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Sample records for analgesics opioid

  1. Structural comparisons of meptazinol with opioid analgesics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LI; Jing-lai HAO; Yun TANG; Yan CHEN; Zhui-bai QIU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanism of action of a potent analgesic, (±)-meptazinol.Methods: The structures of meptazinol enantiomers were compared with opioid pharmacophore and tramadol. Results: Neither enantiomer of meptazinol fitted any patterns among the opioid pharmacophore and tramadol, although they did share some structural and pharmacological similarities. However, the structure superpositions implied that both enantiomers of meptazinol might share some similar analgesic mechanisms with typical opiate analgesics. Conclusion:Meptazinol should have a different mechanism of action to known analgesics,which would be helpful in further investigations of meptazinol in the search for non-addictive analgesics.

  2. Opioid Receptors: Toward Separation of Analgesic from Undesirable Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, P.Y.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Loh, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    The use of opioid analgesics for pain has always been hampered by their many side effects; in particular, the addictive liability associated with chronic use. Recently, attempts to develop analgesic agents with reduced side effects have targeted either the putative opioid receptor splice variants or the receptor heterooligomers. This review discusses the potential for receptor splice variant- and the hetero-oligomer-based discovery of new opioid analgesics. We also examine an alternative approach of using receptor mutants for pain management. Finally, we discuss the role of the biased agonism observed and the recently reported opioid receptor crystal structures in guiding the future development of opioid analgesics PMID:23598157

  3. Opioid receptors: toward separation of analgesic from undesirable effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ping-Yee; Reggio, Patricia H; Loh, Horace H

    2013-06-01

    The use of opioid analgesics for pain has always been hampered by their many side effects; in particular, the addictive liability associated with chronic use. Recently, attempts to develop analgesic agents with reduced side effects have targeted either the putative opioid receptor splice variants or the receptor hetero-oligomers. This review discusses the potential for receptor splice variant- and the hetero-oligomer-based discovery of new opioid analgesics. We also examine an alternative approach of using receptor mutants for pain management. Finally, we discuss the role of the biased agonism observed and the recently reported opioid receptor crystal structures in guiding the future development of opioid analgesics.

  4. Opioid Analgesics and Nicotine: More Than Blowing Smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin H; Lane, Scott D; Weaver, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Practitioners are highly likely to encounter patients with concurrent use of nicotine products and opioid analgesics. Smokers present with more severe and extended chronic pain outcomes and have a higher frequency of prescription opioid use. Current tobacco smoking is a strong predictor of risk for nonmedical use of prescription opioids. Opioid and nicotinic-cholinergic neurotransmitter systems interact in important ways to modulate opioid and nicotine effects: dopamine release induced by nicotine is dependent on facilitation by the opioid system, and the nicotinic-acetylcholine system modulates self-administration of several classes of abused drugs-including opioids. Nicotine can serve as a prime for the use of other drugs, which in the case of the opioid system may be bidirectional. Opioids and compounds in tobacco, including nicotine, are metabolized by the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, but the metabolism of opioids and tobacco products can be complicated. Accordingly, drug interactions are possible but not always clear. Because of these issues, asking about nicotine use in patients taking opioids for pain is recommended. When assessing patient tobacco use, practitioners should also obtain information on products other than cigarettes, such as cigars, pipes, smokeless tobacco, and electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS, or e-cigarettes). There are multiple forms of behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy available to assist patients with smoking cessation, and opioid agonist maintenance and pain clinics represent underutilized opportunities for nicotine intervention programs.

  5. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ. A new opioid, a new analgesic?

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    Taylor, F; Dickenson, A

    1998-08-24

    Opioids form the major class of strong analgesics. Endogenous opioids and their receptors play important roles in central nervous system function. Thus, the discovery of a new opioid peptide, nociceptin or orphanin FQ, and its receptor, opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL-1) has caused considerable interest since this transmitter system appears to exhibit a number of key differences to the other opioids. Analgesia can be produced at spinal sites but there is compelling evidence that the peptide may also have 'anti-opioid' actions in the brain. Effects on auditory processing, pains from nerve injury coupled with an apparent lack of motivational effects have important implications for novel therapy. This review surveys the recent functional studies on this novel peptide.

  6. Non-analgesic effects of opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Kurita, Geana Paula; Kendall, Sally;

    2012-01-01

    Opioids constitute the basis for pharmacological treatment of moderate to severe pain in cancer pain and non-cancer pain patients. Their action is mediated by the activation of opioid receptors, which integrates the pain modulation system with other effects in the central nervous system including...... cognition resulting in complex interactions between pain, opioids and cognition. The literature on this complexity is sparse and information regarding the cognitive effects of opioids in chronic pain patients is substantially lacking. Two previous systematic reviews on cancer pain and non-cancer pain...... patients only using controlled studies were updated. Fourteen controlled studies on the cognitive effects of opioids in chronic non-cancer pain patients and eleven controlled studies in cancer pain patients were included and analyzed. Opioid treatment involved slightly opposite outcomes in the two patient...

  7. Prescription opioid analgesic use among adults: United States, 1999-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenk, Steven M; Porter, Kathryn S; Paulozzi, Leonard J

    2015-02-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics are used to treat pain from surgery, injury, and health conditions such as cancer. Opioid dependence and opioid-related deaths are growing public health problems. Opioid analgesic sales (in kilograms per 10,000) quadrupled from 1999 to 2010 (1), and from 1999 to 2012, opioid-related deaths (per 100,000) more than tripled (2). During 1999–2002, 4.2% of persons aged 18 and over used a prescription opioid analgesic in the past 30 days (3). This report provides updated estimates and trends in prescription opioid analgesic use among adults aged 20 and over, overall and by selected subgroups.

  8. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: opioids and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jennifer A; Opper, Susan E; Agarwal, Sonali; Fibuch, Eugene E

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are among the oldest known and most widely used analgesics. The application of opioids has expanded over the last few decades, especially in the treatment of chronic non-malignant pain. This upsurge in opioid use has been accompanied by the increasingly recognized occurrence of opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This may arise after exposure to enteral, parenteral, or neuraxial opioids. Opioid-associated endocrinopathy consists primarily of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction and may manifest with symptoms of hypogonadism, adrenal dysfunction, and other hormonal disturbances. Additionally, opioid related endocrine dysfunction may be coupled with such disorders as osteoporosis and mood disturbances including depression. Undesirable changes in pain sensitivity such as opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and reduced potency of opioid analgesia may also be potential consequences of chronic opioid consumption. Few studies to date have been able to establish what degree of opioid exposure, in terms of dose or duration of therapy, may predispose patients to opioid-associated endocrinopathy. This article will review the currently available literature concerning opioid-associated endocrinopathy and will provide recommendations for the evaluation, monitoring, and management of opioid-associated endocrinopathy and its other accompanying undesired effects.

  9. Nepetalactone: a new opioid analgesic from Nepeta caesarea Boiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, S; Beis, R; Oztürk, Y; Baser, K H; Baser, C

    1998-07-01

    The essential oils of Nepeta species including Nepeta phyllochlamys P. H. Davis, N. nuda L. ssp. nuda, and N. caesarea Boiss. have been screened by use of the tail-flick and tail immersion (52.5 degrees C) methods. Of the species studied, only N. caesarea showed significant analgesic activity, besides marked sedation, which was also blocked by naloxone, indicating involvement of opioid receptors. Moreover, it was only active on mechanical, not thermal, algesic response which suggests specificity for specific opioid receptor subtypes, excluding mu-opioid receptors. Because 4a alpha,7alpha,7a alpha-nepetalactone is the main component of the essential oil of N. caesarea, and is present at very high levels (92-95%), it is concluded that 4a alpha,7alpha,7a alpha-nepetalactone is the active principle and has a specific opioid receptor subtype agonistic activity.

  10. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: opioid-induced respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boom, Merel; Niesters, Marieke; Sarton, Elise; Aarts, Leon; Smith, Terry W; Dahan, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Opioids induce respiratory depression via activation of μ-opioid receptors at specific sites in the central nervous system including the pre-Bötzinger complex, a respiratory rhythm generating area in the pons. Full opioid agonists like morphine and fentanyl affect breathing with onset and offset profiles that are primarily determined by opioid transfer to the receptor site, while the effects of partial opioid agonists such as buprenorphine are governed by transfer to the receptor site together with receptor kinetics, in particular dissociation kinetics. Opioid-induced respiratory depression is potentially fatal but may be reversed by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, an agent with a short elimination half-life (30 min). The rate-limiting factor in naloxone-reversal of opioid effect is the receptor kinetics of the opioid agonists that requires reversal. Agents with slow dissociation kinetics (buprenorphine) require a continuous naloxone infusion while agents with rapid kinetics (fentanyl) will show complete reversal upon a single naloxone dose. Since naloxone is non-selective and will reverse analgesia as well, efforts are focused on the development of compounds that reverse opioid-induced respiratory depression without affecting analgesic efficacy. Such agents include ampakines and serotonin agonists which are aimed at selectively enhancing central respiratory drive. A novel approach is aimed at the reduction of respiratory depression from opioid-activation of (micro-)glia cells in the pons and brainstem using micro-glia cell stabilizers. Since this approach simultaneously enhances opioid analgesic efficacy it seems an attractive alternative to the classical reversal strategies with naloxone.

  11. Tolerance to non-opioid analgesics is opioid-sensitive in nucleus raphe magnus

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    Merab G Tsagareli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of its effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM in the following four days result in progressively less antinociception, i.e. produce the development of tolerance to these drugs in mail rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with μ-opioid antagonist naloxone in NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs at the first day in behavioral tail flick reflex (TF and hot plate (HP latencies. At the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion on endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  12. Clinically employed opioid analgesics produce antinociception via μ-δ opioid receptor heteromers in Rhesus monkeys.

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    Yekkirala, Ajay S; Banks, Matthew L; Lunzer, Mary M; Negus, Stevens S; Rice, Kenner C; Portoghese, Philip S

    2012-09-19

    Morphine and related drugs are widely employed as analgesics despite the side effects associated with their use. Although morphine is thought to mediate analgesia through mu opioid receptors, delta opioid receptors have been implicated in mediating some side effects such as tolerance and dependence. Here we present evidence in rhesus monkeys that morphine, fentanyl, and possibly methadone selectively activate mu-delta heteromers to produce antinociception that is potently antagonized by the delta opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole (NTI). Studies with HEK293 cells expressing mu-delta heteromeric opioid receptors exhibit a similar antagonism profile of receptor activation in the presence of NTI. In mice, morphine was potently inhibited by naltrindole when administered intrathecally, but not intracerebroventricularly, suggesting the possible involvement of mu-delta heteromers in the spinal cord of rodents. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that, in primates, mu-delta heteromers are allosterically coupled and mediate the antinociceptive effects of three clinically employed opioid analgesics that have been traditionally viewed as mu-selective. Given the known involvement of delta receptors in morphine tolerance and dependence, our results implicate mu-delta heteromers in mediating both antinociception and these side effects in primates. These results open the door for further investigation in humans.

  13. Tolerance to Non-Opioid Analgesics is Opioid Sensitive in the Nucleus Raphe Magnus.

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    Tsagareli, Merab G; Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnaz

    2011-01-01

    Repeated injection of opioid analgesics can lead to a progressive loss of effect. This phenomenon is known as tolerance. Several lines of investigations have shown that systemic, intraperitoneal administration or the microinjection of non-opioid analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) into the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter induces antinociception with some effects of tolerance. Our recent study has revealed that microinjection of three drugs analgin, ketorolac, and xefocam into the central nucleus of amygdala produce tolerance to them and cross-tolerance to morphine. Here we report that repeated administrations of these NSAIDs into the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) in the following 4 days result in progressively less antinociception compare to the saline control, i.e., tolerance develops to these drugs in male rats. Special control experiments showed that post-treatment with the μ-opioid antagonist naloxone into the NRM significantly decreased antinociceptive effects of NSAIDs on the first day of testing in the tail-flick (TF) reflex and hot plate (HP) latency tests. On the second day, naloxone generally had trend effects in both TF and HP tests and impeded the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of non-opioid analgesics. These findings strongly support the suggestion of endogenous opioid involvement in NSAIDs antinociception and tolerance in the descending pain-control system. Moreover, repeated injections of NSAIDs progressively lead to tolerance to them, cross-tolerance to morphine, and the risk of a withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, these results are important for human medicine too.

  14. National consumption of opioid and nonopioid analgesics in Croatia: 2007–2013

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    Krnic D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Darko Krnic,1 Andrea Anic-Matic,2 Svjetlana Dosenovic,2 Pero Draganic,1 Sasa Zezelic,1 Livia Puljak2 1Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices, Zagreb, 2Laboratory for Pain Research, School of Medicine, University of Split, Split, Croatia Background: The increased consumption of analgesics has been documented worldwide during the last 2 decades. The aim of the study was to examine the trends in opioid and nonopioid analgesic consumption in Croatia between 2007 and 2013. Methods: Data on opioid consumption were extracted from the database of the national authority. All opioid and nonopioid analgesics were included in the analysis. Data were presented as defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants per day. Adequacy of opioid consumption was calculated using adequacy of consumption measure. Results: During the examined 7-year period, the total consumption and total cost of all analgesics in Croatia showed continuous increase. In the M01A group (anti-inflammatory and antirheumatic products, nonsteroids, ibuprofen had an exponential increasing trend, and in 2011, it overtook diclofenac consumption. Ibuprofen and diclofenac had the highest consumption also in the M02A group of topical products for joint and muscular pain. Tramadol was by far the most consumed type of opioids (N02A group and paracetamol in the group of other analgesics and antipyretics (N02B. The adequacy of consumption measure value was 0.19, indicating that Croatia is a country with a low opioid consumption. Conclusion: Between 2007 and 2013, both consumption of analgesics and their cost in Croatia had an increasing trend. Comparisons with data from other countries, based on the published literature, indicate that analgesic consumption in Croatia is still relatively low. Calculation of the adequacy of opioid consumption indicated that Croatia is a country with low opioid consumption. Further studies are necessary for establishing whether current analgesic consumption in

  15. Buprenorphine: an analgesic with an expanding role in the treatment of opioid addiction.

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    Robinson, Susan E

    2002-01-01

    Buprenorphine, a long-acting opioid with both agonist and antagonist properties, binds to mu-opioid (OP(3)), kappa-opioid (OP(2)), delta-opioid (OP(1)), and nociceptin (ORL-1) receptors. Its actions at these receptors have not been completely characterized, although buprenorphine is generally regarded as a mu-opioid receptor partial agonist and a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist. Its pharmacology is further complicated by an active metabolite, norbuprenorphine. Although buprenorphine can be used as an analgesic agent, it is of greater importance in the treatment of opioid abuse. Because of its partial agonist activity at mu-opioid receptors and its long half-life, buprenorphine has proven to be an excellent alternative to methadone for either maintenance therapy or detoxification of the opioid addict. Although buprenorphine may ultimately prove to be superior to methadone in the maintenance of the pregnant addict, its effects on the developing fetus must be carefully evaluated.

  16. Benzodiazepines: a major component in unintentional prescription drug overdoses with opioid analgesics.

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    Jann, Michael; Kennedy, William Klugh; Lopez, Gaylord

    2014-02-01

    The misuse and abuse of prescription medications in the United States continues to increase despite interventions by health care professionals, regulatory, and law enforcement agencies. Opioid analgesics are the leading class of prescription drugs that have caused unintentional overdose deaths. Benzodiazepines when taken alone are relatively safe agents in overdose. However, a 5-fold increase in deaths attributed to benzodiazepines occurred from 1999 to 2009. Emergency department visits related to opioid analgesics increased by 111% followed by benzodiazepines 89%. During 2003 to 2009, the 2 prescriptions drugs with the highest increase in death rates were oxycodone 264.6% and alprazolam 233.8%. Therefore, benzodiazepines have a significant impact on prescription drug unintentional overdoses second only to the opioid analgesics. The combination prescribing of benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics commonly takes place. The pharmacokinetic drug interactions between benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics are complex. The pharmacodynamic actions of these agents differ as their combined effects produce significant respiratory depression. Physician and pharmacy shopping by patients occurs, and prescription drug-monitoring programs can provide important information on benzodiazepine and opioid analgesic prescribing patterns and patient usage. Health care professionals need to inform patients and work closely with regulatory agencies and legislatures to stem the increasing fatalities from prescription drug unintentional overdoses.

  17. The pharmacokinetics of alfentanil (R39209): a new opioid analgesic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovill, J G; Sebel, P S; Blackburn, C L; Heykants, J

    1982-12-01

    The pharmacokinetics of alfentanil (R39209), a new short-acting opioid analgesic, have been studied in eleven patients. Six patients were given 50 micrograms/kg alfentanil and five patients 125 micrograms/kg as an intravenous bolus injection. Plasma concentrations were measured at intervals up to 6 h (50 micrograms/kg) or 8-10 h (125 micrograms/kg), using a specific radioimmunoassay technique. Plasma concentrations declined triexponentially in both groups. The initial elimination of alfentanil from the plasma was very rapid with 90% of the administered dose leaving the plasma within 30 min. The average half-lives for the three phases were similar for both groups. The combined mean (+/- SEM) half-lives for the 11 patients for the rapid and slow distribution phases were short (t 1/2 pi = 1.2 +/- 0.26 min, t 1/2 alpha = 11.6 +/- 1.63 min). The elimination half-life, t 1/2 beta was 94 +/- 5.87 min which is considerably shorter than that of other opioids. The mean (+/- SEM) total body clearance was 6.4 +/- 1.39 ml . kg-1 . min-1 and the volume of distribution (Vd) was 0.86 +/- 0.194 l/kg. The latter is considerably less than reported values for the chemically related drug, fentanyl, and suggests that alfentanil may have a lower tissue binding affinity than fentanyl. The rapid elimination and short duration of clinical action suggests the feasibility of repeated administration of alfentanil and its use by continuous intravenous infusion.

  18. Impairment of aspirin antiplatelet effects by non-opioid analgesic medication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amin; Polzin; Thomas; Hohlfeld; Malte; Kelm; Tobias; Zeus

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is the mainstay in prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases. Impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects are associated with enhanced incidence of cardiovascular events. Comedication with non-opioid analgesic drugs has been described to interfere with aspirin,resulting in impaired aspirin antiplatelet effects. Additionally,nonopioid analgesic medication has been shown to enhance the risk of cardiovascular events and death. Pain is very frequent and many patients rely on analgesic drugs to control pain. Therefore effective analgesic options without increased risk of cardiovascular events are desirable. This review focuses on commonly used nonopioid analgesics,interactions with aspirin medication and impact on cardiovascular risk.

  19. Impact of a Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program on Prescription of Opioid Analgesics by Dentists

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Rasubala; Lavanya Pernapati; Ximena Velasquez; James Burk; Yan-Fang Ren

    2015-01-01

    Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP) are statewide databases that collect data on prescription of controlled substances. New York State mandates prescribers to consult the PDMP registry before prescribing a controlled substance such as opioid analgesics. The effect of mandatory PDMP on opioid drug prescriptions by dentists is not known. This study investigates the impact of mandatory PDMP on frequency and quantity of opioid prescriptions by dentists in a dental urgent care center. Bas...

  20. Clinical Research on Nourishing Yin and Unblocking Meridians Recipe Combined with Opioid Analgesics in Cancer Pain Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ting; MA Sheng-lin; XIE Guang-ru; DENG Qing-hua; TANG Zhong-zhu; PAN Xiao-chan; ZHANG Min; XU Su

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the analgesic effects of Nourishing yin and Unblocking meridians Receipe (NUR) combined with opioid analgesics in managing cancer pain. Methods: All the patients enrolled were differentiated as of yin deficiency and meridian blocked syndrome type of TCM. Forty-one of them in the treated group were treated with NUR combined with opioid analgesics, while 43 of them in the control group were given opioid analgesics alone with successive 14 days as one treatment course for both groups. Results:The indexes of the treated group were superior to those in the control group as to the degree of pain-relieving, the therapeutic effect of analgesia, the occurrence frequency of cancer pain every day and its duration each time, the analgesic initial time, and the quality of life. Conclusion: NUR combined with opioid analgesics in cancer pain management was more effective than opioid analgesics alone.

  1. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, Mohamad Ali; El-Mallah, Ahmed; Aboul-Ela, Maha; Ellakany, Abdalla

    2017-01-01

    Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae) that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE) using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome.

  2. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ali Hijazi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome.

  3. Evaluation of Analgesic Activity of Papaver libanoticum Extract in Mice: Involvement of Opioids Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mallah, Ahmed; Aboul-Ela, Maha; Ellakany, Abdalla

    2017-01-01

    Papaver libanoticum is an endemic plant to Lebanese region (family Papaveraceae) that has not been investigated before. The present study aimed to explore the analgesic activity of dried ethanolic extract of Papaver libanoticum (PLE) using tail flick, hot plate, and acetic acid induced writhing models in mice. The involvement of opioid receptors in the analgesic mechanism was investigated using naloxone antagonism. Results demonstrated that PLE exhibited a potent dose dependent analgesic activity in all tested models for analgesia. The analgesic effect involved activation of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, where both spinal and supraspinal components might be involved. The time course for analgesia revealed maximum activity after three hours in both tail flick and hot plate methods, which was prolonged to 24 hours. Metabolites of PLE could be responsible for activation of opioid receptors. The EC50 of PLE was 79 and 50 mg/kg in tail flick and hot plate tests, respectively. The total coverage of analgesia by PLE was double that of morphine in both tests. In conclusion, PLE proved to have opioid agonistic activity with a novel feature of slow and prolonged effect. The present study could add a potential tool in the armaments of opioid drugs as a natural potent analgesic and for treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome. PMID:28280516

  4. Evaluation of Parenteral Opioid Analgesics Utilization in Patients Hospitalized in a Referral Teaching Hospital

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    Rasool Soltani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opioid drugs are the most effective drugs for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Rates of opioid use are influenced by a variety of factors. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of use of parenteral opioid drugs in hospitalized patients in a referral teaching hospital. Methods: In a retrospective study, required data were extracted from medical records of adult patients who had received any parenteral opioid analgesic in the 6-month period from March 2013 to September 2013. The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification/Defined Daily Doses (ATC/DDD system method was used for evaluation of opioid analgesic use in patients.Results: The overall usage of parenteral opioid analgesics was 730.51 DDDs with meperidine (Pethidine having the most amounts of use (588.69 DDDs and 33.23 DDDs/100 bed-days. Overall, the male surgery ward and emergency department had the most amounts of use based on the number of DDDs (445.8 DDDs and per 100 bed-days (1046 DDDs/100 bed-days, respectively. Methadone use was most in the infectious diseases ward.Conclusion: The trend of parenteral opioid analgesics consumption is increasing in this hospital. Therefore, better adherence to pain treatment guidelines by medical staff is necessary for rational use of these drugs.

  5. "Weak" opioid analgesics. Codeine, dihydrocodeine and tramadol: no less risky than morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    So-called weak opioid analgesics are often used to treat severe pain, or when paracetamol or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) proves inadequate. But are weak opioids any more effective than paracetamol or NSAIDs on nociceptive pain, and are they better tolerated than morphine? To answer these questions, we conducted a review of literature using the standard Prescrire methodology. The potency of codeine and tramadol is strongly influenced by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP2D6 genotype, which varies widely from one person to another. This explains reports of overdosing or underdosing after administration of standard doses of the two drugs. The potency of morphine and that of buprenorphine, an opioid receptor agonist-antagonist, appears to be independent of CYP2D6 activity. All "weak" opioids can have the same dose-dependent adverse effects as morphine. There is no evidence that, at equivalent analgesic efficacy, weak opioids carry a lower risk of addiction than low-dose morphine. Respiratory depression can occur in ultrarapid metabolisers after brief exposure to standard doses of codeine or tramadol. Similar cases have been reported with dihydrocodeine in patients with renal failure. In addition, tramadol can cause a serotonin syndrome, hypoglycaemia, hyponatraemia and seizures. Several trials have compared different weak opioids in patients with post-operative pain. A single dose of a weak opioid, possibly combined with paracetamol, has greater analgesic efficacy than paracetamol alone but is not more effective than an NSAID alone. There is a dearth of evidence on weak opioids in patients with chronic pain. Available trials fail to show that a weak opioid has markedly superior analgesic efficacy to paracetamol or an NSAID. Sublingual buprenorphine at analgesic doses appears less likely to cause respiratory depression, but it seems to have weak analgesic efficacy. In practice, when opioid therapy is needed, there is no evidence that codeine

  6. Impact of a Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program on Prescription of Opioid Analgesics by Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasubala, Linda; Pernapati, Lavanya; Velasquez, Ximena; Burk, James; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP) are statewide databases that collect data on prescription of controlled substances. New York State mandates prescribers to consult the PDMP registry before prescribing a controlled substance such as opioid analgesics. The effect of mandatory PDMP on opioid drug prescriptions by dentists is not known. This study investigates the impact of mandatory PDMP on frequency and quantity of opioid prescriptions by dentists in a dental urgent care center. Based on the sample size estimate, we collected patient records of a 3-month period before and two consecutive 3-month periods after the mandatory PDMP implementation and analyzed the data on number of visits, treatment types and drug prescriptions using Chi-square tests. For patients who were prescribed pain medications, 452 (30.6%), 190 (14.1%), and 140 (9.6%) received opioid analgesics in the three study periods respectively, signifying a statistically significant reduction in the number of opioid prescriptions after implementation of the mandatory PDMP (p<0.05). Total numbers of prescribed opioid pills in a 3-month period decreased from 5096 to 1120, signifying a 78% reduction in absolute quantity. Prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics acetaminophen increased during the same periods (p<0.05). We conclude that the mandatory PDMP significantly affected the prescription pattern for pain medications by dentists. Such change in prescription pattern represents a shift towards the evidence-based prescription practices for acute postoperative pain.

  7. Impact of a Mandatory Prescription Drug Monitoring Program on Prescription of Opioid Analgesics by Dentists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Rasubala

    Full Text Available Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP are statewide databases that collect data on prescription of controlled substances. New York State mandates prescribers to consult the PDMP registry before prescribing a controlled substance such as opioid analgesics. The effect of mandatory PDMP on opioid drug prescriptions by dentists is not known. This study investigates the impact of mandatory PDMP on frequency and quantity of opioid prescriptions by dentists in a dental urgent care center. Based on the sample size estimate, we collected patient records of a 3-month period before and two consecutive 3-month periods after the mandatory PDMP implementation and analyzed the data on number of visits, treatment types and drug prescriptions using Chi-square tests. For patients who were prescribed pain medications, 452 (30.6%, 190 (14.1%, and 140 (9.6% received opioid analgesics in the three study periods respectively, signifying a statistically significant reduction in the number of opioid prescriptions after implementation of the mandatory PDMP (p<0.05. Total numbers of prescribed opioid pills in a 3-month period decreased from 5096 to 1120, signifying a 78% reduction in absolute quantity. Prescriptions for non-opioid analgesics acetaminophen increased during the same periods (p<0.05. We conclude that the mandatory PDMP significantly affected the prescription pattern for pain medications by dentists. Such change in prescription pattern represents a shift towards the evidence-based prescription practices for acute postoperative pain.

  8. Genetic predictors of the clinical response to opioid analgesics: clinical utility and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Jörn; Skarke, Carsten; Liefhold, Jürgen; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2004-01-01

    This review uses a candidate gene approach to identify possible pharmacogenetic modulators of opioid therapy, and discusses these modulators together with demonstrated genetic causes for the variability in clinical effects of opioids. Genetically caused inactivity of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 renders codeine ineffective (lack of morphine formation), slightly decreases the efficacy of tramadol (lack of formation of the active O-desmethyl-tramadol) and slightly decreases the clearance of methadone. MDR1 mutations often demonstrate pharmacogenetic consequences, and since opioids are among the P-glycoprotein substrates, opioid pharmacology may be affected by MDR1 mutations. The single nucleotide polymorphism A118G of the mu opioid receptor gene has been associated with decreased potency of morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide, and with decreased analgesic effects and higher alfentanil dose demands in carriers of the mutated G118 allele. Genetic causes may also trigger or modify drug interactions, which in turn can alter the clinical response to opioid therapy. For example, by inhibiting CYP2D6, paroxetine increases the steady-state plasma concentrations of (R)-methadone in extensive but not in poor metabolisers of debrisoquine/sparteine. So far, the clinical consequences of the pharmacogenetics of opioids are limited to codeine, which should not be administered to poor metabolisers of debrisoquine/sparteine. Genetically precipitated drug interactions might render a standard opioid dose toxic and should, therefore, be taken into consideration. Mutations affecting opioid receptors and pain perception/processing are of interest for the study of opioid actions, but with modern practice of on-demand administration of opioids their utility may be limited to explaining why some patients need higher opioid doses; however, the adverse effects profile may be modified by these mutations. Nonetheless, at a limited level, pharmacogenetics can be expected to facilitate individualised

  9. Prediction formulas for individual opioid analgesic requirements based on genetic polymorphism analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Yoshida

    Full Text Available The analgesic efficacy of opioids is well known to vary widely among individuals, and various factors related to individual differences in opioid sensitivity have been identified. However, a prediction model to calculate appropriate opioid analgesic requirements has not yet been established. The present study sought to construct prediction formulas for individual opioid analgesic requirements based on genetic polymorphisms and clinical data from patients who underwent cosmetic orthognathic surgery and validate the utility of the prediction formulas in patients who underwent major open abdominal surgery.To construct the prediction formulas, we performed multiple linear regression analyses using data from subjects who underwent cosmetic orthognathic surgery. The dependent variable was 24-h postoperative or perioperative fentanyl use, and the independent variables were age, gender, height, weight, pain perception latencies (PPL, and genotype data of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. To examine the utility of the prediction formulas, we performed simple linear regression analyses using subjects who underwent major open abdominal surgery. Actual 24-h postoperative or perioperative analgesic use and the predicted values that were calculated using the multiple regression equations were incorporated as dependent and independent variables, respectively.Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the four SNPs, PPL, and weight were retained as independent predictors of 24-h postoperative fentanyl use (R² = 0.145, P = 5.66 × 10⁻¹⁰ and the two SNPs and weight were retained as independent predictors of perioperative fentanyl use (R² = 0.185, P = 1.99 × 10⁻¹⁵. Simple linear regression analyses showed that the predicted values were retained as an independent predictor of actual 24-h postoperative analgesic use (R² = 0.033, P = 0.030 and perioperative analgesic use (R² = 0.100, P = 1.09 × 10⁻⁴, respectively.We constructed

  10. Possible analgesic and anti-inflammatory interactions of aspartame with opioids and NSAIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sameer; Jain, N K; Kulkarni, S K

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of aspartame, an artificial sweetner and its combination with various opioids and NSAIDs for a possible synergistic response. The oral administration of aspartame (2-16mg/kg, po) significantly increased the pain threshold against acetic acid-induced writhes in mice. Co-administration of aspartame (2mg/kg, po) with nimesulide (2 mg/kg, po) and naproxen (5 mg/kg, po) significantly reduced acetic acid-induced writhes as compared to effects per se of individual drugs. Similarly when morphine (1 mg/kg, po) or pentazocine (1 mg/kg, po) was co-administered with aspartame it reduced the number of writhes as compared to their effects per se. Aspartame (4,8,16 mg/kg, po) significantly decreased carrageenan-induced increase in paw volume and also reversed the hyperalgesic effects in rats in combination with nimesulide (2 mg/kg, po). The study indicated that aspartame exerted analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects on its own and have a synergistic analgesic response with conventional analgesics of opioid and non-opioid type, respectively.

  11. Sufentanil citrate: a new opioid analgesic for use in anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosow, C E

    1984-01-01

    Sufentanil citrate is a potent analogue of fentanyl that has been evaluated primarily for use in opioid anesthesia. It is a pure mu receptor agonist and produces the typical spectrum of opioid effects. The major side effects are truncal rigidity and prolonged respiratory depression. In doses of 4-30 micrograms/kg sufentanil produces hypnosis and suppresses most hemodynamic and hormonal responses to surgery without producing significant cardiovascular depression. In this respect sufentanil and fentanyl have clear advantages over morphine, meperidine and potent inhalation anesthetics. Compared to fentanyl, sufentanil has a more rapid onset and shorter duration of action. The relatively high concentration of commercially available sufentanil injection will make it much more convenient for its intended application than fentanyl injection. This new agent will be used primarily for open-heart surgery and major operations in patients with severe cardiovascular compromise.

  12. Histamine-releasing and allergenic properties of opioid analgesic drugs: resolving the two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, B A; Pham, N H

    2012-03-01

    Opioid analgesics are amongst the most commonly administered drugs in hospitals. Whether natural or synthetic, they show some common structural features, morphine-like pharmacological action and binding specificity for complementary opioid receptors. Tramadol differs from the other opioid analgesics in possessing monoaminergic activity in addition to its affinity for the µ opioid receptor. Many opioids are potent histamine releasers producing a variety of haemodynamic changes and anaphylactoid reactions, but the relationship of the appearance of these effects to the histamine plasma concentration is complex and there is no direct and invariable relationship between the two. Studies of the histamine-releasing effects, chiefly centred on morphine, reveal variable findings and conclusions often due to a range of factors including differences in technical measurements, dose, mode of administration, site of injection, the anatomical distribution of histamine receptors and heterogeneity of patient responses. Morphine itself has multiple direct effects on the vasculature and other haemodynamically-active mediators released along with histamine contribute to the variable responses to opioid drug administration. Despite their heavy use and occasional apparent anaphylactic-like side-effects, immunoglobulin E antibody-mediated immediate hypersensitivity reactions to the drugs are not often encountered. Uncertainties associated with skin testing with these known histamine-releasers, and the general unavailability of opioid drug-specific immunoglobulin E antibody tests contribute to the frequent failure to adequately investigate and establish underlying mechanisms of reactions by distinguishing anaphylactoid from true anaphylactic reactions. Clinical implications for diagnosis of reactions and some speculations on the rarity of true Type 1 allergies to these drugs are presented.

  13. Innovative Opioid Peptides and Biased Agonism: Novel Avenues for More Effective and Safer Analgesics to Treat Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedini, Andrea; Spampinato, Santi Mario

    2017-02-15

    Chronic pain is a clinically relevant and yet unsolved conditions that is poorly treated with the currently available drugs, thus highlighting the urgent need of innovative analgesics. Although opiates are not very effective in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, developing novel opioid receptor peptide agonists, as well as modulating the opioid receptor-mediated responses in a ligand-specific fashion, may represent an innovative and promising strategy to identify more efficacious and safer antalgic drugs. In this review, novel analogues of endomorphin 1 (a mu opioid receptor selective agonist able to induce analgesia in different animal models of pain - including neuropathic pain) and dermorphin (one of the most potent opioid peptide existing in nature) will be discussed as they are emerging as a promising starting point to develop novel opioid agonists: endomorphin 1 analogues, in fact, may determine antinociception in different models of neuropathic pain with reduced side effects as compared to classic opiates as morphine; dermorphin analogues may elicit analgesia in animal models of both inflammatory and neuropathic pain and with less severe adverse effects. Furthermore, such opioid peptides may allow to explore unprecedented modalities of ligand-receptor interactions, helping to characterize biased agonism at opioid receptors: exploiting functional selectivity at opioid receptor may lead to identify innovative analgesic with improved pharmacological responses and optimized side effects. Thus, innovative opioid peptides, as those outlined in this review, are promising candidates to develop more effective opioid analgesics to be employed as medications for chronic pain states, as inflammatory or neuropathic pain.

  14. Conformational re-analysis of (+)-meptazinol: an opioid with mixed analgesic pharmacophores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LI; Xing-hai WANG; Choi-wan LAU; Yun TANG; Qiong XIE; Zhui-bai QIU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To further investigate the analgesic pharmacophore of (+)-meptazinol. Methods: Two different opioid pharmacophores, Pharm-Ⅰ and Pharm-Ⅱ, were established from structures of nine typical opiates and meperidine by using molecular modeling approaches according to their different structure activity relationship properties. They were further validated by a set of conformationally constrained arylpiperidines. Two conformers of (+)-meptazinol (Conformer-Ⅰ and Con-former-Ⅱ) detected in solution were then fitted into the pharmacophores, respectively, by Fit Atoms facilities available in SYBYL, a computational modeling tool kit for molecular design and analysis. Results: Conformer-Ⅰ fit Pharm-Ⅰ from typical opiates well. However, Conformer-Ⅱ fit none of these pharmacophores. Instead, it was found to be similar to another potent analgesic, benzofuro[2,3-c] pyridin-6-ol, whose pharmacophore was suggested to hold the transitional state between the two established pharmacophores. Unlike typical analgesics derived from 4-aryl piperidine (eg, meperidine) with one conformer absolutely overwhelming, the (+)-meptazinol exists in two conformers with similar amounts in solution. Furthermore, both conformers can not transform to each other freely in ordinary conditions based on our NMR results. Conclusion: (+)-meptazinol was suggested to be an opioid with mixed analgesic pharmacophores, which may account for the complicated pharmacological properties of meptazinol.

  15. Quality Improvement Initiative to Decrease Variability of Emergency Physician Opioid Analgesic Prescribing

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    John H. Burton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Addressing pain is a crucial aspect of emergency medicine. Prescription opioids are commonly prescribed for moderate to severe pain in the emergency department (ED; unfortunately, prescribing practices are variable. High variability of opioid prescribing decisions suggests a lack of consensus and an opportunity to improve care. This quality improvement (QI initiative aimed to reduce variability in ED opioid analgesic prescribing. Methods: We evaluated the impact of a three-part QI initiative on ED opioid prescribing by physicians at seven sites. Stage 1: Retrospective baseline period (nine months. Stage 2: Physicians were informed that opioid prescribing information would be prospectively collected and feedback on their prescribing and that of the group would be shared at the end of the stage (three months. Stage 3: After physicians received their individual opioid prescribing data with blinded comparison to the group means (from Stage 2 they were informed that individual prescribing data would be unblinded and shared with the group after three months. The primary outcome was variability of the standard error of the mean and standard deviation of the opioid prescribing rate (defined as number of patients discharged with an opioid divided by total number of discharges for each provider. Secondary observations included mean quantity of pills per opioid prescription, and overall frequency of opioid prescribing. Results: The study group included 47 physicians with 149,884 ED patient encounters. The variability in prescribing decreased through each stage of the initiative as represented by the distributions for the opioid prescribing rate: Stage 1 mean 20%; Stage 2 mean 13% (46% reduction, p<0.01, and Stage 3 mean 8% (60% reduction, p<0.01. The mean quantity of pills prescribed per prescription was 16 pills in Stage 1, 14 pills in Stage 2 (18% reduction, p<0.01, and 13 pills in Stage 3 (18% reduction, p<0.01. The group mean

  16. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: cardiovascular effects of opioids and their receptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, John P; Pepe, Salvatore; Peart, Jason N

    2012-01-01

    Opioid peptides and their G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important regulators within the cardiovascular system, implicated in modulation of electrophysiological function, heart rate, myocardial inotropy, vascular function, and cellular stress resistance. The opioid system is also involved in cardiovascular development, adaptation to injury and effects of advanced age. The significant roles of opioids are emphasized by the observation that the heart produces prodynorphin and proenkephalin, which are enzymatically processed from small to large active polypeptides. Indeed, depending on species, cardiac preproenkephalin mRNA levels are comparable to or higher than those found in the central nervous system. This review highlights and discusses current knowledge and recent findings regarding physiological and pathophysiological modulation of the heart and vessels by the opioid receptor system.

  17. The effects of a new opioid analgesic, meptazinol, on the respiration of the conscious rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowlrick, I S; Shepperson, N B

    1985-05-01

    In the conscious rat arterial PCO2 was measured as an index of respiratory status. The opioid analgesic meptazinol (7.5 - 30 mg kg-1) evoked small but significant increases in arterial PCO2 which were attenuated by naloxone. Meptazinol significantly reduced the increase in arterial PCO2 evoked by morphine. The respiratory depression induced by meptazinol, but not that induced by morphine, was enhanced by pretreatment with atropine. The (+)-enantiomer, but not the (-)-enantiomer of meptazinol increased arterial PCO2. In contrast, only the (-)-enantiomer reduced the respiratory depressant effect of morphine. It is proposed that the degree of respiratory depression induced by meptazinol is limited by its opioid antagonist and cholinomimetic properties.

  18. Structure-based discovery of opioid analgesics with reduced side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manglik, Aashish; Lin, Henry; Aryal, Dipendra K; McCorvy, John D; Dengler, Daniela; Corder, Gregory; Levit, Anat; Kling, Ralf C; Bernat, Viachaslau; Hübner, Harald; Huang, Xi-Ping; Sassano, Maria F; Giguère, Patrick M; Löber, Stefan; Da Duan; Scherrer, Grégory; Kobilka, Brian K; Gmeiner, Peter; Roth, Bryan L; Shoichet, Brian K

    2016-09-08

    Morphine is an alkaloid from the opium poppy used to treat pain. The potentially lethal side effects of morphine and related opioids-which include fatal respiratory depression-are thought to be mediated by μ-opioid-receptor (μOR) signalling through the β-arrestin pathway or by actions at other receptors. Conversely, G-protein μOR signalling is thought to confer analgesia. Here we computationally dock over 3 million molecules against the μOR structure and identify new scaffolds unrelated to known opioids. Structure-based optimization yields PZM21-a potent Gi activator with exceptional selectivity for μOR and minimal β-arrestin-2 recruitment. Unlike morphine, PZM21 is more efficacious for the affective component of analgesia versus the reflexive component and is devoid of both respiratory depression and morphine-like reinforcing activity in mice at equi-analgesic doses. PZM21 thus serves as both a probe to disentangle μOR signalling and a therapeutic lead that is devoid of many of the side effects of current opioids.

  19. Physician-related barriers to cancer pain management with opioid analgesics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Sjøgren, Per; Møldrup, Claus

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of studies on physician-related barriers to cancer pain management with opioid analgesics. METHODS: A literature search was conducted in PUBMED, using a combined text word and MeSH heading search strategy. Those articles whose full...... texts were not available in PUBMED were retrieved from the electronic databases of specific journals. RESULTS: Sixty-five relevant articles, published in the period from 1986 to 2006, were identified. Physicians' barriers to cancer pain management were studied in questionnaire surveys and in the reviews...

  20. Routes of abuse of prescription opioid analgesics: a review and assessment of the potential impact of abuse-deterrent formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasior, Maciej; Bond, Mary; Malamut, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics are an important treatment option for patients with chronic pain; however, misuse, abuse and diversion of these medications are a major global public health concern. Prescription opioid analgesics can be abused via intended and non-intended routes of administration, both intact or after manipulation of the original formulation to alter the drug-delivery characteristics. Available data indicate that ingestion (with or without manipulation of the prescribed formulation) is the most prevalent route of abuse, followed by inhalation (snorting, smoking and vaping) and injection. However, reported routes of abuse vary considerably between different formulations. A number of factors have been identified that appear to be associated with non-oral routes of abuse, including a longer duration of abuse, younger age, male sex and a rural or socially deprived location. The development of abuse-deterrent formulations of prescription opioid analgesics is an important step toward reducing abuse of these medications. Available abuse-deterrent formulations aim to hinder extraction of the active ingredient, prevent administration through alternative routes and/or make abuse of the manipulated product less attractive, less rewarding or even aversive. There are currently five opioid analgesics with a Food and Drug Administration abuse-deterrent label, and a number of other products are under review. A growing body of evidence suggests that introduction of abuse-deterrent opioid analgesics in the USA has been associated with decreased rates of abuse of these formulations. The availability of abuse-deterrent formulations therefore appears to represent an important step toward curbing the epidemic of abuse of prescription opioid analgesics, while ensuring the availability of effective pain medications for patients with legitimate medical need.

  1. Local analgesic effect of tramadol is not mediated by opioid receptors in early postoperative pain in rats

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    Angela Maria Sousa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Tramadol is known as a central acting analgesic drug, used for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Local analgesic effect has been demonstrated, in part due to local anesthetic-like effect, but other mechanisms remain unclear. The role of peripheral opioid receptors in the local analgesic effect is not known. In this study, we examined role of peripheral opioid receptors in the local analgesic effect of tramadol in the plantar incision model. METHODS: Young male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups: control, intraplantar tramadol, intravenous tramadol, intravenous naloxone-intraplantar tramadol, intraplantar naloxone-intraplantar tramadol, intravenous naloxone-intravenous tramadol, and intravenous naloxone. After receiving the assigned drugs (tramadol 5 mg, naloxone 200 µg or 0.9% NaCl, rats were submitted to plantar incision, and withdrawal thresholds after mechanical stimuli with von Frey filaments were assessed at baseline, 10, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after incision. RESULTS: Plantar incision led to marked mechanical hyperalgesia during the whole period of observation in the control group, no mechanical hyperalgesia were observed in intraplantar tramadol group, intraplantar naloxone-intraplantar tramadol group and intravenous naloxone-intraplantar tramadol. In the intravenous tramadol group a late increase in withdrawal thresholds (after 45 min was observed, the intravenous naloxone-intravenous tramadol group and intravenous naloxone remained hyperalgesic during the whole period. CONCLUSIONS: Tramadol presented an early local analgesic effect decreasing mechanical hyperalgesia induced by plantar incision. This analgesic effect was not mediated by peripheral opioid receptors.

  2. Pharmacology of kratom: an emerging botanical agent with stimulant, analgesic and opioid-like effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozialeck, Walter C; Jivan, Jateen K; Andurkar, Shridhar V

    2012-12-01

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a plant indigenous to Thailand and Southeast Asia. Kratom leaves produce complex stimulant and opioid-like analgesic effects. In Asia, kratom has been used to stave off fatigue and to manage pain, diarrhea, cough, and opioid withdrawal. Recently, kratom has become widely available in the United States and Europe by means of smoke shops and the Internet. Analyses of the medical literature and select Internet sites indicate that individuals in the United States are increasingly using kratom for the self-management of pain and opioid withdrawal. Kratom contains pharmacologically active constituents, most notably mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. Kratom is illegal in many countries. Although it is still legal in the United States, the US Drug Enforcement Administration has placed kratom on its "Drugs and Chemicals of Concern" list. Physicians should be aware of the availability, user habits, and health effects of kratom. Further research on the therapeutic uses, toxic effects, and abuse potential of kratom and its constituent compounds are needed.

  3. mu-Opioid receptor-independent fashion of the suppression of sodium currents by mu-opioid analgesics in thalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Keisuke; Amano, Taku; Kasakura, Akiko; Uhl, George R; Sora, Ichiro; Sakai, Norio; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Narita, Minoru

    2009-03-27

    Most reports in the literature have shown that the effects of opioid analgesics are primarily mediated by mu-opioid receptor (MOR), whereas other potential targets of opioid analgesics have not been thoroughly characterized. In this study, we found that extracellular application of morphine, fentanyl or oxycodone, which are all considered to be MOR agonists, at relatively high concentrations, but not endogenous mu-opioid peptides, produced a concentration-dependent suppression of sodium currents in cultured thalamic neurons. These effects of opioids were not affected by either a MOR antagonist naloxone or a deletion of MOR gene. Among these opioids, fentanyl strongly suppressed sodium currents to the same degree as lidocaine, and both morphine and oxycodone slightly but significantly reduced sodium currents when they were present extracellularly. In contrast, the intracellular application of morphine, but not oxycodone, fentanyl or lidocaine, reduced sodium currents. These results suggest that morphine, fentanyl and oxycodone each produce the MOR-independent suppression of sodium currents by distinct mechanisms in thalamic neurons.

  4. Non-Opioid Analgesics Consumption At The Surgery Departments Of A Secondary Care Hospital In General Hospital In Kraljevo, Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksic Dejan; Bukonjic Andriana; Stefanovic Srdjan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the amount of non-opioid analgesics consumed at the surgical departments of a secondary care hospital in Serbia, a developing country undergoing a socioeconomic transition that thus lacks sufficient funds to finance and invest in the healthcare system.

  5. Non-Opioid Analgesics Consumption At The Surgery Departments Of A Secondary Care Hospital In General Hospital In Kraljevo, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksic Dejan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the amount of non-opioid analgesics consumed at the surgical departments of a secondary care hospital in Serbia, a developing country undergoing a socioeconomic transition that thus lacks sufficient funds to finance and invest in the healthcare system.

  6. Synthesis and analysis of the opioid analgesic [[sup 14]C]-fentanyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagley, J.R.; Wilhelm, J.A. (Anaquest Inc., Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

    1992-11-01

    The synthesis of [[sup 14]C]-fentanyl, the radiolabelled congener of the potent opioid analgesic chosen for utilization in drug disposition studies, is described. [[sup 14]C]-Labelling was achieved in the first of two steps, a room temperature reduction of the in situ generated Schiff base from 1-phenylethyl-4-piperidone and [UL-[sup 14]C]-aniline hydrochloride with sodium triacetoxyborohydride. A nearly instantaneous production of fentanyl was accomplished at room temperature with the addition of propionyl chloride. The overall radiochemical yield was 18%. The method described is efficiently adaptable for submicromolar scale while yielding a product of sufficient specific activity for in vivo studies. Our solvent system for thin layer chromatography was superior to the USP system reported for chromatographic analysis of fentanyl. This is the first reported preparation of [[sup 14]C]-fentanyl with the radiolabel in the aniline benzene ring. (author).

  7. Endomorphins: potential roles and therapeutic indications in the development of opioid peptide analgesic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei X; Wang, Rui

    2012-05-01

    The application of endomorphins as clinical available analgesic drugs has been impeded by their relatively poor receptor selectivity compared with alkaloid analgesics, rapid degradation in vivo, inefficient to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and undesirable or toxic effects, such as acute tolerance and physical dependence, respiratory depression, and inhibition of gastrointestinal motility. Extensive studies have been performed so far striving to conquer these problems. In this article we review and discuss conformational and topographical modifications of the peptide amide bond and amino acid side groups to attain the most appropriate receptor binding affinity and high receptor selectivity; diverse strategies such as insertion of unnatural amino acids, covalent or noncovalent constraints as well as cyclization of linear peptides to enhance the enzymatic stability; designing of peptidomimetic ligands, glycopeptides, and N-terminal amidinationed analogues (such as incorporating guanidine into endomorphins) to penetrate the BBB. Also, several pertinent examples of bivalent and/or multivalent (such as mixed µ-agonist/δ-antagonist profile) compounds are discussed based on the existing literature and current data intending to give an insight into the development of opioid peptides expressing low tendency to produce acute tolerance and physical dependence.

  8. Sudden unexpected nocturnal death in Chiari type 1 malformation and potential role of opioid analgesics

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    Fereydoon Roohi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1 is a common congenital anomaly of the craniocervical junction. CM1 is reported to run a usually benign course and patients typically experience no symptoms or chronic, slowly progressive symptoms. However, recent reports indicate that a subset of patients with CM1 may present with acute deterioration and sudden unexpected death (SUD. We report a case of SUD during sleep in a young man with CM1, which we believe was related to the administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. We will clarify the pathophysiology of acute deterioration and SUD in CM1 and the possibility that the adverse effects of opiate analgesics likely were the leading cause of death in our patient. Case Description: In this review, we present a 29-year-old male with worsening headache secondary to previously diagnosed CM1. The patient died suddenly and unexpectedly after administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. Conclusion: The mechanism(s of acute neurological deterioration and sudden death in patients with CM1 remains poorly understood. We believe the rapid fatal deterioration in our patient following administration of opioids suggests that this category of medication may cause sudden unexpected "neurogenic" cardiac death in CM1 patients by inducing sleep-related breathing difficulties and associated hypercapnia. Hypercapnia by further increasing intracranial pressure can result in a sudden pressure-induced decompensation of the cardiopulmonary control centers in the brain stem and cause instantaneous cardiorespiratory arrest.

  9. Sudden unexpected nocturnal death in Chiari type 1 malformation and potential role of opioid analgesics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi, Fereydoon; Gropen, Toby; Kula, Roger W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1) is a common congenital anomaly of the craniocervical junction. CM1 is reported to run a usually benign course and patients typically experience no symptoms or chronic, slowly progressive symptoms. However, recent reports indicate that a subset of patients with CM1 may present with acute deterioration and sudden unexpected death (SUD). We report a case of SUD during sleep in a young man with CM1, which we believe was related to the administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. We will clarify the pathophysiology of acute deterioration and SUD in CM1 and the possibility that the adverse effects of opiate analgesics likely were the leading cause of death in our patient. Case Description: In this review, we present a 29-year-old male with worsening headache secondary to previously diagnosed CM1. The patient died suddenly and unexpectedly after administration of common and therapeutic doses of narcotic analgesics for the management of pain. Conclusion: The mechanism(s) of acute neurological deterioration and sudden death in patients with CM1 remains poorly understood. We believe the rapid fatal deterioration in our patient following administration of opioids suggests that this category of medication may cause sudden unexpected “neurogenic” cardiac death in CM1 patients by inducing sleep-related breathing difficulties and associated hypercapnia. Hypercapnia by further increasing intracranial pressure can result in a sudden pressure-induced decompensation of the cardiopulmonary control centers in the brain stem and cause instantaneous cardiorespiratory arrest. PMID:24778905

  10. Synthesis and characterization of a dual kappa-delta opioid receptor agonist analgesic blocking cocaine reward behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Váradi, András; Marrone, Gina F; Eans, Shainnel O; Ganno, Michelle L; Subrath, Joan J; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Hunkele, Amanda; Pasternak, Gavril W; McLaughlin, Jay P; Majumdar, Susruta

    2015-11-18

    3-Iodobenzoyl naltrexamine (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic belonging to the pharmacologically diverse 6β-amidoepoxymorphinan group of opioids. We present the synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of five analogs of IBNtxA. The scaffold of IBNtxA was modified by removing the 14-hydroxy group, incorporating a 7,8 double bond and various N-17 alkyl substituents. The structural modifications resulted in analogs with picomolar affinities for opioid receptors. The lead compound (MP1104) was found to exhibit approximately 15-fold greater antinociceptive potency (ED50 = 0.33 mg/kg) compared with morphine, mediated through the activation of kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. Despite its kappa agonism, this lead derivative did not cause place aversion or preference in mice in a place-conditioning assay, even at doses 3 times the analgesic ED50. However, pretreatment with the lead compound prevented the reward behavior associated with cocaine in a conditioned place preference assay. Together, these results suggest the promise of dual acting kappa- and delta-opioid receptor agonists as analgesics and treatments for cocaine addiction.

  11. Determination of non-opioid analgesics in adulterated food and dietary supplements by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Joo; Lee, Ji Hyun; Park, Hyoung Joon; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Cho, Sooyeul; Kim, Woo Seong

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available non-opioid analgesics such as acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been used to adulterate some foods and dietary supplements. Considering the rapid growth of the dietary supplement market, it is essential to analyse various analgesics used for adulteration over a time period. Acetaminophen and 16 NSAIDs used to adulterate food and dietary supplements were simultaneously determined by LC-MS/MS. The method was validated by determining the coefficient of determinations, limit of quantification and recovery, and samples were analysed for the determination of analgesics. Consequently, acetaminophen, diclofenac, ibuprofen, indomethacin, naproxen and piroxicam were detected in 53 samples (n = 214). Ibuprofen was the most commonly used adulterant, which was detected in a wide concentration range (1.06-233.40 mg g(-1)) and was present in about one-third of the adulterated samples. Various types of samples, in particular pills and capsules (73.6% of the total positive samples), were found to be adulterated with non-opioid analgesics. Samples containing high concentrations of analgesics can have a deleterious effect on human health, and thus the continued monitoring of adulterated food and dietary supplements is essential to maintain a healthy life.

  12. Analgesic tone conferred by constitutively active mu opioid receptors in mice lacking β-arrestin 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hales Tim G

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hedonic reward, dependence and addiction are unwanted effects of opioid analgesics, linked to the phasic cycle of μ opioid receptor activation, tolerance and withdrawal. In vitro studies of recombinant G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs over expressed in cell lines reveal an alternative tonic signaling mechanism that is independent of agonist. Such studies demonstrate that constitutive GPCR signaling can be inhibited by inverse agonists but not by neutral antagonists. However, ligand-independent activity has been difficult to examine in vivo, at the systems level, due to relatively low levels of constitutive activity of most GPCRs including μ receptors, often necessitating mutagenesis or pharmacological manipulation to enhance basal signaling. We previously demonstrated that the absence of β-arrestin 2 (β-arr2 augments the constitutive coupling of μ receptors to voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in primary afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons from β-arr2-/- mice. We used this in vitro approach to characterize neutral competitive antagonists and inverse agonists of the constitutively active wild type μ receptors in neurons. We administered these agents to β-arr2-/- mice to explore the role of constitutive μ receptor activity in nociception and hedonic tone. This study demonstrates that the induction of constitutive μ receptor activity in vivo in β-arr2-/- mice prolongs tail withdrawal from noxious heat, a phenomenon that was reversed by inverse agonists, but not by antagonists that lack negative efficacy. By contrast, the aversive effects of inverse agonists were similar in β-arr2-/- and β-arr2+/+ mice, suggesting that hedonic tone was unaffected.

  13. Ligand requirements for involvement of PKCε in synergistic analgesic interactions between spinal μ and δ opioid receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, D J; Metcalf, M D; Kitto, K F; Messing, R O; Fairbanks, C A; Wilcox, G L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We recently found that PKCε was required for spinal analgesic synergy between two GPCRs, δ opioid receptors and α2A adrenoceptors, co-located in the same cellular subpopulation. We sought to determine if co-delivery of μ and δ opioid receptor agonists would similarly result in synergy requiring PKCε. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Combinations of μ and δ opioid receptor agonists were co-administered intrathecally by direct lumbar puncture to PKCε-wild-type (PKCε-WT) and -knockout (PKCε-KO) mice. Antinociception was assessed using the hot-water tail-flick assay. Drug interactions were evaluated by isobolographic analysis. KEY RESULTS All agonists produced comparable antinociception in both PKCε-WT and PKCε-KO mice. Of 19 agonist combinations that produced analgesic synergy, only 3 required PKCε for a synergistic interaction. In these three combinations, one of the agonists was morphine, although not all combinations involving morphine required PKCε. Morphine + deltorphin II and morphine + deltorphin I required PKCε for synergy, whereas a similar combination, morphine + deltorphin, did not. Additionally, morphine + oxymorphindole required PKCε for synergy, whereas a similar combination, morphine + oxycodindole, did not. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We discovered biased agonism for a specific signalling pathway at the level of spinally co-delivered opioid agonists. As the bias is only revealed by an appropriate ligand combination and cannot be accounted for by a single drug, it is likely that the receptors these agonists act on are interacting with each other. Our results support the existence of μ and δ opioid receptor heteromers at the spinal level in vivo. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24827408

  14. 阿片类镇痛药物的不良反应%Adverse Drug Reactions of Opioid Analgesics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文亭

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the side effects of opioid analgesics.Methods The clinical data of 38 patients with opioid analgesic drugs used in District,Linzi District,January 2015 to January 2014, were colected and analyzed.Results The adverse reactions of opioid analgesics were the most common in patients aged 70 to 70 years,and the incidence of adverse reactions was 60 to years old.The highest adverse reaction rate of opioid analgesics was fentanyl,folowed by the treatment of the pain,and the main adverse reactions were constipation.Conclusion The main adverse reactions of opioid analgesics are constipation, so that the elderly patients can be seen,the clinical application should take ful account of the patient's constitution and tolerance,reduce the incidence of adverse reactions,improve the clinical rational drug use.%目的:探讨阿片类镇痛药物的不良反应。方法收集2014年1月至2015年1月临淄区妇幼保健院使用阿片类镇痛药物出现不良反应的38例患者的临床资料,统计患者的性别、年龄、用药类型、不良反应的类型等,分析导致不良反应发生的原因。结果阿片类镇痛药物的不良反应以>70岁患者最常见,其次为60~70岁;发生率最高的为芬太尼,其次为哌替啶;主要不良反应为便秘。结论阿片类镇痛药物主要不良反应为便秘,以老年患者多见,临床应用要充分考虑患者体质和耐受性,以降低不良反应的发生率,提高临床合理用药。

  15. Truncated G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1 splice variants are targets for highly potent opioid analgesics lacking side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Susruta; Grinnell, Steven; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Burgman, Maxim; Polikar, Lisa; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2011-12-06

    Pain remains a pervasive problem throughout medicine, transcending all specialty boundaries. Despite the extraordinary insights into pain and its mechanisms over the past few decades, few advances have been made with analgesics. Most pain remains treated by opiates, which have significant side effects that limit their utility. We now describe a potent opiate analgesic lacking the traditional side effects associated with classical opiates, including respiratory depression, significant constipation, physical dependence, and, perhaps most important, reinforcing behavior, demonstrating that it is possible to dissociate side effects from analgesia. Evidence indicates that this agent acts through a truncated, six-transmembrane variant of the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1. Although truncated splice variants have been reported for a number of G protein-coupled receptors, their functional relevance has been unclear. Our evidence now suggests that truncated variants can be physiologically important through heterodimerization, even when inactive alone, and can comprise new therapeutic targets, as illustrated by our unique opioid analgesics with a vastly improved pharmacological profile.

  16. Knowledge Toward Cancer Pain and the Use of Opioid Analgesics Among Medical Students in their Integrated Clinical Clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fidelis C. Manalo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among the focal issues of barriers to pain management include the physicians’ lack of knowledge about cancer pain and negative attitudes towards opioids. Many physicians and educators attribute this, at least in part, to limited exposure to pain and palliative care education during medical school.Aim: The researcher investigated the medical students’ knowledge about cancer pain and the use of opioid analgesics.Methods: The subjects were a sample of 50 students of the University of the Philippines College of Medicine in their integrated clinical clerkship year. Descriptive statistics (frequencies, means, standard deviation, rating scales were used to determine mean knowledge score and level of confidence with opioid use. The study also identified specific areas where students exhibited good or poor knowledge of opioids.Results: Approximately sixty-nine (69% of the study respondents mentioned that pain management was given to them during their Anesthesiology lectures while a few recalled that they had these lectures during their Family Medicine rotation in Supportive, Palliative and Hospice Care. More than a third (35% of the respondents admitted to not being confident with morphine use at present. The top three reasons cited as limitations in choice of opioids for cancer pain include fear of addiction, lack of adequate knowledge and experience and fear of side effects and complications. Out of a maximum of 13 correct answers, the mean knowledge score of the medical students was 6.6 ± 2.9. Less than 16% of the respondents had adequate knowledge on cancer pain and opioid use.Conclusions: The results show that basic knowledge of the role of opioids in cancer pain management among medical students in their integrated clinical clerkship year at the University of the Philippines is poor. The findings imply a need to look into making revisions in the medical curriculum to include a training program that will enable all students to

  17. Anti-analgesic effect of the mu/delta opioid receptor heteromer revealed by ligand-biased antagonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Milan-Lobo

    Full Text Available Delta (DOR and mu opioid receptors (MOR can complex as heteromers, conferring functional properties in agonist binding, signaling and trafficking that can differ markedly from their homomeric counterparts. Because of these differences, DOR/MOR heteromers may be a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of pain. However, there are currently no ligands selective for DOR/MOR heteromers, and, consequently, their role in nociception remains unknown. In this study, we used a pharmacological opioid cocktail that selectively activates and stabilizes the DOR/MOR heteromer at the cell surface by blocking its endocytosis to assess its role in antinociception. We found that mice treated chronically with this drug cocktail showed a significant right shift in the ED50 for opioid-mediated analgesia, while mice treated with a drug that promotes degradation of the heteromer did not. Furthermore, promoting degradation of the DOR/MOR heteromer after the right shift in the ED50 had occurred, or blocking signal transduction from the stabilized DOR/MOR heteromer, shifted the ED50 for analgesia back to the left. Taken together, these data suggest an anti-analgesic role for the DOR/MOR heteromer in pain. In conclusion, antagonists selective for DOR/MOR heteromer could provide an avenue for alleviating reduced analgesic response during chronic pain treatment.

  18. DDD-028: a potent potential non-opioid, non-cannabinoid analgesic for neuropathic and inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Parthasarathi; Tracey, Heather; Chen, Zhoumou; Bandyopadhyaya, Acintya; Veeraraghavan, Sridhar; Rajagopalan, Desikan R; Salvemini, Daniela; McPhee, Ian; Viswanadha, Srikant; Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2014-07-15

    DDD-028 (4), a novel pentacyclic pyridoindolobenzazepine derivative was evaluated in vitro for receptor binding affinity and in vivo for analgesic activity using rodent models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. DDD-028 does not bind to opioid, cannabinoid, dopamine, or histamine receptors. DDD-028 is very active even at the low oral dose of 1-5 mg/kg in both neuropathic, (spinal nerve ligation and chronic constriction injury) and inflammatory (Complete Freund's Adjuvant Induced) models of pain. DDD-028 appears to be about 6-fold more potent than pregabalin and indomethacin. Visual observation of all the animals used in these studies indicated that DDD-028 is well tolerated without any sedation. Thus, DDD-028 seems to be a promising candidate for the treatment of neuropathic and inflammatory pain without the possible side effects or abuse potential associated with opioid or cannabinoid activities.

  19. New opioid analgesic use and the risk of injurious single-vehicle crashes in drivers aged 50-80 years : A population-based matched case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monárrez-Espino, Joel; Laflamme, Lucie; Rausch, Christian; Elling, Berty; Möller, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: the increasing trend in opioid analgesic use among older drivers has raised concerns about their risk of being involved in car crashes. AIM: to investigate if older drivers who started using opioid analgesics have a higher probability of being involved in injurious crashes. METHODS: popu

  20. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: opioid-induced nausea and vomiting: mechanisms and strategies for their limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Rocco, Alessandra; Mandatori, Ilenia; Mattia, Consalvo

    2012-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common gastrointestinal symptoms following opioid administration, for either chronic or acute pain management. As a consequence, patients' dissatisfaction has a negative impact on treatment efficacy. A number of mechanisms have been identified, involving both central and peripheral sites. This article will review the pathophysiology of opioid-induced nausea and vomiting and the various pharmacological treatments currently available for its management. Preventive strategies and therapeutic approaches are evaluated in the perioperative setting and in chronic pain. Newer drugs include second generation serotonin receptor antagonists (palonosetron) and neurokinin-1 (NK-1) antagonists (aprepitant).

  1. Broad spectrum analgesic efficacy of IBNtxA is mediated by exon 11-associated splice variants of the mu-opioid receptor gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Pan, Ying-Xian; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Tuttle, Alexander H.; Majumdar, Susruta; Pidakala, John

    2014-01-01

    Mu-opioids remain vastly important for the treatment of pain, and would represent ideal analgesics if their analgesic effects could be separated from their many side effects. A recently synthesized compound, iodobenzoylnaltrexamide (IBNtxA), acting at 6-transmembrane (6-TM) splice variants of the mu-opioid receptor gene, was shown to have potent analgesic actions against acute, thermal pain accompanied by a vastly improved side-effect profile compared to 7-TM-acting drugs such as morphine. Whether such analgesia can be seen in longer-lasting and non-thermal algesiometric assays is not known. The current study demonstrates potent and efficacious IBNtxA inhibition of a wide variety of assays, including inflammatory and neuropathic hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain. We further demonstrate the dependence of such analgesia on 6-TM mu-opioid receptor variants using isobolographic analysis and the testing of Oprm1 (the mu-opioid receptor gene) exon 11 null mutant mice. Finally, the effect of nerve damage (spared nerve injury) and inflammatory injury (complete Freund’s adjuvant) on expression of mu-opioid receptor variant genes in pain-relevant central nervous system loci was examined, revealing a downregulation of the mMOR-1D splice variant in the dorsal root ganglion after spared nerve injury. These findings are supportive of the potential value of 6-TM-acting drugs as novel analgesics. PMID:25093831

  2. Local analgesic effect of tramadol is mediated by opioid receptors in late postoperative pain after plantar incision in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Junior, José Oswaldo; de Freitas, Milena Fernandes; Bullara de Andrade, Carolina; Chacur, Marucia; Ashmawi, Hazem Adel

    2016-01-01

    Tramadol is a drug used to treat moderate to severe pain. It is known to present a peripheral effect, but the local mechanisms underlying its actions remain unclear. The role of peripheral opioid receptors in postoperative pain is not well understood. In the present study, we examined the peripheral opioid receptors to determine the local effect of tramadol in a plantar incision pain model. Rats were subjected to plantar incision and divided into four groups on postoperative day (POD) 1: SF_SF, 0.9% NaCl injected into the right hindpaw; SF_TraI, 0.9% NaCl and tramadol injected into the right hindpaw; SF_TraC, 0.9% NaCl and tramadol injected into the contralateral hindpaw; and Nal_Tra, naloxone and tramadol injected into the ipsilateral hindpaw. To determine the animals’ nociceptive threshold, mechanical hyperalgesia was measured before incision, on POD1 before treatment and at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after the incision. The same procedure was repeated on the POD2. The expression levels of μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and δ-opioid receptor (DOR) were obtained through immunoblotting assays in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (L3–L6) in naïve rats and 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after the incision. Our results showed that the plantar incision was able to cause an increase in mechanical hyperalgesia and that tramadol reversed this hyperalgesia on POD1 and POD2. Tramadol injections in the contralateral paw did not affect the animals’ nociceptive threshold. Naloxone was able to antagonize the tramadol effect partially on POD1 and completely on POD2. The DOR expression increased on POD2, POD3, and POD7, whereas the MOR expression did not change. Together, our results show that tramadol promoted a local analgesic effect in the postoperative pain model that was antagonized by naloxone in POD2, alongside the increase of DOR expression. PMID:27799813

  3. Opioid analgesics as noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebert, B; Thorkildsen, C; Andersen, S;

    1998-01-01

    Much evidence points to the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the development and maintainance of neuropathic pain. In neuropathic pain, there is generally involved a presumed opioid-insensitive component, which apparently can be blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists. However......, in order to obtain complete analgesia, a combination of an NMDA receptor antagonist and an opioid receptor agonist is needed. Recent in vitro data have demonstrated that methadone, ketobemidone, and dextropropoxyphene, in addition to being opioid receptor agonists, also are weak noncompetitive NMDA...... receptor antagonists. Clinical anecdotes suggest that the NMDA receptor antagonism of these opioids may play a significant role in the pharmacological action of these compounds; however, no clinical studies have been conducted to support this issue. In the present commentary, we discuss evidence...

  4. Use and Nonmedical Use of Prescription Opioid Analgesics in the General Population of Canada and Correlations with Dispensing Levels in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D Shield

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Canada, harm from nonmedical prescription opioid analgesic (POA use (NMPOU has increased in recent years; however, there are limitations to the current estimates of NMPOU. The 2009 Canadian Alcohol and Drug Use Monitoring Survey presents an opportunity to produce more accurate estimates of NMPOU.

  5. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory potential of aerial parts of the Daphne mucronata Royle extract in mice: Opioid-independent action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zohreh Khodadadian; Majid Hassanpour-Ezatti; Seyed Zahra Mousavi; Jinous Asgarpanah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory property and possible involvement of opioid receptors of ethyl acetate extract from aerial parts of Daphne mucronata(D. mucronata) in mice by formalin test.Methods: Single doses of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg of body weight of ethyl acetate extract of D. mucronata were intraperitoneally administered to the mice 30 min before analgesic test. The anti-nociceptive effect of preparations was evaluated based on the formalin in mice.Results: The results indicated that the extract(2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg) increased the pain threshold of mice and induced analgesia in both phases of formalin test. Like morphine sulfate(5.0 mg/kg, i.p.), the extract also showed more effective analgesic effect on the late phase of formalin test. Pre-treatment of animals with naloxone(5.0 mg/kg i.p.)did not inhibit the effects of the extract.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that D. mucronata contains potential analgesic and anti-inflammatory compounds which support its traditional use. Moreover, it seems that the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of the extract is mediated by non-opioid mechanisms. Further pharmacological studies are required to determine whether the analgesic mechanisms are actually responsible for such properties.

  6. Genetic variation in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR, rs25531 influences the analgesic response to the short acting opioid Remifentanil in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schalling Martin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence from animal studies that serotonin (5-HT can influence the antinociceptive effects of opioids at the spinal cord level. Therefore, there could be an influence of genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin system on individual variability in response to opioid treatment of pain. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT is a key regulator of serotonin metabolism and availability and its gene harbors several known polymorphisms that are known to affect 5-HTT expression (e.g. 5-HTTLPR, rs25531. The aim of this study was to investigate if the triallelic 5-HTTLPR influences pain sensitivity or the analgesic effect of opioids in humans. 43 healthy volunteers (12 men, 31 women, mean age 26 years underwent heat pain stimulations before and after intravenous injection of Remifentanil; a rapid and potent opioid drug acting on μ-type receptors. Subjects rated their perceived pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS. All participants were genotyped for the 5-HTTLPR and the rs25531 polymorphism. We recruited by advertising, with no history of drug abuse, chronic pain or psychiatric disorders. Results At baseline, there was no difference in pain ratings for the different triallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype groups. However, the opiod drug had a differential analgesic effect depending on the triallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype. Remifentanil had a significantly better analgesic effect in individuals with a genotype coding for low 5-HTT expression (SA/SA and SA/LG as compared to those with high expression(LA/LA, p Conclusion This is the first report showing an influence of the triallelic 5-HTTLPR on pain sensitivity or the analgesic effect of opioids in humans. Previously the 5-HTTLPR s-allele has been associated with higher risk of developing chronic pain conditions but in this study we show that the genotype coding for low 5-HTT expression is associated with a better analgesic effect of an opioid. The s-allele has been associated with downregulation of

  7. Progress of Non-opioid Analgesics in Perioperative Analgesia%非阿片类镇痛药的围术期应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫东来(综述); 于泳浩(审校)

    2015-01-01

    阿片类药物被广泛地应用于手术患者围术期镇痛,但其不良反应明显,且大剂量阿片类药物可能引起急性耐受和痛觉过敏,最终导致更严重的疼痛反应。因此,各种非阿片类药物和新技术逐渐被研发和应用于临床,目的是改善患者疼痛和减少阿片类药物的使用,降低阿片相关的不良反应。该文就几种主要非阿片类镇痛药围术期镇痛的应用进展做一综述,以期对患者围术期疼痛进行精确管理,避免过度使用镇痛药物。%Opioids are a kind of classic perioperative analgesics with several dose-related side-effects. Furthermore,large doses of opioids may cause acute tolerance and hyperalgesia,resulting in more serious pain.Therefore various non-opioids and techniques have been explored as part of multimodal analgesia in order to improve pain management and reduce opioid consumption and opioid-related side-effects.Here is to make a review of recent progresses in the study on these non-opioid analgesics,and remind our readers of pre-cise management of perioperative pain and avoid overuse of analgesic drugs .

  8. Structural improvement of compounds with analgesic activity: AC-MPF4, a compound with mixed anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity via opioid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossato, Mateus Fortes; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Trevisan, Gabriela; Rotta, Mariane; Machado, Pablo; Martins, Marcos A P; Ferreira, Juliano

    2015-02-01

    Successful pain control is a world health problem, which indicates an ever-growing need in the discovery of new molecules with improved analgesic activity and reduced side effects. The aim of this study was to describe the synthesis and biological activity of AC-MPF4, a new acetyl- and pyrazole-containing molecule derivate from MPF4. Firstly, we evaluated the analgesic and anti-edematogenic effect of AC-MPF4 in the carrageenan test. AC-MPF4 presented similar analgesic properties to MPF4 (opioid drug) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA-a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug) (maximal effect of 85.4±10.9%, 62.0±11.0% and 95.0±10.4% of allodynia reduction, respectively). Regarding anti-edematogenic properties, AC-MPF4 presented similar results to ASA, while MPF4 presented no effect (maximal effect of 42.2±8.3% and 46.1±5.1% in paw thickness reduction, respectively). Remarkably, Naloxone fully prevented the analgesic effect of MPF4 and partially prevented the analgesic effect of AC-MPF4. However, neither ASA nor the anti-edematogenic activity was affected by Naloxone. The gastrointestinal motility and gastric mucosa integrity, which are parameters affected by opioid and NSAID drugs, respectively, were also evaluated. Neither of these parameters showed alterations induced by AC-MPF4, whereas ASA induced gastric ulceration (10 fold higher), and MPF4 decreased gastrointestinal motility (62.0±7.7%). Together, these data indicate that AC-MPF4 presents good analgesic and anti-edematogenic effects with no detectable side effects. AC-MPF4 may be considered a good prototype for the development of new analgesic/anti-inflammatory drugs.

  9. Synthetic Studies of Neoclerodane Diterpenes from Salvia divinorum: Identification of a Potent and Centrally Acting μ Opioid Analgesic with Reduced Abuse Liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Rachel Saylor; Riley, Andrew P; Sherwood, Alexander M; Groer, Chad E; Shivaperumal, Nirajmohan; Biscaia, Miguel; Paton, Kelly; Schneider, Sebastian; Provasi, Davide; Kivell, Bronwyn M; Filizola, Marta; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2016-12-22

    Opioids are widely used to treat millions suffering from pain, but their analgesic utility is limited due to associated side effects. Herein we report the development and evaluation of a chemical probe exhibiting analgesia and reduced opioid-induced side effects. This compound, kurkinorin (5), is a potent and selective μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist (EC50 = 1.2 nM, >8000 μ/κ selectivity). 5 is a biased activator of MOR-induced G-protein signaling over β-arrestin-2 recruitment. Metadynamics simulations of 5's binding to a MOR crystal structure suggest energetically preferred binding modes that differ from crystallographic ligands. In vivo studies with 5 demonstrate centrally mediated antinociception, significantly reduced rewarding effects, tolerance, and sedation. We propose that this novel MOR agonist may represent a valuable tool in distinguishing the pathways involved in MOR-induced analgesia from its side effects.

  10. Molecular docking and structural analysis of non-opioid analgesic drug acemetacin with halogen substitution: A DFT approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaraj, D. R.; Manimaran, D.; Joe, I. Hubert

    2016-11-01

    Acemetacin is a non-opioid analgesic which belongs to the class, the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The bioactive conformer was identified through potential energy surface scan studies. Spectral features of acemetacin have been probed by the techniques of Fourier transform infrared, Raman and Nuclear magnetic resonance combined with density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP level with 6-311 + G(d,p) basis set. The detailed interpretation of vibrational spectral assignments has been carried out on the basis of potential energy distribution method. Geometrical parameters reveal that the carbonyl substitution in between chlorophenyl and indole ring leads to a significant loss of planarity. The red-shifted Cdbnd O stretching wavenumber describe the conjugation between N and O atoms. The shifted Csbnd H stretching wavenumbers of Osbnd CH3 and Osbnd CH2 groups depict the back-donation and induction effects. The substitution of halogen atoms on the title molecule influences the charge distribution and the geometrical parameters. Drug activity and binding affinity of halogen substitution in title molecule with target protein were undertaken by molecular docking study. This study enlightens the effects of bioefficiency due to the halogen substitution in the molecule.

  11. Opioid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the oldest and most potent drugs for the treatment of severe pain. Their clinical application is undisputed in acute (e.g., postoperative) and cancer pain, but their long-term use in chronic pain has met increasing scrutiny. This article reviews mechanisms underlying opioid analgesia and other opioid actions. It discusses the structure, function, and plasticity of opioid receptors; the central and peripheral sites of analgesic actions and side effects; endogenous and exogenous opioid receptor ligands; and conventional and novel opioid compounds. Challenging clinical situations, such as the tension between chronic pain and addiction, are also illustrated.

  12. Non-analgesic effects of opioids: the cognitive effects of opioids in chronic pain of malignant and non-malignant origin. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højsted, Jette; Kurita, Geana Paula; Kendall, Sally; Lundorff, Lena; de Mattos Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli; Sjøgren, Per

    2012-01-01

    Opioids constitute the basis for pharmacological treatment of moderate to severe pain in cancer pain and non-cancer pain patients. Their action is mediated by the activation of opioid receptors, which integrates the pain modulation system with other effects in the central nervous system including cognition resulting in complex interactions between pain, opioids and cognition. The literature on this complexity is sparse and information regarding the cognitive effects of opioids in chronic pain patients is substantially lacking. Two previous systematic reviews on cancer pain and non-cancer pain patients only using controlled studies were updated. Fourteen controlled studies on the cognitive effects of opioids in chronic non-cancer pain patients and eleven controlled studies in cancer pain patients were included and analyzed. Opioid treatment involved slightly opposite outcomes in the two patient groups: no effects or worsening of cognitive function in cancer pain patients and no effect or improvements in the chronic non-cancer pain patients, however, due to methodological limitations and a huge variety of designs definite conclusions are difficult to draw from the studies. In studies of higher quality of evidence opioid induced deficits in cognitive functioning were associated with dose increase and the use of supplemental doses of opioids in cancer patients. Future perspectives should comprise the conduction of high quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving relevant control groups and validated neuropsychological assessments tools before and after opioid treatment in order to further explore the complex interaction between pain, opioids and cognition.

  13. Sustained-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone for moderate to severe pain: a new opioid analgesic formulation and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiulu

    2011-05-01

    Opioid usage during chronic nonmalignant pain has increased substantially over the past two decades. Prescription opioids have become the second most misused drug in the USA and prescription opioid abuse has escalated into a widespread public health problem. It is hoped that abuse-deterrent opioid formulations will take an important role in reducing opioid abuse, misuse and diversion. Embeda (sustained-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone)represents a new opioid formulation with an intended abuse-deterrent feature, now available on the market. Although Embeda seems to be a successful formulation by passing the efficacy trial, safety trial, pharmacokinetic study and abuse liability study, etc., it will require some long-term prospective epidemiological studies to substantiate fully its abuse-deterrent benefit. Embeda represents a new opioid formulation, adding to our arsenal to treat moderate to severe pain and playing its potential role in discouraging opioid abuse, misuse and diversion. Faced with an overwhelmingly expanding public health burden due to prescription opioid abuse, clinicians should always keep in mind the balance of maximizing pain relief and minimizing prescription opioid abuse.

  14. Postoperative consumption of opioid analgesics following correction of pectus excavatum is influenced by pectus severity: a single-centre study of 236 patients undergoing minimally invasive correction of pectus excavatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosen, Kasper; Pfeiffer-Jensen, Mogens; Pilegaard, Hans

    2009-01-01

    regression analysis explained approximately 30% of the variation in daily morphine consumption (R-squared=0.2957). There was a significant positive linear relationship between pectus severity and the daily consumption of morphine. Thus, postoperative consumption of morphine increased by 6% (95% confidence...... on the postoperative consumption of opioid analgesics following this procedure to optimise pain management. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 236 consecutive patients undergoing minimally invasive repair of PE from 2005 to 2008. The collected data included depth of preoperative pectus excavation, patient...... demographics, peri- and postoperative information, including data on pain management. The consumption of opioid analgesics was registered after discontinuation of epidural analgesia and other types of opioid analgesics used during the study period were converted to morphine equivalents. Multiple linear...

  15. 麻醉科阿片类镇痛药物应用分析%Application of opioid analgesics in anesthesiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王威; 田斌斌

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the application of opioid analgesics in Anesthesiology Department in the hospital and explore the rationality of narcotic drugs in recent years. Methods The opioid analgesics (dezocine hydrochloride,morphine hy-drochloride,pethidine hydrochloride,remifentanil,sufentanil,fentanyl) were collected and analyzed from drugs integrated query system and medicines information sites from 2011 to 2013,including drug name,size,drug dosage,amount of medication,per capita cost of medication and so on. Results In recent 3 years,except for the decrease of pethidine hydrochloride,the amount of medication and per capita cost of medication and defined daily dose system(DDDs) score,the other opioid analgesics(dezocine hydrochloride,morphine hydrochloride,remifentanil,sufentanil,fentanyl) were increased significantly. The annual increase of dezocine usage amount and per capita amount were maximum. While the DDDs score of fentanyl(0.5 mg) was highest. Conclu-sion With high intraoperative and postoperative requirements on efficacy and low toxicity of analgesics ,the application of new o-pioid analgesics in Anesthesiology Department has increased and been reasonable gradually. But the cost of new opioid analgesics is worthy of concern.%目的:分析近年来该院麻醉科阿片类镇痛药物的应用动态,探讨麻醉用药的合理性。方法利用药品综合查询系统和药品信息网站,收集并分析该院2011~2013年阿片类镇痛药物(地佐辛、盐酸吗啡、盐酸哌替啶、雷米芬太尼、舒芬太尼、芬太尼)的药品名称、规格、用量、人均用药金额等。结果除盐酸哌替啶使用量、使用金额及用药频度(DDDs)值逐年下降外,其余阿片类镇痛药物(地佐辛、盐酸吗啡、雷米芬太尼、舒芬太尼、芬太尼)近3年使用量、人均使用金额、DDDs值均显著上升。其中地佐辛每年使用量、人均使用金额最高,DDDs值的年增加

  16. Determination of opioid analgesics in hair samples using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry and application to patients under palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musshoff, Frank; Lachenmeier, Katrin; Trafkowski, Jens; Madea, Burkhard; Nauck, Friedemann; Stamer, Ulrike

    2007-10-01

    Hair testing procedures allow a cumulative reflection of long-term drug abuse and are useful as a test for compliance in clinical toxicology. In the present study, liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used to determine analgesic opioid drugs in hair samples. The procedure used a simple methanolic extraction, and the evaporated extract was analyzed directly. A selective and sensitive procedure for the simultaneous determination of bisnortilidine, nortilidine, tilidine, buprenorphine, codeine, oxycodone, fentanyl, norfentanyl, hydromorphone, morphine, normorphine, oxymorphone, methadone, piritramide, and tramadol was developed and fully validated. The method fulfilled validation criteria and was shown to be sensitive, with limits of detection ranging from 0.008 to 0.017 ng/mg hair matrix, and precision ranging between 3.1% and 14.9 %. The applicability of the method was shown by analysis of authentic hair samples from patients receiving opioids for the treatment of cancer pain (eg, fentanyl was detected in concentrations up to 0.292 ng/mg, tramadol in concentrations up to 0.612 ng/mg of hair of 1 patient). Hair analysis was shown to be a complementary and useful tool in monitoring the drug-taking behavior of patients consuming opioid analgesics for the treatment of pain. In self-reports and medical records especially, the ingestion of tramadol and methadone was found to be dramatically underreported. In summary, hair analyses gave important additional information for the medical treatment of patients, the results often coming as a surprise to even the attending physicians.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of aryl-naloxamide opiate analgesics targeting truncated exon 11-associated μ opioid receptor (MOR-1) splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Susruta; Subrath, Joan; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Polikar, Lisa; Burgman, Maxim; Nagakura, Kuni; Ocampo, Julie; Haselton, Nathan; Pasternak, Anna R; Grinnell, Steven; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2012-07-26

    3-Iodobenzoylnaltrexamide 1 (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic acting through a novel receptor target that lack many side-effects of traditional opiates composed, in part, of exon 11-associated truncated six transmembrane domain MOR-1 (6TM/E11) splice variants. To better understand the SAR of this drug target, a number of 4,5-epoxymorphinan analogues were synthesized. Results show the importance of a free 3-phenolic group, a phenyl ring at the 6 position, an iodine at the 3'or 4' position of the phenyl ring, and an N-allyl or c-propylmethyl group to maintain high 6TM/E11 affinity and activity. 3-Iodobenzoylnaloxamide 15 (IBNalA) with a N-allyl group displayed lower δ opioid receptor affinity than its naltrexamine analogue, was 10-fold more potent an analgesic than morphine, elicited no respiratory depression or physical dependence, and only limited inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. Thus, the aryl-naloxamide scaffold can generate a potent analgesic acting through the 6TM/E11 sites with advantageous side-effect profile and greater selectivity.

  18. The bifunctional μ opioid agonist/antioxidant [Dmt(1)]DALDA is a superior analgesic in an animal model of complex regional pain syndrome-type i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Peter W; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Saray, Amy; Poon, Annie Wing Hoi; Laferrière, André; Coderre, Terence J

    2015-11-18

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the development of complex regional pain syndrome-Type I (CRPS-I), as also demonstrated with the chronic post ischemia pain (CPIP) animal model of CRPS-I. We show that morphine and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) act synergistically to reduce mechanical allodynia in CPIP rats. The tetrapeptide amide [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2) is a potent and selective μ opioid receptor (MOR) agonist with favorable pharmacokinetic properties and with antioxidant activity due to its N-terminal Dmt (2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) residue. In the CPIP model, [Dmt(1)]DALDA was 15-fold more potent than morphine in reversing mechanical allodynia and 4.5-fold more potent as analgesic in the heat algesia test. The results indicate that bifunctional compounds with MOR agonist/antioxidant activity have therapeutic potential for the treatment of CRPS-I.

  19. Spinal Tolerance and Dependence: Some Observations on the Role of Spinal N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors and Phosphorylation in the Loss of Opioid Analgesic Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony L Yaksh

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous delivery of opiates can lead to a reduction in analgesic effects. In humans, as in other animals, some component of this change in sensitivity seems likely to have a strong pharmacodynamic component. Such loss of effect, deemed to be tolerance in the present article, can be readily demonstrated in animals with repeated bolus and continuous intrathecal infusion of mu and delta opioids and alpha-2 adrenergic agonists. Research has shown that this loss of effect can be diminished by concurrent treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonists and by the suppression of the activity of spinal protein kinase C (PKC. This suggests in part the probable role of PKC-mediated phosphorylation in the right shift in the dose-effect curves observed with continuous opiate or adrenergic exposure. Importantly, this right shift is seen to occur in parallel with an increase in the phosphorylating activity in the dorsal horn and in the expression of several PKC isozymes. The target of this phosphorylation is not certain. Phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor enhances its functionality, while phosphorylation of the opioid receptor or associated channels seems to diminish their activity or to enhance internalization. While the focus is on several specific components, the accumulating data emphasize the biological complexity of these changes in spinal drug reactivity.

  20. The G Protein–Biased κ-Opioid Receptor Agonist RB-64 Is Analgesic with a Unique Spectrum of Activities In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kate L.; Robinson, J. Elliott; Zhu, Hu; DiBerto, Jeffrey F.; Polepally, Prabhakar R.; Zjawiony, Jordan K.; Nichols, David E.; Malanga, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that functionally selective G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists may have enhanced therapeutic benefits has revitalized interest for many GPCR targets. In particular, although κ-opioid receptor (KOR) agonists are analgesic with a low risk of dependence and abuse, their use is limited by a propensity to induce sedation, motor incoordination, hallucinations, and dysphoria-like states. Several laboratories have produced a body of work suggesting that G protein–biased KOR agonists might be analgesic with fewer side effects. Although that has been an intriguing hypothesis, suitable KOR-selective and G protein–biased agonists have not been available to test this idea. Here we provide data using a G protein–biased agonist, RB-64 (22-thiocyanatosalvinorin A), which suggests that KOR-mediated G protein signaling induces analgesia and aversion, whereas β-arrestin-2 signaling may be associated with motor incoordination. Additionally, unlike unbiased KOR agonists, the G protein–biased ligand RB-64 does not induce sedation and does not have anhedonia-like actions, suggesting that a mechanism other than G protein signaling mediates these effects. Our findings provide the first evidence for a highly selective and G protein–biased tool compound for which many, but not all, of the negative side effects of KOR agonists can be minimized by creating G protein–biased KOR agonists. PMID:25320048

  1. Comparison of an Additional Transdermal Fentanyl Patch Compared to Intravenous NSAID and Opioid Analgesics within 24 Hours of an Uterine Artery Embolization for Myoma and Adenomyosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Suk Yun; Kang, Byung Chul; Rho, Kyung Min [Dept. of Radiology, Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an additional transdermal fentanyl patch compared to intravenous analgesics in pain control during the 24-hour period following uterine artery embolization (UAE) for myoma and adenomyosis. Between September 2009 and August 2010, 42 patients underwent UAE for myoma or adenomyosis. Of these, 21 received an intravenous opioid (pethidine) and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (group A), and 21 received an additional transdermal fentanyl patch (group B). Pain perception levels were established verbally on a 0-10 scale during the 24-hour period following UAE. Differences in pain trends, mean dose of intravenous pethidine, and adverse effects were compared between the two groups. Pain perception was most severe at 6 hours after UAE and the mean pain level of group B at that time was 6.3 {+-} 0.7, which was significantly lower than that of group A, 8.2 {+-} 0.7 (p<0.05). The mean dose of intravenous pethidine was 114.3 {+-} 59.5 mg in group A and 90.5 {+-} 49.0 mg in group B, while the incidence of nausea was 67% in group A and 77% in group B. In both cases, the differences were not significantly different (p>0.05), and no evidence of respiratory distress was demonstrated. The addition of a transdermal fentanyl patch to intravenous analgesics is effective in reducing post-embolization pain during the 24-hour period after UAE.

  2. Analgesic tolerance without demonstrable opioid-induced hyperalgesia: a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of sustained-release morphine for treatment of chronic nonradicular low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Larry F; D'Arcy, Nicole; Brady, Caitlin; Zamora, Abigail Kathleen; Young, Chelsea Anne; Kim, Julie Eunwoo; Clemenson, Anna Marie; Angst, Martin S; Clark, J David

    2012-08-01

    Although often successful in acute settings, long-term use of opioid pain medications may be accompanied by waning levels of analgesic response not readily attributable to advancing underlying disease, necessitating dose escalation to attain pain relief. Analgesic tolerance, and more recently opioid-induced hyperalgesia, have been invoked to explain such declines in opioid effectiveness over time. Because both phenomena result in inadequate analgesia, they are difficult to distinguish in a clinical setting. Patients with otherwise uncomplicated low-back pain were titrated to comfort or dose-limiting side effects in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial using sustained-release morphine or weight-matched placebo capsules for 1 month. A total of 103 patients completed the study, with an average end titration dose of 78 mg morphine/d. After 1 month, the morphine-treated patients developed tolerance to the analgesic effects of remifentanil, but did not develop opioid-induced hyperalgesia. On average, these patients experienced a 42% reduction in analgesic potency. The morphine-treated patients experienced clinically relevant improvements in pain relief, as shown by a 44% reduction in average visual analogue scale pain levels and a 31% improvement in functional ability. The differences in visual analogue scale pain levels (P = .003) and self-reported disability (P = .03) between both treatment groups were statistically significant. After 1 month of oral morphine therapy, patients with chronic low-back pain developed tolerance but not opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Improvements in pain and functional ability were observed.

  3. Analgesic activity and pharmacological characterization of N-[1-phenylpyrazol-3-yl]-N-[1-(2-phenethyl)-4-piperidyl] propenamide, a new opioid agonist acting peripherally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea, Carlos; Sánchez, Eva; Cano, Carolina; Jagerovic, Nadine; Martín, Maria Isabel

    2008-10-24

    We previously reported the synthesis of three new opioid agonists as well as their in vitro and in vivo activity [Girón, R., Abalo, R., Goicoechea, C., Martín, M.I., Callado, L.F., Cano, C., Goya, P., Jagerovic, N. 2002. Synthesis and opioid activity of new fentanyl analogs. Life Sci. 71, 1023-1034]. One of them, N-[1-phenylpyrazol-3-yl]-N-[1-(2-phenethyl)-4-piperidyl)] propenamide (IQMF-4), showed an interesting antinociceptive activity. Intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered, it was as effective as fentanyl or morphine, being less potent than fentanyl but more so than morphine. The aim of the present work was to evaluate its antinociceptive effect by different routes of administration, using the hot plate test, and to investigate possible side effects, such as tolerance and withdrawal, in vitro, using the myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle strip preparation from guinea pig ileum, and in vivo, using the hot plate test. IQMF-4 was more potent than morphine when administered per os (p.o.), but less potent when administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). By both routes, fentanyl is more potent that IQMF-4. When IQMF-4 was administered i.p., naloxone methiodide, a peripherally acting antagonist, was able to completely block its antinociceptive effect, whereas, after i.c.v. administration, the blockade was only partial. An interesting feature of the new compound is that it induces tolerance in vitro but not in vivo. Moreover, though in vitro withdrawal was not different from fentanyl or morphine, in vivo withdrawal symptoms were significantly less frequent in mice treated with IQMF-4 than in those treated with morphine or fentanyl. Although more assays are required, these results show that IQMF-4 appears to be a potent analgesic compound with an interesting peripheral component, and reduced ability to induce dependence.

  4. Long-term safety and analgesic efficacy of buprenorphine buccal film in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic pain requiring around-the-clock opioids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale M

    2017-01-01

    associated with opioids, such as nausea, constipation, and headache. In both rollover and de novo patients, pain intensity scores remained constant at approximately 3–4 during long-term treatment, and the dose of buprenorphine buccal film remained unchanged in 86.2% of patients.Conclusion: In appropriate patients, buprenorphine buccal film demonstrated tolerability and efficacy in the long-term management of chronic pain.Keywords: buccal drug administration, buprenorphine, chronic pain management, long-term treatment, opioid analgesics

  5. A randomised controlled trial of opioid only versus combined opioid and non-steroidal anti inflammatory analgesics for pain relief in the first 48 hours after Caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Adamou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-Caesarean section pain is complex in nature, requiring a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological methods. Effective management of postoperative pain will reduce postoperative morbidity, hospital stay and cost. The objective of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness and adverse effects of a combination of non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX inhibitor (Diclofenac sodium 50 mg and opioid (Pentazocine 60 mg to opiod only (Pentazocine 60 mg for pain management after Caesarean section (CS at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH. Materials and Methods: This was a randomised double-blind controlled study conducted at AKTH, Kano, Nigeria. A total of 166 patients scheduled to undergo either emergency or elective Caesarean section were studied. Group I received a combination of COX inhibitor and opiod while Group II received opiod only for pain management after CS. Results: The average age of the patients was 28.35 years (SD ± 6.426 in the group I and 26.9(SD ± 6.133 in group II. The mean parity was 3.27(SD ± 2.67 and 2.75(SD ± 2.14 while the mean gestational age at admission was 37.68(SD ± 2.69 and 38.18(SD ± 2.63 weeks in the first and second groups, respectively. Comparison of the level of pain experienced and patients satisfaction during the first 48 hours postoperatively revealed that the level of pain was statistically significantly less and patient′s satisfaction significantly better in group I compared to group II (P-value 0.00001. Conclusion: The use of combined compared to single agent analgesia is safe, significantly reduced pain and improved patient satisfaction after a caesarian section (CS.

  6. Progress in the study of combining opioid analgesics and ultra-low-dose naloxone%小剂量纳洛酮联合阿片类药物应用的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武林鑫; 段晓芸; 黄雄庆

    2012-01-01

    Background Opioid analgesics play an important role in clinical settings.However,they also have some side effects,such as nausea,vomiting,pruritus,respiratory depression and so on,which could limit their wide use.Recently,lots of preclinical arid clinical studies have demonstrated that cotreatments with extremely small dose of opioid receptor antagonists can markedly enhance the efficacy of opioid analgesics and simultaneously reduce side effects induced by opioids including tolerance and dependence. Objective This article intends to review the progress in the study of the clinical application of opioid analgesics combined with ultra-low-dose naloxone in order to inspire some new research ideas. Content This article is a review of the progress in the preclinical and clinical studies of combining opioid analgesics and ultra-low-dose naloxone.In the mean time,we set out the probable mechanisms that could account for the enhancement of opioids' analgesic potency and attenuation of side effects,tolerance and dependence,which induced by opioids,during cotreatment with opioids and naloxone. Trend Recently,directions of the research are not limited to observation of the effectiveness in combining ultra -low -dose naloxone and morphine as well as in company with other opioids.More and more researchers are eager to concern about the mechanism of this eotreatment.%背景 阿片类镇痛药在临床应用有着重要的地位,但有恶心、呕吐、瘙痒、呼吸抑制等不可忽视副作用,长期应用还可产生耐受和依赖.有研究表明,阿片类镇痛药联合应用小剂量的阿片类受体拮抗剂可以明显增强吗啡等阿片类镇痛药的效能,并且同时减弱由其产生的副作用以及耐受和依赖.目的 拟通过综述的方式,系统地阐述小剂量纳洛酮联合应用阿片类药物的研究现状以及进展,为今后该方向的研究提供参考,进而启发新的研究思路.内容 对阿片类镇痛药联合小剂量纳洛酮应

  7. Use of opioid analgesics in the treatment of cancer pain: evidence-based recommendations from the EAPC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraceni, Augusto; Hanks, Geoffrey; Kaasa, Stein; Bennett, Michael I; Brunelli, Cinzia; Cherny, Nathan; Dale, Ola; De Conno, Franco; Fallon, Marie; Hanna, Magdi; Haugen, Dagny Faksvåg; Juhl, Gitte; King, Samuel; Klepstad, Pål; Laugsand, Eivor A; Maltoni, Marco; Mercadante, Sebastiano; Nabal, Maria; Pigni, Alessandra; Radbruch, Lukas; Reid, Colette; Sjogren, Per; Stone, Patrick C; Tassinari, Davide; Zeppetella, Giovambattista

    2012-02-01

    Here we provide the updated version of the guidelines of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) on the use of opioids for the treatment of cancer pain. The update was undertaken by the European Palliative Care Research Collaborative. Previous EAPC guidelines were reviewed and compared with other currently available guidelines, and consensus recommendations were created by formal international expert panel. The content of the guidelines was defined according to several topics, each of which was assigned to collaborators who developed systematic literature reviews with a common methodology. The recommendations were developed by a writing committee that combined the evidence derived from the systematic reviews with the panellists' evaluations in a co-authored process, and were endorsed by the EAPC Board of Directors. The guidelines are presented as a list of 16 evidence-based recommendations developed according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system.

  8. The evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2009-01-01

    The proteins that mediate the analgesic and other effects of opioid drugs and endogenous opioid peptides are known as opioid receptors. Opioid receptors consist of a family of four closely-related proteins belonging to the large superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors. The three types of opioid receptors shown unequivocally to mediate analgesia in animal models are the mu (MOR), delta (DOR), and kappa (KOR) opioid receptor proteins. The role of the fourth member of the opioid receptor fami...

  9. Bivalent ligands that target μ opioid (MOP) and cannabinoid1 (CB1) receptors are potent analgesics devoid of tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Naour, Morgan; Akgün, Eyup; Yekkirala, Ajay; Lunzer, Mary M; Powers, Mike D; Kalyuzhny, Alexander E; Portoghese, Philip S

    2013-07-11

    Given that μ opioid (MOP) and canabinoid (CB1) receptors are colocalized in various regions of the central nervous system and have been reported to associate as heteromer (MOP-CB1) in cultured cells, the possibility of functional, endogenous MOP-CB1 in nociception and other pharmacologic effects has been raised. As a first step in investigating this possibility, we have synthesized a series of bivalent ligands 1-5 that contain both μ agonist and CB1 antagonist pharmacophores for use as tools to study the functional interaction between MOP and CB1 receptors in vivo. Immunofluorescent studies on HEK293 cells coexpressing both receptors suggested 5 (20-atom spacer) to be the only member of the series that bridges the protomers of the heteromer. Antinociceptive testing in mice revealed 5 to be the most potent member of the series. As neither a mixture of monovalent ligands 9 + 10 nor bivalents 2-5 produced tolerance in mice, MOR-CB1 apparently is not an important target for reducing tolerance.

  10. Are peripheral opioid antagonists the solution to opioid side effects?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bates, John J

    2012-02-03

    Opioid medication is the mainstay of therapy for severe acute and chronic pain. Unfortunately, the side effects of these medications can affect patient comfort and safety, thus limiting their proven therapeutic potential. Whereas the main analgesic effects of opioids are centrally mediated, many of the common side effects are mediated via peripheral receptors. Novel peripheral opioid antagonists have been recently introduced that can block the peripheral actions of opioids without affecting centrally mediated analgesia. We review the clinical and experimental evidence of their efficacy in ameliorating opioid side effects and consider what further information might be useful in defining their role. IMPLICATIONS: The major analgesic effects of opioid medication are mediated within the brain and spinal cord. Many of the side effects of opioids are caused by activation of receptors outside these areas. Recently developed peripherally restricted opioid antagonists have the ability to block many opioid side effects without affecting analgesia.

  11. Conocimiento básico de los riesgos del uso de analgésicos no opioides en pacientes ambulatorios Basic knowledge of risks for non-opioid analgesics (NOA in ambulatory patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Vladislavovna Doubova

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar el conocimiento básico de los pacientes acerca de los analgésicos no opioides (ANOP e identificar los posibles factores relacionados con la falta de información sobre este tipo de analgésicos. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Participaron 629 pacientes >50 años con síndrome doloroso de origen no oncológico y que recibieron ANOP. Se analizaron sus características generales, la información recibida y su conocimiento sobre ANOP. La variable dependiente fue la falta de conocimiento básico (FCB sobre ANOP. Se realizó análisis descriptivo y bivariado. RESULTADOS: Del total de participantes, 64.2% tuvo FCB; 28% desconocía la forma correcta de tomar ANOP y 48% sabía que ocasionan trastornos gastrointestinales. Factores asociados con la FCB: no recibir información sobre ANOP (RM= 2.22; IC95% 1.32-3.70, escolaridad OBJECTIVE: To describe patients’ knowledge of non-opioid analgesics (NOA and to identify factors associated with patients’ lack of basic knowledge (LBN on this type of medication. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 629 ambulatory patients older than 50 years of age, with non-malignant pain syndrome, attended to two family medicine clinics and received seven day prescriptions for NOA. The data on patients’ general characteristics, the information they received and their actual knowledge of NOA were analyzed using descriptive statistics and bivariate analysis. RESULTS: A total of 64.2% had LBN; 28% did not know how to take NOA properly, and 48% knew that these drugs cause gastrointestinal adverse effects. The factors significantly associated with LBN on NOA included: failure to receive information on NOA (OR:2.22, 95%CI 1.32-3.70, education <7 years (OR:1.87, 95%CI 1.33-2.63 and pain duration <4 years (OR:1.70, 95%CI 1.22-2.37. CONCLUSION: Patients lack knowledge and receive little information on NOA. It is important to encourage actions to tackle this problem.

  12. (-)-(1R,2R)-3-(3-dimethylamino-1-ethyl-2-methyl-propyl)-phenol hydrochloride (tapentadol HCl): a novel mu-opioid receptor agonist/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor with broad-spectrum analgesic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzschentke, Thomas M; Christoph, Thomas; Kögel, Babette; Schiene, Klaus; Hennies, Hagen-Heinrich; Englberger, Werner; Haurand, Michael; Jahnel, Ulrich; Cremers, Thomas I F H; Friderichs, Elmar; De Vry, Jean

    2007-10-01

    (-)-(1R,2R)-3-(3-dimethylamino-1-ethyl-2-methyl-propyl)-phenol hydrochloride (tapentadol HCl) is a novel micro-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist (Ki = 0.1 microM; relative efficacy compared with morphine 88% in a [35S]guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding assay) and NE reuptake inhibitor (Ki = 0.5 microM for synaptosomal reuptake inhibition). In vivo intracerebral microdialysis showed that tapentadol, in contrast to morphine, produces large increases in extracellular levels of NE (+450% at 10 mg/kg i.p.). Tapentadol exhibited analgesic effects in a wide range of animal models of acute and chronic pain [hot plate, tail-flick, writhing, Randall-Selitto, mustard oil colitis, chronic constriction injury (CCI), and spinal nerve ligation (SNL)], with ED50 values ranging from 8.2 to 13 mg/kg after i.p. administration in rats. Despite a 50-fold lower binding affinity to MOR, the analgesic potency of tapentadol was only two to three times lower than that of morphine, suggesting that the dual mode of action of tapentadol may result in an opiate-sparing effect. A role of NE in the analgesic efficacy of tapentadol was directly demonstrated in the SNL model, where the analgesic effect of tapentadol was strongly reduced by the alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine but only moderately attenuated by the MOR antagonist naloxone, whereas the opposite was seen for morphine. Tolerance development to the analgesic effect of tapentadol in the CCI model was twice as slow as that of morphine. It is suggested that the broad analgesic profile of tapentadol and its relative resistance to tolerance development may be due to a dual mode of action consisting of both MOR activation and NE reuptake inhibition.

  13. Common Analgesic Agents and Their Roles in Analgesic Nephropathy: A Commentary on the Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Yaxley, Julian

    2016-01-01

    An association between non-opioid analgesic agents and chronic kidney disease has long been suspected. The presumed development of chronic renal impairment following protracted and excessive use of non-opioid analgesia is known as analgesic nephropathy. Many clinicians accept analgesic nephropathy as a real entity despite the paucity of scientific evidence. This narrative review aims to summarize the literature in the field. The weight of available observational literature suggests that long-...

  14. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous indoleamine, produced mainly by the pineal gland. Melatonin has been proven to have chronobiotic, antioxidant, antihypertensive, anxiolytic and sedative properties. There are also experimental and clinical data supporting an analgesic role of melatonin. In experimental...... studies, melatonin shows potent analgesic effects in a dose-dependent manner. In clinical studies, melatonin has been shown to have analgesic benefits in patients with chronic pain (fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine). The physiologic mechanism underlying the analgesic actions of melatonin...... has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid µ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby...

  15. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous indoleamine, produced mainly by the pineal gland. Melatonin has been proven to have chronobiotic, antioxidant, antihypertensive, anxiolytic and sedative properties. There are also experimental and clinical data supporting an analgesic role of melatonin. In experimental...... studies, melatonin shows potent analgesic effects in a dose-dependent manner. In clinical studies, melatonin has been shown to have analgesic benefits in patients with chronic pain (fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine). The physiologic mechanism underlying the analgesic actions of melatonin...... has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid μ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby...

  16. Interaction of the mu-opioid receptor with GPR177 (Wntless) inhibits Wnt secretion: potential implications for opioid dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Stagljar Igor; Van Bockstaele Elisabeth J; Reyes Beverly AS; Wong Victoria; Kittanakom Saranya; Jin Jay; Berrettini Wade; Levenson Robert

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Opioid agonist drugs produce analgesia. However, long-term exposure to opioid agonists may lead to opioid dependence. The analgesic and addictive properties of opioid agonist drugs are mediated primarily via the mu-opioid receptor (MOR). Opioid agonists appear to alter neuronal morphology in key brain regions implicated in the development of opioid dependence. However, the precise role of the MOR in the development of these neuronal alterations remains elusive. We hypothes...

  17. Estudio de utilización de analgésicos opiáceos en un hospital general universitario Study of opioid analgesic use in a general university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gómez Salcedo

    2009-10-01

    el metamizol los analgésicos más ampliamente utilizados. Conclusiones: Los datos de nuestro estudio reflejan una tendencia al incremento del consumo de opiáceos en el hospital, lo que consideramos una mejora en el tratamiento del dolor, tanto agudo como crónico, pues en este incremento se ven involucrados todos los principios activos opiáceos. En un hospital con elevada actividad y complejidad asistencial como el Hospital La Paz, este tipo de estudios constituyen una herramienta que nos permite conocer y comparar el uso de opiáceos en los distintos hospitales y servicios clínicos. Nos permiten conocer la evolución del consumo así como detectar posibles desviaciones e implementar acciones de mejora en los diferentes servicios clínicos implicados en el tratamiento del dolor.Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze opioid analgesic use in the La Paz University Hospital in 2008 in order to identify patterns of use and consumption. To that end, data from inpatients were analyzed overall, as well as by hospitals and departments. We analyzed data on consumption in the previous 5 years and quantified the use of the remaining active principles administered as analgesics in our hospital. Materials and methods: Following the Wold Health Organization's guidelines for studieson medication use in hospitals, data are shown as defined daily dose (DDD per 100 hospital stays. Data on drug use were obtained from the drug management program, Farma Tools (Dominion®, which is used by the Pharmacy Service at La Paz Hospital. Results: The overall value of opioid utilization in 2008 was 8.1 DDD per 100 hospital stays. The most widely used active principles were parenteral morphine and transdermal fentanyl. Together, these drugs represented 83% of total opioid consumption. Analysis by hospital revealed that the General and Traumatology Hospitals showed the highest opioid drug consumption and followed the same utilization pattern as overall use. The services most

  18. Postoperative opioid analgesia: time for a reconsideration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Rung, G W; Callesen, T

    1996-01-01

    ;72:375-8). Many initial improvements simply involved the administration of opioid analgesics in new ways, such as continuous or on demand intravenous (i.v.) or epidural infusion. These methods allow lower total opioid dosages, provide a more stable concentration of opioid at the receptor and correspondingly...

  19. Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia - Worsening Pain in Opioid-Dependent Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    shown to reduce pain . Amantadine is an NMDA receptor antagonist that may mitigate central sensitization. Adjuvant analgesics may lessen nociceptive ...FEB 2013 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Opioid-induced hyperalgesia--worsening pain in opioid-dependent...Report Opioid-induced hyperalgesia—worsening pain in opioid-dependent patients☆ Abstract Patients with chronic opioid use are commonly treated in the

  20. Superior analgesic effect of H-Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2 ([Dmt1]DALDA), a multifunctional opioid peptide, compared to morphine in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Megumi; Schiller, Peter W; Shimoyama, Naohito; Toyama, Satoshi; Szeto, Hazel H

    2012-11-01

    H-Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2) ([Dmt(1)]DALDA) is a synthetic tetrapeptide with extraordinary selectivity for the mu-opioid receptor and is an extremely potent analgesic. [Dmt(1) ]DALDA is unusual in the way that the greater part of its analgesic potency appears to be produced by its actions in the spinal cord. Furthermore, [Dmt(1) ]DALDA inhibits norepinephrine re-uptake and is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. Such characteristics may make [Dmt(1)]DALDA particularly effective against neuropathic pain. The present study was designed to compare the effects of [Dmt(1)]DALDA and morphine on thermal hyperalgesia in an experimental neuropathic pain model. Neuropathic pain was induced in rats by surgical ligation of the L5 spinal nerve, and thermal pain thresholds were assessed by latencies of paw withdrawal to radiant heat. The increase in paw withdrawal latency was greater after the administration of [Dmt(1) ]DALDA than that of morphine in neuropathic rats at doses that were equianalgesic in naïve animals. We conclude that [Dmt(1)]DALDA is more effective than morphine against thermal hyperalgesia in this experimental model of neuropathic pain.

  1. Laboratory Testing for Prescription Opioids

    OpenAIRE

    Milone, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Opioid analgesic misuse has risen significantly over the past two decades, and these drugs now represent the most commonly abused class of prescription medications. They are a major cause of poisoning deaths in the USA exceeding heroin and cocaine. Laboratory testing plays a role in the detection of opioid misuse and the evaluation of patients with opioid intoxication. Laboratories use both immunoassay and chromatographic methods (e.g., liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection),...

  2. Pharmacological Profiles of Oligomerized μ-Opioid Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ing-Kang Ho; Cynthia Wei-Sheng Lee

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are widely prescribed pain relievers with multiple side effects and potential complications. They produce analgesia via G-protein-protein coupled receptors: μ-, δ-, κ-opioid and opioid receptor-like 1 receptors. Bivalent ligands targeted to the oligomerized opioid receptors might be the key to developing analgesics without undesired side effects and obtaining effective treatment for opioid addicts. In this review we will update the biological effects of μ-opioids on homo- or hetero-ol...

  3. Acute Metabolic Changes Associated With Analgesic Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tine Maria; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Simonsen, Carsten Wiberg;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is used to measure brain metabolites. Limited data exist on the analgesic-induced spectroscopy response. This was an explorative study with the aims to investigate the central effects of two analgesic drugs, an opioid and a selective...

  4. A randomized, open, parallel group, multicenter trial to investigate analgesic efficacy and safety of a new transdermal fentanyl patch compared to standard opioid treatment in cancer pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kress, Hans G; Von der Laage, Dorothea; Hoerauf, Klaus H;

    2008-01-01

    to be pharmacokinetically bioequivalent to the marketed fentanyl patch. To determine noninferiority in efficacy in cancer patients and to compare safety, a clinical trial comparing the new fentanyl patch with standard oral or transdermal opioid treatment was planned. The design was an open, parallel group, multicenter...

  5. Opioid rotation with extended-release opioids: where should we begin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalamachu, Srinivas

    2012-01-01

    Opioid rotation is a common and necessary clinical practice in the management of chronic non-cancer pain to improve therapeutic efficacy with the lowest opioid dose. When dose escalations fail to achieve adequate analgesia or are associated with intolerable side effects, a trial of a new opioid should be considered. Much of the scientific rationale of opioid rotation is based on the wide interindividual variability in sensitivity to opioid analgesics and the novel patient response observed when introducing an opioid-tolerant patient to a new opioid. This article discusses patient indicators for opioid rotation, the conversion process between opioid medications, and additional practical considerations for increasing the effectiveness of opioid therapy during a trial of a new opioid. A Patient vignette that demonstrates a step-wise approach to opioid rotation is also presented.

  6. Differences between opioids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewes, Asbjørn; Jensen, Rasmus D.; Nielsen, Lecia M.;

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies comparing the response and side effects of various opioids have not been able to show robust differences between drugs. Hence, recommendations of the regulatory authorities have been driven by costs with a general tendency in many countries to restrict physician's use of opioids...... to morphine. Although this approach is recognized as cost-effective in most cases there is solid evidence that, on an individual patient basis, opioids are not all equal. Therefore it is important to have an armamentarium of strong analgesics in clinical practice to ensure a personalized approach in patients...... who do not respond to standard treatment. In this review we highlight differences between opioids in human studies from a pharmacological, experimental, clinical and health economics point of view. We provide evidence that individuals respond differently to opioids, and that general differences...

  7. A randomized, open, parallel group, multicenter trial to investigate analgesic efficacy and safety of a new transdermal fentanyl patch compared to standard opioid treatment in cancer pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kress, H.G.; Laage, D. Von der; Hoerauf, K.H.;

    2008-01-01

    to be pharmacokinetically bioequivalent to the marked fentanyl patch. To determine noninferiority in efficacy in cancer patients and to compare safety, a clinical trial comparing the new fentanyl patch with standard oral or transdermal opioid treatment was planned. The design was an open, parallel group, multicenter trial......A new 72-hour transdermal fentanyl matrix patch has been designed, which has a 35%-50% reduction of the absolute fentanyl content compared with other currently available transdermal fentanyl patches that are using the matrix technology. The new patch has previously been shown...... in relative PI area under the curve between the fentanyl patch and standard opioid treatment were less than 10% for both the intention-to-treat and per-protocol populations. Scores for the tolerability endpoints were similar in the treatment groups. The new fentanyl matrix patch with a lower drug load...

  8. Pharmacogenetics of new analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Jörn; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2011-06-01

    Patient phenotypes in pharmacological pain treatment varies between individuals, which could be partly assigned to their genotypes regarding the targets of classical analgesics (OPRM1, PTGS2) or associated signalling pathways (KCNJ6). Translational and genetic research have identified new targets, for which new analgesics are being developed. This addresses voltage-gated sodium, calcium and potassium channels, for which SCN9A, CACNA1B, KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, respectively, are primary gene candidates because they code for the subunits of the respective channels targeted by analgesics currently in clinical development. Mutations in voltage gated transient receptor potential (TRPV) channels are known from genetic pain research and may modulate the effects of analgesics under development targeting TRPV1 or TRPV3. To this add ligand-gated ion channels including nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, ionotropic glutamate-gated receptors and ATP-gated purinergic P2X receptors with most important subunits coded by CHRNA4, GRIN2B and P2RX7. Among G protein coupled receptors, δ-opioid receptors (coded by OPRD1), cannabinoid receptors (CNR1 and CNR2), metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5 coded by GRM5), bradykinin B(1) (BDKRB1) and 5-HT(1A) (HTR1A) receptors are targeted by new analgesic substances. Finally, nerve growth factor (NGFB), its tyrosine kinase receptor (NTRK1) and the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) have become targets of interest. For most of these genes, functional variants have been associated with neuro-psychiatric disorders and not yet with analgesia. However, research on the genetic modulation of pain has already identified variants in these genes, relative to pain, which may facilitate the pharmacogenetic assessments of new analgesics. The increased number of candidate pharmacogenetic modulators of analgesic actions may open opportunities for the broader clinical implementation of genotyping information.

  9. Peripherally applied opioids for postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B N; Henneberg, S W; Schmiegelow, K;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids applied peripherally at the site of surgery may produce postoperative analgesia with few side effects. We performed this systematic review to evaluate the analgesic effect of peripherally applied opioids for acute postoperative pain. METHODS: We searched PubMed (1966 to June...... 2013), Embase (1980 to June 2013), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 6). Randomized controlled trials investigating the postoperative analgesic effect of peripherally applied opioids vs. systemic opioids or placebo, measured by pain intensity...... difference -5 mm, 95% CI: -7 to -3) for peripherally applied opioids vs. placebo and statistically significant increased time to first analgesic (mean difference 153 min, 95% CI: 41-265). When preoperative inflammation was reported (five studies), peripherally applied opioids significantly improved...

  10. Opioid Use in Fibromyalgia: A Cautionary Tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Don L; Clauw, Daniel J; Palmer, Roy E; Clair, Andrew G

    2016-05-01

    Multiple pharmacotherapies are available for the treatment of fibromyalgia (FM), including opioid analgesics. We postulate that the mechanism of action of traditional opioids predicts their lack of efficacy in FM. Literature searches of the MEDLINE and Cochrane Library databases were conducted using the search term opioid AND fibromyalgia to identify relevant articles, with no date limitations set. Citation lists in returned articles and personal archives of references were also examined for additional relevant items, and articles were selected based on the expert opinions of the authors. We found no evidence from clinical trials that opioids are effective for the treatment of FM. Observational studies have found that patients with FM receiving opioids have poorer outcomes than patients receiving nonopioids, and FM guidelines recommend against the use of opioid analgesics. Despite this, and despite the availability of alternative Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapies and the efficacy of nonpharmacologic therapies, opioids are commonly used in the treatment of FM. Factors associated with opioid use include female sex; geographic variation; psychological factors; a history of opioid use, misuse, or abuse; and patient or physician preference. The long-term use of opioid analgesics is of particular concern in the United States given the ongoing public health emergency relating to excess prescription opioid consumption. The continued use of opioids to treat FM despite a proven lack of efficacy, lack of support from treatment guidelines, and the availability of approved pharmacotherapy options provides a cautionary tale for their use in other chronic pain conditions.

  11. Opioid induced nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard S; Laufer, Andras

    2014-01-05

    Opioids are broad spectrum analgesics that are an integral part of the therapeutic armamentarium to combat pain in the palliative care population. Unfortunately, among the adverse effects of opioids that may be experienced along with analgesia is nausea, vomiting, and/or retching. Although it is conceivable that in the future, using combination agents (opioids combined with agents which may nullify emetic effects), currently nausea/vomiting remains a significant issue for certain patients. However, there exists potential current strategies that may be useful in efforts to diminish the frequency and/or intensity of opioid-induced nausea/vomiting (OINV).

  12. Redoubling the ring size of an endomorphin-2 analog transforms a centrally acting mu-opioid receptor agonist into a pure peripheral analgesic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekielna, Justyna; De Marco, Rossella; Gentilucci, Luca; Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Calo', Girolamo; Tömböly, Csaba; Artali, Roberto; Janecka, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The study reports the synthesis and biological evaluation of two opioid analogs, a monomer and a dimer, obtained as products of the solid-phase, side-chain to side-chain cyclization of the pentapeptide Tyr-d-Lys-Phe-Phe-AspNH2 . The binding affinities to the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors, as well as results obtained in a calcium mobilization functional assay are reported. Tyr-[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]2 -NH2 1 was a potent and selective full agonist of mu with sub-nanomolar affinity, while the dimer (Tyr-[d-Lys-Phe-Phe-Asp]2 -NH2 )2 2 showed a significant mixed mu/kappa affinity, acting as an agonist at the mu. Molecular docking computations were utilized to explain the ability of the dimeric cyclopeptide 2 to interact with the receptor. Interestingly, in spite of the increased ring size, the higher flexibility allowed 2 to fold and fit into the mu receptor binding pocket. Both cyclopeptides were shown to elicit strong antinociceptive activity after intraventricular injection but only cyclomonomer 1 was able to cross the blood-brain barrier. However, the cyclodimer 2 displayed a potent peripheral antinociceptive activity in a mouse model of visceral inflammatory pain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 309-317, 2016.

  13. Attentional Bias For Prescription Opioid Cues Among Opioid Dependent Chronic Pain Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Garland, Eric L.; Froeliger, Brett; Passik, Steven D.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent use of prescription opioid analgesics by chronic pain patients may result in opioid dependence, which involves implicit neurocognitive operations that organize and impel craving states and compulsive drug taking behavior. Prior studies have identified an attentional bias (AB) towards heroin among heroin dependent individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether opioid-dependent chronic pain patients exhibit an AB towards prescription opioidrelated cues. Opioid-dependent c...

  14. Selective involvement of kappa opioid and phencyclidine receptors in the analgesic and motor effects of dynorphin-A-(1-13)-Tyr-Leu-Phe-Asn-Gly-Pro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, V K; Bansinath, M; Dumont, M; Lemaire, S

    1992-09-18

    Dynorphin A-(1-13)-Tyr-Leu-Phe-Asn-Gly-Pro (Dyn Ia; 1-8 nmol) injected intracerebroventricularly in the mouse produces two independent behavioral effects: (1) a norbinaltorphimine (kappa opioid antagonist)-reversible analgesia in the acetic acid-induced writhing test and (2) motor dysfunction characterized by wild running, pop-corn jumping, hindlimb jerking and barrel rolling and antagonized by the irreversible phencyclidine (PCP) and sigma (sigma) receptor antagonist, metaphit and the non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, dextromethorphan and ketamine. The specific involvement of the PCP receptor in the motor effects of Dyn Ia is supported by the direct competitive interaction of the peptide with the binding of [3H]MK-801 (Ki: 0.63 microM) and [3H]TCP (Ki: 4.6 microM) to mouse brain membrane preparations.

  15. Intravenous analgesia with opioids versus femoral nerve block with 0.2% ropivacaine as preemptive analgesic for fracture femur: A randomized comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvinder Pal; Kohli, Vaneet; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Femoral fractures are extremely painful and pain invariably worsens on any movement. Anesthesia for fracture femur surgery is usually provided by spinal block. This study was undertaken to compare the analgesic effects of femoral nerve block (FNB) using nerve stimulator with 0.2% ropivacaine (15 ml) and intravenous (I.V.) fentanyl before patient positioning for fracture femur surgery under spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, comparative study was conducted on 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients (18–60 years) scheduled for femur surgery under combined spinal epidural anesthesia. Patients in Group I (n = 30), were administered FNB using nerve stimulator with 0.2% ropivacaine (15 ml) and in Group II patients (n = 30), I.V. fentanyl 0.5 μg/kg was given as preemptive analgesia. Parameters observed included time to spinal anesthesia, intra-operative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) for any pain and postoperative epidural top-ups dosages. Results: Demographic profile was comparable in both the groups. VAS at 2 min in Group I was 5.63 and in Group II it was 8.00. Satisfaction score was better in Group I as compared to Group II patients. Time to administer subarachnoid block was 17.80 min in patients of Group I as compared to 25.03 min in Group II patients. Postoperatively, VAS scores were lower in Group I than Group II patients. The frequency of epidural top-ups was higher in Group II than in Group I patients. Conclusions: FNB is comparatively better in comparison to I.V. fentanyl when used as preemptive and postoperative analgesic in patients being operated for fracture femur. PMID:27212771

  16. Laboratory testing for prescription opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milone, Michael C

    2012-12-01

    Opioid analgesic misuse has risen significantly over the past two decades, and these drugs now represent the most commonly abused class of prescription medications. They are a major cause of poisoning deaths in the USA exceeding heroin and cocaine. Laboratory testing plays a role in the detection of opioid misuse and the evaluation of patients with opioid intoxication. Laboratories use both immunoassay and chromatographic methods (e.g., liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection), often in combination, to yield high detection sensitivity and drug specificity. Testing methods for opioids originated in the workplace-testing arena and focused on detection of illicit heroin use. Analysis for a wide range of opioids is now required in the context of the prescription opioid epidemic. Testing methods have also been primarily based upon urine screening; however, methods for analyzing alternative samples such as saliva, sweat, and hair are available. Application of testing to monitor prescription opioid drug therapy is an increasingly important use of drug testing, and this area of testing introduces new interpretative challenges. In particular, drug metabolism may transform one clinically available opioid into another. The sensitivity of testing methods also varies considerably across the spectrum of opioid drugs. An understanding of opioid metabolism and method sensitivity towards different opioid drugs is therefore essential to effective use of these tests. Improved testing algorithms and more research into the effective use of drug testing in the clinical setting, particularly in pain medicine and substance abuse, are needed.

  17. [Analgesic nephropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintér, I; Nagy, J

    1998-11-22

    Analgesic nephropathy is a slowly progressive disease caused by the chronic abuse of analgesic mixtures containing two analgesic components combined with potentially addictive substances (coffeine and/or codeine). Pathologically, the nephropathy is characterized by renal papillary necrosis with calcification and chronic interstitial nephritis sometimes in association with transitional-cell carcinoma of the uroepithelium. In the early stage, the clinical characteristics are polyuria, sterile pyuria, sometimes renal colic and haematuria. With further progression of the disease, there are the nonspecific symptoms of advanced renal failure. The incidence of classic analgesic nephropathy among Hungarian patients on chronic renal replacement therapy has proven. There is an urgent need for the estimation of analgesic nephropathy among patients with chronic renal disease and among patients with chronic pain presumably regularly taking analgesics in Hungary. As long as analgesic mixtures containing phenacetin or paracetamol and/or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and addictive substances are available "over-the-counter", analgesic nephropathy will continue to be a problem also in our country.

  18. Chronic Opioid Therapy and Opioid Tolerance: A New Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are efficacious and cost-effective analgesics, but tolerance limits their effectiveness. This paper does not present any new clinical or experimental data but demonstrates that there exist ascending sensory pathways that contain few opioid receptors. These pathways are located by brain PET scans and spinal cord autoradiography. These nonopioid ascending pathways include portions of the ventral spinal thalamic tract originating in Rexed layers VI–VIII, thalamocortical fibers that proje...

  19. Clinical interpretation of opioid tolerance versus opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lucy; Sein, Michael; Vo, Trang; Amhmed, Shihab; Zhang, Yi; Hilaire, Kristin St; Houghton, Mary; Mao, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Opioid analgesics are commonly used to manage moderate to severe pain. However, the long-term use of opioids could lead to opioid tolerance (OT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Distinguishing OIH from OT would impact the practice of opioid therapy because opioid dose adjustment may differentially influence OT and OIH. Currently, there are no standard criteria of OT versus OIH causing considerable ambiguity in clinical interpretation and management of these conditions. The authors designed a practitioner-based survey consisting of 20 targeted questions. Answering these questions would require responders' actual clinical experiences with opioid therapy. The survey was conducted between 2011 and 2012 through direct mails or e-mails to 1,408 physicians who are currently practicing in the United States. The authors find that certain clinical characteristics (eg, increased pain despite opioid dose escalation) are often used by practitioners to make differential diagnosis of OT and OIH despite some overlap in their clinical presentation. A key difference in clinical outcome is that OT and OIH could be improved and exacerbated by opioid dose escalation, respectively. Our survey results revealed a significant knowledge gap in some responders regarding differential diagnosis and management of OT and OIH. The results also identified several issues, such as opioid dose adjustment and clinical comorbidities related to OT and OIH, which require future patient-based studies.

  20. Self-treatment of opioid withdrawal with a dietary supplement, Kratom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Edward W; Babu, Kavita M; Macalino, Grace E; Compton, Wilson

    2007-01-01

    We examined the use of Kratom (Mitragyna sp.), a dietary supplement with mu-opioid agonist activity, by members of a cybercommunity who self-treat chronic pain with opioid analgesics from Internet pharmacies. Within one year, an increase in the number of mentions on Drugbuyers.com, a Web site that facilitates the online purchase of opioid analgesics, suggested that members began managing opioid withdrawal with Kratom. This study demonstrates the rapidity with which information on psychoactive substances disseminates through online communities and suggests that online surveillance may be important to the generation of effective opioid analgesic abuse prevention strategies.

  1. Resistance to Morphine Analgesic Tolerance in Rats Deleted of TRPV1-Expressing Sensory Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shao-Rui; Prunean, Adrian; Pan, Hao-Min; Welker, Kelli L.; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2007-01-01

    Deletion of TRPV1-expressing afferent neurons reduces presynaptic μ opioid receptors but paradoxically potentiates the analgesic efficacy of μ opioid agonists. In this study, we determined if removal of TRPV1-expressing afferentneurons byresiniferatoxin (RTX), an ultrapotent capsaicin analogue, influences the development of opioid analgesic tolerance. Morphine tolerance was induced by daily intrathecal injections of 10 μg of morphine for 14 consecutive days or by daily intraperitoneal injecti...

  2. Analgesic medication errors in North Carolina nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Rishi J; Williams, Charrlotte E; Greene, Sandra B; Pierson, Stephanie; Caprio, Anthony J; Hansen, Richard A

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize analgesic medication errors and to evaluate their association with patient harm. The authors conducted a cross-sectional analysis of individual medication error incidents reported by North Carolina nursing homes to the Medication Error Quality Initiative (MEQI) during fiscal years 2010-2011. Bivariate associations between analgesic medication errors with patient factors, error-related factors, and impact on patients were tested with chi-square tests. A multivariate logistic regression model explored the relationship between type of analgesic medication errors and patient harm, controlling for patient- and error-related factors. A total of 32,176 individual medication error incidents were reported over a 2-year period in North Carolina nursing homes, 12.3% (n = 3949) of which were analgesic medication errors. Of these analgesic medication errors, opioid and nonopioid analgesics were involved in 3105 and 844 errors, respectively. Opioid errors were more likely to be wrong drug errors, wrong dose errors, and administration errors compared with nonopioid errors (P errors were found to have higher odds of patient harm compared with nonopioid errors (odds ratio [OR] = 3, 95% confodence interval [CI]: 1.1-7.8). The authors conclude that opioid analgesics represent the majority of analgesic error reports, and these error reports reflect an increased likelihood of patient harm compared with nonopioid analgesics.

  3. Opioid rotation with extended-release opioids: where should we begin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalamachu S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Srinivas NalamachuInternational Clinical Research Institute and Pain Management Institute, Overland Park, KS, USAAbstract: Opioid rotation is a common and necessary clinical practice in the management of chronic non-cancer pain to improve therapeutic efficacy with the lowest opioid dose. When dose escalations fail to achieve adequate analgesia or are associated with intolerable side effects, a trial of a new opioid should be considered. Much of the scientific rationale of opioid rotation is based on the wide interindividual variability in sensitivity to opioid analgesics and the novel patient response observed when introducing an opioid-tolerant patient to a new opioid. This article discusses patient indicators for opioid rotation, the conversion process between opioid medications, and additional practical considerations for increasing the effectiveness of opioid therapy during a trial of a new opioid. A Patient vignette that demonstrates a step-wise approach to opioid rotation is also presented.Keywords: extended-release opioids, chronic pain, opioid rotation

  4. Secular trends in opioid prescribing in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezalla, Edmund J; Rosen, David; Erensen, Jennifer G; Haddox, J David; Mayne, Tracy J

    2017-01-01

    Opioid abuse and misuse in the USA is a public health crisis. The use of prescription opioid analgesics increased substantially from 2002 through 2010, then plateaued and began to decrease in 2011. This study examined prescriptions of branded and generic immediate- and extended-release opioid analgesics from 1992 to 2016. This was juxtaposed against state and federal policies designed to decrease overutilization and abuse, as well as the launch of new opioid products, including opioids with abuse-deterrent properties (OADPs). The data indicate that these health policies, including the utilization and reimbursement of OADPs, have coincided with decreased opioid utilization. The hypothesis that OADPs will paradoxically increase opioid prescribing is not supported. PMID:28243142

  5. Secular trends in opioid prescribing in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezalla, Edmund J; Rosen, David; Erensen, Jennifer G; Haddox, J David; Mayne, Tracy J

    2017-01-01

    Opioid abuse and misuse in the USA is a public health crisis. The use of prescription opioid analgesics increased substantially from 2002 through 2010, then plateaued and began to decrease in 2011. This study examined prescriptions of branded and generic immediate- and extended-release opioid analgesics from 1992 to 2016. This was juxtaposed against state and federal policies designed to decrease overutilization and abuse, as well as the launch of new opioid products, including opioids with abuse-deterrent properties (OADPs). The data indicate that these health policies, including the utilization and reimbursement of OADPs, have coincided with decreased opioid utilization. The hypothesis that OADPs will paradoxically increase opioid prescribing is not supported.

  6. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and burn pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtman, Joseph R; Jellish, W Scott

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of pain produced during the management of burn injury has been an ongoing problem for physicians caring for these patients. The main therapeutic option for analgesia has been the repeated and prolonged use of opioids. The adverse effects of opioids are well known but the long term use of opioids which produces tolerance with accompanying dose escalation and dependence is most problematic. Another potentially important consequence of opioid exposure that sometimes masks as tolerance is that of opioid induced hyperalgesia. This syndrome is manifest as enhanced pain, sensitivity and loss of analgesic efficacy in patients treated with opioids who actually become sensitized to painful stimuli. This article focuses on the treatment of burn pain and how current analgesic therapies with opioids may cause hyperalgesia and affect the adequacy of treatment for burn pain. This article also provides possible modalities to help therapeutically manage these patients and considers future analgesic strategies which may help to improve pain management in this complicated patient population.

  7. Mu Opioid Splice Variant MOR-1K Contributes to the Development of Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folabomi A Oladosu

    Full Text Available A subset of the population receiving opioids for the treatment of acute and chronic clinical pain develops a paradoxical increase in pain sensitivity known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Given that opioid analgesics are one of few treatments available against clinical pain, it is critical to determine the key molecular mechanisms that drive opioid-induced hyperalgesia in order to reduce its prevalence. Recent evidence implicates a splice variant of the mu opioid receptor known as MOR-1K in the emergence of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Results from human genetic association and cell signaling studies demonstrate that MOR-1K contributes to decreased opioid analgesic responses and produces increased cellular activity via Gs signaling. Here, we conducted the first study to directly test the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia.In order to examine the role of MOR-1K in opioid-induced hyperalgesia, we first assessed pain responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli prior to, during, and following chronic morphine administration. Results show that genetically diverse mouse strains (C57BL/6J, 129S6, and CXB7/ByJ exhibited different morphine response profiles with corresponding changes in MOR-1K gene expression patterns. The 129S6 mice exhibited an analgesic response correlating to a measured decrease in MOR-1K gene expression levels, while CXB7/ByJ mice exhibited a hyperalgesic response correlating to a measured increase in MOR-1K gene expression levels. Furthermore, knockdown of MOR-1K in CXB7/ByJ mice via chronic intrathecal siRNA administration not only prevented the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia, but also unmasked morphine analgesia.These findings suggest that MOR-1K is likely a necessary contributor to the development of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. With further research, MOR-1K could be exploited as a target for antagonists that reduce or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

  8. Chronic Opioid Therapy and Opioid Tolerance: A New Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel S. Goldberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are efficacious and cost-effective analgesics, but tolerance limits their effectiveness. This paper does not present any new clinical or experimental data but demonstrates that there exist ascending sensory pathways that contain few opioid receptors. These pathways are located by brain PET scans and spinal cord autoradiography. These nonopioid ascending pathways include portions of the ventral spinal thalamic tract originating in Rexed layers VI–VIII, thalamocortical fibers that project to the primary somatosensory cortex (S1, and possibly a midline dorsal column visceral pathway. One hypothesis is that opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia may be caused by homeostatic upregulation during opioid exposure of nonopioid-dependent ascending pain pathways. Upregulation of sensory pathways is not a new concept and has been demonstrated in individuals impaired with deafness or blindness. A second hypothesis is that adjuvant nonopioid therapies may inhibit ascending nonopioid-dependent pathways and support the clinical observations that monotherapy with opioids usually fails. The uniqueness of opioid tolerance compared to tolerance associated with other central nervous system medications and lack of tolerance from excess hormone production is discussed. Experimental work that could prove or disprove the concepts as well as flaws in the concepts is discussed.

  9. Designing Opioids That Deter Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B. Raffa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prescription opioid formulations designed to resist or deter abuse are an important step in reducing opioid abuse. In creating these new formulations, the paradigm of drug development target should be introduced. Biological targets relating to the nature of addiction may pose insurmountable hurdles based on our current knowledge and technology, but products that use behavioral targets seem logical and feasible. The population of opioid abusers is large and diverse so behavioral targets are more challenging than they appear at first glance. Furthermore, we need to find ways to correlate behavioral observations of drug liking to actual use and abuse patterns. This may involve revisiting some pharmacodynamic concepts in light of drug effect rather than peak concentration. In this paper we present several new opioid analgesic agents designed to resist or deter abuse using physical barriers, the inclusion of an opioid agonist or antagonist, an aversive agent, and a prodrug formulation. Further, this paper also provides insight into the challenges facing drug discovery in this field. Designing and screening for opioids intended to resist or deter abuse is an important step to meet the public health challenge of burgeoning prescription opioid abuse.

  10. Analgesic combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Robert B.; Pergolizzi, Joseph V.; Tallarida, Ronald J.

    2010-01-01

    When the pathophysiology of a medical condition is multi-modal, i.e., related to multiple physiological causes or mediated by multiple pathways, the optimal strategy can be to use a drug or a combination of drugs that contribute multiple mechanisms to the therapeutic endpoint. In such situations, a rational multi-modal approach can also result in the fewest adverse effects. We discuss the quantitative analysis of multi-modal action using the treatment of pain as a practical example and give examples of its application to some widely used analgesic drugs. PMID:20338825

  11. To Make Opioid Painkiller without Tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Opioid analgesics such as morphine are the most powerful and widely-used drugs to relieve pain in clinical treatment. They largely work through the μ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system, alleviating the perception of pain. But repeated application of the drugs within a certain period of time could lead to side-effects, like addiction and tolerance. In order to develop new effective painkillers with less side-effects, researchers strive to have a deeper understanding of the mechanism responsible for the analgesic efficacy of the drugs and the formation of their adverse effects.

  12. Synergy between mu opioid ligands: evidence for functional interactions among mu opioid receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolan, Elizabeth A; Tallarida, Ronald J; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2002-11-01

    Pharmacological differences among mu opioid drugs have been observed in in vitro and in vivo preclinical models, as well as clinically, implying that all mu opioids may not be working through the same mechanism of action. Here we demonstrate analgesic synergy between L-methadone and several mu opioid ligands. Of the compounds examined, L-methadone selectively synergizes with morphine, morphine-6beta-glucuronide, codeine, and the active metabolite of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine. Morphine synergizes only with L-methadone. In analgesic assays, D-methadone was inactive alone and did not enhance morphine analgesia when the two were given together, confirming that L-methadone was not acting through N-methyl-D-aspartate mechanisms. Both L-methadone and morphine displayed only additive effects when paired with oxymorphone, oxycodone, fentanyl, alfentanyl, or meperidine. Although it displays synergy in analgesic assays, the L-methadone/morphine combination does not exhibit synergy in the gastrointestinal transit assay. This analgesic synergy of L-methadone with selective mu opioid drugs and the differences in opioid-mediated actions suggest that these drugs may be acting via different mechanisms. These findings provide further evidence for the complexity of the pharmacology of mu opioids.

  13. Chronic pre-operative opioid use and acute pain after fast-track total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, E K; Lunn, T H; Hansen, T B;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-operative opioid use has been suggested to increase post-operative pain and opioid consumption after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), but previous studies are either retrospective or inhomogeneous with regard to surgical procedures or control of analgesic regimes, or with few opioid...

  14. Endogene opioider og deres terapeutiske anvendelse i smertebehandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Pedersen, A T

    1990-01-01

    Cancer patients with chronic pain and obstetric patients have participated in clinical trials of the analgesic effects of endogenous opioids. It is possible to achieve adequate relief of pain in these patients following epidural or intrathecal administration of endogenous opioids. Further investi...

  15. Analgesic stairway in the treatment of oncological pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah María Regueira Betancourt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pain represents the main symptom in an important group of patients who are in active treatment for cancer and in sick people in a very advanced stage. The objective of this article is to review the basic pharmacology of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, weak opioids, bigger opioids, as well as the different special pharmacological and non- pharmacological techniques that constitute the analgesic stairway in the management of patients who are suffering from oncological pain.

  16. Trait Anger Expressiveness and Pain-Induced Beta-Endorphin Release: Support for the Opioid Dysfunction Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y.; Burns, John W.; Diedrich, Laura

    2007-01-01

    The anger management styles of anger-in (inhibition) and anger-out (direct expression) are positively associated with pain responsiveness. Opioid blockade studies suggest that hyperalgesic effects of trait anger-out, but not those of trait anger-in, are mediated in part by opioid analgesic system dysfunction. The current study tested the opioid dysfunction hypothesis of anger-out using an alternative index of opioid function: pain-induced changes in plasma endogenous opioids. Plasma beta-endo...

  17. Postoperative urinary retention: evaluation of patients using opioids analgesic Retención urinaria post-operatoria: evaluación de pacientes en tratamiento analgésico con opioides Retenção urinária pós-operatória: avaliação de pacientes em uso de analgesia com opióides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Barretto de Carvalho Fernandes

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine the occurrence of urinary retention in patients using opioid analgesic and to describe the method used for vesical relief. A prospective and consecutive series of 1,316 patients undergoing surgery from September 1999 to April 2003 and using opioids post surgery were studied. From the 1,136 patients, 594 did not use urinary catheters pre-surgery. From these 594 patients, 128 (22% suffered post operative urinary retention. Urinary retention was significantly related to the use of continuous epidural analgesia (p=0.009. About 69% of patients experiencing urinary retention post surgery returned to spontaneous micturition following a single catheterization. The incidence found of urinary retention was similar to the literature, more frequent in men who received continuous epidural analgesia. The findings suggest orientation and careful nursing team observation of post operative micturition, emphasizing the intermittent aseptically catheterization for urinary retention in order to prevent potential complications of the urinary tract.Los objetivos de este estudio fueron determinar la incidencia de retención urinaria post-operatoria en pacientes que se encontraban en uso de analgésicos opioides, así como describir el método utilizado en el vaciado vesical. Se trata de una serie prospectiva y consecutiva de 1.316 pacientes quirúrgicos, estudiados de septiembre de 1999 a abril de 2003. De ellos, 594 pacientes no usaron cateterismo de demora en el pre-operatorio. Así mismo, 128 pacientes de este grupo presentó retención urinaria, con una incidencia del 22% (128/594. Hubo una asociación estadísticamente significativa entre la ocurrencia de retención urinaria y el uso de analgesia epidural continua (p=0,009. El 69% de los pacientes presentó una micción espontánea luego de haber realizado apenas un cateterismo. La incidencia de retención urinaria encontrada es semejante a la descrita en la literatura, siendo m

  18. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery

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    Brendan Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD. Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI, Fear of Pain (FPQ, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0–10, anticipated analgesic threshold (0–10, and perceived analgesic needs (0–10. Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r=0.349, anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r=-0.349, and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r=0.313. Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R2=0.443, p<0.0001; expected postoperative pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R2=0.421, p<0.0001. Conclusion. Preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements.

  19. A Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Ability of Anticipated Pain, Perceived Analgesic Needs, and Psychological Traits to Predict Pain and Analgesic Usage following Cesarean Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Brendan; Zheng, Ming; Harter, Scott; Sultan, Pervez

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to determine if preoperative psychological tests combined with simple pain prediction ratings could predict pain intensity and analgesic usage following cesarean delivery (CD). Methods. 50 healthy women undergoing scheduled CD with spinal anesthesia comprised the prospective study cohort. Preoperative predictors included 4 validated psychological questionnaires (Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), Fear of Pain (FPQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire) and 3 simple ratings: expected postoperative pain (0-10), anticipated analgesic threshold (0-10), and perceived analgesic needs (0-10). Postoperative outcome measures included post-CD pain (combined rest and movement) and opioid used for the 48-hour study period. Results. Bivariate correlations were significant with expected pain and opioid usage (r = 0.349), anticipated analgesic threshold and post-CD pain (r = -0.349), and perceived analgesic needs and post-CD pain (r = 0.313). Multiple linear regression analysis found that expected postoperative pain and anticipated analgesic needs contributed to post-CD pain prediction modeling (R (2) = 0.443, p pain, ASI, and FPQ were associated with opioid usage (R (2) = 0.421, p pain prediction ratings accounted for 44% and 42% of pain and analgesic use variance, respectively. Preoperatively determined expected postoperative pain and perceived analgesic needs appear to be useful predictors for post-CD pain and analgesic requirements.

  20. Endomorphins and related opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshio; Tsuda, Yuko; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2002-01-01

    Opioid peptides and their G-protein-coupled receptors (delta, kappa, mu) are located in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. The opioid system has been studied to determine the intrinsic mechanism of modulation of pain and to develop uniquely effective pain-control substances with minimal abuse potential and side effects. Two types of endogenous opioid peptides exist, one containing Try-Gly-Gly-Phe as the message domain (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins) and the other containing the Tyr-Pro-Phe/Trp sequence (endomorphins-1 and -2). Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2), which has high mu receptor affinity (Ki = 0.36 nM) and remarkable selectivity (4000- and 15,000-fold preference over the delta and kappa receptors, respectively), was isolated from bovine and human brain. In addition, endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2), isolated from the same sources, exhibited high mu receptor affinity (Ki = 0.69 nM) and very high selectivity (13,000- and 7500-fold preference relative to delta and kappa receptors, respectively). Both opioids bind to mu-opioid receptors, thereby activating G-proteins, resulting in regulation of gastrointestinal motility, manifestation of antinociception, and effects on the vascular systems and memory. To develop novel analgesics with less addictive properties, evaluation of the structure-activity relationships of the endomorphins led to the design of more potent and stable analgesics. Opioidmimetics and opioid peptides containing the amino acid sequence of the message domain of endomorphins, Tyr-Pro-Phe/Trp, could exhibit unique binding activity and lead to the development of new therapeutic drugs for controlling pain.

  1. Opioids for cancer pain: the challenge of optimizing treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Gérard E; VanItallie, Theodore B

    2010-10-01

    During 2007, 11.7 million US men and women of all ages suffered from some form of invasive cancer. During their illness, at least 70% (8.2 million) will experience pain sufficiently severe to require chronic opioid treatment. Cancer-induced pain is usually described under 3 headings: acute pain, chronic pain, and breakthrough pain. Among patients with chronic, persistent cancer pain controlled by around-the-clock analgesics, there is a high prevalence of breakthrough pain-often precipitated by some form of physical activity. Breakthrough pain seems best treated by a powerful, fast-acting opioid such as intravenous morphine or transmucosal fentanyl. At present, opioids are virtually the only analgesics capable of controlling moderate and severe cancer pain. In recent years, a veritable arsenal of opioids with a wide range of pharmacologic properties has become available for use in different pain situations. The World Health Organization has developed a 3-step "analgesic ladder" to guide management of cancer pain, based on the pain's severity, estimated by means of a 1 to 10 numeric rating scale. As the severity of the pain escalates, more potent (World Health Organization Step III) opioids are used. When faced with a difficult case of cancer pain, the physician must choose-from an array of options-the safest and most effective opioid analgesic and the most appropriate delivery system. Such decisions require an adequate understanding of the available opioids and experience with their use. The pharmacodynamic response to a given opioid depends on the nature of the receptor to which the opioid binds and its affinity for the receptor. Morphine activates the μ-opioid receptors, resulting in not only analgesia and sedation, but also euphoria, respiratory depression, constipation, and pruritus. The existence of a number of opioid receptor subtypes, each with its own repertoire of responses, has given rise to the hope (as yet unrealized) that an opioid can be found (or

  2. Repeated Time-to-event Analysis of Consecutive Analgesic Events in Postoperative Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Rasmussen, Sten; Kreilgaard, Mads;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reduction in consumption of opioid rescue medication is often used as an endpoint when investigating analgesic efficacy of drugs by adjunct treatment, but appropriate methods are needed to analyze analgesic consumption in time. Repeated time-to-event (RTTE) modeling is proposed as a w...

  3. Immunomodulatory effects of endogenous and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska, Dorota K; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The main role of endogenous opioid peptides is the modulation of pain. Opioid peptides exert their analgesic activity by binding to the opioid receptors distributed widely in the central nervous system (CNS). However, opioid receptors are also found on tissues and organs outside the CNS, including the cells of the immune system, indicating that opioids are capable of exerting additional effects in periphery. Morphine, which is a gold standard in the treatment of chronic pain, is well-known for its immunosuppressive effects. Much less is known about the immunomodulatory effects exerted by endogenous (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins and endomorphins) and synthetic peptides activating opioid receptors. In this review we tried to summarize opioid peptide-mediated modulation of immune cell functions which can be stimulatory as well as inhibitory.

  4. Pharmacogenomic considerations in opioid analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuilleumier PH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Pascal H Vuilleumier,1 Ulrike M Stamer,1 Ruth Landau21Klinik für Anästhesiologie und Schmerztherapie, Inselspital Universität Bern, Switzerland; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Translating pharmacogenetics to clinical practice has been particularly challenging in the context of pain, due to the complexity of this multifaceted phenotype and the overall subjective nature of pain perception and response to analgesia. Overall, numerous genes involved with the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of opioids response are candidate genes in the context of opioid analgesia. The clinical relevance of CYP2D6 genotyping to predict analgesic outcomes is still relatively unknown; the two extremes in CYP2D6 genotype (ultrarapid and poor metabolism seem to predict pain response and/or adverse effects. Overall, the level of evidence linking genetic variability (CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 to oxycodone response and phenotype (altered biotransformation of oxycodone into oxymorphone and overall clearance of oxycodone and oxymorphone is strong; however, there has been no randomized clinical trial on the benefits of genetic testing prior to oxycodone therapy. On the other hand, predicting the analgesic response to morphine based on pharmacogenetic testing is more complex; though there was hope that simple genetic testing would allow tailoring morphine doses to provide optimal analgesia, this is unlikely to occur. A variety of polymorphisms clearly influence pain perception and behavior in response to pain. However, the response to analgesics also differs depending on the pain modality and the potential for repeated noxious stimuli, the opioid prescribed, and even its route of administration.Keywords: pain perception, opioid analgesia, genetic variation, pharmacogenetics

  5. Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia: A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carullo, Veronica; Fitz-James, Ingrid; Delphin, Ellise

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are utilized frequently for the treatment of moderate to severe acute pain in the perioperative setting, as well as in the treatment of cancer-related pain. When prescribing chronic opioid therapy to patients with chronic pain, it is crucial for the practitioner to be aware not only of the issues of tolerance and withdrawal, but also to have knowledge of the possibility for opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). An understanding of the differences between tolerance and OIH when escalating opioid therapy allows the titration of opioid as well as nonopioid analgesics in order to obtain maximum control of both chronic and acute pain. A case study is described to highlight the importance of judicious utilization of opioids in the treatment of cancer-related pain. In this case, high-dose opioid therapy did not improve chronic pain and contributed to a hyperalgesic state in which a young man experienced severe intractable pain postoperatively after two routine thoracotomies, despite aggressive pharmacologic measures to manage his perioperative pain. Furthermore, it illustrates the potential advantages of opioid rotation to methadone when OIH is suspected.

  6. Targeting Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia in Clinical Treatment: Neurobiological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arout, Caroline A; Edens, Ellen; Petrakis, Ismene L; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2015-06-01

    Opioid analgesics have become a cornerstone in the treatment of moderate to severe pain, resulting in a steady rise of opioid prescriptions. Subsequently, there has been a striking increase in the number of opioid-dependent individuals, opioid-related overdoses, and fatalities. Clinical use of opioids is further complicated by an increasingly deleterious profile of side effects beyond addiction, including tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), where OIH is defined as an increased sensitivity to already painful stimuli. This paradoxical state of increased nociception results from acute and long-term exposure to opioids, and appears to develop in a substantial subset of patients using opioids. Recently, there has been considerable interest in developing an efficacious treatment regimen for acute and chronic pain. However, there are currently no well-established treatments for OIH. Several substrates have emerged as potential modulators of OIH, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate and γ-aminobutyric acid receptors, and most notably, the innate neuroimmune system. This review summarizes the neurobiology of OIH in the context of clinical treatment; specifically, we review evidence for several pathways that show promise for the treatment of pain going forward, as prospective adjuvants to opioid analgesics. Overall, we suggest that this paradoxical state be considered an additional target of clinical treatment for chronic pain.

  7. Prescription Pain Medications (Opioids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain? Opioids attach to specific proteins, called opioid receptors, on nerve cells in the brain, spinal cord, ... essential functions like breathing when they attach to opioid receptors in a brain area that controls respiration. Opioid ...

  8. Is there a role for opioids in the treatment of fibromyalgia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, Geoffrey O; Guymer, Emma K; Ngian, Gene-Siew

    2016-05-01

    The use of opioids for chronic pain has increased significantly due to a combination of the high patient burden of pain and the more widespread availability of a range of long-acting opioid preparations. This increased opioid use has translated into the care of many patients with fibromyalgia. The pain mechanism in fibromyalgia is complex but does not seem to involve disturbance of opioid analgesic functions. Hence, there is general concern about the harms in the absence of benefits of opioids in this setting. There is no evidence that pure opioids are effective in fibromyalgia but there is some evidence that opioids with additional actions on the norepinephrine-related pain modulatory pathways, such as tramadol, can be clinically useful in some patients. Novel actions of low-dose opioid antagonists may lead to better understanding of the role of opioid function in fibromyalgia.

  9. The unsolved case of “bone-impairing analgesics”: the endocrine effects of opioids on bone metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Raffa, Robert B; Mattia, Consalvo

    2015-01-01

    The current literature describes the possible risks for bone fracture in chronic analgesics users. There are three main hypotheses that could explain the increased risk of fracture associated with central analgesics, such as opioids: 1) the increased risk of falls caused by central nervous system effects, including sedation and dizziness; 2) reduced bone mass density caused by the direct opioid effect on osteoblasts; and 3) chronic opioid-induced hypogonadism. The impact of opioids varies by sex and among the type of opioid used (less, for example, for tapentadol and buprenorphine). Opioid-associated androgen deficiency is correlated with an increased risk of osteoporosis; thus, despite that standards have not been established for monitoring and treating opioid-induced hypogonadism or hypoadrenalism, all patients chronically taking opioids (particularly at doses ≥100 mg morphine daily) should be monitored for the early detection of hormonal impairment and low bone mass density. PMID:25848298

  10. Spinal opioids in adult patients with cancer pain: a systematic review: a European Palliative Care Research Collaborative (EPCRC) opioid guidelines project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Kaasa, Stein; Sjøgren, Per

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review, undertaken according to an initiative to revise European Association for Palliative Care guidelines on the use of opioids for cancer pain, which aimed to analyse analgesic efficacy and side effects of spinal opioids in adult cancer patients previously treated with systemic...

  11. Preoperative low-dose ketamine has no preemptive analgesic effect in opioid-naïve patients undergoing colon surgery when nitrous oxide is used - a randomized study [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4bp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Nistal-Nuño

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The analgesic properties of ketamine are associated with its non-competitive antagonism of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor; these receptors exhibit an excitatory function on pain transmission and this binding seems to inhibit or reverse the central sensitization of pain. In the literature, the value of this anesthetic for preemptive analgesia in the control of postoperative pain is uncertain. The objective of this study was to ascertain whether preoperative low-dose ketamine reduces postoperative pain and morphine consumption in adults undergoing colon surgery. Methods: In a double-blind, randomized trial, 48 patients were studied. Patients in the ketamine group received 0.5 mg/kg intravenous ketamine before surgical incision, while the control group received normal saline. The postoperative analgesia was achieved with a continuous infusion of morphine at 0.015 mg∙kgˉ¹∙hˉ¹ with the possibility of 0.02 mg/kg bolus every 10 min. Pain was assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS, morphine consumption, and hemodynamic parameters at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 hours postoperatively. We quantified times to rescue analgesic (Paracetamol, adverse effects and patient satisfaction. Results: No significant differences were observed in VAS scores between groups (P>0.05, except at 4 hours postoperatively (P=0.040. There were no differences in cumulative consumption of morphine at any time point (P>0.05. We found no significant differences in incremental postoperative doses of morphine consumption in bolus, except at 12 h (P =0.013 and 24 h (P =0.002. The time to first required rescue analgesia was 70 ± 15.491 min in the ketamine group and 44 ± 19.494 min in the control (P>0.05. There were no differences in hemodynamic parameters or patient satisfaction (P>0.05. Conclusions: Preoperative low-dose-ketamine did not show a preemptive analgesic effect or efficacy as an adjuvant for decreasing opioid requirements for postoperative pain

  12. Combining opioid and adrenergic mechanisms for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard S; Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Tallarida, Ronald J

    2014-07-01

    Chronic pain is a highly prevalent medical problem in the United States. Although opioids and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) have demonstrated efficacy for relief of chronic pain, each has risks of adverse events in patients. Because of the risk of opioid abuse and addiction, combinations reducing opioid requirements are particularly valuable. Opioid and SNRI agents relieve pain by different pathways; concurrent use of each agent separately offers many potential benefits: complementary and possibly synergistic analgesic efficacy, separate titrations of opioid and SNRI effects, and the reduction of opioid requirements. However, few clinical studies have investigated the ideal ratios for combinations of opioids and SNRIs. A number of factors affect whether specific combinations have additive, synergistic, less than additive efficacy, or increase adverse events in patients, including general pharmacokinetic considerations, the potential for pharmacodynamic drug interactions, dose, and timing. Because there is little clinical evidence guiding combination therapy with separate opioid and SNRI agents, using single-molecule agents provides safe and effective therapy and should be the first option presented to patients. The use of empiric combinations of separate opioid and SNRI combinations needs to be considered in light of clinical cautions, including the lack of published evidence to guide dose conversion from any opioid to tramadol or to tapentadol, and vice versa; the need to avoid combinations with known drug interactions; and the need to titrate the dose when adding an SNRI to an opioid, and vice versa.

  13. Suspected opioid-induced hyperalgesia in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, B R; Chalkiadis, G A

    2012-01-01

    One explanation for diminished opioid analgesic efficacy is opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). We report a case of OIH in an infant with gastroschisis, requiring multiple surgical interventions and prolonged sedation for ventilation. This is the first report of OIH in an infant. On day 41 of life after nine separate surgical interventions, the patient's pain scores increased and remained elevated, despite increasing opioid administration. The patient also developed hyperalgesia, allodynia, and photophobia and became extremely irritable upon handling. Other possible causes were excluded, including interruption to opioid delivery, sepsis, acid-base and electrolyte disturbance, and ongoing surgical pathology. An opioid rotation to hydromorphone was initiated and ketamine was commenced. Sedation for ventilation was achieved with dexmedetomidine and midazolam infusions. Over a period of 24 h after opioid de-escalation, pain scores reduced rapidly and the patient became significantly less irritable with handling. All infusions were gradually weaned and eventually ceased.

  14. Eight principles for safer opioid prescribing and cautions with benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Lynn R; Reisfield, Gary M; Dasgupta, Nabarun

    2015-01-01

    The provision of long-term opioid analgesic therapy for chronic pain requires a careful risk/benefit analysis followed by clinical safety measures to identify and reduce misuse, abuse, and addiction and their associated morbidity and mortality. Multiple data sources show that benzodiazepines, prescribed for comorbid insomnia, anxiety, and mood disorders, heighten the risk of respiratory depression and other adverse outcomes when combined with opioid therapy. Evidence is presented for hazards associated with coadministration of opioids and benzodiazepines and the need for caution when initiating opioid therapy for chronic pain. Clinical recommendations follow, as drawn from 2 previously published literature reviews, one of which proffers 8 principles for safer opioid prescribing; the other review presents risks associated with benzodiazepines, suggests alternatives for co-prescribing benzodiazepines and opioids, and outlines recommendations regarding co-prescribing if alternative therapies are ineffective.

  15. Secular trends in opioid prescribing in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezalla EJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Edmund J Pezalla,1 David Rosen,2 Jennifer G Erensen,2 J David Haddox,2,3 Tracy J Mayne2 1Bioconsult, LLC, Wethersfield, 2Purdue Pharma L.P., Stamford, CT, 3Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Opioid abuse and misuse in the USA is a public health crisis. The use of prescription opioid analgesics increased substantially from 2002 through 2010, then plateaued and began to decrease in 2011. This study examined prescriptions of branded and generic immediate- and extended-release opioid analgesics from 1992 to 2016. This was juxtaposed against state and federal policies designed to decrease overutilization and abuse, as well as the launch of new opioid products, including opioids with abuse-deterrent properties (OADPs. The data indicate that these health policies, including the utilization and reimbursement of OADPs, have coincided with decreased opioid utilization. The hypothesis that OADPs will paradoxically increase opioid prescribing is not supported. Keywords: OADP, prescription, utilization trends, legislation, opioids

  16. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane eAllouche

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Opioid receptors are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization and post-endocytic fate of the receptor.

  17. The pharmacology of topical analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Robert L

    2013-07-01

    Pain management of patients continues to pose challenges to clinicians. Given the multiple dimensions of pain--whether acute or chronic, mild, moderate, or severe, nociceptive or neuropathic--a multimodal approach may be needed. Fortunately, clinicians have an array of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment choices; however, each modality must be chosen carefully, because some often used oral agents are associated with safety and tolerability issues that restrict their use in certain patients. In particular, orally administered nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, opioids, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants are known to cause systemic adverse effects in some patients. To address this problem, a number of topical therapies in various therapeutic classes have been developed to reduce systemic exposure and minimize the risks of patients developing adverse events. For example, topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug formulations produce a site-specific effect (ie, cyclo-oxygenase inhibition) while decreasing the systemic exposure that may lead to undesired effects in patients. Similarly, derivatives of acetylsalicylic acid (ie, salicylates) are used in topical analgesic formulations that do not significantly enter the patient's systemic circulation. Salicylates, along with capsaicin, menthol, and camphor, compose the counterirritant class of topical analgesics, which produce analgesia by activating and then desensitizing epidermal nociceptors. Additionally, patches and creams that contain the local anesthetic lidocaine, alone or co-formulated with other local anesthetics, are also used to manage patients with select acute and chronic pain states. Perhaps the most common topical analgesic modality is the cautious application of cutaneous cold and heat. Such treatments may decrease pain not by reaching the target tissue through systemic distribution, but by acting more directly on the affected tissue. Despite the tolerability benefits associated with avoiding

  18. [Opioid receptors of the CNS: function, structure and distribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamberová, R

    2004-01-01

    Even though the alkaloids of opium, such as morphine and codeine, were isolated at the beginning of 19th century, the opioid receptors were not determined until 1970's. The discovery of endogenous opioid peptides, such as endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins, has helped to differentiate between the specific opioid receptor subtypes, mu, delta and kappa, that are used up to now. Opioid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system unevenly. Each receptor subtype has its own specific and nonspecific agonists and antagonists. Opioides, as exogenous opioid receptor agonists, are drugs that are often used in medicine for their analgesic effects, but they are also some of the most heavily abused drugs in the world. Opioides may also induce long-term changes in the numbers and binding activities of opioid receptors. Some of our studies in fact demonstrate that prenatal morphine exposure can alter opioid receptors of adult rats. This may begin to provide insight into the sources of some of the morphological and behavioral changes in the progeny of mothers that received or abused opioides during pregnancy.

  19. [The clinical relevance of opioid-induced hyperalgesia remains unresolved].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jakob; Sjøgren, Per

    2011-03-28

    Opioids are widely used as analgesics in chronic pain of malignant as well as non-malignant origin. During opioid treatment, pain is occasionally worsened. This could be due to progression of the disease or tolerance or opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The present article summarizes the preclinical and clinical data in support of the existence of OIH. Further, possible mechanisms and potential treatments are outlined. We conclude that only a few clinical studies on OIH are available. However, a growing body of experimental data supports the presence of OIH in clinical settings. Diagnostic tools for assessment of OIH have yet to be developed.

  20. Post-operative analgesic effects of paracetamol, NSAIDs, glucocorticoids, gabapentinoids and their combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, J B; Nielsen, R V; Wetterslev, J

    2014-01-01

    , and no well-documented 'gold standards' exist. The aim of the present topical, narrative review is to provide an update of the evidence for post-operative analgesic efficacy with the most commonly used, systemic non-opioid drugs, paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)/COX-2 antagonists......, glucocorticoids, gabapentinoids, and combinations of these. The review is based on data from previous systematic reviews with meta-analyses, investigating effects of non-opioid analgesics on pain, opioid-requirements, and opioid-related adverse effects. Paracetamol, NSAIDs, COX-2 antagonists, and gabapentin....... Trials of pregabalin > 300 mg/day indicated a morphine-sparing effect of 13.4 (4, 22.8) mg morphine/24 h. Notably, though, the available evidence for additive or synergistic effects of most combination regimens was sparse or lacking. Paracetamol, NSAIDs, selective COX-2 antagonists, and gabapentin all...

  1. Association Between Human Pain-Related Genotypes and Variability in Opioid Analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lecia M; Olesen, Anne E; Branford, Ruth;

    2015-01-01

    /or pharmacodynamics (eg opioid receptor and catechol-O-methyltransferase enzymes). We present recent experimentally induced pain, postoperative pain, and cancer pain and chronic non-malignant pain conditions studies in humans, focusing on the association between genetic variation and analgesic response assessed......On an individual level, there is a difference in the analgesic response to a given opioid. Various factors such as gender, age, and genetic variation can affect the analgesic response. The genetic variation can influence pharmacokinetics (eg drug transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes) and...... as opioid consumption or changes in pain scores. Studies have shown promising results regarding pharmacogenetics as a diagnostic tool for predicting the individual response to a given opioid in the experimental settings; however, in the clinic, it is a more complicated task to accomplish....

  2. Peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists as treatment options for constipation in noncancer pain patients on chronic opioid therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Raffa, Robert B; Pappagallo, Marco; Fleischer, Charles; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Zampogna, Gianpietro; Duval, Elizabeth; Hishmeh, Janan; LeQuang, Jo Ann; Taylor, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC), a prevalent and distressing side effect of opioid therapy, does not reliably respond to treatment with conventional laxatives. OIC can be a treatment-limiting adverse event. Recent advances in medications with peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists, such as methylnaltrexone, naloxegol, and alvimopan, hold promise for treating OIC and thus extending the benefits of opioid analgesia to more chronic pain patients. Peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists have been clinically tested to improve bowel symptoms without compromise to pain relief, although there are associated side effects, including abdominal pain. Other treatment options include fixed-dose combination products of oxycodone analgesic together with naloxone. PMID:28176913

  3. Unexpected opioid activity in a known class of drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römer, D; Büscher, H H; Hill, R C; Maurer, R; Petcher, T J; Zeugner, H; Benson, W; Finner, E; Milkowski, W; Thies, P W

    Tifluadom, although structurally a 1,4 benzodiazepine, has no affinity for the 3H-flunitrazepam binding site, but is a potent displacer of 3H-bremazocine from its opioid binding site. Tifluadom is characterised as an opiate kappa-receptor agonist in vitro and in vivo with potent analgesic activity in animals and no dependence potential.

  4. ORAL OPIOIDS IN THE TREATMENT OF CANCER PAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZYLICZ, Z; TWYCROSS, RG

    1991-01-01

    Persistent severe cancer pain should be treated with opioid drugs, principally morphine. It can be administered orally, rectally and parenterally. Morphine is metabolised in the liver mainly to glucuronides, of which morphine-6-glucuronide is a powerful analgesic. Oral morphine should be administere

  5. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of novel μ-opioid receptor agonist compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaido, Yoshiaki; Kurosawa, Aya; Saikawa, Hitomi; Kuroiwa, Satoshi; Suzuki, Chiharu; Kuwabara, Nobuo; Hoshino, Hazime; Obata, Hideaki; Saito, Shigeru; Saito, Tamio; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Isao; Sezutsu, Hideki; Takeda, Shigeki

    2015-11-15

    Opioids are the most effective and widely used drugs for pain treatment. Morphine is an archetypal opioid and is an opioid receptor agonist. Unfortunately, the clinical usefulness of morphine is limited by adverse effects such as analgesic tolerance and addiction. Therefore, it is important to study the development of novel opioid agonists as part of pain control. The analgesic effects of opioids are mediated by three opioid receptors, namely opioid μ-, δ-, and κ-receptors. They belong to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily and are coupled to Gi proteins. In the present study, we developed a ligand screening system to identify novel opioid μ-receptor agonists that measures [(35)S]GTPγS binding to cell membrane fractions prepared from the fat body of transgenic silkworms expressing μ-receptor-Gi1α fusion protein. We screened the RIKEN Natural Products Depository (NPDepo) chemical library, which contains 5848 compounds, and analogs of hit compounds. We successfully identified a novel, structurally unique compound, that we named GUM1, with agonist activity for the opioid μ-receptor (EC50 of 1.2 µM). The Plantar Test (Hargreaves' Method) demonstrated that subcutaneous injection of 3mg/kg of GUM1 into wild-type rats significantly extended latency time. This extension was also observed in a rat model of morphine tolerance and was inhibited by pre-treatment of naloxone. The unique molecular skeleton of GUM1 makes it an attractive molecule for further ligand-opioid receptor binding studies.

  6. Nonnarcotic analgesics and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaziano, J Michael

    2006-05-01

    In 2004, individuals in the United States spent >$2.5 billion on over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and filled >100 million NSAID prescriptions. The most commonly used OTC analgesics include aspirin, acetaminophen, and nonaspirin NSAIDs. Nonnarcotic analgesics are generally considered safe when used as directed but do have the potential to increase blood pressure in patients with hypertension treated with antihypertensives. This is important because hypertension alone has been correlated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke. Small increases in blood pressure in patients with hypertension also have been shown to increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore, when nonnarcotic analgesics are taken by patients with hypertension, there may be important implications. This review explores the potential connection among analgesic agents, blood pressure, and hypertension, and discusses possible mechanisms by which analgesics might cause increases in blood pressure. This is followed by a summary of data on the relation between analgesics and blood pressure from both observational and randomized trials.

  7. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF OPIOID DRUG ABUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Carballo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the prescription of opioid analgesics is related to increased rates of opioid abuse and the negative consequences of medication misuse. Several international health organisations recommend comprehensive and multidisciplinary patient assessment for the duration of the opioid treatment in order to identify and prevent medication abuse. Due to the lack of specific clinical guidelines in the Spanish National Health System, the aim of this paper is to present a proposal for psychological assessment based on the main psychological tools currently available for assessing opioid abuse. The assessment guidelines have been established based on the psychological variables that can predict and prolong the abuse, classifying all of the variables depending on the current stage of the therapeutic process for each patient. Although there are instruments with good psychometric properties, further research is necessary to adapt, translate and validate these instruments for use in the Spanish population. Future studies are also needed to investigate intervention and prevention strategies in depth in order to reduce the likelihood of abuse in patients treated with opioids.

  8. Clinical observation of analgesic effect of strong opioid drugs for moderate and severe cancer pain in patients with different gastrointestinal function%强阿片类药物对不同胃肠功能状态的晚期中-重度癌痛患者的镇痛效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱士合; 王晓丽; 李平; 孔令娟

    2015-01-01

    为主要维持用药。%Objective To investigate the analgesic effect of strong opioid drugs for moderate and severe cancer pain in patients with different gastrointestinal function. Methods One hundred and two advanced cancer patients with moderate and severe cancer pain were divided into digestive cancer group (n=46) and non-digestive cancer group (n=56), and then according to the different condition of gastrointestinal function, further divided into defecation interval less than 3 days group and more than 3 days group. All patients received analgesic treatment in our department. The proportion of severe pain , pain classification, morphine equivalent daily consumption , pain relief rate and total pain control efficiency were compared between the two groups. Results There was no significant difference in the total pain control efficiency between the digestive and non-digestive cancer groups (93.48% vs. 91.07%, P>0.05). The proportions of the patients with defecation interval more than 3 days (69.57% vs. 37.50%,P0.05). The total pain control efficiency was significantly higher(all P0.05). Conclusions Strong opioids or transdermal fentanyl patch can achieve better control effect for moderate and severe cancer pain. Defecation interval more than 3days is negatively associated with the analgesic effect. The terminal digestive cancer patients with defecation interval over 3 days were suitable for accepting fentanyl patch as main maintenance medication.

  9. Pregabalin for Opioid-Refractory Pain in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

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    Konstantinos A. Kontoangelos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS is a systemic inflammatory disease with chronic back pain as the most common presenting symptom. We present a case of a male patient with AS reporting symptoms of severe low back pain, buttock pain, and limited spinal mobility. After chronic treatment with opioids, we administered pregabalin at a dose of 300 mg as an analgesic agent while opioids were discontinued. Findings. Pain symptoms improved progressively, and opioids were gradually discontinued without any withdrawal symptoms reported. Conclusions. Pregabalin is potentially useful in the management of pain in patients with AS while effectively managing the discontinuation of opioid treatment.

  10. Analgesic effect of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of clove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Kamkar Asl

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The beneficial effects of clove on toothache have been well documented. We have also previously shown the analgesic effects of clove essential oil. The present work was done to investigate the analgesic effects of the aqueous extract of clove using hot plate test. The possible role of opioid receptors in the analgesic effects of clove was also investigated using naloxone. Materials and Methods: Ninety male mice were divided into nine groups: (1 Saline, (2-4 Aaqueous (Aq 50, Aq 100, and Aq 200 groups which were treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg of aqueous extract of clove, respectively, (5-7 Ethanolic (Eth 50, Eth 100, and Eth 200 groups which were treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg of ethanolic extract of clove, respectively, and (8-9 Aq 100- Naloxone and Aq 200- Naloxone which were pretreated with 4 mg/kg of naloxone before injection of 100 or 200 mg/kg of the aqueous extract. The hot plate test was performed as a base record 10 min before injection of drugs and consequently repeated every 10 minutes after the injection. Results: The maximal percent effect (MPE in the animal groups treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg of aqueous extract was significantly higher than the control group. Pretreatment with naloxone reduced the analgesic effects of both 100 and 200 mg/kg of the aqueous extract. Administration of all three doses of the ethanloic extract also non-significantly increased the MPE. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that aqueous extract of clove has analgesic effect in mice demonstrated by hot plate test which is reversible by naloxone. The role of opioid system in the analgesic effect of clove might be suggested. However, more investigations are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism(s.

  11. Overview of genetic analysis of human opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, Santi M

    2015-01-01

    The human μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1), due to its genetic and structural variation, has been a target of interest in several pharmacogenetic studies. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR), encoded by OPRM1, contributes to regulate the analgesic response to pain and also controls the rewarding effects of many drugs of abuse, including opioids, nicotine, and alcohol. Genetic polymorphisms of opioid receptors are candidates for the variability of clinical opioid effects. The non-synonymous polymorphism A118G of the OPRM1 has been repeatedly associated with the efficacy of opioid treatments for pain and various types of dependence. Genetic analysis of human opioid receptors has evidenced the presence of numerous polymorphisms either in exonic or in intronic sequences as well as the presence of synonymous coding variants that may have important effects on transcription, mRNA stability, and splicing, thus affecting gene function despite not directly disrupting any specific residue. Genotyping of opioid receptors is still in its infancy and a relevant progress in this field can be achieved by using advanced gene sequencing techniques described in this review that allow the researchers to obtain vast quantities of data on human genomes and transcriptomes in a brief period of time and with affordable costs.

  12. The impact of opioid-induced hyperalgesia for postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppert, Wolfgang; Schmelz, Martin

    2007-03-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that--besides their well known analgesic activity - opioids can increase rather than decrease sensitivity to noxious stimuli. Based on the observation that opioids can activate pain inhibitory and pain facilitatory systems, this pain hypersensitivity has been attributed to a relative predominance of pronociceptive mechanisms. Acute receptor desensitization via uncoupling of the receptor from G-proteins, upregulation of the cAMP pathway, activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor system, as well as descending facilitation, have been proposed as potential mechanisms underlying opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Numerous reports exist demonstrating that opioid-induced hyperalgesia is observed both in animal and human experimental models. Brief exposures to micro-receptor agonists induce long-lasting hyperalgesic effects for days in rodents, and also in humans large-doses of intraoperative micro-receptor agonists were found to increase postoperative pain and morphine consumption. Furthermore, the prolonged use of opioids in patients is often associated with a requirement for increasing doses and the development of abnormal pain. Successful strategies that may decrease or prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia include the concomitant administration of drugs like NMDA-antagonists, alpha2-agonists, or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioid rotation or combinations of opioids with different receptor/selectivity.

  13. Efficacy of opioid switching in asian 51-year-old-man with a phenomenon of pharmacokinetics tolerance: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Costa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Opioid switching is a therapeutic procedure used in pain management as a method to improve analgesic response and/or reduce adverse side effects. The rationale behind opioid substitution is the incomplete cross-tolerance between opioid. We report the case of an asian 51-year-old man with cancer pain unresponsive to oxycodone. In this case we hypothesize that the lack of response to oxycodone is linked to a phenomenon of pharmacokinetics tolerance.

  14. Analgesic Potential of Opuntia dillenii and Its Compounds Opuntiol and Opuntioside Against Pain Models in Mice

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    Faheema Siddiqui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Opuntia dillenii (Nagphana traditionally used against inflammation and also possess analgesic effect. Thus in the present study analgesic properties of O. dillenii cladode methanol extract, its fractions obtained via vacuum liquid chromatography along with isolated α-pyrones, opuntiol and its glucoside, opuntioside were analyzed. The acetic acid-induced writhes were reduced by O. dillenii test agents with opuntioside being most effective (IC 50 26 ± 0.9 mg/kg and equipotent to diclofenac and β-sitosterol. Consistently, it also elicited most potent effect (IC 50: 28 ± 1.1 and 24 ± 1.2 mg/kg during early and late phases of formalin-induced paw licking, producing effect similar to diclofenac and indomethacin. It was also most effective in hot plate test. Naloxone (opioid antagonist reversed the analgesic effects of extract and fractions but failed to antagonize the opuntiol and opuntioside analgesic effects. In conclusion, edible O. dillenii extract, its fractions, opuntiol and opuntioside reduced peripheral and centrally mediated pain via opioid dependent and independent systems. Among them opuntioside emerged as most effective analgesic possibly due to the presence of glucose moiety at position 7 of its α-pyrone ring. This is the first report of opuntiol and opuntioside analgesic effect which may serve as lead compounds in designing of new analgesics.

  15. Study of analgesic activity of ethanol extract of Phlogacanthus thyrsiflorus on experimental animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurba Mukherjee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the central and peripheral analgesic action of Phlogacanthus thyrsiflorus in experimental animal models. The extract was prepared by percolation method and acute oral toxicity testing was performed as per OECD guidelines. Analgesic activity was assessed by tail flick method (for central action and glacial acetic acid-induced writhing test (for peripheral action. Leaves extract (500 mg/kg, p.o. and aspirin (100 mg/kg showed significant peripheral analgesic activity (p<0.05. Leaves extract (500 mg/kg, p.o. and pethidine (50 mg/kg, i.p. also showed significant central analgesic activity (p<0.05. Naloxone (1 mg/kg, s.c. was used to find the mechanism of central analgesic action. Some partial agonistic activity for the opioid receptors seems to be probable mechanism of action.

  16. Ultrasound-guided quadratus lumborum block as a postoperative analgesic technique for laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Vasanth Rao

    2013-10-01

    The quadratus lumborum (QL) block as a postoperative analgesic method following abdominal surgery has been described by Blanco for superficial surgeries but not used for major laparotomy. This ipsilateral QL block had low pain scores and opioid use on day one with sensory block upto T8-L1. The options of various volume used and pros and cons are discussed.

  17. Ultrasound-guided quadratus lumborum block as a postoperative analgesic technique for laparotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Vasanth Rao Kadam

    2013-01-01

    The quadratus lumborum (QL) block as a postoperative analgesic method following abdominal surgery has been described by Blanco for superficial surgeries but not used for major laparotomy. This ipsilateral QL block had low pain scores and opioid use on day one with sensory block upto T8-L1. The options of various volume used and pros and cons are discussed.

  18. Ultrasound-guided quadratus lumborum block as a postoperative analgesic technique for laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanth Rao Kadam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The quadratus lumborum (QL block as a postoperative analgesic method following abdominal surgery has been described by Blanco for superficial surgeries but not used for major laparotomy. This ipsilateral QL block had low pain scores and opioid use on day one with sensory block upto T8-L1. The options of various volume used and pros and cons are discussed.

  19. The opioid ketobemidone has a NMDA blocking effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S; Dickenson, A H; Kohn, M;

    1996-01-01

    There are clinical observations that neurogenic pain can respond well to the opioid ketobemidone, in contrast to pethidine and morphine. This has led us to the hypothesis that the analgesic effect of ketobemidone in neurogenic pain may be due to both opioid as well as additional non-opioid effects......-fibre strength and their responses quantified. The wind-up of the neurones, due to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation, leading to marked increases in C-fibre responses and an associated post-discharge was also measured. Ketobemidone, applied to the spinal cord, equivalent to an intrathecal injection...... with a Ki value of 26 microM. Therefore, ketobemidone appears to possess both mu opioid agonist as well as NMDA blocking effects....

  20. Postoperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats by Canadian veterinarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohoo, S E; Dohoo, I R

    1996-09-01

    Four hundred and seventeen Canadian veterinarians were surveyed to determine their postoperative use of analgesics in dogs and cats following 6 surgical procedures, and to determine their opinions toward pain perception and perceived complications associated with the postoperative use of potent opioid analgesics. Three hundred and seventeen (76%) returned the questionnaire. The percentage of animals receiving analgesics postoperatively ranged from 84% of dogs and 70% of cats following orthopedic surgery to 10% of dogs and 9% of cats following castration. In general, with the exception of orthopedic surgery, roughly equal percentages of dogs and cats received postoperative analgesics. Opioids were used almost exclusively to provide postoperative analgesia, with butorphanol the most commonly administered drug to both dogs and cats. Analgesics were usually administered either once or twice postoperatively. With regard to the administration of potent opioid agonists, the 3 major concerns included respiratory depression, bradycardia, and sedation in dogs, and excitement, respiratory depression, and bradycardia in cats. Seventy-seven percent of veterinarians considered their knowledge of issues related to the recognition and control of postoperative pain to be inadequate. Experience in practice is currently the major source of knowledge, with undergraduate veterinary school and research articles in journals ranked as the least important sources. Lectures or seminars delivered at the regional level were the preferred format for continuing education.

  1. Dietary methyl content regulates opioid responses in mice

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    Liang DY

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available De-Yong Liang,1,2 Yuan Sun,1,2 J David Clark1,2 1Department of Anesthesiology, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, 2Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Background: Large interindividual differences in clinical responses to opioids and the variable susceptibility to abuse of this class of drugs make their use problematic. We lack a full understanding of the factors responsible for these differences. Dietary factors including methyl donor content have been noted to alter multiple physiological and behavioral characteristics of laboratory animals. The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of dietary methyl donor content on opioid responses in mice. Methods: Groups of male C57BL/6J mice were treated with high and low methyl donor diets either in the perinatal period or after weaning. Analgesic responses to morphine, as well as tolerance, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and physical dependence were assessed. Results: Mice fed high and low methyl donor diets showed equal weight gain over the course of the experiments. Exposure to a high methyl donor diet in the perinatal period enhanced physical dependence. Dietary methyl donor content also altered analgesic responses to low doses of morphine when the dietary treatments were given to the mice after weaning. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia was unaltered by dietary methyl donor content. Conclusion: High and low methyl donor diet treatment has selective effects on opioid responses depending on the timing of exposure. These findings suggest that examination of DNA methylation patterns in specific brain regions linked to opioid analgesia and dependence may provide specific explanations for dietary effects on opioid responses. Keywords: opioid, methylation, tolerance, hyperalgesia, dependence

  2. Opioid rotation: the science and the limitations of the equianalgesic dose table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knotkova, Helena; Fine, Perry G; Portenoy, Russell K

    2009-09-01

    Opioid rotation refers to a switch from one opioid to another in an effort to improve the response to analgesic therapy or reduce adverse effects. It is a common method to address the problem of poor opioid responsiveness despite optimal dose titration. Guidelines for opioid rotation are empirical and begin with the selection of a safe and reasonably effective starting dose for the new opioid, followed by dose adjustment to optimize the balance between analgesia and side effects. The selection of a starting dose must be based on an estimate of the relative potency between the existing opioid and the new one. Potency, which is defined as the dose required to produce a given effect, differs widely among opioids, and among individuals under varying conditions. To effectively rotate from one opioid to another, the new opioid must be started at a dose that will cause neither toxicity nor abstinence, and will be sufficiently efficacious in that pain is no worse than before the change. The estimate of relative potency used in calculating this starting dose has been codified on "equianalgesic dose tables," which historically have been based on the best science available and have been used with little modification for more than 40 years. These tables, and the clinical protocols used to apply them to opioid rotation, may need revision, however, as the science underlying relative potency evolves. Review of these issues informs the use of opioid rotation in the clinical setting and defines key areas for future research.

  3. Prescription opioid use among university students: assessment of post-cue exposure craving.

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    Ashrafioun, Lisham; Carels, Robert A

    2014-03-01

    Despite the increasing number of prescriptions written to adolescents and young adults for opioid analgesics, the rise in non-medical use of such drugs among university students, and the potential role of craving in the misuse of opioids, there have been no published studies assessing craving for prescription opioids in this population. Therefore, the current study was designed to assess the impact of prescription opioid-related cue exposure on craving in university students. Students (n=277) recruited from a large university in the Midwestern United States were randomly assigned to two conditions to test the impact of cue exposure to either prescription opioid-related stimuli or control stimuli. Relative to the control condition, prescription opioid-related cue exposure significantly increased overall craving, desire and intention to use prescription opioids, relief from negative states by using prescription opioids, and perceived control over prescription opioid use. In addition, when assessing correlates of post-cue exposure craving, negative mood and procurement of prescription opioids from non-medical sources were the only measured variables that were significantly associated with overall craving and/or any of the craving measure's subscales. Craving may be important aspect of prescription opioid use among university students. Future research assessing craving as a function of non-medical user subtype is warranted.

  4. The Useage of Opioids and their Adverse Effects in Gastrointestinal Practice: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khansari, MahmoudReza; Sohrabi, MasourReza; Zamani, Farhad

    2013-01-01

    Opium is one of the oldest herbal medicines currently used as an analgesic, sedative and antidiarrheal treatment. The effects of opium are principally mediated by the μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors. Opioid substances consist of all natural and synthetic alkaloids that are derived from opium. Most of their effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion result from suppression of neural activity. Inhibition of gastric emptying, increase in sphincter tone, changes in motor patterns, and blockage of peristalsis result from opioid use. Common adverse effects of opioid administration include sedation, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, dependency and tolerance, and respiratory depression. The most common adverse effect of opioid use is constipation. Although stool softeners are frequently used to decrease opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, however they are not efficacious. Possibly, the use of specific opioid receptor antagonists is a more suitable approach. Opioid antagonists, both central and peripheral, could affect gastrointestinal function and visceromotor sensitivity, which suggests an important role for endogenous opioid peptides in the control of gastrointestinal physiology. Underlying diseases or medications known to influence the central nervous system (CNS) often accelerate the opioid’s adverse effects. However, changing the opioid and/or route of administration could also decrease their adverse effects. Appropriate patient selection, patient education and discussion regarding potential adverse effects may assist physicians in maximizing the effectiveness of opioids, while reducing the number and severity of adverse effects. PMID:24829664

  5. Analgesic effects of calcitonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyritis, G P; Trovas, G

    2002-05-01

    The analgesic activity of salmon calcitonin (subcutaneous or intranasal) has been demonstrated in several prospective clinical trials, in patients suffering different painful skeletal conditions, including recent nontraumatic osteoporotic vertebral fractures. The mechanism of the analgesic effect of calcitonin is not clear. It is possible that specific binding sites for salmon calcitonin exist in the brain. Another explanation is that changes in descending serotonergic modification on the sensory transmission mediated by C afferents contribute to the analgesic effects of calcitonin on pain in osteoporotic patients. From the clinical point of use, the analgesic effect of calcitonin is beneficial throughout the whole period of medical treatment of osteoporotic patients. Salmon calcitonin in a daily dose of 100 IU subcutaneously or 200 IU intranasally reduces dramatically the back pain (p salmon calcitonin effectively controls severe pain in osteoporotic patients with a recent vertebral fracture, allowing them earlier mobility in combination with a reduction of the urinary hydroxyproline excretion, and a limitation of the considerable bone loss that may occur during prolonged bed rest, make this therapeutic scheme attractive.

  6. Is mechanism and symptom-based analgesia an answer to opioid-Induced hyperalgesia?

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    Mayank Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Cancer Pain" and "Pain in cancer patient" are not synonymous. Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia (OIH is a paradoxical state of nociceptive sensitization caused by exposure to opioids. Neuropathic pain is only partially responsive to opioids; injudicious increase in dose of opioids in neuropathic pain may not only result in inadequate pain relief but also OIH. Majority of literature on OIH is in non-cancer pain with systemic use of opioids. We describe the development and successful treatment of OIH in a 55-year-old male patient with Small cell Carcinoma Lung. Opioid tapering, rotation, systemic desensitization helps in combatting OIH. The use of anti-neuropathic adjuvant analgesics helps not only in preventing and treating OIH but also in understanding putative mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain and OIH.

  7. Is mechanism and symptom-based analgesia an answer to opioid-induced hyperalgesia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mayank; Gupta, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    "Cancer Pain" and "Pain in cancer patient" are not synonymous. Opioid-induced Hyperalgesia (OIH) is a paradoxical state of nociceptive sensitization caused by exposure to opioids. Neuropathic pain is only partially responsive to opioids; injudicious increase in dose of opioids in neuropathic pain may not only result in inadequate pain relief but also OIH. Majority of literature on OIH is in non-cancer pain with systemic use of opioids. We describe the development and successful treatment of OIH in a 55-year-old male patient with Small cell Carcinoma Lung. Opioid tapering, rotation, systemic desensitization helps in combatting OIH. The use of anti-neuropathic adjuvant analgesics helps not only in preventing and treating OIH but also in understanding putative mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain and OIH.

  8. Use of opioid analgesics in the treatment of cancer pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caraceni, Augusto; Hanks, Geoffrey; Kaasa, Stein

    2012-01-01

    . The recommendations were developed by a writing committee that combined the evidence derived from the systematic reviews with the panellists' evaluations in a co-authored process, and were endorsed by the EAPC Board of Directors. The guidelines are presented as a list of 16 evidence-based recommendations developed...... according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system....

  9. Methylnaltrexone in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation

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    Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Beverley Greenwood-Van Meerveld1, Kelly M Standifer21Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience, Department of Physiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Oklahoma Center for Neuroscience, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: Constipation is a significant problem related to opioid medications used to manage pain. This review attempts to outline the latest findings related to the therapeutic usefulness of a μ opioid receptor antagonist, methylnaltrexone in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation. The review highlights methylnaltrexone bromide (RelistorTM; Progenics/Wyeth a quaternary derivative of naltrexone, which was recently approved in the United States, Europe and Canada. The Food and Drug Administration in the United States approved a subcutaneous injection for the treatment of opioid bowel dysfunction in patients with advanced illness who are receiving palliative care and when laxative therapy has been insufficient. Methylnaltrexone is a peripherally restricted, μ opioid receptor antagonist that accelerates oral–cecal transit in patients with opioidinduced constipation without reversing the analgesic effects of morphine or inducing symptoms of opioid withdrawal. An analysis of the mechanism of action and the potential benefits of using methylnaltrexone is based on data from published basic research and recent clinical studies.Keywords: methylnaltrexone, constipation, opioid

  10. Interventional Analgesic Management of Lung Cancer Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Uri; Elgueta, Maria Francisca; Perez, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the four most prevalent cancers worldwide. Comprehensive patient care includes not only adherence to clinical guidelines to control and when possible cure the disease but also appropriate symptom control. Pain is one of the most prevalent symptoms in patients diagnosed with lung cancer; it can arise from local invasion of chest structures or metastatic disease invading bones, nerves, or other anatomical structures potentially painful. Pain can also be a consequence of therapeutic approaches like surgery, chemotherapy, or radiotherapy. Conventional medical management of cancer pain includes prescription of opioids and coadjuvants at doses sufficient to control the symptoms without causing severe drug effects. When an adequate pharmacological medical management fails to provide satisfactory analgesia or when it causes limiting side effects, interventional cancer pain techniques may be considered. Interventional pain management is devoted to the use of invasive techniques such as joint injections, nerve blocks and/or neurolysis, neuromodulation, and cement augmentation techniques to provide diagnosis and treatment of pain syndromes resistant to conventional medical management. Advantages of interventional approaches include better analgesic outcomes without experiencing drug-related side effects and potential for opioid reduction thus avoiding central side effects. This review will describe various pain syndromes frequently described in lung cancer patients and those interventional techniques potentially indicated for those cases. PMID:28261561

  11. Resistance to morphine analgesic tolerance in rats with deleted transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1-expressing sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S-R; Prunean, A; Pan, H-M; Welker, K L; Pan, H-L

    2007-03-16

    Deletion of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1)-expressing afferent neurons reduces presynaptic mu opioid receptors but paradoxically potentiates the analgesic efficacy of mu opioid agonists. In this study, we determined if removal of TRPV1-expressing afferent neurons by resiniferatoxin (RTX), an ultrapotent capsaicin analog, influences the development of opioid analgesic tolerance. Morphine tolerance was induced by daily intrathecal injections of 10 microg of morphine for 14 consecutive days or by daily i.p. injections of 10 mg/kg of morphine for 10 days. In vehicle-treated rats, the effect of intrathecal or systemic morphine on the mechanical withdrawal threshold was gradually diminished within 7 days. However, the analgesic effect of intrathecal and systemic morphine was sustained in RTX-treated rats at the time the morphine effect was lost in the vehicle group. Furthermore, the mu opioid receptor-G protein coupling in the spinal cord was significantly decreased ( approximately 22%) in vehicle-treated morphine tolerant rats, but was not significantly altered in RTX-treated rats receiving the same treatment with morphine. Additionally, there was a large reduction in protein kinase Cgamma-immunoreactive afferent terminals in the spinal dorsal horn of RTX-treated rats. These findings suggest that loss of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons attenuates the development of morphine analgesic tolerance possibly by reducing mu opioid receptor desensitization through protein kinase Cgamma in the spinal cord. These data also suggest that the function of presynaptic mu opioid receptors on TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons is particularly sensitive to down-regulation by mu opioid agonists during opioid tolerance development.

  12. Complications of long-term opioid therapy for management of chronic pain: the paradox of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brush, D Eric

    2012-12-01

    While opioids remain a valid and effective analgesic strategy for patients suffering from a wide variety of painful conditions, they are not a panacea. Increasingly, physicians must balance patient expectations of adequate pain control with known limitations of opioid pharmaceuticals including adverse effects, tolerance, addiction, withdrawal, and drug diversion. Further complicating the issue over the last decade is a growing body of evidence suggesting chronic opioid use may unexpectedly worsen the perception of pain in some individuals. This syndrome, termed opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), fundamentally changes our understanding of opioid pharmacodynamics and may influence our approach to management of chronic pain. This manuscript describes the concept OIH and provides an overview of basic science and clinical research to date attempting to characterize this syndrome, as well as ascertain its clinical relevance. The potential existence of OIH in humans is framed within the context of our current understanding of opioids and our prescribing patterns so that physicians may begin to incorporate these ideas into their philosophy of pain management as further information develops. Animal studies reliably validate OIH in controlled models. Rigorous research protocols in humans are lacking, and we cannot yet confidently conclude that OIH manifests in clinically significant ways. However, clinicians should consider the possibility of OIH when evaluating outcomes of patients on chronic opioid therapy.

  13. A new opioid designed multiple ligand derived from the micro opioid agonist endomorphin-2 and the delta opioid antagonist pharmacophore Dmt-Tic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Fiorini, Stella; Negri, Lucia; Lattanzi, Roberta; Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Balboni, Gianfranco

    2007-11-15

    Opioid compounds with mixed micro agonist/delta antagonist properties could be used as analgesics with low propensity to induce tolerance and dependence. Here we report the synthesis of a new designed multiple ligand deriving from the micro selective agonist endomorphin-2 and the delta selective antagonist pharmacophore Dmt-Tic. As predicted, the resulting bivalent ligand showed a micro agonist/delta antagonist profile deriving from the corresponding activities of each pharmacophore.

  14. PK20, a new opioid-neurotensin hybrid peptide that exhibits central and peripheral antinociceptive effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuda Yuko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical treatment of various types of pain relies upon the use of opioid analgesics. However most of them produce, in addition to the analgesic effect, several side effects such as the development of dependence and addiction as well as sedation, dysphoria, and constipation. One solution to these problems are chimeric compounds in which the opioid pharmacophore is hybridized with another type of compound to incease antinociceptive effects. Neurotensin-induced antinociception is not mediated through the opioid system. Therefore, hybridizing neurotensin with opioid elements may result in a potent synergistic antinociceptor. Results Using the known structure-activity relationships of neurotensin we have synthesized a new chimeric opioid-neurotensin compound PK20 which is characterized by a very strong antinociceptive potency. The observation that the opioid antagonist naltrexone did not completely reverse the antinociceptive effect, indicates the partial involvement of the nonopioid component in PK20 in the produced analgesia. Conclusions The opioid-neurotensin hybrid analogue PK20, in which opioid and neurotensin pharmacophores overlap partially, expresses high antinociceptive tail-flick effects after central as well as peripheral applications.

  15. Continuous multimechanistic postoperative analgesia: a rationale for transitioning from intravenous acetaminophen and opioids to oral formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Raffa, Robert B; Tallarida, Ronald; Taylor, Robert; Labhsetwar, Sumedha A

    2012-02-01

    Good surgical outcomes depend in part on good pain relief, allowing for early mobilization, optimal recovery, and patient satisfaction. Postsurgical pain has multiple mechanisms, and multimechanistic approaches to postoperative analgesia are recommended and may be associated with improved pain relief, lowered opioid doses, and sometimes a lower rate of opioid-associated side effects. Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a familiar agent for treating many types of pain, including postsurgical pain. Oral acetaminophen has been shown to be safe and effective in a variety of acute pain models. Combination products using a fixed-dose of acetaminophen and an opioid have also been effective in treating postsurgical pain. Combination products with acetaminophen have demonstrated an opioid-sparing effect, which inconsistently results in a reduced rate of opioid-associated side effects. Intravenous (IV) acetaminophen and an opioid analgesic administered in the perioperative period may be followed by an oral acetaminophen and opioid combination in the postoperative period. Transitioning from an IV acetaminophen and opioid formulation to a similar but oral formulation of the same drugs appears to be a reasonable step in that both analgesic therapies are known to be safe and effective. For postsurgical analgesia with any acetaminophen product, patient education is necessary to be sure that the patient does not concurrently take any over-the-counter products containing acetaminophen and accidentally exceed dose limits.

  16. Association between KCNJ6 (GIRK2) gene polymorphisms and postoperative analgesic requirements after major abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Daisuke; Nagashima, Makoto; Katoh, Ryoji; Satoh, Yasuo; Tagami, Megumi; Kasai, Shinya; Ogai, Yasukazu; Han, Wenhua; Hasegawa, Junko; Shimoyama, Naohito; Sora, Ichiro; Hayashida, Masakazu; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2009-09-16

    Opioids are commonly used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. However, considerable individual differences have been widely observed in sensitivity to opioid analgesics. We focused on a G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel subunit, GIRK2, that is an important molecule in opioid transmission. In our initial polymorphism search, a total of nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the whole exon, 5'-flanking, and exon-intron boundary regions of the KCNJ6 gene encoding GIRK2. Among them, G-1250A and A1032G were selected as representative SNPs for further association studies. In an association study of 129 subjects who underwent major open abdominal surgery, the A/A genotype in the A1032G SNP and -1250G/1032A haplotype were significantly associated with increased postoperative analgesic requirements compared with other genotypes and haplotypes. The total dose (mean+/-SEM) of rescue analgesics converted to equivalent oral morphine doses was 20.45+/-9.27 mg, 10.84+/-2.24 mg, and 13.07+/-2.39 mg for the A/A, A/G, and G/G genotypes in the A1032G SNP, respectively. Additionally, KCNJ6 gene expression levels in the 1032A/A subjects were significantly decreased compared with the 1032A/G and 1032G/G subjects in a real-time quantitative PCR analysis using human brain tissues, suggesting that the 1032A/A subjects required more analgesics because of lower KCNJ6 gene expression levels and consequently insufficient analgesic effects. The results indicate that the A1032G SNP and G-1250A/A1032G haplotype could serve as markers that predict increased analgesic requirements. Our findings will provide valuable information for achieving satisfactory pain control and open new avenues for personalized pain treatment.

  17. Association between KCNJ6 (GIRK2 gene polymorphisms and postoperative analgesic requirements after major abdominal surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Nishizawa

    Full Text Available Opioids are commonly used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. However, considerable individual differences have been widely observed in sensitivity to opioid analgesics. We focused on a G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK channel subunit, GIRK2, that is an important molecule in opioid transmission. In our initial polymorphism search, a total of nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified in the whole exon, 5'-flanking, and exon-intron boundary regions of the KCNJ6 gene encoding GIRK2. Among them, G-1250A and A1032G were selected as representative SNPs for further association studies. In an association study of 129 subjects who underwent major open abdominal surgery, the A/A genotype in the A1032G SNP and -1250G/1032A haplotype were significantly associated with increased postoperative analgesic requirements compared with other genotypes and haplotypes. The total dose (mean+/-SEM of rescue analgesics converted to equivalent oral morphine doses was 20.45+/-9.27 mg, 10.84+/-2.24 mg, and 13.07+/-2.39 mg for the A/A, A/G, and G/G genotypes in the A1032G SNP, respectively. Additionally, KCNJ6 gene expression levels in the 1032A/A subjects were significantly decreased compared with the 1032A/G and 1032G/G subjects in a real-time quantitative PCR analysis using human brain tissues, suggesting that the 1032A/A subjects required more analgesics because of lower KCNJ6 gene expression levels and consequently insufficient analgesic effects. The results indicate that the A1032G SNP and G-1250A/A1032G haplotype could serve as markers that predict increased analgesic requirements. Our findings will provide valuable information for achieving satisfactory pain control and open new avenues for personalized pain treatment.

  18. Dexmedetomidine infusion to facilitate opioid detoxification and withdrawal in a patient with chronic opioid abuse

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    Surjya Prasad Upadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients are admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU for acute intoxication, serious complication of overdose, or withdrawal symptoms of illicit drugs. An acute withdrawal of drugs with addiction potential is associated with a sympathetic overactivity leading to marked psychomimetic disturbances. Acute intoxication or withdrawal of such drugs is often associated with life-threatening complications which require ICU admission and necessitate prolonged sedative analgesic medications, weaning from which is often complicated by withdrawal and other psychomimetic symptoms. Dexmedetomidine, an alpha-2 (α2 agonist, has been used successfully to facilitate withdrawal and detoxification of various drugs and also to control delirium in ICU patients. Herein, we report a case of a chronic opioid abuse (heroin patient admitted with acute overdose complications leading to a prolonged ICU course requiring sedative-analgesic medication; the drug withdrawal-related symptoms further complicated the weaning process. Dexmedetomidine infusion was successfully used as a sedative-analgesic to control the withdrawal-related psychomimetic symptoms and to facilitate smooth detoxification and weaning from opioid and other sedatives.

  19. Exploring Opioid-Sparing Multimodal Analgesia Options in Trauma: A Nursing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Mary; Montgomery, Robert; Quinlan-Colwell, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Challenges with opioids (e.g., adverse events, misuse and abuse with long-term administration) have led to a renewed emphasis on opioid-sparing multimodal management of trauma pain. To assess the extent to which currently available evidence supports the efficacy and safety of various nonopioid analgesics and techniques to manage trauma pain, a literature search of recently published references was performed. Additional citations were included on the basis of authors' knowledge of the literature. Effective options for opioid-sparing analgesics include oral and intravenous (IV) acetaminophen; nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs available via multiple routes; and anticonvulsants, which are especially effective for neuropathic pain associated with trauma. Intravenous routes (e.g., IV acetaminophen, IV ketorolac) may be associated with a faster onset of action than oral routes. Additional adjuvants for the treatment of trauma pain are muscle relaxants and alpha-2 adrenergic agonists. Ketamine and regional techniques play an important role in multimodal therapy but require medical and nursing support. Nonpharmacologic treatments (e.g., cryotherapy, distraction techniques, breathing and relaxation, acupuncture) supplement pharmacologic analgesics and can be safe and easy to implement. In conclusion, opioid-sparing multimodal analgesia addresses concerns associated with high doses of opioids, and many pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options are available to implement this strategy. Nurses play key roles in comprehensive patient assessment; administration of patient-focused, opioid-sparing, multimodal analgesia in trauma; and monitoring for safety concerns. PMID:27828892

  20. Opioid regulation: time to reconsider the nomenclature and approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Danuta; Mendelson, George

    2013-09-01

    In Australia, deaths due to the ingestion of opioid analgesics, though numerically small, have been increasing at a rapid rate. The reasons for this increase are multifactorial; the conceptually outdated legislation that controls prescription and administration of opioid analgesics might be one of them. The stated purposes of the governing statutory instruments include prevention of the improper use of drugs of dependence and protection of the public. However, in order to achieve these aims, the relevant legislation should utilise theories and definitions that are consistent with the medical understanding of the relevant physiology and behaviour, so as to provide a common linguistic and conceptual platform for regulatory and clinical decision-makers. Although Victoria, with its intricate statutory framework for Schedule 8 poisons, is used as an example of an obsolescent approach to the concept of drug dependency, conclusions reached are applicable to other jurisdictions, other scheduled drugs, and all health care practitioners who have the statutory authority to possess and prescribe them.

  1. Mycobacteria attenuate nociceptive responses by formyl peptide receptor triggered opioid peptide release from neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike L Rittner

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In inflammation, pain is regulated by a balance of pro- and analgesic mediators. Analgesic mediators include opioid peptides which are secreted by neutrophils at the site of inflammation, leading to activation of opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons. In humans, local opioids and opioid peptides significantly downregulate postoperative as well as arthritic pain. In rats, inflammatory pain is induced by intraplantar injection of heat inactivated Mycobacterium butyricum, a component of complete Freund's adjuvant. We hypothesized that mycobacterially derived formyl peptide receptor (FPR and/or toll like receptor (TLR agonists could activate neutrophils, leading to opioid peptide release and inhibition of inflammatory pain. In complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation, thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds of the paw were quantified (Hargreaves and Randall-Selitto methods, respectively. Withdrawal time to heat was decreased following systemic neutrophil depletion as well as local injection of opioid receptor antagonists or anti-opioid peptide (i.e. Met-enkephalin, beta-endorphin antibodies indicating an increase in pain. In vitro, opioid peptide release from human and rat neutrophils was measured by radioimmunoassay. Met-enkephalin release was triggered by Mycobacterium butyricum and formyl peptides but not by TLR-2 or TLR-4 agonists. Mycobacterium butyricum induced a rise in intracellular calcium as determined by FURA loading and calcium imaging. Opioid peptide release was blocked by intracellular calcium chelation as well as phosphoinositol-3-kinase inhibition. The FPR antagonists Boc-FLFLF and cyclosporine H reduced opioid peptide release in vitro and increased inflammatory pain in vivo while TLR 2/4 did not appear to be involved. In summary, mycobacteria activate FPR on neutrophils, resulting in tonic secretion of opioid peptides from neutrophils and in a decrease in inflammatory pain. Future therapeutic strategies may aim

  2. Screening of cetirizine for analgesic activity in mice

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    Priya M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pain is the most common symptom for which patients approach doctors. We have multitude of drugs for pain relief, but they have serious side effects ranging from peptic ulcer (e.g. NSAIDs to renal failure. The other group, opioids have well known side effects ranging from sedation to drug dependence. So a search for a drug for analgesia with high therapeutic effect and fewer side effects will be a boon for the patients. The objective of this study was to find whether cetirizine, a second generation antihistaminic drug, has got any analgesic activity in mice. Methods: Ten adult albino mice weighing 20-30 grams of either sex were randomized to two groups (n=5. Group I: control group (Treated with solvent 0.1 ml/kg, Group II: Test group (Cetirizine 1mg/kg. All drugs were given orally. The analgesic activity was evaluated by using tail flick, tail immersion and tail clip methods. Reaction time of animals to pain sensation before and after Cetirizine administration were noted at 0, 15, 30, 60 and 90 minutes time intervals respectively on Day 1, 3, 5, 7, 10. Results: Mean reaction time was expressed as Mean±SEM, and one way ANOVA was used to assess statistical significance. Cetirizine was found to have statistically significant analgesic effect in mice and time dependent increase in analgesic effect were observed in all three pain models and maximum analgesic activity was observed at 60 minutes (p<0.001 after drug administration. Conclusions: Through this study, Cetirizine, a second generation antihistamine, is found to have significant analgesic activity in mice. This effect has to be studied further elaborately in animals as well as in humans. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(2.000: 187-192

  3. The use of analgesic drugs by South African veterinarians : continuing education

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    K.E. Joubert

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available According to a survey, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents were the most popular analgesic used in South Africa for management of peri-operative pain, acute post-operative pain and chronic pain. The most popular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents are flunixin meglumine and phenylbutazone. The most popular opioid type drug is buprenorphine, followed by morphine. In the peri-operative setting, analgesic agents were not actively administered to 86.3 % of cats and 80.7 % of dogs. Analgesic premedications were frequently administered, e.g. xylazine or ketamine, but no specific drug was administered for post-operative pain. Veterinarians need to critically review their anaesthetic and analgesic practices in order to achieve balanced anaesthesia.

  4. Local analgesic efficacy of tramadol following intraplantar injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Tufan; Gunes, Yasemin; Gunay, Ismail

    2007-03-08

    Several studies have suggested that systemic tramadol, an opioid, can represent a valuable treatment in severe pain conditions because of their effects on central pain pathways. However, there are not enough studies supporting that tramadol is efficacious when administered locally. Therefore, we studied the potential local analgesic effects of tramadol in peripheral nociception. In addition, we tested the antinociceptive effects of tramadol-CaCl(2) or naloxone combinations after subcutaneous intraplantar injection in a validated rat model of acute thermal nociception. Local analgesic effects of tramadol were compared with those of lidocaine. The effects of tramadol on thermal paw withdrawal latencies were monitored using the plantar test. The antinociceptive potency of tramadol is higher and long-lasting than that of lidocaine. Naloxone was unable to inhibit the increased antinociceptive response produced by tramadol. Ca(2+) modified the effect of tramadol. When Ca(2+) dose was increased in the solution, thermal antinociceptive potency of tramadol, but not lidocaine was prolonged. Thermal nociceptive responses were not affected in the non-injected paws, indicating a lack of systemic effects with doses of tramadol and lidocaine that elicited local analgesia. These results suggest that intraplantar tramadol administration can produce local analgesic effect with a different action mechanism than that of lidocaine. In addition, extracellular Ca(2+) may play an important role in the local analgesic action of tramadol.

  5. Interaction of the mu-opioid receptor with GPR177 (Wntless inhibits Wnt secretion: potential implications for opioid dependence

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    Stagljar Igor

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid agonist drugs produce analgesia. However, long-term exposure to opioid agonists may lead to opioid dependence. The analgesic and addictive properties of opioid agonist drugs are mediated primarily via the mu-opioid receptor (MOR. Opioid agonists appear to alter neuronal morphology in key brain regions implicated in the development of opioid dependence. However, the precise role of the MOR in the development of these neuronal alterations remains elusive. We hypothesize that identifying and characterizing novel MOR interacting proteins (MORIPs may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved in the development of opioid dependence. Results GPR177, the mammalian ortholog of Drosophila Wntless/Evi/Sprinter, was identified as a MORIP in a modified split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid screen. GPR177 is an evolutionarily conserved protein that plays a critical role in mediating Wnt protein secretion from Wnt producing cells. The MOR/GPR177 interaction was validated in pulldown, coimmunoprecipitation, and colocalization studies using mammalian tissue culture cells. The interaction was also observed in rodent brain, where MOR and GPR177 were coexpressed in close spatial proximity within striatal neurons. At the cellular level, morphine treatment caused a shift in the distribution of GPR177 from cytosol to the cell surface, leading to enhanced MOR/GPR177 complex formation at the cell periphery and the inhibition of Wnt protein secretion. Conclusions It is known that chronic morphine treatment decreases dendritic arborization and hippocampal neurogenesis, and Wnt proteins are essential for these processes. We therefore propose that the morphine-mediated MOR/GPR177 interaction may result in decreased Wnt secretion in the CNS, resulting in atrophy of dendritic arbors and decreased neurogenesis. Our results demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for GPR177 in regulating cellular response to opioid drugs.

  6. Multi-drug resistance gene (MDR1) and opioid analgesia in horses

    OpenAIRE

    Natalini Cláudio Corrêa; Cunha Anderson Fávaro da; Linardi Renata Lehn

    2006-01-01

    Opioid absorption in the intestinal tract as well as its effects in the central nervous system is modulated by the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded in the Multi-drug Resistance gene (MDR1) also named ATP-binding cassete, subfamily B, member 1 (ABCB1). This MDR1 gene acts as a selective pump. The expression of this protein in humans and rodents inhibits cellular uptake of substrate opioids. The presence of the intestinal iso-enzyme CYP3A4 associated with MDR1 gene decreases the opioid analgesic a...

  7. Cyclic endomorphin analogs in targeting opioid receptors to achieve pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Anna; Gentilucci, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Endomorphins, the endogenous ligands of the µ-opioid receptor, are attractive candidates for opioid-based pain-relieving agents. These tetrapeptides, with their remarkable affinity for the µ-opioid receptor, display favorable antinociceptive activity when injected directly into the brain of experimental animals. However, the application of endomorphins as clinical analgesics has been impeded by their instability in body fluids and inability to reach the brain after systemic administration. Among numerous modifications of the endomorphin structure aimed at improving their pharmacological properties, cyclization can be viewed as an interesting option. Here, we have summarized recent advances in obtaining endomorphin-based cyclic peptide analogs.

  8. Multi-drug resistance gene (MDR1 and opioid analgesia in horses

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    Natalini Cláudio Corrêa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid absorption in the intestinal tract as well as its effects in the central nervous system is modulated by the P-glycoprotein (P-gp encoded in the Multi-drug Resistance gene (MDR1 also named ATP-binding cassete, subfamily B, member 1 (ABCB1. This MDR1 gene acts as a selective pump. The expression of this protein in humans and rodents inhibits cellular uptake of substrate opioids. The presence of the intestinal iso-enzyme CYP3A4 associated with MDR1 gene decreases the opioid analgesic activity due to an increase in intestinal metabolism, with a predicted intestinal first pass extraction around 20% which significantly influences the oral availability of opioids. In the central nervous system, P-gp expression decreases opioid neuronal uptake diminishing the analgesic effects. It is unknown if horses have the MDR1 gene and P-gp and what are the effects on opioid absorption, metabolism, and analgesia. Identifying the MDR1 gene and P-gp status in horses is of great importance in order to better understand opioid pharmacologic effects in horses.

  9. A novel alternatively spliced isoform of the mu-opioid receptor: functional antagonism

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    Wentworth Sean

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioids are the most widely used analgesics for the treatment of clinical pain. They produce their therapeutic effects by binding to μ-opioid receptors (MORs, which are 7 transmembrane domain (7TM G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, and inhibiting cellular activity. However, the analgesic efficacy of opioids is compromised by side-effects such as analgesic tolerance, dependence and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH. In contrast to opioid analgesia these side effects are associated with cellular excitation. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain these phenomena, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying tolerance and OIH remain poorly understood. Results We recently discovered a new human alternatively spliced isoform of MOR (MOR1K that is missing the N-terminal extracellular and first transmembrane domains, resulting in a 6TM GPCR variant. To characterize the pattern of cellular transduction pathways activated by this human MOR1K isoform, we conducted a series of pharmacological and molecular experiments. Results show that stimulation of MOR1K with morphine leads to excitatory cellular effects. In contrast to stimulation of MOR1, stimulation of MOR1K leads to increased Ca2+ levels as well as increased nitric oxide (NO release. Immunoprecipitation experiments further reveal that unlike MOR1, which couples to the inhibitory Gαi/o complex, MOR1K couples to the stimulatory Gαs complex. Conclusion The major MOR1 and the alternative MOR1K isoforms mediate opposite cellular effects in response to morphine, with MOR1K driving excitatory processes. These findings warrant further investigations that examine animal and human MORK1 expression and function following chronic exposure to opioids, which may identify MOR1K as a novel target for the development of new clinically effective classes of opioids that have high analgesic efficacy with diminished ability to produce tolerance, OIH, and other unwanted side-effects.

  10. Opioid Abuse after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0373 TITLE: " Opioid Abuse after TBI...2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 July 2013 - 30 June 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE " Opioid Abuse after TBI" 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...the brain’s reward circuitry which may make an injured brain more susceptible to the rewarding effects of opioids . We are currently conducting

  11. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Schmidt, Brian L; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-12-11

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy.

  12. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S.; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy. PMID:26657998

  13. Remifentanil-acute opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hun; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Soghomonyan, Suren; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    The use of opioids may seem to be a double-edged sword; they provide straight analgesic and antihyperalgesic effects initially, but subsequently are associated with the expression of acute opioid tolerance (AOT) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) that have been reported in experimental studies and clinical observations. It has been suggested that opioids can induce an acute tolerance and hyperalgesia in dose- and/or time-dependent manners even when used within the clinically accepted doses. Recently, remifentanil has been used for pain management in clinical anesthesia and in the intensive care units because of its rapid onset and offset. We reviewed articles analyzing AOT and/or OIH by remifentanil and focused on the following issues: (1) evidence of remifentanil inducing AOT and/or OIH and (2) importance of AOT and/or OIH in considering the reduction of remifentanil dosage or adopting preventive modulations. Twenty-four experimental and clinical studies were identified using electronic searches of MEDLINE (PubMed, Ovid, Springer, and Elsevier). However, the development of AOT and OIH by remifentanil administration remains controversial. There is no sufficient evidence to support or refute the existence of OIH in humans.

  14. Modulation of peripheral μ-opioid analgesia by σ1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fernández, Cristina; Montilla-García, Ángeles; González-Cano, Rafael; Nieto, Francisco Rafael; Romero, Lucía; Artacho-Cordón, Antonia; Montes, Rosa; Fernández-Pastor, Begoña; Merlos, Manuel; Baeyens, José Manuel; Entrena, José Manuel; Cobos, Enrique José

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of σ1-receptor inhibition on μ-opioid-induced mechanical antinociception and constipation. σ1-Knockout mice exhibited marked mechanical antinociception in response to several μ-opioid analgesics (fentanyl, oxycodone, morphine, buprenorphine, and tramadol) at systemic (subcutaneous) doses that were inactive in wild-type mice and even unmasked the antinociceptive effects of the peripheral μ-opioid agonist loperamide. Likewise, systemic (subcutaneous) or local (intraplantar) treatment of wild-type mice with the selective σ1 antagonists BD-1063 [1-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-4-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride] or S1RA [4-[2-[[5-methyl-1-(2-naphthalenyl)1H-pyrazol-3-yl]oxy]ethyl] morpholine hydrochloride] potentiated μ-opioid antinociception; these effects were fully reversed by the σ1 agonist PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate) hydrochloride], showing the selectivity of the pharmacological approach. The μ-opioid antinociception potentiated by σ1 inhibition (by σ1-receptor knockout or σ1-pharmacological antagonism) was more sensitive to the peripherally restricted opioid antagonist naloxone methiodide than opioid antinociception under normal conditions, indicating a key role for peripheral opioid receptors in the enhanced antinociception. Direct interaction between the opioid drugs and σ1 receptor cannot account for our results, since the former lacked affinity for σ1 receptors (labeled with [(3)H](+)-pentazocine). A peripheral role for σ1 receptors was also supported by their higher density (Western blot results) in peripheral nervous tissue (dorsal root ganglia) than in several central areas involved in opioid antinociception (dorsal spinal cord, basolateral amygdala, periaqueductal gray, and rostroventral medulla). In contrast to its effects on nociception, σ1-receptor inhibition did not alter fentanyl- or loperamide-induced constipation, a peripherally mediated nonanalgesic opioid effect. Therefore

  15. Nursing time study for the administration of a PRN oral analgesic on an orthopedic postoperative unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Lois J; Chelly, Jacques E; Marlin, Vanessa

    2014-09-01

    As needed (PRN) oral opioid analgesics are an integral part of many orthopedic postoperative multimodal pain management regimens. However, the unpredictable nature of this dosing method can lead to disruptions in the process of administering the medication, as well as be an interruption to regular nursing activities. This IRB approved quantitative time study tested the hypothesis that a significant amount of nursing time is required in the administration of PRN oral opioid analgesics on a postoperative orthopedic nursing unit. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the time necessary to complete the required steps related to the administration of PRN oral analgesics. Nurses from 28 nursing shifts used a personal digital assistant (PDA) to record the time needed to complete these steps. We determined that 10.9 minutes is the mean time required to administer PRN oral analgesics on this unit. Other time studies have evaluated the medication administration process as a whole. No time studies related to PRN oral analgesic administration have been reported. In phase I of our project, the data were summarized and will be used as a baseline comparison for phase II, in which we will evaluate an oral PCA medication administration system.

  16. Electroacupuncture-Induced Dynamic Processes of Gene Expression Levels of Endogenous Opioid Peptide Precursors and Opioid Receptors in the CNS of Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the dynamic processes of mRNA levels of proenkephalin, proopiomelanocortin, prodynorphin, and opioid receptors (δ-, μ-, and κ-receptor induced by electroacupuncture (EA in the central nerve system, goats were stimulated by EA of 60 Hz for 0.5 h at a set of Baihui, Santai, Ergen, and Sanyangluo points. The pain threshold was measured using the method of potassium iontophoresis. The mRNA levels of the three opioid peptide precursors and three opioid receptors were determined with quantitative real-time PCR and the levels of Met-enkephalin with SABC immunohistochemistry at 0.5 h before and at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, and 24 h after EA. The results showed that the pain threshold correlated (P<0.01 with Met-enkephalin immunoactivities in the measured nuclei and areas of goats. The analgesic aftereffect lasted for 12 h at least. The mRNA levels of the three opioid peptide precursors and three opioid receptors began to increase at 0 h, reached the peak during the time from 4 h to 6 h or at 12 h, and remained higher at 24 h after EA was discontinued. These results suggested that the initiation of gene expression of opioid peptides and the three receptors may be associated with EA-induced analgesic aftereffect.

  17. Intercambiabilidad de opioides y moléculas bioequivalentes Opioid switching and bioequivalent molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.D. Rodrigo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ante la alerta creada por dos situaciones que inciden, de manera significativa, en el entorno de la actividad clínica de los médicos que tratan el dolor, y que son: por un lado, la intercambiabilidad de moléculas bioequivalentes y, por el otro, las directrices emitidas por alguna consejería de salud en el fomento del uso de morfina frente a otros opioides como analgésico opioide de primera elección, el Grupo de Trabajo de Opioides de la Sociedad Española del Dolor -considerando que ambas pueden llevar a actuaciones en la práctica clínica que no se ajustan a la evidencia científica disponible- analiza estos dos hechos a partir del informe de experto del Dr. Cecilio Álamo, realizado en mayo de 2009, sobre la intercambiabilidad clínica de opioides potentes. Tras una revisión en profundidad de la bibliografía disponible a nivel nacional e internacional, así como de la posición de instituciones sanitarias europeas, entre otras, la Agencia Francesa del Medicamento y la Royal Pharmaceutical Society del Reino Unido, emite las conclusiones siguientes: 1. No creemos justificada la intercambiabilidad de opioides potentes entre sí, ya sean genéricos o de marca. 2. Ante las ventajas que aportan las nuevas moléculas con diferentes formulaciones (tanto por vía oral como por vía transdérmica, podemos afirmar que hay otras opciones terapéuticas frente al uso de morfina como analgésico opioide de primera elección.Due to the alert created due to two important incidents that took place involving the clinical activity of doctors who treat pain (one is the switching of bioequivalent molecules, and the other is the directives issued by a Health Department on encouraging the use of morphine instead of other opioids as first choice analgesic opioid, the Working Group of the Spanish Pain Society, considering that both can affect the activities in clinical practices that do not adapt to the available scientific evidence, analysed these two facts

  18. Treatment of Chronic Pain in Older People Evidence-Based Choice of Strong-Acting Opioids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ojik, Annette L.; Jansen, Paul A. F.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; van Roon, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of chronic malignant and non-malignant pain, opioids are used as strong analgesics. Frail elderly patients often have multiple comorbidities and use multiple medicines, leading to an increased risk of clinically relevant drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. Age-related changes a

  19. The analgesic effects of exogenous melatonin in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars Peter Holst

    2016-10-01

    standard statistical test. Furthermore, we presented an integrated assessment method of longitudinally measured pain intensity and opioid consumption. Our analyses documented that the employed statistical method impacted the statistical significance of post-operative analgesic outcomes. Furthermore, the novel integrated assessment method combines two interdependent outcomes, lowers the risk of type 2 errors, increases the statistical power, and provides a more accurate description of post-operative analgesic efficacy. Exogenous melatonin may offer an effective and safe analgesic drug. At this moment, however, the results of human studies have been contradictory. High-quality randomized experimental- and clinical studies are still needed to establish a "genuine" analgesic effect of the drug in humans. Other perioperative effects of exogenous melatonin should also be investigated, before melatonin can be introduced for clinical routine use in surgical patients. Despite promising experimental and clinical findings, several unanswered questions also relate to optimal dosage, timing of administration and administration route of exogenous melatonin.

  20. Update on prescription extended-release opioids and appropriate patient selection

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    Brennan MJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Brennan The Pain Center of Fairfield, Fairfield, CT, USA Abstract: Chronic pain is largely underdiagnosed, often undertreated, and expected to increase as the American population ages. Many patients with chronic pain require long-term treatment with analgesic medications, and pain management may involve use of prescription opioids for patients whose pain is inadequately controlled through other therapies. Yet because of the potential for abuse and addiction, many clinicians hesitate to treat their patients with pain with potentially beneficial agents. Finding the right opioid for the right patient is the first – often complicated – step. Ensuring that patients continue to properly use the medication while achieving therapeutic analgesic effects is the long-term goal. Combined with careful patient selection and ongoing monitoring, new formulations using extended-release technologies incorporating tamper-resistant features may help combat the growing risk of abuse or misuse, which will hopefully reduce individual suffering and the societal burden of chronic pain. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an update on extended-release opioids and to provide clinicians with a greater understanding of which patients might benefit from these new opioid formulations and how to integrate the recommended monitoring for abuse potential into clinical practice. Keywords: chronic pain, opioid analgesics, extended release, abuse prevention

  1. Differential Effectiveness of Clinically-Relevant Analgesics in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

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    Alexandra L Whittaker

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis is characterized by pain and a pro-inflammatory tissue response. Rat models are frequently used in mucositis disease investigations yet little is known about the presence of pain in these animals, the ability of analgesics to ameliorate the condition, or the effect that analgesic administration may have on study outcomes. This study investigated different classes of analgesics with the aim of determining their analgesic effects and impact on research outcomes of interest in a rat model of mucositis. Female DA rats were allocated to 8 groups to include saline and chemotherapy controls (n = 8. Analgesics included opioid derivatives (buprenorphine; 0.05mg/kg and tramadol 12.5mg/kg and NSAID (carprofen; 15mg/kg in combination with either saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU; 150mg/kg. Research outcome measures included daily clinical parameters, pain score and gut histology. Myeloperoxidase assay was performed to determine gut inflammation. At the dosages employed, all agents had an analgesic effect based on behavioural pain scores. Jejunal myeloperoxidase activity was significantly reduced by buprenorphine and tramadol in comparison to 5-FU control animals (53%, p = 0.0004 and 58%, p = 0.0001. Carprofen had no ameliorating effect on myeloperoxidase levels. None of the agents reduced the histological damage caused by 5-FU administration although tramadol tended to increase villus length even when administered to healthy animals. These data provide evidence that carprofen offers potential as an analgesic in this animal model due to its pain-relieving efficacy and minimal effect on measured parameters. This study also supports further investigation into the mechanism and utility of opioid agents in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced mucositis.

  2. Donepezil in the treatment of opioid-induced sedation: report of six cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatkin, N E; Rhiner, M; Bolton, T M

    2001-05-01

    Donepezil, an oral acetylcholinesterase inhibitor approved for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, was given to 6 cancer pain patients having sedation related to the analgesic use of opioids. Each patient was taking more than 200 mg of oral morphine equivalents per day, and several were receiving complex analgesic regimens consisting of multiple adjuvant medications. Sedation improved at least moderately in 5 of the patients and mildly in 1 after they began taking donepezil. Patients reported a decrease in episodes of spontaneous sleeping during the day, fewer myoclonic twitches, improved daily function and greater social interaction. Several also reported improved sleep at night. Analgesia was not compromised by the use of donepezil, and in some cases it appeared improved. Donepezil may be a valuable alternative to psychostimulants in the treatment of opioid-induced sedation. A prospective controlled trial comparing the treatment effects of psychostimulants and donepezil on patients having opioid-induced sedation is underway.

  3. Interaction and regulatory functions of μ- and δ-opioid receptors in nociceptive afferent neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Zhang; Lan Bao

    2012-01-01

    μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists such as morphine are powerful analgesics used for pain therapy.However,the use of these drugs is limited by their side-effects,which include antinociceptive tolerance and dependence.Earlier studies reported that MOR analgesic tolerance is reduced by blockade of δ-opioid receptors (DORs) that interact with MORs.Recent studies show that the MOR/DOR interaction in nociceptive afferent neurons in the dorsal root ganglion may contribute to morphine analgesic tolerance.Further analysis of the mechanisms for regulating the trafficking of receptors,ion channels and signaling molecules in nociceptive afferent neurons would help to understand the nociceptive mechanisms and improve pain therapy.

  4. The effect of transdermal opioid use on breakthrough opioid and sedative prescribing for rural patients with chronic pain in Northwest Tasmania: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henshaw J

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available John Henshaw,1 Judi Walker,2 Dom Geraghty3 1Rural Clinical School, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, 2School of Rural Health, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, 3School of Human Life Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia Purpose: The aim of the study reported here was to determine the frequency of prescribing of immediate-release (IR opioids, and benzodiazepines, with both oral sustained-release (SR and transdermal (TD opioid maintenance treatment, in a rural population with chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP. Subjects and methods: A longitudinal study measuring IR opioid and benzodiazepine dispensed prescriptions (scripts by route of maintenance opioid administration over time (monthly for 1 year. Subjects were opioid-treated CNCP patients from Northwest Tasmania. The outcome measures of mean monthly scripts were analyzed using generalized estimating equations with robust standard errors. Results: Details of 12,191 dispensed scripts were obtained from 140 subjects over 12 months. Mean monthly IR scripts with oral SR opioid maintenance were 0.21 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.10; 0.32. With TD opioid maintenance, this was nonsignificantly lower (P = 0.06 at 0.04 (95% CI 0.00; 0.15. Mean monthly benzodiazepine scripts with oral SR opioids were 0.47 (95% CI 0.32; 0.62, and unchanged (P = 0.84 for TD opioids at 0.45 (95% CI 0.28; 0.62. Conclusion: There was a nonsignificant trend toward reduced prescribing of IR opioids with TD opioid-maintained, compared with oral SR opioid-maintained, CNCP rural patients. Benzodiazepine prescribing was similar for both groups. The rationale for use and the provision of breakthrough opioid analgesia for CNCP patients are complex, both for patients and their prescribers, while the regular use of benzodiazepines compounds the sedation from the subjects' maintenance opioid. The prolonged analgesic affect of TD opioids may benefit rural and remote CNCP populations and reduce the risk of diversion

  5. Tramadol and Tramadol+Caffeine Synergism in the Rat Formalin Test Are Mediated by Central Opioid and Serotonergic Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Norma Carrillo-Munguía; Ma. Eva González-Trujano; Miguel Huerta; Xochitl Trujillo; M. Irene Díaz-Reval

    2015-01-01

    Different analgesic combinations with caffeine have shown this drug to be capable of increasing the analgesic effect. Many combinations with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been carried out, but, in regard to opioids, only combinations with morphine and tramadol have been reported. The antinociceptive synergism mechanism of these combinations is not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to determine the participation of spinal and supraspinal opioidergic and...

  6. Comparison of Electroacupuncture and Morphine-Mediated Analgesic Patterns in a Plantar Incision-Induced Pain Model

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    Yen-Jing Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroacupuncture (EA is a complementary therapy to improve morphine analgesia for postoperative pain, but underlying mechanism is not well-known. Herein, we investigated EA-induced analgesic effect in a plantar incision (PI model in male Sprague-Dawley rats. PI was performed at the left hind paw. EA of 4 Hz and high intensity or sham needling was conducted at right ST36 prior to PI and repeated for another 2 days. Behavioral responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli, spinal phospho-ERK, and Fos expression were all analyzed. In additional groups, naloxone and morphine were administered to elucidate involvement of opioid receptors and for comparison with EA. EA pretreatment significantly reduced post-PI tactile allodynia for over 1 day; repeated treatments maintained analgesic effect. Intraperitoneal naloxone could reverse EA analgesia. Low-dose subcutaneous morphine (1 mg/kg had stronger inhibitory effect on PI-induced allodynia than EA for 1 h. However, analgesic tolerance appeared after repeated morphine injections. Both EA and morphine could equally inhibit PI-induced p-ERK and Fos inductions. We conclude that though EA and morphine attenuate postincision pain through opioid receptor activations, daily EA treatments result in analgesic accumulation whereas daily morphine injections develop analgesic tolerance. Discrepant pathways and mechanisms underlying two analgesic means may account for the results.

  7. Pediatric palliative care: use of opioids for the management of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zernikow, Boris; Michel, Erik; Craig, Finella; Anderson, Brian J

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric palliative care (PPC) is provided to children experiencing life-limiting diseases (LLD) or life-threatening diseases (LTD). Sixty to 90% of children with LLD/LTD undergoing PPC receive opioids at the end of life. Analgesia is often insufficient. Reasons include a lack of knowledge concerning opioid prescribing and adjustment of opioid dose to changing requirements. The choice of first-line opioid is based on scientific evidence, pain pathophysiology, and available administration modes. Doses are calculated on a bodyweight basis up to a maximum absolute starting dose. Morphine remains the gold standard starting opioid in PPC. Long-term opioid choice and dose administration is determined by the pathology, analgesic effectiveness, and adverse effect profile. Slow-release oral morphine remains the dominant formulation for long-term use in PPC with hydromorphone slow-release preparations being the first rotation opioid when morphine shows severe adverse effects. The recently introduced fentanyl transdermal therapeutic system with a drug-release rate of 12.5 microg/hour matches the lower dose requirements of pediatric cancer pain control. Its use may be associated with less constipation compared with morphine use. Though oral transmucosal fentanyl citrate has reduced bioavailability (25%), it inherits potential for breakthrough pain management. However, the gold standard breakthrough opioid remains immediate-release morphine. Buprenorphine is of special clinical interest as a result of its different administration routes, long duration of action, and metabolism largely independent of renal function. Antihyperalgesic effects, induced through antagonism at the kappa-receptor, may contribute to its effectiveness in neuropathic pain. Methadone also has a long elimination half-life (19 [SD 14] hours) and NMDA receptor activity although dose administration is complicated by highly variable morphine equianalgesic equivalence (1 : 2.5-20). Opioid rotation to methadone

  8. Management of cancer pain: 1. Wider implications of orthodox analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee SK

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Susannah K Lee,1 Jill Dawson,2 Jack A Lee,3 Gizem Osman,4 Maria O Levitin,5 Refika Mine Guzel,5 Mustafa BA Djamgoz5,61Pomona College, Claremont, CA, USA; 2Healthcare Communications Consultancy, Danville, CA, USA; 3College of Arts and Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA; 4Department of Chemical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK; 5Division of Cell and Molecular Biology, Neuroscience Solutions to Cancer Research Group, South Kensington Campus, Imperial College London, London, UK; 6Cyprus International University, Biotechnology Research Centre, Haspolat, North Cyprus, Mersin, TurkeyAbstract: In this review, the first of two parts, we first provide an overview of the orthodox analgesics used commonly against cancer pain. Then, we examine in more detail the emerging evidence for the potential impact of analgesic use on cancer risk and disease progression. Increasing findings suggest that long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, particularly aspirin, may reduce cancer occurrence. However, acetaminophen may raise the risk of some hematological malignancies. Drugs acting upon receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and GABA “mimetics” (eg, gabapentin appear generally safe for cancer patients, but there is some evidence of potential carcinogenicity. Some barbiturates appear to slightly raise cancer risks and can affect cancer cell behavior in vitro. For cannabis, studies suggest an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue, larynx, and possibly lung. Morphine may stimulate human microvascular endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis; it is not clear whether this might cause harm or produce benefit. The opioid, fentanyl, may promote growth in some tumor cell lines. Opium itself is an emerging risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma and possibly cancers of the esophagus, bladder, larynx, and lung. It is concluded that analgesics currently prescribed for cancer pain can

  9. Stereochemical basis for a unified structure activity theory of aromatic and heterocyclic rings in selected opioids and opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Joel S

    2010-02-18

    This paper presents a novel unified theory of the structure activity relationship of opioids and opioid peptides. It is hypothesized that a virtual or known heterocyclic ring exists in all opioids which have activity in humans, and this ring occupies relative to the aromatic ring of the drug, approximately the same plane in space as the piperidine ring of morphine. Since the rings of morphine are rigid, and the aromatic and piperidine rings are critical structural components for morphine's analgesic properties, the rigid morphine molecule allows for approximations of the aromatic and heterocyclic relationships in subsequent drug models where bond rotations are common. This hypothesis and five propositions are supported by stereochemistry and experimental observations.Proposition #1 The structure of morphine provides a template. Proposition #2 Steric hindrance of some centric portion of the piperidine ring explains antagonist properties of naloxone, naltrexone and alvimopam. Proposition #3 Methadone has an active conformation which contains a virtual heterocyclic ring which explains its analgesic activity and racemic properties. Proposition #4 The piperidine ring of fentanyl can assume the morphine position under conditions of nitrogen inversion. Proposition #5 The first 3 amino acid sequences of beta endorphin (l-try-gly-gly) and the active opioid dipeptide, l-tyr-pro, (as a result of a peptide turn and zwitterion bonding) form a virtual piperazine-like ring which is similar in size, shape and location to the heterocyclic rings of morphine, meperidine, and methadone. Potential flaws in this theory are discussed.This theory could be important for future analgesic drug design.

  10. Tramadol as an Analgesic to Treat Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is defined by the International Association for the Study of Pain as an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. Pain has now been equated to a fifth vital sign highlighting the significance of pain management in patient care. Tramadol is a centrally acting analgesic which is structurally related to codeine and morphine. It is effectively used to treat moderate to severe acute and chronic pain in diverse conditions. Tramadol is placed on the second step of WHO analgesic ladder and in contrast to traditional opioids, exerts its analgesic activity, a dual mechanism of action inhibiting transmission as well as perception of pain. Tramadol is more suitable than NSAID’s and coxib’s for patient with GI, renal and cardiovascular problems. Combined with low dependence/abuse potential, it has proven to be of significant advantage over other agents especially in the elderly.

  11. LABORATORY MODELS FOR SCREENING ANALGESICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parle Milind

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a complex unpleasant phenomenon composed of sensory experiences that include time, space, intensity, emotion, cognition and motivation. Analgesics are the agents, which selectively relieve pain by acting in the CNS or by peripheral pain mechanisms without significantly altering consciousness. Analgesics may be narcotic or non-narcotic. The study of pain in animals raises ethical, philosophical and technical problems. Philosophically, there is a problem that pain cannot be monitored directly in animals but can only be measured by examining their responses to nociceptive stimuli. The observed reactions are almost always motor responses ranging from spinal reflexes to complex behavior. The animal models employed for screening of analgesic agents, include Pain-state models based on the use of thermal stimuli, mechanical stimuli, electrical stimuli and chemical stimuli. The neuronal basis of most of the above laboratory models is poorly understood, however their application is profitable in predicting analgesic activity of newly discovered substances.

  12. New opioid prescribing guidelines favor non-opioid alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Determined to make a dent in the growing problem of opioid addiction, the CDC has unveiled new guidelines for opioid prescribing for chronic pain. The recommendations urge providers to be more judicious in their prescribing, opting for opioids only after carefully weighing substantial risks and benefits. Public health authorities note the rampant use and misuse of opioids have "blurred the lines" between prescription opioids and illicit opioids. The new guidelines are designed to help frontline providers balance the need to manage their patients' chronic pain with the duty to curb dangerous prescribing practices. The recommendations are built around three principles: favor non-opioid alternatives for most cases of chronic pain, use the lowest effective dose when prescribing opioids, and exercise caution/monitor patients who are treated with opioids.

  13. Combinations of opioid agonist and opioid antagonist%阿片受体激动剂和拮抗剂的联用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石靖; 许真玉

    2013-01-01

    The opioid agonists employed primarily as moderate to strong analgesics have many pharmacological effects including vomiting,respiratory depression,constipation,and also have high possibility of addiction and dependence.Combinations of opioid agonists and opioid antagonists have been developed in recent years,and many clinical trials showed that such kind of drug combinations could moderate the side effects of opioid agonists and decrease the risk of drug abuse.Successful development of these combinations gives new options for the clinical application of opioid analgesics.%阿片受体激动剂是临床常用的镇痛药,通常用于中重度疼痛的治疗,但是此类药物常伴有明显的不良反应,如恶心、呕吐、便秘和呼吸抑制等,同时存在较高的成瘾性和依赖性,大大影响了药物的临床应用.近年来,阿片受体拮抗剂与阿片受体激动剂组成的复方药物陆续上市,临床试验显示此类复方制剂可以减轻不良反应,降低药物滥用的风险,为阿片类镇痛的临床应用提供了新的思路和选择.

  14. Analgesic effects of lappaconitine in leukemia bone pain in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Cui Zhu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone pain is a common and severe symptom in cancer patients. The present study employed a mouse model of leukemia bone pain by injection K562 cells into tibia of mouse to evaluate the analgesic effects of lappacontine. Our results showed that the lappaconitine treatment at day 15, 17 and 19 could effectively reduce the spontaneous pain scoring values, restore reduced degree in the inclined-plate test induced by injection of K562 cells, as well as restore paw mechanical withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency induced by injection of K562 cells to the normal levels. Additionally, the molecular mechanisms of lappaconitine’s analgesic effects may be related to affect the expression levels of endogenous opioid system genes (POMC, PENK and MOR, as well as apoptosis-related genes (Xiap, Smac, Bim, NF-κB and p53. Our present results indicated that lappaconitine may become a new analgesic agent for leukemia bone pain management.

  15. Novel Oral Therapies for Opioid-induced Bowel Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Noncancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Renee M; Rhee, Diane

    2016-03-01

    Opioid analgesics are frequently prescribed and play an important role in chronic pain management. Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, which includes constipation, hardened stool, incomplete evacuation, gas, and nausea and vomiting, is the most common adverse event associated with opioid use. Mu-opioid receptors are specifically responsible for opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, resulting in reduced peristaltic and secretory actions. Agents that reverse these actions in the bowel without reversing pain control in the central nervous system may be preferred over traditional laxatives. The efficacy and safety of these agents in chronic noncancer pain were assessed from publications identified through Ovid and PubMed database searches. Trials that evaluated the safety and efficacy of oral agents for opioid-induced constipation or opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, excluding laxatives, were reviewed. Lubiprostone and naloxegol are approved in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration for use in opioid-induced constipation. Axelopran (TD-1211) and sustained-release naloxone have undergone phase 2 and phase 1 studies, respectively, for the same indication. Naloxegol and axelopran are peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists. Naloxone essentially functions as a peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonist when administered orally in a sustained-release formulation. Lubiprostone is a locally acting chloride channel (CIC-2) activator that increases secretions and peristalsis. All agents increase spontaneous bowel movements and reduce other bowel symptoms compared with placebo in patients with noncancer pain who are chronic opioid users. The most common adverse events were gastrointestinal in nature, and none of the drugs were associated with severe adverse or cardiovascular events. Investigations comparing these agents to regimens using standard laxative and combination therapy and trials in special populations and patients with active cancer are

  16. Peripheral Sensitization Increases Opioid Receptor Expression and Activation by Crotalphine in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, Vanessa Olzon; Fernandes, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Gutierrez, Vanessa Pacciari; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Cury, Yara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation enhances the peripheral analgesic efficacy of opioid drugs, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. Crotalphine (CRP), a peptide that was first isolated from South American rattlesnake C.d. terrificus venom, induces a potent and long-lasting anti-nociceptive effect that is mediated by the activation of peripheral opioid receptors. Because the high efficacy of CRP is only observed in the presence of inflammation, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the CRP anti-nociceptive effect induced by inflammation. Using real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA assays, we demonstrate that the intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases the mRNA and protein levels of the µ- and κ-opioid receptors in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and paw tissue of rats within 3 h of the injection. Using conformation state-sensitive antibodies that recognize activated opioid receptors, we show that PGE2, alone does not increase the activation of these opioid receptors but that in the presence of PGE2, the activation of specific opioid receptors by CRP and selective µ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists (positive controls) increases. Furthermore, PGE2 down-regulated the expression and activation of the δ-opioid receptor. CRP increased the level of activated mitogen-activated protein kinases in cultured DRG neurons, and this increase was dependent on the activation of protein kinase Cζ. This CRP effect was much more prominent when the cells were pretreated with PGE2. These results indicate that the expression and activation of peripheral opioid receptors by opioid-like drugs can be up- or down-regulated in the presence of an acute injury and that acute tissue injury enhances the efficacy of peripheral opioids. PMID:24594607

  17. Liposome bupivacaine for improvement in economic outcomes and opioid burden in GI surgery: IMPROVE Study pooled analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen SM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Stephen M Cohen,1 Jon D Vogel,2 Jorge E Marcet,3 Keith A Candiotti4 1Atlanta Colon and Rectal Surgery, PA, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2General Surgery Clinic, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA; 3Department of Surgery, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 4Department of Anesthesiology, University of Miami Leonard Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Abstract: Postsurgical pain management remains a significant challenge. Liposome bupivacaine, as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen, has been shown to significantly reduce postsurgical opioid consumption, hospital length of stay (LOS, and hospitalization costs in gastrointestinal (GI surgery, compared with intravenous (IV opioid-based patient-controlled analgesia (PCA. Pooled results from open-label studies comparing a liposome bupivacaine-based multimodal analgesic regimen with IV opioid PCA were analyzed. Patients (n=191 who underwent planned surgery and received study drug (IV opioid PCA, n=105; multimodal analgesia, n=86 were included. Liposome bupivacaine-based multimodal analgesia compared with IV opioid PCA significantly reduced mean (standard deviation [SD] postsurgical opioid consumption (38 [55] mg versus [vs] 96 [85] mg; P<0.0001, postsurgical LOS (median 2.9 vs 4.3 days; P<0.0001, and mean hospitalization costs (US$8,271 vs US$10,726; P=0.0109. The multimodal analgesia group reported significantly fewer patients with opioid-related adverse events (AEs than the IV opioid PCA group (P=0.0027; there were no significant between-group differences in patient satisfaction scores at 30 days. A liposome bupivacaine-based multimodal analgesic regimen was associated with significantly less opioid consumption, opioid-related AEs, and better health economic outcomes compared with an IV opioid PCA-based regimen in patients undergoing GI surgery. Study registration: This pooled analysis is based on data from Phase IV clinical trials registered on the US National

  18. Remifentanil: a new opioid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, P S

    1995-11-01

    Remifentanil appears to have pharmacodynamic properties similar to other potent mu opioid agonists. It does, however, have unique pharmacokinetic properties, with a rapid onset and rapid offset of effect, irrespective of the duration of its administration. With this property, remifentanil appears to be a very titratable opioid that will make it suitable for administration for either very brief periods, in which analgesia is required, or over prolonged periods, without the concern for prolonged recovery.

  19. Analgesic drug consumption increases after knee arthroplasty: a pharmacoepidemiological study investigating postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzier, Régis; Serres, Isabelle; Bourrel, Robert; Palmaro, Aurore; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse

    2014-07-01

    Knee arthroplasty remains the gold standard in the treatment of severe osteoarthritis. Chronic postoperative pain has been reported with a prevalence ranging from 15% to 47%. The aim of this study was to compare analgesic drug consumption before and after surgery as an indicator of pain after knee surgery. A pharmacoepidemiological method comparing analgesics and antineuropathic issues 1 year before and 1 year after surgery was used. All patients who underwent knee arthroplasty in the Midi-Pyrenees region (2.5 million inhabitants) were identified through the Health Insurance System Database. Increase of drug issues (all analgesics, antineuropathic drugs, strong opioids) was calculated and compared between several periods surrounding the surgery (12 months, 2 months, and 10 months before and after the knee arthroplasty). A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with chronic postoperative pain. The study included 1939 patients. An increase in analgesic, antineuropathic, and opioid drug consumption was observed the year after the surgery in 47.3%, 8.6%, and 5.6% of patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis found a significant association between type of surgery (total knee vs unicompartmental arthroplasty) and analgesic consumption 1 year after surgery, and between preoperative pain and psychiatric vulnerability and increase in neuropathic drug dispensing. Conversely, older age was considered as a protective factor. This study revealed that an increase in the issue of different analgesic drugs is present in half of patients 1 year after knee arthroplasty. Several associated factors of drug consumption (preoperative pain, type of surgery, and psychiatric disorder) were identified.

  20. Urinretention ved postoperativ smertebehandling med epidurale opioider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B J; Rosenberg, J; Andersen, J T

    1990-01-01

    The incidence of retention of urine in cases of postoperative epidural opioid analgesia varies from 15% to 90%. The extent to which this phenomenon depends upon the dosage employed has not been elucidated. The cause of postoperative retention of urine (PU) is probably a combination of the central...... and peripheral effect of the opiate involving altered autonomic activity. Increased sympathetic activity resulting from surgery may, similarly, be a pathogenetic factor. The current methods of treatment are prophylactic or symptomatic alpha-receptor blockade, naloxon in refractory doses or catheterization....... Inhibition of per- and postoperatively increased sympathetic activity may possibly prevent PU. Carbacholine is not effective in the treatment of postoperative retention of urine. In animal experimental studies, kappa-receptor agonists have an analgesic effect without urodynamic side-effects but no clinical...

  1. Opioid delivery in the treatment of cancer breakthrough pain: a review of routes of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Bruce; Agarwala, Sanjiv S

    2011-01-01

    Analgesics delivered via the oral route of administration (capsules, tablets, or solutions) are most commonly used to treat cancer breakthrough pain (BTP); however, the effectiveness of oral opioids may be limited by slow gastrointestinal absorption and first-pass metabolic effects. Although the limitations presented by oral opioid delivery are acknowledged and formulations and delivery systems that mirror the temporal characteristics of the majority of cancer BTP episodes are available, short-acting oral opioids are the accepted standard of care. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the different routes of opioid administration used in the treatment of cancer BTP and briefly discuss the characteristics of different delivery systems.

  2. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients and the mitigating effects of gabapentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Russell, Daric; Weidner, Greg; Durda, Michael; Joseph, Nicholas C; Yu, Jeffrey; Bergese, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain patients receiving opioid drugs are at risk for opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), wherein opioid pain medication leads to a paradoxical pain state. OIH involves central sensitization of primary and secondary afferent neurons in the dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion, similar to neuropathic pain. Gabapentin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog anticonvulsant used to treat neuropathic pain, has been shown in animal models to reduce fentanyl hyperalgesia without compromising analgesic effect. Chronic pain patients have also exhibited lower opioid consumption and improved pain response when given gabapentin. However, few human studies investigating gabapentin use in OIH have been performed in recent years. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie OIH and provide a critical overview of interventional therapeutic strategies, especially the clinically-successful drug gabapentin, which may reduce OIH.

  3. Opioid-Induced Hyperalgesia in Chronic Pain Patients and the Mitigating Effects of Gabapentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta eStoicea

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain patients receiving opioid drugs are at risk for opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH, wherein opioid pain medication leads to a paradoxical pain state. OIH involves central sensitization of primary and secondary afferent neurons in the dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion, similar to neuropathic pain. Gabapentin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA analogue anticonvulsant used to treat neuropathic pain, has been shown in animal models to reduce fentanyl hyperalgesia without compromising analgesic effect. Chronic pain patients have also exhibited lower opioid consumption and improved pain response when given gabapentin. However, few human studies investigating gabapentin use in OIH have been performed in recent years. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie OIH and provide a critical overview of interventional therapeutic strategies, especially the clinically-successful drug gabapentin, which may reduce OIH.

  4. Dual Alleviation of Acute and Neuropathic Pain by Fused Opioid Agonist-Neurokinin 1 Antagonist Peptidomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Cecilia; Starnowska, Joanna; Mika, Joanna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Frankiewicz, Lukasz; Novoa, Alexandre; Bochynska, Marta; Keresztes, Attila; Kosson, Piotr; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Chung, Nga N; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Schiller, Peter W; Janssens, Frans; Ceusters, Marc; Sommen, François; Meert, Theo; Przewlocka, Barbara; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2015-12-10

    Herein, the synthesis and biological evaluation of dual opioid agonists-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists is described. In these multitarget ligands, the two pharmacophores do not overlap, and this allowed maintaining high NK1R affinity and antagonist potency in compounds 12 and 13. Although the fusion of the two ligands resulted in slightly diminished opioid agonism at the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR, respectively), as compared to the opioid parent peptide, balanced MOR/DOR activities were obtained. Compared to morphine, compounds 12 and 13 produced more potent antinociceptive effects in both acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (von Frey and cold plate). Similarly to morphine, analgesic tolerance developed after repetitive administration of these compounds. To our delight, compound 12 did not produce cross-tolerance with morphine and high antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects could be reinstated after chronic administration of each of the two compounds.

  5. Increased survival of tumor-bearing mice by the delta opioid SNC 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Flores, Ricardo; Caballero-Hernández, Diana; Tamez-Guerra, Reyes; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia; Rice, Kenner C; Hicks, Mary E; Weber, Richard J

    2005-01-01

    Opioids represent a major source of relief from pain. However, opioid abuse may cause immunosuppression and cancer. We have recently reported results on novel non-peptidic delta- and mu-selective opioids that induced immunopotentiation of T cell and macrophage functions in vitro and ex vivo. In the present study, the effects of the delta-opioid receptor agonist and potent analgesic (+)-4-((alpha R)-alpha-((2S, 5R)-4-allyl-2, 5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl)-N, N-diethyl-benzamide (SNC80) on in vitro and in vivo tumor cell growth were investigated using the L5178Y-R murine model. SNC80 marginally, but significantly (p SNC80 (2 and 4 mg/kg) reduced up to 60% L5178Y-R tumor-bearing Balb/c mice death, and significantly (p SNC80 in preclinical and clinical studies.

  6. [Toxicity of analgesics in the family doctor practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuźniar-Placek, Justyna; Szponar, Jarosław; Panasiuk, Lech

    2012-01-01

    Analgesic usage without any consultation with a physician is very common in Poland. It increases the risk of occurrence of the harmful effect or harmful interaction with other medicaments taken by the patient. The abuse of painkillers applies not only to opioid but also to nonopioid analgesics. The largest group of commonly available medicaments are NSAIDs. The most frequent undesirable effect of NSAIDs' is dyspepsia. Among the most dangerous, and very often the ones without any symptoms, are gastric and duodenum ulceration for which the bleeding and perforation may be the first manifestation. Each non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug taken in large doses can be a cause of analgesic nephropathy. Its deceitful course can delay the diagnosis leading to chronic kidney failure. A complex supplements, that include central acting substances, increase the risk of kidney damage, as well as physical and psychological addiction. NSAIDs can cause: the heart failure to be more severe, treatment resistant arterial hypertension, increase an effectiveness of anticoagulants or antidiabetic drugs. The problem is also that some medicaments are available without a prescription (acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen, acetaminophen), especially that they are ingredients of many complex supplements considered safe. Taking doses larger than therapeutic or simultaneously taking many supplements of the same active substance had many times led to poisoning and even death. Equally dangerous can be an abuse of tramadol, codeine and COX-2 inhibitors. Therefore, prudential prescription of NSAIDs, knowledge of risks related to therapy and informing the patients about their side effects, may decrease the number of patients abusing the analgesics which can lead to lowering the number of deaths caused by serious complications.

  7. Opioid receptor agonists may favorably affect bone mechanical properties in rats with estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janas, Aleksandra; Folwarczna, Joanna

    2017-02-01

    The results of epidemiological, clinical, and in vivo and in vitro experimental studies on the effect of opioid analgesics on bone are inconsistent. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of morphine (an agonist of opioid receptors), buprenorphine (a partial μ opioid receptor agonist and κ opioid receptor antagonist), and naloxone (an antagonist of opioid receptors) on the skeletal system of female rats in vivo. The experiments were carried out on 3-month-old Wistar rats, divided into two groups: nonovariectomized (intact; NOVX) rats and ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The bilateral ovariectomy was performed 7 days before the start of drug administration. Morphine hydrochloride (20 mg/kg/day s.c.), buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg/day s.c.), or naloxone hydrochloride dihydrate (2 mg/kg/day s.c.) were administered for 4 weeks to NOVX and OVX rats. In OVX rats, the use of morphine and buprenorphine counteracted the development of osteoporotic changes in the skeletal system induced by estrogen deficiency. Morphine and buprenorphine beneficially affected also the skeletal system of NOVX rats, but the effects were much weaker than those in OVX rats. Naloxone generally did not affect the rat skeletal system. The results confirmed the role of opioid receptors in the regulation of bone remodeling processes and demonstrated, in experimental conditions, that the use of opioid analgesics at moderate doses may exert beneficial effects on the skeletal system, especially in estrogen deficiency.

  8. Perioperative analgesic requirements in severely obese adolescents and young adults undergoing laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted gastric sleeve resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Joselyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: One of the major advantages for patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery as compared to an open surgical procedure is the improved recovery profile and decreased opioid requirements in the perioperative period. There are no definitive studies comparing the analgesic requirements in patients undergoing two different types of minimally invasive procedure. This study retrospectively compares the perioperative analgesic requirements in severely obese adolescents and young adults undergoing laparoscopic versus robotic-assisted, laparoscopic gastric sleeve resection. Materials and Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval, the medication administration records of all severely obese patients who underwent gastric sleeve resection were retrospectively reviewed. Intra-operative analgesic and adjuvant medications administered, postoperative analgesic requirements, and visual analog pain scores were compared between those undergoing a laparoscopic procedure versus a robotic-assisted procedure. Results: This study cohort included a total of 28 patients who underwent gastric sleeve resection surgery with 14 patients in the laparoscopic group and 14 patients in the robotic-assisted group. Intra-operative adjuvant administration of both intravenous acetaminophen and ketorolac was similar in both groups. Patients in the robotic-assisted group required significantly less opioid during the intra-operative period as compared to patients in the laparoscopic group (0.15 ± 0.08 mg/kg vs. 0.19 ± 0.06 mg/kg morphine, P = 0.024. Cumulative opioid requirements for the first 72 postoperative h were similar in both the groups (0.64 ± 0.25 vs. 0.68 ± 0.27 mg/kg morphine, P = NS. No difference was noted in the postoperative pain scores. Conclusion: Although intraoperative opioid administration was lower in the robotic-assisted group, the postoperative opioid requirements, and the postoperative pain scores were similar in both groups.

  9. A Nationwide Retrospective Study of Opioid Management Patterns in 2,468 Patients with Spinal Pain in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sung-Soo; Cho, Kyu-Jung; Choi, Kyoung Hyo; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Kim, Sung-Bum; Kuh, Sung-Uk; Lee, Jae Chul; Lee, Jae Hyup; Lee, Kyu-Yeol; Lee, Sun-Ho; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Park, Si-Young; Shim, Jae Hang; Son, Byung-Chul; Yoon, Myung Ha; Park, Hye-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective patient data collection and investigator survey. Purpose To investigate patterns of opioid treatment for pain caused by spinal disorders in Korea. Overview of Literature Opioid analgesic prescription and adequacy of consumption measures in Korea have markedly increased in the past decade, suggesting changing patterns in pain management practice; however, there is lack of integrated data specific to Korean population. Methods Patient data were collected from medical records at 34 university hospitals in Korea. Outpatients receiving opioids for pain caused by spinal disorders were included in the study. Treatment patterns, including opioid types, doses, treatment duration, outcomes, and adverse drug reactions (ADRs), were evaluated. Investigators were interviewed on their perceptions of opioid use for spinal disorders. Results Among 2,468 analyzed cases, spinal stenosis (42.8%) was the most common presentation, followed by disc herniation (24.2%) and vertebral fracture (17.5%). In addition, a greater proportion of patients experienced severe pain (73.9%) rather than moderate (19.9%) or mild (0.7%) pain. Oxycodone (51.9%) and fentanyl (50.8%) were the most frequently prescribed opioids; most patients were prescribed relatively low doses. The median duration of opioid treatment was 84 days. Pain relief was superior in patients with longer treatment duration (≥2 months) or with nociceptive pain than in those with shorter treatment duration or with neuropathic or mixed-type pain. ADRs were observed in 8.6% of cases. According to the investigators' survey, "excellent analgesic effect" was a perceived advantage of opioids, while safety concerns were a disadvantage. Conclusions Opioid usage patterns in patients with spinal disorders are in alignment with international guidelines for spinal pain management. Future prospective studies may address the suitability of opioids for spinal pain treatment by using appropriate objective measurement tools

  10. Effects of Preoperative Use of Oral Dextromethorphan on Postoperative Need for Analgesics in Patients With Knee Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezary, Saeid Reza; Farshadpour, Saeedeh; Alebouyeh, Mahmood Reza; Imani, Farnad; Emami Meybodi, Mohammad Kazem; Yaribeygi, Habibollah

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMIDA) plays an essential role in postoperative pain. It seems that use of NMDA receptor antagonists such as Dextromethorphan intensifies the analgesic effects of opioids. Objectives In this study, we evaluated the effect of preoperative administration of Dextromethorphan on postoperative pain reduction. Patients and Methods This double blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on arthroscopic surgery candidates. Participants were randomly allocated to interventions and assigned to two groups of Dextromethorphan and placebo. In Dextromethorphan group, the patients received 1 mg/kg Dextromethorphan orally the night before the operation. Pain severity based on the visual analog scale (VAS) up to 16 hours postoperation, use of opioids, and the first request for analgesics were recorded postoperatively. Results A total of 112 patients in the Dextromethorphan (n = 54) and placebo groups (n = 58) were evaluated. No significant difference was detected between the two groups for age, sex or ASA. The mean amount of opioid consumption was significantly lower in patients who received Dextromethorphan (10.7 ± 5.6 mg) compared to the placebo group (13.1 ± 5.6 mg), (P = 0.03). The mean time until the first opioid request in patients who received Dextromethorphan was longer than that in the placebo group (P = 0.01). Conclusions The study results demonstrated that preemptive use of Dextromethorphan reduced postoperative pain and opioid consumption. PMID:24660143

  11. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine ... variant of the gene for the μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1) with a decreased risk for addiction to ...

  12. An Acetazolamide Based Multimodal Analgesic Approach Versus Conventional Pain Management in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Living Donor Nephrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rupinder; Sen, Indu; Wig, Jyotsna; Minz, M; Sharma, Ashish; Bala, Indu

    2009-01-01

    Summary Choice of an appropriate anaesthetic technique and adequate pain relief during laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy (LDN) is likely to make the procedure more appealing to kidney donors. Various analgesic regimens proposed to relieve pain after laparoscopic surgery include: opioids, non-opioid analgesics followed by opioids for the breakthrough pain and intra-peritoneal normal saline irrigation and instillation of local anaesthetics at surgical sites. Thorough literature review and medline search did not reveal any study where a combination of orogastric acetazolamide along with intraperitoneal saline irrigation and bupivacaine instillation techniques have been tried in these patients. In a prospective, double blind, randomized trial, eighty healthy adults undergoing LDN under general anaesthesia were enrolled to compare the efficacy of an acetazolamide based multimodal analgesic approach (Group A) with conventional pain management (Group B). Donors' demographics, intra-operative variables, early allograft function and recovery characteristics were evaluated for 72 hours. The primary end points were postoperative pain intensity on a visual analog scale and the incidence of shoulder tip pain (STP). The secondary end points included the latency of the rescue analgesia request rate, total analgesic consumption and patient satisfaction. Consistently lower mean pain scores were observed in Group A (p<0.03 for visceral pain). Frequency as well as the total dose of rescue analgesics administered was significantly less in Group A (p=0.001). Twelve patients (30.7%) in Group B complained of STP compared to three (7.5%) in Group A (p=0.025). Shoulder pain also presented earlier (8 hours versus 12 hours) and persisted for longer period in Group B (72 hours versus 48 hours, p 0.025). To conclude, a multimodal analgesic approach consisting a combination of orogastric acetazolamide, intraperito-neal saline irrigation and use of bupivacaine in the operated renal fossa

  13. Asociación de Fentanilo TTS matricial + Citrato de Fentanilo Oral Transmucosa (CFOT, en pacientes que no han recibido tratamiento previo con opioides y padecen dolor crónico intenso de etiología osteoarticular: Haciendo realidad el Ascensor Analgésico Combination of TTS-Fentanyl and Oral Transmucosal Fentanyl citrate (OTFC in opioid-naive patients suffering severe osteoarticular pain: Towards a fast-track analgesic ladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Collado

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Exponer los resultados obtenidos en 250 pacientes que sin haber tenido contacto previo con opioides, acceden a nuestra Unidad de Tratamiento del Dolor, padeciendo un dolor intenso (EVA ≥ 8 de más de 6 meses de evolución y afectos de un dolor de origen osteoarticular. Métodos: Estudio abierto, prospectivo y controlado. Los pacientes fueron tratados, inicialmente, con fentanilo TTS matricial de 12 µg/h + citrato de fentanilo oral transmucosa (CFOT de 200-400 pg., para el dolor irruptivo. A los 12 días de tratamiento, se aumento la dosificación del parche matricial de fentanilo TTS, a 25 ug/h. Se valoró la situación de los pacientes mensualmente y si el dolor no estaba controlado, se aumento la dosificación de fentanilo TTS matricial. Si por el contrario, el dolor permanecía controlado durante más de un mes y no se precisaba ningún comprimido de CFOT, se redujo la dosificación del fentanilo TTS matricial. Se analizaron los registros de intensidad del dolor, calidad del descanso nocturno, efectos secundarios y consumo medio de fetanilo TTS y CFOT, obtenidos al inicio, 1º, 3º y 6º mes de tratamiento. Resultados: La EVA medio pasó del 8,86 + 0,25, inicial hasta un 2,1 + 0,74, al 6º mes. El descanso nocturno, mejoró en una proporción idéntica a la del alivio del dolor. Solo 17 pacientes (6,80% abandonaron el tratamiento por efectos secundarios 11 por náuseas-vómitos, 5 por sedación excesiva y 1 por dermatitis. Al final del estudio, solo 1 paciente precisaba dosis superiores a los 100 µg/h. de fentanilo TTS. La mayoría de ellos (58,64% estaban tratados con un parche de 50 µg/h, el 33,47% seguía con el parche de 25 µg/h, el 4,72% necesitaba un parche de 75 µg/h y un 1,71% alcanzó el parche de 100 µg/h. Un solo paciente (0,42%, precisó 125 µg/h de fentanilo TTS. Al final del primer mes, el consumo medio de CFOT fue de 5,08 comprimidos/día. El tercer mes, su consumo descendió a una media de 2,88/día. Al

  14. Switching from high doses of pure μ-opioid agonists to transdermal buprenorphine in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorff, Lena; Sjøgren, Per; Hansen, Ole Bo

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several myths on buprenorphine's pharmacology exist: possible analgesic ceiling effect, feasibility of combination with other opioid agonists, and the reversibility of side effects. Aim to evaluate: 1) if cancer patients receiving high doses of pure agonists could obtain adequate pain...

  15. [Functional selectivity of opioid receptors ligands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Nicolas; Archer-Lahlou, Elodie; Richard-Lalonde, Mélissa; Piñeyro-Filpo, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    Opiates are the most effective analgesics available for the treatment of severe pain. However, their clinical use is restricted by unwanted side effects such as tolerance, physical dependence and respiratory depression. The strategy to develop new opiates with reduced side effects has mainly focused on the study and production of ligands that specifically bind to different opiate receptors subtypes. However, this strategy has not allowed the production of novel therapeutic ligands with a better side effects profile. Thus, other research strategies need to be explored. One which is receiving increasing attention is the possibility of exploiting ligand ability to stabilize different receptor conformations with distinct signalling profiles. This newly described property, termed functional selectivity, provides a potential means of directing the stimulus generated by an activated receptor towards a specific cellular response. Here we summarize evidence supporting the existence of ligand-specific active conformations for two opioid receptors subtypes (delta and mu), and analyze how functional selectivity may contribute in the production of longer lasting, better tolerated opiate analgesics. double dagger.

  16. Pain volatility and prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Heinzerling, Keith G; Shoptaw, Steven; Ling, Walter

    2015-12-01

    The combination of prescription opioid dependence and chronic pain is increasingly prevalent and hazardous to public health. Variability in pain may explain poor prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in persons with chronic pain. This study examined pain trajectories and pain volatility in patients with chronic pain receiving treatment for prescription opioid addiction. We conducted secondary analyses of adults with chronic pain (n = 149) who received buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP/NLX) and counseling for 12 weeks in an outpatient, multisite clinical trial. Good treatment outcome was defined as urine-verified abstinence from opioids at treatment endpoint (Week 12) and during at least 2 of the previous 3 weeks. Pain severity significantly declined over time during treatment (b = -0.36, p treatment outcome (odds ratio = 0.55, p treatment provides observational support for the analgesic effects of BUP/NLX in patients with chronic pain and opioid dependence. Patients with greater volatility in subjective pain during treatment have increased risk of returning to opioid use by the conclusion of an intensive treatment with BUP/NLX and counseling. Future research should examine underlying mechanisms of pain volatility and identify related therapeutic targets to optimize interventions for prescription opioid addiction and co-occurring chronic pain.

  17. Neuroimmune Interaction in the Regulation of Peripheral Opioid-Mediated Analgesia in Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral immune cell-mediated analgesia in inflammation is an important endogenous mechanism of pain control. Opioid receptors localized on peripheral sensory nerve terminals are activated by endogenous opioid peptides released from immune cells to produce significant analgesia. Following transendothelial migration of opioid-containing leukocytes into peripheral sites of inflammation, opioid peptides are released into a harsh milieu associated with an increase in temperature, low pH, and high proteolytic activity. Together, this microenvironment has been suggested to increase the activity of opioid peptide metabolism. Therefore, the proximity of immune cells and nerve fibers may be essential to produce adequate analgesic effects. Close associations between opioid-containing immune cells and peripheral nerve terminals have been observed. However, it is not yet determined whether these immune cells actually form synaptic-like contacts with peripheral sensory terminals and/or whether they secrete opioids in a paracrine manner. This review will provide novel insight into the peripheral mechanisms of immune-derived analgesia in inflammation, in particular, the importance of direct interactions between immune cells and the peripheral nervous system.

  18. Opioid-prescribing practices in chronic cancer pain in a tertiary care pain clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu S Thota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Under treatment of pain is a recognized global issue. Opioid analgesic medication is the mainstay of treatment in cancer patients as per the World Health Organization (WHO pain relief ladder, yet 50% of cancer patients worldwide do not receive adequate pain relief or are undertreated. Aim: The aim of this study was to audit the ongoing opioid-prescribing practices in our tertiary cancer pain clinic during January-June 2010. Materials& Methods: The prescribed type of opioid, dose, dosing interval, and laxatives details were analyzed. Results: Five hundred pain files were reviewed and 435 were found complete for audit. Three hundred forty-eight (80% patients were prescribed opioids. Two hundred fifty-nine (74.4% received weak opioids while 118 (33.9% received strong opioids. A total of 195 (45% patients had moderate and 184 (42% had severe pain. Ninety-three (26.7% patients received morphine; however, only 31.5% (58 of 184 in severe pain received morphine as per the WHO pain ladder. Only 73 of 93 (78.4% patients received an adequate dose of morphine with an adequate dosing interval and only 27 (29% were prescribed laxatives with morphine. Conclusion: This study shows that the under treatment of pain and under dosing of opioids coupled with improper side effect management are major issues.

  19. The stigma of low opioid prescription in the hospitalized multimorbid elderly in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengoni, Alessandra; Nobili, Alessandro; Corli, Oscar; Djade, Codjo Djignefa; Bertoni, Diana; Tettamanti, Mauro; Pasina, Luca; Corrao, Salvatore; Salerno, Francesco; Marcucci, Maura; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2015-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of opioid prescriptions in hospitalized geriatric patients. Other aims were to evaluate factors associated with opioid prescription, and whether or not there was consistency between the presence of pain and prescription. Opioid prescriptions were gathered from the REgistro POliterapie Societa` Italiana di Medicina Interna (REPOSI) data for the years 2008, 2010 and 2012. 1,380 in-patients, 65+ years old, were enrolled in the first registry run, 1,332 in the second and 1,340 in the third. The prevalence of opioid prescription was calculated at hospital admission and discharge. In the third run of the registry, the degree of pain was assessed by means of a numerical scale. The prevalence of patients prescribed with opioids at admission was 3.8% in the first run, 3.6% in the second and 4.1% in the third, whereas at discharge rates were slightly higher (5.8, 5.3, and 6.6%). The most frequently prescribed agents were mild opioids such as codeine and tramadol. The number of total prescribed drugs was positively associated with opioid prescription in the three runs; in the third, dementia and a better functional status were inversely associated with opioid prescription. Finally, as many as 58% of patients with significant pain at discharge were prescribed no analgesic at all. The conservative attitude of Italian physicians to prescribe opioids in elderly patients changed very little between hospital admission and discharge through a period of 5 years. Reasons for such a low opioid prescription should be sought in physicians' and patients' concerns and prejudices.

  20. Chronic opioid use is associated with increased DNA methylation correlating with increased clinical pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehring, Alexandra; Oertel, Bruno Georg; Sittl, Reinhard; Lötsch, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    Environmentally caused changes in chromosomes that do not alter the DNA sequence but cause phenotypic changes by altering gene transcription are summarized as epigenetics. A major epigenetic mechanism is methylation or demethylation at CpG-rich DNA islands. DNA methylation triggered by drugs has largely unexplored therapeutic consequences. Here we report increased methylation at a CpG rich island in the OPRM1 gene coding for μ-opioid receptors and at a global methylation site (LINE-1) in leukocytes of methadone-substituted former opiate addicts compared with matched healthy controls. Higher DNA methylation associated with chronic opioid exposure was reproduced in an independent cohort of opioid-treated as compared to non-opioid-treated pain patients. This suggests that opioids may stimulate DNA methylation. The OPRM1 methylation had no immediate effect on μ-opioid receptor transcription and was not associated with opioid dosing requirements. However, the global DNA methylation at LINE-1 was significantly correlated with increased chronic pain. This suggests inhibitory effects on the transcription of still unspecified nocifensive gene products. It further implies that opioids may be causally associated with increased genome-wide DNA methylation, although currently there is no direct evidence of this. This has phenotypic consequences for pain and may provide a new, epigenetics-associated mechanism of opioid-induced hyperalgesia. The results indicate a potential influence of opioid analgesics on the patients' epigenome. They emphasize the need for reliable and cost-effective screening tools and may imply that high-throughput screening for lead compounds in artificial expression systems may not provide the best tools for identifying new pain medications.

  1. Sucrose-induced analgesia in mice: Role of nitric oxide and opioid receptor-mediated system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abtin Shahlaee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanism of action of sweet substance-induced analgesia is thought to involve activation of the endogenous opioid system. The nitric oxide (NO pathway has a pivotal role in pain modulation of analgesic compounds such as opioids. Objectives: We investigated the role of NO and the opioid receptor-mediated system in the analgesic effect of sucrose ingestion in mice. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the effect of intraperitoneal administration of 10 mg/kg of NO synthase inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME and 20 mg/kg of opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone on the tail flick response in sucrose ingesting mice. Results: Sucrose ingestion for 12 days induced a statistically significant increase in the latency of tail flick response which was unmodified by L-NAME, but partially inhibited by naltrexone administration. Conclusions: Sucrose-induced nociception may be explained by facilitating the release of endogenous opioid peptides. Contrary to some previously studied pain models, the NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP pathway had no role in thermal hyperalgesia in our study. We recommend further studies on the involvement of NO in other animals and pain models.

  2. β-arrestins: regulatory role and therapeutic potential in opioid and cannabinoid receptor-mediated analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raehal, Kirsten M; Bohn, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a complex disorder with neurochemical and psychological components contributing to the severity, the persistence, and the difficulty in adequately treating the condition. Opioid and cannabinoids are two classes of analgesics that have been used to treat pain for centuries and are arguably the oldest of "pharmacological" interventions used by man. Unfortunately, they also produce several adverse side effects that can complicate pain management. Opioids and cannabinoids act at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and much of their effects are mediated by the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R), respectively. These receptors couple to intracellular second messengers and regulatory proteins to impart their biological effects. In this chapter, we review the role of the intracellular regulatory proteins, β-arrestins, in modulating MOR and CB1R and how they influence the analgesic and side-effect profiles of opioid and cannabinoid drugs in vivo. This review of the literature suggests that the development of opioid and cannabinoid agonists that bias MOR and CB1R toward G protein signaling cascades and away from β-arrestin interactions may provide a novel mechanism by which to produce analgesia with less severe adverse effects.

  3. Let-7 microRNAs and opioid tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YING eHE

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This chapter will focus on the role of microRNAs (miRs in regulating the actions of opioid drugs through the opioid receptors. Opioids, such as morphine, are analgesics that are used for treating many forms of acute and chronic pain. However, their chronic use is limited by undesirable effects such as opioid tolerance. The µ opioid receptor (MOR is the primary receptor responsible for opioids’ analgesia and antinociceptive tolerance. The long 3’-untranslated region (3’-UTR of MOR mRNA is of great interest since this region may contain elements for the post-transcriptional regulation of receptor expression, such as altering the stability of mRNA, influencing translational efficiency and controlling mRNA transport. Indeed, it was reported that human MOR expression was increased after a 712 bp sequence, immediately downstream of the stop codon, was removed. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNA molecules that exert their functions through base-pairing with partially complementary sequences in the 3’-UTR of target mRNAs, resulting in decreased polypeptide formation from those mRNAs. Since the discovery of the first miR, lin-4 in C. elegans, hundreds of miRs have been identified from humans to viruses, which have provided a crucial and pervasive layer of post-transcriptional gene regulation. The nervous system is a rich source of miR expression, with a diversity of miR functions in fundamental neurobiological processes including neuronal development, plasticity, metabolism and apoptosis. Recently, the let-7 family of miRs is found to be a critical regulator of MOR function in opioid tolerance. Let-7 is the first identified human miR. Its family members are highly conserved across species in sequence and function. In the review, we will present a brief review of the opioid receptors, their regulation, and opioid tolerance as well as an overview of miRs and a perspective how miRs may interact with MOR and serve as a regulator of opioid tolerance.

  4. Effects of ginsenosides on opioid-induced hyperalgesia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Tang, Minke; Li, Hui; Huang, Xinjie; Chen, Lei; Zhai, Haifeng

    2014-07-01

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is characterized by nociceptive sensitization caused by the cessation of chronic opioid use. OIH can limit the clinical use of opioid analgesics and complicate withdrawal from opioid addiction. In this study, we investigated the effects of Re, Rg1, and Rb1 ginsenosides, the bioactive components of ginseng, on OIH. OIH was achieved in mice after subcutaneous administration of morphine for 7 consecutive days three times per day. During withdrawal (days 8 and 9), these mice were administered Re, Rg1, or Rb1 intragastrically two times per day. On the test day (day 10), mice were subjected to the thermal sensitivity test and the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Re (300 mg/kg) inhibited OIH in both the thermal sensitivity test and the acetic acid-induced writhing test. However, the Rg1 and Rb1 ginsenosides failed to prevent OIH in either test. Furthermore, Rg1 showed a tendency to aggravate OIH in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Our data suggested that the ginsenoside Re, but not Rg1 or Rb1, may contribute toward reversal of OIH.

  5. Direct association of Mu-opioid and NMDA glutamate receptors supports their cross-regulation: molecular implications for opioid tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón, Javier; Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar

    2012-09-01

    In the nervous system, the interaction of opioids like morphine and its derivatives, with the G protein-coupled Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) provokes the development of analgesic tolerance, as well as physical dependence. Tolerance implies that increasing doses of the drug are required to achieve the same effect, a phenomenon that contributes significantly to the social problems surrounding recreational opioid abuse. In recent years, our understanding of the mechanisms that control MOR function in the nervous system, and that eventually produce opioid tolerance, has increased greatly. Pharmacological studies have identified a number of signaling proteins involved in morphine-induced tolerance, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate acid glutamate receptor (NMDAR), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase A (PKA), calcium (Ca²⁺)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), delta-opioid receptor (DOR) and the regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins. There is general agreement on the critical role of the NMDAR/nNOS/CaMKII pathway in this process, which is supported by the recent demonstration of a physical association between MORs and NMDARs in post-synaptic structures. Indeed, it is feasible that treatments that diminish morphine tolerance may target distinct elements within the same regulatory MOR-NMDAR pathway. Accordingly, we propose a model that incorporates the most relevant signaling components implicated in opioid tolerance in which, certain signals originating from the activated MOR are perceived by the associated NMDAR, which in turn exerts a negative feedback effect on MOR signaling. MOR- and NMDAR-mediated signals work together in a sequential and interconnected manner to ultimately induce MOR desensitization. Future studies of these phenomena should focus on adding further components to this signaling pathway in order to better define the mechanism underlying MOR desensitization in neural cells.

  6. Mu receptor binding of some commonly used opioids and their metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhaorong; Irvine, R.J. (Univ. of Adelaide (Australia)); Somogyi, A.A.; Bochner, F. (Univ. of Adelaide (Australia) Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    The binding affinity to the {mu} receptor of some opioids chemically related to morphine and some of their metabolites was examined in rat brain homogenates with {sup 3}H-DAMGO. The chemical group at position 6 of the molecule had little effect on binding. Decreasing the length of the alkyl group at position 3 decreased the K{sub i} values (morphine < codeine < ethylmorphine < pholcodine). Analgesics with high clinical potency containing a methoxyl group at position 3 had relatively weak receptor binding, while their O-demethylated metabolites had much stronger binding. Many opioids may exert their pharmacological actions predominantly through metabolites.

  7. Clinical and pathological aspects of analgesic nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Nanra, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    1 Analgesic nephropathy is part of the analgesic syndrome which has gastrointestinal, haematological, cardiovascular, psychological and psychiatric, and pregnancy and gonadal manifestations; premature ageing may also be a feature.

  8. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling of opioids in healthy human volunteers. A minireview

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Pain is characterized by its multi-dimensional nature, explaining in part why the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships are not straightforward for analgesics. The first part of this MiniReview gives an overview of PK, PD and PK/PD models, as well as of population approach used in analgesic studies. The second part updates the state-of-the-art in the PK/PD relationship of opioids, focusing on data obtained on experimental human pain models, a useful tool to characterize the PD...

  9. Analgesic activity of Justicia beddomei leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, U; Rao, J Venkateshwara; Krupanidhi, A M; Shanmukhappa, S

    2007-10-01

    The analgesic activity of ethanolic extract of Justicia beddome leaves (Family: Acanthaceae) was evaluated in albino rats using Eddy's hot plate method. The extract at 50 and 100 mg/ kg, (i.p), showed significant analgesic activity at 90 minutes of administration. The analgesic effect of the extract was comparable to that of morphine sulphate.

  10. Analgesic activity of Justicia beddomei leaf extract

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasa, U.; Rao, J. Venkateshwara; Krupanidhi, A.M.; Shanmukhappa, S.

    2007-01-01

    The analgesic activity of ethanolic extract of Justicia beddome leaves (Family: Acanthaceae) was evaluated in albino rats using Eddy's hot plate method. The extract at 50 and 100 mg/ kg, (i.p), showed significant analgesic activity at 90 minutes of administration. The analgesic effect of the extract was comparable to that of morphine sulphate.

  11. Use of preoperative gabapentin significantly reduces postoperative opioid consumption: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Sudha; Lau, Christine SM; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Effective postoperative pain management is crucial in the care of surgical patients. Opioids, which are commonly used in managing postoperative pain, have a potential for tolerance and addiction, along with sedating side effects. Gabapentin’s use as a multimodal analgesic regimen to treat neuropathic pain has been documented as having favorable side effects. This meta-analysis examined the use of preoperative gabapentin and its impact on postoperative opioid consumption. Materials and methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify randomized control trials that evaluated preoperative gabapentin on postoperative opioid consumption. The outcomes of interest were cumulative opioid consumption following the surgery and the incidence of vomiting, somnolence, and nausea. Results A total of 1,793 patients involved in 17 randomized control trials formed the final analysis for this study. Postoperative opioid consumption was reduced when using gabapentin within the initial 24 hours following surgery (standard mean difference −1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −1.96 to −0.73; Pfentanyl, and tramadol consumption (P<0.05). While a significant increase in postoperative somnolence incidence was observed (relative risk 1.30, 95% CI: 1.10–1.54, P<0.05), there were no significant effects on postoperative vomiting and nausea. Conclusion The administration of preoperative gabapentin reduced the consumption of opioids during the initial 24 hours following surgery. The reduction in postoperative opioids with preoperative gabapentin increased postoperative somnolence, but no significant differences were observed in nausea and vomiting incidences. The results from this study demonstrate that gabapentin is more beneficial in mastectomy and spinal, abdominal, and thyroid surgeries. Gabapentin is an effective analgesic adjunct, and clinicians should consider its use in multimodal treatment plans among patients undergoing elective surgery. PMID

  12. The unsolved case of “bone-impairing analgesics”: the endocrine effects of opioids on bone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coluzzi F

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Flaminia Coluzzi,1,2 Joseph Pergolizzi,3,4 Robert B Raffa,5 Consalvo Mattia1,2 1Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Unit of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine and Pain Therapy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medicine – Polo Pontino, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy; 2SIAARTI Study Group on Acute and Chronic Pain, Rome, Italy; 3Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 4Naples Anesthesia and Pain Associates, Naples, FL, 5Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: The current literature describes the possible risks for bone fracture in chronic analgesics users. There are three main hypotheses that could explain the increased risk of fracture associated with central analgesics, such as opioids: 1 the increased risk of falls caused by central nervous system effects, including sedation and dizziness; 2 reduced bone mass density caused by the direct opioid effect on osteoblasts; and 3 chronic opioid-induced hypogonadism. The impact of opioids varies by sex and among the type of opioid used (less, for example, for tapentadol and buprenorphine. Opioid-associated androgen deficiency is correlated with an increased risk of osteoporosis; thus, despite that standards have not been established for monitoring and treating opioid-induced hypogonadism or hypoadrenalism, all patients chronically taking opioids (particularly at doses ≥100 mg morphine daily should be monitored for the early detection of hormonal impairment and low bone mass density. Keywords: opioids side effects, bone metabolism, fractures, OPIAD, endocrine system, chronic pain

  13. Trait anger expressiveness and pain-induced beta-endorphin release: support for the opioid dysfunction hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruehl, Stephen; Chung, Ok Y; Burns, John W; Diedrich, Laura

    2007-08-01

    The anger management styles of anger-in (inhibition) and anger-out (direct expression) are positively associated with pain responsiveness. Opioid blockade studies suggest that hyperalgesic effects of trait anger-out, but not those of trait anger-in, are mediated in part by opioid analgesic system dysfunction. The current study tested the opioid dysfunction hypothesis of anger-out using an alternative index of opioid function: pain-induced changes in plasma endogenous opioids. Plasma beta-endorphin (BE) was assessed at rest and again following exposure to three laboratory acute pain tasks (finger pressure, ischemic, and thermal) in 14 healthy controls and 13 chronic low back pain (LBP) subjects. As expected, acute pain ratings correlated positively with measures of anger-in (both groups) and anger-out (LBP group; p'spain-induced increases in BE were associated with significantly lower pain ratings in both groups (p'sanger-out significantly predicted smaller pain-induced BE increases (p.10). Anger-in did not display significant main or interaction effects on pain-induced BE changes (p's>.10). The significant association between anger-out and BE release partially mediated the hyperalgesic effects of anger-out on pain unpleasantness, and was not attenuated by statistical control of general negative affect. This suggests unique associations with expressive anger regulation. Elevated trait anger-out therefore appears to be associated with opioid analgesic system dysfunction, whether it is indexed by responses to opioid blockade or by examining circulating endogenous opioid levels. Possible "statextrait" interactions on these anger-related opioid system differences are discussed.

  14. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  15. Weighing the balance: how analgesics used in chronic pain influence sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohra, Miqdad H; Kaushik, Chhavi; Temple, Daniel; Chung, Sharon A; Shapiro, Colin M

    2014-08-01

    Pain and sleep share a bidirectional relationship, with each influencing the other. Several excellent reviews have explored this relationship. In this article, we revisit the evidence and explore existing research on this complex inter-relationship. The primary focus of the article is on the pharmacological treatment of chronic non-malignant pain and the main purpose is to review the effect of various pharmacological agents used in the management of chronic pain on sleep. This has not been comprehensively done before. We explore the clinical use of these agents, their impact on sleep architecture and sleep physiology, the mechanism of action on sleep parameters and sleep disorders associated with these agents. Pharmacological classes reviewed include antidepressants, opioid analgesics, anti-epileptics, cannabinoids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, drugs most commonly used to manage chronic pain. The objective is to help health professionals gain better insight into the complex effect that commonly used analgesics have on an individual's sleep and how this could impact on the effectiveness of the drug as an analgesic. We conclude that antidepressants have both positive and negative effects on sleep, so do opioids, but in the latter case the evidence shifts towards the counterproductive side. Some anticonvulsants are sleep sparing and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are sleep neutral. Cannabinoids remain an underexplored and researched group.

  16. Combination analgesic involvement in the pathogenesis of analgesic nephropathy: the European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elseviers, M M; De Broe, M E

    1996-07-01

    Analgesic nephropathy (AN) is a chronic renal disease characterized by renal papillary necrosis and interstitial nephritis caused by excessive consumption of analgesic mixtures. In a recent study, diagnostic criteria for AN, based on a computed tomography scan investigation without contrast, were presented. The observation of a decreased renal mass of both kidneys combined with either bumpy contours or papillary calcifications was found to have a high diagnostic performance. Although several case control studies and two prospective studies demonstrated the association between analgesic abuse and nephropathy, the nephrotoxicity of the different analgesic products had not been clearly established. Analgesic abuse can be defined as a daily consumption of analgesic mixtures over a several-year period. Abuse of single analgesics is rare; it has been clearly demonstrated that abusers prefer analgesic mixtures. In Belgium, the prevalence of AN was positively related to the sales of analgesic mixtures containing two analgesic components plus caffeine and/or codeine. This relationship could not be observed for analgesics containing only one analgesic component plus caffeine and/or codeine. Moreover, during a European multicenter study, nephrotoxicity of different combinations of analgesic mixtures (all containing caffeine and/or codeine) could be documented in the absence of any previous phenacetin consumption. Epidemiologic observations in Sweden, France, and Belgium regarding incidence of AN, sales figures of analgesics, and legislative measurements concerning analgesic consumption supported the previous observations.

  17. Activation of κ Opioid Receptors in Cutaneous Nerve Endings by Conorphin-1, a Novel Subtype-Selective Conopeptide, Does Not Mediate Peripheral Analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Whately, Ella; Brust, Andreas; Inserra, Marco C; Asvadi, Naghmeh H; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F; Cabot, Peter J; Vetter, Irina

    2015-10-21

    Selective activation of peripheral κ opioid receptors (KORs) may overcome the dose-limiting adverse effects of conventional opioid analgesics. We recently developed a vicinal disulfide-stabilized class of peptides with subnanomolar potency at the KOR. The aim of this study was to assess the analgesic effects of one of these peptides, named conorphin-1, in comparison with the prototypical KOR-selective small molecule agonist U-50488, in several rodent pain models. Surprisingly, neither conorphin-1 nor U-50488 were analgesic when delivered peripherally by intraplantar injection at local concentrations expected to fully activate the KOR at cutaneous nerve endings. While U-50488 was analgesic when delivered at high local concentrations, this effect could not be reversed by coadministration with the selective KOR antagonist ML190 or the nonselective opioid antagonist naloxone. Instead, U-50488 likely mediated its peripheral analgesic effect through nonselective inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels, including peripheral sensory neuron isoforms NaV1.8 and NaV1.7. Our study suggests that targeting the KOR in peripheral sensory nerve endings innervating the skin is not an alternative analgesic approach.

  18. Incidence and Risk Factors for Progression From Acute to Longer-term Opioid Prescribing: A Population-based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooten, W. Michael; St Sauver, Jennifer L.; McGree, Michaela E.; Jacobson, Debra J.; Warner, David O.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine what proportion of a geographically-defined population who receive new opioid prescriptions progress to episodic or chronic patterns of opioid prescribing, and to explore the clinical characteristics associated with patterns of opioid prescribing. Methods Population-based drug prescription records for the Olmsted County population between January 1 and December 31, 2009 were obtained using the Rochester Epidemiology Project medical records linkage system (n=142,377). All medical records were reviewed for a random sample of 293 patients who had a new (“incident”) prescription for an opioid analgesic in 2009. Patients were followed through their medical records for 1 year following their initial prescription date, with patterns of opioid prescribing categorized as acute, episodic, or chronic. Results Overall, 293 patients received 515 new opioid prescriptions in 2009. Of these, 61 (21%) progressed to an episodic prescribing pattern, and 19 (6%) progressed to a chronic prescribing pattern. In multivariable logistic regression analyses, substance abuse was significantly associated with a chronic opioid prescribing pattern compared to an acute prescribing pattern. Past or current nicotine use and substance abuse were significantly associated with episodic or chronic prescribing patterns compared to an acute prescribing pattern. Conclusion Knowledge of the clinical characteristics associated with the progression of an acute to an episodic or chronic prescribing pattern of opioid use could aid in the identification of at-risk patients and provide the basis for developing targeted clinical interventions. PMID:26141327

  19. Delta-opioid receptor analgesia is independent of microglial activation in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Joanna; Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Starowicz, Katarzyna; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic effect of delta-opioid receptor (DOR) ligands in neuropathic pain is not diminished in contrast to other opioid receptor ligands, which lose their effectiveness as analgesics. In this study, we examine whether this effect is related to nerve injury-induced microglial activation. We therefore investigated the influence of minocycline-induced inhibition of microglial activation on the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists: morphine, DAMGO, U50,488H, DPDPE, Deltorphin II and SNC80 after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve in rats. Pre-emptive and repeated administration of minocycline (30 mg/kg, i.p.) over 7 days significantly reduced allodynia and hyperalgesia as measured on day 7 after CCI. The antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of intrathecally (i.t.) administered morphine (10-20 µg), DAMGO (1-2 µg) and U50,488H (25-50 µg) were significantly potentiated in rats after minocycline, but no such changes were observed after DPDPE (10-20 µg), deltorphin II (1.5-15 µg) and SNC80 (10-20 µg) administration. Additionally, nerve injury-induced down-regulation of all types of opioid receptors in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia was not influenced by minocycline, which indicates that the effects of opioid ligands are dependent on other changes, presumably neuroimmune interactions. Our study of rat primary microglial cell culture using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry confirmed the presence of mu-opioid receptors (MOR) and kappa-opioid receptors (KOR), further we provide the first evidence for the lack of DOR on microglial cells. In summary, DOR analgesia is different from analgesia induced by MOR and KOR receptors because it does not dependent on injury-induced microglial activation. DOR agonists appear to be the best candidates for new drugs to treat neuropathic pain.

  20. Delta-opioid receptor analgesia is independent of microglial activation in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Mika

    Full Text Available The analgesic effect of delta-opioid receptor (DOR ligands in neuropathic pain is not diminished in contrast to other opioid receptor ligands, which lose their effectiveness as analgesics. In this study, we examine whether this effect is related to nerve injury-induced microglial activation. We therefore investigated the influence of minocycline-induced inhibition of microglial activation on the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists: morphine, DAMGO, U50,488H, DPDPE, Deltorphin II and SNC80 after chronic constriction injury (CCI to the sciatic nerve in rats. Pre-emptive and repeated administration of minocycline (30 mg/kg, i.p. over 7 days significantly reduced allodynia and hyperalgesia as measured on day 7 after CCI. The antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of intrathecally (i.t. administered morphine (10-20 µg, DAMGO (1-2 µg and U50,488H (25-50 µg were significantly potentiated in rats after minocycline, but no such changes were observed after DPDPE (10-20 µg, deltorphin II (1.5-15 µg and SNC80 (10-20 µg administration. Additionally, nerve injury-induced down-regulation of all types of opioid receptors in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia was not influenced by minocycline, which indicates that the effects of opioid ligands are dependent on other changes, presumably neuroimmune interactions. Our study of rat primary microglial cell culture using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry confirmed the presence of mu-opioid receptors (MOR and kappa-opioid receptors (KOR, further we provide the first evidence for the lack of DOR on microglial cells. In summary, DOR analgesia is different from analgesia induced by MOR and KOR receptors because it does not dependent on injury-induced microglial activation. DOR agonists appear to be the best candidates for new drugs to treat neuropathic pain.

  1. Delta-Opioid Receptor Analgesia Is Independent of Microglial Activation in a Rat Model of Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Starowicz, Katarzyna; Przewlocka, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic effect of delta-opioid receptor (DOR) ligands in neuropathic pain is not diminished in contrast to other opioid receptor ligands, which lose their effectiveness as analgesics. In this study, we examine whether this effect is related to nerve injury-induced microglial activation. We therefore investigated the influence of minocycline-induced inhibition of microglial activation on the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists: morphine, DAMGO, U50,488H, DPDPE, Deltorphin II and SNC80 after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve in rats. Pre-emptive and repeated administration of minocycline (30 mg/kg, i.p.) over 7 days significantly reduced allodynia and hyperalgesia as measured on day 7 after CCI. The antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of intrathecally (i.t.) administered morphine (10–20 µg), DAMGO (1–2 µg) and U50,488H (25–50 µg) were significantly potentiated in rats after minocycline, but no such changes were observed after DPDPE (10–20 µg), deltorphin II (1.5–15 µg) and SNC80 (10–20 µg) administration. Additionally, nerve injury-induced down-regulation of all types of opioid receptors in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia was not influenced by minocycline, which indicates that the effects of opioid ligands are dependent on other changes, presumably neuroimmune interactions. Our study of rat primary microglial cell culture using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry confirmed the presence of mu-opioid receptors (MOR) and kappa-opioid receptors (KOR), further we provide the first evidence for the lack of DOR on microglial cells. In summary, DOR analgesia is different from analgesia induced by MOR and KOR receptors because it does not dependent on injury-induced microglial activation. DOR agonists appear to be the best candidates for new drugs to treat neuropathic pain. PMID:25105291

  2. The role of naloxegol in the management of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Wojciech; Woron, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) and other gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD) significantly deteriorate patients’ quality of life and may lead to noncompliance with opioid schedule and undertreatment of pain. Although traditional oral laxatives are the first-line treatment of OIC, they do not address OIBD pathophysiology, and display numerous adverse effects. OIC treatment includes prokinetics (lubiprostone), opioid switch, and changing route of opioid administration. Targeted management of OIBD comprises the use of purely peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORA): naloxegol and methylnaltrexone. Naloxegol (NKTR-118) is a polymer conjugate of the opioid antagonist naloxone. The polyethylene glycol limits naloxegol capacity to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Naloxegol is substrate for the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporter. The central nervous system penetration of naloxegol is negligible due to reduced permeability and its increased efflux across the BBB, related to P-gp transporter. Naloxegol antagonizes μ- and κ-opioid receptors and displays low affinity to δ-opioid receptors in the GI tract, thereby decreasing OIBD symptoms without reversing central analgesic effects. Naloxegol is metabolised through CYP3A4 to six metabolites, with the majority of the dose (68%) excreted with faeces and less (16%) with urine. The dose of naloxegol equals 25 mg administered orally once daily on a fasting condition. Mild or moderate hepatic impairment has no impact on naloxegol dosing; naloxegol was not studied and is not recommended in patients with hepatic failure. Dose reduction (12.5 mg once daily) and caution is recommended in patients with moderate-to-severe renal impairment. Efficacy (bowel movement in 42–49% of patients not responsive to laxatives) and safety of naloxegol were confirmed in studies conducted in patients with OIC and nonmalignant pain. Naloxegol may be useful for cancer patients with OIC

  3. Opioid partial agonist buprenorphine dampens responses to psychosocial stress in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershad, Anya K; Jaffe, Jerome H; Childs, Emma; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-02-01

    Pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that opioid drugs have stress-dampening effects. In animal models, opioid analgesics attenuate responses to isolation distress, and in humans, opioids reduce stress related to anticipation of physical pain. The stress-reducing effects of opioid drugs may contribute to their abuse potential. Despite this evidence in laboratory animals, the effects of opioids on responses to psychosocial stress have not been determined in humans. Here we examined the effects of buprenorphine, a μ-opioid partial agonist used to treat opioid dependence and pain, on subjective and physiological responses to a stressful public speaking task in healthy adults. We hypothesized that buprenorphine would reduce subjective and physiological stress responses. Healthy adult volunteers (N=48) were randomly assigned to receive placebo, 0.2mg sublingual buprenorphine, or 0.4mg sublingual buprenorphine in a two-session study with a stressful speaking task (Trier Social Stress Test; TSST) and a non-stressful control task. During the sessions, the participants reported on their mood states, provided subjective appraisals of the task, and measures of salivary cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure at regular intervals. Stress produced its expected effects, increasing heart rate, blood pressure, salivary cortisol, and subjective ratings of anxiety and negative mood. In line with our hypothesis, both doses of buprenorphine significantly dampened salivary cortisol responses to stress. On self-report ratings, buprenorphine reduced how threatening participants found the tasks. These results suggest that enhanced opioid signaling dampens responses to social stress in humans, as it does in laboratory animals. This stress-dampening effect of buprenorphine may contribute to the non-medical use of opioid drugs.

  4. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling of opioids in healthy human volunteers. a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing Lorenzini, Kuntheavy; Daali, Youssef; Dayer, Pierre; Desmeules, Jules

    2012-03-01

    Pain is characterized by its multi-dimensional nature, explaining in part why the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationships are not straightforward for analgesics. The first part of this MiniReview gives an overview of PK, PD and PK/PD models, as well as of population approach used in analgesic studies. The second part updates the state-of-the-art in the PK/PD relationship of opioids, focusing on data obtained on experimental human pain models, a useful tool to characterize the PD of analgesics. For the so-called weak opioids such as codeine, experimental human studies showed that analgesia relies mainly upon biotransformation into morphine. However, the time-course of plasma concentrations of morphine did not always reflect the time-course of effects, the major site of action being the central nervous system. For tramadol, a correlation has been observed between the analgesic response and the PK of the (+)R-O-demethyl-tramadol metabolite. For 'stronger' opioids such as oxycodone, studies assessing the PK/PD of oxycodone suggested that active metabolite oxymorphone also strongly contributes to the analgesia and that analgesia may also be partially related through an action to peripherally located κ-opioid receptors. Different models have been proposed to describe the time-course of buprenorphine. An effect-compartment model was adopted to describe the PK/PD of morphine and its active metabolite, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G). A longer blood-effect site equilibration half-life t(1/2) k(e0) was observed for M6G, suggesting a longer onset of action. The studies assessing the PK/PD of fentanyl and its derivatives showed a short t(1/2) k(e0) for analgesia, between 0.2 and 9 min., reflecting a short onset of effect. In conclusion, depending on the speed of transfer between the plasma and the effect site as well as the participation of active metabolites, the time-course of the analgesic effects can be close to the plasma concentrations (alfentanil and

  5. Bioorthogonal click chemistry to assay mu-opioid receptor palmitoylation using 15-hexadecynoic acid and immunoprecipitation

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a modification of bioorthogonal click chemistry to assay the palmitoylation of cellular proteins. This assay utilizes 15-hexadecynoic acid (15-HDYA) as a chemical probe in combination with protein immunoprecipitation using magnetic beads in order to detect S-palmitoylation of proteins of interest. Here we demonstrate the utility of this approach for the mu-opioid receptor (MOR), a GPCR responsible for mediating the analgesic and addictive properties of most clinically releva...

  6. New opioid designed multiple ligand from Dmt-Tic and morphinan pharmacophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeyer, John L; Peng, Xuemei; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Salvadori, Severo; Trapella, Claudio; Balboni, Gianfranco

    2006-09-07

    Here, we report the synthesis of a designed multi-pharmacophore ligand derived from the linkage of a delta selective peptide antagonist (Dmt-Tic) and a mu/kappa morphinan agonist butorphan (MCL 101) through a two methylene spacer. The new compound MCL 450 maintains the same characteristics as those the two reference compounds. MCL 450 represents a useful starting point for the synthesis of other multiple opioid ligands endowed with analgesic properties with low tolerance and dependence.

  7. Synthetic and Receptor Signaling Explorations of the Mitragyna Alkaloids: Mitragynine as an Atypical Molecular Framework for Opioid Receptor Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruegel, Andrew C; Gassaway, Madalee M; Kapoor, Abhijeet; Váradi, András; Majumdar, Susruta; Filizola, Marta; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sames, Dalibor

    2016-06-01

    Mu-opioid receptor agonists represent mainstays of pain management. However, the therapeutic use of these agents is associated with serious side effects, including potentially lethal respiratory depression. Accordingly, there is a longstanding interest in the development of new opioid analgesics with improved therapeutic profiles. The alkaloids of the Southeast Asian plant Mitragyna speciosa, represented by the prototypical member mitragynine, are an unusual class of opioid receptor modulators with distinct pharmacological properties. Here we describe the first receptor-level functional characterization of mitragynine and related natural alkaloids at the human mu-, kappa-, and delta-opioid receptors. These results show that mitragynine and the oxidized analogue 7-hydroxymitragynine, are partial agonists of the human mu-opioid receptor and competitive antagonists at the kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. We also show that mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine are G-protein-biased agonists of the mu-opioid receptor, which do not recruit β-arrestin following receptor activation. Therefore, the Mitragyna alkaloid scaffold represents a novel framework for the development of functionally biased opioid modulators, which may exhibit improved therapeutic profiles. Also presented is an enantioselective total synthesis of both (-)-mitragynine and its unnatural enantiomer, (+)-mitragynine, employing a proline-catalyzed Mannich-Michael reaction sequence as the key transformation. Pharmacological evaluation of (+)-mitragynine revealed its much weaker opioid activity. Likewise, the intermediates and chemical transformations developed in the total synthesis allowed the elucidation of previously unexplored structure-activity relationships (SAR) within the Mitragyna scaffold. Molecular docking studies, in combination with the observed chemical SAR, suggest that Mitragyna alkaloids adopt a binding pose at the mu-opioid receptor that is distinct from that of classical opioids.

  8. Mu Opioid Receptor Gene: New Point Mutations in Opioid Addicts

    OpenAIRE

    Dinarvand, Amin; Goodarzi, Ali; Vousooghi, Nasim; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Dinarvand, Rasoul; Ostadzadeh, Fahimeh; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mu opioid receptor gene and drug addiction has been shown in various studies. Here, we have evaluated the existence of polymorphisms in exon 3 of this gene in Iranian population and investigated the possible association between these mutations and opioid addiction. Methods 79 opioid-dependent subjects (55 males, 24 females) and 134 non-addict or control individuals (74 males, 60 females) participated in the study. Geno...

  9. Enhanced analgesic effect of morphine-nimodipine combination after intraspinal administration as compared to systemic administration in mice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dilip Verma; Subrata Basu Ray; Ishan Patro; Shashi Wadhwa

    2005-09-01

    Calcium plays an important role in the pathophysiology of pain. A number of studies have investigated the effect of L-type calcium channel blockers on the analgesic response of morphine. However, the results are conflicting. In the present study, the antinociceptive effect of morphine (2.5 g) and nimodipine (1 g) co-administered intraspinally in mice was observed using the tail flick test. It was compared to the analgesic effect of these drugs (morphine – 250 g subcutaneously; nimodipine – 100 g intraperitoneally) after systemic administration. Nimodipine is highly lipophilic and readily crosses the blood brain barrier. Addition of nimodipine to morphine potentiated the analgesic response of the latter when administered through the intraspinal route but not when administered through systemic route. It may be due to direct inhibitory effect of morphine and nimodipine on neurons of superficial laminae of the spinal cord after binding to -opioid receptors and L-type calcium channels respectively.

  10. Fisiología y farmacología clínica de los opioides epidurales e intratecales Physiology and clinical pharmacology of epidural and intrathecal opioids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mugabure

    2005-02-01

    intradural. La metadona es otro fármaco al que se le ha observado una selectividad medular moderada tras su administración epidural. Sin embargo, su prolongada vida media puede resultar en su acumulación plasmática y presencia de efectos supraespinales a lo largo del tiempo. La administración epidural de fentanilo ofrece muy pocas ventajas sobre su utilización intravenosa, salvo en obstetricia donde parece producir una analgesia selectiva medular de grado moderado. Finalmente, la administración epidural de sufentanilo o alfentanilo parece producir analgesia por recaptación sistémica y redistribución hacia los receptores opioides cerebrales.The history of intrathecal and epidural anaesthesia is in parallel with the development of general anaesthesia. The first published report on opioids for intrathecal anaesthesia belongs to a Romanian surgeon, who presented his experience at Paris in 1901. It was almost a century before the opioids were used for epidural analgesia. Epidural and intrathecal opioids are today part of a routine regimen for intra and postoperative analgesia. Over the last 30 years, the use of epidural opioids has became a standard for analgesia in labor and delivery, and for the management of acute and chronic pain. It has been widely asumed that any opioid placed in the epidural or intrathecal spaces will produce highly selective spinally mediated analgesia that is superior to that produced by other analgesic techniques. Unfortunately, this is simply not true. In fact, multiples opioids are currently employed for spinal use despite the fact that clinical evidence has shown that spinal administration does not produce analgesia with a selective spinal mechanism or the analgesia produced is not superior to that produced by intravenous administration. Appropriate use of spinal opioids necessitates under-standing the physiology and clinical pharmacology of these drugs and which opioids produce selective spinal analgesia and which do not. In short, spinal

  11. Opioid and nonopioid interactions in two forms of stress-induced analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisel, J E; Fleshner, M; Watkins, L R; Maier, S F

    1993-05-01

    Stressful environmental events activate endogenous mechanisms of pain inhibition. Under some circumstances the analgesia is blocked by naloxone/naltrexone ("opioid"), while under others it is not ("nonopioid"). The existence of these two categories of analgesia leads to the question of how they are related. In a collateral inhibition model proposed by Kirshgessner, Bodnar, and Pasternak (1982), opiate and nonopiate mechanisms were viewed as acting in a mutually inhibitory fashion. In the present experiments, rats were exposed to either of two environmental stressors that produce a nonopioid stress-induced analgesia (SIA) following injections of the opiate antagonist naltrexone or agonist morphine. In the presence of naltrexone, SIA produced by either cold water swim (CWS) or social defeat was enhanced. These same SIAs were found to attenuate the analgesic effect of morphine, demonstrating that an activation of opioid systems can inhibit nonopioid analgesias. These results support an inhibitory interaction of opioid and nonopioid mechanisms in some forms of stress-induced analgesia.

  12. Cancer-Related Pain Management and the Optimal Use of Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis-Pina, Paulo; Lawlor, Peter G; Barbosa, António

    2015-01-01

    Pain relief is vital to the treatment of cancer. Despite the widespread use and recognition of clinical recommendations for the management of cancer-related pain, avoidable suffering is still prevalent in patients with malignant disease. A gap exists between what is known about pain medical management and actual practices of patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals and institutions. Opioids are the pillar of the medical management of moderate to severe pain. The prescription of opioid analgesics - by a registered medical practitioner for absolute pain control - is a legitimate practice. In this article we look at patients' fears and physicians' general hesitations towards morphine and alike. We examine misconceptions that yield fallacies on the therapeutically use of opioids and, therefore, sustain inadequate pain management.

  13. Peripheral Opioid Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-16

    noxious insult . These substances include serotonin. bradykinin. and histamine . Serotonin (5-hydroxylryptamine [5-HT]) is derived from platelets in...IL-IP) and substance P, releases histamine which increases Ca·" permeability resulting in the release of certain neuropeptides (Falus and Meretey...i.p. injection than by intracerebroventricular injection. The effects of delta, mu, and kappa opioid agonists were investigated by Stein et al

  14. Update on prescription extended-release opioids and appropriate patient selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain is largely underdiagnosed, often undertreated, and expected to increase as the American population ages. Many patients with chronic pain require long-term treatment with analgesic medications, and pain management may involve use of prescription opioids for patients whose pain is inadequately controlled through other therapies. Yet because of the potential for abuse and addiction, many clinicians hesitate to treat their patients with pain with potentially beneficial agents. Finding the right opioid for the right patient is the first – often complicated – step. Ensuring that patients continue to properly use the medication while achieving therapeutic analgesic effects is the long-term goal. Combined with careful patient selection and ongoing monitoring, new formulations using extended-release technologies incorporating tamper-resistant features may help combat the growing risk of abuse or misuse, which will hopefully reduce individual suffering and the societal burden of chronic pain. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an update on extended-release opioids and to provide clinicians with a greater understanding of which patients might benefit from these new opioid formulations and how to integrate the recommended monitoring for abuse potential into clinical practice. PMID:23900563

  15. Analgesic efficacy of lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal: A randomized trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecy Ferreira de Oliveira Pinheiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the analgesic efficacy of subcutaneous lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal following heart surgery. Methods: sixty volunteers were randomly allocated in two groups; 30 participants in the experimental group were given 1% subcutaneous lidocaine, and 30 controls were given a multimodal analgesia regime comprising systemic anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. The intensity and quality of pain and trait and state anxiety were assessed. The association between independent variables and final outcome was assessed by means of the Chi-squared test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test. Results: the groups did not exhibit significant difference with respect to the intensity of pain upon chest tube removal (p= 0.47. The most frequent descriptors of pain reported by the participants were pressing, sharp, pricking, burning and unbearable. Conclusion: the present study suggests that the analgesic effect of the subcutaneous administration of 1% lidocaine combined with multimodal analgesia is most efficacious.

  16. The role of multidrug resistance-associated protein in the blood-brain barrier and opioid analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wendy; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2013-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier protects the brain from circulating compounds and drugs. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is involved with the barrier, both preventing the influx of agent from the blood into the brain and facilitating the efflux of compounds from the brain into the blood, raising the possibility of a similar role for other transporters. Multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), a 190 kDa protein, similar to Pgp is also ABC transporter that has been implicated in the blood-brain barrier. The current study explores its role in opioid action. Immunohistochemically, it is localized in the choroid plexus in rats and can be selectively downregulated by antisense treatment at both the level of mRNA, as shown by RT-PCR, and protein, as demonstrated immunohistochemically. Behaviorally, downregulation of MRP significantly enhances the analgesic potency of systemic morphine in MRP knockout mice and in antisense-treated rats by lowering the blood-brain barrier. Following intracerebroventricular administration, a number of compounds, including some opioids, are rapidly secreted from the brain into the blood where they contribute to the overall analgesic effects by activating peripheral systems. MRP plays a role in this efflux. Downregulating MRP expression leads to a corresponding decrease in the transport and a diminished analgesic response from opioids administered intracerebroventricularly. Thus, the transporter protein MRP plays a role in maintaining the blood-brain barrier and modulates the activity of opioids.

  17. Potentiation of Opioid-Induced Analgesia by L-Type Calcium Channel Blockers: Need for Clinical Trial in Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Basu Ray

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports indicate that the analgesic effect of opioids is due to both closure of specific voltage-gated calcium channels (N- and P/Q-types and opening of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs in neurons concerned with transmission of pain. However, administration of opioids leads to unacceptable levels of side effects, particularly at high doses. Thus, current research is directed towards simultaneously targeting other voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs like the L-type VGCCs or even other cell signaling mechanisms, which would aug-ment opioid-mediated analgesic effect without a concurrent increase in the side effects. Unfortunately, the results of these studies are often conflicting considering the different experimental paradigms (variable drug selection and their doses and also the specific pain test used for studying analgesia adopted by researchers. The present review focuses on some of the interesting findings regarding the analgesic effect of Opioids + L-VGCC blockers and suggests that time has come for a clinical trial of this combination of drugs in the treatment of cancer pain.

  18. Evaluation of analgesic activity of the leaves of Passiflora incarnata Linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvarna Ingale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Passiflora incarnata also known as ′Passion flower′ is used as an anxiolytic and sedative throughout the world from ancient time. The plant is used as an analgesic, antispasmodic, sedative- hypnotic and narcotic. It is also used in neuralgia, epilepsy, insomnia, ulcers, haemorrhoids and neurosis in many parts of the world. There was no report on analgesic activity of P. incarnata. Hence, the present study is designed to assess analgesic activity of leaves of P. incarnata using sodium chloride-induced eye wiping test and formalin test. In formalin test, n-butanol extract of leaves of P. incarnata (BEPI in the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg as well as BEPI-F1 showed significant reduction in duration of paw licking in neurogenic and inflammatory phase(P<0.001. Pretreatment with naloxone reversed the analgesia induced by BEPI, while atropine did not reverse the analgesia induced by BEPI significantly (P≤0.001. In eye wiping test, BEPI in the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg, i.p. exerted significant reduction ( P≤0.001 in number of eye wipes compared to control group. Thus, the result concludes that BEPI and the fraction separated, BEPI-F1 has significant analgesic activity, which may be mediated through central mechanism by modulation of opioid receptors and nicotinic receptors.

  19. Over-the-counter analgesic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Broe, Marc E; Elseviers, Monique M

    2009-10-01

    Chronic analgesic nephropathy, particularly chronic interstitial nephritis and renal papillary necrosis, results from daily use for many years of mixtures containing at least two analgesics and caffeine or dependence-inducing drugs. Computed tomography scan can accurately diagnose this disease even in the absence of reliable information on previous analgesic use. The occasion to moderate regular use of aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is without renal risk when renal function is normal. Paracetamol use is less clear although the risk is not great. The continued use of non-phenacetin-combined analgesics with or without nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is associated with faster progression toward renal impairment. As long as high-risk analgesic mixtures are available over the counter, analgesic nephropathy will continue to be a problem.

  20. Morphine protects against methylmercury intoxication: a role for opioid receptors in oxidative stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Costa-Malaquias

    Full Text Available Mercury is an extremely dangerous environmental contaminant responsible for episodes of human intoxication throughout the world. Methylmercury, the most toxic compound of this metal, mainly targets the central nervous system, accumulating preferentially in cells of glial origin and causing oxidative stress. Despite studies demonstrating the current exposure of human populations, the consequences of mercury intoxication and concomitant use of drugs targeting the central nervous system (especially drugs used in long-term treatments, such as analgesics are completely unknown. Morphine is a major option for pain management; its global consumption more than quadrupled in the last decade. Controversially, morphine has been proposed to function in oxidative stress independent of the activation of the opioid receptors. In this work, a therapeutic concentration of morphine partially protected the cellular viability of cells from a C6 glioma cell line exposed to methylmercury. Morphine treatment also reduced lipid peroxidation and totally prevented increases in nitrite levels in those cells. A mechanistic study revealed no alteration in sulfhydryl groups or direct scavenging at this opioid concentration. Interestingly, the opioid antagonist naloxone completely eliminated the protective effect of morphine against methylmercury intoxication, pointing to opioid receptors as the major contributor to this action. Taken together, the experiments in the current study provide the first demonstration that a therapeutic concentration of morphine is able to reduce methylmercury-induced oxidative damage and cell death by activating the opioid receptors. Thus, these receptors may be a promising pharmacological target for modulating the deleterious effects of mercury intoxication. Although additional studies are necessary, our results support the clinical safety of using this opioid in methylmercury-intoxicated patients, suggesting that normal analgesic doses could

  1. Co-prescription of opioids with benzodiazepine and other co-medications among opioid users: differential in opioid doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zin, Che Suraya; Ismail, Fadhilah

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the patterns of opioid co-prescription with benzodiazepine and other concomitant medications among opioid users. Opioid dose in each type of co-prescription was also examined. Patients and methods This cross-sectional study was conducted among opioid users receiving concomitant medications at an outpatient tertiary hospital setting in Malaysia. Opioid prescriptions (morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, dihydrocodeine and tramadol) that were co-prescribed with other medications (opioid + benzodiazepines, opioid + antidepressants, opioid + anticonvulsants, opioid + antipsychotics and opioid + hypnotics) dispensed from January 2013 to December 2014 were identified. The number of patients, number of co-prescriptions and the individual mean opioid daily dose in each type of co-prescription were calculated. Results A total of 276 patients receiving 1059 co-prescription opioids with benzodiazepine and other co-medications were identified during the study period. Of these, 12.3% of patients received co-prescriptions of opioid + benzodiazepine, 19.3% received opioid + anticonvulsant, 6.3% received opioid + antidepressant and 10.9% received other co-prescriptions, including antipsychotics and hypnotics. The individual mean opioid dose was <100 mg/d of morphine equivalents in all types of co-prescriptions, and the dose ranged from 31 to 66 mg/d in the co-prescriptions of opioid + benzodiazepine. Conclusion Among the opioid users receiving concomitant medications, the co-prescriptions of opioid with benzodiazepine were prescribed to 12.3% of patients, and the individual opioid dose in this co-prescription was moderate. Other co-medications were also commonly used, and their opioid doses were within the recommended dose. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the adverse effect and clinical outcomes of the co-medications particularly in long-term opioid users with chronic non-cancer pain. PMID:28182128

  2. [Therapy with opioids in liver or renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegeder, I; Geisslinger, G; Lötsch, J

    1999-06-11

    been reported. On the other hand, the analgesic activity of codeine and tilidine depends on transformation into the active metabolites, morphine and nortilidine. In the case of reduced metabolism in chronic liver disease, the analgesic action of these drugs may be compromised. Lastly, the disposition of a few opioids, such as fentanyl, sufentanil, and remifentanil, appears to be unaffected in liver disease.

  3. Pure analgesics in a rheumatological outpatient clinic

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    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pure analgesics are only rarely used by Italian clinicians and this holds true also for rheumatologists. This work is concerned with an evaluation of the use of analgesics in a rheumatological outpatient clinic during the period 1989-1999. Methods: The records of 1705 patients consecutively seen at the clinic were downloaded on a specifically built website. Results: 4469 visits were considered. In 260 of them (5.8%, analgesics were prescribed to 234 (13.7% patients. The number of patients with a prescription of analgesics steadily increased during the years 1989-1999. The diagnoses in patients assuming analgesics were: osteoarthritis (47.1%, inflammatory arthritis (24.2%, soft tissue rheumatisms (13.7%, nonspecific arthralgia/myalgia (7.5%, and connective tissue diseases (2.6%. Peripheral analgesics were used in 188 (82.5% patients and central analgesics were used in the remaining 40 patients (17.5%. Analgesic drugs were used mainly in degenerative joint conditions. The indications for analgesics in the 55 patients with inflammatory arthrits were: (a partial or total remission of arthritis; for this reason non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were no longer required in 18 patients; (b to increase the analgesic effect of NSAIDs in 23 patients; (c contraindications to NSAIDs in 14 patients (renal failure in 2 patients, gastritis in 10, allergy and bleeding in the remaining two. Conclusions: About 14% of our outpatients were treated with analgesics with an increasing trend in the examined period. The main indications for analgesics are degenerative conditions but they can be used also in selected patients with arthritis.

  4. Anti-nociceptive Activity of Ethnomedicinally Important Analgesic Plant Isodon rugosus Wall. ex Benth: Mechanistic Study and Identifications of Bioactive Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, Anwar; Ahmad, Sajjad; Ullah, Farhat; Ayaz, Muhammad; Sadiq, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Isodon rugosus Wall. ex Benth. is extensively used as traditional medicine for the management of various types of pain including tooth ache, gastric pain, abdominal pain, ear ache, and generalized body pain. The current study is designed to scientifically verify the purported uses of I. rugosus as analgesic agent and to figure out its possible mechanism of action. Bioactive compounds responsible for analgesic activity were identified using GC and GC-MS analysis. Analgesic potentials were evaluated using acetic acid induced writhing, hot plate test, and formalin induced paw licking test. In acetic acid induced writhing chloroform fraction (Ir.Chf) exhibited 53% analgesia while formalin test displayed 61% inhibition at phase-I and 45% at phase-II respectively at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Similarly, in hot plate test Ir.Chf displayed average reaction time of 7 min at 15, 30, 45, and 60 min intervals. The possible mechanism of action was found to be the central pathway via opioidergic receptors as the mice showed morphine like analgesic activity at pre-administration of naloxone (opioid antagonist) in hot plate and formalin tests. In GC-MS analysis, 83 compounds were identified among which eight compounds including benzyl alcohol, sebacic acid, myristic acid, phytol, sugiol, Tocopherol, α-Amyrin, and stigmasterol were sorted out as previously reported analgesic compounds. Current study revealed that analgesic potential of I. rugosus can attributed to the presence of analgesic compounds. It may also be concluded that opioids receptors are involved in the analgesic mechanism of I. rugosus due to effective antagonism of nalaxone.

  5. Dissociation of μ- and δ-opioid inhibition of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in superficial dorsal horn

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    Vaughan Christopher W

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is anatomical and behavioural evidence that μ- and δ-opioid receptors modulate distinct nociceptive modalities within the superficial dorsal horn. The aim of the present study was to examine whether μ- and δ-opioid receptor activation differentially modulates TRP sensitive inputs to neurons within the superficial dorsal horn. To do this, whole cell patch clamp recordings were made from lamina I - II neurons in rat spinal cord slices in vitro to examine the effect of opioids on TRP agonist-enhanced glutamatergic spontaneous miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs. Results Under basal conditions the μ-opioid agonist DAMGO (3 μM reduced the rate of miniature EPSCs in 68% of neurons, while the δ- and κ-opioid agonists deltorphin-II (300 nM and U69593 (300 nM did so in 13 - 17% of neurons tested. The TRP agonists menthol (400 μM and icilin (100 μM both produced a Ca2+-dependent increase in miniature EPSC rate which was unaffected by the voltage dependent calcium channel (VDCC blocker Cd2+. The proportion of neurons in which deltorphin-II reduced the miniature EPSC rate was enhanced in the presence of icilin (83%, but not menthol (0%. By contrast, the proportion of DAMGO and U69593 responders was unaltered in the presence of menthol (57%, 0%, or icilin (57%, 17%. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that δ-opioid receptor activation selectively inhibits inputs activated by icilin, whereas μ-opioid receptor activation has a more widespread effect on synaptic inputs to neurons in the superficial dorsal horn. These findings suggest that δ-opioids may provide a novel analgesic approach for specific, TRPA1-like mediated pain modalities.

  6. The impact of the opioids fentanyl and morphine on nociception and bone destruction in a murine model of bone cancer pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ElMouedden, M.; Meert, T.F.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic pain resulting from metastasis into skeleton of certain neoplastic diseases remains poorly understood and relatively resistant to analgesic treatment. Opioids are the principal axis in drug therapy for this type of pain, especially at the end stage of cancer. Our aim was to examine whether,

  7. Analgesic Activity of Sphaeranthus indicus Linn

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    P. Malairajan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The ethanol extracts of the whole plant Sphaeranthus indicus Linn. (ALSI (Compositae was tested for analgesic activity by tail immersion method in rat models. The test extracts were tested at 250 mg and 500 mg/kg body weight. The analgesic activity was assessed by keeping pentazocine 10 mg/kg as standard drug. The parameters studied were tail withdrawal reflex and percentage protection. In tail immersion method ALSI pretreatment caused significant increase in analgesic activity and percentage protection found was 66.6 and 67.4 respectively. The result suggested that ALSI possess significant and dose dependent analgesic activity.

  8. Simultaneous determination of 18 abused opioids and metabolites in human hair using LC-MS/MS and illegal opioids abuse proven by hair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihyun; Ji, Dajeong; Kang, Soyoung; Park, Meejung; Yang, Wonkyung; Kim, Eunmi; Choi, Hwakyung; Lee, Sooyeun

    2014-02-01

    Natural and synthetic opioids have efficient analgesic activity but can also be addictive. Thus, the determination of opioids and their metabolites in biological specimens is of interest in clinical and forensic toxicology laboratories. The analysis of drugs in hair provides valuable information on previous chronic drug use and has been successfully applied to the diagnosis of drug abuse, tolerance, compliance and gestational drug exposure. Despite the abuse of prescription opioids along with heroin and other illegal opiates, few studies have been conducted on the simultaneous determination of the broad range of opioids covering those drugs in hair. In the present study, an analytical method for the simultaneous detection in hair of 18 opioids and metabolites considered to have a high abuse risk based on the results of urine drug screening was established and validated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the purpose of clinical and forensic applications. The drugs and metabolites were extracted from hair using methanol and analyzed using LC-MS/MS. The validation results proved that the method was selective, accurate and precise with acceptable linearity within calibration ranges. No significant variation was observed by different sources of matrices. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification ranged from 0.05 to 0.25ng/10mg hair and from 0.05 to 0.5ng/10mg hair, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to 15 hair samples from opioids users. This method will be very useful for monitoring the inappropriate use of opioid drugs.

  9. A biphasic opioid function modulator: agmatine%双向阿片功能调节剂:胍丁胺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏瑞斌; 李锦; 秦伯益

    2003-01-01

    近年研究表明某些药物尽管不能与阿片受体发生相互作用,但能对阿片药理作用产生重要的调节.特别是有些药物能对阿片功能产生双向调节作用,即增强阿片镇痛,对抗阿片耐受和躯体依赖.我们将这些不与阿片受体发生作用,但具有双向调节阿片功能的药物称之为双向阿片功能调节剂(biphasic opioid function modulator,BOFM).基于我们的研究工作,可以认定胍丁胺就是一个典型的双向阿片功能调节剂.胍丁胺本身有弱的镇痛作用,它能增强吗啡镇痛,对抗吗啡耐受和依赖;胍丁胺产生上述作用的主要机制与抑制阿片长期作用下在阿片受体信号转导系统产生的代偿性适应过程相关.%Recently it has been revealed that some agents that are not able to interact with opioid receptors play animportant role in regulating the pharmacological actions of opioids. Especially, some of them show biphasicmodulation on opioid functions, which enhance opioid analgesia, but inhibit tolerance to and substance dependenceon opioids. We would like to call these agents which do not interact with opioid receptors, but do have biphasicmodulation on opioid functions as biphasic opioid function modulator (BOFM). Mainly based on our results,agmatine is a typical BOFM. Agmatine itself was a weak analgesic which enhanced analgesic action of morphineand inhibited tolerance to and dependence on opioid. The main mechanisms of agmatine were related to inhibitionof the adaptation of opioid receptor signal transduction induced by chronic treatment of opioid.

  10. Analgesic Potential of Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ferreira Sarmento-Neto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pain is an unpleasant sensation associated with a wide range of injuries and diseases, and affects approximately 20% of adults in the world. The discovery of new and more effective drugs that can relieve pain is an important research goal in both the pharmaceutical industry and academia. This review describes studies involving antinociceptive activity of essential oils from 31 plant species. Botanical aspects of aromatic plants, mechanisms of action in pain models and chemical composition profiles of the essential oils are discussed. The data obtained in these studies demonstrate the analgesic potential of this group of natural products for therapeutic purposes.

  11. Chemotaxis of human and rat leukocytes by the delta-selective non-peptidic opioid SNC 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz-Sánchez, Iván; Weber, Richard J; Rice, Kenner C; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Rodríguez-Padilla, C; Tamez-Guerra, R; Méndez-Vázquez, José L; Gómez-Flores, R

    2003-01-01

    Opioids like morphine, represent a major source of relief for most chronic moderate to severe nonmalignant pain. However, opioid abuse may lead to infections such as hepatitis and AIDS because opioids have been associated with suppressing various parameters of immune function including antimicrobial resistance, antibody production, monocyte-mediated phagocytosis, and both neutrophil and monocyte chemotaxis. We have previously reported immunopotentiating properties of non-peptidic opioid receptor selective agonists and antagonists. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the nonpeptidic delta-opioid receptor agonist (+)-4-((alpha R)-alpha-((2S, 5R)-4-allyl-2, 5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl)-N, N-diethyl-benzamide (SNC 80) on chemotaxis of rat thymic and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by using a modified Wilkinson chamber. Cell recruitment is an essential process in acute and chronic inflammatory responses. We observed that SNC 80 at concentrations of 10(-10), 10(-9), 10(-8), 10(-7), and 10(-6) M, significantly (p SNC 80 on chemotaxis of rat and human leukocytes were antagonized by naloxone, indicating that the modulation of chemotaxis by SNC 80 is via a classic opioid receptor. The development and use of non-peptidic opioids like SNC 80 could have an immediate impact not only as potent analgesics, but in immunoregulation.

  12. Dezocine exhibits antihypersensitivity activities in neuropathy through spinal μ-opioid receptor activation and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Xiang; Mao, Xiao-Fang; Li, Teng-Fei; Gong, Nian; Zhang, Ma-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Dezocine is the number one opioid painkiller prescribed and sold in China, occupying 44% of the nation’s opioid analgesics market today and far ahead of the gold-standard morphine. We discovered the mechanisms underlying dezocine antihypersensitivity activity and assessed their implications to antihypersensitivity tolerance. Dezocine, given subcutaneously in spinal nerve-ligated neuropathic rats, time- and dose-dependently produced mechanical antiallodynia and thermal antihyperalgesia, significantly increased ipsilateral spinal norepinephrine and serotonin levels, and induced less antiallodynic tolerance than morphine. Its mechanical antiallodynia was partially (40% or 60%) and completely (100%) attenuated by spinal μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonism or norepinephrine depletion/α2-adrenoceptor antagonism and combined antagonism of MORs and α2-adenoceptors, respectively. In contrast, antagonism of spinal κ-opioid receptors (KORs) and δ-opioid receptors (DORs) or depletion of spinal serotonin did not significantly alter dezocine antiallodynia. In addition, dezocine-delayed antiallodynic tolerance was accelerated by spinal norepinephrine depletion/α2-adenoceptor antagonism. Thus dezocine produces antihypersensitivity activity through spinal MOR activation and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition (NRI), but apparently not through spinal KOR and DOR activation, serotonin reuptake inhibition or other mechanisms. Our findings reclassify dezocine as the first analgesic of the recently proposed MOR-NRI, and reveal its potential as an alternative to as well as concurrent use with morphine in treating pain. PMID:28230181

  13. Fentanyl tolerance in the treatment of cancer pain: a case of successful opioid switching from fentanyl to oxycodone at a reduced equivalent dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutou, Ichiro; Nakatani, Toshihiko; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Saito, Yoji

    2015-06-01

    Opioids are not generally deemed to have an analgesic ceiling effect on cancer pain. However, there have been occasional reports of tolerance to opioid development induced by multiple doses of fentanyl. The authors report a case of suspected tolerance to the analgesic effect of opioid, in which an increasing dose of fentanyl failed to relieve the patient's cancer pain symptoms, but opioid switching to oxycodone injections enabled a dose reduction to below the equivalent dose conversion ratio. The patient was a 60-year-old man diagnosed with pancreatic body carcinoma with multiple metastases. The base dose consisted of 12 mg/day of transdermal fentanyl patches (equivalent to 3.6 mg/day, 150 μg/h fentanyl injection), and rescue therapy consisted of 10 mg immediate-release oxycodone powders. Despite the total daily dose of fentanyl reaching 5.6 mg (equivalent to 560 mg oral morphine), the analgesic effect was inadequate; thus, an urgent adjustment was necessary. Due to the moderate dose of fentanyl, the switch to oxycodone injection was done incrementally at a daily dose equivalent to 25% of the fentanyl injection. The total dose of oxycodone was replaced approximately 53.5% of the dose of fentanyl prior to opioid switching.

  14. Drug use and sport--a commentary on: Injury, pain and prescription opioid use among former National Football League football players by Cottler et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Eric C

    2011-07-01

    The accompanying paper by Cottler et al. reports on findings from a telephone survey study that examined opioid analgesic use and misuse by U.S. professional football players. The study shows high rates of misuse of these medications, and provides an opportunity to consider the intersection between sports and drug use. While in recent years there has been increasing focus upon the use of performance enhancing drugs (e.g., steroids) in athletes, the present report provides valuable information about a relatively unexplored but important topic: opioid analgesic misuse by athletes. The data provided show that misuse of opioids in this population is cause for concern, suggest that study of other groups of athletes should be undertaken, and that further assessment of opioid use in football players is also needed. The study also provides an opportunity to conceptualize drug (and non-drug) use in athletes, as a means to either return athletic functioning to a previous level of performance, or to enhance functioning. Discussions of drug use in sports need to appreciate the complexity of such use, which can be indicated and appropriate under certain circumstances, but which can also be inappropriate and problematic under others-for example, for drugs such as opioid analgesics.

  15. Liquid chromatography-electrospray linear ion trap mass spectrometry analysis of targeted neuropeptides in Tac1(-/-) mouse spinal cords reveals significant lower concentration of opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Mouna; Beaudry, Francis

    2015-08-01

    Tachykinin and opioid peptides play a central role in pain transmission, modulation and inhibition. The treatment of pain is very important in medicine and many studies using NK1 receptor antagonists failed to show significant analgesic effects in humans. Recent investigations suggest that both pronociceptive tachykinins and the analgesic opioid systems are important for normal pain sensation. The analysis of opioid peptides in Tac1(-/-) spinal cord tissues offers a great opportunity to verify the influence of the tachykinin system on specific opioid peptides. The objectives of this study were to develop an HPLC-MS/MRM assay to quantify targeted peptides in spinal cord tissues. Secondly, we wanted to verify if the Tac1(-/-) mouse endogenous opioid system is hampered and therefore affects significantly the pain modulatory pathways. Targeted neuropeptides were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography linear ion trap mass spectrometry. Our results reveal that EM-2, Leu-Enk and Dyn A were down-regulated in Tac1(-/-) spinal cord tissues. Interestingly, Dyn A was almost 3 fold down-regulated (p<0.0001). No significant concentration differences were observed in mouse Tac1(-/-) spinal cords for Met-Enk and CGRP. The analysis of Tac1(-/-) mouse spinal cords revealed noteworthy decreases of EM-2, Leu-Enk and Dyn A concentrations which strongly suggest a significant impact on the endogenous pain-relieving mechanisms. These observations may have insightful impact on future analgesic drug developments and therapeutic strategies.

  16. Ghrelin receptor agonist, GHRP-2, produces antinociceptive effects at the supraspinal level via the opioid receptor in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ping; Li, Shu; Zheng, Yue-hui; Liu, Fu-Yan; Wang, Jing-lei; Zhang, Da-lei; Wei, Jie

    2014-05-01

    GHRP-2 is a synthetic agonist of ghrelin receptor. GHRP-2 has similar physiological functions with ghrelin. In our previous study, ghrelin (i.c.v.) could induce analgesic effect through an interaction with GHS-R1α and with the central opioid system in the acute pain in mice. To date, the function of GHRP-2 in pain processing was not understood. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GHRP-2 on pain modulation at supraspinal level in mice using the tail immersion test. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of GHRP-2 (0.1, 0.3, 1, 3 and 10 nmol/L) produced a concentration- and time-related antinociceptive effect. This effect could be fully antagonized by GHS-R1α antagonist [d-Lys(3)]-GHRP-6, indicating that the analgesic effect induced by GHRP-2 is mediated through the activation of GHS-R1α. Interestingly, naloxone, naltrindole and nor-binaltorphimine, but not β-funaltrexamine, could also block the analgesic effect markedly, suggesting that δ- and κ-opioid receptor is involved in the analgesic response evoked by GHRP-2. Moreover, i.c.v. administration of GHRP-2 potentiated the analgesic effect induced by morphine (i.c.v., 1 nmol/L) and this potentiated effect could not be reversed by [d-Lys(3)]-GHRP-6. Thus these findings may be a new strategy on investigating the interaction between ghrelin system and opioids on pain modulation. Furthermore, GHRP-2 may be a promising peptide for developing new analgesic drugs.

  17. Opioids and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Opioids may alter immune function, thereby potentially affecting cancer recurrence. The authors investigated the association between postdiagnosis opioid use and breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Patients with incident, early stage breast cancer who were diagnosed during 1996 through...... 2008 in Denmark were identified from the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group Registry. Opioid prescriptions were ascertained from the Danish National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began on the date of primary surgery for breast cancer and continued until breast cancer recurrence, death......, emigration, 10 years, or July 31, 2013, whichever occurred first. Cox regression models were used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals associating breast cancer recurrence with opioid prescription use overall and by opioid type and strength, immunosuppressive effect, chronic use (≥6 months...

  18. Experimental pain and opioid analgesia in volunteers at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea.

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    Anthony G Doufas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is characterized by recurrent nocturnal hypoxia and sleep disruption. Sleep fragmentation caused hyperalgesia in volunteers, while nocturnal hypoxemia enhanced morphine analgesic potency in children with OSA. This evidence directly relates to surgical OSA patients who are at risk for airway compromise due to postoperative use of opioids. Using accepted experimental pain models, we characterized pain processing and opioid analgesia in male volunteers recruited based on their risk for OSA. METHODS: After approval from the Intitutional Review Board and informed consent, we assessed heat and cold pain thresholds and tolerances in volunteers after overnight polysomnography (PSG. Three pro-inflammatory and 3 hypoxia markers were determined in the serum. Pain tests were performed at baseline, placebo, and two effect site concentrations of remifentanil (1 and 2 µg/ml, an μ-opioid agonist. Linear mixed effects regression models were employed to evaluate the association of 3 PSG descriptors [wake after sleep onset, number of sleep stage shifts, and lowest oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO(2 during sleep] and all serum markers with pain thresholds and tolerances at baseline, as well as their changes under remifentanil. RESULTS: Forty-three volunteers (12 normal and 31 with a PSG-based diagnosis of OSA were included in the analysis. The lower nadir SaO(2 and higher insulin growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1 were associated with higher analgesic sensitivity to remifentanil (SaO(2, P = 0.0440; IGFBP-1, P = 0.0013. Other pro-inflammatory mediators like interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α were associated with an enhanced sensitivity to the opioid analgesic effect (IL-1β, P = 0.0218; TNF-α, P = 0.0276. CONCLUSIONS: Nocturnal hypoxemia in subjects at high risk for OSA was associated with an increased potency of opioid analgesia. A serum hypoxia marker (IGFBP-1 was associated with hypoalgesia and

  19. Opioid-Induced Constipation and Bowel Dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Lissner, Stefan; Bassotti, Gabrio; Coffin, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:  To formulate timely evidence-based guidelines for the management of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. SETTING:  Constipation is a major untoward effect of opioids. Increasing prescription of opioids has correlated to increased incidence of opioid-induced constipation. However, the inh...

  20. Role of opioid system in verapamil-induced antinociception in a rat model of orofacial pain

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    Esmaeal Tamaddonfard

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium, through its various channels involves in local, spinal and supra-spinal transmission of pain. In the present study, we investigated the separate and combined treatment effects of verapamil (a calcium channel blocker, morphine (an opioid agonist and naloxone (an opioid antagonist on pain in the orofacial region of rats. Orofacial pain was induced by subcutaneous (SC injection of formalin (50 µL, 1.5% into the left upper lip side, and the time durations spent face rubbing with epsilateral forepaw were recorded in three min blocks for a period of 45 min. Formalin induced a biphasic pattern (first phase: 0-3 min; second phase: 15-33 min of pain. Intraperitoneal (IP injections of verapamil (2 and 8 mg kg-1 and morphine (2 and 4 mg kg-1 suppressed orofacial pain. Co-administration of sub-analgesic doses of verapamil (0.5 mg kg-1 and morphine (1 mg kg-1 produced second phase analgesia. Both phases of formalin-induced pain were suppressed when an analgesic dose (2 mg kg-1 of verapamil co-administered with a sub-analgesic dose (1 mg kg-1 of morphine. The SC injection of naloxone (2 mg kg-1 alone with no effect on pain intensity, prevented the antinociceptive effects induced by morphine (2 mg kg-1, but not verapamil (2 mg kg-1. The obtained results showed antinociceptive effects for verapamli and morphine on orofacial pain. Co-administrations of verapamil and morphine produced antinociceptive effects. It seems that opioid analgesic system may not have a role in the verapamil-induced antinociception.

  1. The damage done by the war on opioids: the pendulum has swung too far

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson TJ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Timothy J Atkinson,1 Michael E Schatman,2 Jeffrey Fudin1,3–51PGY2 Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacy Residency, Stratton VA Medical Center, Albany, NY, 2Foundation for Ethics in Pain Care, Bellevue, WA, 3School of Pharmacy, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 4Western New England University College of Pharmacy, Springfield, MA, 5Buffalo College of Pharmacy, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USAIn the United States, patterns of opioid use for the management of pain have drastically changed over the past 30 years. In the 1980s, the American pain medicine landscape was characterized by opiophobia, the fear to prescribe opioids. Around the turn of the millennium, however, we witnessed a fairly rapid shift to opiophilia, or the "overprescribing" of opioids. The ubiquitous undertreatment of pain was the catalyst for clinicians and pain societies to successfully lobby for increased use of opioids for all pain types, including non-cancer pain. The approval of new standards for pain management incorporating pain as the "fifth vital sign" by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO1 seemingly fueled this increase in opioid prescription. From 1991–2009, prescriptions for opioid analgesics tripled, with emergency department visits related to non-medical use of prescription opioid overdoses doubling from 2005–2009.2 In 2010, accidental overdose deaths associated with opioids increased for the eleventh consecutive year, highlighting the drastic shift in opioid use.3 The figurative pendulum began to swing toward opiophobia following the publication of data that demonstrated that the risk of addiction associated with chronic opioid use was likely underestimated.4 Guidelines for the use of controlled substances released by the Federation of State Medical Boards of the US in 1998 reflected this change in attitude.5 At present, there is a general consensus that opioids are over-prescribed and education among health

  2. The analgesic activity of Bestatin as a potent APN inhibitor

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    Mei-Rong Jia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Bestatin, a small molecular weight dipeptide, is a potent inhibitor of various aminopeptidases as well as LTA4 hydrolase. Various physiological functions of Bestatin have been identified, viz.: (1 an immunomodifier for enhancing the proliferation of normal human bone marrow granulocyte–macrophage progenitor cells to form CFU-GM colonies; Bestatin exerts a direct stimulating effect on lymphocytes via its fixation on the cell surface and an indirect effect on monocytes via aminopeptidase B inhibition of tuftsin catabolism; (2 an immunorestorator and curative or preventive agent for spontaneous tumor; Bestatin alone or its combination with chemicals can prolongate the disease-free interval and survival period in adult acute or chronic leukemia, therefore, it was primarily marketed in 1987 in Japan as an anticancer drug and servers as the only marketed inhibitor of Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13 to cure leukemia to date; (3 a pan-hematopoietic stimulator and restorator; Bestatin promotes granulocytopoiesis and thrombocytopoiesis in vitro and restores them in myelo-hypoplastic men; (4 an inhibitor of several natural opioid peptides. Based on the knowledge that APN can cleave several bioactive neuropeptides such as Met-enkaphalins, Leu-enkaphalins, β-Endorphin, and so on, the antiaminopeptidase action of Bestatin also allows it to protect endopeptides against their catabolism, exhibiting analgesic activity. Although many scientific studies and great accomplishments have been achieved in this field, a large amount of problems are unsolved. This article reviews the promising results obtained for future development of the analgesic activity of Bestatin that can be of vital interest in a number of severe and chronic pain syndromes.

  3. Opioids in the treatment of postoperative pain: old drugs with new options?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeder, Johan

    2014-03-01

    New approved options with opioids in the postoperative setting may include new ways of administration, new combinations with other drugs and new opioid drugs. Newly approved devices for administration include sublingual sufentanil dispenser and transdermal iontophoretic fentanyl, with the purpose of almost mimicking the rapid and reliable onset of intravenous (IV) administration, without the problems of an ongoing IV cannula and cumbersome equipment. Still, potential problems of overdosing and misuse must be in focus when these devices come into use. Tapentadol is a new partial µ-receptor opioid agonist with a combined action on norepinephrine-induced analgesia, representing a promising drug in terms of less side effects at equianalgesic doses compared with pure agonists. The mixture of different opioids given together, such as oxycodone and morphine, for oral use may also have some analgesic synergy with an improved side-effect profile, although more studies are needed. Oral oxycodone is a reliable oral opioid option, but when combined with paracetamol in the same tablet or mixture, care should also be taken to avoid serious side effects from inadvertent paracetamol overdose.

  4. Investigation of in vitro Opioid Receptor Binding Activities of Some Turkish Salvia species

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    Özge Gündüz Çınar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kappa Opioid Peptide Receptor (KOPr activation produces analgesic, psychotomimetic, diuretic and antipruritic effects. KOPr ligands are investigated for their potential roles in the treatment of addiction, depression, feeding behavior, psychosis and schizophrenia. In this study the methanolic extracts of a number of Salvia species which are native to Turkey (S. tomentosa, S. tchihatcheffii , S. rosifolia, S. dichroantha and S. sclarea were tested for their potential binding to opioid receptors in rat brain membranes and Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells expressing human KOPr (CHO-KOPh. [ 3H]Diprenorphine, an unselective opioid antagonist, was utilized in the radioligand receptor binding assays. All extracts (0.11 mg/ml inhibited the [ 3H]Diprenorphine binding with ranging KOPr binding affinities. More than 50% inhibition of diprenorphine binding was shown only with Salvia dichroantha and Salvia sclarea both in rat brain membranes and CHO-KOPh membranes.Among them Salvia sclarea deserves further investigation for its active component(s and its pharmacological characterization. This study clearly demonstrates the potential opioid receptor binding activities of several Turkish Salvia species. This work constitutes the first study on in vitro opioid receptor binding activities of Salvia species from the Turkish flora.

  5. Buprenorphine – an attractive opioid with underutilized potential in treatment of chronic pain

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    Khanna IK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ish K Khanna, Sivaram PillarisettiNeuroPn Therapeutics, Alpharetta, GA, USAAbstract: Despite proven clinical utility, buprenorphine has not been used widely for the treatment of chronic pain. Questions about “ceiling effect” or bell-shaped curve observed for analgesia in preclinical studies and potential withdrawal issues on combining with marketed µ-agonists continue to hinder progress in expanding full potential of buprenorphine in the treatment of cancer and noncancer pain. Mounting evidence from clinical studies and conclusions drawn by a panel of experts strongly support superior safety and efficacy profile of buprenorphine vs marketed opioids. No ceiling on analgesic effect has been reported in clinical studies. The receptor pharmacology and pharmacokinetics profile of buprenorphine is complex but unique and contributes to its distinct safety and efficacy. The buprenorphine pharmacology also allows it to be combined with other µ-receptor opioids for additivity in efficacy. Transdermal delivery products of buprenorphine have been preferred choices for the management of pain but new delivery options are under investigation for the treatment of both opioid dependence and chronic pain.Keywords: buprenorphine, opioids, opioid dependence, partial agonist, hyperalgesia, neuropathic pain

  6. Analgesic nephropathy: is it caused by multi-analgesic abuse or single substance use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elseviers, M M; De Broe, M E

    1999-01-01

    Analgesic nephropathy is a slowly progressive renal disease, characterised by renal papillary necrosis. Recently, diagnostic criteria for this disease have been defined based on renal computed tomography scanning performed without contrast. The observation of a decreased renal mass of both kidneys, combined with either bumpy contours or papillary calcifications, has been found to have high diagnostic specificity and sensitivity. However, the question remains as to what kind of analgesics can cause analgesic nephropathy. In the majority of early reports about this condition, phenacetin was singled out as the nephrotoxic culprit. However, during the last decade the nephrotoxic potential of nonphenacetin-containing preparations has become apparent. It is clear that people who abuse analgesics prefer combination analgesics containing 2 analgesics combined with caffeine and/or codeine. In contrast, abuse of products containing only aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) or paracetamol (acetaminophen) is seldom described and associated renal disease is only occasionally reported. Experimental evidence of the nephrotoxicity of analgesic preparations is not well established. The results of studies involving analgesic administration in animals remain contradictory. Clinical evidence linking high consumption of analgesic preparations with analgesic nephropathy is overwhelming. Most patients who admit to over-consuming analgesics have taken preparation containing more than one compound. In recent years, it has become more apparent that preparations not containing phenacetin also have the potential to cause nephrotoxicity manifesting as identical renal lesions. Further epidemiological evidence of the nephrotoxic potential of analgesic combinations has come from case-control studies published during the last decade and from 2 prospective cohort studies. Effective prevention of analgesic nephropathy consists of the prohibition of over-the-counter sales of preparation containing at least

  7. Analgesic effects of adding lidocaine to morphine pumps after orthopedic surgeries

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    Mahmoud Reza Alebouyeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opiate is used in patient-controlled intravenous analgesia pumps (PCIA for controlling pain in post-surgical patients. Other drugs are remarkably added to opioid pumps to enhance quality, lengthen analgesia, and reduce side effects. Lidocaine, a local anesthetic which inhibits sodium channels, has anesthetic and analgesic effects when injected locally or intravenously. The objective of this study is to evaluate the analgesic effects of adding lidocaine 1% to different doses of morphine via IV pump to patient-controlled analgesia (PCA after orthopedic surgeries. Materials and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 60 patients who had undergone orthopedic surgery of lower extremities were divided into three equal groups to control postoperative pain. Intravenous pump with 5 ml/h flow rate was used as the analgesic method. The solution consisted of lidocaine 1% plus 20 mg morphine for the first group, lidocaine 1% plus 10 mg morphine for the second group, and only 20 mg morphine for the third group (control group. Patients were checked every 12 h, and Visual Analog Scale (VAS, extra opioid doses, nausea/vomiting, and sedation scale were examined. Results: Pain score was lower in the first group compared to the other two groups. Mean VAS was 2.15 ± 0.2, 2.75 ± 0.2, and 2 ± 0.25 on the first day and 1.88 ± 0.1, 2.74 ± 0.3, and 2.40 ± 0.3 on the second day, respectively, in the three groups and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01 and <0.05, respectively. Also, 10% of patients in the first group needed extra opioid doses, while this figure was 30% in the second group and 25% in the third group (P < 0.01. Nausea/vomiting and sedation scores were not statistically different among the three groups. Conclusion: Compared to lidocaine 1% plus 10 mg morphine or 20 mg morphine alone in PCIA, adding lidocaine 1% to 20 mg morphine decreases the pain score and opioid dose after orthopedic surgeries without having side

  8. Understanding the Opioid Overdose Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or continuing opioids Assessing baseline pain and function Scheduling reassessment within one to four weeks Prescribing short- ... become a standard of care for emergency medical personnel. However, in the past two years, the FDA ...

  9. Amnesia Affecting Some Opioid Abusers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they had used opioids. These drugs include prescription painkillers, such as oxycodone (Oxycontin) and oxycodone and acetaminophen ( ... attributed to a stroke or dementia. Moreover, the brain abnormalities seen on the MRI scans appear to ...

  10. Newer approaches to opioid detoxification

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    Siddharth Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid use disorders present with distressing withdrawal symptoms at the time of detoxification. The pharmacological agents and methods currently in use for detoxification mainly include buprenorphine, methadone, and clonidine. Many other pharmacological agents have been tried for opioid detoxification. This review takes a look at the newer pharmacological options, both opioid agonists and non-agonist medications that have been utilized for detoxification. Peer reviewed articles were identified using PubMed and PsychInfo databases. The keywords included for the search were a combination of ′opioid′ and ′detoxification′ and their synonyms. All the articles published in the last 10 years were screened for. Relevant data was extracted from identified studies. Many newer pharmacological agents have been tried in detoxification of opioids. However, the quest for a safe, efficacious, cost-effective pharmacological option which requires minimal monitoring still continues. The role of non-pharmacological measures and alternative medicine needs further evaluation.

  11. Opioids and their peripheral receptors

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    Francesco Amato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The inflammation of peripheral tissues leads the primary afferent neurons, in particular at the cell bodies level located in the DRG (dorsal root ganglia, to an increased synthesis of opioid receptors: determining an “up-regulation”. After that opioid receptors are transported at the level of the nociceptive terminals, they are incorporated into the neuronal membrane becoming functional receptors. The above receptor proteins bind to opioid produced by immune cells or the exogenous ones. This leads to a direct or indirect suppression of the Ca2+ currents induced by TRPV1 or the currents of the Na+, resulting in neuronal reduced excitability and in transmitted signals decrease. The observation that the immune system is able to modulate the pain by ligands that interact with the opioid receptors located on sensory neurons, may have broad implications for the development of innovative and safer pain drugs.

  12. Towards safer use of opioids.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carson, R W R

    2009-09-01

    The main aim of our work was to improve the safety of opioid use in our institution, an acute generalhospital with 620 beds. Initially, all reported opioid errors from 2001 - 2006 were audited. The findings directed a range of multidisciplinary staff educational inputs to improve opioid prescribing and administration practice, and encourage drug error reporting. 448 drug errors were reported, of which 54 (12%) involved opioids; of these, 43 (79%) involved codeine, morphine or oxycodone. 31 of the errors (57%) were associated with administration, followed by 12 (22%) with dispensing and 11 (20%) with prescribing. There were 2 reports of definite patient harm. A subsequent audit examined a 17-month period following the introduction of the above teaching: 17 errors were noted, of which 14 (83%) involved codeine, morphine or oxycodone. Again, drug administration was most error-prone, comprising 11 (65%) of reports. However, just 2 (12%) of the reported errors now involved prescribing, which was a reduction.

  13. MECHANISM OF ANALGESIC EFFECTS OF PROPOFOL ON INCISIONAL PAIN: A RAT MODEL STUDY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhi-hua; SONG Xiao-xing; HU Jiong; YU Bu-wei

    2009-01-01

    Objective To clarify the role of propofol in controlling incisional pain and its potential effects on the spinal opioid receptor expression.Methods A postoperative model of nociception was established in male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200-250 g. A total of 96 rats were randomly divided into 8 groups. All drugs were administered intravenously either 5min pre-operation or 5min post-operation. The analgesic effects of systemic propofol were demonstrated by the measurement of a cumulative pain score (CPS). After that, the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord was removed to evaluate the mRNA level of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and δ-opioid receptor (DOR) by RT-PCR.Results CPS and DOR mRNA expressions significantly increased after the operation. Both propofol post-treatment and propofol pre-treatment groups showed significant suppression of the increased CPS and the expression of DOR mRNA evoked by pain stimulation. Interestingly, propofol pre-treatment had a more pronounced effect in decreasing CPS and the expression of DOR mRNA. Furthermore, these observations were dose-dependent. MOR mRNA expression significantly increased after operation in all animals and propofol treatment had no impact on it.Conclusion Based on these findings, we suggest that propofol can serve as a valuable adjunct in acute postoperative pain management. Systemic propofol induces an analgesic effect on acute incisional pain in a dose-dependant manner, and this effect is mediated in the spinal cord and may be associated with the spinal DOR.

  14. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Opioid Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Absalom, Anthony; Visser, Anniek; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; De Vries, Erik FJ; Van Waarde, Aren; Luiten, Paul GM

    2014-01-01

    The opioid system consists of opioid receptors (which mediate the actions of opium), their endogenous ligands (the enkephalins, endorphins, endomorphins, dynorphin, and nociceptin), and the proteins involved in opioid production, transport, and degradation. PET tracers for the various opioid recepto

  15. Postoperative opioid sparing with injectable hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-diclofenac: pooled analysis of data from two Phase III clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Tong J; Singla, Neil; Daniels, Stephen E; Hamilton, Douglas A; Lacouture, Peter G; Reyes, Christian RD; Carr, Daniel B

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Use of nonopioid analgesics (including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) for postoperative pain management can reduce opioid consumption and potentially prevent opioid-related adverse events. This study examined the postoperative opioid-sparing effect of repeated-dose injectable diclofenac formulated with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD)-diclofenac. Patients and methods Pooled data from two double-blind, randomized, placebo- and active comparator-controlled Phase III trials were analyzed. Patients received HPβCD-diclofenac, placebo, or ketorolac by intravenous injection every 6 hours for up to 5 days following abdominal/pelvic or orthopedic surgery. Rescue opioid use was evaluated from the time of first study drug administration to up to 120 hours following the first dose in the overall study population and in subgroups defined by baseline pain severity, age, and HPβCD-diclofenac dose. Results Overall, 608 patients received ≥1 dose of study medication and were included in the analysis. While 93.2% of patients receiving placebo required opioids, the proportion of patients requiring opioids was significantly lower for patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac (18.75, 37.5, or 50 mg) or ketorolac (P<0.005 for all comparisons). Mean cumulative opioid dose and number of doses were significantly lower among patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac versus placebo for the 0–24 through 0–120 hour time periods (P<0.0001), as well as versus ketorolac for the 0–72 through 0–120 hour time periods (P<0.05). HPβCD-diclofenac significantly reduced opioid consumption versus placebo in subgroups based on baseline pain severity (moderate, severe) and age (<65 years, ≥65 years) from the 0–24 hour period onward. When compared to ketorolac, HPβCD-diclofenac also significantly reduced cumulative opioid consumption among patients with moderate baseline pain (0–72 through 0–120 hours) and opioid dose number among patients ≥65 years old (0–24 through 0

  16. Spider peptide Phα1β induces analgesic effect in a model of cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Flavia Karine; Trevisan, Gabriela; Rosa, Fernanda; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Otuki, Michel Fleith; Cueto, Ana Paula; de Castro Junior, Célio José; Romano-Silva, Marco Aurelio; Cordeiro, Marta do N; Richardson, Michael; Ferreira, Juliano; Gomez, Marcus V

    2013-09-01

    The marine snail peptide ziconotide (ω-conotoxin MVIIA) is used as an analgesic in cancer patients refractory to opioids, but may induce severe adverse effects. Animal venoms represent a rich source of novel drugs, so we investigated the analgesic effects and the side-effects of spider peptide Phα1β in a model of cancer pain in mice with or without tolerance to morphine analgesia. Cancer pain was induced by the inoculation of melanoma B16-F10 cells into the hind paw of C57BL/6 mice. After 14 days, painful hypersensitivity was detected and Phα1β or ω-conotoxin MVIIA (10-100 pmol/site) was intrathecally injected to evaluate the development of antinociception and side-effects in control and morphine-tolerant mice. The treatment with Phα1β or ω-conotoxin MVIIA fully reversed cancer-related painful hypersensitivity, with long-lasting results, at effective doses 50% of 48 (32-72) or 33 (21-53) pmol/site, respectively. Phα1β produced only mild adverse effects, whereas ω-conotoxin MVIIA induced dose-related side-effects in mice at analgesic doses (estimated toxic dose 50% of 30 pmol/site). In addition, we observed that Phα1β was capable of controlling cancer-related pain even in mice tolerant to morphine antinociception (100% of inhibition) and was able to partially restore morphine analgesia in such animals (56 ± 5% of inhibition). In this study, Phα1β was as efficacious as ω-conotoxin MVIIA in inducing analgesia in a model of cancer pain without producing severe adverse effects or losing efficacy in opioid-tolerant mice, indicating that Phα1β has a good profile for the treatment of cancer pain in patients.

  17. Effect of pre-operative rectal diclofenac suppository on post-operative analgesic requirement in cleft palate repair: A randomised clinical trial

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    E S Adarsh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opioid analgesics used for analgesia are associated with sedation, respiratory depression and post-operative nausea and vomiting. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as diclofenac are a safe and effective alternative with opioid-sparing effect. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of pre-operative rectal diclofenac suppository (1 mg/kg in cleft palate repair for post-operative analgesia and reduction in post-operative opioid requirements. Study Design: A randomized clinical trial. Methods: After obtaining approval from the institutional ethical committee, 60 children were allocated by a computer-generated randomisation into two groups of 30 each; group D (Diclofenac group and group C (Conventional group. Children in group D and group C were similar in all aspects except for the fact that group D children received 1 mg/kg diclofenac suppository after induction. Pain was evaluated using modification of the objective pain scale by Hannallah and colleagues for 6 h post-operatively by an anaesthesiology resident or nursing staff who was blinded to the group. If the pain score was more than 3, rescue analgesic I.V. fentanyl 0.5 μgm/kg was administered. The pain scores at different intervals, number of doses and quantity of rescue analgesic required were noted. Results: We observed that pre-operative rectal diclofenac provided effective analgesia in the immediate post-operative period, as evidenced by reduced pain scores and reduced opioid requirement (P=0.00002. There was no evidence of any increased perioperative bleeding in the diclofenac group. Conclusion: Pre-operative rectal diclofenac reduces opioid consumption and provides good post-operative analgesia.

  18. Randomised, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the analgesic efficacy and safety of VVZ-149 injections for postoperative pain following laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljkovic, Srdjan S; Correll, Darin J; Bao, Xiaodong; Zamor, Natacha; Zeballos, Jose L; Zhang, Yi; Young, Mark J; Ledley, Johanna; Sorace, Jessica; Eng, Kristen; Hamsher, Carlyle P; Maniam, Rajivan; Chin, Jonathan W; Tsui, Becky; Cho, Sunyoung; Lee, Doo H

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In spite of advances in understanding and technology, postoperative pain remains poorly treated for a significant number of patients. In colorectal surgery, the need for developing novel analgesics is especially important. Patients after bowel surgery are assessed for rapid return of bowel function and opioids worsen ileus, nausea and constipation. We describe a prospective, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled randomised controlled trial testing the hypothesis that a novel analgesic drug, VVZ -149, is safe and effective in improving pain compared with providing opioid analgesia alone among adults undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Methods and analysis Based on sample size calculations for primary outcome, we plan to enrol 120 participants. Adult patients without significant medical comorbidities or ongoing opioid use and who are undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery will be enrolled. Participants are randomly assigned to receive either VVZ-149 with intravenous (IV) hydromorphone patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) or the control intervention (IV PCA alone) in the postoperative period. The primary outcome is the Sum of Pain Intensity Difference over 8 hours (SPID-8 postdose). Participants receive VVZ-149 for 8 hours postoperatively to the primary study end point, after which they continue to be assessed for up to 24 hours. We measure opioid consumption, record pain intensity and pain relief, and evaluate the number of rescue doses and requests for opioid. To assess safety, we record sedation, nausea and vomiting, respiratory depression, laboratory tests and ECG readings after study drug administration. We evaluate for possible confounders of analgesic response, such as anxiety, depression and catastrophising behaviours. The study will also collect blood sample data and evaluate for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval of the study protocol has been obtained from

  19. Can anaesthetic and analgesic techniques affect cancer recurrence or metastasis?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heaney, A

    2012-12-01

    Summary Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the ratio of incidence is increasing. Mortality usually results from recurrence or metastases. Surgical removal of the primary tumour is the mainstay of treatment, but this is associated with inadvertent dispersal of neoplastic cells into the blood and lymphatic systems. The fate of the dispersed cells depends on the balance of perioperative factors promoting tumour survival and growth (including surgery per se, many anaesthetics per se, acute postoperative pain, and opioid analgesics) together with the perioperative immune status of the patient. Available evidence from experimental cell culture and live animal data on these factors are summarized, together with clinical evidence from retrospective studies. Taken together, current data are sufficient only to generate a hypothesis that an anaesthetic technique during primary cancer surgery could affect recurrence or metastases, but a causal link can only be proved by prospective, randomized, clinical trials. Many are ongoing, but definitive results might not emerge for a further 5 yr or longer. Meanwhile, there is no hard evidence to support altering anaesthetic technique in cancer patients, pending the outcome of the ongoing clinical trials.

  20. Implication of DOP2 but not DOP1 in development of morphine analgesic tolerance in a rat model of chronic inflammatory pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudry, H.; Gendron, L.; Morón, Jose A.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids are well known for their robust analgesic effects. Chronic activation of mu opioid receptors (MOPs) is however accompanied by various unwanted effects such as analgesic tolerance. Among other mechanisms, interactions between MOP and delta opioid receptor (DOP) are thought to play an important role in morphine-induced behavioral adaptations. Interestingly, certain conditions such as inflammation enhance the function of the DOP through a MOP-dependent mechanism. Here, we investigated the role of DOP during the development of morphine-tolerance in an animal model of chronic inflammatory pain. Using behavioral approaches we first established that repeated systemic morphine treatment induces morphine analgesic tolerance in rats coping with chronic inflammatory pain. We then observed that blockade of DOP with subcutaneous naltrindole (NTI), a selective DOP antagonist, significantly attenuates the development of morphine tolerance in a dose-dependent manner. We confirmed that this effect was DOP-mediated by showing that an acute injection of NTI had no effect on morphine-induced analgesia in naïve animals. Previous pharmacological characterizations revealed the existence of DOP1 and DOP2 subtypes. As opposed to NTI, 7-benzylidenenaltrexone (BNTX) and naltriben (NTB) were reported to be selective DOP1 and DOP2 antagonists, respectively. Interestingly, NTB but not BNTX was able to attenuate the development of morphine analgesic tolerance in inflamed rats. Altogether, our results suggest that targeting of DOP2 with antagonists provides a valuable strategy to attenuate the analgesic tolerance that develops after repeated morphine administration in the setting of chronic inflammatory pain. PMID:25639561

  1. Analgesic-antiinflammatory drugs inhibit orbicularis oculi reflexes in humans via a central mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracuti, S; Leardi, M G; Cruccu, G; Fabbri, A; Itil, T M

    1994-01-01

    1. A cross-over single blind study examined the possible central effects of non-opioid analgesic drugs on the trigeminal reflexes. 2. The corneal reflex and blink reflex (R1, R2) were recorded electromyographically and response areas measured in healthy volunteers before and after intramuscular injection of piroxicam (40 mg); and after intravenous injection of lysine acetylsalicylate (500 mg). After the last drug recording the subjects received intravenous naloxone (2 mg) followed 5 minutes later by further reflex testing. Saline was used as a placebo in control experiments. 3. Both analgesics reduced the corneal reflex: piroxicam induced a 27% and lysine acetylsalicylate a 21% a reduction that naloxone did not reverse. Neither drug reduced the early or the late component of the blink reflex. 4. The marked inhibitory changes that the two non-narcotic analgesics produced on the corneal reflex--a nociceptive response--indicate a centrally-mediated action. 5. Naloxone's failure to reverse the induced analgesia argues against opiate receptor mediation.

  2. Asymmetric synthesis and in vitro and in vivo activity of tetrahydroquinolines featuring a diverse set of polar substitutions at the 6 position as mixed-efficacy μ opioid receptor/δ opioid receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Aaron M; Griggs, Nicholas W; Anand, Jessica P; Traynor, John R; Jutkiewicz, Emily M; Mosberg, Henry I

    2015-08-19

    We previously reported a small series of mixed-efficacy μ opioid receptor (MOR) agonist/δ opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist peptidomimetics featuring a tetrahydroquinoline scaffold and showed the promise of this series as effective analgesics after intraperitoneal administration in mice. We report here an expanded structure-activity relationship study of the pendant region of these compounds and focus in particular on the incorporation of heteroatoms into this side chain. These analogues provide new insight into the binding requirements for this scaffold at MOR, DOR, and the κ opioid receptor (KOR), and several of them (10j, 10k, 10m, and 10n) significantly improve upon the overall MOR agonist/DOR antagonist profile of our previous compounds. In vivo data for 10j, 10k, 10m, and 10n are also reported and show the antinociceptive potency and duration of action of compounds 10j and 10m to be comparable to those of morphine.

  3. 42 CFR 8.11 - Opioid treatment program certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 823(g)(1)) to dispense opioid drugs in the treatment of opioid addiction. An OTP... opioid addiction. (2) To obtain certification from SAMHSA, an OTP must meet the Federal opioid treatment... governmental entities to regulate the use of opioid drugs in the treatment of opioid addiction. The...

  4. Parallel Synthesis of Hexahydrodiimidazodiazepines Heterocyclic Peptidomimetics and Their in Vitro and in Vivo Activities at μ (MOR), δ (DOR), and κ (KOR) Opioid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eans, Shainnel O; Ganno, Michelle L; Mizrachi, Elisa; Houghten, Richard A; Dooley, Colette T; McLaughlin, Jay P; Nefzi, Adel

    2015-06-25

    In the development of analgesics with mixed-opioid agonist activity, peripherally selective activity is expected to decrease side effects, minimizing respiratory depression and reinforcing properties generating significantly safer analgesic therapeutics. We synthesized diazaheterocyclics from reduced tripeptides. In vitro screening with radioligand competition binding assays demonstrated variable affinity for μ (MOR), δ (DOR), and κ (KOR) opioid receptors across the series, with the diimidazodiazepine 14 (2065-14) displaying good affinity for DOR and KOR. Central (icv), intraperitoneal (ip), or oral (po) administration of 14 produced dose-dependent, opioid-receptor mediated antinociception in the mouse, as determined from a 55 °C warm-water tail-withdrawal assay. Only trace amounts of compound 14 was found in brain up to 90 min later, suggesting poor BBB penetration and possible peripherally restricted activity. Central administration of 14 did not produce locomotor effects, acute antinociceptive tolerance, or conditioned-place preference or aversion. The data suggest these diazaheterocyclic mixed activity opioid receptor agonists may hold potential as new analgesics with fewer liabilities of use.

  5. Beyond Opioids: Mind and Body Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Opioids Beyond Opioids: Mind and Body Practices Past Issues / Fall 2016 Table ... research shows that some non-drug approaches—including mind and body practices such as tai chi and ...

  6. Buprenorphine Sublingual and Buccal (opioid dependence)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... buprenorphine and naloxone are used to treat opioid dependence (addiction to opioid drugs, including heroin and narcotic ... as ketoconazole (Nizoral); medications for anxiety such as benzodiazepines; cyclobenzaprine (Amrix); dextromethorphan (found in many cough medications; ...

  7. Opioids and Alcohol a Dangerous Cocktail

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken opioids previously. Oxycodone, an ingredient in the brand-name drugs OxyContin and Percocet, is widely prescribed ... in the journal Anesthesiology . "We hope to increase awareness regarding the dangers of prescription opioids, the increased ...

  8. Medicare Part D Opioid Drug Mapping Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The opioid prescribing rate interactive mapping tool shows geographic comparisons, at the state, county, and ZIP code levels, of de-identified Medicare Part D opioid...

  9. Low-dose spinal neostigmine further enhances the analgesic effect of spinal bupivacaine combined with epidural dexamethasone, following orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Rocha Lauretti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opioids are considered mainstream for combined spinal-epidural anesthesia, but frequently limited by adverse effects. The aim of this study was to examine whether low-dose spinal neostigmine, epidural dexamethasone or their combination enhances analgesia from spinal bupivacaine without adverse effects. Materials and Methods : A total of 60 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery were randomized to one of four groups and evaluated for 24-h after surgery for analgesia (time to first rescue analgesic and rescue analgesic consumption. Patients received 15 mg bupivacaine plus the test drug intrathecally (saline or 1 microgram (μg neostigmine. The epidural test drug was either saline or 10 mg dexamethasone. The Control group (CG received spinal and epidural saline. The Neostigmine group (NG, spinal neostigmine and epidural saline; the Dexamethasone group (DG, spinal saline and epidural dexamethasone; and the Neostigmine-dexamethasone group (NDG, spinal neostigmine and epidural dexamethasone. Results: The CG (282 ± 163 min and NG (524 ± 142 min were similar in their times to first rescue analgesic and analgesic consumption. The time to first rescue analgesic was longer for the DG (966 ± 397 min compared with CG and NG (P < 0.0002, and the DG had less ketoprofen consumption and lower overall visual analogue scale-pain sores compared with CG and NG (P < 0.0005. Addition of 1 mg-neostigmine (NDG resulted in longer time to rescue analgesic (1205 ± 303 min; P < 0.02 and lower ketoprofen consumption (P < 0.05 compared to DG. Sporadic cases of vesical catheterization and emesis were observed, however adverse effects were similar among groups. Conclusion: Spinal 1 microgram (μg neostigmine further enhanced analgesia from spinal bupivacaine combined with epidural dexamethasone, without increasing the incidence of adverse effects.

  10. The analgesic efficacy of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block for retroperitoneoscopic donor nephrectomy: A randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena K Parikh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP block is suitable for lower abdominal surgeries. Blind TAP block has many complications and uncertainty of its effects. Use of ultrasonography increases the safety and efficacy. This study was conducted to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of ultrasound (USG-guided TAP block for retroperitoneoscopic donor nephrectomy (RDN. Methods: In a prospective randomized double-blind study, 60 patients undergoing laparoscopic donor nephrectomy were randomly divided into two groups by closed envelope method. At the end of surgery, USG-guided TAP block was given to the patients of both the groups. Study group (group S received inj. Bupivacaine (0.375%, whereas control group (group C received normal saline. Inj. Tramadol (1 mg/kg was given as rescue analgesic at visual analog scale (VAS more than 3 in any group at rest or on movement. The analgesic efficacy was judged by VAS both at rest and on movement, time to first dose of rescue analgesic, cumulative dose of tramadol, sedation score, and nausea score, which were also noted at 30 min, 2, 4, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h postoperatively. Total tramadol consumption at 24 h was also assessed. Results: Patients in group S had significantly lower VAS score, longer time to first dose of rescue analgesic (547.13±266.96 min vs. 49.17±24.95 min and lower tramadol consumption (103.8±32.18 mg vs. 235.8±47.5 mg in 24 h. Conclusion: The USG-guided TAP block is easy to perform and effective as a postoperative analgesic regimen in RDN, with opioids-sparing effect and without any complications.

  11. Opioid Peptides: Potential for Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Aldrich, Jane V.; McLaughlin, Jay P.

    2012-01-01

    Opioid receptors are important targets for the treatment of pain and potentially for other disease states (e.g. mood disorders and drug abuse) as well. Significant recent advances have been made in identifying opioid peptide analogs that exhibit promising in vivo activity for treatment of these maladies. This review focuses on the development and evaluation of opioid peptide analogs demonstrating activity after systemic administration, and recent clinical evaluations of opioid peptides for po...

  12. Opioid Tolerance and Physical Dependence: Role of Spinal Neuropeptides, Excitatory Amino Acids and Their Messengers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khem Jhamandas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic opioid treatment results in the development of tolerance and physical dependence. The mechanisms underlying opioid tolerance and/or physical dependence are unclear. Recent studies suggest that opioid receptor or nociceptive, neural network-based adaptations contribute to this phenomenon. At the spinal level, the genesis of tolerance and physical dependence is associated with increased excitatory amino acid activity expressed through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the dorsal horn. However, recent evidence also implicates spinal neuropeptide transmitters such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and  substance P in the development of opioid tolerance. Long term spinal morphine treatment increases CGRP-like immunostaining in the dorsal horn, and coadministration of morphine with CGRP8-37, a competitive CGRP1 receptor antagonist, prevents this response as well as loss of the analgesic potency. CGRP8-37, like N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, has the potential to restore morphine potency in experimental animals who are already tolerant to the opioid agonist. Recent evidence suggests that the effects of excitatory amino acid and neuropeptide receptor activity may be expressed through the generation of messengers such as nitric oxide and prostanoids. Agents that inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids have the potential to inhibit and reverse spinal opioid tolerance, suggesting that this phenomenon may be expressed through the activity of these mediators. Nociceptive transmission in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord also involves activity of a number of other mediators including morphine modulatory neuropeptides, neuropeptide FF  and neuropeptide SF. The role of these mediators and their relationship with other factors implicated in tolerance remain to be determined.

  13. A structural feature of the non-peptide ligand interactions with mice mu-opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Hamid R; Mucksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2014-01-01

    By binding to and activating the G-protein coupled μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system, opiates are known to induce analgesic and sedative effects. In particular, non-peptide opioid ligands are often used in clinical applications to induce these therapeutically beneficial effects, due to their superior pharmacokinetics and bioavailability in comparison to endogenous neuropeptides. However, since opioid alkaloids are highly addictive substances, it is necessary to understand the exact mechanisms of their actions, specifically the ligand-binding properties of the target receptors, in order to safely apply opiates for therapeutic purposes. Using an in silico molecular docking approach (AutoDock Vina) combined with two-step cluster analysis, we have computationally obtained the docking scores and the ligand-binding pockets of twelve representative non-peptide nonendogenous agonists and antagonists at the crystallographically identified μ-opioid receptor. Our study predicts the existence of two main binding sites that are congruently present in all opioid receptor types. Interestingly, in terms of the agonist or antagonist properties of the substances on the receptors, the clustering analysis suggests a relationship with the position of the ligand-binding pockets, particularly its depth within the receptor structure. Furthermore, the binding affinity of the substances is directly correlated to the proximity of the binding pockets to the extracellular space. In conclusion, the results provide further insights into the structural features of the functional pharmacology of opioid receptors, suggesting the importance of the binding position of non-peptide agonists and antagonists- specifically the distance and the level of exposure to the extracellular space- to their dissociation kinetics and subsequent potency.

  14. Effects of ketoprofen, morphine, and kappa opioids on pain-related depression of nesting in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, S Stevens; Neddenriep, Bradley; Altarifi, Ahmad A; Carroll, F Ivy; Leitl, Michael D; Miller, Laurence L

    2015-06-01

    Pain-related functional impairment and behavioral depression are diagnostic indicators of pain and targets for its treatment. Nesting is an innate behavior in mice that may be sensitive to pain manipulations and responsive to analgesics. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a procedure for evaluation of pain-related depression of nesting in mice. Male ICR mice were individually housed and tested in their home cages. On test days, a 5- × 5-cm Nestlet was subdivided into 6 pieces, the pieces were evenly distributed on the cage floor, and Nestlet consolidation was quantified during 100-minute sessions. Baseline nesting was stable within and between subjects, and nesting was depressed by 2 commonly used inflammatory pain stimuli (intraperitoneal injection of dilute acid; intraplantar injection of complete Freund adjuvant). Pain-related depression of nesting was alleviated by drugs from 2 classes of clinically effective analgesics (the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen and the μ-opioid receptor agonist morphine) but not by a drug from a class that has failed to yield effective analgesics (the centrally acting kappa opioid agonist U69,593). Neither ketoprofen nor morphine alleviated depression of nesting by U69,593, which suggests that ketoprofen and morphine effects were selective for pain-related depression of nesting. In contrast to ketoprofen and morphine, the kappa opioid receptor antagonist JDTic blocked depression of nesting by U69,593 but not by acid or complete Freund adjuvant. These results support utility of this procedure to assess expression and treatment of pain-related depression in mice.

  15. Opioids in Preclinical and Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideaki

    Since 1952, when Gates determined the stereo structure of morphine, numerous groups have focused on discovering a nonnarcotic opioid drug [1]. Although several natural, semisynthetic, and synthetic opioid ligands (alkaloids and peptides) have been developed in clinical studies, very few were nonnarcotic opioid drugs [2]. One of the most important studies in the opioid field appeared in 1976, when Martin and colleagues [3] established types of opioid receptors (these are now classified into μ, δ, and κ types). Later, Portoghese discovered a highly selective μ type opioid receptor antagonist, β-funaltrexamine [4]. This led to the finding that the μ type opioid receptor was correlated to drug dependence [5]. Consequently, δ, and particularly κ, opioid agonists were expected to lead to ideal opioid drugs. Moreover, opioid antagonists were evaluated for the treatment of symptoms related to undesirable opioid system activation. In this chapter, we provide a short survey of opioid ligands in development and describe the discovery of the two most promising drugs, TRK-851 [6] and TRK-820 (nalfurafine hydrochloride) [7].

  16. Anger regulation style, anger arousal and acute pain sensitivity: evidence for an endogenous opioid "triggering" model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, John W; Bruehl, Stephen; Chont, Melissa

    2014-08-01

    Findings suggest that greater tendency to express anger is associated with greater sensitivity to acute pain via endogenous opioid system dysfunction, but past studies have not addressed the role of anger arousal. We used a 2 × 2 factorial design with Drug Condition (placebo or opioid blockade with naltrexone) crossed with Task Order (anger-induction/pain-induction or pain-induction/anger-induction), and with continuous Anger-out Subscale scores. Drug × Task Order × Anger-out Subscale interactions were tested for pain intensity during a 4-min ischemic pain task performed by 146 healthy people. A significant Drug × Task Order × Anger-out Subscale interaction was dissected to reveal different patterns of pain intensity changes during the pain task for high anger-out participants who underwent pain-induction prior to anger-induction compared to those high in anger-out in the opposite order. Namely, when angered prior to pain, high anger-out participants appeared to exhibit low pain intensity under placebo that was not shown by high anger-out participants who received naltrexone. Results hint that people with a pronounced tendency to express anger may suffer from inadequate opioid function under simple pain-induction, but may experience analgesic benefit to some extent from the opioid triggering properties of strong anger arousal.

  17. The Fentanyl Patch Boil-Up - A Novel Method of Opioid Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, Cameron K M W; Shand, James A D; Reynolds, Thomas M

    2015-11-01

    Fentanyl is a potent opioid analgesic used in the treatment of pain. Transdermal fentanyl patches are now widely utilized as an acceptable and efficacious method of medication delivery. Unfortunately, the potential for their abuse is well recognized. Previous case reports have documented deaths after intravenous (IV) misuse of fentanyl which had been extracted from Duragesic (liquid reservoir type) patches. We present a case of IV fentanyl abuse after the extraction from a Mylan (matrix type) patch. This method of abuse has not previously been described in the literature.

  18. Gene expression profiling in the striatum of inbred mouse strains with distinct opioid-related phenotypes

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    Piechota Marcin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse strains with a contrasting response to morphine provide a unique model for studying the genetically determined diversity of sensitivity to opioid reward, tolerance and dependence. Four inbred strains selected for this study exhibit the most distinct opioid-related phenotypes. C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice show remarkable differences in morphine-induced antinociception, self-administration and locomotor activity. 129P3/J mice display low morphine tolerance and dependence in contrast to high sensitivity to precipitated withdrawal observed in SWR/J and C57BL/6J strains. In this study, we attempted to investigate the relationships between genetic background and basal gene expression profile in the striatum, a brain region involved in the mechanism of opioid action. Results Gene expression was studied by Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430v2.0 arrays with probes for over 39.000 transcripts. Analysis of variance with the control for false discovery rate (q Khdrbs1 and ATPase Na+/K+ alpha2 subunit (Atp1a2 with morphine self-administration and analgesic effects, respectively. Finally, the examination of transcript structure demonstrated a possible inter-strain variability of expressed mRNA forms as for example the catechol-O-methyltransferase (Comt gene. Conclusion The presented study led to the recognition of differences in the gene expression that may account for distinct phenotypes. Moreover, results indicate strong contribution of genetic background to differences in gene transcription in the mouse striatum. The genes identified in this work constitute promising candidates for further animal studies and for translational genetic studies in the field of addictive and analgesic properties of opioids.

  19. A novel, potent, oral active and safe antinociceptive pyrazole targeting kappa opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Gabriela; Rossato, Mateus F; Walker, Cristiani I B; Oliveira, Sara M; Rosa, Fernanda; Tonello, Raquel; Silva, Cássia R; Machado, Pablo; Boligon, Aline A; Martins, Marcos A P; Zanatta, Nilo; Bonacorso, Hélio G; Athayde, Margareth L; Rubin, Maribel A; Calixto, João B; Ferreira, Juliano

    2013-10-01

    Pyrazole compounds are an intriguing class of compounds with potential analgesic activity; however, their mechanism of action remains unknown. Thus, the goal of this study was to explore the antinociceptive potential, safety and mechanism of action of novel 1-pyrazole methyl ester derivatives, which were designed by molecular simplification, using in vivo and in vitro methods in mice. First, tree 1-pyrazole methyl ester derivatives (DMPE, MPFE, and MPCIE) were tested in the capsaicin test and all presented antinociceptive effect; however the MPClE (methyl 5-trichloromethyl-3-methyl-1H-pyrazole-1-carboxylate) was the most effective. Thus, we selected this compound to assess the effects and mechanisms in subsequent pain models. MPCIE produced antinociception when administered by oral, intraperitoneal, intrathecal and intraplantar routes and was effective in the capsaicin and the acetic acid-induced nociception tests. Moreover, this compound reduced the hyperalgesia in diverse clinically-relevant pain models, including postoperative, inflammatory, and neuropathic nociception in mice. The antinociception produced by orally administered MPClE was mediated by κ-opioid receptors, since these effects were prevented by systemically pre-treatment with naloxone and the κ-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. Moreover, MPCIE prevented binding of the κ-opioid ligand [(3)H]-CI-977 in vitro (IC₅₀ of 0.68 (0.32-1.4) μM), but not the TRPV1 ([(3)H]-resiniferatoxin) or the α₂-adrenoreceptor ([(3)H]-idazoxan) binding. Regarding the drug-induced side effects, oral administration of MPClE did not produce sedation, constipation or motor impairment at its active dose. In addition, MPCIE was readily absorbed after oral administration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MPClE is a novel, potent, orally active and safe analgesic drug that targets κ-opioid receptors.

  20. Place avoidance learning and stress-induced analgesia in the attacked mouse: role of endogenous opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegfried, B; Frischknecht, H R

    1989-07-01

    In this study, mechanisms of pain inhibition (tail-flick test) and memory (place avoidance paradigm) were investigated in attacked, DBA/2 and C57BL/6, mice. During training, exposure of test animals to 10 or 30 bites by an aggressive, isolated ICR mouse situated in the dark half of a bright/dark conditioning box induced a significantly higher social conflict analgesia in DBA than in C57 mice. Naltrexone (0.5 and 2.0 mg/kg) reduced this response in DBA mice that received 30, but not 10, bites and was ineffective in C57 mice. This points to different, opioid versus naltrexone-insensitive nonopioid, analgesic mechanisms. During place choice testing in the same box 24 h later, DBA mice that had received 30, but not 10, bites showed a significant, naltrexone-reversible, avoidance of the attack place. No place avoidance learning was observed in C57 mice. The data provided unequivocal evidence that place avoidance learning was a result of associative conditioning, in that neither pairing nor social conflict per se significantly changed the preference for the dark side seen in experimentally naive DBA mice. Antagonism of place avoidance conditioning was observed regardless of whether testing was carried out in the drugged or undrugged state, excluding possible state-dependent effects as an explanation for the naltrexone-induced impairment. Individual correlational analysis in saline-injected, attacked DBA mice revealed a negative relationship between the analgesic state immediately after training and the avoidance of attack place during testing. In summary, the results suggest strain-dependent analgesic and learning mechanisms and indicate that endogenous opioids released in attacked DBA mice support pain inhibition and modulate the memorization of attack place by their analgesic effects, as well as by mechanisms independent of pain inhibitory systems.

  1. Pharmacological investigations of N-substituent variation in morphine and oxymorphone: opioid receptor binding, signaling and antinociceptive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Haddou, Tanila; Béni, Szabolcs; Hosztafi, Sándor; Malfacini, Davide; Calo, Girolamo; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Morphine and structurally related derivatives are highly effective analgesics, and the mainstay in the medical management of moderate to severe pain. Pharmacological actions of opioid analgesics are primarily mediated through agonism at the µ opioid peptide (MOP) receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. Position 17 in morphine has been one of the most manipulated sites on the scaffold and intensive research has focused on replacements of the 17-methyl group with other substituents. Structural variations at the N-17 of the morphinan skeleton led to a diversity of molecules appraised as valuable and potential therapeutics and important research probes. Discovery of therapeutically useful morphine-like drugs has also targeted the C-6 hydroxyl group, with oxymorphone as one of the clinically relevant opioid analgesics, where a carbonyl instead of a hydroxyl group is present at position 6. Herein, we describe the effect of N-substituent variation in morphine and oxymorphone on in vitro and in vivo biological properties and the emerging structure-activity relationships. We show that the presence of a N-phenethyl group in position 17 is highly favorable in terms of improved affinity and selectivity at the MOP receptor, potent agonism and antinociceptive efficacy. The N-phenethyl derivatives of morphine and oxymorphone were very potent in stimulating G protein coupling and intracellular calcium release through the MOP receptor. In vivo, they were highly effective against acute thermal nociception in mice with marked increased antinociceptive potency compared to the lead molecules. It was also demonstrated that a carbonyl group at position 6 is preferable to a hydroxyl function in these N-phenethyl derivatives, enhancing MOP receptor affinity and agonist potency in vitro and in vivo. These results expand the understanding of the impact of different moieties at the morphinan nitrogen on ligand-receptor interaction, molecular mode of action and signaling, and may be

  2. Pharmacological investigations of N-substituent variation in morphine and oxymorphone: opioid receptor binding, signaling and antinociceptive activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanila Ben Haddou

    Full Text Available Morphine and structurally related derivatives are highly effective analgesics, and the mainstay in the medical management of moderate to severe pain. Pharmacological actions of opioid analgesics are primarily mediated through agonism at the µ opioid peptide (MOP receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. Position 17 in morphine has been one of the most manipulated sites on the scaffold and intensive research has focused on replacements of the 17-methyl group with other substituents. Structural variations at the N-17 of the morphinan skeleton led to a diversity of molecules appraised as valuable and potential therapeutics and important research probes. Discovery of therapeutically useful morphine-like drugs has also targeted the C-6 hydroxyl group, with oxymorphone as one of the clinically relevant opioid analgesics, where a carbonyl instead of a hydroxyl group is present at position 6. Herein, we describe the effect of N-substituent variation in morphine and oxymorphone on in vitro and in vivo biological properties and the emerging structure-activity relationships. We show that the presence of a N-phenethyl group in position 17 is highly favorable in terms of improved affinity and selectivity at the MOP receptor, potent agonism and antinociceptive efficacy. The N-phenethyl derivatives of morphine and oxymorphone were very potent in stimulating G protein coupling and intracellular calcium release through the MOP receptor. In vivo, they were highly effective against acute thermal nociception in mice with marked increased antinociceptive potency compared to the lead molecules. It was also demonstrated that a carbonyl group at position 6 is preferable to a hydroxyl function in these N-phenethyl derivatives, enhancing MOP receptor affinity and agonist potency in vitro and in vivo. These results expand the understanding of the impact of different moieties at the morphinan nitrogen on ligand-receptor interaction, molecular mode of action and signaling

  3. The role of surfactants in the formulation of elastic liposomal gels containing a synthetic opioid analgesic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh S

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sima Singh,1,* Harsh Vardhan,1,* Niranjan G Kotla,2 Balaji Maddiboyina,3 Dinesh Sharma,4 Thomas J Webster5,6 1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, India; 2Center for Research in Medical Devices, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland; 3Department of Pharmaceutics, Vishwabharathi College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guntur, India; 4Ranbaxy Laboratory Ltd, Gurgaon, India; 5Department of Chemical Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; 6Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Transdermal drug delivery systems have made significant contributions to the medical community, but have yet to completely substitute oral or parenteral delivery. Recently, various strategies have been used to augment the transdermal delivery of therapeutics. Primarily, they include iontophoresis, electrophoresis, sonophoresis, chemical permeation enhancers, microneedles, and vesicular systems. Among these strategies, elastic liposomes appear promising. Elastic vesicle scaffolds have been developed and evaluated as novel topical and transdermal delivery systems, with an infrastructure consisting of hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties together, and as a result, such scaffolds can accommodate drug molecules with a wide range of solubility. High deformability of these vesicles provides for better penetration of intact vesicles. This system is much more efficient at delivering low- and high-molecular-weight drugs to the skin in terms of quantity and depth. In this work, elastic liposomes of Tramadol HCl were prepared using a solvent evaporation method with different surfactants and were characterized using microscopy, and particle size, shape, drug content, ex vivo release, and zeta potential were also calculated. The prepared elastic liposomes were found to be in the range of 152.4 nm with a zeta potential of -22.4 mV; the entrapment efficiencies of the selected formulation was found to be 79.71%±0.27%. All formulations in the form of a gel were evaluated for physicochemical properties and were found to be homogeneous with no grittiness, and the pH of all formulations was found to be neutral. The optimized selected elastic liposomal formulation followed the Higuchi equation and Fickian diffusion and released the drug for a period of 24 hours. The overall results provide much promise for the continued investigation of deformable vesicles as transdermal drug carriers. Keywords: elastic liposome, skin delivery, occlusion, hydration-gradient, hydrogel

  4. Experience with nalbuphine, a new opioid analgesic, in acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, R A; Kaye, G; Mason, P D

    1987-07-01

    A total of 141 patients admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of suspected myocardial infarction were randomized to treatment with intravenous diamorphine (71) or nalbuphine (70). Myocardial infarction was subsequently confirmed in 109 patients. Both drugs provided good analgesia. Heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, peak flow and minute volume were measured over a three-hour study period. Except for a slight fall in systolic blood pressure in the nalbuphine-treated group, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups. The nalbuphine-treated group had higher levels of aspartate aminotransferase and hydroxybutyric acid dehydrogenase but not creatine phosphokinase. The haemodynamic outcome and mortality at three months of the two groups were similar. It is concluded that nalbuphine provides effective analgesia coupled with few adverse circulatory or respiratory effects.

  5. A novel hot-plate test sensitive to hyperalgesic stimuli and non-opioid analgesics

    OpenAIRE

    T.R. Lavich; Cordeiro, R S B; Silva,P.M.R.; M.A. Martins

    2005-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the classical constant-temperature hot-plate test is insensitive to cyclooxygenase inhibitors. In the current study, we developed a variant of the hot-plate test procedure (modified hot-plate (MHP) test) to measure inflammatory nociception in freely moving rats and mice. Following left and right hind paw stimulation with a phlogogen and vehicle, respectively, the animals were placed individually on a hot-plate surface at 51ºC and the withdrawal latency for each paw ...

  6. A novel hot-plate test sensitive to hyperalgesic stimuli and non-opioid analgesics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. Lavich

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that the classical constant-temperature hot-plate test is insensitive to cyclooxygenase inhibitors. In the current study, we developed a variant of the hot-plate test procedure (modified hot-plate (MHP test to measure inflammatory nociception in freely moving rats and mice. Following left and right hind paw stimulation with a phlogogen and vehicle, respectively, the animals were placed individually on a hot-plate surface at 51ºC and the withdrawal latency for each paw was determined simultaneously in measurements performed at 15, 60, 180, and 360 min post-challenge. Plantar stimulation of rats (250 and 500 µg/paw and mice (125-500 µg/paw with carrageenan led to a rapid hyperalgesic response of the ipsilateral paw that reached a plateau from 15 to 360 min after challenge. Pretreatment with indomethacin (4 mg/kg, ip inhibited the phenomenon at all the times analyzed. Similarly, plantar stimulation of rats and mice with prostaglandin E2 (0.5 and 1 µg/paw also resulted in rapid hyperalgesia which was first detected 15 min post-challenge. Finally, we observed that the MHP test was more sensitive than the classical Hargreaves' test, being able to detect about 4- and 10-fold lower doses of prostaglandin E2 and carrageenan, respectively. In conclusion, the MHP test is a simple and sensitive method for detecting peripheral hyperalgesia and analgesia in rats and mice. This test represents a low-cost alternative for the study of inflammatory pain in freely moving animals.

  7. A novel hot-plate test sensitive to hyperalgesic stimuli and non-opioid analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavich, T R; Cordeiro, R S B; Silva, P M R; Martins, M A

    2005-03-01

    It is widely accepted that the classical constant-temperature hot-plate test is insensitive to cyclooxygenase inhibitors. In the current study, we developed a variant of the hot-plate test procedure (modified hot-plate (MHP) test) to measure inflammatory nociception in freely moving rats and mice. Following left and right hind paw stimulation with a phlogogen and vehicle, respectively, the animals were placed individually on a hot-plate surface at 51 degrees C and the withdrawal latency for each paw was determined simultaneously in measurements performed at 15, 60, 180, and 360 min post-challenge. Plantar stimulation of rats (250 and 500 microg/paw) and mice (125-500 microg/paw) with carrageenan led to a rapid hyperalgesic response of the ipsilateral paw that reached a plateau from 15 to 360 min after challenge. Pretreatment with indomethacin (4 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited the phenomenon at all the times analyzed. Similarly, plantar stimulation of rats and mice with prostaglandin E2 (0.5 and 1 microg/paw) also resulted in rapid hyperalgesia which was first detected 15 min post-challenge. Finally, we observed that the MHP test was more sensitive than the classical Hargreaves' test, being able to detect about 4- and 10-fold lower doses of prostaglandin E2 and carrageenan, respectively. In conclusion, the MHP test is a simple and sensitive method for detecting peripheral hyperalgesia and analgesia in rats and mice. This test represents a low-cost alternative for the study of inflammatory pain in freely moving animals.

  8. Management of opioid-induced constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, David; Norton, Christine; Bharucha, Adil E

    Up to 40% of patients taking opioids develop constipation. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) may limit the adequate dosing of opioids for pain relief and reduce quality of life. Health professionals must therefore inquire about bowel function in patients receiving opioids. The management of OIC includes carefully re-evaluating the necessity, type and dose of opioids at each visit. Lifestyle modification and alteration of aggravating factors, the use of simple laxatives and, when essential, the addition of newer laxatives or opioid antagonists (naloxone, naloxegol or methylnaltrexone) can be used to treat OIC. This review discusses the recent literature regarding the management of OIC and provides a rational approach to assessing and managing constipation in individuals receiving opioids.

  9. Inhibition of trigemino-hypoglossal reflex in rats by oxytocin is mediated by mu and kappa opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycka, Maria; Fichna, Jakub; Janecka, Anna

    2005-02-21

    Recent studies showed that oxytocin plays an important role in the modulation of pain at different levels of the central nervous system. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of oxytocin on trigemino-hypoglossal reflex in rats. With the experimental settings used in this study, we have demonstrated that oxytocin showed significant analgesic effect after intracerebroventricular administration in rats, as assayed by the amplitude of the retractory movements of the tongue after tooth pulp stimulation. Antinociceptive effect of oxytocin was inhibited by subsequent perfusion of cerebral ventricles with oxytocin antagonist, [deamino-Cys1-D-Tyr(OEt)2-Thr4-Orn8]-oxytocin, atosiban. An involvement of opioid system in the oxytocin-induced analgesia was studied after intracerebroventricular administration of different opioid antagonists: non-selective naloxone, mu-selective beta-funaltrexamine, delta-selective naltrindole, and kappa-selective nor-binaltorphimine. It was shown that inhibition of antinociceptive effects was mediated through mu and kappa opioid receptors, indicating that there is a synergy between oxytocin and opioid systems in transmitting and modulating pain stimuli. Co-administration of oxytocin and a mu-selective endogenous opioid ligand endomorphin-2 did not significantly increase the antinociceptive activity of endomorphin-2.

  10. Analgesic Treatment in Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars P H; Werner, Mads U; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    This review aimed to present an overview of the randomized controlled trials investigating analgesic regimens used in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery. Literature search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE databases in August 2013 in accordance to PRISMA guidelines. The litera......This review aimed to present an overview of the randomized controlled trials investigating analgesic regimens used in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) surgery. Literature search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE databases in August 2013 in accordance to PRISMA guidelines...

  11. 3-(alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-hydroxybenzyl)-N-alkyl-N-arylbenzamides: potent, non-peptidic agonists of both the micro and delta opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael J; Garrido, Dulce M; Boswell, G Evan; Collins, Mark A; Harris, Philip A; McNutt, Robert W; O'Neill, Scott J; Wei, Ke; Chang, Kwen-Jen

    2003-02-13

    Opioid analgesics with both micro and delta opioid receptor activation represent a new approach to the treatment of severe pain with an improved safety profile. Compounds with this profile may exhibit strong analgesic properties due to micro agonism, with a reduced side effect profile resulting from delta agonism. Replacing the p-diethylamide of the known potent delta opioid receptor selective agonist BW373U86 with a m-diethylamide resulted in a compound with agonist activity at both the micro and delta opioid receptors. Modifying the amide to an N-methyl-N-phenylamide increased agonist potency at both receptors. A series of 3-(alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-hydroxybenzyl)-N-alkyl-N-arylbenzamides have been made to explore the structure-activity relationship (SAR) around the N-methyl-N-phenylamide. Several potent agonists of both the micro and delta opioid receptors have been identified, including (+)-3-((alphaR)-alpha-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-hydroxybenzyl)-N-(4-fluorophenyl)-N-methylbenzamide (23), which has EC50 values of 0.67 and 1.1 nM at the micro (guinea pig ileum assay) and delta (mouse vas deferens assay) opioid receptors, respectively.

  12. Opioid use in the elderly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2005-01-01

    Pain treatment in the elderly is an important challenge to Western societies due to increasing numbers of old persons, their higher incidence of pain, and their greater susceptibility to adverse effects of pain medication. We provide an overview of the factors liable to influence opioid action in th

  13. Analgesic therapy in postherpetic neuralgia: a quantitative systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Hempenstall

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN is a complication of acute herpes zoster, which is emerging as a preferred clinical trial model for chronic neuropathic pain. Although there are published meta-analyses of analgesic therapy in PHN, and neuropathic pain in general, the evidence base has been substantially enhanced by the recent publication of several major trials. Therefore, we have conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis for both efficacy and adverse events of analgesic therapy for PHN. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We systematically searched databases (MEDLINE 1966-2004, EMBASE 1988-2004, CINAHL 1982-2002, and PubMed [29 October 2004] for trials of PHN. We also searched references of retrieved studies and review articles for further trials. We included trials that examined adult patients with PHN of greater duration than 3 mo, that were blinded, randomised, and had at least one measure of pain outcome. Dichotomous pain outcome data were extracted for 50% decrease in baseline pain using a hierarchy of pain/pain-relief measurement tools. Where available, dichotomous data were also collected for adverse events. Calculated estimates of efficacy included relative benefit and number needed to treat. Of 62 studies identified, 35 were randomised controlled trials. Of these, 31 were placebo controlled and suitable for meta-analysis, from which it was possible to extract dichotomous efficacy outcome data from 25. This meta-analysis revealed that there is evidence to support the use of the following orally administered therapies: tricyclic antidepressants, "strong" opioids, gabapentin, tramadol, and pregabalin. Topical therapies associated with efficacy were lidocaine 5% patch and capsaicin. Finally, a single study of spinal intrathecal administration of lidocaine and methyl prednisolone demonstrated efficacy, although this has yet to be replicated. Data suggest that the following therapies are not associated with efficacy in PHN: certain NMDA

  14. The molecular mechanisms of the analgesic action of melatonin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shu-hui; LI Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective To analyse the potential involvement of the opioid receptor gene expression in the mechanisms of the analgesic action of melatonin. Methods A trauma-pain model was established in Wistar rats by combining right-hind limb amputation with 50 ℃ tail-flick test. Antinoeiception was determined by tail-flick latency to hot waster at 50 ℃. RT-PCR was used to observe the the expression of the M1OR and KOR gene. Results Melatonin produced the antinociceptive effect in dose-dependent manner after i. p or i. c. v. administration. Injected i. c. v. to rats, naloxone (10 μg) obviously antagonized the antinoeiceptive effect induced by i. p. melatonin. The expression of the M1OR gene in the rat hypothalamus and the KOR gene in the hippocampus was both significantly reduced at day 3 after injury, which was parallel to the reduction of the rat pain thresholds. However, the expression of the M1OR gene in the hippocampus and the KOR gene in the hypothalamus was not changed. Treatment of trauma-pain rats with melatonin (30-120 mg·kg-1) i. p. administrated induced the up-regulation of M1OR mRNA in the hypothalamus and the KOR mRNA in the hippocampus in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions The present observations suggest that Melatonin-induced antinociceptive effect may partially contribute to the up-regulation of M1OR mRNA level in the hypothalamus and the KOR mRNA level in the hippocampus.

  15. Methadone-related opioid agonist pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction. History, recent molecular and neurochemical research and future in mainstream medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreek, M J

    2000-01-01

    In 1963, Professor Vincent P. Dole at the Rockefeller University formed a small team to develop a pharmacotherapy for the management of heroin addiction. They hypothesized that heroin addiction is a disease of the brain with behavioral manifestations, and not merely a personality disorder or criminal behavior and began to address the specific question of whether a long-acting opioid agonist could be used in the long-term maintenance treatment of heroin addiction. Over the next 35 years, many studies documented the safety, efficacy and effectiveness of methadone pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction, but Federal regulations and stigmatization of heroin addiction prevented implementation of treatment. Finally, in 1999, NIH published a report unequivocally supporting methadone maintenance pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction. Two other effective opioid agonist treatments have been developed: the even longer acting opioid agonist l-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) has been approved for pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction, and still under study is the opioid partial agonist-antagonist buprenorphine-naloxone combination. A variety of studies, both laboratory based and clinical, have revealed the mechanisms of action of long-acting opioid agonists in treatment, including prevention of disruption of molecular, cellular and physiologic events and, in fact, allowing normalization of those functions disrupted by chronic heroin use. Recent molecular biological studies have revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms of the human mu opioid receptor gene; the mu opioid receptor is the site of action of heroin, the major opiate drug of abuse, analgesic agents such as morphine, and the major treatment agents for heroin addiction. These findings support the early hypotheses of our laboratory that addiction may be due to a combination of genetic, drug-induced and environmental (including behavioral) factors and also, that atypical stress responsivity may contribute to the acquisition and

  16. Efficacy of Tramadol as a Sole Analgesic for Postoperative Pain in Male and Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, A Marissa; Kennedy, Lucy H; Na, Jane J; Nemzek-Hamlin, Jean A

    2015-07-01

    Tramadol is a centrally acting weak μ opioid agonist that has few of the adverse side effects common to other opioids. Little work has been done to establish an effective analgesic dose of tramadol specific for surgical laparotomy and visceral manipulation in mice. We used general appearance parameters to score positive indicators of pain including posture, coat condition, activity, breathing, and interactions with other mice, activity events (that is, the number of times each mouse stretched up in a 3-min period) used as an indicator of decreased pain, von Frey fibers, and plasma levels of corticosterone to determine whether tramadol at 20, 40, or 80 mg/kg prevented postoperative pain in male and female C57BL/6 mice. A ventral midline laparotomy with typhlectomy was used as a model of postoperative pain. In male mice, none of the markers differed between groups that received tramadol (regardless of dose) and the saline-treated controls. However, general appearance scores and plasma corticosterone levels were lower in female mice that received 80 mg/kg tramadol compared with saline. In summary, for severe postoperative pain after laparotomy and aseptic typhlectomy, tramadol was ineffective in male C57BL/6 mice at all doses tested. Although 80 mg/kg ameliorated postoperative pain in female C57BL/6 mice, this dose is very close to the threshold reported to cause toxic side effects, such as tremors and seizures. Therefore, we do not recommend the use of tramadol as a sole analgesic in this mouse model of postoperative pain.

  17. 76 FR 22404 - Analgesic Clinical Trials Innovation, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Analgesic Clinical Trials Innovation, Opportunities, and... Analgesic Clinical Trials Innovation, Opportunities, and Networks (ACTION) Initiative. The goal of the... major gaps in scientific information, which can slow down analgesic clinical trials and analgesic...

  18. Use of analgesic drugs and risk of ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammundsen, Henriette B; Faber, Mette T; Jensen, Allan;

    2012-01-01

    The role of analgesic drug use in development of ovarian cancer is not fully understood. We examined the association between analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer. In addition, we examined whether the association differed according to histological types.......The role of analgesic drug use in development of ovarian cancer is not fully understood. We examined the association between analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer. In addition, we examined whether the association differed according to histological types....

  19. Intraoperative nitrous oxide as a preventive analgesic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglitz, D K; Amaratunge, L N; Konstantatos, A H; Lindholm, D E

    2010-09-01

    Preventive analgesia is defined as the persistence of the analgesic effects of a drug beyond the clinical activity of the drug. The N-methyl D-aspartate receptor plays a critical role in the sensitisation of pain pathways induced by injury. Nitrous oxide inhibits excitatory N-methyl D-aspartate sensitive glutamate receptors. The objective of our study was to test the efficacy of nitrous oxide as a preventive analgesic. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data from a subset of patients (n = 100) randomly selected from a previous major multicentre randomised controlled trial on nitrous oxide (ENIGMA trial). Data analysed included postoperative analgesic requirements, pain scores and duration of patient-controlled analgesia during the first 72 postoperative hours. There was no significant difference in postoperative oral morphine equivalent usage (nitrous group 248 mg, no nitrous group 289 mg, mean difference -43 mg, 95% confidence interval 141 to 54 mg). However, patients who received nitrous oxide had a shorter duration of patient-controlled analgesia use (nitrous group 35 hours, no nitrous group 51 hours, mean difference -16 hours, 95% confidence interval -29 to -2 hours, P = 0.022). There was no difference in pain scores between the groups. The shorter patient-controlled analgesia duration in the nitrous oxide group suggests that intraoperative nitrous oxide may have a preventive analgesic effect.

  20. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of flupirtine maleate and ibuprofen in gynaecological ambulatory surgeries: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanita Ahuja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Flupirtine maleate is a centrally acting, non-opioid analgesic with unique muscle relaxant properties as compared to common analgesics. The aim of this study was to compare post-operative analgesic efficacy of flupirtine maleate and ibuprofen in patients undergoing gynaecological ambulatory surgeries. Methods: This prospective, randomised controlled study was conducted in 60 women of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I/II, 18-70 years of age and scheduled to undergo gynaecological ambulatory surgeries. The participants were randomised to receive either 100 mg oral flupirtine maleate (group flupirtine, n = 30 or 800 mg oral ibuprofen (group ibuprofen, n = 30, 1 h prior to surgery and then every 8 h for 48 h. Verbal Numerical Rating Scale (VNRS on movement was assessed at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h following surgery. Following discharge from hospital, the patients were interviewed telephonically at 12, 24 and 48 h post-operatively. VNRS was statistically analysed using Mann-Whitney test. Results: VNRS on movement was statistically reduced at 2 h after surgery (P = 0.04 in group flupirtine as compared to group ibuprofen. The analgesic efficacy was similar in both the groups at 4, 6, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after surgery. The satisfaction scores at 24 and 48 h post-operatively were superior in group flupirtine as compared to group ibuprofen (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Analgesic efficacy of flupirtine maleate was comparable with ibuprofen in patients in ambulatory gynaecological patients up to 48 h postoperatively with superior satisfaction scores.

  1. δ-阿片受体抑制阿片诱发痛觉过敏的研究进展%The role of δ- opioid receptor in the inhibition of opioid induced hyperalgesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李依泽; 王海云; 王国林

    2012-01-01

    Background Opioids are the most powerful analgesics for the treatment of moderate to severe pain.Although opioids have analgesic effect,they have many side effects at the same time.Long term opioids exposure can induce hyperalgesia and tolerance.Moreover,increasing the dose of opioids,paradoxically,aggravates the hyperalgesia and tolerance,causing a vicious cycle.The use of opioids,therefore,is largely limited in the clinical setting. Objective The relevant literatures involved in the role of δ-opioid receptors in the attenuation of opioid induced hyperalgesia (OIH) in recent years were summarized,which helps readership to update the latest information about this topic. Content The structure,distribution,physiological function and the progress of antihyperalgesic effect of δ-opioid receptors were reviewed in this article.Those researches suggest that OIH and tolerance can be attenuated by the inhibition of δ-opioid receptor phosphorylation,knocking out δ-opioid receptor coding genes and the application of δ-opioid receptor antagonists. Trend Since the antihyperalgesia effect of δ-opioid receptor is widely acknowledged,δ- opioid receptor may become a new target to relieve pain in the clinical setting.%背景 阿片类药物是治疗中、重度疼痛的主要药物,长时间应用可出现阿片诱发的痛觉过敏和耐受,而增加药物剂量可造成更严重的痛觉过敏和耐受,从而形成恶性循环,很大程度上限制了阿片类药物在临床工作中的应用.目的 通过对近年δ-阿片受体在痛觉过敏中所起作用的研究进行总结,帮助读者了解国外相关研究的最新趋势和进展.内容 就δ-阿片受体的结构、分布、生理功能和δ-阿片受体的抗痛觉过敏作用的研究进展进行综述.得出如下结论,通过抑制δ-阿片受体磷酸化、敲除δ-阿片受体编码基因和应用δ-阿片受体拮抗剂等方法,可抑制痛觉过敏和耐受的形成.趋向 随着越来越多的学者对

  2. Clinical consequences of nonnarcotic analgesic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, G R

    1997-02-01

    The accuracy of the economic analysis of the selected adverse events evaluated by McGoldrick and Bailie is questionable. The quantitative perspective on the economics of the adverse events associated with nonnarcotic analgesic use proposed by these authors is limited by the fact that they have combined data on over 30 different NSAIDs into a single value for comparison with two single-entity agents: acetaminophen and aspirin. The relative prevalence of major organ system toxicities varies markedly among the NSAIDs, and this variance invalidates the use of a class conclusion approach. Their conservative incidence estimates, the lack of data in some areas (i.e., hepatic injury), and the exclusion of combination analgesics further limit the utility of their conclusions. However, it is difficult to argue authoritatively that the relative costs of toxicities associated with the three analgesic classes they reviewed are not representative. The ultimate question is, "What is the optimal analgesic for a given patient?" This question can be addressed only if one considers the underlying cause of pain, its chronicity/acuity, the patient's concurrent disease states, if any, and the potential for drug interactions with the patient's concomitant medications. McGoldrick and Bailie concluded on an economic basis that acetaminophen is the analgesic of choice for most patients, including those with impaired renal function. This recommendation is in agreement with those of the Analgesics and the Kidney Ad Hoc Committee of the National Kidney Foundation. It also would seem prudent to use acetaminophen as the first-line agent for those patients in whom aspirin and NSAID use should be avoided or used only with caution along with frequent monitoring of renal function, blood pressure, electrolytes, and/or coagulation status. Thus, there is little to no controversy in their recommendation to initiate treatment with acetaminophen. The authors, however, also suggested that switching

  3. Postoperative opioid sparing with injectable hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-diclofenac: pooled analysis of data from two Phase III clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan TJ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tong J Gan,1 Neil Singla,2 Stephen E Daniels,3 Douglas A Hamilton,4,5 Peter G Lacouture,6,7 Christian RD Reyes,8 Daniel B Carr4,9 1Department of Anesthesiology, Stony Brook University, NY, 2Lotus Clinical Research, LLC, Pasadena, CA, 3Premier Research, Austin, TX, 4Javelin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cambridge, MA, 5New Biology Ventures, LLC, San Mateo, CA, 6Magidom Discovery, LLC, St Augustine, FL, 7Department of Emergency Medicine, Brown University School of Medicine, Providence, RI, 8Hospira Inc., Lake Forest, IL, 9Department of Anesthesiology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Use of nonopioid analgesics (including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for postoperative pain management can reduce opioid consumption and potentially prevent opioid-related adverse events. This study examined the postoperative opioid-sparing effect of repeated-dose injectable diclofenac formulated with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD-diclofenac. Patients and methods: Pooled data from two double-blind, randomized, placebo- and active comparator-controlled Phase III trials were analyzed. Patients received HPβCD-diclofenac, placebo, or ketorolac by intravenous injection every 6 hours for up to 5 days following abdominal/pelvic or orthopedic surgery. Rescue opioid use was evaluated from the time of first study drug administration to up to 120 hours following the first dose in the overall study population and in subgroups defined by baseline pain severity, age, and HPβCD-diclofenac dose. Results: Overall, 608 patients received ≥1 dose of study medication and were included in the analysis. While 93.2% of patients receiving placebo required opioids, the proportion of patients requiring opioids was significantly lower for patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac (18.75, 37.5, or 50 mg or ketorolac (P<0.005 for all comparisons. Mean cumulative opioid dose and number of doses were significantly lower among patients receiving HPβCD-diclofenac versus placebo

  4. MOR is not enough: identification of novel mu-opioid receptor interacting proteins using traditional and modified membrane yeast two-hybrid screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petko, Jessica; Justice-Bitner, Stephanie; Jin, Jay; Wong, Victoria; Kittanakom, Saranya; Ferraro, Thomas N; Stagljar, Igor; Levenson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The mu-opioid receptor (MOR) is the G-protein coupled receptor primarily responsible for mediating the analgesic and rewarding properties of opioid agonist drugs such as morphine, fentanyl, and heroin. We have utilized a combination of traditional and modified membrane yeast two-hybrid screening methods to identify a cohort of novel MOR interacting proteins (MORIPs). The interaction between the MOR and a subset of MORIPs was validated in pulldown, co-immunoprecipitation, and co-localization studies using HEK293 cells stably expressing the MOR as well as rodent brain. Additionally, a subset of MORIPs was found capable of interaction with the delta and kappa opioid receptors, suggesting that they may represent general opioid receptor interacting proteins (ORIPS). Expression of several MORIPs was altered in specific mouse brain regions after chronic treatment with morphine, suggesting that these proteins may play a role in response to opioid agonist drugs. Based on the known function of these newly identified MORIPs, the interactions forming the MOR signalplex are hypothesized to be important for MOR signaling and intracellular trafficking. Understanding the molecular complexity of MOR/MORIP interactions provides a conceptual framework for defining the cellular mechanisms of MOR signaling in brain and may be critical for determining the physiological basis of opioid tolerance and addiction.

  5. Opioid/naloxone prolonged release combinations for opioid induced constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shailendra Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    I read with great interest the recent article by Chen et a/in a recent issue of your esteemed journal.The article is highly thought provoking.One emerging therapeutic alternative for opioid induced constipation is the emergence of opioid/naloxone prolonged release combinations.For instance,naloxone when administered in a 1∶2 ratio with oxycodone reverses the inhibitory effect of oxycodone on the gastrointestinal tract.The advantage of oxycodone/naloxone prolonged release (OXN) is that while its anti-nociceptive efficacy is equivalent to that of oxycodone prolonged release (OXC),it significantly decreases the "Bowel Function Index" thereby ameliorating symptoms of opioid induced constipation to a large extent.Schutter et al in a recent study have reported a decrease in the bowel function index from 38.2 to 15.1.Similarly,L(o)wenstein et al in another recent study have reported that following a month of therapy,complete spontaneous bowel movements per week is increased from one in OXC therapy to three in OXN therapy.

  6. Look before leaping: combined opioids may not be the rave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mellar P; LeGrand, Susan B; Lagman, Ruth

    2005-10-01

    The use of combinations of potent opioids is a common clinical practice. The addition of one potent opioid to another has been recommended to reduce opioid side effects, improve pain control, and limit dose escalation of the first opioid. The advantages of using combined opioids have been reported to be relative to differences in receptor activation versus endocytosis (RAVE). However, the advantages and detriment to combining opioids are related to naturally occurring opioid receptor dimers. Dimers and oligomers result in a unique opioid pharmacodynamics which influence opioid binding, G protein interactions, desensitization, receptor trafficking, and endocytosis. The pharmacodynamics of dimers may lead to positive or negative cooperativity when two opioids are combined. The use of multiple opioids in practice can lead to increased risk for dosing errors, reduced patient compliance, increased drug interactions and cost. Opioid combinations should not be used until prospective randomized trials clarify the benefits and safety.

  7. Opioid rotation with extended-release opioids: where should we begin?

    OpenAIRE

    Nalamachu S

    2011-01-01

    Srinivas NalamachuInternational Clinical Research Institute and Pain Management Institute, Overland Park, KS, USAAbstract: Opioid rotation is a common and necessary clinical practice in the management of chronic non-cancer pain to improve therapeutic efficacy with the lowest opioid dose. When dose escalations fail to achieve adequate analgesia or are associated with intolerable side effects, a trial of a new opioid should be considered. Much of the scientific rationale of opioid rotation is b...

  8. Activation profiles of opioid ligands in HEK cells expressing δ opioid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Clark J; Demirci Hasan; Gharagozlou Parham; Lameh Jelveh

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to characterize the activation profiles of 15 opioid ligands in transfected human embryonic kidney cells expressing only δ opioid receptors. Activation profiles of most of these ligands at δ opioid receptors had not been previously characterized in vitro. Receptor activation was assessed by measuring the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production. Results Naltrexone and nalorphine were classified as antagonists at δ opioid receptor....

  9. Reduced consumption of analgesics in patients with diabetes mellitus admitted to hospital for acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F E; Gram-Hansen, P; Christensen, J H;

    1991-01-01

    .05). There was no statistically significant trend for the duration of pain to be shorter in the diabetes group. There was no difference between the two groups with respect to number of patients with Q-wave infarct, initial heart rate-blood pressure product or body weight, all of which are possible confounders. We conclude......In a case-control study, the consumption of analgesics was analysed in 39 patients with diabetes, admitted with acute myocardial infarction (MI). The control group comprised of non-diabetics with MI was computer-matched to the diabetic group with respect to age and sex as well as enzyme......-estimated size of the infarction. The median number of injections of opioid analgesics in the diabetes and non-diabetes groups was 2 and 5, respectively (0.01 less than P less than 0.05), and the median consumption of morphine was 20 mg and 35 mg, respectively (0.01 less than P less than 0...

  10. Intravenous flurbiprofen axetil can increase analgesic effect in refractory cancer pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Jiqing

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic effects of intravenous flurbiprofen axetil for the refractory pain in cancer patients. Methods 2109 patients were screened from the department of medical oncology, the first affiliated hospital of Anhui medical university in China between October of 2007 and October of 2008. Thirty-seven cases of cancer patients who had bad effect from anaesthetic drugs were received administration of intravenous flurbiprofen axetil with dose of 50 mg/5 ml/day. The pain score was evaluated for pre- and post- treatment by Pain Faces Scale criteria, and the side effects were also observed. Results Intravenous flurbiprofen axetil increased the analgesic effects. The total effective rate was 92%. The side effects, such as abdominal pain, alimentary tract bleeding which were found in using NSAIDs or constipation, nausea, vomit, sleepiness which were found in using opioid drugs did not be found. Conclusion Intravenous flurbiprofen axetil could provide better analgesia effects and few side effects to patients with refractory cancer pain. It could also increase analgesia effects when combining with anesthetic drugs in treatment of moderate or severe pain, especially breakthrough pain, and suit to patients who can not take oral drugs for the reason of constipation and psychosomatic symptoms.

  11. Intravenous flurbiprofen axetil can increase analgesic effect in refractory cancer pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongyang; Chen, Zhendong; Sun, Guoping; Gu, Kangsheng; Pan, Yueyin; Hao, Jiqing; Du, Yingying; Ning, Jie

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic effects of intravenous flurbiprofen axetil for the refractory pain in cancer patients. Methods 2109 patients were screened from the department of medical oncology, the first affiliated hospital of Anhui medical university in China between October of 2007 and October of 2008. Thirty-seven cases of cancer patients who had bad effect from anaesthetic drugs were received administration of intravenous flurbiprofen axetil with dose of 50 mg/5 ml/day. The pain score was evaluated for pre- and post- treatment by Pain Faces Scale criteria, and the side effects were also observed. Results Intravenous flurbiprofen axetil increased the analgesic effects. The total effective rate was 92%. The side effects, such as abdominal pain, alimentary tract bleeding which were found in using NSAIDs or constipation, nausea, vomit, sleepiness which were found in using opioid drugs did not be found. Conclusion Intravenous flurbiprofen axetil could provide better analgesia effects and few side effects to patients with refractory cancer pain. It could also increase analgesia effects when combining with anesthetic drugs in treatment of moderate or severe pain, especially breakthrough pain, and suit to patients who can not take oral drugs for the reason of constipation and psychosomatic symptoms. PMID:19267934

  12. Prescription trajectories and effect of total hip arthroplasty on the use of analgesics, hypnotics, antidepressants, and anxiolytics: results from a population of total hip arthroplasty patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blågestad, Tone; Nordhus, Inger H; Grønli, Janne; Engesæter, Lars B; Ruths, Sabine; Ranhoff, Anette H; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Pallesen, Ståle

    2016-03-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been shown to reduce pain and improve function. In addition, it is suggested that THA improves sleep and alleviates symptoms of anxiety and depression. Patients with chronic pain are frequent users of analgesic and psychotropic drugs and thereby risk adverse drug events. The impact of THA on such drug use has not been thoroughly investigated. Based on merged data from the Norwegian Prescription Database and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, this study sought to investigate redeemed medications in a complete population (N = 39,688) undergoing THA in 2005 to 2011. User rates and redeemed drug volume of analgesics (nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, and nonopioids) and psychotropics (hypnotics, anxiolytics, and antidepressants) were calculated for 4 quarters before and 4 quarters after surgery. We analysed preoperative prescription trends (Q1 vs Q4), postoperative prescription (Q4 vs Q5), and long-term effect of surgery (Q4 vs Q8). Before surgery, use of all drug groups increased from Q1 to Q4. Use of opioids, nonopioids, and hypnotics dramatically increased from Q4 to Q5. Long-term (Q4 vs Q8) surgery reduced prescriptions of analgesics, hypnotics, and anxiolytics, but not antidepressants. Overall, the present results extend the positive effects of THA to include reduced reliance on medication to alleviate symptoms.

  13. Opioid tolerance and the emergence of new opioid receptor-coupled signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintzler, A R; Chakrabarti, S

    2000-01-01

    Multiple cellular adaptations are elicited by chronic exposure to opioids. These include diminution of spare opioid receptors, decreased opioid receptor density, and G-protein content and coupling thereof. All imply that opioid tolefance is a manifestation of a loss of opioid function, i.e., desensitization. Recent observations challenge the exclusiveness of this formulation and indicate that opioid tolerance also results from qualitative changes in opioid signaling. In this article, Gintzler and Chakrabarti discuss the evidence that suggests that opioid tolerance results not only from impaired opioid receptor functionality, but also from altered consequences of coupling. Underlying the latter are fundamental changes in the nature of effectors that are coupled to the opioid receptor/G-protein signaling pathway. These molecular changes include the upregulation of adenylyl cyclase isoforms of the type II family as well as a substantial increase in their phosphorylation state. As a result, there is a shift in opioid receptor/G-protein signaling from predominantly Gialpha inhibitory to Gbetagamma stimulatory following chronic in vivo morphine exposure. These adaptations to chronic morphine indicate the plasticity of opioid-signal transduction mechanisms and the ability of chronic morphine to augment new signaling strategies.

  14. Baclofen as an analgesic in chronic peripheral nerve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrence, C F; Fromm, G H; Tenicela, R

    1985-01-01

    Baclofen has shown analgesic properties in a number of animal studies but has failed as a conventional analgesic in the human postoperative dental pain model. In order to test baclofen's analgesic properties in more chronic pain conditions, we selected postherpetic neuralgia and diabetic neuropathy pain as possible trial diseases for baclofen analgesia. 15 patients with postherpetic neuralgia and 10 with diabetic neuropathy pain were treated with baclofen. In the spinal postherpetic neuralgia group and diabetic neuropathy group, there was little evidence of analgesic effect. 6 of 7 patients with facial postherpetic neuralgia had a good response to baclofen during the 3-week trial. Baclofen does not appear to be a conventional analgesic.

  15. COMPARISON OF ANALGESIC EFFECT OF INTRA-ARTICULAR BUPRENORPHINE AND MORPHINE FOLLOWING ARTHROSCOPIC SURGERY OF KNEE

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    Shashidhar Gowdra Sugandarajappa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS Pain after orthopaedic surgery depends on the site and extent of surgery and the preoperative use of analgesics by the patient. Arthroscopic procedures are routinely performed on outpatient basis and have spared patients large incisions and decreased morbidity compared with open incisions, but has not eliminated pain. At present several techniques are available to treat pain following arthroscopic surgeries; these include the use of opioids, local anaesthetics, NSAIDs, corticosteroids, clonidine and cryotherapy. Here, we compared the analgesic effect of intra-articular administration of morphine, buprenorphine and placebo following arthroscopic surgery of knee. METHODS A prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled double-blind comparative study conducted in 60 patients of either sex who underwent arthroscopic surgery of knee; between the age group of 18 and 65 years and of ASA class I and II physical status were included in the study. Patients were randomly assigned equally to one of the 3 groups of 20 each by a sealed envelope method. The groups were Group A - Patients receiving IA Buprenorphine 100 mcg in 20 mL normal saline. Group B - Patients receiving IA Morphine 3 mg in 20 mL normal saline. Group C - Patients receiving IA 20 mL normal saline as placebo. Parameters monitored were degree of analgesia along with haemodynamic parameters and side effects. Data were analysed using student’s t-test for continuous variables and Chi-Square test. RESULTS We found that 100 mcg buprenorphine when injected intra-articularly produced good and comparable postoperative pain control and reduced supplementary analgesic requirement when compared to other groups. CONCLUSION In summary, this study demonstrated that for eight hours postoperatively 100 mcg buprenorphine provided superior postoperative analgesia to that of 3 mg morphine

  16. Dimethyltyrosine, the Viagra of Opioids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction The introduction of 2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine (Dmt) [1] at the N-terminus of Tyr-Tic ( 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid )-containing δ-opioid antagonists[2-8] enhances receptor affinity and in vitro bioactivity to several orders of magnitude[1] and its application in the formation of ligands with new properties[9], such as potent inverse agonism[10].

  17. Opioid Therapy for Chronic Nonmalignant Pain

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    Russell K Portenoy

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term administration of an opioid drug for chronic nonmalignant pain continues to be controversial, but is no longer uniformly rejected by pain specialists. This is true despite concerns that the regulatory agencies that oversee physician prescribing of opioid drugs continue to stigmatize the practice. The changing clinical perspective has been driven, in part, by widespread acknowledgement of the remarkably favourable outcomes achieved during opioid treatment of cancer pain. These outcomes contrast starkly with popular teaching about chronic opioid therapy and affirm the potential for prolonged efficacy, tolerable side effects, enhanced function associated with improved comfort and minimal risk of aberrant drug-related behaviours consistent with addiction. A large anecdotal experience in populations with nonmalignant pain suggests that these patients are more heterogeneous and that opioid therapy will greatly benefit some and will contribute to negative outcomes for others. The few controlled clinical trials that have been performed support the safety and efficacy of opioid therapy, but have been too limited to ensure generalization to the clinical setting. A critical review of the medical literature pertaining to chronic pain, opioid pharmacology and addiction medicine can clarify misconceptions about opioid therapy and provide a foundation for patient selection and drug administration. The available data support the view that opioids are no panacea for chronic pain, but should be considered in carefully selected patients using clinically derived guidelines that stress a structured approach and ongoing monitoring of efficacy, adverse effects, functional outcomes and the occurrence of aberrant drug-related behaviours.

  18. SNC 80 and related delta opioid agonists.

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    Calderon, S N; Coop, A

    2004-01-01

    The discovery of the selective delta (delta) opioid agonists SNC 80 and BW373U86, which possess a diarylmethylpiperazine structure unique among opioids, was a major advance in the field of delta-opioid ligands. Much research has been performed to uncover the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of this class of ligands and also to compare the diarylmethylpiperazines with the traditional morphinan-based delta opioids. This review focuses on the development of the SAR of this unique series of ligands, and discusses questions which remain unanswered.

  19. Case report: analgesic nephropathy: a soda and a powder.

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    Appel, R G; Bleyer, A J; McCabe, J C

    1995-10-01

    Analgesic nephropathy has long been considered a potentially preventable cause of renal disease. Early reports were described in patients who consumed analgesics containing phenacetin. In recent data, the removal of phenacetin from analgesic preparations resulted in a reduction in analgesic-induced end stage renal disease in Europe and Australia. However, a reduction in the incidence of analgesic nephropathy has not occurred uniformly, suggesting that phenacetin is not the sole cause. Current data raise concerns regarding adverse renal effects of acetaminophen and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Aspirin taken alone may be of least concern. The diagnosis of analgesic nephropathy is suggested in subjects with chronic renal failure, a history of daily consumption of analgesic preparations, small bumpy kidneys, and renal papillary necrosis or chronic interstitial nephritis. However, the spectrum of disease may be changing, because these agents also may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and chronic renal disease due to nephrosclerosis, glomerulonephritis, and diabetes mellitus. Potential pathogenetic mechanisms in analgesic nephropathy include direct cellular injury induced by analgesics, prostaglandin inhibition with reduction or redistribution of renal blood flow, and interesting new concepts regarding the role of caffeine in increasing oxygen demand and reducing oxygen supply in the medulla. The primary goal of therapy is discontinuation of analgesic consumption. Because of the association between analgesic intake and uroepithelial tumors, surveillance of patients for neoplasm is suggested.

  20. Hiperalgesia induzida por opioides (HIO

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    Plínio da Cunha Leal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Opioides são medicamentos frequentemente usados para o controle da dor que, contudo, podem causar hiperalgesia. A circunstância pela qual esse fenômeno pode ocorrer não está inteiramente esclarecida. O objetivo desta revisão foi descrever os mecanismos, os fatores implicados e a modulação por medicamentos. CONTEÚDO: Foram descritos os fatores implicados no desenvolvimento da hiperalgesia induzida por opioides (HIO, como duração de uso, dose e tipo de opioide. Os mecanismos incluem o sistema glutamatérgico e receptores N-metil-D-aspartato (NMDA, ativação de ciclo-oxigenase (COX espinal, aminoácidos excitatórios, dinorfina, citocinas e quimocinas; prostaglandinas e facilitação descendente. A modulação de hiperalgesia pode ser feita com antagonistas de receptores NMDA, agonistas adrenérgicos-alfa2 e inibidores de COX. CONCLUSÕES: O assunto é bastante complexo, envolvendo uma série de mecanismos fisiopatológicos que podem contribuir para a HIO e o desconforto do paciente, trazendo consequências que podem ser danosas.

  1. Opioids and the management of chronic severe pain in the elderly: consensus statement of an International Expert Panel with focus on the six clinically most often used World Health Organization Step III opioids (buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Joseph; Böger, Rainer H; Budd, Keith; Dahan, Albert; Erdine, Serdar; Hans, Guy; Kress, Hans-Georg; Langford, Richard; Likar, Rudolf; Raffa, Robert B; Sacerdote, Paola

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY OF CONSENSUS: 1. The use of opioids in cancer pain: The criteria for selecting analgesics for pain treatment in the elderly include, but are not limited to, overall efficacy, overall side-effect profile, onset of action, drug interactions, abuse potential, and practical issues, such as cost and availability of the drug, as well as the severity and type of pain (nociceptive, acute/chronic, etc.). At any given time, the order of choice in the decision-making process can change. This consensus is based on evidence-based literature (extended data are not included and chronic, extended-release opioids are not covered). There are various driving factors relating to prescribing medication, including availability of the compound and cost, which may, at times, be the main driving factor. The transdermal formulation of buprenorphine is available in most European countries, particularly those with high opioid usage, with the exception of France; however, the availability of the sublingual formulation of buprenorphine in Europe is limited, as it is marketed in only a few countries, including Germany and Belgium. The opioid patch is experimental at present in U.S.A. and the sublingual formulation has dispensing restrictions, therefore, its use is limited. It is evident that the population pyramid is upturned. Globally, there is going to be an older population that needs to be cared for in the future. This older population has expectations in life, in that a retiree is no longer an individual who decreases their lifestyle activities. The "baby-boomers" in their 60s and 70s are "baby zoomers"; they want to have a functional active lifestyle. They are willing to make trade-offs regarding treatment choices and understand that they may experience pain, providing that can have increased quality of life and functionality. Therefore, comorbidities--including cancer and noncancer pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and postherpetic neuralgia--and patient functional

  2. Assessment of morphine-induced hyperalgesia and analgesic tolerance in mice using thermal and mechanical nociceptive modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhabazi, Khadija; Ayachi, Safia; Ilien, Brigitte; Simonin, Frédéric

    2014-07-29

    Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance severely impact the clinical efficacy of opiates as pain relievers in animals and humans. The molecular mechanisms underlying both phenomena are not well understood and their elucidation should benefit from the study of animal models and from the design of appropriate experimental protocols. We describe here a methodological approach for inducing, recording and quantifying morphine-induced hyperalgesia as well as for evidencing analgesic tolerance, using the tail-immersion and tail pressure tests in wild-type mice. As shown in the video, the protocol is divided into five sequential steps. Handling and habituation phases allow a safe determination of the basal nociceptive response of the animals. Chronic morphine administration induces significant hyperalgesia as shown by an increase in both thermal and mechanical sensitivity, whereas the comparison of analgesia time-courses after acute or repeated morphine treatment clearly indicates the development of tolerance manifested by a decline in analgesic response amplitude. This protocol may be similarly adapted to genetically modified mice in order to evaluate the role of individual genes in the modulation of nociception and morphine analgesia. It also provides a model system to investigate the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents to improve opiate analgesic efficacy.

  3. Mitigating the risk of opioid abuse through a balanced undergraduate pain medicine curriculum

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    Morley-Forster PK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Patricia K Morley-Forster,1,2 Joseph V Pergolizzi,3–5 Robert Taylor Jr,5 Robert A Axford-Gatley,6 Edward M Sellers71Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada; 2Outpatient Pain Clinic, St Joseph’s Hospital, London, ON, Canada; 3Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Department of Pharmacology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 5NEMA Research Inc, Naples, FL, USA; 6Clinical Content and Editorial Services, Complete Healthcare Communications, Inc, Chadds Ford, PA, USA; 7DL Global Partners Inc, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Chronic pain is highly prevalent in the United States and Canada, occurring in an estimated 30% of the adult population. Despite its high prevalence, US and Canadian medical schools provide very little training in pain management, including training in the safe and effective use of potent analgesics, most notably opioids. In 2005, the International Association for the Study of Pain published recommendations for a core undergraduate pain management curriculum, and several universities have implemented pilot programs based on this curriculum. However, when outcomes have been formally assessed, these initiatives have resulted in only modest improvements in physician knowledge about chronic pain and its treatment. This article discusses strategies to improve undergraduate pain management curricula and proposes areas in which those efforts can be augmented. Emphasis is placed on opioids, which have great potency as analgesics but also substantial risks in terms of adverse events and the risk of abuse and addiction. The authors conclude that the most important element of an undergraduate pain curriculum is clinical experience under mentors who are capable of reinforcing didactic learning by modeling best practices.Keywords: chronic pain, curricular content, medical education, opioids, pain

  4. Opioid-free total intravenous anesthesia with propofol, dexmedetomidine and lidocaine infusions for laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study

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    Mefkur Bakan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Intraoperative use of opioids may be associated with postoperative hyperalgesia and increased analgesic consumption. Side effects due to perioperative use of opioids, such as postoperative nausea and vomiting may delay discharge. We hypothesized that total intravenous anesthesia consisting of lidocaine and dexmedetomidine as an opioid substitute may be an alternative technique for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and would be associated with lower fentanyl requirements in the postoperative period and less incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. METHODS: 80 Anesthesiologists I-II adults were scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups to have either opioid-free anesthesia with dexmedetomidine, lidocaine, and propofol infusions (Group DL or opioid-based anesthesia with remifentanil, and propofol infusions (Group RF. All patients received a standard multimodal analgesia regimen. A patient controlled analgesia device was set to deliver IV fentanyl for 6 h after surgery. The primary outcome variable was postoperative fentanyl consumption. RESULTS: Fentanyl consumption at postoperative 2nd hour was statistically significantly less in Group DL, compared with Group RF, which were 75 ± 59 µg and 120 ± 94 µg respectively, while it was comparable at postoperative 6th hour. During anesthesia, there were more hypotensive events in Group RF, while there were more hypertensive events in Group DL, which were both statistically significant. Despite higher recovery times, Group DL had significantly lower pain scores, rescue analgesic and ondansetron need. CONCLUSION: Opioid-free anesthesia with dexmedetomidine, lidocaine and propofol infusions may be an alternative technique for laparoscopic cholecystectomy especially in patients with high risk for postoperative nausea and vomiting.

  5. Role of the thalamic submedius nucleus histamine H1 and H 2 and opioid receptors in modulation of formalin-induced orofacial pain in rats.

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    Erfanparast, Amir; Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Taati, Mina; Dabaghi, Milad

    2015-10-01

    Histamine and opioid systems are involved in supraspinal modulation of pain. In this study, we investigated the effects of separate and combined microinjections of agonists and antagonists of histamine H1 and H2 and opioid receptors into the thalamic submedius (Sm) nucleus on the formalin-induced orofacial pain. Two guide cannulas were implanted into the right and left sides of the Sm in ketamine- and xylazine-anesthetized rats. Orofacial formalin pain was induced by subcutaneous injection of a diluted formalin solution (50 μl, 1.5%) into the vibrissa pad. Face rubbing durations were recorded at 3-min blocks for 45 min. Formalin produced a biphasic pain response (first phase: 0-3 min and second phase: 15-33 min). Separate and combined microinjections of histamine H1 and H2 receptor agonists, 2-pyridylethylamine (2-PEA) and dimaprit, respectively, and opioid receptor agonist, morphine, attenuated the second phase of pain. The analgesic effects induced by 2-PEA, dimaprit, and morphine were blocked by prior microinjections of fexofenadine (a histamine H1 receptor antagonist), famotidine (a histamine H2 receptor antagonist), and naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist), respectively. Naloxone also prevented 2-PEA- and dimaprit-induced antinociception, and the analgesic effect induced by morphine was inhibited by fexofenadine and famotidine. These results showed the involvement of histamine H1 and H2 and opioid receptors in the Sm modulation of orofacial pain. Opioid receptor might be involved in analgesia induced by activation of histamine H1 and H2 receptors and vice versa.

  6. A method to diagnose opioid dependence resulting from heroin versus prescription opioids using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Jennifer S; Prather, Kristi; Kropp, Frankie; Byrne, Mimmie; Sullivan, C Rollynn; Mohamedi, Nadia; Copersino, Marc L; Weiss, Roger D

    2010-03-01

    Treatment research with opioid-dependent populations has not traditionally distinguished between those dependent on prescription opioids versus dependent upon heroin. Evidence suggests there is a substantial subpopulation of individuals with opioid dependence resulting largely or exclusively from prescription opioid use. Because this subpopulation may respond to treatment differently from heroin users, a method for discriminating DSM-IV opioid dependence due to prescription opioid use would provide more precision when examining this population. This paper describes an innovative method using a currently available diagnostic instrument, to diagnose DSM-IV opioid dependence and distinguish between dependence resulting from prescription opioids versus dependence upon heroin.

  7. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia and rapid opioid detoxification after tacrolimus administration.

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    Siniscalchi, Antonio; Piraccini, Emanuele; Miklosova, Zuzana; Taddei, Stefania; Faenza, Stefano; Martinelli, Gerardo

    2008-02-01

    Opioids can induce central sensitization and hyperalgesia, referred to as "opioid-induced hyperalgesia." Our report describes a patient who underwent intestinal transplant followed by immunosuppressant-related neuropathic pain. Her pain was treated with limited success over the course of 3 yr with different therapies, including i.v. morphine. She developed opioid-induced hyperalgesia, which was successfully treated with rapid detoxification under general anesthesia. Detoxification improved her quality of life, including the ability to resume physiotherapy. Six months after treatment, she remained opioid free. Our experience suggests that rapid detoxification under general anesthesia may be an effective treatment for opioid-induced hyperalgesia and merits comparison to traditional detoxification methods.

  8. Treatment of chronic pain in older people: evidence-based choice of strong-acting opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ojik, Annette L; Jansen, Paul A F; Brouwers, Jacobus R B J; van Roon, Eric N

    2012-08-01

    In the treatment of chronic malignant and non-malignant pain, opioids are used as strong analgesics. Frail elderly patients often have multiple co-morbidities and use multiple medicines, leading to an increased risk of clinically relevant drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. Age-related changes and increased frailty may lead to a less predictable drug response, increased drug sensitivity, and potential harmful drug effects. As a result, physicians face a complex task in prescribing medication to elderly patients. In this review, the appropriateness of the strong-acting opioids buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone and tapentadol is determined for use in elderly patients. Evidence-based recommendations for prescribing strong opioids to the frail elderly are presented. A literature search was performed for all individual drugs, using a validated and published set of 23 criteria concerning effectiveness, safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, experience, and convenience in elderly patients. First, information on the criteria was obtained from pharmaceutical reference books and a MEDLINE search. The information obtained on the individual drugs in the class of opioids was compared with the reference drug morphine. Evidence-based recommendations were formulated on the basis of the pros and cons for the frail elderly. Using the set of 23 criteria, no differentiation can be made between the appropriateness of buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, morphine and oxycodone for use in elderly patients. Methadone has strong negative considerations in the treatment of chronic pain in the frail elderly. Methadone has a high drug-drug interaction potential and is associated with prolongation of the QT interval and a potential risk of accumulation due to a long elimination half-life. In addition, methadone is difficult to titrate because of its large inter-individual variability in pharmacokinetics, particularly in the frail elderly

  9. Opioid therapy: a trade-off between opioid-analgesia and opioid-induced respiratory depression

    OpenAIRE

    Boom, Maria Catharina Anna

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions that may be drawn from the data in this thesis: 1. The ideal drug for antagonism of respiratory depression has not yet been found. At present naloxone seems the most appropriate drug although reversal of respiratory depression coincides with loss of analgesia. New reversal agents acting via non-opioidergic pathways are under investigation and are aimed at reversal of opioid-induced respiratory depression without compromising analgesia. 2. Mathematical modelling of the non-steady s...

  10. Enhancement of Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity by Morphine and Its Attenuation by the Opioid Antagonist Naltrexone

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    Atefeh Aminian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Morphine and other opioids are also used extensively in different types of cancer for the clinical management of pain associated with local or metastatic neoplastic lesions. In addition to its analgesic effects, morphine has also been reported to possess potential immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. Herein, we investigated the effects of morphine in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Following administration of a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg, animals received intraperitoneal injections of morphine (5 mg/kg/day and/or naltrexone (20 mg/kg/day, an opioid antagonist, for 5 days. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was detected by a significant increase in plasma urea and creatinine levels in addition to alterations in kidney tissue morphology. Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased in the renal tissue in cisplatin group. Moreover, glutathione (GSH concentration and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly reduced in renal tissue in cisplatin group compared with control animals. Treatment with morphine aggravated the deleterious effects of cisplatin at clinical, biochemical and histopathological levels; whereas naltrexone diminished the detrimental effects of morphine in animals receiving morphine and cisplatin. Morphine or naltrexone alone had no effect on the mentioned parameters. Our findings indicate that concomitant treatment with morphine might intensify cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats. These findings suggest that morphine and other opioids should be administered cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy.

  11. Enhancement of Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity by Morphine and Its Attenuation by the Opioid Antagonist Naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian, Atefeh; Javadi, Shiva; Rahimian, Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Asadi Amoli, Fahimeh; Moghaddas, Payman; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram

    2016-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Morphine and other opioids are also used extensively in different types of cancer for the clinical management of pain associated with local or metastatic neoplastic lesions. In addition to its analgesic effects, morphine has also been reported to possess potential immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. Herein, we investigated the effects of morphine in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Following administration of a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg), animals received intraperitoneal injections of morphine (5 mg/kg/day) and/or naltrexone (20 mg/kg/day), an opioid antagonist, for 5 days. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was detected by a significant increase in plasma urea and creatinine levels in addition to alterations in kidney tissue morphology. Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased in the renal tissue in cisplatin group. Moreover, glutathione (GSH) concentration and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly reduced in renal tissue in cisplatin group compared with control animals. Treatment with morphine aggravated the deleterious effects of cisplatin at clinical, biochemical and histopathological levels; whereas naltrexone diminished the detrimental effects of morphine in animals receiving morphine and cisplatin. Morphine or naltrexone alone had no effect on the mentioned parameters. Our findings indicate that concomitant treatment with morphine might intensify cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats. These findings suggest that morphine and other opioids should be administered cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy.

  12. Mu opioid mediated discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol: an individual subjects analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Justin C; Rush, Craig R; Stoops, William W

    2015-03-01

    Drug discrimination procedures use dose-dependent generalization, substitution, and pretreatment with selective agonists and antagonists to evaluate receptor systems mediating interoceptive effects of drugs. Despite the extensive use of these techniques in the nonhuman animal literature, few studies have used human participants. Specifically, human studies have not routinely used antagonist administration as a pharmacological tool to elucidate the mechanisms mediating the discriminative stimulus effects of drugs. This study evaluated the discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol, an atypical analgesic with monoamine and mu opioid activity. Three human participants first learned to discriminate 100 mg tramadol from placebo. A range of tramadol doses (25 to 150 mg) and hydromorphone (4 mg) with and without naltrexone pretreatment (50 mg) were then administered to participants after they acquired the discrimination. Tramadol produced dose-dependent increases in drug-appropriate responding and hydromorphone partially or fully substituted for tramadol in all participants. These effects were attenuated by naltrexone. Individual participant records indicated a relationship between mu opioid activity (i.e., miosis) and drug discrimination performance. Our findings indicate that mu opioid activity may mediate the discriminative-stimulus effects of tramadol in humans. The correspondence of generalization, substitution, and pretreatment findings with the animal literature supports the neuropharmacological specificity of the drug discrimination procedure.

  13. Effects of opioids on local anesthesia in the rat: a codeine and tramadol study

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    Talita Girio Carnaval

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are central analgesics that act on the CNS (central nervous system and PNS (peripheral nervous system. We investigated the effects of codeine (COD and tramadol (TRAM on local anesthesia of the sciatic nerve. Eighty Wistar male rats received the following SC injections in the popliteal fossa: local anesthetic with epinephrine (LA; local anesthetic without vasoconstrictor (LA WV; COD; TRAM; LA + COD; LA + TRAM; COD 20 minutes prior to LA (COD 20' + LA or TRAM 20 minutes prior to LA (TRAM 20' + LA. As a nociceptive function, the blockade was considered the absence of a paw withdraw reflex. As a motor function, it was the absence of claudication. As a proprioceptive function, it was the absence of hopping and tactile responses. All data were compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA. Opioids showed a significant increase in the level of anesthesia, and the blockade duration of LA + COD was greater than that of the remaining groups (p < 0.05. The associated use of opioids improved anesthesia efficacy. This could lead to a new perspective in controlling dental pain.

  14. Effects of opioids on local anesthesia in the rat: a codeine and tramadol study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaval, Talita Girio; Sampaio, Roberta Moura; Lanfredi, Camila Bernadeli; Borsatti, Maria Aparecida; Adde, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are central analgesics that act on the CNS (central nervous system) and PNS (peripheral nervous system). We investigated the effects of codeine (COD) and tramadol (TRAM) on local anesthesia of the sciatic nerve. Eighty Wistar male rats received the following SC injections in the popliteal fossa: local anesthetic with epinephrine (LA); local anesthetic without vasoconstrictor (LA WV); COD; TRAM; LA + COD; LA + TRAM; COD 20 minutes prior to LA (COD 20' + LA) or TRAM 20 minutes prior to LA (TRAM 20' + LA). As a nociceptive function, the blockade was considered the absence of a paw withdraw reflex. As a motor function, it was the absence of claudication. As a proprioceptive function, it was the absence of hopping and tactile responses. All data were compared using repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Opioids showed a significant increase in the level of anesthesia, and the blockade duration of LA + COD was greater than that of the remaining groups (p < 0.05). The associated use of opioids improved anesthesia efficacy. This could lead to a new perspective in controlling dental pain.

  15. Pyrrolo- and pyridomorphinans: non-selective opioid antagonists and delta opioid agonists/mu opioid partial agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V; Clark, M J; Traynor, J R; Lewis, J W; Husbands, S M

    2014-08-01

    Opioid ligands have found use in a number of therapeutic areas, including for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction (using agonists) and alcohol addiction (using antagonists such as naltrexone and nalmefene). The reaction of imines, derived from the opioid ligands oxymorphone and naltrexone, with Michael acceptors leads to pyridomorphinans with structures similar to known pyrrolo- and indolomorphinans. One of the synthesized compounds, 5e, derived from oxymorphone had substantial agonist activity at delta opioid receptors but not at mu and/or kappa opioid receptors and in that sense profiled as a selective delta opioid receptor agonist. The pyridomorphinans derived from naltrexone and naloxone were all found to be non-selective potent antagonists and as such could have utility as treatments for alcohol abuse.

  16. Anti-hyperalgesic effect of a benzilidine-cyclohexanone analogue on a mouse model of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain: Participation of the κ-opioid receptor and KATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming-Tatt, Lee; Khalivulla, Shaik Ibrahim; Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem; Lajis, Nordin; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Akira, Ahmad; Ali, Daud Israf; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan

    2013-12-01

    The present study investigated the analgesic effect of a novel synthetic cyclohexanone derivative, 2,6-bis-4-(hydroxyl-3-methoxybenzilidine)-cyclohexanone or BHMC in a mouse model of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain. It was demonstrated that intraperitoneal administration of BHMC (0.03, 0.1, 0.3 and 1.0mg/kg) exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in mice, when evaluated using Randall-Selitto mechanical analgesiometer. It was also demonstrated that pretreatment of naloxone (non-selective opioid receptor blocker), nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI, selective κ-opioid receptor blocker), but not β-funaltrexamine (β-FN, selective μ-opioid receptor blocker) and naltrindole hydrochloride (NTI, selective δ-opioid receptor blocker), reversed the anti-nociceptive effect of BHMC. In addition, the analgesic effect of BHMC was also reverted by pretreatment of 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, soluble guanosyl cyclase blocker) and glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker) but not Nω-nitro-l-arginine (l-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase blocker). Taken together, the present study demonstrated that the systemic administration of BHMC attenuated chronic constriction, injury-induced neuropathic pain. We also suggested that the possible mechanisms include κ-opioid receptor activation and nitric oxide-independent cyclic guanosine monophosphate activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channel opening.

  17. Physicians Experience with and Expectations of the Safety and Tolerability of WHO-Step III Opioids for Chronic (Low Back Pain: Post Hoc Analysis of Data from a German Cross-Sectional Physician Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Ueberall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe physicians’ daily life experience with WHO-step III opioids in the treatment of chronic (low back pain (CLBP. Methods. Post hoc analysis of data from a cross-sectional online survey with 4.283 Germany physicians. Results. With a reported median use in 17% of affected patients, WHO-step III opioids play a minor role in treatment of CLBP in daily practice associated with a broad spectrum of positive and negative effects. If prescribed, potent opioids were reported to show clinically relevant effects (such as ≥50% pain relief in approximately 3 of 4 patients (median 72%. Analgesic effects reported are frequently related with adverse events (AEs. Only 20% of patients were reported to remain free of any AE. Most frequently reported AE was constipation (50%, also graded highest for AE-related daily life restrictions (median 46%. Specific AE countermeasures were reported to be necessary in approximately half of patients (median 45%; nevertheless AE-related premature discontinuation rates reported were high (median 22%. Fentanyl/morphine were the most/least prevalently prescribed potent opioids mentioned (median 20 versus 8%. Conclusion. Overall, use of WHO-step III opioids for CLBP is low. AEs, especially constipation, are commonly reported and interfere significantly with analgesic effects in daily practice. Nevertheless, beneficial effects outweigh related AEs in most patients with CLBP.

  18. An Advance in Prescription Opioid Vaccines: Overdose Mortality Reduction and Extraordinary Alteration of Drug Half-Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimishima, Atsushi; Wenthur, Cody J; Zhou, Bin; Janda, Kim D

    2017-01-20

    Prescription opioids (POs) such as oxycodone and hydrocodone are highly effective medications for pain management, yet they also present a substantial risk for abuse and addiction. The consumption of POs has been escalating worldwide, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths due to overdose each year. Pharmacokinetic strategies based upon vaccination present an attractive avenue to suppress PO abuse. Herein, the preparation of two active PO vaccines is described that were found to elicit high-affinity antiopioid antibodies through a structurally congruent drug-hapten design. Administration of these vaccines resulted in a significant blockade of opioid analgesic activity, along with an unprecedented increase in drug serum half-life and protection against lethal overdose.

  19. The delta opioid receptor tool box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Sanchez, Ana; Segura, Laura; Pradhan, Amynah A

    2016-12-03

    In recent years, the delta opioid receptor has attracted increasing interest as a target for the treatment of chronic pain and emotional disorders. Due to their therapeutic potential, numerous tools have been developed to study the delta opioid receptor from both a molecular and a functional perspective. This review summarizes the most commonly available tools, with an emphasis on their use and limitations. Here, we describe (1) the cell-based assays used to study the delta opioid receptor. (2) The features of several delta opioid receptor ligands, including peptide and non-peptide drugs. (3) The existing approaches to detect delta opioid receptors in fixed tissue, and debates that surround these techniques. (4) Behavioral assays used to study the in vivo effects of delta opioid receptor agonists; including locomotor stimulation and convulsions that are induced by some ligands, but not others. (5) The characterization of genetically modified mice used specifically to study the delta opioid receptor. Overall, this review aims to provide a guideline for the use of these tools with the final goal of increasing our understanding of delta opioid receptor physiology.

  20. Pharmacogenomic study of the role of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor and opioid receptors in diabetic hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Kris; Tzschentke, Thomas M; Koch, Thomas; Schiene, Klaus; Christoph, Thomas

    2014-10-15

    Targeting functionally independent receptors may provide synergistic analgesic effects in neuropathic pain. To examine the interdependency between different opioid receptors (µ-opioid peptide [MOP], δ-opioid peptide [DOP] and κ-opioid peptide [KOP]) and the nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic polyneuropathy, nocifensive activity was measured using a hot plate test in wild-type and NOP, MOP, DOP and KOP receptor knockout mice in response to the selective receptor agonists Ro65-6570, morphine, SNC-80 and U50488H, or vehicle. Nocifensive activity was similar in non-diabetic wild-type and knockout mice at baseline, before agonist or vehicle administration. STZ-induced diabetes significantly increased heat sensitivity in all mouse strains, but MOP, DOP and KOP receptor knockouts showed a smaller degree of hyperalgesia than wild-type mice and NOP receptor knockouts. For each agonist, a significant antihyperalgesic effect was observed in wild-type diabetic mice (all Preceptor compared with wild-type diabetic mice. Morphine was the only agonist that demonstrated near-full antihyperalgesic efficacy across all non-cognate receptor knockouts. Partial or near-complete reductions in efficacy were observed with Ro65-6570 in DOP and KOP receptor knockouts, with SNC-80 in NOP, MOP and KOP receptor knockouts, and with U50488H in NOP and DOP receptor knockouts. There was no evidence of NOP and MOP receptor interdependency in response to selective agonists for these receptors. These findings suggest that concurrent activation of NOP and MOP receptors, which showed functional independence, may yield an effective and favorable therapeutic analgesic profile.

  1. Transcriptomic and behavioural characterisation of a mouse model of burn pain identify the cholecystokinin 2 receptor as an analgesic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kathleen; Deuis, Jennifer R; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Burn injury is a cause of significant mortality and morbidity worldwide and is frequently associated with severe and long-lasting pain that remains difficult to manage throughout recovery. We characterised a mouse model of burn-induced pain using pharmacological and transcriptomic approaches. Mechanical allodynia elicited by burn injury was partially reversed by meloxicam (5 mg/kg), gabapentin (100 mg/kg) and oxycodone (3 and 10 mg/kg), while thermal allodynia and gait abnormalities were only significantly improved by amitriptyline (3 mg/kg) and oxycodone (10 mg/kg). The need for relatively high opioid doses to elicit analgesia suggested a degree of opioid resistance, similar to that shown clinically in burn patients. We thus assessed the gene expression changes in dorsal root ganglion neurons and pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning burn injury-induced pain using a transcriptomic approach. Burn injury was associated with significantly increased expression of genes associated with axon guidance, neuropeptide signalling, behavioural defence response and extracellular signalling, confirming a mixed neuropathic and inflammatory aetiology. Notably, among the pain-related genes that were upregulated post-injury was the cholecystokinin 2 receptor (Cckbr), a G protein-coupled receptor known as a pain target involved in reducing opioid effectiveness. Indeed, the clinically used cholecystokinin receptor antagonist proglumide (30 mg/kg) was effective at reversing mechanical allodynia, with additional analgesia evident in combination with low-dose oxycodone (1 mg/kg), including significant reversal of thermal allodynia. These findings highlight the complex pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning burn injury-induced pain and suggest that cholecystokinin-2 receptor antagonists may be useful clinically as adjuvants to decrease opioid requirements and improve analgesic management.

  2. Natural Flavonoids as Promising Analgesic Candidates: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Wang, Xiaoyu; Gui, Xuan; Chen, Lu; Huang, Baokang

    2016-11-01

    Due to the chemical structural diversity and various analgesic mechanisms, an increasing number of studies indicated that some flavonoids from medicinal plants could be promising candidates for new natural analgesic drugs, which attract high interests of advanced users and academic researchers. The aim of this systematic review is to report flavonoids and its derivatives as new analgesic candidates based on the pharmacological evidences. Sixty-four papers were found concerning the potential analgesic activity of 46 flavonoids. In this case, the evidence for analgesic activity of flavonoids and total flavonoids was investigated. Meanwhile, the corresponding analgesic mechanism of flavonoids was discussed by generalizing and analyzing the current publications. Based on this review, the conclusion can be drawn that some flavonoids are promising candidates for painful conditions and deserve particular attention in further research and development.

  3. 内吗啡肽-1的镇痛作用%Analgesic effect of endomorphin-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李正红; 单立冬; 蒋星红; 郭试瑜; 俞光

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the analgesic effect of endomorphin-1 ( EM-1 ). METHODS: The experiment was performed in rats and mice to study the analgesic effect of intraperi toneal (ip) injection of EM-1 with tail stimulation vocalization test, writhing test, adjuvant arthritis, and neuropathic pain model and to compare it with the anal gesic effects produced by intracerebroventricular (icv) and intrathecal ( it ) administrations. RESULTS: 1 ) EM-1 raised the pain threshold dose-dependently in tail stimulation-vocalization test in rats and inhibited the writhing responses induced by ip acetic acid in mice. EM-1 also decreased the hyperalgesia in both adjuvant arthritis and neuropathic pain model. 2) The analgesic effect induced by central (icv and it) administration of EM-1 was faster and more powerful than that induced by peripheral (ip) administration. 3) The analgesic effect of EM-1 was reversed by naloxone (opioid receptor an tagonist), as well as by cyprodime (μ-opioid receptor se lective antagonist). Repeated administrations of EM-1 in duced tolerance. CONCLUSION: EM-1 had a definite analgesic effect and the analgesic effect of EM-1 was me diated by central μ-opioid receptor.%目的:研究内吗啡肽-1(EM-1)的镇痛作用.方法: 采用电刺激鼠尾-嘶叫法、扭体法、佐剂性关节炎以及 神经源性疼痛等多种疼痛模型,观察腹腔注射EM-1 的镇痛作用,并和脊髓蛛网膜下腔注射和侧脑室注 射EM-1的镇痛作用进行比较.结果:1)EM-1能剂 量依赖地提高大鼠电刺激鼠尾-嘶叫法的痛阈;能抑 制醋酸引起的小鼠扭体反应;在佐剂性关节炎所致 的炎症性痛觉过敏及坐骨神经部分结扎所引起的神 经源性痛觉过敏中,EM-1也有镇痛作用. 2)中枢 给EM-1的镇痛作用比外周给药出现得较快,而且 较强.3)阿片受体拮抗剂纳洛酮能翻转EM-1的镇 痛作用;μ-阿片受体选择性拮抗剂cyprodime也能翻 转EM-1的镇痛作用;反复给予EM-1

  4. Paracetamol and analgesic nephropathy: Are you kidneying me?

    OpenAIRE

    Waddington F; Naunton M; Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Freya Waddington, Mark Naunton, Jackson Thomas Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia Introduction: Analgesic nephropathy is a disease resulting from the frequent use of combinations of analgesic medications over many years, leading to significant impairment of renal function. The observation of a large number of cases of renal failure in patients abusing analgesic mixtures containing phenacetin led to the initial recognition of the nephrotoxicity from the use of...

  5. Relevance of analgesic abuse in the maintenance of chronic headaches

    OpenAIRE

    Pini, Luigi Alberto; Relja, Giuliano

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms facilitating or prompting the chronicization of headache and the increased use of analgesics are still unknown and under debate. It is not clear whether the daily use of analgesics in chronic headaches is to be considered a habit or a therapeutic need. Recently, our group showed that items more involved in chronicization of headaches were the onset as migraine and the use of analgesics, namely mixture compounds. One of the most important features in inducing habit behavior is t...

  6. Fatal intoxications associated with the designer opioid AH-7921.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronstrand, R; Thelander, G; Lindstedt, D; Roman, M; Kugelberg, F C

    2014-10-01

    AH-7921 (3,4-dichloro-N-[(1-dimethylamino)cyclohexylmethyl]benzamide) is a designer opioid with ∼80% of morphine's µ-agonist activity. Over a 6-month period, we encountered nine deaths where AH-7921 was involved and detected in blood from the deceased. Shortly after the last death, on August 1 2013, AH-7921 was scheduled as a narcotic and largely disappeared from the illicit market in Sweden. AH-7921 was measured by a selective liquid chromatography-MS-MS method and the concentrations of AH-7921 ranged from 0.03 to 0.99 µg/g blood. Six of our cases had other drugs of abuse on board and most had other medications such as benzodiazepines, antidepressants and analgesics. However, the other medicinal drugs encountered were present in postmortem therapeutic concentrations and unlikely to have contributed to death. In addition to the parent compound, we identified six possible metabolites where two N-demethylated dominated and four mono-hydroxylated were found in trace amounts in the blood. In conclusion, deaths with AH-7921 seem to occur both at low and high concentrations, probably a result of different tolerance to the drug. Hence, it is reasonable to assume that no sharp dividing line exists between lethal and non-lethal concentrations. Further, poly-drug use did not seem to be a major contributing factor for the fatal outcome.

  7. PD98059 Influences Immune Factors and Enhances Opioid Analgesia in Model of Neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Rojewska

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain treatment remains challenging due to ineffective therapy and resistance to opioid analgesia. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK have been identified as the crucial regulators of pro- and antinociceptive factors. We used PD98059, an inhibitor of the MAPKK family members MEK1/2. The aim of study was to examine the influence of single and/or repeated PD98059 on nociception and opioid effectiveness in neuropathy. Moreover, we examined how PD98059 influences selected members of cellular pathways and cytokines. The PD98059 (2.5 mcg was intrathecally preemptively administered before chronic constriction injury (CCI, and then once daily for 7 days. Additionally, at day 7 after CCI the PD98059-treated rats received a single injection of opioids. Using Western blot and qRT-PCR techniques in PD98059-treated rats we analyzed the mRNA and/or protein level of p38, ERK1/2, JNK, NF-kappaB, IL-1beta, IL-6, iNOS and IL-10 in the lumbar spinal cord. Our results indicate that PD98059 has an analgesic effects and potentiates morphine and/or buprenorphine analgesia. Parallel we observed that PD98059 inhibit upregulation of the CCI-elevated p38, ERK1/2, JNK and NF-kappaB protein levels. Moreover, PD98059 also prevented increase of pro- (IL-1beta, IL-6, and iNOS but enhances anti-nociceptive (IL-10 factors. Summing up, PD98059 diminished pain and increased the effectiveness of opioids in neuropathy. The inhibition of MEKs might inactivate a variety of cell signaling pathways that are implicated in nociception.

  8. PD98059 Influences Immune Factors and Enhances Opioid Analgesia in Model of Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Kolosowska, Natalia; Piotrowska, Anna; Zychowska, Magdalena; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain treatment remains challenging due to ineffective therapy and resistance to opioid analgesia. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) have been identified as the crucial regulators of pro- and antinociceptive factors. We used PD98059, an inhibitor of the MAPKK family members MEK1/2. The aim of study was to examine the influence of single and/or repeated PD98059 on nociception and opioid effectiveness in neuropathy. Moreover, we examined how PD98059 influences selected members of cellular pathways and cytokines. The PD98059 (2.5 mcg) was intrathecally preemptively administered before chronic constriction injury (CCI), and then once daily for 7 days. Additionally, at day 7 after CCI the PD98059-treated rats received a single injection of opioids. Using Western blot and qRT-PCR techniques in PD98059-treated rats we analyzed the mRNA and/or protein level of p38, ERK1/2, JNK, NF-kappaB, IL-1beta, IL-6, iNOS and IL-10 in the lumbar spinal cord. Our results indicate that PD98059 has an analgesic effects and potentiates morphine and/or buprenorphine analgesia. Parallel we observed that PD98059 inhibit upregulation of the CCI-elevated p38, ERK1/2, JNK and NF-kappaB protein levels. Moreover, PD98059 also prevented increase of pro- (IL-1beta, IL-6, and iNOS) but enhances anti-nociceptive (IL-10) factors. Summing up, PD98059 diminished pain and increased the effectiveness of opioids in neuropathy. The inhibition of MEKs might inactivate a variety of cell signaling pathways that are implicated in nociception.

  9. PD98059 Influences Immune Factors and Enhances Opioid Analgesia in Model of Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Popiolek-Barczyk, Katarzyna; Kolosowska, Natalia; Piotrowska, Anna; Zychowska, Magdalena; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain treatment remains challenging due to ineffective therapy and resistance to opioid analgesia. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK) have been identified as the crucial regulators of pro- and antinociceptive factors. We used PD98059, an inhibitor of the MAPKK family members MEK1/2. The aim of study was to examine the influence of single and/or repeated PD98059 on nociception and opioid effectiveness in neuropathy. Moreover, we examined how PD98059 influences selected members of cellular pathways and cytokines. The PD98059 (2.5 mcg) was intrathecally preemptively administered before chronic constriction injury (CCI), and then once daily for 7 days. Additionally, at day 7 after CCI the PD98059-treated rats received a single injection of opioids. Using Western blot and qRT-PCR techniques in PD98059-treated rats we analyzed the mRNA and/or protein level of p38, ERK1/2, JNK, NF-kappaB, IL-1beta, IL-6, iNOS and IL-10 in the lumbar spinal cord. Our results indicate that PD98059 has an analgesic effects and potentiates morphine and/or buprenorphine analgesia. Parallel we observed that PD98059 inhibit upregulation of the CCI-elevated p38, ERK1/2, JNK and NF-kappaB protein levels. Moreover, PD98059 also prevented increase of pro- (IL-1beta, IL-6, and iNOS) but enhances anti-nociceptive (IL-10) factors. Summing up, PD98059 diminished pain and increased the effectiveness of opioids in neuropathy. The inhibition of MEKs might inactivate a variety of cell signaling pathways that are implicated in nociception. PMID:26426693

  10. Paracetamol and analgesic nephropathy: Are you kidneying me?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waddington F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Freya Waddington, Mark Naunton, Jackson Thomas Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia Introduction: Analgesic nephropathy is a disease resulting from the frequent use of combinations of analgesic medications over many years, leading to significant impairment of renal function. The observation of a large number of cases of renal failure in patients abusing analgesic mixtures containing phenacetin led to the initial recognition of the nephrotoxicity from the use of analgesics. Phenacetin was subsequently exclusively blamed for this disease. However, the role of a single analgesic as a sole cause of analgesic nephropathy was challenged, and a number of researchers have since attempted to determine the extent of involvement of other analgesics including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, aspirin, and paracetamol. Case presentation: We present the case of an 83-year-old woman with a history of NSAID-induced nephropathy with poor pain control and reluctance to use paracetamol. We attempt to briefly review the evidence of paracetamol being implicated in the development of analgesic-induced nephropathy. Conclusion: There is a lack of concrete data regarding causative analgesics, including paracetamol. Patients should therefore not be withheld paracetamol, an effective and commonly recommended agent, for fear of worsening renal function. Keywords: kidney, paracetamol, nephropathy, phenacetin

  11. Effect of anchoring 4-anilidopiperidines to opioid peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Ravil R.; Lee, Yeon Sun; Vardanyan, Ruben S.; Liu, Lu; Ma, Shou-wu; Davis, Peg; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Vanderah, Todd W.; Hruby, Victor J.

    2014-01-01

    We report here the design, synthesis, and in vitro characterization of new opioid peptides featuring a 4-anilidopiperidine moiety. Despite the fact that the chemical structures of fentanyl surrogates have been found suboptimal per se for the opioid activity, the corresponding conjugates with opioid peptides displayed potent opioid activity. These studies shed an instructive light on the strategies and potential therapeutic values of anchoring the 4-anilidopiperidine scaffold to different classes of opioid peptides. PMID:23623418

  12. Psychotherapeutic benefits of opioid agonist therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenore, Peter L

    2008-01-01

    Opioids have been used for centuries to treat a variety of psychiatric conditions with much success. The so-called "opium cure" lost popularity in the early 1950s with the development of non-addictive tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Nonetheless, recent literature supports the potent role of methadone, buprenorphine, tramadol, morphine, and other opioids as effective, durable, and rapid therapeutic agents for anxiety and depression. This article reviews the medical literature on the treatment of psychiatric disorders with opioids (notably, methadone and buprenorphine) in both the non-opioid-dependent population and in the opioid-dependent methadone maintenance population. The most recent neurotransmitter theories on the origin of depression and anxiety will be reviewed, including current information on the role of serotonin, N-Methyl d-Aspartate, glutamate, cortisol, catecholamine, and dopamine in psychiatric disorders. The observation that methadone maintenance patients with co-existing psychiatric morbidity (so called dual diagnosis patients) require substantially higher methadone dosages by between 20% and 50% will be explored and qualified. The role of methadone and other opioids as beneficial psychiatric medications that are independent of their drug abuse mitigating properties will be discussed. The mechanisms by which methadone and other opioids can favorably modulate the neurotransmitter systems controlling mood will also be discussed.

  13. Ligand-Specific Regulation of the Endogenous Mu-Opioid Receptor by Chronic Treatment with Mu-Opioid Peptide Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murányi, Marianna; Cinar, Resat; Kékesi, Orsolya; Birkás, Erika; Fábián, Gabriella; Bozó, Beáta; Zentai, András; Tóth, Géza; Kicsi, Emese Gabriella; Mácsai, Mónika; Szabó, Gyula; Szücs, Mária

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of the endomorphins (EM), the postulated endogenous peptide agonists of the mu-opioid receptors, several analogues have been synthesized to improve their binding and pharmacological profiles. We have shown previously that a new analogue, cis-1S,2R-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid2-endomorphin-2 (ACHC-EM2), had elevated mu-receptor affinity, selectivity, and proteolytic stability over the parent compound. In the present work, we have studied its antinociceptive effects and receptor regulatory processes. ACHC-EM2 displayed a somewhat higher (60%) acute antinociceptive response than the parent peptide, EM2 (45%), which peaked at 10 min after intracerebroventricular (icv) administration in the rat tail-flick test. Analgesic tolerance developed to the antinociceptive effect of ACHC-EM2 upon its repeated icv injection that was complete by a 10-day treatment. This was accompanied by attenuated coupling of mu-sites to G-proteins in subcellular fractions of rat brain. Also, the density of mu-receptors was upregulated by about 40% in the light membrane fraction, with no detectable changes in surface binding. Distinct receptor regulatory processes were noted in subcellular fractions of rat brains made tolerant by the prototypic full mu-agonist peptide, DAMGO, and its chloromethyl ketone derivative, DAMCK. These results are discussed in light of the recently discovered phenomenon, that is, the “so-called biased agonism” or “functional selectivity”. PMID:24350273

  14. Ligand-Specific Regulation of the Endogenous Mu-Opioid Receptor by Chronic Treatment with Mu-Opioid Peptide Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Murányi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of the endomorphins (EM, the postulated endogenous peptide agonists of the mu-opioid receptors, several analogues have been synthesized to improve their binding and pharmacological profiles. We have shown previously that a new analogue, cis-1S,2R-aminocyclohexanecarboxylic acid2-endomorphin-2 (ACHC-EM2, had elevated mu-receptor affinity, selectivity, and proteolytic stability over the parent compound. In the present work, we have studied its antinociceptive effects and receptor regulatory processes. ACHC-EM2 displayed a somewhat higher (60% acute antinociceptive response than the parent peptide, EM2 (45%, which peaked at 10 min after intracerebroventricular (icv administration in the rat tail-flick test. Analgesic tolerance developed to the antinociceptive effect of ACHC-EM2 upon its repeated icv injection that was complete by a 10-day treatment. This was accompanied by attenuated coupling of mu-sites to G-proteins in subcellular fractions of rat brain. Also, the density of mu-receptors was upregulated by about 40% in the light membrane fraction, with no detectable changes in surface binding. Distinct receptor regulatory processes were noted in subcellular fractions of rat brains made tolerant by the prototypic full mu-agonist peptide, DAMGO, and its chloromethyl ketone derivative, DAMCK. These results are discussed in light of the recently discovered phenomenon, that is, the “so-called biased agonism” or “functional selectivity”.

  15. Dmt and opioid peptides: a potent alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Sharon D; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Salvadori, Severo; Okada, Yoshio; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of the Dmt (2',6'-dimethyl-L-tyrosine)-Tic pharmacophore into the design of opioid ligands produced an extraordinary family of potent delta-opioid receptor antagonists and heralded a new phase in opioid research. First reviewed extensively in 1998, the incorporation of Dmt into a diverse group of opioid molecules stimulated the opioid field leading to the development of unique analogues with remarkable properties. This overview will document the crucial role played by this residue in the proliferation of opioid peptides with high receptor affinity (K(i) equal to or less than 1 nM) and potent bioactivity. The discussion will include the metamorphosis between delta-opioid receptor antagonists to delta-agonists based solely on subtle structural changes at the C-terminal region of the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore as well as their behavior in vivo. Dmt may be considered promiscuous due to the acquisition of potent mu-agonism by dermorphin and endomorphin derivatives as well as by a unique class of opioidmimetics containing two Dmt residues separated by alkyl or pyrazinone linkers. Structural studies on the Dmt-Tic compounds were enhanced tremendously by x-ray diffraction data for three potent and biologically diverse Dmt-Tic opioidmimetics that led to the development of pharmacophores for both delta-opioid receptor agonists and antagonists. Molecular modeling studies of other unique Dmt opioid analogues illuminated structural differences between delta- and mu-receptor ligand interactions. The future of these compounds as therapeutic applications for various medical syndromes including the control of cancer-associated pain is only a matter of time and perseverance.

  16. Neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Szarvas, Szilvia

    2012-02-03

    When intrathecal and epidural opioids are administered, pruritus occurs as an unwanted and troublesome side effect. The reported incidence varies between 30% and 100%. The exact mechanisms of neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus remain unclear. Postulated mechanisms include the presence of an "itch center" in the central nervous system, medullary dorsal horn activation, and antagonism of inhibitory transmitters. The treatment of intrathecal opioid-induced pruritus remains a challenge. Many pharmacological therapies, including antihistamines, 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonists, opiate-antagonists, propofol, nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs, and droperidol, have been studied. In this review, we will summarize pathophysiological and pharmacological advances that will improve understanding and ultimately the management of this troublesome problem.

  17. Hiperalgesia asociada al tratamiento con opioides

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Martín, A.; M. Moreno García; J. Sánchez-Rubio Ferrández; T. Molina García

    2014-01-01

    La hiperalgesia inducida por opioides es una reacción paradójica caracterizada por una percepción intensificada de dolor relacionada con el uso de estos medicamentos en ausencia de progresión de la enfermedad o de síndrome de retirada. A diferencia de los casos de tolerancia, definida como pérdida de potencia analgésica durante el uso prolongado de opioides, no se produce mejoría con el escalado de dosis. La hiperalgesia inducida por opioides se ha manifestado en pacientes con dosis de manten...

  18. Patient-controlled analgesic infusion pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Patient-controlled analgesic (PCA) infusion devices allow patients to self-administer narcotic analgesics within the limits prescribed by the physician. PCA therapy is typically used for postoperative, obstetric, terminally ill, and trauma patients. PCA pumps deliver solutions intravenously, subcutaneously, or epidurally and allow patient activation by means of a pendant button on a cord connected to the pump or a button directly on the pump. We evaluated nine PCA pumps from six suppliers. Three of these pumps are syringe-type, while the others use cassette-based fluid delivery. Because PCA pumps have often been cited as examples of devices that contribute to medical error (the most significant risk connected with PCA infusion is overmedication), the accident resistance of each device weighed heavily in our testing. The pumps we tested exhibit varying levels of performance, resistance to accidents and tampering, and ease of use. We rate six of them Acceptable. While none of the six units stands out as ideal, they meet most of our criteria, and we consider them somewhat better choices than the rest. We rate one other pump Acceptable (with Conditions) because, in one of its operating modes, it has a drawback that could be dangerous to patients; we consider its use acceptable only if the hospital doesn't employ the operating mode in question. Finally, we rate two pumps Not Recommended because they both have a significant number of disadvantages.

  19. Behavioural and morphological evidence for the involvement of glial cell activation in delta opioid receptor function: implications for the development of opioid tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Anna MW

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous studies have demonstrated that prolonged morphine treatment in vivo induces the translocation of delta opioid receptors (δORs from intracellular compartments to neuronal plasma membranes and this trafficking event is correlated with an increased functional competence of the receptor. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown; however chronic morphine treatment has been shown to involve the activation and hypertrophy of spinal glial cells. In the present study we have examined whether activated glia may be associated with the enhanced δOR-mediated antinociception observed following prolonged morphine treatment. Accordingly, animals were treated with morphine with or without concomitant administration of propentofylline, an inhibitor of glial activation that was previously shown to block the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance. The morphine regimen previously demonstrated to initiate δOR trafficking induced the activation of both astrocytes and microglia in the dorsal spinal cord as indicated by a significant increase in cell volume and cell surface area. Consistent with previous data, morphine-treated rats displayed a significant augmentation in δOR-mediated antinociception. Concomitant spinal administration of propentofylline with morphine significantly attenuated the spinal immune response as well as the morphine-induced enhancement of δOR-mediated effects. These results complement previous reports that glial activation contributes to a state of opioid analgesic tolerance, and also suggest that neuro-glial communication is likely responsible in part for the altered functional competence in δOR-mediated effects following morphine treatment.

  20. Opioid overuse pain syndrome (OOPS): the story of opioids, prometheus unbound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehendale, Anand W; Goldman, Mark P; Mehendale, Rachel P

    2013-01-01

    Throughout history, opioids have effectively alleviated pain but not without the risk of addiction and death. Seductive and dangerous, full of promise and destruction, opioids are both revered and feared by Western culture. Their exponential use in "developed countries" is now an enormous public health problem and requires us to harness their properties with scientific rigor and adequate safeguards. The use of opioids for the treatment of chronic nonterminal pain (CNTP) has been a relatively new phenomenon which has coincided with the proclamation by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organization in 2000 that pain assessment be the "fifth vital sign," notwithstanding the fact that pain is a symptom and not a sign.(1) Nonetheless, this resulted in a culture of a marked increase in use of opioids for acute and chronic pain management. Consequently, there are many unintended outcomes which include opioid-induced hyperalgesia increased diversion, addiction, and death. Understandably, this has resulted in many regulatory responses from such agencies such as the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and state medical boards. This article proposes a clinically relevant paradigm of opioid overuse pain syndrome. The goal of this article is to inform the clinicians of the complicated neurobiology of opioids. It is our hope that scientists rather than government regulators dictate the appropriate response to the epidemic of over prescription of opioids. A similar designation of "medication overuse headache" has resulted in near extinction of excessive use of opioids in the field of headache medicine.

  1. Opioid-Induced Glial Activation: Mechanisms of Activation and Implications for Opioid Analgesia, Dependence, and Reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Hutchinson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will introduce the concept of toll-like receptor (TLR–mediated glial activation as central to all of the following: neuropathic pain, compromised acute opioid analgesia, and unwanted opioid side effects (tolerance, dependence, and reward. Attenuation of glial activation has previously been demonstrated both to alleviate exaggerated pain states induced by experimental pain models and to reduce the development of opioid tolerance. Here we demonstrate that selective acute antagonism of TLR4 results in reversal of neuropathic pain as well as potentiation of opioid analgesia. Attenuating central nervous system glial activation was also found to reduce the development of opioid dependence, and opioid reward at a behavioral (conditioned place preference and neurochemical (nucleus accumbens microdialysis of morphine-induced elevations in dopamine level of analysis. Moreover, a novel antagonism of TLR4 by (+- and (˗-isomer opioid antagonists has now been characterized, and both antiallodynic and morphine analgesia potentiating activity shown. Opioid agonists were found to also possess TLR4 agonistic activity, predictive of glial activation. Targeting glial activation is a novel and as yet clinically unexploited method for treatment of neuropathic pain. Moreover, these data indicate that attenuation of glial activation, by general or selective TLR antagonistic mechanisms, may also be a clinical method for separating the beneficial (analgesia and unwanted (tolerance, dependence, and reward actions of opioids, thereby improving the safety and efficacy of their use.

  2. MicroRNAs are involved in the development of morphine-induced analgesic tolerance and regulate functionally relevant changes in Serpini1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenica D. Tapocik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term opioid treatment results in reduced therapeutic efficacy and in turn leads to an increase in the dose required to produce equivalent pain relief and alleviate break-through or insurmountable pain. Altered gene expression is a likely means for inducing long-term neuroadaptations responsible for tolerance. Studies conducted by our laboratory (Tapocik et al., 2009 revealed a network of gene expression changes occurring in canonical pathways involved in neuroplasticity, and uncovered miRNA processing as a potential mechanism. In particular, the mRNA coding the protein responsible for processing miRNAs, Dicer1, was positively correlated with the development of analgesic tolerance. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that miRNAs play a significant role in the development of analgesic tolerance as measured by thermal nociception. Dicer1 knockdown, miRNA profiling, bioinformatics and confirmation of high value targets were used to test the proposition.Regionally targeted Dicer1 knockdown (via shRNA had the anticipated consequence of eliminating the development of tolerance in C57BL/6J (B6 mice, thus supporting the involvement of miRNAs in the development of tolerance. MiRNA expression profiling identified a core set of chronic morphine-regulated miRNAs (miR’s 27a, 9, 483, 505, 146b, 202. Bioinformatics approaches were implemented to identify and prioritize their predicted target mRNAs. We focused our attention on miR27a and its predicted target serpin peptidase inhibitor clade I (Serpini1 mRNA, a transcript known to be intricately involved in dendritic spine density regulation in a manner consistent with chronic morphine’s consequences and previously found to be correlated with the development of analgesic tolerance. In vitro reporter assay confirmed the targeting of the Serpini1 3’-untranslated region by miR27a. Interestingly miR27a was found to positively regulate Serpini1 mRNA and protein levels in multiple

  3. Opioider påvirker immunsystemet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundestrup, Svend; Sjøgren, Per

    2014-01-01

    Opioids can modulate and suppress the immune system through central mediated mechanisms. Morphine increases replication and spread of HIV-1. Evidence suggests that morphine can also enhance growth and spread of some cancer diagnoses like breast-, prostate- and non-small cell lung cancer. The mech......Opioids can modulate and suppress the immune system through central mediated mechanisms. Morphine increases replication and spread of HIV-1. Evidence suggests that morphine can also enhance growth and spread of some cancer diagnoses like breast-, prostate- and non-small cell lung cancer....... The mechanisms behind the effects of morphine are mainly mediated by inhibiting apoptosis of cancer cells and by stimulation of angiogenesis. Some other opioid agonists seem to be depleted from these effects. Prospective studies are needed to clarify the immunosuppressive effects of opioids in cancer pain...

  4. Opioid Use and Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC.gov . Articles Key Findings: Opioid Use and Neural Tube Defects Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The ... relationship to having a pregnancy affected by a neural tube defect (NTD). Researchers from Boston University and CDC ...

  5. Opioid induced hyperalgesia in anesthetic settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Yeomans, David C

    2014-11-01

    Pain is difficult to investigate and difficult to treat, in part, because of problems in quantification and assessment. The use of opioids, combined with classic anesthetics to maintain hemodynamic stability by controlling responses to intraoperative painful events has gained significant popularity in the anesthetic field. However, several side effects profiles concerning perioperative use of opioid have been published. Over the past two decades, many concerns have arisen with respect to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), which is the paradoxical effect wherein opioid usage may decrease pain thresholds and increase atypical pain unrelated to the original, preexisting pain. This brief review focuses on the evidence, mechanisms, and modulatory and pharmacologic management of OIH in order to elaborate on the clinical implication of OIH.

  6. Opioid-induced constipation: advances and clinical guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Alfred D.; Camilleri, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Currently opioids are the most frequently used medications for chronic noncancer pain. Opioid-induced constipation is the most common adverse effect associated with prolonged use of opioids, having a major impact on quality of life. There is an increasing need to treat opioid-induced constipation. With the recent approval of medications for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation, there are several therapeutic approaches. This review addresses the clinical presentation and diagnosis of opioid-induced constipation, barriers to its diagnosis, effects of opioids in the gastrointestinal tract, differential tolerance to opiates in different gastrointestinal organs, medications approved and in development for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation, and a proposed clinical management algorithm for treating opioid-induced constipation in patients with noncancer pain. PMID:26977281

  7. Effect of the analgesic butorphanol on activity behaviour in turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwalder, T; Huber-Eicher, B

    2005-12-01

    During fattening, the bodyweight of modern broad-breasted turkeys increases considerably within a very short space of time. In particular, the breast muscles increase disproportionately. This leads to a disadvantageous distribution in weight, and as a consequence, to a disturbed leg position and skeletal deformations like antitrochanteric degeneration, tibial dyschondroplasia, bending, twisting and rotation of the tibia, osteochondrosis, osteomyelitis, rickets, and epiphyseolysis of the femoral head increases. This cases of degenerative joint disease cause severe pain in humans and there are indications that this is also true for turkeys. The purpose of this study was to determine if behaviour indicative of such pain in turkeys of the B.U.T. Big 6 breeding line could be attenuated by administering a quick-acting analgesic, butorphanol. Twelve pairs of turkeys were tested at the ages of 7 and 12 weeks. One bird in each pair received an analgesic opioid injection, while the other one received a control injection of physiologically balanced saline solution. The time the birds spent putting weight on their legs, i.e., 'walking' and 'standing' and the distance covered by the birds were recorded during the 30 min periods before and after the application of the drug. At week seven the treated birds spent significantly more time putting weight on their legs than control birds. At week 12, the same tendency was observed. No significant differences were found in the distances covered by the animals. It is concluded that fattening turkeys reduce the time they are putting weight on their legs because these behaviours may be associated with pain.

  8. Spinal analgesic action of endomorphins in acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przewłocka, B; Mika, J; Labuz, D; Toth, G; Przewłocki, R

    1999-02-19

    We studied spinal analgesic and antiallodynic effects of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 administered i.t. in comparison with Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or morphine, during acute, inflammatory and neuropathic pain in rats chronically implanted with intrathecal cannulas. Endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 (2.5, 5, 10 microg i.t.) increased the tail-flick latency and, to the lesser extent, the paw pressure latency. The range of potencies in both those models of acute pain was as follows: DAMGO > morphine = endomorphin-1 > endomorphin-2. In a model of inflammatory pain, the number of formalin-induced flinching episodes was decreased by endomorphin-1. The effect of endomorphin-2 was much less pronounced. Both DAMGO and morphine significantly inhibited the pain-related behavior evoked by formalin. In a neuropathic pain model (sciatic nerve crushing in rats), endomorphin-1 and -2 (5 microg i.t.) had a statistically significant effect on the tail-flick latency and on the cold-water tail flick latency. Morphine, 5 microg, was found to be ineffective. Endomorphin-1 and -2 (2.5 and 5 microg i.t.) dose-dependently antagonized allodynia. Those effects of endomorphins were antagonized in acute (30 microg), inflammatory (30 microg) and neuropathic pain models (60 microg) by cyprodime, a selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist. In conclusion, our results show a strong analgesic action of endomorphins at the spinal cord level. The most interesting finding is a strong, stronger than in the case of morphine, antiallodynic effect of endomorphins in rats subjected to sciatic nerve crushing, which suggests a possible use of these compounds in a very difficult therapy of neuropathic pain.

  9. Nicotine effects and the endogenous opioid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is an exogenous ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and it influences various functions in the central nervous system. Systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) in the supraspinal cord. Additionally, systemic NIC administration induces the release of methionine-enkephalin in the spinal dorsal horn. NIC has acute neurophysiological actions, including antinociceptive effects, and the ability to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The endogenous opioid system participates in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception is mediated by α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation is mediated by α4β2, not α7, suggesting that the effects of NIC on the endogenous opioid system are mediated by α7, not α4β2. NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. The opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone (NLX) elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration, and NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of an opioid-receptor antagonist. NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α7 antagonist, but not an α4β2 antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that NIC-induced antinociception and the development of physical dependence are mediated by the endogenous opioid system, via the α7 nAChR.

  10. The mu1, mu2, delta, kappa opioid receptor binding profiles of methadone stereoisomers and morphine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, K; Christensen, C B; Christrup, Lona Louring

    1995-01-01

    The binding affinities of racemic methadone and its optical isomers R-methadone and S-methadone were evaluated for the opioid receptors mu1, mu2, delta and kappa, in comparison with that of morphine. The analgesic R-methadone had a 10-fold higher affinity for mu1 receptors than S-methadone (IC50 3.......0 nM and 26.4 nM, respectively). At the mu2 receptor, the IC50 value of R-methadone was 6.9 nM and 88 nM for S-methadone, respectively. As expected, R-methadone had twice the affinity for mu1 and mu2 receptors than the racemate. All of the compounds tested had low affinity for the delta and kappa...

  11. Analgesic effects of dexamethasone in burn injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Lassen, Birgit Vibeke; Kehlet, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    differences between treatments in regard to skin erythema (P >.8), thermal or mechanical thresholds (P >.2), thermal or mechanical pain response (P >.2), or mechanical secondary hyperalgesia (P >.2). Dexamethasone had no analgesic effects in normal skin. CONCLUSIONS: The study indicates that systemic...... administration of dexamethasone 2 hours before a burn injury does not reduce the inflammatory-mediated changes in quantitative sensory thresholds, pain perception, or skin erythema in humans....... injury was produced on the medial aspect of the nondominant calf (12.5 cm2, 47 degrees C for 7 minutes). Quantitative sensory testing included pain ratings to thermal and mechanical stimuli (visual analog scale [VAS]), assessments of thermal and mechanical detection thresholds, and areas of allodynia...

  12. ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF LEPIDAGATHIS CRISTATA WILLD FLOWER EXTRACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purma Aravinda Reddy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study was to screen the Lepidagathis cristata Willd, flower extracts for analgesic activity. In the present study the analgesic activity of flower extracts was performed. The methanolic, ethyl acetate, chloroform extracts were prepared and were used for analgesic activity in two dose level of 200 and 400mg/kg body weight in two screening methods, Hot Plate (n=5 and Tail Immersion method (n=5. The flower extracts showed significant analgesic activity. The plant extracts did not exhibit any mortality up to the dose level 4000mg/kg. The methanol, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of flower was evaluated for analgesic activity. The flower ethyl acetate extract of Lepidagathis cristata showed 47% and 57.1% activity at 200 and 400mg/kg.b.wt, after 30 min by Eddy’s Hot plate Method respectively. The flower chloroform extract showed 43.7% and 44.7% protection at 200, 400mg/kg respectively. The flower methanol, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts showed dose dependent analgesic activity in thermal models. The flower ethylacetate extract has maximum analgesic activity with 57.1% (p < 0.001c.

  13. Analysis of Novel Synthetic Opioids U-47700, U-50488 and Furanyl Fentanyl by LC-MS/MS in Postmortem Casework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Amanda L A; Friscia, Melissa; Papsun, Donna; Kacinko, Sherri L; Buzby, David; Logan, Barry K

    2016-11-01

    Following series of synthetic cannabinoid and synthetic cathinone derivatives, the illicit drug market has begun to see increased incidence of synthetic opioids including fentanyl and its derivatives, and other chemically unrelated opioid agonists including AH-7921 and MT-45. Among the most frequently encountered compounds in postmortem casework have been furanyl fentanyl (N-(1-(2-phenylethyl)-4-piperidinyl)-N-phenylfuran-2-carboxamide, Fu-F) and U-47700 (trans-3,4-dichloro-N-(2-(dimethylamino)cyclohexyl)-N-methylbenzamide). Both drugs have been reported to be present in the heroin supply and to be gaining popularity among recreational opioid users, but were initially developed by pharmaceutical companies in the 1970s as candidates for development as potential analgesic therapeutic agents. A method was developed and validated for the analysis of U-47700, U-50488 and furanyl fentanyl in blood specimens. A total of 20 postmortem cases, initially believed to be heroin or other opioid-related drug overdoses, were submitted for quantitative analysis. The analytical range for U-47770 and U-50488 was 1-500 and 1-100 ng/mL for furanyl fentanyl. The limit of detection was 0.5 ng/mL for all compounds. Within the scope of the method, U-47700 was the only confirmed drug in 11 of the cases, 5 cases were confirmed for both U-47700 and furanyl fentanyl, and 3 cases were confirmed only for furanyl fentanyl. The mean and median blood concentrations for U-47700 were 253 ng/mL (±150) and 247 ng/mL, respectively, range 17-490 ng/mL. The mean and median blood concentrations for furanyl fentanyl were 26 ng/mL (±28) and 12.9 ng/mL, respectively, range 2.5-76 ng/mL. Given the widespread geographical distribution and increase in prevalence in postmortem casework, toxicology testing should be expanded to include testing for "designer opioids" in cases with histories consistent with opioid overdose but with no traditional opioids present or insufficient quantities to account for death.

  14. The analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of piperine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, I A; Pivac, N; Alhumayyd, M S; Mahesar, A L; Gilani, A H

    2013-12-01

    Piperine, is the major active principal of black pepper. In traditional medicine, black pepper has been used as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory agent and in the treatment of epilepsy. This study was conducted to evaluate the in vivo analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of piperine in mice. The analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of piperine were studied in mice using acetic acid-induced writhing, tail flick assay, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)- and picrotoxin (PIC)-induced seizures models. The intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of piperine (30, 50 and 70 mg/kg) significantly inhibited (Ppepper, may be contributing factor in the medicinal uses of black pepper in pain and epilepsy.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION FOR ANALGESIC ACTIVITY OF MAMSYADI KWATHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreevathsa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Siddha Yoga Sangraha of Yadavji Trikamji Acharya, states about Mamsyadi kwatha, an Ayurvedic formulation which is said to be effective in minor mental disorders. The ingredients of Mamsyadi kwatha are Jatamamsi (Nardistachys jatamansi DC, Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera Linn and Parasika yavani (Hyoscymus niger Linn, in 8:4:1 ratio respectively. The test formulation was subjected to assess its analgesic effect. The model selected for the assessment of analgesic effect was tail flick test, in albino mice. The test formulation possesses analgesic effect, which is mainly due to its component Parasika yavani.

  16. Antinociceptive effects of morphine and naloxone in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice transfected with the MORS196A gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Pao-Luh

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid analgesics such as morphine and meperidine have been used to control moderate to severe pain for many years. However, these opioids have many side effects, including the development of tolerance and dependence after long-term use, which has limited their clinical use. We previously reported that mutations in the mu-opioid receptors (MOR S196L and S196A rendered them responsive to the opioid antagonist naloxone without altering the agonist phenotype. In MORS196A knock-in mice, naloxone and naltrexone were antinociceptive but did not cause tolerance or physical dependence. In this study we delivery this mutated MOR gene into pain related pathway to confirm the possibility of in vivo transfecting MORS196A gene and using naloxone as a new analgesic agent. Methods The MOR-knockout (MOR-KO mice were used to investigate whether morphine and naloxone could show antinociceptive effects when MORS196A gene was transfected into the spinal cords of MOR-KO mice. Double-stranded adeno-associated virus type 2 (dsAAV2 was used to deliver the MORS196A-enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP gene by microinjected the virus into the spinal cord (S2/S3 dorsal horn region. Tail-flick test was used to measure the antinociceptive effect of drugs. Results Morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c. and naloxone (10 mg/kg, s.c. had no antinociceptive effects in MOR-KO mice before gene transfection. However, two or three weeks after the MOR-S196A gene had been injected locally into the spinal cord of MOR-KO mice, significant antinociceptive effects could be induced by naloxone or morphine. On the other hand, only morphine but not naloxone induced significant tolerance after sub-chronic treatment. Conclusion Transfecting the MORS196A gene into the spinal cord and systemically administering naloxone in MOR-KO mice activated the exogenously delivered mutant MOR and provided antinociceptive effect without causing tolerance. Since naloxone will not activate natural

  17. Receptor Reserve Moderates Mesolimbic Responses to Opioids in a Humanized Mouse Model of the OPRM1 A118G Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J Elliott; Vardy, Eyal; DiBerto, Jeffrey F; Chefer, Vladimir I; White, Kate L; Fish, Eric W; Chen, Meng; Gigante, Eduardo; Krouse, Michael C; Sun, Hui; Thorsell, Annika; Roth, Bryan L; Heilig, Markus; Malanga, C J

    2015-01-01

    The OPRM1 A118G polymorphism is the most widely studied μ-opioid receptor (MOR) variant. Although its involvement in acute alcohol effects is well characterized, less is known about the extent to which it alters responses to opioids. Prior work has shown that both electrophysiological and analgesic responses to morphine but not to fentanyl are moderated by OPRM1 A118G variation, but the mechanism behind this dissociation is not known. Here we found that humanized mice carrying the 118GG allele (h/mOPRM1-118GG) were less sensitive than h/mOPRM1-118AA littermates to the rewarding effects of morphine and hydrocodone but not those of other opioids measured with intracranial self-stimulation. Reduced morphine reward in 118GG mice was associated with decreased dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and reduced effects on GABA release in the ventral tegmental area that were not due to changes in drug potency or efficacy in vitro or receptor-binding affinity. Fewer MOR-binding sites were observed in h/mOPRM1-118GG mice, and pharmacological reduction of MOR availability unmasked genotypic differences in fentanyl sensitivity. These findings suggest that the OPRM1 A118G polymorphism decreases sensitivity to low-potency agonists by decreasing receptor reserve without significantly altering receptor function. PMID:25881115

  18. A case of topical opioid-induced delirium mistaken as behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia in demented state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Go; Kanemoto, Kousuke

    2013-06-01

    In Japan, indications for opioid analgesics, once exclusively used as pain killers for patients suffering from malignant cancer, have been expanded for a wide range of pain. Herein we report a patient with opioid-induced delirium associated with the administration of buprenorphine patches that was well below the indicated therapeutic range limit. An 82-year-old woman was referred to us from an orthopaedic practitioner for uncontrollable behavioural problems apparently caused by the beginning of dementia; the patient had gradually developed disorientation, visual hallucinations, and delusions. Laboratory and imaging findings excluded common causes of delirium including Alzheimer's disease and diffuse Lewy body disease. Detailed questioning revealed that the patient's confused state appeared following a buprenorphine patch dose increase and subsequently disappeared after administration was stopped. Delirium has not been reported as a side-effect in clinical trials of buprenorphine patches. However, our findings in this case show that even topical opioids can precipitate the development of a delirious state in elderly patients.

  19. What You Need to Know When Prescribed an Opioid Painkiller

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Need to Know When Prescribed an Opioid Painkiller Tell your doctor if you or anyone in ... doctor or other health care provider prescribes opioid painkillers such as Oxycontin, Vicodin, codeine and morphine, the ...

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of compact, conformationally constrained bifunctional opioid agonist – neurokinin-1 antagonist peptidomimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemyn, Karel; Kleczkowska, Patrycia; Lesniak, Anna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Van der Poorten, Olivier; Van den Eynde, Isabelle; Keresztes, Attila; Varga, Eva; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Chung, Nga N.; Lemieux, Carole; Mika, Joanna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Przewlocka, Barbara; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Lipkowski, Andrzej W.; Schiller, Peter W.; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2014-01-01

    A reported mixed opioid agonist - neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist 4 (Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-(3’,5’-(CF3)2)NMe-benzyl) was modified to identify important features in both pharmacophores. The new dual ligands were tested in vitro and subsequently two compounds (lead structure 4 and one of the new analogues 22, Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-β-Ala-NMe-Bn) were selected for in vivo behavioral assays, which were conducted in acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (cold plate and von Frey) in rats. Compared to the parent opioid compound 33 (without NK1R pharmacophore), hybrid 22 was more active in the neuropathic pain models. Attenuation of neuropathic pain emerged from NK1R antagonism as demonstrated by the pure NK1R antagonist 6. Surprisingly, despite a lower in vitro activity at NK1R in comparison with 4, compound 22 was more active in the neuropathic pain models. Although potent analgesic effects were observed for 4 and 22, upon chronic administration, both manifested a tolerance profile similar to that of morphine and cross tolerance with morphine in a neuropathic pain model in rat. PMID:25544687

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of compact, conformationally constrained bifunctional opioid agonist - neurokinin-1 antagonist peptidomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemyn, Karel; Kleczkowska, Patrycia; Lesniak, Anna; Dyniewicz, Jolanta; Van der Poorten, Olivier; Van den Eynde, Isabelle; Keresztes, Attila; Varga, Eva; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Chung, Nga N; Lemieux, Carole; Mika, Joanna; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Van Duppen, Joost; Przewlocka, Barbara; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Schiller, Peter W; Tourwé, Dirk; Ballet, Steven

    2015-03-06

    A reported mixed opioid agonist - neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist 4 (Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-(3',5'-(CF3)2)NMe-benzyl) was modified to identify important features in both pharmacophores. The new dual ligands were tested in vitro and subsequently two compounds (lead structure 4 and one of the new analogues 22, Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-β-Ala-NMe-Bn) were selected for in vivo behavioural assays, which were conducted in acute (tail-flick) and neuropathic pain models (cold plate and von Frey) in rats. Compared to the parent opioid compound 33 (without NK1R pharmacophore), hybrid 22 was more active in the neuropathic pain models. Attenuation of neuropathic pain emerged from NK1R antagonism as demonstrated by the pure NK1R antagonist 6. Surprisingly, despite a lower in vitro activity at NK1R in comparison with 4, compound 22 was more active in the neuropathic pain models. Although potent analgesic effects were observed for 4 and 22, upon chronic administration, both manifested a tolerance profile similar to that of morphine and cross tolerance with morphine in a neuropathic pain model in rat.

  2. YFa and analogs: Investigation of opioid receptors in smooth muscle contraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krishan Kumar; Ritika Goyal; Annu Mudgal; Anita Mohan; Santosh Pasha

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the pharmacological profile and inhibition of smooth muscle contraction by YFa and its analogs in conjunction with their receptor selectivity. METHODS: The effects of YFa and its analogs (D-Ala2) YFa, Y (D-Ala2) GFMKKKFMRF amide and Des-Phe- YGGFMKKKFMR amide in guinea pig ileum (GPI) and mouse vas deferens (MVD) motility were studied using an isolated tissue organ bath system, and morphine and DynA (1-13) served as controls. Acetylcholine was used for muscle stimulation. The observations were validated by specific antagonist pretreatment experiments using naloxonazine, naltrindole and norbinaltorphimine norBNI. RESULTS: YFa did not demonstrate significant inhibition of GPI muscle contraction as compared with morphine (15% vs 62%, P = 0.0002), but moderate inhibition of MVD muscle contraction, indicating the role of κ opioid receptors in the contraction. A moderate inhibition of GPI muscles by (Des-Phe) YFa revealed the role of anti-opiate receptors in the smooth muscle contraction. (D-Ala-2) YFa showed significant inhibition of smooth muscle contraction, indicating the involvement of mainly d receptors in MVD contraction. These results were supported by specific antagonist pretreatment assays. CONCLUSION: YFa revealed its side-effect-free analgesic properties with regard to arrest of gastrointestinal transit. The study provides evidences for the involvement of κ and anti-opioid receptors in smooth muscle contraction.

  3. Electroacupuncture Reduces Postoperative Pain and Analgesic Consumption in Patients Undergoing Thoracic Surgery: A Randomized Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tongyu; Xu, Jianjun; Ma, Wen; Zhou, Jia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on postoperative pain management in patients undergoing thoracic surgery. A randomized study was conducted. Ninety-two thoracic surgical patients were randomly divided into an EA group and a sham group. Postoperative intravenous analgesia was applied with a half dose of the conventional drug concentration in both groups. In the EA group, EA treatment was administered for three consecutive days after the surgery with 6 sessions of 30 min each. Compared with the sham group, patients in the EA group had a lower visual analogue scale (VAS) score at 2, 24, 48, and 72 hours and consumed less analgesic after surgery. The incidence of opioid-related adverse effects of nausea was lower in the EA group. The time to first flatus and defecation was also shorter in the EA group. Furthermore, the plasma β-endorphin (β-EP) level was higher by radioimmunoassay and the plasma 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) level was lower in the EA group by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay during the first 72 hr after thoracic surgery. Therefore, EA is suitable as an adjunct treatment for postoperative pain management after thoracic surgery. PMID:27073400

  4. The analgesic effect of preoperative pregabalin in radical cystectomy for cancer bladder patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ayman A. Ghoneim; Mohammed M. Hegazy

    2013-01-01

    Objective: After the pregabalin has been approved for the treatment of neuropathic pain, preliminary clinical studies suggested a possible role in the perioperative period. To our knowledge, It has never been studied the perioperative analgesic effect of pregabalin in patients with cancer bladder. In this study, we hypothesized that cancer bladder patients undergoing radical cystectomy and received oral pregabalin 75 mg twice daily for ten days preoperatively would get their postoperative pain reduced. Methods: Sixty patients scheduled for elective radical cystectomy were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups (control group or pregabalin group). Patients in the pregabalin group received 75 mg pregabalin twice daily for ten days before surgery. Standard anesthesia protocol was applied to all patients. Pain intensity, opioid consumption, level of sedation and other side effects were regularly assessed for 48 h postoperative. Results: Mean time for the first request of analgesia was statistically longer in pregabalin group. Meanwhile, mean morphine consumption, VAS scores at rest (in the first 32 h postoperatively), VAS scores during movement (in the first 20 h postoperatively) were statistically significant lower in the pregabalin group than those in the control group. Patients in the pregabalin group were statistically more sedated in the first four hours postoperative than the control group. Conclusion: Preoperative pregabalin 75 mg twice daily for ten days resulted in 60% reduction in 24 h postoperative morphine requirements in patients undergoing radical cystectomy.

  5. When medications make pain worse: opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Caren McHenry

    2011-08-01

    Opioid medications are commonly used to treat moderate-to-severe pain. While these medications are generally an effective means of pain control, they can, in rare cases, actually exacerbate the pain. This paradoxical reaction is called opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Patients experiencing OIH may benefit from decreasing or discontinuing the opioid, switching to an alternative opioid, and/or using a nonopioid medication for pain.

  6. Evaluation of analgesic effect of local administration of morphine after iliac crest bone graft harvesting: A double blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Pain is a complex process influenced by both physiological and psychological factors. In spite of an armamentarium of analgesic drugs and techniques available to combat post-operative pain, appropriate selection, and effective management for relief of post-operative pain still poses unique challenges. The discovery of peripheral opioid receptors has led to growing interest in the use of locally applied opioids (intra-articular, intra-pleural, intra-peritoneal, and perineural for managing acute pain. As bone graft harvesting is associated with significant post-operative pain and there is a paucity of literature on the use of peripheral opioids at the iliac crest bone harvesting site, the present study was planned to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of local administration of morphine after iliac crest bone graft harvesting. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients, 20-50 years of age scheduled to undergo elective surgery for delayed and non-union fracture both bone leg with bone grafting under general anaesthesia (GA were randomly assigned to one of the four groups of 15 patients each: group 1: 2.5 ml normal saline (NS +2.5 ml NS infiltrated into the harvest site at 2 sites + 1 ml NS intramuscularly (i/m; Group 2: 2.5 ml NS + 2.5 ml NS infiltrated into the harvest site at 2 sites + 5 mg morphine in 1 ml i/m.; Group 3: 2.5 mg (2.5 ml morphine + 2.5 mg (2.5 ml morphine infiltrated into the harvest site at 2 sites + 1 ml NS i/m; Group 4: 0.5 mg naloxone (2.5 ml +5 mg (2.5 ml morphine infiltrated into the harvest site at 2 sites + 1 ml NS i/m. Pain from the bone graft site and operative site was assessed for 24 h post-operatively. Results: The patients who had received morphine infiltration (Group 3 had significantly less pain scores at the graft site at 4, 6, and 10 post-operative hours. They also had significantly less morphine consumption and overall better pain relief as compared to the other groups. Conclusions

  7. Medical cannabis and chronic opioid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisfield, Gary M

    2010-12-01

    Fourteen states and the District of Columbia have legalized the use of cannabis for medical purposes. A small, high-quality literature supports the efficacy of medical cannabis for the treatment of neuropathic pain. The smoked botanical product, however, is associated with a number of adverse medical and psychiatric consequences. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that acute use of cannabis results in impairment of every important metric related to the safe operation of a motor vehicle. Epidemiological data show associations between recent cannabis use and both psychomotor impairment and motor vehicle crashes, associations that are strengthened by the concomitant use of alcohol and other central nervous system depressants. Finally, data from pain clinics reveals an unusually high prevalence of cannabis use in nearly all age groups and an association between cannabis use and opioid and other substance misuse. Based on available data and expert opinion, concomitant use of cannabis and opioids is an absolute contraindication to the operation of a motor vehicle. In patients who use cannabis and are prescribed opioids, heightened vigilance for opioid- and other substance-related problems is warranted. It is appropriate to refrain from prescribing opioids to individuals using medical cannabis if there is reasonable suspicion that the combination will pose a risk to the patient or others.

  8. Noribogaine is a G-protein biased κ-opioid receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillet, Emeline L; Milon, Nicolas; Heghinian, Mari D; Fishback, James; Schürer, Stephan C; Garamszegi, Nandor; Mash, Deborah C

    2015-12-01

    Noribogaine is the long-lived human metabolite of the anti-addictive substance ibogaine. Noribogaine efficaciously reaches the brain with concentrations up to 20 μM after acute therapeutic dose of 40 mg/kg ibogaine in animals. Noribogaine displays atypical opioid-like components in vivo, anti-addictive effects and potent modulatory properties of the tolerance to opiates for which the mode of action remained uncharacterized thus far. Our binding experiments and computational simulations indicate that noribogaine may bind to the orthosteric morphinan binding site of the opioid receptors. Functional activities of noribogaine at G-protein and non G-protein pathways of the mu and kappa opioid receptors were characterized. Noribogaine was a weak mu antagonist with a functional inhibition constants (Ke) of 20 μM at the G-protein and β-arrestin signaling pathways. Conversely, noribogaine was a G-protein biased kappa agonist 75% as efficacious as dynorphin A at stimulating GDP-GTP exchange (EC50=9 μM) but only 12% as efficacious at recruiting β-arrestin, which could contribute to the lack of dysphoric effects of noribogaine. In turn, noribogaine functionally inhibited dynorphin-induced kappa β-arrestin recruitment and was more potent than its G-protein agonistic activity with an IC50 of 1 μM. This biased agonist/antagonist pharmacology is unique to noribogaine in comparison to various other ligands including ibogaine, 18-MC, nalmefene, and 6'-GNTI. We predict noribogaine to promote certain analgesic effects as well as anti-addictive effects at effective concentrations>1 μM in the brain. Because elevated levels of dynorphins are commonly observed and correlated with anxiety, dysphoric effects, and decreased dopaminergic tone, a therapeutically relevant functional inhibition bias to endogenously released dynorphins by noribogaine might be worthy of consideration for treating anxiety and substance related disorders.

  9. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study to Assess the Efficacy of Nonopioid Analgesics on Pain following Arthroscopic Knee Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Abdulla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In a randomized, double-blind trial, the efficacy of nonopioid analgesics on postoperative piritramide consumption was compared for pain relief during the first 24 h in patients recovering from arthroscopic knee surgery. Methods. 120 patients were treated with normal saline and/or one of the nonopioid analgesics (parecoxib, metamizole, paracetamol in addition to piritramide using the PCA pump. Beginning in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, patients were asked to quantify their pain experience at rest while piritramide consumption was recorded. Results. Piritramide consumption upon arrival in the PACU was high in all groups. However, cumulative consumption in the parecoxib group was significantly lower than that in the placebo group at 6 and 12 h after surgery. At discharge from the PACU, VAS scores dropped in all groups and were significantly lower in the parecoxib group. In the PACU, satisfaction of the patients was moderate and improved with time after surgery. Conclusions. There was statistically significant opioid-saving effect by administering parecoxib with better VAS scores and satisfaction level compared to placebo. The high pain score in the PACU in all groups immediately after recovering from remifentanil-based anesthesia would be prevented if local anesthetics were administered intra-articularly as part of a multimodal analgesic approach.

  10. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study to Assess the Efficacy of Nonopioid Analgesics on Pain following Arthroscopic Knee Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Susanne; Eckhardt, Regina; Netter, Ute; Abdulla, Walied

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. In a randomized, double-blind trial, the efficacy of nonopioid analgesics on postoperative piritramide consumption was compared for pain relief during the first 24 h in patients recovering from arthroscopic knee surgery. Methods. 120 patients were treated with normal saline and/or one of the nonopioid analgesics (parecoxib, metamizole, paracetamol) in addition to piritramide using the PCA pump. Beginning in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), patients were asked to quantify their pain experience at rest while piritramide consumption was recorded. Results. Piritramide consumption upon arrival in the PACU was high in all groups. However, cumulative consumption in the parecoxib group was significantly lower than that in the placebo group at 6 and 12 h after surgery. At discharge from the PACU, VAS scores dropped in all groups and were significantly lower in the parecoxib group. In the PACU, satisfaction of the patients was moderate and improved with time after surgery. Conclusions. There was statistically significant opioid-saving effect by administering parecoxib with better VAS scores and satisfaction level compared to placebo. The high pain score in the PACU in all groups immediately after recovering from remifentanil-based anesthesia would be prevented if local anesthetics were administered intra-articularly as part of a multimodal analgesic approach.

  11. Parent and Metabolite Opioid Drug Concentrations in Unintentional Deaths Involving Opioid and Benzodiazepine Combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Marcia D; Abate, Marie A; Hu, Lan; Long, D Leann; Blommel, Matthew L; Haikal, Nabila A; Kraner, James C

    2015-07-01

    Effects of benzodiazepines on postmortem opioid parent and parent/metabolite blood concentration ratios were determined for fentanyl-, hydrocodone-, methadone-, or oxycodone-related accidental deaths. These opioids are partially metabolized by the CYP3A4 enzyme system, which is also affected by diazepam and alprazolam. Opioid/metabolite combinations examined were as follows: fentanyl/norfentanyl, hydrocodone/dihydrocodeine, methadone/EDDP, and oxycodone/oxymorphone. Parent opioid concentrations were analyzed for 877 deaths. Parent/metabolite concentration ratios were analyzed for 349 deaths, excluding cases with co-intoxicants present known to interfere with opioid elimination. Alprazolam in combination with diazepam significantly decreased median hydrocodone concentrations by 48% (p = 0.01) compared to hydrocodone alone. The methadone parent/metabolite concentration ratio was reduced by 35% in the presence of diazepam compared to methadone alone (p = 0.03). Benzodiazepines did not statistically significantly affect fentanyl or oxycodone concentrations. Possible factors affecting opioid concentrations and possible toxicity development, including any differential effects on specific opioids, should continue to be explored.

  12. Chronic ethanol consumption in rats produces opioid antinociceptive tolerance through inhibition of mu opioid receptor endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    Full Text Available It is well known that the mu-opioid receptor (MOR plays an important role in the rewarding properties of ethanol. However, it is less clear how chronic ethanol consumption affects MOR signaling. Here, we demonstrate that rats with prolonged voluntary ethanol consumption develop antinociceptive tolerance to opioids. Signaling through the MOR is controlled at many levels, including via the process of endocytosis. Importantly, agonists at the MOR that promote receptor endocytosis, such as the endogenous peptides enkephalin and β-endorphin, show a reduced propensity to promote antinociceptive tolerance than do agonists, like morphine, which do not promote receptor endocytosis. These observations led us to examine whether chronic ethanol consumption produced opioid tolerance by interfering with MOR endocytosis. Indeed, here we show that chronic ethanol consumption inhibits the endocytosis of MOR in response to opioid peptide. This loss of endocytosis was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2 protein levels after chronic drinking, suggesting that loss of this component of the trafficking machinery could be a mechanism by which endocytosis is lost. We also found that MOR coupling to G-protein was decreased in ethanol-drinking rats, providing a functional explanation for loss of opioid antinociception. Together, these results suggest that chronic ethanol drinking alters the ability of MOR to endocytose in response to opioid peptides, and consequently, promotes tolerance to the effects of opioids.

  13. Deficiency in the Opioid Hypotheses of Self-Injurious Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bryan H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This commentary critiques two papers by Curt Sandman, pointing out interpretive problems in models explaining self-injurious behavior in terms of opioids. Withdrawal effects are emphasized as an alternative to hypotheses asserting congenital opioid excess as a cause of sensory depression or an addiction to a relative excess of opioid activity in…

  14. In vivo opioid receptor heteromerization: where do we stand?

    OpenAIRE

    Massotte, D

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors are highly homologous GPCRs that modulate brain function at all levels of neural integration, including autonomous, sensory, emotional and cognitive processing. Opioid receptors functionally interact in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms involving direct receptor–receptor interactions, affecting signalling pathways or engaging different neuronal circuits, remain unsolved. Heteromer formation through direct physical interaction between two opioid receptors or between an opioi...

  15. Prevalence of Opioid Dispensings and Concurrent Gastrointestinal Medications in Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E Williams

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Opioids are frequently prescribed for moderate to severe pain. A side effect of opioid usage is the inhibition of gastrointestinal (GI motility, known as opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OBD. OBD is typically treated prophylactically with laxatives and/or acid suppressants.

  16. Effective analgesic modalities for ambulatory patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Martin; Florence, Barry; Glass, Peter S A

    2003-06-01

    The introduction of government-mandated standards for pain management has focused our attention on postoperative pain. With the recent JACHO standards' for ambulatory surgery, it is imperative that all health care workers who care for these patients are familiar with appropriate pain management. Developments in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute pain have further enhanced our ability to improve pain management for postoperative ambulatory patients. This has led to the concept of preventive analgesia (inhibition of physiological and pathological secondary inflammatory pain). Extensive work has shown that this is best achieved using a multimodel approach usually consisting of an NSAID, opioid, and local anesthetic. NMDA antagonists (ketamine, dextromethorphan) and alpha-2 agnoists (clonodine) show potential supplements to further enhance pain management, especially if given preemptively. Nonpharmacological intervention such as cold therapy or acupuncture may also be considered. The armanentarium for effective pain management has improved substantially over the past few years. The challenge is for health care workers to implement these therapies to obtain optimum pain management in ambulatory surgical patients.

  17. Endocytosis of μ opioid receptors inhibits morphine tolerance%μ阿片受体的内吞抑制吗啡耐受的形成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕庆琴; 陈霆隽; 洪炎国

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are the most effective analgesics. However, prolonged administration of morphine, the representative of opioids, results in tolerance, limiting the therapeutic utility of o-piate drugs. Studies have recently suggested that endocytosis of μ opioid receptors attenuates opioid tolerance. The ability of inducing endocytosis of opioid receptor is agonist-dependent. It has been shown that the endocytotic efficacy of opioids are negatively correlated with opioid tolerance. Receptor internalization reduced adaptive changes in signaling pathways that are involved in the development of opioid tolerance. Moreover, endocytosised μ-opioid receptors are rapidly recycled back to the cell membrane surface resuming their normal function. Therefore, tolerance does not occur. Thus, the study of receptor endocytosis and trafficking following the activation of the receptors can help the therapy for chronic pain.%阿片类药物是至今最有效的镇痛药,但是长期应用会产生药物耐受,大大限制了其临床应用.μ阿片受体和特定的激动剂结合后会出现内吞.研究发现,μ阿片受体是否内吞与耐受的发生有密切关系;加强μ阿片受体的内吞能够抑制受体耐受.不同的激动剂导致μ阿片受体内吞的能力是不同的;其导致耐受的能力和导致内吞的能力呈负相关.激动剂越容易引起μ受体内吞,就越不容易产生吗啡耐受.内吞的作用在于能抑制过度刺激μ受体而导致的环腺苷酸( cyclic adenosine monophosphate,cAMP)等兴奋性信号通路的激活,而内吞的μ受体也会很快回到细胞膜上,恢复和阿片类药物结合后激活抑制性GTP 结合蛋白的能力.因此,对受体的内吞和其后迁移过程展开研究,可能为慢性疼痛的治疗找到新的路径.

  18. Orbitofrontal Cortex in Chronic Analgesic-Overuse Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Glucose metabolism with 18-FDG PET in 16 chronic migraineurs (mean age 42.5 +/- 11 years with analgesic overuse, before and 3 weeks after medication withdrawal, was compared to controls.

  19. Study on Analgesic Effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Shan; XU Ling; WEI Pin-kang; QIN Zhi-feng; LI Jun; PENG Hai-dong

    2008-01-01

    Chinese medicine has been used in treating pain for a long time.Much progress has been made in studies on the mechanism of the analgesic effect of Chinese medicine in animal experiments.It is found that the analgesic action may be related to the following actions:(1)Reducing the secretion of peripheral algogenic substances and inducing the secretion of pain-sensitive substances;(2)Alleviating the accumulation of local algogenic substances;(3)Increasing the release of endogenous analgesic substances;(4)Regulating c-fos gene and increasing the secretion of such substances in the central newous system,etc.In this paper,the experimental methods and analgesic effect of Chinese medicines are reviewed.