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Sample records for anaerobic ethanol producer

  1. High ethanol tolerance of the thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producer Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    to exogenously added ethanol was studied in a continuous immobilized reactor system at a growth temperature of 70 degrees C. Ethanol tolerance was evaluated based on inhibition of fermentative performance e.g.. inhibition of substrate conversion. At the highest ethanol concentration tested (8.3% v/v), the strain...... was able to convert 42% of the xylose initially present, indicating that this ethanol concentration is not the upper limit tolerated by the strain. Long-term strain adaptation to high ethanol concentrations (6 - 8.3%) resulted in an improvement of xylose conversion by 25% at an ethanol concentration of 5......% v/v, which is the concentration required in practice for economically efficient product recovery. For all ethanol concentrations tested, relatively high and stable ethanol yields (0.40 - 0.42 g/g) were seen. The strain demonstrated a remarkable, ethanol tolerance, which is the second highest...

  2. Identification and characterization of an anaerobic ethanol-producing cellulolytic bacterial consortium from Great Basin hot springs with agricultural residues and energy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chao; Deng, Yunjin; Wang, Xingna; Li, Qiuzhe; Huang, Yifan; Liu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    In order to obtain the cellulolytic bacterial consortia, sediments from Great Basin hot springs (Nevada, USA) were sampled and enriched with cellulosic biomass as the sole carbon source. The bacterial composition of the resulting anaerobic ethanol-producing celluloytic bacterial consortium, named SV79, was analyzed. With methods of the full-length 16S rRNA librarybased analysis and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 21 bacteria belonging to eight genera were detected from this consortium. Clones with closest relation to the genera Acetivibrio, Clostridium, Cellulosilyticum, Ruminococcus, and Sporomusa were predominant. The cellulase activities and ethanol productions of consortium SV79 using different agricultural residues (sugarcane bagasse and spent mushroom substrate) and energy crops (Spartina anglica, Miscanthus floridulus, and Pennisetum sinese Roxb) were studied. During cultivation, consortium SV79 produced the maximum filter paper activity (FPase, 9.41 U/ml), carboxymethylcellulase activity (CMCase, 6.35 U/ml), and xylanase activity (4.28 U/ml) with sugarcane bagasse, spent mushroom substrate, and S. anglica, respectively. The ethanol production using M. floridulus as substrate was up to 2.63 mM ethanol/g using gas chromatography analysis. It has high potential to be a new candidate for producing ethanol with cellulosic biomass under anoxic conditions in natural environments.

  3. Themoanaerobacterium calidifontis sp. nov., a novel anaerobic, thermophilic, ethanol-producing bacterium from hot springs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Shu-mei; Qian, Long; Zhang, Xu; Li, Kun-zhi; Chagan, Irbis

    2013-06-01

    A novel thermophilic Gram staining positive strain Rx1 was isolated from hot springs in Baoshan of Yunnan Province, China. The strain was characterized as a hemicellulose-decomposing obligate anaerobe bacterium that is rod-shaped (diameter: 0.5-0.7 μm; length: 2.0-6.7 μm), spore-forming, and motile. Its growth temperature range is 38-68 °C (optimum 50-55 °C) and pH range is 4.5-8.0 (optimum 7.0). The maximum tolerance concentration of NaCl was 3 %. Rx1 converted thiosulfate to elemental sulfur and reduced sulfite to hydrogen sulfide. The bacterium grew by utilizing xylan and starch, as well as a wide range of monosaccharide and polysaccharides, including glucose and xylose. The main products of fermentation were ethanol, lactate, acetate, CO2, and H2. The maximum xylanase activity in the culture supernatant after 30 h of incubation at 55 °C was 16.2 U/ml. Rx1 DNA G + C content was 36 mol %. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain Rx1 belonged to the genus Thermoanaerobacterium of the family 'Thermoanaerobacteriaceae' (Firmicutes), with Thermoanaerobacterium aciditolerans 761-119 (99.2 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) being its closest relative. DNA-DNA hybridization between Rx1 and T. aciditolerans 761-119 showed 36 % relatedness. Based on its physiological and biochemical tests and DNA-DNA hybridization analyses, the isolate is considered to represent a novel species in the genus Thermoanaerobacterium, for which the name Thermoanaerobacterium calidifontis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain is Rx1 (=JCM 18270 = CCTCC M 2011109).

  4. High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Carriera, Laura H.

    1983-01-01

    Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

  5. Strain and bioprocess improvement of a thermophilic anaerobe for the production of ethanol from wood

    OpenAIRE

    Herring, Christopher D; Kenealy, William R.; Joe Shaw, A.; Covalla, Sean F.; Olson, Daniel G; Zhang, Jiayi; Ryan Sillers, W.; Tsakraklides, Vasiliki; Bardsley, John S.; Rogers, Stephen R.; Thorne, Philip G.; Johnson, Jessica P.; Foster, Abigail; Shikhare, Indraneel D.; Klingeman, Dawn M

    2016-01-01

    Background The thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum digests hemicellulose and utilizes the major sugars present in biomass. It was previously engineered to produce ethanol at yields equivalent to yeast. While saccharolytic anaerobes have been long studied as potential biomass-fermenting organisms, development efforts for commercial ethanol production have not been reported. Results Here, we describe the highest ethanol titers achieved from T. saccharolyticum...

  6. Aerobic and sequential anaerobic fermentation to produce xylitol and ethanol using non-detoxified acid pretreated corncob

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Ke-Ke; Wu, Jing; Lin, Zhang-Nan; Zhang, Jian-An

    2014-01-01

    Background For economical bioethanol production from lignocellulosic materials, the major technical challenges to lower the production cost are as follows: (1) The microorganism should use efficiently all glucose and xylose in the lignocellulose hydrolysate. (2) The microorganism should have high tolerance to the inhibitors present in the lignocellulose hydrolysate. The aim of the present work was to combine inhibitor degradation, xylitol fermentation, and ethanol production using a single ye...

  7. An anaerobic mitochondrion that produces hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxma, Brigitte; Graaf, Rob M. de; Staay, Georg W.M. van der; Alen, Theo A. van; Ricard, Guenola; Gabaldón, Toni; Hoek, Angela H.A.M. van; Moon-van der Staay, Seung Yeo; Koopman, Werner J.H.; Hellemond, Jaap J. van; Tielens, Aloysius G.M.; Friedrich, Thorsten; Veenhuis, Marten; Huynen, Martijn A.; Hackstein, Johannes H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogenosomes are organelles that produce ATP and hydrogen, and are found in various unrelated eukaryotes, such as anaerobic flagellates, chytridiomycete fungi and ciliates. Although all of these organelles generate hydrogen, the hydrogenosomes from these organisms are structurally and metabolicall

  8. Process for producing ethanol from syngas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Theodore R; Rathke, Jerome W; Chen, Michael J

    2013-05-14

    The invention provides a method for producing ethanol, the method comprising establishing an atmosphere containing methanol forming catalyst and ethanol forming catalyst; injecting syngas into the atmosphere at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce methanol; and contacting the produced methanol with additional syngas at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce ethanol. The invention also provides an integrated system for producing methanol and ethanol from syngas, the system comprising an atmosphere isolated from the ambient environment; a first catalyst to produce methanol from syngas wherein the first catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a second catalyst to product ethanol from methanol and syngas, wherein the second catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a conduit for introducing syngas to the atmosphere; and a device for removing ethanol from the atmosphere. The exothermicity of the method and system obviates the need for input of additional heat from outside the atmosphere.

  9. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the

  10. Conversion of hemicelluloses and D-xylose into ethanol by the use of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Ethanol is a CO{sub 2} neutral liquid fuel that can substitute the use of fossil fuels in the transportation sector, thereby reducing the CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere. CO{sub 2} emission is suspected to contribute significantly to the so-called greenhouse effect, the global heating. Substrates for production of ethanol must be cheap and plentiful. This can be met by the use of lignocellulosic biomass such as willow, wheat straw, hardwood and softwood. However, the complexity of these polymeric substrates and the presence of several types of carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose) require additional treatment to release the useful carbohydrates and ferment the major carbohydrates fractions. The costs related to the ethanol-production must be kept at a minimum to be price competitive compared to gasoline. Therefore all of the carbohydrates present in lignocellulose need to be converted into ethanol. Glucose can be fermented to ethanol by yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which, however, is unable to ferment the other major carbohydrate fraction, D-xylose. Thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacteria can be used for fermentation of the hemicelluloses fraction of lignocellulosic biomass. However, physiological studies of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria have shown that the ethanol yield decreases at increasing substrate concentration. The biochemical limitations causing this phenomenon are not known in detail. Physiological and biochemical studies of a newly characterized thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter mathranii, was performed. This study included extraction of intracellular metabolites and enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis. These studies revealed several bottlenecks in the D-xylose metabolism. This knowledge makes way for physiological and genetic engineering of this strain to improve the ethanol yield and productivity at high concentration of D-xylose. (au)

  11. Pervaporation of ethanol produced from banana waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Roger Hoel; Linzmeyer, Poliana; Franco, Cláudia Maria Bueno; Souza, Ozair; Sellin, Noeli; Medeiros, Sandra Helena Westrupp; Marangoni, Cintia

    2014-08-01

    Banana waste has the potential to produce ethanol with a low-cost and sustainable production method. The present work seeks to evaluate the separation of ethanol produced from banana waste (rejected fruit) using pervaporation with different operating conditions. Tests were carried out with model solutions and broth with commercial hollow hydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane membranes. It was observed that pervaporation performance for ethanol/water binary mixtures was strongly dependent on the feed concentration and operating temperature with ethanol concentrations of 1-10%; that an increase of feed flow rate can enhance the permeation rate of ethanol with the water remaining at almost the same value; that water and ethanol fluxes was increased with the temperature increase; and that the higher effect in flux increase was observed when the vapor pressure in the permeate stream was close to the ethanol vapor pressure. Better results were obtained with fermentation broth than with model solutions, indicated by the permeance and membrane selectivity. This could be attributed to by-products present in the multicomponent mixtures, facilitating the ethanol permeability. By-products analyses show that the presence of lactic acid increased the hydrophilicity of the membrane. Based on this, we believe that pervaporation with hollow membrane of ethanol produced from banana waste is indeed a technology with the potential to be applied.

  12. An anaerobic mitochondrion that produces hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxma, B.; Graaf, de R.M.; Staay, van der G.W.M.; Alen, T.A.; Richard, G.; Gabalon, T.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Moon - van der Staay, S.Y.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Hellemond, van J.J.; Tielens, A.G.M.; Friedrich, T.; Veenhuis, M.; Huynen, M.A.; Hackstein, J.H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogenosomes are organelles that produce ATP and hydrogen(1), and are found in various unrelated eukaryotes, such as anaerobic flagellates, chytridiomycete fungi and ciliates(2). Although all of these organelles generate hydrogen, the hydrogenosomes from these organisms are structurally and metabo

  13. Conversion of hemicellulose and D-xylose into ethanol by the use of thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Peter

    1998-02-01

    Ethanol is a CO{sub 2} neutral liquid fuel that can substitute the use of fossil fuels in the transportation sector, thereby reducing the CO{sub 2} emission to the atmoshpere. CO{sub 2} emission is suspected to contribute significantly to the so-called greenhouse effect, the global heating. Substrates for production of ethanol must be cheap and plentiful. This can be met by the use of lignocellulosic biomass such as willow, wheat straw, hardwood and softwood. However, the complexity of these polymeric substrates and the presence of several types of carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, mannose, galactose, arabinose) require additional treatment to release the useful carbohydrates and ferment the major carbohydrates fractions. The costs related to the ethanol-production must be kept at a minimum to be price competitive compared to gasoline. Therefore all of the carbohydrates present in lignocellulose need to be converted into ethanol. Glucose can be fermented to ethanol by yeast strains such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which, however, is unable to ferment the other major carbohydrate fraction, D-xylose. The need for a microorganism able to ferment D-xylose is therefore apparent. Thermophilic anaerobic ethanol producing bacteria can therefore be considered for fermentation of D-xylose. Screening of 130 thermophilic anaerobic bacterial strains, from hot-springs, mesophilic and thermophilic biogas plants, paper pulp industries and brewery waste, were examined for production of ethanol from D-xylose and wet-oxidized hemicellulose hydrolysate. Several strains were isolated and one particular strain was selected for best performance during the screening test. This strain was characterized as a new species, Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. However, the ethanol yield on wet-oxidized hemicellulose hydrolysate was not satisfactory. The bacterium was adapted by isolation of mutant strains, now resistant to the inhibitory compounds present in the hydrolysate. Growth and ethanol yield

  14. Bioenergy from stillage anaerobic digestion to enhance the energy balance ratio of ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuess, Lucas Tadeu; Garcia, Marcelo Loureiro

    2015-10-01

    The challenges associated with the availability of fossil fuels in the past decades intensified the search for alternative energy sources, based on an ever-increasing demand for energy. In this context, the application of anaerobic digestion (AD) as a core treatment technology in industrial plants should be highlighted, since this process combines the pollution control of wastewaters and the generation of bioenergy, based on the conversion of the organic fraction to biogas, a methane-rich gaseous mixture that may supply the energetic demands in industrial plants. In this context, this work aimed at assessing the energetic potential of AD applied to the treatment of stillage, the main wastewater from ethanol production, in an attempt to highlight the improvements in the energy balance ratio of ethanol by inserting the heating value of methane as a bioenergy source. At least 5-15% of the global energy consumption in the ethanol industry could be supplied by the energetic potential of stillage, regardless the feedstock (i.e. sugarcane, corn or cassava). The association between bagasse combustion and stillage anaerobic digestion in sugarcane-based distilleries could provide a bioenergy surplus of at least 130% of the total fossil fuel input into the ethanol plant, considering only the energy from methane. In terms of financial aspects, the economic gains could reach US$ 0.1901 and US$ 0.0512 per liter of produced ethanol, respectively for molasses- (Brazil) and corn-based (EUA) production chains. For large-scale (∼1000 m(3)EtOH per day) Brazilian molasses-based plants, an annual economic gain of up to US$ 70 million could be observed. Considering the association between anaerobic and aerobic digestion, for the scenarios analyzed, at least 25% of the energetic potential of stillage would be required to supply the energy consumption with aeration, however, more suitable effluents for agricultural application could be produced. The main conclusion from this work

  15. Bioenergy from stillage anaerobic digestion to enhance the energy balance ratio of ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuess, Lucas Tadeu; Garcia, Marcelo Loureiro

    2015-10-01

    The challenges associated with the availability of fossil fuels in the past decades intensified the search for alternative energy sources, based on an ever-increasing demand for energy. In this context, the application of anaerobic digestion (AD) as a core treatment technology in industrial plants should be highlighted, since this process combines the pollution control of wastewaters and the generation of bioenergy, based on the conversion of the organic fraction to biogas, a methane-rich gaseous mixture that may supply the energetic demands in industrial plants. In this context, this work aimed at assessing the energetic potential of AD applied to the treatment of stillage, the main wastewater from ethanol production, in an attempt to highlight the improvements in the energy balance ratio of ethanol by inserting the heating value of methane as a bioenergy source. At least 5-15% of the global energy consumption in the ethanol industry could be supplied by the energetic potential of stillage, regardless the feedstock (i.e. sugarcane, corn or cassava). The association between bagasse combustion and stillage anaerobic digestion in sugarcane-based distilleries could provide a bioenergy surplus of at least 130% of the total fossil fuel input into the ethanol plant, considering only the energy from methane. In terms of financial aspects, the economic gains could reach US$ 0.1901 and US$ 0.0512 per liter of produced ethanol, respectively for molasses- (Brazil) and corn-based (EUA) production chains. For large-scale (∼1000 m(3)EtOH per day) Brazilian molasses-based plants, an annual economic gain of up to US$ 70 million could be observed. Considering the association between anaerobic and aerobic digestion, for the scenarios analyzed, at least 25% of the energetic potential of stillage would be required to supply the energy consumption with aeration, however, more suitable effluents for agricultural application could be produced. The main conclusion from this work

  16. Anaerobic bio-hydrogen production from ethanol fermentation: the role of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Moon H; Jang, Nam J; Hyun, Seung H; Kim, In S

    2004-08-01

    Hydrogen was produced by an ethanol-acetate fermentation at pH of 5.0 +/- 0.2 and HRT of 3 days. The yield of hydrogen was 100-200 ml g Glu(-1) with a hydrogen content of 25-40%. This fluctuation in the hydrogen yield was attributed to the formation of propionate and the activity of hydrogen utilizing methanogens. The change in the operational pH for the inhibition of this methanogenic activity induced a change in the main fermentation pathway. In this study, the main products were butyrate, ethanol and propionate, in the pH ranges 4.0-4.5, 4.5-5.0 and 5.0-6.0, respectively. However, the activity of all the microorganisms was inhibited below pH 4.0. Therefore, pH 4.0 was regarded as the operational limit for the anaerobic bio-hydrogen production process. These results indicate that the pH plays an important role in determining the type of anaerobic fermentation pathway in anaerobic bio-hydrogen processes.

  17. Ethanol Marketing and Input Procurement Practices of U.S. Ethanol Producers: 2008 Survey Results

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidgall, Timothy J.; Tudor, Kerry W.; Spaulding, Aslihan D.; Winter, J. Randy

    2010-01-01

    A mail survey was used to collect information about input procurement and ethanol and co-product marketing practices from 60 U.S. ethanol production facilities. Data were used to answer questions about the conduct or behavior of ethanol producers. It was anticipated that firm conduct or behavior would be fairly homogeneous because the ethanol industry was in Stage II of the industry life-cycle, and societal support for ethanol production resulted in large volumes of publicly available informa...

  18. Retooling the ethanol industry: thermophilic anaerobic digestion of thin stillage for methane production and pollution prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Scott H; Sung, Shihwu

    2008-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion of corn ethanol thin stillage was tested at thermophilic temperature (55 degrees C) with two completely stirred tank reactors. The thin stillage wastestream was organically concentrated with 100 g/L total chemical oxygen demand and 60 g/L volatiles solids and a low pH of approximately 4.0. Steady-state was achieved at 30-, 20-, and 15-day hydraulic retention times (HRTs) and digester failure at a 12-day HRT. Significant reduction of volatile solids was achieved, with a maximum reduction (89.8%) at the 20-day HRT. Methane yield ranged from 0.6 to 0.7 L methane/g volatile solids removed during steady-state operation. Effluent volatile fatty acids below 200 mg/L as acetic acid were achieved at 20- and 30-day HRTs. Ultrasonic pretreatment was used for one digester, although no significant improvement was observed. Ethanol plant natural gas consumption could be reduced 43 to 59% with the methane produced, while saving an estimated $7 to $17 million ($10 million likely) for a facility producing 360 million L ethanol/y.

  19. Modelling of Two-Stage Anaerobic Treating Wastewater from a Molasses-Based Ethanol Distillery with the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1

    OpenAIRE

    Kittikhun Taruyanon; Sarun Tejasen

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the application of ADM1 model to simulate the dynamic behaviour of a two-stage anaerobic treatment process treating the wastewater generated from the ethanol distillery process. The laboratory-scale process comprised an anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) connecting in series, was used to treat wastewater from the ethanol distillery process. The CSTR and UASB hydraulic retention times (HRT) were 12 and 70 hours, re...

  20. Research on the Nature of Thermophilic Anaerobic Ethanol Producer Thermo anaerobacter sp DF3 in Petroleum Reservoirs%一株产乙醇嗜热厌氧油藏微生物ThermoanaerobacterspDF3的性质研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰贵红; 邢钰; 曹毅; 乔代蓉; 邹长军; 邓宇; 张辉; 尹小波

    2012-01-01

    [目的]了解油藏微生物ThermoanaerobacterspDF3的生理生化特性,优化木糖产乙醇培养方案。[方法]利用厌氧分离技术从大港油田油层采出液中分离到一株产乙醇厌氧杆菌DF3采用生理生化鉴定与16SrDNA序列的系统发育学分析其系统发育地位,用气相色谱分析其代谢产物。[结果]菌株DF3是一株严格厌氧的嗜热细菌,呈直杆状,G-菌体大小为O.42μm×(1.60~5.20)μm,单生成对或成串生,产顶端芽孢;生长温度为45~78℃(最适65℃),能利用葡萄糖、木糖、果糖、核糖、甘露糖、阿拉伯糖、蔗糖、半乳糖、乳糖、纤维二糖、松三糖、棉子糖、淀粉等作为底物;其16SrRNA与zpseud。ethanolicw相似性为99.7%发酵葡萄糖与木糖的主要产物为乙醇,培养方案优化后其代谢木糖产乙醇终浓度为2.0g/L。[结论]通过试验证明菌株DF3是目前已知菌株中产乙醇活性较强的菌株之一,在65℃时代谢木糖能产生2.0g/L的乙醇目前代谢木糖高产乙醇的菌株均由国外分离获得,菌株DF3的分离获得为我国研究木质纤维素产乙醇提供了优良的出发菌株。%[Objective] The aim was to study the physiological and biochemical char- acteristics of Thermoanaerobacter sp DF3 in petroleum reservoirs and optimize the culture plan of producing ethanol from xylose. [Method] DF3, an anaerobic bacillus producing ethanol, was isolated from produced liquid from oil layer of Dagang oil field with anaerobic isolation technique. The phylogenetic position was analyzed by physiological and biochemical identification and phylogeny of 16S rDNA sequence. The metabolites were analyzed by gas chromatograph. [Result] The strain DF3 was a strict anaerobic thermophilic bacterium, which was straight in rod shape,and gram negative. Besides, it was 0.42 μmx(1.60-5.20) iJm in length. The strains can be soli- tary,in pairs or string and apical spore usually

  1. Aerobic and anaerobic ethanol production by Mucor circinelloides during submerged growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lübbehüsen, Tina Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Mcintyre, Mhairi

    2004-01-01

    to the minimisation or elimination of the by-product ethanol for future process design. Large amounts of ethanol were produced during aerobic growth on glucose under non-oxygen limiting conditions, which is indicative of M. circinelloides being a Crabtree-positive organism. Ethanol production on...

  2. Anaerobic digestion as final step of a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2010-01-01

    of suspended matter reduced the degradation efficiency. The retention time of the anaerobic system could be reduced from 70 to 7 h by additional removal of suspended matter by clarification. Implementation of the biogas production from the fermentation effluent accounted for about 30% higher carbon utilization...

  3. Fermentation of xylose to produce ethanol by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain containing XYLA and XKS1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaolin; JIANG Ning; HE Peng; LU Dajun; SHEN An

    2005-01-01

    Fermentation of the pentose sugar xylose to produce ethanol using lignocellulosic biomass would make bioethanol production economically more competitive. Saccharomyce cerevisise, an efficient ethanol producer, cannot utilize xylose because it lacks the ability to convert xylose to its isomer xylulose. In this study, XYLA gene encoding xylose isomerase (XI) from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis MB4T and XKS1 gene encoding xylulokinase (XK) from Pichia stipitis were cloned and functionally coexpressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae EF-326 to construct a recombinant xylose-utilizing strain. The resulting strain S. cerevisiae EF 1014 not only grew on xylose as sole carbon source, but also produced ethanol under anaerobic conditions. Fermentations performed with different xylose concentrations at different temperatures demonstrated that the highest ethanol productivity was 0.11 g/g xylose when xylose concentration was provided at 50 g/L. Under this condition, 28.4% of xylose was consumed and 1.54 g/L xylitol was formed. An increasing fermentation temperature from 30℃ to 37℃ did not improve ethanol yield.

  4. Ethanol production from maize silage as lignocellulosic biomass in anaerobically digested and wet-oxidized manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Lisiecki, P.; Holm-Nielsen, J.B.;

    2008-01-01

    In this communication, pretreatment of the anaerobically digested (AD) manure and the application of the pretreated AD manure as liquid medium for the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were described. Furthermore, fermentation of pretreated maize silage and wheat straw was inve......In this communication, pretreatment of the anaerobically digested (AD) manure and the application of the pretreated AD manure as liquid medium for the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were described. Furthermore, fermentation of pretreated maize silage and wheat straw....... No extra nitrogen source was needed in the fermentation broth. It was shown that the AD manure could successfully substitute process water in SSF of pretreated lignocellulosic fibres. Theoretical ethanol yields of 82% were achieved, giving 30.8 kg ethanol per 100 kg dry mass of maize silage. (C) 2007...

  5. Modelling Methane Production and Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Granular Sludge Reactor with Ethanol as Electron Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Xiaohu; Wang, Qilin; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a mathematical model based on growth kinetics of microorganisms and substrates transportation through biofilms was developed to describe methane production and sulfate reduction with ethanol being a key electron donor. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from two case studies conducted in granule-based Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The results suggest that the developed model could satisfactorily describe methane and sulfide productions as well as ethanol and sulfate removals in both systems. The modeling results reveal a stratified distribution of methanogenic archaea, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge and the relative abundances of these microorganisms vary with substrate concentrations. It also indicates sulfate-reducing bacteria can successfully outcompete fermentative bacteria for ethanol utilization when COD/SO42‑ ratio reaches 0.5. Model simulation suggests that an optimal granule diameter for the maximum methane production efficiency can be achieved while the sulfate reduction efficiency is not significantly affected by variation in granule size. It also indicates that the methane production and sulfate reduction can be affected by ethanol and sulfate loading rates, and the microbial community development stage in the reactor, which provided comprehensive insights into the system for its practical operation.

  6. Improvement of hydrogen production via ethanol-type fermentation in an anaerobic down-flow structured bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzola-Rojas, Mélida del Pilar; Zaiat, Marcelo; De Wever, Heleen

    2016-02-01

    Although a novel anaerobic down-flow structured bed reactor has shown feasibility and stable performance for a long-term compared to other anaerobic fixed bed systems for continuous hydrogen production, the volumetric rates and yields have so far been too low. In order to improve the performance, an operation strategy was applied by organic loading rate (OLR) variation (12-96 g COD L(-1) d(-1)). Different volumetric hydrogen rates, and yields at the same OLR indicated that the system was mainly driven by the specific organic load (SOL). When SOL was kept between 3.8 and 6.2 g sucrose g(-1) VSS d(-1), the volumetric rates raised from 0.1 to 8.9 L H2 L(-1) d(-1), and the yields were stable around 2.0 mol H2 mol(-1) converted sucrose. Furthermore, hydrogen was produced mainly via ethanol-type fermentation, reaching a total energy conversion rate of 23.40 kJ h(-1) L(-1) based on both hydrogen and ethanol production.

  7. Increasing anaerobic acetate consumption and ethanol yields in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Brooks M; Hon, Shuen; Covalla, Sean F; Sonu, Carolina; Argyros, D Aaron; Barrett, Trisha F; Wiswall, Erin; Froehlich, Allan C; Zelle, Rintze M

    2015-12-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently been engineered to use acetate, a primary inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as a cosubstrate during anaerobic ethanolic fermentation. However, the original metabolic pathway devised to convert acetate to ethanol uses NADH-specific acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase and quickly becomes constrained by limited NADH availability, even when glycerol formation is abolished. We present alcohol dehydrogenase as a novel target for anaerobic redox engineering of S. cerevisiae. Introduction of an NADPH-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (NADPH-ADH) not only reduces the NADH demand of the acetate-to-ethanol pathway but also allows the cell to effectively exchange NADPH for NADH during sugar fermentation. Unlike NADH, NADPH can be freely generated under anoxic conditions, via the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. We show that an industrial bioethanol strain engineered with the original pathway (expressing acetylating acetaldehyde dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis and with deletions of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes GPD1 and GPD2) consumed 1.9 g liter(-1) acetate during fermentation of 114 g liter(-1) glucose. Combined with a decrease in glycerol production from 4.0 to 0.1 g liter(-1), this increased the ethanol yield by 4% over that for the wild type. We provide evidence that acetate consumption in this strain is indeed limited by NADH availability. By introducing an NADPH-ADH from Entamoeba histolytica and with overexpression of ACS2 and ZWF1, we increased acetate consumption to 5.3 g liter(-1) and raised the ethanol yield to 7% above the wild-type level.

  8. Yield and Properties of Ethanol Biofuel Produced from Different Whole Cassava Flours

    OpenAIRE

    Ademiluyi, F. T.; Mepba, H. D.

    2013-01-01

    The yield and properties of ethanol biofuel produced from five different whole cassava flours were investigated. Ethanol was produced from five different whole cassava flours. The effect of quantity of yeast on ethanol yield, effect of whole cassava flour to acid and mineralized media ratio on the yield of ethanol produced, and the physical properties of ethanol produced from different cassava were investigated. Physical properties such as distillation range, density, viscosity, and flash poi...

  9. Modelling of Two-Stage Anaerobic Treating Wastewater from a Molasses-Based Ethanol Distillery with the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittikhun Taruyanon

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of ADM1 model to simulate the dynamic behaviour of a two-stage anaerobic treatment process treating the wastewater generated from the ethanol distillery process. The laboratory-scale process comprised an anaerobic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR and an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB connecting in series, was used to treat wastewater from the ethanol distillery process. The CSTR and UASB hydraulic retention times (HRT were 12 and 70 hours, respectively. The model was developed based on ADM1 basic structure and implemented with the simulation software AQUASIM. The simulated results were compared with measured data obtained from using the laboratory-scale two-stage anaerobic treatment process to treat wastewater. The sensitivity analysis identified maximum specific uptake rate (km and half-saturation constant (Ks of acetate degrader and sulfate reducing bacteria as the kinetic parameters which highly affected the process behaviour, which were further estimated. The study concluded that the model could predict the dynamic behaviour of a two-stage anaerobic treatment process treating the ethanol distillery process wastewater with varying strength of influents with reasonable accuracy.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a hydrogen- and ethanol-producing Clostridium sp. strain URNW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Umesh; Wrana, Nathan; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David B

    2011-03-01

    Identification, characterization, and end-product synthesis patterns were analyzed in a newly identified mesophilic, anaerobic Clostridium sp. strain URNW, capable of producing hydrogen (H₂) and ethanol. Metabolic profiling was used to characterize putative end-product synthesis pathways of the Clostridium sp. strain URNW, which was found to grow on cellobiose; on hexose sugars, such as glucose, sucrose, and mannose; and on sugar alcohols, like mannitol and sorbitol. When grown in batch cultures on 2 g cellobiose·L⁻¹, Clostridium sp. strain URNW showed a cell generation time of 1.5 h, and the major end-products were H2, formate, carbon dioxide (CO₂), lactate, butyrate, acetate, pyruvate, and ethanol. The total volumetric H₂ production was 14.2 mmol·(L culture)⁻¹ and the total production of ethanol was 0.4 mmol·(L culture)⁻¹. The maximum yield of H₂ was 1.3 mol·(mol glucose equivalent)⁻¹ at a carbon recovery of 94%. The specific production rates of H₂, CO₂, and ethanol were 0.45, 0.13, and 0.003 mol·h⁻¹·(g dry cell mass)-1, respectively. BLAST analyses of 16S rDNA and chaperonin 60 (cpn60) sequences from Clostridium sp. strain URNW revealed a 98% nucleotide sequence identity with the 16S rDNA and cpn60 sequences from Clostridium intestinale ATCC 49213. Phylogenetic analyses placed Clostridium sp. strain URNW within the butyrate-synthesizing clostridia.

  11. Ethanol and hydrogen production by two thermophilic, anaerobic bacteria isolated from Icelandic geothermal areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Perttu E P; Beck, Steinar R; Orlygsson, Jóhann; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2008-11-01

    Microbial fermentations are potential producers of sustainable energy carriers. In this study, ethanol and hydrogen production was studied by two thermophilic bacteria (strain AK15 and AK17) isolated from geothermal springs in Iceland. Strain AK15 was affiliated with Clostridium uzonii (98.8%), while AK17 was affiliated with Thermoanaerobacterium aciditolerans (99.2%) based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Both strains fermented a wide variety of sugar residues typically found in lignocellulosic materials, and some polysaccharides. In the batch cultivations, strain AK17 produced ethanol from glucose and xylose fermentations of up to 1.6 mol-EtOH/mol-glucose (80% of the theoretical maximum) and 1.1 mol-EtOH/mol-xylose (66%), respectively. The hydrogen yields by AK17 were up to 1.2 mol-H2/ mol-glucose (30% of the theoretical maximum) and 1.0 mol-H2/mol-xylose (30%). The strain AK15 produced hydrogen as the main fermentation product from glucose (up to 1.9 mol-H2/mol-glucose [48%]) and xylose (1.1 mol-H2/mol-xylose [33%]). The strain AK17 tolerated exogenously added ethanol up to 4% (v/v). The ethanol and hydrogen production performance from glucose by a co-culture of the strains AK15 and AK17 was studied in a continuous-flow bioreactor at 60 degrees C. Stable and continuous ethanol and hydrogen co-production was achieved with ethanol yield of 1.35 mol-EtOH/mol-glucose, and with the hydrogen production rate of 6.1 mmol/h/L (H2 yield of 0.80 mol-H2/mol-glucose). PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that the AK17 became the dominant bacterium in the bioreactor. In conclusion, strain AK17 is a promising strain for the co-production of ethanol and hydrogen with a wide substrate utilization spectrum, relatively high ethanol tolerance, and ethanol yields among the highest reported for thermoanaerobes.

  12. Pretreatment of wheat straw and conversion of xylose and xylan to ethanol by thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Jensen, K.; Nielsen, P.;

    1996-01-01

    . Of five different thermophilic bacteria used in this study only two strains produced ethanol with xylan as substrate, one of them being the strain A3 isolated from an Icelandic hot-spring. Probably other degradation products formed in the presence of oxygen might act as inhibitors. Adaptation...

  13. The molecular biological characterization of a strain of biohydrogen-producing anaerobe in Clostridium Genus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-feng; REN Nan-qi; ZHENG Guo-xiang; LIU Min; HU Li-jie; CHEN Ying; WANG Xiang-jing

    2005-01-01

    The anaerobic process of biohydrogen production was developed recently. The isolation and identification of biohydrogen producing anaerobic bacteria with high evolution rate and yield is an important foundation of the fermented biohydrogen production process through which anaerobic bacteria digest organic wastewater. By considering physiological and biochemical traits, morphological characteristics and a 16S rDNA sequence, the isolated Rennanqilyf33 is shown to be a new species.

  14. The maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures: definition and determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yang; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; He, Chuan-Shu; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Wang, Yi; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from wastes has many advantages compared to various chemical methods. Methodology for characterizing the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures is essential for monitoring reactor operation in fermentative hydrogen production, however there is lack of such kind of standardized methodologies. In the present study, a new index, i.e., the maximum specific hydrogen-producing activity (SHAm) of anaerobic mixed cultures, was proposed, and consequently a reliable and simple method, named SHAm test, was developed to determine it. Furthermore, the influences of various parameters on the SHAm value determination of anaerobic mixed cultures were evaluated. Additionally, this SHAm assay was tested for different types of substrates and bacterial inocula. Our results demonstrate that this novel SHAm assay was a rapid, accurate and simple methodology for determining the hydrogen-producing activity of anaerobic mixed cultures. Thus, application of this approach is beneficial to establishing a stable anaerobic hydrogen-producing system.

  15. Generation potential of electric power surplus with the biogas produced from anaerobic bio digestion of vinasse in Brazilian sugar-ethanol industry; Potencial de geracao de excedentes de energia eletrica com o biogas produzido a partir da biodigestao da vinhaca na industria sucro-alcooleira brasileira

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamonica, Helcio Martins [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DE/FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Energia

    2006-07-01

    This work evaluates the electric power potential of the Brazilian sugarcane industry using the biogas produced by vinasse biodigestion in internal combustion engine driven generators. The electric power surplus based on crop 2004/05 ethanol production data is 9,292 TJ/year (2.6 TWh/year), 0.75% of the total electric power consumption in Brazil during the year of 2003. In spite of its considerable potential the determined minimum selling price for its produced energy of R$ 89.98/GJ (R$ 323.92/MWh) is expensive for present Brazilian electric power market price. (author)

  16. Simultaneous Coproduction of Hydrogen and Ethanol in Anaerobic Packed-Bed Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Marques dos Reis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the use of an anaerobic packed-bed reactor for hydrogen production at different hydraulic retention times (HRT (1–8 h. Two reactors filled with expanded clay and fed with glucose (3136–3875 mg L−1 were operated at different total upflow velocities: 0.30 cm s−1 (R030 and 0.60 cm s−1 (R060. The effluent pH of the reactors was maintained between 4 and 5 by adding NaHCO3 and HCl solutions. It was observed a maximum hydrogen production rate of 0.92 L H2 h−1 L−1 in R030 at HRT of 1 h. Furthermore, the highest hydrogen yield of 2.39 mol H2 mol−1 glucose was obtained in R060. No clear trend was observed by doubling the upflow velocities at this experiment. High ethanol production was also observed, indicating that the ethanol-pathway prevailed throughout the experiment.

  17. A strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic hydrogen-producing culture enriched from digested household waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Kotay, Shireen Meher; Trably, Eric;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to enrich, characterize and identify strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic hydrogen (H-2) producers from digested household solid wastes. A strict anaerobic extreme thermophilic H-2 producing bacterial culture was enriched from a lab-scale digester treating household...... to the genera Bacillus and Clostridium. Relative abundance of the culture members, assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, were 87 +/- 5% and 13 +/- 5% for Bacillus and Clostridium, respectively. An extreme thermophilic, strict anaerobic, mixed microbial culture with H-2-producing potential was enriched...

  18. Micro-aerobic, anaerobic and two-stage condition for ethanol production by Enterobacter aerogenes from biodiesel-derived crude glycerol

    OpenAIRE

    Saisaard, Kanokrat; Angelidaki, Irini; Prasertsan, Poonsuk

    2011-01-01

    The microbial production of ethanol from biodiesel-derived crude glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes TISTR1468, under micro-aerobic and anaerobic conditions, was investigated. The experimental results showed that micro-aerobic conditions were more favorable for cellular growth (4.0 g/L DCW), ethanol production (20.7 g/L) as well as the ethanol yield (0.47 g/g glycerol) than anaerobic conditions (1.2 g/L DCW, 6.3 g/L ethanol and 0.72 g/g glycerol, respectively). Crude glycerol (100 g/L) was con...

  19. Sustainably produced ethanol. A premium fuel component; Nachhaltig produziertes Ethanol. Eine Premium Kraftstoffkomponente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, Joerg [Suedzucker AG, Obrigheim/Pfalz (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Ethanol is the most used biofuel in the world. It is part of the European biofuel strategy, which is intended to preserve finite fossil resources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and strengthen European agriculture. In addition to its traditional use in E5 fuel, ethanol most recently features in new fuels for petrol engines in Europe: as E10 as an expansion of the already existing concept of ethanol blends, such as in E5, or as ethanol fuel E85, a blend made up primarily of ethanol. There is already extensive international experience for both types of fuel for example in the USA or Brazil. The use of ethanol as a biofuel is linked to sustainability criteria in Europe which must be proven through a certification scheme. In addition to ethanol, the integrated production process also provides vegetable protein which is used in food as well as in animal feed and therefore provides the quality products of processed plants used for sustainable energy and in animal and human food. Ethanol has an effect on the vapour pressure, boiling behaviour and octane number of the fuel blend. Adjusting the blend stock petrol to fulfil the quality requirements of the final fuel is therefore necessary. Increasing the antiknock properties, increasing the heat of evaporation of the fuel using ethanol and the positive effects this has on the combustion efficiency of the petrol engine are particularly important. Investigations on cars or engines that were specifically designed for fuel with a higher ethanol content show significant improvements in using the energy from the fuel and the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions if fuels containing ethanol are used. The perspective based purely on an energy equivalent replacement of fossil fuels with ethanol is therefore misleading. Ethanol can also contribute to increasing the energy efficiency of petrol engines as well as being a replacement source of energy. (orig.)

  20. Inhibition of ethanol-producing yeast and bacteria by degradation products produced during pre-treatment of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinke, H B; Thomsen, A B; Ahring, B K

    2004-11-01

    An overview of the different inhibitors formed by pre-treatment of lignocellulosic materials and their inhibition of ethanol production in yeast and bacteria is given. Different high temperature physical pre-treatment methods are available to render the carbohydrates in lignocellulose accessible for ethanol fermentation. The resulting hydrolyzsates contain substances inhibitory to fermentation-depending on both the raw material (biomass) and the pre-treatment applied. An overview of the inhibitory effect on ethanol production by yeast and bacteria is presented. Apart from furans formed by sugar degradation, phenol monomers from lignin degradation are important co-factors in hydrolysate inhibition, and inhibitory effects of these aromatic compounds on different ethanol producing microorganisms is reviewed. The furans and phenols generally inhibited growth and ethanol production rate (Q(EtOH)) but not the ethanol yields (Y(EtOH)) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Within the same phenol functional group (aldehyde, ketone, and acid) the inhibition of volumetric ethanol productivity was found to depend on the amount of methoxyl substituents and hence hydrophobicity (log P). Many pentose-utilizing strains Escherichia coli, Pichia stipititis, and Zymomonas mobilis produce ethanol in concentrated hemicellulose liquors but detoxification by overliming is needed. Thermoanaerobacter mathranii A3M3 can grow on pentoses and produce ethanol in hydrolysate without any need for detoxification. PMID:15300416

  1. Effect of Ethanol and Ethanol Biodegradation Products on Prospects for Natural Anaerobic Biodegradation of Benzene at Gasoline Spill Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been an increasing use of biofuels (ethanol in particular) in the fuel supply nationwide, and an increase in the number of stations that sell gasoline that contains more than 10% ethanol. The U.S. EPA needs to understand the fate of these materials if they are released ...

  2. [Prolonged cultivation of an anaerobic bacterial community producing hydrogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belokopytov, B F; Ryzhmanova, Ia V; Laurinavichius, K S; Shcherbakova, V A

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies various methods of long-term maintenance of the process of hydrogen evolution during the growth of an aerobic bacterial community on a starch-containing environment. When cultured in separable trip fermentation mode for 72 days, from 0.10 to 0.23 H2/l of medium/day was formed. The regime of regular reseeding lasted more than 100 days, forming an average of 0.81 1 H2/l of medium/day. The advantages and disadvantages of different methods of microbial hydrogen production during a dark starch fermentation process are presented. From the obtained H2 forming microbial communities, we isolated an anaerobic spore-forming bacterium (strain BF). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S RNA gene sequence of the new strain showed that according to its genotype it belongs to the Clostridium butyricum species.

  3. Anaerobic degradation of inedible crop residues produced in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingel, W R; Sager, J C

    1996-01-01

    An anaerobic reactor seeded with organisms from an anaerobic lagoon was used to study the degradation of inedible crop residues from potato and wheat crops grown in a closed environment. Conversion of this biomass into other products was also evaluated. Degradation of wheat volatile solids was about 25% where that of potato was about 50%. The main product of the anaerobic fermentation of both crops was acetic acid with smaller quantities of propionate and butyrate produced. Nitrate, known to be high in concentration in inedible potato and wheat biomass grown hydroponically, was converted to ammonia in the anaerobic reactor. Both volatile fatty acid and ammonia production may have implications in a crop production system. PMID:11538974

  4. Microbial community in anaerobic hydrogen-producing microflora enriched from sludge compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Y; Haruta, S; Ishii, M; Igarashi, Y

    2001-11-01

    Hydrogen production by thermophilic anaerobic microflora enriched from sludge compost was studied by using an artificial medium containing cellulose powder. Hydrogen gas was evolved with the formation of acetate, ethanol, and butyrate by decomposition of the cellulose powder. The hydrogen production yield was 2.0 mol/mol-hexose by either batch or chemostat cultivation. A medium that did not contain peptone demonstrated a lower hydrogen production yield of 1.0 mol/mol-hexose with less formation of butyrate. The microbial community in the microflora was investigated through isolation of the microorganisms by both plating and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the' PCR-amplified V3 region of 16S rDNA. Sixty-eight microorganisms were isolated from the microflora and classified into nine distinct groups by genetic fingerprinting of the PCR-DGGE or by a random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis and determination of the partial sequence of 16S rDNA. Most of the isolates belonged to the cluster of the thermophilic Clostridium/Bacillus subphylum of low G+C gram-positive bacteria. Product formation by most of the isolated strains corresponded to that produced by the microflora. Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticium was isolated in the enrichment culture with or without added peptone. and was detected with strong intensity by PCR-DGGE. Two other thermophilic cellulolytic microorganisms, Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium cellulosi, were also detected by PCR-DGGE, although they could not be isolated. These findings imply that hydrogen production from cellulose by microflora is performed by a consortium of several species of microorganisms.

  5. Economic feasibility of producing sweet sorghum as an ethanol feedstock in the southeastern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines the feasibility of producing sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) as an ethanol feedstock in the southeastern United States through representative counties in Mississippi. We construct enterprise budgets along with estimates of transportation costs to estimate sweet sorghum producers' breakeven costs for producing and delivering sweet sorghum biomass. This breakeven cost for the sweet sorghum producer is used to estimate breakeven costs for the ethanol producer based on wholesale ethanol price, production costs, and transportation and marketing costs. Stochastic models are developed to estimate profits for sweet sorghum and competing crops in two representative counties in Mississippi, with sweet sorghum consistently yielding losses in both counties. -- Highlights: → We examine the economic feasibility of sweet sorghum as an ethanol feedstock. → We construct enterprise budgets along with estimates of transportation costs. → We estimate breakeven costs for producing and delivering sweet sorghum biomass. → Stochastic models determine profits for sweet sorghum in two Mississippi counties.

  6. Inhibition of ethanol-producing yeast and bacteria by degradation products produced during pre-treatment of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinke, H.B.; Thomsen, A.B.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2004-01-01

    An overview of the different inhibitors formed by pre-treatment of lignocellulosic materials and their inhibition of ethanol production in yeast and bacteria is given. Different high temperature physical pre-treatment methods are available to render the carbohydrates in lignocellulose accessible...... for ethanol fermentation. The resulting hydrolyzsates contain substances inhibitory to fermentation-depending on both the raw material (biomass) and the pre-treatment applied. An overview of the inhibitory effect on ethanol production by yeast and bacteria is presented. Apart from furans formed by sugar...... degradation, phenol monomers from lignin degradation are important co-factors in hydrolysate inhibition, and inhibitory effects of these aromatic compounds on different ethanol producing microorganisms is reviewed. The furans and phenols generally inhibited growth and ethanol production rate (Q...

  7. Prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing anaerobic bacteria in chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirtilaxmi Kenchappa Benachinmardi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Due to the rampant use of antibiotics bacteria are acquiring resistance to penicillin group of drugs, which results in prescription failure in clinical practice. Beta-lactamase producing organisms are not only more virulent they also cause surrounding bacteria to become resistant. Hence, this study was undertaken to know the prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producing anaerobic bacteria in chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted for a period of 1 year from January to December 2010 at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Clinical samples were collected from the sub gingival pockets from cases of chronic periodontitis and transported to the laboratory in fluid thioglycollate medium. Gram′s staining was performed and anaerobic culture put up. All the anaerobic bacteria isolated were tested for beta-lactamase production by Nitrocefin disc method. Results: A total of 60 samples yielded 121 isolates, out of which 26% were ESBL producers. Bacteroides fragilis was the most common organism followed by Fusobacterium species. Conclusion: ESBL producing anaerobic bacteria exits in chronic periodontitis cases and the present study identified 26% of the isolates to be ESBL producers. Antibiotic resistance testing is essential before starting the therapy and in emergency cases drugs should be chosen to cover ESBL producers.

  8. Anaerobic digestion in combination with 2nd generation ethanol production for maximizing biofuels yield from lignocellulosic biomass – testing in an integrated pilot-scale biorefinery plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    An integrated biorefinery concept for 2nd generation bioethanol production together with biogas production from the fermentation effluent was tested in pilot-scale. The pilot plant comprised pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, hexose and pentose fermentation into ethanol and anaerobic digestion...... for mesophilic than for thermophilic operation. The effluent from the ethanol fermentation showed no signs of toxicity to the anaerobic microorganisms. Implementation of the biogas production from the fermentation effluent accounted for about 30% higher biofuels yield in the biorefinery compared to a system...

  9. Treatment of corn ethanol distillery wastewater using two-stage anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ráduly, B; Gyenge, L; Szilveszter, Sz; Kedves, A; Crognale, S

    2016-01-01

    In this study the mesophilic two-stage anaerobic digestion (AD) of corn bioethanol distillery wastewater is investigated in laboratory-scale reactors. Two-stage AD technology separates the different sub-processes of the AD in two distinct reactors, enabling the use of optimal conditions for the different microbial consortia involved in the different process phases, and thus allowing for higher applicable organic loading rates (OLRs), shorter hydraulic retention times (HRTs) and better conversion rates of the organic matter, as well as higher methane content of the produced biogas. In our experiments the reactors have been operated in semi-continuous phase-separated mode. A specific methane production of 1,092 mL/(L·d) has been reached at an OLR of 6.5 g TCOD/(L·d) (TCOD: total chemical oxygen demand) and a total HRT of 21 days (5.7 days in the first-stage, and 15.3 days in the second-stage reactor). Nonetheless the methane concentration in the second-stage reactor was very high (78.9%); the two-stage AD outperformed the reference single-stage AD (conducted at the same reactor loading rate and retention time) by only a small margin in terms of volumetric methane production rate. This makes questionable whether the higher methane content of the biogas counterbalances the added complexity of the two-stage digestion. PMID:27438248

  10. Performance evaluation of a pilot-scale anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) treating ethanol thin stillage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereli, R K; Urban, D R; Heffernan, B; Jordan, J A; Ewing, J; Rosenberger, G T; Dunaev, T I

    2012-01-01

    The ethanol industry has grown rapidly during the past ten years, mainly due to increasing oil prices. However, efficient and cost-effective solutions for treating thin stillage wastewater have still to be developed. The anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology combines classical anaerobic treatment in a completely-stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with membrane separation. The combination of these two technologies can achieve a superior effluent quality and also increase biogas production compared to conventional anaerobic solutions. A pilot-scale AnMBR treating thin stillage achieved very high treatment efficiencies in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total suspended solids (TSS) removal (>98%). An average permeate flux of 4.3 L/m2 x h was achieved at relatively low transmembrane pressure (TMP) values (0.1-0.2 bars) with flat-sheet membranes. Experience gained during the pilot-scale studies provides valuable information for scaling up of AnMBRs treating complex and high-strength wastewaters. PMID:22988609

  11. Improved glycerol to ethanol conversion by E. coli using a metagenomic fragment isolated from an anaerobic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loaces, Inés; Rodríguez, Cecilia; Amarelle, Vanesa; Fabiano, Elena; Noya, Francisco

    2016-10-01

    Crude glycerol obtained as a by-product of biodiesel production is a reliable feedstock with the potential to be converted into reduced chemicals with high yields. It has been previously shown that ethanol is the primary product of glycerol fermentation by Escherichia coli. However, few efforts were made to enhance this conversion by means of the expression of heterologous genes with the potential to improve glycerol transport or metabolism. In this study, a fosmid-based metagenomic library constructed from an anaerobic reactor purge sludge was screened for genetic elements that promote the use and fermentation of crude glycerol by E. coli. One clone was selected based on its improved growth rate on this feedstock. The corresponding fosmid, named G1, was fully sequenced (41 kbp long) and the gene responsible for the observed phenotype was pinpointed by in vitro insertion mutagenesis. Ethanol production from both pure and crude glycerol was evaluated using the parental G1 clone harboring the ethanologenic plasmid pLOI297 or the industrial strain LY180 complemented with G1. In mineral salts media containing 50 % (v/v) pure glycerol, ethanol concentrations increased two-fold on average when G1 was present in the cells reaching up to 20 g/L after 24 h fermentation. Similar fermentation experiments were done using crude instead of pure glycerol. With an initial OD620 of 8.0, final ethanol concentrations after 24 h were much higher reaching 67 and 75 g/L with LY180 cells carrying the control fosmid or the G1 fosmid, respectively. This translates into a specific ethanol production rate of 0.39 g h(-1) OD(-1) L(-1). PMID:27522660

  12. ETHANOL PRECIPITATION OF GLYCOSYL HYDROLASES PRODUCED BY Trichoderma harzianum P49P11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Mariño

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis study aimed to concentrate glycosyl hydrolases produced by Trichoderma harzianum P49P11 by ethanol precipitation. The variables tested besides ethanol concentration were temperature and pH. The precipitation with 90% (v/v ethanol at pH 5.0 recovered more than 98% of the xylanase activity, regard less of the temperature (5.0, 15.0, or 25.0 °C. The maximum recovery of cellulase activity as FPase was 77% by precipitation carried out at this same pH and ethanol concentration but at 5.0 °C. Therefore, ethanol precipitation can be considered to be an efficient technique for xylanase concentration and, to a certain extent, also for the cellulase complex.

  13. Brain catalase mediates potentiation of social recognition memory produced by ethanol in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Héctor M; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2005-09-01

    The involvement of catalase in ethanol-induced locomotion has been clearly proven. However, studies addressing the role of this enzyme in the effects that ethanol exerts on memory are lacking. In the present study, the social recognition test (SRT) was used to evaluate ethanol effects on memory. In this test, the reduction in investigation time of a juvenile conspecific, when this social stimulus is presented for the second time, is considered a reliable index of memory. Exploration ratios (ER) were calculated to evaluate the recognition capacity of mice. Ethanol (0.0, 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5g/kg, i.p.) was administered immediately after the first juvenile presentation, and 2h later the juvenile was re-exposed to the adult. Additionally, adult mice received aminotriazole (AT) or sodium azide (two catalase inhibitors) 5h or 30 min before juvenile presentation, respectively. Ethanol (1.0 and 1.5g/kg) was able to reduce ER, indicating an improving effect on memory. This improvement was prevented by either AT or sodium azide pre-treatment. However, neither AT nor sodium azide attenuated the memory-enhancing capacity of NMDA or nicotine, suggesting a specific interaction between catalase inhibitors and ethanol in their effects on memory. The present results suggest that brain catalase activity could mediate the memory-enhancing capacity of ethanol and add further support to the idea that this enzyme mediates some of the psychopharmacological effects produced by ethanol. PMID:16102377

  14. Production and the application of anaerobic granular sludge produced by landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Sludge granulation is considered to be the most critical parameter governing successful operation of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket and expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactors. Pre-granulated seeding sludge could greatly reduce the required start-up time. Two lab-scale and a pilot-scale EGSB reactors were operated to treat Shaoxing Wastewater Treatment Plant containing wastewater from real engineering printing and dyeing with high pH and sulfate concentration. The microbiological structure and the particle size distribution in aerobic excess sludge, sanitary landfill sludge digested for one year, and the granular sludge of EGSB reactor after 400 d of operation were analyzed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and sieves. The lab-scale EGSB reactor seeded with anaerobic sludge after digestion for one year in landfill showed obviously better total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal efficiency than one seeded with aerobic excess sludge after cation polyacrylamide flocculation-concentration and dehydration. The TCOD removed was 470.8 mg/L in pilot scale EGSB reactor at short hydraulic retention time of 15 h. SEM of sludge granules showed that the microbiological structure of the sludge from different sources showed some differences. SEM demonstrated that Methanobacterium sp. was present in the granules of pilot-scale EGSB and the granular sludge produced by landfill contained a mixture of anaerobic/anoxic organisms in abundance. The particle size distribution in EGSB demonstrated that using anaerobic granular sludge produced by sanitary landfill as the seeding granular sludge was feasible.

  15. 2015 Survey of Non-Starch Ethanol and Renewable Hydrocarbon Biofuels Producers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, Amy [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Warner, Ethan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lewis, John [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-22

    In order to understand the anticipated status of the industry for non-starch ethanol and renewable hydrocarbon biofuels as of the end of calendar year 2015, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted its first annual survey update of U.S. non-starch ethanol and renewable hydrocarbon biofuels producers. This report presents the results of this survey, describes the survey methodology, and documents important changes since the 2013 survey.

  16. Micro-aerobic, anaerobic and two-stage condition for ethanol production by Enterobacter aerogenes from biodiesel-derived crude glycerol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saisaard, Kanokrat; Angelidaki, Irini; Prasertsan, Poonsuk

    2011-01-01

    The microbial production of ethanol from biodiesel-derived crude glycerol by Enterobacter aerogenes TISTR1468, under micro-aerobic and anaerobic conditions, was investigated. The experimental results showed that micro-aerobic conditions were more favorable for cellular growth (4.0 g/L DCW), ethan...

  17. Chronic ethanol consumption in rats produces opioid antinociceptive tolerance through inhibition of mu opioid receptor endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li He

    Full Text Available It is well known that the mu-opioid receptor (MOR plays an important role in the rewarding properties of ethanol. However, it is less clear how chronic ethanol consumption affects MOR signaling. Here, we demonstrate that rats with prolonged voluntary ethanol consumption develop antinociceptive tolerance to opioids. Signaling through the MOR is controlled at many levels, including via the process of endocytosis. Importantly, agonists at the MOR that promote receptor endocytosis, such as the endogenous peptides enkephalin and β-endorphin, show a reduced propensity to promote antinociceptive tolerance than do agonists, like morphine, which do not promote receptor endocytosis. These observations led us to examine whether chronic ethanol consumption produced opioid tolerance by interfering with MOR endocytosis. Indeed, here we show that chronic ethanol consumption inhibits the endocytosis of MOR in response to opioid peptide. This loss of endocytosis was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in G protein coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2 protein levels after chronic drinking, suggesting that loss of this component of the trafficking machinery could be a mechanism by which endocytosis is lost. We also found that MOR coupling to G-protein was decreased in ethanol-drinking rats, providing a functional explanation for loss of opioid antinociception. Together, these results suggest that chronic ethanol drinking alters the ability of MOR to endocytose in response to opioid peptides, and consequently, promotes tolerance to the effects of opioids.

  18. Utilization of Soft Wood Wastes as a Feed Stock to Produce Fuel Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan M. Khalil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The current research investigated the utilization of soft wood waste as a feedstock to produce a value-added product-fuel ethanol. Approach: The main issue in converting soft wood waste to fuel ethanol is the accessibility of the polysaccharides for breaking down into monosaccharides. This study focused on the use of steam as the pretreatment method. The governing factors for the effectiveness of steam pretreatment are steam temperature and retention times. Following steam pretreatment, soft wood waste was subjected to acid hydrolysis. The sugars released by acid hydrolysis were fermented in series chemical reactions that convert sugars to ethanol. The fermentation reaction was caused by yeast, which feed on the sugars. Results: Steam pretreatment was able to improve both glucose yields from acid hydrolysis and ethanol yields from fermentation. The results obtained from this study showed that steam pretreated soft wood waste are a heterogeneous material. So biomass goes through a size-reduction step to make it easier to handle and to make the ethanol production process more efficient. Steam treatment on soft wood waste increased the hydrolysis of cellulose by acid hydrolysis. Following 24 h of diluted or concentrated acid hydrolysis, a maximum cellulose conversion of 20.5% was obtained. Similarly, sugars to ethanol conversions were improved by steam treatment. Maximum sugar to ethanol conversion of 40.7% was observed. Conclusion: It was recommended that the hydrolysis process be done for 40 min to obtain the maximum sugars yield in a reasonable period of time.

  19. Integrated systems of producing feed and ethanol from fractionated maize silage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh, D.; Mowat, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    Systems were designed, simulated and analyzed to assess the economic feasibility of producing ethanol from high-moisture grain, gradually separated from mature whole-plant maize silage. The residual stover fraction containing some grain fines was fed, along with ethanol production by-products (stillage or maize gluten feed), to growing steers. Three systems were compared. In the control, regular maize silage was fed to growing steers with extra maize harvested later and sold as grain for cash. In one alternative (system 2), the separated grain fraction was processed to ethanol and stillage at a local farmer-cooperative plant. In another alternative (system 3), the grain fraction was transferred to a regional industrial plant for wet milling to ethanol, corn gluten-feed and other products. System comparisons were based on estimating gross costs per farm during 1980 to 1982, minus credits for products such as grain maize (control) and ethanol (alternative systems). System 3 was the more attractive alternative. When ethanol was valued at wholesale prices for regular leaded gasoline, these costs were similar in 1981 and 1982 for System 3 and the control. Further refinements of a separation unit, and detailed assessment of the feeding value of the stover fraction plus stillage or corn gluten feed, are warranted. 17 references.

  20. Accounting for all sugars produced during integrated production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Daniel J; Dowe, Nancy; Chapeaux, Alexandre; Nelson, Robert S; Jennings, Edward W

    2016-04-01

    Accurate mass balance and conversion data from integrated operation is needed to fully elucidate the economics of biofuel production processes. This study explored integrated conversion of corn stover to ethanol and highlights techniques for accurate yield calculations. Acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) produced in a pilot-scale reactor was enzymatically hydrolyzed and the resulting sugars were fermented to ethanol by the glucose-xylose fermenting bacteria, Zymomonas mobilis 8b. The calculations presented here account for high solids operation and oligomeric sugars produced during pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation, which, if not accounted for, leads to overestimating ethanol yields. The calculations are illustrated for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of PCS at 17.5% and 20.0% total solids achieving 80.1% and 77.9% conversion of cellulose and xylan to ethanol and ethanol titers of 63g/L and 69g/L, respectively. These procedures will be employed in the future and the resulting information used for techno-economic analysis.

  1. Accounting for all sugars produced during integrated production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, Daniel J; Dowe, Nancy; Chapeaux, Alexandre; Nelson, Robert S; Jennings, Edward W

    2016-04-01

    Accurate mass balance and conversion data from integrated operation is needed to fully elucidate the economics of biofuel production processes. This study explored integrated conversion of corn stover to ethanol and highlights techniques for accurate yield calculations. Acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) produced in a pilot-scale reactor was enzymatically hydrolyzed and the resulting sugars were fermented to ethanol by the glucose-xylose fermenting bacteria, Zymomonas mobilis 8b. The calculations presented here account for high solids operation and oligomeric sugars produced during pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation, which, if not accounted for, leads to overestimating ethanol yields. The calculations are illustrated for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of PCS at 17.5% and 20.0% total solids achieving 80.1% and 77.9% conversion of cellulose and xylan to ethanol and ethanol titers of 63g/L and 69g/L, respectively. These procedures will be employed in the future and the resulting information used for techno-economic analysis. PMID:26826954

  2. Determining the cost of producing ethanol from corn starch and lignocellulosic feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAloon, Andrew [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington D.C. (United States); Taylor, Frank [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington D.C. (United States); Yee, Winnie [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington D.C. (United States); Ibsen, Kelly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wooley, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2000-10-01

    This report describes the comparison of the processes, each producing 25 million annual gallons of fuel ethanol. This paper attempts to compare the two processes as mature technologies, which requires assuming that the technology improvements needed to make the lignocellulosic process commercializable are achieved, and enough plants have been built to make the design well-understood.

  3. 2013 Survey of Non-Starch Ethanol and Renewable Hydrocarbon Biofuels Producers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, A.; Geiger, J.; Lewis, J.

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the status of the industry for non-starch ethanol and renewable hydrocarbon biofuels as of the end of calendar year 2013, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted the first of what is anticipated to be an annual survey of U.S. non-starch ethanol and renewable hydrocarbon biofuels producers. This report presents the results of this initial survey and describes the survey methodology. Subsequent surveys will report on the progress over time of the development of these facilities and companies.

  4. Ethanol production from wet-exploded wheat straw hydrolysate by thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1 in a continuous immobilized reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2008-01-01

    to sugar mixtures of glucose and xylose ranging from 12 to 41 g/l. The organism, thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1, exhibited significant resistance to high levels of acetic acid (up to 10 g/l) and other metabolic inhibitors present in the hydrolysate. Although the hydrolysate...... was not detoxified, ethanol yield in a range of 0.39-0.42 g/g was obtained. Overall, sugar efficiency to ethanol was 68-76%. The reactor was operated continuously for approximately 143 days, and no contamination was seen without the use of any agent for preventing bacterial infections. The tested microorganism has...

  5. Simultaneous co-fermentation of mixed sugars: a promising strategy for producing cellulosic ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Rin; Ha, Suk-Jin; Wei, Na; Oh, Eun Joong; Jin, Yong-Su

    2012-05-01

    The lack of microbial strains capable of fermenting all sugars prevalent in plant cell wall hydrolyzates to ethanol is a major challenge. Although naturally existing or engineered microorganisms can ferment mixed sugars (glucose, xylose and galactose) in these hydrolyzates sequentially, the preferential utilization of glucose to non-glucose sugars often results in lower overall yield and productivity of ethanol. Therefore, numerous metabolic engineering approaches have been attempted to construct optimal microorganisms capable of co-fermenting mixed sugars simultaneously. Here, we present recent findings and breakthroughs in engineering yeast for improved ethanol production from mixed sugars. In particular, this review discusses new sugar transporters, various strategies for simultaneous co-fermentation of mixed sugars, and potential applications of co-fermentation for producing fuels and chemicals. PMID:22356718

  6. Applying Adaptive Agricultural Management & Industrial Ecology Principles to Produce Lower- Carbon Ethanol from California Energy Beets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiades, Anthy Maria

    The life cycle assessment of a proposed beet-to-ethanol pathway demonstrates how agricultural management and industrial ecology principles can be applied to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, minimize agrochemical inputs and waste, provide ecosystem services and yield a lower-carbon fuel from a highly land-use efficient, first-generation feedstock cultivated in California. Beets grown in California have unique potential as a biofuel feedstock. A mature agricultural product with well-developed supply chains, beet-sugar production in California has contracted over recent decades, leaving idle production capacity and forcing growers to seek other crops for use in rotation or find a new market for beets. California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) faces risk of steeply-rising compliance costs, as greenhouse gas reduction targets in the transportation sector were established assuming commercial volumes of lower-carbon fuels from second-generation feedstocks -- such as residues, waste, algae and cellulosic crops -- would be available by 2020. The expected shortfall of cellulosic ethanol has created an immediate need to develop lower-carbon fuels from readily available feedstocks using conventional conversion technologies. The life cycle carbon intensity of this ethanol pathway is less than 28 gCO2e/MJEthanol: a 72% reduction compared to gasoline and 19% lower than the most efficient corn ethanol pathway (34 gCO2e/MJ not including indirect land use change) approved under LCFS. The system relies primarily on waste-to-energy resources; nearly 18 gCO2e/MJ are avoided by using renewable heat and power generated from anaerobic digestion of fermentation stillage and gasification of orchard residues to meet 88% of the facility's steam demand. Co-products displace 2 gCO2e/MJ. Beet cultivation is the largest source of emissions, contributing 15 gCO 2e/MJ. The goal of the study is to explore opportunities to minimize carbon intensity of beet-ethanol and investigate the potential

  7. Thermo tolerant and ethanol producing saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants using gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene manipulation now plays the main role in fermentation industries. However, throughout ethanol production processes, it appeared the requirements for the selection of higher-producing isolate(s) associated, at the same time, with heat-resistant to overcome higher degrees above 30-35 degree, a step which, actually, will reduce final - producing costs. A total of 43 yeast isolates were selected, after exposure of the strain saccharomyces cervisiae to different doses of gamma radiation. Isolated varied in colony size from the original strain as well as among themselves. These isolates were screened for their ability to grow on glucose and supplemented cane molasses media at 30 degree and 40 degree. Out fo them, only 13 isolates proved to grow well on 40 degree. Furthermore, determination of ethanol production by each of these mutants revealed that yielded in general, 16 to 52.0% increase in alcohol production at 40 degree on cane molasses medium (17.5% w/v initial sugars), compared to the original strain. At 40 degree, maximum ethanol yield was 0.63 coupled with 9.5% ethanol concentration and 85.1% sugar conversion which represents 40, 46.2 and 3.4% increase, respectively from the parental strain

  8. An integrated process to produce ethanol, vanillin, and xylooligosaccharides from Camellia oleifera shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junjun; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Faxian; Xu, Yong; Ouyang, Jia; Yu, Shiyuan

    2013-12-15

    This study aims to present an integrated process that can be used to produce ethanol, vanillin, and xylooligosaccharides from Camellia oleifera shell. After the shell was pretreated with NaOH, two fractions were obtained: solid and liquid fractions. The solid fraction was hydrolyzed with cellulase and then fermented with Pichia stipitis to produce ethanol. The liquid fraction was subjected to oxidation to prepare vanillin or hydrolysis with xylanase to prepare xylooligosaccharides. The optimal pretreatment conditions of an orthogonal test were as follows: 12% NaOH concentration; 120°C; 150 min; and liquid-solid ratio of 10.0. After pretreatment, the solid fraction containing cellulose and a small part of xylan at 10% substance concentration via enzymatic hydrolysis and glucose-xylose cofermentation could obtain 17.35 g/L of ethanol, 80.90% of the theoretical yield. The liquid fraction was initially hydrolyzed with xylanase to produce 1758.63 mg/L of xylooligosaccharides (DP2-6) and then oxidized to produce 322.07 mg/L of vanillin.

  9. ANAEROBIC CO-TREATMENT OF LEACHATES PRODUCED IN A BIODEGRADABLE URBAN SOLID WASTE COMPOSTING PLANT IN MEXICO CITY

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, J; G. Montaño; C FAJARDO; Meraz, M.; P. Castilla

    2013-01-01

    In this work the anaerobic co-treatment of the leachates produced during urban solid biodegradable wastes composting diluted with municipal wastewater, was investigated. Leachates produced during the first 30 days of garbage composting contained 102.1 g COD L-1, 20 g VFA L-1, acid pH and 0.64 g NHt-N L-l. Instead, leachates that remained for 3 months the composting plant after being produced contained 15.8 g COD L-1,2.35 g VFA L-1, a pH near neutrality and 5.36 g NHt-N L-l. An anaerobic zeoli...

  10. Reforming of Ethanol to Produce Hydrogen over PtRuMg/ZrO2 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Y. Z. Chiou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified PtRu/ZrO2 catalyst with Mg is evaluated for the oxidative steam reforming of ethanol (OSRE and the steam reforming of ethanol (SRE. In order to understand the variation in the reaction mechanism on OSRE and SRE, further analysis of both fresh and used catalyst is concentrated on for TEM, TG, Raman, and TPR characterization. The results show that the OSRE reaction requires a higher temperature (∼390°C to achieve 100% ethanol conversion than the SRE reaction (∼2500°C. The distribution of CO is minor for both reactions (< 5% for OSRE, < 1% for SRE. This demonstrates that the water gas shift (WGS reaction is an important side-reaction in the reforming of ethanol to produce H2 and CO2. A comparison of the temperature of WGS (WGS shows it is lower for the SRE reaction (WGS∼250°C for SRE, ~340°C for OSRE.

  11. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Biofuels (Ethanol and Biodiesel) and Proposed Biofuels (n-Propanol, iso-Propanol, n-Butanol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel, are a growing component of the nation’s fuel supply. Ethanol is the primary biofuel in the US market, distributed as a blend with petroleum gasoline, in concentrations ranging from 10% ethanol (E10) to 85% ethanol (E85). Biodiesel, made fr...

  12. Coenzyme B12 can be produced by engineered Escherichia coli under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yeounjoo; Ashok, Somasundar; Ainala, Satish Kumar; Sankaranarayanan, Mugesh; Chun, Ah Yeong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Park, Sunghoon

    2014-12-01

    Coenzyme B12 (Vitamin B12 ) is one of the most complex biomolecules and an essential cofactor required for the catalytic activity of many enzymes. Pseudomonas denitrificans synthesizes coenzyme B12 in an oxygen-dependent manner using a pathway encoded by more than 25 genes that are located in six different operons. Escherichia coli, a robust and suitable host for metabolic engineering was used to produce coenzyme B12 . These genes were cloned into three compatible plasmids and expressed heterologously in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE analysis and bioassay showed that the recombinant E. coli expressed the coenzyme B12 synthetic genes and successfully produced coenzyme B12 . However, according to the quantitative determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, the amount of coenzyme B12 produced by the recombinant E. coli (0.21 ± 0.02 μg/g cdw) was approximately 13-fold lower than that by P. denitrificans (2.75 ± 0.22 μg/g cdw). Optimization of the culture conditions to improve the production of coenzyme B12 by the recombinant E. coli was successful, and the highest titer (0.65 ± 0.03 μg/g cdw) of coenzyme B12 was obtained. Interestingly, although the synthesis of coenzyme B12 in P. denitrificans is strictly oxygen-dependent, the recombinant E. coli could produce coenzyme B12 under anaerobic conditions.

  13. Ethanol withdrawal is required to produce persisting N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-dependent hippocampal cytotoxicity during chronic intermittent ethanol exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Anna R.; Berry, B. Jennifer N.; Sharrett-Field, Lynda; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intermittent ethanol consumption is associated with neurodegeneration and cognitive deficits in preclinical laboratory animals and in the clinical population. While previous work suggests a role for neuroadaptations in the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the development of ethanol dependence and manifestation of withdrawal, the relative roles of ethanol exposure and ethanol withdrawal in producing these effects have not been fully characterized. To examine underlying cytotoxic mechanisms associated with CIE exposure, organotypic hippocampal slices were exposed to 1–3 cycles of ethanol (50 mM) in cell culture medium for 5 days, followed by 24-hours of ethanol withdrawal in which a portion of slices were exposed to competitive NMDA receptor antagonist (2R)-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV; 40 µM). Cytotoxicity was assessed using immunohistochemical labeling of neuron specific nuclear protein (NeuN; Fox-3), a marker of mature neurons, and thionine (2%) staining of Nissl bodies. Multiple cycles of CIE produced neurotoxicity, as reflected in persisting losses of neuron NeuN immunoreactivity and thionine staining in each of the primary cell layers of the hippocampal formation. Hippocampi aged in vitro were significantly more sensitive to the toxic effects of multiple CIEs than were non-aged hippocampi. This effect was not demonstrated in slices exposed to continuous ethanol, in the absence of withdrawal, or to a single exposure/withdrawal regimen. Exposure to APV significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity observed in the primary cell layers of the hippocampus. The present findings suggest that ethanol withdrawal is required to produce NMDA receptor-dependent hippocampal cytotoxicity, particularly in the aging hippocampus in vitro. PMID:25746220

  14. 40 CFR 80.1155 - What are the additional requirements for a producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., 40 CFR part 32, or the Debarment, Suspension and Ineligibility provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulations, 48 CFR, part 9, subpart 9.4, shall be deemed noncompliance with the requirements of this section... for a producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol? 80.1155 Section...

  15. 高温CSTR-中温UASB两级厌氧处理木薯酒精废水%Two-stage anaerobic treatment of cassava ethanol wastewater using thermophilic CSTR and mesophilic UASB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈金荣; 谢丽; 罗刚; 周琪

    2011-01-01

    Since cassava ethanol wastewater is characterized by high temperature,high solid content and high organism concentration,the two-stage anaerobic treatment using thermophilic continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR)and mesophilic upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) has been conducted. Experimental results show that when the influent COD loading of thermophilic CSTR is controlled 14 kg/(m3·d) and COD loading of mesophilic UASB reactor is controlled 3 kg/(m3·d) ,the total removal rates of COD,SS,TN and TP are 94% ,96% ,44% and 87% ,respectively, after the two-stage anaerobic treatment.The life cycle of cassava ethanol production and economic benefits of such wastewater treatment are discussed,indicating that two-stage anaerobic treatment process can not only reduce the pollution resulted from cassava ethanol production, but also create economic benefits from the biogas produced in the course of treatment.%针对木薯酒精废水温度、固体含量及有机物浓度高的特点,采用高温CSTR-中温UASB两级厌氧工艺处理木薯酒精废水.小试结果表明,控制高温CSTR进水COD负荷为14 kg/(m3·d),中温UASB COD负荷为3 kg/(m3·d)时,两级厌氧对COD、SS、溶解性TN、溶解性TP的总去除率分别达94%、96%、44%和87%.对木薯酒精生产周期和废水处理经济效益的分析表明,采用两级厌氧工艺处理木薯酒精废水,不仅削减了木薯酒精生产过程中产生的污染物,其处理过程中产生的沼气还带来了一定的经济效益.

  16. Potential of Biogas Power Plant Produced by Anaerobic Digestion of Biodegradable Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Shuhada Ghazali

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biogas typically refers to a gas produced by the breakdown of organic matter in the absence of oxygen. It is a renewable energy source, like solar and wind energy. Furthermore, biogas can be produced from regionally available raw materials and recycled waste and is environmentally friendly and CO2 neutral. Biogas is produced by the anaerobic digestion or fermentation of biodegradable materials such as manure, sewage, municipal waste, green waste, plant material, and crops. Biogas comprises primarily methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2 and may have small amounts of hydrogen sulphide (H2S, moisture and siloxanes. The gases methane, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide (CO can be combusted or oxidized with oxygen. This energy release allows biogas to be used as a fuel. Biogas can be compressed, much like natural gas, and used to power motor vehicles. Biogas is a renewable fuel so it qualifies for renewable energy subsidies in some parts of the world. Biogas can also be cleaned and upgraded to natural gas standards when it becomes bio methane. This paper will discuss the potential of biogas in order to provide a clean, easily controlled source of renewable energy from organic waste materials for a small labour input, replacing firewood or fossil fuels which are becoming more expensive as supply falls behind demand.

  17. Chronic ethanol exposure produces tolerance to elevations in neuroactive steroids: Mechanisms and reversal by exogenous ACTH

    OpenAIRE

    Boyd, Kevin N.; Kumar, Sandeep; O'Buckley, Todd K.; Morrow, A. Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Acute ethanol administration increases potent GABAergic neuroactive steroids, specifically (3α,5α)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THP) and (3α,5α)-3,21-dihydroxypregnan-20-one. In addition, neuroactive steroids contribute to ethanol actions. Chronic ethanol exposure results in tolerance to many effects of ethanol, including ethanol-induced increases in neuroactive steroid levels. To determine the mechanisms of tolerance to ethanol-induced increases in neuroactive steroids, we investigated cri...

  18. Life Cycle Environmental Impacts of Electricity from Biogas Produced by Anaerobic Digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusi, Alessandra; Bacenetti, Jacopo; Fiala, Marco; Azapagic, Adisa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate life cycle environmental impacts associated with the generation of electricity from biogas produced by the anaerobic digestion (AD) of agricultural products and waste. Five real plants in Italy were considered, using maize silage, slurry, and tomato waste as feedstocks and cogenerating electricity and heat; the latter is not utilized. The results suggest that maize silage and the operation of anaerobic digesters, including open storage of digestate, are the main contributors to the impacts of biogas electricity. The system that uses animal slurry is the best option, except for the marine and terrestrial ecotoxicity. The results also suggest that it is environmentally better to have smaller plants using slurry and waste rather than bigger installations, which require maize silage to operate efficiently. Electricity from biogas is environmentally more sustainable than grid electricity for seven out of 11 impacts considered. However, in comparison with natural gas, biogas electricity is worse for seven out of 11 impacts. It also has mostly higher impacts than other renewables, with a few exceptions, notably solar photovoltaics. Thus, for the AD systems and mesophilic operating conditions considered in this study, biogas electricity can help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relative to a fossil-intensive electricity mix; however, some other impacts increase. If mitigation of climate change is the main aim, other renewables have a greater potential to reduce GHG emissions. If, in addition to this, other impacts are considered, then hydro, wind, and geothermal power are better alternatives to biogas electricity. However, utilization of heat would improve significantly its environmental sustainability, particularly global warming potential, summer smog, and the depletion of abiotic resources and the ozone layer. Further improvements can be achieved by banning open digestate storage to prevent methane emissions and regulating

  19. Life cycle environmental impacts of electricity from biogas produced by anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eFusi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate life cycle environmental impacts associated with the generation of electricity from biogas produced by the anaerobic digestion of agricultural products and waste. Five real plants in Italy were considered, using maize silage, slurry and tomato waste as feedstocks and co-generating electricity and heat; the latter is not utilized. The results suggest that maize silage and the operation of anaerobic digesters, including open storage of digestate, are the main contributors to the impacts of biogas electricity. The system which uses animal slurry is the best option, except for the marine and terrestrial eco-toxicity. The results also suggest that it is environmentally better to have smaller plants using slurry and waste rather than bigger installations which require maize silage to operate efficiently. Electricity from biogas is environmentally more sustainable than grid electricity for seven out of 11 impacts considered. However, in comparison with natural gas, biogas electricity is worse for seven out of 11 impacts. It also has mostly higher impacts than other renewables, with a few exceptions, notably solar photovoltaics. Thus, for the AD systems and mesophilic operating conditions considered in this study, biogas electricity can help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG emissions relative to a fossil-intensive electricity mix; however, some other impacts increase. If mitigation of climate change is the main aim, other renewables have a greater potential to reduce GHG emissions. If, in addition to this, other impacts are considered, then hydro, wind and geothermal power are better alternatives to biogas electricity. However, utilization of heat would improve significantly its environmental sustainability, particularly global warming potential, summer smog and the depletion of abiotic resources and the ozone layer. Further improvements can be achieved by banning open digestate storage to prevent methane emissions and

  20. The feasibility of producing adequate feedstock for year–round cellulosic ethanol production in an intensive agricultural fuelshed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uden, Daniel R.; Mitchell, Rob B.; Allen, Craig R.; Guan, Qingfeng; McCoy, Tim D.

    2013-01-01

    To date, cellulosic ethanol production has not been commercialized in the United States. However, government mandates aimed at increasing second-generation biofuel production could spur exploratory development in the cellulosic ethanol industry. We conducted an in-depth analysis of the fuelshed surrounding a starch-based ethanol plant near York, Nebraska that has the potential for cellulosic ethanol production. To assess the feasibility of supplying adequate biomass for year-round cellulosic ethanol production from residual maize (Zea mays) stover and bioenergy switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) within a 40-km road network service area of the existing ethanol plant, we identified ∼14,000 ha of marginally productive cropland within the service area suitable for conversion from annual rowcrops to switchgrass and ∼132,000 ha of maize-enrolled cropland from which maize stover could be collected. Annual maize stover and switchgrass biomass supplies within the 40-km service area could range between 429,000 and 752,000 metric tons (mT). Approximately 140–250 million liters (l) of cellulosic ethanol could be produced, rivaling the current 208 million l annual starch-based ethanol production capacity of the plant. We conclude that sufficient quantities of biomass could be produced from maize stover and switchgrass near the plant to support year-round cellulosic ethanol production at current feedstock yields, sustainable removal rates and bioconversion efficiencies. Modifying existing starch-based ethanol plants in intensive agricultural fuelsheds could increase ethanol output, return marginally productive cropland to perennial vegetation, and remove maize stover from productive cropland to meet feedstock demand.

  1. Enrichment and hydrogen production by marine anaerobic hydrogen-producing microflora

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI JinLing; WANG GuangCe; LI YanChuan; ZHU DaLing; PAN GuangHua

    2009-01-01

    Acid,alkali,heat-shock,KNO3 and control pretreatment methods applied to anaerobic sludge were evaluated for their ability to selectively enrich the marine hydrogen-producing mixed microflora.Seawater culture medium was used as the substrate.The hydrogen yield of pretreated microflora was higher than that of the un-pretreated control (P<0.05).Among the pretreatment methods studied,heat-shock pretreatment yielded the greatest hydrogen production,which was 14.6 times that of the control.When the effect of initial pH on hydrogen production of heat-shock pretreated samples was studied,hydrogen was produced over the entire pH range (pH 4-10).The hydrogen yield peaked at initial pH 8 (79 mL/g sucrose) and then steadily decreased as the initial pH increased.Sucrose consumption was high at neutral initial pH.During the process of hydrogen production,pH decreased gradually,which indicated that the acquired microflora consisted of acidogenic bacteria.

  2. Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus sp. nov., an anaerobic, extreme thermophilic, high ethanol-yielding bacterium isolated from household waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás, Ana Faria; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    and xylose, but not cellulose, Avicel®, mannitol, inositol, glycerol, acetate, lactate, ethanol, butanol or peptone. Ethanol was the major fermentation product and a maximum yield of 1.39 mol of ethanol per mol xylose was achieved when sulphite was added to the cultivation medium. Thiosulphite...

  3. Selection of hemicellulosic hydrolysate pretreatments and fermentation conditions to stimulate xylitol protection by ethanol-producing yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Converti, A. [Ist. di Ingegneria Chimica e di Processo `G.B. Bonino`, Facolta di Ingegneria, Univ. degli Studi di Genova (Italy); Del Borghi, M. [Ist. di Ingegneria Chimica e di Processo `G.B. Bonino`, Facolta di Ingegneria, Univ. degli Studi di Genova (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    Xylitol production from hardwood hemicellulosic hydrolysates by well-known ethanol-producing yeasts was stimulated through an experimental schedule including pretreatments of the hydrolysate, the choice of the best xylitol producer and the selection of the optimum fermentation conditions. The xylitol or ethanol yields obtained on consumed xylose demonstrated that their production was stimulated under completely different conditions, as to be expected by the fact that these catabolites are the final products of different metabolic pathways. In particular, the catabolism of Pachysolen tannophilus, that is the best ethanol producer from this natural substrate, could be targeted towards xylitol rather than towards ethanol production by ensuring a strongly reducing environment through a suitable pretreatment of the hydrolysate. The final removal of fermentation inhibitors by adsorption onto highly adsorbing substances allowed a further 20% xylitol yield increase. (orig.)

  4. A genome shuffling-generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolate that ferments xylose and glucose to produce high levels of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingping, Ge; Hongbing, Sun; Gang, Song; Hongzhi, Ling; Wenxiang, Ping

    2012-05-01

    Genome shuffling is an efficient approach for the rapid improvement of industrially important microbial phenotypes. This report describes optimized conditions for protoplast preparation, regeneration, inactivation, and fusion using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae W5 strain. Ethanol production was confirmed by TTC (triphenyl tetrazolium chloride) screening and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A genetically stable, high ethanol-producing strain that fermented xylose and glucose was obtained following three rounds of genome shuffling. After fermentation for 84 h, the high ethanol-producing S. cerevisiae GS3-10 strain (which utilized 69.48 and 100% of the xylose and glucose stores, respectively) produced 26.65 g/L ethanol, i.e., 47.08% higher than ethanol production by S. cerevisiae W5 (18.12 g/L). The utilization ratios of xylose and glucose were 69.48 and 100%, compared to 14.83 and 100% for W5, respectively. The ethanol yield was 0.40 g/g (ethanol/consumed glucose and xylose), i.e., 17.65% higher than the yield by S. cerevisiae W5 (0.34 g/g). PMID:22270888

  5. Combining protein extraction and anaerobic digestion to produce feed, fuel and fertilizer from green biomass – An organic biorefinery concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Maria Santamaria; Salces, Beatriz Molinuevo; Lübeck, Mette;

    Organically grown green biomass (red clover, clover grass) was investigated as a resource for organic feed and organic fertilizer by combination of proteins extraction and anaerobic digestion of the residues. Extraction of proteins from both crops revealed very favourable amino acid composition...... for the use as animal feed. The residual 90% of organic matter, leaving the separation as solid press cake and brown juice was subjected to anaerobic digestion to produce biogas and fertilizer. Methane yields of 220-310 and 430-540 ml CH4/g VS were obtained for press cake and brown juice, respectively....... No inhibition was detected but the adaptation of microorganisms in the case of the press cake and the substrate overload in the case of the brown juice played a major role for efficient conversion of both fractions during the anaerobic digestion process....

  6. Process stability and microbial community structure in anaerobic hydrogen-producing microflora from food waste containing kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Ji Hye; Jeon, Che Ok; Lee, Dae Sung; Park, Jong Moon

    2007-09-15

    Hydrogen production by the dark fermentation of food wastes is an economic and environmentally friendly technology to produce the clean energy source as well as to treat the problematic wastes. However, the long-term operations of the continuous anaerobic reactor for fermentative hydrogen production were frequently unstable. In this study, the structure of microbial community within the anaerobic reactor during unstable hydrogen production was examined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) techniques. The changes in microbial community from H(2)-producing Clostridium spp. to lactic acid-producing Lactobacillus spp. were well coincident with the unexpected process failures and the changes of metabolites concentrations in the effluent of the anaerobic reactor. As the rate of hydrogen production decreased, effluent lactic acid concentration increased. Low rate of hydrogen production and changes in microbial community were related to the 'kimchi' content and storage temperature of food waste feed solution. After low temperature control of the storage tank of the feed solution, any significant change in microbial community within the anaerobic reactor did not occur and the hydrogen production was very stably maintained for a long time.

  7. Continuous Ethanol Fermentation of Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomasses, Waste Biomasses, Molasses and Syrup Using the Anaerobic, Thermophilic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter italicus Pentocrobe 411.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rasmus Lund; Jensen, Karen Møller; Mikkelsen, Marie Just

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellosic ethanol production is now at a stage where commercial or semi-commercial plants are coming online and, provided cost effective production can be achieved, lignocellulosic ethanol will become an important part of the world bio economy. However, challenges are still to be overcome throughout the process and particularly for the fermentation of the complex sugar mixtures resulting from the hydrolysis of hemicellulose. Here we describe the continuous fermentation of glucose, xylose and arabinose from non-detoxified pretreated wheat straw, birch, corn cob, sugar cane bagasse, cardboard, mixed bio waste, oil palm empty fruit bunch and frond, sugar cane syrup and sugar cane molasses using the anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter Pentocrobe 411. All fermentations resulted in close to maximum theoretical ethanol yields of 0.47-0.49 g/g (based on glucose, xylose, and arabinose), volumetric ethanol productivities of 1.2-2.7 g/L/h and a total sugar conversion of 90-99% including glucose, xylose and arabinose. The results solidify the potential of Thermoanaerobacter strains as candidates for lignocellulose bioconversion.

  8. Continuous Ethanol Fermentation of Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomasses, Waste Biomasses, Molasses and Syrup Using the Anaerobic, Thermophilic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter italicus Pentocrobe 411.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Lund Andersen

    Full Text Available Lignocellosic ethanol production is now at a stage where commercial or semi-commercial plants are coming online and, provided cost effective production can be achieved, lignocellulosic ethanol will become an important part of the world bio economy. However, challenges are still to be overcome throughout the process and particularly for the fermentation of the complex sugar mixtures resulting from the hydrolysis of hemicellulose. Here we describe the continuous fermentation of glucose, xylose and arabinose from non-detoxified pretreated wheat straw, birch, corn cob, sugar cane bagasse, cardboard, mixed bio waste, oil palm empty fruit bunch and frond, sugar cane syrup and sugar cane molasses using the anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter Pentocrobe 411. All fermentations resulted in close to maximum theoretical ethanol yields of 0.47-0.49 g/g (based on glucose, xylose, and arabinose, volumetric ethanol productivities of 1.2-2.7 g/L/h and a total sugar conversion of 90-99% including glucose, xylose and arabinose. The results solidify the potential of Thermoanaerobacter strains as candidates for lignocellulose bioconversion.

  9. Continuous Ethanol Fermentation of Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomasses, Waste Biomasses, Molasses and Syrup Using the Anaerobic, Thermophilic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter italicus Pentocrobe 411.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Rasmus Lund; Jensen, Karen Møller; Mikkelsen, Marie Just

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellosic ethanol production is now at a stage where commercial or semi-commercial plants are coming online and, provided cost effective production can be achieved, lignocellulosic ethanol will become an important part of the world bio economy. However, challenges are still to be overcome throughout the process and particularly for the fermentation of the complex sugar mixtures resulting from the hydrolysis of hemicellulose. Here we describe the continuous fermentation of glucose, xylose and arabinose from non-detoxified pretreated wheat straw, birch, corn cob, sugar cane bagasse, cardboard, mixed bio waste, oil palm empty fruit bunch and frond, sugar cane syrup and sugar cane molasses using the anaerobic, thermophilic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter Pentocrobe 411. All fermentations resulted in close to maximum theoretical ethanol yields of 0.47-0.49 g/g (based on glucose, xylose, and arabinose), volumetric ethanol productivities of 1.2-2.7 g/L/h and a total sugar conversion of 90-99% including glucose, xylose and arabinose. The results solidify the potential of Thermoanaerobacter strains as candidates for lignocellulose bioconversion. PMID:26295944

  10. Microbiological Diversity of the Anaerobic Sludge During Treatment of Venezuelan Oilfield Produced Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cajacuri María Patricia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation the microbial abundances in the granular sludge of two upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors (UASB were compared: the first one fed with production waters of light oil (31.1-39.0° API, from the zuliana region (Venezuela (APP and the second one with glucose. To this respect, the populations of glucose fermenting bacteria (BFG, acetogenic bacteria (BAC, metanogens (MET, sulfatereducing bacteria (BSR, nitrate-reducing bacteria (BNRand heterotrophic bacteria were monitored, using selective culture media. The microbial density was correlated with physicochemical parameters: pH, total alkalinity, COD, SO4 =, NO3-, as well as with the percentages of CH4, CO2 and N2in the biogas. The results exhibit significant differences between the microbial diversity of both reactors, with a proportion of BFG > BSR > MET > BAC > BNR for the glucose reactor and of MET > BNR > BAC > BSR > BFG for the APP. The abundance of bacteria in the glucose reactor was in the order of 108, whereas in the APP reactor was of 105, which ensues from the organic and mineral composition of effluents. The results presented in this study reach evidences on the population dynamics in sludge of UASB reactors, during the treatment of oilfield produced waters.

  11. Breakdown of food waste by anaerobic fermentation and non-oxygen producing photosynthesis using a photosynthetic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekjinda, N; Ritchie, R J

    2015-01-01

    Large volumes of food waste are produced by restaurants, hotels, etc generating problems in its collection, processing and disposal. Disposal as garbage increases the organic matter in landfills and leachates. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris (CGA 009) easily broke down food waste. R. palustris produces H2 under anaerobic conditions and digests a very wide range of organic compounds. R. palustris reduced BOD by ≈70% and COD by ≈33%, starch, ammonia, nitrate, was removed but had little effect on reducing sugar or the total phosphorus, lipid, protein, total solid in a 7-day incubation. R. palustris produced a maximum of 80ml H2/g COD/day. A two-stage anaerobic digestion using yeast as the first stage, followed by a R. palustris digestion was tested but production of H2 was low. PMID:25465509

  12. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided ethanol injection in aldosterone-producing adrenocortical adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, R.; Savastano, S.; Tommaselli, A.P. [Univ. of Naples (Italy)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    The feasibility, safety and effectiveness of percutaneous computed tomography-guided ethanol injection (PEI-CT) was investigated in a patient affected by aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). A 42-year-old male patient with typical features of hyperaldosteronism presented a solitary left adrenal adenoma measuring 2 cm, with a normal contralateral gland, evidenced by both CT scan and adrenal [{sup 75}Se-19]-nor-cholesterol scintigraphy. After normalization of potassium plasma levels, 4 ml of sterile 95% ethanol with 0.5 ml of 80% iothalamate sodium was injected. The procedure was completed in about 30 min. No severe pain or local complication was noted. Five hour after PEI, a fourfold and a twofold increase in aldosterone and cortisol plasma levels were observed, respectively. After 11 days on a normal sodium and potassium diet, normal potassium plasma levels and reduced aldosterone plasma levels were present, with reappearance of an aldosterone postural response. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone plasma levels normalized 1 month later, with reappearance also of a plasma renin activity postural response and maintenance of normal potassium plasma levels on a high sodium and normal potassium diet. The patient has remained hypertensive, although lower antihypertensive drug dosages have been employed. After 17 months, normal biochemical, hormonal and morphological findings were present. The authors suggested PEI-CT as a further alternative approach to surgery in the management of carefully selected patients with APA. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. The metabolic costs of improving ethanol yield by reducing glycerol formation capacity under anaerobic conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagliardini, Julien; Hubmann, Georg; Alfenore, Sandrine; Nevoigt, Elke; Bideaux, Carine; Guillouet, Stephane E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Finely regulating the carbon flux through the glycerol pathway by regulating the expression of the rate controlling enzyme, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH), has been a promising approach to redirect carbon from glycerol to ethanol and thereby increasing the ethanol yield in eth

  14. Improving isobutanol production in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli by co-producing ethanol and modulation of pentose phosphate pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zichun; Liu, Pingping; Xiao, Dongguang; Zhang, Xueli

    2016-06-01

    Redox imbalance has been regarded as the key limitation for anaerobic isobutanol production in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli strains. In this work, the ethanol synthetic pathway was recruited to solve the NADH redundant problem while the pentose phosphate pathway was modulated to solve the NADPH deficient problem for anaerobic isobutanol production. Recruiting the ethanol synthetic pathway in strain AS108 decreased isobutanol yield from 0.66 to 0.29 mol/mol glucose. It was found that there was a negative correlation between aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) activity and isobutanol production. Decreasing AdhE activity increased isobutanol yield from 0.29 to 0.6 mol/mol. On the other hand, modulation of the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene of the pentose phosphate pathway increased isobutanol yield from 0.29 to 0.41 mol/mol. Combination of these two strategies had a synergistic effect on improving isobutanol production. Isobutanol titer and yield of the best strain ZL021 were 53 mM and 0.74 mol/mol, which were 51 % and 12 % higher than the starting strain AS108, respectively. The total alcohol yield of strain ZL021 was 0.81 mol/mol, which was 23 % higher than strain AS108.

  15. Isolation, identification and optimization of ethanol producing bacteria from Saccharomyces-based fermentation process of alcohol industries in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Ebrahimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to the vast growth of world population, consumption of a lot of energy, limited energy supply and rising prices of fuel oil in the future, other alternative energy source is essential. Ethanol is renewable and a safe fuel and it is mainly based on microbial fermentation. The purpose of this study was isolation of high ethanol producing bacteria from the fermentation process of alcohol industries and optimization of growth conditions to be introduced to the industries. Materials and methods: The samples that were collected from fermentation tanks of alcohol industries were enriched in ZSM medium. To isolate the ethanol producing bacteria, the enriched culture was transferred on RMA agar. Bacterial growth conditions and their effects on ethanol production were optimized based on pH, growth temperature, agitation, fermentation time, initial substrate concentration and carbon and nitrogen sources. In addition, the morphological, physiological and molecular characterizations were investigated for identification of the isolates.Results: Three bacterial isolates ZYM7, ZYM8 and ZYM9 were isolated from fermentation tank. All isolates were able to produce ethanol 5.00, 7.60 and 4.00 gL-1 after 48 hours, respectively. The results demonstrated that all isolates were able to consume most sugars sources specially pentose carbon xylose. The isolate ZYM7 produced 13.00 gL-1 ethanol by consumption of xylose. The results of morphological and physiological characteristics showed that ZYM7 belonged to Lactobacillus sp. and ZYM8 and ZYM9 belonged to Acetobacter sp. Moreover, 16S rRNA sequencing and phylogenetic analyses exhibited that ZYM7 was similar to Lactobacillus rhamnosus with 99% homology and ZYM8 and ZYM9 were similar to Acetobacter pasteurianus with 99 and 98% homology, respectively.Discussion and conclusion: The results showed that that the isolated bacteria were suitable candidates to produce ethanol from raw material enriched with

  16. Price determination for hydrogen produced from bio-ethanol in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregorini, V.A.; Pasquevich, D. [Instituto de Energia y Desarrollo Sustentable - CNEA, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Laborde, M. [Facultad de Ingenieria - Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    A massive penetration for hydrogen as a fuel vector requires a price reduction against fossil fuels (up to lower or at less equal to current prices). That is why it is important to calculate the current prices, so that we can determinate the gap between them and work in reducing them. In order to follow properly prices evolution it is necessary been able to compare data generated by Universities, Laboratories and Industries. So that, DOE creates in 2003 a tool (H2A) to determine prices for hydrogen, with some assumptions and pre defined values, to facilitate transparency and consistency of data. In this work we will use the H2A tool to calculate de price of hydrogen produced in a bio-ethanol semi-industrial Plant in Argentina, and we will compare it with the prices of USA studies. (author)

  17. Microbial development in distillers wet grains produced during fuel ethanol production from corn (Zea mays)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, R.M.; Rosentrater, K.A. [United States Dept. of Agriculture, Brookings, SD (United States). North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory

    2007-09-15

    The microbiology of post-production distillers wet grains (DWG) was investigated over a period of 9 days at an industrial ethanol plant. Samples of the DWG were physically and chemically characterized. Compositional analyses were conducted for protein, fiber, and fat. Fixed suspensions of DWG were dispersed and disrupted by sonication. Bacterial cells were enumerated under epifluorescent illumination. Solid media and standard dilution were used to enumerate total colony-forming units (CFU) of lactic-acid producing bacteria (LAB), and aerobic heterotrophic organisms. The DWG had a pH of approximately 4.4, a moisture content of 53.5 per cent, and 4 x 10{sup 5} total yeast cells. Thirteen morphologically distinct isolates were identified during the study, 10 of which were yeasts and molds from 6 different genera. Two of the yeasts were of the lactic-acid Pediococcus pentosaceus strain, and 1 of the yeasts was an aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. Results showed that the matrix of the DWG produced severe technical difficulties for several of the culture-independent community-level analyses. It was concluded that numbers of potentially beneficial bacteria appeared to increase over the time period relative to potential spoilage agents. Molds capable of producing mycotoxins colonized the DWG and grew to high densities over the 9 day period. 31 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  18. Ethanol at levels produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wheat dough fermentation has a strong impact on dough properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Vinay B; Rezaei, Mohammad N; Cuyvers, Sven; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2014-09-24

    Yeast's role in bread making is primarily the fermentative production of carbon dioxide to leaven the dough. Fermentation also impacts dough matrix rheology, thereby affecting the quality of the end product. Surprisingly, the role of ethanol, the other yeast primary metabolite, has been ill studied in this context. Therefore, this study aims to assess the potential impact of ethanol on yeastless dough extensibility and spread and gluten agglomeration at concentrations at which it is produced in fermenting dough, i.e., up to 60 mmol per 100 g of flour. Reduced dough extensibility and dough spread were observed upon incorporation of ethanol in the dough formula, and were more pronounced for a weak than for a strong flour. Uniaxial and biaxial extension tests showed up to 50% decrease in dough extensibility and a dough strength increase of up to 18% for 60 mmol of ethanol/100 g of flour. Ethanol enhanced gluten agglomeration of a weak flour. Sequential extraction of flour in increasing ethanol concentrations showed that better gluten-solvent interaction is a possible explanation for the changed dough behavior. PMID:25174613

  19. Method for producing ethanol and co-products from cellulosic biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Quang A

    2013-10-01

    The present invention generally relates to processes for production of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention also relates to production of various co-products of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention further relates to improvements in one or more aspects of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass including, for example, improved methods for cleaning biomass feedstocks, improved acid impregnation, and improved steam treatment, or "steam explosion."

  20. Effect of endogenously synthesized and exogenously applied ethanol on tomato fruit ripening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, M.O.; Saltveit, M.E. Jr.

    1988-09-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. var Castlemart) fruit ripening was inhibited by tissue concentrations of ethanol that were produced by either exposure to exogenous ethanol vapors or synthesis under anaerobic atmospheres. Ethanol was not detected in aerobically ripened tomato fruit. Ripening was not inhibited by exposure to methanol at an equivalent molar concentration to inhibitory concentrations of ethanol, while ripening was slightly more inhibited by n-propanol than by equivalent molar concentrations of ethanol. The mottled appearance of a few ripened ethanol-treated fruit was not observed in n-propanol-treated fruit.

  1. Ethanol Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  2. Investigation of anaerobic digestion in a two-stage bioprocess producing hydrogen and methane

    OpenAIRE

    Hiligsmann, Serge; Hamilton, Christopher; Beckers, Laurent; Masset, Julien; Thonart, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen has received wide attention in the last decades as a clean energy vector. The major advantage of energy generation from hydrogen is the near-zero carbon emissions, since the utilization of hydrogen, either via combustion or via fuel cells, results in pure water. Recently, there has been increasing interest on the biological production of hydrogen gas from renewable biomass such as carbohydrates from agriculture or agro-food industries. This specific anaerobic digestion...

  3. Mating type and ploidy effect on the β-glucosidase activity and ethanol-producing performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with multiple δ-integrated bgl1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Huajun; Liu, Cheng; Zou, Shaolan; Hong, Jiefang; Zhang, Minhua

    2016-08-10

    In order to investigate the effect of mating type and ploidy on enzymatic activity and fermentation performance in yeast with multiple δ-integrated foreign genes, eight ploidy series strains were constructed. The initial haploid strain BGL-a was shown to contain about 19 copies of the bgl1 gene. In rich media containing 2% (w/v) sugar the specific activities of BGL-aα were lower than those of BGL-aa or BGL-αα, which indicates the existence of mating type effects. While the maximum OD660 decreased with rising ploidy, the biomass yield showed no significant difference between the eight strains and the specific activities (expressed as U/mL or U/mg DCW) showed little to no variation. When cellobiose was used as the carbon source and β-glucosidase substrate, β-glucosidase was expressed more quickly and at higher levels than in glucose-containing media. The maximum specific activitiy values obtained were 19.07U/mL and 19.39U/mL for BGL-αα and BGL-aa, repsectively. The anaerobic biomass and ethanol-producing performance in rich media containing 10% cellobiose showed no significant difference among the eight strains. Their maximal ethanol concentrations and corresponding yields ranged from 40.27 to 43.46g/L and 77.56 to 83.71%, respectively. When the acid- and alkali-pretreated corncob (10% solids content) was used, the diploid BGL-aα fermented the best. When urea was used as the only supplemented nutrient, the ethanol titer and yield were 35.65g/L and 83.69%, respectively, while a control experiment using industrial Angel yeast with exogenous β-glucosidase addition gave values of 37.93g/L and 89.04%. The combined effects of δ-integration of bgl1, ploidy and mating type result in BGL-aa or BGL-αα being the optimal choice for enzyme production and BGL-aα being more suitable for cellulosic ethanol fermentation. These results provide valuable information for future yeast breeding and utilization efforts.

  4. Studies on the biosorption of uranium by a thermotolerant, ethanol-producing strain of Kluyveromyces marxianus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of residual biomass from the thermotolerant ethanol-producing yeast strain Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB3 to function as a biosorbent for uranium has been examined. It was found that the biomass had an observed maximum biosorption capacity of 120 mg U/g dry weight of biomass. The calculated value for the biosorption maximum, obtained by fitting the data to the Langmuir model was found to be 130 mg U/g dry weight biomass. Maximum biosorption capacities were examined at a number of temperatures and both the observed and calculated values obtained for those capacities increased with increasing temperature. Decreasing the pH of the biosorbate solution resulted in a decrease in uptake capacity. When biosorption reactions were carried out using sea-water as the diluent it was found that the maximum biosorption capacity of the biomass increased significantly. Using transmission electron microscopy, uranium crystals were shown to be concentrated on the outer surface of the cell wall, although uranium deposition was also observed in the interior of the cell. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  5. FEEDSTOCK PRETREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR PRODUCING ETHANOL FROM WOOD, BARK, AND FOREST RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Hu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Energy and environmental issues are among the major concerns facing the global community today. Transportation fuel represents a large proportion of energy consumption, not only in the US, but also world-wide. As fossil fuel is being depleted, new substitutes are needed to provide energy. Ethanol, which has been produced mainly from the fermentation of corn starch in the US, has been regarded as one of the main liquid transportation fuels that can take the place of fossil fuel. However, limitations in the supply of starch are creating a need for different substrates. Forest biomass is believed to be one of the most abundant sources of sugars, although much research has been reported on herbaceous grass, agricultural residue, and municipal waste. The use of biomass sugars entails pretreatment to disrupt the lignin-carbohydrate complex and expose carbohydrates to enzymes. This paper reviews pretreatment technologies from the perspective of their potential use with wood, bark, and forest residues. Acetic acid catalysis is suggested for the first time to be used in steam explosion pretreatment. Its pretreatment economics, as well as that for ammonia fiber explosion pretreatment, is estimated. This analysis suggests that both are promising techniques worthy of further exploration or optimization for commercialization.

  6. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Biofuels (Ethanol, Biodiesel, n-Propanol, n-Butanol, and iso-Butanol) in Aquifer Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the late 1990s, there was a perception that “green” fuels such as ethanol posed less of a threat to ground water because they were readily degraded. This lead to a conclusion that the transition to “green” fuels would require less vigilance and that the existing level of effo...

  7. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Biofuels (Ethanol, Biodiesel, n-Propanol, n-Butanol, and iso-Butanol) in Aquifer Sediment (PP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the late 1990s, there was a perception that “green” fuels such as ethanol posed less of a threat to ground water because they were readily degraded. This lead to a conclusion that the transition to “green” fuels would require less vigilance and that the existing level of effo...

  8. Ethanol exposure disrupts extraembryonic microtubule cytoskeleton and embryonic blastomere cell adhesion, producing epiboly and gastrulation defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnalee Sarmah

    2013-08-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD occurs when pregnant mothers consume alcohol, causing embryonic ethanol exposure and characteristic birth defects that include craniofacial, neural and cardiac defects. Gastrulation is a particularly sensitive developmental stage for teratogen exposure, and zebrafish is an outstanding model to study gastrulation and FASD. Epiboly (spreading blastomere cells over the yolk cell, prechordal plate migration and convergence/extension cell movements are sensitive to early ethanol exposure. Here, experiments are presented that characterize mechanisms of ethanol toxicity on epiboly and gastrulation. Epiboly mechanisms include blastomere radial intercalation cell movements and yolk cell microtubule cytoskeleton pulling the embryo to the vegetal pole. Both of these processes were disrupted by ethanol exposure. Ethanol effects on cell migration also indicated that cell adhesion was affected, which was confirmed by cell aggregation assays. E-cadherin cell adhesion molecule expression was not affected by ethanol exposure, but E-cadherin distribution, which controls epiboly and gastrulation, was changed. E-cadherin was redistributed into cytoplasmic aggregates in blastomeres and dramatically redistributed in the extraembryonic yolk cell. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to identify potential causative factors for early development defects, and expression of the cell adhesion molecule protocadherin-18a (pcdh18a, which controls epiboly, was significantly reduced in ethanol exposed embryos. Injecting pcdh18a synthetic mRNA in ethanol treated embryos partially rescued epiboly cell movements, including enveloping layer cell shape changes. Together, data show that epiboly and gastrulation defects induced by ethanol are multifactorial, and include yolk cell (extraembryonic tissue microtubule cytoskeleton disruption and blastomere adhesion defects, in part caused by reduced pcdh18a expression.

  9. Fermentative Hydrogen Production by Pure Culture with a New H2-producing Anaerobe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-feng; REN Nan-qi; YANG Chuan-ping; XU Jing-li

    2006-01-01

    As a new clean energy source, the utilization and demand for hydrogen fuel are rapidly increasing. The integrated process of wastewater treatment of DESAR and energy recovery was developed in the studies. A new hydrogen anaerobe was isolated from the activated sludge. The optimal glucose concentration and the optimal initial pH were 12.0 g/L and 5. 5 respectively. The optimum C/N of the growth and hydrogen production in Rennanqilyf3 was (3.0 ~3.5): 1. The integrated process between DESAR system and biohydrogen production will be an important progress on energy recovery of DESAR system.

  10. Bacillus spp. produce antibacterial activities against lactic acid bacteria that contaminate fuel ethanol plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) frequently contaminate commercial fuel ethanol fermentations, reducing yields and decreasing profitability of biofuel production. Microorganisms from environmental sources in different geographic regions of Thailand were tested for antibacterial activity against LAB. Fou...

  11. Tolerant yeast in situ detoxifies major class of toxic chemicals while producing ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renewable lignocellulosic materials contain abundant sugar source and biofuels conversion including cellulosic ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass provides a sustainable alternative energy resource for a cleaner environment. In order to release the biomass sugars from the complex cellulo...

  12. Optimizing promoters and secretory signal sequences for producing ethanol from inulin by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying Kluyveromyces marxianus inulinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Dae-Hee; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-02-01

    Inulin is a polyfructan that is abundant in plants such as Jerusalem artichoke, chicory and dahlia. Inulinase can easily hydrolyze inulin to fructose, which is consumed by microorganisms. Generally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an industrial workhorse strain for bioethanol production, is known for not having inulinase activity. The inulinase gene from Kluyveromyces marxianus (KmINU), with the ability of converting inulin to fructose, was introduced into S. cerevisiae D452-2. The inulinase gene was fused to three different types of promoter (GPD, PGK1, truncated HXT7) and secretory signal sequence (KmINU, MFα1, SUC2) to generate nine expression cassettes. The inulin fermentation performance of the nine transformants containing different promoter and signal sequence combinations for inulinase production were compared to select an optimized expression system for efficient inulin fermentation. Among the nine inulinase-producing transformants, the S. cerevisiae carrying the PGK1 promoter and MFα1 signal sequence (S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM) showed not only the highest specific KmINU activity, but also the best inulin fermentation capability. Finally, a batch fermentation of the selected S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM in a bioreactor with 188.2 g/L inulin was performed to produce 80.2 g/L ethanol with 0.43 g ethanol/g inulin of ethanol yield and 1.22 g/L h of ethanol productivity.

  13. Optimizing promoters and secretory signal sequences for producing ethanol from inulin by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying Kluyveromyces marxianus inulinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Hyo Jin; Kim, Jin-Woo; Lee, Dae-Hee; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-02-01

    Inulin is a polyfructan that is abundant in plants such as Jerusalem artichoke, chicory and dahlia. Inulinase can easily hydrolyze inulin to fructose, which is consumed by microorganisms. Generally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an industrial workhorse strain for bioethanol production, is known for not having inulinase activity. The inulinase gene from Kluyveromyces marxianus (KmINU), with the ability of converting inulin to fructose, was introduced into S. cerevisiae D452-2. The inulinase gene was fused to three different types of promoter (GPD, PGK1, truncated HXT7) and secretory signal sequence (KmINU, MFα1, SUC2) to generate nine expression cassettes. The inulin fermentation performance of the nine transformants containing different promoter and signal sequence combinations for inulinase production were compared to select an optimized expression system for efficient inulin fermentation. Among the nine inulinase-producing transformants, the S. cerevisiae carrying the PGK1 promoter and MFα1 signal sequence (S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM) showed not only the highest specific KmINU activity, but also the best inulin fermentation capability. Finally, a batch fermentation of the selected S. cerevisiae D452-2/p426PM in a bioreactor with 188.2 g/L inulin was performed to produce 80.2 g/L ethanol with 0.43 g ethanol/g inulin of ethanol yield and 1.22 g/L h of ethanol productivity. PMID:25142154

  14. Esterification with ethanol to produce biodiesel from high acidity raw materials. Kinetic studies and analysis of secondary reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisarello, M.L.; Dalla Costa, B.; Mendow, G.; Querini, C.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica (INCAPE)-(FIQ-UNL, CONICET), Santiago del Estero 2654-Santa Fe, S3000AOJ (Argentina)

    2010-09-15

    In this work, the esterification reaction of free fatty acids (FFA) in sunflower oil, coconut oil and concentrated FFA, with ethanol, methanol and ethanol 96%, using homogeneous acid catalysts to produce biodiesel is studied. Kinetic parameters are estimated with a simplified model, and then used to predict the reaction behavior. Reactions other than the reversible esterification are considered to explain the behavior that this system displays. Such reactions are the triglycerides conversion by acid catalyzed transesterification and hydrolysis. In addition, we include kinetic studies of the reaction that occur between the sulphuric acid and methanol (or ethanol), forming mono and dialkylsulphates. This reaction produces water and consumes methanol (or ethanol), and consequently has a direct impact in the esterification reaction rate and equilibrium conversion. The concentration of sulphuric acid decreases to less than 50% of the initial value due to the reaction with the alcohol. A minimum in the acidity due to the free fatty acids as a function of time was clearly observed during the reaction, which has not been reported earlier. This behavior is related to the consecutive reactions that take place during the esterification of FFA in the presence of triglycerides. The phase separation due to the presence of water, which is generated during the reaction, is also studied. (author)

  15. Monocentric and polycentric anaerobic fungi produce structrally related cellulases and xylanases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xin-Liang; Chen, Huizhong; Ljungdahl, L.G. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Cellulase and xylanase cDNAs were isolated from a cDNA library of the polycentric anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2 constructed in Escherichia coli. The cellulase cDNA (celB) was 1.8 kb long with an open reading frame (ORF) coding for a polypeptide of 471 amino acids, and the xylanase cDNA (xynA) was 1.2 kb long with an ORF encoding a polypeptide of 362 amino acids. Single transcripts of 1.9 kb for celB and 1.5 kb for xynA were detected in total RNA of Orpinomyces grown on Avicel. Genomic DNA regions coding for CelA and XynA were devoid of introns. The enzymes were highly homologous (80 to 85% identity) to the corresponding enzymes of the monocentric anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum and, like those, contained in addition to a catalytic domain, a noncatalytic repeated peptide domain (NCRPD). The Orpinomyces xylanase contained one catalytic domain and thus differed from the Neocallimastix xylanase, which had two similar catalytic domains. Two peptides corresponding to the catalytic domain and the NCRPD of XynA were synthesized, and antibodies against them were raised and affinity column purified. The antibodies against the catalytic domain peptide reacted specifically with the xylanases of Orpinomyces and Neocallimastix, while the antibodies against the NCRPD reacted with many (at least eight) extracellular proteins of Orpinomyces and Neocallimastix, suggesting that the NCRPD is present in a number of polypeptides. 36 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Design optimization of a polygeneration plant producing power, heat, and lignocellulosic ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lythcke-Jørgensen, Christoffer Ernst; Haglind, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    /L at a straw processing capacity of 5 kg/s to 1.113 Euro/L at a capacity of 12 kg/s, indicating that diseconomies- of-scale applies for the suggested ethanol production scheme. A thermodynamic evaluation further discloses that the average yearly exergy efficiency decreases continuously with increasing ethanol...... production capacity, ranging from 0.746 for 5 kg/s to 0.696 for 12 kg/s. This trend results from operating constraints that induce expensive operation patterns in periods of high district heating loads or shut-down periods for the combined heat and power plant. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the found...

  17. Microbial community analysis in a combined anaerobic and aerobic digestion system for treatment of cellulosic ethanol production wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Lili; Yu, Yanling; Zhu, Zebing; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Haiman; Ambuchi, John J; Feng, Yujie

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the microbial diversity established in a combined system composed of a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor, and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for treatment of cellulosic ethanol production wastewater. Excellent wastewater treatment performance was obtained in the combined system, which showed a high chemical oxygen demand removal efficiency of 95.8% and completely eliminated most complex organics revealed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed differences in the microbial community structures of the three reactors. Further identification of the microbial populations suggested that the presence of Lactobacillus and Prevotella in CSTR played an active role in the production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). The most diverse microorganisms with analogous distribution patterns of different layers were observed in the EGSB reactor, and bacteria affiliated with Firmicutes, Synergistetes, and Thermotogae were associated with production of acetate and carbon dioxide/hydrogen, while all acetoclastic methanogens identified belonged to Methanosaetaceae. Overall, microorganisms associated with the ability to degrade cellulose, hemicellulose, and other biomass-derived organic carbons were observed in the combined system. The results presented herein will facilitate the development of an improved cellulosic ethanol production wastewater treatment system.

  18. Chronic ethanol exposure produces time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Osterndorff-Kahanek

    Full Text Available Repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal in mice increases voluntary drinking and represents an animal model of physical dependence. We examined time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks in amygdala (AMY, nucleus accumbens (NAC, prefrontal cortex (PFC, and liver after four weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE vapor exposure in C57BL/6J mice. Microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles at 0-, 8-, and 120-hours following the last ethanol exposure. Each brain region exhibited a large number of differentially expressed genes (2,000-3,000 at the 0- and 8-hour time points, but fewer changes were detected at the 120-hour time point (400-600. Within each region, there was little gene overlap across time (~20%. All brain regions were significantly enriched with differentially expressed immune-related genes at the 8-hour time point. Weighted gene correlation network analysis identified modules that were highly enriched with differentially expressed genes at the 0- and 8-hour time points with virtually no enrichment at 120 hours. Modules enriched for both ethanol-responsive and cell-specific genes were identified in each brain region. These results indicate that chronic alcohol exposure causes global 'rewiring' of coexpression systems involving glial and immune signaling as well as neuronal genes.

  19. Testing the Fertilizer Effect of Compost Produced by Anaerobic Fermentation of Sewage Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoni Lixandru

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The compost tested in this study resulted from the anaerobic fermentation process of sewage sludge with cereal straw. Processing and post-treatment were made by Biotechnological Research Centre within INCD ECOIND from Bucharest. Experimental program included testing the effect of fertilizer in quantities of 25 t, 50 t and 100 t compost / ha on the production of soya beans. It was also investigated the influence of the combination of fertilization with compost and inorganic fertilization with levels of 200 kg, respectively, 400 kg NPK / ha. Was analyzed the following productivity indicators: plant density, number of floors of pods, number and weight of pods and total beans production, in full ripening stage. In the case of fertilization only with composted sludge, production of peas and beans was higher in variants with 50 t / ha and 100 t / ha (2095 kg and 1990 kg grain / ha. Therefore, doubling the amount of compost does not provide corresponding increase yields of soybeans. Combining organic and inorganic fertilization determine a proportional production increase only for the total biomass production. The tested compost is a good organic fertilizer and the amount that provides the greatest soybeans production is 50 t / ha.

  20. Process for carbohydrates fermentation producing ethanol and biomass. Verfahren zur Fermentation von Kohlenhydraten unter Erzeugung von Aethanol und Biomasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moebus, O.; Teuber, M.; Reuter, H.

    1985-05-15

    Ethanol and biomass are to be produced with a little aqueous residue as possible. This is to be achieved by using a gas-fluidized bed whose particulate fraction consists of a moist mass of microorganisms (especially species of Saccharomyces). The fluidized particles are sprayed with a broth of fermentable carbohydrates, e.g. hydrolyzed starch and/or broths containing hydrolyzed cellulose. The fermentation conditions are controlled by the temperature and by the oxygen partial pressure of the gas flowing continuously into the fluidized bed. The ethanol/water mixture is separated from the gas released by the fluidized particles in cooling and fractionation modules and is processed further. The biomass and the residual, non-fermented substrate are removed from the fluidized bed in the form of moist granulate, and the granulate is dried to the desired residual moisture.

  1. KRAFT MILL BIOREFINERY TO PRODUCE ACETIC ACID AND ETHANOL: TECHNICAL ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Mao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The “near neutral hemicellulose extraction process” involves extraction of hemicellulose using green liquor prior to kraft pulping. Ancillary unit operations include hydrolysis of the extracted carbohydrates using sulfuric acid, removal of extracted lignin, liquid-liquid extraction of acetic acid, liming followed by separation of gypsum, fermentation of C5 and C6 sugars, and upgrading the acetic acid and ethanol products by distillation. The process described here is a variant of the “near neutral hemicellulose extraction process” that uses the minimal amount of green liquor to maximize sugar production while still maintaining the strength quality of the final kraft pulp. Production rates vary between 2.4 to 6.6 million gallons per year of acetic acid and 1.0 and 5.6 million gallons per year of ethanol, depending upon the pulp production rate. The discounted cash flow rate of return for the process is a strong function of plant size, and the capital investment depends on the complexity of the process. For a 1,000 ton per day pulp mill, the production cost for ethanol was estimated to vary between $1.63 and $2.07/gallon, and for acetic acid between $1.98 and $2.75 per gallon depending upon the capital equipment requirements for the new process. To make the process economically attractive, for smaller mill sizes the processing must be simplified to facilitate reductions in capital cost.

  2. High cell density cultures produced by internal retention: application in continuous ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Carola Pérez

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol has provoked great interest due to its potential as an alternative fuel. Nevertheless, fermentation processes must be developed by increasing the low volumetric productivity achieved in conventional cultures (batch or continuous to make this product become economically competitive. This can be achieved by using techniques leading to high cell concentration and reducing inhibition by the end-product. One of the frequently employed methods involves cell recycling. This work thus developed a membrane reactor incorporating a filtration module with 5 u,m stainless steel tubular units inside a 3L stirred jar fermenter for investigating its application in continuous ethanol production. The effects of cell concentration and transmembrane pressure difference on permeate flux were evaluated for testing the filtration module's performance. The internal cell retention system was operated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae continuous culture derived from sucrose, once fermentation conditions had been selected (30 °C, 1.25 -1.75 vvm, pH 4.5. Filter unit permeability was maintained by applying pulses of air. More than 97% of the grown cells were retained in the fermenter, reaching 51 g/L cell concentration and 8.51 g/L.h average ethanol productivity in culture with internal cell retention; this was twice that obtained in a conventional continuous culture. Key words: Membrane reactor, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alcoholic fermentation, cell recycling.

  3. Greenhouse gas emissions and production cost of ethanol produced from biosyngas fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Poritosh; Dutta, Animesh; Deen, Bill

    2015-09-01

    Life cycle (LC) of ethanol has been evaluated to determine the environmental and economical viability of ethanol that was derived from biosyngas fermentation process (gasification-biosynthesis). Four scenarios [S1: untreated (raw), S2: treated (torrefied); S3: untreated-chemical looping gasification (CLG), S4: treated-CLG] were considered. The simulated biosyngas composition was used in this evaluation process. The GHG emissions and production cost varied from 1.19 to 1.32 kg-CO2 e/L and 0.78 to 0.90$/L, respectively, which were found to be dependent on the scenarios. The environmental and economical viability was found be improved when untreated feedstock was used instead of treated feedstock. Although the GHG emissions slightly reduced in the case of CLG process, production cost was nominally increased because of the cost incurred by the use of CaO. This study revealed that miscanthus is a promising feedstock for the ethanol industry, even if it is grown on marginal land, which can help abate GHG emissions.

  4. Interaction of Lactobacillus vini with the ethanol-producing yeasts Dekkera bruxellensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiukova, Ievgeniia; Eberhard, Thomas; Passoth, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus vini was recently described as a contaminant in industrial ethanol fermentations and its co-occurrence with Dekkera bruxellensis was noted. We investigated the growth characteristics of L. vini in cocultivation together with either Saccharomyces cerevisiae or D. bruxellensis. Lower cell numbers of both the yeasts and L. vini as well as a decrease in ethanol and lactate formation in mixed batch cultures compared with pure cultures were noted. L. vini formed cell aggregates (flocs) in all cultivation media with different shapes in Man-Rogosa-Sharpe and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose media. Flocs' size and proportion of cells bound to flocs increased with increasing ethanol concentration. In coculture, formation of lactic acid bacteria-yeast cell aggregates consisting of a bacterial core with an outer layer of yeast cells was observed. L. vini-D. bruxellensis flocs had a bigger surface, due to cells protruding from the pseudomycelium. The involvement of mannose residues in the flocculation between L. vini and yeasts was tested. The presence of mannose induced deflocculation in a concentration-dependent manner. Less mannose was required for the deflocculation of D. bruxellensis as compared with S. cerevisiae.

  5. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Biofuels (Ethanol and Biodiesel) and Proposed Biofuels (n-Propanol, iso-Propanol, n-Butanol, and 2,5-Dimethylfuran) in Aquifer Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel, are a growing component of the nation's fuel supply. Ethanol is the primary biofuel in the US martket, distributed as a blend with petroleum gasoline in concentrations ranging from 10% ethanol (E10) to 85% ethanol (E85). Biodiesel, made ...

  6. Redesigning Escherichia coli metabolism for anaerobic production of isobutanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Cong T; Li, Johnny; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2011-07-01

    Fermentation enables the production of reduced metabolites, such as the biofuels ethanol and butanol, from fermentable sugars. This work demonstrates a general approach for designing and constructing a production host that uses a heterologous pathway as an obligately fermentative pathway to produce reduced metabolites, specifically, the biofuel isobutanol. Elementary mode analysis was applied to design an Escherichia coli strain optimized for isobutanol production under strictly anaerobic conditions. The central metabolism of E. coli was decomposed into 38,219 functional, unique, and elementary modes (EMs). The model predictions revealed that during anaerobic growth E. coli cannot produce isobutanol as the sole fermentative product. By deleting 7 chromosomal genes, the total 38,219 EMs were constrained to 12 EMs, 6 of which can produce high yields of isobutanol in a range from 0.29 to 0.41 g isobutanol/g glucose under anaerobic conditions. The remaining 6 EMs rely primarily on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC) and are typically inhibited under anaerobic conditions. The redesigned E. coli strain was constrained to employ the anaerobic isobutanol pathways through deletion of 7 chromosomal genes, addition of 2 heterologous genes, and overexpression of 5 genes. Here we present the design, construction, and characterization of an isobutanol-producing E. coli strain to illustrate the approach. The model predictions are evaluated in relation to experimental data and strategies proposed to improve anaerobic isobutanol production. We also show that the endogenous alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase AdhE is the key enzyme responsible for the production of isobutanol and ethanol under anaerobic conditions. The glycolytic flux can be controlled to regulate the ratio of isobutanol to ethanol production.

  7. High gravity fermentation of sugarcane molasses to produce ethanol: Effect of nutrients

    OpenAIRE

    Pradeep, P; Reddy, O. V. S.

    2010-01-01

    Fermentation efficiency of more than 85% was obtained by high gravity fermentation of 33–34°Bx (spec. gravity ≈1.134) molasses medium with certain nutrients, instead of generally employed medium containing ≈16% (w/v) total sugar (spec. gravity ≈1.090) for ethanol fermentation in distilleries to get maximum 80–85% conversion. The fermenting yeast, Saccharomyces, has varied capabilities, depending on the species and nutrition for fermenting the high solids medium. The fermentation period was re...

  8. Evaluation of potato anaerobic digestate as a renewable alternative to peat moss in horticultural substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato peels and other low-value wastes from potato processing are currently being used as cattle feed or fermented to produce fuel-grade ethanol. The anaerobic fermentation of food wastes, including potato processing wastes, produces biogas (principally methane), which can be used directly for heat...

  9. Detection of hydrogen gas-producing anaerobes in refuse-derived fuel (RDF) pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Makiko; Kimura, Tetsuya; Ohmiya, Kunio; Sakka, Kazuo

    2005-11-01

    Recently, we reported that refuse-derived fuel (RDF) pellets contain a relatively high number of viable bacterial cells and that these bacteria generate heat and hydrogen gas during fermentation under wet conditions. In this study we analyzed bacterial cell numbers of RDF samples manufactured with different concentrations of calcium hydroxide, which is usually added to waste materials for the prevention of rotting of food wastes and the acceleration of drying of solid wastes, and determined the amount of hydrogen gas produced by them under wet conditions. Furthermore, we analyzed microflora of the RDF samples before and during fermentation by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA followed by sequencing. We found that the RDF samples contained various kinds of clostridia capable of producing hydrogen gas. PMID:16306688

  10. Comparing environmental consequences of anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of pig manure to produce bio-energy – A life cycle perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de J.W.; Vinken, T.M.W.J.; Hamelin, L.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the environmental consequences of anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of pig manure to produce bio-energy, from a life cycle perspective. This included assessing environmental impacts and land use change emissions (LUC) required to replace used co-substrates for anaer

  11. Comparing environmental consequences of anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of pig manure to produce bio-energy – A life cycle perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vries, J.W.; Vinken, T.M.W.J; Hamelin, Lorie;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the environmental consequences of anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of pig manure to produce bio-energy, from a life cycle perspective. This included assessing environmental impacts and land use change emissions (LUC) required to replace used co-substrates for an...

  12. Alkalibaculum bacchi gen. nov., sp. nov., a CO-oxidizing, ethanol-producing acetogen isolated from livestock-impacted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Toby D; Caldwell, Matthew E; Lawson, Paul A; Huhnke, Raymond L; Tanner, Ralph S

    2010-10-01

    Phenotypic and phylogenetic studies were performed on three strains of an acetogenic bacterium isolated from livestock-impacted soil. The bacterium stained Gram-negative and was a non-spore-forming rod that was motile by peritrichous flagella. The novel strains had an optimum pH for growth of 8.0-8.5 and utilized H₂ : CO₂, CO : CO₂, glucose, fructose, mannose, turanose, ribose, trimethylamine, pyruvate, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol and n-butanol as growth substrates. Acetate was produced from glucose. Acetate, CO₂ and ethanol were produced from CO : CO₂. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the novel strains formed a new subline in the family Eubacteriaceae (rRNA cluster XV) of the low G+C-containing Gram-positive bacteria of the class Clostridia. The DNA G+C base composition was 34 mol%. Cell wall analysis revealed the existence of a novel B-type peptidoglycan similar to the B2α-type (B4) configuration with a variation containing aspartic acid. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, it is proposed that the new isolates represent a novel genus and species, for which the name Alkalibaculum bacchi gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is CP11(T) (=ATCC BAA-1772(T)=DSM 22112(T)).

  13. Methanol or ethanol produced from woody biomass: which is more advantageous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Fumio; Yokoyama, Shinya; Imou, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    In this study, two conversion technologies--methanol synthesis and ethanol fermentation--were compared and CO(2) mitigation effect was estimated. The biomethanol production process was revealed as being preferable to the bioethanol process in terms of thermal efficiency, carbon conversion and environmental burden except electrical energy consumption. When biofuels are employed in internal combustion engines, biomethanol has greater potential for gasoline substitution, but the difference in expected CO(2) reduction is rather small due to higher power consumption in methanol production. Consequently, from a short-term perspective, bioethanol is preferable since it can readily substitute the gasoline for conventional vehicles. From a long-term perspective, however, biomethanol has greater potential for gasoline substitution and CO(2) mitigation.

  14. Chemical characterization of municipal wastewater sludges produced by two-phase anaerobic digestion for biogas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francioso, Ornella, E-mail: ornella.francioso@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Agroambientali, V.le Fanin 40, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Rodriguez-Estrada, Maria Teresa [Dipartimento di Scienze degli Alimenti, V.le Fanin 40, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Montecchio, Daniela [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Agroambientali, V.le Fanin 40, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Salomoni, Cesare; Caputo, Armando [Biotec sys srl, Via Gaetano Tacconi, 59, 40139 Bologna (Italy); Palenzona, Domenico [Dipartimento di Biologia Evoluzionistica Sperimentale, Via Selmi 3, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    In the present study, the chemical features of municipal wastewater sludges treated in two-phase separate digesters (one for acetogenesis and the other one for methanogenesis), were characterized by using chemical analysis, stable carbon isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 13}C), HS-SPME-GC-MS, TG-DTA analysis and DRIFT spectroscopy. The results obtained showed that sludges from acetogenesis and methanogenesis differed from each other, as well as from influent raw sludges. Both processes exhibited a diverse chemical pattern in term of VFA and VOC. Additional variations were observed for {delta}{sup 13}C values that changed from acetogenesis to methanogenesis, as a consequence of fermentation processes that led to a greater fractionation of {sup 12}C with respect to the {sup 13}C isotope. Similarly, the thermal profiles of acetogenesis and methanogenesis sludges greatly differed in terms of heat combustion produced. These changes were also supported by higher lipid content (probably fatty acids) in acetogenesis than in methanogenesis, as also shown by DRIFT spectroscopy.

  15. Linking genome content to biofuel production yields: a meta-analysis of major catabolic pathways among select H2 and ethanol-producing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carere Carlo R

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fermentative bacteria offer the potential to convert lignocellulosic waste-streams into biofuels such as hydrogen (H2 and ethanol. Current fermentative H2 and ethanol yields, however, are below theoretical maxima, vary greatly among organisms, and depend on the extent of metabolic pathways utilized. For fermentative H2 and/or ethanol production to become practical, biofuel yields must be increased. We performed a comparative meta-analysis of (i reported end-product yields, and (ii genes encoding pyruvate metabolism and end-product synthesis pathways to identify suitable biomarkers for screening a microorganism’s potential of H2 and/or ethanol production, and to identify targets for metabolic engineering to improve biofuel yields. Our interest in H2 and/or ethanol optimization restricted our meta-analysis to organisms with sequenced genomes and limited branched end-product pathways. These included members of the Firmicutes, Euryarchaeota, and Thermotogae. Results Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the absence of genes encoding acetaldehyde dehydrogenase and bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE in Caldicellulosiruptor, Thermococcus, Pyrococcus, and Thermotoga species coincide with high H2 yields and low ethanol production. Organisms containing genes (or activities for both ethanol and H2 synthesis pathways (i.e. Caldanaerobacter subterraneus subsp. tengcongensis, Ethanoligenens harbinense, and Clostridium species had relatively uniform mixed product patterns. The absence of hydrogenases in Geobacillus and Bacillus species did not confer high ethanol production, but rather high lactate production. Only Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus produced relatively high ethanol and low H2 yields. This may be attributed to the presence of genes encoding proteins that promote NADH production. Lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate:formate lyase are not conducive for ethanol and/or H2 production. While the type(s of

  16. Thermoanaerobacter mathranii sp. nov., an ethanol-producing, extremely thermophilic anaerobic bacterium from a hot spring in Iceland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L.; Nielsen, P.; Ahring, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    occurred in the range of 50-75 degrees C. The pH range for growth was 4.7-8.8, with an optimum at pH 7.0. Strain A3 was sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, penicillin G. neomycin, and vancomycin at 100 mg/l but was not sensitive to chloramphenicol and neomycin at 10 mg/l, which indicates...

  17. Microbial diversity analysis of long term operated biofilm configured anaerobic reactor producing biohydrogen from wastewater under diverse conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkata Mohan, S.; Raghavulu, S. Veer; Goud, R. Kannaiah; Srikanth, S.; Babu, V. Lalit; Sarma, P.N. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre (BEEC), Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), Hyderabad 500 607 (India)

    2010-11-15

    This communication provides an insight into the composition of the microbial community survived in the biofilm configured anaerobic reactor operated for biohydrogen (H{sub 2}) production using wastewater as substrate under diverse conditions for past four years. PCR amplified 16S rDNA product (at variable V3 region using universal primers 341F and 517R) was separated by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to identify the diversity in microbial population survived. The phyologenetic profile of the bioreactor showed significant diversity in the microbial community where major nucleotide sequences were affiliated to Class Clostridia followed by Bacteroidetes, Deltaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. Clostridium were found to be dominant in the microbial community observed. The controlled growth conditions, application of pre-treatment to biocatalyst, operation with specific pH and variation in substrate composition are reasoned for the robust acidogenic culture identified in the bioreactor. Most of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) observed in the bioreactor are capable to undergo acetate producing pathway, feasible for effective H{sub 2} production. (author)

  18. Anaerobic and sequential aerobic production of high-titer ethanol and single cell protein from NaOH-pretreated corn stover by a genome shuffling-modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xueliang; Wang, Juncong; Yu, Hui; Peng, Chunlan; Hu, Jinlong; Ruan, Zhiyong; Zhao, Shumiao; Liang, Yunxiang; Peng, Nan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae recombinant strain 14 was constructed through genome shuffling method by transferring the whole genomic DNA of Candida intermedia strain 23 into a thermo-tolerant S. cerevisiae strain. The recombinant strain 14 combined the good natures of both parent strains that efficiently produced ethanol from glucose and single cell protein from xylose with 54.6% crude protein and all essential amino acids except cysteine at 35°C. Importantly, the recombinant strain 14 produced 64.07g/L ethanol from 25%(w/v) NaOH-pretreated and washed corn stover with the ethanol yield of 0.26g/g total stover by fed-batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation and produced 66.50g/L dry cell mass subsequently from the residual hydrolysate and ethanol. Therefore, this study represents a feasible method to comprehensively utilize hexose and pentose in lignocellulosic materials. PMID:27416512

  19. Production of the Anaerobic GMAX-L Yeast Using High-Throughput Mating and Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae With Identified Genes For Simultaneous Cellulosic Ethanol and Biodiesel Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailored GMAX-L yeast engineering for strains capable of universal ethanol production industrially with coproduction of an expressed lipase catalyst for coproduction of ethyl esters from corn oil and ethanol from the modern dry grind ethanol facility: Production of the stable baseline glucose, mann...

  20. Two-stage medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) production from municipal solid waste and ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootscholten, T.I.M.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Hamelers, B.

    2014-01-01

    Chain elongation is an anaerobic fermentation that produces medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) from volatile fatty acids and ethanol. These MCFAs can be used as biochemical building blocks for fuel production and other chemical processes. Producing MCFAs from the organic fraction of municipal solid wa

  1. Selenite Reduction by Anaerobic Microbial Aggregates: Microbial Community Structure, and Proteins Associated to the Produced Selenium Spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela

    2016-04-26

    Certain types of anaerobic granular sludge, which consists of microbial aggregates, can reduce selenium oxyanions. To envisage strategies for removing those oxyanions from wastewater and recovering the produced elemental selenium (Se0), insights into the microbial community structure and synthesis of Se0 within these microbial aggregates are required. High-throughput sequencing showed that Veillonellaceae (c.a. 20%) and Pseudomonadaceae (c.a.10%) were the most abundant microbial phylotypes in selenite reducing microbial aggregates. The majority of the Pseudomonadaceae sequences were affiliated to the genus Pseudomonas. A distinct outer layer (∼200 μm) of selenium deposits indicated that bioreduction occurred in the outer zone of the microbial aggregates. In that outer layer, SEM analysis showed abundant intracellular and extracellular Se0 (nano)spheres, with some cells having high numbers of intracellular Se0 spheres. Electron tomography showed that microbial cells can harbor a single large intracellular sphere that stretches the cell body. The Se0 spheres produced by the microorganisms were capped with organic material. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of extracted Se0 spheres, combined with a mathematical approach to analyzing XPS spectra from biological origin, indicated that proteins and lipids were components of the capping material associated to the Se0 spheres. The most abundant proteins associated to the spheres were identified by proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins or peptide sequences capping the Se0 spheres were identified as periplasmic outer membrane porins and as the cytoplasmic elongation factor Tu protein, suggesting an intracellular formation of the Se0 spheres. In view of these and previous findings, a schematic model for the synthesis of Se0 spheres by the microorganisms inhabiting the granular sludge is proposed.

  2. A biochemically structured model for ethanol fermentation by Kluyveromyces marxianus: A batch fermentation and kinetic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sansonetti, Sascha; Hobley, Timothy John; Calabrò, V.;

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic batch fermentations of ricotta cheese whey (i.e. containing lactose) were performed under different operating conditions. Ethanol concentrations of ca. 22gL−1 were found from whey containing ca. 44gL−1 lactose, which corresponded to up to 95% of the theoretical ethanol yield within 15h...... ethanol, lactose, biomass and glycerol during batch fermentation could be described within a ca. 6% deviation, as could the yield coefficients for biomass and ethanol produced on lactose. The model structure confirmed that the thermodynamics considerations on the stoichiometry of the system constrain the...... metabolic coefficients within a physically meaningful range thereby providing valuable and reliable insight into fermentation processes....

  3. Hydrogen production by ethanol partial oxidation over nano-iron oxide catalysts produced by chemical vapour synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Wael Ahmed Abou Taleb Sayed

    2011-01-13

    This work presents the experimental results of the synthesis of unsupported and supported SiC iron oxide nanoparticles and their catalytic activity towards ethanol partial oxidation. For comparison, further unsupported iron oxide phases were investigated towards the ethanol partial oxidation. These {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {alpha}/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase catalysts were prepared by the CVS method using Fe(CO){sub 5} as precursor, supplied by another author. The {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiC nanoparticles were prepared by the CVS method using a home made hot wall reactor technique at atmospheric pressure. Ferrocene and tetramethylsilane were used as precursor for the production process. Process parameters of precursor evaporation temperature, precursor concentration, gas mixture velocity and gas mixture dilution were investigated and optimised to produce particle sizes in a range of 10 nm. For Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/SiC catalyst series production, a new hot wall reactor setup was used. The particles were produced by simultaneous thermal decomposition of ferrocene and tetramethylsilane in one reactor from both sides. The production parameters of inlet tube distance inside the reactor, precursor evaporation temperature and carrier gas flow were investigated to produce a series of samples with different iron oxide content. The prepared catalysts composition, physical and chemical properties were characterized by XRD, EDX, SEM, BET surface area, FTIR, XPS and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The catalytic activity for the ethanol gas-phase oxidation was investigated in a temperature range from 260 C to 290 C. The product distributions obtained over all catalysts were analysed with mass spectrometry analysis tool. The activity of bulk Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiC nanoparticles was compared with prepared nano-iron oxide phase catalysts. The reaction parameters, such as reaction temperature and O{sub 2}/ethanol ratio were investigated. The catalysts

  4. 乙醇预发酵对餐厨垃圾与酒糟混合甲烷发酵的影响%Effect of ethanol pre-fermentation on methane fermentation during anaerobic co-digestion of kitchen waste and vinasse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张笑; 宋娜; 汪群慧; 王利红; 项娟; 常强; 于淼

    2014-01-01

    To solve the inhibition issue caused by volatile fatty acids in two-stage dry anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and distillers grains, microzyme was added into the reactors in the acidification process with different pre-treated times of 12 h, 24 h and 48 h respectively. After pre-fermentation, all groups underwent anaerobic digestion under the same experimental condition. The purpose was to investigate the effects of pre-treated time on methane yield, the changes of parameters such as pH, TVFA, acetic acid, propanoic acid, and ethanol concentration in the methane fermentation process, and to compare them with the control group. The most innovative idea is that of the ethanol pre-fermentation process, food waste was converted into ethanol which decreased the other volatile fatty acids`concentration in the meantime. Since ethanol is neutral and it can convert into acetic acid, which can be directly used by methanogens, this ethanol pre-fermentation process can indeed improve digestion efficiency and methane yield in the following anaerobic system. Moreover, with less volatile fatty acids produced at the beginning of digestion, the acid accumulation issue could be well relieved in the future. This meaningful topic has been focused on by our research team since 2011. Please find more detailed information in our articles if you are interested. According to this experiment, the result showed that the ranks of ethanol concentration and pH (from high to low) of all groups were: pre-treated 48h > 24h > 12h > control. However, the ranks of acetic acid and TVFA concentration were the opposite. This phenomenon is caused by the ethanol pre-fermentation which can force more glucose to degrade into ethanol instead of other volatile fatty acids such as propanoic acid. Besides, the ethanol is neutral, and it can convert into acetic acid more easily than propanoic acid. Therefore, the pre-fermentation process can overcome the acidification issue caused by the accumulation of

  5. The role of acid incubation in rapid immobilization of hydrogen-producing culture in anaerobic upflow column reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhen-Peng; Tay, Joo-Hwa [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Show, Kuan-Yeow [Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, University Tunku Abdul Rahman, 31900 Kampar, Perak (Malaysia); Liang, David Tee [Institute of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Lee, Duu-Jong [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617 (China); Su, Ay [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fuel Cell Center, Yuan-Ze University, Taoyuan 320 (China)

    2008-10-15

    An approach of acidification was examined on formation of hydrogen-producing granules and biofilms in upflow column-shaped reactors. The reactors were fed with synthetic glucose wastewater and operated at 37 C and pH 5.5. The acclimated anaerobic culture was inoculated in four reactors designated R1, R2, R3 and R4, with R3 and R4 filled with granular activated carbon as support medium. To unveil the roles of acidification, microbial culture in R2 and R3 was subject to an acid incubation for 24 h by shifting the culture pH from 5.5 to 2.0. The experimental results suggested that the acidification substantially accelerated microbial granulation, but not biofilm formation. Microbial activities were inhibited by the acid incubation for about 78 h, resulting in the retarded formation of biofilms of the acidified culture. Reducing culture pH resulted in improvement in cell surface physicochemical properties favoring microbial adhesion and immobilization. Zeta potential increased from -25.3 mV to 11.9 mV, hydrophobicity in terms of contact angle improved from 31 to 38 and production of extracellular polymers increased from 66 mg/g-VSS to 136 mg/g-VSS. As a result of the formation of granules and biofilms, high hydrogen production rates of 6.98 and 7.49 L/L h were achieved in granule-based and biofilm-based reactors, respectively. It is concluded that acid incubation is an efficient means to initiate the rapid formation of granules by regulating the surface characteristics of microbial culture. The use of support media as starting nuclei may result in rapid formation of biofilms without the acidification. (author)

  6. XAS analysis of iron and palladium bonded to a polysaccharide produced anaerobically by a strain of Klebsiella oxytoca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arčon, Iztok; Paganelli, Stefano; Piccolo, Oreste; Gallo, Michele; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Baldi, Franco

    2015-09-01

    Klebsiella oxytoca BAS-10 ferments citrate to acetic acid and CO2, and secretes a specific exopolysaccharide (EPS), which is able to bind different metallic species. These biomaterials may be used for different biotechnological purposes, including applications as innovative green biogenerated catalysts. In production of biogenerated Pd species, the Fe(III) as ferric citrate is added to anaerobic culture of K. oxytoca BAS-10, in the presence of palladium species, to increase the EPS secretion and improve Pd-EPS yield. In this process, bi-metallic (FePd-EPS) biomaterials were produced for the first time. The morphology of bi-metallic EPS, and the chemical state of the two metals in the FePd-EPS, are investigated by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, micro-X-ray fluorescence, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy methods (XANES and EXAFS), and compared with mono-metallic Pd-EPS and Fe-EPS complexes. Iron in FePd-EPS is in the mineralized form of iron oxides/hydroxides, predominantly in the form of Fe(3+), with a small amount of Fe(2+) in the structure, most probably a mixture of different nano-crystalline iron oxides and hydroxides, as in mono-metallic Fe-EPS. Palladium is found as Pd(0) in the form of metallic nanoparticles with face-centred cubic structure in both bi-metallic (FePd-EPS) and mono-metallic (Pd-EPS) species. In bi-metallic species, Pd and Fe nanoparticles agglomerate in larger clusters, but they remain spatially separated. The catalytic ability of bi-metallic species (FePd-EPS) in a hydrodechlorination reaction is improved in comparison with mono-metallic Pd-EPS.

  7. Pilot Scale Integrated Biorefinery for Producing Ethanol from Hybrid Algae: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-389

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pienkos, P. T.

    2013-11-01

    This collaboration between Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will provide valuable information regarding Direct to Ethanol technology. Specifically, the cooperative R&D will analyze the use of flue gas from industrial sources in the Direct to Ethanol process, which may demonstrate the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously producing a valuable product, i.e., ethanol. Additionally, Algenol Biofuels Inc. and NREL will develop both a techno-economic model with full material and energy balances and an updated life-cycle analysis to identify greenhouse gas emissions relative to gasoline, each of which will provide a better understanding of the Direct to Ethanol process and further demonstrate that it is a breakthrough technology with varied and significant benefits.

  8. Synthesis of FAEEs from glycerol in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae using endogenously produced ethanol by heterologous expression of an unspecific bacterial acyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kyung Ok; Jung, Ju; Kim, Seung Wook; Park, Chul Hwan; Han, Sung Ok

    2012-01-01

    The high price of petroleum-based diesel fuel has led to the development of alternative fuels, such as ethanol. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was metabolically engineered to utilize glycerol as a substrate for ethanol production. For the synthesis of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) by engineered S. cerevisiae that utilize glycerol as substrate, heterologous expression of an unspecific acyltransferase from Acinetobacter baylyi with glycerol utilizing genes was established. As a result, the engineered YPH499 (pGcyaDak, pGupWs-DgaTCas) strain produced 0.24 g/L FAEEs using endogenous ethanol produced from glycerol. And this study also demonstrated the possibility of increasing FAEE production by enhancing ethanol production by minimizing the synthesis of glycerol. The overall FAEE production in strain YPH499 fps1Δ gpd2Δ (pGcyaDak, pGupWs-DgaTCas) was 2.1-fold more than in YPH499 (pGcyaDak, pGupWs-DgaTCas), with approximately 0.52 g/L FAEEs produced, while nearly 17 g/L of glycerol was consumed. These results clearly indicated that FAEEs were synthesized in engineered S. cerevisiae by esterifying exogenous fatty acids with endogenously produced ethanol from glycerol. This microbial system acts as a platform in applying metabolic engineering that allows the production of FAEEs from cheap and abundant substrates specifically glycerol through the use of endogenous bioethanol.

  9. Anaerobes beyond anaerobic digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, D. Z.; Pereira, M A; Alves, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms are widespread in nature. Sediments, gastrointestinal tracks, volcanic vents, geothermal sources are examples of habitats where anaerobic metabolism prevail, in some cases at extreme temperature, pH and pressure conditions. In such microbial ecosystems waste of some is food for others in a true integrated structure. Anaerobic microorganisms are able to use a wide variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Recalcitrant compounds, such as hydrocarbons, a...

  10. Thermophilic-anaerobic digestion to produce class A biosolids: initial full-scale studies at Hyperion Treatment Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranpour, R; Cox, H H J; Oh, S; Fan, S; Kearney, R J; Abkian, V; Haug, R T

    2006-02-01

    biosolids are land-applied, require compliance with both bacterial limits. Additional work identified dewatering, cooling of biosolids after the dewatering centrifuges, and contamination as possible factors in the rise in density of fecal coliforms. These results provided the basis for the full conversion of HTP to the Los Angeles continuous-batch, thermophilic-anaerobic-digestion process. During later phases of testing, this process was demonstrated to produce fully disinfected biosolids at the farm for land application. PMID:16566524

  11. Description of Anaerobaculum hydrogeniformans sp. nov., an anaerobe that produces hydrogen from glucose, and emended description of the genus Anaerobaculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maune, Matthew W; Tanner, Ralph S

    2012-04-01

    A novel anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, NaCl-requiring fermentative bacterium, strain OS1T, was isolated from oil production water collected from Alaska, USA. Cells were Gram-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming rods (1.7-2.7×0.4-0.5 µm). The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain OS1T was 46.6 mol%. The optimum temperature, pH and NaCl concentration for growth of strain OS1T were 55 °C, pH 7 and 10 g l(-1), respectively. The bacterium fermented D-fructose, D-glucose, maltose, D-mannose, α-ketoglutarate, L-glutamate, malonate, pyruvate, L-tartrate, L-asparagine, Casamino acids, L-cysteine, L-histidine, L-leucine, L-phenylalanine, L-serine, L-threonine, L-valine, inositol, inulin, tryptone and yeast extract. When grown on D-glucose, 3.86 mol hydrogen and 1.4 mol acetate were produced per mol substrate. Thiosulfate, sulfur and L-cystine were reduced to sulfide, and crotonate was reduced to butyrate with glucose as the electron donor. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain OS1T was related to Anaerobaculum thermoterrenum (99.7 % similarity to the type strain), a member of the phylum Synergistetes. DNA-DNA hybridization between strain OS1T and A. thermoterrenum DSM 13490T yielded 68 % relatedness. Unlike A. thermoterrenum, strain OS1T fermented malonate, maltose, tryptone, L-leucine and L-phenylalanine, but not citrate, fumarate, lactate, L-malate, glycerol, pectin or starch. The major cellular fatty acid of strain OS1T was iso-C15:0 (91 % of the total). Strain OS1T also contained iso-C13:0 3-OH (3 %), which was absent from A. thermoterrenum, and iso-C13:0 (2 %), which was absent from Anaerobaculum mobile. On the basis of these results, strain OS1T represents a novel species of the genus Anaerobaculum, for which the name Anaerobaculum hydrogeniformans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is OS1T (=DSM 22491T=ATCC BAA-1850T). An emended description of the genus Anaerobaculum is also given. PMID:21602364

  12. Accelerated methanogenesis from effluents of hydrogen-producing stage in anaerobic digestion by mixed cultures enriched with acetate and nano-sized magnetite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiman; Xu, Xiaohui; Guo, Rongbo; Fan, Xiaolei; Zhao, Xiaoxian

    2015-08-01

    Potential for paddy soil enrichments obtained in the presence of nano-sized magnetite particles (named as PSEM) to promote methane production from effluents of hydrogen-producing stage in two-stage anaerobic digestion was investigated. The results showed that the addition of magnetite significantly accelerated methane production from acetate in a dose-independent manner. The results from high-throughput sequencing analysis revealed that Rhodocyclaceae-related species were selectively enriched, which were likely the key players for conversion of acetate to methane in PSEM. Compared to the paddy soil enrichments obtained in the absence of magnetite (named as PSEC), the maximum methane production rate in PSEM was significantly higher (1.5-5.5times higher for the artificial medium and 0.2-1.7times higher for the effluents). The accelerated methane production from the effluents indicated remarkably application potential of PSEM for improving performance of anaerobic digestion. PMID:25935393

  13. Simultaneous fermentation of glucose and xylose at elevated temperatures co-produces ethanol and xylitol through overexpression of a xylose-specific transporter in engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Biao; Zhang, Jia; Wang, Dongmei; Han, Ruixiang; Ding, Rui; Gao, Xiaolian; Sun, Lianhong; Hong, Jiong

    2016-09-01

    Engineered Kluyveromyces marxianus strains were constructed through over-expression of various transporters for simultaneous co-fermentation of glucose and xylose. The glucose was converted into ethanol, whereas xylose was converted into xylitol which has higher value than ethanol. Over-expressing xylose-specific transporter ScGAL2-N376F mutant enabled yeast to co-ferment glucose and xylose and the co-fermentation ability was obviously improved through increasing ScGAL2-N376F expression. The production of glycerol was blocked and acetate production was reduced by disrupting gene KmGPD1. The obtained K. marxianus YZJ119 utilized 120g/L glucose and 60g/L xylose simultaneously and produced 50.10g/L ethanol and 55.88g/L xylitol at 42°C. The yield of xylitol from consumed xylose was over 98% (0.99g/g). Through simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation at 42°C, YZJ119 produced a maximal concentration of 44.58g/L ethanol and 32.03g/L xylitol or 29.82g/L ethanol and 31.72g/L xylitol, respectively, from detoxified or non-detoxified diluted acid pretreated corncob. PMID:27240239

  14. 2-CSTRs 两相厌氧消化系统在不同乙醇回收率下的联合产能%Simultaneous biofuel production of 2-CSTRs anaerobic digestion system with different recovery rates of ethanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万松; 李永峰

    2015-01-01

    以2-CSTRs(连续流搅拌釜式反应器)两相厌氧消化系统的能量转化率为主要研究对象,以氢气、乙醇及甲烷为目标产物,在不同有机负荷下,通过控制反应参数使产氢相反应器内部环境呈现乙醇型发酵状态,并将产氢相出水经回收乙醇后作为产甲烷相反应基质,研究在不同乙醇回收率下2-CSTRs两相厌氧消化系统产能效率.结果表明:当乙醇回收率在0~50%范围内时,系统产能率、能量转化率及基质降解率随乙醇回收率的增加而增加.当乙醇回收率控制在50%时系统可获得最佳运行结果,与未回收乙醇时相比,系统的日产能率平均高约32.63%,能量转化率平均高约17.53%,基质降解率平均高约12.85%.%With the energy conversion efficiency of 2-CSTRs (continuous stirred tank reactor) anaerobic digestion system as the study objectives, hydrogen, ethanol and methane as the target products, at different organic loading rates (OLRs), the ethanol-type fermentation was provided by controlling the available reaction parameters in hydrogen production phase, the treatment water of hydrogen production phase which was recovered ethanol served as the feed of methane production phase, and the energy conversion efficiency of the 2-CSTRs system were dug with different ethanol recovery rates (ERRs). The survey results indicated that energy conversion rate (εT), energy conversion yield (εY) and SDR essentially increased with increasing ERR of 0~50%. Compared with the regular anaerobic digestion system,εT,εY and SDR of the system with ethanol recovery have increased by 32.63%, 17.53% and 12.85% , respectively, with the ERR of 50%.

  15. 钠盐浓度对厌氧产氢颗粒污泥从蔗糖中产氢的影响%Effect of Sodium Ion Concentration on Hydrogen Production from Sucrose by Anaerobic Hydrogen-producing Granular Sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝小龙; 周明华; 俞汉青; 沈琴琴; 雷乐成

    2006-01-01

    This work evaluated the effects of sodium ion concentration, ranging from 0 to 16000mg·L-1(Na+), on the conversion of sucrose to hydrogen by a high-activity anaerobic hydrogen-producing granular sludge. At the optimum sodium ion concentration [1000-2000mg·L-1(Na+)] for hydrogen production at 37℃, the maximum sucrose degradation rate, the specific hydrogen production yield and the specific hydrogen production rate were 393.6-413.1mg·L-1·h-1, 28.04-28.97ml·g-1, 7.52-7.83ml·g-1·h-1, respectively. The specific production yields of propionate, butyrate and valerate decreased, with increasing sodium ion concentration, whereas the specific acetate production yield increased, meanwhile the specific production yields of ethanol and caproate were less than 55.3 and 12.6mg·g-1, respectively. The hybrid fermentation composition gradually developed from acetate, propionate and butyrate to acetate with the increase in sodium ion concentration.

  16. Impacts of an ethanol-blended fuel release on groundwater and fate of produced methane: Simulation of field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) designed to mimic the impact of a small-volume release of E10, two plumes were created by injecting extracted groundwater spiked with benzene, toluene, and o-xylene, abbreviated BToX (No-Ethanol Lane) and BToX plus ethanol...

  17. Mutation Breeding of Salt-tolerant and Ethanol-producing Strain S. cerevisiae H058 by Low-energy Ion Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoubao Yan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To obtain an industrial strain with high ethanol fermentation efficiency under salted conditions, the wild strain H058 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was mutated by means of nitrogen ions implantation. Mutagenic effects of strain H058 by low energy N+ ion implantation were studied. A similar “saddle shape” survival curve due to ion beam irradiation appeared again in this study. By repeated screening, a high salt-tolerant and ethanol-producing strain M158 was obtained. Results showed that in medium contained 0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0% NaCl, M158 produced maximal ethanol of 98.3, 97.2, 96.4, 95.6 and 78.3 g/L at 54, 54, 54 and 72 h, respectively. However, the original strain H058 maximal ethanol of 95.2, 90.9, 84.8, 79.4 and 67.5 g/L at 60, 60, 66 and 72 h, respectively. In addition, the ethanol yield (g/g in all of the NaCl concentrations for M158 is 0.492, 0.486, 0.482, 0.48 and 0.392 g/g, respectively, which were higher than those (0.476, 0.455, 0.424, 0.397 and 0.338 g/g, respectively of the original strain H058. The higher production and shorter fermentation period suggest that strain M158 is a good salt-tolerant and ethanol-producing strain.

  18. Economic process to produce biohydrogen and volatile fatty acids by a mixed culture using vinasse from sugarcane ethanol industry as nutrient source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydney, Eduardo Bittencourt; Larroche, Christian; Novak, Alessandra Cristine; Nouaille, Regis; Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Letti, Luiz Alberto; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    This work evaluates the potential of vinasse (a waste obtained at the bottom of sugarcane ethanol distillation columns) as nutrient source for biohydrogen and volatile fatty acids production by means of anaerobic consortia. Two different media were proposed, using sugarcane juice or molasses as carbon source. The consortium LPBAH1 was selected for fermentation of vinasse supplemented with sugarcane juice, resulting in a higher H2 yield of 7.14 molH2 molsucrose(-1) and hydrogen content in biogas of approx. 31%, while consortium LPBAH2 resulted in 3.66 molH2/molsucrose and 32.7% hydrogen content in biogas. The proposed process showed a rational and economical use for vinasse, a mandatory byproduct of the renewable Brazilian energy matrix.

  19. Fermentation products and plant cell wall-degrading enzymes produced by monocentric and polycentric anaerobic ruminal fungi.

    OpenAIRE

    Borneman, W. S.; Akin, D. E.; Ljungdahl, L G

    1989-01-01

    Five anaerobic fungal isolates from the bovine rumen were grown on Coastal Bermuda grass (CBG) leaf blades and monitored over a 9-day period for substrate utilization, fermentation products, cellulase, and xylanase activities. Two of the fungal isolates showed monocentric growth patterns; one (isolate MC-1) had monoflagellated zoospores and morphologically resembled members of the genus Piromyces; the other (isolate MC-2) had multiflagellated zoospores and resembled members of the genus Neoca...

  20. Glucose Consumption Assay for the Evaluation of Ethanol-producing Capability of Microzyme%酵母菌产酒精能力的葡萄糖消耗检测法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张新军; 岳海梅

    2011-01-01

    研究了1种检测酵母菌产酒精能力的新方法。利用酒精发酵液体培养基在厌氧条件下对产酒精酵母菌株YE—1、YE-2、YE-3进行酒精发酵培养,同时利用菌体发酵培养基在有氧条件下进行菌体培养实验作为对照。通过分光光度法检测培养基中葡萄糖的消耗量,根据所消耗的葡萄糖中用于酒精发酵的量,推算出3株酵母菌菌株在酒精发酵培养基中酒精含量分别为4.03mg/mL、3.50mg/mL和3.77mg/mL,进而比较出各菌株产酒精能力的大小。%A new method for the evaluation of ethanol-producing capability of microzyme had been developed. In the experiments, while microzyme cells were cultured in cell culture mediums under aerobic conditions, ethanol-producing microzyme strains YE-1, YE-2 and YE-3 were cultured for alcohol fermentation in liquid culture mediums under anaerobic conditions. The amount of glucose consumption in alcohol fermentation liquid mediums was detected by spectrophotometric assay. Then alcohol concentration was calculated according to the amount of glucose consumption for alcohol fermentation. The alcohol concentration in these three alcohol fermentation aleohol mediums were 4.03 mg / mL, 3.50 mg / mL and 3.77 mg / mL respectively, and then ethanol-producing capability of each strain was revealed.

  1. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  2. Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Fuel Ethanol Produced from U.S. Midwest Corn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Saricks, Christoper [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wu, May [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1997-12-19

    This study addresses two issues: (1) data and information essential to an informed choice about the corn-to-ethanol cycle are in need of updating, thanks to scientific and technological advances in both corn farming and ethanol production; and (2) generalized national estimates of energy intensities and greenhouse gas (GHG) production are of less relevance than estimates based specifically on activities and practices in the principal domestic corn production and milling region -- the upper Midwest.

  3. Probing the redox metabolism in the strictly anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, hydrogen-producing Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus using amperometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostesha, Natalie; Willquist, Karin; Emnéus, Jenny;

    2011-01-01

    flow between cells harvested in the exponential and stationary growth phases. The electron flow of C. saccharolyticus was dependent on the NADH- and reduced ferredoxin generation flux and the competitive behavior of cytosolic and membrane-associated oxidoreductases. Sodium oxamate was used to inhibit...... electron flow were observed when cells were supplied with different carbon sources. A higher electrochemical response was detected when cells were supplied with xylose than with sucrose or glucose. Moreover, using the mediated electrochemical method, it was possible to detect differences in the electron...... in the intracellular electron flow and to probe redox enzyme properties of a strictly anaerobic thermophile in vivo....

  4. Biological reactor for anaerobic digestion of organic materials to produce methane gas by fermentation by enzymes. Bioreaktor fuer anaerobe Ausfaulung organischer Stoffe zur Methangaserzeugung mittels Fermentierung durch Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemann, R.W.

    1981-11-12

    In order to make undisturbed development of the methane bacteria possible, the biomass (organic waste of all kinds, e.g. sewage sludge, manure, organic industrial waste) is first pre-fermented by adding enzymes. The methane bacteria, which are used to inject the biomass in the fermentation reactor, are fermented separately in feeding solutions. The biological reactor is a system heated by a thermostatically controlled waterbath, with at least 12 individual digestion chambers, which are filled in sequence with biomass. Circulation and therefore destruction of the floating sludge layer is done with biogas produced under pressure in the system. By adding lime solution, a pH value of 7 is set in the chambers. The advantages of the invention consist of a shortened digestion time (6 days) and a reduced CO/sub 2/ consist at a gas yield of 80%.

  5. Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Rheum palmatum L. Ethanol Extract in a Stable HBV-producing Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan SUN; Li-jun LI; Jing LI; Zhi LI

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection is a severe health problem in the world.However,there is still not a satisfactory therapeutic strategy for the HBV infection.To search for new anti-HBV agents with higher efficacy and less side-effects,the inhibitory activities of traditional Chinese medicine Rheum palmatum L.ethanol extract(RPE) against HBV replication were investigated in this study.Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction(PCR) was employed to analyze the inhibitory activity of RPE against HBV-DNA replication in a stable HBV-producing cell line HepAD38; the expression levels of HBV surface antigen(HBsAg) and e antigen(HBeAg) were also determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA) after RPE treatment.RPE could dose-dependently inhibit the production of HBV-DNA and HBsAg.The concentration of 50% inhibition(IC50) was calculated at 209.63,252.53 μg/mL,respectively.However,its inhibitory activity against HBeAg expression was slight even at high concentrations.RPE had a weak cytotoxic effect on HepAD38 cells(CC50 = 1 640 μg/mL) and the selectivity index(SI) was calculated at 7.82.Compared with two anthraquinone derivatives emodin and rhein,RPE showed higher ability of anti-HBV and weaker cytotoxicity.So Rheum palmatum L.might possess other functional agents which could effectively inhibit HBV-DNA replication and HBsAg expression.Further purification of the active agents,identification and modification of their structures to improve the efficacy and decrease the cytotoxicity are required.

  6. Evaluation of continuous ethanol fermentation of dilute-acid corn stover hydrolysate using thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2007-01-01

    Dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover is potential feedstock of industrial interest for second generation fuel ethanol production. However, the toxicity of corn stover hydrolysate (PCS) has been a challenge for fermentation by recombinant xylose fermenting organisms. In this work, the therm......Dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover is potential feedstock of industrial interest for second generation fuel ethanol production. However, the toxicity of corn stover hydrolysate (PCS) has been a challenge for fermentation by recombinant xylose fermenting organisms. In this work...... fermented yielding ethanol of 0.39–0.42 g/g-sugars consumed. Xylose was nearly completely utilized (89–98%) for PCS up to 10% TS, whereas at 15% TS, xylose conversion was lowered to 67%. The reactor was operated continuously for 135 days, and no contamination was seen without the use of any agent...

  7. Increase in ethanol yield via elimination of lactate production in an ethanol-tolerant mutant of Clostridium thermocellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjita Biswas

    Full Text Available Large-scale production of lignocellulosic biofuel is a potential solution to sustainably meet global energy needs. One-step consolidated bioprocessing (CBP is a potentially advantageous approach for the production of biofuels, but requires an organism capable of hydrolyzing biomass to sugars and fermenting the sugars to ethanol at commercially viable titers and yields. Clostridium thermocellum, a thermophilic anaerobe, can ferment cellulosic biomass to ethanol and organic acids, but low yield, low titer, and ethanol sensitivity remain barriers to industrial production. Here, we deleted the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene in ethanol tolerant strain of C. thermocellum adhE*(EA in order to allow use of previously developed gene deletion tools, then deleted lactate dehydrogenase (ldh to redirect carbon flux towards ethanol. Upon deletion of ldh, the adhE*(EA Δldh strain produced 30% more ethanol than wild type on minimal medium. The adhE*(EA Δldh strain retained tolerance to 5% v/v ethanol, resulting in an ethanol tolerant platform strain of C. thermocellum for future metabolic engineering efforts.

  8. KINETIKA FERMENTASI ASAM ASETAT (VINEGAR OLEH BAKTERI Acetobacter aceti B 127 DARI ETANOL HASIL FERMENTASI LIMBAH CAIR PULP KAKAO [Kinetics of Acetic Acid (Vinegar Fermentation By Acetobacter aceti B127 from Ethanol Produced by Fermentation of Liquid Waste of Cacao Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Supli Effendi

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid concentration is one of vinegar’s quality parameter. Acetic acid concentration in vinegar is influenced by the activity of acetic acid bacteria. This research studied the kinetics of anaerobic fermentation of liquid waste of cacao pulp by Saccharomyces cerevisiae R60 to produce ethanol and the kinetics of acetic acid fermentation from ethanol by Acetobacter aceti B127. The kinetics of acetic acid fermentation from ethanol by Acetobacter aceti B127 can be used as a basic of bioprocess design for aerobic fermentation in general and acetic acid fermentation from ethanol by Acetobacter aceti B127 in particular. Fermentation medium used was liquid waste of cocoa pulp with sugar content of 12.85%, and the addition of sucrosa and urea. The parameter observed was growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae R60 and Acetobacter aceti B127, and chemical analysis including concentration of ethanol, total sugar and acetic acid, content. The research result showed that the  value was 0.048 hour-1, Y P was 0.676, Qp value was 0.033 hour-, and KLa value was 0.344, QO2.Cx value was 0.125 (mgO2L-1jam-1, Y X was s O2 0.378 (x 108selmL-1g-1¬¬O2, and dCT was 0.150 mgL-1hour-1. Concentration of acetic acid in the product was 4.24% or 42.4 gL-1

  9. Lower-cost cellulosic ethanol production from corn stover using ß-glucosidase producing yeast Clavispora NRRL Y-50464

    Science.gov (United States)

    For cellulosic ethanol production, decomposition of cellulosic polymers and enzymatic hydrolysis and saccharification are necessary for microbes to efficiently utilize the biomass harbored sugars. The need of additional enzymes and processing steps increase cost of biofuels. To reduce the cost of ce...

  10. Ethanol-induced c-Fos expression in catecholamine- and neuropeptide Y-producing neurons in rat brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiele, TE; Cubero, [No Value; van Dijk, G; Mediavilla, C; Bernstein, IL; Thiele, Todd E.; Cubero, Inmaculada

    2000-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have used c-Fos-like immunoreactivity (cFLI) to examine the neuroanatomical location of cells that are activated in response to ethanol administration. However, the use of cFLI alone fails to reveal the phenotypical identity of cells. Tn the present study we used double-

  11. Comparing environmental consequences of anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of pig manure to produce bio-energy--a life cycle perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, J W; Vinken, T M W J; Hamelin, L; De Boer, I J M

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the environmental consequences of anaerobic mono- and co-digestion of pig manure to produce bio-energy, from a life cycle perspective. This included assessing environmental impacts and land use change emissions (LUC) required to replace used co-substrates for anaerobic digestion. Environmental impact categories considered were climate change, terrestrial acidification, marine and freshwater eutrophication, particulate matter formation, land use, and fossil fuel depletion. Six scenarios were evaluated: mono-digestion of manure, co-digestion with: maize silage, maize silage and glycerin, beet tails, wheat yeast concentrate (WYC), and roadside grass. Mono-digestion reduced most impacts, but represented a limited source for bio-energy. Co-digestion with maize silage, beet tails, and WYC (competing with animal feed), and glycerin increased bio-energy production (up to 568%), but at expense of increasing climate change (through LUC), marine eutrophication, and land use. Co-digestion with wastes or residues like roadside grass gave the best environmental performance. PMID:23026340

  12. Competitiveness of Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Compared to US Corn Ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Crago, Christine Lasco; Khanna, Madhu; Barton, Jason; Giuliani, Eduardo; Amaral, Weber

    2010-01-01

    Corn ethanol produced in the US and sugarcane ethanol produced in Brazil are the world’s leading sources of biofuel. Current US biofuel policies create both incentives and constraints for the import of ethanol from Brazil, and together with the competitiveness and greenhouse gas intensity of sugarcane ethanol compared to corn ethanol will determine the extent of these imports. This study analyzes the supply-side determinants of this competitiveness and compares the greenhouse gas intensity of...

  13. Ruthenibacterium lactatiformans gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, lactate-producing member of the family Ruminococcaceae isolated from human faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkoporov, Andrei N; Chaplin, Andrei V; Shcherbakova, Victoria A; Suzina, Natalia E; Kafarskaia, Lyudmila I; Bozhenko, Vladimir K; Efimov, Boris A

    2016-08-01

    Two novel strains of Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, obligately anaerobic, non-spore-forming, non-motile bacteria were isolated from the faeces of healthy human subjects. The strains, designated as 585-1T and 668, were characterized by mesophilic fermentative metabolism, production of d-lactic acid, succinic acid and acetic acid as end products of d-glucose fermentation, prevalence of C18 : 1ω9, C18 : 1ω9 aldehyde, C16 : 0 and C16 : 1ω7c fatty acids, presence of glycine, glutamic acid, lysine, alanine and aspartic acid in the petidoglycan peptide moiety and lack of respiratory quinones. Whole genome sequencing revealed the DNA G+C content was 56.4-56.6 mol%. The complete 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains shared 91.7/91.6 % similarity with Anaerofilum pentosovorans FaeT, 91.3/91.2 % with Gemmiger formicilis ATCC 27749T and 88.9/88.8 % with Faecalibacterium prausnitzii ATCC 27768T. On the basis of chemotaxonomic and genomic properties it was concluded that the strains represent a novel species in a new genus within the family Ruminococcaceae, for which the name Ruthenibacterium lactatiformans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Ruthenibacterium lactatiformans is 585-1T (=DSM 100348T=VKM B-2901T). PMID:27154556

  14. A new β-glucosidase producing yeast for lower-cost cellulosic ethanol production from xylose-extracted corncob residues by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z Lewis; Weber, Scott A; Cotta, Michael A; Li, Shi-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    This study reports a new yeast strain of Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 that is able to utilize cellobiose as sole source of carbon and produce sufficient native β-glucosidase enzyme activity for cellulosic ethanol production using SSF. In addition, this yeast is tolerant to the major inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass pre-treatment such as 2-furaldehyde (furfural) and 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde (HMF), and converted furfural into furan methanol in less than 12h and HMF into furan-2,5-dimethanol within 24h in the presence of 15 mM each of furfural and HMF. Using xylose-extracted corncob residue as cellulosic feedstock, an ethanol production of 23 g/l was obtained using 25% solids loading at 37 °C by SSF without addition of exogenous β-glucosidase. Development of this yeast aids renewable biofuels development efforts for economic consolidated SSF bio-processing. PMID:22133603

  15. Transesterification of mustard (Brassica nigra) seed oil with ethanol: Purification of the crude ethyl ester with activated carbon produced from de-oiled cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Biodiesel ethyl ester has been developed from mustard seed oil. • Variables affect the transesterification were investigated. • Dry washing using the activated carbon produced from the extraction remaining was applied to purify the ethyl esters. • Properties of the produced fuels were measured. • Blending of the produced ethyl ester with petro diesel was also investigated. - Abstract: The present study reports the production of mustard seed oil ethyl esters (MSOEE) through alkali-catalyzed transesterification with ethanol using potassium hydroxide as a catalyst. The influence of the process parameters such as catalyst concentration, ethanol to oil molar ratio, reaction temperature, reaction duration and the catalyst type was investigated so as to find out the optimal conditions for the transesterification process. As a result, optimum conditions for production of MSOEE were found to be: 0.90% KOH wt/wt of oil, 8:1 ethanol to oil molar ratio, a reaction temperature of 60 °C, and a reaction time of 60 min. Dry washing method with (2.50% wt.) of the activated carbon that was produced from the de-oiled cake was used to purify the crude ethyl ester from the residual catalyst and glycerol. The transesterification process provided a yield of 94% w/w of ethyl esters with an ester content of 98.22% wt. under the optimum conditions. Properties of the produced ethyl esters satisfied the specifications prescribed by the ASTM standards. Blending MSOEE with petro diesel was also investigated. The results showed that the ethyl esters had a slight influence on the properties of petro diesel

  16. Three alcohol dehydrogenase genes and one acetyl-CoA synthetase gene are responsible for ethanol utilization in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatter, Michael; Ottlik, Stephanie; Kövesi, Zsolt; Bauer, Benjamin; Matthäus, Falk; Barth, Gerold

    2016-10-01

    The non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica is able to utilize a wide range of different substrates like glucose, glycerol, ethanol, acetate, proteins and various hydrophobic molecules. Although most metabolic pathways for the utilization of these substrates have been clarified by now, it was not clear whether ethanol is oxidized by alcohol dehydrogenases or by an alternative oxidation system inside the cell. In order to detect the genes that are required for ethanol utilization in Y. lipolytica, eight alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) genes and one alcohol oxidase gene (FAO1) have been identified and respective deletion strains were tested for their ability to metabolize ethanol. As a result of this, we found that the availability of ADH1, ADH2 or ADH3 is required for ethanol utilization in Y. lipolytica. A strain with deletions in all three genes is lacking the ability to utilize ethanol as sole carbon source. Although Adh2p showed by far the highest enzyme activity in an in vitro assay, the availability of any of the three genes was sufficient to enable a decent growth. In addition to ADH1, ADH2 and ADH3, an acetyl-CoA synthetase encoding gene (ACS1) was found to be essential for ethanol utilization. As Y. lipolytica is a non-fermenting yeast, it is neither able to grow under anaerobic conditions nor to produce ethanol. To investigate whether Y. lipolytica may produce ethanol, the key genes of alcoholic fermentation in S. cerevisiae, ScADH1 and ScPDC1, were overexpressed in an ADH and an ACS1 deletion strain. However, instead of producing ethanol, the respective strains regained the ability to use ethanol as single carbon source and were still not able to grow under anaerobic conditions.

  17. Giant cane (Arundo donax L.) can substitute traditional energy crops in producing energy by anaerobic digestion, reducing surface area and costs: A full-scale approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corno, Luca; Lonati, Samuele; Riva, Carlo; Pilu, Roberto; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    Arundo donax L. (Giant cane) was used in a full-scale anaerobic digester (AD) plant (power of 380kWhEE) in partial substitution for corn to produce biogas and electricity. Corn substitution was made on a biomethane potential (BMP) basis so that A. donax L. after substitution accounted for 15.6% of the total mix-BMP (BMPmix) and corn for 66.6% BMPmix. Results obtained indicated that Giant cane was able to substitute for corn, reducing both biomass and electricity production costs, because of both higher biomass productivity (Mg total solid Ha(-1)) and lower biomass cost (€Ha(-1)). Total electricity biogas costs were reduced by 5.5%. The total biomass cost, the total surface area needed to produce the energy crop and the total cost of producing electricity can be reduced by 75.5%, 36.6% and 22%, by substituting corn completely with Giant cane in the mix fed to the full-scale plant.

  18. Giant cane (Arundo donax L.) can substitute traditional energy crops in producing energy by anaerobic digestion, reducing surface area and costs: A full-scale approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corno, Luca; Lonati, Samuele; Riva, Carlo; Pilu, Roberto; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    Arundo donax L. (Giant cane) was used in a full-scale anaerobic digester (AD) plant (power of 380kWhEE) in partial substitution for corn to produce biogas and electricity. Corn substitution was made on a biomethane potential (BMP) basis so that A. donax L. after substitution accounted for 15.6% of the total mix-BMP (BMPmix) and corn for 66.6% BMPmix. Results obtained indicated that Giant cane was able to substitute for corn, reducing both biomass and electricity production costs, because of both higher biomass productivity (Mg total solid Ha(-1)) and lower biomass cost (€Ha(-1)). Total electricity biogas costs were reduced by 5.5%. The total biomass cost, the total surface area needed to produce the energy crop and the total cost of producing electricity can be reduced by 75.5%, 36.6% and 22%, by substituting corn completely with Giant cane in the mix fed to the full-scale plant. PMID:27428299

  19. An analysis of producing ethanol and electric power from woody residues and agricultural crops in East Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismayilova, Rubaba Mammad

    The increasing U.S. dependence on imported oil; the contribution of fossil fuels to the greenhouse gas emissions and the climate change issue; the current level of energy prices and other environmental concerns have increased world interest in renewable energy sources. Biomass is a large, diverse, readily exploitable resource. This dissertation examines the biomass potential in Eastern Texas by examining a 44 county region. This examination considers the potential establishment of a 100-megawatt (MW) power plant and a 20 million gallon per year (MMGY) ethanol plant using lignocellulosic biomass. The biomass sources considered are switchgrass, sugarcane bagasse, and logging residues. In the case of electricity generation, co-firing scenarios are also investigated. The research analyzes the key indicators involved with economic costs and benefits, environmental and social impacts. The bioenergy production possibilities considered here were biofeedstock supported electric power and cellulosic ethanol production. The results were integrated into a comprehensive set of information that addresses the effects of biomass energy development in the region. The analysis indicates that none of the counties in East Texas have sufficient biomass to individually sustain either a 100% biomass fired power plant or the cellulosic ethanol plant. Such plants would only be feasible at the regional level. Co-firing biomass with coal, however, does provide a most attractive alternative for the study region. The results indicate further that basing the decision solely on economics of feedstock availability and costs would suggest that bioenergy, as a renewable energy, is not a viable energy alternative. Accounting for some environmental and social benefits accruing to the region from bioenergy production together with the feedstock economics, however, suggests that government subsidies, up to the amount of accruing benefits, could make the bioenergies an attractive business opportunity

  20. Foreign matter contaminating ethanolic extract of propolis: a filth-test survey comparing products from small beekeeping farms and industrial producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Angelo; Cosci, Francesca; Canovai, Roberto; Giannotti, Paolo; Benelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a resinous material collected by honeybees from the exudates and buds of plants. It has been widely used as a remedy by humans since ancient times, as well as for dietary supplements and cosmetics. European legislation recently focused on the quality and hygiene standards of foods, including beehive products, and extensive efforts have been made to avoid the presence of chemical contaminants, whilst in contrast few studies have investigated the magnitude of contamination by physical ones. We conducted a filth-test survey to evaluate the contamination of ethanolic extract of propolis by foreign materials. We also compared the abundance of contaminants in propolis extracts currently marketed by small beekeepers and industrial producers. We found different foreign materials in the ethanol extract of propolis. Contaminants differed in abundance, with a higher number of carbon particles (small beekeepers: 2.70 ± 0.63; industrial producers: 1.25 ± 0.49; mean (n/30 ml) ± SE) and other inorganic fragments (small beekeepers: 3.50 ± 0.31; industrial producers: 3.88 ± 1.11) than arthropod fragments (small beekeepers: 0.30 ± 0.21; industrial producers: 0.38 ± 0.26) and mammal hairs (small beekeepers: 0.10 ± 0.10; industrial producers: 0.38 ± 0.26). No differences in the abundance of foreign matter between propolis from small beekeepers and industrial producers were found, allowing us to point out an increased awareness by small producers of issues inherent in hygiene management. Contamination of propolis extracts by animal body parts, such as insect fragments, mites and rodent hairs, indicates poor management of hygiene in the production process and low effectiveness of the filtration phase. Animal-borne contaminants can act as pathogen vectors as well as introducing dangerous allergens when ingested or applied to human skin. The filth-test applied to ethanolic propolis extract quality control can be considered a promising tool, also for small beekeeper

  1. Quantitative analysis of a high-rate hydrogen-producing microbial community in anaerobic agitated granular sludge bed bioreactors using glucose as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chun-Hsiung; Lee, Kuo-Shing; Cheng, Lu-Hsiu; Huang, Yu-Hsin; Lin, Ping-Jei; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2007-06-01

    Fermentative H(2) production microbial structure in an agitated granular sludge bed bioreactor was analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and polymerase chain reaction-denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). This hydrogen-producing system was operated at four different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 4, 2, 1, and 0.5 h and with an influent glucose concentration of 20 g chemical oxygen demand/l. According to the PCR-DGGE analysis, bacterial community structures were mainly composed of Clostridium sp. (possibly Clostridium pasteurianum), Klebsiella oxytoca, and Streptococcus sp. Significant increase of Clostridium/total cell ratio (68%) was observed when the reactor was operated under higher influent flow rate. The existence of Streptococcus sp. in the reactor became more important when operated under a short HRT as indicated by the ratio of Streptococcus probe-positive cells to Clostridium probe-positive cells changing from 21% (HRT 4 h) to 38% (HRT 0.5 h). FISH images suggested that Streptococcus cells probably acted as seeds for self-flocculated granule formation. Furthermore, combining the inspections with hydrogen production under different HRTs and their corresponding FISH analysis indicated that K. oxytoca did not directly contribute to H(2) production but possibly played a role in consuming O(2) to create an anaerobic environment for the hydrogen-producing Clostridium.

  2. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, N.H.C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Lovley, D.R.; Jannasch, H.W.; Frankel, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 ?? 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of {110} faces which are capped and truncated by {111} end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization. ?? 1990.

  3. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, N. H. C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Lovley, D. R.; Jannasch, H. W.; Frankel, R. B.

    1990-04-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 × 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of 110 faces which are capped and truncated by 111 end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization.

  4. Prospects for Anaerobic Biodegradation of Biofuels (Ethanol and Biodiesel) and Proposed Biofuels (n-Propanol, iso-Propanol, n-Butanol, and 2,5-Dimethylfuran) in Aquifer Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel, are a growing component of the nation’s fuel supply. Ethanol is the primary biofuel in the US market, distributed as a blend with petroleum gasoline, in concentrations ranging from 10% ethanol (E10) to 85% ethanol (E85). Biodiesel, made ...

  5. HYDROLYSIS OF AGRICULTURAL BIOMASS BY COMBINED PRETREATMENT AND ENZYMATIC METHODS IN ORDER TO PRODUCE BIOFUELS (ETHANOL, BIOGAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STEFANA JURCOANE

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of energy crops (maize straw, wheat straw, barley straw etc. as substrate for renewable energy production (e.g. biogas is more efficient when it is degraded by different hydrolysis methods. However, fibers contained inside energy crops (e.g. cellulose and hemicellulose are only hardly and slowly degraded by anaerobic bacteria. The slow degradation of these substances can decrease the methane yields of agricultural biogas plants.In the present study, we investigated the efficiency of combined pretreatment (different concentrations H2SO4 + 30 minutes at 1210C followed to enzymatic hydrolysis. Testing different concentration of H2SO4, good results were obtained for maize whole crop when we used combined pretreatment (3% H2SO4 + 30 minutes at 1210C followed to enzymatic hydrolysis (3.9 fold higher and for Gavott Maize Straw when we used combined pretreatment (2% H2SO4 + 30 minutes at 1210C followed to enzymatic hydrolysis (3.6 fold higher comparing with untreated samples.

  6. Quantitative fluorescent in-situ hybridization: a hypothesized competition mode between two dominant bacteria groups in hydrogen-producing anaerobic sludge processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C-L; Chen, C-C; Lin, C-Y; Liu, W-T

    2009-01-01

    Two hydrogen-producing continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) fed respectively with glucose and sucrose were investigated by polymerase chain reaction-denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH). The substrate was fed in a continuous mode decreased from hydraulic retention time (HRT) 10 hours to 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2 hours. Quantitative fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) observations further demonstrated that two morphotypes of bacteria dominated both microbial communities. One was long rod bacteria which can be targeted either by Chis150 probe designed to hybridize the gram positive low G + C bacteria or the specific oligonucleotide probe Lg10-6. The probe Lg10-6, affiliated with Clostridium pasteurianum, was designed and then checked with other reference organisms. The other type, unknown group, which cannot be detected by Chis150 was curved rod bacteria. Notably, the population ratios of the two predominant groups reflected the different operational performance of the two reactors, such as hydrogen producing rates, substrate turnover rates and metabolites compositions. Therefore, a competition mode of the two dominant bacteria groups was hypothesized. In the study, 16S rRNA-based gene library of hydrogen-producing microbial communities was established. The efficiency of hydrogen yields was correlated with substrates (glucose or sucrose), HRT, metabolites compositions (acetate, propionate, butyrate and ethanol), thermal pre-treatment (seed biomass was heated at 100 degrees C for 45 minutes), and microbial communities in the bioreactor, not sludge sources (municipal sewage sludge, alcohol-processing sludge, or bean-processing sludge). The designed specific oligonucleotide probe Lg10-6 also provides us a useful and fast molecular tool to screen hydrogen-producing microbial communities in the future research.

  7. The potential of bacteria isolated from ruminal contents of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep to hydrolyse seaweed components and produce methane by anaerobic digestion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allan G; Withers, Susan; Sutherland, Alastair D

    2013-01-01

    The production of methane biofuel from seaweeds is limited by the hydrolysis of polysaccharides. The rumen microbiota of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep was studied for polysaccharidic bacterial isolates degrading brown-seaweed polysaccharides. Only nine isolates out of 65 utilized >90% of the polysaccharide they were isolated on. The nine isolates (eight Prevotella spp. and one Clostridium butyricum) utilized whole Laminaria hyperborea extract and a range of seaweed polysaccharides, including alginate (seven out of nine isolates), laminarin and carboxymethylcellulose (eight out of nine isolates); while two out of nine isolates additionally hydrolysed fucoidan to some extent. Crude enzyme extracts from three of the isolates studied further had diverse glycosidases and polysaccharidase activities; particularly against laminarin and alginate (two isolates were shown to have alginate lyase activity) and notably fucoidan and carageenan (one isolate). In serial culture rumen microbiota hydrolysed a range of seaweed polysaccharides (fucoidan to a notably lesser degree) and homogenates of L. hyperborea, mixed Fucus spp. and Ascophyllum nodosum to produce methane and acetate. The rumen microbiota and isolates represent potential adjunct organisms or enzymes which may improve hydrolysis of seaweed components and thus improve the efficiency of seaweed anaerobic digestion for methane biofuel production. PMID:23170956

  8. Flow-FISH analysis and isolation of clostridial strains in an anaerobic semi-solid bio-hydrogen producing system by hydrogenase gene target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Chang Jui; Chou, Chia-Hung; Hsu, Ping-Chi; Yu, Sian-Jhong; Chen, Wei-En; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Wen, Fu-Shyan

    2007-04-01

    By using hydrogenase gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), the predominant clostridial hydrogenase that may have contributed to biohydrogen production in an anaerobic semi-solid fermentation system has been monitored. The results revealed that a Clostridium pasteurianum-like hydrogenase gene sequence can be detected by both PCR and RT-PCR and suggested that the bacterial strain possessing this specific hydrogenase gene was dominant in hydrogenase activity and population. Whereas another Clostridium saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase gene can be detected only by RT-PCR and suggest that the bacterial strain possessing this specific hydrogenase gene may be less dominant in population. In this study, hydrogenase gene-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that only 6.6% of the total eubacterial cells in a hydrogen-producing culture were detected to express the C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase, whereas the eubacteria that expressed the C. pasteurianum-like hydrogenase was 25.6%. A clostridial strain M1 possessing the identical nucleotide sequences of the C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase gene was then isolated and identified as Clostridium butyricum based on 16S rRNA sequence. Comparing to the original inoculum with mixed microflora, either using C. butyricum M1 as the only inoculum or co-culturing with a Bacillus thermoamylovorans isolate will guarantee an effective and even better production of hydrogen from brewery yeast waste. PMID:17277963

  9. Flow-FISH analysis and isolation of clostridial strains in an anaerobic semi-solid bio-hydrogen producing system by hydrogenase gene target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Chang Jui; Chou, Chia-Hung; Hsu, Ping-Chi; Yu, Sian-Jhong; Chen, Wei-En; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Wen, Fu-Shyan

    2007-04-01

    By using hydrogenase gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), the predominant clostridial hydrogenase that may have contributed to biohydrogen production in an anaerobic semi-solid fermentation system has been monitored. The results revealed that a Clostridium pasteurianum-like hydrogenase gene sequence can be detected by both PCR and RT-PCR and suggested that the bacterial strain possessing this specific hydrogenase gene was dominant in hydrogenase activity and population. Whereas another Clostridium saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase gene can be detected only by RT-PCR and suggest that the bacterial strain possessing this specific hydrogenase gene may be less dominant in population. In this study, hydrogenase gene-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that only 6.6% of the total eubacterial cells in a hydrogen-producing culture were detected to express the C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase, whereas the eubacteria that expressed the C. pasteurianum-like hydrogenase was 25.6%. A clostridial strain M1 possessing the identical nucleotide sequences of the C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase gene was then isolated and identified as Clostridium butyricum based on 16S rRNA sequence. Comparing to the original inoculum with mixed microflora, either using C. butyricum M1 as the only inoculum or co-culturing with a Bacillus thermoamylovorans isolate will guarantee an effective and even better production of hydrogen from brewery yeast waste.

  10. Influence of rice straw cooking conditions in the soda-ethanol-water pulping on the mechanical properties of produced paper sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaee-Ardeh, S; Mohammadi-Rovshandeh, J; Pourjoozi, M

    2004-03-01

    A normalized design was used to examine the influence of independent variables (alcohol concentration, cooking time and temperature) in the catalytic soda-ethanol pulping of rice straw on various mechanical properties (breaking length, burst, tear index and folding endurance) of paper sheets obtained from each pulping process. An equation of each dependent variable as a function of cooking variables (independent variables) was obtained by multiple non-linear regression using the least square method by MATLAB software for developing of empirical models. The ranges of alcohol concentration, cooking time and temperature were 40-65% (w/w), 150-180 min and 195-210 degrees C, respectively. Three-dimensional graphs of dependent variables were also plotted versus independent variables. The optimum values of breaking length, burst and tear index and folding endurance were 4683.7 (m), 30.99 (kN/g), 376.93 (mN m2/g) and 27.31, respectively. However, short cooking time (150 min), high ethanol concentration (65%) and high temperature (210 degrees C) could be used to produce papers with suitable burst and tear index. However, for papers with best breaking length and folding endurance low temperature (195 degrees C) was desirable. Differences between optimum values of dependent variables obtained by normalized design and experimental data were less than 20%. PMID:14643987

  11. Research on the Ethanol Produced from the Simultaneous Glycation and Fermentation of Cellulose%纤维素同步糖化发酵生产乙醇

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙武举; 翁海波; 李萍萍; 晋果果

    2011-01-01

    [目的]利用微生物方法生产乙醇,从而替代化石能源.[方法]土曲霉M11利用纤维素为原料产酶并糖化纤维素成还原糖,利用酿酒酵母发酵生成乙醇.[结果]通过对土曲霉M11生长条件的研究,确定了土曲霉M11的最佳培养时间是3d,最佳接种量为200μl,最适培养湿度为80%,最适培养温度为45℃,最适培养pH为3.0,此条件下可获得最大的产酶量.通过对糖化过程的研究,确定了纤维素酶的最适糖化温度为55℃,最适pH为5.0,此条件下可获得较高的还原糖量,且在酸性条件下酶活力较高,具有很好的热稳定性.通过发酵.还原糖量占原材料干重的62.42%,产生的乙醇占原材料干重的21.36%.[结论]此方法可以应用于工业发酵生产乙醇,有利于保护环境、降低成本、提高社会效益,有很好的应用价值.%[Objective] The ethanol was produced by means of microbiological processes for the replacing approach of energy source. [ Method] The reducing sugar was produced from the cellulose, which was saccharified by the enzyme that was from the cellulose as raw material was acted by Aspergillus teneus-Mll,,and the ethanol was produced based on the fermentation of yeast. [ Result] The experimental result indicated that the optimal culture condition of Aspergillus terreus-Mll growth was that the best time was 3 days,the best inoculation was 200 μl,the optimal culture humidity was 80% ,the optimum temperature was 45℃ and the optimal culture pH was 3.0,under which condition,the largest amount of enzyme-producing was available. And the experiment in the glycation process of cellulase showed the optimal temperature was 55 ℃ and the optimum pH was 5.0,under which condition the production of reducing sugar,which enzyme activity under acidic condition was higher and had good thermal stability,was relevantly high. By fermentation,the reduced sugar accounted for 62.42% of the dry weight of raw material and the produced ethanol

  12. Co-production of ethanol, biogas, protein fodder and natural fertilizer in organic farming – Evaluation of a concept for a farm-scale biorefinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Kádár, Zsófia; Heiske, Stefan;

    2012-01-01

    -digested with clover grass silage to produce biogas. A method for ethanol production from rye was applied by utilizing inherent amylase activity from germination of the seed. Biogas potential of ethanol fermentation effluent was measured through anaerobic digestion trials. The effluent from the trials was assumed...... to serve as natural fertilizer. A technoeconomic analysis was also performed; total capital investment was estimated to be approximately 4 M USD. Setting a methane selling price according to available incentives for “green electricity” (0.72 USD/m3) led to a minimum ethanol selling price of 1.89 USD...

  13. Mechanism and controlling strategy of the production and accumulation of propionic acid for anaerobic wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任南琪; 赵丹; 陈晓蕾; 李建政

    2002-01-01

    The production and accumulation of propionic acid affect significantly anaerobic wastewater treatment system, but the reasons are not approached until now. Based on the results of continuous-flow tests and the analysis of biochemistry and ecology, two mechanisms of producing propionic acid have been put forward. It is demonstrated that the reasons of propionic acid production and accumulation are not caused by higher hydrogen partial pressure. The combination of specific pH value and ORP is the ecological factor affecting propionic acid production, and the equilibrium regulation of NADH/NAD+ ratio in cells is the physiological factor. Meanwhile, it is put forward that using the two-phase anaerobic treatment process and the ethanol type fermentation in anaerobic reactor to avoid propionic acid accumulation are efficient methods.

  14. Behaviors associated with cows more prone to produce milk with reduced stability to ethanol test due to feeding restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Tempel Stumpf; Vivian Fischer; Giovani Jacob Kolling; Alessandra Ventura da Silva; Maria Edi Rocha Ribeiro; Carolina da Silva dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The experiment was carried out to identify changes in the behaviorr of lactating cows induced by severe feeding restriction and further refeeding that could serve as facilitators for the visual identification of cows more prone to produce milk with reduced stability. Twelve cows were separated into two groups: Control: full diet supply; Restriction: 50% of the full diet. Feed restriction lasted seven days (Period 1), with posterior supply of full diet for seven days (Period 2) for a...

  15. Anaerobic Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Ju, Mei-Ting; Li, Wei-Zun; Liu, Le; Wang, Yan-Nan; Chang, Chein-Chi

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 on the focus of Anaerobic Process. It is divided into the following sections. Pretreatment Organic waste Multiple-stage co-digestion Process Methodology and Technology. PMID:27620085

  16. Anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  17. 4-氯酚对厌氧颗粒污泥产甲烷活性的影响%Influence of 4-chlorophenol on activity of methane-producing microorganisms in anaerobic granular sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗艳; 何仕均; 王建龙; 解明曙

    2012-01-01

    With anaerobic granular sludge from an anaerobic baffled reactor(ABR) as the research object and glucose as the co-substrate, the influence of 4-chlorophenol concentration on the methane-producing microorganisms in anaerobic granular sludge was investigated. The test results showed that: 4-chlorophenol had a strong inhibition effect on the activity of methane-producing microorganisms in anaerobic granular sludge, the slightest degree of inhibition appeared when the mass concentration of 4-chlorophenol was 300 mg/L; and then, with the continuous increase of the 4-chlorophenol concentration, the methane-producing activity of anaerobic granular sludge decreased obviously; when it increased to 400, 500 and 600 mg/L, the inhibition rate were 31%, 68% and 54% respectively. The inhibition effect of 4-chlorophenol on the anaerobic biological degradation of glucose happened in the later stage of the reaction when the concentration was low, and in the early stage of the reaction when the concentration was high. In the recovery test carried out simultaneously, the inhibition effect of 4-chlorophenol with different concentrations on the production of methane was still exist; however, the inhibition degree was decreased.%利用取自ABR反应器的厌氧颗粒污泥,以葡萄糖为共基质,测定了不同浓度4-氯酚对厌氧污泥产甲烷微生物的影响以及活性恢复情况.试验结果表明:4-氯酚对厌氧颗粒污泥产甲烷活性具有较强的抑制作用,当4-氯酚的质量浓度为300 mg/L时,抑制作用最小;并且随着4-氯酚浓度的继续提高,厌氧颗粒污泥的产甲烷活性显著下降.当4-氯酚的质量浓度为400、500、600 mg/L时,相应的抑制程度为31%、68%、54%.4-氯酚对厌氧生物降解葡萄糖反应的抑制作用,在低浓度时发生在反应后期,高浓度时发生在反应初期.同时在恢复试验中不同浓度的4-氯酚对产甲烷的抑制作用仍存在,但有所降低.

  18. Market penetration of ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research examines in detail the technology and economics of substituting ethanol for gasoline. This endeavor examines three issues. First, the benefits of ethanol/gasoline blends are examined, and then the technical problems of large-scale implementation of ethanol. Second, ethanol production possibilities are examined in detail from a variety of feedstocks and technologies. The feedstocks are the starch/sugar crops and crop residues, while the technologies are corn wet mill, dry grind, and lignocellulosic fermentation. Examining in detail the production possibilities allows the researchers to identity the extent of technological change, production costs, byproducts, and GHG emissions. Finally, a U.S. agricultural model, FASOMGHG, is updated which predicts the market penetration of ethanol given technological progress, variety of technologies and feedstocks, market interactions, energy prices, and GHG prices. FASOMGHG has several interesting results. First, gasoline prices have a small expansionary impact on the U.S. ethanol industry. Both agricultural producers' income and cost both increase with higher energy prices. If wholesale gasoline is $4 per gallon, the predicted ethanol market penetration attains 53% of U.S. gasoline consumption in 2030. Second, the corn wet mill remains an important industry for ethanol production, because this industry also produces corn oil, which could be converted to biodiesel. Third, GHG prices expand the ethanol industry. However, the GHG price expands the corn wet mill, but has an ambiguous impact on lignocellulosic ethanol. Feedstocks for lignocellulosic fermentation can also be burned with coal to generate electricity. Both industries are quite GHG efficient. Finally, U.S. government subsidies on biofuels have an expansionary impact on ethanol production, but may only increase market penetration by an additional 1% in 2030, which is approximately 6 billion gallons. (author)

  19. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling of Zymomonas mobilis during aerobic and anaerobic fermentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shihui [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Martin, S L. [North Carolina State University; Davison, Brian H [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 (ZM4) produces near theoretical yields of ethanol with high specific productivity and recombinant strains are able to ferment both C-5 and C-6 sugars. Z. mobilis performs best under anaerobic conditions, but is an aerotolerant organism. However, the genetic and physiological basis of ZM4's response to various stresses is understood poorly. In this study, transcriptomic and metabolomic profiles for ZM4 aerobic and anaerobic fermentations were elucidated by microarray analysis and by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses. In the absence of oxygen, ZM4 consumed glucose more rapidly, had a higher growth rate, and ethanol was the major end-product. Greater amounts of other end-products such as acetate, lactate, and acetoin were detected under aerobic conditions and at 26 h there was only 1.7% of the amount of ethanol present aerobically as there was anaerobically. In the early exponential growth phase, significant differences in gene expression were not observed between aerobic and anaerobic conditions via microarray analysis. HPLC and GC analyses revealed minor differences in extracellular metabolite profiles at the corresponding early exponential phase time point. Differences in extracellular metabolite profiles between conditions became greater as the fermentations progressed. GC-MS analysis of stationary phase intracellular metabolites indicated that ZM4 contained lower levels of amino acids such as alanine, valine and lysine, and other metabolites like lactate, ribitol, and 4-hydroxybutanoate under anaerobic conditions relative to aerobic conditions. Stationary phase microarray analysis revealed that 166 genes were significantly differentially expressed by more than two-fold. Transcripts for Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway genes (glk, zwf, pgl, pgk, and eno) and gene pdc, encoding a key enzyme leading to ethanol production, were at least 30-fold more

  20. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling of Zymomonas mobilis during aerobic and anaerobic fermentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palumbo Anthony V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 (ZM4 produces near theoretical yields of ethanol with high specific productivity and recombinant strains are able to ferment both C-5 and C-6 sugars. Z. mobilis performs best under anaerobic conditions, but is an aerotolerant organism. However, the genetic and physiological basis of ZM4's response to various stresses is understood poorly. Results In this study, transcriptomic and metabolomic profiles for ZM4 aerobic and anaerobic fermentations were elucidated by microarray analysis and by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analyses. In the absence of oxygen, ZM4 consumed glucose more rapidly, had a higher growth rate, and ethanol was the major end-product. Greater amounts of other end-products such as acetate, lactate, and acetoin were detected under aerobic conditions and at 26 h there was only 1.7% of the amount of ethanol present aerobically as there was anaerobically. In the early exponential growth phase, significant differences in gene expression were not observed between aerobic and anaerobic conditions via microarray analysis. HPLC and GC analyses revealed minor differences in extracellular metabolite profiles at the corresponding early exponential phase time point. Differences in extracellular metabolite profiles between conditions became greater as the fermentations progressed. GC-MS analysis of stationary phase intracellular metabolites indicated that ZM4 contained lower levels of amino acids such as alanine, valine and lysine, and other metabolites like lactate, ribitol, and 4-hydroxybutanoate under anaerobic conditions relative to aerobic conditions. Stationary phase microarray analysis revealed that 166 genes were significantly differentially expressed by more than two-fold. Transcripts for Entner-Doudoroff (ED pathway genes (glk, zwf, pgl, pgk, and eno and gene pdc, encoding a key enzyme leading to ethanol

  1. Construction Cost Sensitivity of a Lignocellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    OpenAIRE

    Busby, David P.; Philips, Andrew L.; Herndon, Cary W., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The technology has been developed to convert feedstock with cellulose content into ethanol. However, ethanol produced from cellulosic feedstock is the same as ethanol distilled from grain. The objective of research is to determine the price per gallon of ethanol needed so that producing lignocellulosic based ethanol become economically feasible.

  2. Ethanol poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002644.htm Ethanol poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ethanol poisoning is caused by drinking too much alcohol. ...

  3. Ethanol production by engineered thermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Daniel G; Sparling, Richard; Lynd, Lee R

    2015-06-01

    We compare a number of different strategies that have been pursued to engineer thermophilic microorganisms for increased ethanol production. Ethanol production from pyruvate can proceed via one of four pathways, which are named by the key pyruvate dissimilating enzyme: pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), pyruvate formate lyase (PFL), and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). For each of these pathways except PFL, we see examples where ethanol production has been engineered with a yield of >90% of the theoretical maximum. In each of these cases, this engineering was achieved mainly by modulating expression of native genes. We have not found an example where a thermophilic ethanol production pathway has been transferred to a non-ethanol-producing organism to produce ethanol at high yield. A key reason for the lack of transferability of ethanol production pathways is the current lack of understanding of the enzymes involved. PMID:25745810

  4. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellinger, A. [INFOENERGIE, Ettenhausen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  5. Metabolic engineering of ethanol production in Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shou Yao

    2010-11-15

    Strain BG1 is a xylanolytic, thermophilic, anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium originally isolated from an Icelandic hot spring. The strain belongs to the species Thermoanaerobacter mathranii. The strain ferments glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose and mannose simultaneously and produces ethanol, acetate, lactate, CO{sub 2}, and H2 as fermentation end-products. As a potential ethanol producer from lignocellulosic biomass, tailor-made BG1 strain with the metabolism redirected to produce ethanol is needed. Metabolic engineering of T. mathranii BG1 is therefore necessary to improve ethanol production. Strain BG1 contains four alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) encoding genes. They are adhA, adhB, bdhA and adhE encoding primary alcohol dehydrogenase, secondary alcohol dehydrogenase, butanol dehydrogenase and bifunctional alcohol/acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, respectively. The presence in an organism of multiple alcohol dehydrogenases with overlapping specificities makes the determination of the specific role of each ADH difficult. Deletion of each individual adh gene in the strain revealed that the adhE deficient mutant strain fails to produce ethanol as the fermentation product. The bifunctional alcohol/acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, AdhE, is therefore proposed responsible for ethanol production in T. mathranii BG1, by catalyzing sequential NADH-dependent reductions of acetyl-CoA to acetaldehyde and then to ethanol under fermentative conditions. Moreover, AdhE was conditionally expressed from a xylose-induced promoter in a recombinant strain (BG1E1) with a concomitant deletion of a lactate dehydrogenase. Over-expression of AdhE in strain BG1E1 with xylose as a substrate facilitates the production of ethanol at an increased yield. With a cofactor-dependent ethanol production pathway in T. mathranii BG1, it may become crucial to regenerate cofactor to increase the ethanol yield. Feeding the cells with a more reduced carbon source, such as mannitol, was shown to increase ethanol

  6. Biological production of ethanol from coal. Task 4 report, Continuous reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    The production of ethanol from synthesis gas by the anaerobic bacterium C. ljungdahlii has been demonstrated in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTRs), CSTRs with cell recycle and trickle bed reactors. Various liquid media were utilized in these studies including basal medium, basal media with 1/2 B-vitamins and no yeast extract and a medium specifically designed for the growth of C. ljungdahlii in the CSTR. Ethanol production was successful in each of the three reactor types, although trickle bed operation with C. ljungdahlii was not as good as with the stirred tank reactors. Operation in the CSTR with cell recycle was particularly promising, producing 47 g/L ethanol with only minor concentrations of the by-product acetate.

  7. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  8. Characterizing the Anaerobic Response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by Quantitative Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Naumann, Bianca; Hippler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The versatile metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is reflected in its complex response to anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic response is also remarkable in the context of renewable energy because C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. To identify proteins involved during anaerobic acclimation as well as to localize proteins and pathways to the powerhouses of the cell, chloroplasts and mitochondria from C. reinhardtii in aerobic and anaerobic...

  9. Production of functional killer protein in batch cultures upon a shift from aerobic to anaerobic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gildo Almeida da Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the production of functional protein in yeast culture. The cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Embrapa 1B (K+R+ killed a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Embrapa 26B (K-R-in grape must and YEPD media. The lethal effect of toxin-containing supernatant and the effect of aeration upon functional killer production and the correlation between the products of anaerobic metabolism and the functional toxin formation were evaluated. The results showed that at low sugar concentration, the toxin of the killer strain of Sacch. cerevisiae was only produced under anaerobic conditions . The system of killer protein production showed to be regulated by Pasteur and Crabtree effects. As soon as the ethanol was formed, the functional killer toxin was produced. The synthesis of the active killer toxin seemed to be somewhat associated with the switch to fermentation process and with concomitant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH activity.

  10. The anaerobic digestion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, C.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Boone, D.R. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  11. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM XYLOSE AND WOOD HYDROLYZATE BY MUCOR INDICUS AT DIFFERENT AERATION RATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Millati

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Mucor indicus is able to produce ethanol from xylose as well as dilute-acid lignocellulosic hydrolyzates. The fungus completely assimilated 10 g/L xylose as the sole carbon and energy source within 32 to 65 h at an aeration rate of 0.1 to 1.0 vvm. The highest ethanol yield was 0.16 g/g at 0.1 vvm. Xylitol was formed intermediately with a maximum yield of 0.22 g/g at 0.5 vvm, but disappeared towards the end of experiments. During cultivation in a mixture of xylose and glucose, the fungus did not assimilate xylose as long as glucose was present in the medium. The anaerobic cultivation of the fungus in the hydrolyzate containing 20% xylose and 80% hexoses resulted in no assimilation of xylose but complete consumption of the hexoses in less than 15 h. The ethanol yield was 0.44 g/g. However, the xylose in the hydrolyzate was consumed when the media was aerated at 0.067 to 0.333 vvm. The best ethanol yield was 0.44 g/g at 0.067 vvm. The results of this study suggest that M. indicus hydrolyzate can be first fermented anaerobically for hexose assimilation and subsequently continued under oxygen-limited conditions for xylose fermentation.

  12. Construction and analysis of high-ethanol-producing fusants with co-fermentation ability through protoplast fusion and double labeling technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingping Ge

    Full Text Available Double labeling of resistance markers and report genes can be used to breed engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that can assimilate xylose and glucose as a mixed carbon source for ethanol fermentation and increased ethanol production. In this study Saccharomyces cerevisiae W5 and Candida shehatae 20335 were used as parent strains to conduct protoplast fusion and the resulting fusants were screened by double labeling. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used to assess the ethanol yield following the fermentation of xylose and glucose, as both single and mixed carbon sources, by the fusants. Interestingly, one fusant (ZLYRHZ7 was demonstrated to have an excellent fermentation performance, with an ethanol yield using the mixed carbon source of 0.424 g g-1, which compares with 0.240 g g-1 (W5 and 0.353 g g-1 (20335 for the parent strains. This indicates an improvement in the ethanol yield of 43.4% and 16.7%, respectively.

  13. Anaerobic workout

    OpenAIRE

    McAdam, Ewan J.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic technology cannot directly replace current wastewater treatment processes exclusively. The UASB reactor configuration removes slightly less organic carbon by comparison as the process relies on lamella separation for passive clarification rather than using fine pores like anMBR. By contrast, whilst anMBR can operate as a single unit process for organic carbon removal, the membrane surface has to be cleaned using gas sparging to limit surface deposition, which requires extra energy. ...

  14. 启动子对蓝藻合成乙醇能力影响的研究%Study on the effect of different promoters on ethanol producing capacity with Cyanobacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高政绪; 刘中庆; 刘宏; 刘秀丽; 王德权; 张英华; 高倩倩; 杜传印

    2014-01-01

    从集胞藻PCC6803中克隆了Prbp1,Pmmpb和PnrtA3个启动子,用于控制蓝藻中乙醇合成相关酶的表达,分别构建了3个基因工程藻株Syn-ZG72,Syn-ZG73和Syn-ZG74.在相同培养条件下,与之前构建的携带Prbc启动子的Syn-ZG25相比,Syn-ZG73乙醇产量与之相当,明显高于Syn-ZG72和Syn-ZG74,表明Pmpb的表达效果强于Prbp1和PnrtA1不能控制乙醇的诱导合成,PnrtA可以控制乙醇的诱导合成,但是启动子强度弱,乙醇产量低.%CO2 can be converted to biofuel molecules by genetic engineered Cyanobacteria.Bioethanol is one of significantly biofuel molecules.More enzymes related with ethanol synthesis would produce more ethanol.Three Cyanobacteria strains Syn-ZG72 Syn-ZG73 and Syn-ZG74 were constructed by carrying Prbp1,Prnpb and PnrtA of Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803,respectively.Compared with Syn-ZG25 carrying Prbe the ethanol production of Syn-ZG73 and Syn-ZG25 were very close and higher than SynZG72 and Syn-ZG74 under the same condition.The results demonstrated that the expression level of Prnpb and Prbc were very close and higher than Prbpl and PnrtA.Prbpl could not induce the ethanol producing.In contrast,PnrtA could induce the ethanol producing,but the intensity of this promoter was weak and the ethanol production was low.

  15. Ethanol fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The inulin of chicory slices was hydrolyzed enzymically and fermented to ethanol. Maximum ethanol yield was achieved with fermentation combined with saccharification, using cellulase and inulinase for saccharification. The fermenting organism was Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Kluyveromyces fragilis, containing endogenous inulinase, was also used, but with lower yield.

  16. Studying the ability of Fusarium oxysporum and recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently cooperate in decomposition and ethanolic fermentation of wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Topakas, Evangelos; Moukouli, Maria;

    2011-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum F3 alone or in mixed culture with Saccharomyces cerevisiae F12 were used to ferment carbohydrates of wet exploded pre-treated wheat straw (PWS) directly to ethanol. Both microorganisms were first grown aerobically to produce cell mass and thereafter fermented PWS to ethanol under...... anaerobic conditions. During fermentation, soluble and insoluble carbohydrates were hydrolysed by the lignocellulolytic system of F. oxysporum. Mixed substrate fermentation using PWS and corn cobs (CC) in the ratio 1:2 was used to obtain an enzyme mixture with high cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic...

  17. Anaerobic biodegradability of macropollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini

    2002-01-01

    A variety of test procedures for determination of anaerobic biodegradability has been reported. This paper reviews the methods developed for determination of anaerobic biodegradability of macro-pollutants. Anaerobic biodegradability of micro-pollutants is not included. Furthermore, factors import...

  18. Spectroscopic characterization of low power argon microwave-induced plasma with gaseous species produced from ethanol-water solutions in continuous hydride generation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low power microwave-induced argon plasma generated by resonant TE101 rectangular cavity was investigated upon introduction of volatile species formed in the reaction with sodium tetraborohydrate(III) in hydrochloric acid-ethanol solution. The molecular emission bands of OH and CH were used for rotational temperature (Trot) determination, while the atomic emission lines of Ar, H and Sb were applied for excitation temperature (Texc) measurement. Assuming a Boltzmann distribution, the temperatures were calculated with the aid of the least squares method. Electron number density (ne) derived from Stark broadening of the Hβ line was found to be between 2.5x1015 and 0.57x1015 cm-3. The detection limits (DL) were determined for Hg and Sb. The influence of ethanol concentration in analyte solution and microwave power on measured parameters, was investigated. The results showed that Trot(OH) increased from 2970 to 3820 K while Trot(CH) decreased from 6100 to 4540 K with ethanol concentration in the solution, ranging from 10 to 90%. Under the same experimental conditions the excitation temperature for Ar, H and Sb varied in the following ranges: 5670-4800, 6190-3950 and 10500-7390 K, respectively. It was observed that element DL were significantly influenced by the presence of ethanol in the sample solution. The DL values for Hg and Sb were, as follows: 0.5-11 and 5.3-35 μg l-1, respectively

  19. Development of corn silk as a biocarrier for Zymomonas mobilis biofilms in ethanol production from rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todhanakasem, Tatsaporn; Tiwari, Rashmi; Thanonkeo, Pornthap

    2016-01-01

    Z. mobilis cell immobilization has been proposed as an effective means of improving ethanol production. In this work, polystyrene and corn silk were used as biofilm developmental matrices for Z. mobilis ethanol production with rice straw hydrolysate as a substrate. Rice straw was hydrolyzed by dilute sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and enzymatic hydrolysis. The final hydrolysate contained furfural (271.95 ± 76.30 ppm), 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (0.07 ± 0.00 ppm), vanillin (1.81 ± 0.00 ppm), syringaldehyde (5.07 ± 0.83 ppm), 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (4-HB) (2.39 ± 1.20 ppm) and acetic acid (0.26 ± 0.08%). Bacterial attachment or biofilm formation of Z. mobilis strain TISTR 551 on polystyrene and delignified corn silk carrier provided significant ethanol yields. Results showed up to 0.40 ± 0.15 g ethanol produced/g glucose consumed when Z. mobilis was immobilized on a polystyrene carrier and 0.51 ± 0.13 g ethanol produced/g glucose consumed when immobilized on delignified corn silk carrier under batch fermentation by Z. mobilis TISTR 551 biofilm. The higher ethanol yield from immobilized, rather than free living, Z. mobilis could possibly be explained by a higher cell density, better control of anaerobic conditions and higher toxic tolerance of Z. mobilis biofilms over free cells. PMID:27118074

  20. 生产纤维素乙醇的原生质体融合菌株的构建%CONSTRUCTION OF A FUSANT STRAIN BY PROTOPLAST FUSION FOR ETHANOL PRODUCE FROM LIGNICELLULOSIC MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹萌; 宫彦婷; 张宜; 门珣; 杨非; 杨秀山; 田沈

    2011-01-01

    To obtain a strain that is able to produce ethanol from lignocellulosic materials with efficient toxin-tolerant, ethanol-tolerant, and utilization of xylose, a hybridized strain was constructed by the protoplast fusion technique, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y5 and Pichia stipitis CBS6054 served as parents. The fusant named Y10-F was obtained that able to convert xylose into ethanol with satisfied metabolism of inhibitors. Y10-F consumed 58. 8% xylose with ethanol concentration of 5.2g/L in 96h. Y10-F was able to tolerate 6g/L and 8g/L ethanol, which was better than the parents. In medium containing 3. Og/L furfural, the prolonged lag phase of cell growth reduced to 6h and 18h compared to Y5 and CBS6054, respectively. When the enzymatic hydrolysate from steam-explored corn stover without detoxification by washing used for ethanol production, the strain Y10-F expressed sufficient abilities of toxin-tolerant and ethanol production%为了获得耐发酵抑制剂、耐乙醇并利用木糖的纤维素乙醇生产菌种,以实验室保藏菌种Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y5和Pichia stipitis CBS6054为亲本,采用双亲灭活原生质体融合技术,选育出了共代谢葡萄糖和木糖,且耐受发酵抑制剂的酵母菌株Y10-F.该菌在以木糖为唯一碳源的培养基中培养96h,木糖的利用率达到58.8%,乙醇浓度为5.2g/L.在外加6.0、8.0g/L乙醇的培养液中,Y10-F的生长优于亲株.外加3.0g/L的糠醛时,Y10-F的延滞期较亲本Y5和CBS6054分别缩短了6h和18h.对融合菌株Y10-F进行了汽爆法预处理玉米秸秆的酶解液发酵实验,具有较好的耐毒和产乙醇能力.

  1. Developing Biofuel in the Teaching Laboratory: Ethanol from Various Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jessica L.; Vieira, Matthew; Aryal, Binod; Vera, Nicolas; Solis, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    In this series of experiments, we mimic a small-scale ethanol plant. Students discover that the practical aspects of ethanol production are determined by the quantity of biomass produced per unit land, rather than the volume of ethanol produced per unit of biomass. These experiments explore the production of ethanol from different sources: fruits,…

  2. 嗜鞣管囊酵母发酵柑橘皮水解液生产乙醇的研究%Research on Ethanol Produced by Fermentation of Pachysolen Tannophilus using Hemicellulose Hydrolyzate of Orange Peel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武玉学; 靳挺; 王强

    2011-01-01

    本文旨在研究嗜鞣管囊酵母利用柑橘皮半纤维素水解液发酵生产乙醇的可行性.采用木聚糖酶水解柑橘皮半纤维素,利用嗜鞣管囊酵母(Pachysolen tannophilus)进行木糖发酵生产乙醇;测定嗜鞣管囊酵母细胞生长曲线,乙醇生产及木糖残留曲线,并研究发酵工艺条件.试验结果表明,嗜鞣管囊酵母可有效利用柑橘皮水解液中的木糖进行细胞生长和乙醇生产.以柑橘皮水解液为碳源,发酵生产乙醇是可行的.优化的乙醇发酵生产工艺条件是:发酵时间20 h、温度28℃、摇床转速100 r/min、初始pH 4.5、接种量5%.在此工艺条件下,乙醇产量10.1 mg/mL,乙醇得率0.388 g乙醇/g木糖,是理论得率的84.3%.%In order to study the feasibility of ethanol produced by fermentation of Pachysolen tannophilus using hemicellulose hydrolyzate of orange peel, the hemicellulose of orange peel were hydrolyzed by xylanase and the xylose of hydrolyzate were fermented by Pachysolen tannophilus. The growth curve of Pachysolen tannophilus and the time course of residual xylose and ethanol produced by Pachysolen tannophilus were determined. The fermentation conditions were also studied. The results showed that Pachysolen tannophilus can ferment xylose in hemicellulose hydrolyzate of orange peel for cells growth and to produce alcohol. It is feasible that hemicellulose hydrolyzate of orange peel used as carbon source to produce ethanol. The optimum technology conditions of fermentation are as follows: fermentation time of 20 h, 28 ℃, shaking speed of 100r/min, pH4.5, inoculation size of 5%. Under the above conditions, the yield was up to 0.388 g ethanol/g xylose, 84.3% of the theoretical yield and the production of ethanol was 10.1 mg/mL.

  3. Reduction of hematite with ethanol to produce magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4, Fe1 - x O or Fe0 coated with carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristão, Juliana C.; Ardisson, José D.; Sansiviero, Maria Terezinha C.; Lago, Rochel M.

    2010-01-01

    The production of magnetic nanoparticles of Fe3O4 or Fe0 coated with carbon and carbon nanotubes was investigated by the reduction of hematite with ethanol in a Temperature Programmed Reaction up to 950°C. XRD and Mössbauer measurements showed after reaction at 350°C the partial reduction of hematite to magnetite. At 600°C the hematite is completely reduced to magnetite (59%), wüstite (39%) and metallic iron (7%). At higher temperatures, carbide and metallic iron are the only phases present. TG weight losses suggested the formation of 3-56 wt.% carbon deposits after reaction with ethanol. It was observed by SEM images a high concentration of nanometric carbon filaments on the material surface. BET analyses showed a slight increase in the surface area after reaction. These materials have potential application as catalyst support and removal of spilled oil contaminants.

  4. Elucidating central metabolic redox obstacles hindering ethanol production in Clostridium thermocellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R Adam; Layton, Donovan S; Guss, Adam M; Olson, Daniel G; Lynd, Lee R; Trinh, Cong T

    2015-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, thermophilic bacterium that has generated great interest due to its ability to ferment lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. However, ethanol production is low due to the complex and poorly understood branched metabolism of C. thermocellum, and in some cases overflow metabolism as well. In this work, we developed a predictive stoichiometric metabolic model for C. thermocellum which incorporates the current state of understanding, with particular attention to cofactor specificity in the atypical glycolytic enzymes and the complex energy, redox, and fermentative pathways with the goal of aiding metabolic engineering efforts. We validated the model's capability to encompass experimentally observed phenotypes for the parent strain and derived mutants designed for significant perturbation of redox and energy pathways. Metabolic flux distributions revealed significant alterations in key metabolic branch points (e.g., phosphoenol pyruvate, pyruvate, acetyl-CoA, and cofactor nodes) in engineered strains for channeling electron and carbon fluxes for enhanced ethanol synthesis, with the best performing strain doubling ethanol yield and titer compared to the parent strain. In silico predictions of a redox-imbalanced genotype incapable of growth were confirmed in vivo, and a mutant strain was used as a platform to probe redox bottlenecks in the central metabolism that hinder efficient ethanol production. The results highlight the robustness of the redox metabolism of C. thermocellum and the necessity of streamlined electron flux from reduced ferredoxin to NAD(P)H for high ethanol production. The model was further used to design a metabolic engineering strategy to phenotypically constrain C. thermocellum to achieve high ethanol yields while requiring minimal genetic manipulations. The model can be applied to design C. thermocellum as a platform microbe for consolidated bioprocessing to produce ethanol and other reduced

  5. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for ethanol production without foreign genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngnyun

    Worldwide dependence on finite petroleum-based energy necessitates alternative energy sources that can be produced from renewable resources. A successful example of an alternative transportation fuel is bioethanol, produced by microorganisms, from corn starch that is blended with gasoline. However, corn, currently the main feedstock for bioethanol production, also occupies a significant role in human food and animal feed chains. As more corn is diverted to bioethanol, the cost of corn is expected to increase with an increase in the price of food, feed and ethanol. Using lignocellulosic biomass for ethanol production is considered to resolve this problem. However, this requires a microbial biocatalyst that can ferment hexoses and pentoses to ethanol. Escherichia coli is an efficient biocatalyst that can use all the monomeric sugars in lignocellulose, and recombinant derivatives of E. coli have been engineered to produce ethanol as the major fermentation product. In my study, ethanologenic E. coli strains were isolated from a ldhA-, pflB- derivative without introduction of foreign genes. These isolates grew anaerobically and produced ethanol as the main fermentation product. The mutation responsible for anaerobic growth and ethanol production was mapped in the lpdA gene and the mutation was identified as E354K in three of the isolates tested. Another three isolates carried an lpdA mutation, H352Y. Enzyme kinetic studies revealed that the mutated form of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LPD) encoded by the lpdA was significantly less sensitive to NADH inhibition than the native LPD. This reduced NADH sensitivity of the mutated LPD was translated into lower sensitivity to NADH of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in strain SE2378. The net yield of 4 moles of NADH and 2 moles of acetyl-CoA per mole of glucose produced by a combination of glycolysis and PDH provided a logical basis to explain the production of 2 moles of ethanol per glucose. The development of E

  6. Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donal F. Day

    2009-03-31

    The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of

  7. Enhancement of anaerobic hydrogen production by iron and nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Dogan; Puhakka, Jaakko A. [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland)

    2010-08-15

    The effects of iron and nickel on hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production were investigated in a glucose-fed anaerobic Continuous Flow Stirred Tank Reactor (ACSTR). Both iron and nickel improved the reactor performance and H{sub 2} production was enhanced by 71% with the sole iron or nickel supplementation. In all cases, H{sub 2} production yield was increased by lowering both ethanol and total metabolites production and increasing butyrate production. Furthermore, iron and nickel slightly increased biomass production while glucose degradation decreased with the supplementation of nickel. Dynamic changes in bacterial composition as analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-targeted denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed that hydrogen was produced mainly by Clostridium butyricum strains and that nickel addition decreased the microbial diversity. (author)

  8. Anaerobic thermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term "extremophile" was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of "extreme" environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally "hot environments" on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has definitely

  9. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Canganella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong

  10. Autophagy is a protective response to ethanol neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Gang; Ke, Zunji; Xu, Mei; Liao, Mingjun; Wang, Xin; Qi, Yuanlin; Zhang,Tao; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Bower, Kimberly A.; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol is a neuroteratogen and neurodegeneration is the most devastating consequence of developmental exposure to ethanol. The mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced neurodegeneration are complex. Ethanol exposure produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) which cause oxidative stress in the brain. We hypothesized that ethanol would activate autophagy to alleviate oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Our results indicated that ethanol increased the level of the autophagic marker Map1lc3-II (LC3-II...

  11. Anaerobic biotechnological approaches for production of liquid energy carriers from biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; Angelidaki, Irini

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the use of renewable biomass for energy production. Anaerobic biotechnological approaches for production of liquid energy carriers (ethanol and a mixture of acetone, butanol and ethanol) from biomass can be employed to decrease environmental...... pollution and reduce dependency on fossil fuels. There are two major biological processes that can convert biomass to liquid energy carriers via anaerobic biological breakdown of organic matter: ethanol fermentation and mixed acetone, butanol, ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The specific product formation...

  12. Fair Oaks Dairy Farms Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Review Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Wold; Robert Divers

    2011-06-23

    At Fair Oaks Dairy, dried manure solids (''DMS'') are currently used as a low value compost. United Power was engaged to evaluate the feasibility of processing these DMS into ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. The Fair Oaks Dairy group is transitioning their traditional ''manure to methane'' mesophilic anaerobic digester platform to an integrated bio-refinery centered upon thermophilic digestion. Presently, the Digested Manure Solids (DMS) are used as a low value soil amendment (compost). United Power evaluated the feasibility of processing DMS into higher value ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. DMS was analyzed and over 100 potential technology providers were reviewed and evaluated. DMS contains enough carbon to be suitable as a biomass feedstock for conversion into ethanol by gasification technology, or as part of a conversion process that would include combined heat and power. In the first process, 100% of the feedstock is converted into ethanol. In the second process, the feedstock is combusted to provide heat to generate electrical power supporting other processes. Of the 100 technology vendors evaluated, a short list of nine technology providers was developed. From this, two vendors were selected as finalists (one was an enzymatic platform and one was a gasification platform). Their selection was based upon the technical feasibility of their systems, engineering expertise, experience in commercial or pilot scale operations, the ability or willingness to integrate the system into the Fair Oaks Biorefinery, the know-how or experience in producing bio-ethanol, and a clear path to commercial development.

  13. Obtaining ethanol from hemicelluloses (xylane) of deciduous trees and one year old plants. Final report. Gewinnung von Ethanol aus den Hemicellulosen (Xylanen) von Laubhoelzern und Einjahrespflanzen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puls, J.; Wiegel, J.

    1985-01-01

    In contrast to yeast, bacteria have a wide substrate spectrum. Certain bacteria can convert xylose into ethanol. Thermo-anaerobic bacterium ethanolicus and its mutants can also hydrolyse oligomeric xylane and produce alcohol. An elegant and simple process to obtain pentose and pentosane from ligno-cellulose is the steam pressure extraction process, in which the hemi-cellulose can be obtained by prewashing after brief steam pressure treatment between 170 and 210degC. By controlling the parameters of temperature and time, the hemicellulose yield can be optimized and the production of sugar decay products can be minimised. The batch fermentation of a polymer beech wood xylane after integrated hydrolysis and sterilisation gave an ethanol concentration of 5.3 g/litre after 94 hours.

  14. 养猪废水厌氧产沼反应器产气性能的研究%Research on the Performance of the Piggery Water Anaerobic Biogas-producing Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖磊; 万艳雷; 邹俊波; 魏元芹

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic biogas-producing reactor with seeding efficient anaerobic granular sludge and kept running smoothly.During the operation, the impact of load, pH, ammonia nitrogen on gas production performance was studied . The research showed that gas production to a certain extent associated with the water load , the higher the water load and the greater the gas production .Gas production increased steadily in the optimum pH range for Methanogens .The ammonia nitrogen density elevates caused waste water pH to change , destructing the anaerobic microorganism 's best living environment .Ammonia nitrogen concentrations below 1 500 mg/L, no apparent adverse effects to Methanogens , but above 1 500 mg/L the activity of methane -producing bacteria inhibited and lower the gas production , and the reactor performance declined .%厌氧反应器中接种高效厌氧颗粒污泥并保持启动后平稳运行。在运行过程中对负荷、 pH、氨氮对产气性能的影响进行研究。研究表明气体产量在一定范围内与进水负荷相关,进水负荷越高,产气量越大;在产甲烷菌的最适pH范围内产气量稳定上升;氨氮浓度升高使废水pH发生变化,破坏厌氧微生物的最佳生存环境,氨氮浓度在1500 mg/L以下时对产甲烷菌没有明显不利影响;氨氮浓度超过1500 mg/L时抑制产甲烷菌的活性,产气量降低,反应器性能下降。

  15. Influence of torrefaction pretreatment for ethanol fermentation from waste money bills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Md Mominul Islam; Kim, Chul-Hwan; Park, Hyeon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Gyeong-Chul; Lee, Ji-Young; Sim, Sung-Woong; Kim, Jae Won

    2013-01-01

    Waste money bills (WMB) that are no longer legal tender are nonrecyclable and are generally useless. In this work, we used this cellulose-rich material for ethanol fermentation for the first time. Torrefaction of this nonlignocellulosic waste material was attempted to examine whether such material could benefit from this process as a conventional lignocellulosic material does. Effects of two important parameters, that is, residence times (20, 40, and 60 Min) and temperatures (140, 160, 180, 200, and 220°C), on the torrefaction yield were studied under an inert atmosphere. Glucose and ethanol yields were compared using a factorial experimental design. The highest glucose yield (81.59 mg/mL) was obtained with a torrefaction treatment consisting of 40 min at 180 °C, and it was increased 44.89% compared to untreated WMB. Based on ethanol feasibility studies conducted on WMB, this estimated quantity of glucose could be produced for subsequent fermentation to ethanol (38.92 mg/mL) and it was increased 47.92% compared to the untreated sample. The fermentation rate was also enhanced by adding 0.4 mM benzoic acid under anaerobic conditions. It is concluded that production of ethanol from WMB would reduce waste management costs and thus would be profitable.

  16. Steam Reforming of Bio-Ethanol to Produce Hydrogen over Co/CeO2 Catalysts Derived from Ce1−xCoxO2−y Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyong Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of Ce1−xCoxO2−y precursors were prepared by homogeneous precipitation using urea as a precipitant. The Co/CeO2 catalysts obtained from the Ce1−xCoxO2−y precursors were used for the steam reforming of ethanol to produce hydrogen. Co ions could enter the CeO2 lattices to form Ce1−xCoxO2−y mixed oxides at x ≤ 0.2 using the homogeneous precipitation (hp method. CeO2 was an excellent support for Co metal in the steam reforming of ethanol because a strong interaction between support and metal (SISM exists in the Co/CeO2 catalysts. Because Co/CeO2 (hp prepared by homogeneous precipitation possessed a high BET surface area and small Co metal particles, Co/CeO2 (hp showed a higher ethanol conversion than the Co/CeO2 catalysts prepared using the co-precipitation (cp method and the impregnation (im method. The selectivity of CO2 over Co/CeO2 (hp increased with increasing reaction temperature at from 573 to 673 K, and decreased with increasing reaction temperature above 673 K due to the increase of CO formation. The carbonaceous deposits formed on the catalyst surface during the reaction caused a slow deactivation in the steam reforming of ethanol over Co/CeO2 (hp. The catalytic activity of the used catalysts could be regenerated by an oxidation-reduction treatment, calcined in air at 723 K and then reduced by H2 at 673 K.

  17. 产乙醇和木糖醇耐高温酵母菌的筛选及发酵特性%SCREENING OF A THERMOTOLERANT YEAST STRAIN AND ITS CHARACTERISTICS OF PRODUCING ETHANOL AND XYLITOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜英楠; 左壮; 门珣; 田沈; 杨秀山

    2013-01-01

    从土样中分离筛选到一株耐热酵母菌Y9,鉴定为光滑假丝酵母(Candida glabrata),并对其发酵性能进行研究.结果表明:Y9在42℃时可发酵葡萄糖产乙醇,发酵木糖产木糖醇.在含有初始葡萄糖浓度141.93g/L的培养基中,可产乙醇66.14g/L,乙醇产率为0.47g/g,达到理论值的92.16%;在含有初始葡萄糖浓度54.06g/L,初始木糖浓度18.99g/L的培养基中,可产乙醇23.08g/L,乙醇产率0.43g/g,达到理论值的83.71%;产木糖醇13.56g/L,木糖醇产率达到0.71g/g,达到理论值的70.09%.%The performance of the SSF process is limited by the different optimum temperatures for enzymatic saccharification and microbial fermentation.To overcome this notable discrepancy,thermotolerant yeast strains have been used in high temperature SSF processes.The present work describes the isolation and screening of strain Y9 (Y9 was identified as Candida glabrata) and its characteristics.Results showed as follows:Y9 produced ethanol and xylitol from glucose and xylose at 42℃,respectively.The maximum ethanol concentration of 66.14g/L on initial glucose concentration of 141.93g/L and ethanol yield of 0.47g/g glucose,corresponding to 92.16% of the maximum theoretical yield were achieved.The strain was capable to convert mixed sugar of glucose (54.06g/L)and xylose (18.99g/L) to produce ethanol 23.08g/L with ethanol yield of 0.43g/g glucose,corresponding to 83.71% of the maximum theoretical yield and xylitol 13.56g/L with xylitol yield of 0.71 g/g xylose,corresponding to 70.09% of the maximum theoretical yield.

  18. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future. PMID:27005786

  19. Secondary liquefaction in ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of producing ethanol by fermentation, said method comprising a secondary liquefaction step in the presence of a themostable acid alpha-amylase or, a themostable maltogenic acid alpha-amylase.......The invention relates to a method of producing ethanol by fermentation, said method comprising a secondary liquefaction step in the presence of a themostable acid alpha-amylase or, a themostable maltogenic acid alpha-amylase....

  20. Cr(VI)/Cr(III) and As(V)/As(III) ratio assessments in Jordanian spent oil shale produced by aerobic combustion and Anaerobic Pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hasan, Tayel; Szczerba, Wojciech; Buzanich, Günter; Radtke, Martin; Riesemeier, Heinrich; Kersten, Michael

    2011-11-15

    With the increase in the awareness of the public in the environmental impact of oil shale utilization, it is of interest to reveal the mobility of potentially toxic trace elements in spent oil shale. Therefore, the Cr and As oxidation state in a representative Jordanian oil shale sample from the El-Lajjoun area were investigated upon different lab-scale furnace treatments. The anaerobic pyrolysis was performed in a retort flushed by nitrogen gas at temperatures in between 600 and 800 °C (pyrolytic oil shale, POS). The aerobic combustion was simply performed in porcelain cups heated in a muffle furnace for 4 h at temperatures in between 700 and 1000 °C (burned oil shale, BOS). The high loss-on-ignition in the BOS samples of up to 370 g kg(-1) results from both calcium carbonate and organic carbon degradation. The LOI leads to enrichment in the Cr concentrations from 480 mg kg(-1) in the original oil shale up to 675 mg kg(-1) in the ≥ 850 °C BOS samples. Arsenic concentrations were not much elevated beyond that in the average shale standard (13 mg kg(-1)). Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis revealed that within the original oil shale the oxidation states of Cr and As were lower than after its aerobic combustion. Cr(VI) increased from 0% in the untreated or pyrolyzed oil shale up to 60% in the BOS ash combusted at 850 °C, while As(V) increased from 64% in the original oil shale up to 100% in the BOS ash at 700 °C. No Cr was released from original oil shale and POS products by the European compliance leaching test CEN/TC 292 EN 12457-1 (1:2 solid/water ratio, 24 h shaking), whereas leachates from BOS samples showed Cr release in the order of one mmol L(-1). The leachable Cr content is dominated by chromate as revealed by catalytic adsorptive stripping voltammetry (CAdSV) which could cause harmful contamination of surface and groundwater in the semiarid environment of Jordan. PMID:21970732

  1. Electron spin resonance study of free radicals produced from ethanol and acetaldehyde after exposure to a Fenton system or to brain and liver microsomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonthier, B.; Jeunet, A.; Barret, L. (Departement de Toxicologie, C.H.R.U. de Grenoble, (France))

    1991-09-01

    Free radical formation from ethanol and acetaldehyde was studied in the presence of a spin-trap and a NADPH generating system with a chemical model, Fenton's reagent, or by enzymatic oxidation of these solvents by rat liver and brain microsomes. The free radicals were detected by electron spin resonance spectroscopy (E.S.R.), using the spin-trapping agent, alpha-(4-pyridyl l-oxide)-N-tertbutyl-nitrone (POBN). Under such conditions, the hydroxyethyl radical derived from ethanol was obtained after both incubation in liver and brain microsomes as well as after exposure to the Fenton system. Enzymatic inhibition and activation showed that the mixed function oxidase system plays an important role in the generation of such a radical, even in the brain. Under all the experimental conditions acetaldehyde could also generate a free radical deriving directly from the parent molecule and modified by enzymatic activation or inhibition. A second, longer lasting radical was also observed in the presence of acetaldehyde. On the basis of a comparative study to a known process causing lipoperoxidation, its lipidic origin was suggested.

  2. 高产酿酒酵母SCY6生长与发酵条件的优化%Optimization of Growth and Fermentation Conditions for High Ethanol-Producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain SCY6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾华祥; 宋晨; 李迅

    2012-01-01

    采用高产酿酒酵母(Saccharomyces cerevisiae)SCY6发酵葡萄糖产乙醇,设计单因素试验考察该酵母菌株适宜的生长条件,采用正交试验优化酵母发酵产乙醇的条件.结果表明,该酵母菌株的最适生长温度和pH分别为28℃、5.0,培养基中葡萄糖质量分数为15%时其生长状态较好.正交试验结果表明,最适合该酿酒酵母发酵产乙醇的条件为玉米浆和(NH4)2SO4作为氮源,用量分别为20 g/L和2 g/L,接种量为4%,pH 5.0.在此条件下进行发酵,发酵液中乙醇体积分数可达7.77%,葡萄糖转化率达83.82%.%The high ethanol-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain SCY6 was used to ferment glucose to ethanol. Single factor tests were conducted to optimize the cultivation conditions; while orthogonal design was adopted to optimize ethanol fermentation conditions. The results showed that the optimum temperature and pH for yeast growth was 28℃ and 5.0, respectively. The yeast grew well when mass ratio of glucose in YPD medium was 15%. The result of orthogonal test showed that the optimal ethanol fermentation conditions were, 2 g/L (NH4)2SO4 and 20g/L corn syrup as N source; inoculation dose, 4% volume fraction; and pH 5.0. The yield of ethanol reached 7.77%; and the conversion rate of glucose was 83.82% under these conditions.

  3. 微囊藻毒素缺氧/厌氧降解产物Adda对秀丽线虫的毒性%Toxicities of Adda Produced During Microcystin Anoxic/Anaerobic Degradation to Caenorhabditis elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓国; 吴小燕; 章伟成

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that micocystins(MCs) can be degraded by indigenous bacteria from lake sediments under anoxic/ anaerobic conditions. Unlike aerobic MCs degradation, in which MCs are completely decomposed, anoxic/anaerobic degradation can produce and accumulate one product Adda. Up to now, however, little is known about the toxicities of this product. To assess the safety of anoxic/ anaerobic degradation of MCs, the toxicities of Adda were investigated using Caenorhabditis elegans(C. elegans) as the animal model. Our results showed that exposure to low dose Adda(not more than 0.05 μmol·L‐1) had no negative effect on C. elegans. Exposure to Adda of 0.1 μmol · L‐1 could lead to significant defects of head and body locomotion, whereas no negative effect was observed for other functions at the same dosage, suggesting that locomotion ability of C. elegans was more susceptible to Adda than other tested functions. All tested functions except for the rate of vulva abnormality of C. elegans were significantly negatively affected when exposed to Adda of 0.5 μmol · L‐1. These results suggest that Adda is far less toxic than MCLR and biodegradation under anoxic/anaerobic conditions can detoxify MCs efficiently. However, the high concentration of Adda may still pose new risks to ecosystem if it accumulates in natural environment during MCs anoxic/anaer-obic degradation.%微囊藻毒素(MCs)在缺氧/厌氧条件下可以被湖泊沉积物中的土著微生物降解,产生并积累一种降解产物Adda.为了揭示该降解过程的环境安全性,以秀丽线虫(Caenorhabditis elegans)作为模式生物研究了MCs缺氧/厌氧降解产物Adda的毒性.结果表明,低浓度Adda(≤0.05μmol· L-1)暴露对秀丽线虫各项指标均无显著影响,而0.1μmol· L-1的Adda可显著降低线虫的头部和身体摆动频率,说明Adda对线虫运动能力影响较大.当Adda暴露浓度达到0.5μmol· L-1时,可显著影响线虫的寿命、发育、运

  4. In situ hydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from oleaginous fungal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Elhagag Ahmed; Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Bagy, Magdy Mohamed Khalil; Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    An in situ batch fermentation technique was employed for biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production from oleaginous fungal biomass using the anaerobic fermentative bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Oleaginous fungal Cunninghamella echinulata biomass which has ability to accumulate up to 71% cellular lipid was used as the substrate carbon source. The maximum cumulative hydrogen by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from crude C. echinulata biomass was 260 ml H2 l(-1), hydrogen production efficiency was 0.32 mol H2 mole(-1) glucose and the hydrogen production rate was 5.2 ml H2 h(-1). Subsequently, the produced acids (acetic and butyric acids) during acidogenesis phase are re-utilized by ABE-producing clostridia and converted into acetone, butanol, and ethanol. The total ABE produced by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 during batch fermentation was 3.6 g l(-1) from crude fungal biomass including acetone (1.05 g l(-1)), butanol (2.19 g l(-1)) and ethanol (0.36 g l(-1)). C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 has ability to produce lipolytic enzymes with a specific activity 5.59 U/mg protein to hydrolyze ester containing substrates. The lipolytic potential of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was used as a biocatalyst for a lipase transesterification process using the produced ethanol from ABE fermentation for microdiesel production. The fatty acid ethyl esters (microdiesel) generated from the lipase transesterification of crude C. echinulata dry mass was analyzed by GC/MS as 15.4% of total FAEEs. The gross energy content of biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and biodiesel generated through C. acetobutylicum fermentation from crude C. echinulata dry mass was 3113.14 kJ mol(-1). These results suggest a possibility of integrating biohydrogen, acetone, butanol and ethanol production technology by C. acetobutylicum with microdiesel production from crude C. echinulata dry mass and therefore improve the feasibility and commercialization of bioenergy production.

  5. OPTIMIZATION OF YEAST FOR ETHANOL PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Taghizadeh Ghassem; Delbari Azam Sadat; Kulkarni D. K.

    2012-01-01

    The production of pure ethanol apparently begins in the 12-14th century. Improvements in the distillation process with the condensation of vapors of lower boiling liquids. Ethanol is produced commercially by chemical synthesis or biosynthesis. High ethanol producing yeast exhibits rapid metabolic activity and a high fermentation rate with high product output in less time.Yeasts were isolated from Corn, Curd, Grapes, Water 1, Water 2, and Paneer. Isolation was done on MGYP (Malt Extract Glucos...

  6. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Dahlberg, Ph D; Ed Wolfrum, Ph D

    2010-06-30

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called "dedicated bioenergy crops" including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help

  7. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of California, Parlier, CA (United States). Kearney Research and Extension Center; Wolfrum, Edward J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Process and Analytical Engineering Group

    2010-09-28

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called "dedicated bioenergy crops" including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help

  8. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, Jeff; Wolfrum, Ed

    2010-06-30

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called “dedicated bioenergy crops” including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy

  9. Fermentation of hexoses to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Lena [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology]|[Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept of Chemical Reaction Engineering

    2000-06-01

    The Goals of the project has been: to increase the ethanol yield by reducing the by-product formation, primarily biomass and glycerol, and to prevent stuck fermentations, i.e. to maintain a high ethanol production rate simultaneously with a high ethanol yield. The studies have been performed both in defined laboratory media and in a mixture of wood- and wheat hydrolysates. The yeast strains used have been both industrial strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and haploid laboratory strains. The Relevance of these studies with respect to production of ethanol to be used as fuel is explained by: With the traditional process design used today, it is very difficult to reach a yield of more than 90 % of the theoretical maximal value of ethanol based on fermented hexose. During 'normal' growth and fermentation conditions in either anaerobic batch or chemostat cultures, substrate is lost as biomass and glycerol in the range of 8 to 11 % and 6 to 11 % of the substrate consumed (kg/kg). It is essential to reduce these by-products. Traditional processes are mostly batch processes, in which there is a risk that the biocatalyst, i.e. the yeast, may become inactivated. If for example yeast biomass production is avoided by use of non-growing systems, the ethanol production rate is instantaneously reduced by at least 50%. Unfortunately, even if yeast biomass production is not avoided on purpose, it is well known that stuck fermentations caused by cell death is a problem in large scale yeast processes. The main reason for stuck fermentations is nutrient imbalances. For a good process economy, it is necessary to ensure process accessibility, i.e. to maintain a high and reproducible production rate. This will both considerably reduce the necessary total volume of the fermentors (and thereby the investment costs), and moreover minimize undesirable product fall-out.

  10. Managing Multiple Mandates: A System of Systems Model to Analyze Strategies for Producing Cellulosic Ethanol and Reducing Riverine Nitrate Loads in the Upper Mississippi River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housh, Mashor; Yaeger, Mary A; Cai, Ximing; McIsaac, Gregory F; Khanna, Madhu; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Ouyang, Yanfeng; Al-Qadi, Imad; Jain, Atul K

    2015-10-01

    Implementing public policies often involves navigating an array of choices that have economic and environmental consequences that are difficult to quantify due to the complexity of multiple system interactions. Implementing the mandate for cellulosic biofuel production in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) and reducing hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico by reducing riverine nitrate-N loads represent two such cases that overlap in the Mississippi River Basin. To quantify the consequences of these interactions, a system of systems (SoS) model was developed that incorporates interdependencies among the various subsystems, including biofuel refineries, transportation, agriculture, water resources and crop/ethanol markets. The model allows examination of the impact of imposing riverine nitrate-N load limits on the biofuel production system as a whole, including land use change and infrastructure needs. The synergies of crop choice (first versus second generation biofuel crops), infrastructure development, and environmental impacts (streamflow and nitrate-N load) were analyzed to determine the complementarities and trade-offs between environmental protection and biofuel development objectives. For example, the results show that meeting the cellulosic biofuel target in the RFS using Miscanthus x giganteus reduces system profits by 8% and reduces nitrate-N loads by 12% compared to the scenario without a mandate. However, greater water consumption by Miscanthus is likely to reduce streamflow with potentially adverse environmental consequences that need to be considered in future decision making. PMID:26348783

  11. Efficient carbon dioxide utilization and simultaneous hydrogen enrichment from off-gas of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by succinic acid producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Aiyong; Kong, Xiangping; Wang, Chao; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Min; Ma, Jiangfeng; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-08-01

    The off-gas from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was firstly used to be CO2 source (co-substrate) for succinic acid production. The optimum ratio of H2/CO2 indicated higher CO2 partial pressures with presence of H2 could enhance C4 pathway flux and reductive product productivity. Moreover, when an inner recycling bioreactor was used for CO2 recycling at a high total pressure (0.2Mpa), a maximum succinic acid concentration of 65.7g·L(-1) was obtained, and a productivity of 0.76g·L(-1)·h(-1) and a high yield of 0.86g·g(-1) glucose were achieved. Furthermore, the hydrogen content was simultaneously enriched to 92.7%. These results showed one successful attempt to reuse the off-gas of ABE fermentation which can be an attractive CO2 source for succinic acid production. PMID:27142628

  12. Ethanol dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Uyazán

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This review outlines ethanol dehydration processes and their most important characteristics. It also deals with the main operating variables and some criteria used in designing the separation scheme. A differentiation is made between processes involving liquid steam balance in separation operations and those doing it by screening the difference in molecule size. The last part presents a comparison between the three main industrial processes, stressing their stengths and weaknesses from the operational, energy consumption and industrial services points of view.

  13. Fungal protein and ethanol from lignocelluloses using Rhizopus pellets under simultaneous saccharification, filtration and fermentation (SSFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh FazeliNejad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The economic viability of the 2nd generation bioethanol production process cannot rely on a single product but on a biorefinery built around it. In this work, ethanol and fungal biomass (animal feed were produced from acid-pretreated wheat straw slurry under an innovative simultaneous saccharification, fermentation, and filtration (SSFF strategy. A membrane unit separated the solids from the liquid and the latter was converted to biomass or to both biomass and ethanol in the fermentation reactor containing Rhizopus sp. pellets. Biomass yields of up to 0.34 g/g based on the consumed monomeric sugars and acetic acid were achieved. A surplus of glucose in the feed resulted in ethanol production and reduced the biomass yield, whereas limiting glucose concentrations resulted in higher consumption of xylose and acetic acid. The specific growth rate, in the range of 0.013-0.015/h, did not appear to be influenced by the composition of the carbon source. Under anaerobic conditions, an ethanol yield of 0.40 g/g was obtained. The present strategy benefits from the easier separation of the biomass from the medium and the fungus ability to assimilate carbon residuals in comparison with when yeast is used. More specifically, it allows in-situ separation of insoluble solids leading to the production of pure fungal biomass as a value-added product.

  14. Differential production of slime under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, L P; Simpson, W A; Christensen, G D

    1990-01-01

    A series of 37 clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci previously identified as negative for slime production by the tube test were reexamined by the tissue culture plate test under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. None of the strains produced slime under anaerobic conditions; however, five strains (13%) produced slime under aerobic conditions.

  15. Biochar from anaerobically digested sugarcane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyang, Mandu; Gao, Bin; Pullammanappallil, Pratap; Ding, Wenchuan; Zimmerman, Andrew R

    2010-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of anaerobic digestion on biochar produced from sugarcane bagasse. Sugarcane bagasse was anaerobically digested to produce methane. The digested residue and fresh bagasse was pyrolyzed separately into biochar at 600 degrees C in nitrogen environment. The digested bagasse biochar (DBC) and undigested bagasse biochar (BC) were characterized to determine their physicochemical properties. Although biochar was produced from the digested residue (18% by weight) and the raw bagasse (23%) at a similar rate, there were many physiochemical differences between them. Compared to BC, DBC had higher pH, surface area, cation exchange capacity (CEC), anion exchange capacity (AEC), hydrophobicity and more negative surface charge, all properties that are generally desirable for soil amelioration, contaminant remediation or wastewater treatment. Thus, these results suggest that the pyrolysis of anaerobic digestion residues to produce biochar may be an economically and environmentally beneficial use of agricultural wastes. PMID:20634061

  16. Energy concentration and phosphorus digestibility in yeast products produced from the ethanol industry, and in brewers' yeast, fish meal, and soybean meal fed to growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B G; Liu, Y; Stein, H H

    2014-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the DE, ME, and standardized total tract digestibility (STTD) of P in 2 novel sources of yeast (C-yeast and S-yeast) and in brewers' yeast, fish meal, and soybean meal fed to growing pigs. The 2 new sources of yeast are coproducts from the dry-grind ethanol industry. The concentrations of DM, GE, and P were 94.8%, 5,103 kcal/kg, and 1.07% in C-yeast; 94.4%, 4,926 kcal/kg, and 2.01% in S-yeast; 93.6%, 4,524 kcal/kg, and 1.40% in brewers' yeast; 91.4%, 4,461 kcal/kg, and 3.26% in fish meal; and 87.7%, 4,136 kcal/kg, and 0.70% in soybean meal, respectively. The DE and ME in each of the ingredients were determined using 42 growing barrows (28.9±2.18 kg BW). A corn-based basal diet and 5 diets containing corn and 24% to 40% of each test ingredient were formulated. The total collection method was used to collect feces and urine, and the difference procedure was used to calculate values for DE and ME in each ingredient. The concentrations of DE in corn, C-yeast, S-yeast, brewers' yeast, fish meal, and soybean meal were 4,004, 4,344, 4,537, 4,290, 4,544, and 4,362 kcal/kg DM (SEM=57), respectively, and the ME values were 3,879, 3,952, 4,255, 3,771, 4,224, and 4,007 kcal/kg DM (SEM=76), respectively. The ME in S-yeast and fish meal were greater (Pbrewers' yeast, whereas the ME in C-yeast and soybean meal were not different from those of any of the other ingredients. The STTD of P in the 5 ingredients was determined using 42 barrows (28.3±7.21 kg BW) that were placed in metabolism cages. Five diets were formulated to contain each test ingredient as the sole source of P, and a P-free diet was used to estimate the basal endogenous loss of P. Feces were collected for 5 d using the marker to marker method after a 5-d adaptation period. The STTD of P in brewers' yeast (85.2%) was greater (Pyeast (75.7%). The STTD of P in C-yeast (73.9%) was not different from the STTD of P in S-yeast and fish meal (67.3%) but was greater (Pyeast

  17. Ethanolic extracts of Tinospora cordifolia and Alstonia scholaris show antimicrobial activity towards clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant and carbapenemase-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvicini, Francesca; Mandrone, Manuela; Antognoni, Fabiana; Poli, Ferruccio; Gentilomi, Giovanna Angela

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro antimicrobial activity of crude extracts of three plants from Ayurveda tradition (Tinospora cordifolia, Alstonia scholaris, Crataeva nurvala) against reference microbial strains and clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. IC50 values were obtained by micro-dilution methods meeting the requirements of the NCCLS standard. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was also investigated on a mammalian cell line. Extracts displayed a variable degree of antimicrobial activity and did not interfere with mammalian cell proliferation. T. cordifolia and A. scholaris exhibited a higher inhibitory activity against clinical isolates of MRSA and carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae compared with reference strains, while C. nurvala exhibited a different behaviour. An antifungal activity towards Candida albicans was observed for A. scholaris extract. Results indicate that constituents from T. cordifolia and A. scholaris may be a potential source of new therapeutic strategies for infectious diseases. PMID:24749692

  18. Ethanol production from agricultural wastes using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Muhammad; Nadeem, Muhammad; Syed, Quratualain

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was production of ethanol from three lignocellulosic biomasses like sugarcane bagasse, rice straw and wheat straw by Sacchromyces cervisae. All the three substrates were ground to powder form (2 mm) and pretreated with 3%H2O2 + 2% NaOH followed by steaming at 130 °C for 60 min. These substrates were hydrolyzed by commercial cellulase enzyme. The whole fermentation process was carried out in 500 mL Erlenmeyer flask under anaerobic conditions in submerged fermentation at 30 °C for three days of incubation period. FTIR analysis of the substrates indicated significant changes in the alteration of the structure occurred after pretreatment which leads to efficient saccharification. After pretreatment the substrates were hydrolyzed by commercial cellulase enzyme and maximum hydrolysis was observed in sugarcane bagasse (64%) followed by rice straw (40%) and wheat straw (34%). Among all these tested substrates, sugarcane bagasse (77 g/L) produced more ethanol as compared to rice straw (62 g/L) and wheat straw (44 g/L) using medium composition of (%) 0.25 (NH4)2SO4, 0.1 KH2PO4, 0.05 MgSO4, 0.25 Yeast extract by S. cervisae.

  19. Ethanol production from agricultural wastes using Sacchromyces cervisae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Irfan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was production of ethanol from three lignocellulosic biomasses like sugarcane bagasse, rice straw and wheat straw by Sacchromyces cervisae. All the three substrates were ground to powder form (2 mm and pretreated with 3%H2O2 + 2% NaOH followed by steaming at 130 °C for 60 min. These substrates were hydrolyzed by commercial cellulase enzyme. The whole fermentation process was carried out in 500 mL Erlenmeyer flask under anaerobic conditions in submerged fermentation at 30 °C for three days of incubation period. FTIR analysis of the substrates indicated significant changes in the alteration of the structure occurred after pretreatment which leads to efficient saccharification. After pretreatment the substrates were hydrolyzed by commercial cellulase enzyme and maximum hydrolysis was observed in sugarcane bagasse (64% followed by rice straw (40% and wheat straw (34%. Among all these tested substrates, sugarcane bagasse (77 g/L produced more ethanol as compared to rice straw (62 g/L and wheat straw (44 g/L using medium composition of (% 0.25 (NH42SO4, 0.1 KH2PO4, 0.05 MgSO4, 0.25 Yeast extract by S. cervisae.

  20. Anaerobic fungal populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of molecular techniques has greatly broadened our view of microbial diversity and enabled a more complete detection and description of microbial communities. The application of these techniques provides a simple means of following community changes, for example, Ishii et al. described transient and more stable inhabitants in another dynamic microbial system, compost. Our present knowledge of anaerobic gut fungal population diversity within the gastrointestinal tract is based upon isolation, cultivation and observations in vivo. It is likely that there are many species yet to be described, some of which may be non-culturable. We have observed a distinct difference in the ease of cultivation between the different genera, for example, Caecomyes isolates are especially difficult to isolate and maintain in vitro, a feature that is likely to result in the under representation of this genera in culture-based enumerations. The anaerobic gut fungi are the only known obligately anaerobic fungi. For the majority of their life cycles, they are found tightly associated with solid digesta in the rumen and/or hindgut. They produce potent fibrolytic enzymes and grow invasively on and into the plant material they are digesting making them important contributors to fibre digestion. This close association with intestinal digesta has made it difficult to accurately determine the amount of fungal biomass present in the rumen, with Orpin suggesting 8% contribution to the total microbial biomass, whereas Rezaeian et al. more recently gave a value of approximately 20%. It is clear that the rumen microbial complement is affected by dietary changes, and that the fungi are more important in digestion in the rumens of animals fed with high-fibre diets. It seems likely that the gut fungi play an important role within the rumen as primary colonizers of plant fibre, and so we are particularly interested in being able to measure the appearance and diversity of fungi on the plant

  1. Ethanol and biogas production after steam pretreatment of corn stover with or without the addition of sulphuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondesson Pia-Maria

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignocellulosic biomass, such as corn stover, is a potential raw material for ethanol production. One step in the process of producing ethanol from lignocellulose is enzymatic hydrolysis, which produces fermentable sugars from carbohydrates present in the corn stover in the form of cellulose and hemicellulose. A pretreatment step is crucial to achieve efficient conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to soluble sugars, and later ethanol. This study has investigated steam pretreatment of corn stover, with and without sulphuric acid as catalyst, and examined the effect of residence time (5–10 min and temperature (190–210°C on glucose and xylose recovery. The pretreatment conditions with and without dilute acid that gave the highest glucose yield were then used in subsequent experiments. Materials pretreated at the optimal conditions were subjected to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF to produce ethanol, and remaining organic compounds were used to produce biogas by anaerobic digestion (AD. Results The highest glucose yield achieved was 86%, obtained after pretreatment at 210°C for 10 minutes in the absence of catalyst, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest yield using sulphuric acid, 78%, was achieved using pretreatment at 200°C for 10 minutes. These two pretreatment conditions were investigated using two different process configurations. The highest ethanol and methane yields were obtained from the material pretreated in the presence of sulphuric acid. The slurry in this case was split into a solid fraction and a liquid fraction, where the solid fraction was used to produce ethanol and the liquid fraction to produce biogas. The total energy recovery in this case was 86% of the enthalpy of combustion energy in corn stover. Conclusions The highest yield, comprising ethanol, methane and solids, was achieved using pretreatment in the presence of sulphuric acid followed by a process configuration in

  2. Effect of substrate loading on hydrogen production during anaerobic fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum 27405.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Rumana; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David

    2006-09-01

    We have investigated hydrogen (H2) production by the cellulose-degrading anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum. In the following experiments, batch-fermentations were carried out with cellobiose at three different substrate concentrations to observe the effects of carbon-limited or carbon-excess conditions on the carbon flow, H2-production, and synthesis of other fermentation end products, such as ethanol and organic acids. Rates of cell growth were unaffected by different substrate concentrations. H2, carbon dioxide (CO2), acetate, and ethanol were the main products of fermentation. Other significant end products detected were formate and lactate. In cultures where cell growth was severely limited due to low initial substrate concentrations, hydrogen yields of 1 mol H2/mol of glucose were obtained. In the cultures where growth ceased due to carbon depletion, lactate and formate represented a small fraction of the total end products produced, which consisted mainly of H2, CO2, acetate, and ethanol throughout growth. In cultures with high initial substrate concentrations, cellobiose consumption was incomplete and cell growth was limited by factors other than carbon availability. H2-production continued even in stationary phase and H2/CO2 ratios were consistently greater than 1 with a maximum of 1.2 at the stationary phase. A maximum specific H2 production rate of 14.6 mmol g dry cell(-1) h(-1) was observed. As cells entered stationary phase, extracellular pyruvate production was observed in high substrate concentration cultures and lactate became a major end product.

  3. Gender comparisons in anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity tests.

    OpenAIRE

    Maud, P. J.; Shultz, B B

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity test scores between young active men and women. Three performance measures of anaerobic power and two of anaerobic capacity were administered to a sample comprising 52 male and 50 female college students (means age = 21.4 yrs). Results indicated significant differences between men and women in body height, weight and per cent fat, in fat free mass (FFM), anaerobic power, and anaerobic capacity when recorded as gros...

  4. Cellulosic ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindedam, Jane; Bruun, Sander; Jørgensen, Henning;

    2010-01-01

    Background Variations in sugar yield due to genotypic qualities of feedstock are largely undescribed for pilot-scale ethanol processing. Our objectives were to compare glucose and xylose yield (conversion and total sugar yield) from straw of five winter wheat cultivars at three enzyme loadings (2.......5, 5 and 10 FPU g-1 dm pretreated straw) and to compare particle size distribution of cultivars after pilot-scale hydrothermal pretreatment. Results Significant interactions between enzyme loading and cultivars show that breeding for cultivars with high sugar yields under modest enzyme loading could...... be warranted. At an enzyme loading of 5 FPU g-1 dm pretreated straw, a significant difference in sugar yields of 17% was found between the highest and lowest yielding cultivars. Sugar yield from separately hydrolyzed particle-size fractions of each cultivar showed that finer particles had 11% to 21% higher...

  5. Ethanol as an economic competitor to gasoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuel ethanol is one of the technology success stories of the 21st century. In less then one third of a century it has gone from being a material produced rather inefficiently in small quantities to a major commercial product. This success can be attributed not only to the fact that ethanol is a rene...

  6. Anaerobic xylose fermentation by Spathaspora passalidarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru

    2012-01-01

    A cost-effective conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into bioethanol requires that the xylose released from the hemicellulose fraction (20–40% of biomass) can be fermented. Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, efficiently ferments glucose but it lacks the ability to ferment xylose. Xylose......-fermenting yeast such as Pichia stipitis requires accurately controlled microaerophilic conditions during the xylose fermentation, rendering the process technically difficult and expensive. In this study, it is demonstrated that under anaerobic conditions Spathaspora passalidarum showed high ethanol production...

  7. The anaerobic digestion of sugar beet pulp

    OpenAIRE

    Suhartini, Sri

    2014-01-01

    World-wide there are substantial quantities of sugar beet pulp, which arises as a residue after the processing of whole beet to extract sugar for refining as a foodstuff or for use in fermentation, in particular for the production of ethanol for the biofuel market. In both cases the resulting pulp residue is still rich in pentose sugars and fibre, and the research considered anaerobic digestion (AD) as a potential technology for the conversion of this material into renewable energy in the for...

  8. Anaerobic Digestion: Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Batstone, Damien J.

    2011-01-01

    with very little dry matter may also be called a digest. The digest should not be termed compost unless it specifically has been composted in an aerated step. This chapter describes the basic processes of anaerobic digestion. Chapter 9.5 describes the anaerobic treatment technologies, and Chapter 9...

  9. Anaerobic sludge granulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Castro Lopes, de S.I.; Lettinga, G.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades
    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades. The initial stage

  10. TEST RESULTS FOR FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA, in conjunction with ONSI Corp., embarked on a project to define, design, test, and assess a fuel cell energy recovery system for application at anaerobic digester waste water (sewage) treatment plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at these plants during the proce...

  11. Maternal ethanol consumption by pregnant guinea pigs causes neurobehavioral deficits and increases ethanol preference in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kayla M; Hewitt, Amy J; Olmstead, Mary C; Brien, James F; Reynolds, James N

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to ethanol, through maternal consumption of an aqueous ethanol solution, induces neurobehavioral deficits and increases ethanol preference in offspring. Pregnant Dunkin-Hartley-strain guinea pigs were given 24-h access to an aqueous ethanol solution (5%, v/v) sweetened with sucralose (1 g/l), or water sweetened with sucralose (1 g/l), throughout gestation. Spontaneous locomotor activity was measured in the offspring on postnatal day (PD) 10. The offspring underwent either ethanol preference testing using a two-bottle-choice paradigm beginning on PD 40 or Morris water maze testing using a hidden moving platform design beginning on PD 60. Maternal consumption of a 5% (v/v) ethanol solution (average daily dose of 2.3±0.1 g of ethanol/kg maternal body weight; range: 1.8-2.8 g/kg) decreased offspring birth weight, increased spontaneous locomotor activity, and increased preference for an aqueous ethanol solution. In the Morris water maze test, sucralose-exposed offspring decreased escape latency on the second day of testing, whereas the ethanol-exposed offspring showed no improvement. These data demonstrate that moderate maternal consumption of ethanol produces hyperactivity, enhances ethanol preference, and impairs learning and memory in guinea pig offspring. PMID:22157142

  12. Wood ethanol and synthetic natural gas pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provided details of updates to the wood ethanol pathway recently added to the GHGenius model, an analytical tool used to analyze emissions from conventional and alternative fuel combustion processes. The pathway contains data developed by the United States Department of Energy. A number of co-products were added to the wood and agricultural residue pathways, including furfural, xylitol, lignin, and glycerol. New chemical inputs included nitrogen gas, ammonia, enzymes and yeast. Biological ethanol pathways were reviewed, and separate inputs for wood, agricultural residues, corn ethanol, and wheat ethanol were added. The model was updated to reflect current research conducted on the gasification of wood and the upgrading of the gas to produce pipeline quality natural gas. New process developments in producing pipeline quality gas from coal were also added. The ability to model enzyme consumption was added to all ethanol pathways. 25 refs., 41 tabs., 8 figs

  13. Wood ethanol and synthetic natural gas pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-11-30

    This report provided details of updates to the wood ethanol pathway recently added to the GHGenius model, an analytical tool used to analyze emissions from conventional and alternative fuel combustion processes. The pathway contains data developed by the United States Department of Energy. A number of co-products were added to the wood and agricultural residue pathways, including furfural, xylitol, lignin, and glycerol. New chemical inputs included nitrogen gas, ammonia, enzymes and yeast. Biological ethanol pathways were reviewed, and separate inputs for wood, agricultural residues, corn ethanol, and wheat ethanol were added. The model was updated to reflect current research conducted on the gasification of wood and the upgrading of the gas to produce pipeline quality natural gas. New process developments in producing pipeline quality gas from coal were also added. The ability to model enzyme consumption was added to all ethanol pathways. 25 refs., 41 tabs., 8 figs.

  14. ECONOMIC AND TECHNICAL ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL DRY MILLING: MODEL DESCRIPTION

    OpenAIRE

    Rhys T. Dale; Tyner, Wallace E.

    2006-01-01

    Ethanol, the common name for ethyl alcohol, is fuel grade alcohol that is predominately produced through the fermentation of simple carbohydrates by yeasts. In the United States, the carbohydrate feedstock most commonly used in the commercial production of ethanol is yellow dent corn (YDC). The use of ethanol in combustion engines emits less greenhouse gasses than its petroleum equivalent, and it is widely hoped that the increased substitution of petroleum by ethanol will reduce US dependence...

  15. Treatment of biomass to obtain ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunson, Jr., James B.; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, III, Melvin P.; Hennessey, Susan Marie

    2011-08-16

    Ethanol was produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

  16. Potential Uses of Bagasse for Ethanol Production Versus Electricity Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zumalacárregui-De Cárdenas Lourdes Margarita

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The procedure to carry out the energy balance for ethanol production by bagasse’s hydrolysis is presented. The loss of potentialities for electric power generation when bagasse is used to produce ethanol instead of electricity directly is calculated. Potential losses are 45-64% according to the efficiency of the lignocellulosic ethanol production. The relationship that exists between the volume of ethanol and the efficiency of Otto and Rankine cycles is analyzed. Those cycles are used to produce electricity from ethanol and bagasse, respectively.

  17. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-05-10

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at -150, -100 and -50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation.

  18. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at -150, -100 and -50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation. PMID:27161047

  19. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  20. Maximisation of fuel ethanol from pawpaw fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, V.C.; Ayanru, D.K.G.; Ogbeide, O.N.; Okiy, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Fermentation of slurry from pawpaw fruits (Carica papaya L.) was carried out under conditions of non-sterilization, sterilization, pasteurization, and varying concentrations of yeast cells (Saccharomyces carlsbergensis), incubation times and temperatures. For a slurry pH of 3.5, a maximum of 6.84% of ethanol was produced at yeast cell concentration of 4.3 X 10/sup 8/ cells/ml and for incubation time of ca. 24 hr at 25/sup 0/C. This value of ethanol compares well with 8-10% ethanol produced by the brewing and distilling industries by using conventional raw materials and fermentation techniques.

  1. Maximisation of fuel ethanol from pawpaw fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, V.C.; Ayarnu, D.K.G.; Ogbeide, O.N.; Okiy, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    Fermentation of slurry from pawpaw fruits (Carica papaya L.) was carried out under conditions of non-sterilization, sterilization, pasteurization, and varying concentrations of yeast cells (Saccharomyces carlsbergensis), incubation times and temperatures. For a slurry pH of 3.5, a maximum of 6.84% of ethanol was produced at yeast cell concentration of 4.3 x 10 to the power of 8 cells/ml and for incubation time of ca. 24 hours at 25 degrees C. This value of ethanol compares well with 8-10% ethanol produced by the brewing and distilling industries by using conventional raw materials and fermentation techniques. (Refs. 18).

  2. Ethanol demand in Brazil: Regional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Successive studies attempting to clarify national aspects of ethanol demand have assisted policy makers and producers in defining strategies, but little information is available on the dynamic of regional ethanol markets. This study aims to analyze the characteristics of ethanol demand at the regional level taking into account the peculiarities of the developed center-south and the developing north-northeast regions. Regional ethanol demand is evaluated based on a set of market variables that include ethanol price, consumer's income, vehicle stock and prices of substitute fuels; i.e., gasoline and natural gas. A panel cointegration analysis with monthly observations from January 2003 to April 2010 is employed to estimate the long-run demand elasticity. The results reveal that the demand for ethanol in Brazil differs between regions. While in the center-south region the price elasticity for both ethanol and alternative fuels is high, consumption in the north-northeast is more sensitive to changes in the stock of the ethanol-powered fleet and income. These, among other evidences, suggest that the pattern of ethanol demand in the center-south region most closely resembles that in developed nations, while the pattern of demand in the north-northeast most closely resembles that in developing nations. - Research highlights: → Article consists of a first insight on regional demand for ethanol in Brazil. → It proposes a model with multiple fuels, i.e., hydrous ethanol, gasohol and natural gas. → Results evidence that figures for regional demand for ethanol differ amongst regions and with values reported for national demand. → Elasticities for the center-south keep similarities to patterns for fuel demand in developed nations while coefficients for the north-northeast are aligned to patterns on developing countries.

  3. 挥发性有机酸对产沼气效果的模拟试验%Simulation experiment of volatility organic acids on biogas-producing characteristics under anaerobic condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董保成; 赵立欣; 万小春; 罗娟; 陈羚; 高新星

    2011-01-01

    两相厌氧生物处理工艺在废弃物资源化利用中得到广泛应用.为了摸清产酸相的主要产物在产气过程中的效应,该文利用甲酸、乙酸、丙酸和丁酸等4种有机酸模拟产酸过程中的主要酸化产物,以活性污泥为接种物,设计单因素试验和正交试验,研究了在中温条件下,4种有机酸单一作用条件下和混合作用条件下,甲烷日产气量和累积产气量的变化.结果表明:单一有机酸作底物时,存在一个浓度阈值,高于此值会抑制甲烷产生,低于此值,产气效果随着酸浓度增大而提高;有机酸共同存在时,可以产生协同优势,其中乙酸的产气优势高于丁酸,丙酸具有抑制作用;4种单一酸中,单位浓度下乙酸产气效果最好,甲酸产气量最大,甲酸积累不易对发酵过程产生抑制作用,而丙酸累积最易造成抑制.因此,建议在沼气工程中适当调整产甲酸、乙酸和丁酸较多的发酵物料浓度,从而提高产气效率.%Two-phase anaerobic biological treatment has been widely applied in waste disposal/utilization. In order to study the effects of main products on the biogas-producing process, based on the simulation of four major acidified organic acids (formic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid), the activated sludge was inoculated. Then single factor and orthogonal experiments were designed to study the main and interactive effects of organic acids on dynamics of both daily and accumulative methane production under medium temperature condition. The results showed that there existed a critical threshold of organic acid concentration in single organic acid, where high concentration above the threshold would have inhibited effect on gas production; and gas production got increased with the acid concentration increasing when it below the threshold. There was a significant interactive effect among the four organic acids, and acetic acid had the stronger increasing effect than

  4. Anaerobic digestion of coffee waste

    OpenAIRE

    L. Neves; Ribeiro, R.; Oliveira, Rosário; Alves, M. M.

    2005-01-01

    The anaerobic co-digestion of five different by-products from instant coffee substitutes production was studied in mesophilic conditions. The co-substrate was the excess of sewage sludge from the wastewater treatment plant located in the same coffee factory. Four of the tested wastes produced methane in the range of 0.24-0.28 m³CH4(STP)/kgVSinitial . Reduction of 50-73% in total solids and 75-80% in volatile solids were obtained and the hydrolysis rate constants were in the ran...

  5. Biohydrogen production and wastewater treatment from organic wastewater by anaerobic fermentation with UASB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Li, Yong-feng; Wang, Yi-xuan; Yang, Chuan-ping

    2010-11-01

    In order to discuss the ability of H2-production and wastewater treatment, an up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) using a synthesized substrate with brown sugar wastewater was conducted to investigate the hydrogen yield, hydrogen producing rate, fermentation type of biohydrogen production, and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate, respectively. The results show that when the biomass of inoculants was 22.5 g SSṡL-1 and the influent concentration, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and initial pH were within the ranges of 4000˜6000 mg CODṡL-1, 8 h and 5-5.5, respectively, and the biohydrogen producing reactor could work effectively. The maximum hydrogen production rate is 5.98 Lṡd-1. Simultaneously, the concentration of ethanol and acetic acid is around 80% of the aqueous terminal production in the system, which presents the typical ethanol type fermentation. pH is at the range of 4˜4.5 during the whole performing process, however, the removal rate of COD is just about 20%. Therefore, it's still needs further research to successfully achieve the biohydrogen production and wastewater treatment, simultaneously.

  6. A low temperature anaerobic digestion system reduces instability and produces optimal methane yield : case study of a Farrow to Finish farm marketing 10,000 hogs per year in Quebec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeneuve, E.; Boivin, S.; Hince, J.-F. [Bio-Terre Systems, Sherbrooke, PQ (Canada); Masse, D. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This presentation described a joint collaboration between Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Bio-Terre Systems that resulted in the development of an innovative environmental solution for manure management. The solution which combines low-temperature anaerobic digestion, concentration of solids and production of green energy, responds to the growth of hog production in North America. A case study of a Farrow to Finish farm marketing 10,000 swine in St.-Hilaire, Quebec was presented with particular reference to background information on the farm, process stability and process performance. The Bio-Terre technology was discussed in detail including a discussion of the psychrophilic anaerobic digestion and microorganisms and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) process. The advantages and disadvantages of this process were presented. It was concluded that the process offers many benefits, including energy economy, improved health of animals, odorless spreading, better fertilizer, and reduction of land required. tabs., figs.

  7. Do furanic and phenolic compounds of lignocellulosic and algae biomass hydrolyzate inhibit anaerobic mixed cultures? A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monlau, F; Sambusiti, C; Barakat, A; Quéméneur, M; Trably, E; Steyer, J-P; Carrère, H

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays there is a growing interest on the use of both lignocellulosic and algae biomass to produce biofuels (i.e. biohydrogen, ethanol and methane), as future alternatives to fossil fuels. In this purpose, thermal and thermo-chemical pretreatments have been widely investigated to overcome the natural physico-chemical barriers of such biomass and to enhance biofuel production from lignocellulosic residues and, more recently, marine biomass (i.e. macro and microalgae). However, the pretreatment technologies lead not only to the conversion of carbohydrate polymers (ie cellulose, hemicelluloses, starch, agar) to soluble monomeric sugar (ie glucose, xylose, arabinose, galactose), but also the generation of various by-products (i.e. furfural and 5-HMF). In the case of lignocellulosic residues, part of the lignin can also be degraded in lignin derived by-products, mainly composed of phenolic compounds. Although the negative impact of such by-products on ethanol production has been widely described in literature, studies on their impact on biohydrogen and methane production operated with mixed cultures are still very limited. This review aims to summarise and discuss literature data on the impact of pre-treatment by-products on H2-producing dark fermentation and anaerobic digestion processes when using mixed cultures as inoculum. As a summary, furanic (5-HMF, furfural) and phenolic compounds were found to be stronger inhibitors of the microbial dark fermentation than the full anaerobic digestion process. Such observations can be explained by differences in process parameters: anaerobic digestion is performed with more complex mixed cultures, lower substrate/inoculum and by-products/inoculum ratios and longer batch incubation times than dark fermentation. Finally, it has been reported that, during dark fermentation process, the presence of by-products could lead to a metabolic shift from H2-producing pathways (i.e. acetate and butyrate) to non-H2-producing pathways (i

  8. Regularities of polymer substances transformation into methane by thermophilic anaerobic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    V. І. Karpenko; L. S. Yastremska; І. G. Burun; Y. V. Lembey; O. S. Tatarchenko

    2006-01-01

    The paper shows the regularities of polymer substances transformation into methane by extracted thermophilic anaerobic bacteria. The sequence of substrate use by the methane generating bacteria corresponds to the energy efficiency of the methane genesis reactions as in the first place hydrogen is used and then acetate is. Combined cultivation of extracted different anaerobic cultures gives the opportunity to increase ethanol and hydrogen yield as well as the effectiveness of methane formation.

  9. Lignocellulosic ethanol in Brazil : technical assessment of 1st and 2nd generation sugarcane ethanol in a Brazilian setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanovic, M.; Bakker, R.R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Brazil is currently the largest ethanol-biofuel producer worldwide. Ethanol is produced by fermenting the sucrose part of the sugarcane that contains only one third of the sugarcane energy. The rest of the plant is burned to produce energy to run the process and to generate electricity that is sold

  10. Anaerobic Pre-treatment of Strong Sewage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halalsheh, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to assess the feasibility of applying low cost anaerobic technology for the treatment of relatively high strength sewage of Jordan using two-stage and one-stage UASB reactors operated at ambient temperatures. The wastewater produced in Jordan is characterised

  11. Growth of a Strictly Anaerobic Bacterium on Furfural (2-Furaldehyde)

    OpenAIRE

    Brune, Gerhard; Schoberth, Siegfried M.; Sahm, Hermann

    1983-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a continuous fermentor culture which converted the organic constituents of sulfite evaporator condensate to methane and carbon dioxide. Furfural is one of the major components of this condensate. This furfural isolate could degrade furfural as the sole source of carbon and energy in a defined mineral-vitamin-sulfate medium. Acetic acid was the major fermentation product. This organism could also use ethanol, lactate, pyruvate, or fumarate and c...

  12. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  13. Endogenous ethanol affects biopolyester molecular weight in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroe, Ayaka; Hyakutake, Manami; Thomson, Nicholas M; Sivaniah, Easan; Tsuge, Takeharu

    2013-11-15

    In biopolyester synthesis, polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase (PhaC) catalyzes the polymerization of PHA in bacterial cells, followed by a chain transfer (CT) reaction in which the PHA polymer chain is transferred from PhaC to a CT agent. Accordingly, the frequency of CT reaction determines PHA molecular weight. Previous studies have shown that exogenous alcohols are effective CT agents. This study aimed to clarify the effect of endogenous ethanol as a CT agent for poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] [P(3HB)] synthesis in recombinant Escherichia coli, by comparing with that of exogenous ethanol. Ethanol supplementation to the culture medium reduced P(3HB) molecular weights by up to 56% due to ethanol-induced CT reaction. NMR analysis of P(3HB) polymers purified from the culture supplemented with (13)C-labeled ethanol showed the formation of a covalent bond between ethanol and P(3HB) chain at the carboxyl end. Cultivation without ethanol supplementation resulted in the reduction of P(3HB) molecular weight with increasing host-produced ethanol depending on culture aeration. On the other hand, production in recombinant BW25113(ΔadhE), an alcohol dehydrogenase deletion strain, resulted in a 77% increase in molecular weight. Analysis of five E. coli strains revealed that the estimated number of CT reactions was correlated with ethanol production. These results demonstrate that host-produced ethanol acts as an equally effective CT agent as exogenous ethanol, and the control of ethanol production is important to regulate the PHA molecular weight.

  14. Nitrification and denitrification gene abundances in swine wastewater anaerobic lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although anaerobic lagoons are used globally for livestock waste treatment, their detailed microbial cycling of nitrogen is only beginning to become understood. Within this cycling, nitrification can be performed by organisms which produce the enzyme ammonia monooxygenase (AMO). For denitrification,...

  15. Pathway engineering to improve ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynd, L.R.

    1998-12-31

    Continuation of a research project jointly funded by the NSF and DOE is proposed. The primary project goal is to develop and characterize strains of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum having ethanol selectivity similar to more convenient ethanol-producing organisms. An additional goal is to document the maximum concentration of ethanol that can be produced by thermophiles. These goals build on results from the previous project, including development of most of the genetic tools required for pathway engineering in the target organisms. As well, we demonstrated that the tolerance of C. thermosaccharolyticum to added ethanol is sufficiently high to allow practical utilization should similar tolerance to produced ethanol be demonstrated, and that inhibition by neutralizing agents may explain the limited concentrations of ethanol produced in studies to date. Task 1 involves optimization of electrotransformation, using either modified conditions or alternative plasmids to improve upon the low but reproducible transformation, frequencies we have obtained thus far.

  16. New evidence of ethanol's anxiolytic properties in the infant rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Waters, Dustin H; Spear, Norman E

    2014-06-01

    Ethanol induces appetitive, aversive, and anxiolytic effects that are involved in the development of ethanol use and dependence. Because early ethanol exposure produces later increased responsiveness to ethanol, considerable effort has been devoted to analysis of ethanol's appetitive and aversive properties during early ontogeny. Yet, there is a relative scarcity of research related to the anxiolytic effects of ethanol during early infancy, perhaps explained by a lack of age-appropriate tests. The main aim of this study was to validate a model for the assessment of ethanol's anxiolytic effects in the infant rat (postnatal days 13-16). The potentially anxiolytic effects of ethanol tested included: i) amelioration of conditioned place aversion, ii) ethanol intake in the presence of an aversive conditioned stimulus, iii) the inhibitory behavioral effect in an anxiogenic environment, and iv) innate aversion to a brightly illuminated area in a modified light/dark paradigm. Ethanol doses employed across experiments were 0.0, 0.5, and 2.0 g/kg. Results indicated that a low ethanol dose (0.5 g/kg) was effective in attenuating expression of a conditioned aversion. Ethanol intake, however, was unaffected by simultaneous exposure to an aversive stimulus. An anxiogenic environment diminished ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation. Finally, animals given 0.5 g/kg ethanol and evaluated in a light/dark box showed increased time spent in the illuminated area and increased latency to escape from the brightly lit compartment than rats treated with a higher dose of ethanol or vehicle. These new results suggest that ethanol doses as low as 0.5 g/kg are effective in ameliorating an aversive and/or anxiogenic state in preweanling rats. These behavioral preparations can be used to assess ethanol's anxiolytic properties during early development. PMID:24776303

  17. Ethanol from corn silage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehlberg, R.L.

    1981-10-01

    The corn silage to ethanol process is described. The process feed is corn silage preserved with sulfuric acid. No anaerobic ensilement is necessary since H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ completely prevents microbial growth. The acidified corn silage is heated by steam injection as it is loaded into a batch reactor. The polysaccharides are hydrolyzed to xylose and glucose over a 6 to 8 hour period. Then the sugars are washed from the residual fibers over a 6 to 12 hour period with thin stillage or water. The hot, acidic syrup is then neutralized and cooled for fermentation. After fermentation the ethanol is distilled. The residual fibers containing the thin stillage, corn germ, cellulose, and lignin are unloaded from the reactor and dried with flue gases for animal feed.

  18. Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-04-30

    With increased availability and decreased cost, ethanol is potentially a promising platform molecule for the production of a variety of value-added chemicals. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst advances and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms involved in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) to produce hydrogen, ethanol conversion to hydrocarbons ranging from light olefins to longer chain alkenes/alkanes and aromatics, and ethanol conversion to other oxygenates including 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate.

  19. Ethanol: the promise and the peril : Should Manitoba expand ethanol subsidies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethanol is produced through the fermentation of wheat. Blending ethanol with gasoline results in an ethanol-blended gasoline (EBG). Manitoba has already established an ethanol industry in the province and the government of the province is studying the feasibility of expansion. Every year in Manitoba, approximately 90 million litres of EBG are consumed, and the province's ethanol facility also produces a high protein cattle feed called distillers dry grain. Controversies surround the ethanol industry over both the economics and the environmental benefits and impacts. At issue is the economic efficiency of the production of ethanol, where opponents claim that the final product contains less energy than that required to produce it. A small gain is obtained, as revealed by a recent study. It is difficult to quantify the environmental effects of the ethanol industry, whether they be negative or positive. The author indicates that no matter what happens, the gasoline market in Manitoba is so small when compared to the rest of the world that the effect will not be significant. The three methods for the production of ethanol are: (1) the most risky and expensive method is the stand alone ethanol production facility, (2) integrated facilities where other products are produced, such as wet mash or nutraceuticals, and (3) integrated facilities where dry mash can be exported as a high protein feed. The production of a wide range of products is clearly the best option to be considered during the design of an ethanol facility. Price collapse and the capitalizing of subsidies into prices are the main risks facing the expansion of ethanol production in Manitoba. The author states that direct subsidies and price supports should be avoided, since subsidies would encourage the conversion of more feed grain into ethanol. The feed shortage would worsen especially as Manitoba does not currently produce enough feed to support its growing livestock industry. The author concludes that

  20. [Isolation and characterization of new species hydrogen producing bacterium Ethanologenbacterium sp. strain X-1 and its capability of hydrogen production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, De-Feng; Ren, Nan-Qi; Li, Qiu-Bo

    2004-12-01

    To obtain hydrogen-producing bacterium of high efficiency, a strain X-1 of hydrogen-producing bacteria was isolated from the continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) by anaerobic Hungate technique. The Comparative sequence analysis of 16S rDNA showed that homology of strain X-1 with Clostridium cellulose and Acetanaerobacterium elongatum is less than 94%. All sequence alignment of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer regions (ISR) indicated displayed that consensus region is tRNA(Ala), and tRNA(Ile), variable region is not homologous. Morphological, physic-biochemical character, and comparative sequence analysis of 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA ISR indicated that strain X-1 belong to new genus named Ethanologenbacterium gen. nov.. Strain X-1 is facultative anaerobe bacillus; its main fermentative products are acetic acid, ethanol, H2 and CO2. The metabolic character of strain X-1 is typical ethanol type fermentation. Its capability of hydrogen production was measured in the batch culture experiment. X-1's maximum specific hydrogen producing rate is 28.3 mmol H2/( g dry cell x h) at pH 4.0 and 36 degrees C. Result of identify and analysis of hydrogen production ability demonstrated strain X-1 belong to new genus of high hydrogen-producing bacteria.

  1. Environmental analysis of biomass-ethanol facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbus, D.; Putsche, V.

    1995-12-01

    This report analyzes the environmental regulatory requirements for several process configurations of a biomass-to-ethanol facility. It also evaluates the impact of two feedstocks (municipal solid waste [MSW] and agricultural residues) and three facility sizes (1000, 2000, and 3000 dry tons per day [dtpd]) on the environmental requirements. The basic biomass ethanol process has five major steps: (1) Milling, (2) Pretreatment, (3) Cofermentation, (4) Enzyme production, (5) Product recovery. Each step could have environmental impacts and thus be subject to regulation. Facilities that process 2000 dtpd of MSW or agricultural residues would produce 69 and 79 million gallons of ethanol, respectively.

  2. Production of bio-hydrogen by mesophilic anaerobic fermentation in an acid-phase sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Dae-Yeol; Hansen, Conly L; Stevens, David K

    2007-02-15

    The pH and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) were varied to optimize the conversion of carbohydrate-rich synthetic wastewater into bio-hydrogen. A full factorial design using evolutionary operation (EVOP) was used to determine the effect of the factors and to find the optimum condition of each factor required for high hydrogen production rate. Experimental results from 20 runs indicate that a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4,460-5,540 mL/L/day under the volumetric organic loading rate (VOLR) of 75 g-COD/L/day obtained at an observed design point of HRT = 8 h and pH = 5.7. The hydrogen production rate was strongly dependent on the HRT, and the effect was statistically significant (P 0.05) was found for the pH on the hydrogen production rate. When the ASBR conditions were set for a maximum hydrogen production rate, the hydrogen production yield and specific hydrogen production rate were 60-74 mL/g-COD and 330-360 mL/g-VSS/day, respectively. The hydrogen composition was 43-51%, and no methanogenesis was observed. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, caproate, and ethanol were major liquid intermediate metabolites during runs of this ASBR. The dominant fermentative types were butyrate-acetate or ethanol-acetate, representing the typical anaerobic pathway of Clostridium species. This hydrogen-producing ASBR had a higher hydrogen production rate, compared with that produced using continuous-flow stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). This study suggests that the hydrogen-producing ASBR is a promising bio-system for prolonged and stable hydrogen production.

  3. Metabolic engineering of the ethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae away from glycerol formation towards alternative products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar Jain, V.; Divol, B.; Prior, B.; Franz Bauer, F. [Stellenbosch Univ., (South Africa). Inst. for Wine Biotechnology

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated the commercial advantage of eliminating glycerol from the ethanol fermentation process and possible replacement with other value products. Under fermentative conditions yeast re-oxidizes excess NADH through glycerol production which involves NADH-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Deletion of these two genes renders the cells incapable of maintaining fermentative activity under anaerobic conditions due to accumulation of NADH. This study examined the feasibility of converting this excess NADH to Nad by transforming a glycerol synthesizing double mutant with genes that could restore the redox balance in the yeast. The study showed that although glycerol formation can be eliminated during fermentation, no alternative redox balancing pathway is as efficient at the glycerol pathway in maintaining fermentation. Alternative products such as sorbitol and 1,2propanediol can be produced instead of glycerol, but these genetic manipulations were shown to have negative effects on fermentative ability. Ethanol yields, but not concentrations, were improved in mutants. Significant amounts of acetate were also produced. This paper discussed the metabolic and biotechnological implications of these findings. tabs., figs.

  4. Effect of pH and sulfate concentration on hydrogen production using anaerobic mixed microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jeong-A.; Bhatnagar, Amit; Kumar, Eva; Jeon, Byong-Hun [Department of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do, 220-710 (Korea); Abou-Shanab, R.A.I. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon-do, 220-710 (Korea); Department of Environmental Biotechnology, Mubarak City for Scientific Research, Alexandria (Egypt); Min, Booki [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea); Song, Hocheol; Kim, Yong Je [Geologic Environment Division, KIGAM, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea); Choi, Jaeyoung [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea); Lee, Eung Seok [Geological Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701-2979 (United States); Um, Sukkee [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-Dong, Seongdong-Gu, Seoul, 133-791 (Korea); Lee, Dae Sung [Petroleum and Marine Research Department, KIGAM, Daejeon (Korea)

    2009-12-15

    The effects of varying sulfate concentrations with pH on continuous fermentative hydrogen production were studied using anaerobic mixed cultures growing on a glucose substrate in a chemostat reactor. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 2.8 L/day at pH 5.5 and sulfate concentration of 3000 mg/L. Hydrogen production and residual sulfate level decreased with increasing the pH from 5.5 to 6.2. The volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and ethanol fractions in the effluent were in the order of butyric acid (HBu) > acetic acid (HAc) > ethanol > propionic acid (HPr). Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed the presence of hydrogen producing bacteria (HPB) under all pH ranges while sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) were present at pH 5.8 and 6.2. The inhibition in hydrogen production by SRB at pH 6.2 diminished entirely by lowering to pH 5.5, at which activity of SRB is substantially suppressed. (author)

  5. Microbiological characterization and specific methanogenic activity of anaerobe sludges used in urban solid waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents the microbiological characterization of the anaerobic sludge used in a two-stage anaerobic reactor for the treatment of organic fraction of urban solid waste (OFUSW). This treatment is one alternative for reducing solid waste in landfills at the same time producing a biogas (CH4 and CO2) and an effluent that can be used as biofertilizer. The system was inoculated with sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (Rio Frio Plant in Bucaramanga-Colombia) and a methanogenic anaerobic digester for the treatment of pig manure (Mesa de los Santos in Santander). Bacterial populations were evaluated by counting groups related to oxygen sensitivity, while metabolic groups were determined by most probable number (MPN) technique. Specific methanogenic activity (SMA) for acetate, formate, methanol and ethanol substrates was also determined. In the acidogenic reactor (R1), volatile fatty acids (VFA) reached values of 25,000 mg L-1 and a concentration of CO2 of 90%. In this reactor, the fermentative population was predominant (105-106 MPN mL-1). The acetogenic population was (105 MPN mL-1) and the sulphate-reducing population was (104-105 MPN mL-1). In the methanogenic reactor (R2), levels of CH4 (70%) were higher than CO2 (25%), whereas the VFA values were lower than 4000 mg L-1. Substrate competition between sulphate-reducing (104-105 MPN mL-1) and methanogenic bacteria (105 MPN mL-1) was not detected. From the SMA results obtained, acetoclastic (2.39 g COD-CH4 g-1 VSS-1 day-1) and hydrogenophilic (0.94 g COD-CH4 g-1 VSS-1 day-1) transformations as possible metabolic pathways used by methanogenic bacteria is suggested from the SMA results obtained. Methanotrix sp., Methanosarcina sp., Methanoccocus sp. and Methanobacterium sp. were identified

  6. Methane production by treating vinasses from hydrous ethanol using a modified UASB reactor

    OpenAIRE

    España-Gamboa Elda I; Mijangos-Cortés Javier O; Hernández-Zárate Galdy; Maldonado Jorge A Domínguez; Alzate-Gaviria Liliana M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A modified laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was used to obtain methane by treating hydrous ethanol vinasse. Vinasses or stillage are waste materials with high organic loads, and a complex composition resulting from the process of alcohol distillation. They must initially be treated with anaerobic processes due to their high organic loads. Vinasses can be considered multipurpose waste for energy recovery and once treated they can be used in ag...

  7. Anaerobic bacteria in otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulghum, R S; Daniel, H J; Yarborough, J G

    1977-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria, Peptostrepotococcus intermedius and Propionibacterium acnes, were found in mixed culture specimens from four to ten tested cases of chronic secretory otitis media. These anaerobic bacteria were in a mixed infection flora with aerobic bacteria most often Staphylococcus epidermidis and Cornybacterium sp. which do not fit any established species. The findings of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media is consistent with the sporadic report of the involvement of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media in the literature since 1898.

  8. Ethanol and Meat in the U.S.: A Multi-Market Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Suparna; Azzam, Azzeddine M.; Mark, Darrell R.

    2009-01-01

    Since corn is the primary feedstock used for producing ethanol in the U.S., and ethanol production yields byproducts that can be fed to livestock in combination with corn, addressing the effect of ethanol production on meat markets should consider not only demand and supply interdependence between corn, ethanol, and ethanol byproducts; but also demand and supply interdependence between different types of meats. This paper develops a multi-market equilibrium displacement model to account for t...

  9. Isolation, Identification and Characteristic Analysis of an Oil-producing chlorella sp. Tolerant to High-strength Anaerobic Digestion Effluent%耐高浓度沼液产油小球藻的分离鉴定与特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨闯; 王文国; 马丹炜; 汤晓玉; 胡启春

    2015-01-01

    A Chlorella strain tolerant to high-strength anaerobic digestion effluent was isolated from the anaerobic digestion effluent with a long-term exposure to air. The strain was identified as a Chlorella by morphological and molecular biological methods, and named Chlorella sp. BWY-1. The anaerobic digestion effluent used in this study was from a biogas plant with the raw materials of swine wastewater after solid-liquid separation. The Chlorella regularis (FACHB-729) was used as the control strain. The comparative study showed that Chlorella sp. BWY-1had relatively higher growth rate, biomass accumulation capacity and pollutants removal rate in BG11 and different concentrations of anaerobic digestion effluent. Chlorella sp. BWY-1 had the highest growth rate and biomass productivity (324. 40 mg.L - 1 ) in BG11, but its lipid productivity and lipid content increased with the increase of anaerobic digestion effluent concentration. In undiluted anaerobic digestion effluent, the lipid productivity and lipid content of Chlorella sp. BWY-1 were up to 44. 43℅ and 108. 70 mg.L - 1 , respectively. Those results showed that the isolated algal strain had some potential applications in livestock wastewater treatment and bioenergy production, it could be combined with a solid-liquid separation, anaerobic fermentation and other techniques for processing livestock wastewater and producing biodiesel.%本研究从长期在空气中放置的沼液中分离得到1株可以耐受高浓度沼液的藻株,经形态和分子生物学方法鉴定为小球藻属的一种,命名为 Chlorella sp. BWY-1.本研究所用的沼液来自于以固液分离后的猪场废水为发酵原料的沼气工程.与普通小球藻 Chlorella regularis (FACHB-729)的对比研究表明,Chlorella sp. BWY-1在 BG11和不同浓度的沼液中都有相对较强的生长速率﹑生物量积累能力和氮磷等污染物去除能力. Chlorella sp. BWY-1在 BG11中有最高的生长速率和生物量生产力(324

  10. Metabolic engineering to improve ethanol production in Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Shuo; Mikkelsen, Marie Just

    2010-01-01

    Thermoanaerobacter mathranii can produce ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass at high temperatures, but its biotechnological exploitation will require metabolic engineering to increase its ethanol yield. With a cofactor-dependent ethanol production pathway in T. mathranii, it may become crucial...... to regenerate cofactor to increase the ethanol yield. Feeding the cells with a more reduced carbon source, such as mannitol, was shown to increase ethanol yield beyond that obtained with glucose and xylose. The ldh gene coding for lactate dehydrogenase was previously deleted from T. mathranii to eliminate...... an NADH oxidation pathway. To further facilitate NADH regeneration used for ethanol formation, a heterologous gene gldA encoding an NAD+-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase was expressed in T. mathranii. One of the resulting recombinant strains, T. mathranii BG1G1 (Δldh, P xyl GldA), showed increased ethanol...

  11. Potential for using thermophilic anaerobic bacteria for bioethanol production from hemicellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, P.; Georgieva, Tania I.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2004-01-01

    anaerobic bacterial strains growing optimally at 70-80degreesC for their ethanol production from D-Xylose. The new isolates came from different natural and man-made systems such as hot springs, paper pulp mills and brewery waste water. The test was composed of three different steps; (i) test for conversion...

  12. Engineering of the redox imbalance of Fusarium oxysporum enables anaerobic growth on xylose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Christakopoulos, Paul; Grotkjær, Thomas;

    2006-01-01

    Dissimilatory nitrate reduction metabolism, of the natural xylose-fermenting fungus Fusarium oxysporum, was used as a strategy to achieve anaerobic growth and ethanol production from xylose. Beneficial alterations of the redox fluxes and thereby of the xylose metabolism were obtained by taking...

  13. Anaerobic biotransformation of estrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czajka, Cynthia P. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Londry, Kathleen L. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)]. E-mail: londryk@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2006-08-31

    Estrogens are important environmental contaminants that disrupt endocrine systems and feminize male fish. We investigated the potential for anaerobic biodegradation of the estrogens 17-{alpha}-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) in order to understand their fate in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cultures were established using lake water and sediment under methanogenic, sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions. Anaerobic degradation of EE2 (added at 5 mg/L) was not observed in multiple trials over long incubation periods (over three years). E2 (added at 5 mg/L) was transformed to estrone (E1) under all four anaerobic conditions (99-176 {mu}g L{sup -1} day{sup -1}), but the extent of conversion was different for each electron acceptor. The oxidation of E2 to E1 was not inhibited by E1. Under some conditions, reversible inter-conversion of E2 and E1 was observed, and the final steady state concentration of E2 depended on the electron-accepting condition but was independent of the total amount of estrogens added. In addition, racemization occurred and E1 was also transformed to 17-{alpha}-estradiol under all but nitrate-reducing conditions. Although E2 could be readily transformed to E1 and in many cases 17-{alpha}-estradiol under anaerobic conditions, the complete degradation of estrogens under these conditions was minimal, suggesting that they would accumulate in anoxic environments.

  14. Efficient Anaerobic Fermentation of Simple Sugars by Yeast Fuels Resistance Candida spp. Infections to Eradication by Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedosa I. Valentine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Human systemic Candida infections had proved difficult to eradicate by the medical health care system. Some practitioners and scholars see the problem as being due to drug resistance. For example an author wrote that ‘secondary drug resistance is clearly being encountered in one setting, oropharyngeal candidiasis in patients with advanced Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection usually following years or months of azole therapy. Approach: This research work understudied the nutritional strategies of yeast colonies to serve as a guide to understanding the survival strategies of Candida colonies in human Candidiasis. The aim of the research was to make some impute into more effective ways of eradicating human Candida infections. Ethanol was produced biologically by fermentation of sugar by micro-organisms. The yeast Saccaromyces cerevisiae metabolises complex carbohydrates like starch in the absence of oxygen to ethanol, carbon dioxide and water. This study compared the average ethanol yield of hydrolyzed and unhydrolyzed gelatinized cassava starch fermented by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The starch was hydrolyzed by α and β-amylase enzymes. Fermentation of the starch was done with a 1% innoculums of a 12 h culture of saccharomyces cerevisiae incubated for 48 h under anaerobic conditions. Results: The results of the study showed that there was no starch hydrolysis in the absence of α and β-amylase enzymes. Starch hydrolysis in the presence of α and β-amylase enzyme took 1 h. There was no starch fermentation in the absence of saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ethanol yield of starch which had been hydrolyzed by α and β-amylases prior to fermentation by saccharomyces cerevisae was 28 times higher than the ethanol yield of starch which had not been previously hydrolyzed by α and β-amylases. These results of the study suggest that yeast infections in human and animal tissues produce 28 times more ethanol yield from

  15. Development of a mixed culture chain elongation process based on municipal solid waste and ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Grootscholten, T.I.M.

    2013-01-01

    Keywords: mixed culture fermentation; Carboxylates; Caproate; Heptanoate; ethanol; OFMSW To reduce dependence on oil, alternative fuel and chemical production processes are investigates. In this thesis, we investigated the production of medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) using an anaerobic chain elongation process from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and (diluted) ethanol.By using OFMSW for the production of MCFAs, OFMSW can be valorised. Moreover, the food-fuel discussion...

  16. Performances comparison between three technologies for continuous ethanol production from molasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molasses are a potential feedstock for ethanol production. The successful application of anaerobic fermentation for ethanol production from molasses is critically dependent to the development and the use of high rate bioreactors. In this study the fermentation of sugar cane molasses by Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the ethanol production in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR), an immobilised cell reactor (ICR) and a membrane reactor (MBR) was investigated. Ethanol production and reactor productivities were compared under different dilution rates (D). When using the CSTR, a decent ethanol productivity (Qp) of 6.8 g L−1 h−1 was obtained at a dilution rate of 0.5 h−1. The Qp was improved by 48% and the residual sugar concentration was reduced by using the ICR. Intensifying the production of ethanol was investigated in the MBR to achieve a maximum ethanol concentration and a Qp of 46.5 g L−1 and 19.2 g L−1 h−1, respectively. The achieved results in the MBR worked with high substrate concentration are promising for the scale up operation. -- Highlights: ► We compare three reactors for ethanol production from sugar cane molasses. ► The ethanol productivity of 6.8 g L-1 h-1 was obtained using the CSTR. ► The ethanol productivity was improved by 48% by using the ICR. ► Intensifying ethanol productivity (19.2 g L-1 h-1) was investigated in the MBR

  17. Electron beam/biological processing of anaerobic and aerobic sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čuba, V.; Pospíšil, M.; Múčka, V.; Jeníček, P.; Dohányos, M.; Zábranská, J.

    2003-01-01

    Besides common chemical and biological methods, the radiation technology is a promising way of sludge treatment. The paper describes possibilities of combined accelerated electrons/biological processing of both anaerobic and aerobic sludge. Besides one-shot experiments, experimental reactors for the simulation of anaerobic processes have been used. Main effort has been aimed to decrease organic compounds concentration and overall volume of solids, to improve some physico-chemical parameters of sludge, to validate hygienisation effects of the ionising radiation, and in the case of anaerobic sludge, to increase the volume of the produced biogas. Positive effects of the electron beam processing have been observed on all previously named parameters.

  18. Electron beam/biological processing of anaerobic and aerobic sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides common chemical and biological methods, the radiation technology is a promising way of sludge treatment. The paper describes possibilities of combined accelerated electrons/biological processing of both anaerobic and aerobic sludge. Besides one-shot experiments, experimental reactors for the simulation of anaerobic processes have been used. Main effort has been aimed to decrease organic compounds concentration and overall volume of solids, to improve some physico-chemical parameters of sludge, to validate hygienisation effects of the ionising radiation, and in the case of anaerobic sludge, to increase the volume of the produced biogas. Positive effects of the electron beam processing have been observed on all previously named parameters. (author)

  19. Methane and hydrogen production by human intestinal anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, L F; Holbrook, W P; Eastwood, M A

    1982-06-01

    The gas above liquid cultures of a variety of human intestinal anaerobic bacteria was sampled and analysed by headspace gas chromatography. Hydrogen production was greatest with strains of the genus Clostridium, intermediate with anaerobic cocci and least with Bacteroides sp. Very few strains produced methane although small amounts were detected with one strain of B. thetaiotaomicron, C. perfringens and C. histolyticum. There may be a relationship between these anaerobic bacteria and several gastrointestinal disorders in which there is a build up of hydrogen or methane in the intestines.

  20. Ethanol and neuronal metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, P; Ledig, M; M'Paria, J R

    1980-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on membrane enzymes (Na+, K+ and Mg2+ ATPases, 5'-nucleotidase, adenylate cyclase) alcohol dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase were studied in nerve cells (established cell lines, primary cultures of chick and rat brain) cultured in the presence of 100 mM ethanol, and in total rat brain, following various ethanol treatments of the rats (20% ethanol as the sole liquid source, intraperitoneal injection). The results show a difference between neuronal and glial cells. Most of the observed changes in enzymatic activities returned rapidly to control values when ethanol was withdrawn from the culture medium or from the diet. Alcohol dehydrogenase was more stimulated by ethanol than aldehyde dehydrogenase; therefore acetaldehyde may be accumulated. The inhibition of superoxide dismutase activity may allow an accumulation of cytotoxic O2- radicals in nervous tissue and may explain the polymorphism of lesions brought about by alcohol intoxication. PMID:6264495

  1. Anaerobic biological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Enso-Fenox process has been very successfully used to remove chlorinated phenolic compounds from pulp bleaching effluents. It is a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic process consisting of a nonmethanogenic anaerobic fluidized bed followed by a trickling filter. Studies have been conducted on reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions with chlorinated phenols as the sole carbon and energy source. Approximately 40% of the added chlorophenols was converted to CH4 and CO2. Substrate loading rates were 20 mg/L/d at hydraulic detention times of 2-4 days with 90% substrate conversion efficiency. Reductive dechlorination of mono, di-, tri-, and pentachlorophenols has been demonstrated in anaerobic sewage sludge. The following constituents were tested in the laboratory at their approximate concentrations in coal conversion wastewater (CCWW) and were anaerobically degraded in serum bottles: 1,000 mg/L phenol; 500 mg/L resorcinol; 1,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 500 mg/L p-cresol; 200 mg/L pyridine; 2,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 250 mg/L 40 methylcatechol; 500 mg/L 4-ethylpyridine; and 2,000 mg/L hexanoic acid. A petrochemical may initially exhibit toxicity to an unacclimated population of methane-fermenting bacteria, but with acclimation the toxicity may be greatly reduced or disappear. In addition, the microorganisms may develop the capacity to actually degrade compounds which showed initial toxicity. Since biomass digestion requires a complete consortium of bacteria, it is relevant to study the effect of a given process as well as to individual steps within the process. A toxicant can inhibit the rate-limiting step and/or change the step that is rate-limiting. Both manifestations of toxicity can severely affect the overall process

  2. Ethanol cellular defense induce unfolded protein response in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet eNavarro-Tapia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, CECT10094 and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus

  3. Ethanol Cellular Defense Induce Unfolded Protein Response in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Tapia, Elisabet; Nana, Rebeca K; Querol, Amparo; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is a valuable industrial product and a common metabolite used by many cell types. However, this molecule produces high levels of cytotoxicity affecting cellular performance at several levels. In the presence of ethanol, cells must adjust some of their components, such as the membrane lipids to maintain homeostasis. In the case of microorganism as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ethanol is one of the principal products of their metabolism and is the main stress factor during fermentation. Although, many efforts have been made, mechanisms of ethanol tolerance are not fully understood and very little evidence is available to date for specific signaling by ethanol in the cell. This work studied two S. cerevisiae strains, CECT10094, and Temohaya-MI26, isolated from flor wine and agave fermentation (a traditional fermentation from Mexico) respectively, which differ in ethanol tolerance, in order to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol stress response and the reasons for different ethanol tolerance. The transcriptome was analyzed after ethanol stress and, among others, an increased activation of genes related with the unfolded protein response (UPR) and its transcription factor, Hac1p, was observed in the tolerant strain CECT10094. We observed that this strain also resist more UPR agents than Temohaya-MI26 and the UPR-ethanol stress correlation was corroborated observing growth of 15 more strains and discarding UPR correlation with other stresses as thermal or oxidative stress. Furthermore, higher activation of UPR pathway in the tolerant strain CECT10094 was observed using a UPR mCherry reporter. Finally, we observed UPR activation in response to ethanol stress in other S. cerevisiae ethanol tolerant strains as the wine strains T73 and EC1118. This work demonstrates that the UPR pathway is activated under ethanol stress occurring in a standard fermentation and links this response to an enhanced ethanol tolerance. Thus, our data suggest that there

  4. Utilization of metabolic inhibitors for shifting product formation from xylitol to ethanol in pentose fermentations using Candida tropicalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmeier-Vogel, E.; Hahn-Haegerdal, B.

    1985-02-01

    Xylose, glucose and xylose/glucose mixtures were fermented with Candida tropicalis ATCC 32113 under aerobic, oxygen limited and anaerobic conditions. Ethanol yields were highest under oxygen limited conditions with xylose and xylose/glucose. Anaerobic conditions were best for glucose fermentations. The effect of four metabolic inhibitors (azide, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP), oligomycin A and valinomycin-K/sup +/) were then studied under oxygen limited conditions. Only azide had a significant influence on ethanol production. At 2x10/sup -4/ M concentrations, ethanol yield increased up to two times and xylitol levels were repressed by 90% for xylose and glucose/xylose fermentations. 4.2x10/sup -3/ M azide gave highest ethanol yields in glucose fermentations. At this concentration of azide, however, cell growth was inhibited, which seemed to prevent ethanol production in xylose fermentations. The effect of azide is discussed in terms of 'fine-tuning' the respiratory activity necessary for metabolism.

  5. Ultrastructural changes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to ethanol stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Manli; Han, Pei; Zhang, Ruimin; Li, Hao

    2013-09-01

    In the fermentative process using Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce bioethanol, the performance of cells is often compromised by the accumulation of ethanol. However, the mechanism of how S. cerevisiae responds against ethanol stress remains elusive. In the current study, S. cerevisiae cells were cultured in YPD (yeast extract - peptone - dextrose) medium containing various concentrations of ethanol (0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 15% (v/v)). Compared with the control group without ethanol, the mean cell volume of S. cerevisiae decreased significantly in the presence of 7.5% and 10% ethanol after incubation for 16 h (P < 0.05), and in the presence of 15% ethanol at all 3 sampling time points (1, 8, and 16 h) (P < 0.05). The exposure of S. cerevisiae cells to ethanol also led to an increase in malonyldialdehyde content (P < 0.05) and a decrease in sulfhydryl group content (P < 0.05). Moreover, the observations through transmission electron microscopy enabled us to relate ultrastructural changes elicited by ethanol with the cellular stress physiology. Under ethanol stress, the integrity of the cell membrane was compromised. The swelling or distortion of mitochondria together with the occurrence of a single and large vacuole was correlated with the addition of ethanol. These results suggested that the cell membrane is one of the targets of ethanol, and the degeneration of mitochondria promoted the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

  6. Design considerations and operational performance of Anaerobic Digester: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Muzaffar Ahmad Mir; Athar Hussain; Chanchal Verma

    2016-01-01

    Due to the decline in fossil fuel reservoirs, the researchers emphasized more on the production of biogas from organic waste. Producing the renewable energy from biodegradable waste helps to overcome the energy crisis and solid waste management, done by anaerobic digestion. Anaerobic digestion is controlled breakdown of organic matter into methane gas (60%), carbon dioxide (40%), trace components along with digested used as soil conditioner. However there is vast dearth of literature regardin...

  7. Directed evolution of a cellodextrin transporter for improved biofuel production under anaerobic conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jiazhang; Li, Yanglin; HamediRad, Mohammad; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-08-01

    Introduction of a cellobiose utilization pathway consisting of a cellodextrin transporter and a β-glucosidase into Saccharomyces cerevisiae enables co-fermentation of cellobiose and xylose. Cellodextrin transporter 1 (CDT1) from Neurospora crassa has been established as an effective transporter for the engineered cellobiose utilization pathways. However, cellodextrin transporter 2 (CDT2) from the same species is a facilitator and has the potential to be more efficient than CDT1 under anaerobic conditions due to its energetic benefits. Currently, CDT2 has a very low activity and is considered rate-limiting in cellobiose fermentation. Here, we report the directed evolution of CDT2 with an increased cellobiose uptake activity, which results in improved cellobiose fermentation under anaerobic conditions. After three rounds of directed evolution, the cellobiose uptake activity of CDT2 was increased by 2.2-fold, which resulted from both increased specific activity and transporter expression level. Using high cell density fermentation under anaerobic conditions, the evolved mutant conferred 4.0- and 4.4-fold increase in the cellobiose consumption rate and ethanol productivity, respectively. In addition, although the cellobiose uptake activity was still lower than that of CDT1, the engineered CDT2 showed significantly improved cellobiose consumption and ethanol production under anaerobic conditions, representing the energetic benefits of a sugar facilitator for anaerobic cellobiose fermentation. This study demonstrated that anaerobic biofuel production could be significantly improved via directed evolution of a sugar transporter protein in yeast. PMID:24519319

  8. Greenprint on ethanol production in Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investment in Saskatchewan's ethanol industry is being actively promoted by the provincial government. This document represents the provincial strategy in support of the ethanol industry, which will result in significant environmental benefits for the province and the residents through the increased use of ethanol as an additive to conventional gasoline. The big advantage offered by ethanol is a more complete fuel combustion, thereby reducing emissions of greenhouse gases by as much as 30 per cent. The production costs of ethanol have decreased in the last twenty years by 50 per cent. The competitiveness of ethanol should increase due to ongoing research and development progress being made. The agricultural sector should benefit through the creation of meaningful jobs in the sector, as well as offering new marketing opportunities to the grain producers of the province and the wood-product companies. A renewable resource, ethanol reduces carbon dioxide exhaust emissions bu up to 20 per cent, reduces the smog-creating compounds up to 15 per cent, and achieves a net reduction of up to 10 per cent in carbon dioxide emissions. The abundance of raw materials and resources required for the production of ethanol, Saskatchewan possesses an obvious advantage for becoming a world leader in the field. The government of Saskatchewan has developed its strategy, outlined in this document. It calls for tax incentives, the mandating of ethanol blend, opening up markets, working with communities. The industry size, economic impact, export potential, and future opportunities were briefly discussed in the last section of the document. 1 tab., 3 figs

  9. Reduction of hematite with ethanol to produce magnetic nanoparticles of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 1-x}O or Fe{sup 0} coated with carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tristao, Juliana C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica-ICEx (Brazil); Ardisson, Jose D. [Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear, CDTN, Laboratorio de Fisica Aplicada (Brazil); Sansiviero, Maria Terezinha C.; Lago, Rochel M., E-mail: rochel@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Quimica-ICEx (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    The production of magnetic nanoparticles of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} or Fe{sup 0} coated with carbon and carbon nanotubes was investigated by the reduction of hematite with ethanol in a Temperature Programmed Reaction up to 950 deg. C. XRD and Moessbauer measurements showed after reaction at 350 deg. C the partial reduction of hematite to magnetite. At 600 deg. C the hematite is completely reduced to magnetite (59%), wuestite (39%) and metallic iron (7%). At higher temperatures, carbide and metallic iron are the only phases present. TG weight losses suggested the formation of 3-56 wt.% carbon deposits after reaction with ethanol. It was observed by SEM images a high concentration of nanometric carbon filaments on the material surface. BET analyses showed a slight increase in the surface area after reaction. These materials have potential application as catalyst support and removal of spilled oil contaminants.

  10. Biodegradability of leathers through anaerobic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhayalan, K; Fathima, N Nishad; Gnanamani, A; Rao, J Raghava; Nair, B Unni; Ramasami, T

    2007-01-01

    Leather processing generates huge amounts of both solid and liquid wastes. The management of solid wastes, especially tanned leather waste, is a challenging problem faced by tanners. Hence, studies on biodegradability of leather become imperative. In this present work, biodegradability of untanned, chrome tanned and vegetable tanned leather under anaerobic conditions has been addressed. Two different sources of anaerobes have been used for this purpose. The effect of detanning as a pretreatment method before subjecting the leather to biodegradation has also been studied. It has been found that vegetable tanned leather leads to more gas production than chrome tanned leather. Mixed anaerobic isolates when employed as an inoculum are able to degrade the soluble organics of vegetable tanned material and thus exhibit an increased level of gas production during the initial days, compared to the results of the treatments that received the anaerobic sludge. With chrome tanned materials, there was not much change in the volume of the gas produced from the two different sources. It has been found that detanning tends to improve the biodegradability of both types of leathers. PMID:16740383

  11. Anaerobic treatment of wastewater containing methanol in upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The direct conversion of methanol into methane is the main process in anaerobic treatment of methanol containing wastewater.However,acetic acid can also be produced from methanol theoretically,which may probably result in an abrupt pH drop and deteriorate the anaerobic process.Therefore,it is interesting to know what would really happen in an anaerobic reactor treating methanol wastewater.In this study,an up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor treating methanol wastewater was operated.The chemical oxygen demand (COD),acetic acid and pH of the effluent were monitored at different loadings and influent alkalinity.The results showed that the anaerobic reactor could be operated steadily at as low as 119 mg/L of influent alkalinity and high organic loading rate with no obvious pH drops.Volatile fatty acids accumulation was not observed even at strong shock loadings.The microorganisms in the sludge at the end of the test became homogeneous in morphology,which were mainly spherical or spheroidal in shape.

  12. Ethanol Policy in the Clean Air-Free Trade Era

    OpenAIRE

    Rask, Norman; Rask, Kevin; Tiefenthaler, Jill

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. corn ethanol industry is a subsidized, high cost, trade protected, limited scale industry; unable to compete in free markets orto efficiently supply new fuel demands of clean air legislation. Lower cost, sugarcane ethanol from Latin America (Brazil) should be asupplementary source, especially for U.S. coastal markets. Counter trade-corn for ethanolwould be more beneficial to U.S. corn producers than domestic ethanol corn markets and would result in more efficient land use, less soil ...

  13. Synergistic effects of ethanol and cocaine on brain stimulation reward.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, M. J.; June, H L

    1994-01-01

    The effects of two widely abused drugs, ethanol and cocaine, were examined alone and in combination on intracranial reward processes. In agreement with previous research, higher doses of both cocaine and ethanol alone produced facilitation of behavior maintained by brain stimulation reward. Low intraperitoneal doses of ethanol and cocaine, which alone did not affect performance, were found to reduce stimulation reward threshold and modestly increase response rate. The enhancement of brain sti...

  14. Sustainability of grape-ethanol energy chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Foppa Pedretti

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to evaluate the sustainability, in terms of greenhouse gases emission saving, of a new potential bio-ethanol production chain in comparison with the most common ones. The innovation consists of producing bio-ethanol from different types of no-food grapes, while usually bio-ethanol is obtained from matrices taken away from crop for food destination: sugar cane, corn, wheat, sugar beet. In the past, breeding programs were conducted with the aim of improving grapevine characteristics, a large number of hybrid vine varieties were produced and are nowadays present in the Viticulture Research Centre (CRA-VIT Germplasm Collection. Some of them are potentially interesting for bio-energy production because of their high production of sugar, good resistance to diseases, and ability to grow in marginal lands. Life cycle assessment (LCA of grape ethanol energy chain was performed following two different methods: i using the spreadsheet BioGrace, developed within the Intelligent Energy Europe program to support and to ease the Renewable Energy Directive 2009/28/EC implementation; ii using a dedicated LCA software. Emissions were expressed in CO2 equivalent (CO2eq. These two tools gave very similar results. The overall emissions impact of ethanol production from grapes on average is about 33 g CO2eq MJ–1 of ethanol if prunings are used for steam production and 53 g CO2eq MJ–1 of ethanol if methane is used. The comparison with other bio-energy chains points out that the production of ethanol using grapes represents an intermediate situation in terms of general emissions among the different production chains. The results showed that the sustainability limits provided by the normative are respected to this day. On the contrary, from 2017 this production will be sustainable only if the transformation processes will be performed using renewable sources of energy.

  15. Energetic potential of biogas produced from cassava starch wastewater using a pilot scale two-stage anaerobic biodigester; Potencial energetico do biogas gerado no tratamento de aguas residuarias de fecularias em sistema piloto de biodigestao anaerobia com separacao de fases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiden, Armin [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Marechal Candido Rondon, PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Agrarias]. E-mail: armin_feiden@yahoo.com.br; Cereda, Marney Pascoli [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Centro de Raizes Tropicais

    2003-06-01

    Cassava starch is extracted in more of 70 units in west of Parana state, South of Brazil. Near the border of the Parana river there is a big concentration of this type of industry. The cassava starch extraction generates a great quantity of wastewater. The aim of this work was to evaluate the energetic potential of biogas generated in the anaerobic treatment of cassava. The pilot reactors were located at a cassava processing factory, with cassava roots grauding capacity of 250 metric ton day{sup -1} at the parallel 24 deg 09'18'' South latitude and meridian 54 deg 09'26'' West longitude of Grw. The treatment pilot system was consisted of two settling tanks with 500 L each, connected in series, followed by a two-stage anaerobic biodigester reactor. The acidogenic reactor had a capacity of 1,000 L and the methanogenic had a capacity of 3,000 L. The experiment was conducted at temperatures ranging from 23.9 deg C to 27.7 deg C, with a annual average of 25.8 deg C. It was not used the addition of nutrients nor pH correction. The best results were obtained at a flow rate of 901 L d{sup -1} with a TOC (total organic carbon) loading rate of 0.565 g L{sup -1} d{sup -1} and COD (chemical oxygen demand) of 2.49 g L{sup -1} d{sup -1}, and a hydraulic residence time of 4.4 days. At this loading rate, the system had an average biogas yield of 3.975 L L{sup -1} wastewater 0.895 L L{sup -1} reactor day{sup -1}, and 0.391 L g{sup -1} TOC removed. The net biogas yield was 16.10 m{sup 3} ton{sup -1} cassava roots processed, with 28.65% CO{sub 2}. By calculation it was found that the biogas production is enough to supply 30% of the heat necessity to steam production of the industry, 100% of the heat necessity of direct drying of cassava starch, or 50% of the general total electricity need of the factory. (author)

  16. Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Haagensen, Frank; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) found in wastewater is removed in the wastewater treatment facilities by sorption and aerobic biodegradation. The anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge has not been shown to contribute to the removal. The concentration of LAS based on dry matter typically increa...... under thermophilic conditions was 37% with LAS as sole carbon source. Benzaldehyde was produced in the UASB reactor during LAS transformation....

  17. 厌氧菌群SVY42产酶条件分析及产木聚糖酶菌株的分离鉴定%Enzyme-Producing Conditions Analysis of Anaerobic Bactearial Population SVY42 andIsolation and Identification of a Xylanase-Producing Strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵超; 李婷; 邓云金; 刘晓艳; 黄一帆; 刘斌

    2013-01-01

    A highly effective and stable cellulose and hemicellulose degradable anaerobic bacterial population (ABP) SVY42 from the samples collected from Great Basin Hot Spring in Nevada,USA as material was enriched with and obtained.Their production conditions of CMCase,β-galactosidase and xylanase by ABP SVY42 were studied with the giant Juncao,bagasse,waste mushroom culturing cylinder,sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC),filter paper and xylan as carbon sources.Based on these,a xylanase high-producing strain was screened using xylan as substrate.The highest β-galactosidase activity was 0.23 U/mL using the giant Juncao as substrate.The highest CMCase and xylanase activities were 0.31 U/mL and 0.35 U/mL using xylan as substrate respectively.A xylanase high-producing thermophilic strain SVY42-1 from ABP SVY42 was screened from ABP SVY42.The xylanase activity reached 0.26 U/mL under the optimal temperature (41℃) and pH (8.0).Strain SVY42-1 was identified by 16S rDNA sequencing analysis and only 93.8% similar to the highest homology of the known strains,and identified initially belong to a new genus.%以美国内华达州大盆地温泉采集样品为材料,富集获得纤维素及半纤维素高效稳定降解厌氧菌群SVY42,以巨菌草、甘蔗渣、废菇筒、羧甲基纤维素钠、滤纸、木聚糖为碳源,分析菌群SVY42产内切葡聚糖酶(CMC酶)、β-葡萄糖苷酶和木聚糖酶的情况.在此基础上,以木聚糖为底物筛选高产木聚糖酶的菌株.菌群SVY42在以巨菌草作为碳源时的β-葡萄糖苷酶活最高为0.23 U/mL,以木聚糖作为碳源时CMC酶活和木聚糖酶活均为最高,分别为0.31 U/mL和0.35 U/mL.从菌群SVY42中筛选得到1株高产木聚糖酶厌氧菌株SVY42-1,该菌在最适温度41℃和pH 8.0条件下,其木聚糖酶活力为0.26 U/mL,对其进行16S rDNA序列系统进化分析,SVY42-1与已知菌株的最高同源性仅为93.81%,初步鉴定属于新属.

  18. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Meulepas, R.J.W.; Jagersma, C.G.; Khadem, A.F.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P. N. L.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this paper, six methanogenic substrates are tested as candidate-IECs by assessing their effect on AOM and SR by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment. The presence of acetate, formate or hydrogen enhanced SR, but did not inhibit AOM, nor did ...

  19. Enhanced bioprocessing of lignocellulose: Wood-rot fungal saccharification and fermentation of corn fiber to ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Prachand

    no improvement in ethanol yields. We showed that saccharification of lignocellulosic material with a wood-rot fungal process is quite feasible. Corn fiber from wet milling was best degraded to sugars using aerobic solid state fermentation with the soft-rot fungus T. reesei. However, it was shown that both the white-rot fungus P. chrysosporium and brown-rot fungus G. trabeum had the ability to produce additional consortia of hemi/cellulose degrading enzymes. It is likely that a consortium of enzymes from these fungi would be the best approach in saccharification of lignocellulose. In all cases, a subsequent anaerobic yeast process under submerged conditions is required to ferment the released sugars to ethanol. To our knowledge, this is the first time report on production of cellulolytic enzymes from wet-milled corn fiber using white- and brown-rot fungi for sequential fermentation of corn fiber hydrolyzate to ethanol. Keywords: lignocellulose, ethanol, biofuel, bioeconomy, biomass, renewable resources, corn fiber, pretreatment, solid-substrate fermentation, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), white-rot fungus, brown-rot fungus, soft-rot fungus, fermentable sugars, enzyme activities, cellulytic enzymes Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Gloleophyllum trabeum, Trichoderma reesei, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  20. Life cycle greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol, biomethane and limonene production from citrus waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourbafrani, Mohammad; McKechnie, Jon; MacLean, Heather L.; Saville, Bradley A.

    2013-03-01

    The production of biofuel from cellulosic residues can have both environmental and financial benefits. A particular benefit is that it can alleviate competition for land conventionally used for food and feed production. In this research, we investigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate from citrus waste, a byproduct of the citrus processing industry. The study represents the first life cycle-based evaluations of citrus waste biorefineries. Two biorefinery configurations are studied—a large biorefinery that converts citrus waste into ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate, and a small biorefinery that converts citrus waste into biomethane, limonene and digestate. Ethanol is assumed to be used as E85, displacing gasoline as a light-duty vehicle fuel; biomethane displaces natural gas for electricity generation, limonene displaces acetone in solvents, and digestate from the anaerobic digestion process displaces synthetic fertilizer. System expansion and two allocation methods (energy, market value) are considered to determine emissions of co-products. Considerable GHG reductions would be achieved by producing and utilizing the citrus waste-based products in place of the petroleum-based or other non-renewable products. For the large biorefinery, ethanol used as E85 in light-duty vehicles results in a 134% reduction in GHG emissions compared to gasoline-fueled vehicles when applying a system expansion approach. For the small biorefinery, when electricity is generated from biomethane rather than natural gas, GHG emissions are reduced by 77% when applying system expansion. The life cycle GHG emissions vary substantially depending upon biomethane leakage rate, feedstock GHG emissions and the method to determine emissions assigned to co-products. Among the process design parameters, the biomethane leakage rate is critical, and the ethanol produced in the large biorefinery would not meet EISA

  1. Life cycle greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol, biomethane and limonene production from citrus waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of biofuel from cellulosic residues can have both environmental and financial benefits. A particular benefit is that it can alleviate competition for land conventionally used for food and feed production. In this research, we investigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate from citrus waste, a byproduct of the citrus processing industry. The study represents the first life cycle-based evaluations of citrus waste biorefineries. Two biorefinery configurations are studied—a large biorefinery that converts citrus waste into ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate, and a small biorefinery that converts citrus waste into biomethane, limonene and digestate. Ethanol is assumed to be used as E85, displacing gasoline as a light-duty vehicle fuel; biomethane displaces natural gas for electricity generation, limonene displaces acetone in solvents, and digestate from the anaerobic digestion process displaces synthetic fertilizer. System expansion and two allocation methods (energy, market value) are considered to determine emissions of co-products. Considerable GHG reductions would be achieved by producing and utilizing the citrus waste-based products in place of the petroleum-based or other non-renewable products. For the large biorefinery, ethanol used as E85 in light-duty vehicles results in a 134% reduction in GHG emissions compared to gasoline-fueled vehicles when applying a system expansion approach. For the small biorefinery, when electricity is generated from biomethane rather than natural gas, GHG emissions are reduced by 77% when applying system expansion. The life cycle GHG emissions vary substantially depending upon biomethane leakage rate, feedstock GHG emissions and the method to determine emissions assigned to co-products. Among the process design parameters, the biomethane leakage rate is critical, and the ethanol produced in the large biorefinery would not meet EISA

  2. Traits of selected Clostridium strains for syngas fermentation to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael E; Richter, Hanno; Saha, Surya; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-03-01

    Syngas fermentation is an anaerobic bioprocess that could become industrially relevant as a biorefinery platform for sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. An important prerequisite for commercialization is adequate performance of the biocatalyst (i.e., sufficiently high production rate, titer, selectivity, yield, and stability of the fermentation). Here, we compared the performance of three potential candidate Clostridium strains in syngas-to-ethanol conversion: Clostridium ljungdahlii PETC, C. ljungdahlii ERI-2, and Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1. Experiments were conducted in a two-stage, continuously fed syngas-fermentation system that had been optimized for stable ethanol production. The two C. ljungdahlii strains performed similar to each other but different from C. autoethanogenum. When the pH value was lowered from 5.5 to 4.5 to induce solventogenesis, the cell-specific carbon monoxide and hydrogen consumption (similar rate for all strains at pH 5.5), severely decreased in JA1-1, but hardly in PETC and ERI-2. Ethanol production in strains PETC and ERI-2 remained relatively stable while the rate of acetate production decreased, resulting in a high ethanol/acetate ratio, but lower overall productivities. With JA1-1, lowering the pH severely lowered rates of both ethanol and acetate production; and as a consequence, no pronounced shift to solventogenesis was observed. The highest overall ethanol production rate of 0.301 g · L(-1)  · h(-1) was achieved with PETC at pH 4.5 with a corresponding 19 g/L (1.9% w/v) ethanol concentration and a 5.5:1 ethanol/acetate molar ratio. A comparison of the genes relevant for ethanol metabolism revealed differences between C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum that, however, did not conclusively explain the different phenotypes. PMID:26331212

  3. Traits of selected Clostridium strains for syngas fermentation to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael E; Richter, Hanno; Saha, Surya; Angenent, Largus T

    2016-03-01

    Syngas fermentation is an anaerobic bioprocess that could become industrially relevant as a biorefinery platform for sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. An important prerequisite for commercialization is adequate performance of the biocatalyst (i.e., sufficiently high production rate, titer, selectivity, yield, and stability of the fermentation). Here, we compared the performance of three potential candidate Clostridium strains in syngas-to-ethanol conversion: Clostridium ljungdahlii PETC, C. ljungdahlii ERI-2, and Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1. Experiments were conducted in a two-stage, continuously fed syngas-fermentation system that had been optimized for stable ethanol production. The two C. ljungdahlii strains performed similar to each other but different from C. autoethanogenum. When the pH value was lowered from 5.5 to 4.5 to induce solventogenesis, the cell-specific carbon monoxide and hydrogen consumption (similar rate for all strains at pH 5.5), severely decreased in JA1-1, but hardly in PETC and ERI-2. Ethanol production in strains PETC and ERI-2 remained relatively stable while the rate of acetate production decreased, resulting in a high ethanol/acetate ratio, but lower overall productivities. With JA1-1, lowering the pH severely lowered rates of both ethanol and acetate production; and as a consequence, no pronounced shift to solventogenesis was observed. The highest overall ethanol production rate of 0.301 g · L(-1)  · h(-1) was achieved with PETC at pH 4.5 with a corresponding 19 g/L (1.9% w/v) ethanol concentration and a 5.5:1 ethanol/acetate molar ratio. A comparison of the genes relevant for ethanol metabolism revealed differences between C. ljungdahlii and C. autoethanogenum that, however, did not conclusively explain the different phenotypes.

  4. Reducing the life cycle GHG emissions of microalgal biodiesel through integration with ethanol production system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranduba, Henrique Leonardo; Robra, Sabine; Nascimento, Iracema Andrade; da Cruz, Rosenira Serpa; Rodrigues, Luciano Brito; de Almeida Neto, José Adolfo

    2015-10-01

    Despite environmental benefits of algal-biofuels, the energy-intensive systems for producing microalgae-feedstock may result in high GHG emissions. Trying to overcome energy-costs, this research analyzed the biodiesel production system via dry-route, based on Chlorella vulgaris cultivated in raceways, by comparing the GHG-footprints of diverse microalgae-biodiesel scenarios. These involved: the single system of biomass production (C0); the application of pyrolysis on the residual microalgal biomass (cake) from the oil extraction process (C1); the same as C0, with anaerobic cake co-digested with cattle manure (C2); the same conditions as in C1 and C2, by integrating in both cases (respectively C3 and C4), the microalgae cultivation with an autonomous ethanol distillery. The reduction of GHG emissions in scenarios with no such integration (C1 and C2), compared to CO, was insignificant (0.53% and 4.67%, respectively), whereas in the scenarios with integration with ethanol production system, the improvements were 53.57% for C3 and 63.84% for C4. PMID:26176822

  5. Sublethal Concentrations Of Antibiotics Cause Shift To Anaerobic Metabolism In Listeria Monocytogenes And Induce Phenotypes Linked To Antibiotic Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Ng, Yin; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    dehydrogenase gene lmo1634 and repression of alsA and lmo1992, which are involved in acetoin production leading to more ethanol and less acetoin production. This shift in central metabolism indicates a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, that could reduce oxidative stress and be a survival strategy...... investigation. The concentration of acetoin and ethanol are also currently under investigation. Conclusions: Consistent with other studies, we hypothesize that L. monocytogenes when exposed to antibiotics alters its metabolism from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, and this could prepare the organism...

  6. CCL2-ethanol interactions and hippocampal synaptic protein expression in a transgenic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna eGruol

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to ethanol produces a number of detrimental effects on behavior. Neuroadaptive changes in brain structure or function underlie these behavioral changes and may be transient or persistent in nature. Central to the functional changes are alterations in the biology of neuronal and glial cells of the brain. Recent data show that ethanol induces glial cells of the brain to produce elevated levels of neuroimmune factors including CCL2, a key innate immune chemokine. Depending on the conditions of ethanol exposure, the upregulated levels of CCL2 can be transient or persistent and outlast the period of ethanol exposure. Importantly, results indicate that the upregulated levels of CCL2 may lead to CCL2-ethanol interactions that mediate or regulate the effects of ethanol on the brain. Glial cells are in close association with neurons and regulate many neuronal functions. Therefore, effects of ethanol on glial cells may underlie some of the effects of ethanol on neurons. To investigate this possibility, we are studying the effects of chronic ethanol on hippocampal synaptic function in a transgenic mouse model that expresses elevated levels of CCL2 in the brain through enhanced glial expression, a situation know to occur in alcoholics. Both CCL2 and ethanol have been reported to alter synaptic function in the hippocampus. In the current study, we determined if interactions are evident between CCL2 and ethanol at level of hippocampal synaptic proteins. Two ethanol exposure paradigms were used; the first involved ethanol exposure by drinking and the second involved ethanol exposure in a paradigm that combines drinking plus ethanol vapor. The first paradigm does not produce dependence on ethanol, whereas the second paradigm is commonly used to produce ethanol dependence. Results show modest effects of both ethanol exposure paradigms on the level of synaptic proteins in the hippocampus of CCL2 transgenic mice compared with their non

  7. Anaerobic azo dye reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Zee, van der, KG Kristoffer

    2002-01-01

    Azo dyes, aromatic moieties linked together by azo (-N=N-) chromophores, represent the largest class of dyes used in textile-processing and other industries. The release of these compounds into the environment is undesirable, not only because of their colour, but also because many azo dyes and their breakdown products are toxic and/or mutagenic to life. To remove azo dyes from wastewater, a biological treatment strategy based on anaerobic reduction of the azo dyes, followed by aerobic transfo...

  8. Degradation Action of the Anaerobic Bacteria and Oxygen to the Polymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiang-Guo; ZHANG Ke

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen could prohibit anaerobic bacterium in the produced water and degrade the polymer molecular chains.Aiming at problems making up aerobic polymer solution by the produced water in Daqing Oil Field, some evaluations were done on the viscosity characteristics of polymer solution and bactericide in anaerobic and aerobic environments. Reasonable aerobic concentration of the produced water was obtained. The experimental results indicate that the viscosity of polymer solution confected by the produced water in the aerobic environment is higher than that of the polymer solution confected by the produced water in the anaerobic environment, and the reasonable ments, but the sterilization effect is better in the aerobic environment.

  9. An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

    2005-04-29

    The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

  10. The expanding U. S. ethanol industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fecht, B.

    1991-01-01

    American experience in the ethanol industry is discussed. Archer Daniel Midlands Co. (ADM) is a large agri-processing company that is the largest processor of grains and oilseeds, and processes ca 400,000 bushels of corn per day at its Decateur facility. Waste water and heat from the plant is used to grow vegetables hydroponically, with carbon dioxide from distillation used to speed growing at night. About 40,000 heads of lettuce per day are harvested, with cucumbers and tomatoes grown as premium crops. The plant includes a state-of-the-art fluidized bed power plant that burns high sulfur coal without sulfur emission. Approval has recently been granted by the Environmental Protection Agency to burn used tires, and payback for the process is expected to take 3-4 years. Ethanol is produced by steeping corn and separating germ and starch, with the starch used to make corn sweeteners. As well as ethanol, byproducts include animal feed, hydroponics, oils and margarines. ADM is the largest barging company in the U.S., with 14,000 rail cars, 1,200 dedicated to fuel ethanol. The Clean Air Act will mandate a 2.7% oxygen gasoline, and 10% ethanol additive gives 3.3% oxygen. The high octane rating of ethanol-blend gasoline is a strong selling point, and is a good deal for refiners, especially at octane-poor refineries.

  11. Characterizing the anaerobic response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Naumann, Bianca; Hippler, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The versatile metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is reflected in its complex response to anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic response is also remarkable in the context of renewable energy because C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. To identify proteins involved during anaerobic acclimation as well as to localize proteins and pathways to the powerhouses of the cell, chloroplasts and mitochondria from C. reinhardtii in aerobic and anaerobic (induced by 8 h of argon bubbling) conditions were isolated and analyzed using comparative proteomics. A total of 2315 proteins were identified. Further analysis based on spectral counting clearly localized 606 of these proteins to the chloroplast, including many proteins of the fermentative metabolism. Comparative quantitative analyses were performed with the chloroplast-localized proteins using stable isotopic labeling of amino acids ([(13)C(6)]arginine/[(12)C(6)]arginine in an arginine auxotrophic strain). The quantitative data confirmed proteins previously characterized as induced at the transcript level as well as identified several new proteins of unknown function induced under anaerobic conditions. These proteins of unknown function provide new candidates for further investigation, which could bring insights for the engineering of hydrogen-producing alga strains. PMID:20190198

  12. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lier, J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær;

    2001-01-01

    requirements. In fact, most advances were achieved during the last three decades, when high-rate reactor systems were developed and a profound insight was obtained in the microbiology of the anaerobic communities. This insight led to a better understanding of anaerobic treatment and, subsequently, to a broader......The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern...

  13. Strategies to improve anaerobic digestion of wastes with especial attention to lignocellulosic substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Fonoll Almansa, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The energy demand increase and the generation of wastes is being the major problem regarding the next generation sustainability. Both problems can be corrected through the implementation of anaerobic digestion, a waste treatment technology able to produce electricity, heat and a fertilizer. The anaerobic co-digestion between two wastes with complementary characteristics has been widely studied to improve the methane production in anaerobic digesters. However, to increase the methane productio...

  14. Photoproduction of H2 from Cellulose by an Anaerobic Bacterial Coculture

    OpenAIRE

    Odom, James M.; Wall, Judy D.

    1983-01-01

    Cellulomonas sp. strain ATCC 21399 is a facultatively anaerobic, cellulose-degrading microorganism that does not evolve hydrogen but produces organic acids during cellulose fermentation. Rhodopseudomonas capsulata cannot utilize cellulose, but grows photoheterotrophically under anaerobic conditions on organic acids or sugars. This report describes an anaerobic coculture of the Cellulomonas strain with wild-type R. capsulata or a mutant strain lacking uptake hydrogenase, which photoevolves mol...

  15. High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Clark Dale

    2006-10-30

    n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol ‘beers’ in 6 to 12 hours using either a ‘consecutive batch’ or ‘continuous cascade’ implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The ‘consecutive batch’ technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

  16. Bioconversion of crude glycerol feedstocks into ethanol by Pachysolen tannophilus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoying; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Workman, Mhairi

    2012-01-01

    Glycerol, the by-product of biodiesel production, is considered as a waste by biodiesel producers. This study demonstrated the potential of utilising the glycerol surplus through conversion to ethanol by the yeast Pachysolen tannophilus (CBS4044). This study demonstrates a robust bioprocess which...... was not sensitive to the batch variability in crude glycerol dependent on raw materials used for biodiesel production. The oxygen transfer rate (OTR) was a key factor for ethanol production, with lower OTR having a positive effect on ethanol production. The highest ethanol production was 17.5 g/L on 5% (v/v) crude...... glycerol, corresponding to 56% of the theoretical yield. A staged batch process achieved 28.1 g/L ethanol, the maximum achieved so far for conversion of glycerol to ethanol in a microbial bioprocess. The fermentation physiology has been investigated as a means to designing a competitive bioethanol...

  17. Tolerance to ethanol-induced contractions of vascular smooth muscle: role of endothelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knych, E.T.; Guimaraes, C.M.S.; Boivin, S.

    1984-08-06

    Ethanol, at high concentrations, produced a dose-dependent contraction of male rat aortic rings, in vitro. Mechanical removal of endothelial cells from aortic rings of control rats resulted in a small, but significant, shift of the ethanol dose-response curve to the right without a change in the maximal contraction. Removing the endothelial cells of aortic rings obtained from rats intoxicated with ethanol for two days significantly shifted the ethanol dose-response curve to the left and significantly increased the maximal contraction induced by ethanol. A comparison of the ethanol dose-response curves in aortic rings with endothelium o

  18. Defining Anaerobic Digestion Stability-Full Scale Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demitry, M. E., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    A full-scale anaerobic digester receiving a mixture of primary and secondary sludge was monitored for one hundred days. A chemical oxygen demand, COD, and a volatile solids, VS, mass balance was conducted to evaluate the stability of the digester and its capability of producing methane gas. The COD mass balance could account for nearly 90% of the methane gas produced while the VS mass balance showed that 91% of the organic matter removed resulted in biogas formation. Other parameters monitored included: pH, alkalinity, VFA, and propionic acid. The values of these parameters showed that steady state had occurred. Finally, at mesophilic temperature and at steady state performance, the anaerobic digester stability was defined as a constant ratio of methane produced per substrate of ΔVS (average ratio=0.404 l/g). This ratio can be used as universal metric to determine the anaerobic digester stability in an easy and inexpensive way.

  19. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Siti; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  20. Biological production of ethanol from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    Due to the abundant supply of coal in the United States, significant research efforts have occurred over the past 15 years concerning the conversion of coal to liquid fuels. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have concentrated on a biological approach to coal liquefaction, starting with coal-derived synthesis gas as the raw material. Synthesis gas, a mixture of CO, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4] and sulfur gases, is first produced using traditional gasification techniques. The CO, CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] are then converted to ethanol using a bacterial culture of Clostridium 1jungdahlii. Ethanol is the desired product if the resultant product stream is to be used as a liquid fuel. However, under normal operating conditions, the wild strain'' produces acetate in favor of ethanol in conjunction with growth in a 20:1 molar ratio. Research was performed to determine the conditions necessary to maximize not only the ratio of ethanol to acetate, but also to maximize the concentration of ethanol resulting in the product stream.

  1. Use of high-ethanol-resistant yeast isolates from Nigerian palm wine in lager beer brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agu, R C; Anyanwu, T U; Onwumelu, A H

    1993-11-01

    High-ethanol-resistant yeasts, characterized as Saccharomyces sp., were isolated from Nigerian palm wine with added sucrose for high gravity brewing. The yeast isolates that survived the highest ethanol production were used to ferment brewery wort and produced 8.2 to 8.5% (v/v) ethanol; values almost double that of the control yeast from a local brewery.

  2. 26 CFR 48.4041-19 - Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... gasoline to produce a qualified methanol or ethanol fuel. (e) Later blending. If a qualified methanol or... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol....4041-19 Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol fuel. (a) In general. Under section...

  3. 26 CFR 48.4041-20 - Partially exempt methanol and ethanol fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... gasoline to produce a partially exempt methanol or ethanol fuel. (e) Later blending. If a partially exempt... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Partially exempt methanol and ethanol fuel. 48... Partially exempt methanol and ethanol fuel. (a) In general. Under section 4041(m), the sale or use...

  4. Furfural and ethanol production from corn stover by dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant carbohydrate source in the world and has potential for economical production of biofuels, especially ethanol. However, its composition is an obstacle for the production of ethanol by the conventional ethanol producing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as it...

  5. Estimating the net energy value of corn-ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapouri, H.; Duffield, J. [Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC (United States); Graboski, M.S. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Potential air quality benefits and a desire to improve domestic energy security has prompted researchers to investigate the net energy value (NEV) of corn-ethanol. Studies have been conducted in recent years in an attempt to quantify the energy used in growing and converting corn to ethanol. However, variations in data and assumptions among the studies have resulted in a wide range of NEV estimates. The purpose of this study is to identify the factors causing this wide variation and to develop a more consistent NEV estimate. We conclude that the NEV of corn-ethanol is positive when fertilizers are produced by modern processing plants, corn is converted in modern ethanol facilities, farmers achieve normal corn yields and energy credits are allocated to basic coproducts. Our estimate of 16,193 BTU/gal can be considered conservative, since it does not include energy credits for those plants that sell carbon dioxide. Corn ethanol is energy efficient as indicated by an energy ratio of 1.24, i.e., for every BTU dedicated to producing ethanol there is a 24 percent energy gain. Moreover, producing ethanol from domestic corn stocks achieves a net gain in a more desirable form of energy. Ethanol production utilizes abundant domestic feedstocks of coal and natural gas to convert corn into a premium liquid fuel that can replace petroleum imports by a factor of 7 to 1.

  6. Ethanol and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, A Y; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Neve, E; Matsumoto, H; Nishitani, Y; Minowa, Y; Fukui, Y; Bailey, S M; Patel, V B; Cunningham, C C; Zima, T; Fialova, L; Mikulikova, L; Popov, P; Malbohan, I; Janebova, M; Nespor, K; Sun, G Y

    2001-05-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a workshop at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chair was Albert Y. Sun. The presentations were (1) Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P-4502E1 in alcoholic liver disease, by Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg and Etienne Neve; (2) Regulation of NF-kappaB by ethanol, by H. Matsumoto, Y. Nishitani, Y. Minowa, and Y. Fukui; (3) Chronic ethanol consumption increases concentration of oxidized proteins in rat liver, by Shannon M. Bailey, Vinood B. Patel, and Carol C. Cunningham; (4) Antiphospholipids antibodies and oxidized modified low-density lipoprotein in chronic alcoholic patients, by Tomas Zima, Lenka Fialova, Ludmila Mikulikova, Ptr Popov, Ivan Malbohan, Marta Janebova, and Karel Nespor; and (5) Amelioration of ethanol-induced damage by polyphenols, by Albert Y. Sun and Grace Y. Sun. PMID:11391077

  7. Anaerobic Digestion of Piggery Waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velsen, van A.F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes an

  8. Ethanol production from lignocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Wood, Brent E.

    2001-01-01

    This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

  9. Research on Combination of Ethanol and Biogas Production with Cassava%木薯联合产乙醇和产沼气的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷宇; 黄文荣; 刘士清; 胡械科; 张无敌; 尹芳; 陈玉保; 柳静; 赵兴玲

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] To find a way to use cassava as a resource. [ Method] Through optimizing ethanol fermentation technology, the ethanol production rate of cassava was improved; and using ethanol fermentation waste to produce biogas and making the waste become resource. [Result] The ethanol production rate increase 2% through adding complex enzyme and adjusting some process parameters; the cassava fermentation waste which will result in pollution become clear fuel biogas and organic fertilizer through anaerobic fermentation. [ Conclusion] It is a good way that converting cassava to clear fuel through combination of ethanol and biogas fermentation.%[目的]找到一种木薯的资源化利用途径.[方法]通过优化现有工艺,提高木薯乙醇的出酒率;同时对酒精废醪液进行沼气发酵,达到资源化利用的效果.[结果]通过添加复合酶制剂以及对各工段进行优化,最终出酒率比现有工艺提高约2个百分点.酒精废醪液发酵产生的沼气能替代酒精生产中的一部分煤,产生的沼液、沼渣可做有机肥,节约成本的同时减轻对环境的污染.[结论]木薯通过发酵产乙醇,产生的废醪液再进行沼气发酵是一种较好的资源化利用途径.

  10. Bioelectrochemical reduction of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion effluent for the production of biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondaveeti, Sanath; Min, Booki

    2015-12-15

    This study proves for the first time the feasibility of biofuel production from anaerobic digestion effluent via bioelectrochemical cell operation at various applied cell voltages (1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 V). An increase in cell voltage from 1 to 2 V resulted in more reduction current generation (-0.48 to -0.78 mA) at a lowered cathode potential (-0.45 to -0.84 mV vs Ag/AgCl). Various alcohols were produced depending on applied cell voltages, and the main products were butanol, ethanol, and propanol. Hydrogen and methane production were also observed in the headspace of the cell. A large amount of lactic acid was unexpectedly formed at all conditions, which might be the primary cause of the limited biofuel production. The addition of neutral red (NR) to the system could increase the cathodic reduction current, and thus more biofuels were produced with an enhanced alcohol formation compared to without a mediator.

  11. Production of Ethanol Fuel from Organic and Food Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uduak George AKPAN, Adamu Ali ALHAKIM, and Udeme Joshua Josiah IJAH

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Production of ethanol fuel from organic and food waste has been carried out with the singular aim of converting the waste to useful material. To achieve this, the conversion of organic waste (Old newspapers and food waste (maize were respectively carried out via acid and microbial hydrolysis, which yielded 42% and 63% fermentable sugar wort. This was then converted into ethanol by fermentation process using Sacchromyces ceverisiae. 95% ethanol was obtained by fractional distillation of the fermentable wort and the total volume of ethanol produced from 2,500 grams of the organic and food wastes was 0.86 liters.Fermentation Kinetic parameters were evaluated. Considering the percentage fermentable sugar yield from the biomasses in study, it is more economical to produce ethanol from food waste (maize than old organic waste (old newspaper.

  12. Identification of a conserved protein involved in anaerobic unsaturated fatty acid synthesis in Neiserria gonorrhoeae: implications for facultative and obligate anaerobes that lack FabA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabella, Vincent M; Clark, Virginia L

    2011-10-01

    Transcriptome analysis of the facultative anaerobe, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, revealed that many genes of unknown function were induced under anaerobic conditions. Mutation of one such gene, NGO1024, encoding a protein belonging to the 2-nitropropane dioxygenase-like superfamily of proteins, was found to result in an inability of gonococci to grow anaerobically. Anaerobic growth of an NG1024 mutant was restored upon supplementation with unsaturated fatty acids (UFA), but not with the saturated fatty acid palmitate. Gonococcal fatty acid profiles confirmed that NGO1024 was involved in UFA synthesis anaerobically, but not aerobically, demonstrating that gonococci contain two distinct pathways for the production of UFAs, with a yet unidentified aerobic mechanism, and an anaerobic mechanism involving NGO1024. Expression of genes involved in classical anaerobic UFA synthesis, fabA, fabM and fabB, was toxic in gonococci and unable to complement a NGO1024 mutation, suggesting that the chemistry involved in gonococcal anaerobic UFA synthesis is distinct from that of the classical pathway. NGO1024 homologues, which we suggest naming UfaA, form a distinct lineage within the 2-nitropropane dioxygenase-like superfamily, and are found in many facultative and obligate anaerobes that produce UFAs but lack fabA, suggesting that UfaA is part of a widespread pathway involved in UFA synthesis. PMID:21895795

  13. Analysis of the Link between Ethanol, Energy, and Crop Markets, An

    OpenAIRE

    Simla Tokgoz; Amani Elobeid

    2006-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact of price shocks in three input and output markets critical to ethanol: gasoline, corn, and sugar. We investigate the impact of these shocks on ethanol and related agricultural markets in the United States and Brazil. We find that the composition of a country's vehicle fleet determines the direction of the response of ethanol consumption to changes in the gasoline price. We also find that a change in feedstock costs affects the profitability of ethanol producers ...

  14. Understanding the Underlying Fundamentals of Ethanol Markets: Linkages between Energy and Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Tokgoz, Simla; Elobeid, Amani E.

    2007-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact of price shocks in three input and output markets critical to ethanol: gasoline, corn, and sugar. We investigate the impact of these shocks on ethanol and related agricultural markets in the United States and Brazil. We find that the composition of a country's vehicle fleet determines the direction of the response of ethanol consumption to changes in the gasoline price. We also find that a change in feedstock costs affects the profitability of ethanol producers ...

  15. Ethanol production by recombinant and natural xylose-utilising yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliasson, Anna

    2000-07-01

    The xylose-fermenting capacity of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying XYL1 and XYL2 from Pichia stipitis, which encode xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), respectively, is poor due to high xylitol formation. Whereas, P. stipitis exhibits high ethanol yield on xylose, the tolerance towards inhibitors in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate is low. A recombinant strain possessing the advantageous characteristics of both S. cerevisiae and P. stipitis would constitute a biocatalyst capable of efficient ethanol production from lignocellulosic hydrolysate. In the work presented in this thesis, factors influencing xylose fermentation in recombinant S. cerevisiae and in the natural xylose-fermenting yeast P. stipitis have been identified and investigated. Anaerobic xylulose fermentation was compared in strains of Zygosaccharomyces and S. cerevisiae, mutants and wild-type strains to identify host strain background and genetic modifications beneficial for xylose fermentation. The greatest positive effect was found for over-expression of the gene XKS1 for the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) enzyme xylulokinase (XK), which increased the ethanol yield by almost 85%. The Zygosaccharomyces strains tested formed large amounts of polyols, making them unsuitable as host strains. The XR/XDH/XK ratio was found to determine whether carbon accumulated in a xylitol pool or was further utilised for ethanol production in recombinant xylose-utilising S. cerevisiae. Simulations, based on a kinetic model, and anaerobic xylose cultivation experiments implied that a 1:{>=}10:{>=}4 relation was optimal in minimising xylitol formation. Ethanol formation increased with decreasing XR/XDH ratio, whereas xylitol formation decreased and XK overexpression was necessary for adequate ethanol formation. Based on the knowledge of optimal enzyme ratios, a stable, xylose-utilising strain, S. cerevisiae TMB 3001, was constructed by chromosomal integration of the XYL1 and XYL2 genes

  16. Ethanol production by recombinant and natural xylose-utilising yeasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliasson, Anna

    2000-07-01

    The xylose-fermenting capacity of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying XYL1 and XYL2 from Pichia stipitis, which encode xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), respectively, is poor due to high xylitol formation. Whereas, P. stipitis exhibits high ethanol yield on xylose, the tolerance towards inhibitors in the lignocellulosic hydrolysate is low. A recombinant strain possessing the advantageous characteristics of both S. cerevisiae and P. stipitis would constitute a biocatalyst capable of efficient ethanol production from lignocellulosic hydrolysate. In the work presented in this thesis, factors influencing xylose fermentation in recombinant S. cerevisiae and in the natural xylose-fermenting yeast P. stipitis have been identified and investigated. Anaerobic xylulose fermentation was compared in strains of Zygosaccharomyces and S. cerevisiae, mutants and wild-type strains to identify host strain background and genetic modifications beneficial for xylose fermentation. The greatest positive effect was found for over-expression of the gene XKS1 for the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) enzyme xylulokinase (XK), which increased the ethanol yield by almost 85%. The Zygosaccharomyces strains tested formed large amounts of polyols, making them unsuitable as host strains. The XR/XDH/XK ratio was found to determine whether carbon accumulated in a xylitol pool or was further utilised for ethanol production in recombinant xylose-utilising S. cerevisiae. Simulations, based on a kinetic model, and anaerobic xylose cultivation experiments implied that a 1:{>=}10:{>=}4 relation was optimal in minimising xylitol formation. Ethanol formation increased with decreasing XR/XDH ratio, whereas xylitol formation decreased and XK overexpression was necessary for adequate ethanol formation. Based on the knowledge of optimal enzyme ratios, a stable, xylose-utilising strain, S. cerevisiae TMB 3001, was constructed by chromosomal integration of the XYL1 and XYL2 genes

  17. [Anaerobic digestion of animal manure contaminated by tetracyclines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zi-Lin; Liu, Yuan-Lu; Hu, Zhen-Hu; Yuan, Shou-Jun

    2012-03-01

    Anaerobic digestion of pig manure spiked with tetracycline (TC) and chlortetracycline (CTC) and the degradation of the two antibiotics during the anaerobic digestion at 35 degrees C were investigated. The results indicate that propionate was the main volatile fatty acid produced during the anaerobic digestion followed by acetate. Compared with the CTC addition, TC + CTC addition showed obvious inhibitory effect on the hydrolysis and acidification of easily digestible organic components of pig manure. The cumulative methane production of TC, CTC, TC + CTC and CK2 during anaerobic digestion was 386.4 mL, 406.0 mL, 412.1 mL and 464.6 mL, respectively. Degradation of TC and CTC followed the first-order kinetic equation. The half-life of TC and CTC was 14-18 days and 10 days, respectively. After the treatment of 45-day anaerobic digestion, the degradation efficiency of TC was 88.6%-91.6% with 97.7%-98.2% of CTC. Therefore, anaerobic digestion shows the benefit on the management of animal manures contaminated by tetracyclines. PMID:22624404

  18. Understanding the Growth of the Cellulosic Ethanol Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandor, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wallace, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peterson, S. [Peterson Group, Anchorage, AK (United States)

    2008-04-01

    Report identifies and documents plausible scenarios for producing significant quantities of lignocellulosic ethanol in 2017 as a guide for setting government policy and targeting government investment to areas with greatest potential impact.

  19. Understanding the Growth of the Cellulosic Ethanol Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandor, D.; Wallace, R.; Peterson, S.

    2008-04-01

    This report identifies, outlines, and documents a set of plausible scenarios for producing significant quantities of lignocellulosic ethanol in 2017. These scenarios can provide guidance for setting government policy and targeting government investment to the areas with greatest potential impact.

  20. Ethanol as an alternative source of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakistan, at present facades huge shortage of energy that has disabled several industries and has worsened the living standards of a common man. Its economy mainly depends upon agriculture but relies heavily on imported petroleum to meet the necessities. The importance of national resources as an alternative energy resource is thus greatly felt. The sugar cane industry of Pakistan holds a potential to provide such an alternative fuel as bio ethanol that can be produced entirely from molasses. This paper looks deeper into scope of ethanol as one replacement that can reduce the financial and environmental cost of petroleum based fuels. (author)

  1. FUEL CELL OPERATION ON ANAEROBIC DIGESTER GAS: CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conceptual design of a fuel cell (FC) system for operation on anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is described and its economic and environmental feasibility is projected. ADG is produced at water treatment plants during the process of treating sewage anaerobically to reduce solids....

  2. Evaluation of biogas production by dry anaerobic digestion of switchgrass-animal manure mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological method used to convert organic wastes into a stable product for land application without adverse environmental effects. The biogas produced can be used as an alternative renewable energy source. Dry anaerobic digestion (> 15% TS; total solid) has an advantage ov...

  3. Vinasses treatment in anaerobic fludized bed reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. C. Terán

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural use of vinasse produced by the sugar industry has gone through many changes over the years. Coupled with concern over the increased agronomic efficiency and optimizing the management of the use of such waste, you can highlight the major global ecological awareness, developed after 90s. This study aims at the construction and operation of a reactor anaerobic cracker (RALF on pilot scale to verify the burden of chemical demand of oxygen (DQO of vinasse, under mesophilic. The stillage used for feeding the reactor was from a sugar cane processing plant, located in the city of Regente Feijó, São Paulo State. The inoculum was anaerobic sludge from a reactor and upward flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB treating wastewater from a factory of soda. The concentrations of vinasse to be treated ranged 17,239 mg DQO L-1 up to 28,174 mg DQO L-1. The effluent pH was maintained between 6.4 and 8.6 during the research. The productivity of biogas in the reactor has not achieved the expected rates, reaching only 46 mL day-1. Maximum efficiency attained during operation was 51.1 %, corresponding to a 14-day operation time, vinasses organic loading of 19.5 kg DQO m-3 dia-1 and to an hydraulic detention time of one day.

  4. BioEthanol : fuel of the future?

    OpenAIRE

    Hilma Eiðsdóttir Bakken

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fermentations are potential producers of sustainable energy carriers. In this study, 68 samples were used for the isolation of ethanol and hydrogen producing bacteria from various carbon substrates from geothermal springs in Iceland. 16S rRNA analysis revealed that most of low temperature (50°C) enrichments indicated the presence of bacteria belonging to Thermoanaerobacterium, Caloramator and Clostridium. At higher temperatures (60°C) Thermoanaerobacterium and...

  5. The Curing Agent Sodium Nitrite, Used in the Production of Fermented Sausages, Is Less Inhibiting to the Bacteriocin-Producing Meat Starter Culture Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174 under Anaerobic Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Verluyten, Jurgen; Messens, Winy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Curvacin A is a listericidal bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174, a strain isolated from fermented sausage. The response of this strain to an added curing agent (sodium nitrite) in terms of cell growth and bacteriocin production was investigated in vitro by laboratory fermentations with modified MRS broth. The strain was highly sensitive to nitrite; even a concentration of 10 ppm of curing agent inhibited its growth and both volumetric and specific bacteriocin production. ...

  6. Ethanol is a strategic raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baras Josip K.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this review article considers general data about ethanol as an industrial product, its qualities and uses. It is emphasized that, if produced from biomass as a renewable raw material, its perspectives as a chemical raw material and energent are brilliant. Starchy grains, such as corn, must be used as the main raw materials for ethanol production. The production of bioethanol by the enzyme-catalyzed conversion of starch followed by (yeast fermentation, distillation is the process of choice. If used as a motor fuel, anhydrous ethanol can be directly blended with gasoline or converted into an oxygenator such as ETBE. Finally, bioethanol production in Yugoslavia and the possibilities for its further development are discussed.

  7. Second Generation Ethanol Production from Brewers’ Spent Grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Liguori

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomasses raises a global interest because it represents a good alternative to petroleum-derived energies and reduces the food versus fuel conflict generated by first generation ethanol. In this study, alkaline-acid pretreated brewers’ spent grain (BSG was evaluated for ethanol production after enzymatic hydrolysis with commercial enzymes. The obtained hydrolysate containing a glucose concentration of 75 g/L was adopted, after dilution up to 50 g/L, for fermentation by the strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL YB 2293 selected as the best producer among five ethanologenic microorganims. When the hydrolysate was supplemented with yeast extract, 12.79 g/L of ethanol, corresponding to 0.28 g of ethanol per grams of glucose consumed (55% efficiency, was obtained within 24 h, while in the non-supplemented hydrolysate, a similar concentration was reached within 48 h. The volumetric productivity increased from 0.25 g/L·h in the un-supplemented hydrolysate to 0.53 g/L h in the yeast extract supplemented hydrolysate. In conclusion, the strain S. cerevisiae NRRL YB 2293 was shown able to produce ethanol from BSG. Although an equal amount of ethanol was reached in both BSG hydrolysate media, the nitrogen source supplementation reduced the ethanol fermentation time and promoted glucose uptake and cell growth.

  8. Greenhouse gases in the corn-to-fuel ethanol pathway.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M. Q.

    1998-06-18

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has applied its Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model to examine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn-feedstock ethanol, given present and near-future production technology and practice. On the basis of updated information appropriate to corn farming and processing operations in the four principal corn- and ethanol-producing states (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska), the model was used to estimate energy requirements and GHG emissions of corn farming; the manufacture, transportation to farms, and field application of fertilizer and pesticide; transportation of harvested corn to ethanol plants; nitrous oxide emissions from cultivated cornfields; ethanol production in current average and future technology wet and dry mills; and operation of cars and light trucks using ethanol fuels. For all cases examined on the basis of mass emissions per travel mile, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol used in both E85 and E10 blends with gasoline outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG production. Also, GHG reductions (but not energy use) appear surprisingly sensitive to the value chosen for combined soil and leached N-fertilizer conversion to nitrous oxide. Co-product energy-use attribution remains the single key factor in estimating ethanol's relative benefits because this value can range from 0 to 50%, depending on the attribution method chosen.

  9. Greenhouse gases in the corn-to-fuel ethanol pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has applied its Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model to examine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn-feedstock ethanol, given present and near-future production technology and practice. On the basis of updated information appropriate to corn farming and processing operations in the four principal corn- and ethanol-producing states (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska), the model was used to estimate energy requirements and GHG emissions of corn farming; the manufacture, transportation to farms, and field application of fertilizer and pesticide; transportation of harvested corn to ethanol plants; nitrous oxide emissions from cultivated cornfields; ethanol production in current average and future technology wet and dry mills; and operation of cars and light trucks using ethanol fuels. For all cases examined on the basis of mass emissions per travel mile, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol used in both E85 and E10 blends with gasoline outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG production. Also, GHG reductions (but not energy use) appear surprisingly sensitive to the value chosen for combined soil and leached N-fertilizer conversion to nitrous oxide. Co-product energy-use attribution remains the single key factor in estimating ethanol's relative benefits because this value can range from 0 to 50%, depending on the attribution method chosen

  10. CARBOXYLIC ACID EFFECTS ON ETHANOL RECOVERY FROM AQUEOUS MIXTURES USING PERVAPORATION THROUGH MFI ZEOLITE-FILLED POLYDIMETHYLSILOXANE MEMBRANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most bioethanol is produced by fermenting sugars released from biomass and using distillation to recover the ethanol. Recovering ethanol from the fermentation broths using pervaporation through hydrophobic membranes is potentially economically competitive with distillation for s...

  11. Zymomonas mobilis: a bacterium for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratti, J.C.; Bu' Lock, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a facultative anaerobic gram negative bacterium first isolated in tropical countries from alcoholic beverages like the African palm wine, the Mexican pulque and also as a contaminant of cider (cider sickness) or beer in the European countries. It is one of the few facultative anaerobic bacteria degrading glucose by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway usually found in strictly aerobic microorganisms. Some work was devoted to this bacterium in the 50s and 60s and was reviewed by Swings and De Ley in their classical paper published in 1977. During the 70s there was very little work on the bacterium until 1979 and the first report by the Australian group of P.L. Rogers on the great potentialities of Z. mobilis for ethanol production. At that time the petroleum crisis had led the developed countries to search for alternative fuel from renewable resources. The Australian group clearly demonstrated the advantages of the bacterium compared to the yeasts traditionally used for the alcoholic fermentation. As a result, there was a considerable burst in the Zymomonas literature which started from nearly zero in the late 70s to attain 70 papers published in the field in 1984. In this article, papers published from 1982 to 1986 are reviewed.

  12. Cultivos de alta densidad celular por retención interna: aplicación a la fermentación continua de etanol High cell density cultures produced by internal retention: application in continuous ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godoy Rubén Darío

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available El etanol ha generado gran interés por su potencial como combustible alternativo. No obstante, para que este producto sea competitivo económicamente, es necesario desarrollar procesos de fermentación que incrementen la baja productividad volumétrica lograda en cultivos convencionales (por lote o continuo, por medio de técnicas que permitan altas concentraciones celulares y reduzcan la inhibición por producto. Uno de los métodos empleados frecuentemente involucra la recirculación celular; por ello, en este trabajo se desarrolló un reactor de membrana incorporando un módulo de filtración, con unidades tubulares de 5 u,m en acero inoxidable, dentro de un fermentador de tanque agitado de 3L, para investigar su aplicación en la producción continua de etanol. Los efectos de la concentración celular y la caída de presión transmembranal sobre el flux de permeado fueron evaluados para probar el desempeño del módulo de filtración. Previa selección de las condiciones de fermentación (30 °C, 1,25 -1,75 vvm, pH 4,5, el sistema con retención celular interna fue operado en el cultivo continuo de Saccharomyces cerevisiae a partir de sacarosa. La permeabilidad de las unidades filtrantes fue mantenida mediante la aplicación de pulsos de aire. Más del 97% de las células cultivadas fueron retenidas en el fermentador, alcanzándose una concentración celular de 51 g/L y una productividad promedio de etanol, en el cultivo con retención celular, de 8,51 g/L.h, la cual fue dos veces mayor a la que se obtiene en un cultivo continuo convencional. Palabras clave: reactor de membrana, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fermentación alcohólica, recirculación celular.Ethanol has provoked great interest due to its potential as an alternative fuel. Nevertheless, fermentation processes must be developed by increasing the low volumetric productivity achieved in conventional cultures (batch or continuous to make this product become economically competitive

  13. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  14. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of low-level radioactive cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work has been completed using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale. Start-up and operating procedures have been developed, and effluent was generated for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and fed-batch conditions were made lasting 36, 90, and 423 d. Solids solubilization rates and gas production rates averaged approximately 1.8 g cellulose per L of reactor per d and 1.2 L of off-gas per L reactor per d. Greater than 80% destruction of the volatile suspended solids was obtained. A simple dynamic process model was constructed to aid in process design and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester

  15. Ethanol fuels in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The largest alternative transportation fuels program in the world today is Brazil's Proalcool Program. About 6.0 million metric tons of oil equivalent (MTOE) of ethanol, derived mainly from sugar cane, were consumed as transportation fuels in 1991 (equivalent to 127,000 barrels of crude oil per day). Total primary energy consumed by the Brazilian economy in 1991 was 184.1 million MTOE, and approximately 4.3 million vehicles -- about one third of the total vehicle fleet or about 40 percent of the total car population -- run on hydrous or open-quotes neatclose quotes ethanol at the azeotropic composition (96 percent ethanol, 4 percent water, by volume). Additional transportation fuels available in the country are diesel and gasoline, the latter of which is defined by three grades. Gasoline A (regular, leaded gas)d has virtually been replaced by gasoline C, a blend of gasoline and up to 22 percent anhydrous ethanol by volume, and gasoline B (premium gasoline) has been discontinued as a result of neat ethanol market penetration

  16. Anaerobic and aerobic batch cultivations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants impaired in glycerol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Torben Lauesgaard; Hamann, Claus Wendelboe; Kielland-Brandt, M. C.;

    2000-01-01

    Glycerol is formed as a by-product in production of ethanol and baker's yeast during fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under anaerobic and aerobic growth conditions, respectively. One physiological role of glycerol formation by yeast is to reoxidize NADH, formed in synthesis of biomass...... and secondary fermentation products, to NAD(+). The objective of this study was to evaluate whether introduction of a new pathway for reoxidation of NADH, in a yeast strain where glycerol synthesis had been impaired, would result in elimination of glycerol production and lead to increased yields of ethanol...

  17. BIOESTABILIZATION ANAEROBIC SOLID WASTE ORGANIC:QUANTITATIVE ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valderi Duarte Leite

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that in Brazil, the municipal solid waste produced are constituted on average 55% of fermentable organic solid waste and that this quantity can be applied in aerobic or anaerobic stabilization process. Anaerobic digestion is an important alternative for the treatment of different types of potentially fermentable waste, considering providing an alternative source of energy that can be used to replace fossil fuels. To perform the experimental part of this work was constructed and monitored an experimental system consisting of an anaerobic batch reactor, shredding unit of fermentable organic wastes and additional devices. Fermentable organic wastes consisted of leftover fruits and vegetables and were listed in EMPASA (Paraibana Company of Food and Agricultural Services, located in the city of Campina Grande- PB. The residues were collected and transported to the Experimental Station Biological Sewage Treatment (EXTRABES where they were processed and used for substrate preparation. The substrate consisted of a mixture of fermentable organic waste, more anaerobic sewage sludge in the proportion of 80 and 20 % respectively. In the specific case of this study, it was found that 1m3 of substrate concentration of total COD equal to 169 g L-1, considering the reactor efficiency equal to 80 %, the production of CH4 would be approximately 47.25 Nm3 CH4. Therefore, fermentable organic waste, when subjected to anaerobic treatment process produces a quantity of methane gas in addition to the partially biostabilized compound may be applied as a soil conditioning agent.

  18. KCNQ channels show conserved ethanol block and function in ethanol behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Cavaliere

    Full Text Available In humans, KCNQ2/3 channels form an M-current that regulates neuronal excitability, with mutations in these channels causing benign neonatal familial convulsions. The M-current is important in mechanisms of neural plasticity underlying associative memory and in the response to ethanol, with KCNQ controlling the release of dopamine after ethanol exposure. We show that dKCNQ is broadly expressed in the nervous system, with targeted reduction in neuronal KCNQ increasing neural excitability and KCNQ overexpression decreasing excitability and calcium signalling, consistent with KCNQ regulating the resting membrane potential and neural release as in mammalian neurons. We show that the single KCNQ channel in Drosophila (dKCNQ has similar electrophysiological properties to neuronal KCNQ2/3, including conserved acute sensitivity to ethanol block, with the fly channel (IC(50 = 19.8 mM being more sensitive than its mammalian ortholog (IC(50 = 42.1 mM. This suggests that the role of KCNQ in alcohol behaviour can be determined for the first time by using Drosophila. We present evidence that loss of KCNQ function in Drosophila increased sensitivity and tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol. Acute activation of dopaminergic neurons by heat-activated TRP channel or KCNQ-RNAi expression produced ethanol hypersensitivity, suggesting that both act via a common mechanism involving membrane depolarisation and increased dopamine signalling leading to ethanol sedation.

  19. Saponification of fatty slaughterhouse wastes for enhancing anaerobic biodegradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battimelli, Audrey; Carrère, Hélène; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe

    2009-08-01

    The thermochemical pretreatment by saponification of two kinds of fatty slaughterhouse waste--aeroflotation fats and flesh fats from animal carcasses--was studied in order to improve the waste's anaerobic degradation. The effect of an easily biodegradable compound, ethanol, on raw waste biodegradation was also examined. The aims of the study were to enhance the methanisation of fatty waste and also to show a link between biodegradability and bio-availability. The anaerobic digestion of raw waste, saponified waste and waste with a co-substrate was carried out in batch mode under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The results showed little increase in the total volume of biogas, indicating a good biodegradability of the raw wastes. Mean biogas volume reached 1200 mL/g VS which represented more than 90% of the maximal theoretical biogas potential. Raw fatty wastes were slowly biodegraded whereas pretreated wastes showed improved initial reaction kinetics, indicating a better initial bio-availability, particularly for mesophilic runs. The effects observed for raw wastes with ethanol as co-substrate depended on the process temperature: in mesophilic conditions, an initial improvement was observed whereas in thermophilic conditions a significant decrease in biodegradability was observed.

  20. Anaerobic Pre-treatment of Strong Sewage

    OpenAIRE

    Halalsheh, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to assess the feasibility of applying low cost anaerobic technology for the treatment of relatively high strength sewage of Jordan using two-stage and one-stage UASB reactors operated at ambient temperatures. The wastewater produced in Jordan is characterised by a high concentration of COD tot with averages higher than 1200 mg/l and with a large fraction in the suspended form (65-70%). The average wastewater temperature fluctuates between 18 and 25 oC f...

  1. Bacteria engineered for fuel ethanol production: current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dien, B.S.; Cotta, M.A. [National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Peoria, IL (United States); Jeffries, T.W. [Inst. for Microbial and Biochemical Technology, Forest Service, Forest Products Lab., USDA, Madison, WI (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The lack of industrially suitable microorganisms for converting biomass into fuel ethanol has traditionally been cited as a major technical roadblock to developing a bioethanol industry. In the last two decades, numerous microorganisms have been engineered to selectively produce ethanol. Lignocellulosic biomass contains complex carbohydrates that necessitate utilizing microorganisms capable of fermenting sugars not fermentable by brewers' yeast. The most significant of these is xylose. The greatest successes have been in the engineering of gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Zymomonas mobilis. E. coli and K. oxytoca are naturally able to use a wide spectrum of sugars, and work has concentrated on engineering these strains to selectively produce ethanol. Z. mobilis produces ethanol at high yields, but ferments only glucose and fructose. Work on this organism has concentrated on introducing pathways for the fermentation of arabinose and xylose. The history of constructing these strains and current progress in refining them are detailed in this review. (orig.)

  2. Operant Ethanol Self-Administration in Ethanol Dependent Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Marcelo F; Howard C Becker

    2014-01-01

    While rats have been predominantly used to study operant ethanol self-administration behavior in the context of dependence, several studies have employed operant conditioning procedures to examine changes in ethanol self-administration behavior as a function of chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal experience in mice. This review highlights some of the advantages of using operant conditioning procedures for examining the motivational effects of ethanol in animals with a history of dependenc...

  3. Arrowroot as a novel substrate for ethanol production by solid state simultaneous saccharification and fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tian-xiang; Tang, Qing-li; Zhu, Zuo-hua [School of Chemical Engineering, Guizhou University, Guizhou, Guiyang 550003 (China); Wang, Feng [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Ethanol production from Canna edulis Ker was successfully carried out by solid state simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. The enzymatic hydrolysis conditions of C. edulis were optimized by Plackett-Burman design. The effect of inert carrier (corncob and rice bran) on ethanol fermentation and the kinetics of solid state simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was investigated. It was found that C. edulis was an alternative substrate for ethanol production, 10.1% (v/v) of ethanol concentration can attained when 40 g corncob and 10 g rice bran per 100 g C. edulis powder were added for ethanol fermentation. No shortage of fermentable sugars was observed during solid state simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. There was no wastewater produced in the process of ethanol production from C. edulis with solid state simultaneous saccharification and fermentation and the ethanol yield of more than 0.28 tonne per one tonne feedstock was achieved. This is first report for ethanol production from C. edulis powder. (author)

  4. The Health Impacts of Ethanol Blend Petrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Wood

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A measurement program designed to evaluate health impacts or benefits of using ethanol blend petrol examined exhaust and evaporative emissions from 21 vehicles representative of the current Australian light duty petrol (gasoline vehicle fleet using a composite urban emissions drive cycle. The fuels used were unleaded petrol (ULP, ULP blended with either 5% ethanol (E5 or 10% ethanol (E10. The resulting data were combined with inventory data for Sydney to determine the expected fleet emissions for different uptakes of ethanol blended fuel. Fleet ethanol compatibility was estimated to be 60% for 2006, and for the air quality modelling it was assumed that in 2011 over 95% of the fleet would be ethanol compatible. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from ULP, E5 and E10 emissions was studied under controlled conditions by the use of a smog chamber. This was combined with meteorological data from Sydney for February 2004 and the emission data (both measured and inventory data to model pollutant concentrations in Sydney’s airshed for 2006 and 2011. These concentrations were combined with the population distribution to evaluate population exposure to the pollutant. There is a health benefit to the Sydney population arising from a move from ULP to ethanol blends in spark-ignition vehicles. Potential health cost savings for Urban Australia (Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Perth are estimated to be A$39 million (in 2007 dollars for a 50% uptake (by ethanol compatible vehicles of E10 in 2006 and $42 million per annum for a 100% take up of E10 in 2011. Over 97% of the estimated health savings are due to reduced emissions of PM2.5 and consequent reduced impacts on mortality and morbidity (e.g., asthma, cardiovascular disease. Despite more petrol-driven vehicles predicted for 2011, the quantified health impact differential between ULP and ethanol fuelled vehicles drops from 2006 to 2011. This is because modern petrol vehicles, with lower emissions than

  5. Fuel ethanol production using nuclear-plant steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States, the production of fuel ethanol from corn for cars and light trucks has increased from about 6 billion liters per year in 2000 to 19 billion liters per year in 2006. A third of the world's liquid fuel demands could ultimately be obtained from biomass. The production of fuel ethanol from biomass requires large quantities of steam. For a large ethanol plant producing 380 million liters of fuel ethanol from corn per year, about 80 MW(t) of 1-MPa (∼180 deg. C) steam is required. Within several decades, the steam demand for ethanol plants in the United States is projected to be tens of gigawatts, with the worldwide demand being several times larger. This market may become the largest market for cogeneration of steam from nuclear electric power plants. There are strong incentives to use steam from nuclear power plants to meet this requirement. The cost of low-pressure steam from nuclear power plants is less than that of natural gas, which is now used to make steam in corn-to-ethanol plants. Steam from nuclear power plants reduces greenhouse gases compared with steam produced from fossil fuels. While ethanol is now produced from sugarcane and corn, the next-generation ethanol plants will use more abundant cellulose feedstocks. It is planned that these plants will burn the lignin in the cellulosic feedstocks to provide the required steam. Lignin is the primary non-sugar-based component in cellulosic biomass that can not be converted to ethanol. Low-cost steam from nuclear plants creates the option of converting the lignin to other liquid fuels and thus increase the liquid fuel production per unit of biomass. Because liquid fuel production from biomass is ultimately limited by the availability of biomass, steam from nuclear plants can ultimately increase the total liquid fuels produced from biomass. (author)

  6. Engineering Escherichia coli for improved ethanol production from gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Amanda; Schlacta, Theresa; Warmack, Rebeccah; Kasuga, Takao; Fan, Zhiliang

    2013-10-10

    We report on engineering Escherichia coli to produce ethanol at high yield from gluconic acid (gluconate). Knocking out genes encoding for the competing pathways (l-lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate formate lyase A) in E. coli KO11 eliminated lactate production, lowered the carbon flow toward acetate production, and improved the ethanol yield from 87.5% to 97.5% of the theoretical maximum, while the growth rate of the mutant strain was about 70% of the wild type. The corresponding genetic modifications led to a small improvement of ethanol yield from 101.5% to 106.0% on glucose. Deletion of the pyruvate dehydrogenase gene (pdh) alone improved the ethanol yield from 87.5% to 90.4% when gluconate was a substrate. The growth rate of the mutant strain was identical to that of the wild type. The corresponding genetic modification led to no improvements on ethanol yield on glucose.

  7. Ethanol: economic gain or drain?

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua A. Byrge; Kevin L. Kliesen

    2008-01-01

    Corn-based ethanol can make a dent in demand for oil, but at what price? Food costs go up. Environmental damage worsens. If oil prices fall, ethanol production will probably collapse-as it did 20 years ago.

  8. Production of Biocellulosic Ethanol from Wheat Straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat straw is an abundant lignocellulosic feedstock in many parts of the world, and has been selected for producing ethanol in an economically feasible manner. It contains a mixture of sugars (hexoses and pentoses.Two-stage acid hydrolysis was carried out with concentrates of perchloric acid, using wheat straw. The hydrolysate was concentrated by vacuum evaporation to increase the concentration of fermentable sugars, and was detoxified by over-liming to decrease the concentration of fermentation inhibitors. After two-stage acid hydrolysis, the sugars and the inhibitors were measured. The ethanol yields obtained from by converting hexoses and pentoses in the hydrolysate with the co-culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipites were higher than the ethanol yields produced with a monoculture of S. cerevisiae. Various conditions for hysdrolysis and fermentation were investigated. The ethanol concentration was 11.42 g/l in 42 h of incubation, with a yield of 0.475 g/g, productivity of 0.272 gl ·h, and fermentation efficiency of 92.955 %, using a co-culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipites

  9. Biochemical Disincentives to Fertilizing Cellulosic Ethanol Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, M. E.; Hockaday, W. C.; Snapp, S.; McSwiney, C.; Baldock, J.

    2010-12-01

    Corn grain biofuel crops produce the highest yields when the cropping ecosystem is not nitrogen (N)-limited, achieved by application of fertilizer. There are environmental consequences for excessive fertilizer application to crops, including greenhouse gas emissions, hypoxic “dead zones,” and health problems from N runoff into groundwater. The increase in corn acreage in response to demand for alternative fuels (i.e. ethanol) could exacerbate these problems, and divert food supplies to fuel production. A potential substitute for grain ethanol that could reduce some of these impacts is cellulosic ethanol. Cellulosic ethanol feedstocks include grasses (switchgrass), hardwoods, and crop residues (e.g. corn stover, wheat straw). It has been assumed that these feedstocks will require similar N fertilization rates to grain biofuel crops to maximize yields, but carbohydrate yield versus N application has not previously been monitored. We report the biochemical stocks (carbohydrate, protein, and lignin in Mg ha-1) of a corn ecosystem grown under varying N levels. We measured biochemical yield in Mg ha-1 within the grain, leaf and stem, and reproductive parts of corn plants grown at seven N fertilization rates (0-202 kg N ha-1), to evaluate the quantity and quality of these feedstocks across a N fertilization gradient. The N fertilization rate study was performed at the Kellogg Biological Station-Long Term Ecological Research Site (KBS-LTER) in Michigan. Biochemical stocks were measured using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), combined with a molecular mixing model (Baldock et al. 2004). Carbohydrate and lignin are the main biochemicals of interest in ethanol production since carbohydrate is the ethanol feedstock, and lignin hinders the carbohydrate to ethanol conversion process. We show that corn residue carbohydrate yields respond only weakly to N fertilization compared to grain. Grain carbohydrate yields plateau in response to fertilization at

  10. Cellulose fermentation by nitrogen-fixing anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canale-Parola, E.

    1992-12-13

    In anaerobic natural environments cellulose is degraded to methane, carbon dioxide and other products by the combined activities of many diverse microorganisms. We are simulating processes occurring in natural environments by constructing biologically-defined, stable, heterogeneous bacterial communities (consortia) that we use as in vitro systems for quantitative studies of cellulose degradation under conditions of combined nitrogen deprivation. These studies include the investigation of (i) metabolic interactions among members of cellulose-degrading microbial populations, and (ii) processes that regulate the activity or biosynthesis of cellulolytic enzymes. In addition, we are studying the sensory mechanisms that, in natural environments, may enable motile cellulolytic bacteria to migrate toward cellulose. This part of our work includes biochemical characterization of the cellobiose chemoreceptor of cellulolytic bacteria. Finally, an important aspect of our research is the investigation of the mechanisms by which multienzyme complexes of anaerobic bacteria catalyze the depolymerization of crystalline cellulose and of other plant cell wall polysacchaddes. The research will provide fundamental information on the physiology and ecology of cellulose-fermenting, N{sub 2}-fixing bacteria, and on the intricate processes involved in C and N cycling in anaerobic environments. Furthermore, the information will be valuable for the development of practical applications, such as the conversion of plant biomass (e.g., agricultural, forestry and municipal wastes) to automotive fuels such as ethanol.

  11. Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors For Cost-Effective Municipal Water Reuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özgün, H.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology has been increasingly researched for municipal wastewater treatment as a means to produce nutrient-rich, solids free effluents with low levels of pathogens, while occupying a small footprint. An AnMBR can be used not only for on-site

  12. A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boetius, A.; Ravenschlag, K.; Schubert, CJ;

    2000-01-01

    A large fraction of globally produced methane is converted to CO2 by anaerobic oxidation in marine sediments(1). Strong geochemical evidence for net methane consumption in anoxic sediments is based on methane profiles(2), radiotracer experiments(3) and stable carbon isotope data(4). But the elusive...

  13. Biogas energy production from tropical biomass wastes by anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an attractive technology in tropical regions for converting locally abundant biomass wastes into biogas which can be used to produce heat, electricity, and transportation fuels. However, investigations on AD of tropical forestry wastes, such as albizia biomass, and food w...

  14. Hydrogenosomes : convergent adaptations of mitochondria to anaerobic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hackstein, JHP; Akhmanova, A; Voncken, F; van Hoek, A; van Alen, T; Boxma, B; Moon-van der Staay, SY; van der Staay, G; Leunissen, J; Huynen, M; Rosenberg, J; Veenhuis, M; Hackstein, Johannes H.P.; Moon-van der Staay, Seung Yeo

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogenosomes are membrane-bound organelles that compartmentalise the Final steps of energy metabo I is in in a number of anaerobic eukaryotes. They produce hydrogen and ATP. Here we will review the data, which are relevant for the questions: how did the hydrogenosomes originate, and what was their

  15. Status on Science and Application of Thermophilic Anaerobic Digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1994-01-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic processes are often regarded as less stable than mesophilic processes. In the paper this postulate is examined and disproved based on real operational data from of full-scale mesophilic and thermophilic biogas plants. The start-up produce for the thermophilic plants was, ho...

  16. Ethanol from wood. Cellulase enzyme production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szengyel, Zsolt

    2000-03-01

    Conversion of biomass to liquid fuels, such as ethanol, has been investigated during the past decades. First due to the oil crisis of the 1970s and lately because of concerns about greenhouse effect, ethanol has been found to be a suitable substitute for gasoline in transportation. Although ethanol is produced in large quantities from corn starch, the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol is rather problematic. However, cellulosic raw materials are important as they are available in large quantities from agriculture and forestry. One of the most extensively investigated processes is the enzymatic process, in which fungal cellulolytic enzymes are used to convert the cellulose content of the biomass to glucose, which is then fermented to ethanol. In order to make the raw material accessible to biological attack, it has to be pretreated first. The most successful method, which has been evaluated for various lignocellulosic materials, is the steam pretreatment. In this thesis the utilization of steam pretreated willow (hardwood) and spruce (softwood) was examined for enzyme production using a filamentous fungus T. reesei RUT C30. Various carbon sources originating from the steam pretreated materials have been investigated. The replacement of the solid carbon source with a liquid carbon source, as well as the effect of pH, was studied. The effect of toxic compounds generated during pretreatment was also examined. Comparative study of softwood and hardwood showed that steam pretreated hardwood is a better carbon source than softwood. The hydrolytic potential of enzyme solutions produced on wood derived carbon sources was better compared to commercial cellulases. Also enzyme solutions produced on steam pretreated spruce showed less sensitivity towards toxic compounds formed during steam pretreatment.

  17. Screening of bacterial strains capable of converting biodiesel-derived raw glycerol into 1,3-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol and ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metsoviti, Maria; Paramithiotis, Spiros; Drosinos, Eleftherios H.; Galiotou-Panayotou, Maria; Nychas, George-John E.; Papanikolaou, Seraphim [Department of Food Science and Technology, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Zeng, An-Ping [Institute of Bioprocess and Biosystems Engineering, Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    The ability of bacterial strains to assimilate glycerol derived from biodiesel facilities to produce metabolic compounds of importance for the food, textile and chemical industry, such as 1,3-propanediol (PD), 2,3-butanediol (BD) and ethanol (EtOH), was assessed. The screening of 84 bacterial strains was performed using glycerol as carbon source. After initial trials, 12 strains were identified capable of consuming raw glycerol under anaerobic conditions, whereas 5 strains consumed glycerol under aerobiosis. A plethora of metabolic compounds was synthesized; in anaerobic batch-bioreactor cultures PD in quantities up to 11.3 g/L was produced by Clostridium butyricum NRRL B-23495, while the respective value was 10.1 g/L for a newly isolated Citrobacter freundii. Adaptation of Cl. butyricum at higher initial glycerol concentration resulted in a PD{sub max} concentration of {proportional_to}32 g/L. BD was produced by a new Enterobacter aerogenes isolate in shake-flask experiments, under fully aerobic conditions, with a maximum concentration of {proportional_to}22 g/L which was achieved at an initial glycerol quantity of 55 g/L. A new Klebsiella oxytoca isolate converted waste glycerol into mixtures of PD, BD and EtOH at various ratios. Finally, another new C. freundii isolate converted waste glycerol into EtOH in anaerobic batch-bioreactor cultures with constant pH, achieving a final EtOH concentration of 14.5 g/L, a conversion yield of 0.45 g/g and a volumetric productivity of {proportional_to}0.7 g/L/h. As a conclusion, the current study confirmed the utilization of biodiesel-derived raw glycerol as an appropriate substrate for the production of PD, BD and EtOH by several newly isolated bacterial strains under different experimental conditions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meulepas, Roel J.W., E-mail: roel.meulepas@wetsus.nl [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Water Desalination and Reuse Center, Thuwal 13955-69000 (Saudi Arabia); Teshager, Fitfety Melese; Witharana, Ayoma [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Saikaly, Pascal E. [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Water Desalination and Reuse Center, Thuwal 13955-69000 (Saudi Arabia); Lens, Piet N.L. [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342 μg g{sup −1} of copper, 487 μg g{sup −1} of lead, 793 μg g{sup −1} of zinc, 27 μg g{sup −1} of nickel and 2.3 μg g{sup −1} of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3 g{sub dry} {sub weight} L{sup −1} waste activated sludge, 80–85% of the copper, 66–69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94–99% of the nickel and 73–83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead. - Highlights: • Heavy metals were leached during anaerobic acidification of waste activated sludge. • The process does not require the addition of chelating or oxidizing agents. • The metal leaching efficiencies (66 to 99%) were comparable to chemical leaching. • The produced leachate may be used for metal recovery and biogas production. • The produced digested sludge may be used as soil conditioner.

  19. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342 μg g−1 of copper, 487 μg g−1 of lead, 793 μg g−1 of zinc, 27 μg g−1 of nickel and 2.3 μg g−1 of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3 gdry weight L−1 waste activated sludge, 80–85% of the copper, 66–69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94–99% of the nickel and 73–83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead. - Highlights: • Heavy metals were leached during anaerobic acidification of waste activated sludge. • The process does not require the addition of chelating or oxidizing agents. • The metal leaching efficiencies (66 to 99%) were comparable to chemical leaching. • The produced leachate may be used for metal recovery and biogas production. • The produced digested sludge may be used as soil conditioner

  20. Energy positive domestic wastewater treatment: the roles of anaerobic and phototrophic technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoener, B D; Bradley, I M; Cusick, R D; Guest, J S

    2014-05-01

    The negative energy balance of wastewater treatment could be reversed if anaerobic technologies were implemented for organic carbon oxidation and phototrophic technologies were utilized for nutrient recovery. To characterize the potential for energy positive wastewater treatment by anaerobic and phototrophic biotechnologies we performed a comprehensive literature review and analysis, focusing on energy production (as kJ per capita per day and as kJ m(-3) of wastewater treated), energy consumption, and treatment efficacy. Anaerobic technologies included in this review were the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR), anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR), anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFB), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), and microbial fuel cell (MFC). Phototrophic technologies included were the high rate algal pond (HRAP), photobioreactor (PBR), stirred tank reactor, waste stabilization pond (WSP), and algal turf scrubber (ATS). Average energy recovery efficiencies for anaerobic technologies ranged from 1.6% (MFC) to 47.5% (ABR). When including typical percent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals by each technology, this range would equate to roughly 40-1200 kJ per capita per day or 110-3300 kJ m(-3) of treated wastewater. The average bioenergy feedstock production by phototrophic technologies ranged from 1200-4700 kJ per capita per day or 3400-13 000 kJ m(-3) (exceeding anaerobic technologies and, at times, the energetic content of the influent organic carbon), with usable energy production dependent upon downstream conversion to fuels. Energy consumption analysis showed that energy positive anaerobic wastewater treatment by emerging technologies would require significant reductions of parasitic losses from mechanical mixing and gas sparging. Technology targets and critical barriers for energy-producing technologies are identified, and the role of integrated anaerobic and

  1. Energy positive domestic wastewater treatment: the roles of anaerobic and phototrophic technologies

    KAUST Repository

    Shoener, B. D.

    2014-01-01

    The negative energy balance of wastewater treatment could be reversed if anaerobic technologies were implemented for organic carbon oxidation and phototrophic technologies were utilized for nutrient recovery. To characterize the potential for energy positive wastewater treatment by anaerobic and phototrophic biotechnologies we performed a comprehensive literature review and analysis, focusing on energy production (as kJ per capita per day and as kJ m-3 of wastewater treated), energy consumption, and treatment efficacy. Anaerobic technologies included in this review were the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR), anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR), anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFB), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), and microbial fuel cell (MFC). Phototrophic technologies included were the high rate algal pond (HRAP), photobioreactor (PBR), stirred tank reactor, waste stabilization pond (WSP), and algal turf scrubber (ATS). Average energy recovery efficiencies for anaerobic technologies ranged from 1.6% (MFC) to 47.5% (ABR). When including typical percent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals by each technology, this range would equate to roughly 40-1200 kJ per capita per day or 110-3300 kJ m-3 of treated wastewater. The average bioenergy feedstock production by phototrophic technologies ranged from 1200-4700 kJ per capita per day or 3400-13000 kJ m-3 (exceeding anaerobic technologies and, at times, the energetic content of the influent organic carbon), with usable energy production dependent upon downstream conversion to fuels. Energy consumption analysis showed that energy positive anaerobic wastewater treatment by emerging technologies would require significant reductions of parasitic losses from mechanical mixing and gas sparging. Technology targets and critical barriers for energy-producing technologies are identified, and the role of integrated anaerobic and phototrophic

  2. The metabolome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii following induction of anaerobic H2 production by sulfur depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, Timmins; Zhou, Wenxu; Rupprecht, Jens; Lim, Lysha; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Doebbe, Anja; Kruse, Olaf; Hankamer, Ben; Marx, Ute C; Smith, Steven M; Schenk, Peer M

    2009-08-28

    The metabolome of the model species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been analyzed during 120 h of sulfur depletion to induce anaerobic hydrogen (H(2)) production, using NMR spectroscopy, gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, and TLC. The results indicate that these unicellular green algae consume freshly supplied acetate in the medium to accumulate energy reserves during the first 24 h of sulfur depletion. In addition to the previously reported accumulation of starch, large amounts of triacylglycerides were deposited in the cells. During the early 24- to 72-h time period fermentative energy metabolism lowered the pH, H(2) was produced, and amino acid levels generally increased. In the final phase from 72 to 120 h, metabolism slowed down leading to a stabilization of pH, even though some starch and most triacylglycerides remained. We conclude that H(2) production does not slow down due to depletion of energy reserves but rather due to loss of essential functions resulting from sulfur depletion or due to a build-up of the toxic fermentative products formate and ethanol. PMID:19478077

  3. Anaerobic digestion of industrial hemp-effect of harvest time on methane energy yield per hectare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuger, E.; Escobar, F.; Bjoernsson, L. [Department of Biotechnology, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Prade, T.; Svensson, S.-E.; Englund, J.-E. [Department of Agriculture-Farming Systems, Technology and Product Quality, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 104, SE-230 53 Alnarp (Sweden)

    2011-02-15

    There is a worldwide emphasis to increase the share of renewable transportation fuels. When using agricultural land for production of renewable transportation fuels, the energy output per hectare for different crops and transportation fuels is a crucial factor. In this study, the gross methane energy yield per hectare from anaerobic digestion of industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), was determined at four different harvest times between July and October in Southern Sweden, a cold climate region. The biomass yield was determined for three years and the methane yield was determined for two years through the biochemical methane potential test. The highest biomass yield, 16 tonnes dry matter per hectare on an average, and the highest methane energy yield per hectare was achieved when the hemp was harvested in September or October, with an average gross methane energy yield of 136 {+-} 24 GJ per hectare. There was no significant difference in the specific methane yield between the harvest times; the average being 234 {+-} 35 m{sup 3} per tonne volatile solids. Biogas from hemp turned out to be a high yielding alternative to the currently dominating renewable transportation fuels produced from crops grown in Sweden: ethanol from wheat and biodiesel from rapeseed. (author)

  4. Role of phosphodiesterase-4 on ethanol elicited locomotion and narcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliño, Pablo; Ledesma, Juan Carlos; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2016-02-01

    The cAMP signaling pathway has emerged as an important modulator of the pharmacological effects of ethanol. In this respect, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase has been shown to play an important role in the modulation of several ethanol-induced behavioral actions. Cellular levels of cAMP are maintained by the activity of adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. In the present work we have focused on ascertaining the role of PDE4 in mediating the neurobehavioral effects of ethanol. For this purpose, we have used the selective PDE4 inhibitor Ro 20-1724. This compound has been proven to enhance cellular cAMP response by PDE4 blockade and can be administered systemically. Swiss mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with Ro 20-1724 (0-5 mg/kg; i.p.) at different time intervals before ethanol (0-4 g/kg; i.p.) administration. Immediately after the ethanol injection, locomotor activity, loss of righting reflex, PKA footprint and enzymatic activity were assessed. Pretreatment with Ro 20-1724 increased ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. Doses that increased locomotor stimulation did not modify basal locomotion or the suppression of motor activity produced by high doses of this alcohol. Ro 20-1724 did not alter the locomotor activation produced by amphetamine or cocaine. The time of loss of righting reflex evoked by ethanol was increased after pretreatment with Ro 20-1724. This effect was selective for the narcotic effects of ethanol since Ro 20-1724 did not affect pentobarbital-induced narcotic effects. Moreover, Ro 20-1724 administration increased the PKA footprint and enzymatic activity response elicited by ethanol. These data provide further evidence of the key role of the cAMP signaling pathway in the central effects of ethanol.

  5. Processing method for drained water containing ethanol amine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drained water containing ethanol amine is processed with microorganisms such as hydrazine resistant denitrification bacteria in a biodegrading vessel (A) in the coexistence of nitrous ions and/or nitric ions under an anaerobic condition, and then it is processed with microorganisms such as nitrification bacteria in another biotic oxidation vessel (B) under an aerobic condition to generate the coexistent nitrate ion and/or nitric ion, and returned to the biodegrading vessel (A). Further, they are exposed to air or incorporated with an oxidant and optionally a copper compound such as copper sulfate as a catalyst is added in a step of removing hydrazine. (T.M.)

  6. Response surface optimisation for acetone-butanol-ethanol production from cassava starch by co-culture of Clostridium butylicum and Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamas Cheirsilp

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE production from cassava starch was enhanced by a syntrophic co-culture of Clostridium butylicum TISTR 1032 and high amylase producing Bacillus subtilis WD 161 without anaerobic pretreatment. The production of amylase and ABE using this co-culture were respectively 16 and 6 times higher than those using the pure culture of C. butylicum TISTR 1032. The effect of the medium components on the performance of the co-culture was investigated using response surface methodology (RSM. Among the investigated components, cassava starch and ammonium nitrate contributed a significant effect on the production of amylase and ABE, while yeast extract had less effect. Based on the optimum strategy using RSM, the ABE production by the co-culture was improved 2.2-fold compared with that obtained from the initial condition and with a minimum requirement of nitrogen source.

  7. Reactions of ethanol on Ru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, J. M.; Lee, C. J.; F. Bijkerk,

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption and reactions of ethanol on Ru(0001) were studied with temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Ethanol was found to adsorb intact onto Ru(0001) below 100 K. From 175 K to 200 K, ethanol is converted into ethoxy groups, which und

  8. Preparation and emission characteristics of ethanol-diesel fuel blends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Run-duo; HE Hong; SHI Xiao-yan; ZHANG Chang-bin; HE Bang-quan; WANG Jian-xin

    2004-01-01

    The preparation of ethanol-diesel fuel blends and their emission characteristics were investigated. Results showed the absolute ethanol can dissolve in diesel fuel at an arbitrary ratio and a small quantity of water(0.2%) addition can lead to the phase separation of blends. An organic additive was synthesized and it can develop the ability of resistance to water and maintain the stability of ethanol-diesel-trace amounts of water system. The emission characteristics of 10%, 20%, and 30% ethanol-diesel fuel blends, with or without additives, were compared with those of diesel fuel in a direct injection(DI) diesel engine. The experimental results indicated that the blend of ethanol with diesel fuel significantly reduced the concentrations of smoke, hydrocarbon(HC), and carbon monoxide(CO) in exhaust gas. Using 20% ethanol-diesel fuel blend with the additive of 2% of the total volume, the optimum mixing ratio was achieved, at which the bench diesel engine testing showed a significant decrease in exhaust gas. Bosch smoke number was reduced by 55%, HC emission by 70%, and CO emission by 45%, at 13 kW/1540 r/min. However, ethanol-diesel fuel blends produced a few ppm acetaldehydes and more ethanol in exhaust gas.

  9. Ethanol production in China: Potential and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rising oil demand in China has resulted in surging oil imports and mounting environmental pollution. It is projected that by 2030 the demand for fossil fuel oil will be 250 million tons. Ethanol seems to be an attractive renewable alternative to fossil fuel. This study assesses China's ethanol supply potential by examining potential non-food crops as feedstock; emerging conversion technologies; and cost competitiveness. Results of this study show that sweet sorghum among all the non-food feedstocks has the greatest potential. It grows well on the available marginal lands and the ASSF technology when commercialized will shorten the fermentation time which will lower the costs. Other emerging technologies such as improved saccharification and fermentation; and cellulosic technologies will make China more competitive in ethanol production in the future. Based on the estimated available marginal lands for energy crop production and conversion yields of the potential feedstocks, the most likely and optimistic production levels are 19 and 50 million tons of ethanol by 2020. In order to achieve those levels, the roadmap for China is to: select the non-food feedstock most suitable to grow on the available marginal land; provide funding to support the high priority conversion technologies identified by the scientists; provide monetary incentives to new and poor farmers to grow the feedstocks to revitalize rural economy; less market regulation and gradual reduction of subsidies to producers for industry efficiency; and educate consumers on the impact of fossil fuel on the environment to reduce consumption. Since the share of ethanol in the overall fuel demand is small, the impact of ethanol on lowering pollution and enhancing fuel security will be minimal. (author)

  10. The effect of ethanol-gasoline blends on SI engine energy balance and heat transfer characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Alrayyes, Taleb

    2011-01-01

    Ethanol is one of a group of hydrocarbon fuels produced from bio-mass which is attracting interest as an alternative fuel for spark ignition engines. Major producers of ethanol include Brazil, from sugar cane, and the USA, from com. Reasons for the growing interest in ethanol include economic development, security of fuel supply and the reduction of net emissions of carbon dioxide relative to levels associated with the use of fossil fuels. Unlike gasoline, which is a mixture of hydrocarbon co...

  11. Thermodynamics of Microbial Growth Coupled to Metabolism of Glucose, Ethanol, Short-Chain Organic Acids, and Hydrogen ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, Eric E.; Jin, Qusheng

    2011-01-01

    A literature compilation demonstrated a linear relationship between microbial growth yield and the free energy of aerobic and anaerobic (respiratory and/or fermentative) metabolism of glucose, ethanol, formate, acetate, lactate, propionate, butyrate, and H2. This relationship provides a means to estimate growth yields for modeling microbial redox metabolism in soil and sedimentary environments. PMID:21216913

  12. Increased expression of the yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter Pdr18 leads to increased ethanol tolerance and ethanol production in high gravity alcoholic fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teixeira Miguel C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The understanding of the molecular basis of yeast tolerance to ethanol may guide the design of rational strategies to increase process performance in industrial alcoholic fermentations. A set of 21 genes encoding multidrug transporters from the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC Superfamily and Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS in S. cerevisiae were scrutinized for a role in ethanol stress resistance. Results A yeast multidrug resistance ABC transporter encoded by the PDR18 gene, proposed to play a role in the incorporation of ergosterol in the yeast plasma membrane, was found to confer resistance to growth inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 expression was seen to contribute to decreased 3 H-ethanol intracellular concentrations and decreased plasma membrane permeabilization of yeast cells challenged with inhibitory ethanol concentrations. Given the increased tolerance to ethanol of cells expressing PDR18, the final concentration of ethanol produced during high gravity alcoholic fermentation by yeast cells devoid of PDR18 was lower than the final ethanol concentration produced by the corresponding parental strain. Moreover, an engineered yeast strain in which the PDR18 promoter was replaced in the genome by the stronger PDR5 promoter, leading to increased PDR18 mRNA levels during alcoholic fermentation, was able to attain a 6 % higher ethanol concentration and a 17 % higher ethanol production yield than the parental strain. The improved fermentative performance of yeast cells over-expressing PDR18 was found to correlate with their increased ethanol tolerance and ability to restrain plasma membrane permeabilization induced throughout high gravity fermentation. Conclusions PDR18 gene over-expression increases yeast ethanol tolerance and fermentation performance leading to the production of highly inhibitory concentrations of ethanol. PDR18 overexpression in industrial yeast strains appears to be a promising approach to

  13. Integration of an anaerobic digestion plant into the existing Passau biogenous waste composting facility with the aim to double capacity and to produce regenerative energy; Die richtige Strategie macht's: Public-Private-Partnerhsip zum Betrieb der Trockenvergaerungsanlage fuer Bioabfall in Passau. Integration einer Vergaerungsanlage in das bestehende Bioabfallkompostwerk Passau zur Verdopplung der Kapazitaet und zur Erzeugung von regenerativer Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchheit, M. [SIUS GmbH, Homburg, Saarland (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The organic composting operating company Donau-Wald mbH (BBG) was established in 1996 as a public-private partnership; it is a subsidiary of the waste management association Donau-Wald mbH (AWG), Aussernzell (51%), Bavaria, and SIUS GmbH (49%), Homburg, Saarland. The BBG collects and treats for the AWG all accumulating source-separated organic waste from households, as well as those arising from garden and park waste and organically treatable industrial waste. For several years, the AWG Donau-Wald mbH was intending to expand it own treatment capacities from 32,000 tons/a. The increased capacity was to cover the 20,000 tons/a of bio-waste that was being sent to neighbouring facilities for processing. To this end, SIUS developed the concept of integrating an anaerobic digestion plant into the existing Passau composting facility. This made it possible to boost the throughput from 20,000 tons/a to 40,000 tons/a. The goal was to integrate the new technology into the existing Passau composting facility so that the facility could continue to be used with only minor alterations. It was possible to implement this project because the regulatory framework was amended to promote regenerative energies (compensation for the generation of electricity and heat) and interest rates were favourable, which greatly improved the economic prerequisites for constructing the municipality's own plant. For the BBG Donau-Wald mbH, the building of the plant was an important step toward developing a market for generating regenerative energy from biomass. In addition, there was added value in that biogenous wastes previously transported to third-party facilities could now be treated by the municipality's own plant. The Kompogas anaerobic digestion plant produces approx. 10,000,000 kWh of electrical power regeneratively. This means considerable reduction of carbon-dioxide emissions, not including the halting of trucking the excess bio-waste to third-party plants. In terms of the numbers

  14. [Acute toxicity of antibiotics and anaerobic digestion intermediates in pharmaceutical wastewaters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jun-Yuan; Xing, Ya-Juan; Zheng, Ping

    2012-12-01

    In order to determine the toxicity of antibiotics and anaerobic digestion intermediates on anaerobic treatment of pharmaceutical wastewaters containing antibiotics, the single and joint toxicities of some antibiotics and intermediates to Photobacterium phosphoreum were tested by using the 15-min half inhibitory concentration (15 min-IC50) at pH = 7.00 +/- 0.05. The results showed that the 15 min-IC50 of ethanol, acetate, propionate and butyrate were 19.40, 20.71, 10.47 and 12.17 g x L(-1), respectively, which indicated that the toxicity descended in the order of propionate, butyrate, ethanol and acetate. The 15 min-IC50 of Amoxicillin, Kanamycin, Lincomycin and Ciprofloxacin were 3.99, 5.11, 4.32 and 5.63 g x L(-1), respectively, so the toxicity descended in the order of Amoxicillin, Lincomycin, Kanamycin and Ciprofloxacin. Using equal effect mixing method, the joint toxicity of four anaerobic digestion intermediates, the four intermediates together with Amoxicillin, Ciprofloxacin, Kanamycin, Lincomycin individually and all together were investigated, which demonstrated that the first three interactions were additive and the last three were synergistic. The observations have laid a foundation for control and optimization of anaerobic biotechnology for pharmaceutical wastewater containing antibiotics. PMID:23379166

  15. Characterization of Ethanol Production from Xylose and Xylitol by a Cell-Free Pachysolen tannophilus System

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jie; Taylor, Kenneth B.

    1993-01-01

    Whole cells and a cell extract of Pachysolen tannophilus converted xylose to xylitol, ethanol, and CO2. The whole-cell system converted xylitol slowly to CO2 and little ethanol was produced, whereas the cell-free system converted xylitol quantitatively to ethanol (1.64 mol of ethanol per mol of xylitol) and CO2. The supernatant solution from high-speed centrifugation (100,000 × g) of the extract converted xylose to ethanol, but did not metabolize xylitol unless a membrane fraction and oxygen ...

  16. Caracterización y evaluación de biosólidos producidos por digestión anaerobia de residuos agroindustriales Characterization and evaluation of biosolids produced by anaerobic digestion of agroindustrial residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amabelia del Pino

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue la caracterización y evaluación de los biosólidos (lodos producidos en un reactor piloto alimentado con residuos agroindustriales. La caracterización química de los lodos y la estimación de la variabilidad de los parámetros se realizó a partir de muestras tomadas durante cinco semanas. En las muestras se determinó pH, materia seca (MS y contenidos totales de C, N, P, K, Na, Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, Mn y Zn. Para estudiar los patrones de descomposición y liberación de nutrientes de los lodos se incubaron dos suelos de diferente textura con dosis de lodo equivalentes a 80 y 160 kg ha-1 de N, comparándose con dosis iguales de N como fertilizante y un tratamiento testigo sin agregados. En el experimento de incubación se determinó la respiración del suelo y liberación de nutrientes durante 115 días. El contenido promedio de MS de los lodos fue 5,2%, el pH alcalino y las mayores concentraciones de nutrientes correspondieron a N, P y Ca. Hubo variabilidad entre muestreos, aunque los coeficientes de variación fueron menores a 20%. Los niveles de Na y micronutrientes no estuvieron en el rango considerado como riesgo para el ambiente. El agregado de lodo promovió la actividad microbiana del suelo. En el suelo limoso se perdió como CO2 aproximadamente un tercio y en el franco arenoso un quinto del C agregado. El N del lodo se mineralizó rápidamente, llegando a niveles similares de N mineral a los suelos fertilizados. El agregado de lodo incrementó el contenido de P disponible, N mineral, Ca y Mg intercambiables, por lo tanto se concluye que fue beneficioso para la fertilidad del suelo.The objective of this study was to characterize and evaluate the biosolids (slurry produced in a pilot reactor feed with agroindustrial residues. The chemical characterization of the biosolids and variability estimation were conducted on slurry samples taken during five weeks. Samples were analyzed for dry matter (DM, pH, and

  17. Which is a better transportation fuel – butanol or ethanol ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Szulczyk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines butanol and ethanol as transportation fuels for gasoline-powered engines. This paper examines two aspects. First, the fuel properties of butanol and ethanol are examined and compared to each other. Consequently, butanol overcomes three deficiencies of ethanol. Butanol has a higher energy content, butanol-gasoline blends do not separate in the presence of water, and butanol can be blended with gasoline in any percentage, all the way up to 100%. Second, a review of the fermentation technology is examined for both butanol and ethanol production. Both butanol and ethanol can be fermented from the same feedstocks, which include the sugar and starch crops and lignocellulosic fermentation from wood and crop residues, and fast-growing energy crops like hybrid poplar, switchgrass, and willow. Furthermore, the capital and facilities used to produce ethanol can be switched to butanol fermentation with minimal costs. Thus, society is able to transition away from ethanol and begin to produce butanol with minimal capital and infrastructure costs. Unfortunately, the main drawback to butanol fermentation is its low chemical yield. Until researchers discover or engineer new microorganisms that handle higher butanol concentrations, butanol may not be adapted as an alternative fuel.

  18. Anaerobic digestion of pot-ale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, F.E.

    1990-12-01

    In the production of whisky, the fermented wash is distilled twice and each bushel of grain yields about 15.5 gallons of pot-ale, 6.0 gallons of spent lees and 2.7 gallons of proof spirit. Disposal of pot-ale, the strong residue from the first distillation, containing all the non-volatile and unfermented components of the wash, will always be difficult. Anaerobic digestion provides a possible option. By destroying most of the biodegradable solids and converting them to biogas, it provides an intermediate effluent which conventional treatment technology can purify to river discharge standards. Pilot-scale trials confirm that pot-ale can be treated by anaerobic digestion. The most severe problems are the high purification efficiencies required to achieve UK river discharge standards and the quality and settling properties of the biological sludges produced. To achieved these standards, the design and operation of the entire treatment chain is dominated by the need to capture and concentrate suspended solids (SS) produced by the biological fermentations. Overall performance targets are 99.95% removal of biological oxygen demand (BOD), 99% removal of ammonia and a surplus sludge production of less than 20% of the incoming flow. (author).

  19. Correlation of anaerobic ammonium oxidation and denitrification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of the nitrous organic wastewater treated was studied in seven anaerobic sequencing batch reactors(ASBRs)(0 #-6 #) which had been run under stable anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox). By means of monitoring and data analysis of COD, NH4+-N, NO2--N, NO3--N and pH, and of microbial test, the results revealed that the optimal Anammox performance was achieved from 2# reactor in which COD/NH4+-N was 1.65, Anammox bacteria and denitrification bacteria could coexist, and Anammox reaction and denitrification reaction could occur simultaneously in the reactors. The ratio of NH4+-N consumed: NO2--N consumed: NO3--N produced was 1:1.38:0.19 in 0# reactor which was not added glucose in the wastewater. When different ratio of COD and NH4+-N was fed for the reactors, the ratio of NO2--N consumed: NH4+-N consumed was in the range of 1.51-2.29 and the ratio of NO3-N produced: NH4+-N consumed in the range of 0-0.05.

  20. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulepas, Roel J W; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Teshager, Fitfety Melese; Witharana, Ayoma; Saikaly, Pascal E; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342 μg g(-1) of copper, 487 μg g(-1) of lead, 793 μg g(-1) of zinc, 27 μg g(-1) of nickel and 2.3 μg g(-1) of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3 gdry weight L(-1) waste activated sludge, 80-85% of the copper, 66-69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94-99% of the nickel and 73-83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead. PMID:25659306

  1. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J W

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342μgg-1 of copper, 487μgg-1 of lead, 793μgg-1 of zinc, 27μgg-1 of nickel and 2.3μgg-1 of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3gdry weightL-1 waste activated sludge, 80-85% of the copper, 66-69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94-99% of the nickel and 73-83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead.

  2. A Sustainable Ethanol Distillation System

    OpenAIRE

    Yuelei Yang; Dan Zhang; Kevin Boots

    2012-01-01

    The discarded fruit and vegetable waste from the consumer and retailer sectors provide a reliable source for ethanol production. In this paper, an ethanol distillation system has been developed to remove the water contents from the original wash that contains only around 15% of the ethanol. The system has an ethanol production capacity of over 100,000 liters per day. It includes an ethanol condenser, a wash pre-heater, a main exhaust heat exchanger as well as a fractionating column. One uniqu...

  3. Plants producing biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papavinasam, S. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Materials Technology Lab

    2009-08-15

    Biofuels are currently produced primarily from five plants, namely corn, canola, sugar cane, palm oil, jatropha. However, research and development efforts are underway around the world produce biofuels from other sources, particularly from algae. This paper described the characteristics of the top 5 plants and their role in the production of biofuels. Countries where these plants are cultivated were also summarized. The article indicated that producing ethanol from corn, is not very efficient since growing corn requires more fertilizer and pesticides than most other crops, plus the corn kernels have to undergo energy-intensive distillation and chemical extraction processes. China is the world's largest producer of rapeseed oil, with an annual production of 12 million tons. The countries of the European Union collectively produce another 16 million tons, of which nearly 4 million tons were used in 2006 to produce biodiesel. Brazil is the world's largest producer of sugar cane, and accounts for about 45 per cent of global ethanol production. Malaysia and Indonesia are the key players in the palm oil market, accounting for 85 per cent of global production. India has identified more than 11 million hectares that would be suitable for growing jatropha, whose seeds contain up to 40 per cent oil that can be burned in a conventional diesel engine after extraction. 1 tab.

  4. Ammonia disinfection of corn grains intended for ethanol fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Broda

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bacterial contamination is an ongoing problem for commercial bioethanol plants. It concerns factories using grain and also other raw materials for ethanol fermentation. Bacteria compete with precious yeasts for sugar substrates and micronutrients, secrete lactic and acetic acids, which are toxic for yeast and this competition leads to significant decrease of bioethanol productivity. For this study, bacterial contamination of corn grain was examined. Then the grain was treated by ammonia solution to reduce microbial pollution and after that the microbiological purity of grain was tested one more time. Disinfected and non-disinfected corn grains were ground and fermentation process was performed. Microbiological purity of this process and ethanol yield was checked out. Material and methods. The grain was disinfected by ammonia solution for two weeks. Then the grain was milled and used as a raw material for the ethanol fermentation. The fermentation process was carried out in 500-ml Erlenmeyer flasks. Samples were withdrawn for analysis at 0, 24, 48, 72 hrs. The number of total viable bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, acetic acid bacteria, anaerobic bacteria and the quantity of yeasts and moulds were signified by plate method. Results. Ammonia solution effectively reduces bacterial contamination of corn grain. Mash from grain disinfected by ammonia contains less undesirable microorganisms than mash from crude grain. Moreover, ethanol yield from disinfected grain is at the highest level. Conclusions. The ammonia solution proved to be a good disinfection agent for grain used as a raw material for bioethanol fermentation process.

  5. Mechanism, kinetics and microbiology of inhibition caused by long-chain fatty acids in anaerobic digestion of algal biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Jingwei; Zhao, Quan-Bao; Laurens, Lieve L. M.; Jarvis, Eric E.; Nagle, Nick J.; Chen, Shulin; Frear, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oleaginous microalgae contain a high level of lipids, which can be extracted and converted to biofuel. The lipid-extracted residue can then be further utilized through anaerobic digestion to produce biogas. However, long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) have been identified as the main inhibitory factor on microbial activity of anaerobic consortium. In this study, the mechanism of LCFA inhibition on anaerobic digestion of whole and lipid-extracted algal biomass was investigated with a ran...

  6. Potential Application of Anaerobic Extremophiles for Hydrogen Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    During substrate fermentation many anaerobes produce the hydrogen as a waste product, which often regulates the growth of the cultures as an inhibitor. In nature the hydrogen is usually removed from the ecosystem due to its physical properties or by consumption of hydrogen by secondary anaerobes, which sometimes behave as competitors for electron donors as is seen in the classical example in anaerobic microbial communities via the interaction between methanogens and sulfate- or sulfur- reducers. It was demonstrated previously on mixed cultures of anaerobes at neutral pH that bacterial hydrogen production could provide an alternative energy source. But at neutral pH the original cultures can easily be contaminated by methanogens, a most unpleasant side effect of these conditions is the development of pathogenic bacteria. In both cases the rate of hydrogen production was dramatically decreased since some part of the hydrogen was transformed to methane, and the cultivation of human pathogens on a global scale is very dangerous. In our laboratory, experiments with obligately alkaliphilic bacteria that excrete hydrogen as the end metabolic product were performed at different temperature regimes. Mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacterial cultures have been studied and compared for the most effective hydrogen production. For high-mineralized media with pH 9.5-10.0 not many methanogens are known to exist. Furthermore, the development of pathogenic contaminant microorganisms is virtually impossible: carbonate-saturated solutions are used as antiseptics in medicine. Therefore the cultivation of alkaliphilic hydrogen producing bacteria could be considered as most safe process for global Scale industry in future. Here we present experimental data on the rates of hydrogen productivity for mesophilic, alkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic bacterium Spirocheta americana ASpG1 and moderately thermophilic, alkaliphilic, facultative anaerobe Anoxybacillus pushchinoensis K1 and

  7. Granular starch hydrolysis for fuel ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping

    Granular starch hydrolyzing enzymes (GSHE) convert starch into fermentable sugars at low temperatures (≤48°C). Use of GSHE in dry grind process can eliminate high temperature requirements during cooking and liquefaction (≥90°C). In this study, GSHE was compared with two combinations of commercial alpha-amylase and glucoamylase (DG1 and DG2, respectively). All three enzyme treatments resulted in comparable ethanol concentrations (between 14.1 to 14.2% v/v at 72 hr), ethanol conversion efficiencies and ethanol and DDGS yields. Sugar profiles for the GSHE treatment were different from DG1 and DG2 treatments, especially for glucose. During simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), the highest glucose concentration for the GSHE treatment was 7% (w/v); for DG1 and DG2 treatments, maximum glucose concentration was 19% (w/v). GSHE was used in one of the fractionation technologies (enzymatic dry grind) to improve recovery of germ and pericarp fiber prior to fermentation. The enzymatic dry grind process with GSHE was compared with the conventional dry grind process using GSHE with the same process parameters of dry solids content, pH, temperature, time, enzyme and yeast usages. Ethanol concentration (at 72 hr) of the enzymatic process was 15.5% (v/v), which was 9.2% higher than the conventional process (14.2% v/v). Distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) generated from the enzymatic process (9.8% db) was 66% less than conventional process (28.3% db). Three additional coproducts, germ 8.0% (db), pericarp fiber 7.7% (db) and endosperm fiber 5.2% (db) were produced. Costs and amounts of GSHE used is an important factor affecting dry grind process economics. Proteases can weaken protein matrix to aid starch release and may reduce GSHE doses. Proteases also can hydrolyze protein into free amino nitrogen (FAN), which can be used as a yeast nutrient during fermentation. Two types of proteases, exoprotease and endoprotease, were studied; protease and urea

  8. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM A MEMBRANE PURIFIED HEMICELLULOSIC HYDROLYSATE DERIVED FROM SUGAR MAPLE BY PICHIA STIPITIS NRRL Y-7124

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna M. Stoutenburg

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to devise inexpensive and sustainable production of ethanol fuel, experiments were conducted to establish conditions for Pichia stipitis NRRL Y-7124 to ferment a membrane treated wood hydrolysate derived from sugar maple to produce ethanol. The degree of aeration required to effectively utilize xylose, produce ethanol, and minimize xylitol formation as well as the optimal hydrolysate concentration were the conditions examined. P. stipitis produced the highest concentrations of ethanol in shake flasks at 150 rpm (14.3 g/L in 71 h, and 50% hydrolysate maximized ethanol yield (12.4 g/L in 51.5 h. In the 50% hydrolysate cultures, P. stipitis produced ethanol at a rate of 0.24 g/Lh with a yield of 0.41 g ethanol/g wood-derived carbohydrate.

  9. Innovative production technology ethanol from sweet sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashapov, N. F.; Nafikov, M. M.; Gazetdinov, M. X.; Nafikova, M. M.; Nigmatzyanov, A. R.

    2016-06-01

    The paper considers the technological aspects of production of ethanol from nontraditional for Russian Federation crops - sweet sorghum. Presents the technological scheme of alcohol production and fuel pellets from sweet sorghum. Special attention is paid to assessing the efficiency of alcohol production from sweet sorghum. The described advantage of sugar content in stem juice of sweet sorghum compared with other raw materials. Allegedly, the use of the technology for producing alcohol from sweet sorghum allows to save resources.

  10. Water Footprints of Cassava- and Molasses-Based Ethanol Production in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangmeechai, Aweewan, E-mail: aweewan.m@nida.ac.th [National Institute of Development Administration, International College (Major in Public Policy and Management) (Thailand); Pavasant, Prasert [Chulalongkorn University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Thailand)

    2013-12-15

    The Thai government has been promoting renewable energy as well as stimulating the consumption of its products. Replacing transport fuels with bioethanol will require substantial amounts of water and enhance water competition locally. This study shows that the water footprint (WF) of molasses-based ethanol is less than that of cassava-based ethanol. The WF of molasses-based ethanol is estimated to be in the range of 1,510-1,990 L water/L ethanol, while that of cassava-based ethanol is estimated at 2,300-2,820 L water/L ethanol. Approximately 99% of the water in each of these WFs is used to cultivate crops. Ethanol production requires not only substantial amounts of water but also government interventions because it is not cost competitive. In Thailand, the government has exploited several strategies to lower ethanol prices such as oil tax exemptions for consumers, cost compensation for ethanol producers, and crop price assurances for farmers. For the renewable energy policy to succeed in the long run, the government may want to consider promoting molasses-based ethanol production as well as irrigation system improvements and sugarcane yield-enhancing practices, since molasses-based ethanol is more favorable than cassava-based ethanol in terms of its water consumption, chemical fertilizer use, and production costs.

  11. Water Footprints of Cassava- and Molasses-Based Ethanol Production in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Thai government has been promoting renewable energy as well as stimulating the consumption of its products. Replacing transport fuels with bioethanol will require substantial amounts of water and enhance water competition locally. This study shows that the water footprint (WF) of molasses-based ethanol is less than that of cassava-based ethanol. The WF of molasses-based ethanol is estimated to be in the range of 1,510–1,990 L water/L ethanol, while that of cassava-based ethanol is estimated at 2,300–2,820 L water/L ethanol. Approximately 99% of the water in each of these WFs is used to cultivate crops. Ethanol production requires not only substantial amounts of water but also government interventions because it is not cost competitive. In Thailand, the government has exploited several strategies to lower ethanol prices such as oil tax exemptions for consumers, cost compensation for ethanol producers, and crop price assurances for farmers. For the renewable energy policy to succeed in the long run, the government may want to consider promoting molasses-based ethanol production as well as irrigation system improvements and sugarcane yield-enhancing practices, since molasses-based ethanol is more favorable than cassava-based ethanol in terms of its water consumption, chemical fertilizer use, and production costs

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Propolis Ethanol Extract against Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Mohammadi-Sichani; Farzaneh Zeighampour; Elaheh Shams; Nafiseh Sadat NaghaviP

    2014-01-01

    Background: Burn wound is a suitable site for incidence of resistant infections; thus, the research for finding effective drugs against this infection is necessary. The purpose of this study was to determine antibacterial activity of Isfahan bee propolis extracts against beta-lactamase producing bacteria isolated from burn wound infections. Materials and Methods: Ethanol extract of Isfahan bee propolis was prepared by 28 g of propolis in 100 ml of 70% ethanol. Antibacterial activity of eth...

  13. Direct ethanol production from starch, wheat bran and rice straw by the white rot fungus Trametes hirsuta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okamoto, Kenji; Nitta, Yasuyuki; Maekawa, Nitaro; Yanase, Hideshi

    2011-01-01

    The white rot fungus Trametes hirsuta produced ethanol from a variety of hexoses: glucose, mannose, cellobiose and maltose, with yields of 0.49. 0.48, 0.47 and 0.47 g/g of ethanol per sugar utilized, respectively. In addition, this fungus showed relatively favorable xylose consumption and ethanol pr

  14. Hydrogen production from glucose by anaerobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Miura, Takashi; Ishimi, Kosaku; Seki, Minoru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    Various anaerobes were cultivated in media containing glucose. When 100 mL of thioglycollate medium containing 2.0% (w/v) glucose was used, Clostridium butyricum ATCC 859, NBRC 3315, and NBRC 13949 evolved 227-243 mL of biogas containing about 180 mL of hydrogen in 1 day. Although some strains had some resistance against oxygen, C. butyricum ATCC 859 and 860 did not have it. C. butyricum NBRC 3315 and Enterobacter aerogenes NBRC 13534 produced hydrogen in the presence of glucose or pyruvic acid, and E. aerogenes NBRC 13534 produced hydrogen by not only glucose and pyruvic acid but also dextrin, sucrose, maltose, galactose, fructose, mannose, and mannitol. When a medium containing 0.5% (w/v) yeast extract and 2.0% (w/v) glucose was used, E. aerogenes NBRC 13534 evolved more biogas and hydrogen than C. butyricum NBRC 3315 in the absence of reducing agent.

  15. Bio-ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    -20% for transportation. At that time, the electric car/fuel cell car has probably had time enough to mature, and it has a much higher energy efficiency. Therefore, bio-ethanol is not the right intermediate (short term) technology, and it is not the right long term technology either......Throughout the world, nations are seeking ways to decrease CO2 emissions and to reduce their dependency on fossil fuels, especially oil and gas deriving from so-called politically unstable regions. The efforts comprise the energy sector (heat and electricity) as well as the transport sector......, that biomass substitutes gas in the heat & power sector and gas substitute oil in the transport sector. By taking this path, we overall achieve almost twice as high a CO2 reduction and save almost twice as much oil, as if we want to substitute the oil via car engines through conversion to ethanol. We must...

  16. Fact sheet: Ethanol co-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-31

    During the conversion of starch to sugars by enzymes, and by fermentation of these sugars to ethanol and carbon dioxide, the non-fermentable portion of the grain contains most of the non-starch nutritive elements of the kernel, which is the source of a variety of co-products. The wet milling process is used exclusively for corn, whereas the dry milling process is the one usually employed for wheat , corn and other grains. The carbon dioxide produced in both these processes is used as a refrigerant, in carbonated beverages and for flushing oil wells. Co-products produced from wet milling include (1) corn oil, used in producing food products for human consumption, and (2) amino acids, corn gluten meal and corn gluten feed used as animal feed additives. Dry milling gives rise to dry distiller`s grains which are also used as high protein and high energy animal feed. Fibrotein{sup T}M , is also a co-product of ethanol from wheat and is used as a high fibre and protein food additive. Ethanol, carbon dioxide and co-products each represent about one third of the products of the fermentation process.

  17. Horse manure as feedstock for anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadin, Sa; Eriksson, Ola

    2016-10-01

    Horse keeping is of great economic, social and environmental benefit for society, but causes environmental impacts throughout the whole chain from feed production to manure treatment. According to national statistics, the number of horses in Sweden is continually increasing and is currently approximately 360,000. This in turn leads to increasing amounts of horse manure that have to be managed and treated. Current practices could cause local and global environmental impacts due to poor performance or lack of proper management. Horse manure with its content of nutrients and organic material can however contribute to fertilisation of arable land and recovery of renewable energy following anaerobic digestion. At present anaerobic digestion of horse manure is not a common treatment. In this paper the potential for producing biogas and biofertiliser from horse manure is analysed based on a thorough literature review in combination with mathematical modelling and simulations. Anaerobic digestion was chosen as it has a high degree of resource conservation, both in terms of energy (biogas) and nutrients (digestate). Important factors regarding manure characteristics and operating factors in the biogas plant are identified. Two crucial factors are the type and amount of bedding material used, which has strong implications for feedstock characteristics, and the type of digestion method applied (dry or wet process). Straw and waste paper are identified as the best materials in an energy point of view. While the specific methane yield decreases with a high amount of bedding, the bedding material still makes a positive contribution to the energy balance. Thermophilic digestion increases the methane generation rate and yield, compared with mesophilic digestion, but the total effect is negligible.

  18. Horse manure as feedstock for anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadin, Sa; Eriksson, Ola

    2016-10-01

    Horse keeping is of great economic, social and environmental benefit for society, but causes environmental impacts throughout the whole chain from feed production to manure treatment. According to national statistics, the number of horses in Sweden is continually increasing and is currently approximately 360,000. This in turn leads to increasing amounts of horse manure that have to be managed and treated. Current practices could cause local and global environmental impacts due to poor performance or lack of proper management. Horse manure with its content of nutrients and organic material can however contribute to fertilisation of arable land and recovery of renewable energy following anaerobic digestion. At present anaerobic digestion of horse manure is not a common treatment. In this paper the potential for producing biogas and biofertiliser from horse manure is analysed based on a thorough literature review in combination with mathematical modelling and simulations. Anaerobic digestion was chosen as it has a high degree of resource conservation, both in terms of energy (biogas) and nutrients (digestate). Important factors regarding manure characteristics and operating factors in the biogas plant are identified. Two crucial factors are the type and amount of bedding material used, which has strong implications for feedstock characteristics, and the type of digestion method applied (dry or wet process). Straw and waste paper are identified as the best materials in an energy point of view. While the specific methane yield decreases with a high amount of bedding, the bedding material still makes a positive contribution to the energy balance. Thermophilic digestion increases the methane generation rate and yield, compared with mesophilic digestion, but the total effect is negligible. PMID:27396682

  19. Bridging the logistics gap for sustainable ethanol production: the CentroSul ethanol pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megiolaro, Moacir; Daud, Rodrigo; Pittelli, Fernanda [CentroSul Transportadora Dutoviaria, SP (Brazil); Singer, Eugenio [EMS Consultant, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The continuous increase of ethanol production and growth in consumption in Brazil is a reality that poses significant logistics challenges both for producers and consumers. The Brazilian local market absorbs a great portion of the country's production of ethanol, but the export market is also experiencing significant expansion so that both local and external market consumption will require more adequate transportation solutions. The alternative routes for Brazilian ethanol exports within the South and Southeast regions of Brazil range from the port of Paranagua, in the state of Parana, to the port of Vitoria, in the state of Espirito Santo. Each of these routes is about 1,000 km distance from the main production areas in the Central South states of Brazil. Brazilian highways and railways systems are overly congested and do not present efficient logistics alternatives for the transportation of large ethanol flows over long distances (cross-country) from the central Midwest regions of the country to the consumer and export markets in the Southeast. In response to the challenge to overcome such logistic gaps, CentroSul Transportadora Dutoviaria 'CentroSul', a company recently founded by a Brazilian ethanol producer group, the Brenco Group, is developing a project for the first fully-dedicated ethanol pipeline to be constructed in Brazil. The ethanol pipeline will transport 3,3 million m{sup 3} of Brenco - Brazilian Renewable Energy Company's ethanol production and an additional 4,7 million cubic meters from other Brazilian producers. The pipeline, as currently projected, will, at its full capacity, displace a daily vehicle fleet equivalent to 500 trucks which would be required to transport the 8,0 million cubic meters from their production origins to the delivery regions. In addition, the project will reduce GHG (trucking) emissions minimizing the project's overall ecological footprint. Key steps including conceptual engineering, environmental

  20. Life cycle cost of ethanol production from cassava in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorapipatana, Chumnong; Yoosin, Suthamma [Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Pracha-Uthit Rd., Tungkru, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Center for Energy Technology and Environment, Commission on Higher Education, Ministry of Education, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2011-02-15

    To increase the security of energy supply, lessen dependence on crude oil import and buffer against the impacts of large change in crude oil prices, the Thai government initiated and officially announced the national ethanol fuel program in year 2000. Since then, domestic ethanol demand has grown rapidly. Presently, all commercial ethanol in Thailand is produced from molasses as Thai law prohibits producing it from sugar cane directly. This is likely to limit ethanol supply in the near future. One possible solution is to supply more ethanol from cassava which is widely cultivated in this country. However, its production cost has not yet been known for certain. The objective of this study is to estimate the life cycle cost of ethanol production from cassava and to assess its economic competitiveness with gasoline in the Thai fuel market. Based on the record of cassava prices during the years 2002-2005, it was found that using it as feedstock would share more than 50% of the ethanol from cassava total production cost. It was also found that a bio-ethanol plant, with a capacity of 150,000 l/day, can produce ethanol from cassava in a range of ex-factory costs from 16.42 to 20.83 baht/l of gasoline equivalent (excluding all taxes), with an average cost of 18.15 baht/l of gasoline equivalent (41, 52 and 45 US cents/l gasoline equivalent respectively, based on 2005 exchange rate). In the same years, the range of 95-octane gasoline prices in Thailand varied from 6.18 baht to 20.86 baht/l, with an average price of 11.50 baht/l (15, 52 and 29 US cents/l respectively, based on 2005 exchange rate) which were much cheaper than the costs of ethanol made from cassava. Thus, we conclude that under the scenario of low to normal crude oil price, ethanol from cassava is not competitive with gasoline. The gasoline price has to rise consistently above 18.15 baht (45 US cents)/l before ethanol made from cassava can be commercially competitive with gasoline. (author)

  1. Life cycle cost of ethanol production from cassava in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To increase the security of energy supply, lessen dependence on crude oil import and buffer against the impacts of large change in crude oil prices, the Thai government initiated and officially announced the national ethanol fuel program in year 2000. Since then, domestic ethanol demand has grown rapidly. Presently, all commercial ethanol in Thailand is produced from molasses as Thai law prohibits producing it from sugar cane directly. This is likely to limit ethanol supply in the near future. One possible solution is to supply more ethanol from cassava which is widely cultivated in this country. However, its production cost has not yet been known for certain. The objective of this study is to estimate the life cycle cost of ethanol production from cassava and to assess its economic competitiveness with gasoline in the Thai fuel market. Based on the record of cassava prices during the years 2002-2005, it was found that using it as feedstock would share more than 50% of the ethanol from cassava total production cost. It was also found that a bio-ethanol plant, with a capacity of 150,000 l/day, can produce ethanol from cassava in a range of ex-factory costs from 16.42 to 20.83 baht/l of gasoline equivalent (excluding all taxes), with an average cost of 18.15 baht/l of gasoline equivalent (41, 52 and 45 US cents/l gasoline equivalent respectively, based on 2005 exchange rate). In the same years, the range of 95-octane gasoline prices in Thailand varied from 6.18 baht to 20.86 baht/l, with an average price of 11.50 baht/l (15, 52 and 29 US cents/l respectively, based on 2005 exchange rate) which were much cheaper than the costs of ethanol made from cassava. Thus, we conclude that under the scenario of low to normal crude oil price, ethanol from cassava is not competitive with gasoline. The gasoline price has to rise consistently above 18.15 baht (45 US cents)/l before ethanol made from cassava can be commercially competitive with gasoline. (author)

  2. Xylose fermentation to ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

  3. Effects of ethanol on vehicle energy efficiency and implications on ethanol life-cycle greenhouse gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Inderwildi, Oliver R; King, David A; Boies, Adam M

    2013-06-01

    Bioethanol is the world's largest-produced alternative to petroleum-derived transportation fuels due to its compatibility within existing spark-ignition engines and its relatively mature production technology. Despite its success, questions remain over the greenhouse gas (GHG) implications of fuel ethanol use with many studies showing significant impacts of differences in land use, feedstock, and refinery operation. While most efforts to quantify life-cycle GHG impacts have focused on the production stage, a few recent studies have acknowledged the effect of ethanol on engine performance and incorporated these effects into the fuel life cycle. These studies have broadly asserted that vehicle efficiency increases with ethanol use to justify reducing the GHG impact of ethanol. These results seem to conflict with the general notion that ethanol decreases the fuel efficiency (or increases the fuel consumption) of vehicles due to the lower volumetric energy content of ethanol when compared to gasoline. Here we argue that due to the increased emphasis on alternative fuels with drastically differing energy densities, vehicle efficiency should be evaluated based on energy rather than volume. When done so, we show that efficiency of existing vehicles can be affected by ethanol content, but these impacts can serve to have both positive and negative effects and are highly uncertain (ranging from -15% to +24%). As a result, uncertainties in the net GHG effect of ethanol, particularly when used in a low-level blend with gasoline, are considerably larger than previously estimated (standard deviations increase by >10% and >200% when used in high and low blends, respectively). Technical options exist to improve vehicle efficiency through smarter use of ethanol though changes to the vehicle fleets and fuel infrastructure would be required. Future biofuel policies should promote synergies between the vehicle and fuel industries in order to maximize the society-wise benefits or

  4. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  5. Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov., an anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Elkins, James G [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Keller, Martin [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Allman, Steve L [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, designated OB47T, was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA. The isolate was a non-motile, non-spore forming, Gram-positive rod approximately 2 m long by 0.2 m wide and grew at temperatures between 55-85oC with the optimum at 78oC. The pH range for growth was 6.0-8.0 with values of near 7.0 being optimal. Growth on cellobiose produced the fastest specific growth rates at 0.75 hr-1. The organism also displayed fermentative growth on glucose, maltose, arabinose, fructose, starch, lactose, mannose, sucrose, galactose, xylose, arabinogalactan, Avicel, xylan, filter paper, processed cardboard, pectin, dilute acid-pretreated switchgrass and Populus. OB47T was unable to grow on mannitol, fucose, lignin, Gelrite, acetate, glycerol, ribose, sorbital, carboxymethylcellulose and casein. Yeast extract stimulated growth and thiosulfate, sulfate, nitrate, and sulfur were not reduced. Fermentation end products were mainly acetate, H2, and CO2 although lactate and ethanol were produced in 5 l batch fermentations. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol% and sequence analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene placed OB47T within the genus Caldicellulosiruptor. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, the isolate is proposed to be designated Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov. and OB47T is the type stain (ATCC = ____, JCM = ____).

  6. Denatured ethanol release into gasoline residuals, Part 2: Fate and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Juliana G.; Barker, James F.

    2013-05-01

    When denatured ethanol (E95) is spilled in a site with previous gasoline contamination, it modifies the source distribution (Part 1). But it can also impact the transport and fate of hydrocarbons in the groundwater. Ethanol could cause an increase in dissolved concentrations and more persistent plumes due to cosolvency and decreased hydrocarbon biodegradation rates. To investigate these possibilities, two controlled releases were performed: first of E10 (gasoline with 10% ethanol) and one year later of E95 on top of the gasoline. Groundwater concentrations were monitored above and below the water table in multilevel wells. Soil cores and vapor samples were also collected over a period of approximately 400 days. Surprisingly, ethanol transport was very limited; at wells located 2.3 m downgradient from the mid-point of the release trench, the maximum concentration measured was around 2400 mg/L. After 392 days, only 3% of the ethanol released migrated past 2.3 m, and no ethanol remained in the source. The processes that caused ethanol loss were likely volatilization, aerobic biodegradation in the unsaturated zone, and anaerobic biodegradation. Evidence that biodegradation was significant in the source zone includes increased CO2 concentrations in the vapor and the presence of biodegradation products (acetate concentrations up to 2300 mg/L). The position of the dissolved hydrocarbon plumes was slightly shifted, but the concentrations and mass flux remained within the same range as before the spill, indicating that cosolvency was not significant. Hydrocarbons in the groundwater were significantly biodegraded, with more than 63% of the mass being removed in 7.5 m, even when ethanol was present in the groundwater. The impacts of ethanol on the hydrocarbon transport and fate were minimal, largely due to the separation of ethanol and hydrocarbons in the source (Part 1).

  7. Anaerobic Digestion of Piggery Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Velsen, van, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes and lake sediments. Microbial formation of methane also plays a role in the ruminant digestion.In digestion units, the external conditions acting upon the process can be regulated to speed it up as c...

  8. The Emergence and Challenging Growth of the Bio-Ethanol Innovation System in Taiwan (1949–2015)

    OpenAIRE

    Chao-Chen Chung; Siang-Cing Yang

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the bio-ethanol innovation system in Taiwan from the perspective of a technology innovation system (TIS). Taiwan is a newly industrialized country and is not currently a main producer of bio-ethanol. This study analyzes the evolution of bio-ethanol innovation system in Taiwan and places a particular emphasis on challenges that present policies face in the context of potential long-term bio-ethanol development. Through an evaluation of the consistency of the present researc...

  9. EVALUATION OF A TWO-STAGE TREATMENT OF DOMESTIC SEWAGE WITH ANAEROBIC-AEROBIC MICROBIAL FILM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Mesdaghinia

    1986-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to study the feasibility of a two stage continuous system employing anaerobic-aerobic microbial film for domestic wastewater treatment and the effect of iron on the behavior of sulfate reducing bacteria in anaerobic metabolism. A bench scale system with an anaerobic filter followed by aerobic fixed units used plastic media and was operated in up flow manner with hydraulic detention times of 6 hours, whereas the aerobic unit utilized diffused aeration. Raw domestic sewage was fed to the anaerobic unit, and the aerobic unit was fed with the anaerobic unit was fed with the anaerobic effluent. Although, the anaerobic filter did not show a considerable organic removal with domestic sex age it was improved when glucose was added to the influent to increase influent soluble COD. When glucose was added the anaerobic filter removed about 290 mg/1 of influent soluble COD. The aerobic unit produced an excellent effluent with COD, BOD5 and TSS concentrations of 37 mg/1, 9 mg/1 and 10 mg/l respectively. Overall, the system removed 95 percent of influent COD, 97 percent of influent BOD5 and 96 percent of influent TSS.

  10. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  11. Effect of xylose and nutrients concentration on ethanol production by a newly isolated extreme thermophilic bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás, Ana Faria; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    An extreme thermophilic ethanol-producing strain was isolated from an ethanol high-yielding mixed culture, originally isolated from a hydrogen producing reactor operated at 70 °C. Ethanol yields were assessed with increasing concentrations of xylose, up to 20 g/l. The ability of the strain to gro...... product under most of the conditions tested, including in media lacking vitamins, peptone and yeast extract. The results indicate that this new organism is a promising candidate for the development of a second generation bio-ethanol production process. © IWA Publishing 2011....

  12. Anaerobic metabolism in Brassica seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung-Ryoul; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    Germination typically depends on oxidative respiration. The lack of convection under space conditions may create hypoxic or conditions during seed germination. We investigated the effect of reduced oxygen on seed germination and metabolism to understand how metabolic constraints affect seed growth and responsiveness to reorientation. Germination was completely inhibited when seeds were imbibed in the absence of oxygen; germination occurred at 5% oxygen and higher levels. Adding oxygen after 72 h resulted in immediate germination (protrusion of the radicle). Hypoxia typically activates alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27) which produce ethanol and/or L-lactate, respectively. We report on the expression of ADH1 and LDH1, and changes in total soluble sugars, starch, pH, and L-lactate in seedlings grown at 28°C in 0, 2.5, 5, 10% and ambient (21%) oxygen conditions as controls. The highest consumption (lowest level) of sugars was seen at 0% oxygen but the lowest level of starch occurred 24 h after imbibition under ambient condition. Expression levels of ADH1 in ambient oxygen condition increased within 24 h but increased threefold under hypoxic conditions; LDH1 increased up to 8-fold under hypoxia compared to controls but ADH1 and LDH1 were less expressed as the oxygen levels increased. The intracellular pH of seeds decreased as the content of L-lactate increased for all oxygen concentrations. These results indicate that germination of Brassica is sensitive to oxygen levels and that oxygen availability during germination is an important factor for metabolic activities. (Supported by NASA grant NNX10AP91G)

  13. Ethanol production from soybean molasses by Zymomonas mobilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the utilization of soybean molasses (a low cost byproduct) to produce ethanol, an important biofuel, using the microorganism Zymomonas mobilis NRRL 806, a gram negative bacterium. At the first part of the work, laboratorial scale tests, using 125 mL flasks were performed to evaluate the effect of three variables on ethanol production: soybean molasses concentration (the sole carbon and nitrogen source), pH and period of previous aerobial phase. The optimal soybean concentration was around 200 g L-1 of soluble solids, pH between 6.0 and 7.0, and the period of previous aerobial phase did not provide significant effect. At the second part, kinetic tests were performed to compare the fermentation yields of Zymomonas mobilis NRRL 806 in flasks and in a bench scale batch reactor (it was obtained respectively 78.3% and 96.0% of the maximum theoretical yields, with productions of 24.2 and 29.3 g L-1 of ethanol). The process with a reactor fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae LPB1 was also tested (it was reached 89.3% of the theoretical maximum value). A detailed kinetic behavior of the molasses sugars metabolism for Z. mobilis was also shown, either in reactor or in flasks. This work is a valuable tool for further works in the subject of ethanol production from agro-industrial by-products. -- Highlights: ► Zymomonas mobilis was able to grow and produce ethanol on diluted soybean molasses. ► Best conditions for ethanol production:200g L-1 of soluble solids; pH around 6,5. ► Z. mobilis had better ethanol production and yield when compared to S. cerevisiae. ► In reactor, Z. mobilis produced 29.3 g L-1of ethanol, 96.0% of the maximum yield.

  14. 浮霉菌门严格厌氧产氢细菌(Thermopirellula anaerolimosa)的分离及其生理特性%Isolation and characterization of Thermopirellula anaerolimosa gen.nov., sp.nov., an obligate anaerobic hydrogen-producing bacterium of the phylum Planctomycetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冬英; 刘奕; 门学慧; 郭群群; 郭荣波; 邱艳玲

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To cultivate various yet-to-be cultured heterotrophs from anaerobic granule sludge, we used a selective culture medium with low concentrations of substrates supplemented a variety of antibiotics.[Methods] An obligate anaerobic, thermophilic, hydrogen-producing bacterium, strainVM20-7 , was isolated from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket ( UASB ) reactor treating high-strength organic wastewater from isomerized sugar production processes.[Results] Cells of strain VM20-7T are non-motile, spherical, pear or teardrop shaped, occurring singly°r as aggregates (0.7 -2.0 μm×0.7 -2.0 μm).Spore formation was not observed.Growth temperature ranges from 35 - 50℃ ( optimum 45℃ ), pH ranges from 6.0 - 8.3 ( optimum 7.0 - 7.5 ) , NaCl tolerant concentration ranges from 0% -0.5% ( w/v, optimum 0% ).Nitrate, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, elemental sulfur and Fe (Ⅲ) -NTA were not used as terminal electron acceptors.Strain VM20-7 utilizes a wide range of carbohydrates, including glucose, maltose, ribose, xylose, sucrose, galactose, mannose, raffinose, pectin, yeast extract and xylan.Acetate and H2 are the main end products of glucose fermentation.The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 60.9 mol% .16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that it is related to the Pirellula-Rhodopirellula-Blastopirellula (PRB) clade within the order Planctomycetales (82.7 -84.3% similarity with 16S rRNA genes of other known related species).[Conclusion] The first obligate anaerobic bacterium within the phylum Planctomycetes was isolated with low concentration of carbohydrates and antibiotics.On the basis of the physiological and phylogenetic data, the name Thermopirellula anaerolimosa gen.nov., sp.nov.is proposed for strain VM20-7T( =CGMCC 1.5169T = JCM 17478T = DSM24165T).%[目的]厌氧颗粒污泥中含有大量未知微生物资源,利用低浓度底物及添加抗生素的培养基进行厌氧发酵细菌的筛选,并对分离菌株进行生理生化特性研究.[方法]

  15. Potential application of anaerobic extremophiles for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-11-01

    In processes of the substrate fermentation most anaerobes produce molecular hydrogen as a waste end product, which often controls the culture growth as an inhibitor. Usually in nature the hydrogen is easily removed from an ecosystem, due to its physical features, and an immediate consumption by the secondary anaerobes that sometimes behave as competitors for electron donors; a classical example of this kind of substrate competition in anaerobic microbial communities is the interaction between methanogens and sulfate- or sulfur-reducers. Previously, on the mixed cultures of anaerobes at neutral pH, it was demonstrated that bacterial hydrogen production could provide a good alternative energy source. At neutral pH the original cultures could easily contaminated by methanogens, and the most unpleasant side effect of these conditions is the development of pathogenic bacteria. In both cases the rate of hydrogen production was dramatically decreased since some part of the hydrogen was transformed to methane, and furthermore, the cultivation with pathogenic contaminants on an industrial scale would create an unsafe situation. In our laboratory the experiments with obligately alkaliphilic bacteria producing hydrogen as an end metabolic product were performed at different conditions. The mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic and obligately anaerobic bacterium Spirochaeta americana ASpG1T was studied and various cultivation regimes were compared for the most effective hydrogen production. In a highly mineralized media with pH 9.5-10.0 not many known methanogens are capable of growth, and the probability of developing pathogenic contaminants is theoretically is close to zero (in medicine carbonate- saturated solutions are applied as antiseptics). Therefore the cultivation of alkaliphilic hydrogen producing bacteria could be considered as a safe and economical process for large-scale industrial bio-hydrogen production in the future. Here we present and discuss the experimental data

  16. The phenomenon of granulation of anaerobic sludge.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff Pol, L.W.

    1989-01-01

    Successful high-rate anaerobic wastewater treatment can only be accomplished when the slowgrowing anaerobic biomass is efficiently held back in the anaerobic treatment system. This biomass retention can be achieved in various ways including immobilization of the organisms on fixed materials and immo

  17. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent vis

  18. Kinetics and modeling of anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion modeling started in the early 1970s when the need for design and efficient operation of anaerobic systems became evident. At that time not only was the knowledge about the complex process of anaerobic digestion inadequate but also there were computational limitations. Thus, th...

  19. Osmo-, thermo- and ethanol- tolerances of Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrasegarampillai Balakumar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1, which is a locally isolated and improved strain showed viability at 40, 45 and 50ºC and produced ethanol at 40, 43 and 45ºC. When the cells were given heat shock at 45ºC for 30min and grown at 40ºC, 100% viability was observed for 60h, and addition of 200gl-1 ethanol has led to complete cell death at 30h. Heat shock given at 45ºC (for 30min has improved the tolerance to temperature induced ethanol shock leading to 37% viability at 30h. when the cells were subjected to ethanol (200gl-1 for 30 min and osmotic shock (sorbitol 300gl-1, trehalose contents in the cells were increased. The heat shocked cells showed better viability in presence of added ethanol. Soy flour supplementation has improved the viability of S. cerevisiae S1 to 80% in presence of 100gl-1 added ethanol and to 60% in presence of 300gl-1 sorbitol. In presence of sorbitol (200gl-1 and ethanol (50gl-1 at 40ºC, 46% viability was retained by S. cerevisiae S1 at 48h and it was improved to 80% by soy flour supplementation.

  20. Biotechnological processes for conversion of corn into ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bothast, R.J.; Schlicher, M.A. [National Corn-To-Ethanol Research Center, Southern Illinois Univ. Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Ethanol has been utilized as a fuel source in the United States since the turn of the century. However, it has repeatedly faced significant commercial viability obstacles relative to petroleum. Renewed interest exists in ethanol as a fuel source today owing to its positive impact on rural America, the environment and United States energy security. Today, most fuel ethanol is produced by either the dry grind or the wet mill process. Current technologies allow for 2.5 gallons (wet mill process) to 2.8 gallons (dry grind process) of ethanol (1 gallon = 3.7851) per bushel of corn. Valuable co-products, distillers dried grains with solubles (dry grind) and corn gluten meal and feed (wet mill), are also generated in the production of ethanol. While current supplies are generated from both processes, the majority of the growth in the industry is from dry grind plant construction in rural communities across the corn belt. While fuel ethanol production is an energy-efficient process today, additional research is occurring to improve its long-term economic viability. Three of the most significant areas of research are in the production of hybrids with a higher starch content or a higher extractable starch content, in the conversion of the corn kernel fiber fraction to ethanol, and in the identification and development of new and higher-value co-products. (orig.)

  1. Ethanol: The fuel of the future and its environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several major environmental benefits associated with using biomass-derived ethanol as a transportation fuel. First, because ethanol is produced from plant material (primarily corn) that uses atmospheric CO2 for the process of photosynthesis, the combustion of biomass-derived ethanol can be viewed as recycling of CO2 back into the atmosphere, thereby closing the carbon cycle. Further, emission tests on vehicles using E-85 (a blend of 85% denatured ethanol and 15% gasoline) show significant reductions in hydrocarbon and CO emission levels when compared to their gasoline counterparts. Finally, a recent study comparing greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles using E-10 (a blend of 10% ethanol and 90% gasoline, commonly called gasohol) and E-85 fuel to those using gasoline and diesel fuel has been completed by Argonne National Laboratory. Using the most recent energy input data available, the study concluded that corn-derived ethanol reduces greenhouse gases by 2--3% for E-10, and by over 30% for vehicles using E-85 fuel. Additionally, the state of Illinois, with several other corporate and privates partners, is testing the use of a new fuel formulation called OxyDiesel, a blend of 15% ethanol, diesel fuel, and a special blending additive, that holds considerable promise in reducing harmful tailpipe and greenhouse gas emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines in trucks, buses, and other diesel engine applications

  2. Reversal of morphine analgesic tolerance by ethanol in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, L C; Gabra, B H; Bailey, C P; Henderson, G; Dewey, W L

    2013-06-01

    The chronic use of opioids in humans, accompanied by the development of tolerance, is a dangerous phenomenon in its own right. However, chronic opioid use is often made more dangerous by the coconsumption of other substances. It has been observed that the blood level of opioids in postmortem analyses of addicts, who consumed ethanol along with the opioid, was much less than that observed in individuals who died from opioids alone. This relationship between ethanol and opioids led us to investigate the hypothesis that ethanol alters tolerance to opioids. In the present study, we report that ethanol significantly and dose-dependently reduced the antinociceptive tolerance produced by morphine and the cross-tolerance between [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) and morphine in the mouse tail-flick test. The reversal of morphine tolerance was partially blocked by both the gamma receptor blocker bicuculline and by the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(B) receptor blocker phaclofen and the administration of both inhibitors completely reversed the effects of ethanol on morphine tolerance. Diazepam, like ethanol, decreased morphine tolerance. However, this inhibition was reversed by the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline but not by the GABA(B) antagonist phaclofen. These findings have important implications for individuals who abuse opioids and ethanol as well as suggest a mechanism to reduce the amount of opioid needed in chronic pain treatment. PMID:23528610

  3. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  4. Direct ethanol fermentation of the algal storage polysaccharide laminarin with an optimized combination of engineered yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motone, Keisuke; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Sasaki, Yusuke; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-08-10

    Laminarin is the algal storage glucan and represents up to 35% of the dry weight of brown macroalgae. In this study, a novel laminarinase, Gly5M, was first found using focused proteome analysis of a laminarin-assimilating marine bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans, and the encoding gene was isolated. A Gly5M-displaying yeast strain was prepared with the cell surface display system using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It showed a laminarin-degrading activity on the cell surface and caused the dominant accumulation of gentiobiose. The obtained gentiobiose was converted into glucose and could be assimilated by an Aspergillus aculeatus β-glucosidase (BG)-displaying yeast strain. When Gly5M- and BG-displaying yeasts were anaerobically cultivated together in fermentation medium containing 20g/L laminarin as a sole carbon source, the coculture system with the combination of optimized ratios of the 2 yeast strains directly produced 5.2g/L ethanol. This coculture system of the 2 engineered yeast strains would be a platform for the use of laminarin and contribute to the complete utilization of brown macroalgae. PMID:27287535

  5. A Sustainable Ethanol Distillation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuelei Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The discarded fruit and vegetable waste from the consumer and retailer sectors provide a reliable source for ethanol production. In this paper, an ethanol distillation system has been developed to remove the water contents from the original wash that contains only around 15% of the ethanol. The system has an ethanol production capacity of over 100,000 liters per day. It includes an ethanol condenser, a wash pre-heater, a main exhaust heat exchanger as well as a fractionating column. One unique characteristic of this system is that it utilizes the waste heat rejected from a power plant to vaporize the ethanol, thus it saves a significant amount of energy and at the same time reduces the pollution to the environment.

  6. Production of Volatile Derivatives of Metal(loid)s by Microflora Involved in Anaerobic Digestion of Sewage Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Michalke, K.; Wickenheiser, E. B.; Mehring, M.; A. V. Hirner; Hensel, R.

    2000-01-01

    Gases released from anaerobic wastewater treatment facilities contain considerable amounts of volatile methyl and hydride derivatives of metals and metalloids, such as arsine (AsH3), monomethylarsine, dimethylarsine, trimethylarsine, trimethylbismuth (TMBi), elemental mercury (Hg0), trimethylstibine, dimethyltellurium, and tetramethyltin. Most of these compounds could be shown to be produced by pure cultures of microorganisms which are representatives of the anaerobic sewage sludge microflora...

  7. Metabolomics-based prediction models of yeast strains for screening of metabolites contributing to ethanol stress tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Z.; Fukusaki, E.

    2016-06-01

    The increased demand for clean, sustainable and renewable energy resources has driven the development of various microbial systems to produce biofuels. One of such systems is the ethanol-producing yeast. Although yeast produces ethanol naturally using its native pathways, production yield is low and requires improvement for commercial biofuel production. Moreover, ethanol is toxic to yeast and thus ethanol tolerance should be improved to further enhance ethanol production. In this study, we employed metabolomics-based strategy using 30 single-gene deleted yeast strains to construct multivariate models for ethanol tolerance and screen metabolites that relate to ethanol sensitivity/tolerance. The information obtained from this study can be used as an input for strain improvement via metabolic engineering.

  8. Ethanol Production from Waste Potato Mash by Using Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulten Izmirlioglu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Bio-ethanol is one of the energy sources that can be produced by renewable sources. Waste potato mash was chosen as a renewable carbon source for ethanol fermentation because it is relatively inexpensive compared with other feedstock considered as food sources. However, a pretreatment process is needed: specifically, liquefaction and saccharification processes are needed to convert starch of potato into fermentable sugars before ethanol fermentation. In this study, hydrolysis of waste potato mash and growth parameters of the ethanol fermentation were optimized to obtain maximum ethanol production. In order to obtain maximum glucose conversions, the relationship among parameters of the liquefaction and saccharification process was investigated by a response surface method. The optimum combination of temperature, dose of enzyme (α-amylase and amount of waste potato mash was 95 °C, 1 mL of enzyme (18.8 mg protein/mL and 4.04 g dry-weight/100 mL DI water, with a 68.86% loss in dry weight for liquefaction. For saccharification, temperature, dose of enzyme and saccharification time were optimized and optimum condition was determined as 60 °C-72 h-0.8 mL (300 Unit/mL of amyloglucosidase combination, yielded 34.9 g/L glucose. After optimization of hydrolysis of the waste potato mash, ethanol fermentation was studied. Effects of pH and inoculum size were evaluated to obtain maximum ethanol. Results showed that pH of 5.5 and 3% inolculum size were optimum pH and inoculum size, respectively for maximum ethanol concentration and production rate. The maximum bio-ethanol production rate was obtained at the optimum conditions of 30.99 g/L ethanol. Since yeast extract is not the most economical nitrogen source, four animal-based substitutes (poultry meal, hull and fines mix, feather meal, and meat and bone meal were evaluated to determine an economical alternative nitrogen source to yeast extract. Poultry meal and feather meal were able to produce 35 g/L and

  9. Chronic ethanol and nicotine interaction on rat tissue antioxidant defense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, K; Scott, B R; Reddy, S K; Somani, S M

    2001-10-01

    Ethanol consumption and cigarette smoking are common in societies worldwide and have been identified as injurious to human health. This study was undertaken to examine the interactive effects of chronic ethanol and nicotine consumption on the antioxidant defense system in different tissues of rat. Male Fisher-344 rats were divided into four groups of five animals each and treated for 6.5 weeks as follows: (1) Control rats were administered normal saline orally; (2) ethanol (20% [wt./vol.]) was given orally at a dose of 2 g/kg; (3) nicotine was administered subcutaneously at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg; and (4) a combination of ethanol plus nicotine was administered by the route and at the dose described above. The animals were killed 20 h after the last treatment, and liver, lung, kidney, and testes were isolated and analyzed. Chronic ingestion of ethanol resulted in a significant depletion of glutathione (GSH) content in liver, lung, and testes, whereas chronic administration of nicotine significantly depleted GSH content in liver and testes. The combination of ethanol plus nicotine resulted in a significant depletion of GSH content in liver, lung, and testes. Ethanol, nicotine, or a combination of ethanol plus nicotine significantly increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver and decreased SOD activity in kidney. Ethanol, nicotine, or a combination of ethanol plus nicotine significantly decreased catalase (CAT) activity in liver and increased CAT activity in kidney and testes. Chronic ingestion of ethanol resulted in a significant decrease in glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in liver and kidney, whereas a combination of ethanol plus nicotine increased GSH-Px activity in liver and decreased GSH-Px activity in kidney and testes. Ethanol, nicotine, or a combination of ethanol plus nicotine significantly increased lipid peroxidation, respectively, in liver. It is suggested that prolonged exposure to ethanol and nicotine produce similar, and in some cases

  10. Synthesis Gas generation from Bio-Ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-voltage discharge (called GlidArc) is used to assist the partial oxidation of 50 to 90 Ethanol/water solutions using air. The feed conversion is total and the produced synthesis gas does not contain soot, coke or tars. The output reformate gas reaches presently 22 kW power at only 1% of electric power necessary to assist such reforming process. Up to 46 vol.% of H2+CO SynGas mixture is produced (the balance being mostly the N2) in long runs. A 75% thermal efficiency of the process is obtained but a large part of remaining heat can be further reused. (authors)

  11. Endogenous ethanol production in trauma victims associated with medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, F; Hashimoto, Y

    1996-08-01

    Four cases of trauma, where endogenous ethanol production was suspected to have been occurred in association with medical treatment, are reported. To discriminate endogenous ethanol produced de novo by bacteria from exogenous ethanol by drinking, various tissues and body fluids, such as brain and cerebrospinal fluid, together with blood obtained from various locations, were subjected to analysis for both ethanol and n-propanol. The first individual was a 40-year-old man who had been stabbed in the abdomen with a knife and had died of bleeding about 12 h after peritoneotomy, and autopsied 12 h later. In the heart blood, 0.44 mg/g ethanol and 0.005 mg/g n-propanol were detected. Ethanol levels in the cerebrospinal fluid, vitreous humor and brain, reflecting exogenous ethanol levels, were 0.08-0.16 mg/g, and no n-propanol was detected in any of the specimens. The second individual was a 45-year-old man who had been punched hard in the head and face and had died of traumatic shock about 12 h after hospitalization, and autopsied 12 h later. The heart blood concentrations of ethanol and n-propanol were 0.15 and 0.008 mg/g respectively, and a subdural hematoma contained only 0.05 mg/g ethanol and non n-propanol. The third individual was a 34-year-old man who suffered incised wounds of the left arm and head with a sickle and had died of hemorrhagic shock. In the heart blood, 0.30 mg/g ethanol and 0.026 mg/g n-propanol were detected; there was 0.04 mg/g ethanol and no n-propanol in the brain. The fourth individual was a 76-year-old woman who had been hit by a motorcycle and had died of liver rupture about 1 h after admission to a hospital. The heart blood contained 0.22 mg/g ethanol and 0.002 mg/g n-propanol. Only a trace of ethanol and no n-propanol were detected in the pericardial sac fluid and cerebrospinal fluid.

  12. Oxygen Effects in Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshai Botheju

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of free oxygen in bio-gasification is a sparsely studied area, apart from the common argument of oxygen being toxic and inhibitory for anaerobic micro-cultures. Some studies have, however, revealed increased solubilisation of organic matter in the presence of some free oxygen in anaerobic digestion. This article analyses these counterbalancing phenomena with a mathematical modelling approach using the widely accepted biochemical model ADM 1. Aerobic oxidation of soluble carbon and inhibition of obligatory anaerobic organisms are modelled using standard saturation type kinetics. Biomass dependent first order hydrolysis kinetics is used to relate the increased hydrolysis rate with oxygen induced increase in biomass growth. The amended model, ADM 1-Ox (oxygen, has 25 state variables and 22 biochemical processes, presented in matrix form. The computer aided simulation tool AQUASIM 2.1 is used to simulate the developed model. Simulation predictions are evaluated against experimental data obtained using a laboratory batch test array comprising miniature anaerobic bio-reactors of 100 ml total volume each, operated under different initial air headspaces giving rise to the different oxygen loading conditions. The reactors were initially fed with a glucose solution and incubated at 35 Celsius, for 563 hours. Under the oxygen load conditions of 22, 44 and 88 mg/L, the ADM1-Ox model simulations predicted the experimental methane potentials quite adequately. Both the experimental data and the simulations suggest a linear reduction of methane potential with respect to the increase in oxygen load within this range.

  13. Anaerobic Treatment of Methanolic Wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, G.; Geest, van der A.Th.; Hobma, S.W.; Laan, van der J.B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Although it is well known that methanol can be fermented directly by a specific species of methane bacteria, viz. Methanosarcina barkeri, until now little information was available about the effect of important environmental factors on the anaerobic fermentation of methanol. As methanol can be the m

  14. A Probabilistic Analysis of the Switchgrass Ethanol Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz W. Patzek

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The switchgrass-driven process for producing ethanol has received much popular attention. However, a realistic analysis of this process indicates three serious limitations: (a If switchgrass planted on 140 million hectares (the entire area of active U.S. cropland were used as feedstock and energy source for ethanol production, the net ethanol yield would replace on average about 20% of today’s gasoline consumption in the U.S. (b Because nonrenewable resources are required to produce ethanol from switchgrass, the incremental gas emissions would be on average 55 million tons of equivalent carbon dioxide per year to replace just 10% of U.S. automotive gasoline. (c In terms of delivering electrical or mechanical power, ethanol from 1 hectare (10,000 m2 of switchgrass is equivalent, on average, to 30 m2 of low-efficiency photovoltaic cells. This analysis suggests that investing toward more efficient and durable solar cells, and batteries, may be more promising than investing in a process to convert switchgrass to ethanol.

  15. The addition of sugar beet to ethanol pathway in GHGenius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developed by Natural Resources Canada, the GHGenius model is used to estimate the life cycle emissions of primary greenhouse gases (GHGs) as well as the criteria pollutants from combustion sources. The model can be used to analyze the emissions from conventional and alternatively fuelled combustion engines and fuel cell powered trucks and vehicles, as well as light duty powered electric vehicles. Over 140 vehicle and fuel combinations can be used. This paper examined the effects of adding energy used to produce materials consumed in the production of alternative fuels in GHGenius energy balance calculations, as well as vehicle emission calculations on a carbon dioxide (CO2) eq/GJ of fuel consumed basis. This paper also examined the addition of sugar beet ethanol pathways to GHGenius. Energy balances were obtained and a number of process improvements to sugar beet ethanol processing were examined as sensitivity cases. GHGenius was used to calculate the energy consumption of each stage in the production cycle. Estimates included the energy required to produce the chemicals used in the ethanol processing procedure. Results were then compared with results obtained from gasoline, corn and wheat ethanols. Results of the study showed that energy balances were lower than corn or wheat ethanol. Feedstock transmission and processing requirements were also higher due to the higher moisture content of the feedstock. The results of several European studies considering the use of sugar beet ethanol were also included. 17 tabs., 9 figs

  16. [Preparation of ethanol-diesel fuel blends and exhausts emission characteristics in diesel engine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Runduo; He, Hong; Zhang, Changbin; Shi, Xiaoyan

    2003-07-01

    The technology that diesel oil is partly substituted by ethanol can reduce diesel engine exhausts emission, especially fuel soot. This research is concentrated on preparation of ethanol-diesel blend fuel and exhausts emission characteristics using diesel engine bench. Absolute ethanol can dissolve into diesel fuel at an arbitrary ratio. However, a trace of water (0.2%) addition can lead to the phase separation of blends. Organic additive synthesized during this research can develop the ability of resistance to water and maintain the stability of ethanol-diesel-trace amounts of water system. The effects of 10%, 20%, and 30% ethanol-diesel fuel blends on exhausts emission, were compared with that of diesel fuel in direct injection (DI) diesel engine. The optimum ethanol percentage for ethanol-diesel fuel blends was 20%. Using 20% ethanol-diesel fuel blend with 2% additive of the total volume, bench diesel engine showed a large amount decrease of exhaust gas, e.g. 55% of Bosch smoke number, 70% of HC emission, and 45% of CO emission at 13 kW and 1540 r/min. Without the addition of additive, the blend of ethanol produced new organic compounds such as ethanol and acetaldehyde in tail gas. However, the addition of additive obviously reduced the emission of ethanol and acetaldehyde.

  17. Wet oxidation pretreatment of rape straw for ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvaniti, Efthalia; Bjerre, Anne Belinda; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2012-01-01

    Rape straw can be used for production of second generation bioethanol. In this paper we optimized the pretreatment of rape straw for this purpose using Wet oxidation (WO). The effect of reaction temperature, reaction time, and oxygen gas pressure was investigated for maximum ethanol yield via...... slurry (Filter cake + filtrate) in SSF were also tested. Except ethanol yields, pretreatment methods were evaluated based on achieved glucose yields, amount of water used, recovery of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin.The highest ethanol yield obtained was 67% after fermenting the whole slurry...... gas produced higher ethanol yields and cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin recoveries, than 15 min WO treatment at 195 °C. Also, recycling filtrate and use of higher oxygen gas pressure reduced recovery of materials. The use of filtrate could be inhibitory for the yeast, but also reduced lactic acid...

  18. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye;

    2003-01-01

    by the immobilization of the biomass, which forms static biofilms, particle-supported biofilms, or granules depending on the reactor's operational conditions. The advantages of the high-rate anaerobic digestion over the conventional aerobic wastewater treatment methods has created a clear trend for the change......-rate anaerobic treatment systems based on anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm are described in this chapter. Emphasis is given to a) the Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) systems, b) the main characteristics of the anaerobic granular sludge, and c) the factors that control the granulation process...

  19. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle E.; Binder, Thomas P.; Rammelsberg, Anne M.

    2010-11-16

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  20. Anaerobic Metabolism: Linkages to Trace Gases and Aerobic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megonigal, J. P.; Hines, M. E.; Visscher, P. T.

    2003-12-01

    Life evolved and flourished in the absence of molecular oxygen (O2). As the O2 content of the atmosphere rose to the present level of 21% beginning about two billion years ago, anaerobic metabolism was gradually supplanted by aerobic metabolism. Anaerobic environments have persisted on Earth despite the transformation to an oxidized state because of the combined influence of water and organic matter. Molecular oxygen diffuses about 104 times more slowly through water than air, and organic matter supports a large biotic O2 demand that consumes the supply faster than it is replaced by diffusion. Such conditions exist in wetlands, rivers, estuaries, coastal marine sediments, aquifers, anoxic water columns, sewage digesters, landfills, the intestinal tracts of animals, and the rumen of herbivores. Anaerobic microsites are also embedded in oxic environments such as upland soils and marine water columns. Appreciable rates of aerobic respiration are restricted to areas that are in direct contact with air or those inhabited by organisms that produce O2.Rising atmospheric O2 reduced the global area of anaerobic habitat, but enhanced the overall rate of anaerobic metabolism (at least on an area basis) by increasing the supply of electron donors and acceptors. Organic carbon production increased dramatically, as did oxidized forms of nitrogen, manganese, iron, sulfur, and many other elements. In contemporary anaerobic ecosystems, nearly all of the reducing power is derived from photosynthesis, and most of it eventually returns to O2, the most electronegative electron acceptor that is abundant. This photosynthetically driven redox gradient has been thoroughly exploited by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms for metabolism. The same is true of hydrothermal vents (Tunnicliffe, 1992) and some deep subsurface environments ( Chapelle et al., 2002), where thermal energy is the ultimate source of the reducing power.Although anaerobic habitats are currently a small fraction of Earth