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Sample records for analog induce cortisol

  1. Metabolites of an Epac-selective cAMP analog induce cortisol synthesis by adrenocortical cells through a cAMP-independent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A Enyeart

    Full Text Available Adrenal zona fasciculata (AZF cells express a cAMP-activated guanine nucleotide exchange protein (Epac2 that may function in ACTH-stimulated cortisol synthesis. Experiments were done to determine whether cAMP analogs that selectively activate Epacs could induce cortisol synthesis and the expression of genes coding for steroidogenic proteins in bovine AZF cells. Treatment of AZF cells with the Epac-selective cAMP analog (ESCA 8CPT-2'-OMe-cAMP induced large (>100 fold, concentration-dependent, delayed increases in cortisol synthesis and the expression of mRNAs coding for the steroid hydroxylases CYP11a1, CYP17, CYP21, and the steroid acute regulatory protein (StAR. However, a non-hydrolyzable analog of this ESCA, Sp-8CPT-2'-OMe-cAMP, failed to stimulate cortisol production even at concentrations that activated Rap1, a downstream effector of Epac2. Accordingly, putative metabolites of 8CPT-2'-OMe-cAMP, including 8CPT-2'-OMe-5'AMP, 8CPT-2'-OMe-adenosine, and 8CPT-adenine all induced cortisol synthesis and steroid hydroxylase mRNA expression with a temporal pattern, potency, and effectiveness similar to the parent compound. At concentrations that markedly stimulated cortisol production, none of these metabolites significantly activated cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA. These results show that one or more metabolites of the ESCA 8CPT-2'-OMe-cAMP induce cortico-steroidogenesis by activating a panel of genes that code for steroidogenic proteins. The remarkable increases in cortisol synthesis observed in this study appear to be mediated by a novel cAMP-, Epac- and PKA-independent signaling pathway.

  2. Nongenomic actions of cortisol in the teleost lactotroph model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borski, Russell J; Tipsmark, Christian Kølbæk; Mita, M

    2006-01-01

    present study was to investigate the role of phospholipase C (PLC)-IP3 in mediating cortisol's actions. During 30 min and 4-hour incubation, chicken GnRH-II induces a 2-4 fold increase in PRL release from the tilapia pituitary. The stimulatory effect of cGnRH-II was reduced by cortisol, cortisol-21......-hemisuccinate (HEF) and its membrane impermeant analog, HEF-BSA. Since GnRH induces PRL release, in part, via activation of PLC this suggests that cortisol may rapidly inhibit GnRH-induced PRL release by suppressing PLC activity. We also found that cortisol rapidly inhibits IP3 accumulation in tilapia RPD under...

  3. Effect Halothane-Induced Anesthesia on Plasma Cortisol in Celiotomy in Pigeon

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    S. Sabiza

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Blood biochemical factors are changed by anesthesia in birds. Cortisol is one of these factors which related to inflammation and pain at surgery or post-operation. In present study, we evaluated effect of halothaneinduced anesthesia on plasma level of cortisol in pigeon. Ten domestic pigeons were used. The weight of birds was about 300 g. After 3 to 4 h food restriction, anesthesia was induced by halothane for celiotomy within 20 min. Anesthesia was induced by halothane at 2.5% with oxygen gas and it continued by 1.5% halothane. Blood sample was collected before, during and after surgery from pigeons and plasma level of cortisol was measured by commercial kit. Anesthesia induction and maintenance with halothane provided suitable anesthesia during celiotomy in pigeon. Plasma level of cortisol was significantly decreased after anesthesia. The mean of cortisol was 2.02 ng/mL before anesthesia and reached to 1.75 and 1.59 ng/mL in during and after anesthesia respectively. This change significantly differed with comparison to before surgery. But the mean of cortisol was not different significantly between duration of surgery and post operation. Halothane can decrease level of cortisol during anesthesia and so it decreases anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of cortisol and also side effect of corticostroids.

  4. Stress induced Salmonella Typhimurium recrudescence in pigs coincides with cortisol induced increased intracellular proliferation in macrophages

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    Verbrugghe Elin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonella Typhimurium infections in pigs often result in the development of carriers that intermittently excrete Salmonella in very low numbers. During periods of stress, for example transport to the slaughterhouse, recrudescence of Salmonella may occur, but the mechanism of this stress related recrudescence is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the role of the stress hormone cortisol in Salmonella recrudescence by pigs. We showed that a 24 h feed withdrawal increases the intestinal Salmonella Typhimurium load in pigs, which is correlated with increased serum cortisol levels. A second in vivo trial demonstrated that stress related recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium in pigs can be induced by intramuscular injection of dexamethasone. Furthermore, we found that cortisol, but not epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine, promotes intracellular proliferation of Salmonella Typhimurium in primary porcine alveolar macrophages, but not in intestinal epithelial cells and a transformed cell line of porcine alveolar macrophages. A microarray based transcriptomic analysis revealed that cortisol did not directly affect the growth or the gene expression or Salmonella Typhimurium in a rich medium, which implies that the enhanced intracellular proliferation of the bacterium is probably caused by an indirect effect through the cell. These results highlight the role of cortisol in the recrudescence of Salmonella Typhimurium by pigs and they provide new evidence for the role of microbial endocrinology in host-pathogen interactions.

  5. Stress-induced cortisol is associated with generation of non-negative interpretations during cognitive reappraisal

    OpenAIRE

    Tsumura, Hideki; Sensaki, Jun; Shimada, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Background Enhanced processing of emotional stimuli after stress exposure is reported to be associated with stress-induced cortisol. Because enhanced emotional information processing could make cognitive emotion regulation more difficult, it was hypothesized that stress-induced cortisol would be associated with non-negative interpretation generation associated with the cognitive reappraisal processes. Methods A total of 36 participants (Mean age = 21.3 years, SD = 1.8) watched video clips of ...

  6. Cortisol-induced increases of plasma oxytocin levels predict decreased immediate free recall of unpleasant words

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    Mattie eTops

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cortisol and oxytocin have been shown to interact in both the regulation of stress responses and in memory function. In the present study we administered cortisol to 35 healthy female subjects in a within-subject double-blind placebo-controlled design, while measuring oxytocin levels, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH levels, and free recall of pleasant and of unpleasant words. We found that cortisol administration induced both a decrease in oxytocin associated with ACTH suppression and an increase in oxytocin that was independent from ACTH suppression. This cortisol-induced increase in plasma oxytocin was associated with a selective decrease in immediate free recall of unpleasant words from primacy positions. The present results add to evidence that cortisol-induced increases in oxytocin could mediate some of the effects of stress and cortisol treatment on memory, and possibly play a role in the regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal stress response. This mechanism could significantly impact affective and social behaviors, in particular during times of stress.

  7. Psychological and cortisol reactivity to experimentally induced stress in adults with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Sivan; Leykin, Dmitry

    2015-10-01

    Individuals with ADHD suffer from increased vulnerability to environmental and mental stressors and may be at increased risk for chronic stress in everyday life. The Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis is a critical physiological system that mediates responses to stress. The present study seeks to examine test performance, test anxiety, self-reported psychological stress and cortisol reactivity to mental-cognitive stress in adults with ADHD when compared with healthy controls. Stress was induced by an arithmetic ability test. Psychological stress was assessed repeatedly throughout the experimental session. Salivary cortisol, an indicator of the HPA axis function, was evaluated immediately upon arrival, as well as 1 min and 20 min post-test completion. Results revealed higher levels of test anxiety and poorer performance on the test in the ADHD group. The ADHD and control groups showed no difference in base-line levels of subjective stress and in subjective stress levels 20 min after the test. In contrast, individuals with ADHD reported significantly higher levels of stress at the test anticipation phase and 1 min post-test completion. Cortisol response to stress differed according to group: in the ADHD group, 20 min post-test cortisol levels were significantly higher than base-line cortisol levels. This was not evident in the control group. These results suggest greater activation of the HPA axis in response to stress in adults with ADHD when compared with healthy controls. Adults with ADHD do not differ from controls in basal levels of subjective stress and cortisol, but do have stronger psychophysiological reactions in response to stressful challenges. The present findings are among the first to demonstrate significant alterations in cortisol reactivity to stress in adults with ADHD. PMID:26107579

  8. Neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation, perceived neighborhood factors, and cortisol responses to induced stress among healthy adults.

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    Barrington, Wendy E; Stafford, Mai; Hamer, Mark; Beresford, Shirley A A; Koepsell, Thomas; Steptoe, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Associations between measures of neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation and health have been identified, yet work is needed to uncover explanatory mechanisms. One hypothesized pathway is through stress, yet the few studies that have evaluated associations between characteristics of deprived neighborhoods and biomarkers of stress are mixed. This study evaluated whether objectively measured neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation and individual perceived neighborhood characteristics (i.e. social control and fear of crime) impacted cortisol responses to an induced stressor among older healthy adults. Data from Heart Scan, a sub-study of the Whitehall II cohort, were used to generate multilevel piecewise growth-curve models of cortisol trajectories after a laboratory stressor accounting for neighborhood and demographic characteristics. Neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation was significantly associated with individual perceptions of social control and fear of crime in the neighborhood while an association with blunted cortisol reactivity was only evidence among women. Social control was significantly associated with greater cortisol reactivity and mediation between neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation and cortisol reactivity was suggested among women. These findings support a gender-dependent role of neighborhood in stress process models of health. PMID:24603009

  9. Environmental stress-induced testis differentiation: androgen as a by-product of cortisol inactivation.

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    Fernandino, Juan I; Hattori, Ricardo S; Moreno Acosta, Omar D; Strüssmann, Carlos A; Somoza, Gustavo M

    2013-10-01

    This review deals with the gonadal masculinization induced by thermal stress in fish with focus on the action of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) as this mechanism key transducer. High temperatures have been reported to produce male-skewed sex ratios in several species with TSD (temperature-dependent sex determination), and in some of them, this process was reported to be associated with high levels of cortisol, the hormone-related stress in vertebrates, during early gonad development. In addition, in pejerrey larvae reared at high-masculinizing temperatures, 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT), the main and most potent androgen in fish, was also detected at high levels. In testicular explants, cortisol induced the synthesis of 11-KT, suggesting that its synthesis could be under the control of the stress axis at the time of gonadal fate determination. 11β-HSD is one of the enzymes shared by the glucocorticoid and androgen pathways; this enzyme converts cortisol to cortisone and also participates in the finals steps of the synthesis of the 11-oxigenated androgens. Based on these data and literature information, here we propose that the masculinization induced by thermal stress can be considered as a consequence of cortisol inactivation and the concomitant synthesis of 11-KT and discussing this as a possible mechanism of masculinization induced by different types of environmental stressors. PMID:23770022

  10. The role of cortisol in chronic binge alcohol-induced cerebellar injury: Ovine model.

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    Washburn, Shannon E; Tress, Ursula; Lunde, Emilie R; Chen, Wei-Jung A; Cudd, Timothy A

    2013-02-01

    Women who drink alcohol during pregnancy are at high risk of giving birth to children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Previous reports from our laboratory have shown that third trimester equivalent binge alcohol exposure at a dose of 1.75 g/kg/day results in significant fetal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss in fetal sheep and that both maternal and fetal adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cortisol levels are elevated in response to alcohol treatment. In this study, we hypothesized that repeated elevations in cortisol from chronic binge alcohol are responsible at least in part for fetal neuronal deficits. Animals were divided into four treatment groups: normal control, pair-fed saline control, alcohol and cortisol. The magnitude of elevation in cortisol in response to alcohol was mimicked in the cortisol group by infusing pregnant ewes with hydrocortisone for 6 h on each day of the experiment, and administering saline during the first hour in lieu of alcohol. The experiment was conducted on three consecutive days followed by four days without treatment beginning on gestational day (GD) 109 until GD 132. Peak maternal blood alcohol concentration in the alcohol group was 239 ± 7 mg/dl. The fetal brains were collected and processed for stereological cell counting on GD 133. The estimated total number of fetal cerebellar Purkinje cells, the reference volume and the Purkinje cell density were not altered in response to glucocorticoid infusion in the absence of alcohol. These results suggest that glucocorticoids independently during the third trimester equivalent may not produce fetal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss. However, the elevations in cortisol along with other changes induced by alcohol could together lead to brain injury seen in the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. PMID:23218665

  11. Stress, stress-induced cortisol responses, and eyewitness identification performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerland, Melanie; Raymaekers, Linsey H C; Otgaar, Henry; Memon, Amina; Waltjen, Thijs T; Nivo, Maud; Slegers, Chiel; Broers, Nick J; Smeets, Tom

    2016-07-01

    In the eyewitness identification literature, stress and arousal at the time of encoding are considered to adversely influence identification performance. This assumption is in contrast with findings from the neurobiology field of learning and memory, showing that stress and stress hormones are critically involved in forming enduring memories. This discrepancy may be related to methodological differences between the two fields of research, such as the tendency for immediate testing or the use of very short (1-2 hours) retention intervals in eyewitness research, while neurobiology studies insert at least 24 hours. Other differences refer to the extent to which stress-responsive systems (i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) are stimulated effectively under laboratory conditions. The aim of the current study was to conduct an experiment that accounts for the contemporary state of knowledge in both fields. In all, 123 participants witnessed a live staged theft while being exposed to a laboratory stressor that reliably elicits autonomic and glucocorticoid stress responses or while performing a control task. Salivary cortisol levels were measured to control for the effectiveness of the stress induction. One week later, participants attempted to identify the thief from target-present and target-absent line-ups. According to regression and receiver operating characteristic analyses, stress did not have robust detrimental effects on identification performance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Behavioral Sciences & the Law Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27417874

  12. Cortisol level

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enable JavaScript. The cortisol blood test measures the level of cortisol in the blood. Cortisol is a ... in the morning. This is important, because cortisol level varies throughout the day. You may be asked ...

  13. Basal or stress-induced cortisol and asthma development : the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, Nienke M; Boezen, Hendrika; Postma, Dirkje S; Rosmalen, Judith G M

    2013-01-01

    We examined the association between: 1) cortisol levels and asthma or asthma development; 2) cortisol levels upon stress and asthma. In addition, we performed a post hoc meta-analysis on results from the literature. Cortisol, cortisol upon stress, asthma (doctor diagnosis of asthma and/or symptoms a

  14. Basal or stress-induced cortisol and asthma development: the TRAILS study

    OpenAIRE

    Vink, Nienke M; Boezen, Hendrika; Postma, Dirkje S; Rosmalen, Judith G M

    2013-01-01

    We examined the association between: 1) cortisol levels and asthma or asthma development; 2) cortisol levels upon stress and asthma. In addition, we performed a post hoc meta-analysis on results from the literature. Cortisol, cortisol upon stress, asthma (doctor diagnosis of asthma and/or symptoms and/or treatment in the past 12 months) and asthma development (asthma at a specific survey while not having asthma at the previous survey(s)) were assessed in the TRAILS study (n=2230, mean age at ...

  15. Atypical evening cortisol profile induces visual recognition memory deficit in healthy human subjects

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    Gilpin Heather

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diurnal rhythm-mediated endogenous cortisol levels in humans are characterised by a peak in secretion after awakening that declines throughout the day to an evening trough. However, a significant proportion of the population exhibits an atypical cycle of diurnal cortisol due to shift work, jet-lag, aging, and mental illness. Results The present study has demonstrated a correlation between elevation of cortisol in the evening and deterioration of visual object recognition memory. However, high evening cortisol levels have no effect on spatial memory. Conclusion This study suggests that atypical evening salivary cortisol levels have an important role in the early deterioration of recognition memory. The loss of recognition memory, which is vital for everyday life, is a major symptom of the amnesic syndrome and early stages of Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, this study will promote a potential physiologic marker of early deterioration of recognition memory and a possible diagnostic strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

  16. The importance of the training-induced decrease in basal cortisol concentration in the improvement in muscular performance in humans.

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    Grandys, M; Majerczak, J; Kulpa, J; Duda, K; Rychlik, U; Zoladz, J A

    2016-03-14

    Acute exercise-induced changes in cortisol concentration (C) and training related adaptation within hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been widely examined, but their influence on muscle strength performance is at best uncertain. Twenty four young healthy men were randomly assigned to an endurance training group (ET, n=12) or to a non-exercising controls (CON, n=12). ET performed supervised endurance training on cycle ergometer for 20 weeks. Endurance training program improved exercise capacity (14 % increase in power output generated at peak oxygen uptake - VO(2peak)), muscle strength performance (increase in MVC - maximal voluntary contraction - by 9 % and in TTF 50 % MVC - time to fatigue at 50 % MVC - by 21 %) and led to a decrease in basal serum C concentration (P=0.006) and an increase in basal testosterone to cortisol (T/C) and free testosterone to cortisol (fT/C) ratios (P=0.01 and P=0.02, respectively). It was found that the decrease in C concentration (deltaC) was positively correlated to the increase in local muscular endurance (deltaTTF 50 % MVC). No significant hormonal changes were seen in CON group. It is concluded that greater decrease in cortisol concentration after the endurance training is accompanied by poorer improvement in skeletal muscle performance in previously untrained subjects. PMID:26596321

  17. Magnetically coupled electromagnetically induced transparency analogy of dielectric metamaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this manuscript, we experimentally demonstrate magnetically coupled electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) analogy effect inside dielectric metamaterial. In contrast to previous studies employed different metallic topological microstructures to introduce dissipation loss change, barium strontium titanate, and calcium titanate (CaTiO3) are chosen as the bright and dark EIT resonators, respectively, due to their different intrinsic dielectric loss. Under incident magnetic field excitation, dielectric metamaterial exhibits an EIT-type transparency window around 8.9 GHz, which is accompanied by abrupt change of transmission phase. Numerical calculations show good agreement with experiment spectra and reveal remarkably increased group index, indicating potential application in slow light

  18. Pre-treatment waking cortisol response and vulnerability to interferon α induced depression.

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    Eccles, Jessica; Lallemant, Camille; Mushtaq, Farrah; Greenwood, Matthew; Keller, Majella; Golding, Bruno; Tibble, Jeremy; Haq, Inam; Whale, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Depressive disorder is a common consequence of interferon α treatment. An understanding of the aetiological processes involved is evolving. HPA axis abnormalities are clearly described in community depressive disorder and represent vulnerability to depression development. We explored whether pre-treatment HPA axis abnormalities influence depression emergence during interferon α treatment. We examined waking HPA axis response via salivary cortisol sampling in 44 non-depressed, chronic hepatitis C infected patients due to commence standard interferon α treatment. Hamilton depression scales and the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV major depressive disorder status were administered monthly during treatment. Major depressive disorder developed in 26 of 44 subjects during interferon-α treatment. The pre-treatment waking cortisol response over 1h was significantly greater in the subsequent switch to depression group (F=4.23, p=0.046). The waking cortisol response pre-treatment with interferon α appears greater in those subsequently switching to depressive disorder during treatment. This waking response may join other vulnerability factors for depression emergence in this group. This model could prove a valuable tool in understanding non-iatrogenic depressive disorder in the general population and notably the role of cytokines. PMID:22571879

  19. Imbalance between macrophage migration inhibitory factor and cortisol induces multiple organ dysfunction in patients with blunt trauma

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is associated with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Our purposes were to determine the serum MIF, cortisol and tumor narcosis factor-α (TNF-α) and to investigate the influences of the balance between the levels of MIF and cortisol in patients with blunt trauma. The cortisol levels were identical between the patients with and without MODS. However, the MIF and TNF-α levels in the patien...

  20. Serum cortisol concentrations during induced hypothermia for perinatal asphyxia are associated with neurological outcome in human infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzzo, Rosa T; Giampietri, Matteo; Fiorentini, Erika; Bartalena, Laura; Fiori, Simona; Guzzetta, Andrea; Ciampi, Mariella; Boldrini, Antonio; Ghirri, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Birth asphyxia is a cause of neonatal death or adverse neurological sequelae. Biomarkers can be useful to clinicians in order to optimize intensive care management and communication of prognosis to parents. During perinatal adverse events, increased cortisol secretion is due to hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis activation. We aimed to investigate if cortisol variations during therapeutic hypothermia are associated with neurodevelopmental outcome. We compared 18 cases (neonates with birth asphyxia) with 18 controls (healthy term newborns) and confirmed increased serum cortisol concentrations following the peri-partum adverse event. Among cases, we stratified patients according to neurological outcome at 18 months (group A - good; group B - adverse) and found that after 24 h of therapeutic hypothermia serum cortisol concentration was significantly lower in group A vs group B (28.7 ng/mL vs 344 ng/mL, *p = 0.01). In group B serum, cortisol concentration decreased more gradually during therapeutic hypothermia. We conclude that monitoring serum cortisol concentration during neonatal therapeutic hypothermia can add information to clinical evaluation of neonates with birth asphyxia; cortisol values after the first 24 h of hypothermia can be a biomarker associated with neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months of age. PMID:25394684

  1. Analogical Thinking Induces Eye Movements in Scene Viewing

    OpenAIRE

    Gufran Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The studies of eye movements for understanding underlying mechanism of visual attention and perception have been challenging. These studies are obligatory to learn the dynamics of humans’ cognition. We performed and studied eye tracking experiments to examine the hypothesis that the patterns created in scene viewing were predominantly influenced by analogical perspective of cognitive processes. Eye movement data, in terms of heat maps, were collected from participants who watched artistic por...

  2. Exploring shamanic journeying: repetitive drumming with shamanic instructions induces specific subjective experiences but no larger cortisol decrease than instrumental meditation music.

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    Bruno Gingras

    Full Text Available Exposure to repetitive drumming combined with instructions for shamanic journeying has been associated with physiological and therapeutic effects, such as an increase in salivary immunoglobulin A. In order to assess whether the combination of repetitive drumming and shamanic instructions is specifically associated with these effects, we compared the effect of listening to either repetitive drumming or instrumental meditation music for 15 minutes on salivary cortisol concentration and on self-reported physiological and psychological states. For each musical style, two groups of participants were exposed to two conditions: instructions for shamanic journeying or relaxation instructions. A total of 39 participants (24 females inexperienced in shamanic journeying completed the experiment. Salivary cortisol concentrations were measured before and after exposure to music. In addition, participants filled out a mood questionnaire before and after the experiment and completed a post experiment questionnaire on their experiences. A significant decrease in the concentration in salivary cortisol was observed across all musical styles and instructions, indicating that exposure to 15 minutes of either repetitive drumming or instrumental meditation music, while lying down, was sufficient to induce a decrease in cortisol levels. However, no differences were observed across conditions. Significant differences in reported emotional states and subjective experiences were observed between the groups. Notably, participants exposed to repetitive drumming combined with shamanic instructions reported experiencing heaviness, decreased heart rate, and dreamlike experiences significantly more often than participants exposed to repetitive drumming combined with relaxation instructions. Our findings suggest that the subjective effects specifically attributed to repetitive drumming and shamanic journeying may not be reflected in differential endocrine responses.

  3. Relationship of cortisol, norepinephrine, and epinephrine levels with war-induced posttraumatic stress disorder in fathers and their offspring

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    Seyyed Taha Yahyavi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To compare afternoon serum/plasma levels of hormones in four groups: (A veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, (B offspring of PTSD veterans, (C veterans without PTSD, and (D offspring of non-PTSD veterans.Methods:Evaluation consisted of a semi-structured interview for axis I and II diagnoses, followed by measurement of afternoon serum cortisol and plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine by ELISA (Diametra and LND (LDN Labor Diagnostika Nord GmbH & Co. KG respectively. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Student t, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, and nonparametric Mann-Whitney tests.Results:One hundred and sixty-eight volunteers were investigated across the four groups. The groups were similar in terms of demographic characteristics, war experience and traumatization, and psychiatric and medical conditions other than PTSD (group A was similar to group C and group B was similar to group D. Between-groups comparisons did not yield statistically significant differences. Post-hoc analyses revealed significant differences in afternoon cortisol level between the offspring of veterans with current/past history of PTSD and the offspring of veterans without a history of PTSD.Conclusion:We only found decreased cortisol levels in offspring of veterans after rearranging the groups to reflect previous history of PTSD. Further studies are required to investigate the relationship between cortisol levels and the transgenerational effects of trauma and parental PTSD.

  4. Alteração da relação testosterona: cortisol induzida pelo treinamento de força em mulheres Alteración de la relación testosterona: cortisol inducida por el entrenamiento de fuerza en mujeres Alteration of testosterone: cortisol ratio induced by resistance training in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Carlos Uchida

    2004-06-01

    con un año de experiencia en entrenamiento de fuerza fueron sometidas al protocolo MS. Las muestras de sangre fueron colectadas antes e imediatamente después del ejercicio, en el primer día y después de ocho semanas de entrenamiento. Los tests de 1-RM y de repeticiones máximas fueron realizados también al inicio y al final después de las ocho semanas del entrenamiento de fuerza. No fueron observadas alteraciones de la masa corporal, IMC, porcentaje de masa grasa, fuerza (1-RM para los ejercicios supino, agachamiento y rosca directa. El número de repeticiones máximas al 50% de 1-RM fue aumentando solamente apenas para el supino (p The ratio between the concentration of testosterone and cortisol (T:C is frequently used as indicative of the stress level imposed by the exercise. Alterations in the concentration of these hormones are responsible for modulating several responses induced by training, such as hypertrophy and strength gain. The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of the resistance training protocol, also known as multiple-series (MS, on the strength gain, the muscular endurance and the relation between the concentration of catabolic hormones (cortisol and anabolic hormones (testosterone. In order to test this hypothesis, five young women with one-year of strength training practice were submitted to the MS protocol. The blood samples were collected before and immediately after the exercise at the first day and after eight weeks of training. The 1-RM and the maximal repetition tests were also performed at the beginning and after eight weeks of strength training. No alterations on the body mass, on the IMC, on the fat mass percentage and on the maximal strength (1-RM on bench press, squat and arm curl were observed. The number of maximal repetitions at 50% of the 1-RM was increased only for the bench press (p < 0.05. No alterations on the concentration of the total testosterone were observed. The cortisol plasmatic

  5. Preoperative normalization of cortisol levels in cushing's disease after medical treatment: Consequences for somatostatin and dopamine receptor subtype expression and in vitro response to somatostatin analogs and dopamine agonists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van der Pas (Rob); R.A. Feelders (Richard); F. Gatto (Federico); C. de Bruin (Christiaan); A.M. Pereira (A.); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); D. Sprij-Mooij (Diana); A.M. Waaijers (Annet); F. Dogan (Fadime); S. Schulz (S.); J.M. Kros (Johan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); L.J. Hofland (Leo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractContext: Corticotroph pituitary adenomas often highly express the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) and somatostatin receptor subtype 5 (sst5). The sst2 expression is relatively low, likely resulting from downregulating effects of high cortisol levels. This may explain why the sst2-preferring so

  6. Preoperative Normalization of Cortisol Levels in Cushing's Disease After Medical Treatment: Consequences for Somatostatin and Dopamine Receptor Subtype Expression and In Vitro Response to Somatostatin Analogs and Dopamine Agonists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, R. van der; Feelders, R.A.; Gatto, F.; Bruin, C. de; Pereira, A.M.; Koetsveld, P.M. van; Sprij-Mooij, D.M.; Waaijers, A.M.; Dogan, F.; Schulz, S.; Kros, J.M.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Hofland, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Corticotroph pituitary adenomas often highly express the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) and somatostatin receptor subtype 5 (sst5). The sst2 expression is relatively low, likely resulting from downregulating effects of high cortisol levels. This may explain why the sst2-preferring somatostatin a

  7. Sleep and Salivary Cortisol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Anne Helene; Karlson, Bernt; Hansen, Åse Marie;

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present chapter was to analyze whether measures of cortisol in saliva were associated with measures of sleep and to explore if divergent results were related to underlying differences in theoretic assumptions and methods. Measures of sleep quality included sleep duration, overall...... sleep quality, difficulty falling asleep, disturbed sleep, and sleep deprivation. Twenty-three papers were found to fulfill the inclusion criteria. Cortisol measures were grouped into single time points at different times during the day, deviations at different time periods during the day, reactivity...... sleep duration and single measures of salivary cortisol at awakening, which was observed in 3 studies. In these studies, sleep duration was also associated with low evening cortisol levels, steep diurnal deviation of cortisol and/or high area under the curve. Together these findings suggest that longer...

  8. Daily rhythm of cortisol, and evidence for a photo-inducible phase for prolactin secretion in nonpregnant mares housed under non-interrupted and skeleton photoperiods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A L; Malinowski, K

    1986-07-01

    Studies were conducted in anestrous mares to characterize daily rhythms of cortisol in non-interrupted [ambient and 16 h light (L): 8 h dark (D)] and skeleton (10L:4D:2L:8D, 10L:6D:2L:6D and 10L:8D:2L:4D) photoperiods, and to determine if there exists a photosensitive phase for the secretion of prolactin. Neither peak or nadir concentrations of cortisol, nor the time of peak or nadir concentrations differed among photoperiod treatments. Highest concentrations (66 +/- 4.4 ng/ml, mean +/- SE) occurred between 0700 and 0900, whereas lowest concentrations (31 +/- 3.6 ng/ml) were found from 1900 to 2300. Mean daily concentrations of serum prolactin were significantly higher in mares housed under the 16L:8D and the 10L:8D:2L:4D photoperiods as compared with the remaining photoperiod treatments, and were lowest in the ambient photoperiod treatment. The mean daily concentration of prolactin in February among photoperiod treatments was inversely related to the number of days (from December 1) to first seasonal ovulation (r = -.92, P = .027). The results were interpreted to: 1) suggest that mares in the 10L:8D:2L:4D skeleton photoperiod do not phase-shift to interpret the 2-h light pulse as the beginning of their subjective day; and 2) provide further evidence that the photo-inducible phase for both prolactin secretion and the stimulation of seasonal reproductive activity occurs 8 to 10 h following the onset of the dark period (scotophase). PMID:3733571

  9. Cadmium-mediated disruption of cortisol biosynthesis involves suppression of corticosteroidogenic genes in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Navdeep; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2011-05-01

    Cadmium is widely distributed in the aquatic environment and is toxic to fish even at sublethal concentrations. This metal is an endocrine disruptor, and one well established role in teleosts is the suppression of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated cortisol biosynthesis by the interrenal tissue. However the mechanism(s) leading to this steroid suppression is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that cadmium targets genes encoding proteins critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis, including melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To test this, head kidney slices (containing the interrenal tissues) were incubated in vitro with cadmium chloride (0, 10, 100 and 1000nM) for 4h either in the presence or absence of ACTH (0.5IU/mL). In the unstimulated head kidney slices, cadmium exposure did not affect basal cortisol secretion and the mRNA levels of MC2R and P450scc, while StAR gene expression was significantly reduced. Cadmium exposure significantly suppressed ACTH-stimulated cortisol production in a dose-related fashion. This cadmium-mediated suppression in corticosteroidogenesis corresponded with a significant reduction in MC2R, StAR and P450scc mRNA levels in trout head kidney slices. The inhibition of ACTH-stimulated cortisol production and suppression of genes involved in corticosteroidogenesis by cadmium were completely abolished in the presence of 8-Bromo-cAMP (a cAMP analog). Overall, cadmium disrupts the expression of genes critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis in rainbow trout head kidney slices. However, the rescue of cortisol production as well as StAR and P450scc gene expressions by cAMP analog suggests that cadmium impact occurs upstream of cAMP production. We propose that MC2R signaling, the primary step in ACTH-induced cortocosteroidogenesis, is a key target for cadmium-mediated disruption of

  10. Cadmium-mediated disruption of cortisol biosynthesis involves suppression of corticosteroidogenic genes in rainbow trout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, Navdeep [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Vijayan, Mathilakath M., E-mail: mvijayan@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-05-15

    Cadmium is widely distributed in the aquatic environment and is toxic to fish even at sublethal concentrations. This metal is an endocrine disruptor, and one well established role in teleosts is the suppression of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated cortisol biosynthesis by the interrenal tissue. However the mechanism(s) leading to this steroid suppression is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that cadmium targets genes encoding proteins critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis, including melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To test this, head kidney slices (containing the interrenal tissues) were incubated in vitro with cadmium chloride (0, 10, 100 and 1000 nM) for 4 h either in the presence or absence of ACTH (0.5 IU/mL). In the unstimulated head kidney slices, cadmium exposure did not affect basal cortisol secretion and the mRNA levels of MC2R and P450scc, while StAR gene expression was significantly reduced. Cadmium exposure significantly suppressed ACTH-stimulated cortisol production in a dose-related fashion. This cadmium-mediated suppression in corticosteroidogenesis corresponded with a significant reduction in MC2R, StAR and P450scc mRNA levels in trout head kidney slices. The inhibition of ACTH-stimulated cortisol production and suppression of genes involved in corticosteroidogenesis by cadmium were completely abolished in the presence of 8-Bromo-cAMP (a cAMP analog). Overall, cadmium disrupts the expression of genes critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis in rainbow trout head kidney slices. However, the rescue of cortisol production as well as StAR and P450scc gene expressions by cAMP analog suggests that cadmium impact occurs upstream of cAMP production. We propose that MC2R signaling, the primary step in ACTH-induced cortocosteroidogenesis, is a key target for cadmium-mediated disruption of

  11. Cadmium-mediated disruption of cortisol biosynthesis involves suppression of corticosteroidogenic genes in rainbow trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is widely distributed in the aquatic environment and is toxic to fish even at sublethal concentrations. This metal is an endocrine disruptor, and one well established role in teleosts is the suppression of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated cortisol biosynthesis by the interrenal tissue. However the mechanism(s) leading to this steroid suppression is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that cadmium targets genes encoding proteins critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis, including melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). To test this, head kidney slices (containing the interrenal tissues) were incubated in vitro with cadmium chloride (0, 10, 100 and 1000 nM) for 4 h either in the presence or absence of ACTH (0.5 IU/mL). In the unstimulated head kidney slices, cadmium exposure did not affect basal cortisol secretion and the mRNA levels of MC2R and P450scc, while StAR gene expression was significantly reduced. Cadmium exposure significantly suppressed ACTH-stimulated cortisol production in a dose-related fashion. This cadmium-mediated suppression in corticosteroidogenesis corresponded with a significant reduction in MC2R, StAR and P450scc mRNA levels in trout head kidney slices. The inhibition of ACTH-stimulated cortisol production and suppression of genes involved in corticosteroidogenesis by cadmium were completely abolished in the presence of 8-Bromo-cAMP (a cAMP analog). Overall, cadmium disrupts the expression of genes critical for corticosteroid biosynthesis in rainbow trout head kidney slices. However, the rescue of cortisol production as well as StAR and P450scc gene expressions by cAMP analog suggests that cadmium impact occurs upstream of cAMP production. We propose that MC2R signaling, the primary step in ACTH-induced cortocosteroidogenesis, is a key target for cadmium-mediated disruption of

  12. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

  13. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, E.L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Boulware, S. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); Fields, T.; McIvor, E.; Powell, K.L. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); DiGiovanni, J.; Vasquez, K.M. [Division of Pharmacy and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, Dell Pediatric Research Institute, 1400 Barbara Jordan Blvd., Austin, TX 78723 (United States); MacLeod, M.C., E-mail: mcmacleod@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

  14. The scent of wolves: pyrazine analogs induce avoidance and vigilance behaviors in prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumi eOsada

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The common grey wolf (Canis lupus is an apex predator located at the top of the food chain in the Northern Hemisphere. It preys on rodents, rabbits, ungulates, and many other kinds of mammal. However, the behavioral evidence for, and the chemical basis of, the fear-inducing impact of wolf urine on prey are unclear. Recently, the pyrazine analogs 2, 6-dimethylpyrazine, 2, 3, 5-trimethylpyrazine and 3-ethyl-2, 5-dimethyl pyrazine were identified as kairomones in the urine of wolves. When mice were confronted with a mixture of purified pyrazine analogs, vigilance behaviors, including freezing and excitation of neurons at the accessory olfactory bulb, were markedly increased. Additionally, the odor of the pyrazine cocktail effectively suppressed the approach of deer to a feeding area, and for those close to the feeding area elicited fear-related behaviors such as the tail-flag, flight, and jump actions. In this review, we discuss the transfer of chemical information from wolf to prey through the novel kairomones identified in wolf urine and also compare the characteristics of wolf kairomones with other predator-produced kairomones that affect rodents.

  15. New-to-nature sophorose analog: a potent inducer for gene expression in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tom Tao; Wages, John M

    2016-04-01

    Controlled hydrolysis of lactonic sophorolipids from Starmerella bombicola yields a previously undescribed sophorose analog that potently induces cellulase in Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30. Acid treatment of natural sophorolipids results in a mixture of monoacetylated, deacetylated, and diacetylated sophorolipids in acidic and lactonic forms. Isolation of the active components of the mixture, followed by structure determination by MS and NMR, reveals a new chemical entity, in which the lactone ring has been opened at the C-1' rather than at the C-4″ position of the sophorose moiety. This sophorose ester is resistant to degradation by the host and is at least 28 times more powerful an inducer than sophorose in shake-flask culture. Even at low concentrations (0.05mM), the chemically modified sophorolipid effectively induces cellulase. With further improvements, this highly enabling technology can potentially reduce the cost of enzymes produced in T. reesei and can facilitate the rapid deployment of enzyme plants to support the nascent cellulosic biofuels and biochemicals industries. PMID:26920480

  16. Individual differences in cortisol responses to a laboratory speech task and their relationship to responses to stressful daily events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, M; Nicolson, N.A; Berkhof, J.; Sulon, J

    1996-01-01

    A Stress Inducing Speech Task was used to investigate the contribution of perceived stress, individual traits, and current mood states to individual differences in salivary cortisol responses. Additionally, we examined the correspondence between laboratory baseline cortisol levels and overall levels

  17. Salivary cortisol in panic attacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandelow, B; Wedekind, D; Pauls, J; Broocks, A; Hajak, G; Ruther, E

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Documentation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis disturbance in panic disorder has been inconsistent. Increased cortisol levels have been associated with altered HPA function due to stress. The authors examined salivary cortisol levels in spontaneously occurring, unprovoked pani

  18. Diurnal salivary cortisol concentrations in Parkinson’s disease: increased total secretion and morning cortisol concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skogar Ö

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ö Skogar1,4, P-A Fall2, G Hallgren3, J Lökk4, B Bringer2, M Carlsson1, U Lennartsson3, H Sandbjork3, C-J Törnhage51Department of Geriatrics, Ryhov Hospital, Jonkoping, 2Department of Geriatrics, University Hospital, Linkoping, 3Department of Neurology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skovde, 4Institute of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, 5Department of Pediatrics, Skaraborg Hospital, Skövde, SwedenBackground: Parkinson’s disease (PD is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder. There is limited knowledge about the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in PD. The primary aim of this prospective study was to analyze diurnal salivary cortisol concentrations in patients with PD and correlate these with age, gender, body mass index (BMI, duration of PD, and pain. The secondary aim was to compare the results with a healthy reference group.Methods: Fifty-nine PD patients, 35 women and 24 men, aged 50–79 years, were recruited. The reference group comprised healthy individuals matched for age, gender, BMI, and time point for sampling. Salivary cortisol was collected at 8 am, 1 pm, and 8 pm, and 8 am the next day using cotton-based Salivette® tubes and analyzed using Spectria® Cortisol I125. A visual analog scale was used for estimation of pain.Results: The median cortisol concentration was 16.0 (5.8–30.2 nmol/L at 8 am, 5.8 (3.0–16.4 at 1 pm, 2.8 (1.6–8.0 at 8 pm, and 14.0 (7.5–28.7 at 8 am the next day. Total secretion and rate of cortisol secretion during the day (8 am–8 pm and the concentration of cortisol on the next morning were lower (12.5 nmol/L in the reference group. No significant correlations with age, gender, BMI, duration of PD, Hoehn and Yahr score, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale III score, gait, pain, or cortisol concentrations were found.Conclusion: The neurodegenerative changes in PD does not seem to interfere with the

  19. Diurnal cortisol rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, Anette; Endresen Reme, Silje; Tangen, Tone;

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-activity has been associated with low back pain (LBP). The underlying mechanisms are not fully explained, but psychological mechanisms are considered important. In this study we examine the association between psychiatric disorders/symptoms measured......min later, at 15:00h and 22:00h. Results showed no associations between any of the main diagnostic categories from the MINI-interview, or anxiety/depression measured with HADS or HSCL-25 and cortisol. However, significant associations were found between low cortisol awakening response, low cortisol......, such as anxiety and depression, but instead are associated with one dimension of the psychopathology, namely lack of energy. This could help explain the inconsistency in the literature, and it should be explored further....

  20. Myopia and plasma cortisol.

    OpenAIRE

    Ojha R; Singh R; Maurya O; Agrawal J

    1989-01-01

    Estimation of plasma cortisol by fluorometric technique desorbed by Mallingly′s was carried out in 56 cases, including 38 cases of myopia (19 cases of simple myopia and 19 cases of degenerative myopia) and 18 normal individuals. Urinary 17-keto steroids/24 hours was also estimated by Zimmermann technique in 12 out of the 56 cases, which include 8 cases of myopia (4 cases of simple myopia and 4 cases of degenerative myopia) and 4 normal individuals as control. Plasma cortisol level is l...

  1. Novel analogs targeting histone deacetylase suppress aggressive thyroid cancer cell growth and induce re-differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, S; Yu, X-M; Odorico, S; Clark, M; Jaskula-Sztul, R; Schienebeck, C M; Kupcho, K R; Harrison, A D; Winston-McPherson, G N; Tang, W; Chen, H

    2015-08-01

    To develop novel therapies for aggressive thyroid cancers, we have synthesized a collection of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor analogs named AB1 to AB13, which have different linkers between a metal chelating group and a hydrophobic cap. The purpose of this study was to screen out the most effective compounds and evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. AB2, AB3 and AB10 demonstrated the lowest half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values in one metastatic follicular and two anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines. Treatment with each of the three ABs resulted in an increase in apoptosis markers, including cleaved poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP) and cleaved caspase 3. Additionally, the expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins p21(WAF1) and p27(Kip1) increased with the treatment of ABs while cyclin D1 decreased. Furthermore, AB2, AB3 and AB10 were able to induce thyrocyte-specific genes in the three thyroid cancer cell lines indicated by increased expression levels of sodium iodide symporter, paired box gene 8, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF1), TTF2 and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptors. AB2, AB3 and AB10 suppress thyroid cancer cell growth via cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. They also induce cell re-differentiation, which could make aggressive cancer cells more susceptible to radioactive iodine therapy. PMID:26251030

  2. Altered stress-induced cortisol levels in goats exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB 126 and PCB 153) during fetal and postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Karin E; Gutleb, Arno C; Lyche, Jan L; Dahl, Ellen; Oskam, Irma C; Krogenaes, Anette; Skaare, Janneche Utne; Ropstad, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Short-term stress exposure is associated with activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and a consequent rise in blood glucocorticoids and catecholamines, from the adrenal cortex and medulla, respectively. The HPA axis is a potential target for some persistent organic pollutants, among which polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) were found to be modulators of the mammalian endocrine system. PCB are distributed globally in the environment, in food chains, and are transferred to the fetuses of pregnant animals and via mother's milk to suckling offspring. In the present study it was postulated that intrauterine and lactational exposure to either of two single congeners of PCB (PCB 153 and PCB 126, respectively) might affect basal cortisol concentrations, and also the cortisol response to short-term stress in adulthood. Thus, pregnant goats were orally exposed to one of these PCB congeners from d 60 of gestation until delivery, and their offspring studied. Low-dose exposure to PCB 153 and PCB 126 resulted in significantly lower mean basal cortisol concentrations in goat offspring during certain periods of pubertal development and their first breeding season. Male goat kids exposed to either PCB congener showed a greater and more prolonged rise in plasma cortisol levels than controls when animals were subjected to mild stress at 9 mo of age using frequent blood sampling. Neither the basal maternal cortisol plasma level nor goat kid adrenal masses were affected by PCB exposure. PMID:19184731

  3. TDP1 repairs nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage induced by chain-terminating anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Shar-yin N.; Murai, Junko; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Dexheimer, Thomas S.; Naumova, Alena; Gmeiner, William H.; Pommier, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Chain-terminating nucleoside analogs (CTNAs) that cause stalling or premature termination of DNA replication forks are widely used as anticancer and antiviral drugs. However, it is not well understood how cells repair the DNA damage induced by these drugs. Here, we reveal the importance of tyrosyl–DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) in the repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage induced by CTNAs. On investigating the effects of four CTNAs—acyclovir (ACV), cytarabine (Ara-C), zidovudine (AZT...

  4. Nicotine induced CpG methylation of Pax6 binding motif in StAR promoter reduces the gene expression and cortisol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) mediates the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of steroid hormones, essential to fetal development. We have reported that the StAR expression in fetal adrenal is inhibited in a rat model of nicotine-induced intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Here using primary human fetal adrenal cortex (pHFAC) cells and a human fetal adrenal cell line NCI-H295A, we show that nicotine inhibits StAR expression and cortisol production in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and prolongs the inhibitory effect on cells proliferating over 5 passages after termination of nicotine treatment. Methylation detection within the StAR promoter region uncovers a single site CpG methylation at nt -377 that is sensitive to nicotine treatment. Nicotine-induced alterations in frequency of this point methylation correlates well with the levels of StAR expression, suggesting an important role of the single site in regulating StAR expression. Further studies using bioinformatics analysis and siRNA approach reveal that the single CpG site is part of the Pax6 binding motif (CGCCTGA) in the StAR promoter. The luciferase activity assays validate that Pax6 increases StAR gene expression by binding to the glucagon G3-like motif (CGCCTGA) and methylation of this site blocks Pax6 binding and thus suppresses StAR expression. These data identify a nicotine-sensitive CpG site at the Pax6 binding motif in the StAR promoter that may play a central role in regulating StAR expression. The results suggest an epigenetic mechanism that may explain how nicotine contributes to onset of adult diseases or disorders such as metabolic syndrome via fetal programming. -- Highlights: ► Nicotine-induced StAR inhibition in two human adrenal cell models. ► Nicotine-induced single CpG site methylation in StAR promoter. ► Persistent StAR inhibition and single CpG methylation after nicotine termination. ► Single CpG methylation located at Pax6 binding motif regulates St

  5. Nicotine induced CpG methylation of Pax6 binding motif in StAR promoter reduces the gene expression and cortisol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tingting [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Chen, Man; Liu, Lian [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cheng, Huaiyan [Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Yan, You-E [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Feng, Ying-Hong, E-mail: yhfeng@usuhs.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) mediates the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of steroid hormones, essential to fetal development. We have reported that the StAR expression in fetal adrenal is inhibited in a rat model of nicotine-induced intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Here using primary human fetal adrenal cortex (pHFAC) cells and a human fetal adrenal cell line NCI-H295A, we show that nicotine inhibits StAR expression and cortisol production in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and prolongs the inhibitory effect on cells proliferating over 5 passages after termination of nicotine treatment. Methylation detection within the StAR promoter region uncovers a single site CpG methylation at nt -377 that is sensitive to nicotine treatment. Nicotine-induced alterations in frequency of this point methylation correlates well with the levels of StAR expression, suggesting an important role of the single site in regulating StAR expression. Further studies using bioinformatics analysis and siRNA approach reveal that the single CpG site is part of the Pax6 binding motif (CGCCTGA) in the StAR promoter. The luciferase activity assays validate that Pax6 increases StAR gene expression by binding to the glucagon G3-like motif (CGCCTGA) and methylation of this site blocks Pax6 binding and thus suppresses StAR expression. These data identify a nicotine-sensitive CpG site at the Pax6 binding motif in the StAR promoter that may play a central role in regulating StAR expression. The results suggest an epigenetic mechanism that may explain how nicotine contributes to onset of adult diseases or disorders such as metabolic syndrome via fetal programming. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine-induced StAR inhibition in two human adrenal cell models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine-induced single CpG site methylation in StAR promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Persistent StAR inhibition and single CpG methylation after nicotine termination

  6. Novel acridine-based N-acyl-homoserine lactone analogs induce endoreduplication in the human oral squamous carcinoma cell line SAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytotoxicity of novel acridine-based N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) analogs was investigated on the human oral squamous carcinoma cell line SAS. One analog induced G2/M phase arrest at 5.3-10.6 μM and induced polyploidy at a higher dose (21.2 μM). Importantly, treatment of SAS cells with a combination of the AHL analog and the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, SP600125, prevented mitosis and induced polyploidy. The AHL analog synergized with X-irradiation to inhibit clonogenic survival of SAS cells; however, its radiosensitizing effects were relative to not X-irradiation-induced apoptosis but mitotic failure following enhanced expression of Aurora A and B. These results suggest that the active AHL analog showed growth-suppressive and radiosensitizing effects, which involve polyploidy followed by G2/M accumulation and atypical cell death in the SAS cell line. (author)

  7. Leptin Analog Antagonizes Leptin Effects on Food Intake and Body Weight but Mimics Leptin-Induced Vagal Afferent Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, J H; Simasko, S. M.; Ritter, R. C.

    2007-01-01

    A recombinantly produced murine leptin analog (MLA) antagonizes leptin-induced signaling in cell lines that express the long form of the leptin receptor. However, the effects of MLA on the activity of leptin-sensitive neurons and on central neural controls of food intake have not been reported. Here we report effects of MLA on food intake and body weight in adult rats and on the activity of cultured rat vagal afferent neurons. Daily intracerebroventricular coinjection of MLA with exogenous le...

  8. Degradation and aggregation of delta sleep-inducing peptide (DSIP) and two analogs in plasma and serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, M.V.; Saegesser, B.; Schoenenberger, G.A.

    1987-07-01

    The biostability of DSIP (delta sleep-inducing peptide) and two analogs in blood was investigated in order to determine if rates of inactivation contribute to variable effects in vivo. Incubation of DSIP in human or rat blood led to release of products having retention times on a gel filtration column equivalent to Trp. Formation of products was dependent on temperature, time, and species. Incubation of /sup 125/I-N-Tyr-DSIP and /sup 125/I-N-Tyr-P-DSIP, a phosphorylated analog, revealed slower degradation and, in contrast to DSIP, produced complex formation. An excess of unlabeled material did not displace the radioactivity supporting the assumption of non-specific binding/aggregation. It was concluded that the rapid disappearance of injected DSIP in blood was due to degradation, whereas complex formation together with slower degradation resulted in longer persistence of apparently intact analogs. Whether this could explain the sometimes stronger and more consistent effects of DSIP-analogs remains to be examined.

  9. Degradation and aggregation of delta sleep-inducing peptide (DSIP) and two analogs in plasma and serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biostability of DSIP (delta sleep-inducing peptide) and two analogs in blood was investigated in order to determine if rates of inactivation contribute to variable effects in vivo. Incubation of DSIP in human or rat blood led to release of products having retention times on a gel filtration column equivalent to Trp. Formation of products was dependent on temperature, time, and species. Incubation of 125I-N-Tyr-DSIP and 125I-N-Tyr-P-DSIP, a phosphorylated analog, revealed slower degradation and, in contrast to DSIP, produced complex formation. An excess of unlabeled material did not displace the radioactivity supporting the assumption of non-specific binding/aggregation. It was concluded that the rapid disappearance of injected DSIP in blood was due to degradation, whereas complex formation together with slower degradation resulted in longer persistence of apparently intact analogs. Whether this could explain the sometimes stronger and more consistent effects of DSIP-analogs remains to be examined

  10. Exploring Shamanic Journeying: Repetitive Drumming with Shamanic Instructions Induces Specific Subjective Experiences but No Larger Cortisol Decrease than Instrumental Meditation Music

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Gingras; Gerald Pohler; Tecumseh Fitch, W

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to repetitive drumming combined with instructions for shamanic journeying has been associated with physiological and therapeutic effects, such as an increase in salivary immunoglobulin A. In order to assess whether the combination of repetitive drumming and shamanic instructions is specifically associated with these effects, we compared the effect of listening to either repetitive drumming or instrumental meditation music for 15 minutes on salivary cortisol concentration and on self-...

  11. Cortisol in urine and saliva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurwitz Eller, N; Netterstrøm, B; Hansen, Åse Marie

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse the relations between excretion of cortisol in urine and saliva and the intima media thickness (IMT) of the artery carotis communis.......The objective of the study was to analyse the relations between excretion of cortisol in urine and saliva and the intima media thickness (IMT) of the artery carotis communis....

  12. Enantioselectivity Induced by Oxazaborolidine Supported on Mesoporous Silica or by Its Analog in Homogeneous Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy H. Yune

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of immobilization of oxazaborolidines supported on silica via different substituents on the boron and nitrogen atoms is evaluated in the enantioselective reduction of acetophenone. The performances of the homogeneous analog oxazaborolidines and silica supported-ones are compared by varying different parameters. This article deals with the synthesis, characterization and catalytic evaluation of silica-supported oxazaborolidines, their recycling capabilities and regeneration limitations.

  13. Hair cortisol and cortisol awakening response are associated with criteria of the metabolic syndrome in opposite directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Linn K; Hinkelmann, Kim; Muhtz, Christoph; Dettenborn, Lucia; Wingenfeld, Katja; Spitzer, Carsten; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Wiedemann, Klaus; Otte, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Findings on the association between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and metabolic risk are equivocal. Different methods of measuring HPA activity might indicate adverse vs. beneficial effects of HPA activity on metabolic risk thus contributing to heterogenous findings. In this study, we aimed to determine whether (1) the salivary cortisol awakening response (CAR) as a marker of awakening-induced activation of the HPA axis and (2) hair cortisol as a marker of long-term cortisol secretion are associated with criteria of the metabolic syndrome. Therefore, we recruited 41 healthy individuals (26 women, mean age: 41.2 years) and 44 patients with major depression (28 women, 41.4 years) and assessed CAR and hair cortisol values as well as all criteria of the metabolic syndrome (abdominal obesity, blood pressure, plasma glucose, triglycerides and high-density cholesterol levels) according to the International Diabetes Federation. CAR and hair cortisol values were divided into tertiles. Across groups, participants with hair cortisol or hair cortisone in the highest tertile showed significantly more criteria of the metabolic syndrome compared to participants in the medium or low tertile (F2,64=3.37, p=.04). These results were corroborated by significant positive correlations between mean hair cortisol values with waist circumference (r=.29, p=.03), triglycerides (r=.34, p=.01) and systolic blood pressure (r=.29, p=.04) and between mean hair cortisone and triglycerides (r=.46, p<.01). In contrast, mean CAR values correlated negatively with diastolic (r=-.29, p=.03) and systolic blood pressure (r=-.32, p=.02). Our results indicate that higher hair cortisol and hair cortisone levels but lower CAR values are associated with an unfavorable metabolic and cardiovascular risk profile. PMID:25462908

  14. Saliva collection by using filter paper for measuring cortisol levels in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, D; Hyodo, M; Doi, H; Kurachi, T; Takata, M; Koyama, S; Satoh, T; Watanabe, G

    2014-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of noninvasive evaluation of cortisol in saliva of dogs. In experiment 1, we measured the cortisol concentration in the filter paper on which 250-μL cortisol solutions had been quantitatively pipetted and in filter papers dipped in cortisol solution. In experiment 2, we collected the blood and saliva of dogs 3 times at 30-min intervals and compared the cortisol concentrations to examine whether the dynamics of cortisol in the blood and saliva are similar. The results of experiments 1 and 2 showed that the cortisol concentration can be quantitatively measured with this method and that the dynamics of cortisol concentration in the plasma and saliva collected by using filter paper are not different (P = 0.14 for experiment 1 and P = 0.51 for experiment 2). In experiment 3, to investigate the factors related to inducing stress in dogs by using the filter-paper method of collecting saliva, we compared the cortisol concentrations at 0 and 30 min after collecting the saliva of pet dogs. The dog owners completed a survey on their dogs, providing basic information and reporting the collection of their dog's saliva. We found that the cortisol concentrations increased significantly in dogs whose owners spent >2 min collecting saliva (P = 0.005), suggesting that prompt collection of saliva is necessary for accurate assessment of cortisol without induction of a stress response. In addition, the cortisol concentrations increased significantly in dogs whose teeth were not regularly brushed (P = 0.04), suggesting that regular teeth brushing mitigates the effect of the collection process on cortisol concentrations in the saliva, with minimal stress to the dogs. In experiment 4, we measured cortisol concentrations in pet dogs accustomed to having their teeth brushed by their owners, before and after interaction with their owners, to assess whether brushing induces stress in dogs. We detected that the

  15. Proton-induced single event upset characterisation of a 1 giga-sample per second analog to digital converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SPT7760 is an analog to digital converter that is used in satellite for digital processing. In this paper we describe the characterization and analysis of proton-induced single event upsets (SEU) for the SPT7760 operating at sample rates from 125 Msps (Mega-samples per second) to 1 Gsps. The SEU cross-section has been measured as a function of sample rate for various input levels. The data collected is clearly non-linear for all cases. The data shows that this device has a relative low cross-section for proton-induced SEUs and remains functional at a proton dose of 580 krad (Si). (A.C.)

  16. Farnesylpyridinium, an analog of isoprenoid farnesol, induces apoptosis but suppresses apoptotic body formation in human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Masahiro; Nishio, Kyo-ichi; Doe, Matsumi; Usuki, Yoshinosuke; Tanaka, Toshio

    2002-03-13

    1-Farnesylpyridinium (FPy), an analog of isoprenoid farnesol, initially induced morphological changes similar to those of typical apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells but FPy-treated cells were characterized by the absolute absence of final apoptotic events such as fragmentation into apoptotic bodies. FPy-induced cell death was considered to be apoptotic on the basis of the induction of DNA fragmentation and the protection against these events by the coaddition of a pan-caspase inhibitor. The increase in the cytoplasmic cytochrome c level supported the possibility that FPy-treated cells should have the ability to complete the entire apoptotic process ending in cell fragmentation and apoptotic body formation. At concentrations too low to induce apoptosis, FPy could suppress the induction of apoptotic body formation in HL-60 cells by typical inducers of apoptosis such as actinomycin D or anisomycin. FPy exhibited a cytochalasin-like effect on spatial arrangement of actin filament independent of its apoptosis-inducing activity. PMID:11943160

  17. A novel synthetic analog of militarin, MA-1 induces mitochondrial dependent apoptosis by ROS generation in human lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A synthetic Militarin analog-1[(2R,3R,4R,5R)-1,6-bis(4-(2,4,4-trimethylpentan-2-yl)phenoxy) hexane-2,3,4,5-tetraol] is a novel derivative of constituents from Cordyceps militaris, which has been used to treat a variety of chronic diseases including inflammation, diabetes, hyperglycemia and cancers. Here, we report for the first time the synthesis of Militarin analog-1 (MA-1) and the apoptotic mechanism of MA-1 against human lung cancer cell lines. Treatment with MA-1 significantly inhibited the viability of 3 human lung cancer cell lines. The inhibition of viability and growth in MA-1-treated A549 cells with an IC50 of 5 μM were mediated through apoptosis induction, as demonstrated by an increase in DNA fragmentation, sub-G0/G1-DNA fraction, nuclear condensation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. The apoptotic cell death caused mitochondrial membrane permeabilization through regulation of expression of the Bcl-2 family proteins, leading to cytochrome c release in a time-dependent manner. Subsequently, the final stage of apoptosis, activation of caspase-9/-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase, was induced. Furthermore, A549 lung cancer cells were more responsive to MA-1 than a bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B), involving the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. The pharmacological inhibition of ROS generation and JNK/p38 MAPK exhibited attenuated DNA fragmentation in MA-1-induced apoptosis. Oral administration of MA-1 also retarded growth of A549 orthotopic xenografts. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the new synthetic derivative MA-1 triggers mitochondrial apoptosis through ROS generation and regulation of MAPKs and may be a potent therapeutic agent against human lung cancer. - Highlights: • We report a novel synthesized derivative, militarin analog-1 (MA-1). • MA-1-induced cancer cell death was triggered by the ROS generation

  18. A novel synthetic analog of militarin, MA-1 induces mitochondrial dependent apoptosis by ROS generation in human lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Deok Hyo; Lim, Mi-Hee [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yu Ran [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Gi-Ho [Mushroom Research Division, National Institute of Horticultural and Herbal Science, Rural Development Administration, Suwon 404-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Ho [R and D Center, Dong-A Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd, Yongin 446-905 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Byeong Hwa [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jae Youl [Department of Genetic Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Won O. [Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Park, Haeil [College of Pharmacy, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sunga, E-mail: sachoi@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 301-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Woong, E-mail: tawkim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    A synthetic Militarin analog-1[(2R,3R,4R,5R)-1,6-bis(4-(2,4,4-trimethylpentan-2-yl)phenoxy) hexane-2,3,4,5-tetraol] is a novel derivative of constituents from Cordyceps militaris, which has been used to treat a variety of chronic diseases including inflammation, diabetes, hyperglycemia and cancers. Here, we report for the first time the synthesis of Militarin analog-1 (MA-1) and the apoptotic mechanism of MA-1 against human lung cancer cell lines. Treatment with MA-1 significantly inhibited the viability of 3 human lung cancer cell lines. The inhibition of viability and growth in MA-1-treated A549 cells with an IC{sub 50} of 5 μM were mediated through apoptosis induction, as demonstrated by an increase in DNA fragmentation, sub-G{sub 0}/G{sub 1}-DNA fraction, nuclear condensation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. The apoptotic cell death caused mitochondrial membrane permeabilization through regulation of expression of the Bcl-2 family proteins, leading to cytochrome c release in a time-dependent manner. Subsequently, the final stage of apoptosis, activation of caspase-9/-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase, was induced. Furthermore, A549 lung cancer cells were more responsive to MA-1 than a bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B), involving the rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. The pharmacological inhibition of ROS generation and JNK/p38 MAPK exhibited attenuated DNA fragmentation in MA-1-induced apoptosis. Oral administration of MA-1 also retarded growth of A549 orthotopic xenografts. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the new synthetic derivative MA-1 triggers mitochondrial apoptosis through ROS generation and regulation of MAPKs and may be a potent therapeutic agent against human lung cancer. - Highlights: • We report a novel synthesized derivative, militarin analog-1 (MA-1). • MA-1-induced cancer cell death was triggered by

  19. Electrodynamic phenomena induced by a dark fluid: Analogs of pyromagnetic, piezoelectric, and striction effects

    CERN Document Server

    Balakin, Alexander B

    2014-01-01

    We establish a new model of coupling between a cosmic dark fluid and electrodynamic systems, based on an analogy with effects of electric and magnetic striction, piezo-electricity and piezo-magnetism, pyro-electricity and pyro-magnetism, which appear in classical electrodynamics of continuous media. Extended master equations for electromagnetic and gravitational fields are derived using Lagrange formalism. A cosmological application of the model is considered, and it is shown that a striction-type interaction between the dark energy (the main constituent of the dark fluid) and electrodynamic system provides the universe history to include the so-called unlighted epochs, during which electromagnetic waves can not propagate and thus can not scan the universe interior.

  20. Effect of 5-azacytidine and cortisol on the P1798 cortisol-sensitive and non-resistant lymphosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The P1798 lymphosarcoma is a tumor with both cortisol-sensitive (CS) and cortisol-resistant (CR) lines. Although differences between the CS and CR cells have been reported, none can fully explain the detailed mechanism of glucocorticoid resistance in CR tumors. Recently, it was shown that 5-azacytidine treatment could generate CS cells from CR SAK lymphoma cells in vitro. The present study examined the effect of combination treatment with 5-azacytidine and cortisol on the growth of the P1798 lymphosarcoma. 5-Azacytidine rendered the P1798 CR tumors partially cortisol-sensitive, and enhanced the cortisol-induced regression of the P1798 CS tumors. Survival of mice bearing both CS and CR P1798 tumors was increased by combination treatment. Similar whole cell and nuclear binding of 3H-TA were observed in both 5-azacytidine-treated and control P1798 tumors. However, CR nuclei retained 64% of the whole cell binding of 3H-TA compared to 25-29% nuclear retention in CS tumors. DNA methylation in tumors from 5-azacytidine-treated mice decreased to 53% (CS) and 42% (CR) of control. Since 5-azacytidine did not result in any change in thymidine labeling index or cell cycle distribution in P1798 tumors, it would appear to be cytostatic rather than cytotoxic to P1798 tumors. Three cell lines have been isolated from the P1798 lymphosarcoma: two are cortisol-sensitive both in vivo and in vitro, while the other is cortisol-resistant. Results from this study suggest that glucocorticoid resistance is a reversible process, and that the effect of 5-azacytidine on the P1798 CR tumor is at the gene expression level

  1. Effect of 5-azacytidine and cortisol on the P1798 cortisol-sensitive and non-resistant lymphosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, C.

    1986-01-01

    The P1798 lymphosarcoma is a tumor with both cortisol-sensitive (CS) and cortisol-resistant (CR) lines. Although differences between the CS and CR cells have been reported, none can fully explain the detailed mechanism of glucocorticoid resistance in CR tumors. Recently, it was shown that 5-azacytidine treatment could generate CS cells from CR SAK lymphoma cells in vitro. The present study examined the effect of combination treatment with 5-azacytidine and cortisol on the growth of the P1798 lymphosarcoma. 5-Azacytidine rendered the P1798 CR tumors partially cortisol-sensitive, and enhanced the cortisol-induced regression of the P1798 CS tumors. Survival of mice bearing both CS and CR P1798 tumors was increased by combination treatment. Similar whole cell and nuclear binding of /sup 3/H-TA were observed in both 5-azacytidine-treated and control P1798 tumors. However, CR nuclei retained 64% of the whole cell binding of /sup 3/H-TA compared to 25-29% nuclear retention in CS tumors. DNA methylation in tumors from 5-azacytidine-treated mice decreased to 53% (CS) and 42% (CR) of control. Since 5-azacytidine did not result in any change in thymidine labeling index or cell cycle distribution in P1798 tumors, it would appear to be cytostatic rather than cytotoxic to P1798 tumors. Three cell lines have been isolated from the P1798 lymphosarcoma: two are cortisol-sensitive both in vivo and in vitro, while the other is cortisol-resistant. Results from this study suggest that glucocorticoid resistance is a reversible process, and that the effect of 5-azacytidine on the P1798 CR tumor is at the gene expression level.

  2. A new buprenorphine analogy, thenorphine,inhibits morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-liZHAO; Ze-huiGONG; Jian-huiLIANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate effects of thenorphine, a new compound of partial agonist of μ-opioid receptor, on the locomotor activity and the behavioral sensitization to morphine in mice. METHODS: Locomotor activity was observed after administration of thenorphine or co-administration of thenorphine and morphine in mice. Mice were induced behavioral sensitization to morphine by intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg morphine once daily for 7 d. Thenorphine was co-administrated with morphine to observe the effects of thenorphine on the development, transfer and expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. RESULTS: A single dose of thenorphine (0.0625, 0.25, and 1.0 mg/kg) could dose-dependently inhibit the locomotor activity in mice (P<0.05), repeated administrations of thenorphine, however, were not able to induce locomotor sensitization, but induced tolerance. Pretreatment with thenorphine 30 min prior to morphine effectively inhibited the psychomotor effect of morphine in mice (P<0.01). Co-administration of thenorphine (0.0625, 0.25, and 1.0 mg/kg) could dose-dependently inhibit the development,transfer, and expression of behavioral sensitization to morphine in mice (P<0.05 or P<0.01). CONCLUSION:Thenorphine inhibited morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in mice, suggesting that thenorphine may be effective against the addiction of opioids.

  3. A new buprenorphine analogy,thenorphine,inhibits morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-li ZHAO; Ze-hui GONG; Jian-hui LIANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate effects of thenorphine, a new compound of partial agonist of μ-opioid receptor, on the locomotor activity and the behavioral sensitization to morphine in mice. METHODS: Locomotor activity was observed after administration of thenorphine or co-administration of thenorphine and morphine in mice. Mice were induced behavioral sensitization to morphine by intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg morphine once daily for 7 d. Thenorphine was co-administrated with morphine to observe the effects of thenorphine on the development, transfer and expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. RESULTS: A single dose of thenorphine (0.0625, 0.25, and 1.0mg/kg) could dose-dependently inhibit the locomotor activity in mice (P<0.05), repeated administrations of thenorphine, however, were not able to induce locomotor sensitization, but induced tolerance. Pretreatment with thenorphine 30 min prior to morphine effectively inhibited the psychomotor effect of morphine in mice (P<0.01).Co-administration of thenorphine (0.0625, 0.25, and 1.0 mg/kg) could dose-dependently inhibit the development,transfer, and expression of behavioral sensitization to morphine in mice (P<0.05 or P<0.01). CONCLUSION:Thenorphine inhibited morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in mice, suggesting that thenorphine may be effective against the addiction of opioids.

  4. Glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs against antipsychotic-induced weight gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Bjørn H; Knop, Filip K; Ishøy, Pelle L;

    2012-01-01

    already compromised in normal weight patients with schizophrenia. Here we outline the current strategies against antipsychotic-induced weight gain, and we describe peripheral and cerebral effects of the gut hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Moreover, we account for similarities in brain changes...... between schizophrenia and overweight patients. DISCUSSION: Current interventions against antipsychotic-induced weight gain do not facilitate a substantial and lasting weight loss. GLP-1 analogues used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes are associated with significant and sustained weight loss in...... overweight patients. Potential effects of treating schizophrenia patients with antipsychotic-induced weight gain with GLP-1 analogues are discussed. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that adjunctive treatment with GLP-1 analogues may constitute a new avenue to treat and prevent metabolic and cerebral deficiencies in...

  5. Cortisol Diurnal Rhythm and Stress Reactivity in Male Adolescents with Early-Onset or Adolescence-Onset Conduct Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Fairchild, Graeme; van Goozen, Stephanie H. M.; Stollery, Sarah J; Brown, Jamie; Gardiner, Julian; Herbert, Joe; Ian M Goodyer

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported lower basal cortisol levels and reduced cortisol responses to stress in children and adolescents with conduct disorder (CD). It is not known whether these findings are specific to early-onset CD. This study investigated basal and stress-induced cortisol secretion in male participants with early-onset and adolescence-onset forms of CD. Methods Forty-two participants with early-onset CD, 28 with adolescence-onset CD, and 95 control subjects participated...

  6. Vitamin D3 analog maxacalcitol (OCT) induces hCAP-18/LL-37 production in human oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Takamitsu; Nagaoka, Isao; Takada, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Maxacalcitol (22-oxacalcitriol: OCT) is a synthetic vitamin D3 analog with a limited calcemic effect. In this study, we investigated whether OCT increases the production of LL-37/CAP-18, a human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, in human gingival/oral epithelial cells. A human gingival epithelial cell line (Ca9-22) and human oral epithelial cell lines (HSC-2, HSC-3, and HSC-4) exhibited the enhanced expression of LL-37 mRNA upon stimulation with OCT as well as active metabolites of vitamins D3 and D2. Among the human epithelial cell lines, Ca9-22 exhibited the strongest response to these vitamin D-related compounds. OCT induced the higher production of CAP-18 (ng/mL order) until 6 days time-dependently in Ca9-22 cells in culture. The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis was killed by treatment with the LL-37 peptide. These findings suggest that OCT induces the production of hCAP-18/LL-37 in a manner similar to that induced by the active metabolite of vitamin D3. PMID:27356607

  7. Dust Bowl migration as an analog for possible global warming-induced migration from Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.H.; Longstreth, J.D.; Johnson, A.K.; Rosenberg, N.J.

    1994-06-01

    As a result of increases in CO{sub 2} and other radiatively important trace gases, scientists have predicted increases in mean worldwide temperatures of 2--5 degrees C over the next 50 to 100 years. Such temperature increases may result in climate modifications that would in turn be associated with increases in drought and desertification and could even change the patterns of the monsoons and tropical rains, which are important to agriculture throughout the world. They predicted that the rise in sea level caused by melting and thermal expansion of glaciers and polar icecaps could flood large population centers, destroying habitation and displacing populations. This will result in approximately 50 million ``environmental refugees`` worldwide, triple the number of today. The expected shifts in precipitation are also likely to result in (1) increased runoff contaminated with pesticides, salts, garbage, sewage, and eroded soil, and (2) drought also leading to increased soil erosion and salinization, as well as depletion of limited water resources. The total impact of global warming on agriculture and human habitation could considerably slow the economic development of some nations and would particularly affect agricultural production. Loss of homes, the inability to raise food, an increased prevalence of disease and worsened economic conditions may drive people to leave their homelands, seeking entry into countries which have more resources and greater resistance to the economic consequences of climatic change. This report looks at the possible environmental impacts and economic impacts of the greenhouse effect on Mexico while using the American Dust Bowl event as an analog.

  8. Clinical significance of determination of serum cortisol and insulin levels in neonates with asphyxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of the changes of serum cortisol and insulin levels in neonates with asphyxia. Methods: Serum cortisol levels were determined with CLIA and serum insulin levels with RIA in 38 neonates with asphyxia (mild degree 20, advanced 18) and 30 controls. Results: 1) In mild cases, serum insulin levels were significantly higher than those in controls (p<0.01) and serum cortisol levels were very significantly higher (p<0.001). 2) In advanced cases, both serum insulin and cortisol levels were very significantly higher than those in the controls (p<0.001). Conclusion: Hypoxia in the neonates with asphyxia is a very severe stress and will induce hypersecretion of cortisol and hyperglycemia which is detrimental to the patients. However hypersecretion of insulin will result in hypoglycemia, which is also very damaging. Physicians in charge should be aware of these possibilities and deal with them appropriately

  9. Radioimmunoassay of estrone, estradiol, estriol, progesterone, cortisol and prolactin in maternal venous blood and the cord blood of the newborn child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The estrone analyses showed that E1 levels are not sex-dependent. The Prog/E2 ratio changed when the children were in states of exceptional stress; analogous findings were obtained in the acidose group. Due to the wide range of variations of E3, it was found to be impossible to determine the stage of pregnancy from the E3 level. Progesterone levels were significantly higher in the blood of the umbilical vein than in the umbilical artery. Prolactine levels of both the umbilical vein and the umbilical artery are significantly higher than in the mother's venous blood. Cortisol levels differed with the type of delivery, especially when comparing Caesareon with normal delivery. Also, differences were found between deliveries with more or less stress. There is no significant difference between E2/prog ratios measured during induced labour, immature delivery, application of analgetics; instead, cortisol levels are best correlated with the clinical criteria of birth stress, especially during the expulsion period in which stress factors are highest. Further, there is a correlation between the cortisol levels of the umbilical vein and the mother's venous-blood. (orig./MG)

  10. Cortisol does not inhibit prednisolone clearance.

    OpenAIRE

    Meffin, P J; Sallustio, B C; Purdie, Y J; Robson, R A; Wing, L M; Brooks, P M

    1985-01-01

    The disposition of prednisolone has been studied in eight male subjects with and without the concomitant administration of cortisol which produced plasma cortisol concentrations 10-fold higher than endogenous levels. The clearance and steady-state distribution volume of total prednisolone were increased as was the prednisolone free fraction but the clearance of unbound prednisolone was unaltered by cortisol co-administration.

  11. Cortisol and testosterone increase financial risk taking and may destabilize markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Carlos; Roberts, R Edward; Spencer, Tom; Rani, Nisha; Tempest, Michelle; Tobler, Philippe N; Herbert, Joe; Rustichini, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that financial markets can become dangerously unstable, yet it is unclear why. Recent research has highlighted the possibility that endogenous hormones, in particular testosterone and cortisol, may critically influence traders' financial decision making. Here we show that cortisol, a hormone that modulates the response to physical or psychological stress, predicts instability in financial markets. Specifically, we recorded salivary levels of cortisol and testosterone in people participating in an experimental asset market (N = 142) and found that individual and aggregate levels of endogenous cortisol predict subsequent risk-taking and price instability. We then administered either cortisol (single oral dose of 100 mg hydrocortisone, N = 34) or testosterone (three doses of 10 g transdermal 1% testosterone gel over 48 hours, N = 41) to young males before they played an asset trading game. We found that both cortisol and testosterone shifted investment towards riskier assets. Cortisol appears to affect risk preferences directly, whereas testosterone operates by inducing increased optimism about future price changes. Our results suggest that changes in both cortisol and testosterone could play a destabilizing role in financial markets through increased risk taking behaviour, acting via different behavioural pathways. PMID:26135946

  12. Assessing Climate Change Induced Turnover in Bird Communities Using Climatically Analogous Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Janine Sybertz; Michael Reich

    2015-01-01

    It is crucial to define and quantify possible impacts of climate change on wildlife in order to be able to pre-adapt management strategies for nature conservation. Thus, it is necessary to assess which species might be affected by climatic changes, especially at the regional scale. We present a novel approach to estimate possible climate change induced turnovers in bird communities and apply this method to Lüneburg Heath, a region in northern Germany. By comparing species pools of future clim...

  13. Mind your thoughts: associations between self-generated thoughts and stress-induced and baseline levels of cortisol and alpha-amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engert, Veronika; Smallwood, Jonathan; Singer, Tania

    2014-12-01

    Stress is a major health burden in today's society. Research shows that negative cognitive styles are associated with increased stress reactivity, low mood and accelerated cellular aging. Our study sought to unravel the relationship between the content of self-generated thoughts and psychosocial stress measured in terms of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic activity. Features of self-generated thoughts were assessed using thought sampling while participants performed cognitive tasks following a stress induction or in a baseline condition. More negatively toned emotional thoughts and more social temporal thoughts with a past focus were associated with increased cortisol and alpha-amylase levels, both after stress and at baseline. More social temporal thoughts with a future focus, on the other hand, had an overall attenuating effect on the levels of both stress markers. Our results indicate a fundamental link between the thoughts and stress levels we experience. Understanding the mechanisms governing this mind-body association may have important implications for understanding and counteracting the high incidence of stress-related disorders in today's society. PMID:25457636

  14. Radio-deoxynucleoside Analogs used for Imaging tk Expression in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibin Tian, Xincheng Lu, Hong Guo, David Corn, Joseph Molter, Bingcheng Wang, Guangbin Luo, Zhenghong Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A group of radiolabeled thymidine analogs were developed as radio-tracers for imaging herpes viral thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk or its variants used as reporter gene. A transgenic mouse model was created to express tk upon liver injury or naturally occurring hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The purpose of this study was to use this unique animal model for initial testing with radio-labeled thymidine analogs, mainly a pair of newly emerging nucleoside analogs, D-FMAU and L-FMAU.Methods: A transgeneic mouse model was created by putting a fused reporter gene system, firefly luciferase (luc and HSV1-tk, under the control of mouse alpha fetoprotein (Afp promoter. Initial multimodal imaging, which was consisted of bioluminescent imaging (BLI and planar gamma scintigraphy with [125I]-FIAU, was used for examining the model creation in the new born and liver injury in the adult mice. Carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN was then administrated to induce HCC in these knock-in mice such that microPET imaging could be used to track the activity of Afp promoter during tumor development and progression by imaging tk expression first with [18F]-FHBG. Dynamic PET scans with D-[18F]-FMAU and L-[18F]-FMAU were then performed to evaluate this pair of relatively new tracers. Cells were derived from these liver tumors for uptake assays using H-3 labeled version of PET tracers.Results: The mouse model with dual reporters: HSV1-tk and luc placed under the transcriptional control of an endogenous Afp promoter was used for imaging studies. The expression of the Afp gene was highly specific in proliferative hepatocytes, in regenerative liver, and in developing fetal liver, and thus provided an excellent indicator for liver injury and cancer development in adult mice. Both D-FMAU and L-FMAU showed stable liver tumor uptake where the tk gene was expressed under the Afp promoter. The performance of this pair of tracers was slightly different in terms of signal

  15. Elevated hair cortisol concentrations in endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoluda, Nadine; Dettenborn, Lucia; Stalder, Tobias; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2012-05-01

    Engaging in intensive aerobic exercise, specifically endurance sports, is associated with HPA axis activation indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Whether the repeated short-term elevations in cortisol levels result in higher long-term cortisol exposure of endurance athletes has been difficult to examine since traditional methods of cortisol assessments (saliva, blood, urine) reflect only relatively short time periods. Hair segment analysis provides a new method to assess cumulative cortisol secretion over prolonged time periods in a retrospective fashion. The aim of this study was to investigate cumulative cortisol secretion over several months reflecting intensive training and competitive races by examining hair cortisol levels of endurance athletes. Hair samples were obtained from 304 amateur endurance athletes (long-distance runners, triathletes, cyclists) and 70 controls. Cortisol concentrations were determined in the first to third 3-cm hair segments most proximal to the scalp. In addition, self-report measures of training volume were obtained. Endurance athletes exhibited higher cortisol levels in all three hair segments compared to controls (p<.001). Positive correlations between the cortisol concentration in the first hair segment and each indicator of training volume were found (all p<.01). These data suggest that repeated physical stress of intensive training and competitive races among endurance athletes is associated with elevated cortisol exposure over prolonged periods of time. These findings may have important implications with regard to somatic and mental health of athletes which should be investigated in future research. PMID:21944954

  16. LZ-106, a novel analog of enoxacin, inducing apoptosis via activation of ROS-dependent DNA damage response in NSCLCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lin; Yuan, Yinan; Fu, Chengyu; Xu, Xuefen; Zhou, Jieying; Wang, Shuhao; Kong, Lingyi; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Wei, Libin

    2016-06-01

    Lung cancer, especially non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), plays the leading role in cancer which is closely related to a myriad of fatal results. Unfortunately, current molecular mechanisms and clinical treatment of NSCLC still remain to be explored despite the fact that intensive investigations have been carried out in the last two decades. Recently, growing attention to finding exploitable sources of anticancer agents is refocused on quinolone compounds, an antibiotic with a long period of clinic application, for their remarkable cell-killing activity against not only bacteria, but eukaryotes as well. In this study, we found LZ-106, an analog of enoxacin, exhibiting potent inhibitory effects on NSCLC in both cultured cells and xenograft mouse model. We identified apoptosis-inducing action of LZ-106 in NSCLC cells through the mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress apoptotic pathways via Annexin-V/PI double-staining assay, membrane potential detection, calcium level detection and the expression analysis of the key apoptotic proteins. Through comet assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection, the expression analysis of DNA damage response (DDR) marker γ-H2AX and other DDR-related proteins, we also demonstrated that LZ-106 notably induced ROS overproduction and DDR. Interestingly, additional evidence in our findings revealed that DDR and apoptosis could be alleviated in the presence of ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), indicating ROS-dependent DDR involvement in LZ-106-induced apoptosis. Thus our data not only offered a new therapeutic candidate for NSCLC, but also put new insights into the pharmacological research of quinolones. PMID:27012423

  17. Ultra-narrow band perfect absorbers based on plasmonic analog of electromagnetically induced absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinna; Ding, Pei; Wang, Junqiao; Fan, Chunzhen; Liang, Erjun

    2015-03-01

    A novel plasmonic metamaterial consisting of the solid (bar) and the inverse (slot) compound metallic nanostructure for electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) is proposed in this paper, which is demonstrated to achieve an ultra-narrow absorption peak with the linewidth less than 8 nm and the absorptivity exceeding 97% at optical frequencies. This is attributed to the plasmonic EIA resonance arising from the efficient coupling between the magnetic response of the slot (dark mode) and the electric resonance of the bar (bright mode). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the plasmonic EIA is used to realize the narrow-band perfect absorbers. The underlying physics are revealed by applying the two-coupled-oscillator model. The near-perfect-absorption resonance also causes an enhancement of about 50 times in H-field and about 130 times in E-field within the slots. Such absorber possesses potential for applications in filter, thermal emitter, surface enhanced Raman scattering, sensing and nonlinear optics. PMID:25836832

  18. Test-enhanced learning may be a gender-related phenomenon explained by changes in cortisol level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Charles B; Jensen, Morten Lind; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    of this study was to investigate whether cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills testing induce a cortisol increase, whether the cortisol increase enhances retention of CPR skills, and how this relates to gender. Methods We randomised a convenience sample of medical students attending a mandatory...

  19. Interferon Analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelstra, Klaas; Prakash, Jai; Beljaars, Eleonora; Bansal, Ruchi

    2015-01-01

    The invention relates to the field of medicine. Among others, it relates to biologically active analogs of interferons (IFNs) which show less unwanted side-effects and to the therapeutic uses thereof. Provided is an IFN analog, wherein the moiety mediating binding to its natural receptor is at least

  20. Interferon Analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelstra, Klaas; Prakash, Jai; Beljaars, Leonie; Bansal, Ruchi

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to the field of medicine. Among others, it relates to biologically active analogs of interferons (IFNs) which show less unwanted side-effects and to the therapeutic uses thereof. Provided is an IFN analog, wherein the moiety mediating binding to its natural receptor is at least

  1. Control of slab width on subduction-induced upper mantle flow and associated upwellings: Insights from analog models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strak, Vincent; Schellart, Wouter P.

    2016-06-01

    The impact of slab width W (i.e., trench-parallel extent) on subduction-induced upper mantle flow remains uncertain. We present a series of free subduction analog models where W was systematically varied to upscaled values of 250-3600 km to investigate its effect on subducting plate kinematics and upper mantle return flow around the lateral slab edges. We particularly focused on the upwelling component of mantle flow, which might promote decompression melting and could thereby produce intraplate volcanism. The models show that W has a strong control on trench curvature and on the trench retreat, subducting plate, and subduction velocities, generally in good agreement with previous modeling studies. Upper mantle flow velocity maps produced by means of a stereoscopic particle image velocimetry technique indicate that the magnitude of the subduction-induced mantle flow around the lateral slab edges correlates positively with the product of W and trench retreat velocity. For all models an important upwelling component is always produced close to the lateral slab edges, with higher magnitudes for wider slabs. The trench-parallel lateral extent of this upwelling component is the same irrespective of W, but its maximum magnitude gets located closer to the subducting plate in the trench-normal direction and it is more focused when W increases. For W ≤ 2000 km the upwelling occurs laterally (in the trench-parallel direction) next to the subslab domain and the mantle wedge domain, while for W ≥ 2000 km it is located only next to the subslab domain and focuses closer to the trench tip, because of stronger poloidal flow in the mantle wedge extending laterally.

  2. Biological Markers and Salivary Cortisol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Gunnarsson, Lars-Gunnar; Harris, Anette;

    2011-01-01

    variability), markers related to inflammation (C-reactive protein, cytokines and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) and other stress hormones (adrenaline and noradrenaline) were studied. The focus was on healthy adult populations; studies on patient populations and pregnant women were excluded. Studies on genome....... Several of the markers tested showed low or no association with any of the measurements of salivary cortisol. The number of studies exploring the association between cortisol in saliva and markers for inflammation is low, which limits the possibility of interpretation. The number of studies on adrenaline...... and noradrenaline is also low. To sum up, the proportion of non-significant findings was considerable. This may be due to a large number of studies with relatively small study populations. This is true for metabolic abnormalities, markers related to inflammation as well as other stress hormones...

  3. Protective effect of curcumin and its analog on γ-radiation induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in cultured human lymphocytes and isolated rat hepatocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce oxidative stress through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in an imbalance of the pro-oxidant and antioxidant status in the cells, which is suggested to culminate in cell death. The present work was aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of curcumin and its analog on γ-radiation induced toxicity in cultured human lymphocytes and rat hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from the liver of rats by collagenase perfusion. The cellular changes were estimated using lipid peroxidative indices like thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), the antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and reduced glutathione (GSH). The DNA damage was analyzed by comet assay, cytokinesis blocked micro nucleus assay, dicentric aberrations and translocation frequency. Cell cycle distribution and measurement of the percentage of apoptotic cells were performed by flow cytometry analysis. To investigate whether the dietary agents like curcumin and its analog have a role on cell cycle regulation, we analyzed the changes in cell cycle profiles by using fluorescence activated cell sorter. The increase in the severity of DNA damage was observed with the increase dose (1, 2 and 4 Gy) of γ-radiation in cultured lymphocytes and hepatocytes. TBARS were increased significantly, whereas the levels of GSH and antioxidant enzymes were significantly decreased in γ-irradiated hepatocytes and lymphocytes. On pretreatment with curcumin and its analog (1, 5 and 10 μg/ml) showed a significant decrease in the levels of TBARS and DNA damage. The antioxidant enzymes were increased significantly along with the levels of GSH. The maximum protection of hepatocytes and lymphocytes was observed at 10 μg/ml curcumin and 5 μg/ml curcumin analog pretreatment. Thus, pretreatment with curcumin and its analog helps in protecting the normal hepatocytes and lymphocytes against γ-radiation induced cellular

  4. Elevated Levels of DNA Strand Breaks Induced by a Base Analog in the Human Cell Line with the P32T ITPA Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina S.-R. Waisertreiger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Base analogs are powerful antimetabolites and dangerous mutagens generated endogenously by oxidative stress, inflammation, and aberrant nucleotide biosynthesis. Human inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA hydrolyzes triphosphates of noncanonical purine bases (i.e., ITP, dITP, XTP, dXTP, or their mimic: 6-hydroxyaminopurine (HAP deoxynucleoside triphosphate and thus regulates nucleotide pools and protects cells from DNA damage. We demonstrate that the model purine base analog HAP induces DNA breaks in human cells and leads to elevation of levels of ITPA. A human polymorphic allele of the ITPA, 94C->A encodes for the enzyme with a P32T amino-acid change and leads to accumulation of nonhydrolyzed ITP. The polymorphism has been associated with adverse reaction to purine base-analog drugs. The level of both spontaneous and HAP-induced DNA breaks is elevated in the cell line with the ITPA P32T variant. The results suggested that human ITPA plays a pivotal role in the protection of DNA from noncanonical purine base analogs.

  5. Seasonal Variation in Human Salivary Cortisol Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Roger; Garde, Anne Helene; Hansen, Åse Marie;

    2008-01-01

    -of-day (4 levels) as categorical predictors. Cortisol concentrations were analyzed on a log scale. The diurnal pattern of cortisol was similar across months (interaction between month and time of day: p>0.4). The main effects of month and time-of-day were statistically significant (p......Measurement of cortisol concentration can contribute important information about an individual's ability to adjust to various environmental demands of both physical and psychosocial origin. However, one uncertainty that affects the possibilities of correctly interpreting and designing field studies...... is the lack of observations of the impact of seasonal changes on cortisol excretion. For this reason, the month-to-month changes in diurnal cortisol concentration, the awakening cortisol response (ACR), maximum morning concentration, and fall during the day were studied in a group of 24 healthy men and women...

  6. Positive upshots of cortisol in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Lindsay T; Zeiders, Katharine H; Ehrlich, Katherine B; Adam, Emma K

    2016-06-01

    Cortisol, the major physiological end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, is usually associated with stress and negative affect. However, a new body of research highlights the complex, adaptive significance of elevated cortisol within individuals in everyday life. Whereas most studies do not have the power to test the dynamic transactions between cortisol and affect within a person throughout the entire waking day, we employed an intensive study protocol analyzing hourly diary reports of affect in relation to hourly salivary cortisol samples among 24 healthy adults from morning to bedtime, across 2 consecutive weekdays (N = 862 total samples). Utilizing multileveling modeling and focusing on within-person effects, we examined whether momentary increases in cortisol could be mood protective, or energy enhancing, in everyday life, supporting the cortisol boost hypothesis. Results revealed no significant associations between cortisol and current affective state; however, within-person increases in cortisol were significantly associated with subsequent rises in activeness, alertness, and relaxation, and trend-level reductions in stress and nervousness. This study adds to growing evidence that cortisol plays a positive role in regulating affect in everyday life. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26950364

  7. A Role for Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Sulfur Mustard Analog 2-Chloroethyl Ethyl Sulfide-Induced Lung Cell Injury and Antioxidant Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Gould, Neal S; White, Carl W; Day, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur mustards (SMs) have been used as warfare agents since World War I and still pose a significant threat against civilian and military personnel. SM exposure can cause significant blistering of the skin, respiratory injury, and fibrosis. No antidote currently exists for SM exposure, but recent studies, using the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), have focused on the ability of antioxidants to prevent toxicity. Although antioxidants can prevent CEES-induc...

  8. Protection by antioxidants against toxicity and apoptosis induced by the sulphur mustard analog 2-chloroethylethyl sulphide (CEES) in Jurkat T cells and normal human lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Suhua; Espinoza, Luis A; Liao, Hongling; Boulares, A Hamid; Smulson, Mark E.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of toxicity of sulphur mustard was investigated by examining the biochemical effects of the analog 2-chloroethylethyl sulphide (CEES) in both human Jurkat cells as well as normal human lymphocytes.Exposure of both types of cells to CEES resulted in a marked decrease in the intracellular concentration of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH), and CEES-induced cell death was potentiated by L-buthionine sulphoximine, an inhibitor of GSH synthesis.CEES increased the endogenous produ...

  9. The sythetic endomorphin-1 analog, CYT-1010, inhibits sensory neuropeptide release, acute neurogenic inflammation and heat injury-induced thermal hyperalgesia in rodent models

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Helyes; J. Szolcsanyi; T. Maione

    2011-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P released from capsaicin-sensitive afferents induce neurogenic inflammatory and nociceptive actions. Since we have shown that the m opioid receptor agonist endomorphin-1 inhibits sensory neuropeptide outflow, the effects of its synthetic, peptidase-resistant analog, CYT-1010, was studied on CGRP release, acute neurogenic inflammation and thermal hyperalgesia. CGRP release from sensory fibres of isolated rat tracheae was evoked by electrica...

  10. Analog earthquakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, R.B. [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Analogs are used to understand complex or poorly understood phenomena for which little data may be available at the actual repository site. Earthquakes are complex phenomena, and they can have a large number of effects on the natural system, as well as on engineered structures. Instrumental data close to the source of large earthquakes are rarely obtained. The rare events for which measurements are available may be used, with modfications, as analogs for potential large earthquakes at sites where no earthquake data are available. In the following, several examples of nuclear reactor and liquified natural gas facility siting are discussed. A potential use of analog earthquakes is proposed for a high-level nuclear waste (HLW) repository.

  11. Cortisol in hair and the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Stalder; C. Kirschbaum; N. Alexander; S.R. Bornstein; W. Gao; R. Miller; S. Stark; J.A. Bosch; J.E. Fischer

    2013-01-01

    Context: Although exposure to supraphysiological levels of glucocorticoids is known to contribute to the development of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), the importance of physiological variation in basal cortisol secretion is less clear. This issue can be addressed by using hair cortisol analysis, whi

  12. Diurnal cortisol variation and cortisol response to an MRI stressor in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girshkin, Leah; O'Reilly, Nicole; Quidé, Yann; Teroganova, Nina; Rowland, Jesseca E; Schofield, Peter R; Green, Melissa J

    2016-05-01

    Markers of HPA axis function, including diurnal cortisol rhythm and cortisol responses to stress or pharmacological manipulation, are increasingly reported as disrupted in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). However, there has been no direct comparison of cortisol responses to stress in SZ and BD in the same study, and associations between cortisol dysfunction and illness characteristics remain unclear. In this study we used spline embedded linear mixed models to examine cortisol levels of SZ and BD participants at waking, during the first 45min after waking (representing the cortisol awakening response; CAR), during the period of rapid cortisol decline post the awakening response, and in reaction to a stressor (MRI scan), relative to healthy controls (HC). Contrary to expectations, neither SZ nor BD showed differences in waking cortisol levels, CAR, or immediate post-CAR decline compared to HC; however, waking cortisol levels were greater in BD relative to SZ. In response to the MRI stressor, the SZ group showed a significant absence of the expected increase in cortisol responsivity to stress, which was seen in both the BD and HC groups. Clinical factors affecting the CAR differed between SZ and BD. In SZ, higher antipsychotic medication dosage was associated with a steeper incline of the CAR, while greater positive symptom severity was associated with a more blunted CAR, and greater levels of anxiety were associated with the blunted cortisol response to stress. In BD, longer illness duration was associated with a steeper incline in CAR and lower levels of waking cortisol. These results suggest that cortisol responses may normalize with medication (in SZ) and longer illness duration (in BD), in line with findings of aberrant cortisol levels in the early stages of psychotic disorders. PMID:26874562

  13. Correspondence between hair cortisol concentrations and 30-day integrated daily salivary and weekly urinary cortisol measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Sarah J; Stalder, Tobias; Marceau, Kristine; Entringer, Sonja; Moog, Nora K; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Wadhwa, Pathik D; Buss, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of cortisol production, regulation and function is of considerable interest and relevance given its ubiquitous role in virtually all aspects of physiology, health and disease risk. The quantification of cortisol concentration in hair has been proposed as a promising approach for the retrospective assessment of integrated, long-term cortisol production. However, human research is still needed to directly test and validate current assumptions about which aspects of cortisol production and regulation are reflected in hair cortisol concentrations (HCC). Here, we report findings from a validation study in a sample of 17 healthy adults (mean±SD age: 34±8.6 yrs). To determine the extent to which HCC captures cumulative cortisol production, we examined the correspondence of HCC, obtained from the first 1cm scalp-near hair segment, assumed to retrospectively reflect 1-month integrated cortisol secretion, with 30-day average salivary cortisol area-under-the curve (AUC) based on 3 samples collected per day (on awakening, +30min, at bedtime) and the average of 4 weekly 24-h urinary free cortisol (UFC) assessments. To further address which aspects of cortisol production and regulation are best reflected in the HCC measure, we also examined components of the salivary measures that represent: (1) production in response to the challenge of awakening (using the cortisol awakening response [CAR]), and (2) chronobiological regulation of cortisol production (using diurnal slope). Finally, we evaluated the test-retest stability of each cortisol measure. Results indicate that HCC was most strongly associated with the prior 30-day integrated cortisol production measure (average salivary cortisol AUC) (r=0.61, p=0.01). There were no significant associations between HCC and the 30-day summary measures using CAR or diurnal slope. The relationship between 1-month integrated 24-h UFC and HCC did not reach statistical significance (r=0.30, p=0.28). Lastly, of all cortisol

  14. Intraindividual stability of hair cortisol concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Tobias; Steudte, Susann; Miller, Robert; Skoluda, Nadine; Dettenborn, Lucia; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2012-05-01

    The analysis of cortisol in human hair constitutes a promising method for the retrospective assessment of cumulative cortisol secretion over extended periods of time. An implicit assumption underlying the use of this method is that in the absence of major life changes hair cortisol concentrations show a high level of intraindividual stability, i.e. single hair cortisol assessments exhibit considerable trait-specificity and are only to a smaller extent influenced by state-dependent factors. Here, we present data from two independent studies examining patterns of intraindividual stability in hair cortisol levels. In study I, 45 participants were examined at two sampling points carried out one year apart from each other. In study II, 64 individuals provided data at three sampling points which occurred at two-month intervals. In both studies, at each time point hair was sampled and relevant psychosocial and hair-related variables were assessed. Results of both studies consistently revealed strong test-retest associations for repeated hair cortisol measurements ('r's between 0.68 and 0.79, 'p's <0.0001). Findings of structural equation modelling applied to data of study II showed that single hair cortisol assessments comprise a strong trait component, explaining between 59 and 82% of variance, and are only to a lesser extent influenced by state-related factors. Only inconsistent evidence for covariation of changes in hair cortisol concentrations and simultaneous changes in perceived stress or other relevant variables was seen across the two studies. The current findings suggest a considerable degree of intraindividual stability in hair cortisol levels which highlights the utility of this method for obtaining trait estimates of long-term cortisol secretion in psychoneuroendocrinological research. PMID:21917384

  15. Effects of copper on the acute cortisol response and associated physiology in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellis, Margaret S; Alsop, Derek; Wood, Chris M

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of chronic waterborne copper (Cu) exposure on the acute stress-induced cortisol response and associated physiological consequences in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Trout were exposed to 30 μg Cu/L in moderately hard water (120 mg/L as CaCO(3)) for 40 days, following which time the acute cortisol response was examined with a series of stressors. At 40 days, a 65% increase in Cu was observed in the gill, but no accumulation was observed in the liver, brain or head kidney. Stressors such as air exposure or confinement did not elicit an increase in circulating cortisol levels for Cu-exposed fish, in contrast to controls. However, this inhibitory effect on the acute cortisol response appeared to have few implications on the ability of Cu-exposed fish to maintain ion and carbohydrate homeostasis. For example, plasma Na(+), Ca(2+) and glucose levels as well as hepatic glycogen levels were the same post-stress in control and Cu-exposed fish. Trout were also challenged with exposure to 50% seawater for 48 h, where Cu-exposed trout maintained plasma Na(+), glucose and hepatic glycogen levels. However, Cu-exposed fish experienced decreased plasma K(+) levels throughout the Cu exposure and stress tests. In conclusion, chronic Cu exposure resulted in the abolition of an acute cortisol response post-stress. There was no Cu accumulation in the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis (HPI axis) suggesting this was not a direct toxic effect of Cu on the cortisol regulatory pathway. However, the lack of an acute cortisol response in Cu-exposed fish did not impair the ability of the fish to maintain ion and carbohydrate homeostasis. This effect on cortisol may be a strategy to reduce costs during the chronic stress of Cu exposure, and not endocrine disruption as a result of toxic injury. PMID:21964321

  16. Direct salivary cortisol radio-immunoassay determination. Clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salivary cortisol levels reflect the biologically active free fraction of blood cortisol. The authors describe the results obtained with the aim of a radio-immunoassay commercial serum cortisol kit, without prealable extraction in different physiological and pathological situations. Salivary cortisol determination appears performant both in nycthemeral studies and in stimulation or freination tests

  17. The 2-oxoglutarate analog 3-oxoglutarate decreases normoxic hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in cancer cells, induces cell death, and reduces tumor xenograft growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koivunen P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Peppi Koivunen,1 Stuart M Fell,2,3 Wenyun Lu,4 Joshua D Rabinowitz,4 Andrew L Kung,5,6 Susanne Schlisio,2,7 1Biocenter Oulu, Faculty of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Oulu Center for Cell-Matrix Research, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; 2Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; 4Department of Chemistry and Integrative Genomics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 5Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 6Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 7Department of Microbiology and Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Abstract: The cellular response to hypoxia is primarily regulated by the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs. HIF-1α is also a major mediator of tumor physiology, and its abundance is correlated with therapeutic resistance in a broad range of cancers. Accumulation of HIF-1α under hypoxia is mainly controlled by the oxygen-sensing HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylases (EGLNs, also known as PHDs. Here, we identified a high level of normoxic HIF-1α protein in various cancer cell lines. EGLNs require oxygen and 2-oxoglutarate for enzymatic activity. We tested the ability of several cell-permeable 2-oxoglutarate analogs to regulate the abundance of HIF-1α protein. We identified 3-oxoglutarate as a potent regulator of HIF-1α in normoxic conditions. In contrast to 2-oxoglutarate, 3-oxoglutarate decreased the abundance of HIF-1α protein in several cancer cell lines in normoxia and diminished HIF-1α levels independent of EGLN enzymatic activity. Furthermore, we observed that 3-oxoglutarate was detrimental to cancer cell survival. We show that esterified 3-oxoglutarate, in combination with the cancer chemotherapeutic drug vincristine, induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Our data

  18. PET imaging a MPTP-induced mouse model of Parkinson's disease using the fluoropropyl-dihydrotetrabenazine analog [18F]-DTBZ (AV-133.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S Toomey

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is characterized by the loss of dopamine-producing neurons in the nigrostriatal system. Numerous researchers in the past have attempted to track the progression of dopaminergic depletion in PD. We applied a quantitative non-invasive PET imaging technique to follow this degeneration process in an MPTP-induced mouse model of PD. The VMAT2 ligand (18F-DTBZ (AV-133 was used as a radioactive tracer in our imaging experiments to monitor the changes of the dopaminergic system. Intraperitoneal administrations of MPTP (a neurotoxin were delivered to mice at regular intervals to induce lesions consistent with PD. Our results indicate a significant decline in the levels of striatal dopamine and its metabolites (DOPAC and HVA following MPTP treatment as determined by HPLC method. Images obtained by positron emission tomography revealed uptake of (18F-DTBZ analog in the mouse striatum. However, reduction in radioligand binding was evident in the striatum of MPTP lesioned animals as compared with the control group. Immunohistochemical analysis further confirmed PET imaging results and indicated the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in treated animals compared with the control counterparts. In conclusion, our findings suggest that MPTP induced PD in mouse model is appropriate to follow the degeneration of dopaminergic system and that (18F-DTBZ analog is a potentially sensitive radiotracer that can used to diagnose changes associated with PD by PET imaging modality.

  19. Estimation of glucose utilization in a type 2 diabetes mellitus patient on insulin analogs with tumor hypoglycemia induced by IGF-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chode, Suresh; Albert, Stewart G; Shoemaker, James D; Green, Aileen L

    2016-02-01

    We present a 38-year-old male patient with insulin requiring type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) who had fasting hypoglycemia caused by a non-pancreatic-islet-cell mesenchymal tumor producing IGF-II. The evaluation was confounded in that there was pre-existing DM being treated with insulin analogs. Insulin levels were assessed with an immunoassay with cross reactivity with the insulin analogs. An 18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) scan localized the 19.7×18.0×17.8cm retroperitoneal mass. A 3.25kg tumor was resected. Post-operatively insulin treatment was resumed and circulating IGF-II levels returned to normal. The maximum standardized uptake values of FDG (SUVmax) along with a steady state glucose infusion of 17.5g/h were used to determine the components of glucose utilization due to IGF-II induced muscle glucose uptake (utilization, 62%) whereas the tumor itself was responsible for approximately 22% of measurable glucose uptake. Whereas tumor induced hypoglycemia has been ascribed to preferential glucose utilization by the tumor, the predominant hypoglycemic effect was due to hormonal IGF-II induced total body glucose uptake. PMID:26774399

  20. Evaluation of a curcumin analog as an anti-cancer agent inducing ER stress-mediated apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances have highlighted the importance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cell death processes. Pharmacological interventions that effectively enhance tumor cell death through activating ER stress have attracted a great deal of attention for anti-cancer therapy. A bio-evaluation on 113 curcumin analogs against four cancer cell lines was performed through MTT assay. Furthermore, real time cell assay and flow cytometer were used to evaluate the apoptotic induction of (1E,4E)-1,5-bis(5-bromo-2-ethoxyphenyl)penta-1,4-dien-3-one (B82). Western blot, RT-qPCR, and siRNA were then utilized to confirm whether B82-induced apoptosis is mediated through activating ER stress pathway. Finally, the in vivo anti-tumor effect of B82 was evaluated. B82 exhibited strong anti-tumor activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 cells. Treatment with B82 significantly induced apoptosis in H460 cells in vitro and inhibited H460 tumor growth in vivo. Further studies demonstrated that the B82-induced apoptosis is mediated by activating ER stress both in vitro and in vivo. A new monocarbonyl analog of curcumin, B82, exhibited anti-tumor effects on H460 cells via an ER stress-mediated mechanism. B82 could be further explored as a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of NSCLC

  1. Cortisol promotes endoplasmic glucose production via pyridine nucleotide redox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zengmin; Mick, Gail J; Xie, Rongrong; Wang, Xudong; Xie, Xuemei; Li, Guimei; McCormick, Kenneth L

    2016-04-01

    Both increased adrenal and peripheral cortisol production, the latter governed by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), contribute to the maintenance of fasting blood glucose. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the pyridine nucleotide redox state (NADP/NADPH) is dictated by the concentration of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and the coordinated activities of two enzymes, hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH) and 11β-HSD1. However, luminal G6P may similarly serve as a substrate for hepatic glucose-6-phophatase (G6Pase). A tacit belief is that the G6P pool in the ER is equally accessible to both H6PDH and G6Pase. Based on our inhibition studies and kinetic analysis in isolated rat liver microsomes, these two aforesaid luminal enzymes do share the G6P pool in the ER, but not equally. Based on the kinetic modeling of G6P flux, the ER transporter for G6P (T1) preferentially delivers this substrate to G6Pase; hence, the luminal enzymes do not share G6P equally. Moreover, cortisol, acting through 11β-HSD1, begets a more reduced pyridine redox ratio. By altering this luminal redox ratio, G6P flux through H6PDH is restrained, allowing more G6P for the competing enzyme G6Pase. And, at low G6P concentrations in the ER lumen, which occur during fasting, this acute cortisol-induced redox adjustment promotes glucose production. This reproducible cortisol-driven mechanism has been heretofore unrecognized. PMID:26860459

  2. Testosterone, cortisol, and human competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casto, Kathleen V; Edwards, David A

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone and cortisol figure prominently in the research literature having to do with human competition. In this review, we track the history of this literature, concentrating particularly on major theoretical and empirical contributions, and provide commentary on what we see as important unresolved issues. In men and women, athletic competition is typically associated with an increase in testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). Hormone changes in response to non-athletic competition are less predictable. Person (e.g., power motivation, mood, aggressiveness, social anxiety, sex, and baseline levels of T and C) and context (e.g., whether a competition is won or lost, the closeness of the competition, whether the outcome is perceived as being influenced by ability vs. chance, provocations) factors can influence hormone responses to competition. From early on, studies pointed to a positive relationship between T and dominance motivation/status striving. Recent research, however, suggests that this relationship only holds for individuals with low levels of C - this is the core idea of the dual-hormone hypothesis, and it is certain that the broadest applications of the hypothesis have not yet been realized. Individuals differ with respect to the extent to which they embrace competition, but the hormonal correlates of competitiveness remain largely unexplored. Although rapid increases in both T and C associated with competition are likely adaptive, we still know very little about the psychological benefits of these hormonal changes. Administration studies have and will continue to contribute to this inquiry. We close with a discussion of what, we think, are important methodological and mechanistic issues for future research. PMID:27103058

  3. Calcitriol analog ZK191784 ameliorates acute and chronic dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis by modulation of intestinal dendritic cell numbers and phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of ZK1916784, a low calcemic analog of calcitriol on intestinal inflammation.METHODS: Acute and chronic colitis was induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) according to standard procedures. Mice were treated intraperitoneally with ZK1916784 or placebo and colonic inflammation was evaluated. Cytokine production by mesenterial lymph node (MLN) cells was measured by ELISA.Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) within the colonic tissue,and the effect of the calcitriol analog on DCs was investigated.RESULTS: Treatment with ZK191784 resulted in significant amelioration of disease with a reduced histological score in acute and chronic intestinal inflammation. In animals with acute DSS colitis, down-regulation of colonic inflammation was associated with a dramatic reduction in the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interferon (IFN)-γ and a significant increase in intereleukin (IL)-10 by MLN cells.Similarly, in chronic colitis, IL-10 expression in colonic tissue increased 1.4-fold when mice were treated with ZK191784, whereas expression of the Th1-specific transcription factor T-beta decreased by 81.6%. Lower numbers of infiltrating activated CD11c+ DCs were found in the colon in ZK191784-treated mice with acute DSS colitis, and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by primary mucosal DCs was inhibited in the presence of the calcitriol analog.CONCLUSION: The calcitriol analog ZK191784 demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory properties in experimental colitis that were at least partially mediated by the immunosuppressive effects of the derivate on mucosal DCs.

  4. Stress-related cortisol response and laboratory eating behavior in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorig, Fabian; Kießl, Gundula Rebecca Raphaela; Laessle, Reinhold Gustav

    2016-06-01

    Stress-related cortisol secretion has been linked to increased appetite and subsequent food intake in overweight individuals. The present study addresses this relationship in a repeated-measures randomized controlled laboratory experiment. Nineteen obese women were compared to 36 normal weight controls with respect to stress-induced salivary cortisol and laboratory eating behavior, measured by a universal eating monitor. The trier social stress test served as stressor. Stress-induced cortisol levels were significantly higher in the obese compared to the normal weight controls. Unexpectedly, a corresponding increase in laboratory food intake was not detected. The results are interpreted and discussed with regard to restrained eating, which was found to be present to a significant degree in the obese women. PMID:25827493

  5. Study of the photon-induced formation and subsequent desorption of CH3OH and H2CO in interstellar ice analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Doménech, R.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Cruz-Díaz, G. A.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Methanol and formaldehyde are two simple organic molecules that are ubiquitously detected in the interstellar medium, in both the solid and gaseous phases. An origin in the solid phase and a subsequent nonthermal desorption into the gas phase is often invoked to explain their abundances in some of the environments where they are found. Experimental simulations under astrophysically relevant conditions have been carried out in the past four decades in order to find a suitable mechanism for that process. Aims: In particular, photodesorption from pure methanol ice (and presumably from pure formaldehyde ice) has been found to be negligible in previous works, probably because both molecules are very readily dissociated by vacuum-UV photons. Therefore, we explore the in situ formation and subsequent photon-induced desorption of these species, studying the UV photoprocessing of pure ethanol ice, and a more realistic binary H2O:CH4 ice analog. Methods: Experimental simulations were performed in an ultra-high vacuum chamber. Pure ethanol and binary H2O:CH4 ice samples deposited onto an infrared transparent window at 8 K were UV-irradiated using a microwave-discharged hydrogen flow lamp. Evidence of photochemical production of these two species and subsequent UV-photon-induced desorption into the gas phase were searched for by means of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and a quadrupole mass spectrometer, respectively. After irradiation, ice samples were warmed up to room temperature until complete sublimation was attained for detection of volatile products. Results: Formation of CH3OH was only observed during photoprocessing of the H2O:CH4 ice analog, accounting for ~4% of the initial CH4 ice column density, but no photon-induced desorption was detected. Photochemical production of H2CO was observed in both series of experiments. Formation of formaldehyde accounted for ≤45% conversion of the initial ethanol ice, but it could not be quantified during

  6. Modeling from Local to Subsystem Level Effects in Analog and Digital Circuits Due to Space Induced Single Event Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Reinaldo J.

    2011-01-01

    Single Event Transients in analog and digital electronics from space generated high energetic nuclear particles can disrupt either temporarily and sometimes permanently the functionality and performance of electronics in space vehicles. This work first provides some insights into the modeling of SET in electronic circuits that can be used in SPICE-like simulators. The work is then directed to present methodologies, one of which was developed by this author, for the assessment of SET at different levels of integration in electronics, from the circuit level to the subsystem level.

  7. Relation of inflammation and liver function with the plasma cortisol response to adrenocorticotropin in early lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisi, E; Bertoni, G; Lombardelli, R; Minuti, A

    2013-09-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between cortisol and inflammatory status in early lactating dairy cows after a stimulation test of the adrenal cortex. Twenty-four cows were grouped into quartiles (6 cows per each quartile) in accordance with the liver activity index (based on plasma concentration of negative acute phase proteins in early lactation); the quartiles were lower (LO; cows with the lowest liver functionality), intermediate lower, intermediate upper, and upper (UP; cows with the highest liver functionality). Each cow was injected i.v. with 20 µg of a synthetic analog of ACTH at 35 d in milk (DIM). Blood samples were taken to assess inflammatory status, and at 0, 30, and 60 min after ACTH challenge to measure total cortisol. The free cortisol fraction was analyzed in the LO and UP quartiles and the bound cortisol fraction was estimated as the difference between total and free cortisol. The LO, in comparison with the other quartiles, suffered a more severe inflammatory status, with the highest values of haptoglobin, reactive oxygen metabolites, and total nitric oxide metabolites and the lowest concentration of direct or indirect markers of negative acute phase proteins. The cows in the LO quartile had the highest values of plasma nonesterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate at 7 DIM, suggesting a more severe body lipid mobilization. The LO quartile cows showed the highest frequency of health problems and the lowest milk yield in the first 35 DIM. Thirty minutes after the ACTH treatment, the concentration of total cortisol was lower in LO in comparison to other groups. Similarly, the bound cortisol fraction was lower in LO versus UP. The adrenal response appeared inversely related with health status after calving (e.g., lower in LO cows, experiencing the most severe inflammatory status). The lower increase in cortisol after the ACTH challenge in cows with greater inflammation (LO quartile) seems a consequence of the lower availability of

  8. 4-Amino-2-arylamino-5-indoloyl/cinnamoythiazoles, analogs of topsentin-class of marine alkaloids, induce apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneja, Manisha; Vanam, Uma; Paranthaman, Sripriya; Bharathan, Asha; Keerthi, Venugopal S; Reena, Justus K; Rajaram, Rama; Rajasekharan, Kallikat N; Karunagaran, Devarajan

    2013-05-01

    Marine organisms provide several biologically active compounds that include alkaloids with high cytotoxic activity but only a few of them have so far reached clinical stage, due partly to their limited supply and complex structural features. In an attempt to develop novel anticancer compounds, we have now synthesized diaminoindoloylthiazoles (4a-c; DIT1-3) and diaminocinnamoylthiazoles (5a,b; DCT1-2) as analogs based on a topsentin scaffold and investigated the cytotoxic and apoptotic activities of these compounds in HeLa cells. The results suggest that diaminoindoloylthiazoles (DIT1-3) inhibit cell growth and among these, DIT3 is the most cytotoxic against HeLa cells (IC50 1 μM). The diaminocinnamoylthiazoles DCT1 and DCT2, which can be viewed as curcumin-diaminothiazole hybrids, also inhibited cell growth but at relatively higher concentrations with IC50 values of 60 and 30 μM, respectively. These compounds induced apoptosis through the intrinsic pathway by reducing the mitochondrial membrane potential and activating caspases, 9 and 3, but not caspase 8. Among the marine alkaloid analogs tested in this study, DIT1-3 are very effective in inducing apoptosis of HeLa cells followed by DCT2 and DCT1. The treated cells were arrested in G2/M phase followed by accumulation of the cells in the Sub G0 phase. The curcumin-diaminothiazole hybrid DCT1 had the maximum effect in downregulating TNF-induced NF-κB activation among the compounds tested in this study. Thus, we demonstrate that diaminoindoloylthiazoles and diaminocinnamoylthiazoles induce apoptosis, regulate cell cycle and NF-κB signaling and thus show promising anticancer effects that warrant further investigation. PMID:23524113

  9. Effects of Binary Mixtures of Inducers (Toluene Analogs) and of Metals on Bioluminescence Induction of a Recombinant Bioreporter Strain

    OpenAIRE

    In Chul Kong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated the effects of binary mixtures of bioluminescence inducers (toluene, xylene isomers, m-toluate) and of metals (Cu, Cd, As(III), As(V), and Cr) on bioluminescence activity of recombinant (Pm-lux) strain KG1206. Different responses and sensitivities were observed depending on the types and concentrations of mixtures of inducers or metals. In the case of inducer mixtures, antagonistic and synergistic modes of action were observed, whereas metal mixtures showed all three m...

  10. Plasma cortisol and faecal cortisol metabolites concentrations in stereotypic and non-stereotypic horses: do stereotypic horses cope better with poor environmental conditions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fureix Carole

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotypic behaviours, i.e. repetitive behaviours induced by frustration, repeated attempts to cope and/or brain dysfunction, are intriguing as they occur in a variety of domestic and captive species without any clear adaptive function. Among the different hypotheses, the coping hypothesis predicts that stereotypic behaviours provide a way for animals in unfavourable environmental conditions to adjust. As such, they are expected to have a lower physiological stress level (glucocorticoids than non-stereotypic animals. Attempts to link stereotypic behaviours with glucocorticoids however have yielded contradictory results. Here we investigated correlates of oral and motor stereotypic behaviours and glucocorticoid levels in two large samples of domestic horses (NStudy1 = 55, NStudy2 = 58, kept in sub-optimal conditions (e.g. confinement, social isolation, and already known to experience poor welfare states. Each horse was observed in its box using focal sampling (study 1 and instantaneous scan sampling (study 2. Plasma samples (collected in study 1 but also non-invasive faecal samples (collected in both studies were retrieved in order to assess cortisol levels. Results Results showed that 1 plasma cortisol and faecal cortisol metabolites concentrations did not differ between horses displaying stereotypic behaviours and non-stereotypic horses and 2 both oral and motor stereotypic behaviour levels did not predict plasma cortisol or faecal cortisol metabolites concentrations. Conclusions Cortisol measures, collected in two large samples of horses using both plasma sampling as well as faecal sampling (the latter method minimizing bias due to a non-invasive sampling procedure, therefore do not indicate that stereotypic horses cope better, at least in terms of adrenocortical activity.

  11. Circadian secretion of cortisol in bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Pablo; Gelber, Stephen; Kin, François; Nair, Vasavan N.P.; Schwartz, George

    2001-01-01

    Objective To compare the 24-h cortisol secretion profiles of normal control subjects and patients with bipolar disorder who were in the depressive, manic and euthymic phases of the disorder. Participants Eighteen patients, 25–62 years of age, in depressed (n = 5), manic (n = 5) or euthymic (n = 8) phase of bipolar disorder recruited through a psychiatric outpatient clinic, and 5 control subjects, 24–41 years of age, recruited through advertisement or word of mouth. Outcome measures Subjects were interviewed and symptom ratings were obtained using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory and Young Mania Scale. Blood collection began at 0800 and continued at hourly intervals for 24 h. Serum cortisol levels were assayed using a validated commercial radioimmunoassay kit. Results An analysis of variance of the area under the cortisol 24-h time-concentration curve (AUC) revealed a significant difference between the control group and patient groups (F = 3.69, p = 0.03). The mean AUCs of the patients in the depressed (263.4 μg/dL) and hypomanic (262.2 μg/dL) phases were beyond the 95% confidence interval for the controls (120.9–253.3 μg/dL). There were no significant group differences in cosinor acrophase and no significant effects of sex, education, age of illness onset, duration of illness or duration of mood state at time of testing on the cortisol measures. Pearson correlations between symptom rating scores and cortisol secretion variables were not significant. Conclusion The increases in cortisol secretion in patients in both the depressed and manic phases of bipolar disorder suggest that cortisol level is probably not a state marker in bipolar disorder. PMID:11762208

  12. A novel double carbonyl analog of curcumin induces the apoptosis of human lung cancer H460 cells via the activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Wei, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhankun; Zhang, Shanshan; Ren, Jiye; Yao, Song; Shi, Lingyi; Yang, Lizhu; Qiu, Peihong; Wu, Jianzhang; Liang, Guang

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin can inhibit the growth of a variety of cancer cells; however, its poor bioavailability and pharmacokinetic profiles, which are attributed to its instability under physiological conditions, have limited its application in anticancer therapy. In the present study, we screened a double carbonyl analog of curcumin (A17) and analyzed its effects and mechanism of inducing apoptosis in human lung cancer H460 cells. The results showed that A17 not only induced CHOP expression in human lung cancer H460 cells, but also induced the apoptosis of H460 cells in a dose-responsive manner, and this effect was related to corresponding activation of some important components in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis pathway. When CHOP was knocked down by specific siRNA, A17-induced cell apoptosis was attenuated, thereby further demonstrating that the apoptotic pathway is ER stress‑dependent. Our studies demonstrated that A17 has better stability and antitumor activity than curcumin in H460 cells via an ER stress-mediated mechanism. These results imply that A17 could be further explored as a potential anticancer agent for the treatment of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PMID:27431486

  13. Flavonoids exhibit diverse effects on CYP11B1 expression and cortisol synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CYP11B1 catalyzes the final step of cortisol biosynthesis. The effects of flavonoids on transcriptional expression and enzyme activity of CYP11B1 were investigated using the human adrenocortical H295R cell model. All tested nonhydroxylated flavones including 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone, α-naphthoflavone, and β-naphthoflavone upregulated CYP11B1 expression and cortisol production, whereas apigenin and quercetin exhibited potent cytotoxicity and CYP11B1 repression at high concentrations. Nonhydroxylated flavones stimulated CYP11B1-catalyzed cortisol formation at transcriptional level. Resveratrol increased endogenous and substrate-supported cortisol production like nonhydroxylated flavones tested, but it had no effect on CYP11B1 gene expression and enzyme activity. Resveratrol appeared to alter cortisol biosynthesis at an earlier step. The Ad5 element situated in the − 121/− 106 region was required for basal and flavone-induced CYP11B1 expression. Overexpression of COUP-TFI did not improve the responsiveness of Ad5 to nonhydroxylated flavones. Although COUP-TFI overexpression increased CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 promoter activation, its effect was not mediated through the common Ad5 element. Treating cells with PD98059 (a flavone-type MEK1 inhibitor) increased CYP11B1 promoter activity, but not involving ERK signaling because phosphorylation of ERK1/2 remained unvarying throughout the course of treatment. Likewise, AhR was not responsible for the CYP11B1-modulating effects of flavonoids because inconsistency with their effects on AhR activation. 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone and 8-Br-cAMP additively activated CYP11B1 promoter activity. H-89 reduced 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone-induced CYP11B1 promoter activation but to a lesser extent as compared to its inhibition on cAMP-induced transactivation. Our data suggest that constant exposure to nonhydroxylated flavones raises a potential risk of high basal and cAMP-induced cortisol synthesis in consequence of increased CYP11B1

  14. Flavonoids exhibit diverse effects on CYP11B1 expression and cortisol synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Li-Chuan; Li, Lih-Ann, E-mail: lihann@nhri.org.tw

    2012-02-01

    CYP11B1 catalyzes the final step of cortisol biosynthesis. The effects of flavonoids on transcriptional expression and enzyme activity of CYP11B1 were investigated using the human adrenocortical H295R cell model. All tested nonhydroxylated flavones including 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone, α-naphthoflavone, and β-naphthoflavone upregulated CYP11B1 expression and cortisol production, whereas apigenin and quercetin exhibited potent cytotoxicity and CYP11B1 repression at high concentrations. Nonhydroxylated flavones stimulated CYP11B1-catalyzed cortisol formation at transcriptional level. Resveratrol increased endogenous and substrate-supported cortisol production like nonhydroxylated flavones tested, but it had no effect on CYP11B1 gene expression and enzyme activity. Resveratrol appeared to alter cortisol biosynthesis at an earlier step. The Ad5 element situated in the − 121/− 106 region was required for basal and flavone-induced CYP11B1 expression. Overexpression of COUP-TFI did not improve the responsiveness of Ad5 to nonhydroxylated flavones. Although COUP-TFI overexpression increased CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 promoter activation, its effect was not mediated through the common Ad5 element. Treating cells with PD98059 (a flavone-type MEK1 inhibitor) increased CYP11B1 promoter activity, but not involving ERK signaling because phosphorylation of ERK1/2 remained unvarying throughout the course of treatment. Likewise, AhR was not responsible for the CYP11B1-modulating effects of flavonoids because inconsistency with their effects on AhR activation. 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone and 8-Br-cAMP additively activated CYP11B1 promoter activity. H-89 reduced 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone-induced CYP11B1 promoter activation but to a lesser extent as compared to its inhibition on cAMP-induced transactivation. Our data suggest that constant exposure to nonhydroxylated flavones raises a potential risk of high basal and cAMP-induced cortisol synthesis in consequence of increased CYP11B1

  15. Relation of cell division to the acquisition of responsiveness to cortisol in the neural retina of the chick embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Or, S.; Eshel, M. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Hadassah Medical School)

    1982-01-01

    Responsiveness of the neural retina to cortisol, as measured by cortisol-induced glutamine synthetase activity, is acquired in the chick embryo during the second week of embryogenesis. The magnitude of the response is inversely related to the growth rate of the neural retina. This developmental event is also acquired by the 8-d-old neural retina under organ culture conditions. The acquisition of competence to respond to the hormonal stimulation can be reversibly abolished by inhibition of DNA synthesis with 0.01 mM cytosine arabinoside; the magnitude of response that resumes after withdrawal of the drug, is characterized by the stage of growth of the neural retina. Responsiveness to cortisol in the embryonic neural retina is apparently coupled to the number of Muller cells (the targets for cortisol action) that have withdrawn from the cell cycle.

  16. Relation of cell division to the acquisition of responsiveness to cortisol in the neural retina of the chick embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Responsiveness of the neural retina to cortisol, as measured by cortisol-induced glutamine synthetase activity, is acquired in the chick embryo during the second week of embryogenesis. The magnitude of the response is inversely related to the growth rate of the neural retina. This developmental event is also acquired by the 8-d-old neural retina under organ culture conditions. The acquisition of competence to respond to the hormonal stimulation can be reversibly abolished by inhibition of DNA synthesis with 0.01 mM cytosine arabinoside; the magnitude of response that resumes after withdrawal of the drug, is characterized by the stage of growth of the neural retina. Responsiveness to cortisol in the embryonic neural retina is apparently coupled to the number of Muller cells (the targets for cortisol action) that have withdrawn from the cell cycle. (author)

  17. Hormonal modulation of the heat shock response: insights from fish with divergent cortisol stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LeBlanc, Sacha; Höglund, Erik; Gilmour, Kathleen M.;

    2012-01-01

    Acute temperature stress in animals results in increases in heat shock proteins (HSPs) and stress hormones. There is evidence that stress hormones influence the magnitude of the heat shock response; however, their role is equivocal. To determine whether and how stress hormones may affect the heat...... shock response, we capitalized on two lines of rainbow trout specifically bred for their high (HR) and low (LR) cortisol response to stress. We predicted that LR fish, with a low cortisol but high catecholamine response to stress, would induce higher levels of HSPs after acute heat stress than HR trout....... We found that HR fish have significantly higher increases in both catecholamines and cortisol compared with LR fish, and LR fish had no appreciable stress hormone response to heat shock. This unexpected finding prevented further interpretation of the hormonal modulation of the heat shock response but...

  18. Effect of anaethesia and surgery on plasma cortisol, insulin and total thyroxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of anaesthesia and surgery on plasma levels of cortisol, insulin and total thyroxin measured by radio-immunoassay was carried out on 12 patients undergoing elective surgery. During premedication, plasma cortisol and total thyroxin levels showed no change while plasma insulin showed a slight decline and blood sugar showed a light rise. During anaesthesia minimal changes were noticed in all parameters. During surgery significant rises in cortisol and thyroxin levels occurred and persisted post-operatively. Plasma insulin and blood sugar showed minimal fluctuations during surgery with a tendency to rise post-operatively. It is concluded that: 1) Effective premedication can suppress adrenocortical response during anaesthesia. 2) A rise in insulin level at the end of surgery may be gradual and parallel with a rise in blood sugar level. 3) An increased total thyroxin level during general anaesthesia and surgery may be a separate stress response, not due to stress induced increased glucocorticoids

  19. Relationship between serum cortisol levels and some physiological parameters following reining training session in horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Stefania; Vazzana, Irene; Giudice, Elisabetta; Fazio, Francesco; Piccione, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    The changes of cortisol, red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and rectal temperature (RT) were evaluated after a reining training session in eight Quarter Horses. All parameters were measured before exercise (T0), immediately after exercise (T1), 1 h after exercise (T2), 2 h after exercise (T3) and 24 h after exercise (T4). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures, followed Bonferroni's post hoc test, showed a significant effect of the reining training session (P Hct, HR, RR and RT. Simple linear regression analysis showed the positive correlation (P < 0.05) between cortisol changes and variations of studied parameters in T1, T3 and T4. Exercise-induced cortisol concentrations reflect the physiological response of reining training, suggesting that the changes observed are useful to assess the performance in reining horses and their reining training adaptability. PMID:26419874

  20. Analog model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to devices for modelling the space-dependent kinetics of a nuclear reactor. It can be advantageously used in studying the dynamics of the neutron field in the core to determine the effect of the control rods on the power distribution in the core, for training purposes. The proposed analog model of a nuclear reactor comprises operational amplifiers and a grid of resistors simulating neutron diffusion. Connected to the grid nodes are supply resistors modelling absorption and multiplication of neutrons. This is achieved by that, in the proposed model, all resistors through which power is supplied to the grid nodes are interconnected by their other leads and coupled to the output of the amplifier unit common for all nodes. Therewith, the amlifier unit models the transfer function of a ''point'' reactor. Connected to the input of this unit which includes two to four amplifiers are resistors for addition of signals with a grid node. Coupled to the grid nodes via additional resistors are voltage sources simulating reactivity

  1. Phase shift multiplication effect of all-optical analog to electromagnetically induced transparency in two micro-cavities side coupled to a waveguide system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Boyun; Wang, Tao, E-mail: wangtao@hust.edu.cn; Tang, Jian; Li, Xiaoming; Dong, Chuanbo [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-01-14

    We propose phase shift multiplication effect of all-optical analog to electromagnetically induced transparency in two photonic crystal micro-cavities side coupled to a waveguide system through external optical pump beams. With dynamically tuning the propagation phase of the line waveguide, the phase shift of the transmission spectrum in two micro-cavities side coupled to a waveguide system is doubled along with the phase shift of the line waveguide. π-phase shift and 2π-phase shift of the transmission spectrum are obtained when the propagation phase of the line waveguide is tuned to 0.5π-phase shift and π-phase shift, respectively. All observed schemes are analyzed rigorously through finite-difference time-domain simulations and the coupled-mode formalism. These results show a new direction to the miniaturization and the low power consumption of microstructure integration photonic devices in optical communication and quantum information processing.

  2. Stress, cortisol, and obesity: a role for cortisol responsiveness in identifying individuals prone to obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewagalamulage, S D; Lee, T K; Clarke, I J; Henry, B A

    2016-07-01

    There is a strong inter-relationship between activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and energy homeostasis. Patients with abdominal obesity have elevated cortisol levels. Furthermore, stress and glucocorticoids act to control both food intake and energy expenditure. In particular, glucocorticoids are known to increase the consumption of foods enriched in fat and sugar. It is well-known that, in all species, the cortisol response to stress or adrenocorticotropin is highly variable. It has now emerged that cortisol responsiveness is an important determinant in the metabolic sequelae to stress. Sheep that are characterized as high-cortisol responders (HRs) have greater propensity to weight gain and obesity than low-cortisol responders (LRs). This difference in susceptibility to become obese is associated with a distinct metabolic, neuroendocrine, and behavioral phenotype. In women and ewes, HR individuals eat more in response to stress than LR. Furthermore, HR sheep have impaired melanocortin signaling and reduced skeletal muscle thermogenesis. High-cortisol responder sheep exhibit reactive coping strategies, whereas LRs exhibit proactive coping strategies. This complex set of traits leads to increased food intake and reduced energy expenditure in HR and thus, predisposition to obesity. We predict that cortisol responsiveness may be used as a marker to identify individuals who are at risk of weight gain and subsequent obesity. PMID:27345309

  3. Enantiomeric excesses induced in amino acids by ultraviolet circularly polarized light irradiation of extraterrestrial ice analogs: A possible source of asymmetry for prebiotic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of meteoritic amino acids with enantiomeric excesses of the L-form (ee L) has suggested that extraterrestrial organic materials may have contributed to prebiotic chemistry and directed the initial occurrence of the ee L that further led to homochirality of amino acids on Earth. A proposed mechanism for the origin of ee L in meteorites involves an asymmetric photochemistry of extraterrestrial ices by UV circularly polarized light (CPL). We have performed the asymmetric synthesis of amino acids on achiral extraterrestrial ice analogs by VUV CPL, investigating the chiral asymmetry transfer at two different evolutionary stages at which the analogs were irradiated (regular ices and/or organic residues) and at two different photon energies (6.6 and 10.2 eV). We identify 16 distinct amino acids and precisely measure the L-enantiomeric excesses using the enantioselective GC × GC-TOFMS technique in five of them: α-alanine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, valine, and norvaline, with values ranging from ee L = –0.20% ± 0.14% to ee L = –2.54% ± 0.28%. The sign of the induced ee L depends on the helicity and the energy of CPL, but not on the evolutionary stage of the samples, and is the same for all five considered amino acids. Our results support an astrophysical scenario in which the solar system was formed in a high-mass star-forming region where icy grains were irradiated during the protoplanetary phase by an external source of CPL of a given helicity and a dominant energy, inducing a stereo-specific photochemistry.

  4. Enantiomeric excesses induced in amino acids by ultraviolet circularly polarized light irradiation of extraterrestrial ice analogs: A possible source of asymmetry for prebiotic chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modica, Paola; De Marcellus, Pierre; D' Hendecourt, Louis Le Sergeant [Univ. Paris-Sud, Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR 8617, F-91405 Orsay (France); Meinert, Cornelia; Meierhenrich, Uwe J. [Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis, Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR 7272 CNRS, F-06108 Nice (France); Nahon, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.nahon@synchrotron-soleil.fr, E-mail: ldh@ias.u-psud.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2014-06-10

    The discovery of meteoritic amino acids with enantiomeric excesses of the L-form (ee {sub L}) has suggested that extraterrestrial organic materials may have contributed to prebiotic chemistry and directed the initial occurrence of the ee {sub L} that further led to homochirality of amino acids on Earth. A proposed mechanism for the origin of ee {sub L} in meteorites involves an asymmetric photochemistry of extraterrestrial ices by UV circularly polarized light (CPL). We have performed the asymmetric synthesis of amino acids on achiral extraterrestrial ice analogs by VUV CPL, investigating the chiral asymmetry transfer at two different evolutionary stages at which the analogs were irradiated (regular ices and/or organic residues) and at two different photon energies (6.6 and 10.2 eV). We identify 16 distinct amino acids and precisely measure the L-enantiomeric excesses using the enantioselective GC × GC-TOFMS technique in five of them: α-alanine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, valine, and norvaline, with values ranging from ee {sub L} = –0.20% ± 0.14% to ee {sub L} = –2.54% ± 0.28%. The sign of the induced ee {sub L} depends on the helicity and the energy of CPL, but not on the evolutionary stage of the samples, and is the same for all five considered amino acids. Our results support an astrophysical scenario in which the solar system was formed in a high-mass star-forming region where icy grains were irradiated during the protoplanetary phase by an external source of CPL of a given helicity and a dominant energy, inducing a stereo-specific photochemistry.

  5. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CIRCULATING CORTISOL AND TESTOSTERONE: INFLUENCE OF PHYSICAL EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony C. Hackney

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Human research has shown the administration of cortisol into the circulation at rest will result in reduced blood testosterone levels. Many researchers have used these results to imply that physical exercise induced cortisol increases would perhaps result in subsequent reductions in circulating testosterone levels. Our purpose was to examine this concept and determine what, if any, relationship exists between circulating cortisol (C and testosterone (T in men (n = 45, 26.3 3.8 yr at rest and after exercise. Blood samples were collect at rest (10 hour post-prandial; denoted as 'Resting'; n = 45 and again on the same day at 1.0 hr into recovery from intensive exercise (denoted as 'Exercise Recovery'; n = 45. Approximately 48-96 hr after this initial (Trial # 1 blood collection protocol the subjects replicated the exact procedures again and provided a second Resting and Exercise Recovery set of blood samples (Trial # 2. Blood samples from Trial # 1and Trial # 2 were pooled (Resting, n = 90; Exercise Recovery, n = 90. The blood samples were analyzed by radioimmunoassay for C, total T (TT, and free T (fT. Pearson correlation coefficients for the Resting samples ([TT vs. C] r 0.05. For the Exercise Recovery samples ([TT vs. C] r = -0.53; [fT vs. C] r = +0.21 correlation coefficients were significant (p < 0.05. The findings indicate that exercise does allow the development of a significant negative relationship between C and TT. Interestingly, a significant positive relationship developed between C and fT following exercise; possibly due to an adrenal cortex contribution of fT or disassociation of fT from sex hormone binding globulin. The detected in vivo relationships between C and T, however, were associative and not causal in nature and were small to moderate at best in strength.

  6. Urinary cortisol is inversely associated with capillary recruitment in women: a potential explanation for the cortisol-blood pressure relationship

    OpenAIRE

    De Jongh, Renate T; Ijzerman, Richard G.; Serné, Erik H.; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M; Voordouw, Jasper J; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette A.; Stehouwer, Coen DA

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The relationships of cortisol with elevated blood pressure and insulin resistance are likely to be the result of a complex interplay of different mechanisms. We hypothesized that cortisol is associated with microvascular dysfunction and that this contributes to cortisol-associated high blood pressure and insulin resistance. We examined 24h urinary free cortisol excretion in 56 healthy adults (26 women). Blood pressure was assessed by 24h ambulatory measurements. Insulin se...

  7. Analog of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency Effect for Two Nano/Micro-mechanical Resonators Coupled With Spin Ensemble

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Yue; Sun, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    We study a hybrid nano-mechanical system coupled to a spin ensemble as a quantum simulator to favor a quantum interference effect, the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). This system consists of two nano-mechanical resonators (NAMRs), each of which coupled to a nuclear spin ensemble. It could be regarded as a crucial element in the quantum network of NAMR arrays coupled to spin ensembles. Here, the nuclear spin ensembles behave as a long-lived transducer to store and transfer the ...

  8. Effects of ascorbic acid and alpha tocopherol supplementation on basal testosterone cortisol ratio in male sprague dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Basal testosterone cortisol ratio is considered very important to maintain homeostasis. Increase in this ratio has various beneficial effects on body. In this study we determined the effects of ascorbic acid and alpha tocopherol supplementation on basal testosterone cortisol ratio in male Sprague Dawley rats. Methods: It was quasi experimental study carried out in department of Physiology, Army Medical College Rawalpindi in collaboration with National Institute of Health, Islamabad during October 2006 to September 2007. Forty male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups with ten rats in each group and above mentioned antioxidants supplementation were given along with standard diet for one month. After this, blood samples were taken and analyzed for serum testosterone and cortisol by ELISA and malondialdehyde levels colorimetrically. Data were analysed on SPSS version 13 and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: There was no significant rise in testosterone cortisol ratio in rats supplemented with single antioxidant; however rats supplemented with combination of ascorbic acid and alpha tocopherol revealed significant rise in testosterone cortisol ratio with a fall in malondialdehyde levels. Conclusions: Synergistic effects of ascorbic acid and alpha tocopherol resulted in a decline in reactive oxygen species induced lipid peroxidation and rise of testosterone cortisol ratio. (author)

  9. Cortisol responses to mental stress and the progression of coronary artery calcification in healthy men and women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Hamer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychosocial stress is a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD. The mechanisms are incompletely understood, although dysfunction of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA axis might be involved. We examined the association between cortisol responses to laboratory-induced mental stress and the progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC. METHODS AND RESULTS: Participants were 466 healthy men and women (mean age = 62.7±5.6 yrs, without history or objective signs of CHD, drawn from the Whitehall II epidemiological cohort. At the baseline assessment salivary cortisol was measured in response to mental stressors, consisting of a 5-min Stroop task and a 5-min mirror tracing task. CAC was measured at baseline and at 3 years follow up using electron beam computed tomography. CAC progression was defined as an increase >10 Agatston units between baseline and follow up. 38.2% of the sample demonstrated CAC progression over the 3 years follow up. There was considerable variation in the cortisol stress response, with approximately 40% of the sample responding to the stress tasks with an increase in cortisol of at least 1 mmol/l. There was an association between cortisol stress reactivity (per SD and CAC progression (odds ratio = 1.27, 95% CI, 1.02-1.60 after adjustments for age, sex, pre-stress cortisol, employment grade, smoking, resting systolic BP, fibrinogen, body mass index, and use of statins. There was no association between systolic blood pressure reactivity and CAC progression (odds ratio per SD increase = 1.03, 95% CI, 0.85-1.24. Other independent predictors of CAC progression included age, male sex, smoking, resting systolic blood pressure, and fibrinogen. CONCLUSION: Results demonstrate an association between heightened cortisol reactivity to stress and CAC progression. These data support the notion that cortisol reactivity, an index of HPA function, is one of the possible mechanisms through which

  10. Study of the photon-induced formation and subsequent desorption of CH3 OH and H2 CO in interstellar ice analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Martín-Doménech, R; Cruz-Díaz, G A

    2016-01-01

    Methanol and formaldehyde are two simple organic molecules that are ubiquitously detected in the interstellar medium. An origin in the solid phase and a subsequent nonthermal desorption into the gas phase is often invoked to explain their abundances in some of the environments where they are found. Experimental simulations under astrophysically relevant conditions have been carried out to find a suitable mechanism for that process. We explore the in situ formation and subsequent photon-induced desorption of these species, studying the UV photoprocessing of pure ethanol ice, and a more realistic binary H2O:CH4 ice analog. Ice samples deposited onto an infrared transparent window at 8 K were UV-irradiated using a microwave-discharged hydrogen flow lamp. Evidence of photochemical production of these two species and subsequent UV-photon-induced desorption into the gas phase were searched for by means of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and a quadrupole mass spectrometer, respectively. Formation of CH3OH ...

  11. Post-marathon wearing of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes facilitates recovery from race-induced fatigue: an evaluation utilizing a visual analog scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakagawa K

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kento Nakagawa, Takashi Obu, Kazuyuki KanosueFaculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa, Saitama, Japan Purpose: To investigate the potential benefit of post-race wearing of unstable shoes (Masai Barefoot Technology [MBT] on recovery from marathon race–induced fatigue.Patients and methods: Forty-five runners who participated in a full marathon race were divided into three groups: 1 MBT shoes, 2 trail running shoes, and 3 control (CON. Participants ran a full marathon with their own running shoes, and then put on the assigned shoes immediately after the race. They continued to wear the assigned shoes for the ensuing 3 days. The CON group wore their usual shoes. Estimates of post-race fatigue were made by the participants on questionnaires that utilized a visual analog scale. Estimates were made just after the race, as well as for the next 3 days.Results: The subjective fatigue of the MBT group was lower than that of the CON (P<0.05 or trail running shoe groups (P<0.05 on day 3.Conclusion: MBT shoe intervention can promote recovery from the fatigue induced by running a full marathon.Keywords: footwear, VAS, full marathon

  12. Cortisol involvement in mechanisms of behavioral inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, Mattie; Boksem, Maarten A. S.

    2011-01-01

    We studied whether baseline cortisol is associated with post-error slowing, a measure that depends upon brain areas involved in behavioral inhibition. Moreover, we studied whether this association holds after controlling for positive associations with behavioral inhibition scores and error-related n

  13. Smelling lavender and rosemary increases free radical scavenging activity and decreases cortisol level in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsumi, Toshiko; Tonosaki, Keiichi

    2007-02-28

    Free radicals/reactive oxygen species are related to many biological phenomena such as inflammation, aging, and carcinogenesis. The body possesses various antioxidative systems (free radical scavenging activity, FRSA) for preventing oxidative stress, and saliva contains such activity. In the present study, we measured the total salivary FRSA induced after the smelling of lavender and rosemary essential oils that are widely used in aromatherapy. Various physiologically active substances in saliva such as cortisol, secretory IgA, and alpha-amylase activity were found to be correlated with aroma-induced FRSA. The subjects (22 healthy volunteers) sniffed aroma for 5 min, and each subject's saliva was collected immediately. FRSA was measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl. The FRSA values were increased by stimulation with low concentrations (1000 times dilution) of lavender or by high-concentrations (10 times dilution) of rosemary. In contrast, both lavender and rosemary stimulations decreased cortisol levels. A significant inverse correlation was observed between the FRSA values and the cortisol levels with each concentration of rosemary stimulation. No significant changes were noted in sIgA or alpha-amylase. These findings clarify that lavender and rosemary enhance FRSA and decrease the stress hormone, cortisol, which protects the body from oxidative stress. PMID:17291597

  14. Intra- and interspecific challenges modulate cortisol but not androgen levels in a year-round territorial damselfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Albert F H; Vullioud, Philippe; Bruintjes, Rick; Vallat, Armelle; Bshary, Redouan

    2014-05-15

    Interactions between individuals of different species are commonplace in animal communities. Some behaviors displayed during these interspecific social interactions may be very similar to those displayed during intraspecific social interactions. However, whether functional analogies between intra- and interspecific behaviors translate at the proximate level into an overlap in their underlying endocrine mechanisms remains largely unknown. Because steroids both mediate social behaviors and respond to them, we approached this question by comparing the behavioral and steroid response of free-living dusky gregories (Stegastes nigricans) to standardized territorial intrusions (sTI) of either conspecific or heterospecific food competitors. Stegastes nigricans is a year-round territorial fish that 'cultivates' the algae on which it feeds and is highly aggressive to both intra- and interspecific intruders. Behavioral differences between intra- and interspecific aggressive responses to sTI were marginal, and sTI tests caused an increase in cortisol levels that was positively related with the levels of aggression. In contrast, androgen levels did not increase in response to sTI, yet they showed a positive relationship with agonistic behavior. These results parallel a pattern that was first described for year-round territorial bird species. Furthermore, they suggest that changes in endocrine-hormone levels during territoriality might be independent of the species that induces the territorial response. PMID:24577440

  15. Introducing a novel method to assess cumulative steroid concentrations: increased hair cortisol concentrations over 6 months in medicated patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettenborn, Lucia; Muhtz, Christoph; Skoluda, Nadine; Stalder, Tobias; Steudte, Susann; Hinkelmann, Kim; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Otte, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Depression has been linked to increased cortisol concentrations using point measures taken from urine, blood, or saliva samples. However, with regard to hypercortisolism-induced consequences, long-term cumulative cortisol burden is of relevance. Our objective was to use hair analysis as a new method to assess cortisol exposure over 6 months in depressed patients and healthy controls. We examined 23 depressed patients (8 men and 15 women, mean age: 41.6 years ( ± standard deviation (SD), 13.1 years); mean duration of current depressive episode 9 months ( ± SD, 13 months)) and 64 healthy controls, matched for age and gender. Cortisol concentrations in two 3-cm hair segments from near to the scalp were analyzed, representing cortisol secretion during the 6 months prior to sampling. Compared with healthy individuals, depressed patients had higher hair cortisol concentrations in the first (mean ± SD: 26.7 ± 20.8 vs. 18.7 ± 11.5 pg/mg, p < 0.05) and second hair segment (mean ±  SD: 21.9 ± 23.7 vs. 13.4 ± 9.6 pg/mg, p < 0.05). In conclusion, hair cortisol analysis confirmed enhanced cortisol secretion in depressed patients over a prolonged time period. Because of the retrospective and cumulative nature of cortisol in hair, the assessment of hair cortisol concentration may help in addressing unanswered questions regarding hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis overactivity and associated health consequences in psychiatric disorders. PMID:22043813

  16. Analog and VLSI circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wai-Kai

    2009-01-01

    Featuring hundreds of illustrations and references, this book provides the information on analog and VLSI circuits. It focuses on analog integrated circuits, presenting the knowledge on monolithic device models, analog circuit cells, high performance analog circuits, RF communication circuits, and PLL circuits.

  17. Stronger pharmacological cortisol suppression and anticipatory cortisol stress response in transient global amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eGriebe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient global amnesia (TGA is a disorder characterized by a sudden attack of severe anterograde memory disturbance that is frequently preceded by emotional or physical stress and resolves within 24 hours. By using MRI following the acute episode in TGA patients, small lesions in the hippocampus have been observed. Hence it has been hypothesized that the disorder is caused by a stress-related transient inhibition of memory formation in the hippocampus. To study the factors that may link stress and TGA, we measured the cortisol day-profile, the dexamethasone feedback inhibition and the effect of experimental exposure to stress on cortisol levels (using the socially evaluated cold pressor test and a control procedure in 20 patients with a recent history of TGA and in 20 healthy controls. We used self-report scales of depression, anxiety and stress and a detailed neuropsychological assessment to characterize our collective. We did not observe differences in mean cortisol levels in the cortisol day-profile between the two groups. After administration of low-dose dexamethasone, TGA patients showed significantly stronger cortisol suppression in the daytime profile compared to the control group (p = 0.027. The mean salivary cortisol level was significantly higher in the TGA group prior to and after the experimental stress exposure (p = 0.008; p = 0.010 respectively, as well as prior to and after the control condition (p = 0.022; p= 0.024 respectively. The TGA group had higher scores of depressive symptomatology (p = 0.021 and anxiety (p = 0.007, but the groups did not differ in the neuropsychological assessment. Our findings of a stronger pharmacological suppression and higher cortisol levels in anticipation of experimental stress in participants with a previous TGA indicate a hypersensitivity of the HPA axis. This suggests that an individual stress sensitivity might play a role in the pathophysiology of TGA.

  18. Decreased hair cortisol concentrations in generalised anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steudte, Susann; Stalder, Tobias; Dettenborn, Lucia; Klumbies, Elisabeth; Foley, Paul; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2011-04-30

    Previous research examining hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) has suggested a general hypercortisolism. These studies have mostly relied on salivary, plasma or urinary assessments, reflecting cortisol secretion over short time periods. The current study utilised the novel method of cortisol assessment in hair to obtain a retrospective index of cortisol secretion over a prolonged period of time. Hair cortisol levels were determined in 15 GAD patients and in 15 age- and gender-matched controls. In addition, participants collected six saliva samples (on awakening, +30 min, 12:00, 16:00, 20:00 h and at bedtime) on two consecutive weekdays for the assessment of the diurnal cortisol profile. Results revealed significantly lower (50-60%) cortisol levels in the first and second 3-cm hair segments of GAD patients compared to those of controls. No significant between-group differences were seen in diurnal cortisol profiles. The hair cortisol findings tentatively suggest that under naturalistic conditions GAD is associated with hypocortisolism. If corroborated by future research, this demonstrates the important qualities of cortisol measurement in hair as an ecologically valid, retrospective index of long-term cortisol secretion and as a marker for psychiatric disorders associated with hypo- or hypercortisolism. PMID:20889215

  19. Science Teachers' Analogical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozzer, Nilmara Braga; Justi, Rosária

    2013-08-01

    Analogies can play a relevant role in students' learning. However, for the effective use of analogies, teachers should not only have a well-prepared repertoire of validated analogies, which could serve as bridges between the students' prior knowledge and the scientific knowledge they desire them to understand, but also know how to introduce analogies in their lessons. Both aspects have been discussed in the literature in the last few decades. However, almost nothing is known about how teachers draw their own analogies for instructional purposes or, in other words, about how they reason analogically when planning and conducting teaching. This is the focus of this paper. Six secondary teachers were individually interviewed; the aim was to characterize how they perform each of the analogical reasoning subprocesses, as well as to identify their views on analogies and their use in science teaching. The results were analyzed by considering elements of both theories about analogical reasoning: the structural mapping proposed by Gentner and the analogical mechanism described by Vosniadou. A comprehensive discussion of our results makes it evident that teachers' content knowledge on scientific topics and on analogies as well as their pedagogical content knowledge on the use of analogies influence all their analogical reasoning subprocesses. Our results also point to the need for improving teachers' knowledge about analogies and their ability to perform analogical reasoning.

  20. Clozapine and risperidone influence on cortisol and estradiol levels in male patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriu, G; Torac, E; Gaman, L E; Iosif, L; Tivig, I C; Delia, C; Gilca, M; Stoian, I; Atanasiu, V

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens role in schizophrenia patients is a subject, which has gained an increased attention from the medical community. Estrogens have been shown to inhibit dopamine actions, improve neuronal regeneration, and overall, have a protective role in the pathology of schizophrenia. The adjunctive estrogen therapy for men is currently under debate. Antipsychotic medication is known to influence the hypothalamo-hypophyseal - gonadal axis by inducing variable degrees of hyperprolactinemia. Several studies have found that some of the atypical antipsychotics lower cortisol levels in patients and also in healthy controls. We have investigated the effects of clozapine and risperidone on estradiol levels in men with schizophrenia. We have also evaluated the levels of prolactin and cortisol, taking into account the possible influence of antipsychotic drugs on both these hormones. Both prolactin and cortisol also have the potential to regulate sexual hormones biosynthesis. Our study found decreased estradiol levels in men with schizophrenia treated with clozapine and risperidone, while prolactin levels were increased only in the risperidone treated group. Cortisol levels are not statistically significant different between groups. PMID:26664488

  1. THE BLOOD LEVELS OF GLUCAGON, CORTISOL, AND INSULIN FOLLOWING THE INJECTION OF VENOM BY THE SCORPION (Mesobuthus tamulus concanesis, POCOCK) IN DOGS

    OpenAIRE

    K. Radha Krishna Murthy; L. HAGHNAZARI

    1999-01-01

    Severe envenoming was induced in two groups of experimental dogs after subcutaneous (SQ) injection of venom of the scorpion (Mesobuthus tamulus concanesis, Pocock) (3.0 and 3.5 mg/kg body weight). The circulating levels of blood sugar, insulin, glucagon, and cortisol were assayed at 0, and 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after venom injection. There was an increase in the circulating levels of blood sugar, insulin, glucagon, and cortisol following envenoming. Scorpion envenoming causes an autonomic st...

  2. 〈Originals〉The association between anxiety and a decline in saliva cortisol during interview stress in adult patients with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Haraguchi, Ryuta; Tomita, Katsuyuki; Watatani, Nanase; Imbe, Shu; Sato, Ryuji; Makino, Yasushi; Nisiyama, Osamu; Sano, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Hirokazu; Toda, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    [Abstract] The relationship between anxiety and asthma is currently being intensively studied. It has been demonstrated that there is reduced responsiveness of the hypothalamus-pituitaryadrenal (HPA) axis to psychosocial stress in an animal model of asthma. Our objectives were to identify the associations between anxiety and the decline of saliva cortisol during stress in adult patients with asthma. Saliva cortisol was sampled before and up to 30 min following stress induced by interviews in ...

  3. Increased testosterone to cortisol ratio in psychopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn, Andrea L.; Raine, Adrian; Schug, Robert A.; Gao, Yu; Granger, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Only a few studies have examined hormones in psychopathy and results have been mixed. It has been suggested that since hormone systems are highly interconnected, it may be important to examine multiple systems simultaneously to gain a clearer picture of how hormones work together to predispose for a certain construct. In the present study, we attempt to clarify the role of the hormones cortisol and testosterone in psychopathy by examining both hormones in a community sample of 178 adults demo...

  4. Oral cortisol improves implicit sequence learning

    OpenAIRE

    Sonja Roemer

    2009-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe structures are suggested to be essential for declarative memory (explicit memory for facts and events). Recent studies show that the medial temporal lobe (including the hippocampus) is also active in implicit sequence learning. Since glucocorticoids affect memory function via receptors in the hippocampus, the aim of the present study was to investigate implicit sequence learning after glucocorticoid administration. Oral cortisol (30 mg) was given to 29 healthy subjects,...

  5. Physical activity and cortisol in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Diane Alix; Mayer, Laurel E S; Schebendach, Janet Ellen; Walsh, B Timothy

    2007-06-01

    Elevated physical activity is commonly observed among patients with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and can manifest in several forms. While elevated physical activity may play a key role in the pathophysiology of this disorder, much remains unknown about it, including the relationship among its various manifestations, and their underlying mechanism(s). The purposes of the current study were to (1) quantify locomotor activity in inpatients with AN using an accelerometer, (2) determine the association between locomotor activity and exercise history and (3) determine the association between urinary cortisol and physical activity. Thirty-six women hospitalized with AN wore activity armbands for 48 h during the first 2 weeks of hospitalization, collected 24-h urine to measure cortisol, and completed rating forms. Activity counts varied more than four-fold among individuals but were consistent within individuals over the 2 monitoring days (pactivity counts were positively correlated with pre-hospitalization attitude towards exercise as measured by the Commitment to Exercise Scale (CES; p=0.032). Forty-two percent of women reported "high" exercise in the 3 months before hospitalization; compared to non-high-exercising patients, these women demonstrated a higher CES score (pactivity counts (p=0.059). Urinary cortisol was positively associated with activity counts (p=0.044) and CES score (p=0.018). These data suggest that some women with AN have a higher "drive" for physical activity that persists into early hospitalization. HPA axis abnormalities may be associated with this state. PMID:17462830

  6. Inactivity amplifies the catabolic response of skeletal muscle to cortisol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, A. A.; Stuart, C. A.; Sheffield-Moore, M.; Wolfe, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    Severe injury or trauma is accompanied by both hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity or bed rest (BR). Trauma and BR alone each result in a loss of muscle nitrogen, albeit through different metabolic alterations. Although BR alone can result in a 2-3% loss of lean body mass, the effects of severe trauma can be 2- to 3-fold greater. We investigated the combined effects of hypercortisolemia and prolonged inactivity on muscle protein metabolism in healthy volunteers. Six males were studied before and after 14 days of strict BR using a model based on arteriovenous sampling and muscle biopsy. Fractional synthesis and breakdown rates of skeletal muscle protein were also directly calculated. Each assessment of protein metabolism was conducted during a 12-h infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (120 microg/kg x h), resulting in blood cortisol concentrations that mimic severe injury (approximately 31 microg/dL). After 14 days of strict BR, hypercortisolemia increased phenylalanine efflux from muscle by 3-fold (P muscle protein breakdown (P muscle protein synthesis. Muscle efflux of glutamine and alanine increased significantly after bed rest due to a significant increase in de novo synthesis (P skeletal muscle to the catabolic effects of hypercortisolemia. Furthermore, these effects on healthy volunteers are analogous to those seen after severe injury.

  7. Intuitive analog circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Intuitive Analog Circuit Design outlines ways of thinking about analog circuits and systems that let you develop a feel for what a good, working analog circuit design should be. This book reflects author Marc Thompson's 30 years of experience designing analog and power electronics circuits and teaching graduate-level analog circuit design, and is the ideal reference for anyone who needs a straightforward introduction to the subject. In this book, Dr. Thompson describes intuitive and ""back-of-the-envelope"" techniques for designing and analyzing analog circuits, including transistor amplifi

  8. An Optimization Formulation for Characterization of Pulsatile Cortisol Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Taj Faghih

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cortisol is released to relay information to cells to regulate metabolism and reaction to stress and inflammation. In particular, cortisol is released in the form of pulsatile signals. This low-energy method of signaling seems to be more efficient than continuous signaling. We hypothesize that there is a controller in the anterior pituitary that leads to pulsatile release of cortisol, and propose a mathematical formulation for such controller, which leads to impulse control as opposed to continuous control. We postulate that this controller is minimizing the number of secretory events that result in cortisol secretion, which is a way of minimizing the energy required for cortisol secretion; this controller maintains the blood cortisol levels within a specific circadian range while complying with the first order dynamics underlying cortisol secretion. We use an l0-norm cost function for this controller, and solve a reweighed l1-norm minimization algorithm for obtaining the solution to this optimization problem. We use 4 examples to illustrate the performance of this approach: (i a toy problem that achieves impulse control, (ii two examples that achieve physiologically plausible pulsatile cortisol release, (iii an example where the number of pulses is not within the physiologically plausible range for healthy subjects while the cortisol levels are within the desired range. This novel approach results in impulse control where the impulses and the obtained blood cortisol levels have a circadian rhythm and an ultradian rhythm that are in agreement with the known physiology of cortisol secretion. The proposed formulation is a first step in developing intermittent controllers for curing cortisol deficiency. This type of bio-inspired pulse controllers can be employed for designing non-continuous controllers in brain-machine interface design for neuroscience applications.

  9. Cortisol Response Following Exposure Treatment for PTSD in Rape Victims

    OpenAIRE

    Gerardi, Maryrose; Rothbaum, Barbara O.; Astin, Millie C.; Kelley, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This study examined changes in salivary cortisol levels pre-to-post-treatment in adult female rape victims diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) randomly assigned to be treated with either Prolonged Exposure Therapy or Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. Salivary cortisol was collected at baseline, session 3, and session 9. A significant decrease in salivary cortisol levels was observed in individuals classified as treatment responders in both treatment conditions. F...

  10. Daily variations in cortisol levels and binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitton, Sarah; Porn, Patricia M; Shaeffer, Stephanie

    2002-12-01

    Morning and afternoon levels of cortisol for 73 volunteers (67 women and 6 men) were compared in relation to their Binge Eating Disorder scores, Body Mass Indexes, and self-reports of mood and hunger. Cortisol level was not significantly correlated with binge eating or mood or hunger for either time period. However, it was inversely related to body mass, with lower cortisol levels associated with greater body mass. PMID:12530732

  11. Born to yawn? Cortisol linked to yawning: a new hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Simon B N

    2011-11-01

    Yawning has become an interesting and curious scientific conundrum. Links between several neurological disorders can be found through the commonality of yawning episodes and contagious yawning. However, the reasons why we yawn are uncertain. Cortisol levels are known to rise during stress and fatigue; yawning may occur when we are under stress or tired. We do not know whether cortisol levels fluctuate during yawning. Potentially, yawning and cortisol levels may provide a valuable diagnostic tool and warning of untoward underlying neurological problems. A new hypothesis is proposed that links cortisol levels with yawning episodes. PMID:21864988

  12. Individual differences in cortisol stress response predict increases in voice pitch during exam stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanski, Katarzyna; Nowak, Judyta; Sorokowski, Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Despite a long history of empirical research, the potential vocal markers of stress remain unclear. Previous studies examining speech under stress most consistently report an increase in voice pitch (the acoustic correlate of fundamental frequency, F0), however numerous studies have failed to replicate this finding. In the present study we tested the prediction that these inconsistencies are tied to variation in the severity of the stress response, wherein voice changes may be observed predominantly among individuals who show a cortisol stress response (i.e., an increase in free cortisol levels) above a critical threshold. Voice recordings and saliva samples were collected from university psychology students at baseline and again immediately prior to an oral examination. Voice recordings included both read and spontaneous speech, from which we measured mean, minimum, maximum, and the standard deviation in F0. We observed an increase in mean and minimum F0 under stress in both read and spontaneous speech, whereas maximum F0 and its standard deviation showed no systematic changes under stress. Our results confirmed that free cortisol levels increased by an average of 74% (ranging from 0 to 270%) under stress. Critically, increases in cortisol concentrations significantly predicted increases in mean F0 under stress for both speech types, but did not predict variation in F0 at baseline. On average, stress-induced increases in voice pitch occurred only when free cortisol levels more than doubled their baseline concentrations. Our results suggest that researchers examining speech under stress should control for individual differences in the magnitude of the stress response. PMID:27188981

  13. Saliva Cortisol and Exposure to Aircraft Noise in Six European Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Selander, Jenny; Bluhm, Gösta; Theorell, Töres; Pershagen, Göran; Babisch, Wolfgang; Seiffert, Ingeburg; Houthuijs, Danny; Breugelmans, Oscar; Vigna-Taglianti, Federica; Antoniotti, Maria Chiara; Velonakis, Emmanuel; Davou, Elli; Dudley, Marie-Louise; Järup, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Background Several studies show an association between exposure to aircraft or road traffic noise and cardiovascular effects, which may be mediated by a noise-induced release of stress hormones. Objective Our objective was to assess saliva cortisol concentration in relation to exposure to aircraft noise. Method A multicenter cross-sectional study, HYENA (Hypertension and Exposure to Noise near Airports), comprising 4,861 persons was carried out in six European countries. In a subgroup of 439 ...

  14. Effects of Elevated Circulating Cortisol Concentrations on Maternal Behavior in Common Marmoset Monkeys (Callithrix jacchus)

    OpenAIRE

    Saltzman, Wendy; Abbott, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Both acute and chronic stress can impair maternal behavior and increase rates of infant abuse in several species. The mechanisms inducing these effects are unknown, but experimental manipulation of circulating corticosterone levels alters maternal behavior in rats, and circulating or excreted cortisol concentrations have been found to correlate either positively or negatively with maternal behavior in humans and nonhuman primates. In this study, therefore, we experimentally tested the hypothe...

  15. Central activation by histamine-induced itch: analogies to pain processing: a correlational analysis of O-15 H2O positron emission tomography studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzezga, A; Darsow, U; Treede, R D; Siebner, H; Frisch, M; Munz, F; Weilke, F; Ring, J; Schwaiger, M; Bartenstein, P

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the functional cerebral network involved in the central processing of itch and to detect analogies and differences to previously identified cerebral activation patterns triggered by painful noxious stimuli. Repeated positron emission tomography regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurements using O15-labeled water were performed in six healthy right-handed male subjects (mean age 32 +/- 2 years). Each subject underwent 12 sequential rCBF measurements. In all subjects a standardized skin prick test was performed on the right forearm 2 min before each rCBF measurement. For activation, histamine was applied in nine tests in logarithmically increasing concentrations from 0.03 to 8%. Three tests were performed with isotonic saline solution serving as a control condition. Itch intensity and unpleasantness were registered with a visual analogue scale during each test. Subtraction analysis between activation and control conditions as well as correlation analysis with covariates were performed. Itch induced a significant activation in the predominantly contralateral somatosensory cortex and in the ipsilateral and contralateral motor areas (supplementary motor area (SMA), premotor cortex, primary motor cortex). Additional significant activations were found in the prefrontal cortex and the cingulate gyrus, but not in subcortical structures nor in the secondary somatosensory cortex. In correlation analyses, several cortical areas showed a graded increase in rCBF with the logarithm of the histamine concentration (bilateral sensorimotor areas and cingulate cortex; contralateral insula, superior temporal cortex and prefrontal cortex) and with itch unpleasantness (contralateral sensorimotor cortex, prefrontal cortex and posterior insula; ipsilateral SMA). Induction of itch results in the activation of a distributed cerebral network. Itch and pain seem to share common pathways (a medial and a lateral processing pathway and a strong projection

  16. Increased cortisol release and transport stress do not influence semen quality and testosterone release in pony stallions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichsel, Katharina; Pasing, Stephanie; Erber, Regina; Ille, Natascha; Palme, Rupert; Aurich, Jörg; Aurich, Christine

    2015-07-01

    The use of breeding stallions for equestrian competitions requires that fertility is not negatively affected by competition or transport to the competition site. In this study, effects of cortisol release induced by road transport (600 km), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration (3 × 0.5 mg synthetic ACTH) and placebo treatment on semen quality and testosterone release were investigated in Shetland stallions (N = 13) using a crossover design. Saliva for cortisol and blood for testosterone analysis were collected for 10 weeks after treatments. Semen was collected daily for 5 days directly after treatments and twice weekly for another 9 weeks. Total sperm count, sperm morphology, motility, and membrane integrity were analyzed. We hypothesized that elevated cortisol decreases testosterone concentration and semen quality. Cortisol concentrations increased in response to transport and ACTH (P testosterone existed. Total sperm count decreased with daily semen collections in week 1 (P testosterone release and semen quality. Testicular function in stallions is apparently well protected against transiently elevated cortisol concentrations, and stallions can be transported over longer distances without negatively affecting their fertility. PMID:25794840

  17. Analog and hybrid computing

    CERN Document Server

    Hyndman, D E

    2013-01-01

    Analog and Hybrid Computing focuses on the operations of analog and hybrid computers. The book first outlines the history of computing devices that influenced the creation of analog and digital computers. The types of problems to be solved on computers, computing systems, and digital computers are discussed. The text looks at the theory and operation of electronic analog computers, including linear and non-linear computing units and use of analog computers as operational amplifiers. The monograph examines the preparation of problems to be deciphered on computers. Flow diagrams, methods of ampl

  18. Neural traces of stress: cortisol related sustained enhancement of amygdala-hippocampal functional connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon eVaisvaser

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Stressful experiences modulate neuro-circuitry function, and the temporal trajectory of these alterations, elapsing from early disturbances to late recovery, heavily influences resilience and vulnerability to stress. Such effects of stress may depend on processes that are engaged during resting-state, through active recollection of past experiences and anticipation of future events, all known to involve the default mode network (DMN. By inducing social stress and acquiring resting-state fMRI before stress, immediately following it, and two hours later, we expanded the time-window for examining the trajectory of the stress response. Throughout the study repeated cortisol samplings and self-reports of stress levels were obtained from 51 healthy young males. Post-stress alterations were investigated by whole brain resting-state functional connectivity of two central hubs of the DMN: the posterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus. Results indicate a 'recovery' pattern of DMN connectivity, in which all alterations, ascribed to the intervening stress, returned to pre-stress levels. The only exception to this pattern was a stress-induced rise in amygdala-hippocampal connectivity, which was sustained for as long as two hours following stress induction. Furthermore, this sustained enhancement of limbic connectivity was inversely correlated to individual stress-induced cortisol responsiveness (AUCi and characterized only the group lacking such increased cortisol (i.e., non-responders. Our observations provide evidence of a prolonged post-stress response profile, characterized by both the comprehensive balance of most DMN functional connections and the distinct time and cortisol dependent ascent of intra-limbic connectivity. These novel insights into neuro-endocrine relations are another milestone in the ongoing search for individual markers in stress-related psychopathologies.

  19. Cortisol Levels and Conduct Disorder in Adolescent Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Rima; Zoccolillo, Mark; Paquette, Daniel; Quiros, Elsa; Baltzer, Franziska; Tremblay, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between cortisol levels and conduct disorder (CD) in adolescent mothers. Past research has shown that low levels of cortisol were associated with CD, particularly with its aggressive symptoms. The authors tested the hypothesis that adolescent mothers with CD would show lower levels of salivary cortisol…

  20. Salivary cortisol in depressed patients versus control persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, Ulla; Vinberg, Maj; Kessing, Lars V;

    2010-01-01

    bias. Further, in meta-regression analyses higher intra-assay coefficients of variation in cortisol kits (p=0.07) and mean age (p=0.08) were associated with a higher mean difference of morning salivary cortisol between depressed and controls, while gender and depression severity were not. Based on the...

  1. Differentiating anticipatory from reactive cortisol responses to psychosocial stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engert, V.; Efanov, S.I.; Duchesne, A.; Vogel, S.; Corbo, V.; Pruessner, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Most psychosocial stress studies assess the overall cortisol response without further identifying the temporal dynamics within hormone levels. It has been shown, however, that the amplitude of anticipatory cortisol stress levels has a unique predictive value for psychological health. So far, no "bes

  2. Effects of cortisol administration on craving in heroin addicts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, M.; Bentz, D.; Schicktanz, N.; Milnik, A.; Aerni, A.; Gerhards, C.; Schwegler, K.; Vogel, M.; Blum, J.; Schmid, O.; Roozendaal, B.; Lang, U.E.; Borgwardt, S.; Quervain, D. de

    2015-01-01

    Heroin dependence is a severe and chronically relapsing substance use disorder with limited treatment options. Stress is known to increase craving and drug-taking behavior, but it is not known whether the stress hormone cortisol mediates these stress effects or whether cortisol may rather reduce cra

  3. One-step quantitative cortisol dipstick with proportional reading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, Wingman; Chan, Puiyee; Bosgoed, Freddy; Lehmann, Karin; Renneberg, Ilka; Lehmann, Matthias; Renneberg, Reinhard

    2003-01-01

    Rapid quantitative immuno-detection of haptens by the lateral flow assay without “typical” competitive inhibition results is studied. In the present study, we describe an immuno-threshold-based assay for the quantification of cortisol. It gives a signal which is directly proportional to the cortisol

  4. Decreased cortisol production in male type 1 diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, MN; Luik, PT; van der Kleij, FGH; Boonstra, AH; Breukelman, H; Sluiter, WJ; Navis, GJ; Dullaart, RPF

    2003-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether cortisol production and the 11betaHSD-mediated cortisol to cortisone interconversion are different between type 1 diabetic patients and healthy subjects. Materials and methods Fourteen male, nonobese, normotensive type 1 diabetic patients without severe complications

  5. Cortisol exposure, cognition and clinical course of bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, Anne Titia

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, we aimed to identify the influence of cortisol exposure and cognitive performance on the clinical course of bipolar disorder. Data regarding sociodemographics, disease characteristics and genetic analysis of the cortisol receptors, were collected of 366 patients with bipolar d

  6. Cortisol plays central role in biochemical changes during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinloye O.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregnancy is known to alter the feedback effect of cortisol on ACTH secretion and decrease the effectiveness of cortisol to inhibit an ACTH response to hypertension. Neither the mechanism nor the physiological significance of these changes in maternal plasma cortisol concentration is fully understood. This study is the first attempt to investigate the levels of serum cortisol during three stages of pregnancy and its associated physiological significance in Nigeria women. Aim: Serum cortisol in the three stages of pregnancy was measured and correlated with reproductive hormones and electrolyte levels. Methods: 200 volunteers consisted of 50 women in each of the three trimesters and 50 non-pregnant apparently healthy controls were recruited. Demographic data were obtained by questionnaire. Serum cortisol, progesterone and prolactin levels were measured by ELISA, chloride and bicarbonate by titration methods, Na+ and K+ by flame photometry and other analytes by conventional colorimetric methods. Results: While glucose and protein levels were significantly decreased, the total cholesterol concentrations increased progressively in pregnancy. Serum cortisol increased significantly in the first trimester reached a peak in the second and declined in the third trimester. Progesterone and prolactin levels were significantly higher in pregnancy in all stages of pregnancy. Serum cortisol correlates positively with chloride and potassium inversely with bicarbonate. Conclusion: Cortisol plays a central role in biochemical changes that occurs in pregnancy. It increase is an indicator of emotional stress and physiological challenges in pregnancy and also, possible risk signal. The concurrent increases in progesterone and prolactin levels are compensating mechanisms. It may therefore be of clinical relevance to monitor serum cortisol levels and some of the associated variables, especially in women experiencing threatened pregnancy.

  7. Analysis of hair cortisol levels in captive chimpanzees: Effect of various methods on cortisol stability and variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanashi, Yumi; Teramoto, Migaku; Morimura, Naruki; Hirata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Juri; Hayashi, Misato; Kinoshita, Kodzue; Murayama, Miho; Idani, Gen'ichi

    2016-01-01

    Hair cortisol has been reported to be a useful measure of long-term hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation in several species. It serves as a practical tool for long-term stress assessment, but it is important to understand the methodological factors that can affects hair cortisol assays to avoid methodological artifacts. To that end, we tested several procedures for measuring cortisol levels in hair collected from captive chimpanzees. The results showed that reproducibility was high, and we found no differences in cortisol levels among the various storage, drying, and sampling methods. However, the fineness of homogenized hair, sample weight, and extraction time affected absolute hair cortisol concentration. Although hair cortisol levels were stable over time, factors that may influence measurement results should be kept constant throughout a study.•We modified and validated a methodology involving enzyme immunoassays to reliably measure the hair cortisol levels of captive chimpanzees.•The results revealed that the fineness of homogenized hair, sample weight, and extraction time caused variations in absolute hair cortisol concentrations in chimpanzees. In contrast, storage, drying, and sampling from similar body parts did not affect the results. PMID:26870668

  8. Insulin analogs and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eSciacca

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, insulin analogs are used in millions of diabetic patients. Insulin analogs have been developed to achieve more physiological insulin replacement in terms of time course of the effect. Modifications in the amino acid sequence of the insulin molecule change the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the analogs in respect to human insulin. However, these changes can also modify the molecular and biological effects of the analogs. The rapid-acting insulin analogs, lispro, aspart and glulisine, have a rapid onset and shorter duration of action. The long-acting insulin analogs glargine and detemir have a protracted duration of action and a relatively smooth serum concentration profile. Insulin and its analogs may function as growth factors and therefore have a theoretical potential to promote tumor proliferation. A major question is whether analogs have an increased mitogenic activity in respect to insulin. These ligands can promote cell proliferation through many mechanisms like the prolonged stimulation of the insulin receptor, stimulation of the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R, prevalent activation of the ERK rather than the AKT intracellular post-receptor pathways. Studies on in vitro models indicate that short-acting analogs elicit molecular and biological effects that are similar to those of insulin. In contrast, long-acting analogs behave differently. Although not all data are homogeneous, both glargine and detemir have been found to have a decreased binding to IR but an increased binding to IGF-1R, a prevalent activation of the ERK pathway, and an increased mitogenic effect in respect to insulin. Recent retrospective epidemiological clinical studies have suggested that treatment with long-acting analogs (specifically glargine may increase the relative risk for cancer. Results are controversial and methodologically weak. Therefore prospective clinical studies are needed to evaluate the possible tumor growth-promoting effects of these insulin

  9. The Analogical Mind

    OpenAIRE

    Holyoak, Keith J.; Thagard, P.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the use of analogy in human thinking from the perspective of a multiconstraint theory, which postulates three basic types of constraints: similarity, structure and purpose. The operation of these constraints is apparent in both laboratory experiments on analogy and in naturalistic settings, including politics, psychotherapy, and scientific research. We sketch how the multiconstraint theory can be implemented in detailed computational simulations of the analogical human mind.

  10. Analog circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Dobkin, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Analog circuit and system design today is more essential than ever before. With the growth of digital systems, wireless communications, complex industrial and automotive systems, designers are being challenged to develop sophisticated analog solutions. This comprehensive source book of circuit design solutions aids engineers with elegant and practical design techniques that focus on common analog challenges. The book's in-depth application examples provide insight into circuit design and application solutions that you can apply in today's demanding designs. <

  11. Computational approaches to analogical reasoning current trends

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is known as a powerful mode for drawing plausible conclusions and solving problems. It has been the topic of a huge number of works by philosophers, anthropologists, linguists, psychologists, and computer scientists. As such, it has been early studied in artificial intelligence, with a particular renewal of interest in the last decade. The present volume provides a structured view of current research trends on computational approaches to analogical reasoning. It starts with an overview of the field, with an extensive bibliography. The 14 collected contributions cover a large scope of issues. First, the use of analogical proportions and analogies is explained and discussed in various natural language processing problems, as well as in automated deduction. Then, different formal frameworks for handling analogies are presented, dealing with case-based reasoning, heuristic-driven theory projection, commonsense reasoning about incomplete rule bases, logical proportions induced by similarity an...

  12. Analog synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpeshkar, R

    2014-03-28

    We analyse the pros and cons of analog versus digital computation in living cells. Our analysis is based on fundamental laws of noise in gene and protein expression, which set limits on the energy, time, space, molecular count and part-count resources needed to compute at a given level of precision. We conclude that analog computation is significantly more efficient in its use of resources than deterministic digital computation even at relatively high levels of precision in the cell. Based on this analysis, we conclude that synthetic biology must use analog, collective analog, probabilistic and hybrid analog-digital computational approaches; otherwise, even relatively simple synthetic computations in cells such as addition will exceed energy and molecular-count budgets. We present schematics for efficiently representing analog DNA-protein computation in cells. Analog electronic flow in subthreshold transistors and analog molecular flux in chemical reactions obey Boltzmann exponential laws of thermodynamics and are described by astoundingly similar logarithmic electrochemical potentials. Therefore, cytomorphic circuits can help to map circuit designs between electronic and biochemical domains. We review recent work that uses positive-feedback linearization circuits to architect wide-dynamic-range logarithmic analog computation in Escherichia coli using three transcription factors, nearly two orders of magnitude more efficient in parts than prior digital implementations. PMID:24567476

  13. Tissue-specific induction of Hsp90 mRNA and plasma cortisol response in chinook salmon following heat shock, seawater challenge, and handling challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Aldo N.; Winton, J.R.; Dickhoff, Walton W.

    2000-01-01

    In studying the whole-body response of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to various stressors, we found that 5-hour exposure to elevated temperature (mean 21.6??C; + 10.6??C over ambient) induced a marked increase in Hsp90 messenger RNA accumulation in heart, brain, gill, muscle, liver, kidney, and tail fin tissues. The most vital tissues (heart, brain, gill, and muscle) showed the greatest Hsp90-mRNA response, with heart tissue increasing approximately 35-fold, Heat shock induced no increase in plasma cortisol. In contrast, a standard handling challenge induced high plasma cortisol levels, but no elevation in Hsp90 mRNA in any tissue, clearly separating the physiological and cellular stress responses. We saw no increase either in tissue Hsp90 mRNA levels or in plasma cortisol concentrations after exposing the fish to seawater overnight.

  14. Cortisol alters reward processing in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinner, Valerie L; Wolf, Oliver T; Merz, Christian J

    2016-08-01

    Dysfunctional reward processing is known to play a central role for the development of psychiatric disorders. Glucocorticoids that are secreted in response to stress have been shown to attenuate reward sensitivity and thereby might promote the onset of psychopathology. However, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms mediating stress hormone effects on reward processing as well as potential sex differences remain elusive. In this neuroimaging study, we administered 30mg cortisol or a placebo to 30 men and 30 women and subsequently tested them in the Monetary Incentive Delay Task. Cortisol attenuated anticipatory neural responses to a verbal and a monetary reward in the left pallidum and the right anterior parahippocampal gyrus. Furthermore, in men, activation in the amygdala, the precuneus, the anterior cingulate, and in hippocampal regions was reduced under cortisol, whereas in cortisol-treated women a signal increase was observed in these regions. Behavioral performance also indicated that reward learning in men is impaired under high cortisol concentrations, while it is augmented in women. These findings illustrate that the stress hormone cortisol substantially diminishes reward anticipation and provide first evidence that cortisol effects on the neural reward system are sensitive to sex differences, which might translate into different vulnerabilities for psychiatric disorders. PMID:27170428

  15. Cortisol, Cytokines, and Hippocampal Volume in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Daniel Sudheimer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Separate bodies of literature report that elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines and cortisol negatively affect hippocampal structure and cognitive functioning, particularly in older adults. Although interactions between cytokines and cortisol occur through a variety of known mechanisms, few studies consider how their interactions affect brain structure. In this preliminary study, we assess the impact of interactions between circulating levels of IL-1Beta, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-alpha, and waking cortisol on hippocampal volume. Twenty-eight community-dwelling older adults underwent blood draws for quantification of circulating cytokines and saliva collections to quantify the cortisol awakening response. Hippocampal volume measurements were made using structural magnetic resonance imaging. Elevated levels of waking cortisol in conjunction with higher concentrations of IL-6 and TNF-alpha were associated with smaller hippocampal volumes. In addition, independent of cortisol, higher levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha were also associated with smaller hippocampal volumes. These data provide preliminary evidence that higher cortisol, in conjunction with higher IL-6 and TNF-alpha, are associated with smaller hippocampal volume in older adults. We suggest that the dynamic balance between the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis and inflammation processes may explain hippocampal volume reductions in older adults better than either set of measures do in isolation.

  16. A systematic review of the effects of mindfulness interventions on cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Karen; O'Neill, Siobhan; Dockray, Samantha

    2016-09-01

    Cortisol is increasingly included in examinations of mindfulness intervention effects as an indicator of efficacy; however, the association of cortisol and mindfulness has yet to be rigorously evaluated. A systematic review of six studies examining mindfulness intervention effects on cortisol was conducted. Inconsistent results were found for mindfulness effects on cortisol. Significant changes in cortisol levels were observed in within-participants studies but not observed in randomised controlled trial designs. Mindfulness may influence cortisol, but findings are inconclusive. Mindfulness pathways and methodological differences influence variations in mindfulness effects. Robust protocols are needed to adequately examine mindfulness effects on cortisol. PMID:25673371

  17. Deconvolution of serum cortisol levels by using compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghih, Rose T; Dahleh, Munther A; Adler, Gail K; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Brown, Emery N

    2014-01-01

    The pulsatile release of cortisol from the adrenal glands is controlled by a hierarchical system that involves corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) from the hypothalamus, adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) from the pituitary, and cortisol from the adrenal glands. Determining the number, timing, and amplitude of the cortisol secretory events and recovering the infusion and clearance rates from serial measurements of serum cortisol levels is a challenging problem. Despite many years of work on this problem, a complete satisfactory solution has been elusive. We formulate this question as a non-convex optimization problem, and solve it using a coordinate descent algorithm that has a principled combination of (i) compressed sensing for recovering the amplitude and timing of the secretory events, and (ii) generalized cross validation for choosing the regularization parameter. Using only the observed serum cortisol levels, we model cortisol secretion from the adrenal glands using a second-order linear differential equation with pulsatile inputs that represent cortisol pulses released in response to pulses of ACTH. Using our algorithm and the assumption that the number of pulses is between 15 to 22 pulses over 24 hours, we successfully deconvolve both simulated datasets and actual 24-hr serum cortisol datasets sampled every 10 minutes from 10 healthy women. Assuming a one-minute resolution for the secretory events, we obtain physiologically plausible timings and amplitudes of each cortisol secretory event with R (2) above 0.92. Identification of the amplitude and timing of pulsatile hormone release allows (i) quantifying of normal and abnormal secretion patterns towards the goal of understanding pathological neuroendocrine states, and (ii) potentially designing optimal approaches for treating hormonal disorders. PMID:24489656

  18. Hair cortisol and cognitive performance in working age adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Skye N; Ihle, Andreas; Steudte-Schmiedgen, Susann; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Kliegel, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    It has been hypothesized that prolonged exposure to high cortisol levels results in cognitive impairment. However, previous research into the relationship between cortisol and cognition has produced mixed results, most likely due to difficulties achieving valid estimates of long-term cortisol exposure based on salivary or plasma cortisol assessments at a single time point. Furthermore, there has been little research on the cognitive effects of long-term cortisol exposure in working-age adults. In the present study, hair samples were collected from 246 nurses (89.8% female) aged from 21 to 62 (M=42.0, SD=11.2). Hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) in the proximal 3-cm hair segment were analyzed providing an estimate of integrated cortisol secretion over the 3 month-period prior to hair sampling. Cognition was measured using a battery of 15 neuropsychological tests, measuring core dimensions of memory, inductive reasoning, processing speed, crystalized intelligence and major aspects of executive functioning. HCC was not significantly related to any of the cognitive abilities measured, either before or after controlling for potential moderators such as age, sex, education, health, well-being, work ability and burnout. Tests for nonlinear relationships also yielded non-significant results. Thus, despite the study being well powered, long term cortisol exposure did not appear to be related to cognitive performance in this sample of working-age adults, suggesting that long term cortisol exposure may be less relevant to cognition in younger and middle-aged adults than was previously thought. PMID:26881835

  19. Hydraulic Capacitor Analogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baser, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Students have difficulties in physics because of the abstract nature of concepts and principles. One of the effective methods for overcoming students' difficulties is the use of analogies to visualize abstract concepts to promote conceptual understanding. According to Iding, analogies are consistent with the tenets of constructivist learning…

  20. Analog pulse processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Kemper, Dale A.

    2003-06-03

    A very low power analog pulse processing system implemented as an ASIC useful for processing signals from radiation detectors, among other things. The system incorporates the functions of a charge sensitive amplifier, a shaping amplifier, a peak sample and hold circuit, and, optionally, an analog to digital converter and associated drivers.

  1. Baseline cortisol measures and developmental pathways of anxiety in early adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Greaves-Lord, K.; Huizink, A.C.; Oldehinkel, A. J.; Ormel, J.; Verhulst, F.C.; Ferdinand, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated whether baseline cortisol measures predicted future anxiety, and compared cortisol values of groups with different developmental pathways of anxiety. Method: Cortisol levels were assessed in 1768 individuals (10-12 years). Anxiety levels were assessed at the same age and 2 years later. Results: Cortisol measures did not predict future anxiety levels. Individuals with persistent anxiety problems did not show higher morning cortisol levels than those with pers...

  2. Hair Analysis Provides a Historical Record of Cortisol Levels in Cushing’s Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, S; Koren, G; Fraser, L.-A.; Rieder, M; Friedman, T. C.; Van Uum, S. H. M.

    2009-01-01

    The severity of Cushing’s Syndrome (CS) depends on the duration and extent of the exposure to excess glucocorticoids. Current measurements of cortisol in serum, saliva and urine reflect systemic cortisol levels at the time of sample collection, but cannot assess past cortisol levels. Hair cortisol levels may be increased in patients with CS, and, as hair grows about 1 cm/month, measurement of hair cortisol may provide historical information on the development of hypercortisolism. We attempted...

  3. Concerns Regarding Hair Cortisol as a Biomarker of Chronic Stress in Exercise and Sport Science

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H.; Uwe Pühse; Christian Herrmann; Nadeem Kalak; Catherine Elliot; Magnus Lindwall; Serge Brand; Markus Gerber

    2012-01-01

    Hair cortisol has the potential to fill the methodological void of long-term cortisol assessment while becoming a widely accepted measure in biopsychology. This review critically examines the applicability and relevance of hair cortisol measurement specifically within the field of exercise and sport science. Current measures of the HPA axis only cover a brief time period, whereas hair cortisol is a unique, non-invasive means to capture long- term cortisol secretion. Studies have shown that in...

  4. The determination of cortisol in human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a comparative study, seven different methods for the determination of cortisol in human plasma were evaluated, using routine patient samples. Four of these methods used radioactive steroids (125I-or 3H-labelled) and in three no radioactivity was needed. For the statistical evaluation a direct 3H-radioimmunoassay was arbitrarily taken as the independent variable. It was found that all other methods correlated well with this assay. However, the simplest method, the fluorimetric, cannot be recommended mainly because of its non-specific fluorescence and troublesome interference from some widely-used drugs. Of the methods evaluated a radioimmunoassay is recommended. For laboratories having no equipment for measurements of radioactivity, the more elaborate and time-consuming fluorometric method of Clark may represent a good alternative. Two of the radioimmunoassay methods are described in detail. (Auth.)

  5. Effect of α-tocopherol and its sulfur-containing analogs on radiation-induced chemical transformations of hexane and ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of sulfur-containing structural analogs of α-tocopherol was synthesized, and their effect on the formation of molecular products of ethanol and hexane radiolysis under aerated and deaerated conditions was studied. The O-H bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) were calculated for the compounds containing hydroxyl groups. It was found that α-tocopherol and its analogs have the most significant effect on the radiolysis of ethanol and hexane under air-free conditions when the products are formed in the reactions of carbon centered radicals. The probability of the reaction of the test compounds with alkyl radicals increases with a decrease in the BDE for the OH groups present in these compounds. The carbonyl group in compounds makes them efficient oxidants of α-hydroxyalkyl radicals, thus resulting in a change in the product composition for the ethanol radiolysis in the presence of these compounds

  6. Salivary cortisol levels: the importance of clown doctors to reduce stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia G. Saliba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to correlate entertainment of clown-doctors (CD activities on hospitalized children and aphysiological biomarker. For this purpose we collected saliva samples and verified children satisfaction with these activities by using a visual analog scale (VAS. Children from 6 to 7 years-old, with diagnosis of any acute pathology, interned in the Pediatric Ward of the Botucatu Medical School Hospital (São Paulo, Brazil were interviewed. Two groups were taken into consideration: lunchCD and dinnerCD. The following protocol was applied in each group (lunch and dinner: collection of the first saliva sample and presentation of VAS prior to CD activities, followed by collection of a second saliva sample and another VAS assessment after CD activities. The salivary cortisol was reduced in both groups comparing the first saliva sample. The satisfaction of the intervention was evident for lunchCD. The CD intervention is effective in decreasing an important physiological biomarker of stress factor, cortisol, in hospitalized children, been effective for the healing process.

  7. Inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinases increases the sensitivity of A549 lung cancer cells to the cytotoxicity induced by a kava chalcone analog

    OpenAIRE

    Janel K Warmka; Solberg, Eric L.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Charlson, Aaron T.; Xing, Chengguo; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.

    2012-01-01

    We are interested in investigating the biological activity of chalcones, a major class of compounds found in the beverage kava, in order to develop potent and selective chemopreventive candidates. Consumption of kava in the South Pacific Islands is inversely correlated with cancer incidence, even among smokers. Accordingly, chalcones have anti-cancer activities in animal and cell culture models. To investigate signaling pathways that affect chalcone action we studied a potent analog, (E)-3-(3...

  8. Hair as a retrospective calendar of cortisol production-Increased cortisol incorporation into hair in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, Clemens; Tietze, Antje; Skoluda, Nadine; Dettenborn, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Hair has long been used in toxicology, forensic science, doping control and other fields as a biological specimen for the detection of environmental agents, drugs, or toxins. Most recent evidence suggests that also hormones are incorporated and trapped inside the growing hair. This has led to the hypothesis that cortisol measurement of distinct hair segments could provide a retrospective calendar of cortisol production for the individual. In this first proof-of-concept study in humans, we analyzed cortisol in hair donated by mothers with a neonate child (n-Mothers; N=103), mothers with toddlers 3-9 months of age (t-Mothers; N=19), and control women (N=20). We cut hair strands from each women into at least three 3-cm segments, which, based on an average hair growth rate of 1cm per month, would represent hair grown over the past three, six, and nine months, respectively. Since in the third trimester of pregnancy there is a well-documented increased production of cortisol, we expected to see elevated levels of cortisol in the most proximal hair segment of women who had just given birth to a child (n-Mothers) compared with the control women. Likewise, we expected to see elevated levels in the second, third, or fourth segment of mothers of 3-month olds, 6-months olds, and 9-months olds, respectively. These hair segments, cut at 4-12 cm from the scalp, would represent hair grown throughout the third trimester of pregnancy. Results showed that there was a strong monotonic decline in cortisol concentration from the segment closest to the scalp to the most distal hair segment (p0.2). When hair from mothers with 6-9 months old toddlers was analyzed, the hair segment representing the third trimester period contained the same amount of cortisol as the hair grown more recently in mothers with 3-4 months old toddlers only. Age of the women, hair curvature, hair color, and frequency of hair washes per week were unrelated to cortisol levels. We conclude that cortisol measured in

  9. Meat analog: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malav, O P; Talukder, S; Gokulakrishnan, P; Chand, S

    2015-01-01

    The health-conscious consumers are in search of nutritious and convenient food item which can be best suited in their busy life. The vegetarianism is the key for the search of such food which resembles the meat in respect of nutrition and sensory characters, but not of animal origin and contains vegetable or its modified form, this is the point when meat analog evolved out and gets shape. The consumers gets full satisfaction by consumption of meat analog due to its typical meaty texture, appearance and the flavor which are being imparted during the skilled production of meat analog. The supplement of protein in vegetarian diet through meat alike food can be fulfilled by incorporating protein-rich vegetative food grade materials in meat analog and by adopting proper technological process which can promote the proper fabrication of meat analog with acceptable meat like texture, appearance, flavor, etc. The easily available vegetables, cereals, and pulses in India have great advantages and prospects to be used in food products and it can improve the nutritional and functional characters of the food items. The various form and functional characters of food items are available world over and attracts the meat technologists and the food processors to bring some innovativeness in meat analog and its presentation and marketability so that the acceptability of meat analog can be overgrown by the consumers. PMID:24915320

  10. Cortisol Response Following Exposure Treatment for PTSD in Rape Victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardi, Maryrose; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Astin, Millie C; Kelley, Mary

    2010-06-01

    This study examined changes in salivary cortisol levels pre-to-post-treatment in adult female rape victims diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) randomly assigned to be treated with either Prolonged Exposure Therapy or Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. Salivary cortisol was collected at baseline, session 3, and session 9. A significant decrease in salivary cortisol levels was observed in individuals classified as treatment responders in both treatment conditions. Findings suggest that successful exposure-based treatments for PTSD which result in trauma-related and depressive symptom reduction may impact the action of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as measured by changes in level of salivary cortisol from pre-to-post-treatment. PMID:20526437

  11. Salivary cortisol in unaffected twins discordant for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Bennike, Bente; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Andersen, Per Kragh; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2008-01-01

    Dysfunction in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been proposed as a biological endophenotype for affective disorders. In the present study the hypothesis that a high genetic liability to affective disorder is associated with higher cortisol levels was tested in a cross......-sectional high-risk study. Healthy monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins with (High-Risk twins) and without (Low-Risk twins) a co-twin history of affective disorder were identified through nationwide registers. Awakening and evening salivary cortisol levels were compared between the 190 High- and Low......-Risk twins. The 109 High-Risk twins had significantly higher evening cortisol levels than the 81 Low-Risk MZ twins, also after adjustment for age, sex, and the level of subclinical depressive symptoms. No significant difference was found in awakening cortisol levels between High-Risk and Low-Risk twins. In...

  12. [Cortisol and corticosterone plasma levels in different Psittaciformes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochleithner, M; Nowotny, P

    1992-12-01

    Plasma cortisol and corticosterone levels were measured in macaws, African Grey Parrots, Amazon Parrots and budgerigars using a RIA after preliminary cleaning. As in other avian species, the plasma contains predominantly corticosterone. PMID:1481215

  13. Troubleshooting analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pease, Robert A

    1991-01-01

    Troubleshooting Analog Circuits is a guidebook for solving product or process related problems in analog circuits. The book also provides advice in selecting equipment, preventing problems, and general tips. The coverage of the book includes the philosophy of troubleshooting; the modes of failure of various components; and preventive measures. The text also deals with the active components of analog circuits, including diodes and rectifiers, optically coupled devices, solar cells, and batteries. The book will be of great use to both students and practitioners of electronics engineering. Other

  14. Aggression predicts Cortisol Awakening Response in healthy young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Sariñana-González; Ángel Romero-Martínez; Luis Moya-Albiol

    2015-01-01

    It seems that aggressive behavior is negatively related to cortisol (C), but this relationship has been established considering the evening C levels. On the other hand, the relationship with the C awakening response (CAR) and the influence of gender and menstrual cycle phase are not well understood. This study analyzed this relationship in 83 women (38 in the luteal and 45 in the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle) and 20 men. CAR was assessed by measuring salivary free cortisol levels...

  15. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joram eMossink

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-hour ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were associated with two implicit measures. Implicit affect was assessed using the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test, and implicit negative memory bias was assessed with the word fragment completion tasks. In 55 healthy participants, we measured subjective stress levels, worries, implicit and explicit affect each hour during waking hours. Also, saliva samples were collected at three fixed times during the day, as well as upon waking and 30 minutes thereafter (cortisol awakening response. Multilevel analyses of the daytime cortisol levels revealed that the presence of an implicit negative memory bias was associated with increased cortisol levels. Additionally, implicit PA and, unexpectedly, implicit NA were negatively associated with cortisol levels. Finally, participants demonstrating higher levels of implicit sadness during the first measurement day, had a stronger cortisol rise upon awakening at the next day. Contrary to previous research, no associations between explicit affect and cortisol were apparent. The current study was the first to examine the concurrent relation between implicit measures and stress physiology in daily life. The results suggest that the traditional focus on consciously reported feelings and emotions is limited, and that implicit measures can add to our understanding of how stress and emotions contribute to daily physiological activity and, in the long term, health problems.

  16. Cortisol, insulin and leptin during space flight and bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.; Leskiw, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Most ground based models for studying muscle atrophy and bone loss show reasonable fidelity to the space flight situation. However there are some differences. Investigation of the reasons for these differences can provide useful information about humans during space flight and aid in the refinement of ground based models. This report discusses three such differences, the relationships between: (i) cortisol and the protein loss, (ii) cortisol and ACTH and (iii) leptin, insulin and food intake.

  17. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol

    OpenAIRE

    Joram eMossink; Bart eVerkuil; Andreas Michael Burger; Tollenaar, Marieke S.; Brosschot, Jos F.

    2015-01-01

    One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-hour ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were assoc...

  18. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol

    OpenAIRE

    Mossink, Joram C. L.; Verkuil, Bart; Burger, Andreas M.; Tollenaar, Marieke S.; Brosschot, Jos F.

    2015-01-01

    One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-h ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were associat...

  19. Ambulatory assessed implicit affect is associated with salivary cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossink, Joram C L; Verkuil, Bart; Burger, Andreas M; Tollenaar, Marieke S; Brosschot, Jos F

    2015-01-01

    One of the presumed pathways linking negative emotions to adverse somatic health is an overactive HPA-axis, usually indicated by elevated cortisol levels. Traditionally, research has focused on consciously reported negative emotions. Yet, given that the majority of information processing occurs without conscious awareness, stress physiology might also be influenced by affective processes that people are not aware of. In a 24-h ambulatory study we examined whether cortisol levels were associated with two implicit measures. Implicit affect was assessed using the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test, and implicit negative memory bias was assessed with the word fragment completion tasks. In 55 healthy participants, we measured subjective stress levels, worries, implicit, and explicit affect each hour during waking hours. Also, saliva samples were collected at three fixed times during the day, as well as upon waking and 30 min thereafter (cortisol awakening response). Multilevel analyses of the daytime cortisol levels revealed that the presence of an implicit negative memory bias was associated with increased cortisol levels. Additionally, implicit PA and, unexpectedly, implicit NA were negatively associated with cortisol levels. Finally, participants demonstrating higher levels of implicit sadness during the first measurement day, had a stronger cortisol rise upon awakening at the next day. Contrary to previous research, no associations between explicit affect and cortisol were apparent. The current study was the first to examine the concurrent relation between implicit measures and stress physiology in daily life. The results suggest that the traditional focus on consciously reported feelings and emotions is limited, and that implicit measures can add to our understanding of how stress and emotions contribute to daily physiological activity and, in the long term, health problems. PMID:25713550

  20. Catecholamine and cortisol levels in Oxford college rowers.

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, R; Ungpakorn, G; Harrison, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Urinary catecholamines and cortisol levels in two teams of Oxford college eight oarsmen were compared on three different day types: training days, racing days, and non-rowing days. Adrenaline and cortisol were raised on racing and training days compared to non-racing days. Noradrenaline was raised on training days, reflecting longer periods of physical exercise during training. There was evidence of a progressive lowering of adrenaline output over consecutive race days and that the outcome of...

  1. Adolescence, Stress and Cortisol in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Corbett, Blythe A.; Simon, David

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence, the transition between childhood and adulthood, is a period of remarkable physiological, psychological and social change. A variety of physiological changes coincide with the dynamic transition, which is evident in the regulation and responsivity of the Limbic-Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenocortical (LHPA) axis. Specifically, elevations in diurnal basal cortisol levels have been reported, as well as higher cortisol in response to perceived stressors. While this enhanced responsivit...

  2. Childhood trauma and basal cortisol in people with personality disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Flory, Janine D.; Yehuda, Rachel; Grossman, Robert; New, Antonia S.; Mitropoulou, Vivian; Siever, Larry J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the influence of various forms of childhood abuse on basal cortisol levels in a sample of adults with Axis II personality disorders. Participants included 63 adults (n=19 women) who provided basal plasma cortisol samples and completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Linear regression analyses that included all five subscales (i.e., sexual abuse, physical abuse, emotional abuse, physical neglect and emotional neglect) demonstrated that Physical abuse was related to lowe...

  3. Measuring cortisol and DHEA in fingernails: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fay Warnock

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fay Warnock1, Kevin McElwee2, Rubo J Seo3, Sean McIsaac3, Danielle Seim3, Tatiana Ramirez-Aponte3, Karine AN Macritchie3, Allan H Young31Developmental Neuroscience and Child Health, BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 2Department of Dermatology and Skin Science, 3Institute of Mental Health-Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Purpose: Abnormalities in both cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA have been reported in psychiatric disorders. Analysis of saliva, urine and blood cortisol and DHEA levels provides an index of hormone levels over a short time period. Unlike such conventional measures, fingernails incorporate endogenous hormones that passively diffuse to the nail matrix from capillaries during keratinization. This study piloted the measurement of cortisol and DHEA levels in fingernails as a potential measure of their accumulated secretion of steroid hormones over a prolonged time period.Method: Thirty-three university students (18–24 years provided fingernail samples on two occasions over a school semester. The visits were scheduled so nail cortisol and DHEA levels were collected from periods when students might be under different levels of stress.Results: During the putatively stressful period, the nail samples showed a significant increase in the cortisol: DHEA ratio (P = 0.0002 due to a significant decrease in the DHEA levels (P = 0.004 and a numerical but not statistically significant increase in the cortisol levels (P = 0.256.Discussion: This pilot study showed that nails can be used to measure cortisol and DHEA, a measure which may reflect environmental stress. More work is required to further validate this technique which may prove useful in studies of both healthy individuals and patient groups.Keywords: stress, nails, cortisol, DHEA

  4. MDMA, cortisol, and heightened stress in recreational ecstasy users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Andrew C; Montgomery, Cathy; Wetherell, Mark A; Downey, Luke A; Stough, Con; Scholey, Andrew B

    2014-09-01

    Stress develops when an organism requires additional metabolic resources to cope with demanding situations. This review will debate how recreational 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') can increase some aspects of acute and chronic stress in humans. Laboratory studies on the acute effects of MDMA on cortisol release and neurohormone levels in drug-free regular ecstasy/MDMA users have been reviewed, and the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in chronic changes in anxiety, stress, and cognitive coping is debated. In the laboratory, acute ecstasy/MDMA use can increase cortisol levels by 100-200%, whereas ecstasy/MDMA-using dance clubbers experience an 800% increase in cortisol levels, because of the combined effects of the stimulant drug and dancing. Three-month hair samples of abstinent users revealed cortisol levels 400% higher than those in controls. Chronic users show heightened cortisol release in stressful environments and deficits in complex neurocognitive tasks. Event-related evoked response potential studies show altered patterns of brain activation, suggestive of increased mental effort, during basic information processing. Chronic mood deficits include more daily stress and higher depression in susceptible individuals. We conclude that ecstasy/MDMA increases cortisol levels acutely and subchronically and that changes in the HPA axis may explain why recreational ecstasy/MDMA users show various aspects of neuropsychobiological stress. PMID:25014666

  5. Gene expression in Atlantic salmon skin in response to infection with the parasitic copepod Lepeophtheirus salmonis, cortisol implant, and their combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnov Aleksei

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The salmon louse is an ectoparasitic copepod that causes major economic losses in the aquaculture industry of Atlantic salmon. This host displays a high level of susceptibility to lice which can be accounted for by several factors including stress. In addition, the parasite itself acts as a potent stressor of the host, and outcomes of infection can depend on biotic and abiotic factors that stimulate production of cortisol. Consequently, examination of responses to infection with this parasite, in addition to stress hormone regulation in Atlantic salmon, is vital for better understanding of the host pathogen interaction. Results Atlantic salmon post smolts were organised into four experimental groups: lice + cortisol, lice + placebo, no lice + cortisol, no lice + placebo. Infection levels were equal in both treatments upon termination of the experiment. Gene expression changes in skin were assessed with 21 k oligonucleotide microarray and qPCR at the chalimus stage 18 days post infection at 9°C. The transcriptomic effects of hormone treatment were significantly greater than lice-infection induced changes. Cortisol stimulated expression of genes involved in metabolism of steroids and amino acids, chaperones, responses to oxidative stress and eicosanoid metabolism and suppressed genes related to antigen presentation, B and T cells, antiviral and inflammatory responses. Cortisol and lice equally down-regulated a large panel of motor proteins that can be important for wound contraction. Cortisol also suppressed multiple genes involved in wound healing, parts of which were activated by the parasite. Down-regulation of collagens and other structural proteins was in parallel with the induction of proteinases that degrade extracellular matrix (MMP9 and MMP13. Cortisol reduced expression of genes encoding proteins involved in formation of various tissue structures, regulators of cell differentiation and growth factors. Conclusions

  6. Assessing the presence of abnormal regulation of cortisol secretion by membrane hormone receptors: in vivo and in vitro studies in patients with functioning and non-functioning adrenal adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Asta, C; Ballarè, E; Mantovani, G; Ambrosi, B; Spada, A; Barbetta, L; Colombo, P; Travaglini, P; Loli, P; Beck-Peccoz, P

    2004-08-01

    Regulation of cortisol secretion by aberrant hormone receptors may play a role in the pathogenesis of ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome. In this study, the topic was evaluated by combining in vivo and in vitro approaches. Cortisol responses to various stimuli (standard meal, GnRH + TRH, cisapride, vasopressin, glucagon) were assessed in 6 patients with clinical or subclinical adrenal Cushing's syndrome, and non-functioning adrenal adenoma in two cases. Abnormal responses were observed in three patients with Cushing's syndrome; one patient showed a gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP)-dependent cortisol rise after meal, together with responses after GnRH and cisapride; the second patient showed an LH-dependent cortisol response to GnRH, and in the third cortisol rose after cisapride. The pattern of receptor expression performed by RT-PCR showed that while GIP-R was only expressed in tumor from the responsive patient, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 4 receptor and LH-R were also present in normal adrenal tissues and tissues from non-responsive patients. Interestingly, an activating mutation of Gsalpha gene was identified in one of these tumors. Therefore, cortisol responses to agents operating via Gs protein coupled receptors (in one case associated with Gsalpha mutation) were found in Cushing's patients, while these responses were absent in the others. The finding of receptor expression in normal and non-responsive tumors suggests that different mechanisms are probably involved in inducing in vivo cortisol responses. PMID:15326569

  7. Analysis of hair cortisol levels in captive chimpanzees: Effect of various methods on cortisol stability and variability

    OpenAIRE

    Yamanashi, Yumi; Teramoto, Migaku; Morimura, Naruki; Hirata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Juri; Hayashi, Misato; Kinoshita, Kodzue; Murayama, Miho; Idani, Gen’ichi

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract Summary of the experimental process. The items colored blue affected the results of the hair cortisol analysis in the present study. The stippled items were found to affect the results obtained in our previous study [1].

  8. Challenges in Analogical Reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Learning physics requires understanding the applicability of fundamental principles in a variety of contexts that share deep features. One way to help students learn physics is via analogical reasoning. Students can be taught to make an analogy between situations that are more familiar or easier to understand and another situation where the same physics principle is involved but that is more difficult to handle. Here, we examine introductory physics students' ability to use analogies in solving problems involving Newton's second law. Students enrolled in an algebra-based introductory physics course were given a solved problem involving tension in a rope and were then asked to solve another problem for which the physics is very similar but involved a frictional force. They were asked to point out the similarities between the two problems and then use the analogy to solve the friction problem.

  9. TV Analog Station Transmitters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This file is an extract from the Consolidated Database System (CDBS) licensed by the Media Bureau. It consists of Analog Television Stations (see Rule Part47 CFR...

  10. Analog circuits cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Hickman, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Analog Circuits Cookbook presents articles about advanced circuit techniques, components and concepts, useful IC for analog signal processing in the audio range, direct digital synthesis, and ingenious video op-amp. The book also includes articles about amplitude measurements on RF signals, linear optical imager, power supplies and devices, and RF circuits and techniques. Professionals and students of electrical engineering will find the book informative and useful.

  11. Synthesis of Paclitaxel Analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhibing

    2010-01-01

    Paclitaxel is one of the most successful anti-cancer drugs, particularly in the treatment of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. For the investigation of the interaction between paclitaxel and MD-2 protein, and development of new antagonists for lipopolysaccharide, several C10 A-nor-paclitaxel analogs have been synthesized and their biological activities have been evaluated. In order to reduce the myelosuppression effect of the paclitaxel, several C3â ² and C4 paclitaxel analogs have been synth...

  12. Electrical Circuits and Water Analogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frederick A.; Wilson, Jerry D.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly describes water analogies for electrical circuits and presents plans for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate these analogies. Demonstrations include series circuits, parallel circuits, and capacitors. (GS)

  13. Validation of a cortisol enzyme immunoassay and characterization of salivary cortisol circadian rhythm in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Matthew R; Santymire, Rachel M; Parr, Lisa A; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring concentrations of stress hormones is an important tool for behavioral research and conservation for animals both in the wild and captivity. Glucocorticoids can be measured in mammals as an indicator of stress by analyzing blood, feces, urine, hair, feathers, or saliva. The advantages of using saliva for measuring cortisol concentrations are three-fold: it is minimally invasive, multiple samples can be collected from the same individual in a short timeframe, and cortisol has a relatively short response time in saliva as compared with other materials. The purpose of this study was to: (1) conduct an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge as a physiological validation for an enzyme immunoassay to measure salivary cortisol in chimpanzees and (2) characterize the circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol in chimpanzees. We determined that salivary cortisol concentrations peaked 45 min following the ACTH challenge, which is similar to humans. Also, salivary cortisol concentrations peaked early in the morning and decreased throughout the day. We recommend that saliva collection may be the most effective method of measuring stress reactivity and has the potential to complement behavioral, cognitive, physiological, and welfare studies. PMID:21538448

  14. Effects of acute stress on aggression and the cortisol response in the African sharptooth catfish Clarias gariepinus: differences between day and night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, R; Boerrigter, J G J; Cloosterman, M; Gorissen, M; Flik, G; van den Bos, R; van de Vis, H

    2016-06-01

    African sharptooth catfish Clarias gariepinus were housed under continuous dim light (1 lx) or 12L:12D (350-0 lx) cycles. The number of skin lesions, as indicator of aggressive acts, and plasma cortisol levels, as indicator of stress-axis activity, were measured at baseline as well as following a stressor (given in the light or dark phase). Results showed that (1) baseline plasma cortisol levels were not different between photoperiods, (2) the number of baseline skin lesions was highest for C. gariepinus housed under continuous dim light, (3) stressor-induced peak levels of plasma cortisol were highest in the light phase and (4) the number of skin lesions following a stressor was highest in the dark phase. The higher number of stressor-related skin lesions in the dark (active) phase suggests increased stressor-induced aggression while in the active phase. In addition, the data suggest that housing under continuous dim light does not result in higher stress-axis activity, as measured by baseline levels of cortisol, but does result in more stressor-induced aggression, as measured by the higher number of skin lesions. The latter may be related to the fact that the continuous dim light photoperiod has twice the number of dark-phase (active) hours in which stressor-induced aggression is stronger compared to the 12L:12D photoperiod, which has a light phase in which stressor-induced aggression is lower. PMID:27125325

  15. Elevated cortisol during play is associated with age and social engagement in children with autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbett Blythe A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hallmark characteristic of autism is impaired reciprocal social interaction. While children find social interaction stress-reducing, many children with autism may find social interaction stress-inducing. The current study was designed to examine stress responsivity as measured by cortisol by comparing children with autism to neurotypical peers during an ecologically valid 20-minute playground paradigm. Methods The experiment involved sets of three children: a child with autism, a neurotypical child, and a confederate. Participants included 45 prepubescent males between 8 and 12 years of age (21 with autism and 24 neurotypical children. Results Children with autism showed fewer initiations (χ²(1 = 4.03, P = 0.044, rejected initiations from others more (χ²(1 = 7.10, P = 0.008 and spent less time interacting during motor (F(1,43 = 16.7, P = 0.0002 and cooperative (F(1,43 = 14.78, P = 0.0004 play. Repeated measures analysis of the cortisol values revealed a significant model (χ²(4 = 22.76, P P = 0.006 and cooperative (χ²(3 = 8.24, P = 0.04 play as well as reduced nonverbal social skills during motor (χ²(1 = 5.52, P = 0.018 and cooperative play (χ²(1 = 4.53, P = 0.033. Conclusions Overall, children with autism engaged in fewer social overtures and spent less time interacting than typically developing peers during play. The peer interaction paradigm resulted in significantly higher levels of cortisol in many children with autism. Distinct patterns emerged within the autism group based on developmental (older, biological (cortisol responder and behavioral patterns (peripheral group interaction. The enhanced cortisol response was observed in children who voluntarily engaged in interaction; thus, it does not support the notion of a response to social threat. Rather, it appears to reflect attendant metabolic preparedness and enhanced arousal from engaging socially. The data suggest that many children with autism

  16. Effects of electroejaculation and ketamine-HCI on serum cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone in the male cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, K K; Chakraborty, P K; Bush, M; Wildt, D E

    1984-01-01

    The influence of manual restraint, ketamine-hydrochloride anesthesia and electroejaculation under anesthesia on circulating levels of cortisol, progesterone and testosterone was examined in male domestic cats. In the first experiment, cats were anesthetized with ketamine-HCI (17.5 mg/kg of body weight) and serially bled (controls) or serially bled and electroejaculated. These animals showed signs of recovering from anesthesia within 45 to 60 minutes of ketamine-HCI injection. Average serum cortisol concentrations increased (P less than 0.01) over the 84-minute sampling interval in both the electroejaculated and control groups. Cortisol levels reached their maximum concentration in the electrically stimulated males immediately postelectroejaculation (95.1 ng/ml) and were significantly greater (P less than 0.01) than in the controls (36.1 ng/ml) at a comparable time. Maximal mean cortisol concentrations in the control group (62.8 ng/ml) occurred 54 minutes after the first blood sample and occurred together with the onset of anesthesia recovery. Mean testosterone levels did not differ between electroejaculated and control cats, but did decrease (P less than 0.05) between the first and last blood sampling in both groups. In the second experiment, cats were bled on the same time schedule as in Experiment 1, but were bled while awake and manually restrained, or else during a deeper plane of anesthesia induced and maintained with higher doses of ketamine-HCI (initial dose, 23 mg/kg). Mean serum cortisol levels were greater (P less than 0.05) during manual restraint (range, 36.3-41.1 ng/ml) compared to deep anesthesia (range, 16.7-25.8 ng/ml), but did not change over the 84 minute sampling interval in either group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6511657

  17. Effect of Suckling Systems on Serum Oxytocin and Cortisol Concentrations and Behavior to a Novel Object in Beef Calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siyu; Tanaka, Shigefumi; Ogura, Shin-Ichiro; Roh, Sanggun; Sato, Shusuke

    2015-11-01

    We investigated differences between effects of natural- and bucket-suckling methods on basal serum oxytocin (OT) and cortisol concentrations, and the effect of OT concentration on affiliative and investigative behavior of calves to a novel object. Ten Japanese Black calves, balanced with birth order, were allocated evenly to natural-suckling (NS) and bucket suckling (BS) groups. Blood samples were collected at the ages of 1 and 2 months (1 week after weaning) calves, and serum OT and cortisol concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzymeimmunoassay tests, respectively. Each calf at the age of 2 months (2 weeks after weaning) was released into an open-field with a calf decoy, and its investigative and affiliative behaviors were recorded for 20 minutes. In 1-month-old calves, the basal serum OT concentration (25.5±4.9 [mean±standard deviation, pg/mL]) of NS was significantly higher than that of BS (16.9±6.7) (p<0.05), whereas the basal cortisol concentration (5.8±2.5 [mean±standard deviation, ng/mL]) of NS was significantly lower than that in BS (10.0±2.8) (p<0.05). Additionally, a negative correlation was noted between serum OT and cortisol concentrations in 1-month-old calves (p = 0.06). Further, the higher serum OT concentration the calves had at 1 month old, the more investigative the calves were at 2 months old but not affiliative in the open-field with a calf decoy. Thus, we concluded that the natural suckling method from a dam elevates the basal serum OT concentration in calves, and high serum OT concentrations induce investigative behavior and attenuate cortisol concentrations. PMID:26580289

  18. Environmental Context Differentially Affects Behavioral, Leukocyte, Cortisol and Interleukin-6 Responses to Low Doses of Endotoxin in the Rhesus Monkey

    OpenAIRE

    Willette, Auriel A.; Lubach, Gabriele R.; Coe, Christopher L.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial infections and proinflammatory cytokines induce behavioral and physiological responses associated with withdrawal and sickness behavior. These effects in rodents are often exacerbated by stressful environmental contexts. To model this synergistic effect of arousal and stress, low doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 4 or 40 ng/kg, were administered to rhesus monkeys in different environmental contexts. Activity, emotional and social behaviors, cortisol, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and perip...

  19. Effect of Magnolia officinalis and Phellodendron amurense (Relora®) on cortisol and psychological mood state in moderately stressed subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Talbott, Shawn M; Talbott, Julie A; Pugh, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnolia (Magnolia officinalis) and Phellodendron (Phellodendron amurense) barks are medicinal plants commonly used as traditional remedies for reducing stress and anxiety. Modern dietary supplements are intended to induce relaxation and reduce stress as well as stress-related eating. Previous studies have shown the combination of Magnolia/Phellodendron (MP) to reduce both cortisol exposure and the perception of stress/anxiety, while improving weight loss in subjects with stress-re...

  20. Reduced Cingulate Gyrus Volume Associated with Enhanced Cortisol Awakening Response in Young Healthy Adults Reporting Childhood Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Shaojia Lu; Weijia Gao; Zhaoguo Wei; Weiwei Wu; Mei Liao; Yuqiang Ding; Zhijun Zhang; Lingjiang Li

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical studies have demonstrated the relationship between stress-induced increased cortisol levels and atrophy of specific brain regions, however, this association has been less revealed in clinical samples. The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes and associations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and gray matter volumes in young healthy adults with self-reported childhood trauma exposures. METHODS: Twenty four healthy adults with c...

  1. Optimizing the radioimmunologic determination methods for cortisol and calcitonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to build up a specific 125-iodine cortisol radioimmunoassay (RIA) pure cortisol-3(0-carbodxymethyl) oxim was synthesized for teh production of antigens and tracers. The cortisol was coupled with tyrosin methylester and then labelled with 125-iodine. For the antigen production the cortisol derivate was coupled with the same method to thyreoglobulin. The major part of the antisera, which were obtained like this, presented high titres. Apart from a high specificity for cortisol a high affinity was found in the acid pH-area and quantified with a particularly developed computer program. An extractive step in the cortisol RIA could be prevented by efforts. The assay was carried out with an optimized double antibody principle: The reaction time between the first and the second antiserum was considerably accelerated by the administration of polyaethylenglycol. The assay can be carried out automatically by applying a modular analysis system, which operates fast and provides a large capacity. The required quality and accuracy controls were done. The comparison of this assay with other cortisol-RIA showed good correlation. The RIA for human clacitonin was improved. For separating bound and freely mobile hormones the optimized double-antibody technique was applied. The antiserum was examined with respect to its affinity to calcitonin. For the 'zero serum' production the Florisil extraction method was used. The criteria of the quality and accuracy controls were complied. Significantly increased calcitonin concentrations were found in a patient group with medullar thyroid carcinoma and in two patients with an additional phaechromocytoma. (orig./MG)

  2. Role of shame and body esteem in cortisol stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupis, Sarah B; Sabik, Natalie J; Wolf, Jutta M

    2016-04-01

    Studies assessing the role of shame in HPA axis reactivity report mixed findings. Discrepancies may be due to methodological difficulties and inter-individual differences in the propensity to experience shame in a stressful situation. Hence, the current study combined self-report of shame and facial coding of shame expressions and assessed the role of body esteem as a moderator of the shame-stress link. For this, 44 healthy students (24F, age 20.5 ± 2.1 years) were exposed to an acute psychosocial stress paradigm (Trier Social Stress Test: TSST). Salivary cortisol levels were measured throughout the protocol. Trait shame was measured before the stress test, and state shame immediately afterwards. Video recordings of the TSST were coded to determine emotion expressions. State shame was neither associated with cortisol stress responses nor with body esteem (self-report: all ps ≥ .24; expression: all ps ≥ .31). In contrast, higher trait shame was associated with both negative body esteem (p = .049) and stronger cortisol stress responses (p = .013). Lastly, having lower body esteem predicted stronger cortisol stress responses (p = .022); however, it did not significantly moderate the association between shame indices and cortisol stress responses (all ps ≥ .94). These findings suggest that body esteem and trait shame independently contribute to strength of cortisol stress responses. Thus, in addition to trait shame, body esteem emerged as an important predictor of cortisol stress responses and as such, a potential contributor to stress-related negative health outcomes. PMID:26577952

  3. The effects of social stress and cortisol responses on the preconscious selective attention to social threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Karin; Bakvis, Patricia; Hermans, Erno J; van Pelt, Johannes; van Honk, Jack

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of social stress and stress-induced cortisol on the preconscious selective attention to social threat. Twenty healthy participants were administered a masked emotional Stroop task (comparing color-naming latencies for angry, neutral and happy faces) in conditions of rest and social stress. Stress was induced by means of the Trier social stress test. Based on the stress-induced increase in cortisol levels, participants were allocated post hoc (median-split) to a high and low responders group. In contrast to low responders, high responders showed a negative or avoidant attentional bias to threat (i.e. shorter latencies for angry than neutral faces) in the rest condition. Most importantly, although low responders became avoidant, the high responders became vigilant to the angry faces after stress induction. There were no such effects for happy faces. Our findings are in line with previous studies in both animals and humans, that associate high glucocorticoid stress-responsiveness with diminished avoidance and prolonged freezing reactions during stress. PMID:17030399

  4. Estabilidad emocional y cortisol como factores diferenciadores de la fibromialgia Emotional stability and cortisol as differentiating factors for fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Díaz Robredo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio busca un acercamiento al diagnóstico de la fibromialgia desde un modelo psicofisiológico del estrés. En la Introducción justificaremos los principios teóricos en que se basa este trabajo. Las hipótesis planteadas intentarán buscar la diferencia de factores psicológicos y de cortisol entre los grupos control y experimental, así como la correlación entre dichos factores. En el apartado Materiales y métodos nos centramos en los registros de cortisol y de variables de personalidad que realizamos en un grupo de 35 mujeres, 18 con fibromialgia y otras 17 libres de la enfermedad. Los aspectos psicológicos serán recogidos por el test de Personalidad CEP de Pinillos, mientras que el cortisol será medido mediante recolección de saliva. Los resultados, muestran diferencias significativas en los factores psicológicos y fisiológicos de los grupos. En las conclusiones afirmamos que el control emocional y los niveles de cortisol son factores distintivos de esta enfermedad con respecto a un grupo control. Sin embargo, no encontramos una correlación significativa entre control emocional y cortisol pudiendo ser debida a variables extrañas o al escaso número de sujetos de la muestra. Además, los resultados de cortisol suponen una contradicción a estudios previos en los que se observa una reducción de esta hormona en pacientes con fibromialgia, por lo que se recomienda una recogida de cortisol del ciclo diurno para complementar el estudio y solucionar estas disensiones.This study looks for an approach to the diagnosis of fibromyalgia from a psychophysiological model of stress. In the Introduction chapter, we will justify the theoretical principles in which this work is based on. The hypothesis that we suggest will try to find the difference in psychological factors and cortisol between control and experimental group, as well as the correlation of these two factors. In the instrument and method chapter, we will focus on the

  5. Digital and analog communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    The book presents an introductory treatment of digital and analog communication systems with emphasis on digital systems. Attention is given to the following topics: systems and signal analysis, random signal theory, information and channel capacity, baseband data transmission, analog signal transmission, noise in analog communication systems, digital carrier modulation schemes, error control coding, and the digital transmission of analog signals.

  6. Analogical Reasoning in Geometry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdas, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The analogical reasoning isn't used only in mathematics but also in everyday life. In this article we approach the analogical reasoning in Geometry Education. The novelty of this article is a classification of geometrical analogies by reasoning type and their exemplification. Our classification includes: analogies for understanding and setting a…

  7. The vitamin D analog, TX527, promotes a human CD4+CD25highCD127low regulatory T cell profile and induces a migratory signature specific for homing to sites of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeke, Femke; Korf, Hannelie; Overbergh, Lut; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Thorrez, Lieven; Van Lommel, Leentje; Waer, Mark; Schuit, Frans; Gysemans, Conny; Mathieu, Chantal

    2011-01-01

    The use of hypocalcemic vitamin D analogs is an appealing strategy to exploit the immunomodulatory actions of active vitamin D in vivo while circumventing its calcemic side effects. The functional modulation of dendritic cells by these molecules is regarded as the key mechanism underlying their ability to regulate T cell reactivity. In this article, we demonstrate the capacity of the vitamin D analog, TX527, to target T cells directly. Microarray analysis of purified human CD3(+) T cells, cultured in the presence of TX527, revealed differential expression of genes involved in T cell activation, proliferation, differentiation, and migratory capacity. Accordingly, functional analysis showed a TX527-mediated suppression of the T cell proliferative capacity and activation status, accompanied by decreased expression of effector cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17). Furthermore, TX527 triggered the emergence of CD4(+)CD25(high)CD127(low) regulatory T cells featuring elevated levels of IL-10, CTLA-4, and OX40 and the functional capacity to suppress activation and proliferation of effector T cells. Moreover, the vitamin D analog profoundly altered the homing receptor profile of T cells and their migration toward chemokine ligands. Remarkably, TX527 not only modulated skin-homing receptors as illustrated for the parent compound, but also reduced the expression of lymphoid organ-homing receptors (CD62L, CCR7, and CXCR4) and uniquely promoted surface expression of inflammatory homing receptors (CCR5, CXCR3, and CXCR6) on T cells. We conclude that TX527 directly affects human T cell function, thereby inhibiting effector T cell reactivity while inducing regulatory T cell characteristics, and imprints them with a specific homing signature favoring migration to sites of inflammation. PMID:21131424

  8. Electrical analogous in viscoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ala, Guido; Di Paola, Mario; Francomano, Elisa; Li, Yan; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, electrical analogous models of fractional hereditary materials are introduced. Based on recent works by the authors, mechanical models of materials viscoelasticity behavior are firstly approached by using fractional mathematical operators. Viscoelastic models have elastic and viscous components which are obtained by combining springs and dashpots. Various arrangements of these elements can be used, and all of these viscoelastic models can be equivalently modeled as electrical circuits, where the spring and dashpot are analogous to the capacitance and resistance, respectively. The proposed models are validated by using modal analysis. Moreover, a comparison with numerical experiments based on finite difference time domain method shows that, for long time simulations, the correct time behavior can be obtained only with modal analysis. The use of electrical analogous in viscoelasticity can better reveal the real behavior of fractional hereditary materials.

  9. Cortisol disrupts the neural correlates of extinction recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinner, Valerie L; Merz, Christian J; Lissek, Silke; Wolf, Oliver T

    2016-06-01

    The renewal effect describes the recovery of extinguished responses that may occur after a change in context and indicates that extinction memory retrieval is sometimes prone to failure. Stress hormones have been implicated to modulate extinction processes, with mostly impairing effects on extinction retrieval. However, the neurobiological mechanisms mediating stress effects on extinction memory remain elusive. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated the effects of cortisol administration on the neural correlates of extinction memory retrieval in a predictive learning task. In this task, participants were required to predict whether certain food stimuli were associated with stomach trouble when presented in two different contexts. A two-day renewal paradigm was applied in which an association was acquired in context A and subsequently extinguished in context B. On the following day, participants received either cortisol or placebo 40min before extinction memory retrieval was tested in both contexts. Behaviorally, cortisol impaired the retrieval of extinguished associations when presented in the extinction context. On the neural level, this effect was characterized by a reduced context differentiation for the extinguished stimulus in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, but only in men. In the placebo group, ventromedial prefrontal cortex was functionally connected to the left cerebellum, the anterior cingulate and the right anterior parahippocampal gyrus to express extinction memory. This functional crosstalk was reduced under cortisol. These findings illustrate that the stress hormone cortisol disrupts ventromedial prefrontal cortex functioning and its communication with other brain regions implicated in extinction memory. PMID:26973167

  10. Bilateral Adrenocortical Masses Producing Aldosterone and Cortisol Independently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Lee, You Bin; Seok, Hyeri; Shin, In Seub; Eun, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jung Han; Oh, Young Lyun

    2015-12-01

    A 31-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with symptoms of hypertension and bilateral adrenocortical masses with no feature of Cushing syndrome. The serum aldosterone/renin ratio was elevated and the saline loading test showed no suppression of the plasma aldosterone level, consistent with a diagnosis of primary hyperaldosteronism. Overnight and low-dose dexamethasone suppression tests showed no suppression of serum cortisol, indicating a secondary diagnosis of subclinical Cushing syndrome. Adrenal vein sampling during the low-dose dexamethasone suppression test demonstrated excess secretion of cortisol from the left adrenal mass. A partial right adrenalectomy was performed, resulting in normalization of blood pressure, hypokalemia, and high aldosterone level, implying that the right adrenal mass was the main cause of the hyperaldosteronism. A total adrenalectomy for the left adrenal mass was later performed, resulting in a normalization of cortisol level. The final diagnosis was bilateral adrenocortical adenomas, which were secreting aldosterone and cortisol independently. This case is the first report of a concurrent cortisol-producing left adrenal adenoma and an aldosterone-producing right adrenal adenoma in Korea, as demonstrated by adrenal vein sampling and sequential removal of adrenal masses. PMID:26248855

  11. Cortisol levels and suicidal behavior: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Daryl B; Ferguson, Eamonn; Green, Jessica A; O'Carroll, Ronan E; O'Connor, Rory C

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a major cause of death worldwide, responsible for 1.5% of all mortality. The causes of suicidal behavior are not fully understood. Dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, as measured by cortisol levels, is one potential risk factor. This meta-analytic review aimed (i) to estimate the strength and variability of the association between naturally fluctuating cortisol levels and suicidal behavior and (ii) to identify moderators of this relationship. A systematic literature search identified 27 studies (N=2226; 779 suicide attempters and 1447 non-attempters) that met the study eligibility criteria from a total of 417 unique records initially examined. Estimates of effect sizes (r) obtained from these studies were analysed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis. In these analyses, we compared participants identified as having a past history of suicide attempt(s) to those with no such history. Study quality, mean age of sample and percentage of male participants were examined as potential moderators. Overall, there was no significant effect of suicide group on cortisol. However, significant associations between cortisol and suicide attempts were observed as a function of age. In studies where the mean age of the sample was below 40 years the association was positive (i.e., higher cortisol was associated with suicide attempts; r=.234, psuicide attempts; r=-.129, psuicidal behavior. The challenge for theory and clinical practice is to explain the complete reversal of the association with age and to identify its clinical implications. PMID:26555430

  12. A quantitative approach to analysing cortisol response in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, C; Ingvast-Larsson, C; Olsén, L; Hedeland, M; Bondesson, U; Gabrielsson, J

    2016-06-01

    The cortisol response to glucocorticoid intervention has, in spite of several studies in horses, not been fully characterized with regard to the determinants of onset, intensity and duration of response. Therefore, dexamethasone and cortisol response data were collected in a study applying a constant rate infusion regimen of dexamethasone (0.17, 1.7 and 17 μg/kg) to six Standardbreds. Plasma was analysed for dexamethasone and cortisol concentrations using UHPLC-MS/MS. Dexamethasone displayed linear kinetics within the concentration range studied. A turnover model of oscillatory behaviour accurately mimicked cortisol data. The mean baseline concentration range was 34-57 μg/L, the fractional turnover rate 0.47-1.5 1/h, the amplitude parameter 6.8-24 μg/L, the maximum inhibitory capacity 0.77-0.97, the drug potency 6-65 ng/L and the sigmoidicity factor 0.7-30. This analysis provided a better understanding of the time course of the cortisol response in horses. This includes baseline variability within and between horses and determinants of the equilibrium concentration-response relationship. The analysis also challenged a protocol for a dexamethasone suppression test design and indicated future improvement to increase the predictability of the test. PMID:26542753

  13. Activation of nuclear TR3 (NR4A1) by a diindolylmethane analog induces apoptosis and proapoptotic genes in pancreatic cancer cells and tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Kyungsil; Lee, Syng-Ook; Cho, Sung-Dae; Kim, Kyounghyun; Khan, Shaheen; Safe, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    NR4A1 (Nur77, TR3) is overexpressed in pancreatic tumors and activation of TR3 by 1,1-bis(3′-indolyl)-1-(p-methoxyphenyl)methane (DIM-C-pPhOCH3) inhibits cell and tumor growth and induces apoptosis. Microarray analysis demonstrates that in L3.6pL pancreatic cancer cells DIM-C-pPhOCH3 induces genes associated with metabolism, homeostasis, signal transduction, transcription, stress, transport, immune responses, growth inhibition and apoptosis. Among the most highly induced growth inhibitory and...

  14. Curcumin analog 1, 5-bis (2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-1, 4-pentadien-3-one exhibits enhanced ability on Nrf2 activation and protection against acrolein-induced ARPE-19 cell toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuan [Center for Mitochondrial Biology and Medicine, The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology and Frontier Institute of Life Science, FIST, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Zou, Xuan [Center for Translational Medicine, FIST, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Cao, Ke; Xu, Jie; Yue, Tingting [Center for Mitochondrial Biology and Medicine, The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology and Frontier Institute of Life Science, FIST, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Dai, Fang; Zhou, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Applied Organic Chemistry, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China); Lu, Wuyuan [Center for Translational Medicine, FIST, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Feng, Zhihui, E-mail: zhfeng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Center for Mitochondrial Biology and Medicine, The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology and Frontier Institute of Life Science, FIST, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Liu, Jiankang, E-mail: j.liu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Center for Mitochondrial Biology and Medicine, The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology and Frontier Institute of Life Science, FIST, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2013-11-01

    Curcumin, a phytochemical agent in the spice turmeric, has received increasing attention for its anticancer, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. However, application of curcumin has been limited due to its insolubility in water and poor bioavailability both clinically and experimentally. In addition, the protective effects and mechanisms of curcumin in eye diseases have been poorly studied. In the present study, we synthesized a curcumin analog, 1, 5-bis (2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-1, 4-pentadien-3-one (C3), which displayed improved protective effect against acrolein-induced toxicity in a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19). At 5 μM, curcumin completely protected against acrolein-induced cell oxidative damage and preserved GSH levels and mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, C3 displayed a complete protective effect at 0.5 μM, which was much more efficient than curcumin. Both 0.5 μM C3 and 5 μM curcumin induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation and Nrf2 target genes transcription similarly. Experiments using Nrf2 siRNA showed that the protective effects of curcumin and C3 were eliminated by Nrf2 knockdown. Additionally, both curcumin and C3 activated the PI3/Akt pathway, however, Nrf2 activation was independent of this pathway, and therefore, we hypothesized that both curcumin and C3 activated phase II enzymes via directly disrupting the Nrf2/Keap1 complex and promoting Nrf2's nuclear translocation. Since acrolein challenge of ARPE-19 cells has been used as a model of smoking and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we concluded that the curcumin analog, C3, may be a more promising drug candidate for its potential application for the prevention and treatment of eye diseases, such as AMD. - Highlights: • We examine toxicity effects of cigarette smoking component acrolein in retina cells. • We report a more efficient curcumin analog (C3) protecting cellular function. • Mitochondrial function and phase II enzyme activation are the

  15. Curcumin analog 1, 5-bis (2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-1, 4-pentadien-3-one exhibits enhanced ability on Nrf2 activation and protection against acrolein-induced ARPE-19 cell toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curcumin, a phytochemical agent in the spice turmeric, has received increasing attention for its anticancer, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. However, application of curcumin has been limited due to its insolubility in water and poor bioavailability both clinically and experimentally. In addition, the protective effects and mechanisms of curcumin in eye diseases have been poorly studied. In the present study, we synthesized a curcumin analog, 1, 5-bis (2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-1, 4-pentadien-3-one (C3), which displayed improved protective effect against acrolein-induced toxicity in a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19). At 5 μM, curcumin completely protected against acrolein-induced cell oxidative damage and preserved GSH levels and mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, C3 displayed a complete protective effect at 0.5 μM, which was much more efficient than curcumin. Both 0.5 μM C3 and 5 μM curcumin induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation and Nrf2 target genes transcription similarly. Experiments using Nrf2 siRNA showed that the protective effects of curcumin and C3 were eliminated by Nrf2 knockdown. Additionally, both curcumin and C3 activated the PI3/Akt pathway, however, Nrf2 activation was independent of this pathway, and therefore, we hypothesized that both curcumin and C3 activated phase II enzymes via directly disrupting the Nrf2/Keap1 complex and promoting Nrf2's nuclear translocation. Since acrolein challenge of ARPE-19 cells has been used as a model of smoking and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), we concluded that the curcumin analog, C3, may be a more promising drug candidate for its potential application for the prevention and treatment of eye diseases, such as AMD. - Highlights: • We examine toxicity effects of cigarette smoking component acrolein in retina cells. • We report a more efficient curcumin analog (C3) protecting cellular function. • Mitochondrial function and phase II enzyme activation are the major

  16. Psychosocial factors at home and at work and levels of salivary cortisol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eller, Nanna Hurwitz; Netterstrøm, Bo; Hansen, Ase Marie;

    2006-01-01

    Salivary cortisol as a physiological measure of stress has attracted great interest in recent years.......Salivary cortisol as a physiological measure of stress has attracted great interest in recent years....

  17. The pro-social neurohormone oxytocin reverses the actions of the stress hormone cortisol in human ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankarious, Amanda; Dave, Foram; Pados, George; Tsolakidis, Dimitris; Gidron, Yori; Pang, Yefei; Thomas, Peter; Hall, Marcia; Karteris, Emmanouil

    2016-05-01

    The journey patients with ovarian cancer travel from non-specific symptoms causing delayed diagnosis through surgery and chemotherapy, culminating in a 5-year survival rate of 43%, must have a profound and detrimental psychological impact on patients. Emerging studies link higher levels of oxytocin (OT) and increased social support, an independent prognostic factor in cancer, with a moderating effect on stress. In contrast, there is a known association of tumour cell proliferation with elevated cortisol (stress hormone) levels. We hypothesise therefore that there is cross-talk between cortisol and oxytocin at a molecular level. Three ovarian cancer cell lines, used as in vitro models, were treated with cortisol at concentrations mimicking physiological stress in vivo in the presence or absence of OT. OT reduced cell proliferation and migration, induced apoptosis and autophagy for all three cell lines, partially reversing the effects of cortisol. Quantitative RT-PCR of tissue taken from ovarian cancer patients revealed that the glucocorticoid receptor (splice variant GR-P) and OT receptor (OTR) were significantly upregulated compared to controls. Tissue microarray revealed that the expression of GRα was lower in the ovarian cancer samples compared to normal tissue. OT is also shown to drive alternative splicing of the GR gene and cortisol-induced OTR expression. OT was able to transactivate GR in the presence of cortisol, thus providing further evidence of cross-talk in vitro. These data provide explanations for why social support might help distressed ovarian cancer patients and help define novel hypotheses regarding potential therapeutic interventions in socially isolated patients. PMID:26935408

  18. Postoperative plasma cortisol levels predict long-term outcome in patients with Cushing's disease and determine which patients should be treated with pituitary irradiation after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    very rare and radiotherapy will frequently induce hypopituitarism, patients with a subnormal cortisol level following surgery should be treated with pituitary irradiation, because the relapse rate is reportedly high and radiotherapy is effective in preventing relapse, radiotherapy in patients with persistent disease after surgery is effective only in 50% (5/10) of the patients. (author)

  19. A review of cortisol production and child care attendace: The promotion of positive child development

    OpenAIRE

    Mikkelborg, Susann

    2009-01-01

    Extensive evidence exist, demonstrating an association between cortisol and child care attendance. Cortisol is regarded as a valid and reliable measure of stress. This review aim to summarize findings regarding child care and cortisol. The results reveal a trend of atypical levels of cortisol seen in children attending non-parental group-based child care, in particular encompassing children below age three. Long-term effects are evident in some children, resulting in a down regulation of the ...

  20. Pregnant women’s cortisol is elevated with anxiety and depression — but only when comorbid

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Lynn M.; Myers, Michael M.; Monk, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Elevated cortisol during pregnancy is associated with adverse birth outcomes and may alter fetal development and subsequent adult health. Numerous studies link elevated cortisol to depression and anxiety, but only a few have examined these relationships during pregnancy and in response to laboratory stressors. No studies have investigated the impact of comorbid anxiety and depression on cortisol during pregnancy. Salivary cortisol samples were collected twice before and once after a set of co...

  1. Urinary cortisol and depression in early pregnancy: role of adiposity and race

    OpenAIRE

    Luiza, John W.; Gallaher, Marcia J.; Powers, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression before and during pregnancy is associated with adverse birth outcomes including low birth weight and preterm birth. Abnormal maternal cortisol has been hypothesized as one mediator between depression and adverse birth outcomes. The relationship between cortisol and depression in pregnancy is exhibited most strongly in the African American population, and most studies have focused either on circulating or placental levels of cortisol. The utility of urinary cortisol in ea...

  2. Memory performance is related to the cortisol awakening response in older people, but not to the diurnal cortisol slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Vanesa; Almela, Mercedes; Pulopulos, Matias M; Salvador, Alicia

    2016-09-01

    There are large individual differences in age-related cognitive decline. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) functioning has been suggested as one of the mechanisms underlying these differences. This study aimed to investigate the relationships between the diurnal cortisol cycle, measured as the cortisol awakening response (CAR), and the diurnal cortisol slope (DCS) and the memory performance of healthy older people. To do so, we assessed the verbal, visual, and working memory performance of 64 participants (32 men) from 57 to 76 years old who also provided 14 saliva samples on two consecutive weekdays to determine their diurnal cortisol cycle. The CAR was linearly and negatively associated with verbal (significantly) and visual (marginally) memory domains, but not with working memory. Sex did not moderate these relationships. Furthermore, no associations were found between the DCS and any of the three memory domains assessed. Our results indicate that the two components of the diurnal cortisol cycle have different relationships with memory performance, with the CAR being more relevant than DCS in understanding the link from HPA-axis activity and regulation to different types of memory. These results suggest that the CAR is related to memory domains dependent on hippocampal functioning (i.e., declarative memory), but not to those that are more dependent on prefrontal cortex functioning (i.e., working memory). PMID:27266967

  3. Circulating angiogenic cell function is inhibited by cortisol in vitro and associated with psychological stress and cortisol in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; Derakhshandeh, Ronak; Flores, Abdiel J; Narayan, Shilpa; Mendes, Wendy Berry; Springer, Matthew L

    2016-05-01

    Psychological stress and glucocorticoids are associated with heightened cardiovascular disease risk. We investigated whether stress or cortisol would be associated with reduced circulating angiogenic cell (CAC) function, an index of impaired vascular repair. We hypothesized that minority-race individuals who experience threat in interracial interactions would exhibit reduced CAC function, and that this link might be explained by cortisol. To test this experimentally, we recruited 106 African American participants for a laboratory interracial interaction task, in which they received socially evaluative feedback from Caucasian confederates. On a separate day, a subset of 32 participants (mean age=26years, 47% female) enrolled in a separate biological substudy and provided blood samples for CAC isolation and salivary samples to quantify the morning peak in cortisol (the cortisol awakening response, CAR). CAC function was quantified using cell culture assays of migration to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and secretion of VEGF into the culture medium. Heightened threat in response to an interracial interaction and trait anxiety in vivo were both associated with poorer CAC migratory function in vitro. Further, threat and poorer sustained attention during the interracial interaction were associated with a higher CAR, which in turn, was related to lower CAC sensitivity to glucocorticoids. In vitro, higher doses of cortisol impaired CAC migratory function and VEGF protein secretion. The glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU486 reversed this functional impairment. These data identify a novel, neuroendocrine pathway by which psychological stress may reduce CAC function, with potential implications for cardiovascular health. PMID:26925833

  4. Quantum Analog Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  5. Towards analogy in toponyms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpán, Pavel

    Cluj : Mega, 2013 - (Felecan, O.), s. 379-383 ISBN 978-606-543-343-4. [Name and Naming /2./ Onomastics in Contemporary Public Space. Baia Mare (RO), 09.05.2013-11.05.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP406/12/P600 Institutional support: RVO:68378092 Keywords : onomastics * toponyms * analogy Subject RIV: AI - Linguistics

  6. Serotonin transporter genotype, salivary cortisol, neuroticism and life events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Miskowiak, Kamilla; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate if cortisol alone or in interaction with other risk factors (familial risk, the serotonin transporter genotype, neuroticism and life events (LEs)) predicts onset of psychiatric disorder in healthy individuals at heritable risk. MATRIAL AND METHODS: In a high-risk study......, 234 healthy monozygotic and dizygotic twins with or without a co-twin history of affective disorder (high and low risk twins) were baseline assessed. Participants were followed up for seven years and then reassessed with a personal interview revealing whether they had developed psychiatric illness....... RESULTS: 36 participants (15.4%) developed psychiatric disorder. Using Cox proportional hazards ratio (HR) estimates neither morning nor evening salivary cortisol at baseline did predict illness onset. In multivariate Cox models, the two-way interaction between morning cortisol and LEs lifetime before...

  7. A novel protoapigenone analog RY10-4 induces breast cancer MCF-7 cell death through autophagy via the Akt/mTOR pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protoapigenone is a unique flavonoid and enriched in many ferns, showing potent antitumor activity against a broad spectrum of human cancer cell lines. RY10-4, a modified version of protoapigenone, manifested better anti-proliferation activity in human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The cytotoxicity of RY10-4 against MCF-7 cells is exhibited in both time- and concentration-dependent manners. Here we investigated a novel effect of RY10-4 mediated autophagy in autophagy defect MCF-7 cells. Employing immunofluorescence assay for microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3), monodansylcadaverine staining, Western blotting analyses for LC3 and p62 as well as ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy, we showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. Meanwhile, inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological and genetic approaches significantly increased the viability of RY10-4 treated cells, suggesting that the autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. Further studies revealed that RY10-4 suppressed the activation of mTOR and p70S6K via the Akt/mTOR pathway. Our results provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death and the cause of RY10-4 showing better antitumor activity than protoapigenone, and supported further evidences for RY10-4 as a lead to design a promising antitumor agent. - Highlights: • We showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. • Autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. • RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cell through the Akt/mTOR pathway. • We provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death

  8. A novel protoapigenone analog RY10-4 induces breast cancer MCF-7 cell death through autophagy via the Akt/mTOR pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuenong; Wei, Han; Liu, Ziwei; Yuan, Qianying [Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation of Hubei Province, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Wei, Anhua [Department of Pharmacy, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Shi, Du; Yang, Xian [Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation of Hubei Province, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ruan, Jinlan, E-mail: jinlan8152@163.com [Key Laboratory of Natural Medicinal Chemistry and Resource Evaluation of Hubei Province, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Protoapigenone is a unique flavonoid and enriched in many ferns, showing potent antitumor activity against a broad spectrum of human cancer cell lines. RY10-4, a modified version of protoapigenone, manifested better anti-proliferation activity in human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. The cytotoxicity of RY10-4 against MCF-7 cells is exhibited in both time- and concentration-dependent manners. Here we investigated a novel effect of RY10-4 mediated autophagy in autophagy defect MCF-7 cells. Employing immunofluorescence assay for microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3), monodansylcadaverine staining, Western blotting analyses for LC3 and p62 as well as ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy, we showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. Meanwhile, inhibition of autophagy by pharmacological and genetic approaches significantly increased the viability of RY10-4 treated cells, suggesting that the autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. Further studies revealed that RY10-4 suppressed the activation of mTOR and p70S6K via the Akt/mTOR pathway. Our results provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death and the cause of RY10-4 showing better antitumor activity than protoapigenone, and supported further evidences for RY10-4 as a lead to design a promising antitumor agent. - Highlights: • We showed that RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells but protoapigenone did not. • Autophagy induced by RY10-4 played as a promotion mechanism for cell death. • RY10-4 induced autophagy in MCF-7 cell through the Akt/mTOR pathway. • We provided new insights for the mechanism of RY10-4 induced cell death.

  9. TEORES SÉRICOS DE CORTISOL DE FÊMEAS CANINAS (Canis familiaris – LINNAEUS, 1758 SUBMETIDAS À CESARIANA SERIC LEVELS OF CORTISOL IN BITCHES (Canis familiaris – LINNAEUS, 1758 SUBMITTED TO AESARIAN SECTION Niveles séricos del cortisol en perras (Canis familiaris – Linnaeus, 1758 sometidas a cesárea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo José Cardilli

    2009-12-01

    . The reserved serum was used to realization of cortisol measure by radioimmunoassay (on already described periods. The statistics analyzes were made by t test and Tukey. The cortisol levels presented difference (p< 0.05 in the dog of caesarian section (6.83 µg/dL but this didn’t differ (p> 0.05 on subsequent days (1.82 µg/dL, 24 hours later; 1.38 µg/dL, 48 hour later; 1.48 µg/dL, 10 days later. The middle values of control group were 3.43, 2.01, 3.59 e 1.72 µg/dL, in partum day, 24 hours later, 48 hours later and 10 days later. The stress because partum dystocic induced to liberation of cortisol, normalizing in subsequent days, but don’t have variation after cesarian (surgical stress don’t induced bigger liberation of cortisol or partum natural, composed compatible with the one found in the literature.

KEY WORDS: Bitches, caesarian section, cortisol.
Perras sometidas a cesárea por estar en situación distinta de la fisiológica, pueden presentar alteraciones séricas para se adaptaren a esa nueva condición de estrés. Una de las posibles alteraciones, es la concentración de cortisol durante el período peri-parto. Siendo así, el objetivo de ese estudio fue cuantificar los niveles séricos del cortisol en perras sometidas a cesárea en la fase de parto y posparto en la fase de parto y posparto (en el día del acto quirúrgico o parto, 24h, 48h y 10 días después. El método de radioinmunoensayo fue utilizado para la realización del dosaje de cortisol sérico (en los períodos ya descritos. La evaluación estadística fue realizada por medio de los testes t y Tukey. El nivel de cortisol sérico presentó diferencia (p< 0,05 en el día de la cesárea (6,83 µg/dL, pero no hubo diferencia estadística (p> 0,05 en los días consecutivos (1,82 µg/dL, 24 horas después; 1,38 µg/dL, 48 horas después; 1,48 µg/dL 10 días después. Los niveles medios del grupo control

  • Cortisol Awakening Response and Walking Speed in Older People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulopulos, Matias M.; Puig-Perez, Sara; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Villada, Carolina; Salvador, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In older people, less diurnal variability in cortisol levels has been consistently related to worse physical performance, especially to slower walking speed (WS). The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is a discrete component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that has been related to several health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and/or worse performance on executive function and memory. The relationship between the CAR and physical performance in older people is poorly understood. In this study, in 86 older people (mean age = 64.42, SD = 3.93), we investigated the relationship between the CAR and WS, a commonly used measure of physical performance in the older population that has also been related to health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and executive function performance in older people. Additionally, we studied whether the relationship between the CAR and WS was independent from cortisol levels on awakening and several possible confounders. Results showed that a CAR of reduced magnitude (measured with 3 samples each day, for two consecutive days, and calculated as the area under the curve with respect to the increase), but not cortisol levels on awakening, was related to slower WS. In addition, this relationship was independent from cortisol levels on awakening. It is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude would contribute to less diurnal cortisol variability, affecting physical performance. Additionally, it is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude affects WS through a possible negative effect on executive function, or that the association between the CAR and WS is due to the fact that both are related to similar health problems and to changes in cognitive performance in older people. PMID:27191847

  • Cortisol Awakening Response and Walking Speed in Older People.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias M Pulopulos

    Full Text Available In older people, less diurnal variability in cortisol levels has been consistently related to worse physical performance, especially to slower walking speed (WS. The cortisol awakening response (CAR is a discrete component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that has been related to several health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and/or worse performance on executive function and memory. The relationship between the CAR and physical performance in older people is poorly understood. In this study, in 86 older people (mean age = 64.42, SD = 3.93, we investigated the relationship between the CAR and WS, a commonly used measure of physical performance in the older population that has also been related to health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and executive function performance in older people. Additionally, we studied whether the relationship between the CAR and WS was independent from cortisol levels on awakening and several possible confounders. Results showed that a CAR of reduced magnitude (measured with 3 samples each day, for two consecutive days, and calculated as the area under the curve with respect to the increase, but not cortisol levels on awakening, was related to slower WS. In addition, this relationship was independent from cortisol levels on awakening. It is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude would contribute to less diurnal cortisol variability, affecting physical performance. Additionally, it is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude affects WS through a possible negative effect on executive function, or that the association between the CAR and WS is due to the fact that both are related to similar health problems and to changes in cognitive performance in older people.

  • Cortisol Awakening Response and Walking Speed in Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulopulos, Matias M; Puig-Perez, Sara; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Villada, Carolina; Salvador, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In older people, less diurnal variability in cortisol levels has been consistently related to worse physical performance, especially to slower walking speed (WS). The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is a discrete component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that has been related to several health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and/or worse performance on executive function and memory. The relationship between the CAR and physical performance in older people is poorly understood. In this study, in 86 older people (mean age = 64.42, SD = 3.93), we investigated the relationship between the CAR and WS, a commonly used measure of physical performance in the older population that has also been related to health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and executive function performance in older people. Additionally, we studied whether the relationship between the CAR and WS was independent from cortisol levels on awakening and several possible confounders. Results showed that a CAR of reduced magnitude (measured with 3 samples each day, for two consecutive days, and calculated as the area under the curve with respect to the increase), but not cortisol levels on awakening, was related to slower WS. In addition, this relationship was independent from cortisol levels on awakening. It is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude would contribute to less diurnal cortisol variability, affecting physical performance. Additionally, it is possible that a CAR of reduced magnitude affects WS through a possible negative effect on executive function, or that the association between the CAR and WS is due to the fact that both are related to similar health problems and to changes in cognitive performance in older people. PMID:27191847

  • Gender differences in the associations between cortisol and insulin in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, RP; Lamberts, SWJ; deJong, FH; Pols, HAP; Grobbee, DE

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the role of cortisol in the etiology of insulin resistance in men and women, we examined 218 healthy non-hospitalized elderly, selected from the Rotterdam Study. Free cortisol was assessed by the ratio of fasting serum cortisol over corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), and insulin r

  • Cortisol Reactivity and Regulation Associated with Shame Responding in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Rosemary S. L.; Imm, Gorette P.; Walling, Bobbi R.; Weiler, Hope A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize cortisol response and regulation associated with shame responding in early childhood and to examine how general the relation between shame and cortisol is. It was predicted that children responding to task failure with shame would show a larger and more prolonged cortisol response than other children.…

  • Salivary cortisol and depression in public sector employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vammen, Marianne Agergaard; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Hansen, Åse Marie;

    2014-01-01

    . In the present study, we examined the association of several cortisol measures and depression in a repeated cross-sectional and short-term follow-up design. Depression was assessed by both self-reported symptoms of depression and clinical interviews. METHOD: In 2007, 10,036 public sector employees...... received a questionnaire along with salivary cortisol test tubes for home administration. Morning (30min after awakening) and evening (2000h) salivary samples were collected. Questionnaires and valid saliva samples were returned from 3536 employees. Approximately 3.6 months later a subsample of the...

  • Decreased Cortisol and Pain in Breast Cancer: Biofield Therapy Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Alice Running

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among women of all races. Pain is a common symptom associated with cancer; 75–90% of cancer patients experience pain during their illness and up to 50% of that pain is undertreated. Unrelieved pain leads to increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of bioenergy on fecal cortisol levels for mice injected with murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 in two separate pilot studies. Using a m...

  • BAY 50-4798, a novel, high-affinity receptor-specific recombinant interleukin-2 analog, induces dose-dependent increases in CD25 expression and proliferation among unstimulated, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lynn; Chapman, Sherita; Ramchandani, Meena S; Lane, H Clifford; Davey, Richard T; Sereti, Irini

    2004-12-01

    Interleukin-2 administration induces CD4 T cell expansion in HIV-infected patients, however, toxicity can limit dosing. BAY 50-4798 is a recombinant IL-2 analog with >1000-fold specificity for the high-affinity IL-2 receptor. The effects of this compound on unstimulated human PBMC were evaluated. PBMC from HIV(-) and HIV(+) donors were cultured in vitro with incremental doses of BAY 50-4798 or aldesleukin. CD25 expression and proliferation were evaluated with flow cytometry. Cytokine levels were measured by ELISA in culture supernatants. BAY 50-4798 induced dose-dependent increases in CD25 expression and proliferation of T cells, NK, and B cells and showed selectivity for CD4 T cells expressing CD25. Induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines was also dose-dependent and was observed at the concentrations of BAY 50-4798 with the highest biologic activity. These data suggest that BAY 50-4798 can induce proliferation of unstimulated T cells but loss of T cell selectivity and induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines occur at concentrations exerting the highest biologic activity. PMID:15507389

  • Approaches to synthetic platelet analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Tian, Lewis L; Pan, Victor; McCrae, Keith R; Mitragotri, Samir; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is routinely used for treating bleeding complications in patients with hematologic or oncologic clotting disorders, chemo/radiotherapy-induced myelosuppression, trauma and surgery. Currently, these transfusions mostly use allogeneic platelet concentrates, while products like lyophilized platelets, cold-stored platelets and infusible platelet membranes are under investigation. These natural platelet-based products pose considerable risks of contamination, resulting in short shelf-life (3-5 days). Recent advances in pathogen reduction technologies have increased shelf-life to ~7 days. Furthermore, natural platelets are short in supply and also cause several biological side effects. Hence, there is significant clinical interest in platelet-mimetic synthetic analogs that can allow long storage-life and minimum side effects. Accordingly, several designs have been studied which decorate synthetic particles with motifs that promote platelet-mimetic adhesion or aggregation. Recent refinement in this design involves combining the adhesion and aggregation functionalities on a single particle platform. Further refinement is being focused on constructing particles that also mimic natural platelet's shape, size and elasticity, to influence margination and wall-interaction. The optimum design of a synthetic platelet analog would require efficient integration of platelet's physico-mechanical properties and biological functionalities. We present a comprehensive review of these approaches and provide our opinion regarding the future directions of this research. PMID:23092864

  • Estabilidad emocional y cortisol como factores diferenciadores de la fibromialgia Emotional stability and cortisol as differentiating factors for fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Díaz Robredo; J.I. Robles Sánchez

    2011-01-01

    Este estudio busca un acercamiento al diagnóstico de la fibromialgia desde un modelo psicofisiológico del estrés. En la Introducción justificaremos los principios teóricos en que se basa este trabajo. Las hipótesis planteadas intentarán buscar la diferencia de factores psicológicos y de cortisol entre los grupos control y experimental, así como la correlación entre dichos factores. En el apartado Materiales y métodos nos centramos en los registros de cortisol y de variables de personalidad qu...

  • Terrestrial Spaceflight Analogs: Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in immune cell distribution and function, circadian misalignment, stress and latent viral reactivation appear to persist during Antarctic winterover at Concordia Station. Some of these changes are similar to those observed in Astronauts, either during or immediately following spaceflight. Others are unique to the Concordia analog. Based on some initial immune data and environmental conditions, Concordia winterover may be an appropriate analog for some flight-associated immune system changes and mission stress effects. An ongoing smaller control study at Neumayer III will address the influence of the hypoxic variable. Changes were observed in the peripheral blood leukocyte distribution consistent with immune mobilization, and similar to those observed during spaceflight. Alterations in cytokine production profiles were observed during winterover that are distinct from those observed during spaceflight, but potentially consistent with those observed during persistent hypobaric hypoxia. The reactivation of latent herpesviruses was observed during overwinter/isolation, that is consistently associated with dysregulation in immune function.

    1. USW area analogs

      OpenAIRE

      Everett, Keith R.

      2005-01-01

      The purpose of this project is to investigate the feasibility of and methodology for the development of a set of environmental analogs of operational Undersea Warfare (USW) areas within fleet training areas. It is primarily a discussion of the identification of parameters that characterize the tactical USW environment, prioritization of these parameters, identification of existing databases that contain these parameters and an outline of the processes required to extract the desired data fro...

    2. Analogy, Explanation, and Proof

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      John eHummel

      2014-11-01

      Full Text Available People are habitual explanation generators. At its most mundane, our propensity to explain allows us to infer that we should not drink milk that smells sour; at the other extreme, it allows us to establish facts (e.g., theorems in mathematical logic whose truth was not even known prior to the existence of the explanation (proof. What do the cognitive operations underlying the (inductive inference that the milk is sour have in common with the (deductive proof that, say, the square root of two is irrational? Our ability to generate explanations bears striking similarities to our ability to make analogies. Both reflect a capacity to generate inferences and generalizations that go beyond the featural similarities between a novel problem and familiar problems in terms of which the novel problem may be understood. However, a notable difference between analogy-making and explanation-generation is that the former is a process in which a single source situation is used to reason about a single target, whereas the latter often requires the reasoner to integrate multiple sources of knowledge. This small-seeming difference poses a challenge to the task of marshaling our understanding of analogical reasoning in the service of understanding explanation. We describe a model of explanation, derived from a model of analogy, adapted to permit systematic violations of this one-to-one mapping constraint. Simulation results demonstrate that the resulting model can generate explanations for novel explananda and that, like the explanations generated by human reasoners, these explanations vary in their coherence.

    3. ADSL Analog Front End

      OpenAIRE

      Stojković, Nino

      2006-01-01

      In this paper the Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) analog front end (AFE) designs are described and compared. AFE is the part of ADSL modems most responsible for quality signal transmission over phone wires. It can be divided into the transmitting path (TX) circuitry, the receiving path (RX) circuitry and the hybrid network and transformer. The operations and realizations of each functional block are presented. There are the D/A converter, the filter and the line driver in the TX pat...

    4. Analog Signal Processing

      OpenAIRE

      Caloz, Christophe; Gupta, Shulabh; Zhang, Qingfeng; Nikfal, Babak

      2013-01-01

      Analog signal processing (ASP) is presented as a systematic approach to address future challenges in high speed and high frequency microwave applications. The general concept of ASP is explained with the help of examples emphasizing basic ASP effects, such as time spreading and compression, chirping and frequency discrimination. Phasers, which represent the core of ASP systems, are explained to be elements exhibiting a frequency-dependent group delay response, and hence a nonlinear phase resp...

    5. A modified and cost-effective method for hair cortisol analysis.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Xiang, Lianbin; Sunesara, Imran; Rehm, Kristina E; Marshall, Gailen D

      2016-05-01

      Hair cortisol may hold potential as a biomarker for assessment of chronic psychological stress. We report a modified and cost-effective method to prepare hair samples for cortisol assay. Hair samples were ground using an inexpensive ball grinder - ULTRA-TURRAX tube drive. Cortisol was extracted from the powder under various defined conditions. The data showed that the optimal conditions for this method include cortisol extraction at room temperature and evaporation using a stream of room air. These findings should allow more widespread research using economical technology to validate the utility of hair cortisol as a biomarker for assessing chronic stress status. PMID:26767335

    6. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

      CERN Document Server

      Kipping, David M; Henze, Chris; Teachey, Alex; Isaacson, Howard T; Petigura, Erik A; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Buchhave, Lars A; Chen, Jingjing; Bryson, Steve T; Sandford, Emily

      2016-01-01

      Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of $(0.91\\pm0.02)$ $R_{\\mathrm{Jup}}$, a low orbital eccentricity ($0.06_{-0.04}^{+0.10}$) and an equilibrium temperature of $(131\\pm3)$ K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric ...

    7. Reduction of Radiation-Induced Vascular Nitrosative Stress by the Vitamin E Analog γ-Tocotrienol: Evidence of a Role for Tetrahydrobiopterin

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Purpose: The vitamin E analog γ-tocotrienol (GT3) is a powerful radioprotector. GT3 reduces postradiation vascular peroxynitrite production, an effect dependent on inhibition of hydroxy-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. Hydroxy-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors mediate their pleiotropic effects via endothelial nitric oxide synthase that requires the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). This study investigated the effects of radiation on BH4 bioavailability and of GT3 on BH4 metabolism. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to 8.5 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI). Lung BH4 and total biopterin concentrations were measured 0, 3.5, 7, 14, and 21 days after TBI by use of differential oxidation followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The effect of exogenous GT3 and BH4 treatment on postradiation vascular oxidative stress and bone marrow colony-forming units were assessed in vivo. The effect of GT3 on endothelial cell apoptosis and endothelial expression of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH), GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP), GFRP transcription, GFRP protein levels, and GFRP-GTPCH protein binding was determined in vitro. Results: Compared with baseline levels, lung BH4 concentrations decreased by 24% at 3.5 days after TBI, an effect that was reversed by GT3. At 14 and 21 days after TBI, compensatory increases in BH4 (58% and 80%, respectively) were observed. Relative to vehicle-treated controls, both GT3 and BH4 supplementation reduced postirradiation vascular peroxynitrite production at 3.5 days (by 66% and 33%, respectively), and BH4 resulted in a 68% increase in bone marrow colony-forming units. GT3 ameliorated endothelial cell apoptosis and reduced endothelial GFRP protein levels and GFRP-GTPCH binding by decreasing transcription of the GFRP gene. Conclusions: BH4 bioavailability is reduced in the early postradiation phase. Exogenous administration of BH4 reduces postirradiation vascular oxidative stress. GT3

    8. The novel curcumin analog FLLL32 decreases STAT3 DNA binding activity and expression, and induces apoptosis in osteosarcoma cell lines

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Curcumin is a naturally occurring phenolic compound shown to have a wide variety of antitumor activities; however, it does not attain sufficient blood levels to do so when ingested. Using structure-based design, a novel compound, FLLL32, was generated from curcumin. FLLL32 possesses superior biochemical properties and more specifically targets STAT3, a transcription factor important in tumor cell survival, proliferation, metastasis, and chemotherapy resistance. In our previous work, we found that several canine and human osteosarcoma (OSA) cell lines, but not normal osteoblasts, exhibit constitutive phosphorylation of STAT3. Compared to curcumin, we hypothesized that FLLL32 would be more efficient at inhibiting STAT3 function in OSA cells and that this would result in enhanced downregulation of STAT3 transcriptional targets and subsequent death of OSA cells. Human and canine OSA cells were treated with vehicle, curcumin, or FLLL32 and the effects on proliferation (CyQUANT®), apoptosis (SensoLyte® Homogeneous AMC Caspase- 3/7 Assay kit, western blotting), STAT3 DNA binding (EMSA), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), survivin, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) expression (RT-PCR, western blotting) were measured. STAT3 expression was measured by RT-PCR, qRT- PCR, and western blotting. Our data showed that FLLL32 decreased STAT3 DNA binding by EMSA. FLLL32 promoted loss of cell proliferation at lower concentrations than curcumin leading to caspase-3- dependent apoptosis, as evidenced by PARP cleavage and increased caspase 3/7 activity; this could be inhibited by treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Treatment of OSA cells with FLLL32 decreased expression of survivin, VEGF, and MMP2 at both mRNA and protein levels with concurrent decreases in phosphorylated and total STAT3; this loss of total STAT3 occurred, in part, via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. These data demonstrate that the novel curcumin analog FLLL32 has biologic activity

    9. Spiral structure in galaxies: analogies

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Kirkpatrick, R.C.

      1976-01-01

      The vortex analogy to galactic spiral structures is considered. Caution against carrying the analogy past its region of applicability is noted; and some experiments with vorticities are mentioned. (JFP)

    10. Evaluation of aldosterone-and cortisol levels in blood plasma in normal conditions of ingestion of sodium and potassium, after saline-increase and depletion, in regard to position, and after stimulation with ACTH and angiotensin II

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Methods for the determination of plasma aldosterone and cortisol, by radioimmunoassay, were performed utilizing highly specific antisera. With this methodology it was possible to evaluate cortisol and aldosterone secretion, in six normal subjects, submitted to a basal rice diet on standing and recumbent positions, the effects of exogenous cortrosyn (β1-24 ACTH) and angiotensin II and the same manoevres with progressively increased Na+ content of the diet. Aldosterone basal levels decreased with the increase of Na+ content in the diet. However, there were no significant differences between the relative increments observed on the recumbent position, at the three levels of sodium intake. The relative increase of plasma aldosterone after ACTH was similar for each basal level of aldosterone induced by different sodium intakes. The responsiveness of aldosterone secretion to cortrosyn and standing position was similar, with no relation to the sodium intake. The infusion of angiotensin II induced an increase in plasma aldosterone, and the relative increment in the levels of the hormone were higher with high sodium than on the rice diet. The average basal cortisol value at the different levels of sodium intake was significantly different being greater on the basal, rice diet, and there was a decrease in cortisol level after recumbency, with the theree diets. The injection of ACTH induced similar cortisol secretion with no relation to the sodium intake. The infusion of non-hypertensive doses of angiotensin II resulted in an anomalous fall in cortisol level, probably because of 'shunt' of substrates to biosynthesis with the added effect of cortisol diurnal rhythmycity. (Author)

    11. Natural Analogs for the Unsaturated Zone

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) analog sites and processes that are applicable to flow and transport processes expected to occur at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in order to build increased confidence in modeling processes of Unsaturated Zone (UZ) flow and transport. This AMR was prepared in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0135, Natural Analogs for the UZ'' (CRWMS 1999a). Knowledge from analog sites and processes is used as corroborating information to test and build confidence in flow and transport models of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This AMR supports the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR) and the Yucca Mountain Site Description. The objectives of this AMR are to test and build confidence in the representation of UZ processes in numerical models utilized in the UZ Flow and Transport Model. This is accomplished by: (1) applying data from Boxy Canyon, Idaho in simulations of UZ flow using the same methodologies incorporated in the Yucca Mountain UZ Flow and Transport Model to assess the fracture-matrix interaction conceptual model; (2) Providing a preliminary basis for analysis of radionuclide transport at Pena Blanca, Mexico as an analog of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain; and (3) Synthesizing existing information from natural analog studies to provide corroborating evidence for representation of ambient and thermally coupled UZ flow and transport processes in the UZ Model

    12. NaturAnalogs for the Unsaturated Zone

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      A. Simmons; A. Unger; M. Murrell

      2000-03-08

      The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document natural and anthropogenic (human-induced) analog sites and processes that are applicable to flow and transport processes expected to occur at the potential Yucca Mountain repository in order to build increased confidence in modeling processes of Unsaturated Zone (UZ) flow and transport. This AMR was prepared in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0135, Natural Analogs for the UZ'' (CRWMS 1999a). Knowledge from analog sites and processes is used as corroborating information to test and build confidence in flow and transport models of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This AMR supports the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR) and the Yucca Mountain Site Description. The objectives of this AMR are to test and build confidence in the representation of UZ processes in numerical models utilized in the UZ Flow and Transport Model. This is accomplished by: (1) applying data from Boxy Canyon, Idaho in simulations of UZ flow using the same methodologies incorporated in the Yucca Mountain UZ Flow and Transport Model to assess the fracture-matrix interaction conceptual model; (2) Providing a preliminary basis for analysis of radionuclide transport at Pena Blanca, Mexico as an analog of radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain; and (3) Synthesizing existing information from natural analog studies to provide corroborating evidence for representation of ambient and thermally coupled UZ flow and transport processes in the UZ Model.

    13. Sleep problems predict cortisol reactivity to stress in urban adolescents.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Mrug, Sylvie; Tyson, Anna; Turan, Bulent; Granger, Douglas A

      2016-03-01

      This study examined the role of sleep problems and sleep duration on stress-related HPA axis reactivity among urban, low income adolescents. A total of 84 adolescents (M age 13.36 years; 50% male; 95% African American) and their parents provided information on adolescents' sleep problems and sleep quantity. Adolescents completed a standardized social stress test in the laboratory (the Trier Social Stress Test; TSST). Saliva samples collected before and after the TSST yielded measures of cortisol pre-test, 15 min post-test, and 55 min post-test, as well as overall cortisol secretion and its increase (AUCG and AUCI). More sleep problems and longer sleep duration predicted higher cortisol reactivity to the TSST, particularly among females. Self-reports of sleep were more consistently related to stress-related cortisol reactivity than parent reports. Sleep problems and longer sleep duration may place adolescents at risk for HPA axis hyper-reactivity to stress, contributing to academic, behavioral and health problems. PMID:26679739

    14. Cortisol modifies extinction learning of recently acquired fear in men.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Merz, Christian Josef; Hermann, Andrea; Stark, Rudolf; Wolf, Oliver Tobias

      2014-09-01

      Exposure therapy builds on the mechanism of fear extinction leading to decreased fear responses. How the stress hormone cortisol affects brain regions involved in fear extinction in humans is unknown. For this reason, we tested 32 men randomly assigned to receive either 30 mg hydrocortisone or placebo 45 min before fear extinction. In fear acquisition, a picture of a geometrical figure was either partially paired (conditioned stimulus; CS+) or not paired (CS-) with an electrical stimulation (unconditioned stimulus; UCS). In fear extinction, each CS was presented again, but no UCS occurred. Cortisol increased conditioned skin conductance responses in early and late extinction. In early extinction, higher activation towards the CS- than to the CS+ was found in the amygdala, hippocampus and posterior parahippocampal gyrus. This pattern might be associated with the establishment of a new memory trace. In late extinction, the placebo compared with the cortisol group displayed enhanced CS+/CS- differentiation in the amygdala, medial frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. A change from early deactivation to late activation of the extinction circuit as seen in the placebo group seems to be needed to enhance extinction and to reduce fear. Cortisol appears to interfere with this process thereby impairing extinction of recently acquired conditioned fear. PMID:23945999

    15. Bi-directional associations between psychological arousal, cortisol, and sleep

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Garde, Anne Helene; Albertsen, Karen; Persson, Roger;

      2012-01-01

      The aim was to elucidate the possible bi-directional relation between daytime psychological arousal, cortisol, and self-reported sleep in a group of healthy employees in active employment. Logbook ratings of sleep (Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire), stress, and energy, as well as positive and...

    16. The cortisol awakening response (CAR): facts and future directions.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Fries, Eva; Dettenborn, Lucia; Kirschbaum, Clemens

      2009-04-01

      In humans, the secretion of cortisol from the adrenal glands follows a diurnal cycle with a profound increase after awakening. This increase after awakening, a phenomenon termed the cortisol awakening response (CAR), appears to be a distinct feature of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, superimposing the circadian rhythmicity of cortisol secretion. Several studies point towards an important role of the hippocampus and, additionally, other brain structures (e. g. amygdala, prefrontal cortex, suprachiasmatic nucleus) in the regulation of the CAR. There is increasing knowledge that the CAR is influenced by a variety of factors such as gender, health status, and health behavior or stress perception. However, the exact function of the profound cortisol increase after awakening is still not clarified. We hypothesize that the anticipation of the upcoming day is of major relevance for the magnitude of the CAR. The present paper reviews the current knowledge on the neural regulation of the CAR and factors influencing this phenomenon and considerations are addressed concerning the exact function of the CAR. PMID:18854200

    17. Decreased Cortisol and Pain in Breast Cancer: Biofield Therapy Potential

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Alice Running

      2015-01-01

      Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among women of all races. Pain is a common symptom associated with cancer; 75–90% of cancer patients experience pain during their illness and up to 50% of that pain is undertreated. Unrelieved pain leads to increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of bioenergy on fecal cortisol levels for mice injected with murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 in two separate pilot studies. Using a multiple experimental group design, six to eight week old female BALB/c mice were injected with tumor and randomly assigned, in groups of 10, to daily treatment, every other day treatment, and no treatment groups. Five days after tumor cell injection, bioenergy interventions were begun for a period of ten consecutive days. Fecal samples were collected for each study and ELISA analysis was conducted at the end of both studies. For both studies, cortisol levels were decreased in the every other day treatment groups but remained high in the no treatment groups. Future studies utilizing bioenergy therapies on cortisol levels in a murine breast cancer model can begin to describe pain outcomes and therapeutic dose.

    18. Decreased Cortisol and Pain in Breast Cancer: Biofield Therapy Potential.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Running, Alice

      2015-01-01

      Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among women of all races. Pain is a common symptom associated with cancer; 75-90% of cancer patients experience pain during their illness and up to 50% of that pain is undertreated. Unrelieved pain leads to increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of bioenergy on fecal cortisol levels for mice injected with murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 in two separate pilot studies. Using a multiple experimental group design, six to eight week old female BALB/c mice were injected with tumor and randomly assigned, in groups of 10, to daily treatment, every other day treatment, and no treatment groups. Five days after tumor cell injection, bioenergy interventions were begun for a period of ten consecutive days. Fecal samples were collected for each study and ELISA analysis was conducted at the end of both studies. For both studies, cortisol levels were decreased in the every other day treatment groups but remained high in the no treatment groups. Future studies utilizing bioenergy therapies on cortisol levels in a murine breast cancer model can begin to describe pain outcomes and therapeutic dose. PMID:26170887

    19. Mercury and cortisol in Western Hudson Bay polar bear hair.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bechshoft, T; Derocher, A E; Richardson, E; Mislan, P; Lunn, N J; Sonne, C; Dietz, R; Janz, D M; St Louis, V L

      2015-08-01

      Non-invasive methods of assessing animal health and life history are becoming increasingly popular in wildlife research; hair samples from polar bears (Ursus maritimus), are being used to study an ever broader range of anthropogenic and endocrine compounds. A number of contaminants are known to disrupt endocrine function in polar bears. However, the relationship between mercury and cortisol remains unknown, although mercury is an endocrine disruptor in other species. Here, we examine the relationship between concentrations of cortisol and total mercury (THg) analyzed in guard hair from 378 polar bears (184 females, 194 males) sampled in Western Hudson Bay, 2004-2012. The difference in mean cortisol concentration between female (0.8 ± 0.6 pg/mg) and male (0.7 ± 0.5 pg/mg) polar bears bordered on significance (p = 0.054). However, mean mercury concentration was significantly greater (p = 0.009) in females (4.7 ± 1.4 μg/g) than males (4.3 ± 1.2 μg/g). Hair cortisol in males was significantly influenced by mercury, age, and fatness, as well as interactions between mercury and year, mercury and fatness, and year and fatness (all: p polar bears. PMID:26044932

    20. Cortisol and dexamethasone elimination during treatment with cimetidine.

      OpenAIRE

      Peden, N R; Rewhorn, I; Champion, M C; Mussani, R; Ooi, T C

      1984-01-01

      In a randomised cross-over study of treatment for 7 days with cimetidine 600 mg twice daily and placebo, cimetidine had no effect on the pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous dose of dexamethasone sodium phosphate. Likewise the elimination characteristics of endogenous cortisol in the dexamethasone suppressed state were not affected by cimetidine.

    1. Colloidal gold probe based rapid immunochromatographic strip assay for cortisol

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      A rapid and semi-quantitative immunochromatographic strip (ICS) test for cortisol analysis in serum was developed. The test strip was based on a competitive assay format. Colloidal gold nanoparticles were synthesized and coupled with cortisol-3-carboxymethyloxime-adipic acid dihydrazide-bovine serum albumin (F-3-CMO-ADH-BSA) antigen to directly compete with cortisol in human serum samples. F-3-CMO-ADH-BSA-gold label and uncoupled colloidal gold nanoparticles were appropriately characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Anticortisol antibody raised against F-3-CMO-BSA immunogen in New Zealand white rabbits was coated on the NC membrane as test line. Anti-BSA antibody was used as control line. The lower detection limit of the ICS test was 30 ng mL-1 with visual detection and was completed in 10 min. About 30 human serum samples were also analyzed by the developed strip test and their range of cortisol concentration was established. The developed ICS test is rapid, economic and user friendly.

    2. Intimate Partner Violence Exposure, Salivary Cortisol, and Childhood Asthma

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bair-Merritt, Megan H.; Johnson, Sara B.; Okelo, Sande; Page, Gayle

      2012-01-01

      Parents were given supplies to collect 3 child salivary cortisol samples (awakening, 30-min after awakening, bedtime) at home on a typical day, and return them via mail. Medical records also were abstracted. Results: Fifty-three percent (n = 29) returned child salivary samples. Families who returned samples typically returned them within 2 weeks,…

    3. Cortisol, reaction time test and health among offshore shift workers

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Harris, Anette; Waage, Siri; Ursin, Holger;

      2010-01-01

      The stress hormone cortisol shows a pronounced endogenous diurnal rhythm, which is affected by the sleep/wake cycle, meals and activity. Shift work and especially night work disrupts the sleep/wake cycle and causes a desynchronization of the natural biological rhythms. Therefore, different shift ...

    4. The Age of Analog Networks

      OpenAIRE

      Mattiussi, Claudio; Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL); Marbach, Daniel; Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL); Dürr, Peter; Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL); Floreano, Dario; Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL)

      2008-01-01

      A large class of systems of biological and technological relevance can be described as analog networks, that is, collections of dynamical devices interconnected by links of varying strength. Some examples of analog networks are genetic regulatory networks, metabolic networks, neural networks, analog electronic circuits, and control systems. Analog networks are typically complex systems which include nonlinear feedback loops and possess temporal dynamics at different timescales. When tackled b...

    5. Serum cortisol concentration in horses with heaves treated with fluticasone proprionate over a 1 year period.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Munoz, Trohadio; Leclere, Mathilde; Jean, Daniel; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

      2015-02-01

      The purpose of this study is to measure the effect of long-term administration of inhaled fluticasone proprionate on cortisol concentrations in heaves-affected horses. Eleven horses with heaves were treated with fluticasone at least once daily at dosages required to improve lung function or with antigen avoidance alone for 1 year. Morning serum cortisol was measured before and after 10, 30, 110, 190, 230, 280, and 320 days of treatment. Cortisol was also measured in the afternoon of day 330. Cortisol was significantly lower in the Fluticasone group on days 30, 110, and 190 when compared with the Antigen avoidance group. Cortisol measured on day 330 was also significantly lower in the Fluticasone group. Results indicate that inhaled fluticasone, when administered at therapeutic dosages, can significantly suppress serum cortisol concentrations for 8-24 h. The clinical significance of this finding remains to be ascertained, as no clinical signs were associated with this cortisol suppression. PMID:25577545

    6. Cortisol and antisocial behavior in early adolescence: the role of gender in an economically disadvantaged sample.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kobak, Roger; Zajac, Kristyn; Levine, Seymour

      2009-01-01

      This study examines the relation between adolescents' antisocial behaviors and adrenocortical activity during a laboratory visit in a sample of economically disadvantaged families (N = 116, ages 12-14, 51% female). Pretask cortisol levels indexed adolescents' prechallenge response to the lab visit, whereas adolescents' response to a conflict discussion with their caregivers was indexed with residualized change in pre- to postconflict cortisol levels. A trait measure of antisocial behavior (derived from parent, teacher, and self-reports) was associated with lower pretask cortisol levels but greater cortisol response to the conflict discussion. Gender moderated antisocial adolescents' cortisol response to the conflict discussion with girls who reported more covert risky problem behaviors showing an increased cortisol response. The findings suggest that, although antisocial adolescents had lower pretask cortisol levels, conflict discussions with caregivers present a unique challenge to antisocial girls compared with antisocial boys. PMID:19338699

    7. Intranasal Administration of dsRNA Analog Poly(I:C) Induces Interferon-α Receptor-Dependent Accumulation of Antigen Experienced T Cells in the Airways

      OpenAIRE

      McNally, Beth; Willette, Meredith; Ye, Fang; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Flaño, Emilio

      2012-01-01

      Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytoidylic acid (pIC), a synthetic dsRNA, acts as an adjuvant that boosts immune responses and protection. Intranasal (IN) administration of pIC has recently been used to adjuvant influenza virus vaccines; however, the effects of IN pIC administration on pulmonary T cell responses remain unclear. Here we show that a single IN administered dose of dsRNA into mice induced local Th1 chemokine production in the lungs and airways, and generated a biphasic and sustained mig...

    8. Effects of Butafosfan on salivary cortisol and behavioral response to social stress in piglets.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Van Der Staay, F J; De Groot, J; Van Reenen, C G; Hoving-Bolink, A H; Schuurman, T; Schmidt, B H

      2007-10-01

      We assessed the efficacy of Butafosfan, a component of Catosal, in the metaphylactic treatment of stress in pigs. Four 6-week-old female littermates were taken from 12 litters. They were confronted with a pig from a different litter for 2 h. There were 24 pairs, each consisting of confronting two unfamiliar pigs in a new pen. This housing of unfamiliar pigs provides a good, but simple, model of the psychosocial stress that pigs experience when housed in large groups on pig farms. Immediately before being housed with an unfamiliar pig, 12 pairs of pigs were injected subcutaneously with Catosal at a dose equivalent to 20 mg Butafosfan per kg body weight; the other 12 pairs received the control solution containing all ingredients of Catosal except Butafosfan. The frequency and duration of aggressive behavior and the salivary cortisol response were measured during the first 2 h of the encounter. No adverse effects associated with Catosal were observed. Subcutaneous injection of Catosal reduced the stress-induced salivary cortisol response and the frequency of aggressive behavior evoked by the social stress of housing two unfamiliar pigs together. PMID:17803732

    9. Social stress increases cortisol and hampers attention in adolescents with excess weight.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Antonio Verdejo-Garcia

      Full Text Available To experimentally examine if adolescents with excess weight are more sensitive to social stress and hence more sensitive to harmful effects of stress in cognition.We conducted an experimental study in 84 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years old classified in two groups based on age adjusted Body Mass Index percentile: Normal weight (n=42 and Excess weight (n=42. Both groups were exposed to social stress as induced by the virtual reality version of the Trier Social Stress Task--participants were requested to give a public speech about positive and negative aspects of their personalities in front of a virtual audience. The outcome measures were salivary cortisol levels and performance in cognitive tests before and after the social stressor. Cognitive tests included the CANTAB Rapid Visual Processing Test (measuring attention response latency and discriminability and the Iowa Gambling Task (measuring decision-making.Adolescents with excess weight compared to healthy weight controls displayed increased cortisol response and less improvement of attentional performance after the social stressor. Decision-making performance decreased after the social stressor in both groups.Adolescents who are overweight or obese have increased sensitivity to social stress, which detrimentally impacts attentional skills.

    10. High levels of plasma cortisol and impaired hypoosmoregulation in a mutant medaka deficient in P450c17I.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Takahashi, Hideya; Sato, Tadashi; Ikeuchi, Toshitaka; Saito, Kazuhiro; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Tatsuya

      2016-07-15

      scl is a spontaneous medaka mutant deficient in P450c17I, which is required for production of sex steroids, but not of cortisol, the major role of which is osmoregulation in teleost fish. The scl mutant provides a new model to study the functions of these hormones. We first found that fish homozygous for this mutation have plasma cortisol constitutively at a high physiological level (1000 nM). Since we previously showed that this level reversed the seawater-type differentiation of the medaka gastrointestinal tract, hypoosmoregulation of the scl mutant was analyzed. Muscle water contents in freshwater were normal in scl homozygotes, but the contents were lower than those of the wild type (WT) after seawater transfer. There were no differences in gill mRNA levels of corticosteroid receptors or ion transporters between scl homozygotes and WT. In the intestine, expression of glucocorticoid receptors and Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter were induced in WT during seawater acclimation, but not in scl homozygotes. The high plasma cortisol may prevent hypoosmoregulation by inhibition of increased intestinal water absorption, essentially by the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter, in seawater. PMID:27107936

    11. Cortisol responses to immobilization with Telazol or ketamine in baboons (Papio cynocephalus/anubis) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

      OpenAIRE

      Bentson, K L; Capitanio, J P; Mendoza, S P

      2003-01-01

      Little is known about the influence of Telazol on cortisol or of anesthetic agents on immunological measures, and reports of ketamine's effect on cortisol are inconsistent. We measured effects of Telazol, ketamine and blood sampling on cortisol in male rhesus macaques and male savannah baboons. We also obtained leukocyte counts in the macaques. In macaques, Telazol reduced cortisol in the morning but not in the afternoon; ketamine had no effect on cortisol in these animals. In baboons, cortis...

    12. ESD analog circuits and design

      CERN Document Server

      Voldman, Steven H

      2014-01-01

      A comprehensive and in-depth review of analog circuit layout, schematic architecture, device, power network and ESD design This book will provide a balanced overview of analog circuit design layout, analog circuit schematic development, architecture of chips, and ESD design.  It will start at an introductory level and will bring the reader right up to the state-of-the-art. Two critical design aspects for analog and power integrated circuits are combined. The first design aspect covers analog circuit design techniques to achieve the desired circuit performance. The second and main aspect pres

    13. Reduced cingulate gyrus volume associated with enhanced cortisol awakening response in young healthy adults reporting childhood trauma.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Shaojia Lu

      Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preclinical studies have demonstrated the relationship between stress-induced increased cortisol levels and atrophy of specific brain regions, however, this association has been less revealed in clinical samples. The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes and associations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity and gray matter volumes in young healthy adults with self-reported childhood trauma exposures. METHODS: Twenty four healthy adults with childhood trauma and 24 age- and gender-matched individuals without childhood trauma were recruited. Each participant collected salivary samples in the morning at four time points: immediately upon awakening, 30, 45, and 60 min after awakening for the assessment of cortisol awakening response (CAR. The 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging data were obtained on a Philips 3.0 Tesla scanner. Voxel-based morphometry analyses were conducted to compare the gray matter volume between two groups. Correlations of gray matter volume changes with severity of childhood trauma and CAR data were further analyzed. RESULTS: Adults with self-reported childhood trauma showed an enhanced CAR and decreased gray matter volume in the right middle cingulate gyrus. Moreover, a significant association was observed between salivary cortisol secretions after awaking and the right middle cingulate gyrus volume reduction in subjects with childhood trauma. CONCLUSIONS: The present research outcomes suggest that childhood trauma is associated with hyperactivity of the HPA axis and decreased gray matter volume in the right middle cingulate gyrus, which may represent the vulnerability for developing psychosis after childhood trauma experiences. In addition, this study demonstrates that gray matter loss in the cingulate gyrus is related to increased cortisol levels.

    14. Discrete Calculus by Analogy

      CERN Document Server

      Izadi, F A; Bagirov, G

      2009-01-01

      With its origins stretching back several centuries, discrete calculus is now an increasingly central methodology for many problems related to discrete systems and algorithms. The topics covered here usually arise in many branches of science and technology, especially in discrete mathematics, numerical analysis, statistics and probability theory as well as in electrical engineering, but our viewpoint here is that these topics belong to a much more general realm of mathematics; namely calculus and differential equations because of the remarkable analogy of the subject to this branch of mathemati

    15. An analog electronic cochlea

      OpenAIRE

      Lyon, Richard F.; Mead, Carver

      1988-01-01

      An engineered system that hears, such as a speech recognizer, can be designed by modeling the cochlea, or inner ear, and higher levels of the auditory nervous system. To be useful in such a system, a model of the cochlea should incorporate a variety of known effects, such as an asymmetric low-pass/bandpass response at each output channel, a short ringing time, and active adaptation to a wide range of input signal levels. An analog electronic cochlea has been built in CMOS VLSI technolog...

    16. Effect of dopamine, dopamine D-1 and D-2 receptor modulation on ACTH and cortisol levels in normal men and women

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Boesgaard, S; Hagen, C; Andersen, A N; Fenger, M; Eldrup, E

      1990-01-01

      The regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by dopamine is not fully understood. Therefore, we have studied the effect of dopamine, metoclopramide, a D-2 receptor antagonist, and fenoldopam, a specific D-1 receptor agonist, on ACTH and cortisol levels in normal subjects. Normal women...... received 5-h infusions of either glucose (N = 6) or dopamine at rates of 0.04 (N = 6), 0.4 (N = 6) and 4.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 (N = 8). After 3 h, 10 mg metoclopramide was given iv. No intergroup differences regarding ACTH and cortisol levels were observed (p greater than 0.05). In a second study six...... women received dopamine (4.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) or glucose for 18 h. During the infusions cortisol and ACTH levels were similar on the two study days. Administration of metoclopramide (10 mg) after 17 h induced a significant increase in cortisol levels during dopamine infusion (p less than 0...

    17. Changes In Men’s Salivary Testosterone And Cortisol Levels, And In Sexual Desire After Smelling Female Axillary And Vulvar Scents

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Ricardo eMondragón-Ceballos

      2013-10-01

      Full Text Available Several studies have shown that a woman’s vaginal or axillary odors convey information on her attractivity. Yet, whether such scents induce psychoneuroendocrinological changes in perceivers is still controversial. We studied if smelling axillary and vulvar odors collected in the periovulatory and late luteal phases of young women modify salivary testosterone and cortisol levels, as well as sexual desire in men. Forty-five women and 115 men, all of them college students and unacquainted with each other, participated in the study. Female odors were collected on pads affixed to the axilla and on panty protectors both worn the entire night before experiments. Men provided five saliva samples, a basal one before the smelling procedure, and four more 15, 30, 60 and 75 min after exposure to odors. Immediately after smelling the odor source, men answered a questionnaire rating hedonic qualities of scents, and after providing the last saliva sample they answered questionnaire on sexual desire. We found that periovulatory axillary and vulvar odors increased testosterone and cortisol levels, with vulvar scents producing a more prolonged effect. Luteal axilla odors decreased testosterone and cortisol levels, while luteal vulva odors increased cortisol. Periovulatory axilla and vulva scents accounted for a general increase of interest in sex. These odors were also rated as more pleasant and familiar, while luteal vulvar odors were perceived as intense and unpleasant.

    18. Vorticity in analog gravity

      Science.gov (United States)

      Cropp, Bethan; Liberati, Stefano; Turcati, Rodrigo

      2016-06-01

      In the analog gravity framework, the acoustic disturbances in a moving fluid can be described by an equation of motion identical to a relativistic scalar massless field propagating in curved space-time. This description is possible only when the fluid under consideration is barotropic, inviscid, and irrotational. In this case, the propagation of the perturbations is governed by an acoustic metric that depends algebrically on the local speed of sound, density, and the background flow velocity, the latter assumed to be vorticity-free. In this work we provide a straightforward extension in order to go beyond the irrotational constraint. Using a charged—relativistic and nonrelativistic—Bose–Einstein condensate as a physical system, we show that in the low-momentum limit and performing the eikonal approximation we can derive a d’Alembertian equation of motion for the charged phonons where the emergent acoustic metric depends on flow velocity in the presence of vorticity.

    19. Feedback in analog circuits

      CERN Document Server

      Ochoa, Agustin

      2016-01-01

      This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

    20. Elevated hair cortisol levels in chronically stressed dementia caregivers.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Stalder, Tobias; Tietze, Antje; Steudte, Susann; Alexander, Nina; Dettenborn, Lucia; Kirschbaum, Clemens

      2014-09-01

      Hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) are assumed to reflect integrated long-term cortisol levels and have been proposed as a promising endocrine marker of chronic psychological stress. The current study examined HCC in relation to caregiving burden, a well-established naturalistic model of chronic stress in humans. HCC and relevant psychosocial data were examined in 20 caregivers of relatives with dementia and 20 non-caregiver controls matched for age and sex. Results revealed elevated HCC in dementia caregivers compared to non-caregiver controls (F(1,38)=4.4, p=.04, ηp2=.10). Further, within caregivers, a trend for a positive association of HCC with self-reported caregiving burden (r=.43, p=.058) and a positive association with depressiveness (r=.48, p=.045) were observed. No other associations between HCC and subjective measures were seen. These findings concur with the notion that HCC sensitively capture endocrine aberrations in stress-exposed groups. PMID:25001953

    1. Analog regulation of metabolic demand

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Muskhelishvili Georgi

      2011-03-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background The 3D structure of the chromosome of the model organism Escherichia coli is one key component of its gene regulatory machinery. This type of regulation mediated by topological transitions of the chromosomal DNA can be thought of as an analog control, complementing the digital control, i.e. the network of regulation mediated by dedicated transcription factors. It is known that alterations in the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA lead to a rich pattern of differential expressed genes. Using a network approach, we analyze these expression changes for wild type E. coli and mutants lacking nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs from a metabolic and transcriptional regulatory network perspective. Results We find a significantly higher correspondence between gene expression and metabolism for the wild type expression changes compared to mutants in NAPs, indicating that supercoiling induces meaningful metabolic adjustments. As soon as the underlying regulatory machinery is impeded (as for the NAP mutants, this coherence between expression changes and the metabolic network is substantially reduced. This effect is even more pronounced, when we compute a wild type metabolic flux distribution using flux balance analysis and restrict our analysis to active reactions. Furthermore, we are able to show that the regulatory control exhibited by DNA supercoiling is not mediated by the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN, as the consistency of the expression changes with the TRN logic of activation and suppression is strongly reduced in the wild type in comparison to the mutants. Conclusions So far, the rich patterns of gene expression changes induced by alterations of the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA have been difficult to interpret. Here we characterize the effective networks formed by supercoiling-induced gene expression changes mapped onto reconstructions of E. coli's metabolic and transcriptional regulatory network. Our

    2. Use of hair cortisol analysis to detect hypercortisolism during active drinking phases in alcohol-dependent individuals.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Stalder, Tobias; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Heinze, Kareen; Steudte, Susann; Foley, Paul; Tietze, Antje; Dettenborn, Lucia

      2010-12-01

      The assessment of cortisol levels in human hair has recently been suggested to provide a retrospective index of cumulative cortisol exposure over periods of up to 6 months. The current study examined the utility of hair cortisol analysis to retrospectively detect hypercortisolism during active drinking phases in alcoholics in acute withdrawal (n=23), the normalisation of cortisol output in abstinent alcoholics (n=25) and cortisol levels in age- and gender-matched controls (n=20). Scalp-near 3-cm hair segments were sampled and analysed for cortisol content. Results showed three to fourfold higher cortisol levels in hair samples of alcoholics in acute withdrawal than in those of abstinent alcoholics (p<.001) or controls (p<.001), with no differences between the latter two groups. The current hair cortisol findings closely mirror results of previous research using well-established measures of systemic cortisol secretion and thus provide further validation of this novel method. PMID:20727937

    3. Salivary Cortisol, Salivary Alpha Amylase, and the Dental Anxiety Scale

      OpenAIRE

      Sadi, Hana; Finkelman, Matthew; Rosenberg, Morton

      2013-01-01

      The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between dental anxiety, salivary cortisol, and salivary alpha amylase (sAA) levels. Furthermore, the aim was to look into individual differences such as age, race, gender, any existing pain, or traumatic dental experience and their effect on dental anxiety. This study followed a cross-sectional design and included a convenience sample of 46. Every patient was asked to complete the Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) and a basic demographic/denta...

    4. HAIR CORTISOL AS A BIOMARKER FOR PSYCHIATRIC ILLNESSES

      OpenAIRE

      Herane Vives, Andrés

      2013-01-01

      The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis (HPA) consists of a chain of stimulatory hormones and feedback loops and is under control of the higher cerebral centres that determine their overall activity (Papadopoulos and Cleare, 2011). One of those hormones is cortisol which regulates a wide range of bodily functions including metabolism, immunity, neuronal survival, neurogenesis (Dettenborn et al., 2011) and stress (Chrousos, 2009) Acute stress has been associated with an activation of the HPA a...

    5. Perceived Partner Responsiveness Predicts Diurnal Cortisol Profiles 10 Years Later

      OpenAIRE

      Slatcher, Richard B.; Selcuk, Emre; Ong, Anthony D.

      2015-01-01

      Several decades of research have demonstrated that marital relationships have a powerful influence on physical health. However, surprisingly little is known about how marriage affects health—both in terms of psychological processes and biological ones. We investigated the associations between perceived partner responsiveness—the extent to which people feel understood, cared for and appreciated by their romantic partner—and diurnal cortisol over a 10-year period in a large sample of married an...

    6. Effect of weaning age on cortisol release in piglets.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Li, L A; Yang, J J; Li, Y; Lv, L; Xie, J J; Du, G M; Jin, T M; Qin, S Y; Jiao, X L

      2016-01-01

      The effect of weaning age on the adrenal cortex, which plays a vital role in the stress response, is currently unknown. Therefore, plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels, weights and relative weights of adrenal glands, and steroidogenesis-related protein and enzyme expression levels in piglets weaned on different days were determined. Piglets weaned at 35 days had significantly lower ACTH levels than those weaned at 14 or 21 days, and cortisol levels of piglets weaned at 21, 28, and 35 days were significantly lower than those of piglets weaned on day 14. Adrenal gland weights of piglets weaned at 28 and 35 days and relative adrenal gland weights of piglets weaned at 35 days were significantly lower than those of piglets weaned at 14 days. However, no significant difference was detected in the expression of melanocortin-type 2 receptor mRNA, which is associated with weaning age. Steroidogenic acute-regulatory (StAR) mRNA and cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P450 mRNA expression levels in piglets weaned at 28 and 35 days were significantly lower than in those weaned at 14 or 21 days, and P450 11β mRNA expression levels in piglets weaned at 28 and 35 days were significantly lower than in those weaned at 14 days. Therefore, early-weaned piglets exhibited increased adrenal gland weights and StAR and steroidogenic enzyme expression, all of which contributed to high cortisol levels. The high plasma ACTH and cortisol levels in early-weaned piglets indicate that these animals would be greatly affected by stress. PMID:27173313

    7. Effect of Examination Stress on The Plasma Cortisol Level

      OpenAIRE

      Rachit M Joshi; Saurin J Sanghavi; Devanshi P Upadhyaya; Ashutosh Chauhan; Shital Halvadia

      2012-01-01

      Background: Medical profession has been always a noble and prestigious path but the endeavour behind it has been truly known by the persons who undergone the training of becoming a doctor. Medical students face many stresses in their academic life. This study is carried out to provide data and re-establish the effect of academic examination stress on the plasma cortisol levels. Methods: A longitudinal follow up study was carried out on the first MBBS medical students who were appearing for th...

    8. Extraction and Analysis of Cortisol from Human and Monkey Hair

      OpenAIRE

      Meyer, Jerrold; Novak, Melinda; Hamel, Amanda; Rosenberg, Kendra

      2014-01-01

      The stress hormone cortisol (CORT) is slowly incorporated into the growing hair shaft of humans, nonhuman primates, and other mammals. We developed and validated a method for CORT extraction and analysis from rhesus monkey hair and subsequently adapted this method for use with human scalp hair. In contrast to CORT "point samples" obtained from plasma or saliva, hair CORT provides an integrated measure of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system activity, and thus physiological stres...

    9. Social rank and cortisol among female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      Dong-Dong QIN; Joshua Dominic Rizak; Xiao-Li FENG; Xun-Xun CHU; Shang-Chuan YANG; Chun-Lu LI; Long-Bao LV; Yuan-Ye MA; Xin-Tian HU

      2013-01-01

      In animal societies,some stressful events can lead to higher levels of physiological stress.Such stressors,like social rank,also predict an increased vulnerability to an array of diseases.However,the physiological relationship between social rank and stress varies between different species,as well as within groups of a single species.For example,dominant individuals are more socially stressed at times,while at other times it is the subordinate ones who experience this stress.Together,these variations make it difficult to assess disease vulnerability as connected to social interactions.In order to leam more about how physiological rank relationships vary between groups of a single species,cortisol measurements from hair samples were used to evaluate the effects of dominance rank on long-term stress levels in despotic and less stringent female rhesus macaque hierarchal groups.In despotic groups,cortisol levels were found not to be correlated with social rank,but a negative correlation was found between social rank and cortisol levels in less stringent hierarchies.Low ranking monkeys in less stringent groups secreted elevated levels of cortisol compared to higher ranking animals.These data suggest that variations in the strictness of the dominance hierarchy are determining factors in rank related stress physiology.The further consideration of nonhuman primate social system diversity and the linear degree of their hierarchies may allow for the development of valid rank-related stress models that will help increase our understanding and guide the development of new therapeutics for diseases related to human socioeconomic status.

    10. Cortisol levels, burnout and engagement in university employees

      OpenAIRE

      Ortiz-Valdés, Juan A.; Vega-Michel, Claudia

      2009-01-01

      People’s psychological relationship with work can be conceptualized as a continuum ranging from negative experiences of professional burnout to positive experiences, known as engagement. A retrospective ex post facto study was carried out for the purpose of exploring and measuring the degree of relation of professional burnout and job engagement to cortisol levels and the filing of claims for medical costs among university employees. One hundred ninety-nine subjects participated. A weak posit...

    11. Inflammation and cortisol response i coronary artery disease

      OpenAIRE

      Nijm, Johnny

      2008-01-01

      Atherosclerosis is characterized by a chronic inflammation, involving autoimmune components, in the arterial wall. An increase in proinflammatory activity relative to anti-inflammatory activity is considered to cause a progression of the disease towards plaque instability and risk of atherothrombotic events, such as acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Cortisol, the end product of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, is a powerful endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator. Disturbances in the...

    12. Cortisol secretion patterns in addiction and addiction risk

      OpenAIRE

      LOVALLO, WILLIAM R.

      2006-01-01

      Addiction to alcohol or nicotine involves altered functioning of the brain's motivational systems. Altered functioning of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) axis may hold clues to the nature of the motivational changes accompanying addiction and vulnerability to addiction. Alcohol and nicotine show at least three forms of interaction with HPA functioning. Acute intake of both substances causes stress-like cortisol responses. Their persistent use may dysregulate the HPA. Finally, ...

    13. Relationships Among Prenatal Depression, Plasma Cortisol, and Inflammatory Cytokines

      OpenAIRE

      Shelton, Melissa M.; Schminkey, Donna L.; Groer, Maureen W.

      2014-01-01

      A secondary pilot study was carried out as part of a larger parent study of thyroid function in pregnancy and postpartum. All women in the parent study (N = 631) had blood samples, demographic data, and measures of perceived stress and dysphoric moods collected between 16 and 26 weeks’ gestation. The current study was completed with a subset of 105 pregnant women to examine the relationships among perceived stress, depression, plasma cortisol and cytokines during the second trimester of pregn...

    14. Analogy-Based Expectation Equilibrium

      OpenAIRE

      Jehiel, P

      2001-01-01

      It is assumed that players bundle nodes in which other players must move into analogy classes, and players only have expectations about the average behavior in every class. A solution concept is proposed for multi-stage games with perfect information: at every node players choose best-responses to their analogy-based expectations, and expectations are correct on average over those various nodes pooled together into the same analogy classes. The approach is applied to a variety of games. It is...

    15. Beginning analog electronics through projects

      CERN Document Server

      Singmin, Andrew

      2001-01-01

      Analog electronics is the simplest way to start a fun, informative, learning program. Beginning Analog Electronics Through Projects, Second Edition was written with the needs of beginning hobbyists and students in mind. This revision of Andrew Singmin's popular Beginning Electronics Through Projects provides practical exercises, building techniques, and ideas for useful electronics projects. Additionally, it features new material on analog and digital electronics, and new projects for troubleshooting test equipment.Published in the tradition of Beginning Electronics Through Projects an

    16. Analog and digital signal processing

      Science.gov (United States)

      Baher, H.

      The techniques of signal processing in both the analog and digital domains are addressed in a fashion suitable for undergraduate courses in modern electrical engineering. The topics considered include: spectral analysis of continuous and discrete signals, analysis of continuous and discrete systems and networks using transform methods, design of analog and digital filters, digitization of analog signals, power spectrum estimation of stochastic signals, FFT algorithms, finite word-length effects in digital signal processes, linear estimation, and adaptive filtering.

    17. Understanding Relations Among Early Family Environment, Cortisol Response, and Child Aggression via a Prevention Experiment

      Science.gov (United States)

      O’Neal, Colleen R.; Brotman, Laurie Miller; Huang, Keng-Yen; Gouley, Kathleen Kiely; Kamboukos, Dimitra; Calzada, Esther J.; Pine, Daniel S.

      2012-01-01

      This study examined relations among family environment, cortisol response, and behavior in the context of a randomized controlled trial with 92 children (M = 48 months) at risk for antisocial behavior. Previously, researchers reported an intervention effect on cortisol response in anticipation of a social challenge. The current study examined whether changes in cortisol response were related to later child aggression. Among lower warmth families, the intervention effect on aggression was largely mediated by the intervention effect on cortisol response. Although the intervention also resulted in significant benefits on child engaging behavior, cortisol response did not mediate this effect. These findings demonstrate meaningful associations between cortisol response and aggression among children at familial risk for antisocial behavior. PMID:20331668

    18. Cortisol, Health, and Coping in Patients with Nonspecific Low Back Pain

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Sveinsdottir, Vigdis; Eriksen, Hege R; Ursin, Holger;

      2016-01-01

      Subjective health complaints (SHC), including nonspecific low back pain (LBP) as the most common single complaint, are the main reasons for long-term sick leave in many western countries. These complaints are often attributed to "stress". Cortisol has frequently been considered a biomarker...... reflecting sustained physiological HPA-axis activity, and is characterized by a high cortisol awakening response (CAR) and low evening values. The aim of the study was to investigate whether LBP patients had a normal characteristic cortisol profile, and whether possible deviations were related to coping and...... SHC, fatigue, pain, coping, and social support. The patients showed a seemingly normal cortisol profile. However, CAR was larger among patients compared to the reference population. Patients with low cortisol reactivity had more SHC, pain, and fatigue, and those with higher evening cortisol reported...

    19. Relationship status and relationship instability, but not dominance, predict individual differences in baseline cortisol levels.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Dario Maestripieri

      Full Text Available We investigated variation in baseline cortisol levels in relation to relationship status (single or in a relationship, relationship characteristics (length, stability, presence or absence of clear dominance, or individual attributes (dominant or subordinate status, relative physical attractiveness, relationship worries. Study participants were 77 men and 75 women aged between 18 and 38 years. Individuals in romantic relationships had lower cortisol levels than singles. Individuals of African ethnicity, however, showed the opposite pattern. Individuals who perceived their relationship to be highly unstable had higher cortisol levels. Aside from African-Americans, married individuals reported the lowest relationship instability and the lowest cortisol levels, followed by individuals in long-term relationships, and by individuals in short-term relationships. The presence or absence of clear dominance in the relationship, dominance status, or relationship worries did not affect cortisol levels. Therefore relationship status and relationship instability were better predictors of variation in cortisol (presumably through stress-related mechanisms than individual attributes.

    20. REPRODUCTIVE HORMONES AND CORTISOL RESPONSES TO PLYOMETRIC TRAINING IN MALES

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Serife Vatansever Ozen

      2012-07-01

      Full Text Available Plyometric training activities are commonly used by a wide range of athletes to increase jump performance and improve explosive power and muscular activation patterns. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of plyometric training on male reproductive hormones. Nineteen recreationally active males volunteered to participate in this study and were randomly assigned to plyometrically trained (n=10, 21.2 ±2.3 years and control groups (n=9, 21.4± 2.1. The plyometric training group performed in a six-week plyometric training programme and the control group did not perform any plyometric training techniques. Resting serum levels of testosterone, prolactin, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinising hormone (LH, and cortisol were measured in each subject at t0 (before the training, t1 (end of third week and t2 (end of training. Two-way ANOVA revealed significant (P<0.05 interaction effects for testosterone, prolactin, FSH and cortisol. Six-week plyometric training decreased serum levels of testosterone, cortisol and FSH and increased serum levels of prolactin. These results suggest the presence of alterations in anabolic and catabolic hormonal responses to resistance exercise in men.

    1. Daily hassles and snack intake: The role of cortisol reactivity status

      OpenAIRE

      Newman, Emily; O Connor, D. B.; Conner, M.

      2007-01-01

      Previous research has shown high cortisol reactors to consume a greater amount of snack foods than low reactors following a laboratory stressor. The current study tested whether high cortisol reactors also consume more snacks than low reactors in response to field stressors. Fifty pre-menopausal women completed a laboratory stressor, provided saliva samples to assess cortisol reactor status and then completed daily hassles and snack intake diaries over the next fourteen days. Hierarchical mul...

    2. Study on Serum Cortisol and Perceived Stress Scale in the Police Constables

      OpenAIRE

      Sanjeev S. Walvekar; Ambekar, Jeevan G.; Devaranavadagi, Basavaraj B

      2015-01-01

      Introduction: The occupational stress may be more among the police constables. Under the stressed conditions, the body secretes more Cortisol. Elevated serum cortisol levels significantly correlate with the symptoms of metabolic Syndrome. Perceived stress scale (PSS) is the most widely used psychological tool for measuring the perception of stress. The objective of this study was to examine the association between perceived stress and Serum Cortisol and also to explore stress as an occupation...

    3. Cortisol and aldosterone comparisons of cottontail rabbits collected by shooting, trapping, and falconry.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hamilton, G D; Weeks, H P

      1985-01-01

      Cortisol and aldosterone levels were measured in plasma of eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) collected by three different methods, i.e., shooting, live-trapping and falconry. Cortisol levels ranged from near 0 to 27.5 micrograms/100 ml and aldosterone from near 0 to 220 ng/100 ml. Shot animals had significantly lower cortisol concentrations than those taken by either of the other methods. Trapped cottontails also had significantly lower aldosterone levels. PMID:3981742

    4. Understanding Relations Among Early Family Environment, Cortisol Response, and Child Aggression via a Prevention Experiment

      OpenAIRE

      O’Neal, Colleen R.; Brotman, Laurie Miller; Huang, Keng-Yen; Gouley, Kathleen Kiely; Kamboukos, Dimitra; Calzada, Esther J.; Pine, Daniel S.

      2010-01-01

      This study examined relations among family environment, cortisol response, and behavior in the context of a randomized controlled trial with 92 children (M = 48 months) at risk for antisocial behavior. Previously, researchers reported an intervention effect on cortisol response in anticipation of a social challenge. The current study examined whether changes in cortisol response were related to later child aggression. Among lower warmth families, the intervention effect on aggression was larg...

    5. Cortisol and testosterone increase financial risk taking and may destabilize markets

      OpenAIRE

      Cueva, Carlos; Roberts, R. Edward; Spencer, Tom; Rani, Nisha; Tempest, Michelle; Tobler, Philippe N.; Herbert, Joe; Rustichini, Aldo

      2015-01-01

      It is widely known that financial markets can become dangerously unstable, yet it is unclear why. Recent research has highlighted the possibility that endogenous hormones, in particular testosterone and cortisol, may critically influence traders’ financial decision making. Here we show that cortisol, a hormone that modulates the response to physical or psychological stress, predicts instability in financial markets. Specifically, we recorded salivary levels of cortisol and testosterone in peo...

    6. Salivary cortisol day curves in Addison's disease in patients on hydrocortisone replacement.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ross, I L; Levitt, N S; Van der Walt, J S; Schatz, D A; Johannsson, G; Haarburger, D H; Pillay, T S

      2013-01-01

      Using salivary cortisol (SC) measurements, cortisol exposure in Addison's disease patients on hydrocortisone replacement was determined and compared with healthy controls. Cortisol pharmacokinetics was assessed in 31 patients with Addison's disease on replacement hydrocortisone doses (median daily dose 20 mg; range 5-50 mg) and 30 healthy control subjects. Saliva samples (n=16) were collected between 08:00 and 00:00 h in 1 day, using a passive drool technique. Cortisol exposure was evaluated by noncompartmental approach. In the patients, cortisol exposure was significantly higher than in controls: median inter-quartile range (IQR) peak cortisol (C(max)) 174.5 (59.3-837.0) vs. 6.50 (4.7-19.3) nmol/l, p=0.0001; area under the curve (AUC) 390.1 (177.1-928.9) vs. 21.4 (14.6-28.4) minutes*nmol/l, p=0.0001, trough cortisol level (C(min)) 0.49 (0.49-0.96) vs. 0.49 (0.49-0.49) nmol/l, p=0.02, occurring at 480.0 (0.1-660.0) vs. 405.0 (180.0-570.0) min, p=0.56. First peak cortisol was 174.5 (53.0-754.7) vs. 6.27 (3.90-8.47) nmol/l, p=0.0001 and second peak cortisol 18.90 (5.22-76.9) vs. 3.12 (1.76-4.79) nmol/l, p=0.0001. The time to first peak cortisol differed between the 2 groups, 30 (30-75) vs. 0.1 (0.1-30) minutes; p=0.0001. At doses studied, hydrocortisone replacement therapy results in cortisol pharmacokinetics being markedly different from endogenous cortisol profiles in healthy control subjects. Addison's disease patients had significantly higher SC levels compared to healthy control subjects. PMID:22893258

    7. Parenting stressors and morning cortisol in a sample of working mothers

      OpenAIRE

      Hibel, Leah C.; Mercado, Evelyn; Trumbell, Jill M.

      2012-01-01

      The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is a normative rise in cortisol levels across the 30 minutes post awakening. Both the levels and the degree of change in cortisol across this time period are sensitive to the perceived challenges of the day and are thought to prepare the individual to meet these tasks. However, working parents of young children may be under unique strains at this time as they attempt to simultaneously care for their children while also preparing themselves for the workday...

    8. Time-of-day effects in arousal: disrupted diurnal cortisol profiles in children with ADHD

      OpenAIRE

      Imeraj, Lindita; Antrop, Inge; Roeyers, Herbert; Swanson, James; Deschepper, Ellen; Bal, Sarah; Deboutte, Dirk

      2012-01-01

      Background: Fluctuations in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms related to regulatory deficits in arousal states are themselves characterized by circadian rhythms. Although cortisol is an important circadian arousal-related marker, studies focusing on across-the-day cortisol variations in ADHD are scarce. There is no study with multiple measurements to take into account interday and intraday variability. Methods: Salivary cortisol was sampled five times a day (awakenin...

    9. Salivary Cortisol and Binge Eating Disorder in Obese Women After Surgery for Morbid Obesity

      OpenAIRE

      Larsen, Junilla K.; van Ramshorst, Bert; van Doornen, Lorenz J. P.; Geenen, Rinie

      2009-01-01

      Background Binge eating episodes characterized by loss of control are hypothesized to be accompanied by changes in hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis functioning. Cortisol is an end product of this neuroendocrine stress system. Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the cortisol levels and the awakening cortisol response (ACR) in obese persons showing binge eating after surgery for morbid obesity. Method Sixteen obese women with binge eating disorder (BED) and 18 obese women with...

    10. Effects of food substrates on reliability of salivary cortisol measures in dogs in training context

      OpenAIRE

      Ligout, S.; Wright, H; van Driel, K.; Gladwell, F.; Mills, D. S.; Cooper, J. J.

      2009-01-01

      Salivary cortisol has been widely used as a means of assessing stress in dogs (Beerda et al 1988; Schalke et al 2007), though several authors have questioned whether handling and the use of food/chews can affect measures (Kobelt et al 2003, Dreschel and Granger 2009). We investigated effects of food on salivary cortisol measures in a handling/training context. For the first study 10 dogs were used to investigate if food introduced unpredictable variation in salivary cortisol. For each do...

    11. Cortisol awakening response in late pregnancy in women with previous or ongoing depression

      OpenAIRE

      Hellgren, Charlotte; Åkerud, Helena; Skalkidou, Alkistis; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

      2013-01-01

      Pregnancy is associated with increased basal cortisol levels, and decreased hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity. The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is a measure of HPA-axis reactivity which has been reported to be increased in patients with ongoing depressive disorder and in individuals with remitted depression. In this study, we investigated HPA-axis reactivity in pregnant women with ongoing or previous depression. The CAR was assessed by measurement of salivary cortisol ...

    12. La melatonina reduce la respuesta de cortisol al ACTH en humanos Melatonin reduces cortisol response to ACTH in humans

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Carmen Campino

      2008-11-01

      Full Text Available Background: Melatonin receptors are widely distributed in human tissues but they have not been reported in human adrenal gland. Aim: To assess if the human adrenal gland expresses melatonin receptors and if melatonin affeets cortisol response to ACTH in dexamethasone suppressed volunteers. Material and methods: Adrenal glands were obtained from 4 patients undergoing unilateral nephrectomy-adrenalectomy for renal cáncer. Expression of mRNA MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors was measured by Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR. The effect of melatonin on the response to intravenous (i.v. ACTH was tested (randomized cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled tríal in eight young healthy males pretreated with dexamethasone (1 mg at 23:00 h. On the next day at 08:00 h, an i.v. Une was inserted, at 08:30 h, and after a blood sample, subjeets ingested 6 mg melatonin or placebo. At 09:00 h, 1-24 ACTH (Cortrosyn, 1µg/1.73 m² body surface área was injected, drawing samples at 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after. Melatonin, cortisol, cortisone, progesterone, aldosterone, DHEA-S, testosterone and prolactin were measured by immunoassay. Results: The four adrenal glands expressed only MT1 receptor mRNA. Melatonin ingestión reduced the cortisol response to ACTH from 14.6+1.45µg/dl at 60 min in the placebo group to 10.8+1.2µg/dl in the melatonin group (p <0.01 mixed model test. It did not affect other steroid hormone levels and abolished the morningphysiological decline of prolactin. Conclusions: The expression ofMTl melatonin receptor in the human adrenal, and the melatonin reduction of ACTH-stimulated cortisol production suggest a direct melatonin action on the adrenal gland .

    13. A study of cortisol reactivity and recovery among young adolescents: Heterogeneity and longitudinal stability and change.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ji, Juye; Negriff, Sonya; Kim, Hansung; Susman, Elizabeth J

      2016-04-01

      The dominance of reactivity-based theories of the cortisol response and lack of attention to cortisol recovery makes it difficult to compile an integrated theory of the stress response. This report examined a reactivity and recovery model of the cortisol response using variable-centered and person-centered approaches. Age and sex differences and heterogeneity in the pattern of cortisol response were examined. Participants were 135 healthy young adolescents participating in a three-wave longitudinal study of puberty and psychological development. At each wave, five saliva-cortisol samples were collected prior to and following a modified Trier Social Stressor Test for Children. Linear, quadratic, and piece-wise models of latent growth curve analyses and latent class analyses were conducted. Age differences in cortisol reactivity and recovery were found at wave 1 and sex differences in cortisol reactivity emerged at wave 3. Meaningful heterogeneity in the pattern of cortisol response was found cross-sectionally and longitudinally. The implications of heterogeneity in the cortisol response during early adolescence for developmental science are discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 58: 283-302, 2016. PMID:26517401

    14. Cortisol, Health, and Coping in Patients with Nonspecific Low Back Pain.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Sveinsdottir, Vigdis; Eriksen, Hege R; Ursin, Holger; Hansen, Åse M; Harris, Anette

      2016-03-01

      Subjective health complaints (SHC), including nonspecific low back pain (LBP) as the most common single complaint, are the main reasons for long-term sick leave in many western countries. These complaints are often attributed to "stress". Cortisol has frequently been considered a biomarker reflecting sustained physiological HPA-axis activity, and is characterized by a high cortisol awakening response (CAR) and low evening values. The aim of the study was to investigate whether LBP patients had a normal characteristic cortisol profile, and whether possible deviations were related to coping and health. 305 patients on long-term sick leave for LBP participated in the study, and saliva cortisol profiles were compared to a reference population consisting of Danish workers. Cortisol was measured upon awakening, after 30 min, and in the evening. Additionally, patients answered questionnaires about SHC, fatigue, pain, coping, and social support. The patients showed a seemingly normal cortisol profile. However, CAR was larger among patients compared to the reference population. Patients with low cortisol reactivity had more SHC, pain, and fatigue, and those with higher evening cortisol reported higher scores on coping. The results are discussed in terms of theory, practical considerations, and possible mechanisms for the association between cortisol, health, and coping. PMID:26287577

    15. 21 CFR 862.1205 - Cortisol (hydrocortisone and hydroxycorticosterone) test system.

      Science.gov (United States)

      2010-04-01

      ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1205 Cortisol (hydrocortisone and hydroxycorticosterone) test...

    16. Cortisol, sleep, and recovery - Some gender differences but no straight associations

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Eek, Frida; Karlson, Björn; Garde, Anne Helene;

      2012-01-01

      Work related fatigue has been suggested as a link in the assumed sequence of events between repeated adverse work demands and the development of work related stress, which may be associated with changes in concentrations of cortisol, psychological overload and, in the long run, health problems. I......, (II) occupational fatigue and (III) subjective sleep quality the night preceding cortisol sampling. Further, possible gender differences were tested........ Insufficient sleep is a contributing factor to lack of recovery, but previous studies on associations between subjective aspects of sleep and recovery, and cortisol, have been inconclusive. The aim with the present study was to examine possible associations between cortisol measures and (I) self-rated recovery...

    17. The fear-factor stress test: an ethical, non-invasive laboratory method that produces consistent and sustained cortisol responding in men and women.

      Science.gov (United States)

      du Plooy, Christopher; Thomas, Kevin G F; Henry, Michelle; Human, Robyn; Jacobs, W Jake

      2014-06-01

      We describe a method to administer a controlled, effective stressor to humans in the laboratory. The method combines the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and the Cold Pressor Test into a single, believable procedure called the Fear-Factor Stress Test (FFST). In the procedure, participants imagine auditioning for the reality television show Fear Factor. They stand before a video recorder and a panel of judges while (a) delivering a motivational speech, (b) performing a verbal arithmetic task, and (c) placing one hand into a bucket of ice water for up to 2 min. We measured subjective anxiety, heart rate, and salivary cortisol in three groups of young adults (n = 30 each, equal numbers of men and women): FFST, TSST, and Control (a placebo version of the FFST). Although the FFST and TSST groups were not distinguishable at the cortisol measure taken 5 min post-manipulation, at 35 min postmanipulation average cortisol levels in the TSST group had returned to baseline, whereas those in the FFST group continued to rise. The proportion of individual cortisol responders (≥ 2 nmol/l increase over baseline) in the TSST and FFST groups did not differ at the 5-min measure, but at the 35-min measure the FFST group contained significantly more responders. The findings indicate that the FFST induces a more robust and sustained cortisol response (which we assume is a marker of an HPA-axis response) than the TSST, and that it does so without increasing participant discomfort or incurring appreciably greater resource and time costs. PMID:24435939

    18. Novel Analog For Muscle Deconditioning

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Ryder, Jeff; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd. Elizabeth; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Hackney, Kyle; Fiedler, James; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Bloomberg, Jacob

      2011-01-01

      Existing models (such as bed rest) of muscle deconditioning are cumbersome and expensive. We propose a new model utilizing a weighted suit to manipulate strength, power, or endurance (function) relative to body weight (BW). Methods: 20 subjects performed 7 occupational astronaut tasks while wearing a suit weighted with 0-120% of BW. Models of the full relationship between muscle function/BW and task completion time were developed using fractional polynomial regression and verified by the addition of pre-and postflightastronaut performance data for the same tasks. Splineregression was used to identify muscle function thresholds below which task performance was impaired. Results: Thresholds of performance decline were identified for each task. Seated egress & walk (most difficult task) showed thresholds of leg press (LP) isometric peak force/BW of 18 N/kg, LP power/BW of 18 W/kg, LP work/BW of 79 J/kg, isokineticknee extension (KE)/BW of 6 Nm/kg, and KE torque/BW of 1.9 Nm/kg.Conclusions: Laboratory manipulation of relative strength has promise as an appropriate analog for spaceflight-induced loss of muscle function, for predicting occupational task performance and establishing operationally relevant strength thresholds.

    19. Molecular interactions between (--epigallocatechin gallate analogs and pancreatic lipase.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Shihui Wang

      Full Text Available The molecular interactions between pancreatic lipase (PL and four tea polyphenols (EGCG analogs, like (--epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, (--gallocatechin gallate (GCG, (--epicatechin gallate (ECG, and (--epigallocatechin (EC, were studied from PL activity, conformation, kinetics and thermodynamics. It was observed that EGCG analogs inhibited PL activity, and their inhibitory rates decreased by the order of EGCG>GCG>ECG>EC. PL activity at first decreased rapidly and then slowly with the increase of EGCG analogs concentrations. α-Helix content of PL secondary structure decreased dependent on EGCG analogs concentration by the order of EGCG>GCG>ECG>EC. EGCG, ECG, and EC could quench PL fluorescence both dynamically and statically, while GCG only quenched statically. EGCG analogs would induce PL self-assembly into complexes and the hydrodynamic radii of the complexes possessed a close relationship with the inhibitory rates. Kinetics analysis showed that EGCG analogs non-competitively inhibited PL activity and did not bind to PL catalytic site. DSC measurement revealed that EGCG analogs decreased the transition midpoint temperature of PL enzyme, suggesting that these compounds reduced PL enzyme thermostability. In vitro renaturation through urea solution indicated that interactions between PL and EGCG analogs were weak and non-covalent.

    20. Increased SERT DNA methylation is associated with bullying victimization and blunted cortisol response to stress in childhood: a longitudinal study of discordant MZ twins

      OpenAIRE

      Isabelle Ouellet-Morin; Chloe Wong; Andrea Danese; Pariante, Carmine M.; Papadopoulos, Andrew S.; Jonathan Mill; Louise Arseneault

      2012-01-01

      Childhood adverse experiences are known to induce persistent changes in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity to stress. However, the mechanisms by which these experiences shape neuroendocrine response to stress remain unclear.We tested whether bullying victimization influenced SERT DNA methylation using a discordant monozygotic (MZ) twin design. A sub-sample of 28 MZ twin pairs discordant for bullying victimization, with data on cortisol and DNA methylation, ...

    1. Isolated transfer of analog signals

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bezdek, T.

      1974-01-01

      Technique transfers analog signal levels across high isolation boundary without circuit performance being affected by magnetizing reactance or leakage inductance. Transfers of analog information across isolated boundary are made by interrupting signal flow, with switch, in such a manner as to produce alternating signal which is applied to transformer.

    2. Drawing Analogies in Environmental Education

      Science.gov (United States)

      Affifi, Ramsey

      2014-01-01

      Reconsidering the origin, process, and outcomes of analogy-making suggests practices for environmental educators who strive to disengage humans from the isolating illusions of dichotomizing frameworks. We can view analogies as outcomes of developmental processes within which human subjectivity is but an element, threading our sense of self back…

    3. Analog elements for transuranic chemistries

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      A chemical extraction technique for estimating the biologically available fraction of nonessential trace elements in soils has been developed. This procedure has been used in evaluating the uptake of naturally occurring transuranic analog elements from soils into several foodstuffs. The availability of the natural elements has been compared with the availability of their analog transuranics which have been derived from global fallout

    4. Natural analog studies: Licensing perspective

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Bradbury, J.W. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

      1995-09-01

      This report describes the licensing perspective of the term {open_quotes}natural analog studies{close_quotes} as used in CFR Part 60. It describes the misunderstandings related to its definition which has become evident during discussions at the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission meetings and tries to clarify the appropriate applications of natural analog studies to aspects of repository site characterization.

    5. CORTISOL LOWERING ACTION AND CARDIOVASCULAR STABILITY OF ETOMIDATE: A COMPARISON WITH PROPOFOL IN CONTROLLED HYPERTENSIVES

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Swati

      2015-09-01

      Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Etomidate suppresses corticosteroid synthesis in the adrenal cortex by reversibly inhibiting the enzyme 11 - beta - hydroxylase , leading to primary adrenal suppression. Continuous etomidate infusion for sedation of critically ill trauma patients in intensive care units has been associated with increased mortality due to adrenal suppression. Etomidate has a favorable haemodynamic profile and is the preferred drug in hypertensive patients but is often not used for the fear of adrenal suppression. Propofol is a widely used hypnotic agent used for induction of general anaesthesia. AIM: To study and compare the haemodynamic profile, the extent of adrenal suppression and the side effects of etomidate and propofol. METHOD: Sixty controlled hypertensives, undergoing laparoscopic major gynaecological surgery were randomly allocated in a double blind manner to receive as an inducing agent etom idate (0.3mg/kg (group E or propofol (2mg/kg (group P. Anaesthesia was administered according to the standard institutional protocol and residual neuromuscular block was reversed. All patients were sent to post anaesthe tic care unit. Systolic, diastolic , mean blood pressure and heart rates were recorded pre - induction, post induction and at 5 minutes thereafter until 30 minutes. Incidence of pain on injection was noted during induction and myoclonus was observed just after the induction. Incidence of PONV was noted in all cases. Serum cortisol levels were measured pre - operatively, after completion of operation and 24 hours post operatively. RESULTS: Mean blood pressure decreased in 60% patients in group P. 15% patients in this group suffered hypotension immediately after induction and needed bolus iv infusion and /or phenylephrine. No patient in group E needed phenylephrine. Patients receiving etomidate had a lower serum cortisol concentration immediately after the operation than those receiving propofol, but no differences between the groups were

    6. The effects of season, daylight saving and time of sunrise on serum cortisol in a large population.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hadlow, Narelle C; Brown, Suzanne; Wardrop, Robert; Henley, David

      2014-03-01

      Cortisol is critical for maintenance of health and homeostasis and factors affecting cortisol levels are of clinical importance. There is conflicting information about the effects of season on morning cortisol and little information on the effects of sunlight on population cortisol assessment. The aim of this study was to assess whether changes in median serum cortisol occurred in a population in conjunction with changing seasons, daylight saving time (DST) or time of sunrise. We analysed serum cortisol results (n = 27,569) from a single large laboratory over a 13-year period. Subjects with confounding medications or medical conditions were excluded and data analysed in 15-minute intervals. We assessed the influence of traditional seasons, seasons determined by equinox/solstice, DST and time of sunrise on median cortisol. The median time of cortisol collection did not vary significantly between seasons. Using traditional seasons, median cortisol was lowest in summer (386 nmol/L) and spring (384 nmol/L) with higher cortisol in autumn (406 nmol/L) and winter (414 nmol/L). Median cortisol was lowest in the summer solstice quarter with significant comparative increases in the spring equinox quarter (3.1%), the autumn equinox quarter (4.5%) and the winter solstice quarter (8.6%). When cortisol was modelled against time, with adjustment for actual sunrise time on day of collection, for each hour delay in sunrise there was a 4.8% increase in median cortisol (95% CI: 3.9-5.7%). In modelling to explain the variation in cortisol over the morning, sunrise time was better than season in explaining seasonal effects. A subtle cyclic pattern in median cortisol also occurred throughout the months of the year. A 3-year trial of DST allowed comparison of cortisol in DST and non DST periods, when clock time differed by one hour. There was modest evidence of a difference in acrophase between DST and non DST cortisol (p = 0.038), with DST peak cortisol estimated to

    7. Chronic Stress and Adolescents' Mental Health : Modifying Effects of Basal Cortisol and Parental Psychiatric History. The TRAILS Study

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Zandstra, Anna Roos E.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Nederhof, Esther; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Dietrich, Andrea; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Ormel, Johan

      2015-01-01

      Large individual differences in adolescent mental health following chronic psychosocial stress suggest moderating factors. We examined two established moderators, basal cortisol and parental psychiatric history, simultaneously. We hypothesized that individuals with high basal cortisol, assumed to in

    8. Analog-to-digital conversion

      CERN Document Server

      Pelgrom, Marcel J M

      2010-01-01

      The design of an analog-to-digital converter or digital-to-analog converter is one of the most fascinating tasks in micro-electronics. In a converter the analog world with all its intricacies meets the realm of the formal digital abstraction. Both disciplines must be understood for an optimum conversion solution. In a converter also system challenges meet technology opportunities. Modern systems rely on analog-to-digital converters as an essential part of the complex chain to access the physical world. And processors need the ultimate performance of digital-to-analog converters to present the results of their complex algorithms. The same progress in CMOS technology that enables these VLSI digital systems creates new challenges for analog-to-digital converters: lower signal swings, less power and variability issues. Last but not least, the analog-to-digital converter must follow the cost reduction trend. These changing boundary conditions require micro-electronics engineers to consider their design choices for...

    9. Postoperative plasma cortisol levels predict long-term outcome in patients with Cushing's disease and determine which patients should be treated with pituitary irradiation after surgery

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Imaki, Toshihiro; Tsushima, Toshio; Hizuka, Naomi; Odagiri, Emi; Murata, Yoji; Takano, Kazue [Tokyo Women' s Medical Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Endocrinology; Suda, Toshihiro

      2001-02-01

      than 2 {mu}g/dl because relapse is very rare and radiotherapy will frequently induce hypopituitarism, patients with a subnormal cortisol level following surgery should be treated with pituitary irradiation, because the relapse rate is reportedly high and radiotherapy is effective in preventing relapse, radiotherapy in patients with persistent disease after surgery is effective only in 50% (5/10) of the patients. (author)

    10. Molecular modeling of fentanyl analogs

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      LJILJANA DOSEN-MICOVIC

      2004-11-01

      Full Text Available Fentanyl is a highly potent and clinically widely used narcotic analgesic. A large number of its analogs have been synthesized, some of which (sufentanil and alfentanyl are also in clinical use. Theoretical studies, in recent years, afforded a better understanding of the structure-activity relationships of this class of opiates and allowed insight into the molecular mechanism of the interactions of fentanyl analogs with their receptors. An overview of the current computational techniques for modeling fentanyl analogs, their receptors and ligand-receptor interactions is presented in this paper.

    11. Analog Systems for Gravity Duals

      OpenAIRE

      Hossenfelder, S.

      2014-01-01

      We show that analog gravity systems exist for charged, planar black holes in asymptotic Anti-de Sitter space. These black holes have been employed to describe, via the gauge-gravity duality, strongly coupled condensed matter systems on the boundary of AdS-space. The analog gravity system is a different condensed matter system that, in a suitable limit, describes the same bulk physics as the theory on the AdS boundary. This combination of the gauge-gravity duality and analog gravity therefore ...

    12. Differences in Salivary Alpha-Amylase and Cortisol Responsiveness following Exposure to Electrical Stimulation versus the Trier Social Stress Tests

      OpenAIRE

      Yoshihiro Maruyama; Aimi Kawano; Shizuko Okamoto; Tomoko Ando; Yoshinobu Ishitobi; Yoshihiro Tanaka; Ayako Inoue; Junko Imanaga; Masayuki Kanehisa; Haruka Higuma; Taiga Ninomiya; Jusen Tsuru; Hiroaki Hanada; Jotaro Akiyoshi

      2012-01-01

      BACKGROUND: Cortisol is an essential hormone in the regulation of the stress response along the HPA axis, and salivary cortisol has been used as a measure of free circulating cortisol levels. Recently, salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) has also emerged as a novel biomarker for psychosocial stress responsiveness within the sympathetic adrenomedullary (SAM) system. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured sAA and salivary cortisol in healthy volunteers after exposure to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) an...

    13. Differences in Salivary Alpha-Amylase and Cortisol Responsiveness following Exposure to Electrical Stimulation versus the Trier Social Stress Tests

      OpenAIRE

      Maruyama, Yoshihiro; Kawano, Aimi; Okamoto, Shizuko; Ando, Tomoko; Ishitobi, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Ayako; Imanaga, Junko; Kanehisa, Masayuki; Higuma, Haruka; Ninomiya, Taiga; Tsuru, Jusen; Hanada, Hiroaki; Akiyoshi, Jotaro

      2012-01-01

      Background Cortisol is an essential hormone in the regulation of the stress response along the HPA axis, and salivary cortisol has been used as a measure of free circulating cortisol levels. Recently, salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) has also emerged as a novel biomarker for psychosocial stress responsiveness within the sympathetic adrenomedullary (SAM) system. Principal Findings We measured sAA and salivary cortisol in healthy volunteers after exposure to the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and ...

    14. Acute cortisol administration modulates EEG alpha asymmetry in volunteers : relevance to depression

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Tops, M; Wijers, AA; van Staveren, ASJ; Bruin, KJ; Den Boer, JA; Meijman, TF; Korf, J

      2005-01-01

      The acute effects of cortisol (35 mg) administration in 11 healthy male volunteers on resting frontal EEG asymmetry measured in the alpha band were investigated, using a within-subjects double-blind design. Results were indicative of a relative increase of right frontal activity with cortisol. This

    15. Development of SPR Immunosensor by Indirect Competitive Method for Rapid and Highly Sensitive Salivary Cortisol Detection

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Yusuke eTahara

      2014-05-01

      Full Text Available The monitoring of salivary cortisol as a key biomarker of an individual’s stress response has been increasingly focused on. This paper describes the development of a novel cortisol biosensor based on an indirect competitive method using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR immunosensor. The surface of a Au chip was modified with PEG6-COOH aromatic dialkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs and hydrocortisone 3-(O-carboxymethyl oxime (hydrocortisone 3-CMO as a cortisol analogue. A detection limit of 38 ppt range with a measurement range of 10 ppt to 100 ppb was accomplished without the incubation of a mixing solution consisting of standard cortisol and an anti-cortisol antibody, and the response time was 5 min from the sample injection. We experimentally compared our biosensor with a commercialized salivary cortisol enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kit using human saliva samples. It was found that the results obtained by the cortisol biosensor had a high correlation with those obtained by ELISA assay (R = 0.96. Our findings indicate the potential utility of the cortisol biosensor for on-site diagnosis and bedside point-of-care testing (POCT from bedside testing.

    16. Planned Missing Data Designs for Spline Growth Models in Salivary Cortisol Research

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hogue, Candace M.; Pornprasertmanit, Sunthud; Fry, Mary D.; Rhemtulla, Mijke; Little, Todd D.

      2013-01-01

      Salivary cortisol is often used as an index of physiological and psychological stress in exercise science and psychoneuroendocrine research. A primary concern when designing research studies examining cortisol stems from the high cost of analysis. Planned missing data designs involve intentionally omitting a random subset of observations from data…

    17. Cortisol, interleukins and S100B in delirium in the elderly.

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Munster, B.C. van; Bisschop, P.H.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Korevaar, J.C.; Endert, E.; Wiersinga, W.J.; Oosten, H.E. van; Goslings, J.C.; Rooij, S.E. de

      2010-01-01

      In independent studies delirium was associated with higher levels of cortisol, interleukin(IL)s, and S100B. The aim of this study was to simultaneously compare cortisol, IL-6, IL-8, and S100B levels in patients aged 65 years and older admitted for hip fracture surgery with and without delirium. Cort

    18. Cortisol, interleukins and S100B in delirium in the elderly

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      B.C. Munster; P.H. Bisschop; A.H. Zwinderman; J.C. Korevaar; E. Endert; W.J. Wiersinga; H.E. van Oosten; J.C. Goslings; S.E.J.A. de Rooij

      2010-01-01

      In independent studies delirium was associated with higher levels of cortisol, interleukin(IL)s, and S100B. The aim of this study was to simultaneously compare cortisol, IL-6, IL-8, and S100B levels in patients aged 65years and older admitted for hip fracture surgery with and without delirium. Corti

    19. The assessment of cortisol in human hair: associations with sociodemographic variables and potential confounders.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Dettenborn, L; Tietze, A; Kirschbaum, C; Stalder, T

      2012-11-01

      To inform the future use of hair cortisol measurement, we have investigated influences of potential confounding variables (natural hair colour, frequency of hair washes, age, sex, oral contraceptive (OC) use and smoking status) on hair cortisol levels. The main study sample comprised 360 participants (172 women) covering a wide range of ages (1-91 years; mean = 25.95). In addition, to more closely examine influences of natural hair colour and young age on hair cortisol levels, two additional samples comprising 69 participants with natural blond or dark brown hair (hair colour sample) as well as 28 young children and 34 adults (young age sample) were recruited. Results revealed a lack of an effect for natural hair colour, OC use, and smoking status on hair cortisol levels (all p's >0.10). No influence of frequency of hair washes was seen for proximal hair segments (p = 0.335) but for the third hair segment indicating lower cortisol content (p = 0.008). We found elevated hair cortisol levels in young children and older adults (p < 0.001). Finally, men showed higher hair cortisol levels than women (p = 0.002). The present data indicate that hair cortisol measurement provides a useful tool in stress-related psychobiological research when applied with the consideration of possible confounders including age and sex. PMID:22356099

    20. Impact of psychosocial stress on gonadotrophins and sexual behaviour in females: role for cortisol?

      Science.gov (United States)

      Ralph, C R; Lehman, M N; Goodman, R L; Tilbrook, A J

      2016-07-01

      This review focuses on the importance of cortisol in mediating the inhibitory effects of psychosocial stress on reproduction in females. In particular, we have summarized our research in sheep where we have systematically established whether cortisol is both sufficient and necessary to suppress reproductive hormone secretion and inhibit sexual behaviour. Our findings are put into context with previous work and are used to develop important concepts as well as to identify productive further lines of investigation. It is clear that cortisol is necessary to inhibit some, but not all, aspects of reproduction in female sheep. These actions vary with reproductive state, and there are important interactions with gonadal steroids. The impact of cortisol on the tonic secretion of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone has been investigated extensively, but less is known about the surge secretion of these hormones and their effects on sexual behaviour. Furthermore, there are separate effects of cortisol in the brain (hypothalamus) and at the anterior pituitary, illustrating that there are different mechanisms of action. Thus, although cortisol is important in mediating some of the effects of stress on reproduction, we need to look beyond cortisol and investigate some of the other mechanisms and mediators that relay the effects of stress on reproduction. In this regard, we propose that a group of neurons in the hypothalamus that co-synthesize kisspeptin, neurokinin B and dynorphin, termed KNDy cells, play important roles in mediating the effects of cortisol on reproduction. This hypothesis needs to be rigorously tested. PMID:27069009

    1. Fecal and Salivary Cortisol Concentrations in Woolly (Lagothrix ssp. and Spider Monkeys (Ateles spp.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Kimberly D. Ange-van Heugten

      2009-01-01

      Full Text Available Detrimental physiological effects due to stressors can contribute to the low captive success of primates. The objective of this research was to investigate the potential impact of diet composition on cortisol concentrations in feces and saliva in woolly (n=27 and spider monkeys (n=61. The research was conducted in three studies: the first investigated spider monkeys in the United States, the second investigated spider monkeys within Europe, and the third investigated woolly monkeys within Europe. Fecal cortisol in spider monkeys in US zoos varied (P=.07 from 30 to 66 ng/g. The zoo with the highest fecal cortisol also had the highest salivary cortisol (P≤.05. For European zoos, fecal cortisol differed between zoos for both spider and woolly monkeys (P≤.05. Spider monkeys had higher fecal cortisol than woolly monkeys (P≤.05. Zoos with the highest dietary carbohydrates, sugars, glucose, and fruit had the highest cortisol. Cortisol was highest for zoos that did not meet crude protein requirements and fed the lowest percentage of complete feeds and crude fiber. Differences among zoos in housing and diets may increase animal stress. The lifespan and reproductive success of captive primates could improve if stressors are reduced and dietary nutrients optimized.

    2. Childhood Adversity Modifies the Relationship Between Anxiety Disorders and Cortisol Secretion

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Vegt, EJ.M. van der; Ende, J. van der; Huizink, A.C.; Verhulst, F.C.; Tiemeier, H.

      2010-01-01

      Background Internalizing psychiatric disorders and early childhood adversity have both been associated with altered basal cortisol secretion. The aim of the present study is to investigate if early childhood adversity modifies the relationship between anxiety and mood disorders and cortisol secretio

    3. Childhood adversity modifies the relationship between anxiety disorders and cortisol secretion

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      E.J. van der Vegt; J. van der Ende; A.C. Huizink; F.C. Verhulst; H. Tiemeier

      2010-01-01

      Background: Internalizing psychiatric disorders and early childhood adversity have both been associated with altered basal cortisol secretion. The aim of the present study is to investigate if early childhood adversity modifies the relationship between anxiety and mood disorders and cortisol secreti

    4. Symptom-specific associations between low cortisol responses and functional somatic symptoms : The TRAILS study

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Janssens, K.A.; Oldehinkel, A.J.; Verhulst, F.C.; Hunfeld, J.A.; Ormel, J.; Rosmalen, J.G.

      2012-01-01

      Background: Functional somatic symptoms (FSS), like chronic pain and overtiredness, are often assumed to be stress-related. Altered levels of the stress hormone cortisol could explain the association between stress and somatic complaints. We hypothesized that low cortisol levels after awakening and

    5. Peer Victimization, Depressive Symptoms, and High Salivary Cortisol Predict Poorer Memory in Children

      Science.gov (United States)

      Vaillancourt, Tracy; Duku, Eric; Becker, Suzanna; Schmidt, Louis A.; Nicol, Jeffrey; Muir, Cameron; MacMillan, Harriet

      2011-01-01

      The predictive relations of peer victimization, depressive symptoms, and salivary cortisol on memory in 168 children aged 12 at Time 1 (T1) were examined using a longitudinal design in which data were collected on four occasions over a 2-year period. Results indicated that: (1) peer victimization, depressive symptoms, and evening cortisol were…

    6. Chronicity of depressive problems and the cortisol response to psychosocial stress in adolescents: the TRAILS study.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Booij, Sanne H; Bouma, Esther M C; de Jonge, Peter; Ormel, Johan; Oldehinkel, Albertine J

      2013-05-01

      Clinical and epidemiological studies, further supported by meta-analytic studies, indicate a possible association between chronicity (i.e., persistence or recurrence) of depression and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness to psychosocial stress. In the present study, we examined whether and how chronicity of depressive problems predicts cortisol responses to a standardized social stress test in adolescents. Data were collected in a high-risk focus sample (n=351) of the Tracking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS) cohort, a large prospective population study with bi- to triennial measurements. Depressive problems were assessed around age 11, 13.5, and 16. Cortisol levels were measured in saliva, sampled before, during, and after the Groningen Social Stress Test (GSST), to determine the cortisol response to psychosocial stress. The area under the curve with respect to the increase (AUCi) (i.e., change from baseline) of the cortisol response was used as a measure of HPA axis response. By means of linear regression analysis and repeated-measures analysis of variance, it was examined whether chronicity of depressive problems predicted the cortisol response to the GSST around the age of 16. Chronicity of depressive problems was significantly associated with cortisol stress responses. The relationship was curvilinear, with recent-onset depressive problems predicting an increased cortisol response, and more chronic depressive problems a blunted response. The results of this study suggest that depressive problems initially increase cortisol responses to stress, but that this pattern reverses when depressive problems persist over prolonged periods of time. PMID:22963816

    7. High cortisol awakening response is associated with an impairment of the effect of bright light therapy

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Martiny, Klaus Per Juul; Lunde, Marianne Anita; Undén, M;

      2009-01-01

      OBJECTIVE: We investigated the predictive validity of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) in patients with non-seasonal major depression. METHOD: Patients were treated with sertraline in combination with bright or dim light therapy for a 5-week period. Saliva cortisol levels were measured in 63...

    8. Automated-immunosensor with centrifugal fluid valves for salivary cortisol measurement

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Masaki Yamaguchi

      2014-08-01

      Full Text Available Point-of-care measurement of the stress hormone cortisol will greatly facilitate the timely diagnosis and management of stress-related disorders. We describe an automated salivary cortisol immunosensor, incorporating centrifugal fluid valves and a disposable disc-chip that allows for truncated reporting of cortisol levels (<15 min. The performance characteristics of the immunosensor are optimized through select blocking agents to prevent the non-specific adsorption of proteins; immunoglobulin G (IgG polymer for the pad and milk protein for the reservoirs and the flow channels. Incorporated centrifugal fluid valves allow for rapid and repeat washings to remove impurities from the saliva samples. An optical reader and laptop computer automate the immunoassay processes and provide easily accessible digital readouts of salivary cortisol measurements. Linear regression analysis of the calibration curve for the cortisol immunosensor showed 0.92 of coefficient of multiple determination, R2, and 38.7% of coefficient of variation, CV, for a range of salivary cortisol concentrations between 0.4 and 11.3 ng/mL. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis of human saliva samples indicate potential utility for discriminating stress disorders and underscore potential application of the biosensor in stress disorders. The performance of our salivary cortisol immunosensor approaches laboratory based tests and allows noninvasive, quantitative, and automated analysis of human salivary cortisol levels with reporting times compatible with point-of-care applications.

    9. Prolonged secretion of cortisol as a possible mechanism underlying stress and depressive behaviour.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Qin, Dong-Dong; Rizak, Joshua; Feng, Xiao-Li; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Lü, Long-Bao; Pan, Lei; Yin, Yong; Hu, Xin-Tian

      2016-01-01

      Stress is associated with the onset of depressive episodes, and cortisol hypersecretion is considered a biological risk factor of depression. However, the possible mechanisms underlying stress, cortisol and depressive behaviours are inconsistent in the literature. This study examined the interrelationships among stress, cortisol and observed depressive behaviours in female rhesus macaques for the first time and explored the possible mechanism underlying stress and depressive behaviour. Female monkeys were video-recorded, and the frequencies of life events and the duration of huddling were analysed to measure stress and depressive behaviour. Hair samples were used to measure chronic cortisol levels, and the interactions between stress and cortisol in the development of depressive behaviour were further evaluated. Significant correlations were found between stress and depressive behaviour measures and between cortisol levels and depressive behaviour. Stress was positively correlated with cortisol levels, and these two factors interacted with each other to predict the monkeys' depressive behaviours. This finding extends the current understanding of stress/cortisol interactions in depression, especially pertaining to females. PMID:27443987

    10. Salivary Cortisol as a Biomarker to Explore the Role of Maternal Stress in Early Childhood Caries

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Sharat Chandra Pani

      2013-01-01

      Full Text Available Objective. To compare salivary cortisol levels of children with ECC and their mothers with those of caries free children from a similar sociodemographic cohort. Design. Sixty-four college-educated, working mothers from middle income families with no history of anxiety disorders and their first born children aged between 48 and 71 months were included in the study. Salivary cortisol levels were analyzed using electrochemiluminescence (ECL immunoassay. Statistical Analyses. Significance of difference between the cortisol levels of children with ECC and control children and of their mothers was analyzed using the Student’s t- test. The intraclass correlation coefficient was used to measure the significance of correlation of cortisol levels between the mother and the child with logistic regression to explore possible associations. Results. Mothers of children with ECC had significantly higher levels of salivary cortisol ( than mothers of caries free children. The salivary cortisol levels of children with ECC were significantly higher than caries free children (. A significant correlation existed between the salivary cortisol level of the mother and that of the child (. Conclusion. While salivary cortisol levels of the child seem to have a direct impact on the incidence of ECC, maternal stress seems to have an indirect effect.

    11. Salivary cortisol as a biomarker to explore the role of maternal stress in early childhood caries.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Pani, Sharat Chandra; Abuthuraya, Deena; Alshammery, Hadia M; Alshammery, Dalal; Alshehri, Hind

      2013-01-01

      Objective. To compare salivary cortisol levels of children with ECC and their mothers with those of caries free children from a similar sociodemographic cohort. Design. Sixty-four college-educated, working mothers from middle income families with no history of anxiety disorders and their first born children aged between 48 and 71 months were included in the study. Salivary cortisol levels were analyzed using electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay. Statistical Analyses. Significance of difference between the cortisol levels of children with ECC and control children and of their mothers was analyzed using the Student's t- test. The intraclass correlation coefficient was used to measure the significance of correlation of cortisol levels between the mother and the child with logistic regression to explore possible associations. Results. Mothers of children with ECC had significantly higher levels of salivary cortisol (P < 0.05) than mothers of caries free children. The salivary cortisol levels of children with ECC were significantly higher than caries free children (P < 0.0001). A significant correlation existed between the salivary cortisol level of the mother and that of the child (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. While salivary cortisol levels of the child seem to have a direct impact on the incidence of ECC, maternal stress seems to have an indirect effect. PMID:23781246

    12. Comparison of the transplacental pharmacokinetics of cortisol and triamcinolone acetonide in the rhesus monkey

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      The late gestational age rhesus monkey was used to study the transplacental pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled triamcinolone acetonide (TAC) and cortisol. Tritiated-TAC and [14C]cortisol were administered simultaneously via the maternal radial vein were administered simultaneously via the maternal radial vein and blood samples were serially drawn from catheters implanted in both the maternal femoral artery and fetal umbilical vein and artery. High-performance liquid chromatography of the processed blood samples revealed that from 93 to 100% of the 3H in the fetal circulation was parent TAC, whereas only 14 to 49% of the 14C was cortisol during the 40-min period after dose administration. Fetal tissue samples taken at 3 hr after dose administration showed that 75 to 96% of the 3H present was TAC, whereas no cortisol was observed. TAC demonstrated dose-independent kinetics. Samples collected from the umbilical vein of the in situ placenta after fetectomy revealed that cortisol was extensively converted to cortisone by the placenta, whereas TAC was refractory to placental metabolism. This placental conversion of cortisol to cortisone and the further metabolism and conjugation of cortisol by the fetoplacental unit resulted in a fetal to maternal plasma cortisol ratio of 0.2. In contrast, the lack of placental or fetoplacental metabolism of TAC resulted in a fetal to maternal plasma TAC ratio of 0.6

    13. Cortisol Reactivity and Performance Abilities in Social Situations in Adults with Williams Syndrome

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lense, Miriam D.; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

      2013-01-01

      Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with hypersociability and anxiety. However, little is known about how these salient aspects of the phenotype are related or their underlying physiology. We examined cortisol reactivity in WS because cortisol is responsive to psychosocial stress. Compared to typically developing…

    14. Seasonal rhythms of salivary cortisol secretion in captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

      Science.gov (United States)

      Menargues Marcilla, Asunción; Urios, Vicente; Limiñana, Rubén

      2012-04-01

      Salivary cortisol has been recently used to assess welfare of captive and free-ranging animals. However, rhythms of cortisol secretion may vary annually and thus, it is necessary to take into account these rhythms when evaluating the physiological significance of fluctuations of this hormone throughout the year as stress indicator in animals. Here, we analyze monthly differences in cortisol secretion in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) during a year. Saliva samples of eight adult female Asian elephants were collected and analyzed using Radioimmunoassay. Results revealed an overall seasonal pattern of salivary cortisol secretion and significant differences in cortisol concentration among months were found. Overall, the highest cortisol levels were recorded in October, and then decreased until reaching the lowest concentration in April. However, some individual variations were found respect this annual overall trend. The occurrence of this annual pattern of cortisol secretion should be taken into account when using cortisol as a tool to assess animal welfare in captive animal at zoological parks, as well as it opens new questions to further analyze this pattern and its variations, as well as the endogenous mechanisms controlling it. PMID:22366473

    15. Changes In Cortisol And Some Biochemical Parameters In Blood Of Egyptian Buffalo Calves Exposed To Two Successive Summer Seasons

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Ten male buffalo calves were used in the present study. The animals were housed in semi-open barn. Ration was composed of concentrate mixture and wheat straw according to NRC (1985). Animals were allowed to drink fresh water ad libitum. Plasma cortisol, total protein, albumin, globulin, urea, creatinine, GPT and GOT were determined at the end of thermoneutral and summer heat stress exposure periods. Rectal temperature and respiration rate were recorded daily during both periods whereas body weight was recorded weakly during each period. Summer heat stress induced significant increases in rectal temperature, respiration rate, plasma cortisol, albumin/globulin ratio, plasma urea-N, creatinine, GPT and GOT while total protein, albumin, globulin did not affect by summer heat stress. Body weight was decreased under heat stress in both summer seasons but increased with age. In conclusion, summer heat stress induced alterations in some physiological and biochemical parameters of blood and body weight of male buffalo calves, and the young calves were less tolerant to summer heat stress than the older calves.

    16. IL-6 enhances plasma IL-1ra, IL-10, and cortisol in humans

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Steensberg, Adam; Fischer, Christian Philip; Keller, Charlotte;

      2003-01-01

      The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that a transient increase in plasma IL-6 induces an anti-inflammatory environment in humans. Therefore, young healthy volunteers received a low dose of recombinant human (rh)IL-6 or saline for 3 h. Plasma IL-6 levels during rhIL-6 infusion...... were approximately 140 pg/ml, corresponding to the levels obtained during strenuous exercise. The infusion of rhIL-6 did not induce enhanced levels of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha but enhanced the plasma levels of the two anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-1 receptor agonist (IL-1ra) and IL-10...... compared with saline infusion. In addition, C-reactive protein increased 3 h post-rhIL-6 infusion and was further elevated 16 h later compared with saline infusion. rhIL-6 induced increased levels of plasma cortisol and, consequently, an increase in circulating neutrophils and a decrease in the lymphocyte...

    17. Genetic Moderation of Cortisol Secretion in Holocaust Survivors: A Pilot Study on the Role of ADRA2B

      Science.gov (United States)

      Fridman, Ayala; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Sagi-Schwartz, Abraham; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

      2012-01-01

      In the current study we tested whether "ADRA2B" moderates stress regulation of Holocaust survivors as indexed by their diurnal cortisol secretion and cortisol reactivity to a stressor. Salivary cortisol levels of 54 female Holocaust survivors and participants in the comparison group were assessed during a routine day and in response to a…

    18. Backtracking quantum trajectories with analog feedback

      Science.gov (United States)

      de Lange*, G.; Ristè*, D.; Tiggelman, M. J.; Eichler, C.; Tornberg, L.; Johansson, G.; Wallraff, A.; Schouten, R. N.; Dicarlo, L.

      2014-03-01

      Circuit quantum electrodynamics offers a nearly ideal platform for the fundamental study of continuous quantum measurement. A nondemolition measurement of a superconducting qubit can be performed via homodyne detection of microwave transmission through a dispersively coupled cavity. By boosting the homodyne signal with a nearly noiseless phase-sensitive parametric amplifier, we experimentally show that a form of measurement backaction, consisting of stochastic quantum phase kicks on the measured qubit, is highly correlated with the fluctuations in the continuous homodyne record. We demonstrate a real-time analog feedback scheme that counteracts these phase kicks and thereby reduces measurement-induced dephasing. We develop a numerical optimization technique to overcome the bandwidth limitations of the amplification chain and provide a theoretical model for the optimization result. A quantum efficiency of 50% is extracted for the complete analog feedback loop. Finally, we discuss the integration of this analog feedback technique to improve performance in our recent demonstration of entanglement by dispersive parity measurement. *equal contribution. Research funded by NWO and the EU projects SOLID and SCALEQIT.

    19. Corticosteroid-binding globulin: modulating mechanisms of bioavailability of cortisol and its clinical implications.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bae, Yoon Ju; Kratzsch, Juergen

      2015-10-01

      Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is the principal transport protein of glucocorticoids. Approximately 80-90% of serum cortisol binds to CBG with high affinity and only about 5% of cortisol remain unbound and is considered biologically active. CBG seems to modulate and influence the bioavailability of cortisol to local tissues. In this review, we will discuss physicochemical properties of CBG and structure of CBG in the mechanisms of binding and release of cortisol. This review describes several factors affecting CBG functions, such as genetic factors or temperature. Furthermore, clinical implications of CBG abnormalities and the measurement of CBG and its use for assessment of free cortisol levels are described in this review. PMID:26522460

    20. Hormones: commentary. Riding the physiological roller coaster: adaptive significance of cortisol stress reactivity to social contexts.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Peres, Jeremy C; Dismukes, Andrew R; Lee, Yoojin; Phan, Jenny M

      2014-02-01

      The authors conjecture that to understand normal stress regulation, including cortisol stress reactivity, it is important to understand why these biomarkers are released and what they function to accomplish within the individual. This perspective holds that high (or rising) cortisol has advantages and disadvantages that must be understood within a context to understand how individual differences unfold. This perspective is juxtaposed with a popular vantage point of this stress hormone or of stress exposure that emphasizes the deleterious consequences or problems of this hormone. While the costs and benefits of cortisol are emphasized for normal stress regulation, this dynamic context-dependent purpose of stress hormones should extend to the development of psychopathology as well. This functional and dynamic view of cortisol is helpful for interpreting why Tackett and colleagues (2014) appear to observe advantageous cortisol recovery from stress in individuals with elevated personality disorder symptoms. PMID:24344886

    1. Analog filters in nanometer CMOS

      CERN Document Server

      Uhrmann, Heimo; Zimmermann, Horst

      2014-01-01

      Starting from the basics of analog filters and the poor transistor characteristics in nanometer CMOS 10 high-performance analog filters developed by the authors in 120 nm and 65 nm CMOS are described extensively. Among them are gm-C filters, current-mode filters, and active filters for system-on-chip realization for Bluetooth, WCDMA, UWB, DVB-H, and LTE applications. For the active filters several operational amplifier designs are described. The book, furthermore, contains a review of the newest state of research on low-voltage low-power analog filters. To cover the topic of the book comprehensively, linearization issues and measurement methods for the characterization of advanced analog filters are introduced in addition. Numerous elaborate illustrations promote an easy comprehension. This book will be of value to engineers and researchers in industry as well as scientists and Ph.D students at universities. The book is also recommendable to graduate students specializing on nanoelectronics, microelectronics ...

    2. Towards power centric analog design

      OpenAIRE

      Svensson, Christer

      2015-01-01

      Power consumption of analog systems is poorly understoodtoday, in contrast to the very well developed analysis of digitalpower consumption. We show that there is good opportunity todevelop also the analog power understanding to a similar levelas the digital. Such an understanding will have a large impact inthe design of future electronic systems, where low power consumptionwill be crucial. Eventually we may reach a power centricanalog design methodology.

    3. Splitting hair for cortisol? Associations of socio-economic status, ethnicity, hair color, gender and other child characteristics with hair cortisol and cortisone.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Rippe, Ralph C A; Noppe, Gerard; Windhorst, Dafna A; Tiemeier, Henning; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; van den Akker, Erica L T

      2016-04-01

      The aim of this study was to examine associations of SES and ethnicity with hair cortisol and cortisone and to identify potential child and family characteristics that can assist in choosing covariates and potential confounders for analyses involving hair cortisol and cortisone concentrations. Hair samples were collected in 2484 6-year-old children from the Generation R Study, a prospective cohort in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Measurements for cortisol and cortisone were used as the outcome in regression analyses. Predictors were SES, ethnicity, hair color and child characteristics such as birthweight, gestational age at birth, BMI, disease, allergy, and medication use. Lower family income, more children to be supported by this income, higher BMI and darker hair color were associated with higher hair cortisol and cortisone levels. Boys also showed higher levels. Ethnicity (Dutch and North European descent) was related to lower levels. High amounts of sun in the month of hair collection was related to higher levels of cortisone only. More recent hair washing was related to lower levels of cortisol and cortisone. Gestational age at birth, birth weight, age, medication use, hair washing frequency, educational level of the mother, marital status of the mother, disease and allergy were not associated with cortisol or cortisone levels. Our results serve as a starting point for choosing covariates and confounders in studies of substantive predictors or outcomes. Gender, BMI, income, the number of persons in a household, ethnicity, hair color and recency of hair washing are strongly suggested to take into account. PMID:26773401

    4. The Association between Midnight Salivary Cortisol and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Adults

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Yun-Mi Jang

      2012-06-01

      Full Text Available BackgroundThe common characteristics of metabolic syndrome (MetS and Cushing's syndrome suggest that excess cortisol may be involved in the pathogenesis of MetS. Salivary cortisol measurements are simple and can be surrogates for plasma free cortisol, which is the most biologically active form. We evaluated the association between levels of midnight salivary cortisol and MetS in Korean adults.MethodsA total of 46 subjects, aged 20 to 70 years, who visited the Health Care Center at Konkuk University Hospital from August 2008 to August 2009 were enrolled. We compared the levels of midnight salivary cortisol in subjects with MetS with those in subjects without MetS. We analyzed the associations between midnight salivary cortisol levels and components of MetS.ResultsMidnight salivary cortisol levels were higher in the MetS group (70±42.4 ng/dL, n=12 than that in the group without MetS (48.1±36.8 ng/dL, n=34 (P=0.001. Positive correlations were observed between midnight salivary cortisol levels and waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. The risk for MetS was significantly higher in subjects with midnight salivary cortisol levels ≥100 ng/dL than in those with levels <50 ng/dL (odds ratio, 5.9; 95% confidence interval, 2.35 to 36.4.ConclusionThe results showed a positive correlation between midnight salivary cortisol levels and MetS, suggesting that hypercortisolism may be related to MetS.

    5. Aggression predicts Cortisol Awakening Response in healthy young adults

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Patricia Sariñana-González

      2015-10-01

      Full Text Available It seems that aggressive behavior is negatively related to cortisol (C, but this relationship has been established considering the evening C levels. On the other hand, the relationship with the C awakening response (CAR and the influence of gender and menstrual cycle phase are not well understood. This study analyzed this relationship in 83 women (38 in the luteal and 45 in the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle and 20 men. CAR was assessed by measuring salivary free cortisol levels in samples taken immediately following awakening and 30, 45, and 60 minutes later. Additionally, participants completed a self-report of aggression. Men presented lower CAR than women in the luteal phase. Moreover, they also had higher levels of physical aggression than women, independently of their menstrual phase. Regarding the relationships between variables, in men general aggression and verbal aggression predicted the CAR. In women, verbal aggression predicted the CAR during the follicular phase, whereas anger and physical aggression were predictors during the luteal phase. Our data support the view that there is a negative relationship between C and aggressive behavior, even during the morning, this relationship being moderated by gender and menstrual cycle phase in the women. These findings may help improve our understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in violence.

    6. Neural Correlates of the Cortisol Awakening Response in Humans.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Boehringer, Andreas; Tost, Heike; Haddad, Leila; Lederbogen, Florian; Wüst, Stefan; Schwarz, Emanuel; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

      2015-08-01

      The cortisol rise after awakening (cortisol awakening response, CAR) is a core biomarker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation related to psychosocial stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders. However, the neural regulation of the CAR has not been examined in humans. Here, we studied neural regulation related to the CAR in a sample of 25 healthy human participants using an established psychosocial stress paradigm together with multimodal functional and structural (voxel-based morphometry) magnetic resonance imaging. Across subjects, a smaller CAR was associated with reduced grey matter volume and increased stress-related brain activity in the perigenual ACC, a region which inhibits HPA axis activity during stress that is implicated in risk mechanisms and pathophysiology of stress-related mental diseases. Moreover, functional connectivity between the perigenual ACC and the hypothalamus, the primary controller of HPA axis activity, was associated with the CAR. Our findings provide support for a role of the perigenual ACC in regulating the CAR in humans and may aid future research on the pathophysiology of stress-related illnesses, such as depression, and environmental risk for illnesses such as schizophrenia. PMID:25781268

    7. Assessment of the cortisol awakening response: Expert consensus guidelines.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Stalder, Tobias; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Kudielka, Brigitte M; Adam, Emma K; Pruessner, Jens C; Wüst, Stefan; Dockray, Samantha; Smyth, Nina; Evans, Phil; Hellhammer, Dirk H; Miller, Robert; Wetherell, Mark A; Lupien, Sonia J; Clow, Angela

      2016-01-01

      The cortisol awakening response (CAR), the marked increase in cortisol secretion over the first 30-45 min after morning awakening, has been related to a wide range of psychosocial, physical and mental health parameters, making it a key variable for psychoneuroendocrinological research. The CAR is typically assessed from self-collection of saliva samples within the domestic setting. While this confers ecological validity, it lacks direct researcher oversight which can be problematic as the validity of CAR measurement critically relies on participants closely following a timed sampling schedule, beginning with the moment of awakening. Researchers assessing the CAR thus need to take important steps to maximize and monitor saliva sampling accuracy as well as consider a range of other relevant methodological factors. To promote best practice of future research in this field, the International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology initiated an expert panel charged with (i) summarizing relevant evidence and collective experience on methodological factors affecting CAR assessment and (ii) formulating clear consensus guidelines for future research. The present report summarizes the results of this undertaking. Consensus guidelines are presented on central aspects of CAR assessment, including objective control of sampling accuracy/adherence, participant instructions, covariate accounting, sampling protocols, quantification strategies as well as reporting and interpreting of CAR data. Meeting these methodological standards in future research will create more powerful research designs, thus yielding more reliable and reproducible results and helping to further advance understanding in this evolving field of research. PMID:26563991

    8. Cortisol secretion patterns in addiction and addiction risk.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Lovallo, William R

      2006-03-01

      Addiction to alcohol or nicotine involves altered functioning of the brain's motivational systems. Altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis may hold clues to the nature of the motivational changes accompanying addiction and vulnerability to addiction. Alcohol and nicotine show at least three forms of interaction with HPA functioning. Acute intake of both substances causes stress-like cortisol responses. Their persistent use may dysregulate the HPA. Finally, the risk for dependence and for relapse after quitting may be associated with deficient cortisol reactivity to a variety of stressors. The HPA is regulated at the hypothalamus by diurnal and metabolic signals, but during acute emotional states, its regulation is superseded by signals from the limbic system and prefrontal cortex. This top-down organization makes the HPA responsive to inputs that reflect motivational processes. The HPA is accordingly a useful system for studying psychophysiological reactivity in persons who may vary in cognitive, emotional, and behavioral tendencies associated with addiction and risk for addiction. Chronic, heavy intake of alcohol and nicotine may cause modifications in these frontal-limbic interactions and may account for HPA response differences in seen in alcoholics and smokers. In addition, preexisting alterations in frontal-limbic interactions with the HPA may reflect addiction-proneness, as shown in studies of offspring of alcohol- and drug-abusing parents. Continuing research on the relationship between HPA function, stress responsivity, and the addictions may yield insights into how the brain's motivational systems support addictions and risk for addictions. PMID:16434116

    9. Relation Between Night Urinary Free Cortisol and Hypertension in Youth

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      叶涛; 刘治全; 傅毅; 牟建军; 傅西汉; 高保林; 张晓红

      2003-01-01

      Objectives To study the relation between night urinary free cortisol (UFC) ex-cretion and hypertension in youth. Methods Nighturinary free cortisol excretion and blood pressure & itsrelated factor were measured in 188 young people.Results In young men with hypertension the 8 h'snight UFC excretion was significantly higher than thatin the group with normal blood pressure 21.57 ± 6.28μg/8hvs 10. 54 ± 5. 46μg/8 h (P <0.05). Inagroup of young people with positive family history ofhypertension, the night UFC excretion was much higherthan that in the group with negative family history ofhypertension. Men excrete much more night UFC thanwomen (12.73±5.85 μg/8hvs7.80±4.15 μg/8h, P < 0. 05). Conclusions There is an associationbetween hypertension and high 8h's night UFC excre-tion; furthermore, there is gender difference in nightUFC excretion.

    10. Anti-inflammatory activity of Momordica charantia in edema paw and in cortisol seric modulation; Potencial antiinflamatorio da Momordica charantia no edema de pata e na modulacao do cortisol serico

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Magnata, Simey S.L.P. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear]. E-mail: sfmagnata@terra.com.br; Correia, Marilia B.L.; Brandao, Jose Odinilson C.; Souza, Grace M.L.; Catanho, Maria Teresa J.A. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia; Terra, Daniele A.; Amorim, Lucia F. [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia

      2005-07-01

      The first sources that the humanity disposed to disease's treatment was plants and herbs. The Momordica charantia, Melao de Sao Caetano (bitter melon), occur in South and Central America and in East, it has been used as an anti-diabetic agent, anti-tumor, anti-helmintic and anti-ulcerogenic. The objective of this study is to research the Momordica charantia's activity on inflammatory process and the change on cortisol hormone seric concentration. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity were used mice (n=5) in test groups (30,60,100,250 mg/kg of extract) and control (negative and positive) groups (AAS 250 mg/kg and NaCl 0,9%); the inflammatory agent (carrageenan 1% p/v, 0,1 mL) was injected into right hind paw planter surface, 30 min after, the groups received each dose IP of extract, AAS and solution saline respectively; 4 hour after the mice was sacrificed and the difference between right and left hind foot mass was measured. There was a significant reduction (p<0,05)in carrageenan-induced edema paw at test from control group, the best result was obtained at 60 mg/kg dose which inhibits edema formation by 50%. To determinate the cortisol concentrations male Wistar rats, were divided in three groups: control, test A (2 hours of treatment) and test B (4 hours of treatment). The control group received 0,25 mL of saline solution (NaCl) 0,9% and the test groups 0,25 mL of Momordica charantia's aqueous extract, obtained by decoction of green leaves, (31,16 mg/kg animal); all by via IP. After the treatment, the animals were sacrificed and the serum obtained for realization of dosages. The cortisol was determined through radioimmunoassay. The results showed a reduction on a average by 83,9% from control group. The Momordica charantia's extract showed a high anti-inflammatory effect and was capable of reducing the seric cortisol on normal rats. (author)

    11. Decreased cortisol response to awakening is associated with cognitive vulnerability to depression in a nonclinical sample of young adults.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kuehner, Christine; Holzhauer, Susanne; Huffziger, Silke

      2007-02-01

      Due to its high intraindividual stability, the cortisol awakening response (CAR) may be regarded as a trait measure of the dynamics of the HPA-axis activity. The present study aimed at investigating associations of the CAR with rumination as a cognitive vulnerability marker for depression assessed by both a trait measure and by experimental manipulation. After induction of sad mood by viewing a sad sequence of a movie, 42 healthy university students were randomly induced to either ruminatively self-focus on their feelings or to distract themselves from their mood by concentrating on respective text cards for 8min. Trait rumination and distraction were measured by the Response Styles Questionnaire (RSQ) at baseline (T0), while current mood was recorded before (T1) and after (T2) the mood induction as well as after the rumination/distraction induction (T3) using the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). Basal saliva cortisol levels were measured independently on a different day. After mood induction, levels of mood were lowered significantly. Participants subsequently induced to ruminate kept their negative mood whereas participants induced to distract themselves showed a reduction in negative mood. Self-focused trait rumination amplified low mood in both induction conditions. A decreased CAR was associated with self-focused rumination and with less improvement of sad mood after induced distraction. We conclude that the two variables apparently share specific vulnerability qualities towards depression by hampering the adaptive shift of attention to external cues during dysphoric moods, probably involving lowered disinhibition of task-irrelevant negative emotional processing. The present study provided first indications of a possible relationship between a cognitive vulnerability marker for depression and characteristics of basal neuroendocrine activity regarding their association with the course of experimentally induced dysphoric mood. PMID:17291694

    12. Spaceflight Sensorimotor Analogs: Simulating Acute and Adaptive Effects

      Science.gov (United States)

      Taylor, Laura C.; Harm, Deborah L.; Kozlovskaya, Inessa; Reschke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott J.

      2009-01-01

      reviewed. DISCUSSION. A true ground-based flight analog for sensorimotor function is not feasible. A combination of flight analogs; however, can be used to selectively mimic different aspects of the spaceflight-induced sensorimotor performance decrements.

    13. Novel functionalized 5-(phenoxymethyl)-1,3-dioxane analogs exhibiting cytochrome P450 inhibition: a patent evaluation WO2015048311 (A1).

      Science.gov (United States)

      Schroeder, Richard L; Tram, Phan; Liu, Jiawang; Foroozesh, Maryam; Sridhar, Jayalakshmi

      2016-01-01

      Cytochrome P450's (CYP's) constitute a diverse group of over 500 monooxygenase hemoproteins, catalyzing transformations that involve xenobiotic metabolism, steroidogenesis and other metabolic processes. Over-production of the steroid hormone cortisol is implicated in the progression of diseases such as diabetes, heart failure and hypertension, stroke, Cushing's syndrome, obesity and renal failure, among others. The biosynthesis of cortisol involves a cascade of cholesterol metabolizing reactions regulated through three major CYP proteins: 17α-hydroxylase-C17/20-lyase (CYP17), 21-hydroxylase (CYP21), and 11β-hydroxylase (CYP11B1). Excess activities of these enzymes are linked to the progression of malignancies including prostate, breast, ovarian, and uterine cancers. A series of novel functionalized dioxane analogs have been developed and recently patented as CYP17, CYP21, and CYP11B1 inhibitors, which lead to the modulation of cortisol production as a method for treating, delaying, slowing, and inhibiting the implicated diseases. The findings disclosed in this patent have been analyzed and compared with the literature data on inhibitors of CYP17, CYP21, and CYP11B1. The compiled data provide insight into the novel functionality of the compounds described in the patent. In this regard, an objective opinion on the effectiveness and novel biochemistry of these compounds in comparison to current CYP inhibitors used in the treatment of cortisol-related diseases is presented in this paper. PMID:26514241

    14. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

      2015-01-19

      Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. PMID:25532894

    15. Associations between psychiatric symptoms and cortisol levels in Nicaraguan young school-age children.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Isaksson, Johan; Högberg, Ulf; Valladares, Eliette; Lindblad, Frank

      2016-06-30

      The regulation of the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal axis (HPA-axis) with its end product cortisol seems to be affected in several psychiatric disorders. Although findings are not conclusive, internalizing symptoms have primarily been associated with higher diurnal cortisol levels and externalizing symptoms with lower cortisol levels. In this study on nine-year-olds in Nicaragua (n=111), we investigated associations between child psychiatric symptoms, using the Child Behavior Check List (CBCL), and saliva cortisol levels collected in the morning and afternoon, also adjusting for potential confounders. In line with previous findings, internalizing symptoms were significantly associated with higher morning, but not afternoon cortisol levels. Surprisingly, externalizing symptoms were also significantly associated with higher morning cortisol levels. Possibly, this association between externalizing symptoms and cortisol levels may be characteristic of early ages, representing a higher exposure to external stressors. The study highlights the need for prospective studies, following the development of the HPA-axis and its association with psychiatric symptoms. PMID:27138834

    16. Testosterone and cortisol release among Spanish soccer fans watching the 2010 World Cup final.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Leander van der Meij

      Full Text Available This field study investigated the release of testosterone and cortisol of a vicarious winning experience in Spanish fans watching the finals between Spain and the Netherlands in the 2010 FIFA World Cup Soccer. Spanish fans (n = 50 watched the match with friends or family in a public place or at home and also participated in a control condition. Consistent with hypotheses, results revealed that testosterone and cortisol levels were higher when watching the match than on a control day. However, neither testosterone nor cortisol levels increased after the victory of the Spanish team. Moreover, the increase in testosterone secretion was not related to participants' sex, age or soccer fandom, but the increase in total cortisol secretion during the match was higher among men than among women and among fans that were younger. Also, increases in cortisol secretion were greater to the degree that people were a stronger fan of soccer. Level of fandom further appeared to account for the sex effect, but not for the age effect. Generally, the testosterone data from this study are in line with the challenge hypothesis, as testosterone levels of watchers increased to prepare their organism to defend or enhance their social status. The cortisol data from this study are in line with social self-preservation theory, as higher cortisol secretion among young and greater soccer fans suggests that especially they perceived that a negative outcome of the match would threaten their own social esteem.

    17. Hair cortisol varies with season and lifestyle and relates to human interactions in German shepherd dogs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Roth, Lina S V; Faresjö, Åshild; Theodorsson, Elvar; Jensen, Per

      2016-01-01

      It is challenging to measure long-term endocrine stress responses in animals. We investigated whether cortisol extracted from dog hair reflected the levels of activity and stress long-term, during weeks and months. Hair samples from in total 59 German shepherds were analysed. Samples for measuring cortisol concentrations were collected at three occasions and we complemented the data with individual scores from the Canine Behavioural Assessment and Research Questionnaire (C-BARQ). Generalised linear mixed model (GLMM) results showed that hair cortisol varied with season and lifestyle: competition dogs had higher levels than companion, and professional working dogs, and levels were higher in January than in May and September. In addition, a positive correlation was found between the cortisol levels and the C-BARQ score for stranger-directed aggression (r = 0.31, P = 0.036). Interestingly, the factor "playing often with the dog" (r = -0.34, P = 0.019) and "reward with a treat/toy when the dog behaves correctly" (r = -0.37, P = 0.010) correlated negatively with cortisol levels, suggesting that positive human interactions reduce stress. In conclusion, hair cortisol is a promising method for revealing the activity of the HPA-axis over a longer period of time, and human interactions influence the cortisol level in dogs. PMID:26791276

    18. Cortisol suppression and hearing thresholds in tinnitus after low-dose dexamethasone challenge

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Simoens Veerle L

      2012-03-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background Tinnitus is a frequent, debilitating hearing disorder associated with severe emotional and psychological suffering. Although a link between stress and tinnitus has been widely recognized, the empirical evidence is scant. Our aims were to test for dysregulation of the stress-related hypothalamus-pituitary adrenal (HPA axis in tinnitus and to examine ear sensitivity variations with cortisol manipulation. Methods Twenty-one tinnitus participants and 21 controls comparable in age, education, and overall health status but without tinnitus underwent basal cortisol assessments on three non-consecutive days and took 0.5 mg of dexamethasone (DEX at 23:00 on the first day. Cortisol levels were measured hourly the next morning. Detection and discomfort hearing thresholds were measured before and after dexamethasone suppression test. Results Both groups displayed similar basal cortisol levels, but tinnitus participants showed stronger and longer-lasting cortisol suppression after DEX administration. Suppression was unrelated to hearing loss. Discomfort threshold was lower after cortisol suppression in tinnitus ears. Conclusions Our findings suggest heightened glucocorticoid sensitivity in tinnitus in terms of an abnormally strong glucocorticoid receptor (GR-mediated HPA-axis feedback (despite a normal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR-mediated tone and lower tolerance for sound loudness with suppressed cortisol levels. Long-term stress exposure and its deleterious effects therefore constitute an important predisposing factor for, or a significant pathological consequence of, this debilitating hearing disorder.

    19. Salivary Cortisol Reactivity in Preterm Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care: An Integrative Review

      Science.gov (United States)

      Mörelius, Evalotte; He, Hong-Gu; Shorey, Shefaly

      2016-01-01

      Recently, more and more researchers have been using salivary cortisol reactivity to evaluate stress in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The aim of this integrative literature review was to summarize the evidence of interventions leading to a change in salivary cortisol from the baseline in preterm infants in the NICU. The electronic databases of PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched for relevant studies. The inclusion criteria were studies with preterm infants exposed to an intervention evaluated by salivary cortisol reactivity before discharge from the NICU, which were published in English. In total, 16 studies were included. Eye-screening examination and heel lance provoked an increase in the salivary cortisol level. Music, prone position, and co-bedding among twins decreased the salivary cortisol level. Several studies reported a low rate of successful saliva sampling or did not use control groups. Future studies need to focus on non-painful interventions in order to learn more about salivary cortisol regulation in preterm infants. Moreover, these studies should use study designs comprising homogenous gestational and postnatal age groups, control groups, and reliable analysis methods that are able to detect cortisol in small amounts of saliva. PMID:26999185

    20. Comparison of VIDAS and Radioimmunoassay Methods for Measurement of Cortisol Concentration in Bovine Serum

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Daniela Proverbio

      2013-01-01

      Full Text Available Radioimmunoassay (RIA is the “gold standard” method for evaluation of serum cortisol concentration. The VIDAS cortisol test is an enzyme-linked fluorescent assay designed for the MiniVidas system. The aim of this study was to compare the VIDAS method with RIA for measurement of bovine serum cortisol concentration. Cortisol concentrations were evaluated in 40 cows using both VIDAS and RIA methods, the latter as the reference method. A paired Student’s -test, Pearson’s correlation analysis, Bland-Altman plot, and Deming regression analysis were used to compare the two methods. There was no statistically significant difference between mean serum cortisol concentrations measured by VIDAS or RIA methods (. Both methods were able to detect significant differences in mean low and high cortisol concentrations ( RIA and VIDAS. The correlation coefficient was low, but a Bland-Altman plot and Deming regression analysis show neither constant nor proportional error. The VIDAS method produced slightly higher values than RIA, but the difference was small and in no case did the mean value move the normal range. Results suggest that VIDAS method is suitable for the determination of bovine serum cortisol concentration in studies of large numbers of animals.

    1. No PTSD-related differences in diurnal cortisol profiles of genocide survivors.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Eckart, Cindy; Engler, Harald; Riether, Carsten; Kolassa, Stephan; Elbert, Thomas; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

      2009-05-01

      Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with reduced cortisol levels. Opposing results have been interpreted as resulting from methodological differences between studies. We investigated the diurnal profile of salivary cortisol in a population of highly traumatized adult males from Rwanda with and without PTSD, who spent the whole day of examination together under a maximally standardized schedule. Besides the detection of PTSD-related alterations in cortisol release we aimed at determining physiologically relevant effects of cumulative trauma exposure on HPA functioning in interaction with or independent of diagnosis. There were no differences in the diurnal pattern of cortisol release between subjects with and without PTSD. We observed an increasing prevalence of PTSD with increasing number of different traumatic event types experienced, replicating earlier results on a "building-block effect" of multiple traumatization. However, size of cumulative exposure was not related to any of the cortisol measures. The results suggest that besides methodological constraints also confounding factors not previously controlled for, e.g., sex differences or current life stress, might contribute to the diverging results of lowered, unchanged or enhanced cortisol secretion in PTSD. Future research should therefore closely monitor these possible confounds to optimize models for cortisol in research on stress-dependent illnesses. PMID:19054622

    2. Salivary Cortisol Reactivity in Preterm Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care: An Integrative Review.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Mörelius, Evalotte; He, Hong-Gu; Shorey, Shefaly

      2016-03-01

      Recently, more and more researchers have been using salivary cortisol reactivity to evaluate stress in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The aim of this integrative literature review was to summarize the evidence of interventions leading to a change in salivary cortisol from the baseline in preterm infants in the NICU. The electronic databases of PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched for relevant studies. The inclusion criteria were studies with preterm infants exposed to an intervention evaluated by salivary cortisol reactivity before discharge from the NICU, which were published in English. In total, 16 studies were included. Eye-screening examination and heel lance provoked an increase in the salivary cortisol level. Music, prone position, and co-bedding among twins decreased the salivary cortisol level. Several studies reported a low rate of successful saliva sampling or did not use control groups. Future studies need to focus on non-painful interventions in order to learn more about salivary cortisol regulation in preterm infants. Moreover, these studies should use study designs comprising homogenous gestational and postnatal age groups, control groups, and reliable analysis methods that are able to detect cortisol in small amounts of saliva. PMID:26999185

    3. Salivary Cortisol Reactivity in Preterm Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care: An Integrative Review

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Evalotte Mörelius

      2016-03-01

      Full Text Available Recently, more and more researchers have been using salivary cortisol reactivity to evaluate stress in preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. The aim of this integrative literature review was to summarize the evidence of interventions leading to a change in salivary cortisol from the baseline in preterm infants in the NICU. The electronic databases of PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched for relevant studies. The inclusion criteria were studies with preterm infants exposed to an intervention evaluated by salivary cortisol reactivity before discharge from the NICU, which were published in English. In total, 16 studies were included. Eye-screening examination and heel lance provoked an increase in the salivary cortisol level. Music, prone position, and co-bedding among twins decreased the salivary cortisol level. Several studies reported a low rate of successful saliva sampling or did not use control groups. Future studies need to focus on non-painful interventions in order to learn more about salivary cortisol regulation in preterm infants. Moreover, these studies should use study designs comprising homogenous gestational and postnatal age groups, control groups, and reliable analysis methods that are able to detect cortisol in small amounts of saliva.

    4. Hair as a meaningful measure of baseline cortisol levels over time in dogs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bryan, Heather M; Adams, Amanda G; Invik, Rosemary M; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E; Smits, Judit E G

      2013-03-01

      Cortisol measurements of hair are becoming a valuable tool in monitoring chronic stress. To further validate this approach in domestic dogs, we compared the variability of cortisol immunoreactivity in hair with that in saliva and feces of dogs housed under constant social and physical conditions. Fecal (n = 268), and hair (n = 21) samples were collected over 3 mo from 7 dogs housed in a kennel and kept for training veterinary students in minimally invasive procedures. Salivary samples (n = 181) were collected 3 times daily twice weekly during the last month of the study. Hair and salivary samples were analyzed by enzyme immunoassay and feces by radioimmunoassay. HPLC coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used to confirm the presence of cortisol in 3 hair samples. Variability of cortisol was compared across sample types by using repeated-measures ANOVA followed by paired t tests. Within dogs, cortisol immunoreactivity was less variable in hair than in saliva or feces. Averaged over time, the variability of fecal samples approached that of hair when feces were collected at least 4 times monthly. As predicted, the stable social and environmental condition of the dogs maintained repeatability over time and supported the hypothesis that data from hair samples reflect baseline cortisol levels. These findings indicate that determining cortisol immunoreactivity in hair is a more practical approach than is using samples of saliva or feces in monitoring the effects of long-term stressors such as social or physical environments and disease progression. PMID:23562104

    5. The Association between Hair Cortisol and Self-Reported Symptoms of Depression in Pregnant Women.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wikenius, Ellen; Moe, Vibeke; Kjellevold, Marian; Smith, Lars; Lyle, Robert; Waagbø, Rune; Page, Christian Magnus; Myhre, Anne Margrethe

      2016-01-01

      Depression has been linked to an imbalance in cortisol. Until recently, cortisol has been studied by measuring concentrations at single time points in blood or saliva samples. Cortisol concentrations vary with circadian rhythm and experiences, from time point to time point. The measurement of hair cortisol concentration (HCC) is a new method of accessing mean, long-term cortisol concentrations. Recent studies show positive associations between depression and HCC, and prenatal maternal cortisol is thought to influence the developing fetus. We therefore examined the association between HCC and self-reported symptoms of depression in second trimester pregnant women. Participants were 181 women, recruited between September 2011 and October 2013 to the Little-in-Norway (LiN)-study. These women answered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Rating Scale (EPDS) on self-reported symptoms of depression, and one cm maternal scalp hair was collected and analyzed for cortisol concentrations. Multiple regression analyses did not show depressive symptoms as a predictor for HCC in our selection of pregnant women, while gestational age was significantly related. In conclusion, our study indicated that symptoms of depression during pregnancy did not predict HCC, but further studies of clinically depressed, pregnant women using gestational age as an adjustment variable are warranted. PMID:27584584

    6. Is gill cortisol concentration a good acute stress indicator in fish? A study in rainbow trout and zebrafish

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Gesto, Manuel; Hernandez, Juan; Lopez-Patino, Marcos A.;

      2015-01-01

      -invasive techniques have been developed to measure cortisol directly in the water from fish-holding tanks, in skin mucus or in scales. In this study, we explored the possibility to analyze fish cortisol from gill filaments as a reliable acute stress marker. Our results show that gill cortisol levels correlate well...... with plasma cortisol levels in both rainbow trout and zebrafish exposed or not to an acute stress protocol. Measuring cortisol in gill filaments increases the available possibilities for stress assessment in fish. Although this approach should yet be tested for its use with other stressors, it has......Cortisol is the main biomarker of physiological stress in fish. It is usually measured in plasma, which requires blood collection. Though cortisol is produced in the anterior kidney, it can diffuse easily through cell membranes due to its lipophilic nature. Taking advantage of that, some non...

    7. Prolonged fasting and cortisol reduce myostatin mRNA levels in tilapia larvae; short-term fasting elevates.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Rodgers, Buel D; Weber, Gregory M; Kelley, Kevin M; Levine, Michael A

      2003-05-01

      Myostatin negatively regulates muscle growth and development and has recently been characterized in several fishes. We measured fasting myostatin mRNA levels in adult tilapia skeletal muscle and in whole larvae. Although fasting reduced some growth indexes in adults, skeletal muscle myostatin mRNA levels were unaffected. By contrast, larval myostatin mRNA levels were sometimes elevated after a short-term fast and were consistently reduced with prolonged fasting. These effects were specific for myostatin, as mRNA levels of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphatase were unchanged. Cortisol levels were elevated in fasted larvae with reduced myostatin mRNA, whereas in addition immersion of larvae in 1 ppm (2.8 microM) cortisol reduced myostatin mRNA in a time-dependent fashion. These results suggest that larval myostatin mRNA levels may initially rise but ultimately fall during a prolonged fast. The reduction is likely mediated by fasting-induced hypercortisolemia, indicating divergent evolutionary mechanisms of glucocorticoid regulation of myostatin mRNA, since these steroids upregulate myostatin gene expression in mammals. PMID:12676749

    8. Serum leptin and cortisol, related to acutely perceived academic examination stress and performance in female university students.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Haleem, Darakhshan J; Inam, Qurrat-Ul-Aen; Haider, Saida; Perveen, Tahira; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul

      2015-12-01

      Leptin, identified as an antiobesity hormone, also has important role in responses to stress and processing of memory. This study was designed to determine effects of academic examination stress-induced changes in serum leptin and its impact on academic performance. Eighty five healthy female students (age 19-21 years; BMI 21.9 ± 1.6) were recruited for the study. Serum leptin and cortisol were monitored at base line (beginning of academic session) and on the day of examination; using a standardized ELISA kit. Acute perception of academic examination stress was determined with the help of a questionnaire derived from Hamilton Anxiety Scale and self report of stress perception. Academic performance was evaluated by the percentage of marks obtained in the examination. Serum cortisol levels were positively correlated (p < 0.01) with the subjective perception of examination stress but not with academic performance. There was an inverted U-shape relationship between level of stress and academic performance. Leptin increased in all stress groups and correlated (p < 0.01) positively with academic performance. There was an inverted U-shape relationship between level of stress and circulating leptin. The findings suggest the peptide hormone, leptin, is a biomarker of stress perception and a mediator of facilitating effects of stress on cognition. PMID:26187200

    9. Effects of parent training on salivary cortisol in children and adolescents with disruptive behavior disorder

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Masood Motamedi

      2008-04-01

      Full Text Available

      • BACKGROUND: Since adulthood antisocial, aggressive and delinquent behaviors often have their onset early in life, investigating the association between biological factors and disruptive behaviors in children and adolescents are important and are emphasized on in the recent years. Baseline cortisol level seems to be a valuable biological marker of individuals with Disruptive Behavior Disorder (DBD. This study examined the effect of parent training on salivary cortisol levels of children with DBD.
      • METHODS: Saliva samples were assayed to determine cortisol levels in nineteen clinic-referred children with DBD (aged 8 through 13 years before and after an eight-session parent training program. Children’s disruptive behaviors were assessed by Child Behavior Check List before and after the intervention.
      • RESULTS: Children’s salivary cortisol increased significantly after parent training sessions. Children with DBD who had lower basal cortisol levels had more severe disruptive behaviors and a better response to intervention by parent training as assessed by changes in cortisol levels and disruptive behaviour scores. However, post-interventional reduction of disruptive behaviors and increase in cortisol level was significant for all levels of baseline cortisol.
      • CONCLUSIONS: Parent training is an effective method for behavioral modification in DBD. Salivary cortisol may be considered a predictive factor for severity of the child or adolescent's disruptive behaviors and also for response of those behaviors to parent training.
      • KEY WORDS: Disruptive behavior, child, adolescent, parent training.

    10. Cortisol administration increases hippocampal activation to infant crying in males depending on childhood neglect.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bos, Peter A; Montoya, Estrella R; Terburg, David; van Honk, Jack

      2014-10-01

      Animal studies show that exposure to parental neglect alters stress regulation and can lead to neural hyposensitivity or hypersensitivity in response to cortisol, most pronounced in the hippocampus. Cortisol, the end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, has also been related to parenting more directly, for example, in both sexes, cortisol levels increase when listening to infants crying, possibly to activate and facilitate effective care behavior. Severe trauma is known to negatively affect the HPA-axis in humans; however, it is unknown whether normal variation in parental care in the healthy population can alter sensitivity of the hippocampus to cortisol. Here, we investigate whether variation in experienced neglect changes neural sensitivity to cortisol when humans listen to infant crying, which is an unequivocal signal relevant for care behavior. In a placebo-controlled, within-subject neuroimaging study, we administered 40 mg cortisol to 21 healthy young males without children and used a validated task for measuring neural responses to infant crying. The Dutch version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire was used to index participants' early exposure to abuse and neglect. The data show that cortisol markedly increased hippocampal activation toward crying infants, and this effect varied significantly with parental neglect, even in our nonclinical subject sample. Without exposure to severe trauma or neglect, reduced self-experienced quality of parental care in the normal range already substantially increased hippocampal responsivity to cortisol. Altered hippocampal sensitivity to cortisol might be a cross-species marker for the risk of developing later life psychopathology. PMID:24757127

    11. Low cortisol levels in blood from dairy cows with ketosis: a field study

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Jones Bernt V

      2010-05-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background An elevated plasma glucose concentration has been considered to be a potential risk factor in the pathogenesis of left-displaced abomasums (DA. Therefore the present study was performed to investigate if spontaneous disease (parturient paresis, metritis, ketosis etc in dairy cows results in elevated concentrations of glucose and cortisol in blood as cortisol is the major regulator of glucose in ruminants. Methods Cortisol, insulin, β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA, non esterified fatty acids (NEFA, and serum calcium were analyzed in blood serum and glucose, in whole blood, from 57 spontaneously diseased cows collected at different farms. The cows were grouped according to the disease; parturient paresis, recumbent for other reasons, mastitis, metritis, ketosis, inappetance and others. Results No elevated concentrations of cortisol or glucose were found in cows with metritis and mastitis but both cortisol and glucose were elevated in cows stressed by recumbency. Cows with ketonemia (BHBA > 1.5 mmol/l did not have low concentration of glucose in blood but significantly low levels of cortisol. Some of these cows even had cortisol concentrations below the detection limit of the analysing method ( Conclusions The study gives patho-physiological support to the treatment strategies of ketosis, recommending glucocorticoids, insulin etc. However further studies of this problem are needed to understand why cows with ketosis have low levels of cortisol and normal levels of glucose. To what extent elevated cortisol and glucose levels in hypocalcemic and recumbent cows are involved in the ethiology and /or the pathogenesis of DA also will need further research.

    12. Analog electronics for radiation detection

      CERN Document Server

      2016-01-01

      Analog Electronics for Radiation Detection showcases the latest advances in readout electronics for particle, or radiation, detectors. Featuring chapters written by international experts in their respective fields, this authoritative text: Defines the main design parameters of front-end circuitry developed in microelectronics technologies Explains the basis for the use of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors for the detection of charged particles and other non-consumer applications Delivers an in-depth review of analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), evaluating the pros and cons of ADCs integrated at the pixel, column, and per-chip levels Describes incremental sigma delta ADCs, time-to-digital converter (TDC) architectures, and digital pulse-processing techniques complementary to analog processing Examines the fundamental parameters and front-end types associated with silicon photomultipliers used for single visible-light photon detection Discusses pixel sensors ...

    13. Multilateral Collaborations in Analog Research

      Science.gov (United States)

      Cromwell, R. l.

      2016-01-01

      International collaborations in studies utilizing ground-based space flight analogs are an effective means for answering research questions common to participating agencies. These collaborations bring together worldwide experts to solve important space research questions. By collaborating unnecessary duplication of science is reduced, and the efficiency of analog use is improved. These studies also share resources among agencies for cost effective solutions to study implementation. Recently, NASA has engaged in collaborations with international partners at a variety of analog sites. The NASA Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) is currently hosting investigator studies from NASA and from the German Space Agency (DLR). These isolation studies will answer questions in the areas of team cohesion, sleep and circadian rhythms, and neurobehavioral correlates to function. Planning for the next HERA campaign is underway as proposal selections are being made from the International Life Sciences Research Announcement (ILSRA). Studies selected from the ILSRA will be conducted across 4 HERA missions in 2017. NASA is planning collaborative studies with DLR at the :envihab facility in Cologne, Germany. Investigations were recently selected to study the effects of 0.5% CO2 exposure over 30 days of bed rest. These studies will help to determine the fidelity of this ground-based analog for studying the visual impairment intracranial pressure syndrome. NASA is also planning a multilateral collaboration at :envihab with DLR and the European Space Agency (ESA) to examine artificial gravity as a countermeasure to mitigate the effects of 60 days of bed rest. NASA is also considering collaborations with the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems (IBMP) in studies that will utilize their Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK is comprised of 4 interconnected modules and a Martian surface simulator. This isolation analog can support 3 -10 crew members for long duration

    14. Stressful Life Events Prior to Depression Onset and the Cortisol Response to Stress in Youth with First Onset Versus Recurrent Depression.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Mazurka, R; Wynne-Edwards, K E; Harkness, K L

      2016-08-01

      The strongest proximal predictors of depression onset in adolescence are stressful life events (SLEs). Changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress are theorized to mediate the etiological effect of SLEs on depression onset. The goal of the current study was to examine differences in the cortisol response to a laboratory-induced stressor between youth with versus without at least one SLE in the etiologically-central 3-month period prior to depression onset. One hundred adolescents (24 first-onset depression, 18 recurrent depression, and 58 non-depressed controls) had five salivary cortisol samples collected over the course of the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). SLEs were assessed using a rigorous contextual interview and rating system. Among those with an SLE, youth on their first onset of depression had a flatter cortisol reactivity slope relative to non-depressed adolescents, and youth on a recurrent episode of depression had a steeper recovery slope relative to first-onsets and non-depressed adolescents. In contrast, no between-group differences were found among those with no SLE prior to onset. These results suggest that differences in the HPA axis response pattern may represent a neurobiological mechanism that distinguishes depressed and non-depressed groups but only for adolescents whose depression is precipitated by SLEs. Further, this neurobiological mechanism may play a different role in the very first episode of depression than it does in recurrent episodes. PMID:26610671

    15. Measurement of salivary cortisol--effects of replacing polyester with cotton and switching antibody

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Hansen, Ase Marie; Garde, Anne Helene; Persson, Roger;

      2008-01-01

      measurements in our laboratory were affected by: 1) changes in the tampon material and 2) changes in the antibody of the analytical kit. In study 1, saliva from healthy subjects (n = 19) was split and spiked to Salivette polyester and cotton tampons, respectively, and treated as ordinary samples before being...... analysed for cortisol using a Spectria RIA kit for cortisol. In study 2, 68 anonymous saliva samples were analysed with the Spectria Cortisol RIA kit both before and after the manufacturer changed the antibody. The change from polyester to cotton tampons reduced the measured concentration of salivary...

    16. Cortisol Release From Adipose Tissue by 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 in Humans

      OpenAIRE

      Stimson, Roland H.; Andersson, Jonas; Andrew, Ruth; Redhead, Doris N.; Karpe, Fredrik; Peter C. Hayes; Olsson, Tommy; Walker, Brian R

      2009-01-01

      OBJECTIVE—11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) regenerates cortisol from cortisone. 11β-HSD1 mRNA and activity are increased in vitro in subcutaneous adipose tissue from obese patients. Inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is a promising therapeutic approach in type 2 diabetes. However, release of cortisol by 11β-HSD1 from adipose tissue and its effect on portal vein cortisol concentrations have not been quantified in vivo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Six healthy men underwent 9,11,12,12-[2H]...

    17. Correlates of Cortisol in Human Hair: Implications for Epidemiologic Studies on Health Effects of Chronic Stress

      OpenAIRE

      Wosu, Adaeze C.; Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Shields, Alexandra E.; Williams, David R.; Williams, Michelle A

      2013-01-01

      Assessment of cortisol concentrations in hair is one of the latest innovations for measuring long-term cortisol exposure. We performed a systematic review of correlates of cortisol in human hair to inform the design, analysis and interpretation of future epidemiologic studies. Relevant publications were identified through electronic searches on PubMed, WorldCat, and Web of Science using keywords, “cortisol” “hair” “confounders” “chronic” “stress” and “correlates.” Thirty-nine studies were inc...

    18. Application handbook for analog IC

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      This book consists of ten chapters, which are prolog on analog IC and digital, basic function of OP amp for operation, characteristic on direct current and interchange, Op amp and linear circuit, nonlinear arithmetic circuit, filter circuit, oscillation circuit and V-F converter, D-A converter, A-D converter on introduction eight bit and 12 bit, I C for power supply and switching regulator. Each chapter has the explanations of specific function of the programs, filter circuit, converters. So, this book is a application handbook for analog IC.

    19. A Simple Complex Case: Restoration of Circadian Cortisol Activity

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Ragini C Bhake

      2015-08-01

      Full Text Available A 38-year-old librarian with confirmed Carney complex (PRKAR1a mutation was referred for further evaluation of ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome. Previously, she was known to have schwannoma (excised, adenomyoepithelioma and normal annual echocardiograms. Over three years prior to current presentation, she had become aware of coarse hair on her chin and abdomen, as well as centripetal weight gain. She had noticed subtle but definite reduction in her girdle muscle strength. She had acquired some mood changes atypical of her personality, and had developed an interrupted sleep pattern. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of circadian RU486 therapy for PPNAD in a patient with Carney complex. It may have been possible to restore low levels surrounding the midnight hours using other agents, but the side-effect profile and lack of significantly elevated levels of cortisol made them less favorable options.

    20. Salivary cortisol and sleep problems among civil servants

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Hansen, Ase Marie; Thomsen, Jane Frølund; Kaergaard, Anette;

      2012-01-01

      -month later. METHODS: Sleep problems during the past night and the past 4 weeks were assessed by a self-administered questionnaire on overall sleep quality, disturbed sleep, sleep length and awakening problems. Saliva samples were collected in a single day, using cotton tubes, 30min after awakening and again...... at 2000h. A subsample of 387 participants collected saliva samples three-month later at awakening, +20min and +40min after awakening and at 2000h. We adjusted for confounders related to sampling time, life style and personal characteristics, socioeconomic status and work aspects. RESULTS: Sleep...... problems during the past four weeks were associated with low morning and evening saliva cortisol concentrations: [-3.1% per score of disturbed sleep (p=.009); and -4.7% per score of awakening problems (p...

    1. Expression of steroidogenic enzymes and their transcription factors in cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas: immunohistochemical analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction studies.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kubota-Nakayama, Fumie; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Konosu-Fukaya, Sachiko; Azmahani, Abdullah; Ise, Kazue; Yamazaki, Yuto; Kitawaki, Yuko; Felizola, Saulo J A; Ono, Yoshikiyo; Omata, Kei; Morimoto, Ryo; Iwama, Noriyuki; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Sasano, Hironobu

      2016-08-01

      Adrenal Cushing syndrome (CS) is caused by the overproduction of cortisol in adrenocortical tumors including adrenal cortisol-producing adenoma (CPA). In CS, steroidogenic enzymes such as 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lase (CYP17A1), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B), and 11β-hydroxylase (CYP11B1) are abundantly expressed in tumor cells. In addition, several transcriptional factors have been reported to play pivotal roles in the regulation of these enzymes in CPA, but their correlations with those enzymes above have still remained largely unknown. Therefore, in this study, we examined the status of steroidogenic enzymes and their transcriptional factors in 78 and 15 CPA cases by using immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), respectively. Immunoreactivity of HSD3B2, CYP11B1, CYP17A1, steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1[NR5A1]), GATA6, and nerve growth factor induced-B (NGFIB[NR4A1]) was detected in tumor cells. Results of qPCR analysis revealed that expression of HSD3B2 mRNA was significantly higher than that of HSD3B1, and CYP11B1 mRNA was significantly higher than CYP11B2. In addition, the expression of CYP11B1 mRNA was positively correlated with those of NR5A1, GATA6, and NR4A1. These results all indicated that HSD3B2 but not HSD3B1 was mainly involved in cortisol overproduction in CPA. In addition, NR5A1, GATA6, and NR4A1 were all considered to play important roles in cortisol overproduction through regulating CYP11B1 gene transcription. PMID:27085553

    2. International Alligator Rivers Analog Project

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, the U.K. Department of the Environment, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan are participating under the aegis of the Nuclear Energy Agency in the International Alligator Rivers Analog Project. The project has a duration of 3 yr, starting in 1988. The project has grown out of a research program on uranium ore bodies as analogs of high-level waste (HLW) repositories undertaken by ANSTO supported by the NRC. A primary objective of the project is to develop an approach to radionuclide transport model validation that may be used by the participants to support assessments of the safety of radioactive waste repositories. The approach involves integrating mathematical and physical modeling with hydrological and geochemical field and laboratory investigations of the analog site. The Koongarra uranium ore body has been chosen as the analog site because it has a secondary ore body that has formed over the past million years as a result of leaching by groundwater flowing through fractures in the primary ore body

    3. Multichannel analog temperature sensing system

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      A multichannel system that protects the numerous and costly water-cooled magnet coils on the translation section of the FRX-C/T magnetic fusion experiment is described. The system comprises a thermistor for each coil, a constant current circuit for each thermistor, and a multichannel analog-to-digital converter interfaced to the computer

    4. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

      Science.gov (United States)

      Arens, Ellen

      2009-01-01

      DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

    5. Multichannel analog temperature sensing system

      Science.gov (United States)

      Gribble, R.

      1985-08-01

      A multichannel system that protects the numerous and costly water-cooled magnet coils on the translation section of the FRX-C/T magnetic fusion experiment is described. The system comprises a thermistor for each coil, a constant current circuit for each thermistor, and a multichannel analog-to-digital converter interfaced to the computer.

    6. 0268 Is perceived stress related to an increase in salivary cortisol

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Fink, Samuel; Peter Bonde, Jens; Agergaard Vammen, Marianne; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Frølund Thomsen, Jane

      version of the PSS-scale was used to measure perceived stress and operationalized as the average score. Salivary cortisol samples were taken at 30 min post awakening and at 8 pm. A mean value of cortisol was calculated. In our analysis we applied logarithmic transformation to the concentrations. RESULTS......OBJECTIVES: Perceived Stress is a suspected cause of many psychological and physical illnesses. However it remains to be discovered what physiological measures are involved. While it is widely known that acute stress leads to an increase in cortisol levels, the findings in prolonged stress research...... have not been consistent. This study explores the association between Perceived Stress and salivary cortisol levels using the largest population ever used in this field. METHOD: 4467 public employees in the PRISME cohort in 2007. 3217 of those did a similar follow up study in 2009. A 4-item Danish...

    7. Effect of cortisol on muscle sympathetic nerve activity in Pima Indians and Caucasians

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Vozarova, Barbora; Weyer, Christian; Snitker, Soren;

      2003-01-01

      tonic inhibitory effect of cortisol. However, an acute release of cortisol is likely to more effectively contain sympathoexcitation during stress in Pima Indians than in Caucasians, which may be an important mechanism of cardioprotection in this Native American population.......The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) interact to maintain cardiovascular and metabolic homeostasis, especially during stress. Pima Indians have a low SNS activity, which may contribute to both their increased risk of obesity and reduced risk of hypertension....... Although glucocorticoids inhibit SNS activity, Pima Indians are not hypercortisolemic compared with Caucasians. This does not exclude the possibility that the SNS is more responsive to an inhibitory effect of cortisol in the former than in the latter group. We measured fasting plasma ACTH and cortisol and...

    8. Serum cortisol level and adrenal reserve as a predictor of patients’ outcome after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Reza Mosaddegh

      2016-06-01

      Conclusion: Current study could not show the statistically significant difference in initial and post-ACTH serum cortisol levels between survivor and non-survivor patients with cardiac arrest who had initial successful CPR, except to that of minute 60.

    9. Standardization for cortisol determination in human blood by competitive protein-binding

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Standardization for determination of cortisol from human plasma (17-hydroxycorticosteroids) using competitive protein-binding method is presented. Activated carbon coated with dextrans is used for separation of the hormone-protein complexe and hormone labelled free

    10. Effects of growth hormone replacement on cortisol metabolism in hypopituitary patients treated with cortisone acetate

      NARCIS (Netherlands)

      Beentjes, JAM; Kerstens, MN; Dullaart, RPF

      2001-01-01

      Growth hormone (GH) replacement may inhibit 11 beta -hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11 beta HSD1) activity, resulting in diminished conversion of cortisone to cortisol. Moreover, GH replacement may lower bioavailability of hydrocortisone tablets. Therefore, substitution therapy with cortisone

    11. Cortisol Variability and Self-reports in the Measurement of Work-related Stress

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Karlson, Björn; Eek, Frida; Hansen, Åse Marie;

      2011-01-01

      We examined whether a high cortisol awakening response (CAR) and low cortisol decline over the day (CDD) are related to self-reported work stress and well-being, and whether there are gender differences in these relationships. Three hundred eighty-three working men and women responded to a survey...... measuring job stress factors, mastery at work, symptoms and well-being. Salivary cortisol was sampled at awakening, after 45 min and at 21:00, from which the variables CAR and CDD were defi ned. A high CAR was associated with lower perceived job control and work mastery, and poorer well-being. Low CDD was...... associated only with higher job demands, but the self-report scores showed a number of interactions between cortisol group and gender. Among women, those showing a low CDD, compared with those with a higher CDD, had more favourable scores on a number of job stress factors and symptom load. In contrast, among...

    12. Cortisol Secretion and Change in Sleep Problems in Early Childhood: Moderation by Maternal Overcontrol

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Hummel, Alexandra C.; Luebbe, Aaron M.

      2015-01-01

      Childhood sleep problems are prevalent and relate to a wide range of negative psychological outcomes. However, it remains unclear how biological processes, such as HPA activity, may predict sleep problems over time in childhood in the context of certain parenting environments. Fifty-one mothers and their 18–20 month-old toddlers participated in a short-term longitudinal study assessing how shared variance among morning levels, diurnal change, and nocturnal change in toddlers’ cortisol secretion predicted change in sleep problems in the context of maternal overprotection and critical control. A composite characterized by low variability in, and, to a lesser extent, high morning values of cortisol, predicted increasing sleep problems from age 2 to age 3 when mothers reported high critical control. Results suggest value in assessing shared variance among different indices of cortisol secretion patterns and the interaction between cortisol and the environment in predicting sleep problems in early childhood. PMID:25766262

    13. Trait positive and negative emotionality differentially associate with diurnal cortisol activity.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Miller, Karissa G; Wright, Aidan G C; Peterson, Laurel M; Kamarck, Thomas W; Anderson, Barbara A; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Marsland, Anna L; Muldoon, Matthew F; Manuck, Stephen B

      2016-06-01

      Inter-individual variability in metrics of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) activity, such as the slope of the diurnal decline in cortisol, cortisol awakening response (CAR), and total cortisol output, have been found to associate inversely with trait ratings of extraversion and positive affect (E/PA) and positively with neuroticism and negative affect (N/NA) in some, but not all, investigations. These inconsistencies may partly reflect varied intensity of cortisol sampling among studies and reliance on self-rated traits, which are subject to reporting biases and limitations of introspection. Here, we further examined dispositional correlates of HPA activity in 490 healthy, employed midlife volunteers (M age=43 years; 54% Female; 86% white). Trait ratings were requested from participants and 2 participant-elected informants using the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) and Extraversion and Neuroticism dimensions of NEO personality inventories. CAR was assessed as percent increase in cortisol levels from awakening to 30min after awakening; and the diurnal slope and total output of cortisol [Area Under the Curve (AUC)] were determined from cortisol measurements taken at awakening, +4 and +9h later, and bedtime, across 3 workdays. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate multi-informant E/PA and N/NA factors. We used 3days of measurement as indicators to model each of the three latent cortisol factors (slope, CAR, and AUC). With the two latent emotionality and three latent cortisol indices included there was good fit to the data (χ(2)(200)=278.38, p=0.0002; RMSEA=0.028, 90% CI=0.02-0.04; CFI/TLI=0.97/0.96; SRMR=0.04). After controlling for covariates (age, sex, race), results showed higher latent E/PA associated with a steeper diurnal slope (Standardized β=-0.19, p=0.02) and smaller CAR (Standardized β=-0.26, p=0.004), whereas N/NA did not associate with any cortisol metric (Standardized β's=-0.12 to 0.13, p's=0.10 to 0.53). These

    14. The cortisol response to hypobaric hypoxia at rest and post-exercise.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Woods, D R; Davison, A; Stacey, M; Smith, C; Hooper, T; Neely, D; Turner, S; Peaston, R; Mellor, A

      2012-04-01

      High altitude exposure normally leads to a marked natriuresis and diuresis. Acute mountain sickness is often associated with fluid retention, to which an elevated cortisol may contribute. Most investigators report a rise in resting cortisol with ascent, but little data exist regarding the cortisol response to a day trekking. We therefore measured salivary cortisol during ascent to > 5000 m in a cohort of between 42-45 subjects following a 6-h trek (samples taken between 15:30-16:30 h) and between 15-20 subjects at rest (morning samples taken between 08:00-09:00 h). Morning resting cortisol [nmol/l, mean±sd, (range)] was 5.5±2.9 (2.13-13.61) at 1300 m; 4.7±6.8 (1.4-27.02) at 3400 m, and significantly (p=0.002) rose between 4270 m [3.5±2.1 (1.4-8.34)] and 5150 m [14.5±30.3 (1.9-123.1)]. Post-exercise cortisol [nmol/l, mean±sd, (range)] dropped between 3400 m [7±6 (1.5-33.3)] and 4270 m [4.2±4.8 (1.4-29.5)] (p=0.001) followed by a significant rise in post-exercise cortisol between 4270 m [4.2±4.8 (1.4-29.5)] and 5 150 m [9.2±10.2 (1.4-61.3)] (p 5000 m, but present the novel finding that the cortisol response to a day trekking at HA appears suppressed at 4270 m. PMID:22368038

    15. INFLUENCE OF NATURAL IMMUNOMODULATORS ON PROTEIN FRACTIONS AND CORTISOL CONTENT IN RABBIT BLOOD UNDER STRESS

      OpenAIRE

      Grabovskyi S.; Grabovska O.

      2015-01-01

      The results of determination of protein fractions, cortisol content in blood of rabbits, which further added to the feed of natural origin biologically active substances are presented in the article. As an antistressors and immunomodulators in pre-slaughter period are using of spleen extract biologically active substances were obtained with ultrasound application. The purpose of research — determination of changes of protein fractions, cortisol content in rabbits blood before slaughter and th...

    16. Cortisol Response to Stress in Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

      OpenAIRE

      Corominas-Roso, Margarida; Palomar, Gloria; Ferrer, Roser; Real, Alberto; Nogueira, Mariana; Corrales, Montserrat; Casas, Miguel; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni

      2015-01-01

      Background: Differences in the cortisol response have been reported between children exhibiting the inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive subtypes of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, there is no such information about adults. The aim of the present study was to determine the possible differences between the combined and inattentive subtypes in the cortisol response to stress. Methods: Ninety-six adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, 38 inattentive and 58 comb...

    17. Effects of Anosognosia on Perceived Stress and Cortisol Levels in Alzheimer's Disease

      OpenAIRE

      Genevieve Arsenault-Lapierre; Victor Whitehead; Sonia Lupien; Howard Chertkow

      2012-01-01

      Anosognosia, or unawareness of one’s own cognitive deficits, may cause issues when measuring perceived stress and cortisol levels in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). The goal of this study was to examine the effects of anosognosia on perceived stress and salivary cortisol levels in normal elderly (NE) adults, MCI individuals, newly diagnosed AD patients, and long-lasting AD patients, suspected to show more anosognosia. An anosognosia index for perceived stress was...

    18. Sex differences in the functional connectivity of the amygdalae in association with cortisol.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Kogler, Lydia; Müller, Veronika I; Seidel, Eva-Maria; Boubela, Roland; Kalcher, Klaudius; Moser, Ewald; Habel, Ute; Gur, Ruben C; Eickhoff, Simon B; Derntl, Birgit

      2016-07-01

      Human amygdalae are involved in various behavioral functions such as affective and stress processing. For these behavioral functions, as well as for psychophysiological arousal including cortisol release, sex differences are reported. Here, we assessed cortisol levels and resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of left and right amygdalae in 81 healthy participants (42 women) to investigate potential modulation of amygdala rsFC by sex and cortisol concentration. Our analyses revealed that rsFC of the left amygdala significantly differed between women and men: Women showed stronger rsFC than men between the left amygdala and left middle temporal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, postcentral gyrus and hippocampus, regions involved in face processing, inner-speech, fear and pain processing. No stronger connections were detected for men and no sex difference emerged for right amygdala rsFC. Also, an interaction of sex and cortisol appeared: In women, cortisol was negatively associated with rsFC of the amygdalae with striatal regions, mid-orbital frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate gyrus, middle and superior frontal gyri, supplementary motor area and the parietal-occipital sulcus. Contrarily in men, positive associations of cortisol with rsFC of the left amygdala and these structures were observed. Functional decoding analyses revealed an association of the amygdalae and these regions with emotion, reward and memory processing, as well as action execution. Our results suggest that functional connectivity of the amygdalae as well as the regulatory effect of cortisol on brain networks differs between women and men. These sex-differences and the mediating and sex-dependent effect of cortisol on brain communication systems should be taken into account in affective and stress-related neuroimaging research. Thus, more studies including both sexes are required. PMID:27039701

    19. Stress among nurses: an examination of salivary cortisol levels on work and day off

      OpenAIRE

      Maria Cecilia Pires da Rocha; Milva Maria Figueiredo De Martino; Dora Maria Grassi-Kassisse; Aglecio Luiz de Souza

      2013-01-01

      The present study evaluates the use of salivary cortisol concentration as a physiological index of the stress level among nurses on their work day and day off and correlates it with the questionnaire used to measure occupational stress in nurses (Inventário de Estresse em Enfermeiros - IEE). This is a comparative, cross-sectional descriptive study in which sociodemographic data, IEE results and salivary cortisol levels were used. Fifty-seven nurses participated in the study (80.7% females and...

    20. Stress-linked cortisol concentrations in hair: what we know and what we need to know

      OpenAIRE

      Sharpley, Christopher F; McFarlane, James R.; Slominski, Andrzej

      2011-01-01

      Cortisol has major impacts upon a range of physiological homeostatic mechanisms and plays an important role in stress, anxiety and depression. Although traditionally described as being solely synthesised via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, recent animal and human studies indicate that cortisol may also be synthesised via a functionally-equivalent ‘peripheral’ HPA-like process within the skin, principally within hair follicles, melanocytes, epidermal melanocytes and dermal fibro...

    1. Brain white matter integrity and cortisol in older men:the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936

      OpenAIRE

      Cox, Simon R.; Bastin, Mark E; Ferguson, Karen J.; Munoz-Maniega, Susana; MacPherson, Sarah E.; Deary, Ian J; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; MacLullich, Alasdair M. J.

      2015-01-01

      Elevated glucocorticoid (GC) levels are hypothesized to be deleterious to some brain regions, including white matter (WM). Older age is accompanied by increased between-participant variation in GC levels, yet relationships between WM integrity and cortisol levels in older humans are underexplored. Moreover, it is unclear whether GC-WM associations might be general or pathway specific. We analyzed relationships between salivary cortisol (diurnal and reactive) and general measures of brain WM h...

    2. Cortisol and cognitive function in midlife: The role of childhood cognition and educational attainment

      OpenAIRE

      Gaysina, Darya; Michael P Gardner; Richards, Marcus; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav

      2014-01-01

      Summary Adult cognition and age-related cognitive decline can be influenced by dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis with concomitant changes in cortisol levels. However, very little is known about the role of childhood cognition and educational attainment in this relationship. Using data from the British 1946 birth cohort, the present study investigated: (1) associations between cortisol levels and patterns and cognitive function in midlife; (2) direct and interactive effe...

    3. Blow collection as a non-invasive method for measuring cortisol in the beluga (Delphinapterus leucas.

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Laura A Thompson

      Full Text Available Non-invasive sampling techniques are increasingly being used to monitor glucocorticoids, such as cortisol, as indicators of stressor load and fitness in zoo and wildlife conservation, research and medicine. For cetaceans, exhaled breath condensate (blow provides a unique sampling matrix for such purposes. The purpose of this work was to develop an appropriate collection methodology and validate the use of a commercially available EIA for measuring cortisol in blow samples collected from belugas (Delphinapterus leucas. Nitex membrane stretched over a petri dish provided the optimal method for collecting blow. A commercially available cortisol EIA for measuring human cortisol (detection limit 35 pg ml-1 was adapted and validated for beluga cortisol using tests of parallelism, accuracy and recovery. Blow samples were collected from aquarium belugas during monthly health checks and during out of water examination, as well as from wild belugas. Two aquarium belugas showed increased blow cortisol between baseline samples and 30 minutes out of water (Baseline, 0.21 and 0.04 µg dl-1; 30 minutes, 0.95 and 0.14 µg dl-1. Six wild belugas also showed increases in blow cortisol between pre and post 1.5 hour examination (Pre 0.03, 0.23, 0.13, 0.19, 0.13, 0.04 µg dl-1, Post 0.60, 0.31, 0.36, 0.24, 0.14, 0.16 µg dl-1. Though this methodology needs further investigation, this study suggests that blow sampling is a good candidate for non-invasive monitoring of cortisol in belugas. It can be collected from both wild and aquarium animals efficiently for the purposes of health monitoring and research, and may ultimately be useful in obtaining data on wild populations, including endangered species, which are difficult to handle directly.

    4. Cortisol levels and sleep patterns in infants with orofacial clefts undergoing surgery

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Mueller AA

      2014-10-01

      Full Text Available Andreas A Mueller,1,2 Nadeem Kalak,3 Katja Schwenzer-Zimmerer,1,2 Edith Holsboer-Trachsler,3 Serge Brand3,4 1Craniomaxillofacial Surgery, University of Basel and University Hospital of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 2Hightech Research Center of Craniomaxillofacial Surgery, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 3Psychiatric Clinics of the University of Basel, Center for Affective, Stress, and Sleep Disorders, Basel, Switzerland; 4Department of Sport and Health Science, Division of Sport Science, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Background: Traumatic events during early infancy might damage infants’ psychobiological functioning, such as sleep and cortisol secretion. Infants born with orofacial clefts (OFCs undergo functional, anatomical, and aesthetic surgery. The aim of the present study was to determine whether infants with OFC and undergoing OFC surgery show deteriorated sleep and cortisol secretion compared with healthy controls and with their presurgery status.Methods: A total of 27 infants with OFC (mean age: 22 weeks and 30 healthy controls (mean age: 23 weeks took part in the study. For infants with OFC, sleep actigraphy was performed and saliva cortisol was analyzed 5 days before, during, and 5 days after surgery. For controls, sleep and saliva cortisol were assessed similarly, except for the period taken up with surgery.Results: Compared with healthy controls, infants with OFC undergoing OFC surgery did not differ in sleep and cortisol secretion. Their sleep and cortisol secretion did deteriorate during the perisurgical period but recovered 5 days postsurgery. Conclusion: In infants with OFC undergoing corrective surgery, the pattern of results for sleep and cortisol suggests that OFC surgery does not seem to constitute a traumatic event with long-term consequences. Keywords: cortisol, sleep, orofacial cleft, surgery, infants

    5. Radioimmunological determination of plasma cortisol following application of a stomatic paste containing prednisolone (DontisolonR)

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      A radioimmunological method was used to determine the cortisol plasma levels of 69 patients, treated with a stomatic paste containing prednisolone. Significant changes in plasma cortisol were only established in connection with a dose regimen of 3 times 1.25 mg daily. In isolated cases, however, there were major decreases in response to exposure to prednisolone. Therefore, the anamnestic data of any one patient being prescribed corticoids must be examined with care. (TRV)

    6. A Review of Rhythm and Responsiveness of Cortisol in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

      OpenAIRE

      Taylor, Julie Lounds; Corbett, Blythe A

      2014-01-01

      Examination of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis via cortisol among individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has been a growing area of research interest. The following review includes investigations of cortisol conducted with cohorts of individuals with ASD across the lifespan over the past four decades. In general, studies find dysregulation when examining the diurnal rhythm as a whole in lower functioning children with ASD; however, limited evidence exists for alteration...

    7. The Evaluation of Psychological Factor and Salivary Cortisol and IgA Levels in

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Fateme Arbabi-Kalati

      2014-07-01

      Full Text Available Background: Oral lichen planus (OLP is a chronic immunological disorder with unknown etiology. The aim of this study was to determine psychological factors and salivary cortisol, IgA level in patients with oral lichen planus. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study 20 patients with OLP and healthy person were admitted to this study. Saliva samples were collected between - Am. saliva cortisol, IgA level was detected by ELIZA method. In this study, patients with anxiety and depression were measured using the SCL-90 questionnaire. Data analyzed by t-test. Results: The mean salivary cortisol level in patients with OLP was 3.2±1.9 ng/mL and the mean saliva cortisol level in healthy person was 3.5±1.9 ng/mL. Significant difference was observed in the salivary cortisol levels in the 2 study groups (p=0.04. The mean salivary IgA level in patients with OLP was 0.69±0.29 ng/mL and the mean saliva IgA level in healthy person was 0.9±0.43 ng/mL but no significant difference was observed in the salivary cortisol levels in the 2 study groups. Results showed that anxiety levels in patients with oral lichen planus were slightly higher than controls but there was no significant difference between healthy subjects. Conclusion: Finding revealed the mean salivary cortisol level in patient with OLP less than healthy persons. Significant difference was observed in the salivary cortisol levels in the 2 study groups. Based on the t-student test, no significant difference was observed in the salivary IgA levels in the 2 study groups. Anxiety levels in patients with oral lichen planus were slightly higher than controls.

    8. Higher cortisol content in hair among long-term unemployed individuals compared to controls.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Dettenborn, L; Tietze, A; Bruckner, F; Kirschbaum, C

      2010-10-01

      Unemployment and financial strain are chronic stressors that have been shown to be associated with an increase in mean salivary and serum cortisol levels. Hair analysis for cortisol content is a new promising tool by which hair segmental analysis may provide a retrospective calendar of cumulative cortisol exposure over time rather than momentary assessments. Participants of this study were 31 unemployed and 28 employed individuals (46 women). Hair segmental analysis was conducted using 3-cm long segments starting with the scalp-near segment. Due to differing hair length, 52 individuals had values for the second segment and n=33 individuals had values for the third segment. Univariate analysis of variance indicated that unemployed individuals had higher cortisol content in the first (p<0.05, eta(2)=0.071) and second (p<0.05, eta(2)=0.085) hair segment (a total of 6 cm long hair representing the preceding 6 months of collection). Consistent with other data from our laboratory, there was a wash-out effect for the third segment (p<0.05 for segment 3 vs. segment 1 and 2). Unemployed individuals indicated increased levels of perceived stress and impairments in subjective well-being compared to employed individuals. These subjective measures of perceived stress and well-being were unrelated to cortisol content in hair. We conclude that hair analysis for cortisol content may be a valid method to detect differences in cumulative cortisol exposure between chronically stressed individuals and healthy controls. Due to a wash-out effect, retrospective ascertainment of cortisol exposure may be limited to the preceding 6 months of specimen collection. PMID:20471757

    9. On psychobiology in psychoanalysis - salivary cortisol and secretory IgA as psychoanalytic process parameters

      OpenAIRE

      Euler, Sebastian; Schimpf, Heinrich; Hennig, Jürgen; Brosig, Burkhard

      2005-01-01

      This study investigates the psychobiological impact of psychoanalysis in its four-hour setting. During a period of five weeks, 20 subsequent hours of psychoanalysis were evaluated, involving two patients and their analysts. Before and after each session, saliva samples were taken and analysed for cortisol (sCortisol) and secretory immunoglobuline A (sIgA). Four time-series (n=80 observations) resulted and were evaluated by "Pooled Time Series Analysis" (PTSA) for significant level changes and...

    10. Stress Evaluation in Adult Patients with Atopic Dermatitis Using Salivary Cortisol

      OpenAIRE

      Megumi Mizawa; Masaki Yamaguchi; Chieko Ueda; Teruhiko Makino; Tadamichi Shimizu

      2013-01-01

      The symptoms of atopic dermatitis (AD) are often aggravated by stress, and AD can also lead to psychological stress due to social isolation and discrimination. The salivary cortisol level reflects psychological stress, and it is a good index to assess chronic stress. In this study, we measured the salivary cortisol levels in patients with AD (n = 30) and compared them with those of healthy control subjects (n = 42). AD patients were also evaluated for general disease severity using the Scorin...

    11. Work stress and recovery measured by urinary catechlamines and cortisol excretion in long distance coach drivers

      OpenAIRE

      Sluiter, J. K.; van Beek; Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.

      1998-01-01

      OBJECTIVES: To evaluate coach drivers' work stress during work and in the course of recovery from work by measurement of urinary catecholamines and cortisol. METHODS: The urinary excretion rate of adrenaline, noradrenaline, and cortisol of 10 coach drivers was studied during a long distance trip of three days and two consecutive days off. Each driver was asked to provide seven urine samples on the working days and six urine samples on the days off. The second day off was considered as t...

    12. Prospective prediction of major depressive disorder from cortisol awakening responses in adolescence

      OpenAIRE

      Adam, Emma K.; Doane, Leah D.; Zinbarg, Richard E.; Mineka, Susan; Craske, Michelle G.; Griffith, James W.

      2010-01-01

      Levels of the stress-sensitive hormone cortisol increase dramatically in the first 30-40 minutes after waking, an effect known as the cortisol awakening response (CAR). There is considerable cross-sectional evidence that psychosocial stress is associated with an increased CAR, and the CAR has been found to be altered in the presence of stress-related diseases, including Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). To date, no prospective longitudinal studies have examined whether individual differences i...

    13. Hair as a Meaningful Measure of Baseline Cortisol Levels over Time in Dogs

      OpenAIRE

      Bryan, Heather M; Adams, Amanda G; Invik, Rosemary M; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E.; Smits, Judit EG

      2013-01-01

      Cortisol measurements of hair are becoming a valuable tool in monitoring chronic stress. To further validate this approach in domestic dogs, we compared the variability of cortisol immunoreactivity in hair with that in saliva and feces of dogs housed under constant social and physical conditions. Fecal (n = 268), and hair (n = 21) samples were collected over 3 mo from 7 dogs housed in a kennel and kept for training veterinary students in minimally invasive procedures. Salivary samples (n = 18...

    14. Salivary Cortisol as a Biomarker to Explore the Role of Maternal Stress in Early Childhood Caries

      OpenAIRE

      Sharat Chandra Pani; Deena Abuthuraya; Hadia M. AlShammery; Dalal AlShammery; Hind AlShehri

      2013-01-01

      Objective. To compare salivary cortisol levels of children with ECC and their mothers with those of caries free children from a similar sociodemographic cohort. Design. Sixty-four college-educated, working mothers from middle income families with no history of anxiety disorders and their first born children aged between 48 and 71 months were included in the study. Salivary cortisol levels were analyzed using electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay. Statistical Analyses. Significance of dif...

    15. Green space and stress: evidence from cortisol measures in deprived urban communities.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Roe, Jenny J; Thompson, Catharine Ward; Aspinall, Peter A; Brewer, Mark J; Duff, Elizabeth I; Miller, David; Mitchell, Richard; Clow, Angela

      2013-09-01

      Contact with green space in the environment has been associated with mental health benefits, but the mechanism underpinning this association is not clear. This study extends an earlier exploratory study showing that more green space in deprived urban neighbourhoods in Scotland is linked to lower levels of perceived stress and improved physiological stress as measured by diurnal patterns of cortisol secretion. Salivary cortisol concentrations were measured at 3, 6 and 9 h post awakening over two consecutive weekdays, together with measures of perceived stress. Participants (n = 106) were men and women not in work aged between 35-55 years, resident in socially disadvantaged districts from the same Scottish, UK, urban context as the earlier study. Results from linear regression analyses showed a significant and negative relationship between higher green space levels and stress levels, indicating living in areas with a higher percentage of green space is associated with lower stress, confirming the earlier study findings. This study further extends the findings by showing significant gender differences in stress patterns by levels of green space, with women in lower green space areas showing higher levels of stress. A significant interaction effect between gender and percentage green space on mean cortisol concentrations showed a positive effect of higher green space in relation to cortisol measures in women, but not in men. Higher levels of neighbourhood green space were associated with healthier mean cortisol levels in women whilst also attenuating higher cortisol levels in men. We conclude that higher levels of green space in residential neighbourhoods, for this deprived urban population of middle-aged men and women not in work, are linked with lower perceived stress and a steeper (healthier) diurnal cortisol decline. However, overall patterns and levels of cortisol secretion in men and women were differentially related to neighbourhood green space and warrant

    16. Green Space and Stress: Evidence from Cortisol Measures in Deprived Urban Communities

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Angela Clow

      2013-09-01

      Full Text Available Contact with green space in the environment has been associated with mental health benefits, but the mechanism underpinning this association is not clear. This study extends an earlier exploratory study showing that more green space in deprived urban neighbourhoods in Scotland is linked to lower levels of perceived stress and improved physiological stress as measured by diurnal patterns of cortisol secretion. Salivary cortisol concentrations were measured at 3, 6 and 9 h post awakening over two consecutive weekdays, together with measures of perceived stress. Participants (n = 106 were men and women not in work aged between 35–55 years, resident in socially disadvantaged districts from the same Scottish, UK, urban context as the earlier study. Results from linear regression analyses showed a significant and negative relationship between higher green space levels and stress levels, indicating living in areas with a higher percentage of green space is associated with lower stress, confirming the earlier study findings. This study further extends the findings by showing significant gender differences in stress patterns by levels of green space, with women in lower green space areas showing higher levels of stress. A significant interaction effect between gender and percentage green space on mean cortisol concentrations showed a positive effect of higher green space in relation to cortisol measures in women, but not in men. Higher levels of neighbourhood green space were associated with healthier mean cortisol levels in women whilst also attenuating higher cortisol levels in men. We conclude that higher levels of green space in residential neighbourhoods, for this deprived urban population of middle-aged men and women not in work, are linked with lower perceived stress and a steeper (healthier diurnal cortisol decline. However, overall patterns and levels of cortisol secretion in men and women were differentially related to neighbourhood green

    17. Green Space and Stress: Evidence from Cortisol Measures in Deprived Urban Communities

      OpenAIRE

      Angela Clow; Richard Mitchell; David Miller; Duff, Elizabeth I.; Brewer, Mark J; Aspinall, Peter A.; Roe, Jenny J.; Catharine Ward Thompson

      2013-01-01

      Contact with green space in the environment has been associated with mental health benefits, but the mechanism underpinning this association is not clear. This study extends an earlier exploratory study showing that more green space in deprived urban neighbourhoods in Scotland is linked to lower levels of perceived stress and improved physiological stress as measured by diurnal patterns of cortisol secretion. Salivary cortisol concentrations were measured at 3, 6 and 9 h post awakening over t...

    18. Deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder is associated with cortisol changes.

      Science.gov (United States)

      de Koning, Pelle P; Figee, Martijn; Endert, Erik; Storosum, Jitschak G; Fliers, Eric; Denys, Damiaan

      2013-08-01

      Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but its mechanism of action is largely unknown. Since DBS may induce rapid symptomatic changes and the pathophysiology of OCD has been linked to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, we set out to study whether DBS affects the HPA axis in OCD patients. We compared a stimulation ON and OFF condition with a one-week interval in 16 therapy-refractory OCD patients, treated with DBS for at least one year, targeted at the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We measured changes in 24-h urinary excretion of free cortisol (UFC), adrenaline and noradrenaline and changes in obsessive-compulsive (Y-BOCS), depressive (HAM-D) and anxiety (HAM-A) symptom scores. Median UFC levels increased with 53% in the OFF condition (from 93 to 143nmol/24h, p=0.12). There were no changes in urinary adrenaline or noradrenaline excretion. The increase in Y-BOCS (39%), and HAM-D (78%) scores correlated strongly with increased UFC levels in the OFF condition. Our findings indicate that symptom changes following DBS for OCD patients are associated with changes in UFC levels. PMID:23333254

    19. Plasma cortisol and beta-endorphin concentrations in trained and over-trained standardbred racehorses.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Golland, L C; Evans, D L; Stone, G M; Tyler-McGowan, C M; Hodgson, D R; Rose, R J

      1999-12-01

      The effects of training and over-training on plasma cortisol and beta-endorphin (betaEP) concentrations at rest and after standardised exercise tests and the cortisol responses to adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) administration were investigated in standardbred horses. Twelve horses were divided randomly into control and over-trained (OT) groups after 17 weeks slow- and moderate-intensity treadmill training. The standardised treadmill exercise test consisted of 2 min at velocities corresponding to 30, 50, 70 and 100% of maximum O2 consumption. Over-training, defined as a significant decrease in body weight and treadmill run-time-to-fatigue in an incremental velocity test, occurred in the OT group after 32 weeks of training exercise. Peak cortisol concentrations after exercise decreased significantly in the OT group from 320+/-15.6 at week 8 to 245+/-17.0 nmol l(-1) at week 32, and mean cortisol concentrations over a 120-min period after exercise decreased from 258+/-11.7 to 192+/-16.6 nmol l(-1) (P<0.05). Mean and total cortisol and betaEP concentrations in resting horses were not significantly different after over-training. Peak cortisol concentrations after adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) administration were not significantly different in the over-trained group. Dysfunction of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis occurs in over-trained horses, but this adaptation is not associated with a change in the adrenocortical responsiveness to ACTH. PMID:10650995

    20. The Response of Serum Cortisol and Leptin Levels to Academic Stress

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Elizabeth J

      2009-11-01

      Full Text Available Background: Medical students are subjected to various types of stress during the academic course and they react differently. This study is an attempt to establish a relationship between the coping abilities, serum cortisol and leptin levels in response to academic examination stress in first year medical students. Methods: Thirty four 1st year medical students between 18 to 21 yrs of age were randomly selected and their coping abilities were assessed using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory. Two fasting blood samples were drawn, one on the day of examination (Situation I and the second after the completion of the examination (Situation II. Serum cortisol and leptin levels were estimated using a standardized RIA Kit and the levels obtained were correlated with the psychometric data. Results: The results showed increased levels of cortisol prior to examination in the poor adjusters in comparison to the good adjusters. The levels of cortisol decreased after examination in both good and poor adjusters with the poor adjusters showing higher levels. On the other hand, leptin levels increased in good adjusters in comparison with poor adjusters in Situation I and in Situation II the good adjusters showed a marginal decrease and poor adjusters maintained the same levels of leptin. Conclusion: Cortisol and leptin respond inversely to academic stress. Cortisol levels sharply decline from stressful to post-stressful situation indicating the wane of stress.

    1. Reduced Cortisol in Boys with Early-Onset Conduct Disorder and Callous-Unemotional Traits

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Georg G. von Polier

      2013-01-01

      Full Text Available Background. A growing body of evidence suggests an association between altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity and the development of persistent antisocial behavior in children. However the effects of altered cortisol levels remain poorly understood in the complex context of conduct disorder, callous-unemotional (CU personality traits, and frequent comorbidities, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. The aim of the current study was to investigate associations among CU traits, antisocial behavior, and comorbid ADHD symptomatology with cortisol levels in male children and adolescents. Methods. The study included 37 boys with early-onset conduct disorder (EO-CD, mean age 11.9 years and 38 healthy boys (mean age 12.5 years. Participants were subjected to multiple daytime salivary cortisol measurements and a psychometric characterization. Results. Subjects in the EO-CD group with elevated CU traits showed a diminished cortisol awakening response compared to healthy participants. In the EO-CD group, high CU traits and impulsivity were associated with decreased diurnal cortisol levels, while associations with antisocial behavior were not detected. The cortisol awakening response was significantly inversely associated with hyperactivity (P=0.02 and marginally significant with CU traits (P=0.07. Conclusions. These results indicate a specific association between CU traits and a diminished stress response, which is not explained by antisocial behavior in general.

    2. Lower Cortisol Activity is Associated with First-Time Driving while Impaired.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Couture, Sophie; Ouimet, Marie Claude; Gianoulakis, Christina; Tremblay, Jacques; Ng Ying Kin, Nmk; Brochu, Serge; Pruessner, Jens; Dedovic, Katarina; Brown, Thomas G

      2015-01-01

      Driving while impaired (DWI) is a grave and persistent high-risk behavior. Previous work demonstrated that DWI recidivists had attenuated cortisol reactivity compared to non-DWI drivers. This suggests that cortisol is a neurobiological marker of high-risk driving. The present study tested the hypothesis that this initial finding would extend to first-time DWI (fDWI) offenders compared to non-DWI drivers. Male fDWI offenders (n = 139) and non-DWI drivers (n = 31) were exposed to a stress task, and their salivary cortisol activity (total output and reactivity) was measured. Participants also completed questionnaires on sensation seeking, impulsivity, substance use, and engagement in risky and criminal behaviors. As hypothesized, fDWI offenders, compared to non-DWI drivers, had lower cortisol reactivity; fDWI offenders also showed lower total output. In addition, cortisol activity was the most important predictor of group membership, after accounting for alcohol misuse patterns and consequences and other personality and problem behavior characteristics. The findings indicate that attenuated cortisol activity is an independent factor associated with DWI offending risk at an earlier stage in the DWI trajectory than previously detected. PMID:25922575

    3. Evaluation of urinary cortisol excretion by radioimmunoassay through two methods (extracted and non-extracted)

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      The objective of this paper is to compare the feasibility, sensitivity and specificity of both methods (extracted versus non-extracted) in the hypercortisolism diagnosis. It used Gamma Coat 125 cortisol Kit provided by Clinical Assays, Incstar, USA, for both methods extracting it with methylene chloride in order to measure the extracted cortisol. It was performed 32 assays from which it was obtained from 0.1 to 0.47 u g/d l of sensitivity. The intra-run precision was varied from 8.29 +- 3.38% and 8.19 +-4.72% for high and low levels, respectively for non-extracted cortisol, and 9.72 +- 1.94% and 9.54 +- 44% for high and low levels, respectively, for extracted cortisol. The inter-run precision was 15.98% and 16.15% for high level of non-extracted cortisol, respectively. For the low level it obtained 17.25% and 18.59% for non-extracted and extracted cortisol respectively. It was evaluated 24-hour urine basal samples from 43 normal subjects, and 53 obese (body mass index > 30) and 53 Cushing's syndrome patients. The sensitivity of the methods were similar (100% and 98.1% for non-extracted and extracted methods, respectively) and the specificity was the same for both methods (100%). It was noticed a positive correlation between the two methods in all the groups studied (p s syndrome. (author)

    4. Daily cortisol production rate in man determined by stable isotope dilution/mass spectrometry

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Esteban, N.V.; Loughlin, T.; Yergey, A.L.; Zawadzki, J.K.; Booth, J.D.; Winterer, J.C.; Loriaux, D.L. (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD (USA))

      1991-01-01

      Growth retardation as well as the development of Cushingoid features in adrenally insufficient patients treated with the currently accepted replacement dose of cortisol (33-41 mumol/day.m2; 12-15 mg/m2.day) prompted us to reevaluate the cortisol production rate (FPR) in normal subjects and patients with Cushing's syndrome, using a recently developed thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The stable isotope (9,12,12-2H3)cortisol was infused continuously for 31 h at about 5% of the anticipated FPR. Blood samples were obtained at 20-min intervals for 24 h, spun, and pooled in 4-h groups. Tracer dilution in plasma was determined by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The method was validated with controlled infusions in 6 patients with adrenal insufficiency. Results from 12 normal volunteers revealed a FPR of 27.3 +/- 7.5 mumol/day (9.9 +/- 2.7 mg/day) or 15.7 mumol/day.m2; 5.7 mg/m2. day. A previously unreported circadian variation in FPR was observed. Patients with Cushing's syndrome demonstrated unequivocal elevation of FPR and cortisol concentration correlated during each sample period in normal volunteers, indicating that cortisol secretion, rather than metabolism, is mainly responsible for changes in plasma cortisol. Our data suggest that the FPR in normal subjects may be lower than previously believed.

    5. Factors influencing cortisol and behavioral responses to maternal separation in guinea pigs.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hennessy, M B; Moorman, L

      1989-04-01

      Infant guinea pigs recently were found to respond to brief maternal separation with an increase in plasma cortisol levels. The present experiments were conducted to further characterize this response and compare it with the cortisol separation response previously observed in primates. In Experiment 1, separation of guinea pig pups from their mothers did not elevate the plasma cortisol levels of the pups at either 30 or 180 min when they remained alone in their home cages during the separation. Experiment 2 showed that cortisol levels of pups placed alone in a novel cage were greater at 30, 90, and 180 min than were those of pups placed in the cages together with their mothers. In contrast, the separated pups vocalized more than did pups tested with their mothers during the initial 30 min only. In Experiment 3, pups raised on inanimate surrogates responded less intensely to rearing-figure separation in terms of both cortisol and vocalizations than did mother-reared controls. Taken together, these results indicate both differences (response to home cage separation) and similarities (dissociation of cortisol and vocalization responses, effect of surrogate separation) in the separation responses of guinea pig and primate infants. The guinea pig model may provide a useful adjunct to primate studies for examining particular issues concerning physiological effects of brief separation from an attachment object. PMID:2706081

    6. Cortisol Secretion and Functional Disabilities in Old Age: Importance of Using Adaptive Control Strategies

      Science.gov (United States)

      Wrosch, Carsten; Miller, Gregory E.; Schulz, Richard

      2009-01-01

      Objectives To examine whether the use of health-related control strategies moderates the association between elevated diurnal cortisol secretion and increases in older adults’ functional disabilities. Methods Functional disabilities of 164 older adults were assessed over 4 years by measuring participants’ problems with performing activities of daily living. The main predictors included baseline levels of diurnal cortisol secretion and control strategies used to manage physical health threats. Results A large increase in functional disabilities was observed among participants who secreted elevated baseline levels of cortisol and did not use health-related control strategies. By contrast, high cortisol level was not associated with increases in functional disabilities among participants who reported using these control strategies. Among participants with low cortisol level, there was a relatively smaller increase in functional disabilities over time, and the use of control strategies was not significantly associated with changes in functional disabilities. Conclusions The findings suggest that high cortisol level is associated with an increase in older adults’ functional disabilities, but only if older adults do not engage in adaptive control strategies. PMID:19875635

    7. Differential sensitization of parenting on early adolescent cortisol: Moderation by profiles of maternal stress.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Martin, Christina Gamache; Kim, Hyoun K; Fisher, Philip A

      2016-05-01

      The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a critical component of the body's stress-response neurobiological system, and its development and functioning are shaped by the social environment. Much of our understanding of the effects of the caregiving environment on the HPA axis is based on (a) parenting in young children and (b) individual maternal stressors, such as depression. Yet, less is known about how parenting behaviors and maternal stressors interact to influence child cortisol regulation, particularly in older children. With an ethnically diverse sample of 199 mothers and their early adolescent children (M=11.00years; 54% female), a profile analytic approach was used to investigate how multiple phenotypes of maternal stress co-occur and moderate the relation between parenting behaviors and youths' diurnal cortisol rhythms. Latent profile analysis yielded 4 profiles: current parenting stress, concurrent parenting and childhood stress, childhood stress, and low stress. For mothers with the concurrent parenting and childhood stress profile, inconsistent discipline, poor parental supervision, and harsh caregiving behaviors each were related to flattened diurnal cortisol rhythms in their adolescents. For mothers with the current parenting stress and childhood stress profiles, their use of inconsistent discipline was associated with flattened diurnal cortisol rhythms in their adolescents. For mothers with the low stress profile, none of the parenting behaviors was related to their adolescents' cortisol regulation. Findings suggest that based on mothers' stress profile, parenting behaviors are differentially related to youths' diurnal cortisol rhythms. Implications for parenting interventions are discussed. PMID:26859701

    8. Stress among nurses: an examination of salivary cortisol levels on work and day off

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Maria Cecilia Pires da Rocha

      2013-10-01

      Full Text Available The present study evaluates the use of salivary cortisol concentration as a physiological index of the stress level among nurses on their work day and day off and correlates it with the questionnaire used to measure occupational stress in nurses (Inventário de Estresse em Enfermeiros - IEE. This is a comparative, cross-sectional descriptive study in which sociodemographic data, IEE results and salivary cortisol levels were used. Fifty-seven nurses participated in the study (80.7% females and a mean age of 37.1 years old. The IEE average score was 124.5. The average cortisol level was 564.1 ng/m on work day and 354.1 ng/mL on day off. Nurses who had double workdays presented high values of salivary cortisol during the work day (638.1 ng/mL. In conclusion, salivary cortisol identified the nurses’ stress level, and differences were found between a work day and day off. On the nurses’ day off, their salivary cortisol levels and stress scores were lower.

    9. Oral midazolam reduces cortisol levels during local anaesthesia in children: a randomised controlled trial

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Heloisa Sousa GOMES

      2015-01-01

      Full Text Available Little is known about whether midazolam sedation can reduce salivary cortisol levels and consequently influence children’s behaviour during dental treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of midazolam sedation on salivary cortisol and its correlation with children’s behaviour during restorative dental treatment. Eighteen healthy children, aged two to five years, were randomly assigned to two dental treatment appointments, both with physical restraint: oral midazolam 1 mg/kg (MS and placebo (PS. An observer assessed the children’s behaviour (videos using the Ohio State University Behavioral Rating Scale (OSUBRS. The children’s saliva was collected just after waking up, on arrival at the dental school, 25 minutes after local anaesthesia, and 25 minutes after the end of the procedure. Salivary cortisol levels were determined using the enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. The data were analysed by bivariate tests and multivariate analysis of variance (5% level. Salivary cortisol levels were lower in the MS group than in the PS group at the time of anaesthesia (p = 0.004, but did not vary during the appointment within sedation (p = 0.319 or placebo (p = 0.080 groups. Children’s behaviour was negative most of the time and did not differ between MS and PS; however, the behaviour (OSUBRS did not correlate with salivary cortisol levels. Oral midazolam is able to control salivary cortisol levels during dental treatment of pre-schoolers, which might not lead to better clinical behaviour.

    10. Effect of graded doses of cortisol on total body calcium in rats

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Yasumura, S.; Ellis, K.J.; Fairchild, E.; Brook, D.; Cohn, S.H.

      1976-12-01

      Male rats with an average body weight of 250 g were injected (sc) daily for 4 wk with 0.05, 0.20, 0.75, or 3.00 mg of cortisol acetate. Intact and adrenalectomized control animals were injected daily with 0.1 ml of vehicle (corn oil). Total body calcium (TB/sub Ca/) was measured weekly in each rat by in vivo neutron activation analysis. The gain in body weight of rats treated with 0.75 mg cortisol was significantly less than controls, and the animals treated with 3.00 mg cortisol lost weight. In spite of these differences in body weight, the TB/sub Ca/ of all rats increased to an equal degree from an average of 1.93 g to 2.81 g in 4 wk. In addition, there were no significant differences in tibial ash calcium. However, calcium (mg) per unit length (mm) of tibia was increased in rats treated with the higher doses of cortisol; thus bone density was increased. These results demonstrate that the TB/sub Ca/ increases even when rats are subjected to cortisol. This is explained in part by the normal rate of intestinal calcium absorption in cortisol-treated rats.

    11. Development of an assay for urinary free cortisol determination on the Technicon Immuno 1 system

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Letellier, M.; Levesque, A.; Daigle, F. [Centre Universitaire de Sante de l' Estrie, Dept. of Clinical Biochemistry, Site Fleurimont, Sherbrooke, Quebec (Canada)

      1997-08-15

      To develop and evaluate a method using an ethyl acetate extraction procedure for the determination of urinary free cortisol on the Technicon Immuno 1 system from Bayer Corporation. We tested the assay precision, linearity, and correlation with the Urinary Kallestad Quanticoat Cortisol radioimmunoassay. We also studied the efficiency of the extraction procedure, performed a cross-reactivity study with different cortisol metabolites, and determined the reference values. The assay shows within-run CVs varying from 1.6 to 5.3% and between-day CVs from 2.7 to 6.1% for urinary free cortisol concentrations from 58 to 1097 nmol/L. The assay demonstrates an excellent linearity and a very good correlation with the Kallestad Quanticoat Cortisol assay (slope 0.94, y-intercept = 29 nmol/L, Sy|x = 54 nmol/L, r = 0.996). The reference values were estimated at 42-281 nmol/d. The extraction procedure shows an average recovery of 99.0% and minimal interference with the cortisol metabolites tested with the exception of cortisone. The evaluation shows that the developed assay has the analytical characteristics required for its utilization in a clinical laboratory. (author)

    12. Basal and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Stimulated Plasma Cortisol Levels Among Egyptian Autistic Children: Relation to Disease Severity

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Hewedi Doaa H

      2010-10-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism is a disorder of early childhood characterized by social impairment, communication abnormalities and stereotyped behaviors. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis deserves special attention, since it is the basis for emotions and social interactions that are affected in autism. Aim To assess basal and stimulated plasma cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH levels in autistic children and their relationship to disease characteristics. Methods Fifty autistic children were studied in comparison to 50 healthy age-, sex- and pubertal stage- matched children. All subjects were subjected to clinical evaluation and measurement of plasma cortisol (basal and stimulated and ACTH. In addition, electroencephalography (EEG and intelligence quotient (IQ assessment were done for all autistic children. Results Sixteen% of autistic patients had high ACTH, 10% had low basal cortisol and 10% did not show adequate cortisol response to ACTH stimulation. Autistic patients had lower basal (p = 0.032 and stimulated cortisol (p = 0.04 and higher ACTH (p = 0.01 than controls. Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS score correlated positively with ACTH (r = 0.71, p = 0.02 and negatively with each of basal (r = -0.64, p = 0.04 and stimulated cortisol (r = -0.88, p Conclusions The observed hormonal changes may be due to a dysfunction in the HPA axis in autistic individuals. Further studies are warranted regarding the role of HPA axis dysfunction in the pathogenesis of autism.

    13. Circadian plasma cortisol levels during topical use of desoximetasone and triamcinolone acetonide in man.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hartmann, F; Proppe, A; Proppe, D

      1980-05-01

      The effect of topical use of desoximetasone (Topisolon ointment) and triamcinolone acetonide (Volon A cream) for 3 to 4 days on circadian plasma cortisol levels was studied in 22 hospitalized patients (mean age 61 years) for Topisolon, and in ten patients (mean age 59 years) for Volon A. The differences in cortisol levels (RIA) were examined by the frequency distribution analysis of Daeves and Beckel (1958). The need to analyze the features of the distribution curves was clearly demonstrated in preference to simple averaging statistics which rely upon the arithmetic mean as the main parameter. The results suggest two distinct groups of morning plasma cortisol levels - one at a low level of 5.6 X 1.85 +/- 1 and one at a high level of 15.4 X 1.56 +/- 1 microgram/100 ml. The evening level was uniform 6.5 X 2.13 +/- 1 microgram/100 ml. Topisolon depressed the plasma cortisol levels in all groups. Volon A seemed to reduce only the morning high level group to lower values. In addition, Topisolon altered the proportions of patients with high and low plasma cortisol levels, while Volon A had little effect. The different responses of the plasma cortisol levels may imply different kinetics of cutaneous penetration and cutaneous metabolism of the two synthetic corticosteroids. PMID:6893435

    14. Daily cortisol production rate in man determined by stable isotope dilution/mass spectrometry

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      Growth retardation as well as the development of Cushingoid features in adrenally insufficient patients treated with the currently accepted replacement dose of cortisol (33-41 mumol/day.m2; 12-15 mg/m2.day) prompted us to reevaluate the cortisol production rate (FPR) in normal subjects and patients with Cushing's syndrome, using a recently developed thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The stable isotope [9,12,12-2H3]cortisol was infused continuously for 31 h at about 5% of the anticipated FPR. Blood samples were obtained at 20-min intervals for 24 h, spun, and pooled in 4-h groups. Tracer dilution in plasma was determined by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The method was validated with controlled infusions in 6 patients with adrenal insufficiency. Results from 12 normal volunteers revealed a FPR of 27.3 +/- 7.5 mumol/day (9.9 +/- 2.7 mg/day) or 15.7 mumol/day.m2; 5.7 mg/m2. day. A previously unreported circadian variation in FPR was observed. Patients with Cushing's syndrome demonstrated unequivocal elevation of FPR and cortisol concentration correlated during each sample period in normal volunteers, indicating that cortisol secretion, rather than metabolism, is mainly responsible for changes in plasma cortisol. Our data suggest that the FPR in normal subjects may be lower than previously believed

    15. An interlaboratory comparison between similar methods for determination of melatonin, cortisol and testosterone in saliva

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Jensen, Marie Aarrebo; Mortier, Leen; Koh, Eitetsu;

      2014-01-01

      An interlaboratory comparison study for melatonin, cortisol and testosterone in saliva in which five laboratories participated is reported in this study. Each laboratory blindly measured eight samples prepared from natural saliva spiked with melatonin, cortisol and testosterone in the range 0......-579 pmol/L for melatonin, 0-90 nmol/L for cortisol, and 0-622 pmol/L for testosterone. The recovery of spiked material for melatonin ranged from 91-110%, from 83-100% for cortisol and from 80-94% for testosterone. The content of natural hormone in saliva was estimated to be between 0.278 and 6.90 pmol....../L for melatonin, 0.56 and 6.72 nmol/L for cortisol and 11.9 and 73.8 pmol/L for testosterone. This indicates a large interlaboratory variation. The present study emphasizes the importance of external quality control for the analysis of melatonin, cortisol and testosterone in saliva....

    16. Changes in salivary cortisol levels as a prognostic predictor in children with anorexia nervosa.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Shibuya, Ikuhiko; Nagamitsu, Shinichiro; Okamura, Hisayoshi; Komatsu, Hiroko; Ozono, Shuichi; Yamashita, Yushiro; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

      2011-11-01

      This study investigated the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in children with anorexia nervosa (AN) before and after inpatient treatment. Salivary cortisol levels were measured to ascertain whether changes in the HPA axis activity following therapeutic intervention could be applicable as a prognostic predictor. This study comprised 21 females with AN and 22 control subjects. Saliva was collected at 2-hour intervals from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. before and after inpatient treatment. The concentrations for areas under the curve (AUC) were compared with physical parameters, eating attitude score, profile of mood states (POMS), and prognostic factors. Mean salivary cortisol levels at all points and mean AUC cortisol levels in subjects with AN before therapy were significantly higher than those in controls, but returned to control levels after inpatient treatment. Higher AUC cortisol levels were associated with lower standard deviation for weight in AN. A significant positive correlation between the AUC cortisol level and POMS subscale of "Fatigue" was apparent in the control group, but not in the AN group. The increased change values of AUC cortisol level before and after inpatient treatment correlated with increased body weight gain ratio just after treatment, but not with the ratio after one year. The present study indicated that HPA axis activity could reflect severity of illness, but did not show an accurate neuroendocrine response for mood states. Changes in HPA axis activity following treatment could therefore be used to predict prognosis and particularly in the short term. PMID:21906636

    17. The influence of selected factors and sport results of endurance horses on their saliva cortisol concentration.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Janczarek, I; Bereznowski, A; Strzelec, K

      2013-01-01

      The aim of the study was to define the influence of the selected factors (gender, age, transportation time, riding distance and air temperature during the ride) on the cortisol secretion and finding a correlation between the hormone level and the horses' sport results (veterinary parameters and the ride route parameters). The research was performed on 38 Arabian pure breed horses taking part in the endurance rides. The cortisol level was measured with enzyme-immunological method in saliva samples, taken four times from each horse. In order to verify the differences between the mean results the repeated measures design was applied. The significance of the differences between the mean values was determined by the Tukey test. To evaluate the interrelations between the analysed attributes Pearson's correlation analysis was applied. The cortisol level at rest was not affected by any of the analysed factors. In case of other results, the most significant influence (P temperature during the ride. Higher cortisol level was noted in mares, horses running the longest distances and at the highest temperatures. A significant increase in the cortisol level was noted when the ride distance was longer. There were no clear correlation between the adrenal cortex activity and the veterinary parameters at different riding speed. High cortisol concentration can negatively affect the heart rate (HR) by increasing it, but it can simultaneously stimulate the body to fight dehydration. PMID:24195289

    18. Nonsynonymous HTR2C polymorphism predicts cortisol response to psychosocial stress II: Evidence from two samples.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Way, Baldwin M; Brown, Kirk Warren; Quaglia, Jordan; McCain, Nancy; Taylor, Shelley E

      2016-08-01

      The 5-HT2C receptor is the primary serotonin receptor located in the corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) neurons of the hypothalamus. These neurons initiate the signaling cascade that culminates in cortisol release. Therefore, genetic variation in the 5-HT2C receptor gene (HTR2C) is a prime candidate for affecting cortisol reactivity to stress. Accordingly, we examined the association of a nonsynonymous polymorphism (Cys23Ser; rs6318) in HTR2C with stress reactivity in two Trier Social Stress Tests conducted at separate sites. In both Study 1 (N=128) and Study 2 (N=185), Cys23 homozygous females and hemizygous males had greater cortisol reactivity. There was no relation between this polymorphism and self-reported affective response (Studies 1 and 2) or cardiovascular reactivity (Study 2). Additionally, the short/short genotype of a polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) in the serotonin transporter gene was associated with greater cortisol reactivity in Study 1 as well as in Study 2 (previously reported). The Cys23Ser polymorphism and the 5-HTTLPR were independently associated with cortisol reactivity in both studies. These findings emphasize the important role of genetic variation in the serotonin system on regulating cortisol reactivity to social evaluative stress. Comparison of the present associations with those of prior studies underscores the likely importance of situational and psychological factors in determining the direction and magnitude of the association between genotype and phenotype. PMID:27211696

    19. The aetiological association between the dynamics of cortisol productivity and ADHD.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Pinto, Rebecca; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Ouellet-Morin, Isabelle; Asherson, Philip; McLoughlin, Grainne; Kuntsi, Jonna

      2016-08-01

      Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been linked to dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, indexed by salivary cortisol. The phenotypic and aetiological association of cortisol productivity with ADHD was investigated. A selected twin design using 68 male twin-pairs aged 12-15, concordant or discordant for high ADHD symptom scores, or control twin-pairs with low ADHD symptoms, based on developmentally stable parental ADHD ratings. A genetic growth curve model was applied to cortisol samples obtained across three points during a cognitive-electroencephalography assessment, to examine the aetiological overlap of ADHD affection status (high versus low ADHD symptom scores) with latent intercept and slope factors. A significant phenotypic correlation emerged between ADHD and the slope factor, with cortisol levels dropping faster for the group with high ADHD symptom scores. The analyses further suggested this overlap was mostly driven by correlated genetic effects. We identified change in cortisol activity over time as significantly associated with ADHD affection status, primarily explained by shared genetic effects, suggesting that blunted cortisol productivity can be a marker of genetic risk in ADHD. PMID:27106905

    20. Diurnal cortisol rhythm: Associated with anxiety and depression, or just an indication of lack of energy?

      Science.gov (United States)

      Harris, Anette; Endresen Reme, Silje; Tangen, Tone; Hansen, Åse Marie; Helene Garde, Anne; Eriksen, Hege Randi

      2015-08-15

      Dysregulation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-activity has been associated with low back pain (LBP). The underlying mechanisms are not fully explained, but psychological mechanisms are considered important. In this study we examine the association between psychiatric disorders/symptoms measured with different instruments, and cortisol in a population with LBP. Participants (n=305) sick-listed 2-10 months due to non-specific LBP were included in the study. The screening instruments were the MINI-interview, HADS and HSCL-25. Saliva cortisol were measured on 2 consecutive days; at awakening, 30min later, at 15:00h and 22:00h. Results showed no associations between any of the main diagnostic categories from the MINI-interview, or anxiety/depression measured with HADS or HSCL-25 and cortisol. However, significant associations were found between low cortisol awakening response, low cortisol slope during the day and the somatization scale from HSCL-25 (dizziness or lack of energy, lack of sexual interest, the feeling that everything requires substantial efforts, difficulties to fall asleep, headache). The results indicate that cortisol, may not be directly associated with psychopathology, such as anxiety and depression, but instead are associated with one dimension of the psychopathology, namely lack of energy. This could help explain the inconsistency in the literature, and it should be explored further. PMID:26001959

    1. Parenting stressors and morning cortisol in a sample of working mothers.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Hibel, Leah C; Mercado, Evelyn; Trumbell, Jill M

      2012-10-01

      The cortisol awakening response (CAR) is a normative rise in cortisol levels across the 30 minutes post awakening. Both the levels and the degree of change in cortisol across this time period are sensitive to the perceived challenges of the day and are thought to prepare the individual to meet these tasks. However, working parents of young children may be under unique strains at this time as they attempt to simultaneously care for their children while also preparing themselves for the workday ahead. In these analyses we examined the contributions of both work and parenting stress on maternal cortisol levels and awakening responses, and how these relationships differed on workdays compared with nonworkdays. To do this, saliva samples were collected from 56 working mothers (25% single) with a child between the ages of 2 and 4 years old (mode = 2 children), at awakening and 30 min postawakening. Samples were collected on 4 consecutive days-2 nonworkdays followed by 2 workdays. Analyses revealed mothers reporting higher levels of parenting stress had higher average a.m. cortisol on workdays compared with nonworkdays. Further, mothers reporting a combination of high job strain and high parenting stress had significantly higher cortisol levels and steeper CAR increases on workdays compared with nonworkdays. Findings are discussed by integrating knowledge from the fields of parenting stress, work-family, and stress physiology. PMID:22866929

    2. Association between Serum Cortisol and DHEA-S Levels and Response to Antipsychotic Treatment in Schizophrenia

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Zoja Babinkostova

      2015-02-01

      Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggested that alterations in serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. AIM: To compare serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls and to evaluate their association with the response to antipsychotic treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this clinical prospective study were included 60 patients with schizophrenia and 40 healthy age and sex matched control subjects. Clinical evaluation of patients was performed using the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale. A questionnaire for socio-demographic and clinical data collection was used. For the purposes of the study, the examined group was divided in two subgroups: responders and nonresponders. Serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels were measured at baseline in all participants and after 3 and 6 weeks of the antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia. RESULTS: Patients with schizophrenia had significantly higher serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels in comparison to the control group. Responders had significantly higher serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels compared with nonresponders. CONCLUSION: Elevated serum cortisol and DHEA-S levels may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and they may be related to positive response to antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia.

    3. Stress regulation and cognitive control: evidence relating cortisol reactivity and neural responses to errors.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Compton, Rebecca J; Hofheimer, Julia; Kazinka, Rebecca

      2013-03-01

      In this study, we tested the relationship between error-related signals of cognitive control and cortisol reactivity, investigating the hypothesis of common systems for cognitive and emotional self-regulation. Eighty-three participants completed a Stroop task while electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded. Three error-related indices were derived from the EEG: the error-related negativity (ERN), error positivity (Pe), and error-related alpha suppression (ERAS). Pre- and posttask salivary samples were assayed for cortisol, and cortisol change scores were correlated with the EEG variables. Better error-correct differentiation in the ERN predicted less cortisol increase during the task, whereas greater ERAS predicted greater cortisol increase during the task; the Pe was not correlated with cortisol changes. We concluded that an enhanced ERN, part of an adaptive cognitive control system, predicts successful stress regulation. In contrast, an enhanced ERAS response may reflect error-related arousal that is not adaptive. The results support the concept of overlapping systems for cognitive and emotional self-regulation. PMID:23055094

    4. Analog circuit design art, science and personalities

      CERN Document Server

      Williams, Jim

      1991-01-01

      This book is far more than just another tutorial or reference guide - it's a tour through the world of analog design, combining theory and applications with the philosophies behind the design process. Readers will learn how leading analog circuit designers approach problems and how they think about solutions to those problems. They'll also learn about the `analog way' - a broad, flexible method of thinking about analog design tasks.A comprehensive and useful guide to analog theory and applications. Covers visualizing the operation of analog circuits. Looks at how to rap

    5. Synaptic dynamics in analog VLSI.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Bartolozzi, Chiara; Indiveri, Giacomo

      2007-10-01

      Synapses are crucial elements for computation and information transfer in both real and artificial neural systems. Recent experimental findings and theoretical models of pulse-based neural networks suggest that synaptic dynamics can play a crucial role for learning neural codes and encoding spatiotemporal spike patterns. Within the context of hardware implementations of pulse-based neural networks, several analog VLSI circuits modeling synaptic functionality have been proposed. We present an overview of previously proposed circuits and describe a novel analog VLSI synaptic circuit suitable for integration in large VLSI spike-based neural systems. The circuit proposed is based on a computational model that fits the real postsynaptic currents with exponentials. We present experimental data showing how the circuit exhibits realistic dynamics and show how it can be connected to additional modules for implementing a wide range of synaptic properties. PMID:17716003

    6. Mechanical Analogies of Fractional Elements

      Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

      HU Kai-Xin; ZHU Ke-Qin

      2009-01-01

      A Fractional element model describes a special kind of viscoelastic material.Its stress is proportional to the fractional-order derivative of strain. Physically the mechanical analogies of fractional elements can be represented by spring-dashpot fractal networks. We introduce a constitutive operator in the constitutive equations of viscoelastic materials.To derive constitutive operators for spring-dashpot fractal networks, we use Heaviside operational calculus, which provides explicit answers not otherwise obtainable simply.Then the series-parallel formulas for the constitutive operator are derived. Using these formulas, a constitutive equation of fractional element with 1/2-order derivative is obtained.Finally we find the way to derive the constitutive equations with other fractional-order derivatives and their mechanical analogies.

    7. Bottomed analog of Z+(4433)

      International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

      The newly observed Z+(4433) resonance by BELLE is believed to be a tetraquark bound state made up of (cu)(cd). We propose the bottomed analog of this bound state, namely, by replacing one of the charm quarks by a bottom quark, thus forming Zbc0,±,±±. One of the Zbc is doubly charged. The predicted mass of Zbc is around 7.6 GeV. This doubly charged bound state can be detected by its decay into Bc±π±. Similarly, we can also replace both charm quark and antiquark of the Z+(4433) by bottom quark and antiquark, respectively, thus forming Zbb the bottomonium analog of Z+(4433). The predicted mass of Zbb is about 10.7 GeV

    8. Analog Nonvolatile Computer Memory Circuits

      Science.gov (United States)

      MacLeod, Todd

      2007-01-01

      In nonvolatile random-access memory (RAM) circuits of a proposed type, digital data would be stored in analog form in ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FFETs). This type of memory circuit would offer advantages over prior volatile and nonvolatile types: In a conventional complementary metal oxide/semiconductor static RAM, six transistors must be used to store one bit, and storage is volatile in that data are lost when power is turned off. In a conventional dynamic RAM, three transistors must be used to store one bit, and the stored bit must be refreshed every few milliseconds. In contrast, in a RAM according to the proposal, data would be retained when power was turned off, each memory cell would contain only two FFETs, and the cell could store multiple bits (the exact number of bits depending on the specific design). Conventional flash memory circuits afford nonvolatile storage, but they operate at reading and writing times of the order of thousands of conventional computer memory reading and writing times and, hence, are suitable for use only as off-line storage devices. In addition, flash memories cease to function after limited numbers of writing cycles. The proposed memory circuits would not be subject to either of these limitations. Prior developmental nonvolatile ferroelectric memories are limited to one bit per cell, whereas, as stated above, the proposed memories would not be so limited. The design of a memory circuit according to the proposal must reflect the fact that FFET storage is only partly nonvolatile, in that the signal stored in an FFET decays gradually over time. (Retention times of some advanced FFETs exceed ten years.) Instead of storing a single bit of data as either a positively or negatively saturated state in a ferroelectric device, each memory cell according to the proposal would store two values. The two FFETs in each cell would be denoted the storage FFET and the control FFET. The storage FFET would store an analog signal value

    9. A two-year follow-up study of salivary cortisol concentration and the risk of depression

      DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Grynderup, Matias Brødsgaard; Kolstad, Henrik A.; Mikkelsen, Sigurd;

      2013-01-01

      Stress is a suspected cause of depression. High cortisol concentration, a biomarker of an activated stress response, has been found in depressed patients. The aim of this study was to determine if a high level of salivary cortisol is a risk factor of depression. In 2007, we enrolled 4467 public...... employees. Morning and evening salivary cortisol concentration were measured for each participant. Participants reporting high levels of depressive, burnout, or stress symptoms, assessed by questionnaires were assigned to a psychiatric interview. In this interview 98 participants were diagnosed...... were estimated for every 1.0nmol/l increase in morning, evening, and daily mean cortisol concentration, as well as for the difference between morning and evening cortisol concentration. The risk of depression decreased by increasing daily mean cortisol concentration and by increasing difference between...

    10. Evaluation of thymus morphology and serum cortisol concentration as indirect biomarkers to detect low-dose dexamethasone illegal treatment in beef cattle

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      Vascellari Marta

      2012-08-01

      Full Text Available Abstract Background Corticosteroids are illegally used in several countries as growth promoters in veal calves and beef cattle, either alone or in association with sex steroids and β-agonists, especially at low dosages and primarily through oral administration, in order to enhance carcasses and meat quality traits. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the reliability of the histological evaluation of the thymus, as well as the serum cortisol determination, in identifying beef cattle, treated with two different dexamethasone-based growth-promoting protocols and the application of different withdrawal times before slaughter. Results Our findings demonstrate that low dosages of dexamethasone (DXM, administered alone or in association with clenbuterol as growth promoter in beef cattle, induce morphologic changes in the thymus, resulting in increase fat infiltration with concurrent cortical atrophy and reduction of the cortex/medulla ratio (C/M. In fact, the C/M value was significantly lower in treated animals than in control ones, with both the protocols applied. The cut off value of 0.93 for the cortex/medulla ratio resulted to be highly effective to distinguish control and treated animals. The animals treated with DXM showed inhibition of cortisol secretion during the treatment period, as well as at the slaughterhouse, 3 days after treatment suspension. The animals treated with lower doses of DXM in association with clenbuterol, showed inhibition of cortisol secretion during the treatment period, but serum cortisol concentration was restored to physiological levels at slaughterhouse, 8 days after treatment suspension. Conclusions The histological evaluation of thymus morphology, and particularly of the C/M may represent a valuable and reproducible method applicable to large-scale screening programs, due to the easy sampling procedures at slaughterhouse, as well as time and cost-saving of the analysis. Serum cortisol determination could be

    11. Overnight social isolation in pigs decreases salivary cortisol but does not impair spatial learning and memory or performance in a decision making task

      Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

      F. Josef evan der Staay

      2016-01-01

      Full Text Available Pigs in modern farming practice may be exposed to a number of stressors, including social stressors such as mixing or isolation. This may potentially affect both cognitive abilities and stress physiology of the animals. We tested the hypothesis that overnight social isolation in pigs impairs performance in a cognitive Holeboard (HB task (Experiment 1 and the Pig Gambling Task (PGT (Experiment 2, a decision making task inspired by the Iowa Gambling Task. In addition, we tested the effect of overnight social isolation on salivary cortisol levels. A within-subjects approach was used in which performance in the two behavioral tasks and cortisol levels were first determined during normal social housing, followed by performance and cortisol levels after experiencing stress induced by overnight social isolation. A total of nineteen female pigs with a birthweight closest to their respective litter average was selected from 10 different litters and placed in two pens after weaning. Following habituation, pigs were trained in the HB task, starting at 10 weeks of age. Then, the pigs were isolated overnight, five individuals per night, at 15, 16 and 17 weeks of age. Between these three isolations, social housing and training in the HB continued. Starting 6 weeks after the end of the HB experiment, at approximately 23 weeks of age, the pigs were trained in the PGT. The effects of overnight social isolation on performance in this task were assessed once, when the pigs were 25 weeks old. Salivary cortisol was measured from samples collected 15 minutes after the start of isolation and at the end of the isolation period, and compared to baseline values collected before the start of social isolation. Our results did not confirm the hypothesis that isolation impaired HB performance and decision making in the PGT. Unexpectedly, overnight social isolation decreased cortisol levels below baseline values, an effect that was not associated with changes in performance

    12. A Global Analog of Cheshire Charge

      OpenAIRE

      McGraw, Patrick

      1994-01-01

      It is shown that a model with a spontaneously broken global symmetry can support defects analogous to Alice strings, and a process analogous to Cheshire charge exchange can take place. A possible realization in superfluid He-3 is pointed out.

    13. Recurrent short sleep, chronic insomnia symptoms and salivary cortisol: A 10-year follow-up in the Whitehall II study.

      OpenAIRE

      Abell, J. G.; Shipley, M J; Ferrie, J. E.; Kivimäki, M; Kumari, M.

      2016-01-01

      Although an association between both sleep duration and disturbance with salivary cortisol has been suggested, little is known about the long term effects of poor quality sleep on diurnal cortisol rhythm. The aim of this study was to examine the association of poor quality sleep, categorised as recurrent short sleep duration and chronic insomnia symptoms, with the diurnal release of cortisol. We examined this in 3314 participants from an occupational cohort, originally recruited in 1985-1989....

    14. The effect of dog-human interaction on cortisol and behavior in registered animal-assisted activity dogs

      OpenAIRE

      Ng, Zenithson Ying

      2013-01-01

      Background: The effect of animal-assisted activities (AAA) on the animal participants has been minimally investigated and the welfare of these animals has been questioned. Cortisol, in conjunction with stress-associated behavior, has been utilized as an objective assessment of animal welfare.Objective: Salivary cortisol and behavior in AAA dogs were measured to test the null hypothesis that salivary cortisol concentration and behavior are not different in an AAA environment compared to home o...

    15. Validation and use of hair cortisol as a measure of chronic stress in eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus)

      OpenAIRE

      Mastromonaco, Gabriela F; Gunn, Kelsey; McCurdy-Adams, H.; Edwards, D. B.; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I.

      2014-01-01

      Stress levels of individuals are documented using glucocorticoid concentrations (including cortisol) in blood, saliva, urine or faeces, which provide information about stress hormones during a short period of time (minutes to days). In mammals, use of hair cortisol analysis allows for the assessment of prolonged stress over weeks and months and provides information on chronic stress levels without bias associated with handling. Here, we validate hair cortisol analysis in wild rodents using ex...

    16. Association between posttest dexamethasone and cortisol concentrations in the 1 mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test

      OpenAIRE

      Åsvold, Bjørn O.; Grill, Valdemar; Thorstensen, Ketil; Bjørgaas, Marit R.

      2012-01-01

      It has been suggested that comparison of posttest dexamethasone and cortisol concentrations may improve the evaluation of the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) for Cushing's syndrome. In particular, this would be reasonable if posttest cortisol differs by dexamethasone levels within the range that is usually attained in the DST. Using fractional polynomial regression, we therefore studied the association between posttest 0800 h dexamethasone and cortisol levels in 53 subjects without Cushi...

    17. Abnormal reactions to environmental stress in elderly persons with anxiety disorders: Evidence from a population study of diurnal cortisol changes.

      OpenAIRE

      Chaudieu, Isabelle; Beluche, Isabelle; Norton, Joanna; Boulenger, Jean-Philippe; Ritchie, Karen; Ancelin, Marie-Laure

      2008-01-01

      International audience BACKGROUND: Cortisol secretion in elderly persons with anxiety disorders exposed to common stressful situations has not been evaluated. METHODS: Salivary-free cortisol levels were evaluated at 8, 15, and 22 h, in 201 elderly subjects during stressful and non-stressful days. Psychiatric symptomatology was assessed by a standardized psychiatric examination (MINI). RESULTS: Elderly subjects without psychiatric disorder showed a sustained increase in cortisol secretion s...

    18. Atheism and Analogy: Aquinas Against the Atheists

      OpenAIRE

      Linford, Daniel J.

      2014-01-01

      In the 13th century, Thomas Aquinas developed two models for how humans may speak of God - either by the analogy of proportion or by the analogy of proportionality. Aquinas's doctrines initiated a theological debate concerning analogy that spanned several centuries. In the 18th century, there appeared two closely related arguments for atheism which both utilized analogy for their own purposes. In this thesis, I show that one argument, articulated by the French materialist Paul-Henri Thiry Bar...

    19. Proton-induced single event upset characterisation of a 1 giga-sample per second analog to digital converter; Caracterisation de la sensibilite aux upsets induits par les protons d'un convertisseur analogique numerique de 1 giga-echantillons par seconde

      Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

      Reed, R.A. [NASA/GSFC Greenbelt, MD (United States); Marshall, P.W. [NASA/GSFC Greenbelt, Consultant, MD (United States); Carts, M.A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington (United States)

      1999-07-01

      The SPT7760 is an analog to digital converter that is used in satellite for digital processing. In this paper we describe the characterization and analysis of proton-induced single event upsets (SEU) for the SPT7760 operating at sample rates from 125 Msps (Mega-samples per second) to 1 Gsps. The SEU cross-section has been measured as a function of sample rate for various input levels. The data collected is clearly non-linear for all cases. The data shows that this device has a relative low cross-section for proton-induced SEUs and remains functional at a proton dose of 580 krad (Si). (A.C.)

    20. cAMP signaling in cortisol-producing adrenal adenoma.

      Science.gov (United States)

      Calebiro, Davide; Di Dalmazi, Guido; Bathon, Kerstin; Ronchi, Cristina L; Beuschlein, Felix

      2015-10-01

      The cAMP signaling pathway is one of the major players in the regulation of growth and hormonal secretion in adrenocortical cells. Although its role in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical hyperplasia associated with Cushing's syndrome has been clarified, a clear involvement of the cAMP signaling pathway and of one of its major downstream effectors, the protein kinase A (PKA), in sporadic adrenocortical adenomas remained elusive until recently. During the last year, a report by our group and three additional independent groups showed that somatic mutations of PRKACA, the gene coding for the catalytic subunit α of PKA, are a common genetic alteration in patients with Cushing's syndrome due to adrenal adenomas, occurring in 35-65% of the patients. In vitro studies revealed that those mutations are able to disrupt the association between catalytic and regulatory subunits of PKA, leading to a cAMP-independent activity of the enzyme. Despite somatic PRKACA mutations being a common finding in patients with clinically manifest Cushing's syndrome, the pathogenesis of adrenocortical adenomas associated with subclinical hypercortisolism seems to rely on a different molecular background. In this review, the role of cAMP/PKA signaling in the regulation of adrenocortical cell function and its alterations in cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas will be summarized, with particular focus on recent developments. PMID:26139209