WorldWideScience

Sample records for analysis automation caa

  1. A standard analysis method (SAM) for the automated analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soils using the chemical analysis automation (CAA) paradigm: validation and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzeszutko, C.; Johnson, C.R.; Monagle, M.; Klatt, L.N.

    1997-10-01

    The Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) program is developing a standardized modular automation strategy for chemical analysis. In this automation concept, analytical chemistry is performed with modular building blocks that correspond to individual elements of the steps in the analytical process. With a standardized set of behaviors and interactions, these blocks can be assembled in a 'plug and play' manner into a complete analysis system. These building blocks, which are referred to as Standard Laboratory Modules (SLM), interface to a host control system that orchestrates the entire analytical process, from sample preparation through data interpretation. The integrated system is called a Standard Analysis Method (SAME). A SAME for the automated determination of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) in soils, assembled in a mobile laboratory, is undergoing extensive testing and validation. The SAME consists of the following SLMs: a four channel Soxhlet extractor, a High Volume Concentrator, column clean up, a gas chromatograph, a PCB data interpretation module, a robot, and a human- computer interface. The SAME is configured to meet the requirements specified in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) SW-846 Methods 3541/3620A/8082 for the analysis of pcbs in soils. The PCB SAME will be described along with the developmental test plan. Performance data obtained during developmental testing will also be discussed

  2. CAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeschke, A.; Orth, H.; Zilly, G.; Konrad, W.; Tjandra, O.

    1987-01-01

    Due to the lack of sufficient in-line instrumentation, process control and process monitoring of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant require an efficient analytical laboratory for the physical and chemical assay of the various process constituents and intermediate or final products. The demand for efficiency, reliability and short response time calls for the use of computer support in the laboratory, which is usually realized by laboratory information systems covering both levels: analytical instruments automation and laboratory organization. Within the frame of laboratory organization the selection of the appropriate analytical method, the definition of the analytical steps (including sample preparation, measurement procedure, evaluation, etc.) and scheduling the sequences in laboratory work is an inherently complex task. It depends on a variety of input informations and implies multiple decision steps, which often must be revised repeatedly during the analytical treatment because of unexpected analytical results

  3. Contaminant analysis automation, an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollen, R.; Ramos, O. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    To meet the environmental restoration and waste minimization goals of government and industry, several government laboratories, universities, and private companies have formed the Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA) team. The goal of this consortium is to design and fabricate robotics systems that standardize and automate the hardware and software of the most common environmental chemical methods. In essence, the CAA team takes conventional, regulatory- approved (EPA Methods) chemical analysis processes and automates them. The automation consists of standard laboratory modules (SLMs) that perform the work in a much more efficient, accurate, and cost- effective manner

  4. The contaminant analysis automation robot implementation for the automated laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younkin, J.R.; Igou, R.E.; Urenda, T.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA) project defines the automated laboratory as a series of standard laboratory modules (SLM) serviced by a robotic standard support module (SSM). These SLMs are designed to allow plug-and-play integration into automated systems that perform standard analysis methods (SAM). While the SLMs are autonomous in the execution of their particular chemical processing task, the SAM concept relies on a high-level task sequence controller (TSC) to coordinate the robotic delivery of materials requisite for SLM operations, initiate an SLM operation with the chemical method dependent operating parameters, and coordinate the robotic removal of materials from the SLM when its commands and events has been established to allow ready them for transport operations as well as performing the Supervisor and Subsystems (GENISAS) software governs events from the SLMs and robot. The Intelligent System Operating Environment (ISOE) enables the inter-process communications used by GENISAS. CAA selected the Hewlett-Packard Optimized Robot for Chemical Analysis (ORCA) and its associated Windows based Methods Development Software (MDS) as the robot SSM. The MDS software is used to teach the robot each SLM position and required material port motions. To allow the TSC to command these SLM motions, a hardware and software implementation was required that allowed message passing between different operating systems. This implementation involved the use of a Virtual Memory Extended (VME) rack with a Force CPU-30 computer running VxWorks; a real-time multitasking operating system, and a Radiuses PC compatible VME computer running MDS. A GENISAS server on The Force computer accepts a transport command from the TSC, a GENISAS supervisor, over Ethernet and notifies software on the RadiSys PC of the pending command through VMEbus shared memory. The command is then delivered to the MDS robot control software using a Windows Dynamic Data Exchange conversation

  5. Automation of activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, I.N.; Ivanets, V.N.; Filippov, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    The basic data on the methods and equipment of activation analysis are presented. Recommendations on the selection of activation analysis techniques, and especially the technique envisaging the use of short-lived isotopes, are given. The equipment possibilities to increase dataway carrying capacity, using modern computers for the automation of the analysis and data processing procedure, are shown

  6. An overview of the contaminant analysis automation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollen, R.M.; Erkkila, T.; Beugelsdijk, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has significant amounts of radioactive and hazardous wastes stored, buried, and still being generated at many sites within the United States. These wastes must be characterized to determine the elemental, isotopic, and compound content before remediation can begin. In this paper, the authors project that sampling requirements will necessitate generating more than 10 million samples by 1995, which will far exceed the capabilities of our current manual chemical analysis laboratories. The Contaminant Analysis Automation effort (CAA), with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as to the coordinating Laboratory, is designing and fabricating robotic systems that will standardize and automate both the hardware and the software of the most common environmental chemical methods. This will be accomplished by designing and producing several unique analysis systems called Standard Analysis Methods (SAM). Each SAM will automate a specific chemical method, including sample preparation, the analytical analysis, and the data interpretation, by using a building block known as the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). This concept allows the chemist to assemble an automated environmental method using standardized SLMs easily and without the worry of hardware compatibility or the necessity of generating complicated control programs

  7. Automated Motivic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lartillot, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Motivic analysis provides very detailed understanding of musical composi- tions, but is also particularly difficult to formalize and systematize. A computational automation of the discovery of motivic patterns cannot be reduced to a mere extraction of all possible sequences of descriptions...... for lossless compression. The structural complexity resulting from successive repetitions of patterns can be controlled through a simple modelling of cycles. Generally, motivic patterns cannot always be defined solely as sequences of descriptions in a fixed set of dimensions: throughout the descriptions...... of the successive notes and intervals, various sets of musical parameters may be invoked. In this chapter, a method is presented that allows for these heterogeneous patterns to be discovered. Motivic repetition with local ornamentation is detected by reconstructing, on top of “surface-level” monodic voices, longer...

  8. Automated sample analysis and remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollen, R.; Settle, F.

    1995-01-01

    The Contaminant Analysis Automation Project is developing an automated chemical analysis system to address the current needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE). These needs focus on the remediation of large amounts of radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes stored, buried and still being processed at numerous DOE sites. This paper outlines the advantages of the system under development, and details the hardware and software design. A prototype system for characterizing polychlorinated biphenyls in soils is also described

  9. Automated Analysis of Accountability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Alessandro; Giustolisi, Rosario; Schürmann, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    that the system can detect the misbehaving parties who caused that failure. Accountability is an intuitively stronger property than verifiability as the latter only rests on the possibility of detecting the failure of a goal. A plethora of accountability and verifiability definitions have been proposed...... in the literature. Those definitions are either very specific to the protocols in question, hence not applicable in other scenarios, or too general and widely applicable but requiring complicated and hard to follow manual proofs. In this paper, we advance formal definitions of verifiability and accountability...... that are amenable to automated verification. Our definitions are general enough to be applied to different classes of protocols and different automated security verification tools. Furthermore, we point out formally the relation between verifiability and accountability. We validate our definitions...

  10. Automated activation-analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor, M.M.; Hensley, W.K.; Denton, M.M.; Garcia, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    An automated delayed neutron counting and instrumental neutron activation analysis system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Omega West Reactor (OWR) to analyze samples for uranium and 31 additional elements with a maximum throughput of 400 samples per day. The system and its mode of operation for a large reconnaissance survey are described

  11. Automated Analysis of Infinite Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholtz, Mikael

    2005-01-01

    The security of a network protocol crucially relies on the scenario in which the protocol is deployed. This paper describes syntactic constructs for modelling network scenarios and presents an automated analysis tool, which can guarantee that security properties hold in all of the (infinitely many...

  12. Automated activation-analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor, M.M.; Garcia, S.R.; Denton, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    An automated delayed neutron counting and instrumental neutron activation analysis system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Omega West Reactor (OWR) to analyze samples for uranium and 31 additional elements with a maximum throughput of 400 samples per day

  13. AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF BREAKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Farhadzade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breakers relate to Electric Power Systems’ equipment, the reliability of which influence, to a great extend, on reliability of Power Plants. In particular, the breakers determine structural reliability of switchgear circuit of Power Stations and network substations. Failure in short-circuit switching off by breaker with further failure of reservation unit or system of long-distance protection lead quite often to system emergency.The problem of breakers’ reliability improvement and the reduction of maintenance expenses is becoming ever more urgent in conditions of systematic increasing of maintenance cost and repair expenses of oil circuit and air-break circuit breakers. The main direction of this problem solution is the improvement of diagnostic control methods and organization of on-condition maintenance. But this demands to use a great amount of statistic information about nameplate data of breakers and their operating conditions, about their failures, testing and repairing, advanced developments (software of computer technologies and specific automated information system (AIS.The new AIS with AISV logo was developed at the department: “Reliability of power equipment” of AzRDSI of Energy. The main features of AISV are:· to provide the security and data base accuracy;· to carry out systematic control of breakers conformity with operating conditions;· to make the estimation of individual  reliability’s value and characteristics of its changing for given combination of characteristics variety;· to provide personnel, who is responsible for technical maintenance of breakers, not only with information but also with methodological support, including recommendations for the given problem solving  and advanced methods for its realization.

  14. Automated Analysis of Corpora Callosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Davies, Rhodri H.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes and evaluates the steps needed to perform modern model-based interpretation of the corpus callosum in MRI. The process is discussed from the initial landmark-free contours to full-fledged statistical models based on the Active Appearance Models framework. Topics treated incl...... include landmark placement, background modelling and multi-resolution analysis. Preliminary quantitative and qualitative validation in a cross-sectional study show that fully automated analysis and segmentation of the corpus callosum are feasible....

  15. Automated Software Vulnerability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, Emre C.; Kil, Chongkyung; Ning, Peng

    Despite decades of research, software continues to have vulnerabilities. Successful exploitations of these vulnerabilities by attackers cost millions of dollars to businesses and individuals. Unfortunately, most effective defensive measures, such as patching and intrusion prevention systems, require an intimate knowledge of the vulnerabilities. Many systems for detecting attacks have been proposed. However, the analysis of the exploited vulnerabilities is left to security experts and programmers. Both the human effortinvolved and the slow analysis process are unfavorable for timely defensive measure to be deployed. The problem is exacerbated by zero-day attacks.

  16. Automated analysis of gastric emptying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abutaleb, A.; Frey, D.; Spicer, K.; Spivey, M.; Buckles, D.

    1986-01-01

    The authors devised a novel method to automate the analysis of nuclear gastric emptying studies. Many previous methods have been used to measure gastric emptying but, are cumbersome and require continuing interference by the operator to use. Two specific problems that occur are related to patient movement between images and changes in the location of the radioactive material within the stomach. Their method can be used with either dual or single phase studies. For dual phase studies the authors use In-111 labeled water and Tc-99MSC (Sulfur Colloid) labeled scrambled eggs. For single phase studies either the liquid or solid phase material is used

  17. Reload safety analysis automation tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havlůj, F.; Hejzlar, J.; Vočka, R.

    2013-01-01

    Performing core physics calculations for the sake of reload safety analysis is a very demanding and time consuming process. This process generally begins with the preparation of libraries for the core physics code using a lattice code. The next step involves creating a very large set of calculations with the core physics code. Lastly, the results of the calculations must be interpreted, correctly applying uncertainties and checking whether applicable limits are satisfied. Such a procedure requires three specialized experts. One must understand the lattice code in order to correctly calculate and interpret its results. The next expert must have a good understanding of the physics code in order to create libraries from the lattice code results and to correctly define all the calculations involved. The third expert must have a deep knowledge of the power plant and the reload safety analysis procedure in order to verify, that all the necessary calculations were performed. Such a procedure involves many steps and is very time consuming. At ÚJV Řež, a.s., we have developed a set of tools which can be used to automate and simplify the whole process of performing reload safety analysis. Our application QUADRIGA automates lattice code calculations for library preparation. It removes user interaction with the lattice code and reduces his task to defining fuel pin types, enrichments, assembly maps and operational parameters all through a very nice and user-friendly GUI. The second part in reload safety analysis calculations is done by CycleKit, a code which is linked with our core physics code ANDREA. Through CycleKit large sets of calculations with complicated interdependencies can be performed using simple and convenient notation. CycleKit automates the interaction with ANDREA, organizes all the calculations, collects the results, performs limit verification and displays the output in clickable html format. Using this set of tools for reload safety analysis simplifies

  18. Hybrid CFD/CAA Modeling for Liftoff Acoustic Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Liever, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents development efforts at the NASA Marshall Space flight Center to establish a hybrid Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Aero-Acoustics (CFD/CAA) simulation system for launch vehicle liftoff acoustics environment analysis. Acoustic prediction engineering tools based on empirical jet acoustic strength and directivity models or scaled historical measurements are of limited value in efforts to proactively design and optimize launch vehicles and launch facility configurations for liftoff acoustics. CFD based modeling approaches are now able to capture the important details of vehicle specific plume flow environment, identifY the noise generation sources, and allow assessment of the influence of launch pad geometric details and sound mitigation measures such as water injection. However, CFD methodologies are numerically too dissipative to accurately capture the propagation of the acoustic waves in the large CFD models. The hybrid CFD/CAA approach combines the high-fidelity CFD analysis capable of identifYing the acoustic sources with a fast and efficient Boundary Element Method (BEM) that accurately propagates the acoustic field from the source locations. The BEM approach was chosen for its ability to properly account for reflections and scattering of acoustic waves from launch pad structures. The paper will present an overview of the technology components of the CFD/CAA framework and discuss plans for demonstration and validation against test data.

  19. Automated analysis of instructional text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, L.M.

    1983-05-01

    The development of a capability for automated processing of natural language text is a long-range goal of artificial intelligence. This paper discusses an investigation into the issues involved in the comprehension of descriptive, as opposed to illustrative, textual material. The comprehension process is viewed as the conversion of knowledge from one representation into another. The proposed target representation consists of statements of the prolog language, which can be interpreted both declaratively and procedurally, much like production rules. A computer program has been written to model in detail some ideas about this process. The program successfully analyzes several heavily edited paragraphs adapted from an elementary textbook on programming, automatically synthesizing as a result of the analysis a working Prolog program which, when executed, can parse and interpret let commands in the basic language. The paper discusses the motivations and philosophy of the project, the many kinds of prerequisite knowledge which are necessary, and the structure of the text analysis program. A sentence-by-sentence account of the analysis of the sample text is presented, describing the syntactic and semantic processing which is involved. The paper closes with a discussion of lessons learned from the project, possible alternative approaches, and possible extensions for future work. The entire project is presented as illustrative of the nature and complexity of the text analysis process, rather than as providing definitive or optimal solutions to any aspects of the task. 12 references.

  20. Automation for System Safety Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land; Throop, David; Thronesbery, Carroll; Flores, Joshua; Bennett, Ted; Wennberg, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This presentation describes work to integrate a set of tools to support early model-based analysis of failures and hazards due to system-software interactions. The tools perform and assist analysts in the following tasks: 1) extract model parts from text for architecture and safety/hazard models; 2) combine the parts with library information to develop the models for visualization and analysis; 3) perform graph analysis and simulation to identify and evaluate possible paths from hazard sources to vulnerable entities and functions, in nominal and anomalous system-software configurations and scenarios; and 4) identify resulting candidate scenarios for software integration testing. There has been significant technical progress in model extraction from Orion program text sources, architecture model derivation (components and connections) and documentation of extraction sources. Models have been derived from Internal Interface Requirements Documents (IIRDs) and FMEA documents. Linguistic text processing is used to extract model parts and relationships, and the Aerospace Ontology also aids automated model development from the extracted information. Visualizations of these models assist analysts in requirements overview and in checking consistency and completeness.

  1. Review of design criteria for Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) used in Fuel Reprocessing Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Basu, Pew; Sivasubramaniyan, K.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-01-01

    Though fuel cycle facilities handling fissile materials are designed with careful criticality safety analysis, the criticality accident cannot be ruled out completely. Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) is being installed as part of criticality safety management in fuel cycle facilities. CAAS system being used in India, is ECIL make, ionization chamber based gamma detector, which houses three identical detectors and works on 2/3 logic. As per ISO 7753 and ANSI/ANS-8.3, the CAAS must be designed to be capable of detecting any minimum accident occurs which could be of concern. Based on this, alarm limit used in CAAS is: 4 R/h (fast transient excursion) and 3 mR in 0.5 sec (slow excursion). In case of reprocessing facilities wherein process tanks located in heavy shielding, identification of CAAS installation locations require detailed radiation transport calculations. A study has been taken to estimate the gamma dose rate from thick concrete hot cells in order to determine the locations of CAAS to meet the present design criteria of alarm limit

  2. Automated analysis of autoradiographic imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisignani, W.T.; Greenhouse, S.C.

    1975-01-01

    A research programme is described which has as its objective the automated characterization of neurological tissue regions from autoradiographs by utilizing hybrid-resolution image processing techniques. An experimental system is discussed which includes raw imagery, scanning an digitizing equipments, feature-extraction algorithms, and regional characterization techniques. The parameters extracted by these algorithms are presented as well as the regional characteristics which are obtained by operating on the parameters with statistical sampling techniques. An approach is presented for validating the techniques and initial experimental results are obtained from an anlysis of an autoradiograph of a region of the hypothalamus. An extension of these automated techniques to other biomedical research areas is discussed as well as the implications of applying automated techniques to biomedical research problems. (author)

  3. Distribution system analysis and automation

    CERN Document Server

    Gers, Juan

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive guide to techniques that allow engineers to simulate, analyse and optimise power distribution systems which combined with automation, underpin the emerging concept of the "smart grid". This book is supported by theoretical concepts with real-world applications and MATLAB exercises.

  4. Development testing of the chemical analysis automation polychlorinated biphenyl standard analysis method during surface soils sampling at the David Witherspoon 1630 site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, M.A.; Klatt, L.N.; Thompson, D.H.

    1998-02-01

    The Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) project is developing standardized, software-driven, site-deployable robotic laboratory systems with the objective of lowering the per-sample analysis cost, decreasing sample turnaround time, and minimizing human exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials associated with DOE remediation projects. The first integrated system developed by the CAA project is designed to determine polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) content in soil matrices. A demonstration and development testing of this system was conducted in conjuction with surface soil characterization activities at the David Witherspoon 1630 Site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The PCB system consists of five hardware standard laboratory modules (SLMs), one software SLM, the task sequence controller (TSC), and the human-computer interface (HCI). Four of the hardware SLMs included a four-channel Soxhlet extractor, a high-volume concentrator, a column cleanup, and a gas chromatograph. These SLMs performed the sample preparation and measurement steps within the total analysis protocol. The fifth hardware module was a robot that transports samples between the SLMs and the required consumable supplies to the SLMs. The software SLM is an automated data interpretation module that receives raw data from the gas chromatograph SLM and analyzes the data to yield the analyte information. The TSC is a software system that provides the scheduling, management of system resources, and the coordination of all SLM activities. The HCI is a graphical user interface that presents the automated laboratory to the analyst in terms of the analytical procedures and methods. Human control of the automated laboratory is accomplished via the HCI. Sample information required for processing by the automated laboratory is entered through the HCI. Information related to the sample and the system status is presented to the analyst via graphical icons

  5. Automated analysis of slitless spectra. II. Quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, G.; Beauchemin, M.; Borra, F.

    1988-01-01

    Automated software have been developed to process slitless spectra. The software, described in a previous paper, automatically separates stars from extended objects and quasars from stars. This paper describes the quasar search techniques and discusses the results. The performance of the software is compared and calibrated with a plate taken in a region of SA 57 that has been extensively surveyed by others using a variety of techniques: the proposed automated software performs very well. It is found that an eye search of the same plate is less complete than the automated search: surveys that rely on eye searches suffer from incompleteness at least from a magnitude brighter than the plate limit. It is shown how the complete automated analysis of a plate and computer simulations are used to calibrate and understand the characteristics of the present data. 20 references

  6. Automated analysis in generic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerholm, Edvard

    This thesis studies automated methods for analyzing hardness assumptions in generic group models, following ideas of symbolic cryptography. We define a broad class of generic and symbolic group models for different settings---symmetric or asymmetric (leveled) k-linear groups --- and prove ''computational soundness'' theorems for the symbolic models. Based on this result, we formulate a master theorem that relates the hardness of an assumption to solving problems in polynomial algebra. We systematically analyze these problems identifying different classes of assumptions and obtain decidability and undecidability results. Then, we develop automated procedures for verifying the conditions of our master theorems, and thus the validity of hardness assumptions in generic group models. The concrete outcome is an automated tool, the Generic Group Analyzer, which takes as input the statement of an assumption, and outputs either a proof of its generic hardness or shows an algebraic attack against the assumption. Structure-preserving signatures are signature schemes defined over bilinear groups in which messages, public keys and signatures are group elements, and the verification algorithm consists of evaluating ''pairing-product equations''. Recent work on structure-preserving signatures studies optimality of these schemes in terms of the number of group elements needed in the verification key and the signature, and the number of pairing-product equations in the verification algorithm. While the size of keys and signatures is crucial for many applications, another aspect of performance is the time it takes to verify a signature. The most expensive operation during verification is the computation of pairings. However, the concrete number of pairings is not captured by the number of pairing-product equations considered in earlier work. We consider the question of what is the minimal number of pairing computations needed to verify structure-preserving signatures. We build an

  7. Automated Analysis of Security in Networking Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholtz, Mikael

    2004-01-01

    such networking systems are modelled in the process calculus LySa. On top of this programming language based formalism an analysis is developed, which relies on techniques from data and control ow analysis. These are techniques that can be fully automated, which make them an ideal basis for tools targeted at non...

  8. Automated Technology for Verificiation and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    -of-the-art research on theoretical and practical aspects of automated analysis, verification, and synthesis. Among 74 research papers and 10 tool papers submitted to ATVA 2009, the Program Committee accepted 23 as regular papers and 3 as tool papers. In all, 33 experts from 17 countries worked hard to make sure......This volume contains the papers presented at the 7th International Symposium on Automated Technology for Verification and Analysis held during October 13-16 in Macao SAR, China. The primary objective of the ATVA conferences remains the same: to exchange and promote the latest advances of state...

  9. Automated x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    A fully automated x-ray fluorescence analytical system is described. The hardware is based on a Philips PW1220 sequential x-ray spectrometer. Software for on-line analysis of a wide range of sample types has been developed for the Hewlett-Packard 9810A programmable calculator. Routines to test the system hardware are also described. (Author)

  10. Computer-automated neutron activation analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minor, M.M.; Garcia, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    An automated delayed neutron counting and instrumental neutron activation analysis system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Omega West Reactor (OWR) to analyze samples for uranium and 31 additional elements with a maximum throughput of 400 samples per day. 5 references

  11. Planning representation for automated exploratory data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Amant, Robert; Cohen, Paul R.

    1994-03-01

    Igor is a knowledge-based system for exploratory statistical analysis of complex systems and environments. Igor has two related goals: to help automate the search for interesting patterns in data sets, and to help develop models that capture significant relationships in the data. We outline a language for Igor, based on techniques of opportunistic planning, which balances control and opportunism. We describe the application of Igor to the analysis of the behavior of Phoenix, an artificial intelligence planning system.

  12. Analysis And Control System For Automated Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.; Kennedy, Larry Z.; Rodgers, Michael H.; Goode, K. Wayne

    1994-01-01

    Automated variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding apparatus operates under electronic supervision by welding analysis and control system. System performs all major monitoring and controlling functions. It acquires, analyzes, and displays weld-quality data in real time and adjusts process parameters accordingly. Also records pertinent data for use in post-weld analysis and documentation of quality. System includes optoelectronic sensors and data processors that provide feedback control of welding process.

  13. Improvement of Binary Analysis Components in Automated Malware Analysis Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-21

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0018 Improvement of Binary Analysis Components in Automated Malware Analysis Framework Keiji Takeda KEIO UNIVERSITY Final...TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 26 May 2015 to 25 Nov 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Improvement of Binary Analysis Components in Automated Malware ...analyze malicious software ( malware ) with minimum human interaction. The system autonomously analyze malware samples by analyzing malware binary program

  14. Automated Loads Analysis System (ATLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Stephen; Frere, Scot; O’Reilly, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS is a generalized solution that can be used for launch vehicles. ATLAS is used to produce modal transient analysis and quasi-static analysis results (i.e., accelerations, displacements, and forces) for the payload math models on a specific Shuttle Transport System (STS) flight using the shuttle math model and associated forcing functions. This innovation solves the problem of coupling of payload math models into a shuttle math model. It performs a transient loads analysis simulating liftoff, landing, and all flight events between liftoff and landing. ATLAS utilizes efficient and numerically stable algorithms available in MSC/NASTRAN.

  15. Automated spectral and timing analysis of AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munz, F.; Karas, V.; Guainazzi, M.

    2006-12-01

    % We have developed an autonomous script that helps the user to automate the XMM-Newton data analysis for the purposes of extensive statistical investigations. We test this approach by examining X-ray spectra of bright AGNs pre-selected from the public database. The event lists extracted in this process were studied further by constructing their energy-resolved Fourier power-spectrum density. This analysis combines energy distributions, light-curves, and their power-spectra and it proves useful to assess the variability patterns present is the data. As another example, an automated search was based on the XSPEC package to reveal the emission features in 2-8 keV range.

  16. Techniques for Automated Performance Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Ryan C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-02

    The performance of a particular HPC code depends on a multitude of variables, including compiler selection, optimization flags, OpenMP pool size, file system load, memory usage, MPI configuration, etc. As a result of this complexity, current predictive models have limited applicability, especially at scale. We present a formulation of scientific codes, nodes, and clusters that reduces complex performance analysis to well-known mathematical techniques. Building accurate predictive models and enhancing our understanding of scientific codes at scale is an important step towards exascale computing.

  17. Automated information retrieval system for radioactivation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrev, V.G.; Bochkov, P.E.; Gorokhov, S.A.; Nekrasov, V.V.; Tolstikova, L.I.

    1981-01-01

    An automated information retrieval system for radioactivation analysis has been developed. An ES-1022 computer and a problem-oriented software ''The description information search system'' were used for the purpose. Main aspects and sources of forming the system information fund, characteristics of the information retrieval language of the system are reported and examples of question-answer dialogue are given. Two modes can be used: selective information distribution and retrospective search [ru

  18. Automated analysis of objective-prism spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewett, P.C.; Irwin, M.J.; Bunclark, P.; Bridgeland, M.T.; Kibblewhite, E.J.; Smith, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    A fully automated system for the location, measurement and analysis of large numbers of low-resolution objective-prism spectra is described. The system is based on the APM facility at the University of Cambridge, and allows processing of objective-prism, grens or grism data. Particular emphasis is placed on techniques to obtain the maximum signal-to-noise ratio from the data, both in the initial spectral estimation procedure and for subsequent feature identification. Comparison of a high-quality visual catalogue of faint quasar candidates with an equivalent automated sample demonstrates the ability of the APM system to identify all the visually selected quasar candidates. In addition, a large population of new, faint (msub(J)approx. 20) candidates is identified. (author)

  19. Automating risk analysis of software design models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman, Maxime; Ruiz, Guifré; Heymann, Elisa; César, Eduardo; Miller, Barton P

    2014-01-01

    The growth of the internet and networked systems has exposed software to an increased amount of security threats. One of the responses from software developers to these threats is the introduction of security activities in the software development lifecycle. This paper describes an approach to reduce the need for costly human expertise to perform risk analysis in software, which is common in secure development methodologies, by automating threat modeling. Reducing the dependency on security experts aims at reducing the cost of secure development by allowing non-security-aware developers to apply secure development with little to no additional cost, making secure development more accessible. To automate threat modeling two data structures are introduced, identification trees and mitigation trees, to identify threats in software designs and advise mitigation techniques, while taking into account specification requirements and cost concerns. These are the components of our model for automated threat modeling, AutSEC. We validated AutSEC by implementing it in a tool based on data flow diagrams, from the Microsoft security development methodology, and applying it to VOMS, a grid middleware component, to evaluate our model's performance.

  20. Automating Trend Analysis for Spacecraft Constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, George; Cooter, Miranda; Updike, Clark; Carey, Everett; Mackey, Jennifer; Rykowski, Timothy; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft trend analysis is a vital mission operations function performed by satellite controllers and engineers, who perform detailed analyses of engineering telemetry data to diagnose subsystem faults and to detect trends that may potentially lead to degraded subsystem performance or failure in the future. It is this latter function that is of greatest importance, for careful trending can often predict or detect events that may lead to a spacecraft's entry into safe-hold. Early prediction and detection of such events could result in the avoidance of, or rapid return to service from, spacecraft safing, which not only results in reduced recovery costs but also in a higher overall level of service for the satellite system. Contemporary spacecraft trending activities are manually intensive and are primarily performed diagnostically after a fault occurs, rather than proactively to predict its occurrence. They also tend to rely on information systems and software that are oudated when compared to current technologies. When coupled with the fact that flight operations teams often have limited resources, proactive trending opportunities are limited, and detailed trend analysis is often reserved for critical responses to safe holds or other on-orbit events such as maneuvers. While the contemporary trend analysis approach has sufficed for current single-spacecraft operations, it will be unfeasible for NASA's planned and proposed space science constellations. Missions such as the Dynamics, Reconnection and Configuration Observatory (DRACO), for example, are planning to launch as many as 100 'nanospacecraft' to form a homogenous constellation. A simple extrapolation of resources and manpower based on single-spacecraft operations suggests that trending for such a large spacecraft fleet will be unmanageable, unwieldy, and cost-prohibitive. It is therefore imperative that an approach to automating the spacecraft trend analysis function be studied, developed, and applied to

  1. Automated reasoning applications to design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Given the necessary relationships and definitions of design functions and components, validation of system incarnation (the physical product of design) and sneak function analysis can be achieved via automated reasoners. The relationships and definitions must define the design specification and incarnation functionally. For the design specification, the hierarchical functional representation is based on physics and engineering principles and bounded by design objectives and constraints. The relationships and definitions of the design incarnation are manifested as element functional definitions, state relationship to functions, functional relationship to direction, element connectivity, and functional hierarchical configuration

  2. Automated analysis for nitrate by hydrazine reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamphake, L J; Hannah, S A; Cohen, J M

    1967-01-01

    An automated procedure for the simultaneous determinations of nitrate and nitrite in water is presented. Nitrite initially present in the sample is determined by a conventional diazotization-coupling reaction. Nitrate in another portion of sample is quantitatively reduced with hydrazine sulfate to nitrite which is then determined by the same diazotization-coupling reaction. Subtracting the nitrite initially present in the sample from that after reduction yields nitrite equivalent to nitrate initially in the sample. The rate of analysis is 20 samples/hr. Applicable range of the described method is 0.05-10 mg/l nitrite or nitrate nitrogen; however, increased sensitivity can be obtained by suitable modifications.

  3. Automated metabolic gas analysis systems: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, D J

    2001-01-01

    The use of automated metabolic gas analysis systems or metabolic measurement carts (MMC) in exercise studies is common throughout the industrialised world. They have become essential tools for diagnosing many hospital patients, especially those with cardiorespiratory disease. Moreover, the measurement of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is routine for many athletes in fitness laboratories and has become a defacto standard in spite of its limitations. The development of metabolic carts has also facilitated the noninvasive determination of the lactate threshold and cardiac output, respiratory gas exchange kinetics, as well as studies of outdoor activities via small portable systems that often use telemetry. Although the fundamental principles behind the measurement of oxygen uptake (VO2) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) have not changed, the techniques used have, and indeed, some have almost turned through a full circle. Early scientists often employed a manual Douglas bag method together with separate chemical analyses, but the need for faster and more efficient techniques fuelled the development of semi- and full-automated systems by private and commercial institutions. Yet, recently some scientists are returning back to the traditional Douglas bag or Tissot-spirometer methods, or are using less complex automated systems to not only save capital costs, but also to have greater control over the measurement process. Over the last 40 years, a considerable number of automated systems have been developed, with over a dozen commercial manufacturers producing in excess of 20 different automated systems. The validity and reliability of all these different systems is not well known, with relatively few independent studies having been published in this area. For comparative studies to be possible and to facilitate greater consistency of measurements in test-retest or longitudinal studies of individuals, further knowledge about the performance characteristics of these

  4. Specdata: Automated Analysis Software for Broadband Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jasmine N.; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2017-06-01

    With the advancement of chirped-pulse techniques, broadband rotational spectra with a few tens to several hundred GHz of spectral coverage are now routinely recorded. When studying multi-component mixtures that might result, for example, with the use of an electrical discharge, lines of new chemical species are often obscured by those of known compounds, and analysis can be laborious. To address this issue, we have developed SPECdata, an open source, interactive tool which is designed to simplify and greatly accelerate the spectral analysis and discovery. Our software tool combines both automated and manual components that free the user from computation, while giving him/her considerable flexibility to assign, manipulate, interpret and export their analysis. The automated - and key - component of the new software is a database query system that rapidly assigns transitions of known species in an experimental spectrum. For each experiment, the software identifies spectral features, and subsequently assigns them to known molecules within an in-house database (Pickett .cat files, list of frequencies...), or those catalogued in Splatalogue (using automatic on-line queries). With suggested assignments, the control is then handed over to the user who can choose to accept, decline or add additional species. Data visualization, statistical information, and interactive widgets assist the user in making decisions about their data. SPECdata has several other useful features intended to improve the user experience. Exporting a full report of the analysis, or a peak file in which assigned lines are removed are among several options. A user may also save their progress to continue at another time. Additional features of SPECdata help the user to maintain and expand their database for future use. A user-friendly interface allows one to search, upload, edit or update catalog or experiment entries.

  5. Management issues in automated audit analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, K.A.; Hochberg, J.G.; Wilhelmy, S.K.; McClary, J.F.; Christoph, G.G.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses management issues associated with the design and implementation of an automated audit analysis system that we use to detect security events. It gives the viewpoint of a team directly responsible for developing and managing such a system. We use Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) as a case in point. We examine issues encountered at Los Alamos, detail our solutions to them, and where appropriate suggest general solutions. After providing an introduction to NADIR, we explore four general management issues: cost-benefit questions, privacy considerations, legal issues, and system integrity. Our experiences are of general interest both to security professionals and to anyone who may wish to implement a similar system. While NADIR investigates security events, the methods used and the management issues are potentially applicable to a broad range of complex systems. These include those used to audit credit card transactions, medical care payments, and procurement systems.

  6. An approach to automated chromosome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Go, Roland

    1972-01-01

    The methods of approach developed with a view to automatic processing of the different stages of chromosome analysis are described in this study divided into three parts. Part 1 relates the study of automated selection of metaphase spreads, which operates a decision process in order to reject ail the non-pertinent images and keep the good ones. This approach has been achieved by Computing a simulation program that has allowed to establish the proper selection algorithms in order to design a kit of electronic logical units. Part 2 deals with the automatic processing of the morphological study of the chromosome complements in a metaphase: the metaphase photographs are processed by an optical-to-digital converter which extracts the image information and writes it out as a digital data set on a magnetic tape. For one metaphase image this data set includes some 200 000 grey values, encoded according to a 16, 32 or 64 grey-level scale, and is processed by a pattern recognition program isolating the chromosomes and investigating their characteristic features (arm tips, centromere areas), in order to get measurements equivalent to the lengths of the four arms. Part 3 studies a program of automated karyotyping by optimized pairing of human chromosomes. The data are derived from direct digitizing of the arm lengths by means of a BENSON digital reader. The program supplies' 1/ a list of the pairs, 2/ a graphic representation of the pairs so constituted according to their respective lengths and centromeric indexes, and 3/ another BENSON graphic drawing according to the author's own representation of the chromosomes, i.e. crosses with orthogonal arms, each branch being the accurate measurement of the corresponding chromosome arm. This conventionalized karyotype indicates on the last line the really abnormal or non-standard images unpaired by the program, which are of special interest for the biologist. (author) [fr

  7. Ecological Automation Design, Extending Work Domain Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelink, M.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    In high–risk domains like aviation, medicine and nuclear power plant control, automation has enabled new capabilities, increased the economy of operation and has greatly contributed to safety. However, automation increases the number of couplings in a system, which can inadvertently lead to more

  8. Automated Image Analysis Corrosion Working Group Update: February 1, 2018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, James G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    These are slides for the automated image analysis corrosion working group update. The overall goals were: automate the detection and quantification of features in images (faster, more accurate), how to do this (obtain data, analyze data), focus on Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope (LCM) data (laser intensity, laser height/depth, optical RGB, optical plus laser RGB).

  9. Automated fault tree analysis: the GRAFTER system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sancaktar, S.; Sharp, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    An inherent part of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is the construction and analysis of detailed fault trees. For this purpose, a fault tree computer graphics code named GRAFTER has been developed. The code system centers around the GRAFTER code. This code is used interactively to construct, store, update and print fault trees of small or large sizes. The SIMON code is used to provide data for the basic event probabilities. ENCODE is used to process the GRAFTER files to prepare input for the WAMCUT code. WAMCUT is used to quantify the top event probability and to identify the cutsets. This code system has been extensively used in various PRA projects. It has resulted in reduced manpower costs, increased QA capability, ease of documentation and it has simplified sensitivity analyses. Because of its automated nature, it is also suitable for LIVING PRA Studies which require updating and modifications during the lifetime of the plant. Brief descriptions and capabilities of the GRAFTER, SIMON and ENCODE codes are provided; an application of the GRAFTER system is outlined; and conclusions and comments on the code system are given

  10. Automated and connected vehicle implications and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Automated and connected vehicles (ACV) and, in particular, autonomous vehicles have captured : the interest of the public, industry and transportation authorities. ACVs can significantly reduce : accidents, fuel consumption, pollution and the costs o...

  11. System analysis of automated speed enforcement implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Speeding is a major factor in a large proportion of traffic crashes, injuries, and fatalities in the United States. Automated Speed Enforcement (ASE) is one of many approaches shown to be effective in reducing speeding violations and crashes. However...

  12. Delineated Analysis of Robotic Process Automation Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Ruchi Isaac; Riya Muni; Kenali Desai

    2017-01-01

    In this age and time when celerity is expected out of all the sectors of the country, the speed of execution of various processes and hence efficiency, becomes a prominent factor. To facilitate the speeding demands of these diverse platforms, Robotic Process Automation (RPA) is used. Robotic Process Automation can expedite back-office tasks in commercial industries, remote management tasks in IT industries and conservation of resources in multiple sectors. To implement RPA, many software ...

  13. Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Casuccio (RJ Lee Group); Michael Potter (RJ Lee Group); Fred Schwerer (RJ Lee Group); Dr. Richard J. Fruehan (Carnegie Mellon University); Dr. Scott Story (US Steel)

    2005-12-30

    The objective of this study was to develop the Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCATTM) to permit steelmakers to evaluate the quality of the steel through the analysis of individual inclusions. By characterizing individual inclusions, determinations can be made as to the cleanliness of the steel. Understanding the complicating effects of inclusions in the steelmaking process and on the resulting properties of steel allows the steel producer to increase throughput, better control the process, reduce remelts, and improve the quality of the product. The ASCAT (Figure 1) is a steel-smart inclusion analysis tool developed around a customized next-generation computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (NG-CCSEM) hardware platform that permits acquisition of inclusion size and composition data at a rate never before possible in SEM-based instruments. With built-in customized ''intelligent'' software, the inclusion data is automatically sorted into clusters representing different inclusion types to define the characteristics of a particular heat (Figure 2). The ASCAT represents an innovative new tool for the collection of statistically meaningful data on inclusions, and provides a means of understanding the complicated effects of inclusions in the steel making process and on the resulting properties of steel. Research conducted by RJLG with AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) and SMA (Steel Manufactures of America) members indicates that the ASCAT has application in high-grade bar, sheet, plate, tin products, pipes, SBQ, tire cord, welding rod, and specialty steels and alloys where control of inclusions, whether natural or engineered, are crucial to their specification for a given end-use. Example applications include castability of calcium treated steel; interstitial free (IF) degasser grade slag conditioning practice; tundish clogging and erosion minimization; degasser circulation and optimization; quality assessment

  14. Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary Casuccio; Michael Potter; Fred Schwerer; Richard J. Fruehan; Dr. Scott Story

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop the Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCATTM) to permit steelmakers to evaluate the quality of the steel through the analysis of individual inclusions. By characterizing individual inclusions, determinations can be made as to the cleanliness of the steel. Understanding the complicating effects of inclusions in the steelmaking process and on the resulting properties of steel allows the steel producer to increase throughput, better control the process, reduce remelts, and improve the quality of the product. The ASCAT (Figure 1) is a steel-smart inclusion analysis tool developed around a customized next-generation computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (NG-CCSEM) hardware platform that permits acquisition of inclusion size and composition data at a rate never before possible in SEM-based instruments. With built-in customized ''intelligent'' software, the inclusion data is automatically sorted into clusters representing different inclusion types to define the characteristics of a particular heat (Figure 2). The ASCAT represents an innovative new tool for the collection of statistically meaningful data on inclusions, and provides a means of understanding the complicated effects of inclusions in the steel making process and on the resulting properties of steel. Research conducted by RJLG with AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) and SMA (Steel Manufactures of America) members indicates that the ASCAT has application in high-grade bar, sheet, plate, tin products, pipes, SBQ, tire cord, welding rod, and specialty steels and alloys where control of inclusions, whether natural or engineered, are crucial to their specification for a given end-use. Example applications include castability of calcium treated steel; interstitial free (IF) degasser grade slag conditioning practice; tundish clogging and erosion minimization; degasser circulation and optimization; quality assessment/steel cleanliness; slab, billet

  15. Automated Cache Performance Analysis And Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohror, Kathryn [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-12-23

    While there is no lack of performance counter tools for coarse-grained measurement of cache activity, there is a critical lack of tools for relating data layout to cache behavior to application performance. Generally, any nontrivial optimizations are either not done at all, or are done ”by hand” requiring significant time and expertise. To the best of our knowledge no tool available to users measures the latency of memory reference instructions for partic- ular addresses and makes this information available to users in an easy-to-use and intuitive way. In this project, we worked to enable the Open|SpeedShop performance analysis tool to gather memory reference latency information for specific instructions and memory ad- dresses, and to gather and display this information in an easy-to-use and intuitive way to aid performance analysts in identifying problematic data structures in their codes. This tool was primarily designed for use in the supercomputer domain as well as grid, cluster, cloud-based parallel e-commerce, and engineering systems and middleware. Ultimately, we envision a tool to automate optimization of application cache layout and utilization in the Open|SpeedShop performance analysis tool. To commercialize this soft- ware, we worked to develop core capabilities for gathering enhanced memory usage per- formance data from applications and create and apply novel methods for automatic data structure layout optimizations, tailoring the overall approach to support existing supercom- puter and cluster programming models and constraints. In this Phase I project, we focused on infrastructure necessary to gather performance data and present it in an intuitive way to users. With the advent of enhanced Precise Event-Based Sampling (PEBS) counters on recent Intel processor architectures and equivalent technology on AMD processors, we are now in a position to access memory reference information for particular addresses. Prior to the introduction of PEBS counters

  16. US refineries lament lack of final CAA rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Bush administration spokesman appeared unconvinced about the extent of the U.S. refining industry's problems at a Senate energy committee hearing. This paper reports that the oversight hearing examined various challenges facing refiners. Roger Beach, president of Unocal Refining and Marketing Division, testified for the National Petroleum Refiners Association, of which he is chairman. Beach the refineries still do not know what final Clean Air Act (CAA) amendments regulations will be, and state rules are changing, too

  17. Automated migration analysis based on cell texture: method & reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittenden Thomas W

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper, we present and validate a way to measure automatically the extent of cell migration based on automated examination of a series of digital photographs. It was designed specifically to identify the impact of Second Hand Smoke (SHS on endothelial cell migration but has broader applications. The analysis has two stages: (1 preprocessing of image texture, and (2 migration analysis. Results The output is a graphic overlay that indicates the front lines of cell migration superimposed on each original image, with automated reporting of the distance traversed vs. time. Expert preference compares to manual placement of leading edge shows complete equivalence of automated vs. manual leading edge definition for cell migration measurement. Conclusion Our method is indistinguishable from careful manual determinations of cell front lines, with the advantages of full automation, objectivity, and speed.

  18. Evaluation of an automated karyotyping system for chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prichard, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Chromosome aberration analysis is a promising complement to conventional radiation dosimetry, particularly in the complex radiation fields encountered in the space environment. The capabilities of a recently developed automated karyotyping system were evaluated both to determine current capabilities and limitations and to suggest areas where future development should be emphasized. Cells exposed to radiometric chemicals and to photon and particulate radiation were evaluated by manual inspection and by automated karyotyping. It was demonstrated that the evaluated programs were appropriate for image digitization, storage, and transmission. However, automated and semi-automated scoring techniques must be advanced significantly if in-flight chromosome aberration analysis is to be practical. A degree of artificial intelligence may be necessary to realize this goal

  19. Automation of the Analysis of Moessbauer Spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Paulo A. de Jr.; Garg, R.; Garg, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    In the present report we propose the automation of least square fitting of Moessbauer spectra, the identification of the substance, its crystal structure and the access to the references with the help of a genetic algorith, Fuzzy logic, and the artificial neural network associated with a databank of Moessbauer parameters and references. This system could be useful for specialists and non-specialists, in industry as well as in research laboratories

  20. Comparison of Manual and Automated Preprocedural Segmentation Tools to Predict the Annulus Plane Angulation and C-Arm Positioning for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Veulemans

    Full Text Available Preprocedural manual multi-slice-CT-segmentation tools (MSCT-ST define the gold standard for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. They are able to predict the perpendicular line of the aortic annulus (PPL and to indicate the corresponding C-arm angulation (CAA. Fully automated planning-tools and their clinical relevance have not been systematically evaluated in a real world setting so far.The study population consists of an all-comers cohort of 160 consecutive TAVR patients with a drop out of 35 patients for technical and anatomical reasons. 125 TAVR patients underwent preprocedural analysis by manual (M-MSCT and fully automated MSCT-ST (A-MSCT. Method-comparison was performed for 105 patients (Cohort A. In Cohort A, CAA was defined for each patient, and accordance within 10° between M-MSCT and A-MSCT was considered adequate for concept-proof (95% in LAO/RAO; 94% in CRAN/CAUD. Intraprocedural CAA was defined by repetitive angiograms without utilizing the preprocedural measurements. In Cohort B, intraprocedural CAA was established with the use of A-MSCT (20 patients. Using preprocedural A-MSCT to indicate the corresponding CAA, the levels of contrast medium (ml and radiation exposure (cine runs were reduced in Cohort B compared to Cohort A significantly (23.3±10.3 vs. 35.3 ±21.1 ml, p = 0.02; 1.6±0.7 vs. 2.4±1.4 cine runs; p = 0.02 and trends towards more safety in valve-positioning could be demonstrated.A-MSCT-analysis provides precise preprocedural information on CAA for optimal visualization of the aortic annulus compared to the M-MSCT gold standard. Intraprocedural application of this information during TAVR significantly reduces the levels of contrast and radiation exposure.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01805739.

  1. Automated quantitative cytological analysis using portable microfluidic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Murthy, Rashmi Sreeramachandra; Srinivasan, Rajesh; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2016-06-01

    In this article, a portable microfluidic microscopy based approach for automated cytological investigations is presented. Inexpensive optical and electronic components have been used to construct a simple microfluidic microscopy system. In contrast to the conventional slide-based methods, the presented method employs microfluidics to enable automated sample handling and image acquisition. The approach involves the use of simple in-suspension staining and automated image acquisition to enable quantitative cytological analysis of samples. The applicability of the presented approach to research in cellular biology is shown by performing an automated cell viability assessment on a given population of yeast cells. Further, the relevance of the presented approach to clinical diagnosis and prognosis has been demonstrated by performing detection and differential assessment of malaria infection in a given sample. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Automating sensitivity analysis of computer models using computer calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblow, E.M.; Pin, F.G.

    1986-01-01

    An automated procedure for performing sensitivity analysis has been developed. The procedure uses a new FORTRAN compiler with computer calculus capabilities to generate the derivatives needed to set up sensitivity equations. The new compiler is called GRESS - Gradient Enhanced Software System. Application of the automated procedure with direct and adjoint sensitivity theory for the analysis of non-linear, iterative systems of equations is discussed. Calculational efficiency consideration and techniques for adjoint sensitivity analysis are emphasized. The new approach is found to preserve the traditional advantages of adjoint theory while removing the tedious human effort previously needed to apply this theoretical methodology. Conclusions are drawn about the applicability of the automated procedure in numerical analysis and large-scale modelling sensitivity studies

  3. Analysis of Trinity Power Metrics for Automated Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalenko, Ashley Christine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-28

    This is a presentation from Los Alamos National Laboraotyr (LANL) about the analysis of trinity power metrics for automated monitoring. The following topics are covered: current monitoring efforts, motivation for analysis, tools used, the methodology, work performed during the summer, and future work planned.

  4. Initial development of an automated task analysis profiling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    A program for automated task analysis is described. Called TAPS (task analysis profiling system), the program accepts normal English prose and outputs skills, knowledges, attitudes, and abilities (SKAAs) along with specific guidance and recommended ability measurement tests for nuclear power plant operators. A new method for defining SKAAs is presented along with a sample program output

  5. Automating sensitivity analysis of computer models using computer calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblow, E.M.; Pin, F.G.

    1985-01-01

    An automated procedure for performing sensitivity analyses has been developed. The procedure uses a new FORTRAN compiler with computer calculus capabilities to generate the derivatives needed to set up sensitivity equations. The new compiler is called GRESS - Gradient Enhanced Software System. Application of the automated procedure with ''direct'' and ''adjoint'' sensitivity theory for the analysis of non-linear, iterative systems of equations is discussed. Calculational efficiency consideration and techniques for adjoint sensitivity analysis are emphasized. The new approach is found to preserve the traditional advantages of adjoint theory while removing the tedious human effort previously needed to apply this theoretical methodology. Conclusions are drawn about the applicability of the automated procedure in numerical analysis and large-scale modelling sensitivity studies. 24 refs., 2 figs

  6. Flow injection analysis: Emerging tool for laboratory automation in radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, O.; Ruzicka, J.; Grate, J.W.; Janata, J.

    1996-01-01

    Automation of routine and serial assays is a common practice of modern analytical laboratory, while it is virtually nonexistent in the field of radiochemistry. Flow injection analysis (FIA) is a general solution handling methodology that has been extensively used for automation of routine assays in many areas of analytical chemistry. Reproducible automated solution handling and on-line separation capabilities are among several distinctive features that make FI a very promising, yet under utilized tool for automation in analytical radiochemistry. The potential of the technique is demonstrated through the development of an automated 90 Sr analyzer and its application in the analysis of tank waste samples from the Hanford site. Sequential injection (SI), the latest generation of FIA, is used to rapidly separate 90 Sr from interfering radionuclides and deliver separated Sr zone to a flow-through liquid scintillation detector. The separation is performed on a mini column containing Sr-specific sorbent extraction material, which selectively retains Sr under acidic conditions. The 90 Sr is eluted with water, mixed with scintillation cocktail, and sent through the flow cell of a flow through counter, where 90 Sr radioactivity is detected as a transient signal. Both peak area and peak height can be used for quantification of sample radioactivity. Alternatively, stopped flow detection can be performed to improve detection precision for low activity samples. The authors current research activities are focused on expansion of radiochemical applications of FIA methodology, with an ultimate goal of creating a set of automated methods that will cover the basic needs of radiochemical analysis at the Hanford site. The results of preliminary experiments indicate that FIA is a highly suitable technique for the automation of chemically more challenging separations, such as separation of actinide elements

  7. A catalog of automated analysis methods for enterprise models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Hector; Sánchez, Mario; Villalobos, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Enterprise models are created for documenting and communicating the structure and state of Business and Information Technologies elements of an enterprise. After models are completed, they are mainly used to support analysis. Model analysis is an activity typically based on human skills and due to the size and complexity of the models, this process can be complicated and omissions or miscalculations are very likely. This situation has fostered the research of automated analysis methods, for supporting analysts in enterprise analysis processes. By reviewing the literature, we found several analysis methods; nevertheless, they are based on specific situations and different metamodels; then, some analysis methods might not be applicable to all enterprise models. This paper presents the work of compilation (literature review), classification, structuring, and characterization of automated analysis methods for enterprise models, expressing them in a standardized modeling language. In addition, we have implemented the analysis methods in our modeling tool.

  8. Automated image analysis in the study of collagenous colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiehn, Anne-Marie Kanstrup; Kristensson, Martin; Engel, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to develop an automated image analysis software to measure the thickness of the subepithelial collagenous band in colon biopsies with collagenous colitis (CC) and incomplete CC (CCi). The software measures the thickness of the collagenous band on microscopic...... slides stained with Van Gieson (VG). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A training set consisting of ten biopsies diagnosed as CC, CCi, and normal colon mucosa was used to develop the automated image analysis (VG app) to match the assessment by a pathologist. The study set consisted of biopsies from 75 patients...

  9. Automation of reactor neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, S.S.; Dmitriev, A.Yu.; Frontasyeva, M.V.

    2013-01-01

    The present status of the development of a software package designed for automation of NAA at the IBR-2 reactor of FLNP, JINR, Dubna, is reported. Following decisions adopted at the CRP Meeting in Delft, August 27-31, 2012, the missing tool - a sample changer - will be installed for NAA in compliance with the peculiar features of the radioanalytical laboratory REGATA at the IBR-2 reactor. The details of the design are presented. The software for operation with the sample changer consists of two parts. The first part is a user interface and the second one is a program to control the sample changer. The second part will be developed after installing the tool.

  10. Automated sensitivity analysis using the GRESS language

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Oblow, E.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1986-04-01

    An automated procedure for performing large-scale sensitivity studies based on the use of computer calculus is presented. The procedure is embodied in a FORTRAN precompiler called GRESS, which automatically processes computer models and adds derivative-taking capabilities to the normal calculated results. In this report, the GRESS code is described, tested against analytic and numerical test problems, and then applied to a major geohydrological modeling problem. The SWENT nuclear waste repository modeling code is used as the basis for these studies. Results for all problems are discussed in detail. Conclusions are drawn as to the applicability of GRESS in the problems at hand and for more general large-scale modeling sensitivity studies

  11. Automated analysis and design of complex structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, E.L.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses the following: 1. The relationship of analysis to design. 2. New methods of analysis. 3. Improved finite elements. 4. Effect of minicomputer on structural analysis methods. 5. The use of system of microprocessors for nonlinear structural analysis. 6. The role of interacting graphics systems in future analysis and design. The discussion focusses on the impact of new inexpensive computer hardware on design and analysis methods. (Auth.)

  12. Automated hazard analysis of digital control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, Chris J.; Apostolakis, George E.

    2002-01-01

    Digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems can provide important benefits in many safety-critical applications, but they can also introduce potential new failure modes that can affect safety. Unlike electro-mechanical systems, whose failure modes are fairly well understood and which can often be built to fail in a particular way, software errors are very unpredictable. There is virtually no nontrivial software that will function as expected under all conditions. Consequently, there is a great deal of concern about whether there is a sufficient basis on which to resolve questions about safety. In this paper, an approach for validating the safety requirements of digital I and C systems is developed which uses the Dynamic Flowgraph Methodology to conduct automated hazard analyses. The prime implicants of these analyses can be used to identify unknown system hazards, prioritize the disposition of known system hazards, and guide lower-level design decisions to either eliminate or mitigate known hazards. In a case study involving a space-based reactor control system, the method succeeded in identifying an unknown failure mechanism

  13. Capacity analysis of an automated kit transportation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijm, W.H.M.; Adan, I.J.B.F.; Buitenhek, R.; Houtum, van G.J.J.A.N.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we present a capacity analysis of an automated transportation system in a flexible assembly factory. The transportation system, together with the workstations, is modeled as a network of queues with multiple job classes. Due to its complex nature, the steadystate behavior of this

  14. Automated image analysis for quantification of filamentous bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, Marlene; Rosenvinge, Flemming Schønning; Spillum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    in systems relying on colorimetry or turbidometry (such as Vitek-2, Phoenix, MicroScan WalkAway). The objective was to examine an automated image analysis algorithm for quantification of filamentous bacteria using the 3D digital microscopy imaging system, oCelloScope. Results Three E. coli strains displaying...

  15. Automation of the Analysis and Classification of the Line Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Machuev

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the automation of the process of the analysis and verification of various formats of data presentation for what the special software is developed. Working out and testing the special software were made on an example of files with the typical expansions which features of structure are known in advance.

  16. An Automated Data Analysis Tool for Livestock Market Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Galen S.; Raper, Kellie Curry

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an automated data analysis tool that allows Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service educators to disseminate results in a timely manner. Primary data collected at Oklahoma Quality Beef Network (OQBN) certified calf auctions across the state results in a large amount of data per sale site. Sale summaries for an individual sale…

  17. IMAGE CONSTRUCTION TO AUTOMATION OF PROJECTIVE TECHNIQUES FOR PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Pavlova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The search for a solution of automation of the process of assessment of a psychological analysis of the person drawings created by it from an available set of some templates are presented at this article. It will allow to reveal more effectively infringements of persons mentality. In particular, such decision can be used for work with children who possess the developed figurative thinking, but are not yet capable of an accurate statement of the thoughts and experiences. For automation of testing by using a projective method, we construct interactive environment for visualization of compositions of the several images and then analyse

  18. Automated procedure for performing computer security risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.T.; Lim, J.J.

    1984-05-01

    Computers, the invisible backbone of nuclear safeguards, monitor and control plant operations and support many materials accounting systems. Our automated procedure to assess computer security effectiveness differs from traditional risk analysis methods. The system is modeled as an interactive questionnaire, fully automated on a portable microcomputer. A set of modular event trees links the questionnaire to the risk assessment. Qualitative scores are obtained for target vulnerability, and qualitative impact measures are evaluated for a spectrum of threat-target pairs. These are then combined by a linguistic algebra to provide an accurate and meaningful risk measure. 12 references, 7 figures

  19. ORIGAMI Automator Primer. Automated ORIGEN Source Terms and Spent Fuel Storage Pool Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieselquist, William A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thompson, Adam B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowman, Stephen M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peterson, Joshua L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Source terms and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage pool decay heat load analyses for operating nuclear power plants require a large number of Oak Ridge Isotope Generation and Depletion (ORIGEN) calculations. SNF source term calculations also require a significant amount of bookkeeping to track quantities such as core and assembly operating histories, spent fuel pool (SFP) residence times, heavy metal masses, and enrichments. The ORIGEN Assembly Isotopics (ORIGAMI) module in the SCALE code system provides a simple scheme for entering these data. However, given the large scope of the analysis, extensive scripting is necessary to convert formats and process data to create thousands of ORIGAMI input files (one per assembly) and to process the results into formats readily usable by follow-on analysis tools. This primer describes a project within the SCALE Fulcrum graphical user interface (GUI) called ORIGAMI Automator that was developed to automate the scripting and bookkeeping in large-scale source term analyses. The ORIGAMI Automator enables the analyst to (1) easily create, view, and edit the reactor site and assembly information, (2) automatically create and run ORIGAMI inputs, and (3) analyze the results from ORIGAMI. ORIGAMI Automator uses the standard ORIGEN binary concentrations files produced by ORIGAMI, with concentrations available at all time points in each assembly’s life. The GUI plots results such as mass, concentration, activity, and decay heat using a powerful new ORIGEN Post-Processing Utility for SCALE (OPUS) GUI component. This document includes a description and user guide for the GUI, a step-by-step tutorial for a simplified scenario, and appendices that document the file structures used.

  20. Combined process automation for large-scale EEG analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondouris, John L; Quebedeaux, Tabitha M; Holdgraf, Chris; Musto, Alberto E

    2012-01-01

    Epileptogenesis is a dynamic process producing increased seizure susceptibility. Electroencephalography (EEG) data provides information critical in understanding the evolution of epileptiform changes throughout epileptic foci. We designed an algorithm to facilitate efficient large-scale EEG analysis via linked automation of multiple data processing steps. Using EEG recordings obtained from electrical stimulation studies, the following steps of EEG analysis were automated: (1) alignment and isolation of pre- and post-stimulation intervals, (2) generation of user-defined band frequency waveforms, (3) spike-sorting, (4) quantification of spike and burst data and (5) power spectral density analysis. This algorithm allows for quicker, more efficient EEG analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Automated analysis and design of complex structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, E.L.

    1977-01-01

    The present application of optimum design appears to be restricted to components of the structure rather than to the total structural system. Since design normally involved many analysis of the system any improvement in the efficiency of the basic methods of analysis will allow more complicated systems to be designed by optimum methods. The evaluation of the risk and reliability of a structural system can be extremely important. Reliability studies have been made of many non-structural systems for which the individual components have been extensively tested and the service environment is known. For such systems the reliability studies are valid. For most structural systems, however, the properties of the components can only be estimated and statistical data associated with the potential loads is often minimum. Also, a potentially critical loading condition may be completely neglected in the study. For these reasons and the previous problems associated with the reliability of both linear and nonlinear analysis computer programs it appears to be premature to place a significant value on such studies for complex structures. With these comments as background the purpose of this paper is to discuss the following: the relationship of analysis to design; new methods of analysis; new of improved finite elements; effect of minicomputer on structural analysis methods; the use of system of microprocessors for nonlinear structural analysis; the role of interacting graphics systems in future analysis and design. This discussion will focus on the impact of new, inexpensive computer hardware on design and analysis methods

  2. A5: Automated Analysis of Adversarial Android Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-03

    A5: Automated Analysis of Adversarial Android Applications Timothy Vidas, Jiaqi Tan, Jay Nahata, Chaur Lih Tan, Nicolas Christin...detecting, on the device itself, that an application is malicious is much more complex without elevated privileges . In other words, given the...interface via website. Blasing et al. [7] describe another dynamic analysis system for Android . Their system focuses on classifying input applications as

  3. Cardiac imaging: working towards fully-automated machine analysis & interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, Piotr J; Dey, Damini; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Motwani, Manish; Berman, Daniel S; Germano, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging plays a critical role in managing patients with cardiovascular disease. Although subjective visual interpretation remains the clinical mainstay, quantitative analysis facilitates objective, evidence-based management, and advances in clinical research. This has driven developments in computing and software tools aimed at achieving fully automated image processing and quantitative analysis. In parallel, machine learning techniques have been used to rapidly integrate large amounts of clinical and quantitative imaging data to provide highly personalized individual patient-based conclusions. Areas covered: This review summarizes recent advances in automated quantitative imaging in cardiology and describes the latest techniques which incorporate machine learning principles. The review focuses on the cardiac imaging techniques which are in wide clinical use. It also discusses key issues and obstacles for these tools to become utilized in mainstream clinical practice. Expert commentary: Fully-automated processing and high-level computer interpretation of cardiac imaging are becoming a reality. Application of machine learning to the vast amounts of quantitative data generated per scan and integration with clinical data also facilitates a move to more patient-specific interpretation. These developments are unlikely to replace interpreting physicians but will provide them with highly accurate tools to detect disease, risk-stratify, and optimize patient-specific treatment. However, with each technological advance, we move further from human dependence and closer to fully-automated machine interpretation.

  4. Automated software analysis of nuclear core discharge data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, T.W.; Halbig, J.K.; Howell, J.A.; Eccleston, G.W.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1993-03-01

    Monitoring the fueling process of an on-load nuclear reactor is a full-time job for nuclear safeguarding agencies. Nuclear core discharge monitors (CDMS) can provide continuous, unattended recording of the reactor's fueling activity for later, qualitative review by a safeguards inspector. A quantitative analysis of this collected data could prove to be a great asset to inspectors because more information can be extracted from the data and the analysis time can be reduced considerably. This paper presents a prototype for an automated software analysis system capable of identifying when fuel bundle pushes occurred and monitoring the power level of the reactor. Neural network models were developed for calculating the region on the reactor face from which the fuel was discharged and predicting the burnup. These models were created and tested using actual data collected from a CDM system at an on-load reactor facility. Collectively, these automated quantitative analysis programs could help safeguarding agencies to gain a better perspective on the complete picture of the fueling activity of an on-load nuclear reactor. This type of system can provide a cost-effective solution for automated monitoring of on-load reactors significantly reducing time and effort

  5. Tank Farm Operations Surveillance Automation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARQUEZ, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Nuclear Operations Project Services identified the need to improve manual tank farm surveillance data collection, review, distribution and storage practices often referred to as Operator Rounds. This document provides the analysis in terms of feasibility to improve the manual data collection methods by using handheld computer units, barcode technology, a database for storage and acquisitions, associated software, and operational procedures to increase the efficiency of Operator Rounds associated with surveillance activities

  6. 4CaaSt : Comprehensive management of Cloud services through a PaaS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Gomez, S.; Lelli, F.; Eschriche-Vicente, M.; Arozarena-Llopis, P.; Taher, Y.; Momm, C.; Spriestersbach, A.; Jimenez-Ganan, M.; Le Jeune, G.; Dao, M.; Carrie, S.P.; Niemoller, J.; Mazmanov, D.; Biro, J.; Giesmann, A.; Junker, F.

    2012-01-01

    The 4CaaSt project aims at developing a PaaS framework that enables flexible definition, marketing, deployment and management of Cloud-based services and applications. The major innovations proposed by 4CaaSt are the blueprint and its lifecycle management, a one stop shop for Cloud services and a

  7. Automated optics inspection analysis for NIF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kegelmeyer, Laura M., E-mail: kegelmeyer1@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Clark, Raelyn; Leach, Richard R.; McGuigan, David; Kamm, Victoria Miller; Potter, Daniel; Salmon, J. Thad; Senecal, Joshua; Conder, Alan; Nostrand, Mike; Whitman, Pamela K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 beamlines that house thousands of optics. These optics guide, amplify and tightly focus light onto a tiny target for fusion ignition research and high energy density physics experiments. The condition of these optics is key to the economic, efficient and maximally energetic performance of the laser. Our goal, and novel achievement, is to find on the optics any imperfections while they are tens of microns in size, track them through time to see if they grow and if so, remove the optic and repair the single site so the entire optic can then be re-installed for further use on the laser. This paper gives an overview of the image analysis used for detecting, measuring, and tracking sites of interest on an optic while it is installed on the beamline via in situ inspection and after it has been removed for maintenance. In this way, the condition of each optic is monitored throughout the optic's lifetime. This overview paper will summarize key algorithms and technical developments for custom image analysis and processing and highlight recent improvements. (Associated papers will include more details on these issues.) We will also discuss the use of OI Analysis for daily operation of the NIF laser and its extension to inspection of NIF targets.

  8. Micro photometer's automation for quantitative spectrograph analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez E, C.Y.A.

    1996-01-01

    A Microphotometer is used to increase the sharpness of dark spectral lines. Analyzing these lines one sample content and its concentration could be determined and the analysis is known as Quantitative Spectrographic Analysis. The Quantitative Spectrographic Analysis is carried out in 3 steps, as follows. 1. Emulsion calibration. This consists of gauging a photographic emulsion, to determine the intensity variations in terms of the incident radiation. For the procedure of emulsion calibration an adjustment with square minimum to the data obtained is applied to obtain a graph. It is possible to determine the density of dark spectral line against the incident light intensity shown by the microphotometer. 2. Working curves. The values of known concentration of an element against incident light intensity are plotted. Since the sample contains several elements, it is necessary to find a work curve for each one of them. 3. Analytical results. The calibration curve and working curves are compared and the concentration of the studied element is determined. The automatic data acquisition, calculation and obtaining of resulting, is done by means of a computer (PC) and a computer program. The conditioning signal circuits have the function of delivering TTL levels (Transistor Transistor Logic) to make the communication between the microphotometer and the computer possible. Data calculation is done using a computer programm

  9. Automated optics inspection analysis for NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kegelmeyer, Laura M.; Clark, Raelyn; Leach, Richard R.; McGuigan, David; Kamm, Victoria Miller; Potter, Daniel; Salmon, J. Thad; Senecal, Joshua; Conder, Alan; Nostrand, Mike; Whitman, Pamela K.

    2012-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 beamlines that house thousands of optics. These optics guide, amplify and tightly focus light onto a tiny target for fusion ignition research and high energy density physics experiments. The condition of these optics is key to the economic, efficient and maximally energetic performance of the laser. Our goal, and novel achievement, is to find on the optics any imperfections while they are tens of microns in size, track them through time to see if they grow and if so, remove the optic and repair the single site so the entire optic can then be re-installed for further use on the laser. This paper gives an overview of the image analysis used for detecting, measuring, and tracking sites of interest on an optic while it is installed on the beamline via in situ inspection and after it has been removed for maintenance. In this way, the condition of each optic is monitored throughout the optic's lifetime. This overview paper will summarize key algorithms and technical developments for custom image analysis and processing and highlight recent improvements. (Associated papers will include more details on these issues.) We will also discuss the use of OI Analysis for daily operation of the NIF laser and its extension to inspection of NIF targets.

  10. Automated reasoning applications to design validation and sneak function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is actively involved in the LMFBR Man-Machine Integration (MMI) Safety Program. The objective of this program is to enhance the operational safety and reliability of fast-breeder reactors by optimum integration of men and machines through the application of human factors principles and control engineering to the design, operation, and the control environment. ANL is developing methods to apply automated reasoning and computerization in the validation and sneak function analysis process. This project provides the element definitions and relations necessary for an automated reasoner (AR) to reason about design validation and sneak function analysis. This project also provides a demonstration of this AR application on an Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) system, the Argonne Cooling System

  11. Automated Asteroseismic Analysis of Solar-type Stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Campante, T.L.; Chaplin, W.J.

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly increasing volume of asteroseismic observations on solar-type stars has revealed a need for automated analysis tools. The reason for this is not only that individual analyses of single stars are rather time consuming, but more importantly that these large volumes of observations open...... are calculated in a consistent way. Here we present a set of automated asterosesimic analysis tools. The main engine of these set of tools is an algorithm for modelling the autocovariance spectra of the stellar acoustic spectra allowing us to measure not only the frequency of maximum power and the large......, radius, luminosity, effective temperature, surface gravity and age based on grid modeling. All the tools take into account the window function of the observations which means that they work equally well for space-based photometry observations from e.g. the NASA Kepler satellite and ground-based velocity...

  12. Extended -Regular Sequence for Automated Analysis of Microarray Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hee-Jeong

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray study enables us to obtain hundreds of thousands of expressions of genes or genotypes at once, and it is an indispensable technology for genome research. The first step is the analysis of scanned microarray images. This is the most important procedure for obtaining biologically reliable data. Currently most microarray image processing systems require burdensome manual block/spot indexing work. Since the amount of experimental data is increasing very quickly, automated microarray image analysis software becomes important. In this paper, we propose two automated methods for analyzing microarray images. First, we propose the extended -regular sequence to index blocks and spots, which enables a novel automatic gridding procedure. Second, we provide a methodology, hierarchical metagrid alignment, to allow reliable and efficient batch processing for a set of microarray images. Experimental results show that the proposed methods are more reliable and convenient than the commercial tools.

  13. Automated analysis of damages for radiation in plastics surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, C.; Camacho M, E.; Tavera, L.; Balcazar, M.

    1990-02-01

    Analysis of damages done by the radiation in a polymer characterized by optic properties of polished surfaces, of uniformity and chemical resistance that the acrylic; resistant until the 150 centigrade grades of temperature, and with an approximate weight of half of the glass. An objective of this work is the development of a method that analyze in automated form the superficial damages induced by radiation in plastic materials means an images analyst. (Author)

  14. Experience based ageing analysis of NPP protection automation in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simola, K.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes three successive studies on ageing of protection automation of nuclear power plants. These studies were aimed at developing a methodology for an experience based ageing analysis, and applying it to identify the most critical components from ageing and safety points of view. The analyses resulted also to suggestions for improvement of data collection systems for the purpose of further ageing analyses. (author)

  15. An automated solution enrichment system for uranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.A.; Sparks, R.; Sampson, T.; Parker, J.; Horley, E.; Kelly, T.

    1993-01-01

    An automated Solution Enrichment system (SES) for analysis of Uranium and U-235 isotopes in process samples has been developed through a joint effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Martin Marietta Energy systems, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This device features an advanced robotics system which in conjuction with stabilized passive gamma-ray and X-ray fluorescence detectors provides for rapid, non-destructive analyses of process samples for improved special nuclear material accountability and process control

  16. Automated Freedom from Interference Analysis for Automotive Software

    OpenAIRE

    Leitner-Fischer , Florian; Leue , Stefan; Liu , Sirui

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Freedom from Interference for automotive software systems developed according to the ISO 26262 standard means that a fault in a less safety critical software component will not lead to a fault in a more safety critical component. It is an important concern in the realm of functional safety for automotive systems. We present an automated method for the analysis of concurrency-related interferences based on the QuantUM approach and tool that we have previously developed....

  17. Discrimination between smiling faces: Human observers vs. automated face analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Líbano, Mario; Calvo, Manuel G; Fernández-Martín, Andrés; Recio, Guillermo

    2018-05-11

    This study investigated (a) how prototypical happy faces (with happy eyes and a smile) can be discriminated from blended expressions with a smile but non-happy eyes, depending on type and intensity of the eye expression; and (b) how smile discrimination differs for human perceivers versus automated face analysis, depending on affective valence and morphological facial features. Human observers categorized faces as happy or non-happy, or rated their valence. Automated analysis (FACET software) computed seven expressions (including joy/happiness) and 20 facial action units (AUs). Physical properties (low-level image statistics and visual saliency) of the face stimuli were controlled. Results revealed, first, that some blended expressions (especially, with angry eyes) had lower discrimination thresholds (i.e., they were identified as "non-happy" at lower non-happy eye intensities) than others (especially, with neutral eyes). Second, discrimination sensitivity was better for human perceivers than for automated FACET analysis. As an additional finding, affective valence predicted human discrimination performance, whereas morphological AUs predicted FACET discrimination. FACET can be a valid tool for categorizing prototypical expressions, but is currently more limited than human observers for discrimination of blended expressions. Configural processing facilitates detection of in/congruence(s) across regions, and thus detection of non-genuine smiling faces (due to non-happy eyes). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An optimized method for automated analysis of algal pigments by HPLC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwe, M. A.; Villerius, L. A.; Roggeveld, J.; Visser, R. J. W.; Stefels, J.

    2006-01-01

    A recent development in algal pigment analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is the application of automation. An optimization of a complete sampling and analysis protocol applied specifically in automation has not yet been performed. In this paper we show that automation can only

  19. Prevalence of discordant microscopic changes with automated CBC analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano de Jesus Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The most common cause of diagnostic error is related to errors in laboratory tests as well as errors of results interpretation. In order to reduce them, the laboratory currently has modern equipment which provides accurate and reliable results. The development of automation has revolutionized the laboratory procedures in Brazil and worldwide.Objective:To determine the prevalence of microscopic changes present in blood slides concordant and discordant with results obtained using fully automated procedures.Materials and method:From January to July 2013, 1,000 hematological parameters slides were analyzed. Automated analysis was performed on last generation equipment, which methodology is based on electrical impedance, and is able to quantify all the figurative elements of the blood in a universe of 22 parameters. The microscopy was performed by two experts in microscopy simultaneously.Results:The data showed that only 42.70% were concordant, comparing with 57.30% discordant. The main findings among discordant were: Changes in red blood cells 43.70% (n = 250, white blood cells 38.46% (n = 220, and number of platelet 17.80% (n = 102.Discussion:The data show that some results are not consistent with clinical or physiological state of an individual, and cannot be explained because they have not been investigated, which may compromise the final diagnosis.Conclusion:It was observed that it is of fundamental importance that the microscopy qualitative analysis must be performed in parallel with automated analysis in order to obtain reliable results, causing a positive impact on the prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic follow-up.

  20. Semi-automated retinal vessel analysis in nonmydriatic fundus photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Alexander Karl-Georg; Fischer, Joachim Ernst; Vossmerbaeumer, Urs

    2014-02-01

    Funduscopic assessment of the retinal vessels may be used to assess the health status of microcirculation and as a component in the evaluation of cardiovascular risk factors. Typically, the evaluation is restricted to morphological appreciation without strict quantification. Our purpose was to develop and validate a software tool for semi-automated quantitative analysis of retinal vasculature in nonmydriatic fundus photography. matlab software was used to develop a semi-automated image recognition and analysis tool for the determination of the arterial-venous (A/V) ratio in the central vessel equivalent on 45° digital fundus photographs. Validity and reproducibility of the results were ascertained using nonmydriatic photographs of 50 eyes from 25 subjects recorded from a 3DOCT device (Topcon Corp.). Two hundred and thirty-three eyes of 121 healthy subjects were evaluated to define normative values. A software tool was developed using image thresholds for vessel recognition and vessel width calculation in a semi-automated three-step procedure: vessel recognition on the photograph and artery/vein designation, width measurement and calculation of central retinal vessel equivalents. Mean vessel recognition rate was 78%, vessel class designation rate 75% and reproducibility between 0.78 and 0.91. Mean A/V ratio was 0.84. Application on a healthy norm cohort showed high congruence with prior published manual methods. Processing time per image was one minute. Quantitative geometrical assessment of the retinal vasculature may be performed in a semi-automated manner using dedicated software tools. Yielding reproducible numerical data within a short time leap, this may contribute additional value to mere morphological estimates in the clinical evaluation of fundus photographs. © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Using historical wafermap data for automated yield analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, K.W.; Karnowski, T.P.; Gleason, S.S.; Jensen, D.; Lakhani, F.

    1999-01-01

    To be productive and profitable in a modern semiconductor fabrication environment, large amounts of manufacturing data must be collected, analyzed, and maintained. This includes data collected from in- and off-line wafer inspection systems and from the process equipment itself. This data is increasingly being used to design new processes, control and maintain tools, and to provide the information needed for rapid yield learning and prediction. Because of increasing device complexity, the amount of data being generated is outstripping the yield engineer close-quote s ability to effectively monitor and correct unexpected trends and excursions. The 1997 SIA National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors highlights a need to address these issues through open-quotes automated data reduction algorithms to source defects from multiple data sources and to reduce defect sourcing time.close quotes SEMATECH and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been developing new strategies and technologies for providing the yield engineer with higher levels of assisted data reduction for the purpose of automated yield analysis. In this article, we will discuss the current state of the art and trends in yield management automation. copyright 1999 American Vacuum Society

  2. Automated Tracking of Cell Migration with Rapid Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuChez, Brian J

    2017-09-01

    Cell migration is essential for many biological processes including development, wound healing, and metastasis. However, studying cell migration often requires the time-consuming and labor-intensive task of manually tracking cells. To accelerate the task of obtaining coordinate positions of migrating cells, we have developed a graphical user interface (GUI) capable of automating the tracking of fluorescently labeled nuclei. This GUI provides an intuitive user interface that makes automated tracking accessible to researchers with no image-processing experience or familiarity with particle-tracking approaches. Using this GUI, users can interactively determine a minimum of four parameters to identify fluorescently labeled cells and automate acquisition of cell trajectories. Additional features allow for batch processing of numerous time-lapse images, curation of unwanted tracks, and subsequent statistical analysis of tracked cells. Statistical outputs allow users to evaluate migratory phenotypes, including cell speed, distance, displacement, and persistence, as well as measures of directional movement, such as forward migration index (FMI) and angular displacement. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Applications of Automation Methods for Nonlinear Fracture Test Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wells, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Using automated and standardized computer tools to calculate the pertinent test result values has several advantages such as: 1. allowing high-fidelity solutions to complex nonlinear phenomena that would be impractical to express in written equation form, 2. eliminating errors associated with the interpretation and programing of analysis procedures from the text of test standards, 3. lessening the need for expertise in the areas of solid mechanics, fracture mechanics, numerical methods, and/or finite element modeling, to achieve sound results, 4. and providing one computer tool and/or one set of solutions for all users for a more "standardized" answer. In summary, this approach allows a non-expert with rudimentary training to get the best practical solution based on the latest understanding with minimum difficulty.Other existing ASTM standards that cover complicated phenomena use standard computer programs: 1. ASTM C1340/C1340M-10- Standard Practice for Estimation of Heat Gain or Loss Through Ceilings Under Attics Containing Radiant Barriers by Use of a Computer Program 2. ASTM F 2815 - Standard Practice for Chemical Permeation through Protective Clothing Materials: Testing Data Analysis by Use of a Computer Program 3. ASTM E2807 - Standard Specification for 3D Imaging Data Exchange, Version 1.0 The verification, validation, and round-robin processes required of a computer tool closely parallel the methods that are used to ensure the solution validity for equations included in test standard. The use of automated analysis tools allows the creation and practical implementation of advanced fracture mechanics test standards that capture the physics of a nonlinear fracture mechanics problem without adding undue burden or expense to the user. The presented approach forms a bridge between the equation-based fracture testing standards of today and the next generation of standards solving complex problems through analysis automation.

  4. AMDA: an R package for the automated microarray data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foti Maria

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are routinely used to assess mRNA transcript levels on a genome-wide scale. Large amount of microarray datasets are now available in several databases, and new experiments are constantly being performed. In spite of this fact, few and limited tools exist for quickly and easily analyzing the results. Microarray analysis can be challenging for researchers without the necessary training and it can be time-consuming for service providers with many users. Results To address these problems we have developed an automated microarray data analysis (AMDA software, which provides scientists with an easy and integrated system for the analysis of Affymetrix microarray experiments. AMDA is free and it is available as an R package. It is based on the Bioconductor project that provides a number of powerful bioinformatics and microarray analysis tools. This automated pipeline integrates different functions available in the R and Bioconductor projects with newly developed functions. AMDA covers all of the steps, performing a full data analysis, including image analysis, quality controls, normalization, selection of differentially expressed genes, clustering, correspondence analysis and functional evaluation. Finally a LaTEX document is dynamically generated depending on the performed analysis steps. The generated report contains comments and analysis results as well as the references to several files for a deeper investigation. Conclusion AMDA is freely available as an R package under the GPL license. The package as well as an example analysis report can be downloaded in the Services/Bioinformatics section of the Genopolis http://www.genopolis.it/

  5. IFDOTMETER: A New Software Application for Automated Immunofluorescence Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Arribas, Mario; Pizarro-Estrella, Elisa; Gómez-Sánchez, Rubén; Yakhine-Diop, S M S; Gragera-Hidalgo, Antonio; Cristo, Alejandro; Bravo-San Pedro, Jose M; González-Polo, Rosa A; Fuentes, José M

    2016-04-01

    Most laboratories interested in autophagy use different imaging software for managing and analyzing heterogeneous parameters in immunofluorescence experiments (e.g., LC3-puncta quantification and determination of the number and size of lysosomes). One solution would be software that works on a user's laptop or workstation that can access all image settings and provide quick and easy-to-use analysis of data. Thus, we have designed and implemented an application called IFDOTMETER, which can run on all major operating systems because it has been programmed using JAVA (Sun Microsystems). Briefly, IFDOTMETER software has been created to quantify a variety of biological hallmarks, including mitochondrial morphology and nuclear condensation. The program interface is intuitive and user-friendly, making it useful for users not familiar with computer handling. By setting previously defined parameters, the software can automatically analyze a large number of images without the supervision of the researcher. Once analysis is complete, the results are stored in a spreadsheet. Using software for high-throughput cell image analysis offers researchers the possibility of performing comprehensive and precise analysis of a high number of images in an automated manner, making this routine task easier. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  6. Assessment of Automated Data Analysis Application on VVER Steam Generator Tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picek, E.; Barilar, D.

    2006-01-01

    INETEC - Institute for Nuclear Technology has developed software package named EddyOne having an option of automated analysis of bobbin coil eddy current data. During its development and site use some features were noticed preventing the wide use automatic analysis on VVER SG data. This article discuss these specific problems as well evaluates possible solutions. With regards to current state of automated analysis technology an overview of advantaged and disadvantages of automated analysis on VVER SG is summarized as well.(author)

  7. Postprocessing algorithm for automated analysis of pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegner Celine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two dimensional pelvic intraoperative neuromonitoring (pIONM® is based on electric stimulation of autonomic nerves under observation of electromyography of internal anal sphincter (IAS and manometry of urinary bladder. The method provides nerve identification and verification of its’ functional integrity. Currently pIONM® is gaining increased attention in times where preservation of function is becoming more and more important. Ongoing technical and methodological developments in experimental and clinical settings require further analysis of the obtained signals. This work describes a postprocessing algorithm for pIONM® signals, developed for automated analysis of huge amount of recorded data. The analysis routine includes a graphical representation of the recorded signals in the time and frequency domain, as well as a quantitative evaluation by means of features calculated from the time and frequency domain. The produced plots are summarized automatically in a PowerPoint presentation. The calculated features are filled into a standardized Excel-sheet, ready for statistical analysis.

  8. Automated gamma spectrometry and data analysis on radiometric neutron dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, W.Y.

    1983-01-01

    An automated gamma-ray spectrometry system was designed and implemented by the Westinghouse Hanford Company at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) to analyze radiometric neutron dosimeters. Unattended, automatic, 24 hour/day, 7 day/week operation with online data analysis and mainframe-computer compatible magnetic tape output are system features. The system was used to analyze most of the 4000-plus radiometric monitors (RM's) from extensive reactor characterization tests during startup and initial operation of th Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The FFTF, operated by HEDL for the Department of Energy, incorporates a 400 MW(th) sodium-cooled fast reactor. Aumomated system hardware consists of a high purity germanium detector, a computerized multichannel analyzer data acquisition system (Nuclear Data, Inc. Model 6620) with two dual 2.5 Mbyte magnetic disk drives plus two 10.5 inch reel magnetic tape units for mass storage of programs/data and an automated Sample Changer-Positioner (ASC-P) run with a programmable controller. The ASC-P has a 200 sample capacity and 12 calibrated counting (analysis) positions ranging from 6 inches (15 cm) to more than 20 feet (6.1 m) from the detector. The system software was programmed in Fortran at HEDL, except for the Nuclear Data, Inc. Peak Search and Analysis Program and Disk Operating System (MIDAS+)

  9. The Effect of Information Analysis Automation Display Content on Human Judgment Performance in Noisy Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Bass, Ellen J.; Baumgart, Leigh A.; Shepley, Kathryn Klein

    2012-01-01

    Displaying both the strategy that information analysis automation employs to makes its judgments and variability in the task environment may improve human judgment performance, especially in cases where this variability impacts the judgment performance of the information analysis automation. This work investigated the contribution of providing either information analysis automation strategy information, task environment information, or both, on human judgment performance in a domain where noi...

  10. Quantifying biodiversity using digital cameras and automated image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roadknight, C. M.; Rose, R. J.; Barber, M. L.; Price, M. C.; Marshall, I. W.

    2009-04-01

    Monitoring the effects on biodiversity of extensive grazing in complex semi-natural habitats is labour intensive. There are also concerns about the standardization of semi-quantitative data collection. We have chosen to focus initially on automating the most time consuming aspect - the image analysis. The advent of cheaper and more sophisticated digital camera technology has lead to a sudden increase in the number of habitat monitoring images and information that is being collected. We report on the use of automated trail cameras (designed for the game hunting market) to continuously capture images of grazer activity in a variety of habitats at Moor House National Nature Reserve, which is situated in the North of England at an average altitude of over 600m. Rainfall is high, and in most areas the soil consists of deep peat (1m to 3m), populated by a mix of heather, mosses and sedges. The cameras have been continuously in operation over a 6 month period, daylight images are in full colour and night images (IR flash) are black and white. We have developed artificial intelligence based methods to assist in the analysis of the large number of images collected, generating alert states for new or unusual image conditions. This paper describes the data collection techniques, outlines the quantitative and qualitative data collected and proposes online and offline systems that can reduce the manpower overheads and increase focus on important subsets in the collected data. By converting digital image data into statistical composite data it can be handled in a similar way to other biodiversity statistics thus improving the scalability of monitoring experiments. Unsupervised feature detection methods and supervised neural methods were tested and offered solutions to simplifying the process. Accurate (85 to 95%) categorization of faunal content can be obtained, requiring human intervention for only those images containing rare animals or unusual (undecidable) conditions, and

  11. A Hierarchically Micro-Meso-Macroporous Zeolite CaA for Methanol Conversion to Dimethyl Ether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A hierarchical zeolite CaA with microporous, mesoporous and macroporous structure was hydrothermally synthesized by a ”Bond-Blocking” method using organo-functionalized mesoporous silica (MS as a silica source. The characterization by XRD, SEM/TEM and N2 adsorption/desorption techniques showed that the prepared material had well-crystalline zeolite Linde Type A (LTA topological structure, microspherical particle morphologies, and hierarchically intracrystalline micro-meso-macropores structure. With the Bond-Blocking principle, the external surface area and macro-mesoporosity of the hierarchical zeolite CaA can be adjusted by varying the organo-functionalized degree of the mesoporous silica surface. Similarly, the distribution of the micro-meso-macroporous structure in the zeolite CaA can be controlled purposely. Compared with the conventional microporous zeolite CaA, the hierarchical zeolite CaA as a catalyst in the conversion of methanol to dimethyl ether (DME, exhibited complete DME selectivity and stable catalytic activity with high methanol conversion. The catalytic performances of the hierarchical zeolite CaA results clearly from the micro-meso-macroporous structure, improving diffusion properties, favoring the access to the active surface and avoiding secondary reactions (no hydrocarbon products were detected after 3 h of reaction.

  12. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2009-04-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity Defect(R) data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  13. Automated analysis of prerecorded evoked electromyographic activity from rat muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarab-Horwath, I; Dewhurst, D G; Dixon, R; Meehan, A S; Odusanya, S

    1989-03-01

    An automated microprocessor-based data acquisition and analysis system has been developed specifically to quantify electromyographic (EMG) activity induced by the convulsant agent catechol in the anaesthetized rat. The stimulus and EMG response are recorded on magnetic tape. On playback, the stimulus triggers a digital oscilloscope and, via interface circuitry, a BBC B microcomputer. The myoelectric activity is digitized by the oscilloscope before being transferred under computer control via a RS232 link to the microcomputer. This system overcomes the problems of dealing with signals of variable latency and allows quantification of latency, amplitude, area and frequency of occurrence of specific components within the signal. The captured data can be used to generate either signal or superimposed high resolution graphic reproductions of the original waveforms. Although this system has been designed for a specific application, it could easily be modified to allow analysis of any complex waveform.

  14. Automated sensitivity analysis: New tools for modeling complex dynamic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.

    1987-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is an established methodology used by researchers in almost every field to gain essential insight in design and modeling studies and in performance assessments of complex systems. Conventional sensitivity analysis methodologies, however, have not enjoyed the widespread use they deserve considering the wealth of information they can provide, partly because of their prohibitive cost or the large initial analytical investment they require. Automated systems have recently been developed at ORNL to eliminate these drawbacks. Compilers such as GRESS and EXAP now allow automatic and cost effective calculation of sensitivities in FORTRAN computer codes. In this paper, these and other related tools are described and their impact and applicability in the general areas of modeling, performance assessment and decision making for radioactive waste isolation problems are discussed

  15. Automated analysis of organic particles using cluster SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillen, Greg; Zeissler, Cindy; Mahoney, Christine; Lindstrom, Abigail; Fletcher, Robert; Chi, Peter; Verkouteren, Jennifer; Bright, David; Lareau, Richard T.; Boldman, Mike

    2004-06-15

    Cluster primary ion bombardment combined with secondary ion imaging is used on an ion microscope secondary ion mass spectrometer for the spatially resolved analysis of organic particles on various surfaces. Compared to the use of monoatomic primary ion beam bombardment, the use of a cluster primary ion beam (SF{sub 5}{sup +} or C{sub 8}{sup -}) provides significant improvement in molecular ion yields and a reduction in beam-induced degradation of the analyte molecules. These characteristics of cluster bombardment, along with automated sample stage control and custom image analysis software are utilized to rapidly characterize the spatial distribution of trace explosive particles, narcotics and inkjet-printed microarrays on a variety of surfaces.

  16. Automated rice leaf disease detection using color image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugoy, Reinald Adrian D. L.; Mariano, Vladimir Y.

    2011-06-01

    In rice-related institutions such as the International Rice Research Institute, assessing the health condition of a rice plant through its leaves, which is usually done as a manual eyeball exercise, is important to come up with good nutrient and disease management strategies. In this paper, an automated system that can detect diseases present in a rice leaf using color image analysis is presented. In the system, the outlier region is first obtained from a rice leaf image to be tested using histogram intersection between the test and healthy rice leaf images. Upon obtaining the outlier, it is then subjected to a threshold-based K-means clustering algorithm to group related regions into clusters. Then, these clusters are subjected to further analysis to finally determine the suspected diseases of the rice leaf.

  17. Automated analysis of invadopodia dynamics in live cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E. Berginski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cell types form specialized protein complexes that are used by the cell to actively degrade the surrounding extracellular matrix. These structures are called podosomes or invadopodia and collectively referred to as invadosomes. Due to their potential importance in both healthy physiology as well as in pathological conditions such as cancer, the characterization of these structures has been of increasing interest. Following early descriptions of invadopodia, assays were developed which labelled the matrix underneath metastatic cancer cells allowing for the assessment of invadopodia activity in motile cells. However, characterization of invadopodia using these methods has traditionally been done manually with time-consuming and potentially biased quantification methods, limiting the number of experiments and the quantity of data that can be analysed. We have developed a system to automate the segmentation, tracking and quantification of invadopodia in time-lapse fluorescence image sets at both the single invadopodia level and whole cell level. We rigorously tested the ability of the method to detect changes in invadopodia formation and dynamics through the use of well-characterized small molecule inhibitors, with known effects on invadopodia. Our results demonstrate the ability of this analysis method to quantify changes in invadopodia formation from live cell imaging data in a high throughput, automated manner.

  18. Automated uncertainty analysis methods in the FRAP computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peck, S.O.

    1980-01-01

    A user oriented, automated uncertainty analysis capability has been incorporated in the Fuel Rod Analysis Program (FRAP) computer codes. The FRAP codes have been developed for the analysis of Light Water Reactor fuel rod behavior during steady state (FRAPCON) and transient (FRAP-T) conditions as part of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Water Reactor Safety Research Program. The objective of uncertainty analysis of these codes is to obtain estimates of the uncertainty in computed outputs of the codes is to obtain estimates of the uncertainty in computed outputs of the codes as a function of known uncertainties in input variables. This paper presents the methods used to generate an uncertainty analysis of a large computer code, discusses the assumptions that are made, and shows techniques for testing them. An uncertainty analysis of FRAP-T calculated fuel rod behavior during a hypothetical loss-of-coolant transient is presented as an example and carried through the discussion to illustrate the various concepts

  19. The Effect of Information Analysis Automation Display Content on Human Judgment Performance in Noisy Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Ellen J.; Baumgart, Leigh A.; Shepley, Kathryn Klein

    2014-01-01

    Displaying both the strategy that information analysis automation employs to makes its judgments and variability in the task environment may improve human judgment performance, especially in cases where this variability impacts the judgment performance of the information analysis automation. This work investigated the contribution of providing either information analysis automation strategy information, task environment information, or both, on human judgment performance in a domain where noisy sensor data are used by both the human and the information analysis automation to make judgments. In a simplified air traffic conflict prediction experiment, 32 participants made probability of horizontal conflict judgments under different display content conditions. After being exposed to the information analysis automation, judgment achievement significantly improved for all participants as compared to judgments without any of the automation's information. Participants provided with additional display content pertaining to cue variability in the task environment had significantly higher aided judgment achievement compared to those provided with only the automation's judgment of a probability of conflict. When designing information analysis automation for environments where the automation's judgment achievement is impacted by noisy environmental data, it may be beneficial to show additional task environment information to the human judge in order to improve judgment performance. PMID:24847184

  20. The Effect of Information Analysis Automation Display Content on Human Judgment Performance in Noisy Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Ellen J; Baumgart, Leigh A; Shepley, Kathryn Klein

    2013-03-01

    Displaying both the strategy that information analysis automation employs to makes its judgments and variability in the task environment may improve human judgment performance, especially in cases where this variability impacts the judgment performance of the information analysis automation. This work investigated the contribution of providing either information analysis automation strategy information, task environment information, or both, on human judgment performance in a domain where noisy sensor data are used by both the human and the information analysis automation to make judgments. In a simplified air traffic conflict prediction experiment, 32 participants made probability of horizontal conflict judgments under different display content conditions. After being exposed to the information analysis automation, judgment achievement significantly improved for all participants as compared to judgments without any of the automation's information. Participants provided with additional display content pertaining to cue variability in the task environment had significantly higher aided judgment achievement compared to those provided with only the automation's judgment of a probability of conflict. When designing information analysis automation for environments where the automation's judgment achievement is impacted by noisy environmental data, it may be beneficial to show additional task environment information to the human judge in order to improve judgment performance.

  1. Automated differentiation of computer models for sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worley, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis of reactor physics computer models is an established discipline after more than twenty years of active development of generalized perturbations theory based on direct and adjoint methods. Many reactor physics models have been enhanced to solve for sensitivities of model results to model data. The calculated sensitivities are usually normalized first derivatives although some codes are capable of solving for higher-order sensitivities. The purpose of this paper is to report on the development and application of the GRESS system for automating the implementation of the direct and adjoint techniques into existing FORTRAN computer codes. The GRESS system was developed at ORNL to eliminate the costly man-power intensive effort required to implement the direct and adjoint techniques into already-existing FORTRAN codes. GRESS has been successfully tested for a number of codes over a wide range of applications and presently operates on VAX machines under both VMS and UNIX operating systems

  2. Automated differentiation of computer models for sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worley, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis of reactor physics computer models is an established discipline after more than twenty years of active development of generalized perturbations theory based on direct and adjoint methods. Many reactor physics models have been enhanced to solve for sensitivities of model results to model data. The calculated sensitivities are usually normalized first derivatives, although some codes are capable of solving for higher-order sensitivities. The purpose of this paper is to report on the development and application of the GRESS system for automating the implementation of the direct and adjoint techniques into existing FORTRAN computer codes. The GRESS system was developed at ORNL to eliminate the costly man-power intensive effort required to implement the direct and adjoint techniques into already-existing FORTRAN codes. GRESS has been successfully tested for a number of codes over a wide range of applications and presently operates on VAX machines under both VMS and UNIX operating systems. (author). 9 refs, 1 tab

  3. Crowdsourcing and Automated Retinal Image Analysis for Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudie, Lucy I; Wang, Xueyang; Friedman, David S; Brady, Christopher J

    2017-09-23

    As the number of people with diabetic retinopathy (DR) in the USA is expected to increase threefold by 2050, the need to reduce health care costs associated with screening for this treatable disease is ever present. Crowdsourcing and automated retinal image analysis (ARIA) are two areas where new technology has been applied to reduce costs in screening for DR. This paper reviews the current literature surrounding these new technologies. Crowdsourcing has high sensitivity for normal vs abnormal images; however, when multiple categories for severity of DR are added, specificity is reduced. ARIAs have higher sensitivity and specificity, and some commercial ARIA programs are already in use. Deep learning enhanced ARIAs appear to offer even more improvement in ARIA grading accuracy. The utilization of crowdsourcing and ARIAs may be a key to reducing the time and cost burden of processing images from DR screening.

  4. Automated uranium analysis by delayed-neutron counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunzendorf, H.; Loevborg, L.; Christiansen, E.M.

    1980-10-01

    Automated uranium analysis by fission-induced delayed-neutron counting is described. A short description is given of the instrumentation including transfer system, process control, irradiation and counting sites, and computer operations. Characteristic parameters of the facility (sample preparations, background, and standards) are discussed. A sensitivity of 817 +- 22 counts per 10 -6 g U is found using irradiation, delay, and counting times of 20 s, 5 s, and 10 s, respectively. Presicion is generally less than 1% for normal geological samples. Critical level and detection limits for 7.5 g samples are 8 and 16 ppb, respectively. The importance of some physical and elemental interferences are outlined. Dead-time corrections of measured count rates are necessary and a polynomical expression is used for count rates up to 10 5 . The presence of rare earth elements is regarded as the most important elemental interference. A typical application is given and other areas of application are described. (auther)

  5. Analysis of Automated Aircraft Conflict Resolution and Weather Avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, John F.; Chan, William N.; Lee, Chu Han

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of using trajectory-based automation to resolve both aircraft and weather constraints for near-term air traffic management decision making. The auto resolution algorithm developed and tested at NASA-Ames to resolve aircraft to aircraft conflicts has been modified to mitigate convective weather constraints. Modifications include adding information about the size of a gap between weather constraints to the routing solution. Routes that traverse gaps that are smaller than a specific size are not used. An evaluation of the performance of the modified autoresolver to resolve both conflicts with aircraft and weather was performed. Integration with the Center-TRACON Traffic Management System was completed to evaluate the effect of weather routing on schedule delays.

  6. Knowledge-based requirements analysis for automating software development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markosian, Lawrence Z.

    1988-01-01

    We present a new software development paradigm that automates the derivation of implementations from requirements. In this paradigm, informally-stated requirements are expressed in a domain-specific requirements specification language. This language is machine-understable and requirements expressed in it are captured in a knowledge base. Once the requirements are captured, more detailed specifications and eventually implementations are derived by the system using transformational synthesis. A key characteristic of the process is that the required human intervention is in the form of providing problem- and domain-specific engineering knowledge, not in writing detailed implementations. We describe a prototype system that applies the paradigm in the realm of communication engineering: the prototype automatically generates implementations of buffers following analysis of the requirements on each buffer.

  7. Automated generation of burnup chain for reactor analysis applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Viet Phu; Tran Hoai Nam; Akio Yamamoto; Tomohiro Endo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an automated generation of a new burnup chain for reactor analysis applications. The JENDL FP Decay Data File 2011 and Fission Yields Data File 2011 were used as the data sources. The nuclides in the new chain are determined by restrictions of the half-life and cumulative yield of fission products or from a given list. Then, decay modes, branching ratios and fission yields are recalculated taking into account intermediate reactions. The new burnup chain is output according to the format for the SRAC code system. Verification was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the new burnup chain. The results show that the new burnup chain reproduces well the results of a reference one with 193 fission products used in SRAC. Further development and applications are being planned with the burnup chain code. (author)

  8. Automated generation of burnup chain for reactor analysis applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Viet-Phu; Tran, Hoai-Nam; Yamamoto, Akio; Endo, Tomohiro

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an automated generation of burnup chain for reactor analysis applications. Algorithms are proposed to reevaluate decay modes, branching ratios and effective fission product (FP) cumulative yields of a given list of important FPs taking into account intermediate reactions. A new burnup chain is generated using the updated data sources taken from the JENDL FP decay data file 2011 and Fission yields data file 2011. The new burnup chain is output according to the format for the SRAC code system. Verification has been performed to evaluate the accuracy of the new burnup chain. The results show that the new burnup chain reproduces well the results of a reference one with 193 fission products used in SRAC. Burnup calculations using the new burnup chain have also been performed based on UO_2 and MOX fuel pin cells and compared with a reference chain th2cm6fp193bp6T.

  9. Automated generation of burnup chain for reactor analysis applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Viet-Phu [VINATOM, Hanoi (Viet Nam). Inst. for Nuclear Science and Technology; Tran, Hoai-Nam [Duy Tan Univ., Da Nang (Viet Nam). Inst. of Research and Development; Yamamoto, Akio; Endo, Tomohiro [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya-shi (Japan). Dept. of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering

    2017-05-15

    This paper presents the development of an automated generation of burnup chain for reactor analysis applications. Algorithms are proposed to reevaluate decay modes, branching ratios and effective fission product (FP) cumulative yields of a given list of important FPs taking into account intermediate reactions. A new burnup chain is generated using the updated data sources taken from the JENDL FP decay data file 2011 and Fission yields data file 2011. The new burnup chain is output according to the format for the SRAC code system. Verification has been performed to evaluate the accuracy of the new burnup chain. The results show that the new burnup chain reproduces well the results of a reference one with 193 fission products used in SRAC. Burnup calculations using the new burnup chain have also been performed based on UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel pin cells and compared with a reference chain th2cm6fp193bp6T.

  10. Elemental misinterpretation in automated analysis of LIBS spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübert, Waldemar; Ankerhold, Georg

    2011-07-01

    In this work, the Stark effect is shown to be mainly responsible for wrong elemental allocation by automated laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) software solutions. Due to broadening and shift of an elemental emission line affected by the Stark effect, its measured spectral position might interfere with the line position of several other elements. The micro-plasma is generated by focusing a frequency-doubled 200 mJ pulsed Nd/YAG laser on an aluminum target and furthermore on a brass sample in air at atmospheric pressure. After laser pulse excitation, we have measured the temporal evolution of the Al(II) ion line at 281.6 nm (4s(1)S-3p(1)P) during the decay of the laser-induced plasma. Depending on laser pulse power, the center of the measured line is red-shifted by 130 pm (490 GHz) with respect to the exact line position. In this case, the well-known spectral line positions of two moderate and strong lines of other elements coincide with the actual shifted position of the Al(II) line. Consequently, a time-resolving software analysis can lead to an elemental misinterpretation. To avoid a wrong interpretation of LIBS spectra in automated analysis software for a given LIBS system, we recommend using larger gate delays incorporating Stark broadening parameters and using a range of tolerance, which is non-symmetric around the measured line center. These suggestions may help to improve time-resolving LIBS software promising a smaller probability of wrong elemental identification and making LIBS more attractive for industrial applications.

  11. galaxieEST: addressing EST identity through automated phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, R Henrik; Rajashekar, Balaji; Larsson, Karl-Henrik; Ursing, Björn M

    2004-07-05

    Research involving expressed sequence tags (ESTs) is intricately coupled to the existence of large, well-annotated sequence repositories. Comparatively complete and satisfactory annotated public sequence libraries are, however, available only for a limited range of organisms, rendering the absence of sequences and gene structure information a tangible problem for those working with taxa lacking an EST or genome sequencing project. Paralogous genes belonging to the same gene family but distinguished by derived characteristics are particularly prone to misidentification and erroneous annotation; high but incomplete levels of sequence similarity are typically difficult to interpret and have formed the basis of many unsubstantiated assumptions of orthology. In these cases, a phylogenetic study of the query sequence together with the most similar sequences in the database may be of great value to the identification process. In order to facilitate this laborious procedure, a project to employ automated phylogenetic analysis in the identification of ESTs was initiated. galaxieEST is an open source Perl-CGI script package designed to complement traditional similarity-based identification of EST sequences through employment of automated phylogenetic analysis. It uses a series of BLAST runs as a sieve to retrieve nucleotide and protein sequences for inclusion in neighbour joining and parsimony analyses; the output includes the BLAST output, the results of the phylogenetic analyses, and the corresponding multiple alignments. galaxieEST is available as an on-line web service for identification of fungal ESTs and for download / local installation for use with any organism group at http://galaxie.cgb.ki.se/galaxieEST.html. By addressing sequence relatedness in addition to similarity, galaxieEST provides an integrative view on EST origin and identity, which may prove particularly useful in cases where similarity searches return one or more pertinent, but not full, matches and

  12. 14 CFR 1261.413 - Analysis of costs; automation; prevention of overpayments, delinquencies, or defaults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Analysis of costs; automation; prevention of overpayments, delinquencies, or defaults. 1261.413 Section 1261.413 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL...) § 1261.413 Analysis of costs; automation; prevention of overpayments, delinquencies, or defaults. The...

  13. Automated SEM Modal Analysis Applied to the Diogenites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, L. E.; Spilde, M. N.; Papike, James J.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of volume proportions of minerals, or modal analysis, is routinely accomplished by point counting on an optical microscope, but the process, particularly on brecciated samples such as the diogenite meteorites, is tedious and prone to error by misidentification of very small fragments, which may make up a significant volume of the sample. Precise volume percentage data can be gathered on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) utilizing digital imaging and an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). This form of automated phase analysis reduces error, and at the same time provides more information than could be gathered using simple point counting alone, such as particle morphology statistics and chemical analyses. We have previously studied major, minor, and trace-element chemistry of orthopyroxene from a suite of diogenites. This abstract describes the method applied to determine the modes on this same suite of meteorites and the results of that research. The modal abundances thus determined add additional information on the petrogenesis of the diogenites. In addition, low-abundance phases such as spinels were located for further analysis by this method.

  14. Granulometric profiling of aeolian dust deposits by automated image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, György; Újvári, Gábor; Kovács, János; Jakab, Gergely; Kiss, Klaudia; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Determination of granulometric parameters is of growing interest in the Earth sciences. Particle size data of sedimentary deposits provide insights into the physicochemical environment of transport, accumulation and post-depositional alterations of sedimentary particles, and are important proxies applied in paleoclimatic reconstructions. It is especially true for aeolian dust deposits with a fairly narrow grain size range as a consequence of the extremely selective nature of wind sediment transport. Therefore, various aspects of aeolian sedimentation (wind strength, distance to source(s), possible secondary source regions and modes of sedimentation and transport) can be reconstructed only from precise grain size data. As terrestrial wind-blown deposits are among the most important archives of past environmental changes, proper explanation of the proxy data is a mandatory issue. Automated imaging provides a unique technique to gather direct information on granulometric characteristics of sedimentary particles. Granulometric data obtained from automatic image analysis of Malvern Morphologi G3-ID is a rarely applied new technique for particle size and shape analyses in sedimentary geology. Size and shape data of several hundred thousand (or even million) individual particles were automatically recorded in this study from 15 loess and paleosoil samples from the captured high-resolution images. Several size (e.g. circle-equivalent diameter, major axis, length, width, area) and shape parameters (e.g. elongation, circularity, convexity) were calculated by the instrument software. At the same time, the mean light intensity after transmission through each particle is automatically collected by the system as a proxy of optical properties of the material. Intensity values are dependent on chemical composition and/or thickness of the particles. The results of the automated imaging were compared to particle size data determined by three different laser diffraction instruments

  15. Automated Image Analysis of Offshore Infrastructure Marine Biofouling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Gormley

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the UK, some of the oldest oil and gas installations have been in the water for over 40 years and have considerable colonisation by marine organisms, which may lead to both industry challenges and/or potential biodiversity benefits (e.g., artificial reefs. The project objective was to test the use of an automated image analysis software (CoralNet on images of marine biofouling from offshore platforms on the UK continental shelf, with the aim of (i training the software to identify the main marine biofouling organisms on UK platforms; (ii testing the software performance on 3 platforms under 3 different analysis criteria (methods A–C; (iii calculating the percentage cover of marine biofouling organisms and (iv providing recommendations to industry. Following software training with 857 images, and testing of three platforms, results showed that diversity of the three platforms ranged from low (in the central North Sea to moderate (in the northern North Sea. The two central North Sea platforms were dominated by the plumose anemone Metridium dianthus; and the northern North Sea platform showed less obvious species domination. Three different analysis criteria were created, where the method of selection of points, number of points assessed and confidence level thresholds (CT varied: (method A random selection of 20 points with CT 80%, (method B stratified random of 50 points with CT of 90% and (method C a grid approach of 100 points with CT of 90%. Performed across the three platforms, the results showed that there were no significant differences across the majority of species and comparison pairs. No significant difference (across all species was noted between confirmed annotations methods (A, B and C. It was considered that the software performed well for the classification of the main fouling species in the North Sea. Overall, the study showed that the use of automated image analysis software may enable a more efficient and consistent

  16. Automated Communications Analysis System using Latent Semantic Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foltz, Peter W

    2006-01-01

    ... and during the debriefing process to assess knowledge proficiency. In this report, the contractor describes prior research on communication analysis and how it can inform assessment of individual and team cognitive processing...

  17. Automated modelling of complex refrigeration cycles through topological structure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belman-Flores, J.M.; Riesco-Avila, J.M.; Gallegos-Munoz, A.; Navarro-Esbri, J.; Aceves, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a computational method for analysis of refrigeration cycles. The method is well suited for automated analysis of complex refrigeration systems. The refrigerator is specified through a description of flows representing thermodynamic sates at system locations; components that modify the thermodynamic state of a flow; and controls that specify flow characteristics at selected points in the diagram. A system of equations is then established for the refrigerator, based on mass, energy and momentum balances for each of the system components. Controls specify the values of certain system variables, thereby reducing the number of unknowns. It is found that the system of equations for the refrigerator may contain a number of redundant or duplicate equations, and therefore further equations are necessary for a full characterization. The number of additional equations is related to the number of loops in the cycle, and this is calculated by a matrix-based topological method. The methodology is demonstrated through an analysis of a two-stage refrigeration cycle.

  18. Automated computer analysis of plasma-streak traces from SCYLLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitman, R.L.; Jahoda, F.C.; Kruger, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    An automated computer analysis technique that locates and references the approximate centroid of single- or dual-streak traces from the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory SCYLLAC facility is described. The technique also determines the plasma-trace width over a limited self-adjusting region. The plasma traces are recorded with streak cameras on Polaroid film, then scanned and digitized for processing. The analysis technique uses scene segmentation to separate the plasma trace from a reference fiducial trace. The technique employs two methods of peak detection; one for the plasma trace and one for the fiducial trace. The width is obtained using an edge-detection, or slope, method. Timing data are derived from the intensity modulation of the fiducial trace. To smooth (despike) the output graphs showing the plasma-trace centroid and width, a technique of ''twicing'' developed by Tukey was employed. In addition, an interactive sorting algorithm allows retrieval of the centroid, width, and fiducial data from any test shot plasma for post analysis. As yet, only a limited set of sixteen plasma traces has been processed using this technique

  19. Automated computer analysis of plasma-streak traces from SCYLLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiteman, R.L.; Jahoda, F.C.; Kruger, R.P.

    1977-11-01

    An automated computer analysis technique that locates and references the approximate centroid of single- or dual-streak traces from the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory SCYLLAC facility is described. The technique also determines the plasma-trace width over a limited self-adjusting region. The plasma traces are recorded with streak cameras on Polaroid film, then scanned and digitized for processing. The analysis technique uses scene segmentation to separate the plasma trace from a reference fiducial trace. The technique employs two methods of peak detection; one for the plasma trace and one for the fiducial trace. The width is obtained using an edge-detection, or slope, method. Timing data are derived from the intensity modulation of the fiducial trace. To smooth (despike) the output graphs showing the plasma-trace centroid and width, a technique of ''twicing'' developed by Tukey was employed. In addition, an interactive sorting algorithm allows retrieval of the centroid, width, and fiducial data from any test shot plasma for post analysis. As yet, only a limited set of the plasma traces has been processed with this technique

  20. Development of a software for INAA analysis automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Genezini, Frederico A.; Figueiredo, Ana Maria G.; Ticianelli, Regina B.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a software to automate the post-counting tasks in comparative INAA has been developed that aims to become more flexible than the available options, integrating itself with some of the routines currently in use in the IPEN Activation Analysis Laboratory and allowing the user to choose between a fully-automatic analysis or an Excel-oriented one. The software makes use of the Genie 2000 data importing and analysis routines and stores each 'energy-counts-uncertainty' table as a separate ASCII file that can be used later on if required by the analyst. Moreover, it generates an Excel-compatible CSV (comma separated values) file with only the relevant results from the analyses for each sample or comparator, as well as the results of the concentration calculations and the results obtained with four different statistical tools (unweighted average, weighted average, normalized residuals and Rajeval technique), allowing the analyst to double-check the results. Finally, a 'summary' CSV file is also produced, with the final concentration results obtained for each element in each sample. (author)

  1. Intelligent Control in Automation Based on Wireless Traffic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2007-08-01

    Wireless technology is a central component of many factory automation infrastructures in both the commercial and government sectors, providing connectivity among various components in industrial realms (distributed sensors, machines, mobile process controllers). However wireless technologies provide more threats to computer security than wired environments. The advantageous features of Bluetooth technology resulted in Bluetooth units shipments climbing to five million per week at the end of 2005 [1, 2]. This is why the real-time interpretation and understanding of Bluetooth traffic behavior is critical in both maintaining the integrity of computer systems and increasing the efficient use of this technology in control type applications. Although neuro-fuzzy approaches have been applied to wireless 802.11 behavior analysis in the past, a significantly different Bluetooth protocol framework has not been extensively explored using this technology. This paper presents a new neurofuzzy traffic analysis algorithm of this still new territory of Bluetooth traffic. Further enhancements of this algorithm are presented along with the comparison against the traditional, numerical approach. Through test examples, interesting Bluetooth traffic behavior characteristics were captured, and the comparative elegance of this computationally inexpensive approach was demonstrated. This analysis can be used to provide directions for future development and use of this prevailing technology in various control type applications, as well as making the use of it more secure.

  2. Intelligent Control in Automation Based on Wireless Traffic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt Derr; Milos Manic

    2007-09-01

    Wireless technology is a central component of many factory automation infrastructures in both the commercial and government sectors, providing connectivity among various components in industrial realms (distributed sensors, machines, mobile process controllers). However wireless technologies provide more threats to computer security than wired environments. The advantageous features of Bluetooth technology resulted in Bluetooth units shipments climbing to five million per week at the end of 2005 [1, 2]. This is why the real-time interpretation and understanding of Bluetooth traffic behavior is critical in both maintaining the integrity of computer systems and increasing the efficient use of this technology in control type applications. Although neuro-fuzzy approaches have been applied to wireless 802.11 behavior analysis in the past, a significantly different Bluetooth protocol framework has not been extensively explored using this technology. This paper presents a new neurofuzzy traffic analysis algorithm of this still new territory of Bluetooth traffic. Further enhancements of this algorithm are presented along with the comparison against the traditional, numerical approach. Through test examples, interesting Bluetooth traffic behavior characteristics were captured, and the comparative elegance of this computationally inexpensive approach was demonstrated. This analysis can be used to provide directions for future development and use of this prevailing technology in various control type applications, as well as making the use of it more secure.

  3. A fully automated fast analysis system for capillary gas chromatography. Part 1. Automation of system control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, H.M.J.; Rijks, J.P.E.M.; Bombeeck, A.J.; Rijks, J.A.; Sandra, P.; Lee, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is dealing with the design, the automation and evaluation of a high speed capillary gas chromatographic system. A combination of software and hardware was developed for a new cold trap/reinjection device that allows selective solvent eliminating and on column sample enrichment and an

  4. Space Environment Automated Alerts and Anomaly Analysis Assistant (SEA^5) for NASA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a comprehensive analysis and dissemination system (Space Environment Automated Alerts  & Anomaly Analysis Assistant: SEA5) that will...

  5. Automated analysis for detecting beams in laser wakefield simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Weber, Gunther H.; Bethel, E. Wes; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Hamann, Bernd; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Laser wakefield particle accelerators have shown the potential to generate electric fields thousands of times higher than those of conventional accelerators. The resulting extremely short particle acceleration distance could yield a potential new compact source of energetic electrons and radiation, with wide applications from medicine to physics. Physicists investigate laser-plasma internal dynamics by running particle-in-cell simulations; however, this generates a large dataset that requires time-consuming, manual inspection by experts in order to detect key features such as beam formation. This paper describes a framework to automate the data analysis and classification of simulation data. First, we propose a new method to identify locations with high density of particles in the space-time domain, based on maximum extremum point detection on the particle distribution. We analyze high density electron regions using a lifetime diagram by organizing and pruning the maximum extrema as nodes in a minimum spanning tree. Second, we partition the multivariate data using fuzzy clustering to detect time steps in a experiment that may contain a high quality electron beam. Finally, we combine results from fuzzy clustering and bunch lifetime analysis to estimate spatially confined beams. We demonstrate our algorithms successfully on four different simulation datasets

  6. GWATCH: a web platform for automated gene association discovery analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background As genome-wide sequence analyses for complex human disease determinants are expanding, it is increasingly necessary to develop strategies to promote discovery and validation of potential disease-gene associations. Findings Here we present a dynamic web-based platform – GWATCH – that automates and facilitates four steps in genetic epidemiological discovery: 1) Rapid gene association search and discovery analysis of large genome-wide datasets; 2) Expanded visual display of gene associations for genome-wide variants (SNPs, indels, CNVs), including Manhattan plots, 2D and 3D snapshots of any gene region, and a dynamic genome browser illustrating gene association chromosomal regions; 3) Real-time validation/replication of candidate or putative genes suggested from other sources, limiting Bonferroni genome-wide association study (GWAS) penalties; 4) Open data release and sharing by eliminating privacy constraints (The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) Institutional Review Board (IRB), informed consent, The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 etc.) on unabridged results, which allows for open access comparative and meta-analysis. Conclusions GWATCH is suitable for both GWAS and whole genome sequence association datasets. We illustrate the utility of GWATCH with three large genome-wide association studies for HIV-AIDS resistance genes screened in large multicenter cohorts; however, association datasets from any study can be uploaded and analyzed by GWATCH. PMID:25374661

  7. Cost and Benefit Analysis of an Automated Nursing Administration System: A Methodology*

    OpenAIRE

    Rieder, Karen A.

    1984-01-01

    In order for a nursing service administration to select the appropriate automated system for its requirements, a systematic process of evaluating alternative approaches must be completed. This paper describes a methodology for evaluating and comparing alternative automated systems based upon an economic analysis which includes two major categories of criteria: costs and benefits.

  8. 40 CFR 13.19 - Analysis of costs; automation; prevention of overpayments, delinquencies or defaults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Analysis of costs; automation; prevention of overpayments, delinquencies or defaults. 13.19 Section 13.19 Protection of Environment...; automation; prevention of overpayments, delinquencies or defaults. (a) The Administrator may periodically...

  9. Application of automated image analysis to coal petrography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.; Thompson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    The coal petrologist seeks to determine the petrographic characteristics of organic and inorganic coal constituents and their lateral and vertical variations within a single coal bed or different coal beds of a particular coal field. Definitive descriptions of coal characteristics and coal facies provide the basis for interpretation of depositional environments, diagenetic changes, and burial history and determination of the degree of coalification or metamorphism. Numerous coal core or columnar samples must be studied in detail in order to adequately describe and define coal microlithotypes, lithotypes, and lithologic facies and their variations. The large amount of petrographic information required can be obtained rapidly and quantitatively by use of an automated image-analysis system (AIAS). An AIAS can be used to generate quantitative megascopic and microscopic modal analyses for the lithologic units of an entire columnar section of a coal bed. In our scheme for megascopic analysis, distinctive bands 2 mm or more thick are first demarcated by visual inspection. These bands consist of either nearly pure microlithotypes or lithotypes such as vitrite/vitrain or fusite/fusain, or assemblages of microlithotypes. Megascopic analysis with the aid of the AIAS is next performed to determine volume percentages of vitrite, inertite, minerals, and microlithotype mixtures in bands 0.5 to 2 mm thick. The microlithotype mixtures are analyzed microscopically by use of the AIAS to determine their modal composition in terms of maceral and optically observable mineral components. Megascopic and microscopic data are combined to describe the coal unit quantitatively in terms of (V) for vitrite, (E) for liptite, (I) for inertite or fusite, (M) for mineral components other than iron sulfide, (S) for iron sulfide, and (VEIM) for the composition of the mixed phases (Xi) i = 1,2, etc. in terms of the maceral groups vitrinite V, exinite E, inertinite I, and optically observable mineral

  10. Automated absolute activation analysis with californium-252 sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacMurdo, K.W.; Bowman, W.W.

    1978-09-01

    A 100-mg 252 Cf neutron activation analysis facility is used routinely at the Savannah River Laboratory for multielement analysis of many solid and liquid samples. An absolute analysis technique converts counting data directly to elemental concentration without the use of classical comparative standards and flux monitors. With the totally automated pneumatic sample transfer system, cyclic irradiation-decay-count regimes can be pre-selected for up to 40 samples, and samples can be analyzed with the facility unattended. An automatic data control system starts and stops a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer and/or a delayed-neutron detector; the system also stores data and controls output modes. Gamma ray data are reduced by three main programs in the IBM 360/195 computer: the 4096-channel spectrum and pertinent experimental timing, counting, and sample data are stored on magnetic tape; the spectrum is then reduced to a list of significant photopeak energies, integrated areas, and their associated statistical errors; and the third program assigns gamma ray photopeaks to the appropriate neutron activation product(s) by comparing photopeak energies to tabulated gamma ray energies. Photopeak areas are then converted to elemental concentration by using experimental timing and sample data, calculated elemental neutron capture rates, absolute detector efficiencies, and absolute spectroscopic decay data. Calculational procedures have been developed so that fissile material can be analyzed by cyclic neutron activation and delayed-neutron counting procedures. These calculations are based on a 6 half-life group model of delayed neutron emission; calculations include corrections for delayed neutron interference from 17 O. Detection sensitivities of 239 Pu were demonstrated with 15-g samples at a throughput of up to 140 per day. Over 40 elements can be detected at the sub-ppM level

  11. Semi-automated analysis of three-dimensional track images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meesen, G.; Poffijn, A.

    2001-01-01

    In the past, three-dimensional (3-d) track images in solid state detectors were difficult to obtain. With the introduction of the confocal scanning laser microscope it is now possible to record 3-d track images in a non-destructive way. These 3-d track images can latter be used to measure typical track parameters. Preparing the detectors and recording the 3-d images however is only the first step. The second step in this process is enhancing the image quality by means of deconvolution techniques to obtain the maximum possible resolution. The third step is extracting the typical track parameters. This can be done on-screen by an experienced operator. For large sets of data however, this manual technique is not desirable. This paper will present some techniques to analyse 3-d track data in an automated way by means of image analysis routines. Advanced thresholding techniques guarantee stable results in different recording situations. By using pre-knowledge about the track shape, reliable object identification is obtained. In case of ambiguity, manual intervention is possible

  12. High-Throughput Analysis and Automation for Glycomics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubhakar, Archana; Reiding, Karli R; Gardner, Richard A; Spencer, Daniel I R; Fernandes, Daryl L; Wuhrer, Manfred

    This review covers advances in analytical technologies for high-throughput (HTP) glycomics. Our focus is on structural studies of glycoprotein glycosylation to support biopharmaceutical realization and the discovery of glycan biomarkers for human disease. For biopharmaceuticals, there is increasing use of glycomics in Quality by Design studies to help optimize glycan profiles of drugs with a view to improving their clinical performance. Glycomics is also used in comparability studies to ensure consistency of glycosylation both throughout product development and between biosimilars and innovator drugs. In clinical studies there is as well an expanding interest in the use of glycomics-for example in Genome Wide Association Studies-to follow changes in glycosylation patterns of biological tissues and fluids with the progress of certain diseases. These include cancers, neurodegenerative disorders and inflammatory conditions. Despite rising activity in this field, there are significant challenges in performing large scale glycomics studies. The requirement is accurate identification and quantitation of individual glycan structures. However, glycoconjugate samples are often very complex and heterogeneous and contain many diverse branched glycan structures. In this article we cover HTP sample preparation and derivatization methods, sample purification, robotization, optimized glycan profiling by UHPLC, MS and multiplexed CE, as well as hyphenated techniques and automated data analysis tools. Throughout, we summarize the advantages and challenges with each of these technologies. The issues considered include reliability of the methods for glycan identification and quantitation, sample throughput, labor intensity, and affordability for large sample numbers.

  13. Technical and economic viability of automated highway systems : preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Technical and economic investigations of automated highway systems (AHS) are addressed. It has generally been accepted that such systems show potential to alleviate urban traffic congestion, so most of the AHS research has been focused instead on tec...

  14. Computer automated mass spectrometer for isotope analysis on gas samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamula, A.; Kaucsar, M.; Fatu, C.; Ursu, D.; Vonica, D.; Bendea, D.; Muntean, F.

    1998-01-01

    A low resolution, high precision instrument was designed and realized in the mass spectrometry laboratory of the Institute of Isotopic and Molecular Technology, Cluj-Napoca. The paper presents the vacuum system, the sample inlet system, the ion source, the magnetic analyzer and the ion collector. The instrument is almost completely automated. There are described the analog-to-digital conversion circuits, the local control microcomputer, the automation systems and the performance checking. (authors)

  15. Steam generator automated eddy current data analysis: A benchmarking study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.D.

    1998-12-01

    The eddy current examination of steam generator tubes is a very demanding process. Challenges include: complex signal analysis, massive amount of data to be reviewed quickly with extreme precision and accuracy, shortages of data analysts during peak periods, and the desire to reduce examination costs. One method to address these challenges is by incorporating automation into the data analysis process. Specific advantages, which automated data analysis has the potential to provide, include the ability to analyze data more quickly, consistently and accurately than can be performed manually. Also, automated data analysis can potentially perform the data analysis function with significantly smaller levels of analyst staffing. Despite the clear advantages that an automated data analysis system has the potential to provide, no automated system has been produced and qualified that can perform all of the functions that utility engineers demand. This report investigates the current status of automated data analysis, both at the commercial and developmental level. A summary of the various commercial and developmental data analysis systems is provided which includes the signal processing methodologies used and, where available, the performance data obtained for each system. Also, included in this report is input from seventeen research organizations regarding the actions required and obstacles to be overcome in order to bring automatic data analysis from the laboratory into the field environment. In order to provide assistance with ongoing and future research efforts in the automated data analysis arena, the most promising approaches to signal processing are described in this report. These approaches include: wavelet applications, pattern recognition, template matching, expert systems, artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic, case based reasoning and genetic algorithms. Utility engineers and NDE researchers can use this information to assist in developing automated data

  16. Automating dChip: toward reproducible sharing of microarray data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past decade, many software packages have been developed for analysis and visualization of various types of microarrays. We have developed and maintained the widely used dChip as a microarray analysis software package accessible to both biologist and data analysts. However, challenges arise when dChip users want to analyze large number of arrays automatically and share data analysis procedures and parameters. Improvement is also needed when the dChip user support team tries to identify the causes of reported analysis errors or bugs from users. Results We report here implementation and application of the dChip automation module. Through this module, dChip automation files can be created to include menu steps, parameters, and data viewpoints to run automatically. A data-packaging function allows convenient transfer from one user to another of the dChip software, microarray data, and analysis procedures, so that the second user can reproduce the entire analysis session of the first user. An analysis report file can also be generated during an automated run, including analysis logs, user comments, and viewpoint screenshots. Conclusion The dChip automation module is a step toward reproducible research, and it can prompt a more convenient and reproducible mechanism for sharing microarray software, data, and analysis procedures and results. Automation data packages can also be used as publication supplements. Similar automation mechanisms could be valuable to the research community if implemented in other genomics and bioinformatics software packages.

  17. Robotics/Automated Systems Task Analysis and Description of Required Job Competencies Report. Task Analysis and Description of Required Job Competencies of Robotics/Automated Systems Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Daniel M.; Lovett, James E.

    This task analysis report for the Robotics/Automated Systems Technician (RAST) curriculum project first provides a RAST job description. It then discusses the task analysis, including the identification of tasks, the grouping of tasks according to major areas of specialty, and the comparison of the competencies to existing or new courses to…

  18. Comparativo das propriedades do concreto autoadensável (CAA utilizando areia fina e cinza volante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. F. Tutikian

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é contribuir para a tomada de decisão sobre a definição do uso de materiais finos responsáveis pela resistência à segregação do concreto auto-adensável (CAA. Neste estudo, amostras de CAA foram dosadas com cinza volante, um material pozolânico, e areia fina, que é um material não pozolânico, utilizando o método de dosagem proposto por Tutikian & Dal Molin (2007 [1]. Foi observado que a utilização de cinza volante aumentou a resistência à compressão, principalmente nas idades mais avançadas, assim como os valores de módulo de deformação e velocidade das ondas de ultrasom. Também diminuiu a penetração de íons cloretos, para os mesmos valores de resistência em comparação com os CAA com areia fina e o custo final dos CAA com cinza volante foi inferior. Foram apresentados tanto os diagramas de dosagem como os de desempenho.

  19. The caa(3) terminal oxidase of Bacillus stearothermophilus - Transient spectroscopy of electron transfer and ligand binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giuffre, A; DItri, E; Giannini, S; Brunori, M; UbbinkKok, T; Konings, WN; Antonini, G

    1996-01-01

    The thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus possesses a caa(3)-type terminal oxidase, which was previously purified (De Vrij, W., Heyne, R. I. HL, and Konings, W. N. (1989) Ear. J. Biochem. 178, 763-770). We have carried out extensive kinetic experiments on the purified enzyme by

  20. Development of a fully automated online mixing system for SAXS protein structure analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Skou; Arleth, Lise

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents the development of an automated high-throughput mixing and exposure system for Small-Angle Scattering analysis on a synchrotron using polymer microfluidics. Software and hardware for both automated mixing, exposure control on a beamline and automated data reduction...... and preliminary analysis is presented. Three mixing systems that have been the corner stones of the development process are presented including a fully functioning high-throughput microfluidic system that is able to produce and expose 36 mixed samples per hour using 30 μL of sample volume. The system is tested...

  1. Development of a robotics system for automated chemical analysis of sediments, sludges, and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrail, B.P.; Dodson, M.G.; Skorpik, J.R.; Strachan, D.M.; Barich, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Adaptation and use of a high-reliability robot to conduct a standard laboratory procedure for soil chemical analysis are reported. Results from a blind comparative test were used to obtain a quantitative measure of the improvement in precision possible with the automated test method. Results from the automated chemical analysis procedure were compared with values obtained from an EPA-certified lab and with results from a more extensive interlaboratory round robin conducted by the EPA. For several elements, up to fivefold improvement in precision was obtained with the automated test method

  2. Automated Design and Analysis Tool for CEV Structural and TPS Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation of the proposed effort is a unique automated process for the analysis, design, and sizing of CEV structures and TPS. This developed process will...

  3. Automated Design and Analysis Tool for CLV/CEV Composite and Metallic Structural Components, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation of the proposed effort is a unique automated process for the analysis, design, and sizing of CLV/CEV composite and metallic structures. This developed...

  4. An Analysis of Automated Solutions for the Certification and Accreditation of Navy Medicine Information Assets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzales, Dominic V

    2005-01-01

    ... improve Navy Medicine's current C AND A security posture. The primary research reviewed C AND A policy and included a comparative analysis of two cutting edge automated C AND A tools namely, Xacta and eMASS...

  5. Manual versus Automated Narrative Analysis of Agrammatic Production Patterns: The Northwestern Narrative Language Analysis and Computerized Language Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chien-Ju; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare the outcomes of the manually coded Northwestern Narrative Language Analysis (NNLA) system, which was developed for characterizing agrammatic production patterns, and the automated Computerized Language Analysis (CLAN) system, which has recently been adopted to analyze speech samples of individuals…

  6. Automated computation of autonomous spectral submanifolds for nonlinear modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsioen, Sten; Pedergnana, Tiemo; Haller, George

    2018-04-01

    We discuss an automated computational methodology for computing two-dimensional spectral submanifolds (SSMs) in autonomous nonlinear mechanical systems of arbitrary degrees of freedom. In our algorithm, SSMs, the smoothest nonlinear continuations of modal subspaces of the linearized system, are constructed up to arbitrary orders of accuracy, using the parameterization method. An advantage of this approach is that the construction of the SSMs does not break down when the SSM folds over its underlying spectral subspace. A further advantage is an automated a posteriori error estimation feature that enables a systematic increase in the orders of the SSM computation until the required accuracy is reached. We find that the present algorithm provides a major speed-up, relative to numerical continuation methods, in the computation of backbone curves, especially in higher-dimensional problems. We illustrate the accuracy and speed of the automated SSM algorithm on lower- and higher-dimensional mechanical systems.

  7. Economic and workflow analysis of a blood bank automated system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Hyung Hoi; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup

    2013-07-01

    This study compared the estimated costs and times required for ABO/Rh(D) typing and unexpected antibody screening using an automated system and manual methods. The total cost included direct and labor costs. Labor costs were calculated on the basis of the average operator salaries and unit values (minutes), which was the hands-on time required to test one sample. To estimate unit values, workflows were recorded on video, and the time required for each process was analyzed separately. The unit values of ABO/Rh(D) typing using the manual method were 5.65 and 8.1 min during regular and unsocial working hours, respectively. The unit value was less than 3.5 min when several samples were tested simultaneously. The unit value for unexpected antibody screening was 2.6 min. The unit values using the automated method for ABO/Rh(D) typing, unexpected antibody screening, and both simultaneously were all 1.5 min. The total cost of ABO/Rh(D) typing of only one sample using the automated analyzer was lower than that of testing only one sample using the manual technique but higher than that of testing several samples simultaneously. The total cost of unexpected antibody screening using an automated analyzer was less than that using the manual method. ABO/Rh(D) typing using an automated analyzer incurs a lower unit value and cost than that using the manual technique when only one sample is tested at a time. Unexpected antibody screening using an automated analyzer always incurs a lower unit value and cost than that using the manual technique.

  8. Automated modal parameter estimation using correlation analysis and bootstrap sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghoubi, Vahid; Vakilzadeh, Majid K.; Abrahamsson, Thomas J. S.

    2018-02-01

    The estimation of modal parameters from a set of noisy measured data is a highly judgmental task, with user expertise playing a significant role in distinguishing between estimated physical and noise modes of a test-piece. Various methods have been developed to automate this procedure. The common approach is to identify models with different orders and cluster similar modes together. However, most proposed methods based on this approach suffer from high-dimensional optimization problems in either the estimation or clustering step. To overcome this problem, this study presents an algorithm for autonomous modal parameter estimation in which the only required optimization is performed in a three-dimensional space. To this end, a subspace-based identification method is employed for the estimation and a non-iterative correlation-based method is used for the clustering. This clustering is at the heart of the paper. The keys to success are correlation metrics that are able to treat the problems of spatial eigenvector aliasing and nonunique eigenvectors of coalescent modes simultaneously. The algorithm commences by the identification of an excessively high-order model from frequency response function test data. The high number of modes of this model provides bases for two subspaces: one for likely physical modes of the tested system and one for its complement dubbed the subspace of noise modes. By employing the bootstrap resampling technique, several subsets are generated from the same basic dataset and for each of them a model is identified to form a set of models. Then, by correlation analysis with the two aforementioned subspaces, highly correlated modes of these models which appear repeatedly are clustered together and the noise modes are collected in a so-called Trashbox cluster. Stray noise modes attracted to the mode clusters are trimmed away in a second step by correlation analysis. The final step of the algorithm is a fuzzy c-means clustering procedure applied to

  9. EddyOne automated analysis of PWR/WWER steam generator tubes eddy current data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadinic, B.; Vanjak, Z.

    2004-01-01

    INETEC Institute for Nuclear Technology developed software package called Eddy One which has option of automated analysis of bobbin coil eddy current data. During its development and on site use, many valuable lessons were learned which are described in this article. In accordance with previous, the following topics are covered: General requirements for automated analysis of bobbin coil eddy current data; Main approaches to automated analysis; Multi rule algorithms for data screening; Landmark detection algorithms as prerequisite for automated analysis (threshold algorithms and algorithms based on neural network principles); Field experience with Eddy One software; Development directions (use of artificial intelligence with self learning abilities for indication detection and sizing); Automated analysis software qualification; Conclusions. Special emphasis is given on results obtained on different types of steam generators, condensers and heat exchangers. Such results are then compared with results obtained by other automated software vendors giving clear advantage to INETEC approach. It has to be pointed out that INETEC field experience was collected also on WWER steam generators what is for now unique experience.(author)

  10. Prajna: adding automated reasoning to the visual- analysis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swing, E

    2010-01-01

    Developers who create applications for knowledge representation must contend with challenges in both the abundance of data and the variety of toolkits, architectures, and standards for representing it. Prajna is a flexible Java toolkit designed to overcome these challenges with an extensible architecture that supports both visualization and automated reasoning.

  11. Automated analysis of angle closure from anterior chamber angle images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Mani; Cheng, Jun; Perera, Shamira A; Tun, Tin A; Liu, Jiang; Aung, Tin

    2014-10-21

    To evaluate a novel software capable of automatically grading angle closure on EyeCam angle images in comparison with manual grading of images, with gonioscopy as the reference standard. In this hospital-based, prospective study, subjects underwent gonioscopy by a single observer, and EyeCam imaging by a different operator. The anterior chamber angle in a quadrant was classified as closed if the posterior trabecular meshwork could not be seen. An eye was classified as having angle closure if there were two or more quadrants of closure. Automated grading of the angle images was performed using customized software. Agreement between the methods was ascertained by κ statistic and comparison of area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). One hundred forty subjects (140 eyes) were included, most of whom were Chinese (102/140, 72.9%) and women (72/140, 51.5%). Angle closure was detected in 61 eyes (43.6%) with gonioscopy in comparison with 59 eyes (42.1%, P = 0.73) using manual grading, and 67 eyes (47.9%, P = 0.24) with automated grading of EyeCam images. The agreement for angle closure diagnosis between gonioscopy and both manual (κ = 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI), 0.81-0.96) and automated grading of EyeCam images was good (κ = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63-0.85). The AUC for detecting eyes with gonioscopic angle closure was comparable for manual and automated grading (AUC 0.974 vs. 0.954, P = 0.31) of EyeCam images. Customized software for automated grading of EyeCam angle images was found to have good agreement with gonioscopy. Human observation of the EyeCam images may still be needed to avoid gross misclassification, especially in eyes with extensive angle closure. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  12. Automated X-ray image analysis for cargo security: Critical review and future promise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Thomas W; Jaccard, Nicolas; Morton, Edward J; Griffin, Lewis D

    2017-01-01

    We review the relatively immature field of automated image analysis for X-ray cargo imagery. There is increasing demand for automated analysis methods that can assist in the inspection and selection of containers, due to the ever-growing volumes of traded cargo and the increasing concerns that customs- and security-related threats are being smuggled across borders by organised crime and terrorist networks. We split the field into the classical pipeline of image preprocessing and image understanding. Preprocessing includes: image manipulation; quality improvement; Threat Image Projection (TIP); and material discrimination and segmentation. Image understanding includes: Automated Threat Detection (ATD); and Automated Contents Verification (ACV). We identify several gaps in the literature that need to be addressed and propose ideas for future research. Where the current literature is sparse we borrow from the single-view, multi-view, and CT X-ray baggage domains, which have some characteristics in common with X-ray cargo.

  13. Extending and automating a Systems-Theoretic hazard analysis for requirements generation and analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, John (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    2012-05-01

    Systems Theoretic Process Analysis (STPA) is a powerful new hazard analysis method designed to go beyond traditional safety techniques - such as Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) - that overlook important causes of accidents like flawed requirements, dysfunctional component interactions, and software errors. While proving to be very effective on real systems, no formal structure has been defined for STPA and its application has been ad-hoc with no rigorous procedures or model-based design tools. This report defines a formal mathematical structure underlying STPA and describes a procedure for systematically performing an STPA analysis based on that structure. A method for using the results of the hazard analysis to generate formal safety-critical, model-based system and software requirements is also presented. Techniques to automate both the analysis and the requirements generation are introduced, as well as a method to detect conflicts between the safety and other functional model-based requirements during early development of the system.

  14. SWOT Analysis of Automation for Cash and Accounts Control in Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Mariya Deriy

    2013-01-01

    The possibility has been analyzed as to computerization of control over accounting and information systems data in terms of cash and payments in company practical activity provided that the problem is solved of the existence of well-functioning single computer network between different units of a developing company. Current state of the control organization and possibility of its automation has been observed. SWOT analysis of control automation to identify its strengths and weaknesses, obstac...

  15. Automated Source Code Analysis to Identify and Remove Software Security Vulnerabilities: Case Studies on Java Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan Meghanathan

    2013-01-01

    The high-level contribution of this paper is to illustrate the development of generic solution strategies to remove software security vulnerabilities that could be identified using automated tools for source code analysis on software programs (developed in Java). We use the Source Code Analyzer and Audit Workbench automated tools, developed by HP Fortify Inc., for our testing purposes. We present case studies involving a file writer program embedded with features for password validation, and ...

  16. Redefining the Practice of Peer Review Through Intelligent Automation-Part 3: Automated Report Analysis and Data Reconciliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Bruce I

    2018-02-01

    One method for addressing existing peer review limitations is the assignment of peer review cases on a completely blinded basis, in which the peer reviewer would create an independent report which can then be cross-referenced with the primary reader report of record. By leveraging existing computerized data mining techniques, one could in theory automate and objectify the process of report data extraction, classification, and analysis, while reducing time and resource requirements intrinsic to manual peer review report analysis. Once inter-report analysis has been performed, resulting inter-report discrepancies can be presented to the radiologist of record for review, along with the option to directly communicate with the peer reviewer through an electronic data reconciliation tool aimed at collaboratively resolving inter-report discrepancies and improving report accuracy. All associated report and reconciled data could in turn be recorded in a referenceable peer review database, which provides opportunity for context and user-specific education and decision support.

  17. Automics: an integrated platform for NMR-based metabonomics spectral processing and data analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Lijia

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spectral processing and post-experimental data analysis are the major tasks in NMR-based metabonomics studies. While there are commercial and free licensed software tools available to assist these tasks, researchers usually have to use multiple software packages for their studies because software packages generally focus on specific tasks. It would be beneficial to have a highly integrated platform, in which these tasks can be completed within one package. Moreover, with open source architecture, newly proposed algorithms or methods for spectral processing and data analysis can be implemented much more easily and accessed freely by the public. Results In this paper, we report an open source software tool, Automics, which is specifically designed for NMR-based metabonomics studies. Automics is a highly integrated platform that provides functions covering almost all the stages of NMR-based metabonomics studies. Automics provides high throughput automatic modules with most recently proposed algorithms and powerful manual modules for 1D NMR spectral processing. In addition to spectral processing functions, powerful features for data organization, data pre-processing, and data analysis have been implemented. Nine statistical methods can be applied to analyses including: feature selection (Fisher's criterion, data reduction (PCA, LDA, ULDA, unsupervised clustering (K-Mean and supervised regression and classification (PLS/PLS-DA, KNN, SIMCA, SVM. Moreover, Automics has a user-friendly graphical interface for visualizing NMR spectra and data analysis results. The functional ability of Automics is demonstrated with an analysis of a type 2 diabetes metabolic profile. Conclusion Automics facilitates high throughput 1D NMR spectral processing and high dimensional data analysis for NMR-based metabonomics applications. Using Automics, users can complete spectral processing and data analysis within one software package in most cases

  18. Automics: an integrated platform for NMR-based metabonomics spectral processing and data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Shao, Kang; Chu, Qinying; Ren, Yanfei; Mu, Yiming; Qu, Lijia; He, Jie; Jin, Changwen; Xia, Bin

    2009-03-16

    Spectral processing and post-experimental data analysis are the major tasks in NMR-based metabonomics studies. While there are commercial and free licensed software tools available to assist these tasks, researchers usually have to use multiple software packages for their studies because software packages generally focus on specific tasks. It would be beneficial to have a highly integrated platform, in which these tasks can be completed within one package. Moreover, with open source architecture, newly proposed algorithms or methods for spectral processing and data analysis can be implemented much more easily and accessed freely by the public. In this paper, we report an open source software tool, Automics, which is specifically designed for NMR-based metabonomics studies. Automics is a highly integrated platform that provides functions covering almost all the stages of NMR-based metabonomics studies. Automics provides high throughput automatic modules with most recently proposed algorithms and powerful manual modules for 1D NMR spectral processing. In addition to spectral processing functions, powerful features for data organization, data pre-processing, and data analysis have been implemented. Nine statistical methods can be applied to analyses including: feature selection (Fisher's criterion), data reduction (PCA, LDA, ULDA), unsupervised clustering (K-Mean) and supervised regression and classification (PLS/PLS-DA, KNN, SIMCA, SVM). Moreover, Automics has a user-friendly graphical interface for visualizing NMR spectra and data analysis results. The functional ability of Automics is demonstrated with an analysis of a type 2 diabetes metabolic profile. Automics facilitates high throughput 1D NMR spectral processing and high dimensional data analysis for NMR-based metabonomics applications. Using Automics, users can complete spectral processing and data analysis within one software package in most cases. Moreover, with its open source architecture, interested

  19. Automated defect spatial signature analysis for semiconductor manufacturing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Gleason, Shaun S.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for performing automated defect spatial signature alysis on a data set representing defect coordinates and wafer processing information includes categorizing data from the data set into a plurality of high level categories, classifying the categorized data contained in each high level category into user-labeled signature events, and correlating the categorized, classified signature events to a present or incipient anomalous process condition.

  20. Automated handling for SAF batch furnace and chemistry analysis operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, W.W.; Sherrell, D.L.; Wiemers, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The Secure Automated Fabrication Program is developing a remotely operated breeder reactor fuel pin fabrication line. The equipment will be installed in the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility being constructed at Hanford, Washington. Production is scheduled to start in mid-1986. The application of small pneumatically operated industrial robots for loading and unloading product into and out of batch furnaces and for distribution and handling of chemistry samples is described

  1. Alert management for home healthcare based on home automation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, T T; de Lamotte, F; Diguet, J-Ph; Said-Hocine, F

    2010-01-01

    Rising healthcare for elder and disabled people can be controlled by offering people autonomy at home by means of information technology. In this paper, we present an original and sensorless alert management solution which performs multimedia and home automation service discrimination and extracts highly regular home activities as sensors for alert management. The results of simulation data, based on real context, allow us to evaluate our approach before application to real data.

  2. Improving Automated Lexical and Discourse Analysis of Online Chat Dialog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    chatbots ”. Chatbots are automated user software independent of the chat room system that assist human participants, provide entertainment to the chat...both the chat room system and chatbots as well as information provided by the system and chatbots were often preceded by either the token “.” or...personal chatbots . Finally, we also classified chatbot responses as system dialog acts. The Yes/No Question chat dialog act is simply a question that

  3. Prototype Software for Automated Structural Analysis of Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Kristensen, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present a prototype software tool that is developed to analyse the structural model of automated systems in order to identify redundant information that is hence utilized for Fault detection and Isolation (FDI) purposes. The dedicated algorithms in this software tool use a tri......-partite graph that represents the structural model of the system. A component-based approach has been used to address issues such as system complexity and recon¯gurability possibilities....

  4. Prototype Software for Automated Structural Analysis of Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh; Kristensen, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present a prototype software tool that is developed to analyse the structural model of automated systems in order to identify redundant information that is hence utilized for Fault detection and Isolation (FDI) purposes. The dedicated algorithms in this software tool use a tri......-partite graph that represents the structural model of the system. A component-based approach has been used to address issues such as system complexity and reconfigurability possibilities....

  5. Fuzzy Emotional Semantic Analysis and Automated Annotation of Scene Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advances in electronic and imaging techniques, the production of digital images has rapidly increased, and the extraction and automated annotation of emotional semantics implied by images have become issues that must be urgently addressed. To better simulate human subjectivity and ambiguity for understanding scene images, the current study proposes an emotional semantic annotation method for scene images based on fuzzy set theory. A fuzzy membership degree was calculated to describe the emotional degree of a scene image and was implemented using the Adaboost algorithm and a back-propagation (BP neural network. The automated annotation method was trained and tested using scene images from the SUN Database. The annotation results were then compared with those based on artificial annotation. Our method showed an annotation accuracy rate of 91.2% for basic emotional values and 82.4% after extended emotional values were added, which correspond to increases of 5.5% and 8.9%, respectively, compared with the results from using a single BP neural network algorithm. Furthermore, the retrieval accuracy rate based on our method reached approximately 89%. This study attempts to lay a solid foundation for the automated emotional semantic annotation of more types of images and therefore is of practical significance.

  6. Automated multivariate analysis of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatograms of petroleum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Søren Furbo

    of separated compounds makes the analysis of GCGC chromatograms tricky, as there are too much data for manual analysis , and automated analysis is not always trouble-free: Manual checking of the results is often necessary. In this work, I will investigate the possibility of another approach to analysis of GCGC...... impossible to find it. For a special class of models, multi-way models, unique solutions often exist, meaning that the underlying phenomena can be found. I have tested this class of models on GCGC data from petroleum and conclude that more work is needed before they can be automated. I demonstrate how...

  7. Development of Process Automation in the Neutron Activation Analysis Facility in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussup, N.; Azman, A.; Ibrahim, M.M.; Rahman, N.A.A.; Che Sohashaari, S.; Atan, M.N.; Hamzah, M.A.; Mokhtar, M.; Khalid, M.A.; Salim, N.A.A.; Hamzah, M.S.

    2018-01-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) has been established in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) since 1980s. Most of the procedures established from sample registration to analysis are performed manually. These manual procedures carried out by the NAA laboratory personnel are time consuming and inefficient. Hence, system automation is developed in order to provide an effective method to replace redundant manual data entries and produce faster sample analysis and calculation process. This report explains NAA process in Nuclear Malaysia and describes the automation development in detail which includes sample registration software, automatic sample changer system which consists of hardware and software; and sample analysis software. (author)

  8. Development of an Automated Technique for Failure Modes and Effect Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, M.; Borch, Ole; Allasia, G.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in automation have provided integration of monitoring and control functions to enhance the operator's overview and ability to take remedy actions when faults occur. Automation in plant supervision is technically possible with integrated automation systems as platforms, but new design...... methods are needed to cope efficiently with the complexity and to ensure that the functionality of a supervisor is correct and consistent. In particular these methods are expected to significantly improve fault tolerance of the designed systems. The purpose of this work is to develop a software module...... implementing an automated technique for Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA). This technique is based on the matrix formulation of FMEA for the investigation of failure propagation through a system. As main result, this technique will provide the design engineer with decision tables for fault handling...

  9. Automated longitudinal intra-subject analysis (ALISA) for diffusion MRI tractography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarnink, Saskia H; Vos, Sjoerd B; Leemans, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    the inter-subject and intra-subject automation in this situation are intended for subjects without gross pathology. In this work, we propose such an automated longitudinal intra-subject analysis (dubbed ALISA) approach, and assessed whether ALISA could preserve the same level of reliability as obtained....... The major disadvantage of manual FT segmentations, unfortunately, is that placing regions-of-interest for tract selection can be very labor-intensive and time-consuming. Although there are several methods that can identify specific WM fiber bundles in an automated way, manual FT segmentations across...... multiple subjects performed by a trained rater with neuroanatomical expertise are generally assumed to be more accurate. However, for longitudinal DTI analyses it may still be beneficial to automate the FT segmentation across multiple time points, but then for each individual subject separately. Both...

  10. Development of an automated technique for failure modes and effect analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Borch, Ole; Bagnoli, F.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in automation have provided integration of monitoring and control functions to enhance the operator's overview and ability to take remedy actions when faults occur. Automation in plant supervision is technically possible with integrated automation systems as platforms, but new design...... methods are needed to cope efficiently with the complexity and to ensure that the functionality of a supervisor is correct and consistent. In particular these methods are expected to significantly improve fault tolerance of the designed systems. The purpose of this work is to develop a software module...... implementing an automated technique for Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA). This technique is based on the matrix formulation of FMEA for the investigation of failure propagation through a system. As main result, this technique will provide the design engineer with decision tables for fault handling...

  11. Engineering Mathematical Analysis Method for Productivity Rate in Linear Arrangement Serial Structure Automated Flow Assembly Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Chan Sin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Productivity rate (Q or production rate is one of the important indicator criteria for industrial engineer to improve the system and finish good output in production or assembly line. Mathematical and statistical analysis method is required to be applied for productivity rate in industry visual overviews of the failure factors and further improvement within the production line especially for automated flow line since it is complicated. Mathematical model of productivity rate in linear arrangement serial structure automated flow line with different failure rate and bottleneck machining time parameters becomes the basic model for this productivity analysis. This paper presents the engineering mathematical analysis method which is applied in an automotive company which possesses automated flow assembly line in final assembly line to produce motorcycle in Malaysia. DCAS engineering and mathematical analysis method that consists of four stages known as data collection, calculation and comparison, analysis, and sustainable improvement is used to analyze productivity in automated flow assembly line based on particular mathematical model. Variety of failure rate that causes loss of productivity and bottleneck machining time is shown specifically in mathematic figure and presents the sustainable solution for productivity improvement for this final assembly automated flow line.

  12. Application of quantum dots as analytical tools in automated chemical analysis: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigerio, Christian; Ribeiro, David S.M.; Rodrigues, S. Sofia M.; Abreu, Vera L.R.G.; Barbosa, João A.C.; Prior, João A.V.; Marques, Karine L.; Santos, João L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Review on quantum dots application in automated chemical analysis. ► Automation by using flow-based techniques. ► Quantum dots in liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. ► Detection by fluorescence and chemiluminescence. ► Electrochemiluminescence and radical generation. - Abstract: Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are one of the most relevant developments in the fast-growing world of nanotechnology. Initially proposed as luminescent biological labels, they are finding new important fields of application in analytical chemistry, where their photoluminescent properties have been exploited in environmental monitoring, pharmaceutical and clinical analysis and food quality control. Despite the enormous variety of applications that have been developed, the automation of QDs-based analytical methodologies by resorting to automation tools such as continuous flow analysis and related techniques, which would allow to take advantage of particular features of the nanocrystals such as the versatile surface chemistry and ligand binding ability, the aptitude to generate reactive species, the possibility of encapsulation in different materials while retaining native luminescence providing the means for the implementation of renewable chemosensors or even the utilisation of more drastic and even stability impairing reaction conditions, is hitherto very limited. In this review, we provide insights into the analytical potential of quantum dots focusing on prospects of their utilisation in automated flow-based and flow-related approaches and the future outlook of QDs applications in chemical analysis.

  13. Web-based automation of green building rating index and life cycle cost analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzaib Khan, Jam; Zakaria, Rozana; Aminuddin, Eeydzah; IzieAdiana Abidin, Nur; Sahamir, Shaza Rina; Ahmad, Rosli; Nafis Abas, Darul

    2018-04-01

    Sudden decline in financial markets and economic meltdown has slow down adaptation and lowered interest of investors towards green certified buildings due to their higher initial costs. Similarly, it is essential to fetch investor’s attention towards more development of green buildings through automated tools for the construction projects. Though, historical dearth is found on the automation of green building rating tools that brings up an essential gap to develop an automated analog computerized programming tool. This paper present a proposed research aim to develop an integrated web-based automated analog computerized programming that applies green building rating assessment tool, green technology and life cycle cost analysis. It also emphasizes to identify variables of MyCrest and LCC to be integrated and developed in a framework then transformed into automated analog computerized programming. A mix methodology of qualitative and quantitative survey and its development portray the planned to carry MyCrest-LCC integration to an automated level. In this study, the preliminary literature review enriches better understanding of Green Building Rating Tools (GBRT) integration to LCC. The outcome of this research is a pave way for future researchers to integrate other efficient tool and parameters that contributes towards green buildings and future agendas.

  14. Comparative analysis of automation of production process with industrial robots in Asia/Australia and Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Karabegović

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The term "INDUSTRY 4.0" or "fourth industrial revolution" was first introduced at the fair in 2011 in Hannover. It comes from the high-tech strategy of the German Federal Government that promotes automation-computerization to complete smart automation, meaning the introduction of a method of self-automation, self-configuration, self-diagnosing and fixing the problem, knowledge and intelligent decision-making. Any automation, including smart, cannot be imagined without industrial robots. Along with the fourth industrial revolution, ‘’robotic revolution’’ is taking place in Japan. Robotic revolution refers to the development and research of robotic technology with the aim of using robots in all production processes, and the use of robots in real life, to be of service to a man in daily life. Knowing these facts, an analysis was conducted of the representation of industrial robots in the production processes on the two continents of Europe and Asia /Australia, as well as research that industry is ready for the introduction of intelligent automation with the goal of establishing future smart factories. The paper gives a representation of the automation of production processes in Europe and Asia/Australia, with predictions for the future.

  15. Automated daily quality control analysis for mammography in a multi-unit imaging center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundell, Veli-Matti; Mäkelä, Teemu; Meaney, Alexander; Kaasalainen, Touko; Savolainen, Sauli

    2018-01-01

    Background The high requirements for mammography image quality necessitate a systematic quality assurance process. Digital imaging allows automation of the image quality analysis, which can potentially improve repeatability and objectivity compared to a visual evaluation made by the users. Purpose To develop an automatic image quality analysis software for daily mammography quality control in a multi-unit imaging center. Material and Methods An automated image quality analysis software using the discrete wavelet transform and multiresolution analysis was developed for the American College of Radiology accreditation phantom. The software was validated by analyzing 60 randomly selected phantom images from six mammography systems and 20 phantom images with different dose levels from one mammography system. The results were compared to a visual analysis made by four reviewers. Additionally, long-term image quality trends of a full-field digital mammography system and a computed radiography mammography system were investigated. Results The automated software produced feature detection levels comparable to visual analysis. The agreement was good in the case of fibers, while the software detected somewhat more microcalcifications and characteristic masses. Long-term follow-up via a quality assurance web portal demonstrated the feasibility of using the software for monitoring the performance of mammography systems in a multi-unit imaging center. Conclusion Automated image quality analysis enables monitoring the performance of digital mammography systems in an efficient, centralized manner.

  16. Completely automated modal analysis procedure based on the combination of different OMA methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Francesco; Bussini, Alberto; Resta, Ferruccio

    2018-03-01

    In this work a completely automated output-only Modal Analysis procedure is presented and all its benefits are listed. Based on the merging of different Operational Modal Analysis methods and a statistical approach, the identification process has been improved becoming more robust and giving as results only the real natural frequencies, damping ratios and mode shapes of the system. The effect of the temperature can be taken into account as well, leading to the creation of a better tool for automated Structural Health Monitoring. The algorithm has been developed and tested on a numerical model of a scaled three-story steel building present in the laboratories of Politecnico di Milano.

  17. 3D Assembly Group Analysis for Cognitive Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Brecher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept that allows the cognitive automation of robotic assembly processes is introduced. An assembly cell comprised of two robots was designed to verify the concept. For the purpose of validation a customer-defined part group consisting of Hubelino bricks is assembled. One of the key aspects for this process is the verification of the assembly group. Hence a software component was designed that utilizes the Microsoft Kinect to perceive both depth and color data in the assembly area. This information is used to determine the current state of the assembly group and is compared to a CAD model for validation purposes. In order to efficiently resolve erroneous situations, the results are interactively accessible to a human expert. The implications for an industrial application are demonstrated by transferring the developed concepts to an assembly scenario for switch-cabinet systems.

  18. An approach for automated analysis of particle holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, A. C.; Caulfield, H. J.; Stewart, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    A simple method for analyzing droplet holograms is proposed that is readily adaptable to automation using modern image digitizers and analyzers for determination of the number, location, and size distributions of spherical or nearly spherical droplets. The method determines these parameters by finding the spatial location of best focus of the droplet images. With this location known, the particle size may be determined by direct measurement of image area in the focal plane. Particle velocity and trajectory may be determined by comparison of image locations at different instants in time. The method is tested by analyzing digitized images from a reconstructed in-line hologram, and the results show that the method is more accurate than a time-consuming plane-by-plane search for sharpest focus.

  19. Automated Multivariate Optimization Tool for Energy Analysis: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, P. G.; Griffith, B. T.; Long, N.; Torcellini, P. A.; Crawley, D.

    2006-07-01

    Building energy simulations are often used for trial-and-error evaluation of ''what-if'' options in building design--a limited search for an optimal solution, or ''optimization''. Computerized searching has the potential to automate the input and output, evaluate many options, and perform enough simulations to account for the complex interactions among combinations of options. This paper describes ongoing efforts to develop such a tool. The optimization tool employs multiple modules, including a graphical user interface, a database, a preprocessor, the EnergyPlus simulation engine, an optimization engine, and a simulation run manager. Each module is described and the overall application architecture is summarized.

  20. Fatigue analysis through automated cycle counting using ThermAND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, G.R.; Ding, Y.; Scovil, A.; Yetisir, M.

    2008-01-01

    The potential for fatigue damage due to thermal transients is one of the degradation mechanisms that needs to be managed for plant components. The original design of CANDU stations accounts for projected fatigue usage for specific components over a specified design lifetime. Fatigue design calculations were based on estimates of the number and severity of expected transients for 30 years operation at 80% power. Many CANDU plants are now approaching the end of their design lives and are being considered for extended operation. Industry practice is to have a comprehensive fatigue management program in place for extended operation beyond the original design life. A CANDU-specific framework for fatigue management has recently been developed to identify the options for implementation, and the critical components and locations requiring long-term fatigue monitoring. An essential element of fatigue monitoring is to identify, count and monitor the number of plant transients to ensure that the number assumed in the original design is not exceeded. The number and severity of actual CANDU station thermal transients at key locations in critical systems have been assessed using ThermAND, AECL's health monitor for systems and components, based on archived station operational data. The automated cycle counting has demonstrated that actual transients are generally less numerous than the quantity assumed in the design basis, and are almost always significantly less severe. This paper will discuss the methodology to adapt ThermAND for automated cycle counting of specific system transients, illustrate and test this capability for cycle-based fatigue monitoring using CANDU station data, report the results, and provide data for stress-based fatigue calculations. (author)

  1. Comparison of manual & automated analysis methods for corneal endothelial cell density measurements by specular microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianyan; Maram, Jyotsna; Tepelus, Tudor C; Modak, Cristina; Marion, Ken; Sadda, SriniVas R; Chopra, Vikas; Lee, Olivia L

    2017-08-07

    To determine the reliability of corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) obtained by automated specular microscopy versus that of validated manual methods and factors that predict such reliability. Sharp central images from 94 control and 106 glaucomatous eyes were captured with Konan specular microscope NSP-9900. All images were analyzed by trained graders using Konan CellChek Software, employing the fully- and semi-automated methods as well as Center Method. Images with low cell count (input cells number <100) and/or guttata were compared with the Center and Flex-Center Methods. ECDs were compared and absolute error was used to assess variation. The effect on ECD of age, cell count, cell size, and cell size variation was evaluated. No significant difference was observed between the Center and Flex-Center Methods in corneas with guttata (p=0.48) or low ECD (p=0.11). No difference (p=0.32) was observed in ECD of normal controls <40 yrs old between the fully-automated method and manual Center Method. However, in older controls and glaucomatous eyes, ECD was overestimated by the fully-automated method (p=0.034) and semi-automated method (p=0.025) as compared to manual method. Our findings show that automated analysis significantly overestimates ECD in the eyes with high polymegathism and/or large cell size, compared to the manual method. Therefore, we discourage reliance upon the fully-automated method alone to perform specular microscopy analysis, particularly if an accurate ECD value is imperative. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  2. Digital image analysis applied to industrial nondestructive evaluation and automated parts assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janney, D.H.; Kruger, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    Many ideas of image enhancement and analysis are relevant to the needs of the nondestructive testing engineer. These ideas not only aid the engineer in the performance of his current responsibilities, they also open to him new areas of industrial development and automation which are logical extensions of classical testing problems. The paper begins with a tutorial on the fundamentals of computerized image enhancement as applied to nondestructive testing, then progresses through pattern recognition and automated inspection to automated, or robotic, assembly procedures. It is believed that such procedures are cost-effective in many instances, and are but the logical extension of those techniques now commonly used, but often limited to analysis of data from quality-assurance images. Many references are given in order to help the reader who wishes to pursue a given idea further

  3. Semi-automated analysis of EEG spikes in the preterm fetal sheep using wavelet analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walbran, A.C.; Unsworth, C.P.; Gunn, A.J.; Benett, L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Presentation Preference Oral Presentation Perinatal hypoxia plays a key role in the cause of brain injury in premature infants. Cerebral hypothermia commenced in the latent phase of evolving injury (first 6-8 h post hypoxic-ischemic insult) is the lead candidate for treatment however currently there is no means to identify which infants can benefit from treatment. Recent studies suggest that epileptiform transients in latent phase are predictive of neural outcome. To quantify this, an automated means of EEG analysis is required as EEG monitoring produces vast amounts of data which is timely to analyse manually. We have developed a semi-automated EEG spike detection method which employs a discretized version of the continuous wavelet transform (CWT). EEG data was obtained from a fetal sheep at approximately 0.7 of gestation. Fetal asphyxia was maintained for 25 min and the EEG recorded for 8 h before and after asphyxia. The CWT was calculated followed by the power of the wavelet transform coefficients. Areas of high power corresponded to spike waves so thresholding was employed to identify the spikes. The performance of the method was found have a good sensitivity and selectivity, thus demonstrating that this method is a simple, robust and potentially effective spike detection algorithm.

  4. Automated striatal uptake analysis of 18F-FDOPA PET images applied to Parkinson's disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Icheng; Lue Kunhan; Hsieh Hungjen; Liu Shuhsin; Kao, Chinhao K.

    2011-01-01

    6-[ 18 F]Fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) is a radiopharmaceutical valuable for assessing the presynaptic dopaminergic function when used with positron emission tomography (PET). More specifically, the striatal-to-occipital ratio (SOR) of FDOPA uptake images has been extensively used as a quantitative parameter in these PET studies. Our aim was to develop an easy, automated method capable of performing objective analysis of SOR in FDOPA PET images of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Brain images from FDOPA PET studies of 21 patients with PD and 6 healthy subjects were included in our automated striatal analyses. Images of each individual were spatially normalized into an FDOPA template. Subsequently, the image slice with the highest level of basal ganglia activity was chosen among the series of normalized images. Also, the immediate preceding and following slices of the chosen image were then selected. Finally, the summation of these three images was used to quantify and calculate the SOR values. The results obtained by automated analysis were compared with manual analysis by a trained and experienced image processing technologist. The SOR values obtained from the automated analysis had a good agreement and high correlation with manual analysis. The differences in caudate, putamen, and striatum were -0.023, -0.029, and -0.025, respectively; correlation coefficients 0.961, 0.957, and 0.972, respectively. We have successfully developed a method for automated striatal uptake analysis of FDOPA PET images. There was no significant difference between the SOR values obtained from this method and using manual analysis. Yet it is an unbiased time-saving and cost-effective program and easy to implement on a personal computer. (author)

  5. Automated analysis of small animal PET studies through deformable registration to an atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Daniel F.; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to develop a methodology for automated atlas-guided analysis of small animal positron emission tomography (PET) data through deformable registration to an anatomical mouse model. A non-rigid registration technique is used to put into correspondence relevant anatomical regions of rodent CT images from combined PET/CT studies to corresponding CT images of the Digimouse anatomical mouse model. The latter provides a pre-segmented atlas consisting of 21 anatomical regions suitable for automated quantitative analysis. Image registration is performed using a package based on the Insight Toolkit allowing the implementation of various image registration algorithms. The optimal parameters obtained for deformable registration were applied to simulated and experimental mouse PET/CT studies. The accuracy of the image registration procedure was assessed by segmenting mouse CT images into seven regions: brain, lungs, heart, kidneys, bladder, skeleton and the rest of the body. This was accomplished prior to image registration using a semi-automated algorithm. Each mouse segmentation was transformed using the parameters obtained during CT to CT image registration. The resulting segmentation was compared with the original Digimouse atlas to quantify image registration accuracy using established metrics such as the Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance. PET images were then transformed using the same technique and automated quantitative analysis of tracer uptake performed. The Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance show fair to excellent agreement and a mean registration mismatch distance of about 6 mm. The results demonstrate good quantification accuracy in most of the regions, especially the brain, but not in the bladder, as expected. Normalized mean activity estimates were preserved between the reference and automated quantification techniques with relative errors below 10 % in most of the organs considered. The proposed automated quantification technique is

  6. Automated data acquisition and analysis system for inventory verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, R.J.; Kaye, J.H.

    1974-03-01

    A real-time system is proposed which would allow CLO Safeguards Branch to conduct a meaningful inventory verification using a variety of NDA instruments. The overall system would include the NDA instruments, automated data handling equipment, and a vehicle to house and transport the instruments and equipment. For the purpose of the preliminary cost estimate a specific data handling system and vehicle were required. A Tracor Northern TN-11 data handling system including a PDP-11 minicomputer and a measurement vehicle similar to the Commission's Regulatory Region I van were used. The basic system is currently estimated to cost about $100,000, and future add-ons which would expand the systems' capabilities are estimated to cost about $40,000. The concept of using a vehicle in order to permanently rack mount the data handling equipmentoffers a number of benefits such as control of equipment environment and allowance for improvements, expansion, and flexibility in the system. Justification is also presented for local design and assembly of the overall system. A summary of the demonstration system which illustrates the advantages and feasibility of the overall system is included in this discussion. Two ideas are discussed which are not considered to be viable alternatives to the proposed system: addition of the data handling capabilities to the semiportable ''cart'' and use of a telephone link to a large computer center

  7. Automating X-ray Fluorescence Analysis for Rapid Astrobiology Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David R; Flannery, David T; Lanka, Ravi; Allwood, Abigail C; Bue, Brian D; Clark, Benton C; Elam, W Timothy; Estlin, Tara A; Hodyss, Robert P; Hurowitz, Joel A; Liu, Yang; Wade, Lawrence A

    2015-11-01

    A new generation of planetary rover instruments, such as PIXL (Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry) and SHERLOC (Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals) selected for the Mars 2020 mission rover payload, aim to map mineralogical and elemental composition in situ at microscopic scales. These instruments will produce large spectral cubes with thousands of channels acquired over thousands of spatial locations, a large potential science yield limited mainly by the time required to acquire a measurement after placement. A secondary bottleneck also faces mission planners after downlink; analysts must interpret the complex data products quickly to inform tactical planning for the next command cycle. This study demonstrates operational approaches to overcome these bottlenecks by specialized early-stage science data processing. Onboard, simple real-time systems can perform a basic compositional assessment, recognizing specific features of interest and optimizing sensor integration time to characterize anomalies. On the ground, statistically motivated visualization can make raw uncalibrated data products more interpretable for tactical decision making. Techniques such as manifold dimensionality reduction can help operators comprehend large databases at a glance, identifying trends and anomalies in data. These onboard and ground-side analyses can complement a quantitative interpretation. We evaluate system performance for the case study of PIXL, an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Experiments on three representative samples demonstrate improved methods for onboard and ground-side automation and illustrate new astrobiological science capabilities unavailable in previous planetary instruments. Dimensionality reduction-Planetary science-Visualization.

  8. Development of a novel and automated fluorescent immunoassay for the analysis of beta-lactam antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benito-Pena, E.; Moreno-Bondi, M.C.; Orellana, G.; Maquieira, K.; Amerongen, van A.

    2005-01-01

    An automated immunosensor for the rapid and sensitive analysis of penicillin type -lactam antibiotics has been developed and optimized. An immunogen was prepared by coupling the common structure of the penicillanic -lactam antibiotics, i.e., 6-aminopenicillanic acid to keyhole limpet hemocyanin.

  9. Automated analysis of small animal PET studies through deformable registration to an atlas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez, Daniel F.; Zaidi, Habib

    This work aims to develop a methodology for automated atlas-guided analysis of small animal positron emission tomography (PET) data through deformable registration to an anatomical mouse model. A non-rigid registration technique is used to put into correspondence relevant anatomical regions of

  10. UAV : Warnings From Multiple Automated Static Analysis Tools At A Glance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckers, T.B.; Cao, C.S.; Doesburg, M.S.; Gong, Boning; Wang, Sunwei; Beller, M.M.; Zaidman, A.E.; Pinzger, Martin; Bavota, Gabriele; Marcus, Andrian

    2017-01-01

    Automated Static Analysis Tools (ASATs) are an integral part of today’s software quality assurance practices. At present, a plethora of ASATs exist, each with different strengths. However, there is little guidance for developers on which of these ASATs to choose and combine for a project. As a

  11. Substructure analysis techniques and automation. [to eliminate logistical data handling and generation chores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennrich, C. W.; Konrath, E. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A basic automated substructure analysis capability for NASTRAN is presented which eliminates most of the logistical data handling and generation chores that are currently associated with the method. Rigid formats are proposed which will accomplish this using three new modules, all of which can be added to level 16 with a relatively small effort.

  12. Automated voxel-based analysis of brain perfusion SPECT for vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, S.; Yokouchi, T.; Hayashi, M.; Kimura, H.; Tomiyama, A.; Hirata, Y.; Saito, N.; Harashina, J.; Nakayama, H.; Sato, K.; Aoki, K.; Samejima, H.; Ueda, M.; Terada, H.; Hamazaki, K.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during vasospasm after subarachnoid haemorrhage ISAH) using automated voxel-based analysis of brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPELT). Brain perfusion SPECT was performed 7 to 10 days after onset of SAH. Automated voxel-based analysis of SPECT used a Z-score map that was calculated by comparing the patients data with a control database. In cases where computed tomography (CT) scans detected an ischemic region due to vasospasm, automated voxel-based analysis of brain perfusion SPECT revealed dramatically reduced rCBF (Z-score ≤ -4). No patients with mildly or moderately diminished rCBF (Z-score > -3) progressed to cerebral infarction. Some patients with a Z-score < -4 did not progress to cerebral infarction after active treatment with a angioplasty. Three-dimensional images provided detailed anatomical information and helped us to distinguish surgical sequelae from vasospasm. In conclusion, automated voxel-based analysis of brain perfusion SPECT using a Z-score map is helpful in evaluating decreased rCBF due to vasospasm. (author)

  13. Automated Analysis of ARM Binaries using the Low-Level Virtual Machine Compiler Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Maintenance ABACAS offers a level of flexibility in software development that would be very useful later in the software engineering life cycle. New... Blackjacking : security threats to blackberry devices, PDAs and cell phones in the enterprise. Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.A.: Wiley Publishing, 2007...AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF ARM BINARIES USING THE LOW- LEVEL VIRTUAL MACHINE COMPILER FRAMEWORK THESIS Jeffrey B. Scott

  14. Application of fluorescence-based semi-automated AFLP analysis in barley and wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, G.; Herz, M.; Huang, X.Q.

    2000-01-01

    of semi-automated codominant analysis for hemizygous AFLP markers in an F-2 population was too low, proposing the use of dominant allele-typing defaults. Nevertheless, the efficiency of genetic mapping, especially of complex plant genomes, will be accelerated by combining the presented genotyping......Genetic mapping and the selection of closely linked molecular markers for important agronomic traits require efficient, large-scale genotyping methods. A semi-automated multifluorophore technique was applied for genotyping AFLP marker loci in barley and wheat. In comparison to conventional P-33...

  15. Automated Diatom Analysis Applied to Traditional Light Microscopy: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Z. H. L.; Bishop, I.; Spaulding, S. A.; Nelson, H.; Mahoney, C.

    2017-12-01

    Diatom identification and enumeration by high resolution light microscopy is required for many areas of research and water quality assessment. Such analyses, however, are both expertise and labor-intensive. These challenges motivate the need for an automated process to efficiently and accurately identify and enumerate diatoms. Improvements in particle analysis software have increased the likelihood that diatom enumeration can be automated. VisualSpreadsheet software provides a possible solution for automated particle analysis of high-resolution light microscope diatom images. We applied the software, independent of its complementary FlowCam hardware, to automated analysis of light microscope images containing diatoms. Through numerous trials, we arrived at threshold settings to correctly segment 67% of the total possible diatom valves and fragments from broad fields of view. (183 light microscope images were examined containing 255 diatom particles. Of the 255 diatom particles present, 216 diatoms valves and fragments of valves were processed, with 170 properly analyzed and focused upon by the software). Manual analysis of the images yielded 255 particles in 400 seconds, whereas the software yielded a total of 216 particles in 68 seconds, thus highlighting that the software has an approximate five-fold efficiency advantage in particle analysis time. As in past efforts, incomplete or incorrect recognition was found for images with multiple valves in contact or valves with little contrast. The software has potential to be an effective tool in assisting taxonomists with diatom enumeration by completing a large portion of analyses. Benefits and limitations of the approach are presented to allow for development of future work in image analysis and automated enumeration of traditional light microscope images containing diatoms.

  16. Scoring of radiation-induced micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked human lymphocytes by automated image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaegen, F.; Seuntjens, J.; Thierens, H.

    1994-01-01

    The micronucleus assay in human lymphocytes is, at present, frequently used to assess chromosomal damage caused by ionizing radiation or mutagens. Manual scoring of micronuclei (MN) by trained personnel is very time-consuming, tiring work, and the results depend on subjective interpretation of scoring criteria. More objective scoring can be accomplished only if the test can be automated. Furthermore, an automated system allows scoring of large numbers of cells, thereby increasing the statistical significance of the results. This is of special importance for screening programs for low doses of chromosome-damaging agents. In this paper, the first results of our effort to automate the micronucleus assay with an image-analysis system are represented. The method we used is described in detail, and the results are compared to those of other groups. Our system is able to detect 88% of the binucleated lymphocytes on the slides. The procedure consists of a fully automated localization of binucleated cells and counting of the MN within these cells, followed by a simple and fast manual operation in which the false positives are removed. Preliminary measurements for blood samples irradiated with a dose of 1 Gy X-rays indicate that the automated system can find 89% ± 12% of the micronuclei within the binucleated cells compared to a manual screening. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  17. Driver-centred vehicle automation: using network analysis for agent-based modelling of the driver in highly automated driving systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Victoria A; Stanton, Neville A

    2016-11-01

    To the average driver, the concept of automation in driving infers that they can become completely 'hands and feet free'. This is a common misconception, however, one that has been shown through the application of Network Analysis to new Cruise Assist technologies that may feature on our roads by 2020. Through the adoption of a Systems Theoretic approach, this paper introduces the concept of driver-initiated automation which reflects the role of the driver in highly automated driving systems. Using a combination of traditional task analysis and the application of quantitative network metrics, this agent-based modelling paper shows how the role of the driver remains an integral part of the driving system implicating the need for designers to ensure they are provided with the tools necessary to remain actively in-the-loop despite giving increasing opportunities to delegate their control to the automated subsystems. Practitioner Summary: This paper describes and analyses a driver-initiated command and control system of automation using representations afforded by task and social networks to understand how drivers remain actively involved in the task. A network analysis of different driver commands suggests that such a strategy does maintain the driver in the control loop.

  18. Evaluation of damping estimates by automated Operational Modal Analysis for offshore wind turbine tower vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajrić, Anela; Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Rüdinger, Finn

    2018-01-01

    Reliable predictions of the lifetime of offshore wind turbine structures are influenced by the limited knowledge concerning the inherent level of damping during downtime. Error measures and an automated procedure for covariance driven Operational Modal Analysis (OMA) techniques has been proposed....... In order to obtain algorithmic independent answers, three identification techniques are compared: Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA), covariance driven Stochastic Subspace Identification (COV-SSI) and the Enhanced Frequency Domain Decomposition (EFDD). Discrepancies between automated identification...... techniques are discussed and illustrated with respect to signal noise, measurement time, vibration amplitudes and stationarity of the ambient response. The best bias-variance error trade-off of damping estimates is obtained by the COV-SSI. The proposed automated procedure is validated by real vibration...

  19. Evaluation of automated analysis of 15N and total N in plant material and soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    Simultaneous determination of N-15 and total N using an automated nitrogen analyser interfaced to a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (ANA-MS method) was evaluated. The coefficient of variation (CV) of repeated analyses of homogeneous standards and samples at natural abundance...... was lower than 0.1%. The CV of repeated analyses of N-15-labelled plant material and soil samples varied between 0.3% and 1.1%. The reproducibility of repeated total N analyses using the automated method was comparable to results obtained with a semi-micro Kjeldahl procedure. However, the automated method...... analysis showed that the recovery of inorganic N in the NH3 trap was lower when the N was diffused from water than from 2 M KCl. The results also indicated that different proportions of the NO3- and the NH4+ in aqueous solution were recovered in the trap after combined diffusion. The method is most suited...

  20. ROBOCAL: An automated NDA [nondestructive analysis] calorimetry and gamma isotopic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurd, J.R.; Powell, W.D.; Ostenak, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    ROBOCAL, which is presently being developed and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is a full-scale, prototype robotic system for remote calorimetric and gamma-ray analysis of special nuclear materials. It integrates a fully automated, multidrawer, vertical stacker-retriever system for staging unmeasured nuclear materials, and a fully automated gantry robot for computer-based selection and transfer of nuclear materials to calorimetric and gamma-ray measurement stations. Since ROBOCAL is designed for minimal operator intervention, a completely programmed user interface is provided to interact with the automated mechanical and assay systems. The assay system is designed to completely integrate calorimetric and gamma-ray data acquisition and to perform state-of-the-art analyses on both homogeneous and heterogeneous distributions of nuclear materials in a wide variety of matrices

  1. Artificial neural networks for automation of Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy experiments and data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barradas, N.P.; Vieira, A.; Patricio, R.

    2002-01-01

    We present an algorithm based on artificial neural networks able to determine optimized experimental conditions for Rutherford backscattering measurements of Ge-implanted Si. The algorithm can be implemented for any other element implanted into a lighter substrate. It is foreseeable that the method developed in this work can be applied to still many other systems. The algorithm presented is a push-button black box, and does not require any human intervention. It is thus suited for automated control of an experimental setup, given an interface to the relevant hardware. Once the experimental conditions are optimized, the algorithm analyzes the final data obtained, and determines the desired parameters. The method is thus also suited for automated analysis of the data. The algorithm presented can be easily extended to other ion beam analysis techniques. Finally, it is suggested how the artificial neural networks required for automated control and analysis of experiments could be automatically generated. This would be suited for automated generation of the required computer code. Thus could RBS be done without experimentalists, data analysts, or programmers, with only technicians to keep the machines running

  2. Semi-automated digital image analysis of patellofemoral joint space width from lateral knee radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grochowski, S.J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rochester (United States); Amrami, K.K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester (United States); Kaufman, K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rochester (United States); Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Charlton North L-110L, Rochester (United States)

    2005-10-01

    To design a semi-automated program to measure minimum patellofemoral joint space width (JSW) using standing lateral view radiographs. Lateral patellofemoral knee radiographs were obtained from 35 asymptomatic subjects. The radiographs were analyzed to report both the repeatability of the image analysis program and the reproducibility of JSW measurements within a 2 week period. The results were also compared with manual measurements done by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. The image analysis program was shown to have an excellent coefficient of repeatability of 0.18 and 0.23 mm for intra- and inter-observer measurements respectively. The manual method measured a greater minimum JSW than the automated method. Reproducibility between days was comparable to other published results, but was less satisfactory for both manual and semi-automated measurements. The image analysis program had an inter-day coefficient of repeatability of 1.24 mm, which was lower than 1.66 mm for the manual method. A repeatable semi-automated method for measurement of the patellofemoral JSW from radiographs has been developed. The method is more accurate than manual measurements. However, the between-day reproducibility is higher than the intra-day reproducibility. Further investigation of the protocol for obtaining sequential lateral knee radiographs is needed in order to reduce the between-day variability. (orig.)

  3. Recent developments in the dissolution and automated analysis of plutonium and uranium for safeguards measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Rein, J.E.; Waterbury, G.R.

    1975-01-01

    The status of a program to develop assay methods for plutonium and uranium for safeguards purposes is presented. The current effort is directed more toward analyses of scrap-type material with an end goal of precise automated methods that also will be applicable to product materials. A guiding philosophy for the analysis of scrap-type materials, characterized by heterogeneity and difficult dissolution, is relatively fast dissolution treatment to effect 90 percent or more solubilization of the uranium and plutonium, analysis of the soluble fraction by precise automated methods, and gamma-counting assay of any residue fraction using simple techniques. A Teflon-container metal-shell apparatus provides acid dissolutions of typical fuel cycle materials at temperatures to 275 0 C and pressures to 340 atm. Gas--solid reactions at elevated temperatures separate uranium from refractory materials by the formation of volatile uranium compounds. The condensed compounds then are dissolved in acid for subsequent analysis. An automated spectrophotometer is used for the determination of uranium and plutonium. The measurement range is 1 to 14 mg of either element with a relative standard deviation of 0.5 percent over most of the range. The throughput rate is 5 min per sample. A second-generation automated instrument is being developed for the determination of plutonium. A precise and specific electroanalytical method is used as its operational basis. (auth)

  4. Antioxidant activity of puha (Sonchus oleraceus L.) as assessed by the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Arlene; Thompson, Scott; Stark, Mirjam; Ou, Zong-Quan; Gould, Kevin S

    2011-12-01

    There is considerable interest in antioxidant dietary components that can be protective against degenerative diseases in humans. Puha (Sonchus oleraceus L.) is a rich source of polyphenols, and exhibits strong antioxidant activity as measured by the 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. However, the potential of puha to protect against degenerative diseases requires that low molecular weight antioxidants (LMWA) are absorbed by, and active in, human cells. The cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay was used to investigate the antioxidant activity of puha leaf extracts. Preparation methods of freezing and freeze-drying reduced the total polyphenolic content compared with fresh puha, but did not affect the LMWA potential as determined by the DPPH assay. The IC(50) values were 0.012 ± 0.003 mg/mL and 0.010 ± 0.005 mg/mL for freeze-dried and fresh puha leaves, respectively. Using the CAA assay, it was shown that LMWAs from foliar extracts of puha were effectively absorbed into HepG2 cells, and exerted antioxidant activity at levels comparable to those of extracts from blueberry fruits, the much-touted antioxidant superfood. Methylene blue staining of HepG2 cells indicated that puha extracts were not cytotoxic at concentrations below 100 mg DW/mL. The data indicate the potential of puha as a nutraceutical supplement for human health. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Automated quantification and sizing of unbranched filamentous cyanobacteria by model based object oriented image analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeder, M; Van den Wyngaert, S; Köster, O; Felder, K M; Pernthaler, J

    2010-01-01

    Quantification and sizing of filamentous cyanobacteria in environmental samples or cultures are time-consuming and are often performed by using manual or semiautomated microscopic analysis. Automation of conventional image analysis is difficult because filaments may exhibit great variations in length and patchy autofluorescence. Moreover, individual filaments frequently cross each other in microscopic preparations, as deduced by modeling. This paper describes a novel approach based on object-...

  6. Quantitative analysis and automation of CaF2 ore flotation via neutronic activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reggiani, F.; Garagnani, A.; Lembo, L.; Muntoni, C.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the project was to prove the operative feasibility of an 'one line analysis' based on nuclear activation using 14 MeV neutrons. This on line analysis method was to be used to automate control of the flotation process for ores containing mostly fluorspar. The thermoluminescence technique was also forecast as a subsidiary method in those points of the flotation cycle where less precision is acceptable. (author). 11 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Evaluation of an Automated Analysis Tool for Prostate Cancer Prediction Using Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias C Roethke

    Full Text Available To evaluate the diagnostic performance of an automated analysis tool for the assessment of prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI of the prostate.A fully automated analysis tool was used for a retrospective analysis of mpMRI sets (T2-weighted, T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced, and diffusion-weighted sequences. The software provided a malignancy prediction value for each image pixel, defined as Malignancy Attention Index (MAI that can be depicted as a colour map overlay on the original images. The malignancy maps were compared to histopathology derived from a combination of MRI-targeted and systematic transperineal MRI/TRUS-fusion biopsies.In total, mpMRI data of 45 patients were evaluated. With a sensitivity of 85.7% (with 95% CI of 65.4-95.0, a specificity of 87.5% (with 95% CI of 69.0-95.7 and a diagnostic accuracy of 86.7% (with 95% CI of 73.8-93.8 for detection of prostate cancer, the automated analysis results corresponded well with the reported diagnostic accuracies by human readers based on the PI-RADS system in the current literature.The study revealed comparable diagnostic accuracies for the detection of prostate cancer of a user-independent MAI-based automated analysis tool and PI-RADS-scoring-based human reader analysis of mpMRI. Thus, the analysis tool could serve as a detection support system for less experienced readers. The results of the study also suggest the potential of MAI-based analysis for advanced lesion assessments, such as cancer extent and staging prediction.

  8. Automated acquisition and analysis of small angle X-ray scattering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, Daniel; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) is a powerful tool in the study of biological macromolecules providing information about the shape, conformation, assembly and folding states in solution. Recent advances in robotic fluid handling make it possible to perform automated high throughput experiments including fast screening of solution conditions, measurement of structural responses to ligand binding, changes in temperature or chemical modifications. Here, an approach to full automation of SAXS data acquisition and data analysis is presented, which advances automated experiments to the level of a routine tool suitable for large scale structural studies. The approach links automated sample loading, primary data reduction and further processing, facilitating queuing of multiple samples for subsequent measurement and analysis and providing means of remote experiment control. The system was implemented and comprehensively tested in user operation at the BioSAXS beamlines X33 and P12 of EMBL at the DORIS and PETRA storage rings of DESY, Hamburg, respectively, but is also easily applicable to other SAXS stations due to its modular design.

  9. Automated tool for virtual screening and pharmacology-based pathway prediction and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugandh Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The virtual screening is an effective tool for the lead identification in drug discovery. However, there are limited numbers of crystal structures available as compared to the number of biological sequences which makes (Structure Based Drug Discovery SBDD a difficult choice. The current tool is an attempt to automate the protein structure modelling and automatic virtual screening followed by pharmacology-based prediction and analysis. Starting from sequence(s, this tool automates protein structure modelling, binding site identification, automated docking, ligand preparation, post docking analysis and identification of hits in the biological pathways that can be modulated by a group of ligands. This automation helps in the characterization of ligands selectivity and action of ligands on a complex biological molecular network as well as on individual receptor. The judicial combination of the ligands binding different receptors can be used to inhibit selective biological pathways in a disease. This tool also allows the user to systemically investigate network-dependent effects of a drug or drug candidate.

  10. Evaluation of an automated analysis for pain-related evoked potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulf Michael

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents initial steps towards an auto-mated analysis for pain-related evoked potentials (PREP to achieve a higher objectivity and non-biased examination as well as a reduction in the time expended during clinical daily routines. While manually examining, each epoch of an en-semble of stimulus-locked EEG signals, elicited by electrical stimulation of predominantly intra-epidermal small nerve fibers and recorded over the central electrode (Cz, is in-spected for artifacts before calculating the PREP by averag-ing the artifact-free epochs. Afterwards, specific peak-latencies (like the P0-, N1 and P1-latency are identified as certain extrema in the PREP’s waveform. The proposed automated analysis uses Pearson’s correlation and low-pass differentiation to perform these tasks. To evaluate the auto-mated analysis’ accuracy its results of 232 datasets were compared to the results of the manually performed examina-tion. Results of the automated artifact rejection were compa-rable to the manual examination. Detection of peak-latencies was more heterogeneous, indicating some sensitivity of the detected events upon the criteria used during data examina-tion.

  11. The role of the computer in automated spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, S.E.

    This report describes how a computer can be an extremely valuable tool for routine analysis of spectra, which is a time consuming process. A number of general-purpose algorithms that are available for the various phases of the analysis can be implemented, if these algorithms are designed to cope with all the variations that may occur. Since this is basically impossible, one must find a compromise between obscure error and program complexity. This is usually possible with human interaction at critical points. In spectral analysis this is possible if the user scans the data on an interactive graphics terminal, makes the necessary changes and then returns control to the computer for completion of the analysis

  12. An automated robotic platform for rapid profiling oligosaccharide analysis of monoclonal antibodies directly from cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Margaret; Bones, Jonathan; McLoughlin, Niaobh; Telford, Jayne E; Harmon, Bryan; DeFelippis, Michael R; Rudd, Pauline M

    2013-11-01

    Oligosaccharides attached to Asn297 in each of the CH2 domains of monoclonal antibodies play an important role in antibody effector functions by modulating the affinity of interaction with Fc receptors displayed on cells of the innate immune system. Rapid, detailed, and quantitative N-glycan analysis is required at all stages of bioprocess development to ensure the safety and efficacy of the therapeutic. The high sample numbers generated during quality by design (QbD) and process analytical technology (PAT) create a demand for high-performance, high-throughput analytical technologies for comprehensive oligosaccharide analysis. We have developed an automated 96-well plate-based sample preparation platform for high-throughput N-glycan analysis using a liquid handling robotic system. Complete process automation includes monoclonal antibody (mAb) purification directly from bioreactor media, glycan release, fluorescent labeling, purification, and subsequent ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis. The entire sample preparation and commencement of analysis is achieved within a 5-h timeframe. The automated sample preparation platform can easily be interfaced with other downstream analytical technologies, including mass spectrometry (MS) and capillary electrophoresis (CE), for rapid characterization of oligosaccharides present on therapeutic antibodies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Automated thermal mapping techniques using chromatic image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal imaging techniques are introduced using a chromatic image analysis system and temperature sensitive coatings. These techniques are used for thermal mapping and surface heat transfer measurements on aerothermodynamic test models in hypersonic wind tunnels. Measurements are made on complex vehicle configurations in a timely manner and at minimal expense. The image analysis system uses separate wavelength filtered images to analyze surface spectral intensity data. The system was initially developed for quantitative surface temperature mapping using two-color thermographic phosphors but was found useful in interpreting phase change paint and liquid crystal data as well.

  14. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH Signal Analysis Using Automated Generated Projection Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH tests provide promising molecular imaging biomarkers to more accurately and reliably detect and diagnose cancers and genetic disorders. Since current manual FISH signal analysis is low-efficient and inconsistent, which limits its clinical utility, developing automated FISH image scanning systems and computer-aided detection (CAD schemes has been attracting research interests. To acquire high-resolution FISH images in a multi-spectral scanning mode, a huge amount of image data with the stack of the multiple three-dimensional (3-D image slices is generated from a single specimen. Automated preprocessing these scanned images to eliminate the non-useful and redundant data is important to make the automated FISH tests acceptable in clinical applications. In this study, a dual-detector fluorescence image scanning system was applied to scan four specimen slides with FISH-probed chromosome X. A CAD scheme was developed to detect analyzable interphase cells and map the multiple imaging slices recorded FISH-probed signals into the 2-D projection images. CAD scheme was then applied to each projection image to detect analyzable interphase cells using an adaptive multiple-threshold algorithm, identify FISH-probed signals using a top-hat transform, and compute the ratios between the normal and abnormal cells. To assess CAD performance, the FISH-probed signals were also independently visually detected by an observer. The Kappa coefficients for agreement between CAD and observer ranged from 0.69 to 1.0 in detecting/counting FISH signal spots in four testing samples. The study demonstrated the feasibility of automated FISH signal analysis that applying a CAD scheme to the automated generated 2-D projection images.

  15. Automated retroillumination photography analysis for objective assessment of Fuchs Corneal Dystrophy severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghrari, Allen O.; Mumtaz, Aisha A.; Garrett, Brian; Rezaei, Mahsa; Akhavan, Mina S.; Riazuddin, S. Amer; Gottsch, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retroillumination photography analysis (RPA) is an objective tool for assessment of the number and distribution of guttae in eyes affected with Fuchs Corneal Dystrophy (FCD). Current protocols include manual processing of images; here we assess validity and interrater reliability of automated analysis across various levels of FCD severity. Methods Retroillumination photographs of 97 FCD-affected corneas were acquired and total counts of guttae previously summated manually. For each cornea, a single image was loaded into ImageJ software. We reduced color variability and subtracted background noise. Reflection of light from each gutta was identified as a local area of maximum intensity and counted automatically. Noise tolerance level was titrated for each cornea by examining a small region of each image with automated overlay to ensure appropriate coverage of individual guttae. We tested interrater reliability of automated counts of guttae across a spectrum of clinical and educational experience. Results A set of 97 retroillumination photographs were analyzed. Clinical severity as measured by a modified Krachmer scale ranged from a severity level of 1 to 5 in the set of analyzed corneas. Automated counts by an ophthalmologist correlated strongly with Krachmer grading (R2=0.79) and manual counts (R2=0.88). Intraclass correlation coefficient demonstrated strong correlation, at 0.924 (95% CI, 0.870- 0.958) among cases analyzed by three students, and 0.869 (95% CI, 0.797- 0.918) among cases for which images was analyzed by an ophthalmologist and two students. Conclusions Automated RPA allows for grading of FCD severity with high resolution across a spectrum of disease severity. PMID:27811565

  16. GenePublisher: automated analysis of DNA microarray data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Steen; Workman, Christopher; Sicheritz-Ponten, T.

    2003-01-01

    GenePublisher, a system for automatic analysis of data from DNA microarray experiments, has been implemented with a web interface at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/GenePublisher. Raw data are uploaded to the server together with aspecification of the data. The server performs normalization...

  17. Automated analysis of security requirements through risk-based argumentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Yijun; Nunes Leal Franqueira, V.; Tun, Thein Tan; Wieringa, Roelf J.; Nuseibeh, Bashar

    2015-01-01

    Computer-based systems are increasingly being exposed to evolving security threats, which often reveal new vulnerabilities. A formal analysis of the evolving threats is difficult due to a number of practical considerations such as incomplete knowledge about the design, limited information about

  18. Automated injection of slurry samples in flow-injection analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsman, M.H.F.M.; Hulsman, M.; Bos, M.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of injectors are described for introducing solid samples as slurries in flow analysis systems. A time-based and a volume-based injector based on multitube solenoid pinch valves were built, both can be characterized as hydrodynamic injectors. Reproducibility of the injections of dispersed

  19. Automated Speech and Audio Analysis for Semantic Access to Multimedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, F.M.G. de; Ordelman, R.; Huijbregts, M.

    2006-01-01

    The deployment and integration of audio processing tools can enhance the semantic annotation of multimedia content, and as a consequence, improve the effectiveness of conceptual access tools. This paper overviews the various ways in which automatic speech and audio analysis can contribute to

  20. Automated speech and audio analysis for semantic access to multimedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Franciska M.G.; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; Huijbregts, M.A.H.; Avrithis, Y.; Kompatsiaris, Y.; Staab, S.; O' Connor, N.E.

    2006-01-01

    The deployment and integration of audio processing tools can enhance the semantic annotation of multimedia content, and as a consequence, improve the effectiveness of conceptual access tools. This paper overviews the various ways in which automatic speech and audio analysis can contribute to

  1. Sistema de predicció de pictogrames per una aplicació de CAA basada en pictogrames

    OpenAIRE

    Rivas Medina, José M.

    2016-01-01

    En aquest projecte hem construït un sistema de compansió (compressió-expansió) que expandeix llenguatge telegràfic (frases únicament amb paraules de contingut sense reflexió) en frases de llenguatge natural en català i castellà, en el context d'un programari de Comunicació Augmentativa i Alternativa (CAA). El sistema ha estat dissenyat per millorar la comunicació dels usuaris de CAA, que normalment tenen deficiències motores o de parla greus i que utilitzen mètodes de comunicació basats en pi...

  2. An automated image analysis system to measure and count organisms in laboratory microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Mallard

    Full Text Available 1. Because of recent technological improvements in the way computer and digital camera perform, the potential use of imaging for contributing to the study of communities, populations or individuals in laboratory microcosms has risen enormously. However its limited use is due to difficulties in the automation of image analysis. 2. We present an accurate and flexible method of image analysis for detecting, counting and measuring moving particles on a fixed but heterogeneous substrate. This method has been specifically designed to follow individuals, or entire populations, in experimental laboratory microcosms. It can be used in other applications. 3. The method consists in comparing multiple pictures of the same experimental microcosm in order to generate an image of the fixed background. This background is then used to extract, measure and count the moving organisms, leaving out the fixed background and the motionless or dead individuals. 4. We provide different examples (springtails, ants, nematodes, daphnia to show that this non intrusive method is efficient at detecting organisms under a wide variety of conditions even on faintly contrasted and heterogeneous substrates. 5. The repeatability and reliability of this method has been assessed using experimental populations of the Collembola Folsomia candida. 6. We present an ImageJ plugin to automate the analysis of digital pictures of laboratory microcosms. The plugin automates the successive steps of the analysis and recursively analyses multiple sets of images, rapidly producing measurements from a large number of replicated microcosms.

  3. Molecular Detection of Bladder Cancer by Fluorescence Microsatellite Analysis and an Automated Genetic Analyzing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarel Halachmi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the ability of an automated fluorescent analyzing system to detect microsatellite alterations, in patients with bladder cancer. We investigated 11 with pathology proven bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC for microsatellite alterations in blood, urine, and tumor biopsies. DNA was prepared by standard methods from blood, urine and resected tumor specimens, and was used for microsatellite analysis. After the primers were fluorescent labeled, amplification of the DNA was performed with PCR. The PCR products were placed into the automated genetic analyser (ABI Prism 310, Perkin Elmer, USA and were subjected to fluorescent scanning with argon ion laser beams. The fluorescent signal intensity measured by the genetic analyzer measured the product size in terms of base pairs. We found loss of heterozygocity (LOH or microsatellite alterations (a loss or gain of nucleotides, which alter the original normal locus size in all the patients by using fluorescent microsatellite analysis and an automated analyzing system. In each case the genetic changes found in urine samples were identical to those found in the resected tumor sample. The studies demonstrated the ability to detect bladder tumor non-invasively by fluorescent microsatellite analysis of urine samples. Our study supports the worldwide trend for the search of non-invasive methods to detect bladder cancer. We have overcome major obstacles that prevented the clinical use of an experimental system. With our new tested system microsatellite analysis can be done cheaper, faster, easier and with higher scientific accuracy.

  4. Automated vessel segmentation using cross-correlation and pooled covariance matrix analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiang; Karimi, Afshin; Wu, Yijing; Korosec, Frank R; Grist, Thomas M; Mistretta, Charles A

    2011-04-01

    Time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) provides contrast dynamics in the vasculature and allows vessel segmentation based on temporal correlation analysis. Here we present an automated vessel segmentation algorithm including automated generation of regions of interest (ROIs), cross-correlation and pooled sample covariance matrix analysis. The dynamic images are divided into multiple equal-sized regions. In each region, ROIs for artery, vein and background are generated using an iterative thresholding algorithm based on the contrast arrival time map and contrast enhancement map. Region-specific multi-feature cross-correlation analysis and pooled covariance matrix analysis are performed to calculate the Mahalanobis distances (MDs), which are used to automatically separate arteries from veins. This segmentation algorithm is applied to a dual-phase dynamic imaging acquisition scheme where low-resolution time-resolved images are acquired during the dynamic phase followed by high-frequency data acquisition at the steady-state phase. The segmented low-resolution arterial and venous images are then combined with the high-frequency data in k-space and inverse Fourier transformed to form the final segmented arterial and venous images. Results from volunteer and patient studies demonstrate the advantages of this automated vessel segmentation and dual phase data acquisition technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Automated analysis of craniofacial morphology using magnetic resonance images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mallar Chakravarty

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis of craniofacial morphology is of interest to scholars working in a wide variety of disciplines, such as anthropology, developmental biology, and medicine. T1-weighted (anatomical magnetic resonance images (MRI provide excellent contrast between soft tissues. Given its three-dimensional nature, MRI represents an ideal imaging modality for the analysis of craniofacial structure in living individuals. Here we describe how T1-weighted MR images, acquired to examine brain anatomy, can also be used to analyze facial features. Using a sample of typically developing adolescents from the Saguenay Youth Study (N = 597; 292 male, 305 female, ages: 12 to 18 years, we quantified inter-individual variations in craniofacial structure in two ways. First, we adapted existing nonlinear registration-based morphological techniques to generate iteratively a group-wise population average of craniofacial features. The nonlinear transformations were used to map the craniofacial structure of each individual to the population average. Using voxel-wise measures of expansion and contraction, we then examined the effects of sex and age on inter-individual variations in facial features. Second, we employed a landmark-based approach to quantify variations in face surfaces. This approach involves: (a placing 56 landmarks (forehead, nose, lips, jaw-line, cheekbones, and eyes on a surface representation of the MRI-based group average; (b warping the landmarks to the individual faces using the inverse nonlinear transformation estimated for each person; and (3 using a principal components analysis (PCA of the warped landmarks to identify facial features (i.e. clusters of landmarks that vary in our sample in a correlated fashion. As with the voxel-wise analysis of the deformation fields, we examined the effects of sex and age on the PCA-derived spatial relationships between facial features. Both methods demonstrated significant sexual dimorphism in

  6. Automated NMR relaxation dispersion data analysis using NESSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gooley Paul R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins are dynamic molecules with motions ranging from picoseconds to longer than seconds. Many protein functions, however, appear to occur on the micro to millisecond timescale and therefore there has been intense research of the importance of these motions in catalysis and molecular interactions. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR relaxation dispersion experiments are used to measure motion of discrete nuclei within the micro to millisecond timescale. Information about conformational/chemical exchange, populations of exchanging states and chemical shift differences are extracted from these experiments. To ensure these parameters are correctly extracted, accurate and careful analysis of these experiments is necessary. Results The software introduced in this article is designed for the automatic analysis of relaxation dispersion data and the extraction of the parameters mentioned above. It is written in Python for multi platform use and highest performance. Experimental data can be fitted to different models using the Levenberg-Marquardt minimization algorithm and different statistical tests can be used to select the best model. To demonstrate the functionality of this program, synthetic data as well as NMR data were analyzed. Analysis of these data including the generation of plots and color coded structures can be performed with minimal user intervention and using standard procedures that are included in the program. Conclusions NESSY is easy to use open source software to analyze NMR relaxation data. The robustness and standard procedures are demonstrated in this article.

  7. SHEAN (Simplified Human Error Analysis code) and automated THERP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most widely used human error analysis tools is THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction). Unfortunately, this tool has disadvantages. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, realizing these drawbacks, commissioned Dr. Swain, the author of THERP, to create a simpler, more consistent tool for deriving human error rates. That effort produced the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program Human Reliability Analysis Procedure (ASEP), which is more conservative than THERP, but a valuable screening tool. ASEP involves answering simple questions about the scenario in question, and then looking up the appropriate human error rate in the indicated table (THERP also uses look-up tables, but four times as many). The advantages of ASEP are that human factors expertise is not required, and the training to use the method is minimal. Although not originally envisioned by Dr. Swain, the ASEP approach actually begs to be computerized. That WINCO did, calling the code SHEAN, for Simplified Human Error ANalysis. The code was done in TURBO Basic for IBM or IBM-compatible MS-DOS, for fast execution. WINCO is now in the process of comparing this code against THERP for various scenarios. This report provides a discussion of SHEAN

  8. Satellite Imagery Analysis for Automated Global Food Security Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, D.; Brumby, S. P.; Chartrand, R.; Keisler, R.; Mathis, M.; Beneke, C. M.; Nicholaeff, D.; Skillman, S.; Warren, M. S.; Poehnelt, J.

    2017-12-01

    The recent computing performance revolution has driven improvements in sensor, communication, and storage technology. Multi-decadal remote sensing datasets at the petabyte scale are now available in commercial clouds, with new satellite constellations generating petabytes/year of daily high-resolution global coverage imagery. Cloud computing and storage, combined with recent advances in machine learning, are enabling understanding of the world at a scale and at a level of detail never before feasible. We present results from an ongoing effort to develop satellite imagery analysis tools that aggregate temporal, spatial, and spectral information and that can scale with the high-rate and dimensionality of imagery being collected. We focus on the problem of monitoring food crop productivity across the Middle East and North Africa, and show how an analysis-ready, multi-sensor data platform enables quick prototyping of satellite imagery analysis algorithms, from land use/land cover classification and natural resource mapping, to yearly and monthly vegetative health change trends at the structural field level.

  9. An automated sensitivity analysis procedure for the performance assessment of nuclear waste isolation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Worley, B.A.; Oblow, E.M.; Wright, R.Q.; Harper, W.V.

    1986-01-01

    To support an effort in making large-scale sensitivity analyses feasible, cost efficient and quantitatively complete, the authors have developed an automated procedure making use of computer calculus. The procedure, called GRESS (GRadient Enhanced Software System), is embodied in a precompiler that can process Fortran computer codes and add derivative-taking capabilities to the normal calculation scheme. In this paper, the automated GRESS procedure is described and applied to the code UCB-NE-10.2, which simulates the migration through a sorption medium of the radionuclide members of a decay chain. The sensitivity calculations for a sample problem are verified using comparison with analytical and perturbation analysis results. Conclusions are drawn relative to the applicability of GRESS for more general large-scale sensitivity studies, and the role of such techniques in an overall sensitivity and uncertainty analysis program is discussed

  10. Automated three-dimensional X-ray analysis using a dual-beam FIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, Miroslava; Wagner, Julian; Schaffer, Bernhard; Schmied, Mario; Mulders, Hans

    2007-01-01

    We present a fully automated method for three-dimensional (3D) elemental analysis demonstrated using a ceramic sample of chemistry (Ca)MgTiO x . The specimen is serially sectioned by a focused ion beam (FIB) microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDXS) is used for elemental analysis of each cross-section created. A 3D elemental model is reconstructed from the stack of two-dimensional (2D) data. This work concentrates on issues arising from process automation, the large sample volume of approximately 17x17x10 μm 3 , and the insulating nature of the specimen. A new routine for post-acquisition data correction of different drift effects is demonstrated. Furthermore, it is shown that EDXS data may be erroneous for specimens containing voids, and that back-scattered electron images have to be used to correct for these errors

  11. Automated analysis of plethysmograms for functional studies of hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatrudina, R. Sh.; Isupov, I. B.; Gribkov, V. Yu.

    2018-04-01

    The most promising method for the quantitative determination of cardiovascular tone indicators and of cerebral hemodynamics indicators is the method of impedance plethysmography. The accurate determination of these indicators requires the correct identification of the characteristic points in the thoracic impedance plethysmogram and the cranial impedance plethysmogram respectively. An algorithm for automatic analysis of these plethysmogram is presented. The algorithm is based on the hard temporal relationships between the phases of the cardiac cycle and the characteristic points of the plethysmogram. The proposed algorithm does not require estimation of initial data and selection of processing parameters. Use of the method on healthy subjects showed a very low detection error of characteristic points.

  12. A Neural Network Based Workstation for Automated Cell Proliferation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    work was supported by the Programa de Apoyo a Proyectos de Desarrollo e Investigacíon en Informática REDII 2000. We thank Blanca Itzel Taboada for...Meléndez1, G. Corkidi.2 1Centro de Instrumentos, UNAM. P.O. Box 70-186, México 04510, D.F. 2Instituto de Biotecnología, UNAM. P.O. Box 510-3, 62250...proliferation analysis, of cytological microscope images. The software of the system assists the expert biotechnologist during cell proliferation and

  13. The impact of air pollution on the level of micronuclei measured by automated image analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rössnerová, Andrea; Špátová, Milada; Rossner, P.; Solanský, I.; Šrám, Radim

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 669, 1-2 (2009), s. 42-47 ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS500390506; GA MŠk 2B06088; GA MŠk 2B08005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : micronuclei * binucleated cells * automated image analysis Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 3.556, year: 2009

  14. CloVR-Comparative: automated, cloud-enabled comparative microbial genome sequence analysis pipeline

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Sonia; Arze, Cesar; Adkins, Ricky S.; Crabtree, Jonathan; Riley, David; Vangala, Mahesh; Galens, Kevin; Fraser, Claire M.; Tettelin, Herv?; White, Owen; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Mahurkar, Anup; Fricke, W. Florian

    2017-01-01

    Background The benefit of increasing genomic sequence data to the scientific community depends on easy-to-use, scalable bioinformatics support. CloVR-Comparative combines commonly used bioinformatics tools into an intuitive, automated, and cloud-enabled analysis pipeline for comparative microbial genomics. Results CloVR-Comparative runs on annotated complete or draft genome sequences that are uploaded by the user or selected via a taxonomic tree-based user interface and downloaded from NCBI. ...

  15. PLAYER POSITION DETECTION AND MOVEMENT PATTERN RECOGNITION FOR AUTOMATED TACTICAL ANALYSIS IN BADMINTON

    OpenAIRE

    KOKUM GAYANATH WEERATUNGA

    2018-01-01

    This thesis documents the development of a comprehensive approach to automate badminton tactical analysis. First, a computer algorithm was developed to automatically track badminton players moving on a court. Next, a machine learning algorithm was developed to analyse these movements and understand their underlying tactical implications. Both algorithms were tested and validated using video footage recorded at International badminton tournaments. The results demonstrate that the combination o...

  16. Automated analysis of Physarum network structure and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, Mark D.; Akita, Dai; Heaton, Luke LM; Jones, Nick; Obara, Boguslaw; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-06-01

    We evaluate different ridge-enhancement and segmentation methods to automatically extract the network architecture from time-series of Physarum plasmodia withdrawing from an arena via a single exit. Whilst all methods gave reasonable results, judged by precision-recall analysis against a ground-truth skeleton, the mean phase angle (Feature Type) from intensity-independent, phase-congruency edge enhancement and watershed segmentation was the most robust to variation in threshold parameters. The resultant single pixel-wide segmented skeleton was converted to a graph representation as a set of weighted adjacency matrices containing the physical dimensions of each vein, and the inter-vein regions. We encapsulate the complete image processing and network analysis pipeline in a downloadable software package, and provide an extensive set of metrics that characterise the network structure, including hierarchical loop decomposition to analyse the nested structure of the developing network. In addition, the change in volume for each vein and intervening plasmodial sheet was used to predict the net flow across the network. The scaling relationships between predicted current, speed and shear force with vein radius were consistent with predictions from Murray’s law. This work was presented at PhysNet 2015.

  17. Automated economic analysis model for hazardous waste minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dharmavaram, S.; Mount, J.B.; Donahue, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The US Army has established a policy of achieving a 50 percent reduction in hazardous waste generation by the end of 1992. To assist the Army in reaching this goal, the Environmental Division of the US Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (USACERL) designed the Economic Analysis Model for Hazardous Waste Minimization (EAHWM). The EAHWM was designed to allow the user to evaluate the life cycle costs for various techniques used in hazardous waste minimization and to compare them to the life cycle costs of current operating practices. The program was developed in C language on an IBM compatible PC and is consistent with other pertinent models for performing economic analyses. The potential hierarchical minimization categories used in EAHWM include source reduction, recovery and/or reuse, and treatment. Although treatment is no longer an acceptable minimization option, its use is widespread and has therefore been addressed in the model. The model allows for economic analysis for minimization of the Army's six most important hazardous waste streams. These include, solvents, paint stripping wastes, metal plating wastes, industrial waste-sludges, used oils, and batteries and battery electrolytes. The EAHWM also includes a general application which can be used to calculate and compare the life cycle costs for minimization alternatives of any waste stream, hazardous or non-hazardous. The EAHWM has been fully tested and implemented in more than 60 Army installations in the United States

  18. Automated analysis of Physarum network structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricker, Mark D; Heaton, Luke LM; Akita, Dai; Jones, Nick; Obara, Boguslaw; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate different ridge-enhancement and segmentation methods to automatically extract the network architecture from time-series of Physarum plasmodia withdrawing from an arena via a single exit. Whilst all methods gave reasonable results, judged by precision-recall analysis against a ground-truth skeleton, the mean phase angle (Feature Type) from intensity-independent, phase-congruency edge enhancement and watershed segmentation was the most robust to variation in threshold parameters. The resultant single pixel-wide segmented skeleton was converted to a graph representation as a set of weighted adjacency matrices containing the physical dimensions of each vein, and the inter-vein regions. We encapsulate the complete image processing and network analysis pipeline in a downloadable software package, and provide an extensive set of metrics that characterise the network structure, including hierarchical loop decomposition to analyse the nested structure of the developing network. In addition, the change in volume for each vein and intervening plasmodial sheet was used to predict the net flow across the network. The scaling relationships between predicted current, speed and shear force with vein radius were consistent with predictions from Murray’s law. This work was presented at PhysNet 2015. (paper)

  19. A flexible matrix-based human exposure assessment framework suitable for LCA and CAA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jolliet, Olivier; Ernstoff, Alexi; Huang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    are not applicable to all types of near-field chemical releases from consumer products, e.g. direct dermal application. A consistent near-and far-field framework is needed for life cycle assessment (LCA) and chemical alternative assessment (CAA) to inform mitigation of human exposure to harmful chemicals. To close......Humans can be exposed to chemicals via near-field exposure pathways (e.g. through consumer product use) and far-field exposure pathways (e.g. through environmental emissions along product life cycles). Pathways are often complex where chemicals can transfer directly from products to humans during...... use or exchange between near-and far-field compartments until sub -fractions reach humans via inhalation, ingestion or dermal uptake. Currently, however, multimedia exposure models mainly focus on far-field exposure pathways. Metrics and modeling approaches used in far-field, emission-based models...

  20. Sensitivity analysis of predictive models with an automated adjoint generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Oblow, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    The adjoint method is a well established sensitivity analysis methodology that is particularly efficient in large-scale modeling problems. The coefficients of sensitivity of a given response with respect to every parameter involved in the modeling code can be calculated from the solution of a single adjoint run of the code. Sensitivity coefficients provide a quantitative measure of the importance of the model data in calculating the final results. The major drawback of the adjoint method is the requirement for calculations of very large numbers of partial derivatives to set up the adjoint equations of the model. ADGEN is a software system that has been designed to eliminate this drawback and automatically implement the adjoint formulation in computer codes. The ADGEN system will be described and its use for improving performance assessments and predictive simulations will be discussed. 8 refs., 1 fig

  1. Learning Methods for Dynamic Topic Modeling in Automated Behavior Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isupova, Olga; Kuzin, Danil; Mihaylova, Lyudmila

    2017-09-27

    Semisupervised and unsupervised systems provide operators with invaluable support and can tremendously reduce the operators' load. In the light of the necessity to process large volumes of video data and provide autonomous decisions, this paper proposes new learning algorithms for activity analysis in video. The activities and behaviors are described by a dynamic topic model. Two novel learning algorithms based on the expectation maximization approach and variational Bayes inference are proposed. Theoretical derivations of the posterior estimates of model parameters are given. The designed learning algorithms are compared with the Gibbs sampling inference scheme introduced earlier in the literature. A detailed comparison of the learning algorithms is presented on real video data. We also propose an anomaly localization procedure, elegantly embedded in the topic modeling framework. It is shown that the developed learning algorithms can achieve 95% success rate. The proposed framework can be applied to a number of areas, including transportation systems, security, and surveillance.

  2. Toward the automated analysis of plasma physics problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.

    1989-04-01

    A program (CALC) is described, which carries out nontrivial plasma physics calculations, in a manner intended to emulate the approach of a human theorist. This includes the initial process of gathering the relevant equations from a plasma knowledge base, and then determining how to solve them. Solution of the sets of equations governing physics problems, which in general have a nonuniform,irregular structure, not amenable to solution by standardized algorithmic procedures, is facilitated by an analysis of the structure of the equations and the relations among them. This often permits decompositions of the full problem into subproblems, and other simplifications in form, which renders the resultant subsystems soluble by more standardized tools. CALC's operation is illustrated by a detailed description of its treatment of a sample plasma calculation. 5 refs., 3 figs

  3. Automated analysis of autoradiographic grains density with scanning microspectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Pingrong

    1988-01-01

    The mouse ascites tumour cells were used as the specimen, and 3 H-thymidine was used as the tracer. The smears were treated without staining or with Eosin or Giemsa-Wright staining. The automatic analysis of autoradiographic silver grains was performed with UNIVAR-MSPM. The relationship between integrated optical density (IOD) and silver grain density (SGD) in cell nuclei was studied. The results showed that the IOD could reflect the SGD basically, the correlation coefficients being 0.922, 0.9118 and 0.6218. Since the G-W stained cell nuclei appeared blue, their IOD was influenced strongly, whereas the Eosin stained cell nuclei appeared light red, their IOD was influenced only slightly. The latter was recommended. This method could be used for studying the DNA synthesis and cell proliferating kinetics

  4. Automated analysis technique developed for detection of ODSCC on the tubes of OPR1000 steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Chul; Nam, Min Woo

    2013-01-01

    A steam generator (SG) tube is an important component of a nuclear power plant (NPP). It works as a pressure boundary between the primary and secondary systems. The integrity of a SG tube can be assessed by an eddy current test every outage. The eddy current technique(adopting a bobbin probe) is currently the main technique used to assess the integrity of the tubing of a steam generator. An eddy current signal analyst for steam generator tubes continuously analyzes data over a given period of time. However, there are possibilities that the analyst conducting the test may get tired and cause mistakes, such as: missing indications or not being able to separate a true defect signal from one that is more complicated. This error could lead to confusion and an improper interpretation of the signal analysis. In order to avoid these possibilities, many countries of opted for automated analyses. Axial ODSCC (outside diameter stress corrosion cracking) defects on the tubes of OPR1000 steam generators have been found on the tube that are in contract with tube support plates. In this study, automated analysis software called CDS (computer data screening) made by Zetec was used. This paper will discuss the results of introducing an automated analysis system for an axial ODSCC on the tubes of an OPR1000 steam generator.

  5. Automated analysis of free speech predicts psychosis onset in high-risk youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Gillinder; Carrillo, Facundo; Cecchi, Guillermo A; Slezak, Diego Fernández; Sigman, Mariano; Mota, Natália B; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Javitt, Daniel C; Copelli, Mauro; Corcoran, Cheryl M

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Psychiatry lacks the objective clinical tests routinely used in other specializations. Novel computerized methods to characterize complex behaviors such as speech could be used to identify and predict psychiatric illness in individuals. AIMS: In this proof-of-principle study, our aim was to test automated speech analyses combined with Machine Learning to predict later psychosis onset in youths at clinical high-risk (CHR) for psychosis. Methods: Thirty-four CHR youths (11 females) had baseline interviews and were assessed quarterly for up to 2.5 years; five transitioned to psychosis. Using automated analysis, transcripts of interviews were evaluated for semantic and syntactic features predicting later psychosis onset. Speech features were fed into a convex hull classification algorithm with leave-one-subject-out cross-validation to assess their predictive value for psychosis outcome. The canonical correlation between the speech features and prodromal symptom ratings was computed. Results: Derived speech features included a Latent Semantic Analysis measure of semantic coherence and two syntactic markers of speech complexity: maximum phrase length and use of determiners (e.g., which). These speech features predicted later psychosis development with 100% accuracy, outperforming classification from clinical interviews. Speech features were significantly correlated with prodromal symptoms. Conclusions: Findings support the utility of automated speech analysis to measure subtle, clinically relevant mental state changes in emergent psychosis. Recent developments in computer science, including natural language processing, could provide the foundation for future development of objective clinical tests for psychiatry. PMID:27336038

  6. Application of Automated Facial Expression Analysis and Qualitative Analysis to Assess Consumer Perception and Acceptability of Beverages and Water

    OpenAIRE

    Crist, Courtney Alissa

    2016-01-01

    Sensory and consumer sciences aim to understand the influences of product acceptability and purchase decisions. The food industry measures product acceptability through hedonic testing but often does not assess implicit or qualitative response. Incorporation of qualitative research and automated facial expression analysis (AFEA) may supplement hedonic acceptability testing to provide product insights. The purpose of this research was to assess the application of AFEA and qualitative analysis ...

  7. Trends and applications of integrated automated ultra-trace sample handling and analysis (T9)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingston, H.M.S.; Ye Han; Stewart, L.; Link, D.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Automated analysis, sub-ppt detection limits, and the trend toward speciated analysis (rather than just elemental analysis) force the innovation of sophisticated and integrated sample preparation and analysis techniques. Traditionally, the ability to handle samples at ppt and sub-ppt levels has been limited to clean laboratories and special sample handling techniques and equipment. The world of sample handling has passed a threshold where older or 'old fashioned' traditional techniques no longer provide the ability to see the sample due to the influence of the analytical blank and the fragile nature of the analyte. When samples require decomposition, extraction, separation and manipulation, application of newer more sophisticated sample handling systems are emerging that enable ultra-trace analysis and species manipulation. In addition, new instrumentation has emerged which integrate sample preparation and analysis to enable on-line near real-time analysis. Examples of those newer sample-handling methods will be discussed and current examples provided as alternatives to traditional sample handling. Two new techniques applying ultra-trace microwave energy enhanced sample handling have been developed that permit sample separation and refinement while performing species manipulation during decomposition. A demonstration, that applies to semiconductor materials, will be presented. Next, a new approach to the old problem of sample evaporation without losses will be demonstrated that is capable of retaining all elements and species tested. Both of those methods require microwave energy manipulation in specialized systems and are not accessible through convection, conduction, or other traditional energy applications. A new automated integrated method for handling samples for ultra-trace analysis has been developed. An on-line near real-time measurement system will be described that enables many new automated sample handling and measurement capabilities. This

  8. Search Analytics: Automated Learning, Analysis, and Search with Open Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundman, K.; Mattmann, C. A.; Hyon, J.; Ramirez, P.

    2016-12-01

    The sheer volume of unstructured scientific data makes comprehensive human analysis impossible, resulting in missed opportunities to identify relationships, trends, gaps, and outliers. As the open source community continues to grow, tools like Apache Tika, Apache Solr, Stanford's DeepDive, and Data-Driven Documents (D3) can help address this challenge. With a focus on journal publications and conference abstracts often in the form of PDF and Microsoft Office documents, we've initiated an exploratory NASA Advanced Concepts project aiming to use the aforementioned open source text analytics tools to build a data-driven justification for the HyspIRI Decadal Survey mission. We call this capability Search Analytics, and it fuses and augments these open source tools to enable the automatic discovery and extraction of salient information. In the case of HyspIRI, a hyperspectral infrared imager mission, key findings resulted from the extractions and visualizations of relationships from thousands of unstructured scientific documents. The relationships include links between satellites (e.g. Landsat 8), domain-specific measurements (e.g. spectral coverage) and subjects (e.g. invasive species). Using the above open source tools, Search Analytics mined and characterized a corpus of information that would be infeasible for a human to process. More broadly, Search Analytics offers insights into various scientific and commercial applications enabled through missions and instrumentation with specific technical capabilities. For example, the following phrases were extracted in close proximity within a publication: "In this study, hyperspectral images…with high spatial resolution (1 m) were analyzed to detect cutleaf teasel in two areas. …Classification of cutleaf teasel reached a users accuracy of 82 to 84%." Without reading a single paper we can use Search Analytics to automatically identify that a 1 m spatial resolution provides a cutleaf teasel detection users accuracy of 82

  9. ADGEN: a system for automated sensitivity analysis of predictive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Horwedel, J.E.; Oblow, E.M.; Lucius, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A system that can automatically enhance computer codes with a sensitivity calculation capability is presented. With this new system, named ADGEN, rapid and cost-effective calculation of sensitivities can be performed in any FORTRAN code for all input data or parameters. The resulting sensitivities can be used in performance assessment studies related to licensing or interactions with the public to systematically and quantitatively prove the relative importance of each of the system parameters in calculating the final performance results. A general procedure calling for the systematic use of sensitivities in assessment studies is presented. The procedure can be used in modeling and model validation studies to avoid over modeling, in site characterization planning to avoid over collection of data, and in performance assessments to determine the uncertainties on the final calculated results. The added capability to formally perform the inverse problem, i.e., to determine the input data or parameters on which to focus to determine the input data or parameters on which to focus additional research or analysis effort in order to improve the uncertainty of the final results, is also discussed. 7 references, 2 figures

  10. ADGEN: a system for automated sensitivity analysis of predictive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Horwedel, J.E.; Oblow, E.M.; Lucius, J.L.

    1986-09-01

    A system that can automatically enhance computer codes with a sensitivity calculation capability is presented. With this new system, named ADGEN, rapid and cost-effective calculation of sensitivities can be performed in any FORTRAN code for all input data or parameters. The resulting sensitivities can be used in performance assessment studies related to licensing or interactions with the public to systematically and quantitatively prove the relative importance of each of the system parameters in calculating the final performance results. A general procedure calling for the systematic use of sensitivities in assessment studies is presented. The procedure can be used in modelling and model validation studies to avoid ''over modelling,'' in site characterization planning to avoid ''over collection of data,'' and in performance assessment to determine the uncertainties on the final calculated results. The added capability to formally perform the inverse problem, i.e., to determine the input data or parameters on which to focus additional research or analysis effort in order to improve the uncertainty of the final results, is also discussed

  11. Automated region selection for analysis of dynamic cardiac SPECT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, E. V. R.; Gullberg, G. T.; Barclay, A. B.; Eisner, R. L.

    1997-06-01

    Dynamic cardiac SPECT using Tc-99m labeled teboroxime can provide kinetic parameters (washin, washout) indicative of myocardial blood flow. A time-consuming and subjective step of the data analysis is drawing regions of interest to delineate blood pool and myocardial tissue regions. The time-activity curves of the regions are then used to estimate local kinetic parameters. In this work, the appropriate regions are found automatically, in a manner similar to that used for calculating maximum count circumferential profiles in conventional static cardiac studies. The drawbacks to applying standard static circumferential profile methods are the high noise level and high liver uptake common in dynamic teboroxime studies. Searching along each ray for maxima to locate the myocardium does not typically provide useful information. Here we propose an iterative scheme in which constraints are imposed on the radii searched along each ray. The constraints are based on the shape of the time-activity curves of the circumferential profile members and on an assumption that the short axis slices are approximately circular. The constraints eliminate outliers and help to reduce the effects of noise and liver activity. Kinetic parameter estimates from the automatically generated regions were comparable to estimates from manually selected regions in dynamic canine teboroxime studies.

  12. Unsupervised EEG analysis for automated epileptic seizure detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjandtalab, Javad; Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2016-07-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder which can, if not controlled, potentially cause unexpected death. It is extremely crucial to have accurate automatic pattern recognition and data mining techniques to detect the onset of seizures and inform care-givers to help the patients. EEG signals are the preferred biosignals for diagnosis of epileptic patients. Most of the existing pattern recognition techniques used in EEG analysis leverage the notion of supervised machine learning algorithms. Since seizure data are heavily under-represented, such techniques are not always practical particularly when the labeled data is not sufficiently available or when disease progression is rapid and the corresponding EEG footprint pattern will not be robust. Furthermore, EEG pattern change is highly individual dependent and requires experienced specialists to annotate the seizure and non-seizure events. In this work, we present an unsupervised technique to discriminate seizures and non-seizures events. We employ power spectral density of EEG signals in different frequency bands that are informative features to accurately cluster seizure and non-seizure events. The experimental results tried so far indicate achieving more than 90% accuracy in clustering seizure and non-seizure events without having any prior knowledge on patient's history.

  13. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genebes, Caroline; Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre; Jonca, Frédéric; Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes

  14. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genebes, Caroline, E-mail: genebes.caroline@claudiusregaud.fr [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Jonca, Frédéric [Department of Urology, Clinique Ambroise Paré, Toulouse (France); Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard [Department of Urology and Andrology, CHU Rangueil, Toulouse (France); Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc [Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes.

  15. Video and accelerometer-based motion analysis for automated surgical skills assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Aneeq; Sharma, Yachna; Bettadapura, Vinay; Sarin, Eric L; Essa, Irfan

    2018-03-01

    Basic surgical skills of suturing and knot tying are an essential part of medical training. Having an automated system for surgical skills assessment could help save experts time and improve training efficiency. There have been some recent attempts at automated surgical skills assessment using either video analysis or acceleration data. In this paper, we present a novel approach for automated assessment of OSATS-like surgical skills and provide an analysis of different features on multi-modal data (video and accelerometer data). We conduct a large study for basic surgical skill assessment on a dataset that contained video and accelerometer data for suturing and knot-tying tasks. We introduce "entropy-based" features-approximate entropy and cross-approximate entropy, which quantify the amount of predictability and regularity of fluctuations in time series data. The proposed features are compared to existing methods of Sequential Motion Texture, Discrete Cosine Transform and Discrete Fourier Transform, for surgical skills assessment. We report average performance of different features across all applicable OSATS-like criteria for suturing and knot-tying tasks. Our analysis shows that the proposed entropy-based features outperform previous state-of-the-art methods using video data, achieving average classification accuracies of 95.1 and 92.2% for suturing and knot tying, respectively. For accelerometer data, our method performs better for suturing achieving 86.8% average accuracy. We also show that fusion of video and acceleration features can improve overall performance for skill assessment. Automated surgical skills assessment can be achieved with high accuracy using the proposed entropy features. Such a system can significantly improve the efficiency of surgical training in medical schools and teaching hospitals.

  16. Knowledge Support and Automation for Performance Analysis with PerfExplorer 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A. Huck

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of scalable performance analysis in parallel development tools is difficult. The potential size of data sets and the need to compare results from multiple experiments presents a challenge to manage and process the information. Simply to characterize the performance of parallel applications running on potentially hundreds of thousands of processor cores requires new scalable analysis techniques. Furthermore, many exploratory analysis processes are repeatable and could be automated, but are now implemented as manual procedures. In this paper, we will discuss the current version of PerfExplorer, a performance analysis framework which provides dimension reduction, clustering and correlation analysis of individual trails of large dimensions, and can perform relative performance analysis between multiple application executions. PerfExplorer analysis processes can be captured in the form of Python scripts, automating what would otherwise be time-consuming tasks. We will give examples of large-scale analysis results, and discuss the future development of the framework, including the encoding and processing of expert performance rules, and the increasing use of performance metadata.

  17. Recording and automated analysis of naturalistic bioptic driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Peli, Eli

    2011-05-01

    People with moderate central vision loss are legally permitted to drive with a bioptic telescope in 39 US states and the Netherlands, but the safety of bioptic driving remains highly controversial. There is no scientific evidence about bioptic use and its impact on safety. We propose searching for evidence by recording naturalistic driving activities in patients' cars. In a pilot study we used an analogue video system to record two bioptic drivers' daily driving activities for 10 and 5 days, respectively. In this technical report, we also describe our novel digital system that collects vehicle manoeuvre information and enables recording over more extended periods, and discuss our approach to analyzing the vast amount of data. Our observations of telescope use by the pilot subjects were quite different from their reports in a previous survey. One subject used the telescope only seven times in nearly 6 h of driving. For the other subject, the average interval between telescope use was about 2 min, and Mobile (cell) phone use in one trip extended the interval to almost 5 min. We demonstrate that computerized analysis of lengthy recordings based on video, GPS, acceleration, and black box data can be used to select informative segments for efficient off-line review of naturalistic driving behaviours. The inconsistency between self reports and objective data as well as infrequent telescope use underscores the importance of recording bioptic driving behaviours in naturalistic conditions over extended periods. We argue that the new recording system is important for understanding bioptic use behaviours and bioptic driving safety. © 2011 The College of Optometrists.

  18. Semi-automated volumetric analysis of artificial lymph nodes in a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabel, M.; Biederer, J.; Jochens, A.; Bornemann, L.; Soza, G.; Heller, M.; Bolte, H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of tumour burden in oncology requires accurate and reproducible image evaluation. The current standard is one-dimensional measurement (e.g. RECIST) with inherent disadvantages. Volumetric analysis is discussed as an alternative for therapy monitoring of lung and liver metastases. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of semi-automated volumetric analysis of artificial lymph node metastases in a phantom study. Materials and methods: Fifty artificial lymph nodes were produced in a size range from 10 to 55 mm; some of them enhanced using iodine contrast media. All nodules were placed in an artificial chest phantom (artiCHEST ® ) within different surrounding tissues. MDCT was performed using different collimations (1–5 mm) at varying reconstruction kernels (B20f, B40f, B60f). Volume and RECIST measurements were performed using Oncology Software (Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) and were compared to reference volume and diameter by calculating absolute percentage errors. Results: The software performance allowed a robust volumetric analysis in a phantom setting. Unsatisfying segmentation results were frequently found for native nodules within surrounding muscle. The absolute percentage error (APE) for volumetric analysis varied between 0.01 and 225%. No significant differences were seen between different reconstruction kernels. The most unsatisfactory segmentation results occurred in higher slice thickness (4 and 5 mm). Contrast enhanced lymph nodes showed better segmentation results by trend. Conclusion: The semi-automated 3D-volumetric analysis software tool allows a reliable and convenient segmentation of artificial lymph nodes in a phantom setting. Lymph nodes adjacent to tissue of similar density cause segmentation problems. For volumetric analysis of lymph node metastases in clinical routine a slice thickness of ≤3 mm and a medium soft reconstruction kernel (e.g. B40f for Siemens scan systems) may be a suitable

  19. Design and Demonstration of Automated Data Analysis Algorithms for Ultrasonic Inspection of Complex Composite Panels with Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    all of the ADA called indications into three groups: true positives (TP), missed calls (MC) and false calls (FC). Note, an indication position error...data review burden and improve the reliability of the ultrasonic inspection of large composite structures, automated data analysis ( ADA ) algorithms...thickness and backwall C-scan images. 15. SUBJECT TERMS automated data analysis ( ADA ) algorithms; time-of-flight indications; backwall amplitude dropout

  20. Automated Software Analysis of Fetal Movement Recorded during a Pregnant Woman's Sleep at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Kyoko; Ohki, Noboru; Kamata, Hideo; Ryo, Eiji; Horiuchi, Shigeko

    2015-01-01

    Fetal movement is an important biological index of fetal well-being. Since 2008, we have been developing an original capacitive acceleration sensor and device that a pregnant woman can easily use to record fetal movement by herself at home during sleep. In this study, we report a newly developed automated software system for analyzing recorded fetal movement. This study will introduce the system and compare its results to those of a manual analysis of the same fetal movement signals (Experiment I). We will also demonstrate an appropriate way to use the system (Experiment II). In Experiment I, fetal movement data reported previously for six pregnant women at 28-38 gestational weeks were used. We evaluated the agreement of the manual and automated analyses for the same 10-sec epochs using prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) including quantitative indicators for prevalence and bias. The mean PABAK value was 0.83, which can be considered almost perfect. In Experiment II, twelve pregnant women at 24-36 gestational weeks recorded fetal movement at night once every four weeks. Overall, mean fetal movement counts per hour during maternal sleep significantly decreased along with gestational weeks, though individual differences in fetal development were noted. This newly developed automated analysis system can provide important data throughout late pregnancy.

  1. Automated magnification calibration in transmission electron microscopy using Fourier analysis of replica images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laak, Jeroen A.W.M. van der; Dijkman, Henry B.P.M.; Pahlplatz, Martin M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The magnification factor in transmission electron microscopy is not very precise, hampering for instance quantitative analysis of specimens. Calibration of the magnification is usually performed interactively using replica specimens, containing line or grating patterns with known spacing. In the present study, a procedure is described for automated magnification calibration using digital images of a line replica. This procedure is based on analysis of the power spectrum of Fourier transformed replica images, and is compared to interactive measurement in the same images. Images were used with magnification ranging from 1,000x to 200,000x. The automated procedure deviated on average 0.10% from interactive measurements. Especially for catalase replicas, the coefficient of variation of automated measurement was considerably smaller (average 0.28%) compared to that of interactive measurement (average 3.5%). In conclusion, calibration of the magnification in digital images from transmission electron microscopy may be performed automatically, using the procedure presented here, with high precision and accuracy

  2. Automated Software Analysis of Fetal Movement Recorded during a Pregnant Woman's Sleep at Home.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Nishihara

    Full Text Available Fetal movement is an important biological index of fetal well-being. Since 2008, we have been developing an original capacitive acceleration sensor and device that a pregnant woman can easily use to record fetal movement by herself at home during sleep. In this study, we report a newly developed automated software system for analyzing recorded fetal movement. This study will introduce the system and compare its results to those of a manual analysis of the same fetal movement signals (Experiment I. We will also demonstrate an appropriate way to use the system (Experiment II. In Experiment I, fetal movement data reported previously for six pregnant women at 28-38 gestational weeks were used. We evaluated the agreement of the manual and automated analyses for the same 10-sec epochs using prevalence-adjusted bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK including quantitative indicators for prevalence and bias. The mean PABAK value was 0.83, which can be considered almost perfect. In Experiment II, twelve pregnant women at 24-36 gestational weeks recorded fetal movement at night once every four weeks. Overall, mean fetal movement counts per hour during maternal sleep significantly decreased along with gestational weeks, though individual differences in fetal development were noted. This newly developed automated analysis system can provide important data throughout late pregnancy.

  3. 40 CFR 51.902 - Which classification and nonattainment area planning provisions of the CAA shall apply to areas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... area planning provisions of the CAA shall apply to areas designated nonattainment for the 8-hour NAAQS? 51.902 Section 51.902 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.902 Which classification and...

  4. Data for automated, high-throughput microscopy analysis of intracellular bacterial colonies using spot detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstsen, Christina L; Login, Frédéric H; Jensen, Helene H; Nørregaard, Rikke; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Nejsum, Lene N

    2017-10-01

    Quantification of intracellular bacterial colonies is useful in strategies directed against bacterial attachment, subsequent cellular invasion and intracellular proliferation. An automated, high-throughput microscopy-method was established to quantify the number and size of intracellular bacterial colonies in infected host cells (Detection and quantification of intracellular bacterial colonies by automated, high-throughput microscopy, Ernstsen et al., 2017 [1]). The infected cells were imaged with a 10× objective and number of intracellular bacterial colonies, their size distribution and the number of cell nuclei were automatically quantified using a spot detection-tool. The spot detection-output was exported to Excel, where data analysis was performed. In this article, micrographs and spot detection data are made available to facilitate implementation of the method.

  5. Some problems concenrning the use of automated radiochemical separation systems in destructive neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, L.G.; Toeroek, G.

    1977-01-01

    The present state of a long term program is reviewed. It was started to elaborate a remote controlled automated radiochemical processing system for the neutron activation analysis of biological materials. The system is based on wet ashing of the sample followed by reactive desorption of some volatile components. The distillation residue is passed through a series of columns filled with selective ion screening materials to remove the matrix activity. The solution is thus ''stripped'' from the interfering radioions, and it is processed to single-elements through group separations using ion-exchange chromatographic techniques. Some special problems concerning this system are treated. (a) General aspects of the construction of a (semi)automated radiochemical processing system are discussed. (b) Comparison is made between various technical realizations of the same basic concept. (c) Some problems concerning the ''reconstruction'' of an already published processing system are outlined. (T.G.)

  6. SAMPO 90 - High resolution interactive gamma spectrum analysis including automation with macros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarnio, P.A.; Nikkinen, M.T.; Routti, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    SAMPO 90 is a high performance gamma spectrum analysis program for personal computers. It uses high resolution color graphics to display calibrations, spectra, fitting results as multiplet components, and analysis results. All the analysis phases can be done either under full interactive user control or by using macros for automated measurement and analysis sequences including the control of MCAs and sample changers. Semi-automated calibrations for peak shapes (Gaussian with exponential tails), detector efficiency, and energy are available with a possibility for user intervention through interactive graphics. Accurate peak area determination of even the most complex multiplets, of up to 32 components, is accomplished using linear, non-linear and mixed mode fitting, where the component energies and areas can be either frozen or allowed to float in arbitrary combinations. Nuclide identification is done using associated lines techniques which allow interference correction for fully overlapping peaks. Peaked Background Subtraction can be performed and Minimum Detectable Activities calculated. Attenuation corrections can be taken into account in detector efficiency calculation. The most common PC-based MCA spectrum formats (Canberra S100, Ortec ACE, Nucleus PCA, ND AccuSpec) are supported as well as ASCII spectrum files. A gamma-line library is included together with an editor for user configurable libraries. The analysis reports and program parameters are fully customizable. Function key macros can be used to automate the most common analysis procedures. Small batch type modules are additionally available for routine work. SAMPO 90 is a result of over twenty man years of programming and contains 25,000 lines of Fortran, 10,000 lines of C, and 12,000 lines of assembler

  7. OpenComet: An automated tool for comet assay image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Gyori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive species such as free radicals are constantly generated in vivo and DNA is the most important target of oxidative stress. Oxidative DNA damage is used as a predictive biomarker to monitor the risk of development of many diseases. The comet assay is widely used for measuring oxidative DNA damage at a single cell level. The analysis of comet assay output images, however, poses considerable challenges. Commercial software is costly and restrictive, while free software generally requires laborious manual tagging of cells. This paper presents OpenComet, an open-source software tool providing automated analysis of comet assay images. It uses a novel and robust method for finding comets based on geometric shape attributes and segmenting the comet heads through image intensity profile analysis. Due to automation, OpenComet is more accurate, less prone to human bias, and faster than manual analysis. A live analysis functionality also allows users to analyze images captured directly from a microscope. We have validated OpenComet on both alkaline and neutral comet assay images as well as sample images from existing software packages. Our results show that OpenComet achieves high accuracy with significantly reduced analysis time.

  8. Optimizing transformations for automated, high throughput analysis of flow cytometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finak, Greg; Perez, Juan-Manuel; Weng, Andrew; Gottardo, Raphael

    2010-11-04

    In a high throughput setting, effective flow cytometry data analysis depends heavily on proper data preprocessing. While usual preprocessing steps of quality assessment, outlier removal, normalization, and gating have received considerable scrutiny from the community, the influence of data transformation on the output of high throughput analysis has been largely overlooked. Flow cytometry measurements can vary over several orders of magnitude, cell populations can have variances that depend on their mean fluorescence intensities, and may exhibit heavily-skewed distributions. Consequently, the choice of data transformation can influence the output of automated gating. An appropriate data transformation aids in data visualization and gating of cell populations across the range of data. Experience shows that the choice of transformation is data specific. Our goal here is to compare the performance of different transformations applied to flow cytometry data in the context of automated gating in a high throughput, fully automated setting. We examine the most common transformations used in flow cytometry, including the generalized hyperbolic arcsine, biexponential, linlog, and generalized Box-Cox, all within the BioConductor flowCore framework that is widely used in high throughput, automated flow cytometry data analysis. All of these transformations have adjustable parameters whose effects upon the data are non-intuitive for most users. By making some modelling assumptions about the transformed data, we develop maximum likelihood criteria to optimize parameter choice for these different transformations. We compare the performance of parameter-optimized and default-parameter (in flowCore) data transformations on real and simulated data by measuring the variation in the locations of cell populations across samples, discovered via automated gating in both the scatter and fluorescence channels. We find that parameter-optimized transformations improve visualization, reduce

  9. Optimizing transformations for automated, high throughput analysis of flow cytometry data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a high throughput setting, effective flow cytometry data analysis depends heavily on proper data preprocessing. While usual preprocessing steps of quality assessment, outlier removal, normalization, and gating have received considerable scrutiny from the community, the influence of data transformation on the output of high throughput analysis has been largely overlooked. Flow cytometry measurements can vary over several orders of magnitude, cell populations can have variances that depend on their mean fluorescence intensities, and may exhibit heavily-skewed distributions. Consequently, the choice of data transformation can influence the output of automated gating. An appropriate data transformation aids in data visualization and gating of cell populations across the range of data. Experience shows that the choice of transformation is data specific. Our goal here is to compare the performance of different transformations applied to flow cytometry data in the context of automated gating in a high throughput, fully automated setting. We examine the most common transformations used in flow cytometry, including the generalized hyperbolic arcsine, biexponential, linlog, and generalized Box-Cox, all within the BioConductor flowCore framework that is widely used in high throughput, automated flow cytometry data analysis. All of these transformations have adjustable parameters whose effects upon the data are non-intuitive for most users. By making some modelling assumptions about the transformed data, we develop maximum likelihood criteria to optimize parameter choice for these different transformations. Results We compare the performance of parameter-optimized and default-parameter (in flowCore data transformations on real and simulated data by measuring the variation in the locations of cell populations across samples, discovered via automated gating in both the scatter and fluorescence channels. We find that parameter

  10. Automated image analysis of lateral lumber X-rays by a form model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahnken, A.H.; Kohnen, M.; Steinberg, S.; Wein, B.B.; Guenther, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    Development of a software for fully automated image analysis of lateral lumbar spine X-rays. Material and method: Using the concept of active shape models, we developed a software that produces a form model of the lumbar spine from lateral lumbar spine radiographs and runs an automated image segmentation. This model is able to detect lumbar vertebrae automatically after the filtering of digitized X-ray images. The model was trained with 20 lateral lumbar spine radiographs with no pathological findings before we evaluated the software with 30 further X-ray images which were sorted by image quality ranging from one (best) to three (worst). There were 10 images for each quality. Results: Image recognition strongly depended on image quality. In group one 52 and in group two 51 out of 60 vertebral bodies including the sacrum were recognized, but in group three only 18 vertebral bodies were properly identified. Conclusion: Fully automated and reliable recognition of vertebral bodies from lateral spine radiographs using the concept of active shape models is possible. The precision of this technique is limited by the superposition of different structures. Further improvements are necessary. Therefore standardized image quality and enlargement of the training data set are required. (orig.) [de

  11. Automated kidney morphology measurements from ultrasound images using texture and edge analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, Hariharan; Annangi, Pavan; Washburn, Michael; Lanning, Justin

    2016-04-01

    In a typical ultrasound scan, a sonographer measures Kidney morphology to assess renal abnormalities. Kidney morphology can also help to discriminate between chronic and acute kidney failure. The caliper placements and volume measurements are often time consuming and an automated solution will help to improve accuracy, repeatability and throughput. In this work, we developed an automated Kidney morphology measurement solution from long axis Ultrasound scans. Automated kidney segmentation is challenging due to wide variability in kidney shape, size, weak contrast of the kidney boundaries and presence of strong edges like diaphragm, fat layers. To address the challenges and be able to accurately localize and detect kidney regions, we present a two-step algorithm that makes use of edge and texture information in combination with anatomical cues. First, we use an edge analysis technique to localize kidney region by matching the edge map with predefined templates. To accurately estimate the kidney morphology, we use textural information in a machine learning algorithm framework using Haar features and Gradient boosting classifier. We have tested the algorithm on 45 unseen cases and the performance against ground truth is measured by computing Dice overlap, % error in major and minor axis of kidney. The algorithm shows successful performance on 80% cases.

  12. Large-scale automated analysis of news media: a novel computational method for obesity policy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Rita; Pomeranz, Jennifer L; Siddiqi, Arjumand; Basu, Sanjay

    2015-02-01

    Analyzing news media allows obesity policy researchers to understand popular conceptions about obesity, which is important for targeting health education and policies. A persistent dilemma is that investigators have to read and manually classify thousands of individual news articles to identify how obesity and obesity-related policy proposals may be described to the public in the media. A machine learning method called "automated content analysis" that permits researchers to train computers to "read" and classify massive volumes of documents was demonstrated. 14,302 newspaper articles that mentioned the word "obesity" during 2011-2012 were identified. Four states that vary in obesity prevalence and policy (Alabama, California, New Jersey, and North Carolina) were examined. The reliability of an automated program to categorize the media's framing of obesity as an individual-level problem (e.g., diet) and/or an environmental-level problem (e.g., obesogenic environment) was tested. The automated program performed similarly to human coders. The proportion of articles with individual-level framing (27.7-31.0%) was higher than the proportion with neutral (18.0-22.1%) or environmental-level framing (16.0-16.4%) across all states and over the entire study period (Pnews media was demonstrated. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  13. Approach to analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms by automated constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerheim, Jens; Abrahamsen, Torveig Weum; Kristensen, Annette Torgunrud; Gaudernack, Gustav; Ekstroem, Per O.

    2003-01-01

    Melting gel techniques have proven to be amenable and powerful tools in point mutation and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. With the introduction of commercially available capillary electrophoresis instruments, a partly automated platform for denaturant capillary electrophoresis with potential for routine screening of selected target sequences has been established. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the use of automated constant denaturant capillary electrophoresis (ACDCE) in single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of various target sequences. Optimal analysis conditions for different single nucleotide polymorphisms on ACDCE are evaluated with the Poland algorithm. Laboratory procedures include only PCR and electrophoresis. For direct genotyping of individual SNPs, the samples are analyzed with an internal standard and the alleles are identified by co-migration of sample and standard peaks. In conclusion, SNPs suitable for melting gel analysis based on theoretical thermodynamics were separated by ACDCE under appropriate conditions. With this instrumentation (ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer), 48 samples could be analyzed without any intervention. Several institutions have capillary instrumentation in-house, thus making this SNP analysis method accessible to large groups of researchers without any need for instrument modification

  14. Electrically evoked compound action potentials artefact rejection by independent component analysis: procedure automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhoun, Idrick; McKay, Colette; El-Deredy, Wael

    2015-01-15

    Independent-components-analysis (ICA) successfully separated electrically-evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) from the stimulation artefact and noise (ECAP-ICA, Akhoun et al., 2013). This paper shows how to automate the ECAP-ICA artefact cancellation process. Raw-ECAPs without artefact rejection were consecutively recorded for each stimulation condition from at least 8 intra-cochlear electrodes. Firstly, amplifier-saturated recordings were discarded, and the data from different stimulus conditions (different current-levels) were concatenated temporally. The key aspect of the automation procedure was the sequential deductive source categorisation after ICA was applied with a restriction to 4 sources. The stereotypical aspect of the 4 sources enables their automatic classification as two artefact components, a noise and the sought ECAP based on theoretical and empirical considerations. The automatic procedure was tested using 8 cochlear implant (CI) users and one to four stimulus electrodes. The artefact and noise sources were successively identified and discarded, leaving the ECAP as the remaining source. The automated ECAP-ICA procedure successfully extracted the correct ECAPs compared to standard clinical forward masking paradigm in 22 out of 26 cases. ECAP-ICA does not require extracting the ECAP from a combination of distinct buffers as it is the case with regular methods. It is an alternative that does not have the possible bias of traditional artefact rejections such as alternate-polarity or forward-masking paradigms. The ECAP-ICA procedure bears clinical relevance, for example as the artefact rejection sub-module of automated ECAP-threshold detection techniques, which are common features of CI clinical fitting software. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. SAMPO 90 high resolution interactive gamma-spectrum analysis including automation with macros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aarnio, P.A.; Nikkinen, M.T.; Routti, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    SAMPO 90 is high performance gamma-spectrum analysis program for personal computers. It uses color graphics to display calibrations, spectra, fitting results as multiplet components, and analysis results. All the analysis phases can be done either under full interactive user control or macros and programmable function keys can be used for completely automated measurement and analysis sequences including the control of MACs and sample changers. Accurate peak area determination of even the most complex multiplets, of up to 32 components, is accomplished using linear and mixed mode fitting. Nuclide identification is done using associated lines techniques allowing interference correction for fully overlapping peaks. Peaked Background Subtraction can be performed and Minimum Detectable Activities calculated. The analysis reports and program parameters are fully customizable. (author) 13 refs.; 1 fig

  16. A method for the automated detection phishing websites through both site characteristics and image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joshua S.; Matthews, Jeanna N.; Stacy, John L.

    2012-06-01

    Phishing website analysis is largely still a time-consuming manual process of discovering potential phishing sites, verifying if suspicious sites truly are malicious spoofs and if so, distributing their URLs to the appropriate blacklisting services. Attackers increasingly use sophisticated systems for bringing phishing sites up and down rapidly at new locations, making automated response essential. In this paper, we present a method for rapid, automated detection and analysis of phishing websites. Our method relies on near real-time gathering and analysis of URLs posted on social media sites. We fetch the pages pointed to by each URL and characterize each page with a set of easily computed values such as number of images and links. We also capture a screen-shot of the rendered page image, compute a hash of the image and use the Hamming distance between these image hashes as a form of visual comparison. We provide initial results demonstrate the feasibility of our techniques by comparing legitimate sites to known fraudulent versions from Phishtank.com, by actively introducing a series of minor changes to a phishing toolkit captured in a local honeypot and by performing some initial analysis on a set of over 2.8 million URLs posted to Twitter over a 4 days in August 2011. We discuss the issues encountered during our testing such as resolvability and legitimacy of URL's posted on Twitter, the data sets used, the characteristics of the phishing sites we discovered, and our plans for future work.

  17. Automated Classification and Analysis of Non-metallic Inclusion Data Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsalam, Mohammad; Zhang, Tongsheng; Tan, Jia; Webler, Bryan A.

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study is to utilize principal component analysis (PCA), clustering methods, and correlation analysis to condense and examine large, multivariate data sets produced from automated analysis of non-metallic inclusions. Non-metallic inclusions play a major role in defining the properties of steel and their examination has been greatly aided by automated analysis in scanning electron microscopes equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The methods were applied to analyze inclusions on two sets of samples: two laboratory-scale samples and four industrial samples from a near-finished 4140 alloy steel components with varying machinability. The laboratory samples had well-defined inclusions chemistries, composed of MgO-Al2O3-CaO, spinel (MgO-Al2O3), and calcium aluminate inclusions. The industrial samples contained MnS inclusions as well as (Ca,Mn)S + calcium aluminate oxide inclusions. PCA could be used to reduce inclusion chemistry variables to a 2D plot, which revealed inclusion chemistry groupings in the samples. Clustering methods were used to automatically classify inclusion chemistry measurements into groups, i.e., no user-defined rules were required.

  18. Development and Applications of a Prototypic SCALE Control Module for Automated Burnup Credit Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2001-01-01

    Consideration of the depletion phenomena and isotopic uncertainties in burnup-credit criticality analysis places an increasing reliance on computational tools and significantly increases the overall complexity of the calculations. An automated analysis and data management capability is essential for practical implementation of large-scale burnup credit analyses that can be performed in a reasonable amount of time. STARBUCS is a new prototypic analysis sequence being developed for the SCALE code system to perform automated criticality calculations of spent fuel systems employing burnup credit. STARBUCS is designed to help analyze the dominant burnup credit phenomena including spatial burnup gradients and isotopic uncertainties. A search capability also allows STARBUCS to iterate to determine the spent fuel parameters (e.g., enrichment and burnup combinations) that result in a desired k eff for a storage configuration. Although STARBUCS was developed to address the analysis needs for spent fuel transport and storage systems, it provides sufficient flexibility to allow virtually any configuration of spent fuel to be analyzed, such as storage pools and reprocessing operations. STARBUCS has been used extensively at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study burnup credit phenomena in support of the NRC Research program

  19. Performance analysis of automated evaluation of Crithidia luciliae-based indirect immunofluorescence tests in a routine setting - strengths and weaknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormann, Wymke; Hahn, Melanie; Gerlach, Stefan; Hochstrate, Nicola; Affeldt, Kai; Giesen, Joyce; Fechner, Kai; Damoiseaux, Jan G M C

    2017-11-27

    Antibodies directed against dsDNA are a highly specific diagnostic marker for the presence of systemic lupus erythematosus and of particular importance in its diagnosis. To assess anti-dsDNA antibodies, the Crithidia luciliae-based indirect immunofluorescence test (CLIFT) is one of the assays considered to be the best choice. To overcome the drawback of subjective result interpretation that inheres indirect immunofluorescence assays in general, automated systems have been introduced into the market during the last years. Among these systems is the EUROPattern Suite, an advanced automated fluorescence microscope equipped with different software packages, capable of automated pattern interpretation and result suggestion for ANA, ANCA and CLIFT analysis. We analyzed the performance of the EUROPattern Suite with its automated fluorescence interpretation for CLIFT in a routine setting, reflecting the everyday life of a diagnostic laboratory. Three hundred and twelve consecutive samples were collected, sent to the Central Diagnostic Laboratory of the Maastricht University Medical Centre with a request for anti-dsDNA analysis over a period of 7 months. Agreement between EUROPattern assay analysis and the visual read was 93.3%. Sensitivity and specificity were 94.1% and 93.2%, respectively. The EUROPattern Suite performed reliably and greatly supported result interpretation. Automated image acquisition is readily performed and automated image classification gives a reliable recommendation for assay evaluation to the operator. The EUROPattern Suite optimizes workflow and contributes to standardization between different operators or laboratories.

  20. Bacterial growth on surfaces: Automated image analysis for quantification of growth rate-related parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S.; Sternberg, Claus; Poulsen, L. K.

    1995-01-01

    species-specific hybridizations with fluorescence-labelled ribosomal probes to estimate the single-cell concentration of RNA. By automated analysis of digitized images of stained cells, we determined four independent growth rate-related parameters: cellular RNA and DNA contents, cell volume......, and the frequency of dividing cells in a cell population. These parameters were used to compare physiological states of liquid-suspended and surfacegrowing Pseudomonas putida KT2442 in chemostat cultures. The major finding is that the correlation between substrate availability and cellular growth rate found...

  1. Software Tool for Automated Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) of Hydraulic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stecki, J. S.; Conrad, Finn; Oh, B.

    2002-01-01

    Offshore, marine,aircraft and other complex engineering systems operate in harsh environmental and operational conditions and must meet stringent requirements of reliability, safety and maintability. To reduce the hight costs of development of new systems in these fields improved the design...... management techniques and a vast array of computer aided techniques are applied during design and testing stages. The paper present and discusses the research and development of a software tool for automated failure mode and effects analysis - FMEA - of hydraulic systems. The paper explains the underlying...

  2. Secure automated fabrication (SAF). Phase I interim report: a systems analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    An advanced Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) System is being developed for mixed uranium and plutonium fuel fabrication. SAF System development will ultimately result in systems which maximize personnel radiation protection, restrict and control access to SNM material, improve containment and detection systems for nuclear materials, provide adequate SNM accountability and improve product uniformity and quality. A systems requirement analysis study was initiated to establish the consistent and objective set of requirements within which the choice among alternatives represents the balanced viewpoints of performance, achievability and risk

  3. Oak ridge national laboratory automated clean chemistry for bulk analysis of environmental swipe samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, Debra A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hexel, Cole R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ticknor, Brian W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tevepaugh, Kayron N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Metzger, Shalina C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    To shorten the lengthy and costly manual chemical purification procedures, sample preparation methods for mass spectrometry are being automated using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment. This addresses a serious need in the nuclear safeguards community to debottleneck the separation of U and Pu in environmental samples—currently performed by overburdened chemists—with a method that allows unattended, overnight operation. In collaboration with Elemental Scientific Inc., the prepFAST-MC2 was designed based on current COTS equipment that was modified for U/Pu separations utilizing Eichrom™ TEVA and UTEVA resins. Initial verification of individual columns yielded small elution volumes with consistent elution profiles and good recovery. Combined column calibration demonstrated ample separation without crosscontamination of the eluent. Automated packing and unpacking of the built-in columns initially showed >15% deviation in resin loading by weight, which can lead to inconsistent separations. Optimization of the packing and unpacking methods led to a reduction in the variability of the packed resin to less than 5% daily. The reproducibility of the automated system was tested with samples containing 30 ng U and 15 pg Pu, which were separated in a series with alternating reagent blanks. These experiments showed very good washout of both the resin and the sample from the columns as evidenced by low blank values. Analysis of the major and minor isotope ratios for U and Pu provided values well within data quality limits for the International Atomic Energy Agency. Additionally, system process blanks spiked with 233U and 244Pu tracers were separated using the automated system after it was moved outside of a clean room and yielded levels equivalent to clean room blanks, confirming that the system can produce high quality results without the need for expensive clean room infrastructure. Comparison of the amount of personnel time necessary for successful manual vs

  4. An Automated Approach to Syntax-based Analysis of Classical Latin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjalie Field

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to present an automated method for analyzing the style of Latin authors. Many of the common automated methods in stylistic analysis are based on lexical measures, which do not work well with Latin because of the language’s high degree of inflection and free word order. In contrast, this study focuses on analysis at a syntax level by examining two constructions, the ablative absolute and the cum clause. These constructions are often interchangeable, which suggests an author’s choice of construction is typically more stylistic than functional. We first identified these constructions in hand-annotated texts. Next we developed a method for identifying the constructions in unannotated texts, using probabilistic morphological tagging. Our methods identified constructions with enough accuracy to distinguish among different genres and different authors. In particular, we were able to determine which book of Caesar’s Commentarii de Bello Gallico was not written by Caesar. Furthermore, the usage of ablative absolutes and cum clauses observed in this study is consistent with the usage scholars have observed when analyzing these texts by hand. The proposed methods for an automatic syntax-based analysis are shown to be valuable for the study of classical literature.

  5. Development of an Automated LIBS Analytical Test System Integrated with Component Control and Spectrum Analysis Capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yu; Tian Di; Chen Feipeng; Chen Pengfei; Qiao Shujun; Yang Guang; Li Chunsheng

    2015-01-01

    The present paper proposes an automated Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analytical test system, which consists of a LIBS measurement and control platform based on a modular design concept, and a LIBS qualitative spectrum analysis software and is developed in C#. The platform provides flexible interfacing and automated control; it is compatible with different manufacturer component models and is constructed in modularized form for easy expandability. During peak identification, a more robust peak identification method with improved stability in peak identification has been achieved by applying additional smoothing on the slope obtained by calculation before peak identification. For the purpose of element identification, an improved main lines analysis method, which detects all elements on the spectral peak to avoid omission of certain elements without strong spectral lines, is applied to element identification in the tested LIBS samples. This method also increases the identification speed. In this paper, actual applications have been carried out. According to tests, the analytical test system is compatible with components of various models made by different manufacturers. It can automatically control components to get experimental data and conduct filtering, peak identification and qualitative analysis, etc. on spectral data. (paper)

  6. GapCoder automates the use of indel characters in phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Nelson D; Healy, John

    2003-02-19

    Several ways of incorporating indels into phylogenetic analysis have been suggested. Simple indel coding has two strengths: (1) biological realism and (2) efficiency of analysis. In the method, each indel with different start and/or end positions is considered to be a separate character. The presence/absence of these indel characters is then added to the data set. We have written a program, GapCoder to automate this procedure. The program can input PIR format aligned datasets, find the indels and add the indel-based characters. The output is a NEXUS format file, which includes a table showing what region each indel characters is based on. If regions are excluded from analysis, this table makes it easy to identify the corresponding indel characters for exclusion. Manual implementation of the simple indel coding method can be very time-consuming, especially in data sets where indels are numerous and/or overlapping. GapCoder automates this method and is therefore particularly useful during procedures where phylogenetic analyses need to be repeated many times, such as when different alignments are being explored or when various taxon or character sets are being explored. GapCoder is currently available for Windows from http://www.home.duq.edu/~youngnd/GapCoder.

  7. Automation process for morphometric analysis of volumetric CT data from pulmonary vasculature in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingrani, Rahul; Krenz, Gary; Molthen, Robert

    2010-01-01

    With advances in medical imaging scanners, it has become commonplace to generate large multidimensional datasets. These datasets require tools for a rapid, thorough analysis. To address this need, we have developed an automated algorithm for morphometric analysis incorporating A Visualization Workshop computational and image processing libraries for three-dimensional segmentation, vascular tree generation and structural hierarchical ordering with a two-stage numeric optimization procedure for estimating vessel diameters. We combine this new technique with our mathematical models of pulmonary vascular morphology to quantify structural and functional attributes of lung arterial trees. Our physiological studies require repeated measurements of vascular structure to determine differences in vessel biomechanical properties between animal models of pulmonary disease. Automation provides many advantages including significantly improved speed and minimized operator interaction and biasing. The results are validated by comparison with previously published rat pulmonary arterial micro-CT data analysis techniques, in which vessels were manually mapped and measured using intense operator intervention. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Failure mode and effects analysis of software-based automation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapanen, P.; Helminen, A.

    2002-08-01

    Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) is one of the well-known analysis methods having an established position in the traditional reliability analysis. The purpose of FMEA is to identify possible failure modes of the system components, evaluate their influences on system behaviour and propose proper countermeasures to suppress these effects. The generic nature of FMEA has enabled its wide use in various branches of industry reaching from business management to the design of spaceships. The popularity and diverse use of the analysis method has led to multiple interpretations, practices and standards presenting the same analysis method. FMEA is well understood at the systems and hardware levels, where the potential failure modes usually are known and the task is to analyse their effects on system behaviour. Nowadays, more and more system functions are realised on software level, which has aroused the urge to apply the FMEA methodology also on software based systems. Software failure modes generally are unknown - 'software modules do not fail, they only display incorrect behaviour' - and depend on dynamic behaviour of the application. These facts set special requirements on the FMEA of software based systems and make it difficult to realise. In this report the failure mode and effects analysis is studied for the use of reliability analysis of software-based systems. More precisely, the target system of FMEA is defined to be a safety-critical software-based automation application in a nuclear power plant, implemented on an industrial automation system platform. Through a literature study the report tries to clarify the intriguing questions related to the practical use of software failure mode and effects analysis. The study is a part of the research project 'Programmable Automation System Safety Integrity assessment (PASSI)', belonging to the Finnish Nuclear Safety Research Programme (FINNUS, 1999-2002). In the project various safety assessment methods and tools for

  9. Automated image analysis for quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization with environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Pons, Marie Noëlle; Raskin, Lutgarde; Zilles, Julie L

    2007-05-01

    When fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses are performed with complex environmental samples, difficulties related to the presence of microbial cell aggregates and nonuniform background fluorescence are often encountered. The objective of this study was to develop a robust and automated quantitative FISH method for complex environmental samples, such as manure and soil. The method and duration of sample dispersion were optimized to reduce the interference of cell aggregates. An automated image analysis program that detects cells from 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) micrographs and extracts the maximum and mean fluorescence intensities for each cell from corresponding FISH images was developed with the software Visilog. Intensity thresholds were not consistent even for duplicate analyses, so alternative ways of classifying signals were investigated. In the resulting method, the intensity data were divided into clusters using fuzzy c-means clustering, and the resulting clusters were classified as target (positive) or nontarget (negative). A manual quality control confirmed this classification. With this method, 50.4, 72.1, and 64.9% of the cells in two swine manure samples and one soil sample, respectively, were positive as determined with a 16S rRNA-targeted bacterial probe (S-D-Bact-0338-a-A-18). Manual counting resulted in corresponding values of 52.3, 70.6, and 61.5%, respectively. In two swine manure samples and one soil sample 21.6, 12.3, and 2.5% of the cells were positive with an archaeal probe (S-D-Arch-0915-a-A-20), respectively. Manual counting resulted in corresponding values of 22.4, 14.0, and 2.9%, respectively. This automated method should facilitate quantitative analysis of FISH images for a variety of complex environmental samples.

  10. Automated CBED processing: Sample thickness estimation based on analysis of zone-axis CBED pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, M., E-mail: klinger@post.cz; Němec, M.; Polívka, L.; Gärtnerová, V.; Jäger, A.

    2015-03-15

    An automated processing of convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns is presented. The proposed methods are used in an automated tool for estimating the thickness of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples by matching an experimental zone-axis CBED pattern with a series of patterns simulated for known thicknesses. The proposed tool detects CBED disks, localizes a pattern in detected disks and unifies the coordinate system of the experimental pattern with the simulated one. The experimental pattern is then compared disk-by-disk with a series of simulated patterns each corresponding to different known thicknesses. The thickness of the most similar simulated pattern is then taken as the thickness estimate. The tool was tested on [0 1 1] Si, [0 1 0] α-Ti and [0 1 1] α-Ti samples prepared using different techniques. Results of the presented approach were compared with thickness estimates based on analysis of CBED patterns in two beam conditions. The mean difference between these two methods was 4.1% for the FIB-prepared silicon samples, 5.2% for the electro-chemically polished titanium and 7.9% for Ar{sup +} ion-polished titanium. The proposed techniques can also be employed in other established CBED analyses. Apart from the thickness estimation, it can potentially be used to quantify lattice deformation, structure factors, symmetry, defects or extinction distance. - Highlights: • Automated TEM sample thickness estimation using zone-axis CBED is presented. • Computer vision and artificial intelligence are employed in CBED processing. • This approach reduces operator effort, analysis time and increases repeatability. • Individual parts can be employed in other analyses of CBED/diffraction pattern.

  11. Automated, Ultra-Sterile Solid Sample Handling and Analysis on a Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Maria F.; Stockton, Amanda M.; Willis, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    There are no existing ultra-sterile lab-on-a-chip systems that can accept solid samples and perform complete chemical analyses without human intervention. The proposed solution is to demonstrate completely automated lab-on-a-chip manipulation of powdered solid samples, followed by on-chip liquid extraction and chemical analysis. This technology utilizes a newly invented glass micro-device for solid manipulation, which mates with existing lab-on-a-chip instrumentation. Devices are fabricated in a Class 10 cleanroom at the JPL MicroDevices Lab, and are plasma-cleaned before and after assembly. Solid samples enter the device through a drilled hole in the top. Existing micro-pumping technology is used to transfer milligrams of powdered sample into an extraction chamber where it is mixed with liquids to extract organic material. Subsequent chemical analysis is performed using portable microchip capillary electrophoresis systems (CE). These instruments have been used for ultra-highly sensitive (parts-per-trillion, pptr) analysis of organic compounds including amines, amino acids, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and thiols. Fully autonomous amino acid analyses in liquids were demonstrated; however, to date there have been no reports of completely automated analysis of solid samples on chip. This approach utilizes an existing portable instrument that houses optics, high-voltage power supplies, and solenoids for fully autonomous microfluidic sample processing and CE analysis with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. Furthermore, the entire system can be sterilized and placed in a cleanroom environment for analyzing samples returned from extraterrestrial targets, if desired. This is an entirely new capability never demonstrated before. The ability to manipulate solid samples, coupled with lab-on-a-chip analysis technology, will enable ultraclean and ultrasensitive end-to-end analysis of samples that is orders of magnitude more sensitive than the ppb goal given

  12. A Meta-Analysis of Factors Influencing the Development of Trust in Automation: Implications for Understanding Autonomy in Future Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Kristin E; Chen, Jessie Y C; Szalma, James L; Hancock, P A

    2016-05-01

    We used meta-analysis to assess research concerning human trust in automation to understand the foundation upon which future autonomous systems can be built. Trust is increasingly important in the growing need for synergistic human-machine teaming. Thus, we expand on our previous meta-analytic foundation in the field of human-robot interaction to include all of automation interaction. We used meta-analysis to assess trust in automation. Thirty studies provided 164 pairwise effect sizes, and 16 studies provided 63 correlational effect sizes. The overall effect size of all factors on trust development was ḡ = +0.48, and the correlational effect was [Formula: see text]  = +0.34, each of which represented medium effects. Moderator effects were observed for the human-related (ḡ  = +0.49; [Formula: see text] = +0.16) and automation-related (ḡ = +0.53; [Formula: see text] = +0.41) factors. Moderator effects specific to environmental factors proved insufficient in number to calculate at this time. Findings provide a quantitative representation of factors influencing the development of trust in automation as well as identify additional areas of needed empirical research. This work has important implications to the enhancement of current and future human-automation interaction, especially in high-risk or extreme performance environments. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  13. Linking Automated Data Analysis and Visualization with Applications in Developmental Biology and High-Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruebel, Oliver [Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-11-20

    Knowledge discovery from large and complex collections of today's scientific datasets is a challenging task. With the ability to measure and simulate more processes at increasingly finer spatial and temporal scales, the increasing number of data dimensions and data objects is presenting tremendous challenges for data analysis and effective data exploration methods and tools. Researchers are overwhelmed with data and standard tools are often insufficient to enable effective data analysis and knowledge discovery. The main objective of this thesis is to provide important new capabilities to accelerate scientific knowledge discovery form large, complex, and multivariate scientific data. The research covered in this thesis addresses these scientific challenges using a combination of scientific visualization, information visualization, automated data analysis, and other enabling technologies, such as efficient data management. The effectiveness of the proposed analysis methods is demonstrated via applications in two distinct scientific research fields, namely developmental biology and high-energy physics.Advances in microscopy, image analysis, and embryo registration enable for the first time measurement of gene expression at cellular resolution for entire organisms. Analysis of high-dimensional spatial gene expression datasets is a challenging task. By integrating data clustering and visualization, analysis of complex, time-varying, spatial gene expression patterns and their formation becomes possible. The analysis framework MATLAB and the visualization have been integrated, making advanced analysis tools accessible to biologist and enabling bioinformatic researchers to directly integrate their analysis with the visualization. Laser wakefield particle accelerators (LWFAs) promise to be a new compact source of high-energy particles and radiation, with wide applications ranging from medicine to physics. To gain insight into the complex physical processes of particle

  14. Linking Automated Data Analysis and Visualization with Applications in Developmental Biology and High-Energy Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebel, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge discovery from large and complex collections of today's scientific datasets is a challenging task. With the ability to measure and simulate more processes at increasingly finer spatial and temporal scales, the increasing number of data dimensions and data objects is presenting tremendous challenges for data analysis and effective data exploration methods and tools. Researchers are overwhelmed with data and standard tools are often insufficient to enable effective data analysis and knowledge discovery. The main objective of this thesis is to provide important new capabilities to accelerate scientific knowledge discovery form large, complex, and multivariate scientific data. The research covered in this thesis addresses these scientific challenges using a combination of scientific visualization, information visualization, automated data analysis, and other enabling technologies, such as efficient data management. The effectiveness of the proposed analysis methods is demonstrated via applications in two distinct scientific research fields, namely developmental biology and high-energy physics.Advances in microscopy, image analysis, and embryo registration enable for the first time measurement of gene expression at cellular resolution for entire organisms. Analysis of high-dimensional spatial gene expression datasets is a challenging task. By integrating data clustering and visualization, analysis of complex, time-varying, spatial gene expression patterns and their formation becomes possible. The analysis framework MATLAB and the visualization have been integrated, making advanced analysis tools accessible to biologist and enabling bioinformatic researchers to directly integrate their analysis with the visualization. Laser wakefield particle accelerators (LWFAs) promise to be a new compact source of high-energy particles and radiation, with wide applications ranging from medicine to physics. To gain insight into the complex physical processes of particle

  15. Foreign object detection and removal to improve automated analysis of chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogeweg, Laurens; Sánchez, Clara I.; Melendez, Jaime; Maduskar, Pragnya; Ginneken, Bram van; Story, Alistair; Hayward, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Chest radiographs commonly contain projections of foreign objects, such as buttons, brassier clips, jewellery, or pacemakers and wires. The presence of these structures can substantially affect the output of computer analysis of these images. An automated method is presented to detect, segment, and remove foreign objects from chest radiographs.Methods: Detection is performed using supervised pixel classification with a kNN classifier, resulting in a probability estimate per pixel to belong to a projected foreign object. Segmentation is performed by grouping and post-processing pixels with a probability above a certain threshold. Next, the objects are replaced by texture inpainting.Results: The method is evaluated in experiments on 257 chest radiographs. The detection at pixel level is evaluated with receiver operating characteristic analysis on pixels within the unobscured lung fields and an A z value of 0.949 is achieved. Free response operator characteristic analysis is performed at the object level, and 95.6% of objects are detected with on average 0.25 false positive detections per image. To investigate the effect of removing the detected objects through inpainting, a texture analysis system for tuberculosis detection is applied to images with and without pathology and with and without foreign object removal. Unprocessed, the texture analysis abnormality score of normal images with foreign objects is comparable to those with pathology. After removing foreign objects, the texture score of normal images with and without foreign objects is similar, while abnormal images, whether they contain foreign objects or not, achieve on average higher scores.Conclusions: The authors conclude that removal of foreign objects from chest radiographs is feasible and beneficial for automated image analysis

  16. Automated Analysis of Human Sperm Number and Concentration (Oligospermia) Using Otsu Threshold Method and Labelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susrama, I. G.; Purnama, K. E.; Purnomo, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Oligospermia is a male fertility issue defined as a low sperm concentration in the ejaculate. Normally the sperm concentration is 20-120 million/ml, while Oligospermia patients has sperm concentration less than 20 million/ml. Sperm test done in the fertility laboratory to determine oligospermia by checking fresh sperm according to WHO standards in 2010 [9]. The sperm seen in a microscope using a Neubauer improved counting chamber and manually count the number of sperm. In order to be counted automatically, this research made an automation system to analyse and count the sperm concentration called Automated Analysis of Sperm Concentration Counters (A2SC2) using Otsu threshold segmentation process and morphology. Data sperm used is the fresh sperm directly in the analysis in the laboratory from 10 people. The test results using A2SC2 method obtained an accuracy of 91%. Thus in this study, A2SC2 can be used to calculate the amount and concentration of sperm automatically

  17. Statistical analysis to assess automated level of suspicion scoring methods in breast ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Michael

    2003-05-01

    A well-defined rule-based system has been developed for scoring 0-5 the Level of Suspicion (LOS) based on qualitative lexicon describing the ultrasound appearance of breast lesion. The purposes of the research are to asses and select one of the automated LOS scoring quantitative methods developed during preliminary studies in benign biopsies reduction. The study has used Computer Aided Imaging System (CAIS) to improve the uniformity and accuracy of applying the LOS scheme by automatically detecting, analyzing and comparing breast masses. The overall goal is to reduce biopsies on the masses with lower levels of suspicion, rather that increasing the accuracy of diagnosis of cancers (will require biopsy anyway). On complex cysts and fibroadenoma cases experienced radiologists were up to 50% less certain in true negatives than CAIS. Full correlation analysis was applied to determine which of the proposed LOS quantification methods serves CAIS accuracy the best. This paper presents current results of applying statistical analysis for automated LOS scoring quantification for breast masses with known biopsy results. It was found that First Order Ranking method yielded most the accurate results. The CAIS system (Image Companion, Data Companion software) is developed by Almen Laboratories and was used to achieve the results.

  18. Quantification of sterol-specific response in human macrophages using automated imaged-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gater, Deborah L; Widatalla, Namareq; Islam, Kinza; AlRaeesi, Maryam; Teo, Jeremy C M; Pearson, Yanthe E

    2017-12-13

    The transformation of normal macrophage cells into lipid-laden foam cells is an important step in the progression of atherosclerosis. One major contributor to foam cell formation in vivo is the intracellular accumulation of cholesterol. Here, we report the effects of various combinations of low-density lipoprotein, sterols, lipids and other factors on human macrophages, using an automated image analysis program to quantitatively compare single cell properties, such as cell size and lipid content, in different conditions. We observed that the addition of cholesterol caused an increase in average cell lipid content across a range of conditions. All of the sterol-lipid mixtures examined were capable of inducing increases in average cell lipid content, with variations in the distribution of the response, in cytotoxicity and in how the sterol-lipid combination interacted with other activating factors. For example, cholesterol and lipopolysaccharide acted synergistically to increase cell lipid content while also increasing cell survival compared with the addition of lipopolysaccharide alone. Additionally, ergosterol and cholesteryl hemisuccinate caused similar increases in lipid content but also exhibited considerably greater cytotoxicity than cholesterol. The use of automated image analysis enables us to assess not only changes in average cell size and content, but also to rapidly and automatically compare population distributions based on simple fluorescence images. Our observations add to increasing understanding of the complex and multifactorial nature of foam-cell formation and provide a novel approach to assessing the heterogeneity of macrophage response to a variety of factors.

  19. Scaling up Ecological Measurements of Coral Reefs Using Semi-Automated Field Image Collection and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel González-Rivero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological measurements in marine settings are often constrained in space and time, with spatial heterogeneity obscuring broader generalisations. While advances in remote sensing, integrative modelling and meta-analysis enable generalisations from field observations, there is an underlying need for high-resolution, standardised and geo-referenced field data. Here, we evaluate a new approach aimed at optimising data collection and analysis to assess broad-scale patterns of coral reef community composition using automatically annotated underwater imagery, captured along 2 km transects. We validate this approach by investigating its ability to detect spatial (e.g., across regions and temporal (e.g., over years change, and by comparing automated annotation errors to those of multiple human annotators. Our results indicate that change of coral reef benthos can be captured at high resolution both spatially and temporally, with an average error below 5%, among key benthic groups. Cover estimation errors using automated annotation varied between 2% and 12%, slightly larger than human errors (which varied between 1% and 7%, but small enough to detect significant changes among dominant groups. Overall, this approach allows a rapid collection of in-situ observations at larger spatial scales (km than previously possible, and provides a pathway to link, calibrate, and validate broader analyses across even larger spatial scales (10–10,000 km2.

  20. Automated flow cytometric analysis across large numbers of samples and cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyi; Hasan, Milena; Libri, Valentina; Urrutia, Alejandra; Beitz, Benoît; Rouilly, Vincent; Duffy, Darragh; Patin, Étienne; Chalmond, Bernard; Rogge, Lars; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Albert, Matthew L; Schwikowski, Benno

    2015-04-01

    Multi-parametric flow cytometry is a key technology for characterization of immune cell phenotypes. However, robust high-dimensional post-analytic strategies for automated data analysis in large numbers of donors are still lacking. Here, we report a computational pipeline, called FlowGM, which minimizes operator input, is insensitive to compensation settings, and can be adapted to different analytic panels. A Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM)-based approach was utilized for initial clustering, with the number of clusters determined using Bayesian Information Criterion. Meta-clustering in a reference donor permitted automated identification of 24 cell types across four panels. Cluster labels were integrated into FCS files, thus permitting comparisons to manual gating. Cell numbers and coefficient of variation (CV) were similar between FlowGM and conventional gating for lymphocyte populations, but notably FlowGM provided improved discrimination of "hard-to-gate" monocyte and dendritic cell (DC) subsets. FlowGM thus provides rapid high-dimensional analysis of cell phenotypes and is amenable to cohort studies. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Automated retinofugal visual pathway reconstruction with multi-shell HARDI and FOD-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammen, Alexandra; Law, Meng; Tjan, Bosco S; Toga, Arthur W; Shi, Yonggang

    2016-01-15

    Diffusion MRI tractography provides a non-invasive modality to examine the human retinofugal projection, which consists of the optic nerves, optic chiasm, optic tracts, the lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN) and the optic radiations. However, the pathway has several anatomic features that make it particularly challenging to study with tractography, including its location near blood vessels and bone-air interface at the base of the cerebrum, crossing fibers at the chiasm, somewhat-tortuous course around the temporal horn via Meyer's Loop, and multiple closely neighboring fiber bundles. To date, these unique complexities of the visual pathway have impeded the development of a robust and automated reconstruction method using tractography. To overcome these challenges, we develop a novel, fully automated system to reconstruct the retinofugal visual pathway from high-resolution diffusion imaging data. Using multi-shell, high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) data, we reconstruct precise fiber orientation distributions (FODs) with high order spherical harmonics (SPHARM) to resolve fiber crossings, which allows the tractography algorithm to successfully navigate the complicated anatomy surrounding the retinofugal pathway. We also develop automated algorithms for the identification of ROIs used for fiber bundle reconstruction. In particular, we develop a novel approach to extract the LGN region of interest (ROI) based on intrinsic shape analysis of a fiber bundle computed from a seed region at the optic chiasm to a target at the primary visual cortex. By combining automatically identified ROIs and FOD-based tractography, we obtain a fully automated system to compute the main components of the retinofugal pathway, including the optic tract and the optic radiation. We apply our method to the multi-shell HARDI data of 215 subjects from the Human Connectome Project (HCP). Through comparisons with post-mortem dissection measurements, we demonstrate the retinotopic

  2. Design and development of a phantom for tomosynthesis with potential for automated analysis via the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, David; Levy, Josh; Olafsdottir, Hildur; Olafsson, Ingvi

    2018-03-06

    This paper describes Development of a Phantom for Tomosynthesis with Potential for Automated Analysis via the Cloud. Several studies are underway to investigate the effectiveness of Tomosynthesis Mammographic Image Screening, including the large TMIST project as funded by the National Cancer Institute https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/clinical-trials/nci-supported/tmist. The development of the phantom described in this paper follows initiatives from the FDA, the AAPM TG245 task group, and European Reference Organization (EUREF) for Quality Assured Breast Screening and Diagnostic Services Committee report noting, that no formal endorsement nor recommendation for use has been sought, or granted by any of these groups. This paper reports on the possibility of using this newly developed Tomosynthesis Phantom for Quality Assurance, field testing of image performance, including remote monitoring of DBT system performance, e.g., via transmission over the cloud. The phantom includes tests for: phantom positioning and alignment (important for remote analysis), scan geometry (x and y), chest wall offset, scan slice width and Slice Sensitivity Profile (SSP(z)) slice geometry (slice width), scan slice incrementation (z), z axis geometry bead, low contrast detectability using low contrast spheres, spatial resolution via Point Spread Function (PSF), Image uniformity, Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), and Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) via readings over an Aluminum square. The phantom is designed for use with automated analysis via transmission of images over the cloud and the analysis package includes test of positioning accuracy (roll, pitch, and yaw). Data are shown from several commercial Tomosynthesis Scanners including Fuji, GE, Hologic, IMS-Giotti, and Siemens; however, the focus of this paper is on phantom design, and not in general aimed at direct commercial comparisons, and wherever possible the identity of the data is anonymized. Results of automated analysis of

  3. A Study of Automation for Examination Analysis of Inservice Inspection for Nuclear Power Plant (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, W.

    1985-01-01

    The developing country, KOREA where does not possess the natural resources for traditional energy such as oil and gas, so. The nuclear energy is the most single reliable source available for closing the energy gap. For these reason, It is inavoidable to construct the nuclear power plant and to develop technology related nuclear energy. The rate of operation in large nuclear power facilities depends upon the performance of work system through design and construction, and also the applied technology. Especially, it is the most important element that safety and reliability in operation of nuclear power plant. In view of this aspects, Nuclear power plant is performed severe examinations during perceives and inservice inspection. This study provide an automation of analysis for volumetric examination which is required to nuclear power plant components. It is composed as follows: I. Introduction II. Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant * General Requirement. * Principle and Methods of Ultrasonic Test. * Study of Flaw Evaluation and Design of Classifying Formula for Flaws. III. Design of Automation for Flaw Evaluation. IV. An Example V. Conclusion In this theory, It is classifying the flaws, the formula of classifying flaws and the design of automation that is the main important point. As motioned the above, Owing to such as automatic design, more time could be allocated to practical test than that of evaluation of defects, Protecting against subjective bias tester by himself and miscalculation by dint of various process of computation. For the more, adopting this method would be used to more retaining for many test data and comparative evaluating during successive inspection intervals. Inspire of limitation for testing method and required application to test components, it provide useful application to flow evaluation for volumetric examination. Owing to the characteristics of nuclear power plant that is highly skill intensive industry and has huge system, the

  4. Automated high-speed video analysis of the bubble dynamics in subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurus, Reinhold; Ilchenko, Volodymyr; Sattelmayer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik, Garching (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Subcooled flow boiling is a commonly applied technique for achieving efficient heat transfer. In the study, an experimental investigation in the nucleate boiling regime was performed for water circulating in a closed loop at atmospheric pressure. The test-section consists of a rectangular channel with a one side heated copper strip and a very good optical access. For the optical observation of the bubble behaviour the high-speed cinematography is used. Automated image processing and analysis algorithms developed by the authors were applied for a wide range of mass flow rates and heat fluxes in order to extract characteristic length and time scales of the bubbly layer during the boiling process. Using this methodology, a huge number of bubble cycles could be analysed. The structure of the developed algorithms for the detection of the bubble diameter, the bubble lifetime, the lifetime after the detachment process and the waiting time between two bubble cycles is described. Subsequently, the results from using these automated procedures are presented. A remarkable novelty is the presentation of all results as distribution functions. This is of physical importance because the commonly applied spatial and temporal averaging leads to a loss of information and, moreover, to an unjustified deterministic view of the boiling process, which exhibits in reality a very wide spread of bubble sizes and characteristic times. The results show that the mass flux dominates the temporal bubble behaviour. An increase of the liquid mass flux reveals a strong decrease of the bubble life - and waiting time. In contrast, the variation of the heat flux has a much smaller impact. It is shown in addition that the investigation of the bubble history using automated algorithms delivers novel information with respect to the bubble lift-off probability. (Author)

  5. Automated high-speed video analysis of the bubble dynamics in subcooled flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurus, Reinhold; Ilchenko, Volodymyr; Sattelmayer, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Subcooled flow boiling is a commonly applied technique for achieving efficient heat transfer. In the study, an experimental investigation in the nucleate boiling regime was performed for water circulating in a closed loop at atmospheric pressure. The test-section consists of a rectangular channel with a one side heated copper strip and a very good optical access. For the optical observation of the bubble behaviour the high-speed cinematography is used. Automated image processing and analysis algorithms developed by the authors were applied for a wide range of mass flow rates and heat fluxes in order to extract characteristic length and time scales of the bubbly layer during the boiling process. Using this methodology, a huge number of bubble cycles could be analysed. The structure of the developed algorithms for the detection of the bubble diameter, the bubble lifetime, the lifetime after the detachment process and the waiting time between two bubble cycles is described. Subsequently, the results from using these automated procedures are presented. A remarkable novelty is the presentation of all results as distribution functions. This is of physical importance because the commonly applied spatial and temporal averaging leads to a loss of information and, moreover, to an unjustified deterministic view of the boiling process, which exhibits in reality a very wide spread of bubble sizes and characteristic times. The results show that the mass flux dominates the temporal bubble behaviour. An increase of the liquid mass flux reveals a strong decrease of the bubble life- and waiting time. In contrast, the variation of the heat flux has a much smaller impact. It is shown in addition that the investigation of the bubble history using automated algorithms delivers novel information with respect to the bubble lift-off probability

  6. Employing Computer Assisted Assessment (CAA to facilitate formative assessment in the State Secondary School: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Effimia Karagianni

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on theories of assessment as well as on the pedagogical and administrative advantages Computer Assisted Assessment (CAA has to offer in foreign language learning, the study presented in this paper examines how computers can facilitate the formative assessment of EFL learners and enhance their feeling of responsibility towards monitoring their progress. The subjects of the study were twenty five 14-year-old students attending the third class of a State Gymnasium in Greece. The instruments utilized were questionnaires on motivation and learning styles, three quizzes designed with the software Hot Potatoes, a self–assessment questionnaire and an evaluation questionnaire showing the subjects’ attitudes towards the experience of using computers for assessing purposes. After reviewing formative assessment, CAA and how these two can be combined, the paper focuses on the description of the three class quizzes used in the study. Ιnformation from the questionnaires filled in by students combined with the results of the quizzes, shows how computers can be used to provide continuous ongoing measurement of students’ progress needed for formative assessment. The results are also used to show how students and teachers can benefit from formative CAA and the extent to which such kind of assessment could be applicable in the Greek state school reality.

  7. Automated microfluidic devices integrating solid-phase extraction, fluorescent labeling, and microchip electrophoresis for preterm birth biomarker analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahore, Vishal; Sonker, Mukul; Nielsen, Anna V; Knob, Radim; Kumar, Suresh; Woolley, Adam T

    2018-01-01

    We have developed multichannel integrated microfluidic devices for automated preconcentration, labeling, purification, and separation of preterm birth (PTB) biomarkers. We fabricated multilayer poly(dimethylsiloxane)-cyclic olefin copolymer (PDMS-COC) devices that perform solid-phase extraction (SPE) and microchip electrophoresis (μCE) for automated PTB biomarker analysis. The PDMS control layer had a peristaltic pump and pneumatic valves for flow control, while the PDMS fluidic layer had five input reservoirs connected to microchannels and a μCE system. The COC layers had a reversed-phase octyl methacrylate porous polymer monolith for SPE and fluorescent labeling of PTB biomarkers. We determined μCE conditions for two PTB biomarkers, ferritin (Fer) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). We used these integrated microfluidic devices to preconcentrate and purify off-chip-labeled Fer and CRF in an automated fashion. Finally, we performed a fully automated on-chip analysis of unlabeled PTB biomarkers, involving SPE, labeling, and μCE separation with 1 h total analysis time. These integrated systems have strong potential to be combined with upstream immunoaffinity extraction, offering a compact sample-to-answer biomarker analysis platform. Graphical abstract Pressure-actuated integrated microfluidic devices have been developed for automated solid-phase extraction, fluorescent labeling, and microchip electrophoresis of preterm birth biomarkers.

  8. CEST ANALYSIS: AUTOMATED CHANGE DETECTION FROM VERY-HIGH-RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ehlers

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A fast detection, visualization and assessment of change in areas of crisis or catastrophes are important requirements for coordination and planning of help. Through the availability of new satellites and/or airborne sensors with very high spatial resolutions (e.g., WorldView, GeoEye new remote sensing data are available for a better detection, delineation and visualization of change. For automated change detection, a large number of algorithms has been proposed and developed. From previous studies, however, it is evident that to-date no single algorithm has the potential for being a reliable change detector for all possible scenarios. This paper introduces the Combined Edge Segment Texture (CEST analysis, a decision-tree based cooperative suite of algorithms for automated change detection that is especially designed for the generation of new satellites with very high spatial resolution. The method incorporates frequency based filtering, texture analysis, and image segmentation techniques. For the frequency analysis, different band pass filters can be applied to identify the relevant frequency information for change detection. After transforming the multitemporal images via a fast Fourier transform (FFT and applying the most suitable band pass filter, different methods are available to extract changed structures: differencing and correlation in the frequency domain and correlation and edge detection in the spatial domain. Best results are obtained using edge extraction. For the texture analysis, different 'Haralick' parameters can be calculated (e.g., energy, correlation, contrast, inverse distance moment with 'energy' so far providing the most accurate results. These algorithms are combined with a prior segmentation of the image data as well as with morphological operations for a final binary change result. A rule-based combination (CEST of the change algorithms is applied to calculate the probability of change for a particular location. CEST

  9. Automated CO2 extraction from air for clumped isotope analysis in the atmo- and biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Magdalena; Ziegler, Martin; Pons, Thijs; Lourens, Lucas; Röckmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The conventional stable isotope ratios 13C/12C and 18O/16O in atmospheric CO2 are a powerful tool for unraveling the global carbon cycle. In recent years, it has been suggested that the abundance of the very rare isotopologue 13C18O16O on m/z 47 might be a promising tracer to complement conventional stable isotope analysis of atmospheric CO2 [Affek and Eiler, 2006; Affek et al. 2007; Eiler and Schauble, 2004; Yeung et al., 2009]. Here we present an automated analytical system that is designed for clumped isotope analysis of atmo- and biospheric CO2. The carbon dioxide gas is quantitatively extracted from about 1.5L of air (ATP). The automated stainless steel extraction and purification line consists of three main components: (i) a drying unit (a magnesium perchlorate unit and a cryogenic water trap), (ii) two CO2 traps cooled with liquid nitrogen [Werner et al., 2001] and (iii) a GC column packed with Porapak Q that can be cooled with liquid nitrogen to -30°C during purification and heated up to 230°C in-between two extraction runs. After CO2 extraction and purification, the CO2 is automatically transferred to the mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometric analysis of the 13C18O16O abundance is carried out in dual inlet mode on a MAT 253 mass spectrometer. Each analysis generally consists of 80 change-over-cycles. Three additional Faraday cups were added to the mass spectrometer for simultaneous analysis of the mass-to-charge ratios 44, 45, 46, 47, 48 and 49. The reproducibility for δ13C, δ18O and Δ47 for repeated CO2 extractions from air is in the range of 0.11o (SD), 0.18o (SD) and 0.02 (SD)o respectively. This automated CO2 extraction and purification system will be used to analyse the clumped isotopic signature in atmospheric CO2 (tall tower, Cabauw, Netherlands) and to study the clumped isotopic fractionation during photosynthesis (leaf chamber experiments) and soil respiration. References Affek, H. P., Xu, X. & Eiler, J. M., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 5033

  10. Automated impedance-manometry analysis detects esophageal motor dysfunction in patients who have non-obstructive dysphagia with normal manometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, N. Q.; Holloway, R. H.; Smout, A. J.; Omari, T. I.

    2013-01-01

    Background  Automated integrated analysis of impedance and pressure signals has been reported to identify patients at risk of developing dysphagia post fundoplication. This study aimed to investigate this analysis in the evaluation of patients with non-obstructive dysphagia (NOD) and normal

  11. Mapping of brain activity by automated volume analysis of immediate early genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renier, Nicolas; Adams, Eliza L.; Kirst, Christoph; Wu, Zhuhao; Azevedo, Ricardo; Kohl, Johannes; Autry, Anita E.; Kadiri, Lolahon; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Victoria X.; Tang, Cheuk Y.; Olsen, Olav; Dulac, Catherine; Osten, Pavel; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Summary Understanding how neural information is processed in physiological and pathological states would benefit from precise detection, localization and quantification of the activity of all neurons across the entire brain, which has not to date been achieved in the mammalian brain. We introduce a pipeline for high speed acquisition of brain activity at cellular resolution through profiling immediate early gene expression using immunostaining and light-sheet fluorescence imaging, followed by automated mapping and analysis of activity by an open-source software program we term ClearMap. We validate the pipeline first by analysis of brain regions activated in response to Haloperidol. Next, we report new cortical regions downstream of whisker-evoked sensory processing during active exploration. Lastly, we combine activity mapping with axon tracing to uncover new brain regions differentially activated during parenting behavior. This pipeline is widely applicable to different experimental paradigms, including animal species for which transgenic activity reporters are not readily available. PMID:27238021

  12. Optimisation of automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis for the estimation of microbial diversity in fynbos soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Jacobs

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA has become a commonly used molecular technique for the study of microbial populations in environmental samples. The reproducibility and accuracy of ARISA, with and without the polymerase chain reaction (PCR are important aspects that influence the results and effectiveness of these techniques. We used the primer set ITS4/ITS5 for ARISA to assess the fungal community composition of two sites situated in the Sand Fynbos. The primer set proved to deliver reproducible ARISA profiles of the fungal community composition with little variation observed between ARISA-PCRs. Variation that occurred in a sample due to repeated DNA extraction is expected for ecological studies. This reproducibility made ARISA a useful tool for the assessment and comparison of diversity in ecological samples. In this paper, we also offered particular suggestions concerning the binning strategy for the analysis of ARISA profiles.

  13. Automated Analysis and Classification of Histological Tissue Features by Multi-Dimensional Microscopic Molecular Profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Riordan

    Full Text Available Characterization of the molecular attributes and spatial arrangements of cells and features within complex human tissues provides a critical basis for understanding processes involved in development and disease. Moreover, the ability to automate steps in the analysis and interpretation of histological images that currently require manual inspection by pathologists could revolutionize medical diagnostics. Toward this end, we developed a new imaging approach called multidimensional microscopic molecular profiling (MMMP that can measure several independent molecular properties in situ at subcellular resolution for the same tissue specimen. MMMP involves repeated cycles of antibody or histochemical staining, imaging, and signal removal, which ultimately can generate information analogous to a multidimensional flow cytometry analysis on intact tissue sections. We performed a MMMP analysis on a tissue microarray containing a diverse set of 102 human tissues using a panel of 15 informative antibody and 5 histochemical stains plus DAPI. Large-scale unsupervised analysis of MMMP data, and visualization of the resulting classifications, identified molecular profiles that were associated with functional tissue features. We then directly annotated H&E images from this MMMP series such that canonical histological features of interest (e.g. blood vessels, epithelium, red blood cells were individually labeled. By integrating image annotation data, we identified molecular signatures that were associated with specific histological annotations and we developed statistical models for automatically classifying these features. The classification accuracy for automated histology labeling was objectively evaluated using a cross-validation strategy, and significant accuracy (with a median per-pixel rate of 77% per feature from 15 annotated samples for de novo feature prediction was obtained. These results suggest that high-dimensional profiling may advance the

  14. Improved automated analysis of radon (222Rn) and thoron (220Rn) in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, Natasha; Burnett, William C; Lane-Smith, Derek

    2009-11-15

    Natural radon ((222)Rn) and thoron ((220)Rn) can be used as tracers of various chemical and physical processes in the environment. We present here results from an extended series of laboratory experiments intended to improve the automated analysis of (222)Rn and (220)Rn in water using a modified RAD AQUA (Durridge Inc.) system. Previous experience with similar equipment showed that it takes about 30-40 min for the system to equilibrate to radon-in-water concentration increases and even longer for the response to return to baseline after a sharp spike. While the original water/gas exchanger setup was built only for radon-in-water measurement, our goal here is to provide an automated system capable of high resolution and good sensitivity for both radon- and thoron-in-water detections. We found that faster water flow rates substantially improved the response for both isotopes while thoron is detected most efficiently at airflow rates of 3 L/min. Our results show that the optimum conditions for fastest response and sensitivity for both isotopes are at water flow rates up to 17 L/min and an airflow rate of 3 L/min through the detector. Applications for such measurements include prospecting for naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in pipelines and locating points of groundwater/surface water interaction.

  15. The Development Of Mathematical Model For Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardisasmita, M. Syamsa

    2001-01-01

    Fingerprint has a strong oriented and periodic structure composed of dark lines of raised skin (ridges) and clear lines of lowered skin (furrows)that twist to form a distinct pattern. Although the manner in which the ridges flow is distinctive, other characteristics of the fingerprint called m inutiae a re what are most unique to the individual. These features are particular patterns consisting of terminations or bifurcations of the ridges. To assert if two fingerprints are from the same finger or not, experts detect those minutiae. AFIS (Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems) extract and compare these features for determining a match. The classic methods of fingerprints recognition are not suitable for direct implementation in form of computer algorithms. The creation of a finger's model was however the necessity of development of new, better algorithms of analysis. This paper presents a new numerical methods of fingerprints' simulation based on mathematical model of arrangement of dermatoglyphics and creation of minutiae. This paper describes also the design and implementation of an automated fingerprint identification systems which operates in two stages: minutiae extraction and minutiae matching

  16. Automated Microfluidic Platform for Serial Polymerase Chain Reaction and High-Resolution Melting Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weidong; Bean, Brian; Corey, Scott; Coursey, Johnathan S; Hasson, Kenton C; Inoue, Hiroshi; Isano, Taisuke; Kanderian, Sami; Lane, Ben; Liang, Hongye; Murphy, Brian; Owen, Greg; Shinoda, Nobuhiko; Zeng, Shulin; Knight, Ivor T

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an automated genetic analyzer for human sample testing based on microfluidic rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA). The integrated DNA microfluidic cartridge was used on a platform designed with a robotic pipettor system that works by sequentially picking up different test solutions from a 384-well plate, mixing them in the tips, and delivering mixed fluids to the DNA cartridge. A novel image feedback flow control system based on a Canon 5D Mark II digital camera was developed for controlling fluid movement through a complex microfluidic branching network without the use of valves. The same camera was used for measuring the high-resolution melt curve of DNA amplicons that were generated in the microfluidic chip. Owing to fast heating and cooling as well as sensitive temperature measurement in the microfluidic channels, the time frame for PCR and HRMA was dramatically reduced from hours to minutes. Preliminary testing results demonstrated that rapid serial PCR and HRMA are possible while still achieving high data quality that is suitable for human sample testing. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  17. A computer based, automated analysis of process and outcomes of diabetic care in 23 GP practices.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hill, F

    2012-02-01

    The predicted prevalence of diabetes in Ireland by 2015 is 190,000. Structured diabetes care in general practice has outcomes equivalent to secondary care and good diabetes care has been shown to be associated with the use of electronic healthcare records (EHRs). This automated analysis of EHRs in 23 practices took 10 minutes per practice compared with 15 hours per practice for manual searches. Data was extracted for 1901 type II diabetics. There was valid data for >80% of patients for 6 of the 9 key indicators in the previous year. 543 (34%) had a Hba1c > 7.5%, 142 (9%) had a total cholesterol >6 mmol\\/l, 83 (6%) had an LDL cholesterol >4 mmol\\/l, 367 (22%) had Triglycerides > 2.2 mmol\\/l and 162 (10%) had Blood Pressure > 160\\/100 mmHg. Data quality and key indicators of care compare well with manual audits in Ireland and the U.K. electronic healthcare records and automated audits should be a feature of all chronic disease management programs.

  18. Automated rapid analysis for dioxins and PCBs in food, feedingstuff and environmental matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelscher, K.; Maulshagen, A.; Behnisch, P.A. [eurofins-GfA, Muenster (Germany); Shirkhan, H. [Fluid Management Systems Inc., Waltham, MA (United States); Lieck, G. [University of Applied Science, Steinfurt (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Today there is a need to develop high throughput specific and sensitive methods for the determination of dioxins, dioxin-like PCBs and indicator-PCBs to ensure their rapid and reliable quantification in several kinds of food and feedingstuffs. Ideally one method would fit for several matrices with highest quality standards and with the possibility of a cost/time-effective samplehandling. However, generally in case of the numerous different PCDD/Fs, dioxin-like PCBs and indicator-PCBs as well as the large concentration range to cover this is quite difficult to fulfill. The implementation of an automated sample-treatment flow process (''dioxin street''), which contains an accelerated solvent extraction (ASE), a Power-Prep workstation (Fluid Management Systems, FMS) for automated clean-up, a Syncore Polyvap (Buechi, Switzerland) for solvent evaporation and a HRGC/HRMS (VG AutoSpec) analysis as detection method for several kinds of different matrices is described here. The aim of the present study is to confirm the high quality, low limits of quantification (LOQ), low PCB background levels and reliability of the Power-Prep system in combination with ASE extraction for dioxins, dioxin-like PCBs and indicator-PCBs.

  19. A scanning electron microscope method for automated, quantitative analysis of mineral matter in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creelman, R.A.; Ward, C.R. [R.A. Creelman and Associates, Epping, NSW (Australia)

    1996-07-01

    Quantitative mineralogical analysis has been carried out in a series of nine coal samples from Australia, South Africa and China using a newly-developed automated image analysis system coupled to a scanning electron microscopy. The image analysis system (QEM{asterisk}SEM) gathers X-ray spectra and backscattered electron data from a number of points on a conventional grain-mount polished section under the SEM, and interprets the data from each point in mineralogical terms. The cumulative data in each case was integrated to provide a volumetric modal analysis of the species present in the coal samples, expressed as percentages of the respective coals` mineral matter. Comparison was made of the QEM{asterisk}SEM results to data obtained from the same samples using other methods of quantitative mineralogical analysis, namely X-ray diffraction of the low-temperature oxygen-plasma ash and normative calculation from the (high-temperature) ash analysis and carbonate CO{sub 2} data. Good agreement was obtained from all three methods for quartz in the coals, and also for most of the iron-bearing minerals. The correlation between results from the different methods was less strong, however, for individual clay minerals, or for minerals such as calcite, dolomite and phosphate species that made up only relatively small proportions of the mineral matter. The image analysis approach, using the electron microscope for mineralogical studies, has significant potential as a supplement to optical microscopy in quantitative coal characterisation. 36 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Predicting blood transfusion using automated analysis of pulse oximetry signals and laboratory values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Stacy; Yang, Shiming; Hu, Peter; Miller, Catriona; Anazodo, Amechi; Galvagno, Samuel; Wang, Yulei; Hartsky, Lauren; Fang, Raymond; Mackenzie, Colin

    2015-10-01

    Identification of hemorrhaging trauma patients and prediction of blood transfusion needs in near real time will expedite care of the critically injured. We hypothesized that automated analysis of pulse oximetry signals in combination with laboratory values and vital signs obtained at the time of triage would predict the need for blood transfusion with accuracy greater than that of triage vital signs or pulse oximetry analysis alone. Continuous pulse oximetry signals were recorded for directly admitted trauma patients with abnormal prehospital shock index (heart rate [HR] / systolic blood pressure) of 0.62 or greater. Predictions of blood transfusion within 24 hours were compared using Delong's method for area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves to determine the optimal combination of triage vital signs (prehospital HR + systolic blood pressure), pulse oximetry features (40 waveform features, O2 saturation, HR), and laboratory values (hematocrit, electrolytes, bicarbonate, prothrombin time, international normalization ratio, lactate) in multivariate logistic regression models. We enrolled 1,191 patients; 339 were excluded because of incomplete data; 40 received blood within 3 hours; and 14 received massive transfusion. Triage vital signs predicted need for transfusion within 3 hours (AUROC, 0.59) and massive transfusion (AUROC, 0.70). Pulse oximetry for 15 minutes predicted transfusion more accurately than triage vital signs for both time frames (3-hour AUROC, 0.74; p = 0.004) (massive transfusion AUROC, 0.88; p transfusion prediction (3-hour AUROC, 0.84; p transfusion AUROC, 0.91; p blood transfusion during trauma resuscitation more accurately than triage vital signs or pulse oximetry analysis alone. Results suggest automated calculations from a noninvasive vital sign monitor interfaced with a point-of-care laboratory device may support clinical decisions by recognizing patients with hemorrhage sufficient to need transfusion. Epidemiologic

  1. RoboSCell: An automated single cell arraying and analysis instrument

    KAUST Repository

    Sakaki, Kelly

    2009-09-09

    Single cell research has the potential to revolutionize experimental methods in biomedical sciences and contribute to clinical practices. Recent studies suggest analysis of single cells reveals novel features of intracellular processes, cell-to-cell interactions and cell structure. The methods of single cell analysis require mechanical resolution and accuracy that is not possible using conventional techniques. Robotic instruments and novel microdevices can achieve higher throughput and repeatability; however, the development of such instrumentation is a formidable task. A void exists in the state-of-the-art for automated analysis of single cells. With the increase in interest in single cell analyses in stem cell and cancer research the ability to facilitate higher throughput and repeatable procedures is necessary. In this paper, a high-throughput, single cell microarray-based robotic instrument, called the RoboSCell, is described. The proposed instrument employs a partially transparent single cell microarray (SCM) integrated with a robotic biomanipulator for in vitro analyses of live single cells trapped at the array sites. Cells, labeled with immunomagnetic particles, are captured at the array sites by channeling magnetic fields through encapsulated permalloy channels in the SCM. The RoboSCell is capable of systematically scanning the captured cells temporarily immobilized at the array sites and using optical methods to repeatedly measure extracellular and intracellular characteristics over time. The instrument\\'s capabilities are demonstrated by arraying human T lymphocytes and measuring the uptake dynamics of calcein acetoxymethylester-all in a fully automated fashion. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  2. Assessment of paclitaxel induced sensory polyneuropathy with "Catwalk" automated gait analysis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Huehnchen

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain as a symptom of sensory nerve damage is a frequent side effect of chemotherapy. The most common behavioral observation in animal models of chemotherapy induced polyneuropathy is the development of mechanical allodynia, which is quantified with von Frey filaments. The data from one study, however, cannot be easily compared with other studies owing to influences of environmental factors, inter-rater variability and differences in test paradigms. To overcome these limitations, automated quantitative gait analysis was proposed as an alternative, but its usefulness for assessing animals suffering from polyneuropathy has remained unclear. In the present study, we used a novel mouse model of paclitaxel induced polyneuropathy to compare results from electrophysiology and the von Frey method to gait alterations measured with the Catwalk test. To mimic recently improved clinical treatment strategies of gynecological malignancies, we established a mouse model of dose-dense paclitaxel therapy on the common C57Bl/6 background. In this model paclitaxel treated animals developed mechanical allodynia as well as reduced caudal sensory nerve action potential amplitudes indicative of a sensory polyneuropathy. Gait analysis with the Catwalk method detected distinct alterations of gait parameters in animals suffering from sensory neuropathy, revealing a minimized contact of the hind paws with the floor. Treatment of mechanical allodynia with gabapentin improved altered dynamic gait parameters. This study establishes a novel mouse model for investigating the side effects of dose-dense paclitaxel therapy and underlines the usefulness of automated gait analysis as an additional easy-to-use objective test for evaluating painful sensory polyneuropathy.

  3. Rapid Automated Dissolution and Analysis Techniques for Radionuclides in Recycle Process Streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudowe, Ralf; Roman, Audrey; Dailey, Ashlee; Go, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of process samples for radionuclide content is an important part of current procedures for material balance and accountancy in the different process streams of a recycling plant. The destructive sample analysis techniques currently available necessitate a significant amount of time. It is therefore desirable to develop new sample analysis procedures that allow for a quick turnaround time and increased sample throughput with a minimum of deviation between samples. In particular, new capabilities for rapid sample dissolution and radiochemical separation are required. Most of the radioanalytical techniques currently employed for sample analysis are based on manual laboratory procedures. Such procedures are time- and labor-intensive, and not well suited for situations in which a rapid sample analysis is required and/or large number of samples need to be analyzed. To address this issue we are currently investigating radiochemical separation methods based on extraction chromatography that have been specifically optimized for the analysis of process stream samples. The influence of potential interferences present in the process samples as well as mass loading, flow rate and resin performance is being studied. In addition, the potential to automate these procedures utilizing a robotic platform is evaluated. Initial studies have been carried out using the commercially available DGA resin. This resin shows an affinity for Am, Pu, U, and Th and is also exhibiting signs of a possible synergistic effects in the presence of iron.

  4. Long-term live cell imaging and automated 4D analysis of drosophila neuroblast lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina C F Homem

    Full Text Available The developing Drosophila brain is a well-studied model system for neurogenesis and stem cell biology. In the Drosophila central brain, around 200 neural stem cells called neuroblasts undergo repeated rounds of asymmetric cell division. These divisions typically generate a larger self-renewing neuroblast and a smaller ganglion mother cell that undergoes one terminal division to create two differentiating neurons. Although single mitotic divisions of neuroblasts can easily be imaged in real time, the lack of long term imaging procedures has limited the use of neuroblast live imaging for lineage analysis. Here we describe a method that allows live imaging of cultured Drosophila neuroblasts over multiple cell cycles for up to 24 hours. We describe a 4D image analysis protocol that can be used to extract cell cycle times and growth rates from the resulting movies in an automated manner. We use it to perform lineage analysis in type II neuroblasts where clonal analysis has indicated the presence of a transit-amplifying population that potentiates the number of neurons. Indeed, our experiments verify type II lineages and provide quantitative parameters for all cell types in those lineages. As defects in type II neuroblast lineages can result in brain tumor formation, our lineage analysis method will allow more detailed and quantitative analysis of tumorigenesis and asymmetric cell division in the Drosophila brain.

  5. Proteomics wants cRacker: automated standardized data analysis of LC-MS derived proteomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zauber, Henrik; Schulze, Waltraud X

    2012-11-02

    The large-scale analysis of thousands of proteins under various experimental conditions or in mutant lines has gained more and more importance in hypothesis-driven scientific research and systems biology in the past years. Quantitative analysis by large scale proteomics using modern mass spectrometry usually results in long lists of peptide ion intensities. The main interest for most researchers, however, is to draw conclusions on the protein level. Postprocessing and combining peptide intensities of a proteomic data set requires expert knowledge, and the often repetitive and standardized manual calculations can be time-consuming. The analysis of complex samples can result in very large data sets (lists with several 1000s to 100,000 entries of different peptides) that cannot easily be analyzed using standard spreadsheet programs. To improve speed and consistency of the data analysis of LC-MS derived proteomic data, we developed cRacker. cRacker is an R-based program for automated downstream proteomic data analysis including data normalization strategies for metabolic labeling and label free quantitation. In addition, cRacker includes basic statistical analysis, such as clustering of data, or ANOVA and t tests for comparison between treatments. Results are presented in editable graphic formats and in list files.

  6. Geena 2, improved automated analysis of MALDI/TOF mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Paolo; Profumo, Aldo; Rocco, Mattia; Mangerini, Rosa; Ferri, Fabio; Facchiano, Angelo

    2016-03-02

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is producing high volumes of data supporting oncological sciences, especially for translational research. Most of related elaborations can be carried out by combining existing tools at different levels, but little is currently available for the automation of the fundamental steps. For the analysis of MALDI/TOF spectra, a number of pre-processing steps are required, including joining of isotopic abundances for a given molecular species, normalization of signals against an internal standard, background noise removal, averaging multiple spectra from the same sample, and aligning spectra from different samples. In this paper, we present Geena 2, a public software tool for the automated execution of these pre-processing steps for MALDI/TOF spectra. Geena 2 has been developed in a Linux-Apache-MySQL-PHP web development environment, with scripts in PHP and Perl. Input and output are managed as simple formats that can be consumed by any database system and spreadsheet software. Input data may also be stored in a MySQL database. Processing methods are based on original heuristic algorithms which are introduced in the paper. Three simple and intuitive web interfaces are available: the Standard Search Interface, which allows a complete control over all parameters, the Bright Search Interface, which leaves to the user the possibility to tune parameters for alignment of spectra, and the Quick Search Interface, which limits the number of parameters to a minimum by using default values for the majority of parameters. Geena 2 has been utilized, in conjunction with a statistical analysis tool, in three published experimental works: a proteomic study on the effects of long-term cryopreservation on the low molecular weight fraction of serum proteome, and two retrospective serum proteomic studies, one on the risk of developing breat cancer in patients affected by gross cystic disease of the breast (GCDB) and the other for the identification of a predictor of

  7. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of an Automated Medication System Implemented in a Danish Hospital Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risoer, Bettina Wulff; Lisby, Marianne; Soerensen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an automated medication system (AMS) implemented in a Danish hospital setting. Methods An economic evaluation was performed alongside a controlled before-and-after effectiveness study with one control ward and one intervention ward. The primary...... outcome measure was the number of errors in the medication administration process observed prospectively before and after implementation. To determine the difference in proportion of errors after implementation of the AMS, logistic regression was applied with the presence of error(s) as the dependent...... variable. Time, group, and interaction between time and group were the independent variables. The cost analysis used the hospital perspective with a short-term incremental costing approach. The total 6-month costs with and without the AMS were calculated as well as the incremental costs. The number...

  8. Automated sensitivity analysis of the radionuclide migration code UCB-NE-10.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Worley, B.A.; Oblow, E.M.; Wright, R.Q.; Harper, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    The Salt Repository Project (SRP) of the U.S. Department of Energy is performing ongoing performance assessment analyses for the eventual licensing of an underground high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. As part of these studies, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses play a major role in the identification of important parameters, and in the identification of specific data needs for site characterization. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has supported the SRP in this effort resulting in thee development of an automated procedure for performing large scale sensitivity analysis using computer calculus. GRESS, GRadient Enhanced Software System, is a pre-compiler that can process FORTRAN computer codes and add derivative taking capabilities to the normal calculated results. The GRESS code is described and applied to the code UCB-NE-10.2 which simulates the migration through a sorption medium of the radionuclide members of a decay chain

  9. Automated Text Analysis Based on Skip-Gram Model for Food Evaluation in Predicting Consumer Acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Augustine Yongwhi; Ha, Jin Gwan; Choi, Hoduk; Moon, Hyeonjoon

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate food taste, smell, and characteristics from consumers' online reviews. Several studies in food sensory evaluation have been presented for consumer acceptance. However, these studies need taste descriptive word lexicon, and they are not suitable for analyzing large number of evaluators to predict consumer acceptance. In this paper, an automated text analysis method for food evaluation is presented to analyze and compare recently introduced two jjampong ramen types (mixed seafood noodles). To avoid building a sensory word lexicon, consumers' reviews are collected from SNS. Then, by training word embedding model with acquired reviews, words in the large amount of review text are converted into vectors. Based on these words represented as vectors, inference is performed to evaluate taste and smell of two jjampong ramen types. Finally, the reliability and merits of the proposed food evaluation method are confirmed by a comparison with the results from an actual consumer preference taste evaluation.

  10. Automated Clean Chemistry for Bulk Analysis of Environmental Swipe Samples - FY17 Year End Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ticknor, Brian W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Metzger, Shalina C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McBay, Eddy H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hexel, Cole R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tevepaugh, Kayron N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bostick, Debra A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-11-30

    Sample preparation methods for mass spectrometry are being automated using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment to shorten lengthy and costly manual chemical purification procedures. This development addresses a serious need in the International Atomic Energy Agency’s Network of Analytical Laboratories (IAEA NWAL) to increase efficiency in the Bulk Analysis of Environmental Samples for Safeguards program with a method that allows unattended, overnight operation. In collaboration with Elemental Scientific Inc., the prepFAST-MC2 was designed based on COTS equipment. It was modified for uranium/plutonium separations using renewable columns packed with Eichrom TEVA and UTEVA resins, with a chemical separation method based on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) NWAL chemical procedure. The newly designed prepFAST-SR has had several upgrades compared with the original prepFAST-MC2. Both systems are currently installed in the Ultra-Trace Forensics Science Center at ORNL.

  11. Automatic sample changer control software for automation of neutron activation analysis process in Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yussup, N.; Ibrahim, M. M.; Rahman, N. A. A.; Mokhtar, M.; Salim, N. A. A.; Soh@Shaari, S. C.; Azman, A.; Lombigit, L.; Azman, A.; Omar, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    Most of the procedures in neutron activation analysis (NAA) process that has been established in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) since 1980s were performed manually. These manual procedures carried out by the NAA laboratory personnel are time consuming and inefficient especially for sample counting and measurement process. The sample needs to be changed and the measurement software needs to be setup for every one hour counting time. Both of these procedures are performed manually for every sample. Hence, an automatic sample changer system (ASC) that consists of hardware and software is developed to automate sample counting process for up to 30 samples consecutively. This paper describes the ASC control software for NAA process which is designed and developed to control the ASC hardware and call GammaVision software for sample measurement. The software is developed by using National Instrument LabVIEW development package.

  12. Automation of C-terminal sequence analysis of 2D-PAGE separated proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P. Moerman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental assignment of the protein termini remains essential to define the functional protein structure. Here, we report on the improvement of a proteomic C-terminal sequence analysis method. The approach aims to discriminate the C-terminal peptide in a CNBr-digest where Met-Xxx peptide bonds are cleaved in internal peptides ending at a homoserine lactone (hsl-derivative. pH-dependent partial opening of the lactone ring results in the formation of doublets for all internal peptides. C-terminal peptides are distinguished as singlet peaks by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS is then used for their identification. We present a fully automated protocol established on a robotic liquid-handling station.

  13. Advantages of an Automated Chemical Processor for XAFS Analysis of Novel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvin, S.; Carpenter, E. E.

    2007-01-01

    For synthetic chemists and material scientists, XAFS analysis is typically used after promising samples have already been identified. This is not an inherent limitation of the technique, which can be applied in a crude fashion quite rapidly, but is rather an artifact of the separation of laboratory from synchrotron, and of the nature of the allocation of beam time. One way around these difficulties is to use automated chemical processors; preferably with identical machines at the home institution and at the beamline. This allows identical samples to be synthesized on demand in both locations, so that the characterization resources of the home institution's laboratory can be applied immediately to samples synthesized at the beamline. In addition, the processor can be run in a combinatorial mode, so that the XAFS of many possible synthesis results are examined in a short time. Finally, spectra possessing features of interest can be identified by software, and those syntheses singled out for further study

  14. Mathematical support for automated geometry analysis of lathe machining of oblique peakless round-nose tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, A. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu; Podgornyh, O. A.; Shamarin, N. N.; Filippova, E. O.

    2017-01-01

    Automatization of engineering processes requires developing relevant mathematical support and a computer software. Analysis of metal cutting kinematics and tool geometry is a necessary key task at the preproduction stage. This paper is focused on developing a procedure for determining the geometry of oblique peakless round-nose tool lathe machining with the use of vector/matrix transformations. Such an approach allows integration into modern mathematical software packages in distinction to the traditional analytic description. Such an advantage is very promising for developing automated control of the preproduction process. A kinematic criterion for the applicable tool geometry has been developed from the results of this study. The effect of tool blade inclination and curvature on the geometry-dependent process parameters was evaluated.

  15. Selection of Filtration Methods in the Analysis of Motion of Automated Guided Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrzańska Magdalena

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article the issues related to mapping the route and error correction in automated guided vehicle (AGV movement have been discussed. The nature and size of disruption have been determined using the registered runs in experimental studies. On the basis of the analysis a number of numerical runs have been generated, which mapped possible to obtain runs in a real movement of the vehicle. The obtained data set has been used for further research. The aim of this paper was to test the selected methods of digital filtering on the same data set and determine their effectiveness. The results of simulation studies have been presented in the article. The effectiveness of various methods has been determined and on this basis the conclusions have been drawn.

  16. Results of Automated Retinal Image Analysis for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy from the Nakuru Study, Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Bøgelund Hansen, Morten; Abramoff, M. D.; Folk, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Digital retinal imaging is an established method of screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR). It has been established that currently about 1% of the world's blind or visually impaired is due to DR. However, the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus and DR is creating an increased...... workload on those with expertise in grading retinal images. Safe and reliable automated analysis of retinal images may support screening services worldwide. This study aimed to compare the Iowa Detection Program (IDP) ability to detect diabetic eye diseases (DED) to human grading carried out at Moorfields...... predictive value of IDP versus the human grader as reference standard. Results Altogether 3,460 participants were included. 113 had DED, giving a prevalence of 3.3%(95% CI, 2.7-3.9%). Sensitivity of the IDP to detect DED as by the human grading was 91.0%(95% CI, 88.0-93.4%). The IDP ability to detect DED...

  17. Automated forensic DNA purification optimized for FTA card punches and identifiler STR-based PCR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Lois C; Thomas, Michelle; Reich, Karl

    2007-03-01

    Forensic labs globally face the same problem-a growing need to process a greater number and wider variety of samples for DNA analysis. The same forensic lab can be tasked all at once with processing mixed casework samples from crime scenes, convicted offender samples for database entry, and tissue from tsunami victims for identification. Besides flexibility in the robotic system chosen for forensic automation, there is a need, for each sample type, to develop new methodology that is not only faster but also more reliable than past procedures. FTA is a chemical treatment of paper, unique to Whatman Bioscience, and is used for the stabilization and storage of biological samples. Here, the authors describe optimization of the Whatman FTA Purification Kit protocol for use with the AmpFlSTR Identifiler PCR Amplification Kit.

  18. Extraction of the number of peroxisomes in yeast cells by automated image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemistö, Antti; Selinummi, Jyrki; Saleem, Ramsey; Shmulevich, Ilya; Aitchison, John; Yli-Harja, Olli

    2006-01-01

    An automated image analysis method for extracting the number of peroxisomes in yeast cells is presented. Two images of the cell population are required for the method: a bright field microscope image from which the yeast cells are detected and the respective fluorescent image from which the number of peroxisomes in each cell is found. The segmentation of the cells is based on clustering the local mean-variance space. The watershed transformation is thereafter employed to separate cells that are clustered together. The peroxisomes are detected by thresholding the fluorescent image. The method is tested with several images of a budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae population, and the results are compared with manually obtained results.

  19. Semi-automated digital measurement as the method of choice for beta cell mass analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violette Coppens

    Full Text Available Pancreas injury by partial duct ligation (PDL activates beta cell differentiation and proliferation in adult mouse pancreas but remains controversial regarding the anticipated increase in beta cell volume. Several reports unable to show beta cell volume augmentation in PDL pancreas used automated digital image analysis software. We hypothesized that fully automatic beta cell morphometry without manual micrograph artifact remediation introduces bias and therefore might be responsible for reported discrepancies and controversy. However, our present results prove that standard digital image processing with automatic thresholding is sufficiently robust albeit less sensitive and less adequate to demonstrate a significant increase in beta cell volume in PDL versus Sham-operated pancreas. We therefore conclude that other confounding factors such as quality of surgery, selection of samples based on relative abundance of the transcription factor Neurogenin 3 (Ngn3 and tissue processing give rise to inter-laboratory inconsistencies in beta cell volume quantification in PDL pancreas.

  20. Automated Text Analysis Based on Skip-Gram Model for Food Evaluation in Predicting Consumer Acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustine Yongwhi Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evaluate food taste, smell, and characteristics from consumers’ online reviews. Several studies in food sensory evaluation have been presented for consumer acceptance. However, these studies need taste descriptive word lexicon, and they are not suitable for analyzing large number of evaluators to predict consumer acceptance. In this paper, an automated text analysis method for food evaluation is presented to analyze and compare recently introduced two jjampong ramen types (mixed seafood noodles. To avoid building a sensory word lexicon, consumers’ reviews are collected from SNS. Then, by training word embedding model with acquired reviews, words in the large amount of review text are converted into vectors. Based on these words represented as vectors, inference is performed to evaluate taste and smell of two jjampong ramen types. Finally, the reliability and merits of the proposed food evaluation method are confirmed by a comparison with the results from an actual consumer preference taste evaluation.

  1. A novel method for automated grid generation of ice shapes for local-flow analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogretim, Egemen; Huebsch, Wade W.

    2004-02-01

    Modelling a complex geometry, such as ice roughness, plays a key role for the computational flow analysis over rough surfaces. This paper presents two enhancement ideas in modelling roughness geometry for local flow analysis over an aerodynamic surface. The first enhancement is use of the leading-edge region of an airfoil as a perturbation to the parabola surface. The reasons for using a parabola as the base geometry are: it resembles the airfoil leading edge in the vicinity of its apex and it allows the use of a lower apparent Reynolds number. The second enhancement makes use of the Fourier analysis for modelling complex ice roughness on the leading edge of airfoils. This method of modelling provides an analytical expression, which describes the roughness geometry and the corresponding derivatives. The factors affecting the performance of the Fourier analysis were also investigated. It was shown that the number of sine-cosine terms and the number of control points are of importance. Finally, these enhancements are incorporated into an automated grid generation method over the airfoil ice accretion surface. The validations for both enhancements demonstrate that they can improve the current capability of grid generation and computational flow field analysis around airfoils with ice roughness.

  2. QuickNGS elevates Next-Generation Sequencing data analysis to a new level of automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Prerana; Nikolić, Miloš; Frommolt, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) has emerged as a widely used tool in molecular biology. While time and cost for the sequencing itself are decreasing, the analysis of the massive amounts of data remains challenging. Since multiple algorithmic approaches for the basic data analysis have been developed, there is now an increasing need to efficiently use these tools to obtain results in reasonable time. We have developed QuickNGS, a new workflow system for laboratories with the need to analyze data from multiple NGS projects at a time. QuickNGS takes advantage of parallel computing resources, a comprehensive back-end database, and a careful selection of previously published algorithmic approaches to build fully automated data analysis workflows. We demonstrate the efficiency of our new software by a comprehensive analysis of 10 RNA-Seq samples which we can finish in only a few minutes of hands-on time. The approach we have taken is suitable to process even much larger numbers of samples and multiple projects at a time. Our approach considerably reduces the barriers that still limit the usability of the powerful NGS technology and finally decreases the time to be spent before proceeding to further downstream analysis and interpretation of the data.

  3. Network meta-analysis using R: a review of currently available automated packages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Neupane

    Full Text Available Network meta-analysis (NMA--a statistical technique that allows comparison of multiple treatments in the same meta-analysis simultaneously--has become increasingly popular in the medical literature in recent years. The statistical methodology underpinning this technique and software tools for implementing the methods are evolving. Both commercial and freely available statistical software packages have been developed to facilitate the statistical computations using NMA with varying degrees of functionality and ease of use. This paper aims to introduce the reader to three R packages, namely, gemtc, pcnetmeta, and netmeta, which are freely available software tools implemented in R. Each automates the process of performing NMA so that users can perform the analysis with minimal computational effort. We present, compare and contrast the availability and functionality of different important features of NMA in these three packages so that clinical investigators and researchers can determine which R packages to implement depending on their analysis needs. Four summary tables detailing (i data input and network plotting, (ii modeling options, (iii assumption checking and diagnostic testing, and (iv inference and reporting tools, are provided, along with an analysis of a previously published dataset to illustrate the outputs available from each package. We demonstrate that each of the three packages provides a useful set of tools, and combined provide users with nearly all functionality that might be desired when conducting a NMA.

  4. Safety analysis code input automation using the Nuclear Plant Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, H.; Leung, J.; Tajbakhsh, A.; Viles, F.

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Data Bank (NPDB) is a computer-based system that organizes a nuclear power plant's technical data, providing mechanisms for data storage, retrieval, and computer-aided engineering analysis. It has the specific objective to describe thermohydraulic systems in order to support: rapid information retrieval and display, and thermohydraulic analysis modeling. The Nuclear Plant Data Bank (NPBD) system fully automates the storage and analysis based on this data. The system combines the benefits of a structured data base system and computer-aided modeling with links to large scale codes for engineering analysis. Emphasis on a friendly and very graphically oriented user interface facilitates both initial use and longer term efficiency. Specific features are: organization and storage of thermohydraulic data items, ease in locating specific data items, graphical and tabular display capabilities, interactive model construction, organization and display of model input parameters, input deck construction for TRAC and RELAP analysis programs, and traceability of plant data, user model assumptions, and codes used in the input deck construction process. The major accomplishments of this past year were the development of a RELAP model generation capability and the development of a CRAY version of the code

  5. A Fully Automated and Robust Method to Incorporate Stamping Data in Crash, NVH and Durability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniswamy, Hariharasudhan; Kanthadai, Narayan; Roy, Subir; Beauchesne, Erwan

    2011-08-01

    Crash, NVH (Noise, Vibration, Harshness), and durability analysis are commonly deployed in structural CAE analysis for mechanical design of components especially in the automotive industry. Components manufactured by stamping constitute a major portion of the automotive structure. In CAE analysis they are modeled at a nominal state with uniform thickness and no residual stresses and strains. However, in reality the stamped components have non-uniformly distributed thickness and residual stresses and strains resulting from stamping. It is essential to consider the stamping information in CAE analysis to accurately model the behavior of the sheet metal structures under different loading conditions. Especially with the current emphasis on weight reduction by replacing conventional steels with aluminum and advanced high strength steels it is imperative to avoid over design. Considering this growing need in industry, a highly automated and robust method has been integrated within Altair Hyperworks® to initialize sheet metal components in CAE models with stamping data. This paper demonstrates this new feature and the influence of stamping data for a full car frontal crash analysis.

  6. Automated multivariate analysis of multi-sensor data submitted online: Real-time environmental monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Ingvar; Westad, Frank

    2018-01-01

    A pilot study demonstrating real-time environmental monitoring with automated multivariate analysis of multi-sensor data submitted online has been performed at the cabled LoVe Ocean Observatory located at 258 m depth 20 km off the coast of Lofoten-Vesterålen, Norway. The major purpose was efficient monitoring of many variables simultaneously and early detection of changes and time-trends in the overall response pattern before changes were evident in individual variables. The pilot study was performed with 12 sensors from May 16 to August 31, 2015. The sensors provided data for chlorophyll, turbidity, conductivity, temperature (three sensors), salinity (calculated from temperature and conductivity), biomass at three different depth intervals (5-50, 50-120, 120-250 m), and current speed measured in two directions (east and north) using two sensors covering different depths with overlap. A total of 88 variables were monitored, 78 from the two current speed sensors. The time-resolution varied, thus the data had to be aligned to a common time resolution. After alignment, the data were interpreted using principal component analysis (PCA). Initially, a calibration model was established using data from May 16 to July 31. The data on current speed from two sensors were subject to two separate PCA models and the score vectors from these two models were combined with the other 10 variables in a multi-block PCA model. The observations from August were projected on the calibration model consecutively one at a time and the result was visualized in a score plot. Automated PCA of multi-sensor data submitted online is illustrated with an attached time-lapse video covering the relative short time period used in the pilot study. Methods for statistical validation, and warning and alarm limits are described. Redundant sensors enable sensor diagnostics and quality assurance. In a future perspective, the concept may be used in integrated environmental monitoring.

  7. Automated multivariate analysis of multi-sensor data submitted online: Real-time environmental monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingvar Eide

    Full Text Available A pilot study demonstrating real-time environmental monitoring with automated multivariate analysis of multi-sensor data submitted online has been performed at the cabled LoVe Ocean Observatory located at 258 m depth 20 km off the coast of Lofoten-Vesterålen, Norway. The major purpose was efficient monitoring of many variables simultaneously and early detection of changes and time-trends in the overall response pattern before changes were evident in individual variables. The pilot study was performed with 12 sensors from May 16 to August 31, 2015. The sensors provided data for chlorophyll, turbidity, conductivity, temperature (three sensors, salinity (calculated from temperature and conductivity, biomass at three different depth intervals (5-50, 50-120, 120-250 m, and current speed measured in two directions (east and north using two sensors covering different depths with overlap. A total of 88 variables were monitored, 78 from the two current speed sensors. The time-resolution varied, thus the data had to be aligned to a common time resolution. After alignment, the data were interpreted using principal component analysis (PCA. Initially, a calibration model was established using data from May 16 to July 31. The data on current speed from two sensors were subject to two separate PCA models and the score vectors from these two models were combined with the other 10 variables in a multi-block PCA model. The observations from August were projected on the calibration model consecutively one at a time and the result was visualized in a score plot. Automated PCA of multi-sensor data submitted online is illustrated with an attached time-lapse video covering the relative short time period used in the pilot study. Methods for statistical validation, and warning and alarm limits are described. Redundant sensors enable sensor diagnostics and quality assurance. In a future perspective, the concept may be used in integrated environmental monitoring.

  8. Automated analysis of information processing, kinetic independence and modular architecture in biochemical networks using MIDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowsher, Clive G

    2011-02-15

    Understanding the encoding and propagation of information by biochemical reaction networks and the relationship of such information processing properties to modular network structure is of fundamental importance in the study of cell signalling and regulation. However, a rigorous, automated approach for general biochemical networks has not been available, and high-throughput analysis has therefore been out of reach. Modularization Identification by Dynamic Independence Algorithms (MIDIA) is a user-friendly, extensible R package that performs automated analysis of how information is processed by biochemical networks. An important component is the algorithm's ability to identify exact network decompositions based on both the mass action kinetics and informational properties of the network. These modularizations are visualized using a tree structure from which important dynamic conditional independence properties can be directly read. Only partial stoichiometric information needs to be used as input to MIDIA, and neither simulations nor knowledge of rate parameters are required. When applied to a signalling network, for example, the method identifies the routes and species involved in the sequential propagation of information between its multiple inputs and outputs. These routes correspond to the relevant paths in the tree structure and may be further visualized using the Input-Output Path Matrix tool. MIDIA remains computationally feasible for the largest network reconstructions currently available and is straightforward to use with models written in Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML). The package is distributed under the GNU General Public License and is available, together with a link to browsable Supplementary Material, at http://code.google.com/p/midia. Further information is at www.maths.bris.ac.uk/~macgb/Software.html.

  9. Application of sodium carbonate prevents sulphur poisoning of catalysts in automated total mercury analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLagan, David S.; Huang, Haiyong; Lei, Ying D.; Wania, Frank; Mitchell, Carl P. J.

    2017-07-01

    Analysis of high sulphur-containing samples for total mercury content using automated thermal decomposition, amalgamation, and atomic absorption spectroscopy instruments (USEPA Method 7473) leads to rapid and costly SO2 poisoning of catalysts. In an effort to overcome this issue, we tested whether the addition of powdered sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) to the catalyst and/or directly on top of sample material increases throughput of sulphur-impregnated (8-15 wt%) activated carbon samples per catalyst tube. Adding 5 g of Na2CO3 to the catalyst alone only marginally increases the functional lifetime of the catalyst (31 ± 4 g of activated carbon analyzed per catalyst tube) in relation to unaltered catalyst of the AMA254 total mercury analyzer (17 ± 4 g of activated carbon). Adding ≈ 0.2 g of Na2CO3 to samples substantially increases (81 ± 17 g of activated carbon) catalyst life over the unaltered catalyst. The greatest improvement is achieved by adding Na2CO3 to both catalyst and samples (200 ± 70 g of activated carbon), which significantly increases catalyst performance over all other treatments and enables an order of magnitude greater sample throughput than the unaltered samples and catalyst. It is likely that Na2CO3 efficiently sequesters SO2, even at high furnace temperatures to produce Na2SO4 and CO2, largely negating the poisonous impact of SO2 on the catalyst material. Increased corrosion of nickel sampling boats resulting from this methodological variation is easily resolved by substituting quartz boats. Overall, this variation enables an efficient and significantly more affordable means of employing automated atomic absorption spectrometry instruments for total mercury analysis of high-sulphur matrices.

  10. SU-E-T-139: Automated Daily EPID Exit Dose Analysis Uncovers Treatment Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olch, A [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a fully automated EPID exit dose system for its ability to detect daily treatment deviations including patient setup, delivery, and anatomy changes. Methods: PerFRACTION (Sun Nuclear Corporation) software is a system that uses integrated EPID images taken during patient treatment and automatically pulled from the Aria database and analyzed based on user-defined comparisons. This was used to monitor 20 plans consisting of a total of 859 fields for 18 patients, for a total of 251 fractions. Nine VMAT, 5 IMRT, and 6 3D plans were monitored. The Gamma analysis was performed for each field within a plan, comparing the first fraction against each of the other fractions in each treatment course. A 2% dose difference, 1 mm distance-to-agreement, and 10% dose threshold was used. These tight tolerances were chosen to achieve a high sensitivity to treatment variations. The field passed if 93% of the pixels had a Gamma of 1 or less. Results: Twenty-nine percent of the fields failed. The average plan passing rate was 92.5%.The average 3D plan passing rate was less than for VMAT or IMRT, 84%, vs. an average of 96.2%. When fields failed, an investigation revealed changes in patient anatomy or setup variations, often also leading to variations of transmission through immobilization devices. Conclusion: PerFRACTION is a fully automated system for determining daily changes in dose transmission through the patient that requires no effort other than for the imager panel to be deployed during treatment. A surprising number of fields failed the analysis and can be attributed to important treatment variations that would otherwise not be appreciated. Further study of inter-fraction treatment variations is possible and warranted. Sun Nuclear Corporation provided a license to the software described.

  11. Automated detection of regions of interest for tissue microarray experiments: an image texture analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaçali, Bilge; Tözeren, Aydin

    2007-01-01

    Recent research with tissue microarrays led to a rapid progress toward quantifying the expressions of large sets of biomarkers in normal and diseased tissue. However, standard procedures for sampling tissue for molecular profiling have not yet been established. This study presents a high throughput analysis of texture heterogeneity on breast tissue images for the purpose of identifying regions of interest in the tissue for molecular profiling via tissue microarray technology. Image texture of breast histology slides was described in terms of three parameters: the percentage of area occupied in an image block by chromatin (B), percentage occupied by stroma-like regions (P), and a statistical heterogeneity index H commonly used in image analysis. Texture parameters were defined and computed for each of the thousands of image blocks in our dataset using both the gray scale and color segmentation. The image blocks were then classified into three categories using the texture feature parameters in a novel statistical learning algorithm. These categories are as follows: image blocks specific to normal breast tissue, blocks specific to cancerous tissue, and those image blocks that are non-specific to normal and disease states. Gray scale and color segmentation techniques led to identification of same regions in histology slides as cancer-specific. Moreover the image blocks identified as cancer-specific belonged to those cell crowded regions in whole section image slides that were marked by two pathologists as regions of interest for further histological studies. These results indicate the high efficiency of our automated method for identifying pathologic regions of interest on histology slides. Automation of critical region identification will help minimize the inter-rater variability among different raters (pathologists) as hundreds of tumors that are used to develop an array have typically been evaluated (graded) by different pathologists. The region of interest

  12. Widely applicable MATLAB routines for automated analysis of saccadic reaction times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Jukka M; Forssman, Linda; Kaatiala, Jussi; Yrttiaho, Santeri; Wass, Sam

    2015-06-01

    Saccadic reaction time (SRT) is a widely used dependent variable in eye-tracking studies of human cognition and its disorders. SRTs are also frequently measured in studies with special populations, such as infants and young children, who are limited in their ability to follow verbal instructions and remain in a stable position over time. In this article, we describe a library of MATLAB routines (Mathworks, Natick, MA) that are designed to (1) enable completely automated implementation of SRT analysis for multiple data sets and (2) cope with the unique challenges of analyzing SRTs from eye-tracking data collected from poorly cooperating participants. The library includes preprocessing and SRT analysis routines. The preprocessing routines (i.e., moving median filter and interpolation) are designed to remove technical artifacts and missing samples from raw eye-tracking data. The SRTs are detected by a simple algorithm that identifies the last point of gaze in the area of interest, but, critically, the extracted SRTs are further subjected to a number of postanalysis verification checks to exclude values contaminated by artifacts. Example analyses of data from 5- to 11-month-old infants demonstrated that SRTs extracted with the proposed routines were in high agreement with SRTs obtained manually from video records, robust against potential sources of artifact, and exhibited moderate to high test-retest stability. We propose that the present library has wide utility in standardizing and automating SRT-based cognitive testing in various populations. The MATLAB routines are open source and can be downloaded from http://www.uta.fi/med/icl/methods.html .

  13. Analysis of an Automated Vehicle Routing Problem in Logistics considering Path Interruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of automated vehicles in logistics can efficiently reduce the cost of logistics and reduce the potential risks in the last mile. Considering the path restriction in the initial stage of the application of automated vehicles in logistics, the conventional model for a vehicle routing problem (VRP is modified. Thus, the automated vehicle routing problem with time windows (AVRPTW model considering path interruption is established. Additionally, an improved particle swarm optimisation (PSO algorithm is designed to solve this problem. Finally, a case study is undertaken to test the validity of the model and the algorithm. Four automated vehicles are designated to execute all delivery tasks required by 25 stores. Capacities of all of the automated vehicles are almost fully utilised. It is of considerable significance for the promotion of automated vehicles in last-mile situations to develop such research into real problems arising in the initial period.

  14. Monitored Retrievable Storage/Multi-Purpose Canister analysis: Simulation and economics of automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.C.; Stringer, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Robotic automation is examined as a possible alternative to manual spent nuclear fuel, transport cask and Multi-Purpose canister (MPC) handling at a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. Automation of key operational aspects for the MRS/MPC system are analyzed to determine equipment requirements, through-put times and equipment costs is described. The economic and radiation dose impacts resulting from this automation are compared to manual handling methods

  15. Automated analysis of art object surfaces using time-averaged digital speckle pattern interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukomski, Michal; Krzemien, Leszek

    2013-05-01

    Technical development and practical evaluation of a laboratory built, out-of-plane digital speckle pattern interferometer (DSPI) are reported. The instrument was used for non-invasive, non-contact detection and characterization of early-stage damage, like fracturing and layer separation, of painted objects of art. A fully automated algorithm was developed for recording and analysis of vibrating objects utilizing continuous-wave laser light. The algorithm uses direct, numerical fitting or Hilbert transformation for an independent, quantitative evaluation of the Bessel function at every point of the investigated surface. The procedure does not require phase modulation and thus can be implemented within any, even the simplest, DSPI apparatus. The proposed deformation analysis is fast and computationally inexpensive. Diagnosis of physical state of the surface of a panel painting attributed to Nicolaus Haberschrack (a late-mediaeval painter active in Krakow) from the collection of the National Museum in Krakow is presented as an example of an in situ application of the developed methodology. It has allowed the effectiveness of the deformation analysis to be evaluated for the surface of a real painting (heterogeneous colour and texture) in a conservation studio where vibration level was considerably higher than in the laboratory. It has been established that the methodology, which offers automatic analysis of the interferometric fringe patterns, has a considerable potential to facilitate and render more precise the condition surveys of works of art.

  16. Semi-Automated Digital Image Analysis of Pick's Disease and TDP-43 Proteinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, David J; Byrne, Matthew D; McMillan, Corey T; Cooper, Felicia; Arnold, Steven E; Lee, Edward B; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Xie, Sharon X; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Grossman, Murray; Trojanowski, John Q

    2016-01-01

    Digital image analysis of histology sections provides reliable, high-throughput methods for neuropathological studies but data is scant in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), which has an added challenge of study due to morphologically diverse pathologies. Here, we describe a novel method of semi-automated digital image analysis in FTLD subtypes including: Pick's disease (PiD, n=11) with tau-positive intracellular inclusions and neuropil threads, and TDP-43 pathology type C (FTLD-TDPC, n=10), defined by TDP-43-positive aggregates predominantly in large dystrophic neurites. To do this, we examined three FTLD-associated cortical regions: mid-frontal gyrus (MFG), superior temporal gyrus (STG) and anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG) by immunohistochemistry. We used a color deconvolution process to isolate signal from the chromogen and applied both object detection and intensity thresholding algorithms to quantify pathological burden. We found object-detection algorithms had good agreement with gold-standard manual quantification of tau- and TDP-43-positive inclusions. Our sampling method was reliable across three separate investigators and we obtained similar results in a pilot analysis using open-source software. Regional comparisons using these algorithms finds differences in regional anatomic disease burden between PiD and FTLD-TDP not detected using traditional ordinal scale data, suggesting digital image analysis is a powerful tool for clinicopathological studies in morphologically diverse FTLD syndromes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Semi-Automated Digital Image Analysis of Pick’s Disease and TDP-43 Proteinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, David J.; Byrne, Matthew D.; McMillan, Corey T.; Cooper, Felicia; Arnold, Steven E.; Lee, Edward B.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Xie, Sharon X.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Grossman, Murray; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Digital image analysis of histology sections provides reliable, high-throughput methods for neuropathological studies but data is scant in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), which has an added challenge of study due to morphologically diverse pathologies. Here, we describe a novel method of semi-automated digital image analysis in FTLD subtypes including: Pick’s disease (PiD, n=11) with tau-positive intracellular inclusions and neuropil threads, and TDP-43 pathology type C (FTLD-TDPC, n=10), defined by TDP-43-positive aggregates predominantly in large dystrophic neurites. To do this, we examined three FTLD-associated cortical regions: mid-frontal gyrus (MFG), superior temporal gyrus (STG) and anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG) by immunohistochemistry. We used a color deconvolution process to isolate signal from the chromogen and applied both object detection and intensity thresholding algorithms to quantify pathological burden. We found object-detection algorithms had good agreement with gold-standard manual quantification of tau- and TDP-43-positive inclusions. Our sampling method was reliable across three separate investigators and we obtained similar results in a pilot analysis using open-source software. Regional comparisons using these algorithms finds differences in regional anatomic disease burden between PiD and FTLD-TDP not detected using traditional ordinal scale data, suggesting digital image analysis is a powerful tool for clinicopathological studies in morphologically diverse FTLD syndromes. PMID:26538548

  18. Digital transplantation pathology: combining whole slide imaging, multiplex staining and automated image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isse, K; Lesniak, A; Grama, K; Roysam, B; Minervini, M I; Demetris, A J

    2012-01-01

    Conventional histopathology is the gold standard for allograft monitoring, but its value proposition is increasingly questioned. "-Omics" analysis of tissues, peripheral blood and fluids and targeted serologic studies provide mechanistic insights into allograft injury not currently provided by conventional histology. Microscopic biopsy analysis, however, provides valuable and unique information: (a) spatial-temporal relationships; (b) rare events/cells; (c) complex structural context; and (d) integration into a "systems" model. Nevertheless, except for immunostaining, no transformative advancements have "modernized" routine microscopy in over 100 years. Pathologists now team with hardware and software engineers to exploit remarkable developments in digital imaging, nanoparticle multiplex staining, and computational image analysis software to bridge the traditional histology-global "-omic" analyses gap. Included are side-by-side comparisons, objective biopsy finding quantification, multiplexing, automated image analysis, and electronic data and resource sharing. Current utilization for teaching, quality assurance, conferencing, consultations, research and clinical trials is evolving toward implementation for low-volume, high-complexity clinical services like transplantation pathology. Cost, complexities of implementation, fluid/evolving standards, and unsettled medical/legal and regulatory issues remain as challenges. Regardless, challenges will be overcome and these technologies will enable transplant pathologists to increase information extraction from tissue specimens and contribute to cross-platform biomarker discovery for improved outcomes. ©Copyright 2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Automated system for ST segment and arrhythmia analysis in exercise radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsia, P.W.; Jenkins, J.M.; Shimoni, Y.; Gage, K.P.; Santinga, J.T.; Pitt, B.

    1986-01-01

    A computer-based system for interpretation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in the diagnosis of arrhythmia and ST segment abnormality in an exercise system is presented. The system was designed for inclusion in a gamma camera so the ECG diagnosis could be combined with the diagnostic capability of radionuclide ventriculography. Digitized data are analyzed in a beat-by-beat mode and a contextual diagnosis of underlying rhythm is provided. Each beat is assigned a beat code based on a combination of waveform analysis and RR interval measurement. The waveform analysis employs a new correlation coefficient formula which corrects for baseline wander. Selective signal averaging, in which only normal beats are included, is done for an improved signal-to-noise ratio prior to ST segment analysis. Template generation, R wave detection, QRS window size, baseline correction, and continuous updating of heart rate have all been automated. ST level and slope measurements are computed on signal-averaged data. Arrhythmia analysis of 13 passages of abnormal rhythm by computer was found to be correct in 98.4 percent of all beats. 25 passages of exercise data, 1-5 min in length, were evaluated by the cardiologist and found to be in agreement in 95.8 percent in measurements of ST level and 91.7 percent in measurements of ST slope

  20. A Machine Learning Approach to Automated Gait Analysis for the Noldus Catwalk System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Holger; Claes, Kasper; De Wolf, Catherine; Van Damme, Xavier; Michel, Anne

    2018-05-01

    Gait analysis of animal disease models can provide valuable insights into in vivo compound effects and thus help in preclinical drug development. The purpose of this paper is to establish a computational gait analysis approach for the Noldus Catwalk system, in which footprints are automatically captured and stored. We present a - to our knowledge - first machine learning based approach for the Catwalk system, which comprises a step decomposition, definition and extraction of meaningful features, multivariate step sequence alignment, feature selection, and training of different classifiers (gradient boosting machine, random forest, and elastic net). Using animal-wise leave-one-out cross validation we demonstrate that with our method we can reliable separate movement patterns of a putative Parkinson's disease animal model and several control groups. Furthermore, we show that we can predict the time point after and the type of different brain lesions and can even forecast the brain region, where the intervention was applied. We provide an in-depth analysis of the features involved into our classifiers via statistical techniques for model interpretation. A machine learning method for automated analysis of data from the Noldus Catwalk system was established. Our works shows the ability of machine learning to discriminate pharmacologically relevant animal groups based on their walking behavior in a multivariate manner. Further interesting aspects of the approach include the ability to learn from past experiments, improve with more data arriving and to make predictions for single animals in future studies.

  1. Theoretical remarks on the statistics of three discriminants in Piety's automated signature analysis of PSD [Power Spectral Density] data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behringer, K.; Spiekerman, G.

    1984-01-01

    Piety (1977) proposed an automated signature analysis of power spectral density data. Eight statistical decision discriminants are introduced. For nearly all the discriminants, improved confidence statements can be made. The statistical characteristics of the last three discriminants, which are applications of non-parametric tests, are considered. (author)

  2. Measurement precision and biological variation of cranial arteries using automated analysis of 3 T magnetic resonance angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Lundholm, Elisabet; Hougaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-invasive magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) has facilitated repeated measurements of human cranial arteries in several headache and migraine studies. To ensure comparability across studies the same automated analysis software has been used, but the intra- and interobserver, day-...

  3. Identifying and Quantifying Cultural Factors That Matter to the IT Workforce: An Approach Based on Automated Content Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiedel, Theresa; Müller, Oliver; Debortoli, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    builds on 112,610 online reviews of Fortune 500 IT companies collected from Glassdoor, an online platform on which current and former employees can anonymously review companies and their management. We perform an automated content analysis to identify cultural factors that employees emphasize...

  4. Automated electronic reminders to prevent miscommunication among primary medical, surgical and anaesthesia providers: a root cause analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundlich, Robert E; Grondin, Louise; Tremper, Kevin K; Saran, Kelly A; Kheterpal, Sachin

    2012-10-01

    In this case report, the authors present an adverse event possibly caused by miscommunication among three separate medical teams at their hospital. The authors then discuss the hospital's root cause analysis and its proposed solutions, focusing on the subsequent hospital-wide implementation of an automated electronic reminder for abnormal laboratory values that may have helped to prevent similar medical errors.

  5. Automation of radiochemical analysis by flow injection techniques. Am-Pu separation using TRU-resinTM sorbent extraction column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, O.; Washington Univ., Seattle, WA; Grate, J.W.; Ruzicka, J.

    1998-01-01

    A rapid automated flow injection analysis (FIA) procedure was developed for efficient separation of Am and Pu from each other and from interfering matrix and radionuclide components using a TRU-resin TM column. Selective Pu elution is enabled via on-column reduction. The separation was developed using on-line radioactivity detection. After the separation had been developed, fraction collection was used to obtain the separated fractions. In this manner, a FIA instrument functions as an automated separation workstation capable of unattended operation. (author)

  6. Optical Coherence Tomography in the UK Biobank Study - Rapid Automated Analysis of Retinal Thickness for Large Population-Based Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearse A Keane

    Full Text Available To describe an approach to the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT imaging in large, population-based studies, including methods for OCT image acquisition, storage, and the remote, rapid, automated analysis of retinal thickness.In UK Biobank, OCT images were acquired between 2009 and 2010 using a commercially available "spectral domain" OCT device (3D OCT-1000, Topcon. Images were obtained using a raster scan protocol, 6 mm x 6 mm in area, and consisting of 128 B-scans. OCT image sets were stored on UK Biobank servers in a central repository, adjacent to high performance computers. Rapid, automated analysis of retinal thickness was performed using custom image segmentation software developed by the Topcon Advanced Biomedical Imaging Laboratory (TABIL. This software employs dual-scale gradient information to allow for automated segmentation of nine intraretinal boundaries in a rapid fashion.67,321 participants (134,642 eyes in UK Biobank underwent OCT imaging of both eyes as part of the ocular module. 134,611 images were successfully processed with 31 images failing segmentation analysis due to corrupted OCT files or withdrawal of subject consent for UKBB study participation. Average time taken to call up an image from the database and complete segmentation analysis was approximately 120 seconds per data set per login, and analysis of the entire dataset was completed in approximately 28 days.We report an approach to the rapid, automated measurement of retinal thickness from nearly 140,000 OCT image sets from the UK Biobank. In the near future, these measurements will be publically available for utilization by researchers around the world, and thus for correlation with the wealth of other data collected in UK Biobank. The automated analysis approaches we describe may be of utility for future large population-based epidemiological studies, clinical trials, and screening programs that employ OCT imaging.

  7. Stromal vascular fraction isolated from lipo-aspirates using an automated processing system: bench and bed analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Kentaro; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Iida, Hideo; Eto, Hitomi; Kato, Harunosuke; Aoi, Noriyuki; Kuno, Shinichiro; Hirohi, Toshitsugu; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2013-11-01

    The heterogeneous stromal vascular fraction (SVF), containing adipose-derived stem/progenitor cells (ASCs), can be easily isolated through enzymatic digestion of aspirated adipose tissue. In clinical settings, however, strict control of technical procedures according to standard operating procedures and validation of cell-processing conditions are required. Therefore, we evaluated the efficiency and reliability of an automated system for SVF isolation from adipose tissue. SVF cells, freshly isolated using the automated procedure, showed comparable number and viability to those from manual isolation. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed an SVF cell composition profile similar to that after manual isolation. In addition, the ASC yield after 1 week in culture was also not significantly different between the two groups. Our clinical study, in which SVF cells isolated with the automated system were transplanted with aspirated fat tissue for soft tissue augmentation/reconstruction in 42 patients, showed satisfactory outcomes with no serious side-effects. Taken together, our results suggested that the automated isolation system is as reliable a method as manual isolation and may also be useful in clinical settings. Automated isolation is expected to enable cell-based clinical trials in small facilities with an aseptic room, without the necessity of a good manufacturing practice-level cell processing area. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Automated combustion accelerator mass spectrometry for the analysis of biomedical samples in the low attomole range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Esther; Sandman, Hugo; Grossouw, Dimitri; Mocking, Johannes A J; Coulier, Leon; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2014-08-05

    The increasing role of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in biomedical research necessitates modernization of the traditional sample handling process. AMS was originally developed and used for carbon dating, therefore focusing on a very high precision but with a comparably low sample throughput. Here, we describe the combination of automated sample combustion with an elemental analyzer (EA) online coupled to an AMS via a dedicated interface. This setup allows direct radiocarbon measurements for over 70 samples daily by AMS. No sample processing is required apart from the pipetting of the sample into a tin foil cup, which is placed in the carousel of the EA. In our system, up to 200 AMS analyses are performed automatically without the need for manual interventions. We present results on the direct total (14)C count measurements in <2 μL human plasma samples. The method shows linearity over a range of 0.65-821 mBq/mL, with a lower limit of quantification of 0.65 mBq/mL (corresponding to 0.67 amol for acetaminophen). At these extremely low levels of activity, it becomes important to quantify plasma specific carbon percentages. This carbon percentage is automatically generated upon combustion of a sample on the EA. Apparent advantages of the present approach include complete omission of sample preparation (reduced hands-on time) and fully automated sample analysis. These improvements clearly stimulate the standard incorporation of microtracer research in the drug development process. In combination with the particularly low sample volumes required and extreme sensitivity, AMS strongly improves its position as a bioanalysis method.

  9. SCDU Testbed Automated In-Situ Alignment, Data Acquisition and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werne, Thomas A.; Wehmeier, Udo J.; Wu, Janet P.; An, Xin; Goullioud, Renaud; Nemati, Bijan; Shao, Michael; Shen, Tsae-Pyng J.; Wang, Xu; Weilert, Mark A.; hide

    2010-01-01

    In the course of fulfilling its mandate, the Spectral Calibration Development Unit (SCDU) testbed for SIM-Lite produces copious amounts of raw data. To effectively spend time attempting to understand the science driving the data, the team devised computerized automations to limit the time spent bringing the testbed to a healthy state and commanding it, and instead focus on analyzing the processed results. We developed a multi-layered scripting language that emphasized the scientific experiments we conducted, which drastically shortened our experiment scripts, improved their readability, and all-but-eliminated testbed operator errors. In addition to scientific experiment functions, we also developed a set of automated alignments that bring the testbed up to a well-aligned state with little more than the push of a button. These scripts were written in the scripting language, and in Matlab via an interface library, allowing all members of the team to augment the existing scripting language with complex analysis scripts. To keep track of these results, we created an easily-parseable state log in which we logged both the state of the testbed and relevant metadata. Finally, we designed a distributed processing system that allowed us to farm lengthy analyses to a collection of client computers which reported their results in a central log. Since these logs were parseable, we wrote query scripts that gave us an effortless way to compare results collected under different conditions. This paper serves as a case-study, detailing the motivating requirements for the decisions we made and explaining the implementation process.

  10. Results of Automated Retinal Image Analysis for Detection of Diabetic Retinopathy from the Nakuru Study, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Morten B; Abràmoff, Michael D; Folk, James C; Mathenge, Wanjiku; Bastawrous, Andrew; Peto, Tunde

    2015-01-01

    Digital retinal imaging is an established method of screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR). It has been established that currently about 1% of the world's blind or visually impaired is due to DR. However, the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus and DR is creating an increased workload on those with expertise in grading retinal images. Safe and reliable automated analysis of retinal images may support screening services worldwide. This study aimed to compare the Iowa Detection Program (IDP) ability to detect diabetic eye diseases (DED) to human grading carried out at Moorfields Reading Centre on the population of Nakuru Study from Kenya. Retinal images were taken from participants of the Nakuru Eye Disease Study in Kenya in 2007/08 (n = 4,381 participants [NW6 Topcon Digital Retinal Camera]). First, human grading was performed for the presence or absence of DR, and for those with DR this was sub-divided in to referable or non-referable DR. The automated IDP software was deployed to identify those with DR and also to categorize the severity of DR. The primary outcomes were sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of IDP versus the human grader as reference standard. Altogether 3,460 participants were included. 113 had DED, giving a prevalence of 3.3% (95% CI, 2.7-3.9%). Sensitivity of the IDP to detect DED as by the human grading was 91.0% (95% CI, 88.0-93.4%). The IDP ability to detect DED gave an AUC of 0.878 (95% CI 0.850-0.905). It showed a negative predictive value of 98%. The IDP missed no vision threatening retinopathy in any patients and none of the false negative cases met criteria for treatment. In this epidemiological sample, the IDP's grading was comparable to that of human graders'. It therefore might be feasible to consider inclusion into usual epidemiological grading.

  11. Volumetric analysis of pelvic hematomas after blunt trauma using semi-automated seeded region growing segmentation: a method validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreizin, David; Bodanapally, Uttam K; Neerchal, Nagaraj; Tirada, Nikki; Patlas, Michael; Herskovits, Edward

    2016-11-01

    Manually segmented traumatic pelvic hematoma volumes are strongly predictive of active bleeding at conventional angiography, but the method is time intensive, limiting its clinical applicability. We compared volumetric analysis using semi-automated region growing segmentation to manual segmentation and diameter-based size estimates in patients with pelvic hematomas after blunt pelvic trauma. A 14-patient cohort was selected in an anonymous randomized fashion from a dataset of patients with pelvic binders at MDCT, collected retrospectively as part of a HIPAA-compliant IRB-approved study from January 2008 to December 2013. To evaluate intermethod differences, one reader (R1) performed three volume measurements using the manual technique and three volume measurements using the semi-automated technique. To evaluate interobserver differences for semi-automated segmentation, a second reader (R2) performed three semi-automated measurements. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare differences in mean volumes. Time effort was also compared. Correlation between the two methods as well as two shorthand appraisals (greatest diameter, and the ABC/2 method for estimating ellipsoid volumes) was assessed with Spearman's rho (r). Intraobserver variability was lower for semi-automated compared to manual segmentation, with standard deviations ranging between ±5-32 mL and ±17-84 mL, respectively (p = 0.0003). There was no significant difference in mean volumes between the two readers' semi-automated measurements (p = 0.83); however, means were lower for the semi-automated compared with the manual technique (manual: mean and SD 309.6 ± 139 mL; R1 semi-auto: 229.6 ± 88.2 mL, p = 0.004; R2 semi-auto: 243.79 ± 99.7 mL, p = 0.021). Despite differences in means, the correlation between the two methods was very strong and highly significant (r = 0.91, p hematoma volumes correlate strongly with manually segmented volumes. Since semi-automated segmentation

  12. Sensitivity analysis of reactor safety parameters with automated adjoint function generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallfelz, J.M.; Horwedel, J.E.; Worley, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    A project at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) involves the development of simulation models for the transient analysis of the reactors in Switzerland (STARS). This project, funded in part by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate, also involves the calculation and evaluation of certain transients for Swiss light water reactors (LWRs). For best-estimate analyses, a key element in quantifying reactor safety margins is uncertainty evaluation to determine the uncertainty in calculated integral values (responses) caused by modeling, calculational methodology, and input data (parameters). The work reported in this paper is a joint PSI/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) application to a core transient analysis code of an ORNL software system for automated sensitivity analysis. The Gradient-Enhanced Software System (GRESS) is a software package that can in principle enhance any code so that it can calculate the sensitivity (derivative) to input parameters of any integral value (response) calculated in the original code. The studies reported are the first application of the GRESS capability to core neutronics and safety codes

  13. Automated Bearing Fault Diagnosis Using 2D Analysis of Vibration Acceleration Signals under Variable Speed Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheraz Ali Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional fault diagnosis methods of bearings detect characteristic defect frequencies in the envelope power spectrum of the vibration signal. These defect frequencies depend upon the inherently nonstationary shaft speed. Time-frequency and subband signal analysis of vibration signals has been used to deal with random variations in speed, whereas design variations require retraining a new instance of the classifier for each operating speed. This paper presents an automated approach for fault diagnosis in bearings based upon the 2D analysis of vibration acceleration signals under variable speed conditions. Images created from the vibration signals exhibit unique textures for each fault, which show minimal variation with shaft speed. Microtexture analysis of these images is used to generate distinctive fault signatures for each fault type, which can be used to detect those faults at different speeds. A k-nearest neighbor classifier trained using fault signatures generated for one operating speed is used to detect faults at all the other operating speeds. The proposed approach is tested on the bearing fault dataset of Case Western Reserve University, and the results are compared with those of a spectrum imaging-based approach.

  14. Automated patterning and probing with multiple nanoscale tools for single-cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiayao; Kim, Yeonuk; Liu, Boyin; Qin, Ruwen; Li, Jian; Fu, Jing

    2017-10-01

    The nano-manipulation approach that combines Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling and various imaging and probing techniques enables researchers to investigate the cellular structures in three dimensions. Such fusion approach, however, requires extensive effort on locating and examining randomly-distributed targets due to limited Field of View (FOV) when high magnification is desired. In the present study, we present the development that automates 'pattern and probe' particularly for single-cell analysis, achieved by computer aided tools including feature recognition and geometric planning algorithms. Scheduling of serial FOVs for imaging and probing of multiple cells was considered as a rectangle covering problem, and optimal or near-optimal solutions were obtained with the heuristics developed. FIB milling was then employed automatically followed by downstream analysis using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to probe the cellular interior. Our strategy was applied to examine bacterial cells (Klebsiella pneumoniae) and achieved high efficiency with limited human interference. The developed algorithms can be easily adapted and integrated with different imaging platforms towards high-throughput imaging analysis of single cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. AUTOMATED SYSTEM OF THE OPERATIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE FEASIBILITY OF EARTH REMOTE SENSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Arkhipova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article scopes the hardware and software of the information system for pre-contractual real-time analysis of requests feasibility for supplying of Earth remote sensing data, which is an integral part of the Belarusian Space System for Earth Remote Sensing. The main purpose of the development of this information system is the creation of computer-aided system for real-time analysis of customers’ requests feasibility by using the resources of two space vehicles. This system is a decision support system in the pre-contractual phase on the everyday business practice. This automation activity is solved using multicriteria optimization approaches. The created information system allows to speed-up calculations and increase its quality as well as to augment the precision of assessment of space images acquisition by including the resources of two satellites during the requested period of time. This system has passed the evaluation test for both satellites and may be further used as the base for real-time analysis of requests feasibility taking into account the resources of several space vehicles.

  16. Automated analysis of high-content microscopy data with deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Oren Z; Grys, Ben T; Ba, Jimmy; Chong, Yolanda; Frey, Brendan J; Boone, Charles; Andrews, Brenda J

    2017-04-18

    Existing computational pipelines for quantitative analysis of high-content microscopy data rely on traditional machine learning approaches that fail to accurately classify more than a single dataset without substantial tuning and training, requiring extensive analysis. Here, we demonstrate that the application of deep learning to biological image data can overcome the pitfalls associated with conventional machine learning classifiers. Using a deep convolutional neural network (DeepLoc) to analyze yeast cell images, we show improved performance over traditional approaches in the automated classification of protein subcellular localization. We also demonstrate the ability of DeepLoc to classify highly divergent image sets, including images of pheromone-arrested cells with abnormal cellular morphology, as well as images generated in different genetic backgrounds and in different laboratories. We offer an open-source implementation that enables updating DeepLoc on new microscopy datasets. This study highlights deep learning as an important tool for the expedited analysis of high-content microscopy data. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  17. Automated classification and quantitative analysis of arterial and venous vessels in fundus images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Minhaj; Son, Taeyoon; Toslak, Devrim; Lim, Jennifer I.; Yao, Xincheng

    2018-02-01

    It is known that retinopathies may affect arteries and veins differently. Therefore, reliable differentiation of arteries and veins is essential for computer-aided analysis of fundus images. The purpose of this study is to validate one automated method for robust classification of arteries and veins (A-V) in digital fundus images. We combine optical density ratio (ODR) analysis and blood vessel tracking algorithm to classify arteries and veins. A matched filtering method is used to enhance retinal blood vessels. Bottom hat filtering and global thresholding are used to segment the vessel and skeleton individual blood vessels. The vessel tracking algorithm is used to locate the optic disk and to identify source nodes of blood vessels in optic disk area. Each node can be identified as vein or artery using ODR information. Using the source nodes as starting point, the whole vessel trace is then tracked and classified as vein or artery using vessel curvature and angle information. 50 color fundus images from diabetic retinopathy patients were used to test the algorithm. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy metrics were measured to assess the validity of the proposed classification method compared to ground truths created by two independent observers. The algorithm demonstrated 97.52% accuracy in identifying blood vessels as vein or artery. A quantitative analysis upon A-V classification showed that average A-V ratio of width for NPDR subjects with hypertension decreased significantly (43.13%).

  18. Quality-assurance techniques used with automated analysis of gamma-ray spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killian, E.W.; Koeppen, L.D.; Femec, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    In the course of developing gamma-ray spectrum analysis algorithms for use by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), several techniques have been developed that enhance and verify the quality of the analytical results. The use of these quality-assurance techniques is critical when gamma-ray analysis results from low-level environmental samples are used in risk assessment or site restoration and cleanup decisions. This paper describes four of the quality-assurance techniques that are in routine use at the laboratory. They are used for all types of samples, from reactor effluents to environmental samples. The techniques include: (1) the use of precision pulsers (with subsequent removal) to validate the correct operation of the spectrometer electronics for each and every spectrum acquired, (2) the use of naturally occurring and cosmically induced radionuclides in samples to help verify that the data acquisition and analysis were performed properly, (3) the use of an ambient background correction technique that involves superimposing (open-quotes mappingclose quotes) sample photopeak fitting parameters onto multiple background spectra for accurate and more consistent quantification of the background activities, (4) the use of interactive, computer-driven graphics to review the automated locating and fitting of photopeaks and to allow for manual fitting of photopeaks

  19. Automated Detection of Connective Tissue by Tissue Counter Analysis and Classification and Regression Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Smolle

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of the CART (Classification and Regression Tree procedure for the recognition of microscopic structures in tissue counter analysis. Methods: Digital microscopic images of H&E stained slides of normal human skin and of primary malignant melanoma were overlayed with regularly distributed square measuring masks (elements and grey value, texture and colour features within each mask were recorded. In the learning set, elements were interactively labeled as representing either connective tissue of the reticular dermis, other tissue components or background. Subsequently, CART models were based on these data sets. Results: Implementation of the CART classification rules into the image analysis program showed that in an independent test set 94.1% of elements classified as connective tissue of the reticular dermis were correctly labeled. Automated measurements of the total amount of tissue and of the amount of connective tissue within a slide showed high reproducibility (r=0.97 and r=0.94, respectively; p < 0.001. Conclusions: CART procedure in tissue counter analysis yields simple and reproducible classification rules for tissue elements.

  20. Automated GC-MS analysis of free amino acids in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Hannelore; Dettmer, Katja; Gronwald, Wolfram; Oefner, Peter J

    2008-07-15

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed for the quantitative analysis of free amino acids as their propyl chloroformate derivatives in biological fluids. Derivatization with propyl chloroformate is carried out directly in the biological samples without prior protein precipitation or solid-phase extraction of the amino acids, thereby allowing automation of the entire procedure, including addition of reagents, extraction and injection into the GC-MS. The total analysis time was 30 min and 30 amino acids could be reliably quantified using 19 stable isotope-labeled amino acids as internal standards. Limits of detection (LOD) and lower limits of quantification (LLOQ) were in the range of 0.03-12 microM and 0.3-30 microM, respectively. The method was validated using a certified amino acid standard and reference plasma, and its applicability to different biological fluids was shown. Intra-day precision for the analysis of human urine, blood plasma, and cell culture medium was 2.0-8.8%, 0.9-8.3%, and 2.0-14.3%, respectively, while the inter-day precision for human urine was 1.5-14.1%.

  1. Automated analysis of pumping tests; Analise automatizada de testes de bombeamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, Luiz Alberto Nozaki

    1996-01-01

    An automated procedure for analysis of pumping test data performed in groundwater wells is described. A computer software was developed to be used under the Windows operational system. The software allows the choice of 3 mathematical models for representing the aquifer behavior, which are: Confined aquifer (Theis model); Leaky aquifer (Hantush model); unconfined aquifer (Boulton model). The analysis of pumping test data using the proper aquifer model, allows for the determination of the model parameters such as transmissivity, storage coefficient, leakage coefficient and delay index. The computer program can be used for the analysis of data obtained from both pumping tests, with one or more pumping rates, and recovery tests. In the multiple rate case, a de superposition procedure has been implemented in order to obtain the equivalent aquifer response for the first flow rate, which is used in obtaining an initial estimate of the model parameters. Such initial estimate is required in the non-linear regression analysis method. The solutions to the partial differential equations describing the aquifer behavior were obtained in Laplace space, followed by numerical inversion of the transformed solution using the Stehfest algorithm. The data analysis procedure is based on a non-linear regression method by matching the field data to the theoretical response of a selected aquifer model, for a given type of test. A least squared regression analysis method was implemented using either Gauss-Newton or Levenberg-Marquardt procedures for minimization of a objective function. The computer software can also be applied to multiple rate test data in order to determine the non-linear well coefficient, allowing for the computation of the well inflow performance curve. (author)

  2. ADGEN: An automated adjoint code generator for large-scale sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Oblow, E.M.; Horwedel, J.E.; Lucius, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a new automated system, named ADGEN, which makes use of the strengths of computer calculus to automate the costly and time-consuming calculation of derivatives in FORTRAN computer codes, and automatically generate adjoint solutions of computer codes

  3. On-line Automated Sample Preparation-Capillary Gas Chromatography for the Analysis of Plasma Samples.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louter, A.J.H.; van der Wagt, R.A.C.A.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    An automated sample preparation module, (the automated sample preparation with extraction columns, ASPEC), was interfaced with a capillary gas chromatograph (GC) by means of an on-column interface. The system was optimised for the determination of the antidepressant trazodone in plasma. The clean-up

  4. Automated discrimination of lower and higher grade gliomas based on histopathological image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojjat Seyed Mousavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Histopathological images have rich structural information, are multi-channel in nature and contain meaningful pathological information at various scales. Sophisticated image analysis tools that can automatically extract discriminative information from the histopathology image slides for diagnosis remain an area of significant research activity. In this work, we focus on automated brain cancer grading, specifically glioma grading. Grading of a glioma is a highly important problem in pathology and is largely done manually by medical experts based on an examination of pathology slides (images. To complement the efforts of clinicians engaged in brain cancer diagnosis, we develop novel image processing algorithms and systems to automatically grade glioma tumor into two categories: Low-grade glioma (LGG and high-grade glioma (HGG which represent a more advanced stage of the disease. Results: We propose novel image processing algorithms based on spatial domain analysis for glioma tumor grading that will complement the clinical interpretation of the tissue. The image processing techniques are developed in close collaboration with medical experts to mimic the visual cues that a clinician looks for in judging of the grade of the disease. Specifically, two algorithmic techniques are developed: (1 A cell segmentation and cell-count profile creation for identification of Pseudopalisading Necrosis, and (2 a customized operation of spatial and morphological filters to accurately identify microvascular proliferation (MVP. In both techniques, a hierarchical decision is made via a decision tree mechanism. If either Pseudopalisading Necrosis or MVP is found present in any part of the histopathology slide, the whole slide is identified as HGG, which is consistent with World Health Organization guidelines. Experimental results on the Cancer Genome Atlas database are presented in the form of: (1 Successful detection rates of pseudopalisading necrosis

  5. Comparison of Automated 4D-MSPECT and Visual Analysis for Evaluating Myocardial Perfusion in Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chin Hsu

    2008-09-01

    , specificity, and accuracy for CAD were 79.1%, 82.4% and 80.0%, respectively. In conclusion, the reproducibility of automated semiquantitative analysis with 4D-MSPECT was excellent. The diagnostic performance of automated semiquantitative analysis with 4D-MSPECT was comparable with the visual approach.

  6. Immunohistochemical Ki-67/KL1 double stains increase accuracy of Ki-67 indices in breast cancer and simplify automated image analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Patricia S; Bentzer, Nina K; Jensen, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    observers and automated image analysis. RESULTS: Indices were predominantly higher for single stains than double stains (P≤0.002), yet the difference between observers was statistically significant (PPearson correlation coefficient for manual and automated indices ranged from 0.......69 to 0.85 (Pcorrelating automated indices with tumor characteristics, for example, tumor size (P... stains, Ki-67 should be quantified on double stains to reach a higher accuracy. Automated indices correlated well with manual estimates and tumor characteristics, and they are thus possibly valuable tools in future exploration of Ki-67 in breast cancer....

  7. Automated multi-radionuclide separation and analysis with combined detection capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plionis, Alexander Asterios

    The radiological dispersal device (RDD) is a weapon of great concern to those agencies responsible for protecting the public from the modern age of terrorism. In order to effectively respond to an RDD event, these agencies need to possess the capability to rapidly identify the radiological agents involved in the incident and assess the uptake of each individual victim. Since medical treatment for internal radiation poisoning is radionuclide-specific, it is critical to identify and quantify the radiological uptake of each individual victim. This dissertation describes the development of automated analytical components that could be used to determine and quantify multiple radionuclides in human urine bioassays. This is accomplished through the use of extraction chromatography that is plumbed in-line with one of a variety of detection instruments. Flow scintillation analysis is used for 90Sr and 210Po determination, flow gamma analysis is used assess 60 Co and 137Cs, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is used to determine actinides. Detection limits for these analytes were determined for the appropriate technique and related to their implications for health physics.

  8. Integrated and automated data analysis for neuronal activation studies using positron emission tomography. Methodology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoshima, Satoshi; Arimizu, Noboru; Koeppe, R.A.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    A data analysis method was developed for neuronal activation studies using [ 15 O] water positron emission tomography (PET). The method consists of several procedures including intra-subject head motion correction (co-registration), detection of the mid-sagittal plane of the brain, detection of the intercommissural (AC-PC) line, linear scaling and non-linear warping for anatomical standardization, pixel-by-pixel statistical analysis, and data display. All steps are performed in three dimensions and are fully automated. Each step was validated using a brain phantom, computer simulations, and data from human subjects, demonstrating accuracy and reliability of the procedure. The method was applied to human neuronal activation studies using vibratory and visual stimulations. The method detected significant blood flow increases in the primary sensory cortices as well as in other regions such as the secondary sensory cortex and cerebellum. The proposed method should enhance application of PET neuronal activation studies to the investigation of higher-order human brain functions. (author) 38 refs

  9. Automated sensitivity analysis of the radionuclide migration code UCBNE10.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Worley, B.A.; Oblow, E.M.; Wright, R.Q.; Harper, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    The Salt Repository Project (SRP) of the US Department of Energy is performing ongoing performance assessment analyses for the eventual licensing of an underground high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. As part of these studies, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis play a major role in the identification of important parameters, and in the identification of specific data needs for site characterization. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has supported the SRP in this effort resulting in the development of an automated procedure for performing large-scale sensitivity analysis using computer calculus. GRESS, Gradient Enhanced Software System, is a pre-compiler that can process FORTRAN computer codes and add derivative taking capabilities to the normal calculated results. The GRESS code is described and applied to the code UCB-NE-10.2 which simulates the migration through an adsorptive medium of the radionuclide members of a decay chain. Conclusions are drawn relative to the applicability of GRESS for more general large-scale modeling sensitivity studies, and the role of such techniques in the overall SRP sensitivity/uncertainty program is detailed. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Automated drug dispensing systems in the intensive care unit: a financial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuis, Claire; Bedouch, Pierrick; Detavernier, Maxime; Durand, Michel; Francony, Gilles; Lavagne, Pierre; Foroni, Luc; Albaladejo, Pierre; Allenet, Benoit; Payen, Jean-Francois

    2015-09-09

    To evaluate the economic impact of automated-drug dispensing systems (ADS) in surgical intensive care units (ICUs). A financial analysis was conducted in three adult ICUs of one university hospital, where ADS were implemented, one in each unit, to replace the traditional floor stock system. Costs were estimated before and after implementation of the ADS on the basis of floor stock inventories, expired drugs, and time spent by nurses and pharmacy technicians on medication-related work activities. A financial analysis was conducted that included operating cash flows, investment cash flows, global cash flow and net present value. After ADS implementation, nurses spent less time on medication-related activities with an average of 14.7 hours saved per day/33 beds. Pharmacy technicians spent more time on floor-stock activities with an average of 3.5 additional hours per day across the three ICUs. The cost of drug storage was reduced by €44,298 and the cost of expired drugs was reduced by €14,772 per year across the three ICUs. Five years after the initial investment, the global cash flow was €148,229 and the net present value of the project was positive by €510,404. The financial modeling of the ADS implementation in three ICUs showed a high return on investment for the hospital. Medication-related costs and nursing time dedicated to medications are reduced with ADS.

  11. A New Method for Automated Identification and Morphometry of Myelinated Fibers Through Light Microscopy Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novas, Romulo Bourget; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar

    2016-02-01

    Nerve morphometry is known to produce relevant information for the evaluation of several phenomena, such as nerve repair, regeneration, implant, transplant, aging, and different human neuropathies. Manual morphometry is laborious, tedious, time consuming, and subject to many sources of error. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new method for the automated morphometry of myelinated fibers in cross-section light microscopy images. Images from the recurrent laryngeal nerve of adult rats and the vestibulocochlear nerve of adult guinea pigs were used herein. The proposed pipeline for fiber segmentation is based on the techniques of competitive clustering and concavity analysis. The evaluation of the proposed method for segmentation of images was done by comparing the automatic segmentation with the manual segmentation. To further evaluate the proposed method considering morphometric features extracted from the segmented images, the distributions of these features were tested for statistical significant difference. The method achieved a high overall sensitivity and very low false-positive rates per image. We detect no statistical difference between the distribution of the features extracted from the manual and the pipeline segmentations. The method presented a good overall performance, showing widespread potential in experimental and clinical settings allowing large-scale image analysis and, thus, leading to more reliable results.

  12. Video-processing-based system for automated pedestrian data collection and analysis when crossing the street

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Nabila; Watelain, Eric; Ben Jemaa, Yousra; Motamed, Cina

    2018-03-01

    Computer-vision techniques for pedestrian detection and tracking have progressed considerably and become widely used in several applications. However, a quick glance at the literature shows a minimal use of these techniques in pedestrian behavior and safety analysis, which might be due to the technical complexities facing the processing of pedestrian videos. To extract pedestrian trajectories from a video automatically, all road users must be detected and tracked during sequences, which is a challenging task, especially in a congested open-outdoor urban space. A multipedestrian tracker based on an interframe-detection-association process was proposed and evaluated. The tracker results are used to implement an automatic tool for pedestrians data collection when crossing the street based on video processing. The variations in the instantaneous speed allowed the detection of the street crossing phases (approach, waiting, and crossing). These were addressed for the first time in the pedestrian road security analysis to illustrate the causal relationship between pedestrian behaviors in the different phases. A comparison with a manual data collection method, by computing the root mean square error and the Pearson correlation coefficient, confirmed that the procedures proposed have significant potential to automate the data collection process.

  13. Automated Spatiotemporal Analysis of Fibrils and Coronal Rain Using the Rolling Hough Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    A technique is presented that automates the direction characterization of curvilinear features in multidimensional solar imaging datasets. It is an extension of the Rolling Hough Transform (RHT) technique presented by Clark, Peek, and Putman ( Astrophys. J. 789, 82, 2014), and it excels at rapid quantification of spatial and spatiotemporal feature orientation even for applications with a low signal-to-noise ratio. It operates on a pixel-by-pixel basis within a dataset and reliably quantifies orientation even for locations not centered on a feature ridge, which is used here to derive a quasi-continuous map of the chromospheric fine-structure projection angle. For time-series analysis, a procedure is developed that uses a hierarchical application of the RHT to automatically derive the apparent motion of coronal rain observed off-limb. Essential to the success of this technique is the formulation presented in this article for the RHT error analysis as it provides a means to properly filter results.

  14. galaxie--CGI scripts for sequence identification through automated phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, R Henrik; Larsson, Karl-Henrik; Ursing, Björn M

    2004-06-12

    The prevalent use of similarity searches like BLAST to identify sequences and species implicitly assumes the reference database to be of extensive sequence sampling. This is often not the case, restraining the correctness of the outcome as a basis for sequence identification. Phylogenetic inference outperforms similarity searches in retrieving correct phylogenies and consequently sequence identities, and a project was initiated to design a freely available script package for sequence identification through automated Web-based phylogenetic analysis. Three CGI scripts were designed to facilitate qualified sequence identification from a Web interface. Query sequences are aligned to pre-made alignments or to alignments made by ClustalW with entries retrieved from a BLAST search. The subsequent phylogenetic analysis is based on the PHYLIP package for inferring neighbor-joining and parsimony trees. The scripts are highly configurable. A service installation and a version for local use are found at http://andromeda.botany.gu.se/galaxiewelcome.html and http://galaxie.cgb.ki.se

  15. Chemical composition dispersion in bi-metallic nanoparticles: semi-automated analysis using HAADF-STEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epicier, T.; Sato, K.; Tournus, F.; Konno, T.

    2012-01-01

    We present a method using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) to determine the chemical composition of bi-metallic nanoparticles. This method, which can be applied in a semi-automated way, allows large scale analysis with a statistical number of particles (several hundreds) in a short time. Once a calibration curve has been obtained, e.g., using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) measurements on a few particles, the HAADF integrated intensity of each particle can indeed be directly related to its chemical composition. After a theoretical description, this approach is applied to the case of iron–palladium nanoparticles (expected to be nearly stoichiometric) with a mean size of 8.3 nm. It will be shown that an accurate chemical composition histogram is obtained, i.e., the Fe content has been determined to be 49.0 at.% with a dispersion of 10.4 %. HAADF-STEM analysis represents a powerful alternative to fastidious single particle EDX measurements, for the compositional dispersion in alloy nanoparticles.

  16. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataraman, S.; Allison, D.P.; Qi, H.; Morrell-Falvey, J.L.; Kallewaard, N.L.; Crowe, J.E.; Doktycz, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of biological samples can be imaged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) under environments that range from vacuum to ambient to liquid. Generally imaging is pursued to evaluate structural features of the sample or perhaps identify some structural changes in the sample that are induced by the investigator. In many cases, AFM images of sample features and induced structural changes are interpreted in general qualitative terms such as markedly smaller or larger, rougher, highly irregular, or smooth. Various manual tools can be used to analyze images and extract more quantitative data, but this is usually a cumbersome process. To facilitate quantitative AFM imaging, automated image analysis routines are being developed. Viral particles imaged in water were used as a test case to develop an algorithm that automatically extracts average dimensional information from a large set of individual particles. The extracted information allows statistical analyses of the dimensional characteristics of the particles and facilitates interpretation related to the binding of the particles to the surface. This algorithm is being extended for analysis of other biological samples and physical objects that are imaged by AFM

  17. Automated image analysis of atomic force microscopy images of rotavirus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkataraman, S. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Allison, D.P. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, Cellular, and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Molecular Imaging Inc. Tempe, AZ, 85282 (United States); Qi, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Morrell-Falvey, J.L. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Kallewaard, N.L. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Crowe, J.E. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232-2905 (United States); Doktycz, M.J. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: doktyczmj@ornl.gov

    2006-06-15

    A variety of biological samples can be imaged by the atomic force microscope (AFM) under environments that range from vacuum to ambient to liquid. Generally imaging is pursued to evaluate structural features of the sample or perhaps identify some structural changes in the sample that are induced by the investigator. In many cases, AFM images of sample features and induced structural changes are interpreted in general qualitative terms such as markedly smaller or larger, rougher, highly irregular, or smooth. Various manual tools can be used to analyze images and extract more quantitative data, but this is usually a cumbersome process. To facilitate quantitative AFM imaging, automated image analysis routines are being developed. Viral particles imaged in water were used as a test case to develop an algorithm that automatically extracts average dimensional information from a large set of individual particles. The extracted information allows statistical analyses of the dimensional characteristics of the particles and facilitates interpretation related to the binding of the particles to the surface. This algorithm is being extended for analysis of other biological samples and physical objects that are imaged by AFM.

  18. Automated Slide Scanning and Segmentation in Fluorescently-labeled Tissues Using a Widefield High-content Analysis System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Candice C; Ebacher, Vincent; Liu, Katherine; Yong, Voon Wee; Kelly, John James Patrick

    2018-05-03

    Automated slide scanning and segmentation of fluorescently-labeled tissues is the most efficient way to analyze whole slides or large tissue sections. Unfortunately, many researchers spend large amounts of time and resources developing and optimizing workflows that are only relevant to their own experiments. In this article, we describe a protocol that can be used by those with access to a widefield high-content analysis system (WHCAS) to image any slide-mounted tissue, with options for customization within pre-built modules found in the associated software. Not originally intended for slide scanning, the steps detailed in this article make it possible to acquire slide scanning images in the WHCAS which can be imported into the associated software. In this example, the automated segmentation of brain tumor slides is demonstrated, but the automated segmentation of any fluorescently-labeled nuclear or cytoplasmic marker is possible. Furthermore, there are a variety of other quantitative software modules including assays for protein localization/translocation, cellular proliferation/viability/apoptosis, and angiogenesis that can be run. This technique will save researchers time and effort and create an automated protocol for slide analysis.

  19. MEGA-CC: computing core of molecular evolutionary genetics analysis program for automated and iterative data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Stecher, Glen; Peterson, Daniel; Tamura, Koichiro

    2012-10-15

    There is a growing need in the research community to apply the molecular evolutionary genetics analysis (MEGA) software tool for batch processing a large number of datasets and to integrate it into analysis workflows. Therefore, we now make available the computing core of the MEGA software as a stand-alone executable (MEGA-CC), along with an analysis prototyper (MEGA-Proto). MEGA-CC provides users with access to all the computational analyses available through MEGA's graphical user interface version. This includes methods for multiple sequence alignment, substitution model selection, evolutionary distance estimation, phylogeny inference, substitution rate and pattern estimation, tests of natural selection and ancestral sequence inference. Additionally, we have upgraded the source code for phylogenetic analysis using the maximum likelihood methods for parallel execution on multiple processors and cores. Here, we describe MEGA-CC and outline the steps for using MEGA-CC in tandem with MEGA-Proto for iterative and automated data analysis. http://www.megasoftware.net/.

  20. Mouse Social Interaction Test (MoST): a quantitative computer automated analysis of behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Restif, Christophe; O'Rourke, Joseph R; Lam, Chiu Yin; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    Rodents are the most commonly used preclinical model of human disease assessing the mechanism(s) involved as well as the role of genetics, epigenetics, and pharmacotherapy on this disease as well as identifying vulnerability factors and risk assessment for disease critical in the development of improved treatment strategies. Unfortunately, the majority of rodent preclinical studies utilize single housed approaches where animals are either entirely housed and tested in solitary environments or group housed but tested in solitary environments. This approach, however, ignores the important contribution of social interaction and social behavior. Social interaction in rodents is found to be a major criterion for the ethological validity of rodent species-specific behavioral characteristics (Zurn et al. 2007; Analysis 2011). It is also well established that there is significant and growing number of reports, which illustrates the important role of social environment and social interaction in all diseases, with particularly significance in all neuropsychiatric diseases. Thus, it is imperative that research studies be able to add large-scale evaluations of social interaction and behavior in mice and benefit from automated tracking of behaviors and measurements by removing user bias and by quantifying aspects of behaviors that cannot be assessed by a human observer. Single mouse setups have been used routinely, but cannot be easily extended to multiple-animal studies where social behavior is key, e.g., autism, depression, anxiety, substance and non-substance addictive disorders, aggression, sexual behavior, or parenting. While recent efforts are focusing on multiple-animal tracking alone, a significant limitation remains the lack of insightful measures of social interactions. We present a novel, non-invasive single camera-based automated tracking method described as Mouse Social Test (MoST) and set of measures designed for estimating the interactions of multiple mice at the

  1. Automation and heat transfer characterization of immersion mode spectroscopy for analysis of ice nucleating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Charlotte M.; Stokes, M. Dale; Hill, Thomas C.; DeMott, Paul J.; DeWald, Jesse T.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2017-07-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) influence cloud properties and can affect the overall precipitation efficiency. Developing a parameterization of INPs in global climate models has proven challenging. More INP measurements - including studies of their spatial distribution, sources and sinks, and fundamental freezing mechanisms - must be conducted in order to further improve INP parameterizations. In this paper, an immersion mode INP measurement technique is modified and automated using a software-controlled, real-time image stream designed to leverage optical changes of water droplets to detect freezing events. For the first time, heat transfer properties of the INP measurement technique are characterized using a finite-element-analysis-based heat transfer simulation to improve accuracy of INP freezing temperature measurement. The heat transfer simulation is proposed as a tool that could be used to explain the sources of bias in temperature measurements in INP measurement techniques and ultimately explain the observed discrepancies in measured INP freezing temperatures between different instruments. The simulation results show that a difference of +8.4 °C between the well base temperature and the headspace gas results in an up to 0.6 °C stratification of the aliquot, whereas a difference of +4.2 °C or less results in a thermally homogenous water volume within the error of the thermal probe, ±0.2 °C. The results also show that there is a strong temperature gradient in the immediate vicinity of the aliquot, such that without careful placement of temperature probes, or characterization of heat transfer properties of the water and cooling environment, INP measurements can be biased toward colder temperatures. Based on a modified immersion mode technique, the Automated Ice Spectrometer (AIS), measurements of the standard test dust illite NX are reported and compared against six other immersion mode droplet assay techniques featured in Hiranuma et al. (2015) that used

  2. Automated pure-tone audiometry: an analysis of capacity, need, and benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Robert H; Morgan, Donald E

    2008-12-01

    The rationale for automating pure-tone audiometry based on the need for hearing tests and the capacity of audiologists to provide testing is presented. The personnel time savings from automated testing are analyzed. Some possible effects of automated testing on the profession are explored. Need for testing was based on prevalence of hearing impairment, number of normal hearing patients seen for testing, and an assumption of the frequency of testing. Capacity is based on the number of audiologists and the number of audiograms performed in a typical workday. Time savings were estimated from the average duration of an audiogram and an assumption that 80% can be automated. A large gap exists between the need and the capacity of audiologists to provide testing. Automating 80% of audiograms would only partially close the gap. A significant time savings could accrue, permitting reallocation of time for doctoral level services. Although certain jobs could be affected, the gap between capacity and need is so great that automated audiometry will not significantly affect employment. Automation could increase the number of hearing impaired patients that could be served. The reallocation of personnel time would be a positive change for our patients and our profession.

  3. Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Matthias [ORNL; Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant

  4. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear protein distribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-01-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues

  5. Development of an automated flow injection analysis system for determination of phosphate in nutrient solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadağ, Sevinç; Görüşük, Emine M; Çetinkaya, Ebru; Deveci, Seda; Dönmez, Koray B; Uncuoğlu, Emre; Doğu, Mustafa

    2018-01-25

    A fully automated flow injection analysis (FIA) system was developed for determination of phosphate ion in nutrient solutions. This newly developed FIA system is a portable, rapid and sensitive measuring instrument that allows on-line analysis and monitoring of phosphate ion concentration in nutrient solutions. The molybdenum blue method, which is widely used in FIA phosphate analysis, was adapted to the developed FIA system. The method is based on the formation of ammonium Mo(VI) ion by reaction of ammonium molybdate with the phosphate ion present in the medium. The Mo(VI) ion then reacts with ascorbic acid and is reduced to the spectrometrically measurable Mo(V) ion. New software specific for flow analysis was developed in the LabVIEW development environment to control all the components of the FIA system. The important factors affecting the analytical signal were identified as reagent flow rate, injection volume and post-injection flow path length, and they were optimized using Box-Behnken experimental design and response surface methodology. The optimum point for the maximum analytical signal was calculated as 0.50 mL min -1 reagent flow rate, 100 µL sample injection volume and 60 cm post-injection flow path length. The proposed FIA system had a sampling frequency of 100 samples per hour over a linear working range of 3-100 mg L -1 (R 2  = 0.9995). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 1.09% and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.34 mg L -1 . Various nutrient solutions from a tomato-growing hydroponic greenhouse were analyzed with the developed FIA system and the results were found to be in good agreement with vanadomolybdate chemical method findings. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  7. Automated analysis of heterogeneous carbon nanostructures by high-resolution electron microscopy and on-line image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, P.; Farrer, J.K.; Palotas, A.B.; Lighty, J.S.; Eddings, E.G.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution electron microscopy is an efficient tool for characterizing heterogeneous nanostructures; however, currently the analysis is a laborious and time-consuming manual process. In order to be able to accurately and robustly quantify heterostructures, one must obtain a statistically high number of micrographs showing images of the appropriate sub-structures. The second step of analysis is usually the application of digital image processing techniques in order to extract meaningful structural descriptors from the acquired images. In this paper it will be shown that by applying on-line image processing and basic machine vision algorithms, it is possible to fully automate the image acquisition step; therefore, the number of acquired images in a given time can be increased drastically without the need for additional human labor. The proposed automation technique works by computing fields of structural descriptors in situ and thus outputs sets of the desired structural descriptors in real-time. The merits of the method are demonstrated by using combustion-generated black carbon samples. - Highlights: ► The HRTEM analysis of heterogeneous nanostructures is a tedious manual process. ► Automatic HRTEM image acquisition and analysis can improve data quantity and quality. ► We propose a method based on on-line image analysis for the automation of HRTEM image acquisition. ► The proposed method is demonstrated using HRTEM images of soot particles

  8. Automated Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Remotely Sensed Imagery for Water Resources Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Since 2012, the state of California faces an extreme drought, which impacts water supply in many ways. Advanced remote sensing is an important technology to better assess water resources, monitor drought conditions and water supplies, plan for drought response and mitigation, and measure drought impacts. In the present case study latest time series analysis capabilities are used to examine surface water in reservoirs located along the western flank of the Sierra Nevada region of California. This case study was performed using the COTS software package ENVI 5.3. Integration of custom processes and automation is supported by IDL (Interactive Data Language). Thus, ENVI analytics is running via the object-oriented and IDL-based ENVITask API. A time series from Landsat images (L-5 TM, L-7 ETM+, L-8 OLI) of the AOI was obtained for 1999 to 2015 (October acquisitions). Downloaded from the USGS EarthExplorer web site, they already were georeferenced to a UTM Zone 10N (WGS-84) coordinate system. ENVITasks were used to pre-process the Landsat images as follows: • Triangulation based gap-filling for the SLC-off Landsat-7 ETM+ images. • Spatial subsetting to the same geographic extent. • Radiometric correction to top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance. • Atmospheric correction using QUAC®, which determines atmospheric correction parameters directly from the observed pixel spectra in a scene, without ancillary information. Spatio-temporal analysis was executed with the following tasks: • Creation of Modified Normalized Difference Water Index images (MNDWI, Xu 2006) to enhance open water features while suppressing noise from built-up land, vegetation, and soil. • Threshold based classification of the water index images to extract the water features. • Classification aggregation as a post-classification cleanup process. • Export of the respective water classes to vector layers for further evaluation in a GIS. • Animation of the classification series and export to

  9. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat; Ruebel, O.; Weber, G.; Hamann, B.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical simulations of laser-plasma wakefield (particle) accelerators model the acceleration of electrons trapped in plasma oscillations (wakes) left behind when an intense laser pulse propagates through the plasma. The goal of these simulations is to better understand the process involved in plasma wake generation and how electrons are trapped and accelerated by the wake. Understanding of such accelerators, and their development, offer high accelerating gradients, potentially reducing size and cost of new accelerators. One operating regime of interest is where a trapped subset of electrons loads the wake and forms an isolated group of accelerated particles with low spread in momentum and position, desirable characteristics for many applications. The electrons trapped in the wake may be accelerated to high energies, the plasma gradient in the wake reaching up to a gigaelectronvolt per centimeter. High-energy electron accelerators power intense X-ray radiation to terahertz sources, and are used in many applications including medical radiotherapy and imaging. To extract information from the simulation about the quality of the beam, a typical approach is to examine plots of the entire dataset, visually determining the adequate parameters necessary to select a subset of particles, which is then further analyzed. This procedure requires laborious examination of massive data sets over many time steps using several plots, a routine that is unfeasible for large data collections. Demand for automated analysis is growing along with the volume and size of simulations. Current 2D LWFA simulation datasets are typically between 1GB and 100GB in size, but simulations in 3D are of the order of TBs. The increase in the number of datasets and dataset sizes leads to a need for automatic routines to recognize particle patterns as particle bunches (beam of electrons) for subsequent analysis. Because of the growth in dataset size, the application of machine learning techniques for

  10. Comparison of manual and semi-automated delineation of regions of interest for radioligand PET imaging analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, Tiffany W; Verhoeff, Nicolaas PLG; Takeshita, Shinichiro; Honjo, Kie; Pataky, Christina E; St Jacques, Peggy L; Kusano, Maggie L; Caldwell, Curtis B; Ramirez, Joel; Black, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    As imaging centers produce higher resolution research scans, the number of man-hours required to process regional data has become a major concern. Comparison of automated vs. manual methodology has not been reported for functional imaging. We explored validation of using automation to delineate regions of interest on positron emission tomography (PET) scans. The purpose of this study was to ascertain improvements in image processing time and reproducibility of a semi-automated brain region extraction (SABRE) method over manual delineation of regions of interest (ROIs). We compared 2 sets of partial volume corrected serotonin 1a receptor binding potentials (BPs) resulting from manual vs. semi-automated methods. BPs were obtained from subjects meeting consensus criteria for frontotemporal degeneration and from age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Two trained raters provided each set of data to conduct comparisons of inter-rater mean image processing time, rank order of BPs for 9 PET scans, intra- and inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), repeatability coefficients (RC), percentages of the average parameter value (RM%), and effect sizes of either method. SABRE saved approximately 3 hours of processing time per PET subject over manual delineation (p < .001). Quality of the SABRE BP results was preserved relative to the rank order of subjects by manual methods. Intra- and inter-rater ICC were high (>0.8) for both methods. RC and RM% were lower for the manual method across all ROIs, indicating less intra-rater variance across PET subjects' BPs. SABRE demonstrated significant time savings and no significant difference in reproducibility over manual methods, justifying the use of SABRE in serotonin 1a receptor radioligand PET imaging analysis. This implies that semi-automated ROI delineation is a valid methodology for future PET imaging analysis

  11. How many fish in a tank? Constructing an automated fish counting system by using PTV analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, S.; Takagi, T.; Takehara, K.; Kimura, N.; Hiraishi, T.; Komeyama, K.; Torisawa, S.; Asaumi, S.

    2017-02-01

    Because escape from a net cage and mortality are constant problems in fish farming, health control and management of facilities are important in aquaculture. In particular, the development of an accurate fish counting system has been strongly desired for the Pacific Bluefin tuna farming industry owing to the high market value of these fish. The current fish counting method, which involves human counting, results in poor accuracy; moreover, the method is cumbersome because the aquaculture net cage is so large that fish can only be counted when they move to another net cage. Therefore, we have developed an automated fish counting system by applying particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) analysis to a shoal of swimming fish inside a net cage. In essence, we treated the swimming fish as tracer particles and estimated the number of fish by analyzing the corresponding motion vectors. The proposed fish counting system comprises two main components: image processing and motion analysis, where the image-processing component abstracts the foreground and the motion analysis component traces the individual's motion. In this study, we developed a Region Extraction and Centroid Computation (RECC) method and a Kalman filter and Chi-square (KC) test for the two main components. To evaluate the efficiency of our method, we constructed a closed system, placed an underwater video camera with a spherical curved lens at the bottom of the tank, and recorded a 360° view of a swimming school of Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes). Our study showed that almost all fish could be abstracted by the RECC method and the motion vectors could be calculated by the KC test. The recognition rate was approximately 90% when more than 180 individuals were observed within the frame of the video camera. These results suggest that the presented method has potential application as a fish counting system for industrial aquaculture.

  12. Automated selected reaction monitoring data analysis workflow for large-scale targeted proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surinova, Silvia; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Chang, Ching-Yun; Espona, Lucia; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2013-08-01

    Targeted proteomics based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry is commonly used for accurate and reproducible quantification of protein analytes in complex biological mixtures. Strictly hypothesis-driven, SRM assays quantify each targeted protein by collecting measurements on its peptide fragment ions, called transitions. To achieve sensitive and accurate quantitative results, experimental design and data analysis must consistently account for the variability of the quantified transitions. This consistency is especially important in large experiments, which increasingly require profiling up to hundreds of proteins over hundreds of samples. Here we describe a robust and automated workflow for the analysis of large quantitative SRM data sets that integrates data processing, statistical protein identification and quantification, and dissemination of the results. The integrated workflow combines three software tools: mProphet for peptide identification via probabilistic scoring; SRMstats for protein significance analysis with linear mixed-effect models; and PASSEL, a public repository for storage, retrieval and query of SRM data. The input requirements for the protocol are files with SRM traces in mzXML format, and a file with a list of transitions in a text tab-separated format. The protocol is especially suited for data with heavy isotope-labeled peptide internal standards. We demonstrate the protocol on a clinical data set in which the abundances of 35 biomarker candidates were profiled in 83 blood plasma samples of subjects with ovarian cancer or benign ovarian tumors. The time frame to realize the protocol is 1-2 weeks, depending on the number of replicates used in the experiment.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of an Automated Medication System Implemented in a Danish Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Lisby, Marianne; Sørensen, Jan

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an automated medication system (AMS) implemented in a Danish hospital setting. An economic evaluation was performed alongside a controlled before-and-after effectiveness study with one control ward and one intervention ward. The primary outcome measure was the number of errors in the medication administration process observed prospectively before and after implementation. To determine the difference in proportion of errors after implementation of the AMS, logistic regression was applied with the presence of error(s) as the dependent variable. Time, group, and interaction between time and group were the independent variables. The cost analysis used the hospital perspective with a short-term incremental costing approach. The total 6-month costs with and without the AMS were calculated as well as the incremental costs. The number of avoided administration errors was related to the incremental costs to obtain the cost-effectiveness ratio expressed as the cost per avoided administration error. The AMS resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the proportion of errors in the intervention ward compared with the control ward. The cost analysis showed that the AMS increased the ward's 6-month cost by €16,843. The cost-effectiveness ratio was estimated at €2.01 per avoided administration error, €2.91 per avoided procedural error, and €19.38 per avoided clinical error. The AMS was effective in reducing errors in the medication administration process at a higher overall cost. The cost-effectiveness analysis showed that the AMS was associated with affordable cost-effectiveness rates. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of xanthines in beverages using a fully automated SPE-SPC-DAD hyphenated system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedovici, A. [Bucarest Univ., Bucarest (Romania). Faculty of Chemistry, Dept. of Analytical Chemistry; David, F.; David, V.; Sandra, P. [Research Institute of Chromatography, Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2000-08-01

    Analysis of some xanthines (caffeine, theophylline and theobromine) in beverages has been achieved by a fully automated on-line Solid Phase Extraction - Supercritical Fluid Chromatography - Diode Array Detection (Spe - Sofc - Dad). Three adsorbents have been tested for the Spe procedure: octadecyl modified silicagel (ODS) and two types of styrene-divinylbenzen copolymer based materials, from which Porapack proved to be the most suitable adsorbent. Optimisation and correlation of both Spe and Sofc operational parameters are also discussed. By this technique, caffeine was determined in ice tea and Coca-Cola in a concentration of 0.15 ppm, theobromine - 1.5 ppb, and theophylline - 0.15 ppb. [Italian] Si e' realizzata l'analis di alcune xantine (caffeina, teofillina e teobromina) mediante un sistema, in linea, completamente automatizzato basato su Estrazione in Fase Solida - Cromatografia in Fase Supercritica - Rivelazione con Diode Array (Spe - Sfc - Dad). Per la procedura Spe sono stati valutati tre substrati: silice ottadecilica (ODS) e due tipi di materiali polimerici a base stirene-divinilbenzene, di cui, quello denominato PRP-1, e' risultato essere il piu' efficiente. Sono discusse sia l'ottimizzazione che la correlazione dei parametri operazionali per la Spe e la Sfc. Con questa tecnica sono state determinate, in te' ghiacciato e Coca-Cola, la caffeina, la teobromina e la teofillina alle concentrazini di 0.15, 1.5 e 0.15 ppm.

  15. An automated smartphone-based diagnostic assay for point-of-care semen analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakasabapathy, Manoj Kumar; Sadasivam, Magesh; Singh, Anupriya; Preston, Collin; Thirumalaraju, Prudhvi; Venkataraman, Maanasa; Bormann, Charles L.; Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Petrozza, John C.; Shafiee, Hadi

    2017-01-01

    Male infertility affects up to 12% of the world’s male population and is linked to various environmental and medical conditions. Manual microscope-based testing and computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) are the current standard methods to diagnose male infertility; however, these methods are labor-intensive, expensive, and laboratory-based. Cultural and socially dominated stigma against male infertility testing hinders a large number of men from getting tested for infertility, especially in resource-limited African countries. We describe the development and clinical testing of an automated smartphone-based semen analyzer designed for quantitative measurement of sperm concentration and motility for point-of-care male infertility screening. Using a total of 350 clinical semen specimens at a fertility clinic, we have shown that our assay can analyze an unwashed, unprocessed liquefied semen sample with smartphone capabilities, can make remote semen quality testing accessible to people in both developed and developing countries who have access to smartphones. PMID:28330865

  16. Semi-automated uranium analysis by a modified Davies--Gray procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, G.C.

    1977-01-01

    To rapidly and reliably determine uranium in fuel materials a semi-automated implementation of the Davies-Gray uranium titration was developed. The Davies-Gray method is essentially a three step procedure. First uranium is reduced quantitatively from +6 valence to +4 valence by excess of iron (II) in strong phosphoric acid in the absence of nitrite. Prior to the uranium reduction nitrite is destroyed by addition of sulfamic acid. In the second step iron (II) is selectively oxidized to iron (III) by nitric acid in the presence of Mo (VI) catalyst. Finally after dilution to reduce phosphate concentration, the uranium is titrated to U (VI) by standard dichromate. The original sluggish colorimetric endpoint determination used by Davies and Gray is seldom used since New Brunswick Laboratory discovered that addition of vanadium (IV) just prior to titration sufficiently improves reaction rate to allow a potentiometric endpoint determination. One of the advantages of the Davies-Gray uranium titration is that it is quite specific for uranium, most common impurity elements do not interfere with the analysis, and specifically high levels of Pu, Th, and Fe are tolerated

  17. An Automated High Throughput Proteolysis and Desalting Platform for Quantitative Proteomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert-Baskar Arul

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics for biomarker validation needs high throughput instrumentation to analyze huge set of clinical samples for quantitative and reproducible analysis at a minimum time without manual experimental errors. Sample preparation, a vital step in proteomics plays a major role in identification and quantification of proteins from biological samples. Tryptic digestion a major check point in sample preparation for mass spectrometry based proteomics needs to be more accurate with rapid processing time. The present study focuses on establishing a high throughput automated online system for proteolytic digestion and desalting of proteins from biological samples quantitatively and qualitatively in a reproducible manner. The present study compares online protein digestion and desalting of BSA with conventional off-line (in-solution method and validated for real time sample for reproducibility. Proteins were identified using SEQUEST data base search engine and the data were quantified using IDEALQ software. The present study shows that the online system capable of handling high throughput samples in 96 well formats carries out protein digestion and peptide desalting efficiently in a reproducible and quantitative manner. Label free quantification showed clear increase of peptide quantities with increase in concentration with much linearity compared to off line method. Hence we would like to suggest that inclusion of this online system in proteomic pipeline will be effective in quantification of proteins in comparative proteomics were the quantification is really very crucial.

  18. Analysis of HbA1c on an automated multicapillary zone electrophoresis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollborn, Niclas; Åkerfeldt, Torbjörn; Nordin, Gunnar; Xu, Xiao Yan; Mandic-Havelka, Aleksandra; Hansson, Lars-Olof; Larsson, Anders

    2017-02-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a frequently requested laboratory test and there is thus a need for high throughput instruments for this assay. We evaluated a new automated multicapillary zone electrophoresis instrument (Capillarys 3 Tera, Sebia, Lisses, France) for analysis of HbA1c in venous samples. Routine requested HbA1c samples were analyzed immunologically on a Roche c6000 instrument (n = 142) and then with the Capillarys 3 Tera instrument. The Capillarys 3 Tera instrument performed approximately 70 HbA1c tests/hour. There was a strong linear correlation between Capillarys 3 Tera and Roche Tina-Quant HbA1c Gen 3 assay (y = 1.003x - 0.3246 R 2  = .996). The total CV for the 12 capillaries varied between 0.8 and 2.2% and there was a good agreement between duplicate samples (R 2  = .997). In conclusion, the Capillarys 3 Tera instrument has a high assay capacity for HbA1c. It has a good precision and agreement with the Roche Tina-Quant HbA1c method and is well suited for high volume testing of HbA1c.

  19. CloVR-Comparative: automated, cloud-enabled comparative microbial genome sequence analysis pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sonia; Arze, Cesar; Adkins, Ricky S; Crabtree, Jonathan; Riley, David; Vangala, Mahesh; Galens, Kevin; Fraser, Claire M; Tettelin, Hervé; White, Owen; Angiuoli, Samuel V; Mahurkar, Anup; Fricke, W Florian

    2017-04-27

    The benefit of increasing genomic sequence data to the scientific community depends on easy-to-use, scalable bioinformatics support. CloVR-Comparative combines commonly used bioinformatics tools into an intuitive, automated, and cloud-enabled analysis pipeline for comparative microbial genomics. CloVR-Comparative runs on annotated complete or draft genome sequences that are uploaded by the user or selected via a taxonomic tree-based user interface and downloaded from NCBI. CloVR-Comparative runs reference-free multiple whole-genome alignments to determine unique, shared and core coding sequences (CDSs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Output includes short summary reports and detailed text-based results files, graphical visualizations (phylogenetic trees, circular figures), and a database file linked to the Sybil comparative genome browser. Data up- and download, pipeline configuration and monitoring, and access to Sybil are managed through CloVR-Comparative web interface. CloVR-Comparative and Sybil are distributed as part of the CloVR virtual appliance, which runs on local computers or the Amazon EC2 cloud. Representative datasets (e.g. 40 draft and complete Escherichia coli genomes) are processed in genomics projects, while eliminating the need for on-site computational resources and expertise.

  20. SlugIn 1.0: A Free Tool for Automated Slug Test Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Rosillo, Sergio; Guardiola-Albert, Carolina; Padilla Benítez, Alberto; Delgado Pastor, Joaquín; Azcón González, Antonio; Durán Valsero, Juan José

    2018-05-01

    The correct characterization of aquifer parameters is essential for water-supply and water-quality investigations. Slug tests are widely used for these purposes. While free software is available to interpret slug tests, some codes are not user-friendly, or do not include a wide range of methods to interpret the results, or do not include automatic, inverse solutions to the test data. The private sector has also generated several good programs to interpret slug test data, but they are not free of charge. The computer program SlugIn 1.0 is available online for free download, and is demonstrated to aid in the analysis of slug tests to estimate hydraulic parameters. The program provides an easy-to-use Graphical User Interface. SlugIn 1.0 incorporates automated parameter estimation and facilitates the visualization of several interpretations of the same test. It incorporates solutions for confined and unconfined aquifers, partially penetrating wells, skin effects, shape factor, anisotropy, high hydraulic conductivity formations and the Mace test for large-diameter wells. It is available in English and Spanish and can be downloaded from the web site of the Geological Survey of Spain. Two field examples are presented to illustrate how the software operates. © 2018, National Ground Water Association.

  1. Mapping the Early Language Environment Using All-Day Recordings and Automated Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkerson, Jill; Richards, Jeffrey A; Warren, Steven F; Montgomery, Judith K; Greenwood, Charles R; Kimbrough Oller, D; Hansen, John H L; Paul, Terrance D

    2017-05-17

    This research provided a first-generation standardization of automated language environment estimates, validated these estimates against standard language assessments, and extended on previous research reporting language behavior differences across socioeconomic groups. Typically developing children between 2 to 48 months of age completed monthly, daylong recordings in their natural language environments over a span of approximately 6-38 months. The resulting data set contained 3,213 12-hr recordings automatically analyzed by using the Language Environment Analysis (LENA) System to generate estimates of (a) the number of adult words in the child's environment, (b) the amount of caregiver-child interaction, and (c) the frequency of child vocal output. Child vocalization frequency and turn-taking increased with age, whereas adult word counts were age independent after early infancy. Child vocalization and conversational turn estimates predicted 7%-16% of the variance observed in child language assessment scores. Lower socioeconomic status (SES) children produced fewer vocalizations, engaged in fewer adult-child interactions, and were exposed to fewer daily adult words compared with their higher socioeconomic status peers, but within-group variability was high. The results offer new insight into the landscape of the early language environment, with clinical implications for identification of children at-risk for impoverished language environments.

  2. Atmosphere Processing Module Automation and Catalyst Durability Analysis for Mars ISRU Pathfinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Elspeth M.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization Pathfinder was designed to create fuel using components found in the planet’s atmosphere and regolith for an ascension vehicle to return a potential sample return or crew return vehicle from Mars. The Atmosphere Processing Module (APM), a subunit of the pathfinder, uses cryocoolers to isolate and collect carbon dioxide from Mars simulant gas. The carbon dioxide is fed with hydrogen into a Sabatier reactor where methane is produced. The APM is currently undergoing the final stages of testing at Kennedy Space Center prior to process integration testing with the other subunits of the pathfinder. The automation software for the APM cryocoolers was tested and found to perform nominally. The catalyst used for the Sabatier reactor was investigated to determine the factors contributing to catalyst failure. The results from the catalyst testing require further analysis, but it appears that the rapid change in temperature during reactor start up or the elevated operating temperature is responsible for the changes observed in the catalyst.

  3. Spectral neighbor analysis method for automated generation of quantum-accurate interatomic potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aidan P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Multiscale Science Dept.; Swiler, Laura P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Optimization and Uncertainty Quantification Dept.; Trott, Christian R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Scalable Algorithms Dept.; Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computational Materials and Data Science Dept.; Tucker, Garritt J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computational Materials and Data Science Dept.; Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2015-03-15

    Here, we present a new interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected onto a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The bispectrum components are the same bond-orientational order parameters employed by the GAP potential [1]. The SNAP potential, unlike GAP, assumes a linear relationship between atom energy and bispectrum components. The linear SNAP coefficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. We demonstrate that a previously unnoticed symmetry property can be exploited to reduce the computational cost of the force calculations by more than one order of magnitude. We present results for a SNAP potential for tantalum, showing that it accurately reproduces a range of commonly calculated properties of both the crystalline solid and the liquid phases. In addition, unlike simpler existing potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the energy barrier for screw dislocation migration in BCC tantalum.

  4. Pharmacokinetic analysis of topical tobramycin in equine tears by automated immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Sarah L; Lyon, Andrew W; Skorobohach, Brian; Léguillette, Renaud

    2012-08-21

    Ophthalmic antibiotic therapy in large animals is often used empirically because of the lack of pharmacokinetics studies. The purpose of the study was to determine the pharmacokinetics of topical tobramycin 0.3% ophthalmic solution in the tears of normal horses using an automated immunoassay analysis. The mean tobramycin concentrations in the tears at 5, 10, 15, 30 minutes and 1, 2, 4, 6 hours after administration were 759 (±414), 489 (±237), 346 (±227), 147 (±264), 27.6 (±28.4), 14.8 (±66.6), 6.7 (±18.6), and 23.4 (±73.4) mg/L. Mean tobramycin concentration was maintained above the MIC90 for commonly isolated bacteria for 68.5 min. A single dose of topical tobramycin resulted in therapeutic concentrations of tobramycin in the tears for 1 h after administration. Therapeutic levels of tobramycin remained in equine tears 6 times longer than was reported in rabbit tears.

  5. XAssist: A System for the Automation of X-ray Astrophysics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, A.

    2004-08-01

    XAssist is a NASA AISR-funded project for the automation of X-ray astrophysics. It is capable of data reprocessing, source detection, and preliminary spatial, temporal and spectral analysis for each source with sufficient counts. The bulk of the system is written in Python, which in turn drives underlying software (CIAO for Chandra data, etc.). Future work will include a GUI (mainly for beginners and status monitoring) and the exposure of at least some functionality as web services. The latter will help XAssist to eventually become part of the VO, making advanced queries possible, such as determining the X-ray fluxes of counterparts to HST or SDSS sources (including the use of unpublished X-ray data), and add the ability of ``on-the-fly'' X-ray processing. Pipelines are running on Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of galaxies to demonstrate XAssist's capabilities, and the results are available online (in real time) at http://www.xassist.org. XAssist itself as well as various associated projects are available for download.

  6. Spectral neighbor analysis method for automated generation of quantum-accurate interatomic potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, A.P., E-mail: athomps@sandia.gov [Multiscale Science Department, Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, MS 1322, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Swiler, L.P., E-mail: lpswile@sandia.gov [Optimization and Uncertainty Quantification Department, Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, MS 1318, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Trott, C.R., E-mail: crtrott@sandia.gov [Scalable Algorithms Department, Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, MS 1322, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Foiles, S.M., E-mail: foiles@sandia.gov [Computational Materials and Data Science Department, Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, MS 1411, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Tucker, G.J., E-mail: gtucker@coe.drexel.edu [Computational Materials and Data Science Department, Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, MS 1411, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    We present a new interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected onto a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The bispectrum components are the same bond-orientational order parameters employed by the GAP potential [1]. The SNAP potential, unlike GAP, assumes a linear relationship between atom energy and bispectrum components. The linear SNAP coefficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. We demonstrate that a previously unnoticed symmetry property can be exploited to reduce the computational cost of the force calculations by more than one order of magnitude. We present results for a SNAP potential for tantalum, showing that it accurately reproduces a range of commonly calculated properties of both the crystalline solid and the liquid phases. In addition, unlike simpler existing potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the energy barrier for screw dislocation migration in BCC tantalum.

  7. Automated segmentation of muscle and adipose tissue on CT images for human body composition analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Howard; Cobzas, Dana; Birdsell, Laura; Lieffers, Jessica; Baracos, Vickie

    2009-02-01

    The ability to compute body composition in cancer patients lends itself to determining the specific clinical outcomes associated with fat and lean tissue stores. For example, a wasting syndrome of advanced disease associates with shortened survival. Moreover, certain tissue compartments represent sites for drug distribution and are likely determinants of chemotherapy efficacy and toxicity. CT images are abundant, but these cannot be fully exploited unless there exist practical and fast approaches for tissue quantification. Here we propose a fully automated method for segmenting muscle, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues, taking the approach of shape modeling for the analysis of skeletal muscle. Muscle shape is represented using PCA encoded Free Form Deformations with respect to a mean shape. The shape model is learned from manually segmented images and used in conjunction with a tissue appearance prior. VAT and SAT are segmented based on the final deformed muscle shape. In comparing the automatic and manual methods, coefficients of variation (COV) (1 - 2%), were similar to or smaller than inter- and intra-observer COVs reported for manual segmentation.

  8. Spectral neighbor analysis method for automated generation of quantum-accurate interatomic potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.P.; Swiler, L.P.; Trott, C.R.; Foiles, S.M.; Tucker, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected onto a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The bispectrum components are the same bond-orientational order parameters employed by the GAP potential [1]. The SNAP potential, unlike GAP, assumes a linear relationship between atom energy and bispectrum components. The linear SNAP coefficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. We demonstrate that a previously unnoticed symmetry property can be exploited to reduce the computational cost of the force calculations by more than one order of magnitude. We present results for a SNAP potential for tantalum, showing that it accurately reproduces a range of commonly calculated properties of both the crystalline solid and the liquid phases. In addition, unlike simpler existing potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the energy barrier for screw dislocation migration in BCC tantalum

  9. Towards automated processing of clinical Finnish: sublanguage analysis and a rule-based parser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laippala, Veronika; Ginter, Filip; Pyysalo, Sampo; Salakoski, Tapio

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present steps taken towards more efficient automated processing of clinical Finnish, focusing on daily nursing notes in a Finnish Intensive Care Unit (ICU). First, we analyze ICU Finnish as a sublanguage, identifying its specific features facilitating, for example, the development of a specialized syntactic analyser. The identified features include frequent omission of finite verbs, limitations in allowed syntactic structures, and domain-specific vocabulary. Second, we develop a formal grammar and a parser for ICU Finnish, thus providing better tools for the development of further applications in the clinical domain. The grammar is implemented in the LKB system in a typed feature structure formalism. The lexicon is automatically generated based on the output of the FinTWOL morphological analyzer adapted to the clinical domain. As an additional experiment, we study the effect of using Finnish constraint grammar to reduce the size of the lexicon. The parser construction thus makes efficient use of existing resources for Finnish. The grammar currently covers 76.6% of ICU Finnish sentences, producing highly accurate best-parse analyzes with F-score of 91.1%. We find that building a parser for the highly specialized domain sublanguage is not only feasible, but also surprisingly efficient, given an existing morphological analyzer with broad vocabulary coverage. The resulting parser enables a deeper analysis of the text than was previously possible.

  10. Sharing Feelings Online: Studying Emotional Well-Being via Automated Text Analysis of Facebook Posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eSettanni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Digital traces of activity on social network sites represent a vast source of ecological data with potential connections with individual behavioral and psychological characteristics. The present study investigates the relationship between user-generated textual content shared on Facebook and emotional well-being. Self-report measures of depression, anxiety and stress were collected from 201 adult Facebook users from North Italy. Emotion-related textual indicators, including emoticon use, were extracted form users’ Facebook posts via automated text analysis. Correlation analyses revealed that individuals with higher levels of depression, anxiety expressed negative emotions on Facebook more frequently. In addition, use of emoticons expressing positive emotions correlated negatively with stress level. When comparing age groups, younger users reported higher frequency of both emotion-related words and emoticon use in their posts. Also, the relationship between online emotional expression and self-report emotional well-being was generally stronger in the younger group. Overall, findings support the feasibility and validity of studying individual emotional well-being by means of examination of Facebook profiles. Implications for online screening purposes and future research directions are discussed.

  11. Sharing feelings online: studying emotional well-being via automated text analysis of Facebook posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settanni, Michele; Marengo, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Digital traces of activity on social network sites represent a vast source of ecological data with potential connections with individual behavioral and psychological characteristics. The present study investigates the relationship between user-generated textual content shared on Facebook and emotional well-being. Self-report measures of depression, anxiety, and stress were collected from 201 adult Facebook users from North Italy. Emotion-related textual indicators, including emoticon use, were extracted form users' Facebook posts via automated text analysis. Correlation analyses revealed that individuals with higher levels of depression, anxiety expressed negative emotions on Facebook more frequently. In addition, use of emoticons expressing positive emotions correlated negatively with stress level. When comparing age groups, younger users reported higher frequency of both emotion-related words and emoticon use in their posts. Also, the relationship between online emotional expression and self-report emotional well-being was generally stronger in the younger group. Overall, findings support the feasibility and validity of studying individual emotional well-being by means of examination of Facebook profiles. Implications for online screening purposes and future research directions are discussed.

  12. Analysis and Automation of Calibration Process for Measurement Coils for Particle Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2226624; Azzam, Jamal; Chanthery, Elodie

    Various techniques are used to measure magnetic fields within the Magnetic Measurement (MM) section, all of which require the use of specific sensors. These sensors need to be calibrated in order to map the resulting signals to the characteristics of the magnetic field. Thus, the calibration procedure would benefit from being improved and made more stable, efficient, and technologically up-to-date. Consequently, to improve the efficiency of the calibration procedure and the work processes it was first necessary to analyze them and identify potential issues and weaknesses to be further addressed. The calibration procedure mainly suffered from too many manual operations, which were potential sources of error, and from outdated readout and data acquisition software and hardware. Firstly, a new software program had to be developed using a C++ framework called Flexible Framework for Magnetic Measurements (FFMM), that would automate the data acquisition and analysis. Next, a feasibility study had to be done ...

  13. Automated Identification and Shape Analysis of Chorus Elements in the Van Allen Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Gupta, Ananya; Kletzing, Craig; Howk, Robin; Kurth, William; Matheny, Morgan

    2017-12-01

    An important goal of the Van Allen Probes mission is to understand wave-particle interaction by chorus emissions in terrestrial Van Allen radiation belts. To test models, statistical characterization of chorus properties, such as amplitude variation and sweep rates, is an important scientific goal. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrumentation suite provides measurements of wave electric and magnetic fields as well as DC magnetic fields for the Van Allen Probes mission. However, manual inspection across terabytes of EMFISIS data is not feasible and as such introduces human confirmation bias. We present signal processing techniques for automated identification, shape analysis, and sweep rate characterization of high-amplitude whistler-mode chorus elements in the Van Allen radiation belts. Specifically, we develop signal processing techniques based on the radon transform that disambiguate chorus elements with a dominant sweep rate against hiss-like chorus. We present representative results validating our techniques and also provide statistical characterization of detected chorus elements across a case study of a 6 s epoch.

  14. An automated smartphone-based diagnostic assay for point-of-care semen analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakasabapathy, Manoj Kumar; Sadasivam, Magesh; Singh, Anupriya; Preston, Collin; Thirumalaraju, Prudhvi; Venkataraman, Maanasa; Bormann, Charles L; Draz, Mohamed Shehata; Petrozza, John C; Shafiee, Hadi

    2017-03-22

    Male infertility affects up to 12% of the world's male population and is linked to various environmental and medical conditions. Manual microscope-based testing and computer-assisted semen analysis (CASA) are the current standard methods to diagnose male infertility; however, these methods are labor-intensive, expensive, and laboratory-based. Cultural and socially dominated stigma against male infertility testing hinders a large number of men from getting tested for infertility, especially in resource-limited African countries. We describe the development and clinical testing of an automated smartphone-based semen analyzer designed for quantitative measurement of sperm concentration and motility for point-of-care male infertility screening. Using a total of 350 clinical semen specimens at a fertility clinic, we have shown that our assay can analyze an unwashed, unprocessed liquefied semen sample with time and provide the user a semen quality evaluation based on the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines with ~98% accuracy. The work suggests that the integration of microfluidics, optical sensing accessories, and advances in consumer electronics, particularly smartphone capabilities, can make remote semen quality testing accessible to people in both developed and developing countries who have access to smartphones. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Strategic Deconfliction of 4D Trajectory and Perturbation Analysis for Air Traffic Control and Automation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinmin Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategic 4D trajectory conflict-free planning is recognized as one of the core technologies of next-generation air traffic control and automation systems. To resolve potential conflicts during strategic 4D conflict-free trajectory planning, a protection-zone conflict-control model based on air traffic control separation constraints was proposed, in which relationships between expected arrival time and adjusted arrival time at conflicting waypoints for aircraft queues were built and transformed into dynamic linear equations under the definition of max-plus algebra. A method for strategic deconfliction of 4D trajectory was then proposed using two strategies: arrival time adjustment and departure time adjustment. In addition, departure time and flight duration perturbations were introduced to analyze the sensitivity of the planned strategic conflict-free 4D trajectories, and a robustness index for the conflict-free 4D trajectories was calculated. Finally, the proposed method was tested for the Shanghai air traffic control terminal area. The outcomes demonstrated that the planned strategic conflict-free 4D trajectories could avoid potential conflicts, and the slack time could be used to indicate their robustness. Complexity analysis demonstrated that deconfliction using max-plus algebra is more suitable for deconfliction of 4D trajectory with random sampling period in fix air route.

  16. Automated qualification and analysis of protective spark gaps for DC accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Srutarshi; Rajan, Rehim N.; Dewangan, S.; Sharma, D.K.; Patel, Rupesh; Bakhtsingh, R.I.; Gond, Seema; Waghmare, Abhay; Thakur, Nitin; Mittal, K.C. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-07-01

    Protective spark gaps are used in the high voltage multiplier column of a 3 MeV DC Accelerator to prevent excessive voltage build-ups. Precise gap of 5 mm is maintained between the electrodes in these spark gaps for obtaining 120 kV± 5 kV in 6 kg/cm{sup 2} SF{sub 6} environment which is the dielectric medium. There are 74 such spark gaps used in the multiplier. Each spark gap has to be qualified for electrical performance before fitting in the accelerator to ensure reliable operation. As the breakdown voltage stabilizes after a large number of sparks between the electrodes, the qualification process becomes time consuming and cumbersome. For qualifying large number of spark gaps an automatic breakdown analysis setup has been developed. This setup operates in air, a dielectric medium. The setup consists of a flyback topology based high voltage power supply with maximum rating of 25 kV. This setup works in conjunction with spark detection and automated shutdown circuit. The breakdown voltage is sensed using a peak detector circuit. The voltage breakdown data is recorded and statistical distribution of the breakdown voltage has been analyzed. This paper describes details of the diagnostics and the spark gap qualification process based on the experimental data. (author)

  17. Automated analysis for early signs of cerebral infarctions on brain X-ray CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Kazuki; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, X.; Muramatsu, Chisako; Fujita, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    t-PA (tissue plasminogen activator) thrombolysis is an effective clinical treatment for the acute cerebral infarction by breakdown to blood clots. However there is a risk of hemorrhage with its use. The guideline of the treatment is denying cerebral hemorrhage and widespread Early CT sign (ECS) on CT images. In this study, we analyzed the CT value of normal brain and ECS with normal brain model by comparing patient brain CT scan with a statistical normal model. Our method has constructed normal brain models consisted of 60 normal brain X-ray CT images. We calculated Z-score based on statistical model for 16 cases of cerebral infarction with ECS, 3 cases of cerebral infarction without ECS, and 25 cases of normal brain. The results of statistical analysis showed that there was a statistically significant difference between control and abnormal groups. This result implied that the automated detection scheme for ECS by using Z-score would be a possible application for brain computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). (author)

  18. Automated Video Analysis of Non-verbal Communication in a Medical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Yuval; Czerniak, Efrat; Karnieli-Miller, Orit; Mayo, Avraham E; Ziv, Amitai; Biegon, Anat; Citron, Atay; Alon, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Non-verbal communication plays a significant role in establishing good rapport between physicians and patients and may influence aspects of patient health outcomes. It is therefore important to analyze non-verbal communication in medical settings. Current approaches to measure non-verbal interactions in medicine employ coding by human raters. Such tools are labor intensive and hence limit the scale of possible studies. Here, we present an automated video analysis tool for non-verbal interactions in a medical setting. We test the tool using videos of subjects that interact with an actor portraying a doctor. The actor interviews the subjects performing one of two scripted scenarios of interviewing the subjects: in one scenario the actor showed minimal engagement with the subject. The second scenario included active listening by the doctor and attentiveness to the subject. We analyze the cross correlation in total kinetic energy of the two people in the dyad, and also characterize the frequency spectrum of their motion. We find large differences in interpersonal motion synchrony and entrainment between the two performance scenarios. The active listening scenario shows more synchrony and more symmetric followership than the other scenario. Moreover, the active listening scenario shows more high-frequency motion termed jitter that has been recently suggested to be a marker of followership. The present approach may be useful for analyzing physician-patient interactions in terms of synchrony and dominance in a range of medical settings.

  19. PCR evaluation : considering transition from manual to semi-automated pavement distress collection and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This study is designed to assist the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) in determining : whether transitioning from manual to state-of the-practice semi-automated pavement distress : data collection is feasible and recommended. Statistical and ...

  20. Pilot Dependence on Imperfect Diagnostic Automation in Simulated UAV Flights: An Attentional Visual Scanning Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wickens, Christopher; Dixon, Stephen; Goh, Juliana; Hammer, Ben

    2005-01-01

    An unmanned air vehicle (UAV) simulation was designed to reveal the effects of imperfectly reliable diagnostic automation a monitor of system health parameters on pilot attention, as the latter was assessed via visual scanning...

  1. Data for automated, high-throughput microscopy analysis of intracellular bacterial colonies using spot detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Christina Lundgaard; Login, Frédéric H.; Jensen, Helene Halkjær

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of intracellular bacterial colonies is useful in strategies directed against bacterial attachment, subsequent cellular invasion and intracellular proliferation. An automated, high-throughput microscopy-method was established to quantify the number and size of intracellular bacteria...

  2. The AAL project: automated monitoring and intelligent analysis for the ATLAS data taking infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazarov, A; Miotto, G Lehmann; Magnoni, L

    2012-01-01

    The Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system of the ATLAS experiment at CERN is the infrastructure responsible for collecting and transferring ATLAS experimental data from detectors to the mass storage system. It relies on a large, distributed computing environment, including thousands of computing nodes with thousands of application running concurrently. In such a complex environment, information analysis is fundamental for controlling applications behavior, error reporting and operational monitoring. During data taking runs, streams of messages sent by applications via the message reporting system together with data published from applications via information services are the main sources of knowledge about correctness of running operations. The flow of data produced (with an average rate of O(1-10KHz)) is constantly monitored by experts to detect problem or misbehavior. This requires strong competence and experience in understanding and discovering problems and root causes, and often the meaningful information is not in the single message or update, but in the aggregated behavior in a certain time-line. The AAL project is meant at reducing the man power needs and at assuring a constant high quality of problem detection by automating most of the monitoring tasks and providing real-time correlation of data-taking and system metrics. This project combines technologies coming from different disciplines, in particular it leverages on an Event Driven Architecture to unify the flow of data from the ATLAS infrastructure, on a Complex Event Processing (CEP) engine for correlation of events and on a message oriented architecture for components integration. The project is composed of 2 main components: a core processing engine, responsible for correlation of events through expert-defined queries and a web based front-end to present real-time information and interact with the system. All components works in a loose-coupled event based architecture, with a message broker

  3. Automation and uncertainty analysis of a method for in-vivo range verification in particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, K; Unholtz, D; Bauer, J; Debus, J; Min, C H; Bortfeld, T; Paganetti, H; Parodi, K

    2014-10-07

    We introduce the automation of the range difference calculation deduced from particle-irradiation induced β(+)-activity distributions with the so-called most-likely-shift approach, and evaluate its reliability via the monitoring of algorithm- and patient-specific uncertainty factors. The calculation of the range deviation is based on the minimization of the absolute profile differences in the distal part of two activity depth profiles shifted against each other. Depending on the workflow of positron emission tomography (PET)-based range verification, the two profiles under evaluation can correspond to measured and simulated distributions, or only measured data from different treatment sessions. In comparison to previous work, the proposed approach includes an automated identification of the distal region of interest for each pair of PET depth profiles and under consideration of the planned dose distribution, resulting in the optimal shift distance. Moreover, it introduces an estimate of uncertainty associated to the identified shift, which is then used as weighting factor to 'red flag' problematic large range differences. Furthermore, additional patient-specific uncertainty factors are calculated using available computed tomography (CT) data to support the range analysis. The performance of the new method for in-vivo treatment verification in the clinical routine is investigated with in-room PET images for proton therapy as well as with offline PET images for proton and carbon ion therapy. The comparison between measured PET activity distributions and predictions obtained by Monte Carlo simulations or measurements from previous treatment fractions is performed. For this purpose, a total of 15 patient datasets were analyzed, which were acquired at Massachusetts General Hospital and Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center with in-room PET and offline PET/CT scanners, respectively. Calculated range differences between the compared activity distributions are reported in a

  4. The AAL project: automated monitoring and intelligent analysis for the ATLAS data taking infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarov, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Magnoni, L.

    2012-06-01

    The Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system of the ATLAS experiment at CERN is the infrastructure responsible for collecting and transferring ATLAS experimental data from detectors to the mass storage system. It relies on a large, distributed computing environment, including thousands of computing nodes with thousands of application running concurrently. In such a complex environment, information analysis is fundamental for controlling applications behavior, error reporting and operational monitoring. During data taking runs, streams of messages sent by applications via the message reporting system together with data published from applications via information services are the main sources of knowledge about correctness of running operations. The flow of data produced (with an average rate of O(1-10KHz)) is constantly monitored by experts to detect problem or misbehavior. This requires strong competence and experience in understanding and discovering problems and root causes, and often the meaningful information is not in the single message or update, but in the aggregated behavior in a certain time-line. The AAL project is meant at reducing the man power needs and at assuring a constant high quality of problem detection by automating most of the monitoring tasks and providing real-time correlation of data-taking and system metrics. This project combines technologies coming from different disciplines, in particular it leverages on an Event Driven Architecture to unify the flow of data from the ATLAS infrastructure, on a Complex Event Processing (CEP) engine for correlation of events and on a message oriented architecture for components integration. The project is composed of 2 main components: a core processing engine, responsible for correlation of events through expert-defined queries and a web based front-end to present real-time information and interact with the system. All components works in a loose-coupled event based architecture, with a message broker

  5. Semi-automated vectorial analysis of anorectal motion by magnetic resonance defecography in healthy subjects and fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noelting, J; Bharucha, A E; Lake, D S; Manduca, A; Fletcher, J G; Riederer, S J; Joseph Melton, L; Zinsmeister, A R

    2012-10-01

    Inter-observer variability limits the reproducibility of pelvic floor motion measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our aim was to develop a semi-automated program measuring pelvic floor motion in a reproducible and refined manner. Pelvic floor anatomy and motion during voluntary contraction (squeeze) and rectal evacuation were assessed by MRI in 64 women with fecal incontinence (FI) and 64 age-matched controls. A radiologist measured anorectal angles and anorectal junction motion. A semi-automated program did the same and also dissected anorectal motion into perpendicular vectors representing the puborectalis and other pelvic floor muscles, assessed the pubococcygeal angle, and evaluated pelvic rotation. Manual and semi-automated measurements of anorectal junction motion (r = 0.70; P controls. This semi-automated program provides a reproducible, efficient, and refined analysis of pelvic floor motion by MRI. Puborectalis injury is independently associated with impaired motion of puborectalis, not other pelvic floor muscles in controls and women with FI. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Analysis of Real Time Technical Data Obtained While Shotcreting: An Approach Towards Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, Ángel; Río, Olga

    2010-01-01

    Automation of shotcreting process is a key factor in both improving the working conditions and increasing productivity; as well as in increasing the quality of shotcrete. The confidence in the quality of the automation process itself and shotcrete linings can be improved by real time monitoring of pumping as well as other shotcreting machine related parameters. Prediction of how the difIerent technical parameters of application are governing the whole process is being a subject of increasing ...

  7. Task Analysis and Descriptions of Required Job Competencies of Robotics/Automated Systems Technicians. Outlines for New Courses and Modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Daniel M.; Lovett, James E.

    The six new robotics and automated systems specialty courses developed by the Robotics/Automated Systems Technician (RAST) project are described in this publication. Course titles are Fundamentals of Robotics and Automated Systems, Automated Systems and Support Components, Controllers for Robots and Automated Systems, Robotics and Automated…

  8. A high-throughput screening system for barley/powdery mildew interactions based on automated analysis of light micrographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlow, Alexander; Schweizer, Patrick; Seiffert, Udo

    2008-01-23

    To find candidate genes that potentially influence the susceptibility or resistance of crop plants to powdery mildew fungi, an assay system based on transient-induced gene silencing (TIGS) as well as transient over-expression in single epidermal cells of barley has been developed. However, this system relies on quantitative microscopic analysis of the barley/powdery mildew interaction and will only become a high-throughput tool of phenomics upon automation of the most time-consuming steps. We have developed a high-throughput screening system based on a motorized microscope which evaluates the specimens fully automatically. A large-scale double-blind verification of the system showed an excellent agreement of manual and automated analysis and proved the system to work dependably. Furthermore, in a series of bombardment experiments an RNAi construct targeting the Mlo gene was included, which is expected to phenocopy resistance mediated by recessive loss-of-function alleles such as mlo5. In most cases, the automated analysis system recorded a shift towards resistance upon RNAi of Mlo, thus providing proof of concept for its usefulness in detecting gene-target effects. Besides saving labor and enabling a screening of thousands of candidate genes, this system offers continuous operation of expensive laboratory equipment and provides a less subjective analysis as well as a complete and enduring documentation of the experimental raw data in terms of digital images. In general, it proves the concept of enabling available microscope hardware to handle challenging screening tasks fully automatically.

  9. Use of computed tomography and automated software for quantitative analysis of the vasculature of patients with pulmonary hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Danilo Tadao; Pádua, Adriana Ignácio de; Lima Filho, Moyses Oliveira; Marin Neto, José Antonio; Elias Júnior, Jorge; Baddini-Martinez, José; Santos, Marcel Koenigkam, E-mail: danilowada@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de São Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clínicas

    2017-11-15

    Objective: To perform a quantitative analysis of the lung parenchyma and pulmonary vasculature of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) on computed tomography angiography (CTA) images, using automated software. Materials And Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the CTA findings and clinical records of 45 patients with PH (17 males and 28 females), in comparison with a control group of 20 healthy individuals (7 males and 13 females); the mean age differed significantly between the two groups (53 ± 14.7 vs. 35 ± 9.6 years; p = 0.0001). Results: The automated analysis showed that, in comparison with the controls, the patients with PH showed lower 10{sup th} percentile values for lung density, higher vascular volumes in the right upper lung lobe, and higher vascular volume ratios between the upper and lower lobes. In our quantitative analysis, we found no differences among the various PH subgroups. We inferred that a difference in the 10{sup th} percentile values indicates areas of hypovolaemia in patients with PH and that a difference in pulmonary vascular volumes indicates redistribution of the pulmonary vasculature and an increase in pulmonary vasculature resistance. Conclusion: Automated analysis of pulmonary vessels on CTA images revealed alterations and could represent an objective diagnostic tool for the evaluation of patients with PH. (author)

  10. Matrix Failure Modes and Effects Analysis as a Knowledge Base for a Real Time Automated Diagnosis Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrin, Stephanie; Iverson, David; Spukovska, Lilly; Souza, Kenneth A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Failure Modes and Effects Analysis contain a wealth of information that can be used to create the knowledge base required for building automated diagnostic Expert systems. A real time monitoring and diagnosis expert system based on an actual NASA project's matrix failure modes and effects analysis was developed. This Expert system Was developed at NASA Ames Research Center. This system was first used as a case study to monitor the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF), a Space Shuttle payload that is used to house and monitor animals in orbit so the effects of space flight and microgravity can be studied. The techniques developed for the RAHF monitoring and diagnosis Expert system are general enough to be used for monitoring and diagnosis of a variety of other systems that undergo a Matrix FMEA. This automated diagnosis system was successfully used on-line and validated on the Space Shuttle flight STS-58, mission SLS-2 in October 1993.

  11. Quantification of Eosinophilic Granule Protein Deposition in Biopsies of Inflammatory Skin Diseases by Automated Image Analysis of Highly Sensitive Immunostaining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kiehl

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic granulocytes are major effector cells in inflammation. Extracellular deposition of toxic eosinophilic granule proteins (EGPs, but not the presence of intact eosinophils, is crucial for their functional effect in situ. As even recent morphometric approaches to quantify the involvement of eosinophils in inflammation have been only based on cell counting, we developed a new method for the cell‐independent quantification of EGPs by image analysis of immunostaining. Highly sensitive, automated immunohistochemistry was done on paraffin sections of inflammatory skin diseases with 4 different primary antibodies against EGPs. Image analysis of immunostaining was performed by colour translation, linear combination and automated thresholding. Using strictly standardized protocols, the assay was proven to be specific and accurate concerning segmentation in 8916 fields of 520 sections, well reproducible in repeated measurements and reliable over 16 weeks observation time. The method may be valuable for the cell‐independent segmentation of immunostaining in other applications as well.

  12. Automated analysis of connected speech reveals early biomarkers of Parkinson's disease in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavnička, Jan; Čmejla, Roman; Tykalová, Tereza; Šonka, Karel; Růžička, Evžen; Rusz, Jan

    2017-02-02

    For generations, the evaluation of speech abnormalities in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) has been limited to perceptual tests or user-controlled laboratory analysis based upon rather small samples of human vocalizations. Our study introduces a fully automated method that yields significant features related to respiratory deficits, dysphonia, imprecise articulation and dysrhythmia from acoustic microphone data of natural connected speech for predicting early and distinctive patterns of neurodegeneration. We compared speech recordings of 50 subjects with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD), 30 newly diagnosed, untreated PD patients and 50 healthy controls, and showed that subliminal parkinsonian speech deficits can be reliably captured even in RBD patients, which are at high risk of developing PD or other synucleinopathies. Thus, automated vocal analysis should soon be able to contribute to screening and diagnostic procedures for prodromal parkinsonian neurodegeneration in natural environments.

  13. Automated microscopic characterization of metallic ores with image analysis: a key to improve ore processing. I: test of the methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrezueta, E.; Castroviejo, R.

    2007-01-01

    Ore microscopy has traditionally been an important support to control ore processing, but the volume of present day processes is beyond the reach of human operators. Automation is therefore compulsory, but its development through digital image analysis, DIA, is limited by various problems, such as the similarity in reflectance values of some important ores, their anisotropism, and the performance of instruments and methods. The results presented show that automated identification and quantification by DIA are possible through multiband (RGB) determinations with a research 3CCD video camera on reflected light microscope. These results were obtained by systematic measurement of selected ores accounting for most of the industrial applications. Polarized light is avoided, so the effects of anisotropism can be neglected. Quality control at various stages and statistical analysis are important, as is the application of complementary criteria (e.g. metallogenetic). The sequential methodology is described and shown through practical examples. (Author)

  14. Machine Learning-Based Content Analysis: Automating the analysis of frames and agendas in political communication research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burscher, B.

    2016-01-01

    We used machine learning to study policy issues and frames in political messages. With regard to frames, we investigated the automation of two content-analytical tasks: frame coding and frame identification. We found that both tasks can be successfully automated by means of machine learning

  15. Methods for Automating Analysis of Glacier Morphology for Regional Modelling: Centerlines, Extensions, and Elevation Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viger, R. J.; Van Beusekom, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    The treatment of glaciers in modeling requires information about their shape and extent. This presentation discusses new methods and their application in a new glacier-capable variant of the USGS PRMS model, a physically-based, spatially distributed daily time-step model designed to simulate the runoff and evolution of glaciers through time. In addition to developing parameters describing PRMS land surfaces (hydrologic response units, HRUs), several of the analyses and products are likely of interest to cryospheric science community in general. The first method is a (fully automated) variation of logic previously presented in the literature for definition of the glacier centerline. Given that the surface of a glacier might be convex, using traditional topographic analyses based on a DEM to trace a path down the glacier is not reliable. Instead a path is derived based on a cost function. Although only a single path is presented in our results, the method can be easily modified to delineate a branched network of centerlines for each glacier. The second method extends the glacier terminus downslope by an arbitrary distance, according to local surface topography. This product is can be used to explore possible, if unlikely, scenarios under which glacier area grows. More usefully, this method can be used to approximate glacier extents from previous years without needing historical imagery. The final method presents an approach for segmenting the glacier into altitude-based HRUs. Successful integration of this information with traditional approaches for discretizing the non-glacierized portions of a basin requires several additional steps. These include synthesizing the glacier centerline network with one developed with a traditional DEM analysis, ensuring that flow can be routed under and beyond glaciers to a basin outlet. Results are presented based on analysis of the Copper River Basin, Alaska.

  16. Temperature control of fimbriation circuit switch in uropathogenic Escherichia coli: quantitative analysis via automated model abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Myers, Chris J; Samoilov, Michael S

    2010-03-26

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) represent the predominant cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs). A key UPEC molecular virulence mechanism is type 1 fimbriae, whose expression is controlled by the orientation of an invertible chromosomal DNA element-the fim switch. Temperature has been shown to act as a major regulator of fim switching behavior and is overall an important indicator as well as functional feature of many urologic diseases, including UPEC host-pathogen interaction dynamics. Given this panoptic physiological role of temperature during UTI progression and notable empirical challenges to its direct in vivo studies, in silico modeling of corresponding biochemical and biophysical mechanisms essential to UPEC pathogenicity may significantly aid our understanding of the underlying disease processes. However, rigorous computational analysis of biological systems, such as fim switch temperature control circuit, has hereto presented a notoriously demanding problem due to both the substantial complexity of the gene regulatory networks involved as well as their often characteristically discrete and stochastic dynamics. To address these issues, we have developed an approach that enables automated multiscale abstraction of biological system descriptions based on reaction kinetics. Implemented as a computational tool, this method has allowed us to efficiently analyze the modular organization and behavior of the E. coli fimbriation switch circuit at different temperature settings, thus facilitating new insights into this mode of UPEC molecular virulence regulation. In particular, our results suggest that, with respect to its role in shutting down fimbriae expression, the primary function of FimB recombinase may be to effect a controlled down-regulation (rather than increase) of the ON-to-OFF fim switching rate via temperature-dependent suppression of competing dynamics mediated by recombinase FimE. Our computational analysis further implies that this down

  17. Temperature control of fimbriation circuit switch in uropathogenic Escherichia coli: quantitative analysis via automated model abstraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Kuwahara

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC represent the predominant cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs. A key UPEC molecular virulence mechanism is type 1 fimbriae, whose expression is controlled by the orientation of an invertible chromosomal DNA element-the fim switch. Temperature has been shown to act as a major regulator of fim switching behavior and is overall an important indicator as well as functional feature of many urologic diseases, including UPEC host-pathogen interaction dynamics. Given this panoptic physiological role of temperature during UTI progression and notable empirical challenges to its direct in vivo studies, in silico modeling of corresponding biochemical and biophysical mechanisms essential to UPEC pathogenicity may significantly aid our understanding of the underlying disease processes. However, rigorous computational analysis of biological systems, such as fim switch temperature control circuit, has hereto presented a notoriously demanding problem due to both the substantial complexity of the gene regulatory networks involved as well as their often characteristically discrete and stochastic dynamics. To address these issues, we have developed an approach that enables automated multiscale abstraction of biological system descriptions based on reaction kinetics. Implemented as a computational tool, this method has allowed us to efficiently analyze the modular organization and behavior of the E. coli fimbriation switch circuit at different temperature settings, thus facilitating new insights into this mode of UPEC molecular virulence regulation. In particular, our results suggest that, with respect to its role in shutting down fimbriae expression, the primary function of FimB recombinase may be to effect a controlled down-regulation (rather than increase of the ON-to-OFF fim switching rate via temperature-dependent suppression of competing dynamics mediated by recombinase FimE. Our computational analysis further implies

  18. Cerebral blood flow SPET in transient global amnesia with automated ROI analysis by 3DSRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Ryo [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Nishi-Kobe Medical Center, Kohjidai 5-7-1, 651-2273, Nishi-ku, Kobe-City, Hyogo (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, National Center Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshioka, Katsunori [Daiichi Radioisotope Laboratories, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui (Japan)

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the areas involved in episodes of transient global amnesia (TGA) by calculation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using 3DSRT, fully automated ROI analysis software which we recently developed. Technetium-99m l,l-ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission tomography ({sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPET) was performed during and after TGA attacks on eight patients (four men and four women; mean study interval, 34 days). The SPET images were anatomically standardized using SPM99 followed by quantification of 318 constant ROIs, grouped into 12 segments (callosomarginal, precentral, central, parietal, angular, temporal, posterior cerebral, pericallosal, lenticular nucleus, thalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum), in each hemisphere to calculate segmental CBF (sCBF) as the area-weighted mean value for each of the respective 12 segments based on the regional CBF in each ROI. Correlation of the intra- and post-episodic sCBF of each of the 12 segments of the eight patients was estimated by scatter-plot graphical analysis and Pearson's correlation test with Fisher's Z-transformation. For the control, {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPET was performed on eight subjects (three men and five women) and repeated within 1 month; the correlation between the first and second sCBF values of each of the 12 segments was evaluated in the same way as for patients with TGA. Excellent reproducibility between the two sCBF values was found in all 12 segments of the control subjects. However, a significant correlation between intra- and post-episodic sCBF was not shown in the thalamus or angular segments of TGA patients. The present study was preliminary, but at least suggested that thalamus and angular regions are closely involved in the symptoms of TGA. (orig.)

  19. Cerebral blood flow SPET in transient global amnesia with automated ROI analysis by 3DSRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Ryo; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Katsunori; Yonekura, Yoshiharu

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the areas involved in episodes of transient global amnesia (TGA) by calculation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using 3DSRT, fully automated ROI analysis software which we recently developed. Technetium-99m l,l-ethyl cysteinate dimer single-photon emission tomography ( 99m Tc-ECD SPET) was performed during and after TGA attacks on eight patients (four men and four women; mean study interval, 34 days). The SPET images were anatomically standardized using SPM99 followed by quantification of 318 constant ROIs, grouped into 12 segments (callosomarginal, precentral, central, parietal, angular, temporal, posterior cerebral, pericallosal, lenticular nucleus, thalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum), in each hemisphere to calculate segmental CBF (sCBF) as the area-weighted mean value for each of the respective 12 segments based on the regional CBF in each ROI. Correlation of the intra- and post-episodic sCBF of each of the 12 segments of the eight patients was estimated by scatter-plot graphical analysis and Pearson's correlation test with Fisher's Z-transformation. For the control, 99m Tc-ECD SPET was performed on eight subjects (three men and five women) and repeated within 1 month; the correlation between the first and second sCBF values of each of the 12 segments was evaluated in the same way as for patients with TGA. Excellent reproducibility between the two sCBF values was found in all 12 segments of the control subjects. However, a significant correlation between intra- and post-episodic sCBF was not shown in the thalamus or angular segments of TGA patients. The present study was preliminary, but at least suggested that thalamus and angular regions are closely involved in the symptoms of TGA. (orig.)

  20. Automated X-ray and Optical Analysis of the Virtual Observatory and Grid Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, A.; Krughoff, S.; Connolly, A.

    2011-01-01

    We are developing a system to combine the Web Enabled Source Identification with X-Matching (WESIX) web service, which emphasizes source detection on optical images,with the XAssist program that automates the analysis of X-ray data. XAssist is continuously processing archival X-ray data in several pipelines. We have established a workflow in which FITS images and/or (in the case of X ray data) an X-ray field can be input to WESIX. Intelligent services return available data (if requested fields have been processed) or submit job requests to a queue to be performed asynchronously. These services will be available via web services (for non-interactive use by Virtual Observatory portals and applications) and through web applications (written in the Django web application framework). We are adding web services for specific XAssist functionality such as determining .the exposure and limiting flux for a given position on the sky and extracting spectra and images for a given region. We are improving the queuing system in XAssist to allow for "watch lists" to be specified by users, and when X-ray fields in a user's watch list become publicly available they will be automatically added to the queue. XAssist is being expanded to be used as a survey planning 1001 when coupled with simulation software, including functionality for NuStar, eRosita, IXO, and the Wide Field Xray Telescope (WFXT), as part of an end to end simulation/analysis system. We are also investigating the possibility of a dedicated iPhone/iPad app for querying pipeline data, requesting processing, and administrative job control.

  1. A methodology for automated CPA extraction using liver biopsy image analysis and machine learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsipouras, Markos G; Giannakeas, Nikolaos; Tzallas, Alexandros T; Tsianou, Zoe E; Manousou, Pinelopi; Hall, Andrew; Tsoulos, Ioannis; Tsianos, Epameinondas

    2017-03-01

    Collagen proportional area (CPA) extraction in liver biopsy images provides the degree of fibrosis expansion in liver tissue, which is the most characteristic histological alteration in hepatitis C virus (HCV). Assessment of the fibrotic tissue is currently based on semiquantitative staging scores such as Ishak and Metavir. Since its introduction as a fibrotic tissue assessment technique, CPA calculation based on image analysis techniques has proven to be more accurate than semiquantitative scores. However, CPA has yet to reach everyday clinical practice, since the lack of standardized and robust methods for computerized image analysis for CPA assessment have proven to be a major limitation. The current work introduces a three-stage fully automated methodology for CPA extraction based on machine learning techniques. Specifically, clustering algorithms have been employed for background-tissue separation, as well as for fibrosis detection in liver tissue regions, in the first and the third stage of the methodology, respectively. Due to the existence of several types of tissue regions in the image (such as blood clots, muscle tissue, structural collagen, etc.), classification algorithms have been employed to identify liver tissue regions and exclude all other non-liver tissue regions from CPA computation. For the evaluation of the methodology, 79 liver biopsy images have been employed, obtaining 1.31% mean absolute CPA error, with 0.923 concordance correlation coefficient. The proposed methodology is designed to (i) avoid manual threshold-based and region selection processes, widely used in similar approaches presented in the literature, and (ii) minimize CPA calculation time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Automated Analysis of 123I-beta-CIT SPECT Images with Statistical Probabilistic Anatomical Mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eo, Jae Seon; Lee, Hoyoung; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Yu Kyung; Jeon, Bumseok; Lee, Dong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Population-based statistical probabilistic anatomical maps have been used to generate probabilistic volumes of interest for analyzing perfusion and metabolic brain imaging. We investigated the feasibility of automated analysis for dopamine transporter images using this technique and evaluated striatal binding potentials in Parkinson's disease and Wilson's disease. We analyzed 2β-Carbomethoxy-3β-(4- 123 I-iodophenyl)tropane ( 123 I-beta-CIT) SPECT images acquired from 26 people with Parkinson's disease (M:F=11:15,mean age=49±12 years), 9 people with Wilson's disease (M: F=6:3, mean age=26±11 years) and 17 normal controls (M:F=5:12, mean age=39±16 years). A SPECT template was created using striatal statistical probabilistic map images. All images were spatially normalized onto the template, and probability-weighted regional counts in striatal structures were estimated. The binding potential was calculated using the ratio of specific and nonspecific binding activities at equilibrium. Voxel-based comparisons between groups were also performed using statistical parametric mapping. Qualitative assessment showed that spatial normalizations of the SPECT images were successful for all images. The striatal binding potentials of participants with Parkinson's disease and Wilson's disease were significantly lower than those of normal controls. Statistical parametric mapping analysis found statistically significant differences only in striatal regions in both disease groups compared to controls. We successfully evaluated the regional 123 I-beta-CIT distribution using the SPECT template and probabilistic map data automatically. This procedure allows an objective and quantitative comparison of the binding potential, which in this case showed a significantly decreased binding potential in the striata of patients with Parkinson's disease or Wilson's disease

  3. ZebraZoom: an automated program for high-throughput behavioral analysis and categorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirat, Olivier; Sternberg, Jenna R.; Severi, Kristen E.; Wyart, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The zebrafish larva stands out as an emergent model organism for translational studies involving gene or drug screening thanks to its size, genetics, and permeability. At the larval stage, locomotion occurs in short episodes punctuated by periods of rest. Although phenotyping behavior is a key component of large-scale screens, it has not yet been automated in this model system. We developed ZebraZoom, a program to automatically track larvae and identify maneuvers for many animals performing discrete movements. Our program detects each episodic movement and extracts large-scale statistics on motor patterns to produce a quantification of the locomotor repertoire. We used ZebraZoom to identify motor defects induced by a glycinergic receptor antagonist. The analysis of the blind mutant atoh7 revealed small locomotor defects associated with the mutation. Using multiclass supervised machine learning, ZebraZoom categorized all episodes of movement for each larva into one of three possible maneuvers: slow forward swim, routine turn, and escape. ZebraZoom reached 91% accuracy for categorization of stereotypical maneuvers that four independent experimenters unanimously identified. For all maneuvers in the data set, ZebraZoom agreed with four experimenters in 73.2–82.5% of cases. We modeled the series of maneuvers performed by larvae as Markov chains and observed that larvae often repeated the same maneuvers within a group. When analyzing subsequent maneuvers performed by different larvae, we found that larva–larva interactions occurred as series of escapes. Overall, ZebraZoom reached the level of precision found in manual analysis but accomplished tasks in a high-throughput format necessary for large screens. PMID:23781175

  4. Automated analysis of damages for radiation in plastics surfaces; Analisis automatizado de danos por radiacion en superficies plasticas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, C; Camacho M, E; Tavera, L; Balcazar, M [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1990-02-15

    Analysis of damages done by the radiation in a polymer characterized by optic properties of polished surfaces, of uniformity and chemical resistance that the acrylic; resistant until the 150 centigrade grades of temperature, and with an approximate weight of half of the glass. An objective of this work is the development of a method that analyze in automated form the superficial damages induced by radiation in plastic materials means an images analyst. (Author)

  5. Time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy of new automated myocardial perfusion analysis software in 320-row CT cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rief, Matthias; Stenzei, Fabian; Kranz, Anisha; Schlattmann, Peter; Dewey, Marc [Dept. of Radiology, Charite - Universiteitsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Greece)

    2013-01-15

    We aimed to evaluate the time efficiency and diagnostic accuracy of automated myocardial computed tomography perfusion (CTP) image analysis software. 320-row CTP was performed in 30 patients, and analyses were conducted independently by three different blinded readers by the use of two recent software releases (version 4.6 and novel version 4.71GR001, Toshiba, Tokyo, Japan). Analysis times were compared, and automated epi- and endocardial contour detection was subjectively rated in five categories (excellent, good, fair, poor and very poor). As semi-quantitative perfusion parameters, myocardial attenuation and transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) were calculated for each myocardial segment and agreement was tested by using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Conventional coronary angiography served as reference standard. The analysis time was significantly reduced with the novel automated software version as compared with the former release (Reader 1: 43:08 ± 11:39 min vs. 09:47 ± 04:51 min, Reader 2: 42:07 ± 06:44 min vs. 09:42 ± 02:50 min and Reader 3: 21:38 ± 3:44 min vs. 07:34 ± 02:12 min; p < 0.001 for all). Epi- and endocardial contour detection for the novel software was rated to be significantly better (p < 0.001) than with the former software. ICCs demonstrated strong agreement (≥ 0.75) for myocardial attenuation in 93% and for TPR in 82%. Diagnostic accuracy for the two software versions was not significantly different (p 0.169) as compared with conventional coronary angiography. The novel automated CTP analysis software offers enhanced time efficiency with an improvement by a factor of about four, while maintaining diagnostic accuracy.

  6. The effects of total laboratory automation on the management of a clinical chemistry laboratory. Retrospective analysis of 36 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkozi, Laszlo; Simson, Elkin; Ramanathan, Lakshmi

    2003-03-01

    Thirty-six years of data and history of laboratory practice at our institution has enabled us to follow the effects of analytical automation, then recently pre-analytical and post-analytical automation on productivity, cost reduction and enhanced quality of service. In 1998, we began the operation of a pre- and post-analytical automation system (robotics), together with an advanced laboratory information system to process specimens prior to analysis, deliver them to various automated analytical instruments, specimen outlet racks and finally to refrigerated stockyards. By the end of 3 years of continuous operation, we compared the chemistry part of the system with the prior 33 years and quantitated the financial impact of the various stages of automation. Between 1965 and 2000, the Consumer Price Index increased by a factor of 5.5 in the United States. During the same 36 years, at our institution's Chemistry Department the productivity (indicated as the number of reported test results/employee/year) increased from 10,600 to 104,558 (9.3-fold). When expressed in constant 1965 dollars, the total cost per test decreased from 0.79 dollars to 0.15 dollars. Turnaround time for availability of results on patient units decreased to the extent that Stat specimens requiring a turnaround time of productivity together with decreased operational cost. It enabled us to significantly increase our workload together with a reduction of personnel. In addition, stats are handled easily and there are benefits such as safer working conditions and improved sample identification, which are difficult to quantify at this stage.

  7. Utilizing the ultrasensitive Schistosoma up-converting phosphor lateral flow circulating anodic antigen (UCP-LF CAA) assay for sample pooling-strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corstjens, Paul L A M; Hoekstra, Pytsje T; de Dood, Claudia J; van Dam, Govert J

    2017-11-01

    Methodological applications of the high sensitivity genus-specific Schistosoma CAA strip test, allowing detection of single worm active infections (ultimate sensitivity), are discussed for efficient utilization in sample pooling strategies. Besides relevant cost reduction, pooling of samples rather than individual testing can provide valuable data for large scale mapping, surveillance, and monitoring. The laboratory-based CAA strip test utilizes luminescent quantitative up-converting phosphor (UCP) reporter particles and a rapid user-friendly lateral flow (LF) assay format. The test includes a sample preparation step that permits virtually unlimited sample concentration with urine, reaching ultimate sensitivity (single worm detection) at 100% specificity. This facilitates testing large urine pools from many individuals with minimal loss of sensitivity and specificity. The test determines the average CAA level of the individuals in the pool thus indicating overall worm burden and prevalence. When requiring test results at the individual level, smaller pools need to be analysed with the pool-size based on expected prevalence or when unknown, on the average CAA level of a larger group; CAA negative pools do not require individual test results and thus reduce the number of tests. Straightforward pooling strategies indicate that at sub-population level the CAA strip test is an efficient assay for general mapping, identification of hotspots, determination of stratified infection levels, and accurate monitoring of mass drug administrations (MDA). At the individual level, the number of tests can be reduced i.e. in low endemic settings as the pool size can be increased as opposed to prevalence decrease. At the sub-population level, average CAA concentrations determined in urine pools can be an appropriate measure indicating worm burden. Pooling strategies allowing this type of large scale testing are feasible with the various CAA strip test formats and do not affect

  8. An automated classification system for the differentiation of obstructive lung diseases based on the textural analysis of HRCT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Hoon; Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Nam Kug; Lee, Young Kyung; Kim, Song Soo; Chae, Eun Jin; Lee, June Goo

    2007-01-01

    To develop an automated classification system for the differentiation of obstructive lung diseases based on the textural analysis of HRCT images, and to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of the system. For textural analysis, histogram features, gradient features, run length encoding, and a co-occurrence matrix were employed. A Bayesian classifier was used for automated classification. The images (image number n = 256) were selected from the HRCT images obtained from 17 healthy subjects (n = 67), 26 patients with bronchiolitis obliterans (n = 70), 28 patients with mild centrilobular emphysema (n = 65), and 21 patients with panlobular emphysema or severe centrilobular emphysema (n = 63). An five-fold cross-validation method was used to assess the performance of the system. Class-specific sensitivities were analyzed and the overall accuracy of the system was assessed with kappa statistics. The sensitivity of the system for each class was as follows: normal lung 84.9%, bronchiolitis obliterans 83.8%, mild centrilobular emphysema 77.0%, and panlobular emphysema or severe centrilobular emphysema 95.8%. The overall performance for differentiating each disease and the normal lung was satisfactory with a kappa value of 0.779. An automated classification system for the differentiation between obstructive lung diseases based on the textural analysis of HRCT images was developed. The proposed system discriminates well between the various obstructive lung diseases and the normal lung

  9. Data management in large-scale collaborative toxicity studies: how to file experimental data for automated statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanzel, Sven; Weimer, Marc; Kopp-Schneider, Annette

    2013-06-01

    High-throughput screening approaches are carried out for the toxicity assessment of a large number of chemical compounds. In such large-scale in vitro toxicity studies several hundred or thousand concentration-response experiments are conducted. The automated evaluation of concentration-response data using statistical analysis scripts saves time and yields more consistent results in comparison to data analysis performed by the use of menu-driven statistical software. Automated statistical analysis requires that concentration-response data are available in a standardised data format across all compounds. To obtain consistent data formats, a standardised data management workflow must be established, including guidelines for data storage, data handling and data extraction. In this paper two procedures for data management within large-scale toxicological projects are proposed. Both procedures are based on Microsoft Excel files as the researcher's primary data format and use a computer programme to automate the handling of data files. The first procedure assumes that data collection has not yet started whereas the second procedure can be used when data files already exist. Successful implementation of the two approaches into the European project ACuteTox is illustrated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 6C polarization analysis - seismic direction finding in coherent noise, automated event identification, and wavefield separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzbach, C.; Sollberger, D.; Greenhalgh, S.; Van Renterghem, C.; Robertsson, J. O. A.

    2017-12-01

    Polarization analysis of standard three-component (3C) seismic data is an established tool to determine the propagation directions of seismic waves recorded by a single station. A major limitation of seismic direction finding methods using 3C recordings, however, is that a correct propagation-direction determination is only possible if the wave mode is known. Furthermore, 3C polarization analysis techniques break down in the presence of coherent noise (i.e., when more than one event is present in the analysis time window). Recent advances in sensor technology (e.g., fibre-optical, magnetohydrodynamic angular rate sensors, and ring laser gyroscopes) have made it possible to accurately measure all three components of rotational ground motion exhibited by seismic waves, in addition to the conventionally recorded three components of translational motion. Here, we present an extension of the theory of single station 3C polarization analysis to six-component (6C) recordings of collocated translational and rotational ground motions. We demonstrate that the information contained in rotation measurements can help to overcome some of the main limitations of standard 3C seismic direction finding, such as handling multiple arrivals simultaneously. We show that the 6C polarisation of elastic waves measured at the Earth's free surface does not only depend on the seismic wave type and propagation direction, but also on the local P- and S-wave velocities just beneath the recording station. Using an adaptation of the multiple signal classification algorithm (MUSIC), we demonstrate how seismic events can univocally be identified and characterized in terms of their wave type. Furthermore, we show how the local velocities can be inferred from single-station 6C data, in addition to the direction angles (inclination and azimuth) of seismic arrivals. A major benefit of our proposed 6C method is that it also allows the accurate recovery of the wave type, propagation directions, and phase

  11. An automated data management/analysis system for space shuttle orbiter tiles. [stress analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, G. L.; Ballas, M.

    1982-01-01

    An engineering data management system was combined with a nonlinear stress analysis program to provide a capability for analyzing a large number of tiles on the space shuttle orbiter. Tile geometry data and all data necessary of define the tile loads environment accessed automatically as needed for the analysis of a particular tile or a set of tiles. User documentation provided includes: (1) description of computer programs and data files contained in the system; (2) definitions of all engineering data stored in the data base; (3) characteristics of the tile anaytical model; (4) instructions for preparation of user input; and (5) a sample problem to illustrate use of the system. Description of data, computer programs, and analytical models of the tile are sufficiently detailed to guide extension of the system to include additional zones of tiles and/or additional types of analyses

  12. Fast-FISH Detection and Semi-Automated Image Analysis of Numerical Chromosome Aberrations in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Esa

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique called Fast-FISH in combination with semi-automated image analysis was applied to detect numerical aberrations of chromosomes 8 and 12 in interphase nuclei of peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow cells from patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Commercially available α-satellite DNA probes specific for the centromere regions of chromosome 8 and chromosome 12, respectively, were used. After application of the Fast-FISH protocol, the microscopic images of the fluorescence-labelled cell nuclei were recorded by the true color CCD camera Kappa CF 15 MC and evaluated quantitatively by computer analysis on a PC. These results were compared to results obtained from the same type of specimens using the same analysis system but with a standard FISH protocol. In addition, automated spot counting after both FISH techniques was compared to visual spot counting after standard FISH. A total number of about 3,000 cell nuclei was evaluated. For quantitative brightness parameters, a good correlation between standard FISH labelling and Fast-FISH was found. Automated spot counting after Fast-FISH coincided within a few percent to automated and visual spot counting after standard FISH. The examples shown indicate the reliability and reproducibility of Fast-FISH and its potential for automatized interphase cell diagnostics of numerical chromosome aberrations. Since the Fast-FISH technique requires a hybridization time as low as 1/20 of established standard FISH techniques, omitting most of the time consuming working steps in the protocol, it may contribute considerably to clinical diagnostics. This may especially be interesting in cases where an accurate result is required within a few hours.

  13. Comparison between manual and automated analysis for the quantification of carotid wall by using sonography. A validation study with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saba, Luca; Montisci, Roberto; Molinari, Filippo; Tallapally, Niranjan; Zeng, Guang; Mallarini, Giorgio; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to compare manual and automated analysis for the quantification of carotid wall obtained with sonography by using the computed tomography as validation technique. Material and methods: 21 consecutive patients underwent MDCTA and ultrasound analysis of carotid arteries (mean age 68 years; age range 59–81 years). The intima–media-thickness (IMT) of the 42 carotids was measured with novel and dedicated automated software analysis (called AtheroEdge™, Biomedical Technologies, Denver, CO, USA) and by four observers that manually calculated the IMT. The carotid artery wall thickness (CAWT) was also quantified in the CT datasets. Bland–Altman statistics was employed to measure the agreement between methods. A Student's t-test was used to test the differences between the IMT values of AtheroEdge™. The study obtained the IRB approval. Results: The correlation between automated AtheroEdge™ measurements and those of the human experts were equal to 95.5%, 73.5%, 88.9%, and 81.7%. The IMT coefficient of variation of the human experts was equal to 11.9%. By using a Student's t-test, the differences between the IMT values of AtheroEdge™ and those of the human experts were not found statistically significant (p value = 0.02). On comparing AtheroEdge™ (using Ultrasound) with CAWT (using CT), the results suggested a very good concordance of 84.96%. Conclusions: Data of this preliminary study indicate that automated software AtheroEdge™ can analyze with precision the IMT of carotid arteries and that the concordance with CT is optimal.

  14. A New Automated Method and Sample Data Flow for Analysis of Volatile Nitrosamines in Human Urine*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, James A.; Seyler, Tiffany H.; McGahee, Ernest; Arnstein, Stephen; Wang, Lanqing

    2016-01-01

    Volatile nitrosamines (VNAs) are a group of compounds classified as probable (group 2A) and possible (group 2B) carcinogens in humans. Along with certain foods and contaminated drinking water, VNAs are detected at high levels in tobacco products and in both mainstream and sidestream smoke. Our laboratory monitors six urinary VNAs—N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosomethylethylamine (NMEA), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), and N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR)—using isotope dilution GC-MS/MS (QQQ) for large population studies such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In this paper, we report for the first time a new automated sample preparation method to more efficiently quantitate these VNAs. Automation is done using Hamilton STAR™ and Caliper Staccato™ workstations. This new automated method reduces sample preparation time from 4 hours to 2.5 hours while maintaining precision (inter-run CV < 10%) and accuracy (85% - 111%). More importantly this method increases sample throughput while maintaining a low limit of detection (<10 pg/mL) for all analytes. A streamlined sample data flow was created in parallel to the automated method, in which samples can be tracked from receiving to final LIMs output with minimal human intervention, further minimizing human error in the sample preparation process. This new automated method and the sample data flow are currently applied in bio-monitoring of VNAs in the US non-institutionalized population NHANES 2013-2014 cycle. PMID:26949569

  15. How automated image analysis techniques help scientists in species identification and classification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef Kalafi, Elham; Town, Christopher; Kaur Dhillon, Sarinder

    2017-09-04

    Identification of taxonomy at a specific level is time consuming and reliant upon expert ecologists. Hence the demand for automated species identification increased over the last two decades. Automation of data classification is primarily focussed on images, incorporating and analysing image data has recently become easier due to developments in computational technology. Research efforts in identification of species include specimens' image processing, extraction of identical features, followed by classifying them into correct categories. In this paper, we discuss recent automated species identification systems, categorizing and evaluating their methods. We reviewed and compared different methods in step by step scheme of automated identification and classification systems of species images. The selection of methods is influenced by many variables such as level of classification, number of training data and complexity of images. The aim of writing this paper is to provide researchers and scientists an extensive background study on work related to automated species identification, focusing on pattern recognition techniques in building such systems for biodiversity studies.

  16. Multichannel Mars Organic Analyzer (McMOA): Microfluidic Networks for the Automated In Situ Microchip Electrophoretic Analysis of Organic Biomarkers on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesl, T. N.; Benhabib, M.; Stockton, A. M.; Mathies, R. A.

    2010-04-01

    We present the Multichannel Mars Organic Analyzer (McMOA) for the analysis of Amino Acids, PAHs, and Oxidized Carbon. Microfluidic architecures integrating automated metering, mixing, on chip reactions, and serial dilutions are also discussed.

  17. Towards an automated analysis of video-microscopy images of fungal morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diéguez-Uribeondo, Javier

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Fungal morphogenesis is an exciting field of cell biology and several mathematical models have been developed to describe it. These models require experimental evidences to be corroborated and, therefore, there is a continuous search for new microscopy and image analysis techniques. In this work, we have used a Canny-edge-detector based technique to automate the generation of hyphal profiles and calculation of morphogenetic parameters such as