy and optimized management of patients with high risk for reperfusion injury or perforator strokes, including selection of a stenting device adapted to individual vessel morphology

  16. Trauma center variation in splenic artery embolization and spleen salvage: a multicenter analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aman; Duane, Therese M; Wilson, Sean P; Haney, Starre; O'Neill, Patrick J; Evans, Heather L; Como, John J; Claridge, Jeffrey A

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate if variation in management of blunt splenic injury (BSI) among Level I trauma centers is associated with different outcomes related to the use of splenic artery embolization (SAE). All adult patients admitted for BSI from 2008 to 2010 at 4 Level I trauma centers were reviewed. Use of SAE was determined, and outcomes of spleen salvage and nonoperative management (NOM) failure were evaluated. A priori, a 10% SAE rate was used to group centers into high- or low-use groups. There were 1,275 BSI patients. There were intercenter differences in age, injury severity, and grade of spleen injury (Spleen Injury Scale [SIS]). Mortality was similar by center; however, BSI treatment varied significantly by center. Overall, SAE use was highest at center A compared with B, C, and D (19%, 11%, 1%, and 4%, respectively; p trauma centers. Centers with higher rates of SAE use have higher spleen salvage and less NOM failure. SAE was shown to be an independent predictor of spleen salvage. Therapeutic study, level IV.

  17. Analysis of differences in outcome of two European liver transplant centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemes, B; Polak, W; Ther, G; Hendriks, H; Kobori, L; Porte, RJ; Sarvary, E; de Jong, KP; Doros, A; Gerlei, Z; van den Berg, AP; Fehervari, [No Value; Gorog, D; Peeters, PM; Jaray, J; Slooff, MJH

    Authors analyzed the differences in the outcome of two European liver transplant centers differing in case volume and experience. The first was the Transplantation and Surgical Clinic, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary (SEB) and the second the University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen,

  18. Building for consumption: an institutional analysis of peripheral shopping center development in northwest Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, D.V.H.

    2004-01-01

    In West Europe, one of the most contested kinds of urban development is the out-of-town shopping center. Pointing to the US experience, these are viewed as threats to the vitality of traditional town centers, and are often actively discouraged by planning legislation. This notwithstanding,

  19. Evaluation and analysis of real-time precise orbits and clocks products from different IGS analysis centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Yang, Hongzhou; Gao, Yang; Yao, Yibin; Xu, Chaoqian

    2018-06-01

    To meet the increasing demands from the real-time Precise Point Positioning (PPP) users, the real-time satellite orbit and clock products are generated by different International GNSS Service (IGS) real-time analysis centers and can be publicly received through the Internet. Based on different data sources and processing strategies, the real-time products from different analysis centers therefore differ in availability and accuracy. The main objective of this paper is to evaluate availability and accuracy of different real-time products and their effects on real-time PPP. A total of nine commonly used Real-Time Service (RTS) products, namely IGS01, IGS03, CLK01, CLK15, CLK22, CLK52, CLK70, CLK81 and CLK90, will be evaluated in this paper. Because not all RTS products support multi-GNSS, only GPS products are analyzed in this paper. Firstly, the availability of all RTS products is analyzed in two levels. The first level is the epoch availability, indicating whether there is outage for that epoch. The second level is the satellite availability, which defines the available satellite number for each epoch. Then the accuracy of different RTS products is investigated on nominal accuracy and the accuracy degradation over time. Results show that Root-Mean-Square Error (RMSE) of satellite orbit ranges from 3.8 cm to 7.5 cm for different RTS products. While the mean Standard Deviations of Errors (STDE) of satellite clocks range from 1.9 cm to 5.6 cm. The modified Signal In Space Range Error (SISRE) for all products are from 1.3 cm to 5.5 cm for different RTS products. The accuracy degradation of the orbit has the linear trend for all RTS products and the satellite clock degradation depends on the satellite clock types. The Rb clocks on board of GPS IIF satellites have the smallest degradation rate of less than 3 cm over 10 min while the Cs clocks on board of GPS IIF have the largest degradation rate of more than 10 cm over 10 min. Finally, the real-time kinematic PPP is

  20. Analysis of patterns of palliative radiotherapy in north west India: A regional cancer center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil Kapoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Palliative radiotherapy (PRT is the eventual requirement in 30-50% of all cancer patients. PRT is primarily aimed to relieve pain and prevent/treat collapse or fracture in case of bone metastasis, to reduce edema in patients with cranial metastasis, and to control distressing symptoms of rapid primary growth. An audit of PRT planned in a busy cancer center can help in the characterization of the requirements of the patients and the formulation of institutional policies. Materials and Methods: In total, 516 patients who received PRT in our regional cancer center from January 2012 to December 2012 and whose complete records were available for analysis were selected for this retrospective study. Medical records and radiotherapy files were analyzed to obtain data such as sociodemographic parameters, prescription of PRT, and follow up. Descriptive statistics were evaluated in terms of frequencies and percentages to allow comparisons. Results: Of the 516 patients, 73% patients were male; the median age of the patients receiving PRT was 62 years (range 13-83 years. About 48% ( n = 248 patients received PRT at the primary site while rest (52% were given PRT at the metastatic site. The most common indication of PRT was pain (56.8% cases, followed by cytostatic PRT (19.8% and raised ICT (12.4%. The median dose prescribed was 30 Gy (range 8-36 Gy delivered in 1-12 fractions over the duration of 1-18 days. The overall response rate was about 43% at 2 weeks of completion of PRT; the median follow-up of the patients was 154 days (range 9-256 days. The long-term symptom relief at median follow up was 8%. Conclusions: Good clinical judgment and expertise is required in prescribing correct fractionation schedule to achieve effective symptom palliation with lowest possible cost and inconvenience to the patients and relatives. Hypofractionated radiotherapy is a feasible treatment option in patients with advanced incurable disease to achieve effective