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Sample records for amyloid binding agents

  1. Identification of a Common Binding Mode for Imaging Agents to Amyloid Fibrils from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby; Sørensen, Jesper; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid diseases are characterized by the misfolding and deposition of proteins in the body in the form of insoluble amyloid fibrils. Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are two examples of amyloid diseases which are closely related both with respect to the atomic structures of the a......Amyloid diseases are characterized by the misfolding and deposition of proteins in the body in the form of insoluble amyloid fibrils. Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are two examples of amyloid diseases which are closely related both with respect to the atomic structures...... of the amyloid fibrils and the disease pathology. Alzheimer’s disease is very difficult to diagnose, and much research is being performed to develop noninvasive diagnostic methods, such as imaging with small-molecule agents. The interactions between amyloid fibrils and imaging agents are challenging to examine...

  2. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Heidel, Eric [Department of Surgery, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Macy, Sallie [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Kennel, Stephen J. [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Wall, Jonathan S., E-mail: jwall@utmck.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States)

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  3. Polyfluorinated bis-styrylbenzenes as amyloid-β plaque binding ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabuurs, Rob J A; Kapoerchan, Varsha V; Metaxas, Athanasios; de Jongh, Sanne; de Backer, Maaike; Welling, Mick M; Jiskoot, Wim; Windhorst, Albert D; Overkleeft, Hermen S; van Buchem, Mark A; Overhand, Mark; van der Weerd, Louise

    2014-04-15

    Detection of cerebral β-amyloid (Aβ) by targeted contrast agents remains of great interest to aid the in vivo diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Bis-styrylbenzenes have been previously reported as potential Aβ imaging agents. To further explore their potency as (19)F MRI contrast agents we synthetized several novel fluorinated bis-styrylbenzenes and studied their fluorescent properties and amyloidbinding characteristics. The compounds showed a high affinity for Aβ plaques on murine and human brain sections. Interestingly, competitive binding experiments demonstrated that they bound to a different binding site than chrysamine G. Despite their high logP values, many bis-styrylbenzenes were able to enter the brain and label murine amyloid in vivo. Unfortunately initial post-mortem (19)F NMR studies showed that these compounds as yet do not warrant further MRI studies due to the reduction of the (19)F signal in the environment of the brain. PMID:24657049

  4. Development of (F-18)-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the 'amyloid cascade hypothesis' which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  5. Development of [F-18]-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, CA

    2007-05-09

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  6. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.;

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly...

  7. Does aluminium bind to histidine? An NMR investigation of amyloid β12 and amyloid β16 fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Priya; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Vishwanathan, Vinaya; Jagadeesh Kumar, Dasappa; Babu, Sudhir; Ramanathan, Krishna Venkatachala; Easwaran, Kalpathy Ramaier Katchap; Nagendra, Holenarasipur Gundurao; Raghothama, Srinivasarao

    2013-07-01

    Aluminium and zinc are known to be the major triggering agents for aggregation of amyloid peptides leading to plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease. While zinc binding to histidine in Aβ (amyloid β) fragments has been implicated as responsible for aggregation, not much information is available on the interaction of aluminium with histidine. In the NMR study of the N-terminal Aβ fragments, DAEFRHDSGYEV (Aβ12) and DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQK (Aβ16) presented here, the interactions of the fragments with aluminium have been investigated. Significant chemical shifts were observed for few residues near the C-terminus when aluminium chloride was titrated with Aβ12 and Aβ16 peptides. Surprisingly, it is nonhistidine residues which seem to be involved in aluminium binding. Based on NMR constrained structure obtained by molecular modelling, aluminium-binding pockets in Aβ12 were around charged residues such as Asp, Glu. The results are discussed in terms of native structure propagation, and the relevance of histidine residues in the sequences for metal-binding interactions. We expect that the study of such short amyloid peptide fragments will not only provide clues for plaque formation in aggregated conditions but also facilitate design of potential drugs for these targets. PMID:23464626

  8. Curcumin Binding to Beta Amyloid: A Computational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Praveen P N; Mohamed, Tarek; Teckwani, Karan; Tin, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Curcumin, a chemical constituent present in the spice turmeric, is known to prevent the aggregation of amyloid peptide implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. While curcumin is known to bind directly to various amyloid aggregates, no systematic investigations have been carried out to understand its ability to bind to the amyloid aggregates including oligomers and fibrils. In this study, we constructed computational models of (i) Aβ hexapeptide (16) KLVFFA(21) octamer steric-zipper β-sheet assembly and (ii) full-length Aβ fibril β-sheet assembly. Curcumin binding in these models was evaluated by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. In both the models, curcumin was oriented in a linear extended conformation parallel to fiber axis and exhibited better stability in the Aβ hexapeptide (16) KLVFFA(21) octamer steric-zipper model (Ebinding  = -10.05 kcal/mol) compared to full-length Aβ fibril model (Ebinding  = -3.47 kcal/mol). Analysis of MD trajectories of curcumin bound to full-length Aβ fibril shows good stability with minimum Cα-atom RMSD shifts. Interestingly, curcumin binding led to marked fluctuations in the (14) HQKLVFFA(21) region that constitute the fibril spine with RMSF values ranging from 1.4 to 3.6 Å. These results show that curcumin binding to Aβ shifts the equilibrium in the aggregation pathway by promoting the formation of non-toxic aggregates.

  9. The Effect of Milk Constituents and Crowding Agents on Amyloid Fibril Formation by κ-Casein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jihua; Dehle, Francis C; Liu, Yanqin; Bahraminejad, Elmira; Ecroyd, Heath; Thorn, David C; Carver, John A

    2016-02-17

    When not incorporated into the casein micelle, κ-casein, a major milk protein, rapidly forms amyloid fibrils at physiological pH and temperature. In this study, the effects of milk components (calcium, lactose, lipids, and heparan sulfate) and crowding agents on reduced and carboxymethylated (RCM) κ-casein fibril formation was investigated using far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy, thioflavin T binding assays, and transmission electron microscopy. Longer-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids, which form the lining of milk ducts and milk fat globules, enhanced RCM κ-casein fibril formation irrespective of whether the lipids were in a monomeric or micellar state, whereas shorter-chain phospholipids and triglycerides had little effect. Heparan sulfate, a component of the milk fat globule membrane and catalyst of amyloid deposition in extracellular tissue, had little effect on the kinetics of RCM κ-casein fibril formation. Major nutritional components such as calcium and lactose also had no significant effect. Macromolecular crowding enhances protein-protein interactions, but in contrast to other fibril-forming species, the extent of RCM κ-casein fibril formation was reduced by the presence of a variety of crowding agents. These data are consistent with a mechanism of κ-casein fibril formation in which the rate-determining step is dissociation from the oligomer to give the highly amyloidogenic monomer. We conclude that the interaction of κ-casein with membrane-associated phospholipids along its secretory pathway may contribute to the development of amyloid deposits in mammary tissue. However, the formation of spherical oligomers such as casein micelles is favored over amyloid fibrils in the crowded environment of milk, within which the occurrence of amyloid fibrils is low. PMID:26807595

  10. Binding of fullerenes to amyloid beta fibrils: size matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huy, Pham Dinh Quoc; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-10-01

    Binding affinity of fullerenes C20, C36, C60, C70 and C84 for amyloid beta fibrils is studied by docking and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with the Amber force field and water model TIP3P. Using the molecular mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann surface area method one can demonstrate that the binding free energy linearly decreases with the number of carbon atoms of fullerene, i.e. the larger is the fullerene size, the higher is the binding affinity. Overall, fullerenes bind to Aβ9-40 fibrils stronger than to Aβ17-42. The number of water molecules trapped in the interior of 12Aβ9-40 fibrils was found to be lower than inside pentamer 5Aβ17-42. C60 destroys Aβ17-42 fibril structure to a greater extent compared to other fullerenes. Our study revealed that the van der Waals interaction dominates over the electrostatic interaction and non-polar residues of amyloid beta peptides play the significant role in interaction with fullerenes providing novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.

  11. RNA aptamer probes as optical imaging agents for the detection of amyloid plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Farrar

    Full Text Available Optical imaging using multiphoton microscopy and whole body near infrared imaging has become a routine part of biomedical research. However, optical imaging methods rely on the availability of either small molecule reporters or genetically encoded fluorescent proteins, which are challenging and time consuming to develop. While directly labeled antibodies can also be used as imaging agents, antibodies are species specific, can typically not be tagged with multiple fluorescent reporters without interfering with target binding, and are bioactive, almost always eliciting a biological response and thereby influencing the process that is being studied. We examined the possibility of developing highly specific and sensitive optical imaging agents using aptamer technology. We developed a fluorescently tagged anti-Aβ RNA aptamer, β55, which binds amyloid plaques in both ex vivo human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue and in vivo APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Diffuse β55 positive halos, attributed to oligomeric Aβ, were observed surrounding the methoxy-XO4 positive plaque cores. Dot blots of synthetic Aβ aggregates provide further evidence that β55 binds both fibrillar and non-fibrillar Aβ. The high binding affinity, the ease of probe development, and the ability to incorporate multiple and multimodal imaging reporters suggest that RNA aptamers may have complementary and perhaps advantageous properties compared to conventional optical imaging probes and reporters.

  12. Specific binding of DNA to aggregated forms of Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camero, Sergio; Ayuso, Jose M; Barrantes, Alejandro; Benítez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2013-04-01

    Anomalous protein aggregation is closely associated to age-related mental illness. Extraneuronal plaques, mainly composed of aggregated amyloid peptides, are considered as hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, this disease starts as a consequence of an abnormal processing of the amyloid precursor protein resulting in an excess of amyloid peptides. Nuclear localization of amyloid peptide aggregates together with amyloid-DNA interaction, have been repeatedly reported. In this paper we have used surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy to study the structure and behavior of different peptides and proteins, including β-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, histone, casein and the amyloid-β peptides related to Alzheimer's disease Aβ25-35 and Aβ1-40. The main purpose of this study is to investigate whether proneness to DNA interaction is a general property displayed by aggregated forms of proteins, or it is an interaction specifically related to the aggregated forms of those particular proteins and peptides related to neurodegenerative diseases. Our results reveal that those aggregates formed by amyloid peptides show a particular proneness to interact with DNA. They are the only aggregated structures capable of binding DNA, and show more affinity for DNA than for other polyanions like heparin and polyglutamic acid, therefore strengthening the hypothesis that amyloid peptides may, by means of interaction with nuclear DNA, contribute to the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  13. C1q binding and complement activation by prions and amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday; Villiers, Christian L; Marche, Patrice N; Mitchell, Daniel A

    2007-01-01

    C1q binds to many non-self and altered-self-materials. These include microorganisms, immune complexes, apoptotic and necrotic cells and their breakdown products, and amyloids. C1q binding to amyloid fibrils found as extracellular deposits in tissues, and subsequent complement activation are involved in the pathology of several amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. Prion diseases, such as scrapie also involve formation of amyloid by polymerization of the host prion protein (PrP). Complement activation is likely to contribute to neuronal damage in the end stages of prion diseases, but is also thought to participate in the initial infection, dissemination and replication stages. Infectious prion particles are likely to bind C1q and activate the complement system. Bound complement proteins may then influence the uptake and transport of prion particles by dendritic cells (DCs) and their subsequent proliferation at sites such as follicular DCs. PMID:17544820

  14. AMYLOID-β PEPTIDE BINDS TO MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1B (MAP1B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18079022

  15. Autoinhibition of Mint1 adaptor protein regulates amyloid precursor protein binding and processing

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, Maria F.; Xu, Yibin; Dulubova, Irina; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Richardson, John M.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Rizo, Josep; Ho, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Mint adaptor proteins bind to the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and regulate APP processing associated with Alzheimer’s disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying Mint regulation in APP binding and processing remain unclear. Biochemical, biophysical, and cellular experiments now show that the Mint1 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain that binds to APP is intramolecularly inhibited by the adjacent C-terminal linker region. The crystal structure of a C-terminally extended Mint1 PT...

  16. Synthesis of Oxorhenium(V) and Oxotechnetium(V) Complexes That Bind to Amyloid-β Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, David J; White, Jonathan M; McLean, Catriona A; Villemagne, Victor L; Barnham, Kevin J; Donnelly, Paul S

    2016-08-15

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques in the brain. The primary constituents of the plaques are aggregated forms of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. With the goal of preparing technetium-99(m) complexes that bind to Aβ plaques with the potential to be diagnostic imaging agents for Alzheimer's disease, new tetradentate ligands capable of forming neutral and lipophilic complexes with oxotechentium(V) and oxorhenium(V) were prepared. Nonradioactive isotopes of technetium are not available so rhenium was used as a surrogate for exploratory chemistry. Two planar tetradentate N3O ligands were prepared that form charge-neutral complexes with oxorhenium(v) as well as a ligand featuring a styrylpyridyl functional group designed to bind to Aβ plaques. All three ligands formed complexes with oxorhenium(V), and each complex was characterized by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. The oxorhenium(V) complex with a styrylpyridyl functional group binds to Aβ plaques present in post-mortem human brain tissue. The chemistry was extrapolated to technetium-99(m) at the tracer level for two of the ligands. The resulting oxotechnetium(V) complexes were sufficiently lipophilic and charge-neutral to suggest that they have the potential to cross the blood-brain barrier but exhibited modest stability with respect to exchange with histidine. The chemistry presented here identifies a strategy to integrate styrylpyridyl functional groups into tetradentate ligands capable of forming complexes with [M═O](3+) cores (M = Re or Tc).

  17. Preparation of Amyloid Immuno-Nanoparticles as Potential MRI Contrast Agents for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhenyu; Yul, Tingting; Xu, Yun

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia which is caused by accumulation in the brain of plaques made up of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta). Research on nanosized systems indicated that nanoparticles (NPs) could pass across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and improve the visibility of internal body structures in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which made it possible to aid the early diagnosis of AD. In this research study we synthesized magnetite nanoparticles by high-temperature solution-phase reaction, transferred into water based on a ligand exchange process and coated with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic (DMSA). Subsequently, the anti-amyloid Abeta immunomagnetic nanoparticles (IMNPs) were prepared by grafting anti-amyloid antibodies on the surface of the DMSA-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method was introduced to evaluate the IMNPs activity and conjugation amount of antibodies. The biocompatibility of the IMNPs was tested by colony-forming assay. The results showed that the anti-amyloid Abeta IMNPs were biocompatible and biologically active, as well as effective in enhancing MRI solution, indicating that the IMNPs could be used as potential MRI contrast agents and targeted carriers for AD early diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26716196

  18. Stoichiometry and Affinity of Thioflavin T Binding to Sup35p Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulatskaya, Anna I; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Belousov, Mikhail V; Bondarev, Stanislav A; Zhouravleva, Galina A; Turoverov, Konstantin K

    2016-01-01

    In this work two modes of binding of the fluorescent probe thioflavin T to yeast prion protein Sup35p amyloid fibrils were revealed by absorption spectrometry of solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. These binding modes exhibited significant differences in binding affinity and stoichiometry. Moreover, the absorption spectrum and the molar extinction coefficient of the dye bound in each mode were determined. The fluorescence quantum yield of the dye bound in each mode was determined via a spectrofluorimetric study of the same solutions in which the recorded fluorescence intensity was corrected for the primary inner filter effect. As previously predicted, the existence of one of the detected binding modes may be due to the incorporation of the dye into the grooves along the fiber axis perpendicular to the β-sheets of the fibrils. It was assumed that the second type of binding with higher affinity may be due to the existence of ThT binding sites that are localized to areas where amyloid fibrils are clustered.

  19. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  20. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Hernandez-Zimbron

    Full Text Available Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  1. Intravenous immunglobulin binds beta amyloid and modifies its aggregation, neurotoxicity and microglial phagocytosis in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Cattepoel

    Full Text Available Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG has been proposed as a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease (AD and its efficacy is currently being tested in mild-to-moderate AD. Earlier studies reported the presence of anti-amyloid beta (Aβ antibodies in IVIG. These observations led to clinical studies investigating the potential role of IVIG as a therapeutic agent in AD. Also, IVIG is known to mediate beneficial effects in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions by interfering with various pathological processes. Therefore, we investigated the effects of IVIG and purified polyclonal Aβ-specific antibodies (pAbs-Aβ on aggregation, toxicity and phagocytosis of Aβ in vitro, thus elucidating some of the potential mechanisms of action of IVIG in AD patients. We report that both IVIG and pAbs-Aβ specifically bound to Aβ and inhibited its aggregation in a dose-dependent manner as measured by Thioflavin T assay. Additionally, IVIG and the purified pAbs-Aβ inhibited Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line and prevented Aβ binding to rat primary cortical neurons. Interestingly, IVIG and pAbs-Aβ also increased the number of phagocytosing cells as well as the amount of phagocytosed fibrillar Aβ by BV-2 microglia. Phagocytosis of Aβ depended on receptor-mediated endocytosis and was accompanied by upregulation of CD11b expression. Importantly, we could also show that Privigen dose-dependently reversed Aβ-mediated LTP inhibition in mouse hippocampal slices. Therefore, our in vitro results suggest that IVIG may have an impact on different processes involved in AD pathogenesis, thereby promoting further understanding of the effects of IVIG observed in clinical studies.

  2. Zinc-induced interaction of the metal-binding domain of amyloid-β peptide with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmeleva, Svetlana A; Mezentsev, Yuri V; Kozin, Sergey A; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Ivanov, Alexis S; Bodoev, Nikolay V; Makarov, Alexander A; Radko, Sergey P

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of the 16-mer synthetic peptide (Aβ16), which represents the metal-binding domain of the amyloid-β with DNA, was studied employing the surface plasmon resonance technique. It has been shown that Aβ16 binds to the duplex DNA in the presence of zinc ions and thus the metal-binding domain can serve as a zinc-dependent DNA-binding site of the amyloid-β. The interaction of Aβ16 with DNA most probably depends on oligomerization of the peptide and is dominated by interaction with phosphates of the DNA backbone.

  3. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Fibril Binding to Catalase: A Transmission Electron Microscopy and Microplate Study

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    Nathaniel G. N. Milton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The diabetes-associated human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP is a 37-amino-acid peptide that forms fibrils in vitro and in vivo. Human IAPP fibrils are toxic in a similar manner to Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ and prion protein (PrP fibrils. Previous studies have shown that catalase binds to Aβ fibrils and appears to recognize a region containing the Gly-Ala-Ile-Ile sequence that is similar to the Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu sequence found in human IAPP residues 24-27. This study presents a transmission electron microscopy (TEM—based analysis of fibril formation and the binding of human erythrocyte catalase to IAPP fibrils. The results show that human IAPP 1-37, 8-37, and 20-29 peptides form fibrils with diverse and polymorphic structures. All three forms of IAPP bound catalase, and complexes of IAPP 1-37 or 8-37 with catalase were identified by immunoassay. The binding of biotinylated IAPP to catalase was high affinity with a KD of 0.77nM, and could be inhibited by either human or rat IAPP 1-37 and 8-37 forms. Fibrils formed by the PrP 118-135 peptide with a Gly-Ala-Val-Val sequence also bound catalase. These results suggest that catalase recognizes a Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu—like sequence in amyloid fibril-forming peptides. For IAPP 1-37 and 8-37, the catalase binding was primarily directed towards fibrillar rather than ribbon-like structures, suggesting differences in the accessibility of the human IAPP 24-27 Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu region. This suggests that catalase may be able to discriminate between different structural forms of IAPP fibrils. The ability of catalase to bind IAPP, Aβ, and PrP fibrils demonstrates the presence of similar accessible structural motifs that may be targets for antiamyloid therapeutic development.

  4. Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Madhu; Franks, Trent W; Saeidpour, Siavash; Schubeis, Tobias; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Ritter, Christiane; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT. PMID:27147408

  5. A binding-site barrier affects imaging efficiency of high affinity amyloid-reactive peptide radiotracers in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a complex pathology associated with a growing number of diseases including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and myeloma. The distribution and extent of amyloid deposition in body organs establishes the prognosis and can define treatment options; therefore, determining the amyloid load by using non-invasive molecular imaging is clinically important. We have identified a heparin-binding peptide designated p5 that, when radioiodinated, was capable of selectively imaging systemic visceral AA amyloidosis in a murine model of the disease. The p5 peptide was posited to bind effectively to amyloid deposits, relative to similarly charged polybasic heparin-reactive peptides, because it adopted a polar α helix secondary structure. We have now synthesized a variant, p5R, in which the 8 lysine amino acids of p5 have been replaced with arginine residues predisposing the peptide toward the α helical conformation in an effort to enhance the reactivity of the peptide with the amyloid substrate. The p5R peptide had higher affinity for amyloid and visualized AA amyloid in mice by using SPECT/CT imaging; however, the microdistribution, as evidenced in micro-autoradiographs, was dramatically altered relative to the p5 peptide due to its increased affinity and a resultant "binding site barrier" effect. These data suggest that radioiodinated peptide p5R may be optimal for the in vivo detection of discreet, perivascular amyloid, as found in the brain and pancreatic vasculature, by using molecular imaging techniques; however, peptide p5, due to its increased penetration, may yield more quantitative imaging of expansive tissue amyloid deposits.

  6. Inhibition of aggregation of amyloid peptides by beta-sheet breaker peptides and their binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viet, Man Hoang; Ngo, Son Tung; Lam, Nguyen Sy; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-06-01

    The effects of beta-sheet breaker peptides KLVFF and LPFFD on the oligomerization of amyloid peptides were studied by all-atom simulations. It was found that LPFFD interferes the aggregation of Aβ(16-22) peptides to a greater extent than does KLVFF. Using the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we found that the former binds more strongly to Aβ(16-22). Therefore, by simulations, we have clarified the relationship between aggregation rates and binding affinity: the stronger the ligand binding, the slower the oligomerization process. The binding affinity of pentapeptides to full-length peptide Aβ(1-40) and its mature fibrils has been considered using the Autodock and MM-PBSA methods. The hydrophobic interaction between ligands and receptors plays a more important role for association than does hydrogen bonding. The influence of beta-sheet breaker peptides on the secondary structures of monomer Aβ(1-40) was studied in detail, and it turns out that, in their presence, the total beta-sheet content can be enhanced. However, the aggregation can be slowed because the beta-content is reduced in fibril-prone regions. Both pentapeptides strongly bind to monomer Aβ(1-40), as well as to mature fibrils, but KLVFF displays a lower binding affinity than LPFFD. Our findings are in accord with earlier experiments that both of these peptides can serve as prominent inhibitors. In addition, we predict that LPFFD inhibits/degrades the fibrillogenesis of full-length amyloid peptides better than KLVFF. This is probably related to a difference in their total hydrophobicities in that the higher the hydrophobicity, the lower the inhibitory capacity. The GROMOS96 43a1 force field with explicit water and the force field proposed by Morris et al. (Morris et al. J. Comput. Chem. 1998, 19, 1639 ) were employed for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and Autodock experiments, respectively. PMID:21563780

  7. Local atomic structure and oxidation processes of Cu(I) binding site in amyloid beta peptide: XAS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremennaya, M. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Stretsov, V. A.; Soldatov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    There are two different motifs of X-ray absorption spectra for Cu(I) K-edge in amyloid-β peptide which could be due to two different configurations of local Cu(I) environment. Two or three histidine ligands can coordinate copper ion in varying conformations. On the other hand, oxidation of amyloid-β peptide could play an additional role in local copper environment. In order to explore the peculiarities of local atomic and electronic structure of Cu(I) binding sites in amyloid-β peptide the x-ray absorption spectra were simulated for various Cu(I) environments including oxidized amyloid-β and compared with experimental data.

  8. Binding affinity of amyloid oligomers to cellular membranes is a generic indicator of cellular dysfunction in protein misfolding diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Elisa; Cascella, Roberta; Becatti, Matteo; Marrazza, Giovanna; Dobson, Christopher M.; Chiti, Fabrizio; Stefani, Massimo; Cecchi, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of peptides or proteins from their soluble native states into intractable amyloid deposits is associated with a wide range of human disorders. Misfolded protein oligomers formed during the process of aggregation have been identified as the primary pathogenic agents in many such conditions. Here, we show the existence of a quantitative relationship between the degree of binding to neuronal cells of different types of oligomers formed from a model protein, HypF-N, and the GM1 content of the plasma membranes. In addition, remarkably similar behavior is observed for oligomers of the Aβ42 peptide associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Further analysis has revealed the existence of a linear correlation between the level of the influx of Ca2+ across neuronal membranes that triggers cellular damage, and the fraction of oligomeric species bound to the membrane. Our findings indicate that the susceptibility of neuronal cells to different types of misfolded oligomeric assemblies is directly related to the extent of binding of such oligomers to the cellular membrane. PMID:27619987

  9. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloid-β fibril models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  10. Binding of an oxindole alkaloid from Uncaria tomentosa to amyloid protein (Abeta1-40).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frackowiak, Teresa; Baczek, Tomasz; Roman, Kaliszana; Zbikowska, Beata; Gleńsk, Michał; Fecka, Izabela; Cisowski, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    The primary aim of this work was to determine the interactions of an oxindole alkaloid (mitraphylline) isolated from Uncaria tomentosa with beta-amyloid 1-40 (Abeta1-40 protein) applying the capillary electrophoresis (CE) method. Specifically the Hummel-Dreyer method and Scatchard analysis were performed to study the binding of oxindole alkaloids with Abeta1-40 protein. Prior to these studies extraction of the alkaloid of interest was carried out. Identification of the isolated alkaloid was performed by the use of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The proposed approach was proved to be an efficient and accurate method for specific compound isolation and identification purposes. Moreover, analytical information from the CE approach can be considered as the valuable tool for binding constant determination. The binding constant of mitraphylline with Abeta1-40 protein determined by the Hummel-Dreyer method and Scatchard analysis equals K = 9.95 x 10(5) M(-1). The results obtained showed the significant binding of the tested compound with Abeta1-40 protein. These results are discussed and interpreted in the view of developing a strategy for identification of novel compounds of great importance in Alzheimer disease therapy.

  11. Comparison of the binding characteristics of [{sup 18}F]THK-523 and other amyloid imaging tracers to Alzheimer's disease pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Ryuichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Yanai, Kazuhiko [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Furumoto, Shozo [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tago, Tetsuro; Iwata, Ren [Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Maruyama, Masahiro; Higuchi, Makoto [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Arai, Hiroyuki [Tohoku University, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Sendai (Japan); Kudo, Yukitsuka [Tohoku University, Innovation of New Biomedical Engineering Center, Sendai (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Extensive deposition of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although several PET imaging agents have been developed for in vivo detection of senile plaques, no PET probe is currently available for selective detection of neurofibrillary tangles in the living human brain. Recently, [{sup 18}F]THK-523 was developed as a potential in vivo imaging probe for tau pathology. The purpose of this study was to compare the binding properties of [{sup 18}F]THK-523 and other amyloid imaging agents, including PiB, BF-227 and FDDNP, to synthetic protein fibrils and human brain tissue. In vitro radioligand binding assays were conducted using synthetic amyloid {beta}{sub 42} and K18{Delta}K280-tau fibrils. Nonspecific binding was determined by the addition of unlabelled compounds at a concentration of 2 {mu}M. To examine radioligand binding to neuropathological lesions, in vitro autoradiography was conducted using sections of AD brain. [{sup 18}F]THK-523 showed higher affinity for tau fibrils than for A{beta} fibrils, whereas the other probes showed a higher affinity for A{beta} fibrils. The autoradiographic analysis indicated that [{sup 18}F]THK-523 accumulated in the regions containing a high density of tau protein deposits. Conversely, PiB and BF-227 accumulated in the regions containing a high density of A{beta} plaques. These findings suggest that the unique binding profile of [{sup 18}F]THK-523 can be used to identify tau deposits in AD brain. (orig.)

  12. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein and serum amyloid A secretion by human intestinal epithelial cells during the acute phase response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreugdenhil, A C; Dentener, M A; Snoek, A M; Greve, J W; Buurman, W A

    1999-09-01

    The acute phase proteins LPS binding protein (LBP) and serum amyloid A (SAA) are produced by the liver and are present in the circulation. Both proteins have been shown to participate in the immune response to endotoxins. The intestinal mucosa forms a large surface that is continuously exposed to these microbial products. By secretion of antimicrobial and immunomodulating agents, the intestinal epithelium contributes to the defense against bacteria and their products. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of the inflammatory mediators TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-1beta on the release of LBP and SAA by intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). In addition, the induction of LBP and SAA release by cell lines of intestinal epithelial cells and hepatic cells was compared. The data obtained show that in addition to liver cells, IEC also expressed LBP mRNA and released bioactive LBP and SAA upon stimulation. Regulation of LBP and SAA release by IEC and hepatocytes was typical for class 1 acute phase proteins, although differences in regulation between the cell types were observed. Endotoxin did not induce LBP and SAA release. Glucocorticoids were demonstrated to strongly enhance the cytokine-induced release of LBP and SAA by IEC, corresponding to hepatocytes. The data from this study, which imply that human IEC can produce LBP and SAA, suggest a role for these proteins in the local defense mechanism of the gut to endotoxin. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that tissues other than the liver are involved in the acute phase response.

  13. Transmissible amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjernberg, L O; Rising, A; Johansson, J; Jaudzems, K; Westermark, P

    2016-08-01

    There are around 30 human diseases associated with protein misfolding and amyloid formation, each one caused by a certain protein or peptide. Many of these diseases are lethal and together they pose an enormous burden to society. The prion protein has attracted particular interest as being shown to be the pathogenic agent in transmissible diseases such as kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Whether similar transmission could occur also in other amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and serum amyloid A amyloidosis is a matter of intense research and debate. Furthermore, it has been suggested that novel biomaterials such as artificial spider silk are potentially amyloidogenic. Here, we provide a brief introduction to amyloid, prions and other proteins involved in amyloid disease and review recent evidence for their potential transmission. We discuss the similarities and differences between amyloid and silk, as well as the potential hazards associated with protein-based biomaterials. PMID:27002185

  14. Amyloid Plaques in PSAPP Mice Bind Less Metal than Plaques in Human Alzheimer's Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leskovjan, A.; Lanzirotti, A; Miller, L

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid beta (A{Beta}) is the primary component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) plaques, a key pathological feature of the disease. Metal ions of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and calcium (Ca) are elevated in human amyloid plaques and are thought to be involved in neurodegeneration. Transgenic mouse models of AD also exhibit amyloid plaques, but fail to exhibit the high degree of neurodegeneration observed in humans. In this study, we imaged the Zn, Cu, Fe, and Ca ion distribution in the PSAPP transgenic mouse model representing end-stage AD (N = 6) using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe. In order to account for differences in density in the plaques, the relative protein content was imaged with synchrotron Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) on the same samples. FTIRM results revealed a 61% increase in protein content in the plaques compared to the surrounding tissue. After normalizing to protein density, we found that the PSAPP plaques contained only a 29% increase in Zn and there was actually less Cu, Fe, and Ca in the plaque compared to the surrounding tissue. Since metal binding to A{beta} is thought to induce redox chemistry that is toxic to neurons, the reduced metal binding in PSAPP mice is consistent with the lack of neurodegeneration in these animals. These findings were in stark contrast to the high metal ion content observed in human AD plaques, further implicating the role of metal ions in human AD pathology.

  15. Small molecule agents that target amyloid-β aggregation in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Michael Roy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and currently there is no cure. AD is characterized by the formation of two pathological hallmarks; aggregated forms of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide called Aβ plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins, called neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Aβ is enzymatically cleaved from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) to afford a 38-43 amino acid residue peptide with Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 being the most common. Plaque deposits have been shown to ...

  16. In Silico and in Vitro Study of Binding Affinity of Tripeptides to Amyloid β Fibrils: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viet, Man Hoang; Siposova, Katarina; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea; Nguyen, Truc Trang; Gazova, Zuzana; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-23

    Self-assembly of Aβ peptides into amyloid aggregates has been suggested as the major cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nowadays, there is no medication for AD, but experimental data indicate that reversion of the process of amyloid aggregation reduces the symptoms of disease. In this paper, all 8000 tripeptides were studied for their ability to destroy Aβ fibrils. The docking method and the more sophisticated MM-PBSA (molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area) method were employed to calculate the binding affinity and mode of tripeptides to Aβ fibrils. The ability of these peptides to depolymerize Aβ fibrils was also investigated experimentally using atomic force microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy (Thioflavin T assay). It was shown that tripeptides prefer to bind to hydrophobic regions of 6Aβ9-40 fibrils. Tripeptides WWW, WWP, WPW and PWW were found to be the most potent binders. In vitro experiments showed that tight-binding tripeptides have significant depolymerizing activities and their DC50 values determined from dose-response curves were in micromolar range. The ability of nonbinding (GAM, AAM) and weak-binding (IVL and VLA) tripeptides to destroy Aβ fibrils was negligible. In vitro data of tripeptide depolymerizing activities support the predictions obtained by molecular docking and all-atom simulation methods. Our results suggest that presence of multiple complexes of heterocycles forming by tryptophan and proline residues in tripeptides is crucial for their tight binding to Aβ fibrils as well as for extensive fibril depolymerization. We recommend PWW for further studies as it has the lowest experimental binding constant. PMID:25815792

  17. Binding of anti-prion agents to glycosaminoglycans: Evidence from electronic absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polyanionic glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are intimately involved in the pathogenesis of protein conformational disorders such as amyloidosis and prion diseases. Several cationic agents are known to exhibit anti-prion activity but their mechanism of action is poorly understood. In this study, UV absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the interaction between heparin and chondroitin-6-sulfate and anti-prion drugs including acridine, quinoline, and phenothiazine derivatives. UV band hypochromism of (±)-quinacrine, (±)-primaquine, tacrine, quinidine, chlorpromazine, and induced CD spectra of (±)-quinacrine upon addition of GAGs provided evidence for the GAG binding of these compounds. The association constants (∼106-107 M-1) estimated from the UV titration curves show high-affinity drug-heparin interactions. Ionic strength-dependence of the absorption spectra suggested that the interaction between GAGs and the cationic drugs is principally electrostatic in nature. Drug binding differences of heparin and chondroitin-6-sulfate were attributed to their different negative charge density. These results call the attention to the alteration of GAG-prion/GAG-amyloid interactions by which these compounds might exert their anti-prion/anti-amyloidogenic activities

  18. Serum amyloid A binds specific extracellular matrix glycoproteins and induces the adhesion of resting CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado-Patt, L; Hershkoviz, R; Fridkin, M; Lider, O

    1996-02-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA), a prototypic acute phase protein reactant, exists naturally in the serum of healthy individuals. However, the levels of SAA in serum and its presence in sites of inflammation increase during certain chronic diseases associated with a local elevation of cytokine concentrations. Although the chemical structure of SAA is defined, its putative immunologic role(s) is still obscure. Nevertheless, it has been shown that 1) SAA acts as a chemoattractant and regulator of the migration of monocytes, polymorphonuclear cells, and T lymphocytes through endothelial cell monolayers; and 2) SAA and its proteolytically degraded N-terminal amyloid A fragment contain an extracellular matrix (ECM)-related cell adhesion epitopes. Herein, we examined whether SAA can associate with specific ECM moieties, and whether immobilized SAA-ECM complexes affect T lymphocyte adhesion. Radiolabeled human rSAA ([125I]rSAA) interacted avidly (Kd = 10(-9) M) and transiently with intact ECM, laminin, and vitronectin, but not with fibronectin or collagen type II. The binding of [125I]rSAA to ECM and laminin was inhibited by unlabeled rSAA and by the AA fragment, but not by the C-terminal portion of SAA (amino acid residues 2-82 and 77-104, respectively). Upon interactions with SAA or amyloid A, immobilized ECM, laminin, and vitronectin induced the adhesion of resting human CD4+ T cells in an apparently beta 1-integrin-mediated manner. Thus, the ECM appears to serve as a temporary anchorage site for SAA and amyloid A, and these ECM-complexed molecules seem to be involved in regulating the recruitment and accumulation of immunocytes in extravascular inflammatory compartments. PMID:8557997

  19. Microtubule-binding agents: a dynamic field of cancer therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Dumontet, Charles; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    International audience Microtubules are dynamic filamentous cytoskeletal proteins composed of tubulin and are an important therapeutic target in tumour cells. Agents that bind to microtubules have been part of the pharmacopoeia of anticancer therapy for decades and until the advent of targeted therapy, microtubules were the only alternative to DNA as a therapeutic target in cancer. The screening of a range of botanical species and marine organisms has yielded promising new antitubulin agen...

  20. Alternate Energy Sources for Thermalplastic Binding Agent Consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, B.J.

    1999-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate microwave and electron beam technologies as alternate energy sources to consolidate fiber coated with a thermoplastic binding agent into preforms for composite molding applications. Bench experiments showed that both microwave and electron beam energy can produce heat sufficient to melt and consolidate a thermoplastic binding agent applied to fiberglass mat, and several two- and three-dimensional fiberglass preforms were produced with each method. In both cases, it is postulated that the heating was accomplished by the effective interaction of the microwave or electron beam energy with the combination of the mat preform and the tooling used to shape the preform. Both methods contrast with conventional thermal energy applied via infrared heaters or from a heated tool in which the heat to melt the thermoplastic binding agent must diffuse over time from the outer surface of the preform toward its center under a thermal gradient. For these reasons, the microwave and electron beam energy techniques have the potential to rapidly consolidate thick fiber preforms more efficiently than the thermal process. With further development, both technologies have the potential to make preform production more cost effective by decreasing cycle time in the preform tool, reducing energy costs, and by enabling the use of less expensive tooling materials. Descriptions of the microwave and electron beam consolidation experiments and a summary of the results are presented in this report.

  1. Preclinical studies of potential amyloid binding PET/SPECT ligands in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visualizing the neuropathological hallmarks amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer's disease in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography will be of great value in diagnosing the individual patient and will also help in our understanding of the disease. The successful introduction of [11C]PIB as a PET tracer for the amyloid plaques less than 10 years ago started an intensive research, and numerous new compounds for use in molecular imaging of the amyloid plaques have been developed. The candidates are based on dyes like thioflavin T, Congo red and chrysamine G, but also on other types such as benzoxazoles, curcumin and stilbenes. In the present review, we present methods of the radiochemistry and preclinical evaluation as well as the main properties of some of these compounds.

  2. Structural Studies of the Alzheimer's Amyloid Precursor Protein Copper-Binding Domain Reveal How It Binds Copper Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, G.K.-W.; Adams, J.J.; Harris, H.H.; Boas, J.F.; Curtain, C.C.; Galatis, D.; Master, C.L.; Barnham, K.J.; McKinstry, W.J.; Cappai, R.; Parker, M.W.; /Sydney U.

    2007-07-09

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia. Amyloid {beta} peptide (A {beta}), generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is central to AD pathogenesis. APP can function as a metalloprotein and modulate copper (Cu) transport, presumably via its extracellular Cu-binding domain (CuBD). Cu binding to the CuBD reduces A{beta} levels, suggesting that a Cu mimetic may have therapeutic potential. We describe here the atomic structures of apo CuBD from three crystal forms and found they have identical Cu-binding sites despite the different crystal lattices. The structure of Cu[2+]-bound CuBD reveals that the metal ligands are His147, His151, Tyrl68 and two water molecules, which are arranged in a square pyramidal geometry. The site resembles a Type 2 non-blue Cu center and is supported by electron paramagnetic resonance and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies. A previous study suggested that Met170 might be a ligand but we suggest that this residue plays a critical role as an electron donor in CuBDs ability to reduce Cu ions. The structure of Cu[+]-bound CuBD is almost identical to the Cu[2+]-bound structure except for the loss of one of the water ligands. The geometry of the site is unfavorable for Cu[+], thus providing a mechanism by which CuBD could readily transfer Cu ions to other proteins.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the copper-binding domain of the amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer’s disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of Cu2+ ions to the copper-binding domain of the amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer’s disease reduces the production of the amyloid β peptide, which is centrally involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Structural studies of the copper-binding domain will provide a basis for structure-based drug design that might prove useful in treating this devastating disease. Alzheimer’s disease is thought to be triggered by production of the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide through proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). The binding of Cu2+ to the copper-binding domain (CuBD) of APP reduces the production of Aβ in cell-culture and animal studies. It is expected that structural studies of the CuBD will lead to a better understanding of how copper binding causes Aβ depletion and will define a potential drug target. The crystallization of CuBD in two different forms suitable for structure determination is reported here

  4. PEGylated nanoparticles bind to and alter amyloid-beta peptide conformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brambilla, Davide; Verpillot, Romain; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin;

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aß(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs...

  5. NMR WaterLOGSY Reveals Weak Binding of Bisphenol A with Amyloid Fibers of a Conserved 11 Residue Peptide from Androgen Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asencio-Hernández, Julia; Kieffer, Bruno; Delsuc, Marc-André

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that bisphenol A (BPA), a molecule largely released in the environment, has detrimental effects on ecosystems and on human health. It acts as an endocrine disruptor targeting steroid hormone receptors, such as the estrogen receptor (ER), estrogen-related receptor (ERR) and androgen receptor (AR). BPA-derived molecules have recently been shown to interact with the AR N-terminal domain (AR-NTD), which is known to be largely intrinsically disordered. This N-terminal domain contains an 11 residue conserved domain that forms amyloid fibers upon oxidative dimerisation through its strictly conserved Cys240 residue. We investigate here the interaction of BPA, and other potential endocrine disruptors, with AR-NTD amyloid fibers using the WaterLOGSY NMR experiment. We observed a selective binding of these compounds to the amyloid fibers formed by the AR-NTD conserved region and glutamine homopolymers. This observation suggests that the high potency of endocrine disruptors may result, in part, from their ability to bind amyloid forms of nuclear receptors in addition to their cognate binding sites. This property may be exploited to design future therapeutic strategies targeting AR related diseases such as the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy or prostate cancer. The ability of NMR WaterLOGSY experiments to detect weak interactions between small ligands and amyloid fibers may prove to be of particular interest for identifying promising hit molecules. PMID:27583469

  6. NMR WaterLOGSY Reveals Weak Binding of Bisphenol A with Amyloid Fibers of a Conserved 11 Residue Peptide from Androgen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asencio-Hernández, Julia; Kieffer, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that bisphenol A (BPA), a molecule largely released in the environment, has detrimental effects on ecosystems and on human health. It acts as an endocrine disruptor targeting steroid hormone receptors, such as the estrogen receptor (ER), estrogen-related receptor (ERR) and androgen receptor (AR). BPA-derived molecules have recently been shown to interact with the AR N-terminal domain (AR-NTD), which is known to be largely intrinsically disordered. This N-terminal domain contains an 11 residue conserved domain that forms amyloid fibers upon oxidative dimerisation through its strictly conserved Cys240 residue. We investigate here the interaction of BPA, and other potential endocrine disruptors, with AR-NTD amyloid fibers using the WaterLOGSY NMR experiment. We observed a selective binding of these compounds to the amyloid fibers formed by the AR-NTD conserved region and glutamine homopolymers. This observation suggests that the high potency of endocrine disruptors may result, in part, from their ability to bind amyloid forms of nuclear receptors in addition to their cognate binding sites. This property may be exploited to design future therapeutic strategies targeting AR related diseases such as the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy or prostate cancer. The ability of NMR WaterLOGSY experiments to detect weak interactions between small ligands and amyloid fibers may prove to be of particular interest for identifying promising hit molecules. PMID:27583469

  7. Studies on folate binding and a radioassay for serum and whole blood folate using goat milk as binding agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparations of cow, goat, buffalo, and human milk in addition to pig plasma were tested for folate binding properties. Of these, only pig plasma and goat milk showed sufficient binding to enable use as binding agents in a radioassay for serum and whole blood folate. The binding of folate by cow mild preparations in particular was found to be very poor. (orig.)

  8. Apolipoprotein E LDL receptor-binding domain-containing high-density lipoprotein: a nanovehicle to transport curcumin, an antioxidant and anti-amyloid bioflavonoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumsupan, Panupon; Ramirez, Ricardo; Khumsupan, Darin; Narayanaswami, Vasanthy

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory bioflavonoid that has been recently identified as an anti-amyloid agent as well. To make it more available in its potent form as a potential amyloid disaggregation agent, we employed high-density lipoproteins (HDL), which are lipid-protein complexes that transport plasma cholesterol, to transport curcumin. The objective of this study was to employ reconstituted HDL containing human apoE3 N-terminal (NT) domain, as a vehicle to transport curcumin. The NT domain serves as a ligand to mediate binding and uptake of lipoprotein complexes via the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) family of proteins located at the cell surface. Reconstituted HDL was prepared with phospholipids and recombinant apoE3-NT domain in the absence or presence of curcumin. Non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the molecular mass and Stokes' diameter of HDL bearing curcumin were ~670kDa and ~17nm, respectively, while electron microscopy revealed the presence of discoidal particles. Fluorescence emission spectra of HDL bearing (the intrinsically fluorescent) curcumin indicated that the wavelength of maximal fluorescence emission (λ(max)) of curcumin was ~495nm, which is highly blue-shifted compared to λ(max) of curcumin in solvents of varying polarity (λ(max) ranging from 515-575nm) or in aqueous buffers. In addition, an enormous enhancement in fluorescence emission intensity was noted in curcumin-containing HDL compared to curcumin in aqueous buffers. Curcumin fluorescence emission was quenched to a significant extent by lipid-based quenchers but not by aqueous quenchers. These observations indicate that curcumin has partitioned efficiently into the hydrophobic milieu of the phospholipid bilayer of HDL. Functional assays indicated that the LDLr-binding ability of curcumin-containing HDL with apoE3-NT is similar to that of HDL without curcumin. Taken together, we report that apoE-containing HDL has a tremendous

  9. Binding of complement proteins C1q and C4bp to serum amyloid P component (SAP) in solid contra liquid phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Inge Juul; Nielsen, EH; Andersen, Ove;

    1996-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP), a member of the conserved pentraxin family of plasma proteins, binds calcium dependently to its ligands. The authors investigated SAPs interaction with the complement proteins C4b binding protein (C4bp) and C1q by ELISA, immunoelectrophoresis and electron microscopy...... affinity, did not interfere with the subsequent binding of C4bp or C1q to SAP. In contrast, collagen I and IV showed partial competition with the binding of C1q to SAP. Using fresh serum, immobilized native SAP bound C4bp whereas binding of C1q/C1 could not be demonstrated. Altogether the results indicate...

  10. Calcium binding to beta-2-microglobulin at physiological pH drives the occurrence of conformational changes which cause the protein to precipitate into amorphous forms that subsequently transform into amyloid aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhdeep Kumar

    Full Text Available Using spectroscopic, calorimetric and microscopic methods, we demonstrate that calcium binds to beta-2-microglobulin (β2m under physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength, in biological buffers, causing a conformational change associated with the binding of up to four calcium atoms per β2m molecule, with a marked transformation of some random coil structure into beta sheet structure, and culminating in the aggregation of the protein at physiological (serum concentrations of calcium and β2m. We draw attention to the fact that the sequence of β2m contains several potential calcium-binding motifs of the DXD and DXDXD (or DXEXD varieties. We establish (a that the microscopic aggregation seen at physiological concentrations of β2m and calcium turns into actual turbidity and visible precipitation at higher concentrations of protein and β2m, (b that this initial aggregation/precipitation leads to the formation of amorphous aggregates, (c that the formation of the amorphous aggregates can be partially reversed through the addition of the divalent ion chelating agent, EDTA, and (d that upon incubation for a few weeks, the amorphous aggregates appear to support the formation of amyloid aggregates that bind to the dye, thioflavin T (ThT, resulting in increase in the dye's fluorescence. We speculate that β2m exists in the form of microscopic aggregates in vivo and that these don't progress to form larger amyloid aggregates because protein concentrations remain low under normal conditions of kidney function and β2m degradation. However, when kidney function is compromised and especially when dialysis is performed, β2m concentrations probably transiently rise to yield large aggregates that deposit in bone joints and transform into amyloids during dialysis related amyloidosis.

  11. MMPBSA decomposition of the binding energy throughout a molecular dynamics simulation of amyloid-beta (Abeta(10-35)) aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanera, Josep M; Pouplana, Ramon

    2010-04-15

    Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides indicate that the formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The toxicity of Abeta oligomers depend on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. However, a detailed knowledge of the structure of at the atomic level has not been achieved yet due to limitations of current experimental techniques. In this study, replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify the expected diversity of dimer conformations of Abeta(10-35) monomers. The most representative dimer conformation has been used to track the dimer formation process between both monomers. The process has been characterized by means of the evolution of the decomposition of the binding free energy, which provides an energetic profile of the interaction. Dimers undergo a process of reorganization driven basically by inter-chain hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions and also solvation/desolvation processes.

  12. MMPBSA Decomposition of the Binding Energy throughout a Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Amyloid-Beta (Aß10−35 Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Campanera

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Aβ peptides indicate that the formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. The toxicity of Aβ oligomers depend on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. However, a detailed knowledge of the structure of at the atomic level has not been achieved yet due to limitations of current experimental techniques. In this study, replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify the expected diversity of dimer conformations of Aβ10−35 monomers. The most representative dimer conformation has been used to track the dimer formation process between both monomers. The process has been characterized by means of the evolution of the decomposition of the binding free energy, which provides an energetic profile of the interaction. Dimers undergo a process of reorganization driven basically by inter-chain hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions and also solvation/desolvation processes.

  13. Effects of structural modifications on the metal binding, anti-amyloid activity, and cholinesterase inhibitory activity of chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosso, Marina Y; LeVine, Harry; Green, Keith D; Tsodikov, Oleg V; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-09-28

    As the number of individuals affected with Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases and the availability of drugs for AD treatment remains limited, the need to develop effective therapeutics for AD becomes more and more pressing. Strategies currently pursued include inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and targeting amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides and metal-Aβ complexes. This work presents the design, synthesis, and biochemical evaluation of a series of chalcones, and assesses the relationship between their structures and their ability to bind metal ions and/or Aβ species, and inhibit AChE/BChE activity. Several chalcones were found to exhibit potent disaggregation of pre-formed N-biotinyl Aβ1-42 (bioAβ42) aggregates in vitro in the absence and presence of Cu(2+)/Zn(2+), while others were effective at inhibiting the action of AChE.

  14. Sorting by the cytoplasmic domain of the amyloid precursor protein binding receptor SorLA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten S; Gustafsen, Camilla; Madsen, Peder;

    2007-01-01

    -formation with the amyloid precursor protein it downregulates generation of Alzheimer's disease-associated Abeta-peptide. The receptor is mainly located in vesicles, suggesting a function in protein sorting and transport. Here we examined SorLA's trafficking using full-length and chimeric receptors and find that its...... established that the AP-1 adaptor complex is essential to SorLA's transport between Golgi membranes and endosomes. Our results further implicate the GGA proteins in SorLA trafficking and provide evidence that SNX1 and Vps35, as parts of the retromer complex or possibly in a separate context, are engaged...

  15. Molecular modeling on Zn(Ⅱ) binding modes of Alzheimer's amyloid β-peptide in insoluble aggregates and soluble complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Daxiong; YANG Pin

    2004-01-01

    Aggregation of the amyloid β-peptide (A β) into insoluble fibrils is a key pathological event in Alzheimer's disease. Zn(Ⅱ) ion induces significant Aβ aggregation at nearly physiological concentrations in vitro. In order to explore the induce mechanism, the possible binding modes of Zn(Ⅱ) in Aβ peptide are studied by molecular modeling method. First, the Aβ species containing 1,2,4 and 12 peptides are established respectively. And next a Zn(Ⅱ) ion is manually hold the different sits of the Aβ species based on the experimental data and subsequently the coordinate atom and number are assigned. Finally, the optimum binding site is found by the system energy minimization. Modeling results show that in soluble Zn(Ⅱ) complex, Nτ of imidazole ring of His14, O of carbonyl of main-chain, and two O of water occupy the four ligand positions of the tetrahedral complex; in the aggregation of Aβ, the His13(Nτ)-Zn(Ⅱ)-His14(Nτ)bridges are formed by Zn(Ⅱ) cross-linking action. Therefore, the possible Zn(Ⅱ) binding mode obtained by the studies will be helpful to reveal the form mechanism of pathogenic aggregates in brain.

  16. The Structure of the Amyloid-[beta] Peptide High-Affinity Copper II Binding Site in Alzheimer Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streltsov, Victor A.; Titmuss, Stephen J.; Epa, V. Chandana; Barnham, Kevin J.; Masters, Colin L.; Varghese, Joseph N. (CSIRO/MHT)

    2008-11-03

    Neurodegeneration observed in Alzheimer disease (AD) is believed to be related to the toxicity from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the brain by the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) protein bound primarily to copper ions. The evidence for an oxidative stress role of A{beta}-Cu redox chemistry is still incomplete. Details of the copper binding site in A{beta} may be critical to the etiology of AD. Here we present the structure determined by combining x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory analysis of A{beta} peptides complexed with Cu{sup 2+} in solution under a range of buffer conditions. Phosphate-buffered saline buffer salt (NaCl) concentration does not affect the high-affinity copper binding mode but alters the second coordination sphere. The XAS spectra for truncated and full-length A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} peptides are similar. The novel distorted six-coordinated (3N3O) geometry around copper in the A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} complexes include three histidines: glutamic, or/and aspartic acid, and axial water. The structure of the high-affinity Cu{sup 2+} binding site is consistent with the hypothesis that the redox activity of the metal ion bound to A{beta} can lead to the formation of dityrosine-linked dimers found in AD.

  17. [Effect of mutations and modifications of amino acid residues on zinc-induced interaction of the metal-binding domain of β-amyloid with DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmeleva, S A; Mezentsev, Y V; Kozin, S A; Mitkevich, V A; Medvedev, A E; Ivanov, A S; Bodoev, N V; Makarov, A A; Radko, S P

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of intranuclear β-amyloid with DNA is considered to be a plausible mechanism of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. The interaction of single- and double-stranded DNA with synthetic peptides was analyzed using surface plasmon resonance. The peptides represent the metal-binding domain of β-amyloid (amino acids 1-16) and its variants with chemical modifications and point substitutions of amino acid residues which are associated with enhanced neurotoxicity of β-amyloid in cell tests. It has been shown that the presence of zinc ions is necessary for the interaction of the peptides with DNA in solution. H6R substitution has remarkably reduced the ability of domain 1-16 to bind DNA. This is in accordance with the supposition that the coordination of a zinc ion by amino acid residues His6, Glu11, His13, and His14 of the β-amyloid metal-binding domain results in the occurrence of an anion-binding site responsible for the interaction of the domain with DNA. Zinc-induced dimerization and oligomerization of domain 1-16 associated with phosphorylation of Ser8 and the presence of unblocked amino- and carboxy-terminal groups have resulted in a decrease of peptide concentrations required for detection of the peptide-DNA interaction. The presence of multiple anion-binding sites on the dimers and oligomers is responsible for the enhancement of the peptide-DNA interaction. A substitution of the negatively charged residue Asp7 for the neutral residue Asn in close proximity to the anion-binding site of the domain 1-16 of Aβ facilitates the electrostatic interaction between this site and phosphates of a polynucleotide chain, which enhances zinc-induced binding to DNA.

  18. Divalent cation tolerance protein binds to β-secretase and inhibits the processing of amyloid precursor protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Runzhong Liu; Haibo Hou; Xuelian Yi; Shanwen Wu; Huan Zeng

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid-beta is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-beta is derived from amyloid precursor protein through sequential proteolytic cleavages by β-secretase (beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1) and γ-secretase. To further elucidate the roles of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 in the development of Alzheimer's disease, a yeast two-hybrid system was used to screen a human embryonic brain cDNA library for proteins directly interacting with the intracellular domain of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1. A potential beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1- interacting protein identified from the positive clones was divalent cation tolerance protein. Immunoprecipitation studies in the neuroblastoma cell line N2a showed that exogenous divalent cation tolerance protein interacts with endogenous beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1. The overexpression of divalent cation tolerance protein did not affect beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 protein levels, but led to increased amyloid precursor protein levels in N2a/APP695 cells, with a concomitant reduction in the processing product amyloid precursor protein C-terminal fragment, indicating that divalent cation tolerance protein inhibits the processing of amyloid precursor protein. Our experimental findings suggest that divalent cation tolerance protein negatively regulates the function of beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1. Thus, divalent cation tolerance protein could play a protective role in Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Carbohydrate-Binding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Laure; Oliveira, Catarina; Fournier, Carole; Descamps, Véronique; Morel, Virginie; Dubuisson, Jean; Brochot, Etienne; Francois, Catherine; Castelain, Sandrine; Duverlie, Gilles; Helle, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs), including natural lectins, are more and more considered as broad-spectrum antivirals. These molecules are able to directly inhibit many viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus through binding to envelope protein N-glycans. In the case of HIV, it has been shown that CBAs select for mutant viruses with N-glycosylation site deletions which are more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. In this study we aimed at evaluating the HCV resistance to CBAs in vitro. HCV was cultivated in the presence of increasing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Cyanovirin-N, Concanavalin-A or Griffithsin concentrations, during more than eight weeks. At the end of lectin exposure, the genome of the isolated strains was sequenced and several potential resistance mutations in the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were identified. The effect of these mutations on viral fitness as well as on sensitivity to inhibition by lectins, soluble CD81 or the 3/11 neutralizing antibody was assessed. Surprisingly, none of these mutations, alone or in combination, conferred resistance to CBAs. In contrast, we observed that some mutants were more sensitive to 3/11 or CD81-LEL inhibition. Additionally, several mutations were identified in the Core and the non-structural proteins. Thus, our results suggest that in contrast to HIV, HCV resistance to CBAs is not directly conferred by mutations in the envelope protein genes but could occur through an indirect mechanism involving mutations in other viral proteins. Further investigations are needed to completely elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26871442

  20. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Carbohydrate-Binding Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Izquierdo

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs, including natural lectins, are more and more considered as broad-spectrum antivirals. These molecules are able to directly inhibit many viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, Hepatitis C Virus (HCV, Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus through binding to envelope protein N-glycans. In the case of HIV, it has been shown that CBAs select for mutant viruses with N-glycosylation site deletions which are more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. In this study we aimed at evaluating the HCV resistance to CBAs in vitro. HCV was cultivated in the presence of increasing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA, Cyanovirin-N, Concanavalin-A or Griffithsin concentrations, during more than eight weeks. At the end of lectin exposure, the genome of the isolated strains was sequenced and several potential resistance mutations in the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were identified. The effect of these mutations on viral fitness as well as on sensitivity to inhibition by lectins, soluble CD81 or the 3/11 neutralizing antibody was assessed. Surprisingly, none of these mutations, alone or in combination, conferred resistance to CBAs. In contrast, we observed that some mutants were more sensitive to 3/11 or CD81-LEL inhibition. Additionally, several mutations were identified in the Core and the non-structural proteins. Thus, our results suggest that in contrast to HIV, HCV resistance to CBAs is not directly conferred by mutations in the envelope protein genes but could occur through an indirect mechanism involving mutations in other viral proteins. Further investigations are needed to completely elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  1. A synthetic peptide with the putative iron binding motif of amyloid precursor protein (APP does not catalytically oxidize iron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Honarmand Ebrahimi

    Full Text Available The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP, which is a key player in Alzheimer's disease, was recently reported to possess an Fe(II binding site within its E2 domain which exhibits ferroxidase activity [Duce et al. 2010, Cell 142: 857]. The putative ligands of this site were compared to those in the ferroxidase site of ferritin. The activity was indirectly measured using transferrin, which scavenges the Fe(III product of the reaction. A 22-residue synthetic peptide, named FD1, with the putative ferroxidase site of APP, and the E2 domain of APP were each reported to exhibit 40% of the ferroxidase activity of APP and of ceruloplasmin. It was also claimed that the ferroxidase activity of APP is inhibited by Zn(II just as in ferritin. We measured the ferroxidase activity indirectly (i by the incorporation of the Fe(III product of the ferroxidase reaction into transferrin and directly (ii by monitoring consumption of the substrate molecular oxygen. The results with the FD1 peptide were compared to the established ferroxidase activities of human H-chain ferritin and of ceruloplasmin. For FD1 we observed no activity above the background of non-enzymatic Fe(II oxidation by molecular oxygen. Zn(II binds to transferrin and diminishes its Fe(III incorporation capacity and rate but it does not specifically bind to a putative ferroxidase site of FD1. Based on these results, and on comparison of the putative ligands of the ferroxidase site of APP with those of ferritin, we conclude that the previously reported results for ferroxidase activity of FD1 and - by implication - of APP should be re-evaluated.

  2. β-Amyloid binding in elderly subjects with declining or stable episodic memory function measured with PET and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Patrik [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Forsberg, Anton; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Persson, Jonas; Nilsson, Lars-Goeran [Karolinska Institute and Stockholm University, Aging Research Center (ARC), Stockholm (Sweden); Nyberg, Lars [Umeaa University, Department of Radiation Sciences (Diagnostic Radiology), Umeaa (Sweden); Farde, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); AstraZeneca Translational Science Center at Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    Cognitive decline has been suggested as an early marker for later onset of Alzheimer's disease. We therefore explored the relationship between decline in episodic memory and β-amyloid using positron emission tomography (PET) and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184, a radioligand with potential to detect low levels of amyloid deposits. Healthy elderly subjects with declining (n = 10) or stable (n = 10) episodic memory over 15 years were recruited from the population-based Betula study and examined with PET. Brain radioactivity was measured after intravenous administration of [{sup 11}C]AZD2184. The binding potential BP{sub ND} was calculated using linear graphical analysis with the cerebellum as reference region. The binding of [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in total grey matter was generally low in the declining group, whereas some binding could be observed in the stable group. Mean BP{sub ND} was significantly higher in the stable group compared to the declining group (p = 0.019). An observation was that the three subjects with the highest BP{sub ND} were ApoE ε4 allele carriers. We conclude that cognitive decline in the general population does not seem to stand by itself as an early predictor for amyloid deposits. (orig.)

  3. Insights on the binding of thioflavin derivative markers to amyloid fibril models and Aβ{sub 1-40} fibrils from computational approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alí-Torres, Jorge; Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona [Departament de Química, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Rodriguez-Rodríguez, Cristina [Medicinal Inorganic Chemistry Group, Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2014-10-06

    The present contribution analyzes the binding of ThT and neutral ThT derivatives to a β-sheet model by means of quantum chemical calculations. In addition, we study the properties of four molecules: (2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBX), 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole (HBT) and their respective iodinated compounds, HBXI and HBTI, in binding to amyloid fibril models and Aβ{sub 1-40}fibrils by using a combination of docking, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations.

  4. A β-hairpin-binding protein for three different disease-related amyloidogenic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaykhalishahi, Hamed; Mirecka, Ewa A; Gauhar, Aziz; Grüning, Clara S R; Willbold, Dieter; Härd, Torleif; Stoldt, Matthias; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Amyloidogenic proteins share a propensity to convert to the β-structure-rich amyloid state that is associated with the progression of several protein-misfolding disorders. Here we show that a single engineered β-hairpin-binding protein, the β-wrapin AS10, binds monomers of three different amyloidogenic proteins, that is, amyloid-β peptide, α-synuclein, and islet amyloid polypeptide, with sub-micromolar affinity. AS10 binding inhibits the aggregation and toxicity of all three proteins. The results demonstrate common conformational preferences and related binding sites in a subset of the amyloidogenic proteins. These commonalities enable the generation of multispecific monomer-binding agents.

  5. Specific localization and imaging of amyloid deposits in vivo using /sup 123/I-labeled serum amyloid P component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkins, P.N.; Myers, M.J.; Epenetos, A.A.; Caspi, D.; Pepys, M.B.

    1988-03-01

    Highly specific, high-resolution scintigraphic images of amyloid-laden organs in mice with experimentally induced amyloid A protein (AA) amyloidosis were obtained after intravenous injection of /sup 123/I-labeled serum amyloid P component (SAP). Interestingly, a much higher proportion (up to 40%) of the injected dose of heterologous human SAP localized to amyloid and was retained there than was the case with isologous mouse SAP, indicating that human SAP binds more avidly to mouse AA fibrils than does mouse SAP. Specificity of SAP localization was established by the failure of the related proteins, human C-reactive protein and Limulus C-reactive protein, to deposit significantly in amyloid and by the absence of human SAP deposition in nonamyloidotic organs. However, only partial correlations were observed between the quantity of SAP localized and two independent estimates, histology and RIA for AA of the amount of amyloid in particular organs. It is not clear which of the three methods used reflects better the extent or clinical significance of the amyloid deposits but in vivo localization of radiolabeled SAP, detectable and quantifiable by gamma camera imaging, is apparently extremely sensitive. These findings establish the use of labeled SAP as a noninvasive in vivo diagnostic probe in experimental amyloidosis, potentially capable of revealing the natural history of the condition, and suggest that it may also be applicable generally as a specific targeting agent for diagnostic and even therapeutic purposes in clinical amyloidosis.

  6. Binding of complement proteins C1q and C4bp to serum amyloid P component (SAP) in solid contra liquid phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Inge Juul; Nielsen, EH; Andersen, Ove;

    1996-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP), a member of the conserved pentraxin family of plasma proteins, binds calcium dependently to its ligands. The authors investigated SAPs interaction with the complement proteins C4b binding protein (C4bp) and C1q by ELISA, immunoelectrophoresis and electron microscopy....... Binding of these proteins to SAP was demonstrated when SAP was immobilized using F(ab')2 anti-SAP, but not when SAP reacted with these proteins in liquid phase; thus the binding to human SAP was markedly phase state dependent. Presaturation of solid phase SAP with heparin, which binds SAP with high...... affinity, did not interfere with the subsequent binding of C4bp or C1q to SAP. In contrast, collagen I and IV showed partial competition with the binding of C1q to SAP. Using fresh serum, immobilized native SAP bound C4bp whereas binding of C1q/C1 could not be demonstrated. Altogether the results indicate...

  7. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  8. Synthesis of fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents for amyloid-beta fibrils detection and removal by a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaat, Hadas; Margel, Shlomo

    2009-09-01

    Early diagnosis in Alzheimer's disease (AD), before the onset of marked clinical symptoms, is critical in preventing the irreversible neuronal damage that eventually leads to dementia and ultimately death. Therefore, there is an urgent need for in vivo imaging agents, which are valuable as specific biomarkers to demonstrate the location and density of amyloid plaques in the living human brain. The present manuscript describes a novel method for selective marking of Abeta(40) fibrils by non-fluorescent gamma-Fe(2)O(3) and fluorescent-magnetic gamma-Fe(2)O(3)-rhodamine or gamma-Fe(2)O(3)-Congo red nanoparticles, and the complete removal of the magnetized fibrils from the aqueous continuous phase by a magnetic field. These fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents have a great advantage due to the combination of the magnetic and fluorescence imaging into one nanostructured system. This hybrid system, which selectively marks Abeta(40) fibrils, might enable the early detection of plaques using both MRI and fluorescence microscopy, and therefore may be applied in in vivo AD diagnosis studies. These fluorescent-magnetic nanoparticles may also be useful as selective biomarkers to detect the location and the removal of other amyloid plaques derived from different amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow, and prion diseases. PMID:19559008

  9. Comparison of crystal and solution hemoglobin binding of selected antigelling agents and allosteric modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehanna, A.S.; Abraham, D.J. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond (USA))

    1990-04-24

    This paper details comprehensive binding studies (solution and X-ray) of human hemoglobin A with a group of halogenated carboxylic acids that were investigated as potential antisickling agents. It is, to our knowledge, the first study to compare solution and crystal binding for a series of compounds under similar high-salt conditions used for cocrystallization. The compounds include ((3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxy)acetic acid, ((p-bromobenzyl)oxy)acetic acid, clofibric acid, and bezafibrate. The location and stereochemistry of binding sites have been established by X-ray crystallography, while the number of binding sites and affinity constants were measured by using equilibrium dialysis. The observed crystal structures are consistent with the binding observed in solution and that the number of binding sites is independent of salt concentration, while the binding constant increases with increasing salt concentration. The studies also reveal that relatively small changes in the chemical structure of a drug molecule can result in entirely different binding sites on the protein. Moreover, the X-ray studies provide a possible explanation for the multiplicity in function exhibited by these compounds as allosteric modulators and/or antisickling agents. Finally, the studies indicate that these compounds bind differently to the R and T states of hemoglobin, and observation of special significance to the original design of these agents.

  10. Effect of nanoparticles binding ß-amyloid peptide on nitric oxide production by cultured endothelial cells and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Antonina Orlando,1 Francesca Re,1 Silvia Sesana,1 Ilaria Rivolta,1 Alice Panariti,1 Davide Brambilla,2 Julien Nicolas,2 Patrick Couvreur,2 Karine Andrieux,2 Massimo Masserini,1 Emanuela Cazzaniga1 1Department of Health Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy; 2Institut Galien Paris Sud, University Paris-Sud, Châtenay-Malabry, France Background: As part of a project designing nanoparticles for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, we have synthesized and characterized a small library of nanoparticles binding with high affinity to the β-amyloid peptide and showing features of biocompatibility in vitro, which are important properties for administration in vivo. In this study, we focused on biocompatibility issues, evaluating production of nitric oxide by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells and macrophages, used as models of cells which would be exposed to nanoparticles after systemic administration. Methods: The nanoparticles tested were liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles carrying phosphatidic acid or cardiolipin, and PEGylated poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PEG-PACA. We measured nitric oxide production using the Griess method as well as phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and intracellular free calcium, which are biochemically related to nitric oxide production. MTT viability tests and caspase-3 detection were also undertaken. Results: Exposure to liposomes did not affect the viability of endothelial cells at any concentration tested. Increased production of nitric oxide was detected only with liposomes carrying phosphatidic acid or cardiolipin at the highest concentration (120 µg/mL, together with increased synthase phosphorylation and intracellular calcium levels. Macrophages exposed to liposomes showed a slightly dose-dependent decrease in viability, with no increase in production of nitric oxide. Exposure to solid lipid nanoparticles carrying phosphatidic acid decreased viability in

  11. Melanin-Based Coatings as Lead-Binding Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Karin Sono; Diane Lye; Moore, Christine A.; W. Christopher Boyd; Thomas A. Gorlin; Belitsky, Jason M.

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between metal ions and different forms of melanin play significant roles in melanin biochemistry. The binding properties of natural melanin and related synthetic materials can be exploited for nonbiological applications, potentially including water purification. A method for investigating metal ion-melanin interactions on solid support is described, with lead as the initial target. 2.5 cm discs of the hydrophobic polymer PVDF were coated with synthetic eumelanin from the tyros...

  12. Melanin-Based Coatings as Lead-Binding Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Sono

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between metal ions and different forms of melanin play significant roles in melanin biochemistry. The binding properties of natural melanin and related synthetic materials can be exploited for nonbiological applications, potentially including water purification. A method for investigating metal ion-melanin interactions on solid support is described, with lead as the initial target. 2.5 cm discs of the hydrophobic polymer PVDF were coated with synthetic eumelanin from the tyrosinase-catalyzed polymerization of L-dopa, and with melanin extracted from human hair. Lead (Pb2+ binding was quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy (flame mode, and the data was well fit by the Langmuir model. Langmuir affinities ranged from 3.4·103 to 2.2·104 M-1. At the maximum capacity observed, the synthetic eumelanin coating bound ~9% of its mass in lead. Binding of copper (Cu2+, zinc (Zn2+, and cadmium (Cd2+ to the synthetic-eumelanin-coated discs was also investigated. Under the conditions tested, the Langmuir affinities for Zn2+, Cd2+, and Cu2+ were 35%, 53%, and 77%, respectively, of the Langmuir affinity for Pb2+. The synthetic-eumelanin-coated discs have a slightly higher capacity for Cu2+ on a per mole basis than for Pb2+, and lower capacities for Cd2+ and Zn2+. The system described can be used to address biological questions and potentially be applied toward melanin-based water purification.

  13. Thermal analysis of moulding sands with a polyacrylic binding agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Grabowska

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Heating of materials causes their physical or chemical changes accompanied by thermal clfccts. Thcrmnl cfrccts of plymcrs an: rclarcd totheir structural changes. such as: melting, crystallization, polymorphous transformations, vitrification. dcgradnlion, dcstmct ion as wcll nsintramolecular or intermolecular reactions. Samples of sodium ptyacrylatc (uscd as a binding agcnr, high-silica sand (grain matrix andsamplcs of moulding sands with a potyacrylic binder aftcr hardening were tcsted derivatographically. Samplcs For thcrmal analysis wcrctaken from sham blocks aRer pcrrorming strcnglh tcsts. Invcstigations wcrc done within the tcmpcmturc rangc: 25-1000°C.Mct hds of thcrmal analysis (DTA,T G} were uscd to dacminc thc thcrmal stability of thc tcstcd snmplcs by cstablisbing rhc tcmpcsaturcand thermal effccts of transformations occurring during hcating. In addition, the invcstigations wcrc to dctcsminc changcs raking placcinside moulding sands whcn in contact with molten mctal. On the basis of differences in Ihermograms of moulding sand samptcs withpolyacrylic binding agcnt. hdcncd cithcr by Ca(Olll and C0: or by microwaves, onc cnn infcr that significant strucrural changesoccurrcd aftcr cross-linking. Thosc changes are rclatcd to intra- and intermolecular rcactions and thc way of hardcning influcnccs thccross-linking reaction - which was also confirmed by mcws of thc spectroscopic investigations (IT-IR. Rarnan, NMR.

  14. Aβ-binding molecules: Possible application as imaging probes and as anti-aggregation agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    As amyloid β (Aβ) is at the centre of pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Aβ aggregate-specific probes for in vivo studies of Aβ are potentially important for the early diagnosis and the assessment of new treatment strategies in the AD brain by noninvasive imaging. Several series of compounds derived from Congo red (CR) and Thioflavin T (ThT) have been evaluated as potential probes for the Aβ imaging. They include a diversity of core structures contributing to their affinities to Aβ. Small-molecule inhibi- tors were known to inhibit the formation of Aβ oligomers and fibrils. This inhibition has to be performed in such a way that these inhibitors bind to Aβ in the binding channel where Aβ-binding probes should sit. Therefore, several of them were used as novel core structures to develop Aβ probes, with their de- rivatives exhibiting good Aβ affinities. This approach will facilitate the design of a variety of candidates for Aβ probe molecules and anti-aggregation-therapeutic drugs. Moreover, the finding of Aβ probes with diverse core structures recognized by binding sites on Aβs will likely provide a promising per- spective for the design of 99mTc-labeled probe-derived molecules.

  15. Anti-amyloid Aggregation Activity of Natural Compounds: Implications for Alzheimer's Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xian-Le; Rao, Praveen P N; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Several plant-derived natural compounds are known to exhibit anti-amyloid aggregation activity which makes them attractive as potential therapies to treat Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms of their anti-amyloid activity are not well known. In this regard, many natural compounds are known to exhibit direct binding to various amyloid species including oligomers and fibrils, which in turn can lead to conformational change in the beta-sheet assembly to form nontoxic aggregates. This review discusses the mechanism of anti-amyloid activity of 16 natural compounds and gives structural details on their direct binding interactions with amyloid aggregates. Our computational investigations show that the physicochemical properties of natural products do fit Lipinski's criteria and that catechol and catechol-type moieties present in natural compounds act as lysine site-specific inhibitors of amyloid aggregation. Based on these observations, we propose a structural template to design novel small molecules containing site-specific ring scaffolds, planar aromatic and nonaromatic linkers with suitably substituted hydrogen bond acceptors and donors. These studies will have significant implications in the design and development of novel amyloid aggregation inhibitors with superior metabolic stability and blood-brain barrier penetration as potential agents to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Structural Characterization of the E2 Domain of APL-1, a C. Elegans Homolog of Human Amyloid Precursor Protein, and its Heparin Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopes, J.; Liu, X; Xu, X; Demeler, B; Folta-Stogniew, E; Li, C; Ha, Y

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid {beta}-peptide deposit found in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer disease is derived from a large heparin-binding protein precursor APP. The biological function of APP and its homologs is not precisely known. Here we report the x-ray structure of the E2 domain of APL-1, an APP homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans, and compare it to the human APP structure. We also describe the structure of APL-1 E2 in complex with sucrose octasulfate, a highly negatively charged disaccharide, which reveals an unexpected binding pocket between the two halves of E2. Based on the crystal structure, we are able to map, using site-directed mutagenesis, a surface groove on E2 to which heparin may bind. Our biochemical data also indicate that the affinity of E2 for heparin is influenced by pH: at pH 5, the binding appears to be much stronger than that at neutral pH. This property is likely caused by histidine residues in the vicinity of the mapped heparin binding site and could be important for the proposed adhesive function of APL-1.

  17. A comparative analysis on the binding characteristics of various mammalian albumins towards a multitherapeutic agent, pinostrobin

    OpenAIRE

    Feroz, Shevin R.; SUMI, Rumana A.; Sri N A Malek; Tayyab, Saad

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of pinostrobin (PS), a multitherapeutic agent with serum albumins of various mammalian species namely, goat, bovine, human, porcine, rabbit, sheep and dog was investigated using fluorescence quench titration and competitive drug displacement experiments. Analysis of the intrinsic fluorescence quenching data revealed values of the association constant, Ka in the range of 1.49 – 6.12 × 104 M−1, with 1:1 binding stoichiometry. Based on the PS–albumin binding characteristics, thes...

  18. Interaction of the amyloid precursor protein-like protein 1 (APLP1) E2 domain with heparan sulfate involves two distinct binding modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahms, Sven O., E-mail: sdahms@fli-leibniz.de [Leibniz Institute for Age Research (FLI), Beutenbergstrasse 11, 07745 Jena (Germany); Mayer, Magnus C. [Freie Universität Berlin, Thielallee 63, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Miltenyi Biotec GmbH, Robert-Koch-Strasse 1, 17166 Teterow (Germany); Roeser, Dirk [Leibniz Institute for Age Research (FLI), Beutenbergstrasse 11, 07745 Jena (Germany); Multhaup, Gerd [McGill University Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1Y6 (Canada); Than, Manuel E., E-mail: sdahms@fli-leibniz.de [Leibniz Institute for Age Research (FLI), Beutenbergstrasse 11, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Two X-ray structures of APLP1 E2 with and without a heparin dodecasaccharide are presented, revealing two distinct binding modes of the protein to heparan sulfate. The data provide a mechanistic explanation of how APP-like proteins bind to heparan sulfates and how they specifically recognize nonreducing structures of heparan sulfates. Beyond the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, the members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family are essential for neuronal development and cell homeostasis in mammals. APP and its paralogues APP-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APP-like protein 2 (APLP2) contain the highly conserved heparan sulfate (HS) binding domain E2, which effects various (patho)physiological functions. Here, two crystal structures of the E2 domain of APLP1 are presented in the apo form and in complex with a heparin dodecasaccharide at 2.5 Å resolution. The apo structure of APLP1 E2 revealed an unfolded and hence flexible N-terminal helix αA. The (APLP1 E2){sub 2}–(heparin){sub 2} complex structure revealed two distinct binding modes, with APLP1 E2 explicitly recognizing the heparin terminus but also interacting with a continuous heparin chain. The latter only requires a certain register of the sugar moieties that fits to a positively charged surface patch and contributes to the general heparin-binding capability of APP-family proteins. Terminal binding of APLP1 E2 to heparin specifically involves a structure of the nonreducing end that is very similar to heparanase-processed HS chains. These data reveal a conserved mechanism for the binding of APP-family proteins to HS and imply a specific regulatory role of HS modifications in the biology of APP and APP-like proteins.

  19. Human brain tumor imaging with a protein-binding MR contrast agent: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, Marco; Giesel, Frederik; Weber, Marc-Andre; Gerigk, Lars [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Rohrer, Martin [University of Applied Science Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Tuettenberg, Jochen [University of Heidelberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum Mannheim (Germany); Michaely, Hendrik; Voth, Matthias [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Klinikum Mannheim (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Gadofosveset is a Gd-based protein-binding blood pool agent with increased relaxivities and blood half-life compared with conventional Gd-based contrast agents (GBCAs). No experience exists about the use of gadofosveset as an extracellular agent. In this report we present the first clinical experience with gadofosveset in enhancing intracranial tumors. Ten patients with different intracranial tumors were examined with a standard dose (0.03 mmol/kg) of gadofosveset compared with a standard dose (0.1 mmol/kg) of conventional GBCA. As a result of its significantly higher relaxivity, gadofosveset could, despite its low dose, achieve a sufficient contrast enhancement. The visual rating of the intensity of enhancement and the contrast to noise ratios were comparable to conventional agents. The detection and delineation of more complex lesions was rated equal. In one nonenhancing low grade astrocytoma an enhancing nodule became visible only 5 h after gadofosvesest injection. As shown in this initial report, contrast-enhanced intracranial tumor imaging is possible with the protein-binding blood pool agent gadofosveset. The agent gives a significant tumor contrast in early postcontrast imaging comparable with conventional agents. As a result of its unique longer lasting contrast, the use of gadofosveset might enable a new approach to imaging mild or nonenhancing tumors. (orig.)

  20. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in

  1. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  2. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  3. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Xu, Jinbin; Zeng, Chenbo; Kirk, Molly J; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Cruchaga, Carlos; Goate, Alison; Cahill, Michael A; Arancio, Ottavio; Mach, Robert H; Craven, Rolf; Head, Elizabeth; LeVine, Harry; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1) protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological effects of

  4. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Abeta 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1 protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological

  5. A comparative analysis on the binding characteristics of various mammalian albumins towards a multitherapeutic agent, pinostrobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feroz, Shevin R; Sumi, Rumana A; Malek, Sri N A; Tayyab, Saad

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of pinostrobin (PS), a multitherapeutic agent with serum albumins of various mammalian species namely, goat, bovine, human, porcine, rabbit, sheep and dog was investigated using fluorescence quench titration and competitive drug displacement experiments. Analysis of the intrinsic fluorescence quenching data revealed values of the association constant, K(a) in the range of 1.49 - 6.12 × 10(4) M(-1), with 1:1 binding stoichiometry. Based on the PS-albumin binding characteristics, these albumins were grouped into two classes. Ligand displacement studies using warfarin as the site I marker ligand correlated well with the binding data. Albumins from goat and bovine were found to be closely similar to human albumin on the basis of PS binding characteristics. PMID:25519455

  6. Predictive Modeling of Estrogen Receptor Binding Agents Using Advanced Cheminformatics Tools and Massive Public Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribay, Kathryn; Kim, Marlene T.; Wang, Wenyi; Pinolini, Daniel; Zhu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERα) are a critical target for drug design as well as a potential source of toxicity when activated unintentionally. Thus, evaluating potential ERα binding agents is critical in both drug discovery and chemical toxicity areas. Using computational tools, e.g., Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models, can predict potential ERα binding agents before chemical synthesis. The purpose of this project was to develop enhanced predictive models of ERα binding agents by utilizing advanced cheminformatics tools that can integrate publicly available bioassay data. The initial ERα binding agent data set, consisting of 446 binders and 8307 non-binders, was obtained from the Tox21 Challenge project organized by the NIH Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC). After removing the duplicates and inorganic compounds, this data set was used to create a training set (259 binders and 259 non-binders). This training set was used to develop QSAR models using chemical descriptors. The resulting models were then used to predict the binding activity of 264 external compounds, which were available to us after the models were developed. The cross-validation results of training set [Correct Classification Rate (CCR) = 0.72] were much higher than the external predictivity of the unknown compounds (CCR = 0.59). To improve the conventional QSAR models, all compounds in the training set were used to search PubChem and generate a profile of their biological responses across thousands of bioassays. The most important bioassays were prioritized to generate a similarity index that was used to calculate the biosimilarity score between each two compounds. The nearest neighbors for each compound within the set were then identified and its ERα binding potential was predicted by its nearest neighbors in the training set. The hybrid model performance (CCR = 0.94 for cross validation; CCR = 0.68 for external prediction) showed significant improvement over the original QSAR

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-fluoroethylated benzothiazole derivatives for in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amyloid aggregates play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Targeting these aggregates by PET probes enables non-invasively the detection and quantification of amyloid deposit distribution in human brains. Based on benzothiazole core structure a series of amyloid imaging agents were developed. Currently [11C]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (Pittsburgh Compound-B (PIB) is the most specific and widely used amyloid imaging ligand. But due to the short half life of 11C, longer lived 18F-labeled derivatives offer logistic advantages and higher contrast images. In this work, three different [18F]fluoroethoxy-substituted benzothiazole derivatives ([18F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole, [18F]2-((2'-(2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole and [18F]2-(3'-((2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole) were synthesized via [18F]fluoroethylation. The latter two derivatives with fluoroethoxy-substitution on the aromatic amino group showed very low binding affinity for amyloid aggregates. In contrast [18F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole with [18F]fluoroethoxy-substitution in 6-position showed excellent amyloid imaging properties with respect to lipophilicity, brain entry and brain clearance in normal SCID mice, amyloid plaque binding affinity and specificity.

  8. Rescue of amyloid-Beta-induced inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by a peptide homologous to the nicotine binding domain of the alpha 7 subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur A Nery

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by brain accumulation of the neurotoxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ and by loss of cholinergic neurons and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. Recent evidence indicates that memory loss and cognitive decline in AD correlate better with the amount of soluble Aβ than with the extent of amyloid plaque deposits in affected brains. Inhibition of nAChRs by soluble Aβ40 is suggested to contribute to early cholinergic dysfunction in AD. Using phage display screening, we have previously identified a heptapeptide, termed IQ, homologous to most nAChR subtypes, binding with nanomolar affinity to soluble Aβ40 and blocking Aβ-induced inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced currents in PC12 cells expressing α7 nAChRs. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis and whole-cell current recording, we have now defined the amino acids in IQ essential for reversal of Aβ40 inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced responses in PC12 cells, mediated by α7 subtypes and other endogenously expressed nAChRs. We further investigated the effects of soluble Aβ, IQ and analogues of IQ on α3β4 nAChRs recombinantly expressed in HEK293 cells. Results show that nanomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ40 potently inhibit the function of α3β4 nAChRs, and that subsequent addition of IQ or its analogues does not reverse this effect. However, co-application of IQ makes the inhibition of α3β4 nAChRs by Aβ40 reversible. These findings indicate that Aβ40 inhibits different subtypes of nAChRs by interacting with specific receptor domains homologous to the IQ peptide, suggesting that IQ may be a lead for novel drugs to block the inhibition of cholinergic function in AD.

  9. Binding, conformational transition and dimerization of amyloid-β peptide on GM1-containing ternary membrane: insights from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moutusi Manna

    Full Text Available Interactions of amyloid-β (Aβ with neuronal membrane are associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Ganglioside GM1 has been shown to promote the structural conversion of Aβ and increase the rate of peptide aggregation; but the exact nature of interaction driving theses processes remains to be explored. In this work, we have carried out atomistic-scale computer simulations (totaling 2.65 µs to investigate the behavior of Aβ monomer and dimers in GM1-containing raft-like membrane. The oligosaccharide head-group of GM1 was observed to act as scaffold for Aβ-binding through sugar-specific interactions. Starting from the initial helical peptide conformation, a β-hairpin motif was formed at the C-terminus of the GM1-bound Aβ-monomer; that didn't appear in absence of GM1 (both in fluid POPC and liquid-ordered cholesterol/POPC bilayers and also in aqueous medium within the simulation time span. For Aβ-dimers, the β-structure was further enhanced by peptide-peptide interactions, which might influence the propensity of Aβ to aggregate into higher-ordered structures. The salt-bridges and inter-peptide hydrogen bonds were found to account for dimer stability. We observed spontaneous formation of intra-peptide D(23-K(28 salt-bridge and a turn at V(24GSN(27 region - long been accepted as characteristic structural-motifs for amyloid self-assembly. Altogether, our results provide atomistic details of Aβ-GM1 and Aβ-Aβ interactions and demonstrate their importance in the early-stages of GM1-mediated Aβ-oligomerisation on membrane surface.

  10. Quantitative kinetic analysis of PET amyloid imaging agents [11C]BF227 and [18F]FACT in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare two amyloid imaging agents, [11C]BF227 and [18F]FACT (derivative from [11C]BF227) through quantitative pharmacokinetics analysis in human brain. Methods: Positron emission tomography studies were performed on six elderly healthy control (HC) subjects and seven probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients with [11C]BF227 and 10 HC subjects and 10 probable AD patients with [18F]FACT. Data from nine regions of interest were analyzed by several approaches, namely non-linear least-squared fitting methods with arterial input functions (one-tissue compartment model(1TCM), two-tissue compartment model (2TCM)), Logan plot, and linearized methods with reference region (Reference Logan plot (RefLogan), MRTM0, MRTM2). We also evaluated SUV and SUVR for both tracers. The parameters estimated by several approaches were compared between two tracers for detectability of differences between HC and AD patients. Results: For [11C]BF227, there were no significant difference of VT (2TCM, 1TCM) and SUV in all regions (Student t-test; p < 0.05) and significant differences in the DVRs (Logan, RefLogan, and MRTM2) and SUVRs in six neocortical regions (p < 0.05) between the HC and AD groups. For [18F]FACT, significant differences in DVRs (RefLogan, MRTM0, and MRTM2) were observed in more than four neocortical regions between the HC and AD groups (p < 0.05), and the significant differences were found in SUVRs for two neocortical regions (inferior frontal coretex and lateral temporal coretex). Our results showed that both tracers can clearly distinguish between HC and AD groups although the pharmacokinetics and distribution patterns in brain for two tracers were substantially different. Conclusion: This study revealed that although the PET amyloid imaging agents [11C]BF227 and [18F]FACT have similar chemical and biological properties, they have different pharmacokinetics, and caution must be paid for usage of the tracers

  11. Serum amyloid P component binds to influenza A virus haemagglutinin and inhibits the virus infection in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Vilsgaard Ravn, K; Juul Sørensen, I;

    1997-01-01

    that SAP can bind to influenza A virus and inhibit agglutination of erythrocytes mediated by the virus subtypes H1N1, H2N2 and H3N2. SAP also inhibits the production of haemagglutinin (HA) an the cytopathogenic effect of influenza A virus in MDCK cells. The binding of SAP to the virus requires...

  12. The E1 copper binding domain of full-length amyloid precursor protein mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition in brain metastatic prostate cancer DU145 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Mallory; Blanthorn-Hazell, Sophee; Delury, Craig; Parkin, Edward

    2014-10-31

    Copper plays an important role in the aetiology and growth of tumours and levels of the metal are increased in the serum and tumour tissue of patients affected by a range of cancers including prostate cancer (PCa). The molecular mechanisms that enable cancer cells to proliferate in the presence of elevated copper levels are, therefore, of key importance in our understanding of tumour growth progression. In the current study, we have examined the role played by the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in mitigating copper-induced growth inhibition of the PCa cell line, DU145. A range of APP molecular constructs were stably over-expressed in DU145 cells and their effects on cell proliferation in the presence of copper were monitored. Our results show that endogenous APP expression was induced by sub-toxic copper concentrations in DU145 cells and over-expression of the wild-type protein was able to mitigate copper-induced growth inhibition via a mechanism involving the cytosolic and E1 copper binding domains of the full-length protein. APP likely represents one of a range of copper binding proteins that PCa cells employ in order to ensure efficient proliferation despite elevated concentrations of the metal within the tumour microenvironment. Targeting the expression of such proteins may contribute to therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancers.

  13. Basalt fiber insulating material with a mineral binding agent for industrial use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdyuk, T.; Aizenshtadt, A.; Tutygin, A.; Frolova, M.

    2016-04-01

    The paper considers a possibility of using mining industry waste as a binding agent for heat insulating material on the basis of basalt fiber. The main objective of the research is to produce a heat-insulating material to be applied in machine building in high-temperature environments. After synthetic binder having been replaced by a mineral one, an environmentally sound thermal insulating material having desirable heat-protecting ability and not failing when exposed to high temperatures was obtained.

  14. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  15. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquiza Sablón-Carrazana

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP:NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17-42 and Aβ16-21:NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the

  16. Amyloid-β Oligomers May Impair SNARE-Mediated Exocytosis by Direct Binding to Syntaxin 1a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoosoo Yang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is closely associated with synaptic dysfunction, and thus current treatments often aim to stimulate neurotransmission to improve cognitive impairment. Whereas the formation of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE complex is essential for synaptic transmission, the correlation between SNAREs and AD neuropathology is unknown. Here, we report that intracellular amyloid-β (Aβ oligomers directly inhibit SNARE-mediated exocytosis by impairing SNARE complex formation. We observe abnormal reduction of SNARE complex levels in the brains of APP/PS1 transgenic (TG mice compared to age-matched wild-types. We demonstrate that Aβ oligomers block SNARE complex assembly through the direct interaction with a target membrane (t-SNARE syntaxin 1a in vitro. Furthermore, the results of the in vitro single-vesicle content-mixing assay reveal that Aβ oligomers inhibit SNARE-mediated fusion pores. Thus, our study identifies a potential molecular mechanism by which intracellular Aβ oligomers hamper SNARE-mediated exocytosis, likely leading to AD-associated synaptic dysfunctions.

  17. The E1 copper binding domain of full-length amyloid precursor protein mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition in brain metastatic prostate cancer DU145 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gough, Mallory, E-mail: m.gough1@lancaster.ac.uk; Blanthorn-Hazell, Sophee, E-mail: s.blanthorn-hazell@lancaster.ac.uk; Delury, Craig, E-mail: c.delury@lancaster.ac.uk; Parkin, Edward, E-mail: e.parkin@lancaster.ac.uk

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • Copper levels are elevated in the tumour microenvironment. • APP mitigates copper-induced growth inhibition of DU145 prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • The APP intracellular domain is a prerequisite; soluble forms have no effect. • The E1 CuBD of APP is also a prerequisite. • APP copper binding potentially mitigates copper-induced PCa cell growth inhibition. - Abstract: Copper plays an important role in the aetiology and growth of tumours and levels of the metal are increased in the serum and tumour tissue of patients affected by a range of cancers including prostate cancer (PCa). The molecular mechanisms that enable cancer cells to proliferate in the presence of elevated copper levels are, therefore, of key importance in our understanding of tumour growth progression. In the current study, we have examined the role played by the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in mitigating copper-induced growth inhibition of the PCa cell line, DU145. A range of APP molecular constructs were stably over-expressed in DU145 cells and their effects on cell proliferation in the presence of copper were monitored. Our results show that endogenous APP expression was induced by sub-toxic copper concentrations in DU145 cells and over-expression of the wild-type protein was able to mitigate copper-induced growth inhibition via a mechanism involving the cytosolic and E1 copper binding domains of the full-length protein. APP likely represents one of a range of copper binding proteins that PCa cells employ in order to ensure efficient proliferation despite elevated concentrations of the metal within the tumour microenvironment. Targeting the expression of such proteins may contribute to therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancers.

  18. DNA aptamers detecting generic amyloid epitopes

    OpenAIRE

    Mitkevich, Olga V.; Kochneva-Pervukhova, Natalia V; Surina, Elizaveta R.; Benevolensky, Sergei V.; Kushnirov, Vitaly V.; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloids are fibrillar protein aggregates resulting from non-covalent autocatalytic polymerization of various structurally and functionally unrelated proteins. Previously we have selected DNA aptamers, which bind specifically to the in vitro assembled amyloid fibrils of the yeast prionogenic protein Sup35. Here we show that such DNA aptamers can be used to detect SDS-insoluble amyloid aggregates of the Sup35 protein, and of some other amyloidogenic proteins, including mouse PrP, formed in yea...

  19. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of

  20. Noninvasive measurement of fecal calprotectin and serum amyloid A combined with intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in necrotizing enterocolitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reisinger, K.W.; Zee, D.C. van der; Brouwers, H.A.A.; Kramer, B.W.; Heurn, L.W.E. van; Buurman, W.A.; Derikx, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), prevalent in premature infants, remains challenging. Enterocyte damage in NEC can be assessed by intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP), with a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 90%. Numerous markers of inflammation are known, s

  1. Noninvasive measurement of fecal calprotectin and serum amyloid A combined with intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in necrotizing enterocolitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reisinger, Kostan W.; Van der Zee, David C.; Brouwers, Hens A. A.; Kramer, Boris W.; van Heurn, L. W. Ernest; Buurman, Wim A.; Derikx, Joep P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), prevalent in premature infants, remains challenging. Enterocyte damage in NEC can be assessed by intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP), with a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 90%. Numerous markers of inflammation are known, s

  2. The Peptide Vaccine Combined with Prior Immunization of a Conventional Diphtheria-Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Induced Amyloid β Binding Antibodies on Cynomolgus Monkeys and Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of brain amyloid beta (Aβ peptides by anti-Aβ antibodies is one of the possible therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported that the Aβ peptide vaccine including the T-cell epitope of diphtheria-tetanus combined toxoid (DT induced anti-Aβ antibodies, and the prior immunization with conventional DT vaccine enhanced the immunogenicity of the peptide. Cynomolgus monkeys were given the peptide vaccine subcutaneously in combination with the prior DT vaccination. Vaccination with a similar regimen was also performed on guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine induced anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs without chemical adjuvants, and excessive immune responses were not observed. Those antibodies could preferentially recognize Aβ40, and Aβ42 compared to Aβ fibrils. The levels of serum anti-Aβ antibodies and plasma Aβ peptides increased in both animals and decreased the brain Aβ40 level of guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine could induce a similar binding profile of anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs. The peptide vaccination could be expected to reduce the brain Aβ peptides and their toxic effects via clearance of Aβ peptides by generated antibodies.

  3. Effects of Drying Condition and Binding Agent on the Quality Characteristics of Ground Dried-Pork Meat Products

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Ku, Su-Kyung; Park, Jong-Dae; Kim, Hee-Ju; Jang, Aera; Kim, Young-Boong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of processing conditions (temperature and time) and binding agent types (glutinous rice flour, potato starch, bean flour, and acorn flour) on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of ground dried-pork meat product. For this purpose, ground dried-pork meat product was produced by adding several binding agents at different drying temperatures and times. The drying time affected moisture content and water activity in all drying...

  4. The CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP δ is differently regulated by fibrillar and oligomeric forms of the Alzheimer amyloid-β peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Lars NG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBP α, β and δ have been shown to be expressed in brain and to be involved in regulation of inflammatory genes in concert with nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. In general, C/EBPα is down-regulated, whereas both C/EBPβ and δ are up-regulated in response to inflammatory stimuli. In Alzheimer's disease (AD one of the hallmarks is chronic neuroinflammation mediated by astrocytes and microglial cells, most likely induced by the formation of amyloid-β (Aβ deposits. The inflammatory response in AD has been ascribed both beneficial and detrimental roles. It is therefore important to delineate the inflammatory mediators and signaling pathways affected by Aβ deposits with the aim of defining new therapeutic targets. Methods Here we have investigated the effects of Aβ on expression of C/EBP family members with a focus on C/EBPδ in rat primary astro-microglial cultures and in a transgenic mouse model with high levels of fibrillar Aβ deposits (tg-ArcSwe by western blot analysis. Effects on DNA binding activity were analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Cross-talk between C/EBPδ and NF-κB was investigated by analyzing binding to a κB site using a biotin streptavidin-agarose pull-down assay. Results We show that exposure to fibril-enriched, but not oligomer-enriched, preparations of Aβ inhibit up-regulation of C/EBPδ expression in interleukin-1β-activated glial cultures. Furthermore, we observed that, in aged transgenic mice, C/EBPα was significantly down-regulated and C/EBPβ was significantly up-regulated. C/EBPδ, on the other hand, was selectively down-regulated in the forebrain, a part of the brain showing high levels of fibrillar Aβ deposits. In contrast, no difference in expression levels of C/EBPδ between wild type and transgenic mice was detected in the relatively spared hindbrain. Finally, we show that interleukin-1β-induced C/EBPδ DNA

  5. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-01

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  6. Magnetite nanoparticle interactions with insulin amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan; Kung, Mei-Lang; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils is one of the likely key factors leading to the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other amyloidosis associated diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed as promising medical materials for many medical applications. In this study, we have explored the effects of Fe3O4 NPs on the fibrillogenesis process of insulin fibrils. When Fe3O4 NPs were co-incubated with insulin, Fe3O4 NPs had no effect on the structural transformation into amyloid-like fibrils but had higher affinity toward insulin fibrils. We demonstrated that the zeta potential of insulin fibrils and Fe3O4 NPs were both positive, suggesting the binding forces between Fe3O4 NPs and insulin fibrils were van der Waals forces but not surface charge. Moreover, a different amount of Fe3O4 NPs added had no effect on secondary structural changes of insulin fibrils. These results propose the potential use of Fe3O4 NPs as therapeutic agents against diseases related to protein aggregation or contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of {sup 18}F-fluoroethylated benzothiazole derivatives for in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumaier, B. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research, Klaus-Joachim-Zuelch Laboratories of the Max Planck Society and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: bernd.neumaier@nf.mpg.de; Deisenhofer, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Sommer, C. [Department of Neuropathology, University of Mainz (Germany); Solbach, C.; Reske, S.N. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Mottaghy, F. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Amyloid aggregates play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Targeting these aggregates by PET probes enables non-invasively the detection and quantification of amyloid deposit distribution in human brains. Based on benzothiazole core structure a series of amyloid imaging agents were developed. Currently [{sup 11}C]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (Pittsburgh Compound-B (PIB) is the most specific and widely used amyloid imaging ligand. But due to the short half life of {sup 11}C, longer lived {sup 18}F-labeled derivatives offer logistic advantages and higher contrast images. In this work, three different [{sup 18}F]fluoroethoxy-substituted benzothiazole derivatives ([{sup 18}F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole, [{sup 18}F]2-((2'-(2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole and [{sup 18}F]2-(3'-((2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole) were synthesized via [{sup 18}F]fluoroethylation. The latter two derivatives with fluoroethoxy-substitution on the aromatic amino group showed very low binding affinity for amyloid aggregates. In contrast [{sup 18}F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole with [{sup 18}F]fluoroethoxy-substitution in 6-position showed excellent amyloid imaging properties with respect to lipophilicity, brain entry and brain clearance in normal SCID mice, amyloid plaque binding affinity and specificity.

  8. Antiviral activity of carbohydrate-binding agents against Nidovirales in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, F J U M; de Haan, C A M; Schuurman, N M P; Haijema, B J; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J M; Delputte, P L; Balzarini, J; Egberink, H F

    2007-10-01

    Coronaviruses are important human and animal pathogens, the relevance of which increased due to the emergence of new human coronaviruses like SARS-CoV, HKU1 and NL63. Together with toroviruses, arteriviruses, and roniviruses the coronaviruses belong to the order Nidovirales. So far antivirals are hardly available to combat infections with viruses of this order. Therefore, various antiviral strategies to counter nidoviral infections are under evaluation. Lectins, which bind to N-linked oligosaccharide elements of enveloped viruses, can be considered as a conceptionally new class of virus inhibitors. These agents were recently evaluated for their antiviral activity towards a variety of enveloped viruses and were shown in most cases to inhibit virus infection at low concentrations. However, limited knowledge is available for their efficacy towards nidoviruses. In this article the application of the plant lectins Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin (HHA), Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Cymbidium sp. agglutinin (CA) and Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) as well as non-plant derived pradimicin-A (PRM-A) and cyanovirin-N (CV-N) as potential antiviral agents was evaluated. Three antiviral tests were compared based on different evaluation principles: cell viability (MTT-based colorimetric assay), number of infected cells (immunoperoxidase assay) and amount of viral protein expression (luciferase-based assay). The presence of carbohydrate-binding agents strongly inhibited coronaviruses (transmissible gastroenteritis virus, infectious bronchitis virus, feline coronaviruses serotypes I and II, mouse hepatitis virus), arteriviruses (equine arteritis virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus) and torovirus (equine Berne virus). Remarkably, serotype II feline coronaviruses and arteriviruses were not inhibited by PRM-A, in contrast to the other viruses tested.

  9. Protonated diamines as anion-binding agents and their utility in capillary electrophoresis separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblitt, Scott D; Speights, Rachel M; Henry, Charles S

    2011-11-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis is a proven method for separating small ions because of the inherent charge and differences in mobility of these analytes. Despite its resolving power, CZE can be insufficient for separating ions with similar mobilities. One remedy is to modify mobilities via the addition of background electrolyte complexation agents. However, this approach is not straightforward for inorganic anions, which lack complexation options. To address this shortfall, the diprotonated diamine moiety was investigated for complexation of dianions. Dicationic diamines significantly complexed dianions, and this interaction was not purely electrostatic in nature because affinities varied with dianion identity. Aqueous association constants were measured with affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) and found to be similar in magnitude but different in selectivity to those of dianions with magnesium ion. Binding was also investigated for zwitterionic buffers containing the protonated diamine moiety. Zwitterions exhibited binding constants as high as 18 M(-1) (30-mM ionic strength). This work discusses the observed binding constants and their potential usefulness in CZE separations of inorganic anions. Also covered are improvements to ACE methodology and an evaluation of some of the assumptions employed. PMID:22002837

  10. Triazolopyridyl ketones as a novel class of antileishmanial agents. DNA binding and BSA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rosa; Bilbao-Ramos, Pablo; López-Molina, Sonia; Abarca, Belén; Ballesteros, Rafael; González-Rosende, M Eugenia; Dea-Ayuela, M Auxiliadora; Alzuet-Piña, Gloria

    2014-08-01

    A new series of triazolopyridyl pyridyl ketones has been synthetized by regioselective lithiation of the corresponding [1,2,3]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridine at 7 position followed by reaction with different electrophiles. The in vitro antileishmanial activity of these compounds was evaluated against Leishmaniainfantum, Leishmaniabraziliensis, Leishmaniaguyanensis and Leishmaniaamazonensis. Compounds 6 and 7 were found to be the most active leishmanicidal agents. Both of them showed activities at micromolar concentration against cultured promastigotes of Leishmania spp. (IC₅₀=99.8-26.8 μM), without cytotoxicity on J774 macrophage cells. These two compounds were also tested in vivo in a murine model of acute infection by L. infantum. The triazolopyridine derivative 6 was effective against both spleen and liver parasites forms, while 7 was inactive against liver parasites. Mechanistic aspects of the antileishmanial activity were investigated by means of DNA binding studies (UV-titration and viscosimetry). Results have revealed that these active ligands are able to interact strongly with DNA [Kb=1.14 × 10(5)M(-1) (6) and 3.26 × 10(5)M(-1) (7)]. Moreover, a DNA groove binding has been proposed for both 6 and 7. To provide more insight on the mode of action of compounds 6 and 7 under biological conditions, their interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was monitored by fluorescence titrations and UV-visible spectroscopy. The quenching constants and binding parameters were determined. Triazolopyridine ketones 6 and 7 have exhibited significant affinity towards BSA [Kb=2.5 × 10(4)M(-1) (6) and 1.9 × 10(4)M(-1) (7)]. Finally, to identify the binding location of compounds 6 and 7 on the BSA, competitive binding experiments were carried out, using warfarin, a characteristic marker for site I, and ibuprofen as one for site II. Results derived from these studies have indicated that both compounds interact at BSA site I and, to a lesser extent, at site II.

  11. A Novel liposomal nanoparticle for the imaging of amyloid plaque by MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Tanifum, Eric A; Ghaghada, Ketan; Vollert, Craig; Head, Elizabeth; Eriksen, Jason L.; Annapragada, Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid binding molecules with greater hydrophilicity than existing ligands were synthesized. The lead candidate ET6-21 bound amyloid fibrils, and amyloid deposits in dog brain and human brain tissue ex vivo. The ligand was used to prepare novel amyloid-targeted liposomal nanoparticles. The preparation was tested in the Tg2576 and TetO/APP mouse models of amyloid deposition. Gd chelates and Indocyanine green were included in the particles for visualization by MRI and near-infrared microscopy....

  12. Preclinical Validation of the Heparin-Reactive Peptide p5+14 as a Molecular Imaging Agent for Visceral Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S. Wall

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a complex pathologic matrix comprised principally of paracrystalline protein fibrils and heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Systemic amyloid diseases are rare, thus, routine diagnosis is often challenging. The glycosaminoglycans ubiquitously present in amyloid deposits are biochemically and electrochemically distinct from those found in the healthy tissues due to the high degree of sulfation. We have exploited this unique property and evaluated heparin-reactive peptides, such as p5+14, as novel agents for specifically targeting and imaging amyloid. Herein, we demonstrate that radiolabeled p5+14 effectively bound murine AA amyloid in vivo by using molecular imaging. Biotinylated peptide also reacted with the major forms of human amyloid in tissue sections as evidenced immunohistochemically. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the peptide also binds synthetic amyloid fibrils that lack glycosaminoglycans implying that the dense anionic motif present on heparin is mimicked by the amyloid protein fibril itself. These biochemical and functional data support the translation of radiolabeled peptide p5+14 for the clinical imaging of amyloid in patients.

  13. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of β-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. PMID:21695112

  14. Biochemical characterization and molecular dynamic simulation of β-sitosterol as a tubulin-binding anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaddalkar, Tejashree; Suri, Charu; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Lopus, Manu

    2015-08-01

    Βeta-sitosterol (β-SITO), a phytosterol present in pomegranate, peanut, corn oil, almond, and avocado, has been recognized to offer health benefits and potential clinical uses. β-SITO is orally bioavailable and, as a constituent of edible natural products, is considered to have no undesired side effects. It has also been considered as a potent anticancer agent. However, the molecular mechanism of action of β-SITO as a tubulin-binding anticancer agent and its binding site on tubulin are poorly understood. Using a combination of biochemical analyses and molecular dynamic simulation, we investigated the molecular details of the binding interactions of β-SITO with tubulin. A polymer mass assay comparing the effects of β-SITO and of taxol and vinblastine on tubulin assembly showed that this phytosterol stabilized microtubule assembly in a manner similar to taxol. An 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid assay confirmed the direct interaction of β-SITO with tubulin. Although β-SITO did not show direct binding to the colchicine site on tubulin, it stabilized the colchicine binding. Interestingly, no sulfhydryl groups of tubulin were involved in the binding interaction of β-SITO with tubulin. Based on the results from the biochemical assays, we computationally modeled the binding of β-SITO with tubulin. Using molecular docking followed by molecular dynamic simulations, we found that β-SITO binds tubulin at a novel site (which we call the 'SITO site') adjacent to the colchicine and noscapine sites. Our data suggest that β-SITO is a potent anticancer compound that interferes with microtubule assembly dynamics by binding to a novel site on tubulin. PMID:25912799

  15. Amyloid Imaging in Aging and Dementia: Testing the Amyloid Hypothesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rabinovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging represents a major advance in neuroscience, enabling the detection and quantification of pathologic protein aggregations in the brain. In this review we survey current amyloid imaging techniques, focusing on positron emission tomography (PET with ^{11}carbon-labelled Pittsburgh Compound-B (11C-PIB, the most extensively studied and best validated tracer. PIB binds specifically to fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ deposits, and is a sensitive marker for Aβ pathology in cognitively normal older individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. PIB-PET provides us with a powerful tool to examine in vivo the relationship between amyloid deposition, clinical symptoms, and structural and functional brain changes in the continuum between normal aging and AD. Amyloid imaging studies support a model in which amyloid deposition is an early event on the path to dementia, beginning insidiously in cognitively normal individuals, and accompanied by subtle cognitive decline and functional and structural brain changes suggestive of incipient AD. As patients progress to dementia, clinical decline and neurodegeneration accelerate and proceed independently of amyloid accumulation. In the future, amyloid imaging is likely to supplement clinical evaluation in selecting patients for anti-amyloid therapies, while MRI and FDG-PET may be more appropriate markers of clinical progression.

  16. A New F-18 Labeled PET Agent For Imaging Alzheimer's Plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advances in development of imaging agents have focused on targeting amyloid plaques. Notable success has been the development of C-11 labeled PIB (Pittsburgh Compound) and a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of this agent. However, the short half life of C-11 (t1/2: 20 min), is a limitation, thus has prompted the development of F-18 labeled agents. Most of these agents are derivatives of amyloid binding dyes; Congo red and Thioflavin. Some of these agents are in clinical trials with encouraging results. We have been exploring new class of agents based on 8-hydroxy quinoline, a weak metal chelator, targeting elevated levels of metals in plaques. Iodine-123 labeled clioquinol showed affinity for amyloid plaques however, it had limited brain uptake and was not successful in imaging in intact animals and humans. We have been successful in synthesizing F-18 labeled 8-hydroxy quinoline. Small animal PET/CT imaging studies with this agent showed high (7-10% ID/g), rapid brain uptake and fast washout of the agent from normal mice brains and delayed washout from transgenic Alzheimer's mice. These promising results encouraged us in further evaluation of this class of compounds for imaging AD plaques.

  17. The novel amyloid-beta peptide aptamer inhibits intracellular amyloid-beta peptide toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wang; Yi Yang; Mingyue Jia; Chi Ma; Mingyu Wang; Lihe Che; Yu Yang; Jiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β peptide binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) decoy peptide (DP) can competitively antagonize binding of amyloid β peptide to ABAD and inhibit the cytotoxic effects of amyloid β peptide. Based on peptide aptamers, the present study inserted ABAD-DP into the disulfide bond of human thioredoxin (TRX) using molecular cloning technique to construct a fusion gene that can express the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer. Moreover, adeno-associated virus was used to allow its stable expression. Immunofluorescent staining revealed the co-expression of the transduced fusion gene TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 and amyloid β peptide in NIH-3T3 cells, indicating that the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer can bind amyloid β peptide within cells. In addition, cell morphology and MTT results suggested that TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 attenuated amyloid β peptide-induced SH-SY5Y cell injury and improved cell viability. These findings confirmed the possibility of constructing TRX-based peptide aptamer using ABAD-DP. Moreover, TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 inhibited the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β peptide.

  18. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Balas QA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Qosay A Al-Balas,1 Mohammad A Hassan,1 Nizar A Al-Shar’i,1 Nizar M Mhaidat,2 Ammar M Almaaytah,3 Fatima M Al-Mahasneh,1 Israa H Isawi1 1Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan Background: The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs.Methods: Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I.Results: Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM.Conclusion: We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may

  19. Application of poly (ethyleneimine) solution as a binding agent in DGT technique for measurement of heavy metals in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Dian-Peng; Fan, Hong-Tao; Li, Jing; Li, You; Li, Qiong; Sun, Ting

    2013-09-30

    A 0.050 mol L(-1) solution of poly (ethyleneimine) (PEI), had been used as a novel binding agent of diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) technique (PEI-DGT) for measuring the concentrations of labile Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) in waters. The binding capacities of the PEI-DGT for Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) were 11.8, 10.2 and 10.6 μmol L(-1), respectively. The performance of PEI-DGT was independence of pH in the range of 4-8 and ionic strength in the range from 1×10(-4) to 0.1 mol L(-1) (as NaNO3). PEI-DGT could measure 104.7±5.2% of the total concentration of Cd(2+) (0.500 mg L(-1)), 95.2±4.3% of the total Cu(2+) (0.500 mg L(-1)) and 99.2±3.4% of the total Pb(2+) (0.500 mg L(-1)) in synthetic solution. Effects of the ligands on the measurement of labile metals were also investigated in synthetic solutions containing the various concentrations of EDTA and humic acid. In EDTA solution, the concentrations of labile metals measured by PEI-DGT showed good agreement with the theoretical concentrations of free metal ions. In humic acid solution, the concentrations of labile metals measured by PEI-DGT decreased with the increase of the concentrations of humic acid. Several DGT devices with various binding agents, including PEI, sodium polyacrylate and poly(4-styrenesulfonate) solution, were used for the measurement of labile fractions of Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) in the spiked waters and in mine wastewaters. The results showed that the concentrations of labile metal measured by DGT devices with different binding agents could be significantly different, indicating that the labile fractions of metals were dependent on the binding strength of the binding agents with metals. By choosing binding agents, the useful information on the speciation and bioavailability of the analytes can be provided. PMID:23953471

  20. Solidification of radioactive liquid waste - blast furnace slag as a binding agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the reprocessing of spent Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel elements from research reactor DIDO a radioactive waste solution is produced. Besides the radiotoxical elements, the waste solution contains aluminium from the cladding material of the spent fuel element and sodium hydroxide which is given to the acidic waste solution to reach a pH value between 12 and 13. After the neutralisation, the waste solution is solidified in a slag rich cement matrix. The final solidified product has to be assessed for a final disposal in a deep geological repository. One aspect of the assessment is related to intrinsic factors inherent to the solidified waste physical properties and the interaction between the binding agent and the waste solution. Another aspect of the safety assessment is related to the hydrolytic behaviour of the final cemented waste product under deep geological disposal conditions. The alkalinity of the waste solution acts as an activator for the hydration of the blast furnace slag. The rate of slag hydration decreases at late ages due to the formation of a denser microstructure of reaction products around the slag particles. The solidification of the waste solution with pure blast furnace slag and slag rich matrices leads to significant compressive strength. The effect is more marked for the waste solution cemented with only blast furnace slag. The solidification with blast furnace slag enables a physical immobilisation of the radiotoxical elements. In presence of MgCl2-rich salt brines, the solid waste matrice has no barrier function: the radiotoxical elements are released from the cement matrix within few months. Cs leaching behaviour shows no interaction with the cement matrix regardless of the pH in the surrounding aqueous phase. In contrast, a chemical interaction of Sr with the cement matrix can be identified for pH-value of leachant above 7. (orig.)

  1. The effects of moisture content, particle size and binding agent content on oil palm shell pellet quality parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Arzola

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Waste-to-energy represents a challenge for the oil palm industry worldwide. Bio-pellet production is an alternative way of adding value to oil palm biomass. This would mean that a product having major energy density becomes more mechanically stable and achieves better performance during combustion. This paper deals with oil palm shell pelleting; using binding agents having up to 25% mass keeping average particle size less than 1mm and moisture content up to 18.7% (d.b. were evaluated. An experimental factorial design used binding agent mass percentage, milled shell particle size and moisture content as factors. Pellet density response surfaces and durability index were obtained. Pellet performance during thermal-chemical transformation was also evaluated by using thermogravimetry equipment. The results led to technical evaluation of scale-up at industrial production level.

  2. Amyloid-associated nucleic acid hybridisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Braun

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids promote amyloid formation in diseases including Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, it remains unclear whether the close interactions between amyloid and nucleic acid allow nucleic acid secondary structure to play a role in modulating amyloid structure and function. Here we have used a simplified system of short basic peptides with alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues to study nucleic acid - amyloid interactions. Employing biophysical techniques including X-ray fibre diffraction, circular dichroism spectroscopy and electron microscopy we show that the polymerized charges of nucleic acids concentrate and enhance the formation of amyloid from short basic peptides, many of which would not otherwise form fibres. In turn, the amyloid component binds nucleic acids and promotes their hybridisation at concentrations below their solution K(d, as shown by time-resolved FRET studies. The self-reinforcing interactions between peptides and nucleic acids lead to the formation of amyloid nucleic acid (ANA fibres whose properties are distinct from their component polymers. In addition to their importance in disease and potential in engineering, ANA fibres formed from prebiotically-produced peptides and nucleic acids may have played a role in early evolution, constituting the first entities subject to Darwinian evolution.

  3. Identification of poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as a target protein of immunosuppressive agent 15-deoxyspergualin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murahashi, Masataka; Simizu, Siro; Morioka, Masahiko; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2016-08-01

    15-Deoxyspergualin (DSG) is an immunosuppressive agent being clinically used. Unlike tacrolimus and cyclosporine A, it does not inhibit the calcineurin pathway, and its mechanism of action and target molecule have not been elucidated. Therefore, we previously prepared biotinylated derivative of DSG (BDSG) to fish up the target protein. In the present research, we identified poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as a DSG-binding protein using this probe. DSG was confirmed to bind to PCBP2 by pull-down assay. Intracellular localization of PCBP2 was changed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by DSG treatment. DSG inhibited the cell growth, and over-expression of PCBP2 reduced the anti-proliferative activity of DSG. PCBP2 is known to regulate various proteins including STAT1/2. Thus, we found PCBP2 as the first target protein of DSG that can explain the immunosuppressive activity. PMID:27261432

  4. Two adjacent C/EBP-binding sequences that participate in the cell-specific expression of the mouse serum amyloid A3 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, X. X.; J.H. Huang; Rienhoff, H Y; Liao, W S

    1990-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute-phase protein synthesized primarily in the liver. Its expression, very low in normal animals, is increased several hundredfold following acute inflammation. To examine DNA sequences involved in liver-specific expression, 5'-flanking regions of the mouse SAA3 gene were analyzed by transient transfection, band shift, and DNase I protection assays. We found that a 56-bp fragment immediately 5' to the TATA box spanning the region -93 to -38 relative to the t...

  5. Timing and modality of the sclerosing agents binding to the human proteins: laboratory analysis and clinical evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Tessari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing agents (SA are blood inactivated. Nevertheless, investigations concerning the interaction among SA and blood components have never been deeply investigated. Aim of the study is to precisely identify SA blood ligands, to determine their binding time and to highlight the clinical consequences. Thirty-one blood samples were collected from chronic venous disease patients and tested by capillary and agarose gel (AGE electrophoresis before and after adding polidocanol (POL and sodiumtetradecylsulphate (STS. The two different types of electrophoresis allowed an evaluation of the blood proteins binding with the sclerosing agents, with a reaction time lower than 8 seconds for the AGE. Subsequently six patients underwent foam sclerotherapy and then were subdivided in group A (4 patients and B (2 patients. In group A blood sample was obtained from the ipsilateral brachial vein immediately before (T0 and repeated 1, 3, 5, and 10 minutes after injection of STS 3% injection into the GSV. In group B, the same procedure was performed with the same timing from the ipsilateral femoral vein. Free STS (fSTS and total proteinbound STS (bSTS were measured. POL mainly binds to β-globulins (11%, while STS to albumin and α-globulins (62.6% and 30.7% on the protidogram, respectively. Both in the brachial and in the femoral vein, the average fSTS was always 0. STS binds to albumin (62.6% and α-globulins (30.7%, while POL is bound mainly by the b-globulins (11%. The present paper demonstrates how the vast majority of the sclerosing agent is bound to the blood proteins, suggesting the need to look for possible sclerotherapy complications factors also in the used gas and/or in the subsequent cathabolites release.

  6. Direct binding of ledipasvir to HCV NS5A: mechanism of resistance to an HCV antiviral agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyock Joo Kwon

    Full Text Available Ledipasvir, a direct acting antiviral agent (DAA targeting the Hepatitis C Virus NS5A protein, exhibits picomolar activity in replicon cells. While its mechanism of action is unclear, mutations that confer resistance to ledipasvir in HCV replicon cells are located in NS5A, suggesting that NS5A is the direct target of ledipasvir. To date co-precipitation and cross-linking experiments in replicon or NS5A transfected cells have not conclusively shown a direct, specific interaction between NS5A and ledipasvir. Using recombinant, full length NS5A, we show that ledipasvir binds directly, with high affinity and specificity, to NS5A. Ledipasvir binding to recombinant NS5A is saturable with a dissociation constant in the low nanomolar range. A mutant form of NS5A (Y93H that confers resistance to ledipasvir shows diminished binding to ledipasvir. The current study shows that ledipasvir inhibits NS5A through direct binding and that resistance to ledipasvir is the result of a reduction in binding affinity to NS5A mutants.

  7. A role for amyloid in cell aggregation and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa C Garcia

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans contain amyloid-forming sequences that are highly conserved. We have now used site-specific mutagenesis and specific peptide perturbants to explore amyloid-dependent activity in the Candida albicans adhesin Als5p. A V326N substitution in the amyloid-forming region conserved secondary structure and ligand binding, but abrogated formation of amyloid fibrils in soluble Als5p and reduced cell surface thioflavin T fluorescence. When displayed on the cell surface, Als5p with this substitution prevented formation of adhesion nanodomains and formation of large cellular aggregates and model biofilms. In addition, amyloid nanodomains were regulated by exogenous peptides. An amyloid-forming homologous peptide rescued aggregation and biofilm activity of Als5p(V326N cells, and V326N substitution peptide inhibited aggregation and biofilm activity in Als5p(WT cells. Therefore, specific site mutation, inhibition by anti-amyloid peturbants, and sequence-specificity of pro-amyloid and anti-amyloid peptides showed that amyloid formation is essential for nanodomain formation and activation.

  8. Atomic View of a Toxic Amyloid Small Oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Park, Jiyong; Zhao, Minglei; Pensalfini, Anna; Soriaga, Angela B.; Landau, Meytal; Teng, Poh K.; Cascio, Duilio; Glabe, Charles; Eisenberg, David (UCI); (UCLA)

    2012-04-30

    Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and the prion conditions, are each associated with a particular protein in fibrillar form. These amyloid fibrils were long suspected to be the disease agents, but evidence suggests that smaller, often transient and polymorphic oligomers are the toxic entities. Here, we identify a segment of the amyloid-forming protein {alpha}{beta} crystallin, which forms an oligomeric complex exhibiting properties of other amyloid oligomers: {beta}-sheet-rich structure, cytotoxicity, and recognition by an oligomer-specific antibody. The x-ray-derived atomic structure of the oligomer reveals a cylindrical barrel, formed from six antiparallel protein strands, that we term a cylindrin. The cylindrin structure is compatible with a sequence segment from the {beta}-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease. Cylindrins offer models for the hitherto elusive structures of amyloid oligomers.

  9. Generation of amyloid-β is reduced by the interaction of calreticulin with amyloid precursor protein, presenilin and nicastrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Stemmer

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein by γ-secretase and the ensuing generation of amyloid-β is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the identification of amyloid precursor protein binding proteins involved in regulating processing of amyloid precursor protein by the γ-secretase complex is essential for understanding the mechanisms underlying the molecular pathology of the disease. We identified calreticulin as novel amyloid precursor protein interaction partner that binds to the γ-secretase cleavage site within amyloid precursor protein and showed that this Ca(2+- and N-glycan-independent interaction is mediated by amino acids 330-344 in the C-terminal C-domain of calreticulin. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that calreticulin is not only associated with amyloid precursor protein but also with the γ-secretase complex members presenilin and nicastrin. Calreticulin was detected at the cell surface by surface biotinylation of cells overexpressing amyloid precursor protein and was co-localized by immunostaining with amyloid precursor protein and presenilin at the cell surface of hippocampal neurons. The P-domain of calreticulin located between the N-terminal N-domain and the C-domain interacts with presenilin, the catalytic subunit of the γ-secretase complex. The P- and C-domains also interact with nicastrin, another functionally important subunit of this complex. Transfection of amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells with full-length calreticulin leads to a decrease in amyloid-β42 levels in culture supernatants, while transfection with the P-domain increases amyloid-β40 levels. Similarly, application of the recombinant P- or C-domains and of a synthetic calreticulin peptide comprising amino acid 330-344 to amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells result in elevated amyloid-β40 and amyloid-β42 levels, respectively. These findings indicate that the interaction of

  10. Human RNASET2 derivatives as potential anti-angiogenic agents: actin binding sequence identification and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesiel-Nuttman, Liron; Doron, Shani; Schwartz, Betty; Shoseyov, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Human RNASET2 (hRNASET2) has been demonstrated to exert antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic effects independent of its ribonuclease capacity. We suggested that RNASET2 exerts its antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic activities via binding to actin and consequently inhibits cell motility. We focused herein on the identification of the actin binding site of hRNASET2 using defined sequences encountered within the whole hRNASET2 protein. For that purpose we designed 29 different hRNASET2-derived peptides. The 29 peptides were examined for their ability to bind immobilized actin. Two selected peptides-A103-Q159 consisting of 57 amino acids and peptide K108-K133 consisting of 26 amino acids were demonstrated to have the highest actin binding ability and concomitantly the most potent anti-angiogenic activity. Further analyses on the putative mechanisms associated with angiogenesis inhibition exerted by peptide K108-K133 involved its location during treatment within the HUVE cells. Peptide K108-K133 readily penetrates the cell membrane within 10 min of incubation. In addition, supplementation with angiogenin delays the entrance of peptide K108-K133 to the cell suggesting competition on the same cell internalization route. The peptide was demonstrated to co-localize with angiogenin, suggesting that both molecules bind analogous cellular epitopes, similar to our previously reported data for ACTIBIND and trT2-50. PMID:25815360

  11. Insights into the Interaction Mechanism of Ligands with Aβ42 Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Mechanics: Implications of Role of Common Binding Site in Drug Design for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundaikar, Harish S; Degani, Mariam S

    2015-10-01

    Aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) into oligomers and further into fibrils is hypothesized to be a key factor in pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, mapping and docking were used to study the binding of ligands to protofibrils. It was followed by molecular simulations to understand the differences in interactions of known therapeutic agents such as curcumin, fluorescence-based amyloid staining agents such as thioflavin T, and diagnostic agents such as florbetapir (AV45), with Aβ protofibrils. We show that therapeutic agents bind to and distort the protofibrils, thus causing destabilization or prevention of oligomerization, in contrast to diagnostic agents which bind to but do not distort such structures. This has implications in the rational design of ligands, both for diagnostics and therapeutics of AD.

  12. The effects of moisture content, particle size and binding agent content on oil palm shell pellet quality parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson Arzola; Alexander Gómez; Sonia Rincón

    2012-01-01

    Waste-to-energy represents a challenge for the oil palm industry worldwide. Bio-pellet production is an alternative way of adding value to oil palm biomass. This would mean that a product having major energy density becomes more mechanically stable and achieves better performance during combustion. This paper deals with oil palm shell pelleting; using binding agents having up to 25% mass keeping average particle size less than 1mm and moisture content up to 18.7% (d.b.) were evaluated. An exp...

  13. The Effect of Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs on Amyloid Aggregation and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Iannuzzi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a protein folding disorder in which normally soluble proteins are deposited extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, impairing tissue structure and function. Charged polyelectrolytes such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are frequently found associated with the proteinaceous deposits in tissues of patients affected by amyloid diseases. Experimental evidence indicate that they can play an active role in favoring amyloid fibril formation and stabilization. Binding of GAGs to amyloid fibrils occurs mainly through electrostatic interactions involving the negative polyelectrolyte charges and positively charged side chains residues of aggregating protein. Similarly to catalyst for reactions, GAGs favor aggregation, nucleation and amyloid fibril formation functioning as a structural templates for the self-assembly of highly cytotoxic oligomeric precursors, rich in β-sheets, into harmless amyloid fibrils. Moreover, the GAGs amyloid promoting activity can be facilitated through specific interactions via consensus binding sites between amyloid polypeptide and GAGs molecules. We review the effect of GAGs on amyloid deposition as well as proteins not strictly related to diseases. In addition, we consider the potential of the GAGs therapy in amyloidosis.

  14. Curcumin as an Amyloid-indicator Dye in E. coli †

    OpenAIRE

    McCrate, Oscar A.; Zhou, Xiaoxue; Cegelski, Lynette

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that curcumin is an amyloid-specific dye in E. coli. Curcumin binds to curliated whole cells and to isolated curli amyloid fibers. Similar to Congo red, curcumin exhibits a red-shift in absorbance and a significant increase in fluorescence upon binding to isolated curli.

  15. The butter flavorant, diacetyl, exacerbates β-amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Swati S; Vartak, Ashish P; Vince, Robert

    2012-10-15

    Diacetyl (DA), an ubiquitous butter-flavoring agent, was found to influence several aspects of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation--one of the two primary pathologies associated with Alzheimer's disease. Thioflavin T fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic measurements revealed that DA accelerates Aβ¹⁻⁴² aggregation into soluble and ultimately insoluble β-pleated sheet structures. DA was found to covalently bind to Arg⁵ of Aβ¹⁻⁴² through proteolytic digestion-mass spectrometric experiments. These biophysical and chemical effects translated into the potentiation of Aβ¹⁻⁴² cytotoxicity by DA toward SH-SY5Y cells in culture. DA easily traversed through a MDR1-MDCK cell monolayer, an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. Additionally, DA was found not only to be resistant to but also inhibitory toward glyoxalase I, the primary initiator of detoxification of amyloid-promoting reactive dicarbonyl species that are generated naturally in large amounts by neuronal tissue. In light of the chronic exposure of industry workers to DA, this study raises the troubling possibility of long-term neurological toxicity mediated by DA.

  16. Tubulin assembly, taxoid site binding, and cellular effects of the microtubule-stabilizing agent dictyostatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiraju, Charitha; Edler, Michael C; Hamel, Ernest; Raccor, Brianne S; Balachandran, Raghavan; Zhu, Guangyu; Giuliano, Kenneth A; Vogt, Andreas; Shin, Youseung; Fournier, Jean-Hugues; Fukui, Yoshikazu; Brückner, Arndt M; Curran, Dennis P; Day, Billy W

    2005-11-15

    (-)-Dictyostatin is a sponge-derived, 22-member macrolactone natural product shown to cause cells to accumulate in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, with changes in intracellular microtubules analogous to those observed with paclitaxel treatment. Dictyostatin also induces assembly of purified tubulin more rapidly than does paclitaxel, and nearly as vigorously as does dictyostatin's close structural congener, (+)-discodermolide (Isbrucker et al. (2003), Biochem. Pharmacol. 65, 75-82). We used synthetic (-)-dictyostatin to study its biochemical and cytological activities in greater detail. The antiproliferative activity of dictyostatin did not differ greatly from that of paclitaxel or discodermolide. Like discodermolide, dictyostatin retained antiproliferative activity against human ovarian carcinoma cells resistant to paclitaxel due to beta-tubulin mutations and caused conversion of cellular soluble tubulin pools to microtubules. Detailed comparison of the abilities of dictyostatin and discodermolide to induce tubulin assembly demonstrated that the compounds had similar potencies. Dictyostatin inhibited the binding of radiolabeled discodermolide to microtubules more potently than any other compound examined, and dictyostatin and discodermolide had equivalent activity as inhibitors of the binding of both radiolabeled epothilone B and paclitaxel to microtubules. These results are consistent with the idea that the macrocyclic structure of dictyostatin represents the template for the bioactive conformation of discodermolide.

  17. Contemporary treatment of amyloid heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palecek, Tomas; Fikrle, Michal; Nemecek, Eduard; Bauerova, Lenka; Kuchynka, Petr; Louch, William E; Spicka, Ivan; Rysava, Romana

    2015-01-01

    The amyloidoses represent a group of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein, amyloid, which is formed by insoluble extracellular fibrils in β-pleated sheets. Although cardiac involvement may occur in all types of amyloidoses, clinically relevant amyloid cardiomyopathy is a typical feature of AL amyloidosis and transthyretin-related amyloidoses. Congestive heart failure represents the commonest manifestation of amyloid heart disease. Noninvasive imaging techniques, especially echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance, play a major role in the diagnosis of amyloid cardiomyopathy; however, histological confirmation and exact typing of amyloid deposits is necessary whether in extracardiac location or directly in the myocardium. Early diagnosis of amyloid heart disease is of utmost importance as the presence and especially the severity of cardiac involvement generally drives the prognosis of affected subjects and plays a major role in determining the intensity of specific treatment, namely in AL amyloidosis. The management of patients with amyloid heart disease is complex. Loop diuretics together with aldosterone antagonists represent the basis for influencing signs of congestion. In AL amyloidosis, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation is generally considered to be a front-line treatment option, if the disease is diagnosed at its early stage. The combination of mephalan with dexamethasone has been the standard therapy for severely affected individuals; however, the combinations with several novel agents including immunomodulatory drugs and bortezomibe have been tested in clinical trials with promising results. New therapeutic substances with the potential to slow or even stop the progression of transthyretin-related amyloidosis are also extensively studied. PMID:25483951

  18. Self-assembled cardanol azo derivatives as antifungal agent with chitin-binding ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahata, Denial; Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Gupta, Vinay Krishna; Mandal, Mahitosh; Nag, Ahindra; Nando, Golok B

    2014-08-01

    Cardanol is a non-isoprenoic phenolic lipid-mixture of distilled cashew nut shell liquid obtained from Anacardium occidentale. Herein, cardanol is purified from cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) and synthesized to new compounds with different azo amphiphiles. These synthesized compounds are allowed to self-assembled in hydrophobic environment and checked antifungal activity against Candida albicans. Self-assembled structure of CABA showed higher antifungal activity (16μg/mL) and chitin-binding ability in comparison to CAP and CANB. Furthermore, the self-assembled azo amphiphiles are immobilized with silver ions to prepare hydrogel which showed eight folds enhanced antifungal activity. Toxicity is reduced by several folds of self-assembled or hydrogel structure in comparison to pure compounds. Thus, the self-assembled structure of amphiphiles and their hydrogels have been found to be new macromolecules of interest with potential use as antifungal drugs. PMID:24836571

  19. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  20. Discovery of membrane active benzimidazole quinolones-based topoisomerase inhibitors as potential DNA-binding antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Addla, Dinesh; Ponmani, Jeyakkumar; Wang, Ao; Xie, Dan; Wang, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Geng, Rong-Xia; Cai, Gui-Xin; Li, Shuo; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2016-03-23

    A series of novel benzimidazole quinolones as potential antimicrobial agents were designed and synthesized. Most of the prepared compounds exhibited good or even stronger antimicrobial activities in comparison with reference drugs. The most potent compound 15m was membrane active and did not trigger the development of resistance in bacteria. It not only inhibited the formation of biofilms but also disrupted the established Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms. It was able to inhibit the relaxation activity of E. coli topoisomerase IV at 10 μM concentration. Moreover, this compound also showed low toxicity against mammalian cells. Molecular modeling and experimental investigation of compound 15m with DNA suggested that this compound could effectively bind with DNA to form a steady 15m-DNA complex which might further block DNA replication to exert the powerful bioactivities.

  1. Design, synthesis and evaluation of novel indandione derivatives as multifunctional agents with cholinesterase inhibition, anti-β-amyloid aggregation, antioxidant and neuroprotection properties against Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Chandra Bhushan; Manral, Apra; Kumari, Shikha; Saini, Vikas; Tiwari, Manisha

    2016-08-15

    A series of novel 2-(4-(4-substituted piperazin-1-yl)benzylidene)-1H-indene-1,3(2H)-diones were designed, synthesized and appraised as multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents. In vitro studies of compounds 27-38 showed that these compounds exhibit moderate to excellent AChE, BuChE and Aβ aggregation inhibitory activity. Notably, compounds 34 and 38 appeared as most active multifunctional agents in the entire series and exhibited excellent inhibition against AChE (IC50=0.048μM: 34; 0.036μM: 38), Aβ aggregation (max% inhibition 82.2%, IC50=9.2μM: 34; max% inhibition 80.9%, IC50=10.11μM: 38) and displayed significant antioxidant potential in ORAC-FL assay. Both compounds also successfully diminished H2O2 induced oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. Fascinatingly, compounds 34 and 38 showed admirable neuroprotective effects against H2O2 and Aβ induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Additionally, both derivatives showed no considerable toxicity in neuronal cell viability assay and represented drug likeness properties in the primarily pharmacokinetics study. All these results together, propelled out that compounds 34 and 38 might serve as promising multi-functional lead candidates for treatment of AD in the future. PMID:27353888

  2. Pharmacokinetics of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol in wild-type rodents and its binding to beta amyloid deposits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snellman, Anniina; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R.; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja [University of Turku, MediCity/PET Preclinical Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Rokka, Johanna; Eskola, Olli [University of Turku, Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Wilson, Ian; Farrar, Gill [GE Healthcare Medical Diagnostics, Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire (United Kingdom); Scheinin, Mika [University of Turku, Department of Pharmacology, Drug Development and Therapeutics, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology, Turku (Finland); Solin, Olof [University of Turku, Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Aabo Akademi University, Accelerator Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Rinne, Juha O. [University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland)

    2012-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol as a preclinical PET tracer for imaging {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) deposition by comparing its pharmacokinetics to those of [{sup 11}C]Pittsburgh compound B ([{sup 11}C]PIB) in wild-type Sprague Dawley rats and C57Bl/6N mice. In addition, binding of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol to A{beta} deposits was studied in the Tg2576 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. [{sup 18}F]Flutemetamol biodistribution was evaluated using ex vivo PET methods and in vivo PET imaging in wild-type rats and mice. Metabolism and binding of [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol to plasma proteins were analysed using thin-layer chromatography and ultrafiltration methods, respectively. Radiation dose estimates were calculated from rat ex vivo biodistribution data. The binding of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol to A{beta} deposits was also studied using ex vivo and in vitro autoradiography. The location of A{beta} deposits in the brain was determined with thioflavine S staining and immunohistochemistry. The pharmacokinetics of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol resembled that of [{sup 11}C]PIB in rats and mice. In vivo studies showed that both tracers readily entered the brain, and were excreted via the hepatobiliary pathway in both rats and mice. The metabolism of [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol into radioactive metabolites was faster than that of [{sup 11}C]PIB. [{sup 18}F]Flutemetamol cleared more slowly from the brain than [{sup 11}C]PIB, particularly from white matter, in line with its higher lipophilicity. Effective dose estimates for [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol were 2.28 and 6.65 {mu}Sv/MBq, respectively. Autoradiographs showed [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol binding to fibrillar A{beta} deposits in the brain of Tg2576 mice. Based on its pharmacokinetic profile, [{sup 18}F]flutemetamol showed potential as a PET tracer for preclinical imaging. It showed good brain uptake and was bound to A{beta} deposits in the

  3. Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides interact with DNA, as proved by surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrantes, Alejandro; Camero, Sergio; Garcia-Lucas, Angel; Navarro, Pedro J; Benitez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2012-10-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, abnormal processing of the β-amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer's disease patients increases the production of β-amyloid toxic peptides, which, after forming highly aggregated fibrillar structures, lead to extracellular plaques formation, neuronal loss and dementia. However, a great deal of evidence has point to intracellular small oligomers of amyloid peptides, probably transient intermediates in the process of fibrillar structures formation, as the most toxic species. In order to study the amyloid-DNA interaction, we have selected here three different forms of the amyloid peptide: Aβ1-40, Aβ25-35 and a scrambled form of Aβ25-35. Surface Plasmon Resonance was used together with UV-visible spectroscopy, Electrophoresis and Electronic Microscopy to carry out this study. Our results prove that, similarly to the full length Aβ1-42, all conformations of toxic amyloid peptides, Aβ1-40 and Aβ25-35, may bind DNA. In contrast, the scrambled form of Aβ25-35, a non-aggregating and nontoxic form of this peptide, could not bind DNA. We conclude that although the amyloid-DNA interaction is closely related to the amyloid aggregation proneness, this cannot be the only factor which determines the interaction, since small oligomers of amyloid peptides may also bind DNA if their predominant negatively charged amino acid residues are previously neutralized.

  4. Purification, subunit characterization and ultrastructure of three soluble bovine lectins: conglutinin, mannose-binding protein and the pentraxin serum amyloid P-component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Friis, P; Holm Nielsen, E;

    1992-01-01

    affinity chromatography and selective elution was developed. The purification was monitored by SDS-PAGE, Western blotting and electron microscopy. Binding of the lectins to Sephadex-iC3b, their collagenase sensitivity, and the size and antibody reactivity of their subunits was investigated. The...... demonstration, by SDS-PAGE, of 25-kDa subunits, which were unaffected by collagenase treatment but bound to Sephadex-iC3b and antibodies to human SAP, indicated the existence of bovine SAP. Bovine conglutinin (BK) also showed calcium-dependent binding to Sephadex-iC3b, whereas bovine MBP did not. The binding of...... BK was inhibitable with GlcNAc. A 3000-fold increase in BK activity (ELISA) was obtained in eluates from Sephadex-iC3b. SDS-PAGE analyses of BK and MBP revealed subunits with an Mr of 43 kDa and 30 kDa, respectively. These subunits were sensitive to collagenase treatment which reduced the Mr to 20 k...

  5. Potential of carbohydrate-binding agents as therapeutics against enveloped viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, K O; Balzarini, J

    2012-03-01

    Twenty-seven years after the discovery of HIV as the cause of AIDS more than 25 drugs directed against four different viral targets (i.e. reverse transcriptase, protease, integrase, envelope gp41) and one cellular target (i.e. CCR5 co-receptor) are available for treatment. However, the search for an efficient vaccine is still ongoing. One of the main problems is the presence of a continuously evolving dense carbohydrate shield, consisting of N-linked glycans that surrounds the virion and protects it against efficient recognition and persistent neutralization by the immune system. However, several lectins from the innate immune system specifically bind to these glycans in an attempt to process the virus antigens to provoke an immune response. Across a wide variety of different species in nature lectins can be found that can interact with the glycosylated envelope of HIV-1 and can block the infection of susceptible cells by the virus. In this review, we will give an overview of the lectins from non-mammalian origin that are endowed with antiviral properties and discuss the complex interactions between lectins of the innate immune system and HIV-1. Also, attention will be given to different carbohydrate-related modalities that can be exploited for antiviral chemotherapy.

  6. The binding of the radioprotective agent cysteamine with the phospholipidic membrane headgroup-interface region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of the aminothiol radioprotector cysteamine (β-mercaptoethylamine)(CYST) with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) artificial membranes has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), turbidimetry and spin labeling. This hydrophilic molecule displays a biphasic, concentration-dependent binding to the phospholipidic head groups at neutral pH. In the CYST/DPPC molar ratio 1:160-1:2 (mole/mole) an increasing ordering effect is observed. At high concentrations (over 3:1 ratio), this ordering effect decreases. With the symmetric disulfide dimer cystamine, the biphasic effect is not shown and the membrane rigidity decrease is obtained only at concentration ratio higher than 1:1. The charge repartition of the cysteamine molecule has been shown to be disymmetric, +0.52 e on the NH3 group and +0.19 e on the SH extremity, whereas the cystamine molecule is electrostatically symmetrical. These properties could be related to their membrane effects. With cysteamine, at a low concentration, an electrostatic bridging between the negatively charged phosphate groups of the polar heads induces the increase in membrane stability: the molecules behave like a divalent cation. At high concentration a displacement of the slightly charged SH extremity by the amine disrupts the bridges and induces the decrease in rigidity: the drug behaves like a monovalent cation. Due to its symmetric charge and its double length, such an effect is not observed with cystamine. This study could bring further information about the interactions between cysteamine and polyelectrolytic structures (ADN for example) and about the radioprotective properties of this drug. (author)

  7. DCE-MRI using small-molecular and albumin-binding contrast agents in experimental carcinomas with different stromal content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farace, Paolo; Merigo, Flavia; Fiorini, Silvia; Nicolato, Elena; Tambalo, Stefano; Daducci, Alessandro [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Degrassi, Anna [Nerviano Medical Sciences Institute, Milan (Italy); Sbarbati, Andrea [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Verona, Verona (Italy); Rubello, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.rubello@libero.it [Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Physics, Services of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, ' S. Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Viale Tre Martiri 140, 45100 Rovigo (Italy); Marzola, Pasquina [Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences, Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Verona, Verona (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    Objectives: To compare DCE-MRI experiments performed using a standard small-molecular (Gd-DTPA) and an albumin-binding (MS-325) contrast agent in two carcinoma models with different stromal content. Materials and methods: DU-145 or BXPC-3 cancer cells were subcutaneously injected into nude mice. DCE-MRI was performed by a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA or MS-325 about 2 weeks after inoculation. For quantitative analysis a volume of interest was manually drawn over each tumor. To address the heterogeneous enhancement, each tumor volume was then divided into the 20% most-enhancing and the remaining 80% least-enhancing fractions. Mean tumor enhancement was calculated over these selected tumor volumes and compared between tumor groups and contrast agents. Maps of differential enhancement, peak enhancement and time-to-peak were used for visual evaluation. CD31 and VEGF immunohistochemistry were performed in excised tumors. Results: In the 80% least-enhancing volume, at late time points of the dynamic scan, the mean enhancement elicited by MS-325 was higher in BXPC-3 than in DU-145 tumors. In the 20% most-enhancing volume, using either contrast agents, significant difference between the two tumors types were observed only early, while at later time points of the dynamic scan the difference were obscured by the faster washout observed in the BXPC-3 tumors. Enhancement maps confirmed that BXPC-3 tumors were characterized by marked washout rate using either contrast agent, particularly in the higher enhancing peripheral rim. With MS-325 this washout pattern appeared to be specific to the BXPC-3 carcinomas, since it was not observed in the DU-145 tumors. Finally, in both tumor types, MS-325 produced significantly higher enhancement than Gd-DTPA in the late phase of the dynamic scan. Ex vivo analysis confirmed the marked presence of aberrant infiltrative stroma in BXPC-3 tumors, in which tumor vessels were embedded. In all tumors the central portion was less viable and less

  8. Sulfonated dyes attenuate the toxic effects of beta-amyloid in a structure-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S J; Sadler, I I; Hawtin, S R; Tailor, V J; Shearman, M S

    1995-09-15

    We recently reported that several sulfate-containing glycosaminoglycans, a class of compounds associated with the beta-amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease, attenuate the toxic effects of beta-amyloid fragments beta 25-35 and beta 1-40. The amyloid-binding sulfonated dye Congo Red was shown to have a similar effect. Using two clonal cell lines, we now demonstrate that several sulfonated dyes attenuate beta-amyloid toxicity and that the protective effect appears specific for compounds whose sulfonate groups can interact with the beta-pleated structure of aggregated amyloid. These results suggest that by binding beta-amyloid these compounds may prevent toxic interactions of the peptide with cells.

  9. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... al. Course of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation. Neurology. 2007;68:1411-1416. PMID: 17452586 www.ncbi. ...

  10. De novo Amyloid Proteins from Designed Combinatorial Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Michael W.; Wang, Weixun; Patterson, Jennifer; Mancias, Joseph D.; Beasley, James R.; Hecht, Michael H.

    1999-09-01

    Amyloid deposits are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and the prion diseases. The amyloid fibrils isolated from these different diseases share similar structural features. However, the protein sequences that assemble into these fibrils differ substantially from one disease to another. To probe the relationship between amino acid sequence and the propensity to form amyloid, we studied a combinatorial library of sequences designed de novo. All sequences in the library were designed to share an identical pattern of alternating polar and nonpolar residues, but the precise identities of these side chains were not constrained and were varied combinatorially. The resulting proteins self-assemble into large oligomers visible by electron microscopy as amyloid-like fibrils. Like natural amyloid, the de novo fibrils are composed of β -sheet secondary structure and bind the diagnostic dye, Congo red. Thus, binary patterning of polar and nonpolar residues arranged in alternating periodicity can direct protein sequences to form fibrils resembling amyloid. The model amyloid fibrils assemble and disassemble reversibly, providing a tractable system for both basic studies into the mechanisms of fibril assembly and the development of molecular therapies that interfere with this assembly.

  11. Binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes for amyloid fibrils recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanczyc, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.hanczyc@chalmers.se

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Interactions of binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes with amyloid fibrils. • Dimer ruthenium(II) compounds are sensitive amyloid fibrils biomarkers. • Recognition of amyloid-chromophore adducts by two-photon excited emission. - Abstract: Metal–organic compounds represent a unique class of biomarkers with promising photophysical properties useful for imaging. Here interactions of insulin fibrils with two binuclear complexes [μ-(11,11′-bidppz)(phen){sub 4}Ru{sub 2}]{sup 4+} (1) and [μ-C4(cpdppz)(phen){sub 4}Ru{sub 2}]{sup 4+} (2) are studied by linear dichroism (LD) and fluorescence. These ruthenium(II) compounds could provide a new generation of amyloid binding chromophores with long lived lifetimes, good luminescence quantum yields for the bound molecules and photo-stability useful in multiphoton luminescence imaging.

  12. Semi-automated high-throughput fluorescent intercalator displacement-based discovery of cytotoxic DNA binding agents from a large compound library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Lateca S; Bapat, Aditi; Kelley, Mark R; Georgiadis, Millie M; Long, Eric C

    2010-03-01

    High-throughput fluorescent intercalator displacement (HT-FID) was adapted to the semi-automated screening of a commercial compound library containing 60,000 molecules resulting in the discovery of cytotoxic DNA-targeted agents. Although commercial libraries are routinely screened in drug discovery efforts, the DNA binding potential of the compounds they contain has largely been overlooked. HT-FID led to the rapid identification of a number of compounds for which DNA binding properties were validated through demonstration of concentration-dependent DNA binding and increased thermal melting of A/T- or G/C-rich DNA sequences. Selected compounds were assayed further for cell proliferation inhibition in glioblastoma cells. Seven distinct compounds emerged from this screening procedure that represent structures unknown previously to be capable of targeting DNA leading to cell death. These agents may represent structures worthy of further modification to optimally explore their potential as cytotoxic anti-cancer agents. In addition, the general screening strategy described may find broader impact toward the rapid discovery of DNA targeted agents with biological activity.

  13. A comparative analysis of the aggregation behavior of amyloid-beta peptide variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandersteen, A.; Hubin, E.; Sarroukh, R.; Baets, G. de; Schymkowitz, J.; Rousseau, F.; Subramaniam, V.; Raussens, V.; Wenschuh, H.; Wildemann, D.; Broersen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Aggregated forms of the amyloid-beta peptide are hypothesized to act as the prime toxic agents in Alzheimer disease (AD). The in vivo amyloid-beta peptide pool consists of both C- and N-terminally truncated or mutated peptides, and the composition thereof significantly determines AD risk. Other vari

  14. Insights into the interaction of discodermolide and docetaxel with tubulin. Mapping the binding sites of microtubule-stabilizing agents by using an integrated NMR and computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Angeles; Rodríguez-Salarichs, Javier; Trigili, Chiara; Nieto, Lidia; Coderch, Claire; Andreu, José Manuel; Paterson, Ian; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Díaz, J Fernando

    2011-08-19

    The binding interactions of two antitumor agents that target the paclitaxel site, docetaxel and discodermolide, to unassembled α/β-tubulin heterodimers and microtubules have been studied using biochemical and NMR techniques. The use of discodermolide as a water-soluble paclitaxel biomimetic and extensive NMR experiments allowed the detection of binding of microtubule-stabilizing agents to unassembled tubulin α/β-heterodimers. The bioactive 3D structures of docetaxel and discodermolide bound to α/β-heterodimers were elucidated and compared to those bound to microtubules, where subtle changes in the conformations of docetaxel in its different bound states were evident. Moreover, the combination of experimental TR-NOE and STD NMR data with CORCEMA-ST calculations indicate that docetaxel and discodermolide target an additional binding site at the pore of the microtubules, which is different from the internal binding site at the lumen previously determined by electron crystallography. Binding to this pore site can then be considered as the first ligand-protein recognition event that takes place in advance of the drug internalization process and interaction with the lumen of the microtubules.

  15. Amyloid β Levels in Human Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, Takehiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Satoh, Akira; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs) to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid) to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging), implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402 PMID:23166730

  16. Amyloid β levels in human red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Kiko

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging, implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402.

  17. Interaction of amyloid inhibitor proteins with amyloid beta peptides: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Das

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the detailed mechanism by which proteins such as human αB- crystallin and human lysozyme inhibit amyloid beta (Aβ peptide aggregation is crucial for designing treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Thus, unconstrained, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent have been performed to characterize the Aβ17-42 assembly in presence of the αB-crystallin core domain and of lysozyme. Simulations reveal that both inhibitor proteins compete with inter-peptide interaction by binding to the peptides during the early stage of aggregation, which is consistent with their inhibitory action reported in experiments. However, the Aβ binding dynamics appear different for each inhibitor. The binding between crystallin and the peptide monomer, dominated by electrostatics, is relatively weak and transient due to the heterogeneous amino acid distribution of the inhibitor surface. The crystallin-bound Aβ oligomers are relatively long-lived, as they form more extensive contact surface with the inhibitor protein. In contrast, a high local density of arginines from lysozyme allows strong binding with Aβ peptide monomers, resulting in stable complexes. Our findings not only illustrate, in atomic detail, how the amyloid inhibitory mechanism of human αB-crystallin, a natural chaperone, is different from that of human lysozyme, but also may aid de novo design of amyloid inhibitors.

  18. Amyloid Fibril Solubility

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, L G

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  19. 99mTc-MAMA-chrysamine G, a probe for beta-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrysamine G (CG), an analogue of Congo red, is known to bind in vitro to the β-amyloid protein (Aβ 10-43) and to homogenates of several regions of the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We synthesised a conjugate of 2-(acetamido)-CG with a bis-S-trityl protected monoamide-monoaminedithiol (MAMA-Tr2) tetraligand, which was efficiently deprotected and labelled with a 75% yield with technetium-99m, to obtain 99mTc-MAMA-CG. In mice, 99mTc-MAMA-CG was cleared mainly by the hepatobiliary system, resulting in a fast blood clearance. Brain uptake of 99mTc-MAMA-CG was low. Co-injection with the blood pool tracer iodine-125 human serum albumin (125I-HSA) demonstrated a brain/blood activity ratio for 99mTc-MAMA-CG that was significantly higher than that for 125I-HSA (t test for dependent samples, P99mTc-MAMA-CG to cross the blood-brain barrier. In vitro autoradiography demonstrated pronounced binding of 99mTc-MAMA-CG to β-amyloid deposits in autopsy sections of the parietal and occipital cortex of an AD patient as compared with controls. Adding 10 μM Congo red during incubation displaced the binding of 99mTc-MAMA-CG. Congo red staining and autoradiography identified the same lesions. 99mTc-MAMA-CG seems to bind selectively to β-amyloid deposition in human brain parenchyma and blood vessels in vitro and thus might be a lead compound for further development of a useful tracer agent for the in vivo diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.)

  20. Therapeutic treatment of Alzheimer's disease using metal complexing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Katherine A; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2007-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by deposition of extracellular amyloid plaques, formation of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal dysfunction in the brain. A growing body of evidence indicates a central role for biometals such as copper in many critical aspects of AD. The amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide and its parental molecule, the amyloid precursor protein (APP) both modulate Cu and Zn metabolism in the brain. Therefore, aberrant changes to APP or Abeta metabolism could potentially alter biometal homoestasis in AD, leading to increased free radical production and neuronal oxidative stress. Modulation of metal bioavailability in the brain has been proposed as a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of AD patients. The lipid permeable metal complexing agent, clioquinol (CQ), has shown promising results in animal models of AD and in small clinical trials involving AD patients. Moreover, a new generation of metal-ligand based therapeutics is currently under development. Patents now cover the generation of novel metal ligand structures designed to modulate metal binding to Abeta and quench metal-mediated free radical generation. However, the mechanism by which CQ and other metal complexing agents slows cognitive decline in AD animal models and patients is unknown. Increasing evidence suggests that ligand-mediated redistribution of metals at a cellular level in the brain may be important. Further research will be necessary to fully understand the complex pathways associated with efficacious metal-based pharmaceuticals for treatment of AD.

  1. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosicka, Iga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II is a metabolic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The disease is associated with occurence of insoluble, fibrillar, protein aggregates in islets of Langerhans in the pancreas - islet amyloid. The main constituent of these protein fibers is the human islet...

  2. Switchable photooxygenation catalysts that sense higher-order amyloid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Atsuhiko; Shimizu, Yusuke; Oisaki, Kounosuke; Sohma, Youhei; Kanai, Motomu

    2016-10-01

    Proteins can misfold into amyloid structures that are associated with diseases; however, the same proteins often have important biological roles. To degrade selectively the amyloid form without affecting the fraction of functional protein is, therefore, an attractive goal. Here we report target-state-dependent photooxygenation catalysts that are active only when bound to the cross-β-sheet structure that is characteristic of pathogenic aggregated amyloid proteins. We show these catalysts can selectively oxygenate the amyloid form of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) 1-42 in the presence of non-amyloid off-target substrates. Furthermore, photooxygenation with a catalyst that bears an Aβ-binding peptide attenuated the Aβ pathogenicity in the presence of cells. We also show that selective photooxygenation is generally applicable to other amyloidogenic proteins (amylin, insulin, β2-microglobulin, transthyretin and α-synuclein) and does not affect the physiologically functional non-aggregate states of these proteins. This is the first report of an artificial catalyst that can be selectively and reversibly turned on and off depending on the structure and aggregation state of the substrate protein.

  3. Complexation of amyloid fibrils with charged conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dhiman; Dutta, Paulami; Chakraborty, Chanchal; Singh, Pradeep K; Anoop, A; Jha, Narendra Nath; Jacob, Reeba S; Mondal, Mrityunjoy; Mankar, Shruti; Das, Subhadeep; Malik, Sudip; Maji, Samir K

    2014-04-01

    It has been suggested that conjugated charged polymers are amyloid imaging agents and promising therapeutic candidates for neurological disorders. However, very less is known about their efficacy in modulating the amyloid aggregation pathway. Here, we studied the modulation of Parkinson's disease associated α-synuclein (AS) amyloid assembly kinetics using conjugated polyfluorene polymers (PF, cationic; PFS, anionic). We also explored the complexation of these charged polymers with the various AS aggregated species including amyloid fibrils and oligomers using multidisciplinary biophysical techniques. Our data suggests that both polymers irrespective of their different charges in the side chains increase the fibrilization kinetics of AS and also remarkably change the morphology of the resultant amyloid fibrils. Both polymers were incorporated/aligned onto the AS amyloid fibrils as evident from electron microscopy (EM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the resultant complexes were structurally distinct from their pristine form of both polymers and AS supported by FTIR study. Additionally, we observed that the mechanism of interactions between the polymers with different species of AS aggregates were markedly different.

  4. A potential amyloid-imaging probe for Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To screen out the human single-chain fragment variable (scFv) against amyloid β peptide 40 from a human synthetic antibody library, sub-clone its gene into E. coli expression system, and express and purify it for amyloid peptide imaging research. The overload of amyloid β peptide and the appearance of senile plaques in the human brain tissue is one of the hallmark of the Alzheimer's disease, and in vivo imaging of amyloidβ peptide is valuable for the earlier diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Methods: Amyloid β peptide 40 was bound on the solid surface of Nunc plates as antigen and a human antibody library constructed with human antibody heavy and light chain variable gene and nucleotides sequence coded (Gly4Ser)3 linker and displayed on the protein surface of filamentous phage was used to screen the binding clones. After five rounds of bio-panning, the host E. coli TG1 was infected with eluted filamentous phage from the last turn of selection. 55 well-separated colonies were picked randomly from the plates and several specific positive clones were identified by ELISA testing, and their binding sites were determined by competitive ELISA with amyloid 13 peptide 40, 1-16, 25-35. The single-chain Fv antibody gene was sequenced and their amino acids sequence was deduced. The scFv antibody gene was sub-cloned into a protokayotic expression vector pET-22b(+) and transformed into bacteria strain BL21 to express the His6-tagged single-chain antibody and the whole cell culture was subjected to SDS-PAGE analysis. The antibody was expressed in inclusion bodies and purified with serial buffers and verified with western blotting and their activity was tested by ELISA against amyloid β peptide 40. Results: ELISA testing showed that 33 clones could bind amyloid β peptide 40 and 10 of these clones could be inhibited by amyloid β peptide 40 itself to below 50% of its original binding activities. Five clones could also be inhibited by amyloid β peptide 1-16. DNA

  5. Amyloid Aggregation and Membrane Disruption by Amyloid Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-03-01

    Amyloidogenesis has been the focus of intense basic and clinical research, as an increasing number of amyloidogenic proteins have been linked to common and incurable degenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, type II diabetes, and Parkinson's. Recent studies suggest that the cell toxicity is mainly due to intermediates generated during the assembly process of amyloid fibers, which have been proposed to attack cells in a variety of ways. Disruption of cell membranes is believed to be one of the key components of amyloid toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Our research in this area is focused on the investigation of the early events in the aggregation and membrane disruption of amyloid proteins, Islet amyloid polypeptide protein (IAPP, also known as amylin) and amyloid-beta peptide, on the molecular level. Structural insights into the mechanisms of membrane disruption by these amyloid proteins and the role of membrane components on the membrane disruption will be presented.

  6. CYB5D2 requires heme-binding to regulate HeLa cell growth and confer survival from chemotherapeutic agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Bruce

    Full Text Available The cytochrome b5 domain containing 2 (CYB5D2; Neuferricin protein has been reported to bind heme, however, the critical residues responsible for heme-binding are undefined. Furthermore, the relationship between heme-binding and CYB5D2-mediated intracellular functions remains unknown. Previous studies examining heme-binding in two cytochrome b5 heme-binding domain-containing proteins, damage-associated protein 1 (Dap1; Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1, have revealed that conserved tyrosine (Y 73, Y79, aspartic acid (D 86, and Y127 residues present in human CYB5D2 may be involved in heme-binding. CYB5D2 binds to type b heme, however, only the substitution of glycine (G at D86 (D86G within its cytochrome b5 heme-binding (cyt-b5 domain abolished its heme-binding ability. Both CYB5D2 and CYB5D2(D86G localize to the endoplasmic reticulum. Ectopic CYB5D2 expression inhibited cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony growth of HeLa cells. Conversely, CYB5D2 knockdown and ectopic CYB5D2(D86G expression increased cell proliferation and colony growth. As PGRMC1 has been reported to regulate the expression and activities of cytochrome P450 proteins (CYPs, we examined the role of CYB5D2 in regulating the activities of CYPs involved in sterol synthesis (CYP51A1 and drug metabolism (CYP3A4. CYB5D2 co-localizes with cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR, while CYB5D2 knockdown reduced lanosterol demethylase (CYP51A1 levels and rendered HeLa cells sensitive to mevalonate. Additionally, knockdown of CYB5D2 reduced CYP3A4 activity. Lastly, CYB5D2 expression conferred HeLa cell survival from chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, cisplatin and doxorubicin, with its ability to promote survival being dependent on its heme-binding ability. Taken together, this study provides evidence that heme-binding is critical for CYB5D2 in regulating HeLa cell growth and survival, with endogenous CYB5D2 being required to

  7. Amyloids here, amyloids there…What’s wrong with them?

    OpenAIRE

    Gharibyan, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid formation is inherent property of proteins which under certain circumstances can become a pathologic feature of a group of diseases called amyloidosis. There are about 30 known human amyloidosis and more than 27 identified proteins involved in these pathologies.  Besides these proteins, there are a growing number of proteins non-related to diseases shown to form amyloid-like structures in vitro, which make them excellent tools for studying amyloid formation mechanisms, physicochemical...

  8. Binding of the potential antitumour agent indirubin-5-sulphonate at the inhibitor site of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b. Comparison with ligand binding to pCDK2-cyclin A complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmopoulou, Magda N; Leonidas, Demetres D; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Bischler, Nicolas; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Sakarellos, Constantinos E; Pauptit, Richard; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2004-06-01

    The binding of indirubin-5-sulphonate (E226), a potential anti-tumour agent and a potent inhibitor (IC(50) = 35 nm) of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) has been studied by kinetic and crystallographic methods. Kinetic analysis revealed that E226 is a moderate inhibitor of GPb (K(i) = 13.8 +/- 0.2 micro m) and GPa (K(i) = 57.8 +/- 7.1 micro m) and acts synergistically with glucose. To explore the molecular basis of E226 binding we have determined the crystal structure of the GPb/E226 complex at 2.3 A resolution. Structure analysis shows clearly that E226 binds at the purine inhibitor site, where caffeine and flavopiridol also bind [Oikonomakos, N.G., Schnier, J.B., Zographos, S.E., Skamnaki, V.T., Tsitsanou, K.E. & Johnson, L.N. (2000) J. Biol. Chem.275, 34566-34573], by intercalating between the two aromatic rings of Phe285 and Tyr613. The mode of binding of E226 to GPb is similar, but not identical, to that of caffeine and flavopiridol. Comparative structural analyses of the GPb-E226, GPb-caffeine and GPb-flavopiridol complex structures reveal the structural basis of the differences in the potencies of the three inhibitors and indicate binding residues in the inhibitor site that can be exploited to obtain more potent inhibitors. Structural comparison of the GPb-E226 complex structure with the active pCDK2-cyclin A-E226 complex structure clearly shows the different binding modes of the ligand to GPb and CDK2; the more extensive interactions of E226 with the active site of CDK2 may explain its higher affinity towards the latter enzyme. PMID:15153119

  9. Pretreatment of plasma samples by a novel hollow fiber centrifugal ultrafiltration technique for the determination of plasma protein binding of three coumarins using acetone as protein binding releasing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junmei; Shi, Qingwen; Jiang, Ye; Liu, Yan

    2015-09-15

    A novel and practical sample pretreatment method based on hollow fiber centrifugal ultrafiltration (HFCF-UF) was developed to determine plasma protein binding by using HPLC. The samples for analyzing unbound and total concentrations could be prepared in parallel simultaneously by the same device. It only required centrifugation for a short time and the filtrate could be injected directly for HPLC analysis without further treatment. Coumarins were selected as the model drugs. Acetone was chosen as the releasing agent to free the binding drug from the drug-protein complex for the total drug concentration determination. Non-specific bindings (NSBs) between the analytes and hollow fiber membrane materials were investigated. The type and volume of protein binding releaser were optimized. Additionally, centrifugal speed and centrifugal time were considered. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute recovery rates of the unbound and total concentrations were in the range of 97.5-100.9% for the three analytes. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.0135-0.0667μgmL(-1). In vitro plasma protein binding of the three coumarins was determined at three concentrations using the validated method and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 3.4%. Compared with traditional method, the HFCF-UF method is simple to run, no specialized equipment requirement and is a more accurate plasma pretreatment procedure with almost excellent drug-protein binding equilibrium. Therefore, this method can be applied to determine the plasma protein binding in clinical practice. It also provides a reliable alternative for accurate monitoring of unbound or total drug concentration in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM).

  10. Designed Trpzip-3 β-Hairpin Inhibits Amyloid Formation in Two Different Amyloid Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopping, Gene; Kellock, Jackson; Caughey, Byron; Daggett, Valerie

    2013-09-12

    The trpzip peptides are small, monomeric, and extremely stable β-hairpins that have become valuable tools for studying protein folding. Here, we show that trpzip-3 inhibits aggregation in two very different amyloid systems: transthyretin and Aβ(1-42). Interestingly, Trp → Leu mutations renders the peptide ineffective against transthyretin, but Aβ inhibition remains. Computational docking was used to predict the interactions between trpzip-3 and transthyretin, suggesting that inhibition occurs via binding to the outer region of the thyroxine-binding site, which is supported by dye displacement experiments. PMID:24900756

  11. Rational design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of third generation α-noscapine analogues as potent tubulin binding anti-cancer agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kumar Manchukonda

    Full Text Available Systematic screening based on structural similarity of drugs such as colchicine and podophyllotoxin led to identification of noscapine, a microtubule-targeted agent that attenuates the dynamic instability of microtubules without affecting the total polymer mass of microtubules. We report a new generation of noscapine derivatives as potential tubulin binding anti-cancer agents. Molecular modeling experiments of these derivatives 5a, 6a-j yielded better docking score (-7.252 to -5.402 kCal/mol than the parent compound, noscapine (-5.505 kCal/mol and its existing derivatives (-5.563 to -6.412 kCal/mol. Free energy (ΔG bind calculations based on the linear interaction energy (LIE empirical equation utilizing Surface Generalized Born (SGB continuum solvent model predicted the tubulin-binding affinities for the derivatives 5a, 6a-j (ranging from -4.923 to -6.189 kCal/mol. Compound 6f showed highest binding affinity to tubulin (-6.189 kCal/mol. The experimental evaluation of these compounds corroborated with theoretical studies. N-(3-brormobenzyl noscapine (6f binds tubulin with highest binding affinity (KD, 38 ± 4.0 µM, which is ~ 4.0 times higher than that of the parent compound, noscapine (KD, 144 ± 1.0 µM and is also more potent than that of the first generation clinical candidate EM011, 9-bromonoscapine (KD, 54 ± 9.1 µM. All these compounds exhibited substantial cytotoxicity toward cancer cells, with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 72.9 µM; compound 6f showed prominent anti-cancer efficacy with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 26.9 µM in cancer cells of different tissues of origin. These compounds perturbed DNA synthesis, delayed the cell cycle progression at G2/M phase, and induced apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Collectively, the study reported here identified potent, third generation noscapinoids as new anti-cancer agents.

  12. Effects of Divalent Cations and Disulfide Bond Reducing Agents on Specific Binding of Growth Hormone to Liver Membrane Receptors from Snakehead Fish (Ophiocephalus argus, Cantor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xun; Zhang, Xin-Na; Zhu, Shang-Quan; Zheng, Han-Qi

    2000-01-01

    Divalent cations, Ca(2 ), Mg(2 ) and Mn(2 ) enhance the binding of bream growth hormone (brGH) to snakehead fish liver membrane, and their optimum concentration was found to be 8 12 mmol/L, at which Ca(2 ), Mg(2 ) and Mn(2 ) could increase, respectively, the specific binding to 230%, 180%, and 200%, compared with the binding in the absence of ions. The Eadie-Scatchard plot was used for the dynamic analysis of the Ca(2 ) binding site. A low affinity Ca(2 ) binding site was found in the GH-receptor complex with K(m)=0.384 mmol/L, and the affinity constant (K(a)) was increased from 1.045x10(9) L.mol(-1) to 1.295x10(9) L.mol(-1) by the addition of 10 mmol/L CaCl(2). The effects of disulfide bond reducing agents, DTT and ME, on (125)I-brGH binding to growth hormone receptor (GHR) on snakehead fish liver memebrane were also analyzed. The addition of 0.1 20 mmol/L DTT or 0.01% 1% ME to the radioreceptor assay system caused a significant dose dependent increase in the specific binding for (125)I-brGH. In the presence of 0.8 mmol/L DTT or 0.08% ME, the specific binding of (125)I-brGH was increased from 10.2% to 15.5% and 13.2% respectively, and the affinity constant was also increased from 1.265x10(9) L.mol(-1) to 2.185x10(9) L.mol(-1) and 1.625x10(9) L.mol(-1), respectively but no changes in the binding capacity were observed. Further studies showed that the effects of reductants on the specific binding of brGH were due in part to the ligand itself and in part to GHR. In addition, it was observed that one of the three disulfide bonds of brGH could be reduced by 0.8 mmol/L DTT.

  13. Synthesis, Molecular Modelling and Biological Evaluation of Novel Heterodimeric, Multiple Ligands Targeting Cholinesterases and Amyloid Beta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalina Hebda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholinesterases and amyloid beta are one of the major biological targets in the search for a new and efficacious treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. The study describes synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of new compounds designed as dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Among the synthesized compounds, two deserve special attention—compounds 42 and 13. The former is a saccharin derivative and the most potent and selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (EeAChE IC50 = 70 nM. Isoindoline-1,3-dione derivative 13 displays balanced inhibitory potency against acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE (EeAChE IC50 = 0.76 μM, EqBuChE IC50 = 0.618 μM, and it inhibits amyloid beta aggregation (35.8% at 10 μM. Kinetic studies show that the developed compounds act as mixed or non-competitive acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. According to molecular modelling studies, they are able to interact with both catalytic and peripheral active sites of the acetylcholinesterase. Their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB was confirmed in vitro in the parallel artificial membrane permeability BBB assay. These compounds can be used as a solid starting point for further development of novel multifunctional ligands as potential anti-Alzheimer’s agents.

  14. Effects of beta-adrenergic blocking agents on specific binding of [3H]D-Ala2-Met5-enkephalinamide and [3H]naloxone.

    OpenAIRE

    Takayama, Haruhiko; Ogawa,Norio; Asanuma, Masato; Hirata, Hiroshi; Ogura,Toshio; Ota,Zensuke

    1991-01-01

    To gain further insight into the central nervous system (CNS)-action of beta-adrenergic blocking agents (beta-blockers), we examined the effects of various kinds of beta-blockers on opioid receptors (Op-Rs) using radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA). We demonstrated that beta-blockers are competitively bound to Op-Rs in the CNS. Sodium index of beta-blockers in [3H]naloxone binding study indicated that beta-blockers had the mixed agonist-antagonist activity of opiates. The relative potency of be...

  15. Quantitative amyloid imaging using image-derived arterial input function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Su

    Full Text Available Amyloid PET imaging is an indispensable tool widely used in the investigation, diagnosis and monitoring of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Currently, a reference region based approach is used as the mainstream quantification technique for amyloid imaging. This approach assumes the reference region is amyloid free and has the same tracer influx and washout kinetics as the regions of interest. However, this assumption may not always be valid. The goal of this work is to evaluate an amyloid imaging quantification technique that uses arterial region of interest as the reference to avoid potential bias caused by specific binding in the reference region. 21 participants, age 58 and up, underwent Pittsburgh compound B (PiB PET imaging and MR imaging including a time-of-flight (TOF MR angiography (MRA scan and a structural scan. FreeSurfer based regional analysis was performed to quantify PiB PET data. Arterial input function was estimated based on coregistered TOF MRA using a modeling based technique. Regional distribution volume (VT was calculated using Logan graphical analysis with estimated arterial input function. Kinetic modeling was also performed using the estimated arterial input function as a way to evaluate PiB binding (DVRkinetic without a reference region. As a comparison, Logan graphical analysis was also performed with cerebellar cortex as reference to obtain DVRREF. Excellent agreement was observed between the two distribution volume ratio measurements (r>0.89, ICC>0.80. The estimated cerebellum VT was in line with literature reported values and the variability of cerebellum VT in the control group was comparable to reported variability using arterial sampling data. This study suggests that image-based arterial input function is a viable approach to quantify amyloid imaging data, without the need of arterial sampling or a reference region. This technique can be a valuable tool for amyloid imaging, particularly in population where reference

  16. Amyloid PET in European and North American cohorts; and exploring age as a limit to clinical use of amyloid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several radiotracers that bind to fibrillar amyloid-beta in the brain have been developed and used in various patient cohorts. This study aimed to investigate the comparability of two amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as well as examine how age affects the discriminative properties of amyloid PET imaging. Fifty-one healthy controls (HCs), 72 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 90 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a European cohort were scanned with [11C]Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) and compared with an age-, sex- and disease severity-matched population of 51 HC, 72 MCI and 84 AD patients from a North American cohort who were scanned with [18F]Florbetapir. An additional North American population of 246 HC, 342 MCI and 138 AD patients with a Florbetapir scan was split by age (55-75 vs 76-93 y) into groups matched for gender and disease severity. PET template-based analyses were used to quantify regional tracer uptake. The mean regional uptake patterns were similar and strong correlations were found between the two tracers across the regions of interest in HC (ρ = 0.671, p = 0.02), amyloid-positive MCI (ρ = 0.902, p < 0.001) and AD patients (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001). The application of the Florbetapir cut-off point resulted in a higher proportion of amyloid-positive HC and a lower proportion of amyloid-positive AD patients in the older group (28 and 30 %, respectively) than in the younger group (19 and 20 %, respectively). These results illustrate the comparability of Florbetapir and PIB in unrelated but matched patient populations. The role of amyloid PET imaging becomes increasingly important with increasing age in the diagnostic assessment of clinically impaired patients. (orig.)

  17. Amyloid PET in European and North American cohorts; and exploring age as a limit to clinical use of amyloid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiotis, Konstantinos [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Carter, Stephen F. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Farid, Karim [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); APHP, Hotel-Dieu Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Savitcheva, Irina [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Collaboration: for the Diagnostic Molecular Imaging (DiMI) network and the Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2015-09-15

    Several radiotracers that bind to fibrillar amyloid-beta in the brain have been developed and used in various patient cohorts. This study aimed to investigate the comparability of two amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as well as examine how age affects the discriminative properties of amyloid PET imaging. Fifty-one healthy controls (HCs), 72 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 90 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a European cohort were scanned with [11C]Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) and compared with an age-, sex- and disease severity-matched population of 51 HC, 72 MCI and 84 AD patients from a North American cohort who were scanned with [18F]Florbetapir. An additional North American population of 246 HC, 342 MCI and 138 AD patients with a Florbetapir scan was split by age (55-75 vs 76-93 y) into groups matched for gender and disease severity. PET template-based analyses were used to quantify regional tracer uptake. The mean regional uptake patterns were similar and strong correlations were found between the two tracers across the regions of interest in HC (ρ = 0.671, p = 0.02), amyloid-positive MCI (ρ = 0.902, p < 0.001) and AD patients (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001). The application of the Florbetapir cut-off point resulted in a higher proportion of amyloid-positive HC and a lower proportion of amyloid-positive AD patients in the older group (28 and 30 %, respectively) than in the younger group (19 and 20 %, respectively). These results illustrate the comparability of Florbetapir and PIB in unrelated but matched patient populations. The role of amyloid PET imaging becomes increasingly important with increasing age in the diagnostic assessment of clinically impaired patients. (orig.)

  18. Extraskeletal problems and amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drüeke, T B

    1999-12-01

    The major clinical manifestations of dialysis-associated A beta 2M amyloidosis are chronic arthralgias, destructive arthropathy and the carpal tunnel syndrome. For dialysis patients who have been maintained on renal replacement therapy for more than 10-15 years, this complication may become a major physical handicap. It may even be life-threatening in some instances due to cervical cord compression. Amyloid deposits in joint areas precede clinical symptoms and signs by several years. Systemic deposits may also occur but their clinical manifestations are infrequent. The diagnosis of dialysis arthropathy associated with beta 2-microglobulin-associated (A beta 2M) amyloidosis mostly relies on indirect clinical and radiological evidence. Histologic proof is rarely obtained in vivo. The pathogenesis of the disease is complex. It includes reduced elimination of beta 2M and potentially also as impaired degradation of A beta 2M as well as enhanced production of A beta 2M amyloid fibrils. Non enzymatic modifications of beta 2M probably play a role, including beta 2M protein modification with advanced glycation end-products (AGE) and advanced oxidation protein products. Modified beta 2M, collagen and proteoglycans appear actively involved in the induction of a local inflammatory response and beta 2M amyloid formation. There is also evidence in favor of treatment-related factors such as the type of hemodialysis membrane and the purity of dialysis water. Hopefully, the translation of our improving knowledge of all the factors involved will lead to a better treatment and eventually to the prevention of this dramatic complication of dialysis.

  19. Acetylcholinesterase accelerates assembly of amyloid-beta-peptides into Alzheimer's fibrils: possible role of the peripheral site of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inestrosa, N C; Alvarez, A; Pérez, C A; Moreno, R D; Vicente, M; Linker, C; Casanueva, O I; Soto, C; Garrido, J

    1996-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an important component of cholinergic synapses, colocalizes with amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) deposits of Alzheimer's brain. We report here that bovine brain AChE, as well as the human and mouse recombinant enzyme, accelerates amyloid formation from wild-type A beta and a mutant A beta peptide, which alone produces few amyloid-like fibrils. The action of AChE was independent of the subunit array of the enzyme, was not affected by edrophonium, an active site inhibitor, but it was affected by propidium, a peripheral anionic binding site ligand. Butyrylcholinesterase, an enzyme that lacks the peripheral site, did not affect amyloid formation. Furthermore, AChE is a potent amyloid-promoting factor when compared with other A beta-associated proteins. Thus, in addition to its role in cholinergic synapses, AChE may function by accelerating A beta formation and could play a role during amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's brain.

  20. Probing the GnRH receptor agonist binding site identifies methylated triptorelin as a new anti-proliferative agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Millar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available D-amino acid substitutions at Glycine postion-6 in GnRH-I decapeptide can possess super-agonist activity and enhanced in vivo pharmacokinetics. Agonists elicit growth-inhibition in tumorigenic cells expressing the GnRH receptor above threshold levels. However, new agonists with modified properties are required to improve the anti-proliferative range. Effects of residue substitutions and methylations on tumourigenic HEK293[SCL60] and WPE-1-NB26-3 prostate cells expressing the rat GnRH receptor were compared. Peptides were ranked according to receptor binding affinity, induction of inositol phosphate production and cell growth-inhibition. Analogues possessing D-Trp6 (including Triptorelin, D-Leu6 (including Leuprolide, D-Ala6, D-Lys6, or D-Arg6 exhibited agonist and anti-proliferative activity. Residues His5 or His5,Trp7,Tyr8, corresponding to residues found in GnRH-II , were tolerated, with retention of sub-nanomolar/low nanomolar binding affinities and EC50s for receptor activation and IC50s for cell growth-inhibition. His5D-Arg6-GnRH-I exhibited reduced binding affinity and potency, effective in the mid-nanomolar range. However, all GnRH-II-like analogues were less potent than Triptorelin. By comparison, three methylated-Trp6 Triptorelin variants showed differential binding, receptor activation and anti-proliferation potency. Significantly, 5-Methyl-DL-Trp6-Triptorelin was equipotent to triptorelin. Subsequent studies should determine whether pharmacologically enhanced derivatives of Triptorelin can be developed by further alkylations, without substitutions or cleavable cytotoxic adducts, to improve the extent of growth-inhibition of tumour cells expressing the GnRH receptor.

  1. Hacking the code of amyloid formation: the amyloid stretch hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Serrano, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems.

  2. Congo Red Interactions with Curli-Producing E. coli and Native Curli Amyloid Fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Reichhardt

    Full Text Available Microorganisms produce functional amyloids that can be examined and manipulated in vivo and in vitro. Escherichia coli assemble extracellular adhesive amyloid fibers termed curli that mediate adhesion and promote biofilm formation. We have characterized the dye binding properties of the hallmark amyloid dye, Congo red, with curliated E. coli and with isolated curli fibers. Congo red binds to curliated whole cells, does not inhibit growth, and can be used to comparatively quantify whole-cell curliation. Using Surface Plasmon Resonance, we measured the binding and dissociation kinetics of Congo red to curli. Furthermore, we determined that the binding of Congo red to curli is pH-dependent and that histidine residues in the CsgA protein do not influence Congo red binding. Our results on E. coli strain MC4100, the most commonly employed strain for studies of E. coli amyloid biogenesis, provide a starting point from which to compare the influence of Congo red binding in other E. coli strains and amyloid-producing organisms.

  3. Between Amyloids and Aggregation Lies a Connection with Strength and Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter N. Lipke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tell of a journey that led to discovery of amyloids formed by yeast cell adhesins and their importance in biofilms and host immunity. We begin with the identification of the adhesin functional amyloid-forming sequences that mediate fiber formation in vitro. Atomic force microscopy and confocal microscopy show 2-dimensional amyloid “nanodomains” on the surface of cells that are activated for adhesion. These nanodomains are arrays of adhesin molecules that bind multivalent ligands with high avidity. Nanodomains form when adhesin molecules are stretched in the AFM or under laminar flow. Treatment with anti-amyloid perturbants or mutation of the amyloid sequence prevents adhesion nanodomain formation and activation. We are now discovering biological consequences. Adhesin nanodomains promote formation and maintenance of biofilms, which are microbial communities. Also, in abscesses within candidiasis patients, we find adhesin amyloids on the surface of the fungi. In both human infection and a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model, the presence of fungal surface amyloids elicits anti-inflammatory responses. Thus, this is a story of how fungal adhesins respond to extension forces through formation of cell surface amyloid nanodomains, with key consequences for biofilm formation and host responses.

  4. Selective sampling and measurement of Cr (VI) in water with polyquaternary ammonium salt as a binding agent in diffusive gradients in thin-films technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hong, E-mail: redastar@163.com [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Food Safety, Bohai University (China); Research Institute of Food Science, Bohai University (China); Food Safety Key Lab of Liaoning Province, Jinzhou 121013 (China); Zhang, Yang-Yang; Zhong, Ke-Li; Guo, Lian-Wen [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Food Safety, Bohai University (China); Research Institute of Food Science, Bohai University (China); Food Safety Key Lab of Liaoning Province, Jinzhou 121013 (China); Gu, Jia-Li [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Food Safety, Bohai University (China); Bo, Le; Zhang, Meng-Han [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Food Safety, Bohai University (China); Research Institute of Food Science, Bohai University (China); Food Safety Key Lab of Liaoning Province, Jinzhou 121013 (China); Li, Jian-Rong, E-mail: lijianrong@zjgsu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Food Safety, Bohai University (China); Research Institute of Food Science, Bohai University (China); Food Safety Key Lab of Liaoning Province, Jinzhou 121013 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We develop a new DGT device for in situ sampling Cr (VI) in water. • Polyquaternary ammonium salt (PQAS) was used as binding agent of DGT device. • Cr (VI) can be accumulated in the PQAS binding phase whereas Cr (III) cannot. • The DGT performance was independent of pH 3–12 and ionic strength 1 × 10{sup −3}–1 mol L{sup −1}. - Abstract: A diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) device with polyquaternary ammonium salt (PQAS) as a novel binding agent (PQAS DGT) combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) was developed for the selective sampling and measurement of Cr (VI) in water. The performance of PQAS DGT was independent of pH 3–12 and ionic strength from 1 × 10{sup −3} to 1 mol L{sup −1}. DGT validation experiments showed that Cr (VI) was measured accurately as well as selectively by PQAS DGT, whereas Cr (III) was not determined quantitatively. Compared with diphenylcarbazide spectrophotometric method (DPC), the measurement of Cr (VI) with PQAS DGT was agreement with that of DPC method in the industrial wastewater. PQAS-DGT device had been successfully deployed in local freshwater. The concentrations of Cr (VI) determined by PQAS DGT coupled with GFAAS in Nuer River, Ling River and North Lake were 0.73 ± 0.09 μg L{sup −1}, 0.50 ± 0.07 μg L{sup −1} and 0.61 ± 0.07 μg L{sup −1}, respectively. The results indicate that PQAS DGT device can be used for the selective sampling and measurement Cr (VI) in water and its detection limit is lower than that of DPC method.

  5. Selective sampling and measurement of Cr (VI) in water with polyquaternary ammonium salt as a binding agent in diffusive gradients in thin-films technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We develop a new DGT device for in situ sampling Cr (VI) in water. • Polyquaternary ammonium salt (PQAS) was used as binding agent of DGT device. • Cr (VI) can be accumulated in the PQAS binding phase whereas Cr (III) cannot. • The DGT performance was independent of pH 3–12 and ionic strength 1 × 10−3–1 mol L−1. - Abstract: A diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) device with polyquaternary ammonium salt (PQAS) as a novel binding agent (PQAS DGT) combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) was developed for the selective sampling and measurement of Cr (VI) in water. The performance of PQAS DGT was independent of pH 3–12 and ionic strength from 1 × 10−3 to 1 mol L−1. DGT validation experiments showed that Cr (VI) was measured accurately as well as selectively by PQAS DGT, whereas Cr (III) was not determined quantitatively. Compared with diphenylcarbazide spectrophotometric method (DPC), the measurement of Cr (VI) with PQAS DGT was agreement with that of DPC method in the industrial wastewater. PQAS-DGT device had been successfully deployed in local freshwater. The concentrations of Cr (VI) determined by PQAS DGT coupled with GFAAS in Nuer River, Ling River and North Lake were 0.73 ± 0.09 μg L−1, 0.50 ± 0.07 μg L−1 and 0.61 ± 0.07 μg L−1, respectively. The results indicate that PQAS DGT device can be used for the selective sampling and measurement Cr (VI) in water and its detection limit is lower than that of DPC method

  6. Serum amyloid P component scintigraphy in familial amyloid polyneuropathy: regression of visceral amyloid following liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) associated with transthyretin (TTR) mutations is the commonest type of hereditary amyloidosis. Plasma TTR is produced almost exclusively in the liver and orthotopic liver transplantation is the only available treatment, although the clinical outcome varies. Serum amyloid P component (SAP) scintigraphy is a method for identifying and quantitatively monitoring amyloid deposits in vivo, but it has not previously been used to study the outcome of visceral amyloid deposits in FAP following liver transplantation. Whole body scintigraphy following injection of iodine-123 labelled SAP was performed in 17 patients with FAP associated with TTR Met30 and in five asymptomatic gene carriers. Follow-up studies were performed in ten patients, eight of whom had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation 1-5 years beforehand. There was abnormal uptake of 123I-SAP in all FAP patients, including the kidneys in each case, the spleen in five cases and the adrenal glands in three cases. Renal amyloid deposits were also present in three of the asymptomatic carriers. Follow-up studies 1-5 years after liver transplantation showed that there had been substantial regression of the visceral amyloid deposits in two patients and modest improvement in three cases. The amyloid deposits were unchanged in two patients. In conclusion, 123I-SAP scintigraphy identified unsuspected visceral amyloid in each patient with FAP due to TTR Met30. The universal presence of renal amyloid probably underlies the high frequency of renal failure that occurs in FAP following liver transplantation. The variable capacity of patients to mobilise amyloid deposits following liver transplantation may contribute to their long-term clinical outcome. (orig.)

  7. Serum amyloid P component scintigraphy in familial amyloid polyneuropathy: regression of visceral amyloid following liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydh, A.; Hietala, S.O.; Aahlstroem, K.R. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Suhr, O. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Pepys, M.B.; Hawkins, P.N. [Immunological Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) associated with transthyretin (TTR) mutations is the commonest type of hereditary amyloidosis. Plasma TTR is produced almost exclusively in the liver and orthotopic liver transplantation is the only available treatment, although the clinical outcome varies. Serum amyloid P component (SAP) scintigraphy is a method for identifying and quantitatively monitoring amyloid deposits in vivo, but it has not previously been used to study the outcome of visceral amyloid deposits in FAP following liver transplantation. Whole body scintigraphy following injection of iodine-123 labelled SAP was performed in 17 patients with FAP associated with TTR Met30 and in five asymptomatic gene carriers. Follow-up studies were performed in ten patients, eight of whom had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation 1-5 years beforehand. There was abnormal uptake of {sup 123}I-SAP in all FAP patients, including the kidneys in each case, the spleen in five cases and the adrenal glands in three cases. Renal amyloid deposits were also present in three of the asymptomatic carriers. Follow-up studies 1-5 years after liver transplantation showed that there had been substantial regression of the visceral amyloid deposits in two patients and modest improvement in three cases. The amyloid deposits were unchanged in two patients. In conclusion, {sup 123}I-SAP scintigraphy identified unsuspected visceral amyloid in each patient with FAP due to TTR Met30. The universal presence of renal amyloid probably underlies the high frequency of renal failure that occurs in FAP following liver transplantation. The variable capacity of patients to mobilise amyloid deposits following liver transplantation may contribute to their long-term clinical outcome. (orig.) With 2 figs., 2 tabs., 22 refs.

  8. Radioiodinated benzimidazole derivatives as single photon emission computed tomography probes for imaging of {beta}-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Mengchao [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Ono, Masahiro, E-mail: ono@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Hidekazu [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Liu Boli [Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Saji, Hideo, E-mail: hsaji@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Five iodinated 2-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as potential probes for {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques. One of the compounds, 4-(6-iodo-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylaniline (12), showed excellent affinity for A{beta}{sub 1-42} aggregates (K{sub i}=9.8 nM). Autoradiography with sections of postmortem Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain revealed that a radioiodinated probe [{sup 125}I]12, labeled A{beta} plaques selectively with low nonspecific binding. Biodistribution experiments with normal mice injected intravenously with [{sup 125}I]12 showed high uptake [4.14 percent injected dose per gram (% ID/g) at 2 min] into and rapid clearance (0.15% ID/g at 60 min) from the brain, which may bring about a good signal-to-noise ratio and therefore achieve highly sensitive detection of A{beta} plaques. In addition, [{sup 125}I]12 labeled amyloid plaques in vivo in an AD transgenic model. The preliminary results strongly suggest that [{sup 125}I]12 bears characteristics suitable for detecting amyloid plaques in vivo. When labeled with {sup 123}I, it may be a useful SPECT imaging agent for A{beta} plaques in the brain of living AD patients.

  9. Speciation of lead in seawater and river water by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in agarose gel as a binding agent in the diffusive gradients in thin films technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pescim, Guilherme Favoreto; Marrach, Gabriela; Vannuci-Silva, Monizze; Souza, Lais Alves; Menegario, Amauri Antonio [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Centro de Estudos Ambientais, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in agarose gel is proposed as a binding agent for the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique for determination of Pb in river water and seawater. DGT samplers were assembled with the proposed binding agent (25-mm disk containing 20 %, m/v, S. cerevisiae and 3.0 %, m/v, agarose) and a diffusive layer of cellulose (3MM Chr chromatography paper of 25-mm diameter). The effects of some DGT parameters (e.g., immersion time, ionic strength, and pH) were evaluated. Elution of Pb from the binding agent was effectively done with 1.75 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3}. The deployment curve (between 2 and 24 h) was characterized by a significant uptake of Pb (346 ng Pb h{sup -1}) and good linear regression (R {sup 2} = 0.9757). The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the predicted theoretical curve for mass uptake. Consistent results were found for solutions with ionic strengths of 0.005 mol L{sup -1} or greater and within a pH range of 4.5-8.5. Interferences from Cu (20:1), Mn (20:1), Fe (20:1), Zn (20:1), Ca (250:1), and Mg (250:1) in Pb retention were negligible. Determination of Pb in spiked river water samples (from the Corumbatai and Piracicaba rivers) performed using the proposed device was in agreement with total dissolved Pb, whereas measurements in seawater suggest that of the various species of Pb present in the samples, only cationic Pb species are adsorbed by the agarose-yeast gel disks. The in situ concentration of Pb obtained at two different sites of the Rio Claro stream (Corumbatai basin) were 1.13 {+-} 0.01 and 1.34 {+-} 0.04 {mu}g L{sup -1}. For 72-h deployments, a detection limit of 0.75 {mu}g L{sup -1} was calculated. The combination of inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and in situ deployments of DGT samplers during the 72-h period makes possible the determination of labile Pb in river water. (orig.)

  10. Synthesis, photochemical properties and DNA binding studies of dna cleaving agents based on chiral dipyridine dihydrodioxins salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamaev, Alexei

    Control of chemical reactions becomes especially challenging when chemical processes have to work within the complexity of biological environments. This is one of the reasons why the ability to design "caged" molecules with structure, reactivity, and biological activity that can be activated externally by light continues to draw significant attention, from both the practical and fundamental points of view. Possible applications of such molecules include design of molecular machines and switches, logic gate mimics, optical sensors, drug delivery systems, etc. Since "caged" molecules are of particular use for processes that occur in biochemical systems and in the environment, interesting light-sensitive systems, anti-cancer drugs, have been developed recently to control DNA cleavage. Caged molecules may interact with or bind with DNA and can be classified by their mechanism of action. Each of these classes of molecules has a different structure and interacts with DNA in a different way, but some molecules can combine several functionalities. The preponderance of caged molecules, anti-cancer drugs, capable of DNA cleavage or their metabolites incorporate Electron Transfer (ET) functionalities, which play important roles in physiological responses. These main groups include quinones (or phenolic precursors), metal complexes, aromatic nitro compounds (or reduced derivatives), and conjugated imines (or iminium species). Redox cycling with oxygen can occur giving rise to Oxidation Stress (OS) through generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) which can contribute to drug efficacy or can lead to undesirable toxicity. In some cases, ET results in interference with normal electron transport chains. In this work a series of caged molecules-chiral Pyrene Dihydridioxins (PDHD)-DNA chiral DNA intecalators and PDHD-metal complexes bearing masked o-quinone functionality activated through intramolecular ET were synthesized. The o-quinone release and intramolecular ET can be easily

  11. Amyloid β oligomers in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, treatment, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Kirsten L; Klein, William L

    2015-02-01

    Protein aggregation is common to dozens of diseases including prionoses, diabetes, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Over the past 15 years, there has been a paradigm shift in understanding the structural basis for these proteinopathies. Precedent for this shift has come from investigation of soluble Aβ oligomers (AβOs), toxins now widely regarded as instigating neuron damage leading to Alzheimer's dementia. Toxic AβOs accumulate in AD brain and constitute long-lived alternatives to the disease-defining Aβ fibrils deposited in amyloid plaques. Key experiments using fibril-free AβO solutions demonstrated that while Aβ is essential for memory loss, the fibrillar Aβ in amyloid deposits is not the agent. The AD-like cellular pathologies induced by AβOs suggest their impact provides a unifying mechanism for AD pathogenesis, explaining why early stage disease is specific for memory and accounting for major facets of AD neuropathology. Alternative ideas for triggering mechanisms are being actively investigated. Some research favors insertion of AβOs into membrane, while other evidence supports ligand-like accumulation at particular synapses. Over a dozen candidate toxin receptors have been proposed. AβO binding triggers a redistribution of critical synaptic proteins and induces hyperactivity in metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors. This leads to Ca(2+) overload and instigates major facets of AD neuropathology, including tau hyperphosphorylation, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and synapse loss. Because different species of AβOs have been identified, a remaining question is which oligomer is the major pathogenic culprit. The possibility has been raised that more than one species plays a role. Despite some key unknowns, the clinical relevance of AβOs has been established, and new studies are beginning to point to co-morbidities such as diabetes and hypercholesterolemia as etiological factors. Because pathogenic AβOs appear early in the disease, they

  12. Atomic Resolution Structure of Monomorphic Aβ42 Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Michael T; Silvers, Robert; Ni, Qing Zhe; Can, Thach V; Sergeyev, Ivan; Rosay, Melanie; Donovan, Kevin J; Michael, Brian; Wall, Joseph; Linse, Sara; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a 39-42 residue protein produced by the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which subsequently aggregates to form cross-β amyloid fibrils that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most prominent forms of Aβ are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, which differ by two amino acids (I and A) at the C-terminus. However, Aβ42 is more neurotoxic and essential to the etiology of AD. Here, we present an atomic resolution structure of a monomorphic form of AβM01-42 amyloid fibrils derived from over 500 (13)C-(13)C, (13)C-(15)N distance and backbone angle structural constraints obtained from high field magic angle spinning NMR spectra. The structure (PDB ID: 5KK3 ) shows that the fibril core consists of a dimer of Aβ42 molecules, each containing four β-strands in a S-shaped amyloid fold, and arranged in a manner that generates two hydrophobic cores that are capped at the end of the chain by a salt bridge. The outer surface of the monomers presents hydrophilic side chains to the solvent. The interface between the monomers of the dimer shows clear contacts between M35 of one molecule and L17 and Q15 of the second. Intermolecular (13)C-(15)N constraints demonstrate that the amyloid fibrils are parallel in register. The RMSD of the backbone structure (Q15-A42) is 0.71 ± 0.12 Å and of all heavy atoms is 1.07 ± 0.08 Å. The structure provides a point of departure for the design of drugs that bind to the fibril surface and therefore interfere with secondary nucleation and for other therapeutic approaches to mitigate Aβ42 aggregation. PMID:27355699

  13. Key Points Concerning Amyloid Infectivity and Prion-Like Neuronal Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espargaró, Alba; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Estelrich, Joan; Sabate, Raimon

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation has been related to an increasing number of human illnesses, from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases (AD/PD) to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Commonly, only prions have been considered as infectious agents with a high capacity of propagation. However, recent publications have shown that many amyloid proteins, including amyloid β-peptide, α-synuclein (α-syn) and tau protein, also propagate in a “prion-like” manner. Meanwhile, no link between propagation of pathological proteins and neurotoxicity has been demonstrated. The extremely low infectivity under natural conditions of most non-prion amyloids is far below the capacity to spread exhibited by prions. Nonetheless, it is important to elucidate the key factors that cause non-prion amyloids to become infectious agents. In recent years, important advances in our understanding of the amyloid processes of amyloid-like proteins and unrelated prions (i.e., yeast and fungal prions) have yielded essential information that can shed light on the prion phenomenon in mammals and humans. As shown in this review, recent evidence suggests that there are key factors that could dramatically modulate the prion capacity of proteins in the amyloid conformation. The concentration of nuclei, the presence of oligomers, and the toxicity, resistance and localization of these aggregates could all be key factors affecting their spread. In short, those factors that favor the high concentration of extracellular nuclei or oligomers, characterized by small size, with a low toxicity could dramatically increase prion propensity; whereas low concentrations of highly toxic intracellular amyloids, with a large size, would effectively prevent infectivity. PMID:27147962

  14. Key points concerning amyloid infectivity and prion-like neuronal invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba eEspargaró

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid aggregation has been related to an increasing number of human illnesses, from Alzheimer and Parkinson’s diseases to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Traditionally only prions have been considered as infectious agents with a high capacity of propagation. Although recent publications have showed that many amyloid proteins, including amyloid β-peptide, α-synuclein and tau protein, also propagate in a prion-like manner, the link between propagation of pathological proteins and neurotoxicity has not been evidenced. The extremely low infectivity in natural conditions of the most of non-prion amyloids is far from the spreading capacity displayed by the prions. However, it is important to elucidate the key factors that cause non-prion amyloids become infectious agents. In recent years, important advances in the understanding of the amyloid processes of amyloid-like proteins and unrelated prions (i.e., yeast and fungal prions have yielded essential information that can be applied to shed light on the prion phenomenon in mammals and humans. As shown in this review, recent evidences suggest that there are key factors that could dramatically modulate the prion capacity of proteins in the amyloid conformation. The concentration of nuclei, the presence of oligomers, and the toxicity, resistance and localization of these aggregates could be key factors affecting their spreading. In short, those factors that favor the high concentration of extracellular nuclei or oligomers, characterized by a small size, with a low toxicity could dramatically increase prion propensity; whereas low concentrations of highly toxic intracellular amyloids, with a large size, would prevent infectivity.

  15. Key Points Concerning Amyloid Infectivity and Prion-Like Neuronal Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espargaró, Alba; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Estelrich, Joan; Sabate, Raimon

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation has been related to an increasing number of human illnesses, from Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases (AD/PD) to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Commonly, only prions have been considered as infectious agents with a high capacity of propagation. However, recent publications have shown that many amyloid proteins, including amyloid β-peptide, α-synuclein (α-syn) and tau protein, also propagate in a "prion-like" manner. Meanwhile, no link between propagation of pathological proteins and neurotoxicity has been demonstrated. The extremely low infectivity under natural conditions of most non-prion amyloids is far below the capacity to spread exhibited by prions. Nonetheless, it is important to elucidate the key factors that cause non-prion amyloids to become infectious agents. In recent years, important advances in our understanding of the amyloid processes of amyloid-like proteins and unrelated prions (i.e., yeast and fungal prions) have yielded essential information that can shed light on the prion phenomenon in mammals and humans. As shown in this review, recent evidence suggests that there are key factors that could dramatically modulate the prion capacity of proteins in the amyloid conformation. The concentration of nuclei, the presence of oligomers, and the toxicity, resistance and localization of these aggregates could all be key factors affecting their spread. In short, those factors that favor the high concentration of extracellular nuclei or oligomers, characterized by small size, with a low toxicity could dramatically increase prion propensity; whereas low concentrations of highly toxic intracellular amyloids, with a large size, would effectively prevent infectivity. PMID:27147962

  16. Serum amyloid P component bound to gram-negative bacteria prevents lipopolysaccharide-mediated classical pathway complement activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, CJC; van Leeuwen, EMM; van Bommel, T; Verhoef, J; van Kessel, KPM; van Strijp, JAG

    2000-01-01

    Although serum amyloid P component (SAP) is known to bind many ligands, its biological function is not yet clear. Recently, it was demonstrated that SAP binds to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), In the present study, SAP was shown to bind to gram-negative bacteria expressing short types of LPS or lipo-olig

  17. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M.; Eisenberg, David S.

    2013-01-01

    New and improved materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential to addressing the global threat of accelerating climate change. The presently used industrial methods for carbon dioxide capture have severe drawbacks, including toxicity and energy inefficiency. Newer porous materials are so far less effective in water, invariably a component of combustion gases. Here, we present a material for carbon dioxide capture. This material, amyloid fibers in powdered form, selectively capture...

  18. NNanomechanical characteristics of proteins and peptides in amyloid

    OpenAIRE

    Boayue, Nya Mehnwolo

    2012-01-01

    ......The understanding of the aggregation of amyloid fibrils is essential as they are linked to a number of diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkston’s disease. Amy- loids from different proteins or peptides have common characteristics such as core β-sheet structure, green birefringence upon binding to Congo red, and fibrillar mor- phology. In this thesis, I report single molecule analysis of TTR105−115 a fragment of transthyretin, a serum and cerebrospinal fluid carrier of ...

  19. Navigating into the binding pockets of the HER family protein kinases: discovery of novel EGFR inhibitor as antitumor agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu W

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wei Liu,1,* Jin-Feng Ning,2,* Qing-Wei Meng,1 Jing Hu,1 Yan-Bin Zhao,1 Chao Liu,3 Li Cai11The Fourth Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 2The Thoracic Surgery Department, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 3General Surgery Department, Mudanjiang Guanliju Central Hospital, Mishan, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR family has been validated as a successful antitumor drug target for decades. Known EGFR inhibitors were exposed to distinct drug resistance against the various EGFR mutants within non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, particularly the T790M mutation. Although so far a number of studies have been reported on the development of third-generation EGFR inhibitors for overcoming the resistance issue, the design procedure largely depends on the intuition of medicinal chemists. Here we retrospectively make a detailed analysis of the 42 EGFR family protein crystal complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Based on the analysis of inhibitor binding modes in the kinase catalytic cleft, we identified a potent EGFR inhibitor (compound A-10 against drug-resistant EGFR through fragment-based drug design. This compound showed at least 30-fold more potency against EGFR T790M than the two control molecules erlotinib and gefitinib in vitro. Moreover, it could exhibit potent HER2 inhibitory activities as well as tumor growth inhibitory activity. Molecular docking studies revealed a structural basis for the increased potency and mutant selectivity of this compound. Compound A-10 may be selected as a promising candidate in further preclinical studies. In addition, our findings could provide a powerful strategy to identify novel selective kinase inhibitors on the basis of detailed kinase–ligand interaction space in the PDB.Keywords: EGFR, kinase

  20. Impact of amyloid imaging on drug development in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, Chester A. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)], E-mail: mathisca@upmc.edu; Lopresti, Brian J. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Klunk, William E. [Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Imaging agents capable of assessing amyloid-beta (A{beta}) content in vivo in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects likely will be important as diagnostic agents to detect A{beta} plaques in the brain as well as to help test the amyloid cascade hypothesis of AD and as an aid to assess the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutics currently under development and in clinical trials. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies of amyloid deposition in human subjects with several A{beta} imaging agents are currently underway. We reported the first PET studies of the carbon 11-labeled thioflavin-T derivative Pittsburgh Compound B in 2004, and this work has subsequently been extended to include a variety of subject groups, including AD patients, mild cognitive impairment patients and healthy controls. The ability to quantify regional A{beta} plaque load in the brains of living human subjects has provided a means to begin to apply this technology as a diagnostic agent to detect regional concentrations of A{beta} plaques and as a surrogate marker of therapeutic efficacy in anti-amyloid drug trials.

  1. Effects of beta-amyloid protein on M1 and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band complex of the rat: relationship with cholinergic, GABAergic, and calcium-binding protein perikarya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Iván; Arévalo-Serrano, Juan; Sanz-Anquela, José Miguel; Gonzalo-Ruiz, Alicia

    2007-06-01

    Cortical cholinergic dysfunction has been correlated with the expression and processing of beta-amyloid precursor protein. However, it remains unclear as to how cholinergic dysfunction and beta-amyloid (Abeta) formation and deposition might be related to one another. Since the M1- and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are considered key molecules that transduce the cholinergic message, the purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of the injected Abeta peptide on the number of M1mAchR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum-diagonal band (MS-nDBB) complex of the rat. Injections of Abeta protein into the retrosplenial cortex resulted in a decrease in M1mAChR and M2mAChR immunoreactivity in the MS-nDBB complex. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant reduction in the number of M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum nucleus (MS) and in the horizontal nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) as compared to the corresponding hemisphere in control animals and with that seen in the contralateral hemisphere, which corresponds to the PBS-injected side. Co-localization studies showed that the M1mAChR protein is localized in GABA-immunoreactive cells of the MS-nDBB complex, in particular those of the MS nucleus, while M2mAChR protein is localized in both the cholinergic and GABAergic cells. Moreover, GABAergic cells containing M2mAChR are mainly localized in the MS nucleus, while cholinergic cells containing M2mAChR are localized in the MS and the HDB nuclei. Our findings suggest that Abeta induces a reduction in M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-containing cells, which may contribute to impairments of cholinergic and GABAergic transmission in the MS-nDBB complex.

  2. IMPY, a potential β-amyloid imaging probe for detection of prion deposits in scrapie-infected mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: A potential single-photon emission computed tomography imaging agent for labeling of Aβ plaques of Alzheimer's disease, IMPY (2-(4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-6-iodo-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine), would be effective in detection of prion amyloid deposits in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Methods: In vitro autoradiographic studies were carried out with [125I]IMPY on brain sections from scrapie-infected mice and age-matched controls. Competition study was performed to evaluate the prion deposit binding specificity with nonradioactive IMPY. Results: Binding of [125I]IMPY was observed in infected brain sections, while on age-matched control brain sections, there was no or very low labeling. Prion deposit binding was confirmed by histoblots with prion protein-specific monoclonal antibody 2D6. In the presence of nonradioactive IMPY, the binding of [125I]IMPY was significantly inhibited in all regions studied. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IMPY can detect the prion deposits in vitro in scrapie-infected mice. Labeled with 123I, this ligand may be useful to quantitate prion deposit burdens in TSEs by in vivo imaging

  3. IMPY, a potential {beta}-amyloid imaging probe for detection of prion deposits in scrapie-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, P.-J. [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Bernard, Serge [IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France)], E-mail: bernard@tours.inra.fr; Sarradin, Pierre [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Vergote, Jackie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Barc, Celine [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Chalon, Sylvie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Kung, M.-P.; Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guilloteau, Denis [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction: A potential single-photon emission computed tomography imaging agent for labeling of A{beta} plaques of Alzheimer's disease, IMPY (2-(4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-6-iodo-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine), would be effective in detection of prion amyloid deposits in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Methods: In vitro autoradiographic studies were carried out with [{sup 125}I]IMPY on brain sections from scrapie-infected mice and age-matched controls. Competition study was performed to evaluate the prion deposit binding specificity with nonradioactive IMPY. Results: Binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was observed in infected brain sections, while on age-matched control brain sections, there was no or very low labeling. Prion deposit binding was confirmed by histoblots with prion protein-specific monoclonal antibody 2D6. In the presence of nonradioactive IMPY, the binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was significantly inhibited in all regions studied. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IMPY can detect the prion deposits in vitro in scrapie-infected mice. Labeled with {sup 123}I, this ligand may be useful to quantitate prion deposit burdens in TSEs by in vivo imaging.

  4. Benzofuranone derivatives as effective small molecules related to insulin amyloid fibrillation: a structure-function study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Navidpour, Latifeh;

    2011-01-01

    . In this study, the effects of five new synthetic benzofuranone derivatives were investigated on the insulin amyloid formation process. Protein fibrillation was analyzed by thioflavin-T fluorescence, Congo red binding, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy. Despite high structural similarity, one......Amyloids are protein fibrils of nanometer size resulting from protein self-assembly. They have been shown to be associated with a wide variety of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's and may contribute to various other pathological conditions, known as amyloidoses. Insulin is prone to form...... amyloid fibrils under slightly destabilizing conditions in vitro and may form amyloid structures when subcutaneously injected into patients with diabetes. There is a great deal of interest in developing novel small molecule inhibitors of amyloidogenic processes, as potential therapeutic compounds...

  5. Broad antiviral activity of carbohydrate-binding agents against the four serotypes of dengue virus in monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke M F Alen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DC, present in the skin, are the first target cells of dengue virus (DENV. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN is present on DC and recognizes N-glycosylation sites on the E-glycoprotein of DENV. Thus, the DC-SIGN/E-glycoprotein interaction can be considered as an important target for inhibitors of viral replication. We evaluated various carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs against all four described serotypes of DENV replication in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells and in monocyte-derived DC (MDDC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dose-dependent anti-DENV activity of the CBAs Hippeastrum hybrid (HHA, Galanthus nivalis (GNA and Urtica dioica (UDA, but not actinohivin (AH was observed against all four DENV serotypes as analyzed by flow cytometry making use of anti-DENV antibodies. Remarkably, the potency of the CBAs against DENV in MDDC cultures was significantly higher (up to 100-fold than in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells. Pradimicin-S (PRM-S, a small-size non-peptidic CBA, exerted antiviral activity in MDDC but not in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells. The CBAs act at an early step of DENV infection as they bind to the viral envelope of DENV and subsequently prevent virus attachment. Only weak antiviral activity of the CBAs was detected when administered after the virus attachment step. The CBAs were also able to completely prevent the cellular activation and differentiation process of MDDC induced upon DENV infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CBAs exerted broad spectrum antiviral activity against the four DENV serotypes, laboratory-adapted viruses and low passage clinical isolates, evaluated in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells and in primary MDDC.

  6. Interactions driving the collapse of islet amyloid polypeptide: Implications for amyloid aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Stephanie M.

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), also known as amylin, is a 37-residue intrinsically disordered hormone involved in glucose regulation and gastric emptying. The aggregation of hIAPP into amyloid fibrils is believed to play a causal role in type 2 diabetes. To date, not much is known about the monomeric state of hIAPP or how it undergoes an irreversible transformation from disordered peptide to insoluble aggregate. IAPP contains a highly conserved disulfide bond that restricts hIAPP(1-8) into a short ring-like structure: N_loop. Removal or chemical reduction of N_loop not only prevents cell response upon binding to the CGRP receptor, but also alters the mass per length distribution of hIAPP fibers and the kinetics of fibril formation. The mechanism by which N_loop affects hIAPP aggregation is not yet understood, but is important for rationalizing kinetics and developing potential inhibitors. By measuring end-to-end contact formation rates, Vaiana et al. showed that N_loop induces collapsed states in IAPP monomers, implying attractive interactions between N_loop and other regions of the disordered polypeptide chain . We show that in addition to being involved in intra-protein interactions, the N_loop is involved in inter-protein interactions, which lead to the formation of extremely long and stable beta-turn fibers. These non-amyloid fibers are present in the 10 muM concentration range, under the same solution conditions in which hIAPP forms amyloid fibers. We discuss the effect of peptide cyclization on both intra- and inter-protein interactions, and its possible implications for aggregation. Our findings indicate a potential role of N_loop-N_loop interactions in hIAPP aggregation, which has not previously been explored. Though our findings suggest that N_loop plays an important role in the pathway of amyloid formation, other naturally occurring IAPP variants that contain this structural feature are incapable of forming amyloids. For example, hIAPP readily

  7. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  8. Sensitivity of transmitted and founder human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelopes to carbohydrate-binding agents griffithsin, cyanovirin-N and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bodan; Du, Tao; Li, Chang; Luo, Sukun; Liu, Yalan; Huang, Xin; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission often results from infection by a single transmitted/founder (T/F) virus. Here, we investigated the sensitivity of T/F HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) to microbicide candidate carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), showing that T/F Envs demonstrated different sensitivity to CBAs, with IC50 values ranging from 0.006 ± 0.0003 to >10 nM for GRFT, from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 28.9 ± 2.9 nM for CV-N and from 1.3 ± 0.2 to >500 nM for GNA. We further revealed that deglycosylation at position 295 or 448 decreased the sensitivity of T/F Env to GRFT, and at 339 to both CV-N and GNA. Mutation of all the three glcyans rendered a CBA-sensitive T/F Env largely resistant to GRFT, indicating that the sensitivity of T/F Env to GRFT is mainly determined by glycans at 295, 339 and 448. Our study identified specific T/F Env residues associated with CBA sensitivity.

  9. SPECT imaging of peripheral amyloid in mice by targeting hyper-sulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans with specific scFv antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Amyloid deposits are associated with a broad spectrum of disorders including monoclonal gammopathies, chronic inflammation, and Alzheimer's disease. In all cases, the amyloid pathology contains, in addition to protein fibrils, a plethora of associated molecules, including high concentrations of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Methods: We have evaluated radioiodinated scFvs that bind HS for their ability to image amyloid deposits in vivo. scFv's with different binding characteristics were isolated by phage display using HS extracted from bovine kidney or mouse and human skeletal muscle glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Following purification and radioiodination, the biodistribution of 125I-scFv's was assessed in mice with inflammation-associated AA amyloidosis or in amyloid-free mice by using SPECT imaging, biodistribution measurements and tissue autoradiography. Results: Four different scFv's all showed binding in vivo to amyloid in the spleen, liver and kidney of diseased mice; however, three of the scFv's also bound to sites within these organs in disease free mice. One scFv specific for hypersulfated HSPGs preferentially bound amyloid and did not accumulate in healthy tissues. Conclusions: These data indicate that HS expressed in amyloid deposits has unique qualities that can be distinguished from HS in normal tissues. A scFv specific for rare hypersulfated HS was used to selectively image AA amyloid in mice with minimal retention in normal tissue.

  10. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweers, K. K. M.; Bennink, M. L.; Subramaniam, V.

    2012-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils.

  11. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  12. First selective dual inhibitors of tau phosphorylation and Beta-amyloid aggregation, two major pathogenic mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, Marica; Schmitt, Christian; Miralinaghi, Parisa; Catto, Marco; Hartmann, Rolf W; Carotti, Angelo; Engel, Matthias

    2014-12-17

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple factors account for the accumulation of neurocellular changes, which may begin several years before symptoms appear. The most important pathogenic brain changes that are contributing to the development of AD are the formation of the cytotoxic β-amyloid aggregates and of the neurofibrillary tangles, which originate from amyloid-β peptides and hyperphosphorylated tau protein, respectively. New therapeutic agents that target both major pathogenic mechanisms may be particularly efficient. In this study, we introduce bis(hydroxyphenyl)-substituted thiophenes as a novel class of selective, dual inhibitors of the tau kinase Dyrk1A and of the amyloid-β aggregation. PMID:25247807

  13. Preliminary assay of β-amyloid binding elements in heart-beneficial recipe%调心方中β淀粉样蛋白结合成分的初步探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程敏; 冯琼; 钱淑文; 高慧; 朱粹青

    2008-01-01

    目的:探讨调心方中是否具有通过结合β淀粉样蛋白(β-amyloid protein,Aβ)而减少其神经元毒性的成分.方法:调心方提取物与Aβ共同沉淀并对沉淀物中的Aβ进行免疫印迹检测,制备小量Affi-gel-Aβ,用高效液相色谱(high-performance liquid chromatography,HPLC)检测调心方中Affi-gel-Aβ结合组分;大鼠原代皮层神经元培养,以乳酸脱氢酶(lactic dehydrogenase,LDH)测定法反映细胞损害程度.结果:免疫印迹检测显示Aβ能与调心方中的成分一起沉淀,且沉淀中的Aβ会随调心方的稀释而减少;调心方与Affi-gel-Aβ反应后,用甘氨酸液(pH 2.5)洗脱的组分中有可被HPLC荧光检测器所检测的物质.LDH漏出检测结果显示,在无血清和含血清的培养体系中5 μmol/L Aβ处理48 h均可导致原代培养神经元损害,LDH漏出率显著增加(P<0.01),而大鼠调心方药物血清可抑制Aβ诱导的LDH漏出(P<0.05);经Affi-gel-Aβ吸附的调心方药物血清对Aβ毒性仍有抑制作用(P<0.05),但较经Affi-gel吸附的药物血清有减弱的趋势.结论:调心方中有Aβ结合成分,这类成分不促进Aβ的毒性,而可能具有抑制Aβ毒性的作用.提示在对老年性痴呆有效的中药方剂中探寻Aβ结合成分可能是探寻治疗AD药物的一个手段.

  14. Exploring new biological functions of amyloids: bacteria cell agglutination mediated by host protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Torrent

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs are important effectors of the innate immune system that play a vital role in the prevention of infections. Recent advances have highlighted the similarity between AMPs and amyloid proteins. Using the Eosinophil Cationic Protein as a model, we have rationalized the structure-activity relationships between amyloid aggregation and antimicrobial activity. Our results show how protein aggregation can induce bacteria agglutination and cell death. Using confocal and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy we have tracked the formation in situ of protein amyloid-like aggregates at the bacteria surface and on membrane models. In both cases, fibrillar aggregates able to bind to amyloid diagnostic dyes were detected. Additionally, a single point mutation (Ile13 to Ala can suppress the protein amyloid behavior, abolishing the agglutinating activity and impairing the antimicrobial action. The mutant is also defective in triggering both leakage and lipid vesicle aggregation. We conclude that ECP aggregation at the bacterial surface is essential for its cytotoxicity. Hence, we propose here a new prospective biological function for amyloid-like aggregates with potential biological relevance.

  15. Surface plasmon resonance for the label-free detection of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Pasquale; Aura, Angela M; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid peptide oligomers and fibrils are studied as targets for therapy and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. They are usually detected by amyloid incubation, but such method is necessarily associated with Aβ1-42 depletion and dye binding or conjugation, which have a complex influence on fibril growth, provide information about fibril elongation over long time periods only, and might lead to false-positive results in amyloid inhibition assay. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is used to study with no labelling and in real time the aggregation of Aβ1-42 amyloid on specific antibodies. SPR data show, for the first time by using SPR, a multi-phase association behavior for Aβ1-42 oligomers accounting for a sigmoidal growth of amyloid as a function of time, with two antibody-dependent aggregation patterns. The new method represents an advantageous alternative to traditional procedures for investigating amyloid self-assembly and inhibition from early-stage oligomer association, on the time scale of seconds to minutes, to long-term polymerization, on the time scale of hours to days. PMID:26558762

  16. Common benzothiazole and benzoxazole fluorescent DNA intercalators for studying Alzheimer Aβ1-42 and prion amyloid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Steingrimur; Adams, Daniel L; Tang, Cha-Mei

    2012-05-01

    Amyloids are fibrillar protein aggregates associated with a number of neurodegenerative pathologies including Alzheimer and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The study of amyloids is usually based on fluorescence with the dye thioflavin-T. Although a number of amyloid binding compounds have been synthesized, many are nonfluorescent or not readily available for research use. Here we report on a class of commercial benzothiazole/benzoxazole containing fluorescent DNA intercalators from Invitrogen that possess the ability to bind amyloid Aβ1-42 peptide and hamster prion. These dyes fluoresce from 500-750 nm and are available as dimers or monomers. We demonstrate that these dyes can be used as acceptors for thioflavin-T fluorescence resonance energy transfer as well as reporter groups for binding studies with Congo red and chrysamine G. As more potential therapeutic compounds for these diseases are generated, there is a need for simple and inexpensive methods to monitor their interactions with amyloids. The fluorescent dyes reported here are readily available and can be used as tools for biochemical studies of amyloid structures and in vitro screening of potential therapeutics.

  17. Amyloid formation: functional friend or fearful foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, P; Roan, N R; Römling, U; Bevins, C L; Münch, J

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid formation has been most studied in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, as well as in amyloidosis. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that amyloid is also present in the healthy setting; for example nontoxic amyloid formation is important for melanin synthesis and in innate immunity. Furthermore, bacteria have mechanisms to produce functional amyloid structures with important roles in bacterial physiology and interaction with host cells. Here, we will discuss some novel aspects of fibril-forming proteins in humans and bacteria. First, the amyloid-forming properties of the antimicrobial peptide human defensin 6 (HD6) will be considered. Intriguingly, unlike other antimicrobial peptides, HD6 does not kill bacteria. However, recent data show that HD6 can form amyloid structures at the gut mucosa with strong affinity for bacterial surfaces. These so-called nanonets block bacterial invasion by entangling the bacteria in net-like structures. Next, the role of functional amyloid fibrils in human semen will be discussed. These fibrils were discovered through their property to enhance HIV infection but they may also have other yet unknown functions. Finally, the role of amyloid formation in bacteria will be reviewed. The recent finding that bacteria can make amyloid in a controlled fashion without toxic effects is of particular interest and may have implications for human disease. The role of amyloid in health and disease is beginning to be unravelled, and here, we will review some of the most recent findings in this exciting area. PMID:27151743

  18. /sup 32/P-Postlabeling test for covalent DNA binding of chemicals in vivo: Application to a variety of aromatic carcinogens and methylating agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M.V.; Gupta, R.C.; Randerath, E.; Randerath, K.

    1984-02-01

    Carcinogen--DNA adducts were detected and determined by /sup 32/P-postlabeling assay after exposure of mouse or rat tissues in vivo to a total of 28 compounds comprising 7 arylamines and derivatives, 3 azo compounds, 2 nitroaromatics, 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 4 methylating agents. DNA was isolated from mouse skin, mouse liver, and rat liver after treatment with the individual carcinogens, then digested enzymatically to deoxyribonucleoside 3'-monophosphates, which were converted to 5'-/sup 32/P-labeled deoxyribonucleoside 3',5'-bisphosphates by T4 polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)phosphate transfer from (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP. The nucleotides were resolved by anion-exchange t.l.c. on polyethyleneimine-cellulose and detected by autoradiography. The determination of low levels of DNA binding of the aromatic carcinogens entailed the removal of normal nucleotides prior to the resolution of adduct nucleotides. For this purpose, an alternative procedure employing reversed-phase t.l.c. was devised which offered advantages for the detection of quantitatively minor adducts. The procedures described enabled the detection of 1 aromatic DNA adduct in approximately 10(/sup 8/) normal nucleotides, while the limit of detection of methylated adducts was 1 adduct in approximately 6 X 10(/sup 5/) nucleotides. The results show that a great number of carcinogen-DNA adducts of diverse structure are substrates for /sup 32/P-labeling by polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation. Because covalent DNA adduct formation in vivo appears to be an essential property of the majority of chemical carcinogens, /sup 32/P-postlabeling analysis of carcinogen--DNA adducts in mammalian tissues may serve as a test for the screening of chemicals for potential carcinogenicity.

  19. 32P-Postlabeling test for covalent DNA binding of chemicals in vivo: Application to a variety of aromatic carcinogens and methylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinogen--DNA adducts were detected and determined by 32P-postlabeling assay after exposure of mouse or rat tissues in vivo to a total of 28 compounds comprising 7 arylamines and derivatives, 3 azo compounds, 2 nitroaromatics, 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 4 methylating agents. DNA was isolated from mouse skin, mouse liver, and rat liver after treatment with the individual carcinogens, then digested enzymatically to deoxyribonucleoside 3'-monophosphates, which were converted to 5'-32P-labeled deoxyribonucleoside 3',5'-bisphosphates by T4 polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed [32P]phosphate transfer from [gamma-32P]ATP. The nucleotides were resolved by anion-exchange t.l.c. on polyethyleneimine-cellulose and detected by autoradiography. The determination of low levels of DNA binding of the aromatic carcinogens entailed the removal of normal nucleotides prior to the resolution of adduct nucleotides. For this purpose, an alternative procedure employing reversed-phase t.l.c. was devised which offered advantages for the detection of quantitatively minor adducts. The procedures described enabled the detection of 1 aromatic DNA adduct in approximately 10(8) normal nucleotides, while the limit of detection of methylated adducts was 1 adduct in approximately 6 X 10(5) nucleotides. The results show that a great number of carcinogen-DNA adducts of diverse structure are substrates for 32P-labeling by polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation. Because covalent DNA adduct formation in vivo appears to be an essential property of the majority of chemical carcinogens, 32P-postlabeling analysis of carcinogen--DNA adducts in mammalian tissues may serve as a test for the screening of chemicals for potential carcinogenicity

  20. Amyloid Fibril-Induced Structural and Spectral Modifications in the Thioflavin-T Optical Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murugan, N. Arul; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Kongsted, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by future possibilities to design target molecules for fibrils with diagnostic or therapeutic capability related to amyloidosis diseases, we investigate in this work the dielectric nature of amyloid fibril microenvironments in different binding sites using an optical probe, thioflavin-T...

  1. Small heat shock proteins potentiate amyloid dissolution by protein disaggregases from yeast and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L Duennwald

    Full Text Available How small heat shock proteins (sHsps might empower proteostasis networks to control beneficial prions or disassemble pathological amyloid is unknown. Here, we establish that yeast sHsps, Hsp26 and Hsp42, inhibit prionogenesis by the [PSI+] prion protein, Sup35, via distinct and synergistic mechanisms. Hsp42 prevents conformational rearrangements within molten oligomers that enable de novo prionogenesis and collaborates with Hsp70 to attenuate self-templating. By contrast, Hsp26 inhibits self-templating upon binding assembled prions. sHsp binding destabilizes Sup35 prions and promotes their disaggregation by Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40. In yeast, Hsp26 or Hsp42 overexpression prevents [PSI+] induction, cures [PSI+], and potentiates [PSI+]-curing by Hsp104 overexpression. In vitro, sHsps enhance Hsp104-catalyzed disaggregation of pathological amyloid forms of α-synuclein and polyglutamine. Unexpectedly, in the absence of Hsp104, sHsps promote an unprecedented, gradual depolymerization of Sup35 prions by Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. This unanticipated amyloid-depolymerase activity is conserved from yeast to humans, which lack Hsp104 orthologues. A human sHsp, HspB5, stimulates depolymerization of α-synuclein amyloid by human Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. Thus, we elucidate a heretofore-unrecognized human amyloid-depolymerase system that could have applications in various neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Characterization of the Cu(Π) and Zn(Π) binding to the Amyloid-β short peptides by both the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and the Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyin; Sun, Shuaishuai; Xu, Jianhua; Zhang, Jing; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Bingbing; Tao, Ye

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and devastating neurodegenerative pathology, clinically characterized by dementia, cognitive impairment, personality disorders and memory loss. It is generally accepted that, misfolding of Aβ peptides is the key element in pathogenesis and the secondary structure of Aβ can be changed to major β-strand with reasons unknown yet. Many studies have shown that the misfolding may be linked with some biometals, mainly copper and zinc ions. To characterize interactions of Aβ and metal ions, we utilized both the extended X-ray fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and the synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy (SRCD). Aβ (13-22), Aβ (13-21), Aβ (E22G) and Aβ(HH-AA) were selected to study the mechanism of copper and zinc binding to Aβ. We found that Cu interaction with H13 and H14 residues led to the disappearance of the PPΠ, while the Cu binding E22 residue caused a remarkable conformation change to β-sheet enrichment. The Zn ion, in contrast, made little effect on the conformation and it coordinated to only one histidine (H residue) or not.

  3. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  4. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Bunyamin; Koca, Yavuz Savas; Koca, Tugba; Yildiz, Ihsan; Gerek Celikden, Sevda; Ciris, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG) is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn's disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis. PMID:27051538

  5. Apolipoprotein E: Essential Catalyst of the Alzheimer Amyloid Cascade

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    Huntington Potter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid cascade hypothesis remains a robust model of AD neurodegeneration. However, amyloid deposits contain proteins besides Aβ, such as apolipoprotein E (apoE. Inheritance of the apoE4 allele is the strongest genetic risk factor for late-onset AD. However, there is no consensus on how different apoE isotypes contribute to AD pathogenesis. It has been hypothesized that apoE and apoE4 in particular is an amyloid catalyst or “pathological chaperone”. Alternatively it has been posited that apoE regulates Aβ clearance, with apoE4 been worse at this function compared to apoE3. These views seem fundamentally opposed. The former would indicate that removing apoE will reduce AD pathology, while the latter suggests increasing brain ApoE levels may be beneficial. Here we consider the scientific basis of these different models of apoE function and suggest that these seemingly opposing views can be reconciled. The optimal therapeutic target may be to inhibit the interaction of apoE with Aβ rather than altering apoE levels. Such an approach will not have detrimental effects on the many beneficial roles apoE plays in neurobiology. Furthermore, other Aβ binding proteins, including ACT and apo J can inhibit or promote Aβ oligomerization/polymerization depending on conditions and might be manipulated to effect AD treatment.

  6. Amyloid myopathy: a diagnostic challenge

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    Heli Tuomaala

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid myopathy (AM is a rare manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis (AL. Like inflammatory myopathies, it presents with proximal muscle weakness and an increased creatine kinase level. We describe a case of AL with severe, rapidly progressive myopathy as the initial symptom. The clinical manifestation and muscle biopsy were suggestive of inclusion body myositis. AM was not suspected until amyloidosis was seen in the gastric mucosal biopsy. The muscle biopsy was then re-examined more specifically, and Congo red staining eventually showed vascular and interstitial amyloid accumulation, which led to a diagnosis of AM. The present case illustrates the fact that the clinical picture of AM can mimic that of inclusion body myositis.

  7. Magnetite-Amyloid-β deteriorates activity and functional organization in an in vitro model for Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Sara; Tahirbegi, Islam Bogachan; Mir, Mònica; Samitier, Josep; Soriano, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    The understanding of the key mechanisms behind human brain deterioration in Alzheimer’ disease (AD) is a highly active field of research. The most widespread hypothesis considers a cascade of events initiated by amyloid-β peptide fibrils that ultimately lead to the formation of the lethal amyloid plaques. Recent studies have shown that other agents, in particular magnetite, can also play a pivotal role. To shed light on the action of magnetite and amyloid-β in the deterioration of neuronal circuits, we investigated their capacity to alter spontaneous activity patterns in cultured neuronal networks. Using a versatile experimental platform that allows the parallel monitoring of several cultures, the activity in controls was compared with the one in cultures dosed with magnetite, amyloid-β and magnetite-amyloid-β complex. A prominent degradation in spontaneous activity was observed solely when amyloid-β and magnetite acted together. Our work suggests that magnetite nanoparticles have a more prominent role in AD than previously thought, and may bring new insights in the understanding of the damaging action of magnetite-amyloid-β complex. Our experimental system also offers new interesting perspectives to explore key biochemical players in neurological disorders through a controlled, model system manner.

  8. Novel targeted nuclear imaging agent for gastric cancer diagnosis: glucose-regulated protein 78 binding peptide-guided 111In-labeled polymeric micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng CC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Chia Cheng,1,2,* Chiung-Fang Huang,3,4,* Ai-Sheng Ho,5 Cheng-Liang Peng,6 Chun-Chao Chang,7,8 Fu-Der Mai,1,9 Ling-Yun Chen,10 Tsai-Yueh Luo,2 Jungshan Chang1,11,121Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 2Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan, 3School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 4Division of Family and Operative Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 5Division of Gastroenterology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, 6Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 7Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 8Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 9Department of Biochemistry, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 10Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, 11Neuroscience Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 12Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Increased expression of cellular membrane bound glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78 is considered to be one of the biomarkers for gastric cancers. Therefore, peptides or molecules with specific recognition to GRP78 can act as a guiding probe to direct conjugated imaging agents to localized cancers. Based on this rationale, GRP78-guided polymeric micelles were designed and manufactured for nuclear imaging detection of tumors. Thiolated GRP78 binding peptide (GRP78BP was first labeled with maleimide-terminated poly(ethylene glycol–poly(ε-caprolactone and then mixed with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA-linked poly(ethylene glycol–poly(ε-caprolactone to form DTPA/GRP78BP-conjugated micelles. The coupling efficiency of micelles with

  9. Specific interactions between amyloid-β peptide and curcumin derivatives: Ab initio molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Kadoya, Ryushi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Murakawa, Takeru; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is caused by accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, it is effective to inhibit the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by secretases. However, because the secretases also play important roles to produce vital proteins for human body, inhibitors for the secretases may have side effects. To propose new agents for protecting the cleavage site of APP from the attacking of the γ-secretase, we have investigated here the specific interactions between a short APP peptide and curcumin derivatives, using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations.

  10. Induction of hepatic synthesis of serum amyloid A protein and actin.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, J F; Stearman, R S; Peltzman, C G; Potter, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Major changes in the mRNA population of murine liver occur after administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, an agent that causes increases in the concentrations of acute-phase serum proteins. The mRNA for one of these, serum amyloid A, is increased at least 500-fold compared to the normal level. It becomes one of the most abundant hepatic mRNAs, and serum amyloid A synthesis comprises about 2.5% of total hepatic protein synthesis in the acute-phase response. Its synthesis is tissue-speci...

  11. Synthesis and biological evaluation of indole-chalcone derivatives as β-amyloid imaging probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mengchao; Ono, Masahiro; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Liu, Bo Li; Saji, Hideo

    2011-02-01

    A series of chaclone derivatives containing an indole moiety were evaluated in competitive binding assays with Aβ(1-42) aggregates versus [(125)I]IMPY. The affinity of these compounds ranged from 4.46 to >1008 nM, depending on the substitution on the phenyl ring. Fluorescent staining in vitro showed that one compound with a N,N-dimethylamino group intensely stained Aβ plaques within brain sections of AD transgenic mice. The radioiodinated probe [(125)I]-(E)-3-(1H-indol-5-yl)-1-(4-iodophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one, [(125)I]4, was prepared and autoradiography in sections of brain tissue from an animal model of AD showed that it labeled Aβ plaques specifically. However, experiments with normal mice indicated that [(125)I]4 exhibited a low uptake into the brain in vivo (0.41% ID/g at 2 min). Additional chemical modifications of this indole-chalcone structure may lead to more useful imaging agents for detecting β-amyloid plaques in the brains of AD patients. PMID:21216142

  12. The Luminescent Oligothiophene p-FTAA Converts Toxic Aβ1-42 Species into Nontoxic Amyloid Fibers with Altered Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitelli, Livia; Sandin, Linnea; Nelson, Erin; Khattak, Sikander Iqbal; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Kågedal, Katarina

    2016-04-22

    Aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain leads to the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques, which is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). It is a general hypothesis that soluble prefibrillar assemblies of the Aβ peptide, rather than mature amyloid fibrils, cause neuronal dysfunction and memory impairment in AD. Thus, reducing the level of these prefibrillar species by using molecules that can interfere with the Aβ fibrillation pathway may be a valid approach to reduce Aβ cytotoxicity. Luminescent-conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) have amyloid binding properties and spectral properties that differ when they bind to protein aggregates with different morphologies and can therefore be used to visualize protein aggregates. In this study, cell toxicity experiments and biophysical studies demonstrated that the LCO p-FTAA was able to reduce the pool of soluble toxic Aβ species in favor of the formation of larger insoluble nontoxic amyloid fibrils, there by counteracting Aβ-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, p-FTAA bound to early formed Aβ species and induced a rapid formation of β-sheet structures. These p-FTAA generated amyloid fibrils were less hydrophobic and more resistant to proteolysis by proteinase K. In summary, our data show that p-FTAA promoted the formation of insoluble and stable Aβ species that were nontoxic which indicates that p-FTAA might have therapeutic potential. PMID:26907684

  13. β淀粉样蛋白PET显像剂11C-DPOD的制备及其在动物体内的分布%Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 11C-DPOD for PET Imaging Agent of Amyloid-β in Mouse Brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新艳; 张政伟; 蒋雨平; 孔艳艳; 桂媛; 胡名扬; 华逢春; 管一晖

    2013-01-01

    Aim To study the synthesis of 11C-labeled PET amyloid-P (Ap) imaging agent titled DPOD, a new series of 11C-6-OH-BTA-1 derivatives, and biological evaluation of 11C-DPOD for detecting amyloid-P plaques in mouse brain. Methods 11C-triflate-CH3 was bubbled into 2 mg precursor DPOD, which was dissolved in 0.1 mg methyl ethyl ketone, to generate 11C-DPOD in a V-tube at high temperature (about 80℃). The radiolabelled products were purified by HPLC. Then the image of radioactive concentration of transgenic, senile mice and rhesus monkey was made by using PET/CT. All data were analyzed by Stata 10.0 software (P<0.05). Results 11C-DPOD was a kind of colorless transparent liquid with ethyl alcohol about 10%, pH7.0. The radiochemical purity was over 95% and the average radiolabeling yield was from 10% to 15%. 11C-DPOD had the same effect as 11C-PIB in pharmacokinetics of transgenic and senile mice. Conclusion 11C-DPOD radioactivity of brain was synthesized by ourselves and washed out quickly thereafter in both transgenic mice and monkey.%目的 研究脑内β淀粉样蛋白(Aβ)的PET显像剂11C-DPOD即[N-甲基-11C]-3,5-二苯基-1,2,4-苯并噻唑的制备路线和在动物体内的分布情况.方法 使用11C-三氟甲基磺酰甲烷(11C-triflate-CH3)和2 mg自制DPOD前体(溶于0.1 mL丁酮中,摇匀后装于3mL的特制密闭反应瓶中,置-20℃)反应,在80℃水浴中对前体进行甲基化反应并完成11C标记.反应后的液体加入5mL注射用水稀释,过活化的固相C18柱除去杂质,再用乙醇0.5 mL洗脱保留在柱上的产品.经无菌注射水稀释和0.22 μm的微孔无菌滤膜过滤,得到澄清11C-DPOD乙醇水溶液.经尾静脉注射于转基因型阿尔茨海默病(AD)小鼠(AD小鼠)、正常C57老龄小鼠(正常老龄小鼠,作为对照);经肘静脉注射猕猴,进行动态显像.结果 11C-DPOD注射液为无色澄清透明液体(pH 7.0),含10%的乙醇,放射性化学纯度>98%,产率为10%~15%.在AD小鼠和正常

  14. Acetylcholinesterase, a senile plaque component, affects the fibrillogenesis of amyloid-beta-peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, A; Bronfman, F; Pérez, C A; Vicente, M; Garrido, J; Inestrosa, N C

    1995-12-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) colocalizes with amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) deposits present in the brain of Alzheimer's patients. Recent studies showed that A beta 1-40 can adopt two different conformational states in solution (an amyloidogenic conformer, A beta ac, and a non-amyloidogenic conformer, A beta nac) which have distinct abilities to form amyloid fibrils. We report here that AChE binds A beta nac and accelerates amyloid formation by the same peptide. No such effect was observed with A beta ac, the amyloidogenic conformer, suggesting that AChE acts as a 'pathological chaperone' inducing a conformational transition from A beta nac into A beta ac in vitro.

  15. Combined thioflavin T–Congo red fluorescence assay for amyloid fibril detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girych, Mykhailo; Gorbenko, Galyna; Maliyov, Ivan; Trusova, Valeriya; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Saito, Hiroyuki; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence represents one of the most powerful tools for the detection and structural characterization of the pathogenic protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils. The traditional approaches to the identification and quantification of amyloid fibrils are based on monitoring the fluorescence changes of the benzothiazole dye thioflavin T (ThT) and absorbance changes of the azo dye Congo red (CR). In routine screening it is usually sufficient to perform only the ThT and CR assays, but both of them, when used separately, could give false results. Moreover, fibrillization kinetics can be measured only by ThT fluorescence, while the characteristic absorption spectra and birefringence of CR represent more rigid criteria for the presence of amyloid fibrils. Therefore, it seemed reasonable to use both these dyes simultaneously, combining the advantages of each technique. To this end, we undertook a detailed analysis of the fluorescence spectral behavior of these unique amyloid tracers upon their binding to amyloid fibrils from lysozyme, insulin and an N-terminal fragment of apolipoprotein A-I with Iowa mutation. The fluorescence measurements revealed several criteria for distinguishing between fibrillar and monomeric protein states: (i) a common drastic increase in ThT fluorescence intensity; (ii) a sharp decrease in ThT fluorescence upon addition of CR; (iii) an appearance of the maximum at 535–540 nm in the CR excitation spectra; (iv) increase in CR fluorescence intensity at 610 nm. Based on these findings we designed a novel combined ThT–CR fluorescence assay for amyloid identification. Such an approach not only strengthens the reliability of the ThT assay, but also provides new opportunities for structural characterization of amyloid fibrils.

  16. Combined thioflavin T-Congo red fluorescence assay for amyloid fibril detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girych, Mykhailo; Gorbenko, Galyna; Maliyov, Ivan; Trusova, Valeriya; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Saito, Hiroyuki; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence represents one of the most powerful tools for the detection and structural characterization of the pathogenic protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils. The traditional approaches to the identification and quantification of amyloid fibrils are based on monitoring the fluorescence changes of the benzothiazole dye thioflavin T (ThT) and absorbance changes of the azo dye Congo red (CR). In routine screening it is usually sufficient to perform only the ThT and CR assays, but both of them, when used separately, could give false results. Moreover, fibrillization kinetics can be measured only by ThT fluorescence, while the characteristic absorption spectra and birefringence of CR represent more rigid criteria for the presence of amyloid fibrils. Therefore, it seemed reasonable to use both these dyes simultaneously, combining the advantages of each technique. To this end, we undertook a detailed analysis of the fluorescence spectral behavior of these unique amyloid tracers upon their binding to amyloid fibrils from lysozyme, insulin and an N-terminal fragment of apolipoprotein A-I with Iowa mutation. The fluorescence measurements revealed several criteria for distinguishing between fibrillar and monomeric protein states: (i) a common drastic increase in ThT fluorescence intensity; (ii) a sharp decrease in ThT fluorescence upon addition of CR; (iii) an appearance of the maximum at 535-540 nm in the CR excitation spectra; (iv) increase in CR fluorescence intensity at 610 nm. Based on these findings we designed a novel combined ThT-CR fluorescence assay for amyloid identification. Such an approach not only strengthens the reliability of the ThT assay, but also provides new opportunities for structural characterization of amyloid fibrils.

  17. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate rapidly remodels PAP85-120, SEM1(45-107, and SEM2(49-107 seminal amyloid fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Castellano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Semen harbors amyloid fibrils formed by proteolytic fragments of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP248-286 and PAP85-120 and semenogelins (SEM1 and SEM2 that potently enhance HIV infectivity. Amyloid but not soluble forms of these peptides enhance HIV infection. Thus, agents that remodel these amyloid fibrils could prevent HIV transmission. Here, we confirm that the green tea polyphenol, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, slowly remodels fibrils formed by PAP248-286 termed SEVI (semen derived enhancer of viral infection and also exerts a direct anti-viral effect. We elucidate for the first time that EGCG remodels PAP85-120, SEM1(45-107, and SEM2(49-107 fibrils more rapidly than SEVI fibrils. We establish EGCG as the first small molecule that can remodel all four classes of seminal amyloid. The combined anti-amyloid and anti-viral properties of EGCG could have utility in preventing HIV transmission.

  18. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  19. Characterization of Amyloid Cores in Prion Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo; Fernández, Maria Rosario; Batlle, Cristina; Navarro, Susanna; de Groot, Natalia S.; Serpell, Louise; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids consist of repetitions of a specific polypeptide chain in a regular cross-β-sheet conformation. Amyloid propensity is largely determined by the protein sequence, the aggregation process being nucleated by specific and short segments. Prions are special amyloids that become self-perpetuating after aggregation. Prions are responsible for neuropathology in mammals, but they can also be functional, as in yeast prions. The conversion of these last proteins to the prion state is driven by prion forming domains (PFDs), which are generally large, intrinsically disordered, enriched in glutamines/asparagines and depleted in hydrophobic residues. The self-assembly of PFDs has been thought to rely mostly on their particular amino acid composition, rather than on their sequence. Instead, we have recently proposed that specific amyloid-prone sequences within PFDs might be key to their prion behaviour. Here, we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these amyloid stretches inside the PFDs of the canonical Sup35, Swi1, Mot3 and Ure2 prions. These sequences self-assemble efficiently into highly ordered amyloid fibrils, that are functionally competent, being able to promote the PFD amyloid conversion in vitro and in vivo. Computational analyses indicate that these kind of amyloid stretches may act as typical nucleating signals in a number of different prion domains. PMID:27686217

  20. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Controls PIKfyve Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balklava, Zita; Niehage, Christian; Currinn, Heather; Mellor, Laura; Guscott, Benjamin; Poulin, Gino; Hoflack, Bernard; Wassmer, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    While the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease, its cellular function still remains largely unclear. It was our goal to establish APP function which will provide insights into APP's implication in Alzheimer's disease. Using our recently developed proteo-liposome assay we established the interactome of APP's intracellular domain (known as AICD), thereby identifying novel APP interactors that provide mechanistic insights into APP function. By combining biochemical, cell biological and genetic approaches we validated the functional significance of one of these novel interactors. Here we show that APP binds the PIKfyve complex, an essential kinase for the synthesis of the endosomal phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate. This signalling lipid plays a crucial role in endosomal homeostasis and receptor sorting. Loss of PIKfyve function by mutation causes profound neurodegeneration in mammals. Using C. elegans genetics we demonstrate that APP functionally cooperates with PIKfyve in vivo. This regulation is required for maintaining endosomal and neuronal function. Our findings establish an unexpected role for APP in the regulation of endosomal phosphoinositide metabolism with dramatic consequences for endosomal biology and important implications for our understanding of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26125944

  1. The Amyloid Precursor Protein Controls PIKfyve Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zita Balklava

    Full Text Available While the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease, its cellular function still remains largely unclear. It was our goal to establish APP function which will provide insights into APP's implication in Alzheimer's disease. Using our recently developed proteo-liposome assay we established the interactome of APP's intracellular domain (known as AICD, thereby identifying novel APP interactors that provide mechanistic insights into APP function. By combining biochemical, cell biological and genetic approaches we validated the functional significance of one of these novel interactors. Here we show that APP binds the PIKfyve complex, an essential kinase for the synthesis of the endosomal phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate. This signalling lipid plays a crucial role in endosomal homeostasis and receptor sorting. Loss of PIKfyve function by mutation causes profound neurodegeneration in mammals. Using C. elegans genetics we demonstrate that APP functionally cooperates with PIKfyve in vivo. This regulation is required for maintaining endosomal and neuronal function. Our findings establish an unexpected role for APP in the regulation of endosomal phosphoinositide metabolism with dramatic consequences for endosomal biology and important implications for our understanding of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Amyloid fibrils compared to peptide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zganec, Matjaž; Zerovnik, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Prefibrillar oligomeric states and amyloid fibrils of amyloid-forming proteins qualify as nanoparticles. We aim to predict what biophysical and biochemical properties they could share in common with better researched peptide nanotubes. We first describe what is known of amyloid fibrils and prefibrillar aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils): their structure, mechanisms of formation and putative mechanism of cytotoxicity. In distinction from other neuronal fibrillar constituents, amyloid fibrils are believed to cause pathology, however, some can also be functional. Second, we give a review of known biophysical properties of peptide nanotubes. Finally, we compare properties of these two macromolecular states side by side and discuss which measurements that have already been done with peptide nanotubes could be done with amyloid fibrils as well.

  3. Methionine oxidation of amyloid peptides by peroxovanadium complexes: inhibition of fibril formation through a distinct mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Fibril formation of amyloid peptides is linked to a number of pathological states. The prion protein (PrP) and amyloid-β (Aβ) are two remarkable examples that are correlated with prion disorders and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Metal complexes, such as those formed by platinum and ruthenium compounds, can act as inhibitors against peptide aggregation primarily through metal coordination. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of two peroxovanadium complexes, (NH4)[VO(O2)2(bipy)]·4H2O (1) and (NH4)[VO(O2)2(phen)]·2H2O (2), on amyloid fibril formation of PrP106-126 and Aβ1-42via site-specific oxidation of methionine residues, besides direct binding of the complexes with the peptides. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher anti-amyloidogenic activity on PrP106-126 aggregation than on Aβ1-42, though their regulation on the cytotoxicity induced by the two peptides could not be differentiated. The action efficacy may be attributed to the different molecular structures of the vanadium complex and the peptide sequence. Results reflected that methionine oxidation may be a crucial action mode in inhibiting amyloid fibril formation. This study offers a possible application value for peroxovanadium complexes against amyloid proteins.

  4. Carnosine's effect on amyloid fibril formation and induced cytotoxicity of lysozyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine W Wu

    Full Text Available Carnosine, a common dipeptide in mammals, has previously been shown to dissemble alpha-crystallin amyloid fibrils. To date, the dipeptide's anti-fibrillogensis effect has not been thoroughly characterized in other proteins. For a more complete understanding of carnosine's mechanism of action in amyloid fibril inhibition, we have investigated the effect of the dipeptide on lysozyme fibril formation and induced cytotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Our study demonstrates a positive correlation between the concentration and inhibitory effect of carnosine against lysozyme fibril formation. Molecular docking results show carnosine's mechanism of fibrillogenesis inhibition may be initiated by binding with the aggregation-prone region of the protein. The dipeptide attenuates the amyloid fibril-induced cytotoxicity of human neuronal cells by reducing both apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths. Our study provides solid support for carnosine's amyloid fibril inhibitory property and its effect against fibril-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The additional insights gained herein may pave way to the discovery of other small molecules that may exert similar effects against amyloid fibril formation and its associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Methionine oxidation of amyloid peptides by peroxovanadium complexes: inhibition of fibril formation through a distinct mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Fibril formation of amyloid peptides is linked to a number of pathological states. The prion protein (PrP) and amyloid-β (Aβ) are two remarkable examples that are correlated with prion disorders and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Metal complexes, such as those formed by platinum and ruthenium compounds, can act as inhibitors against peptide aggregation primarily through metal coordination. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of two peroxovanadium complexes, (NH4)[VO(O2)2(bipy)]·4H2O (1) and (NH4)[VO(O2)2(phen)]·2H2O (2), on amyloid fibril formation of PrP106-126 and Aβ1-42via site-specific oxidation of methionine residues, besides direct binding of the complexes with the peptides. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher anti-amyloidogenic activity on PrP106-126 aggregation than on Aβ1-42, though their regulation on the cytotoxicity induced by the two peptides could not be differentiated. The action efficacy may be attributed to the different molecular structures of the vanadium complex and the peptide sequence. Results reflected that methionine oxidation may be a crucial action mode in inhibiting amyloid fibril formation. This study offers a possible application value for peroxovanadium complexes against amyloid proteins. PMID:26444976

  6. Depolymerization of insulin amyloid fibrils by albumin-modified magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siposova, Katarina; Kubovcikova, Martina; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Koneracka, Martina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Antosova, Andrea; Kopcansky, Peter; Daxnerova, Zuzana; Gazova, Zuzana

    2012-02-01

    Pathogenesis of amyloid-related diseases is associated with the presence of protein amyloid deposits. Insulin amyloids have been reported in a patient with diabetes undergoing treatment by injection of insulin and causes problems in the production and storage of this drug and in application of insulin pumps. We have studied the interference of insulin amyloid fibrils with a series of 18 albumin magnetic fluids (MFBSAs) consisting of magnetite nanoparticles modified by different amounts of bovine serum albumin (w/w BSA/Fe3O4 from 0.005 up to 15). We have found that MFBSAs are able to destroy amyloid fibrils in vitro. The extent of fibril depolymerization was affected by nanoparticle physical-chemical properties (hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and isoelectric point) determined by the BSA amount present in MFBSAs. The most effective were MFBSAs with lower BSA/Fe3O4 ratios (from 0.005 to 0.1) characteristic of about 90% depolymerizing activity. For the most active magnetic fluids (ratios 0.01 and 0.02) the DC50 values were determined in the range of low concentrations, indicating their ability to interfere with insulin fibrils at stoichiometric concentrations. We assume that the present findings represent a starting point for the application of the active MFBSAs as therapeutic agents targeting insulin amyloidosis.

  7. Depolymerization of insulin amyloid fibrils by albumin-modified magnetic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathogenesis of amyloid-related diseases is associated with the presence of protein amyloid deposits. Insulin amyloids have been reported in a patient with diabetes undergoing treatment by injection of insulin and causes problems in the production and storage of this drug and in application of insulin pumps. We have studied the interference of insulin amyloid fibrils with a series of 18 albumin magnetic fluids (MFBSAs) consisting of magnetite nanoparticles modified by different amounts of bovine serum albumin (w/w BSA/Fe3O4 from 0.005 up to 15). We have found that MFBSAs are able to destroy amyloid fibrils in vitro. The extent of fibril depolymerization was affected by nanoparticle physical–chemical properties (hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and isoelectric point) determined by the BSA amount present in MFBSAs. The most effective were MFBSAs with lower BSA/Fe3O4 ratios (from 0.005 to 0.1) characteristic of about 90% depolymerizing activity. For the most active magnetic fluids (ratios 0.01 and 0.02) the DC50 values were determined in the range of low concentrations, indicating their ability to interfere with insulin fibrils at stoichiometric concentrations. We assume that the present findings represent a starting point for the application of the active MFBSAs as therapeutic agents targeting insulin amyloidosis. (paper)

  8. Transthyretin V122I amyloidosis with clinical and histological evidence of amyloid neuropathy and myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, A S; Pelayo-Negro, A L; Jaunmuktane, Z; Scalco, R S; Hutt, D; Evans, M R B; Heally, E; Brandner, S; Holton, J; Blake, J; Whelan, C J; Wechalekar, A D; Gillmore, J D; Hawkins, P N; Reilly, M M

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease manifesting with predominant peripheral and autonomic neuropathy; cardiomyopathy, or both. ATTR V122I is the most common variant associated with non-neuropathic familial amyloid cardiomyopathy. We present an unusual case of V122I amyloidosis with features of amyloid neuropathy and myopathy, supported by histological confirmation in both sites and diffuse tracer uptake on (99m)Tc-3,3-Diphosphono-1,2-Propanodicarboxylic acid (DPD) scintigraphy throughout skeletal and cardiac muscle. A 64 year old Jamaican man presented with cardiac failure. Cardiac MR revealed infiltrative cardiomyopathy; abdominal fat aspirate confirmed the presence of amyloid, and he was homozygous for the V122I variant of transthyretin. He also described general weakness and EMG demonstrated myopathic features. Sural nerve and vastus lateralis biopsy showed TTR amyloid. The patient is being treated with diflunisal, an oral TTR stabilising agent. Symptomatic myopathy and neuropathy with confirmation of tissue amyloid deposition has not previously been described. Extracardiac amyloidosis has implications for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25819286

  9. A look into amyloid formation by transthyretin: aggregation pathway and a novel kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Tiago Q; Almeida, Zaida L; Cruz, Pedro F; Jesus, Catarina S H; Castanheira, Pedro; Brito, Rui M M

    2015-03-21

    The aggregation of proteins into insoluble amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of many, highly debilitating, human pathologies such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. Transthyretin (TTR) is a homotetrameric protein implicated in several amyloidoses like Senile Systemic Amyloidosis (SSA), Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (FAP), Familial Amyloid Cardiomyopathy (FAC), and the rare Central Nervous System selective Amyloidosis (CNSA). In this work, we have investigated the kinetics of TTR aggregation into amyloid fibrils produced by the addition of NaCl to acid-unfolded TTR monomers and we propose a mathematically simple kinetic mechanism to analyse the aggregation kinetics of TTR. We have conducted circular dichroism, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and thioflavin-T emission experiments to follow the conformational changes accompanying amyloid formation at different TTR concentrations. Kinetic traces were adjusted to a two-step model with the first step being second-order and the second being unimolecular. The molecular species present in the pathway of TTR oligomerization were characterized by size exclusion chromatography coupled to multi-angle light scattering and by transmission electron microscopy. The results show the transient accumulation of oligomers composed of 6 to 10 monomers in agreement with reports suggesting that these oligomers may be the causative agent of cell toxicity. The results obtained may prove to be useful in understanding the mode of action of different compounds in preventing fibril formation and, therefore, in designing new drugs against TTR amyloidosis. PMID:25694367

  10. Loss of metal ions, disulfide reduction and mutations related to familial ALS promote formation of amyloid-like aggregates from superoxide dismutase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep A Oztug Durer

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene encoding Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 are one of the causes of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS. Fibrillar inclusions containing SOD1 and SOD1 inclusions that bind the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin S have been found in neurons of transgenic mice expressing mutant SOD1. Therefore, the formation of amyloid fibrils from human SOD1 was investigated. When agitated at acidic pH in the presence of low concentrations of guanidine or acetonitrile, metalated SOD1 formed fibrillar material which bound both thioflavin T and Congo red and had circular dichroism and infrared spectra characteristic of amyloid. While metalated SOD1 did not form amyloid-like aggregates at neutral pH, either removing metals from SOD1 with its intramolecular disulfide bond intact or reducing the intramolecular disulfide bond of metalated SOD1 was sufficient to promote formation of these aggregates. SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates both with and without intermolecular disulfide bonds, depending on the incubation conditions, and a mutant SOD1 lacking free sulfhydryl groups (AS-SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates at neutral pH under reducing conditions. ALS mutations enhanced the ability of disulfide-reduced SOD1 to form amyloid-like aggregates, and apo-AS-SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates at pH 7 only when an ALS mutation was also present. These results indicate that some mutations related to ALS promote formation of amyloid-like aggregates by facilitating the loss of metals and/or by making the intramolecular disulfide bond more susceptible to reduction, thus allowing the conversion of SOD1 to a form that aggregates to form resembling amyloid. Furthermore, the occurrence of amyloid-like aggregates per se does not depend on forming intermolecular disulfide bonds, and multiple forms of such aggregates can be produced from SOD1.

  11. Bile acid binding protein: a versatile host of small hydrophobic ligands for applications in the fields of MRI contrast agents and bio-nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiuscia Pagano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade a growing amount of evidence has been obtained, supporting the role of the beta-clamshell family of intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs not only in the translocation of lipophilic molecules but also in lipid mediated signalling and metabolism. Given the central role of lipids in physiological processes, it is essential to have detailed knowledge on their interactions with cognate binding proteins. Structural and dynamical aspects of the binding mechanisms have been widely investigated by means of NMR spectroscopy, docking and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. iLBPs share a stable beta-barrel fold, delimiting an internal cavity capable of promiscuous ligand binding and display significant flexibility at the putative ligand portal. These features make this class of proteins good scaffolds to build host-guest systems for applications in nanomedicine and nanomaterials.

  12. [18F]Fluoroazabenzoxazoles as potential amyloid plaque PET tracers: synthesis and in vivo evaluation in rhesus monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: An 18F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for amyloid plaque is desirable for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, particularly to enable preventative treatment once effective therapeutics are available. Similarly, such a tracer would be useful as a biomarker for enrollment of patients in clinical trials for evaluation of antiamyloid therapeutics. Furthermore, changes in the level of plaque burden as quantified by an amyloid plaque PET tracer may provide valuable insights into the effectiveness of amyloid-targeted therapeutics. This work describes our approach to evaluate and select a candidate PET tracer for in vivo quantification of human amyloid plaque. Methods: Ligands were evaluated for their in vitro binding to human amyloid plaques, lipophilicity and predicted blood–brain barrier permeability. Candidates with favorable in vitro properties were radiolabeled with 18F and evaluated in vivo. Baseline PET scans in rhesus monkey were conducted to evaluate the regional distribution and kinetics of each tracer using tracer kinetic modeling methods. High binding potential in cerebral white matter and cortical grey matter was considered an unfavorable feature of the candidate tracers. Results: [18F]MK-3328 showed the most favorable combination of low in vivo binding potential in white matter and cortical grey matter in rhesus monkeys, low lipophilicity (Log D=2.91) and high affinity for human amyloid plaques (IC50=10.5±1.3 nM). Conclusions: [18F]MK-3328 was identified as a promising PET tracer for in vivo quantification of amyloid plaques, and further evaluation in humans is warranted.

  13. Reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block by the selective relaxant binding agent sugammadex: a dose-finding and safety study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorgenfrei, Iben F; Norrild, Kathrine; Larsen, Per Bo;

    2006-01-01

    Sugammadex (Org 25969) forms a complex with steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents, thereby reversing neuromuscular block. This study investigated the dose-response relation, safety, and pharmacokinetics of sugammadex to reverse rocuronium-induced block....

  14. Study on the thermodynamics of the binding of iminium and alkanolamine forms of the anticancer agent sanguinarine to human serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Energetics of sanguinarine–human serum albumin has been elucidated. ► The alkanolamine binds stronger than iminium. ► Enthalpy driven binding for iminium was revealed. ► Alkanolamine form binding was favored by negative enthalpy and entropy changes. ► Spectroscopic results support calorimetry data. - Abstract: Sanguinarine is an anticancer plant alkaloid that can exist in the charged iminium and neutral alkanolamine forms. The thermodynamics of the interaction of the two forms with human serum albumin was investigated using calorimetric techniques, and the data supplemented with circular dichroism and spectrofluorimetric studies. The thermodynamic results show that there is only one class of binding for sanguinarine on HSA. The equilibrium constant was four times higher for the alkanolamine (Ka = 2.18 · 105 M−1) than for iminium (Ka = 5.97 · 104 M−1). The binding was enthalpy driven for iminium and favoured by both a negative enthalpy and a stronger favourable entropy contribution for the alkanolamine. Temperature dependent calorimetric data yielded values of ΔCp∘ that are consistent with the involvement of different molecular forces in the complexation of the two forms of sanguinarine to HSA. The fluorescence quenching data suggest a static quenching mechanism. Synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroic data are consistent with a conformational change in the protein on binding that was also higher for the alkanolamine form.

  15. General amyloid inhibitors? A critical examination of the inhibition of IAPP amyloid formation by inositol stereoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design.

  16. Solution NMR structure of CsgE: Structural insights into a chaperone and regulator protein important for functional amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Qin; Krezel, Andrzej M; Cusumano, Zachary T; Pinkner, Jerome S; Klein, Roger; Hultgren, Scott J; Frieden, Carl

    2016-06-28

    Curli, consisting primarily of major structural subunit CsgA, are functional amyloids produced on the surface of Escherichia coli, as well as many other enteric bacteria, and are involved in cell colonization and biofilm formation. CsgE is a periplasmic accessory protein that plays a crucial role in curli biogenesis. CsgE binds to both CsgA and the nonameric pore protein CsgG. The CsgG-CsgE complex is the curli secretion channel and is essential for the formation of the curli fibril in vivo. To better understand the role of CsgE in curli formation, we have determined the solution NMR structure of a double mutant of CsgE (W48A/F79A) that appears to be similar to the wild-type (WT) protein in overall structure and function but does not form mixed oligomers at NMR concentrations similar to the WT. The well-converged structure of this mutant has a core scaffold composed of a layer of two α-helices and a layer of three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet with flexible N and C termini. The structure of CsgE fits well into the cryoelectron microscopy density map of the CsgG-CsgE complex. We highlight a striking feature of the electrostatic potential surface in CsgE structure and present an assembly model of the CsgG-CsgE complex. We suggest a structural mechanism of the interaction between CsgE and CsgA. Understanding curli formation can provide the information necessary to develop treatments and therapeutic agents for biofilm-related infections and may benefit the prevention and treatment of amyloid diseases. CsgE could establish a paradigm for the regulation of amyloidogenesis because of its unique role in curli formation. PMID:27298344

  17. Hacking the Code of Amyloid Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems. PMID:19164912

  18. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anckarsäter Henrik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP and β-amyloid (Aβ is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB. Methods The first part of the study was a cross-sectional cohort study in 61 patients with acute facial palsy (19 with LNB and 42 with idiopathic facial paresis, Bell's palsy and 22 healthy controls. CSF was analysed for the β-amyloid peptides Aβ38, Aβ40 and Aβ42, and the amyloid precursor protein (APP isoforms α-sAPP and β-sAPP. CSF total-tau (T-tau, phosphorylated tau (P-tau and neurofilament protein (NFL were measured to monitor neural cell damage. The second part of the study was a prospective cohort-study in 26 LNB patients undergoing consecutive lumbar punctures before and after antibiotic treatment to study time-dependent dynamics of the biomarkers. Results In the cross-sectional study, LNB patients had lower levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau, and higher levels of CSF NFL than healthy controls and patients with Bell's palsy. In the prospective study, LNB patients had low levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau at baseline, which all increased towards normal at follow-up. Conclusions Amyloid metabolism is altered in LNB. CSF levels of α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau are decreased in acute infection and increase after treatment. In combination with earlier findings in multiple sclerosis, cerebral SLE and HIV with cerebral engagement, this points to an influence of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism.

  19. Bovine Insulin Filaments Induced by Reducing Disulfide Bonds Show a Different Morphology, Secondary Structure, and Cell Toxicity from Intact Insulin Amyloid Fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Zako, Tamotsu; Sakono, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Naomi; Ihara, Masaki; Maeda, Mizuo

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with more than 20 diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Insulin is a 51-residue polypeptide hormone, with its two polypeptide chains linked by one intrachain and two interchain disulfide bonds, and has long been known to self-assemble in vitro into amyloid fibrils. We demonstrate here that bovine insulin forms flexible filaments in the presence of a reducing agent, Tris (2-carboxyethyl) phosphine. The insulin filaments, possibly formed du...

  20. Mapping local structural perturbations in the native state of stefin B (cystatin B under amyloid forming conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eParamore

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Unlike a number of amyloid-forming proteins, stefins, in particular stefin B (cystatin B form amyloids under conditions where the native state predominates. In order to trigger oligomerization processes, the stability of the protein needs to be compromised, favoring structural re-arrangement however, accelerating fibril formation is not a simple function of protein stability. We report here on how optimal conditions for amyloid formation lead to the destabilization of dimeric and tetrameric states of the protein in favor of the monomer. Small, highly localized structural changes can be mapped out that allow us to visualize directly areas of the protein which eventually become responsible for triggering amyloid formation. These regions of the protein overlap with the Cu (II-binding sites which we identify here for the first time. We hypothesize that in vivo modulators of amyloid formation may act similarly to painstakingly optimized solvent conditions developed in vitro. We discuss these data in the light of current structural models of stefin B amyloid fibrils based on H-exchange data, where the detachment of the helical part and the extension of loops were observed.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency The prevalence of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy is unknown. The Dutch type is the most common, with over 200 ...

  2. Amyloid myopathy presenting with respiratory failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Ashe, J.; Borel, C O; Hart, G.; Humphrey, R L; Derrick, D A; Kuncl, R W

    1992-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare cause of myopathy. Its prominent or presenting feature may be respiratory failure. Physiological measurement of transdiaphragmatic pressure and biopsy specimens of muscle show the pathological mechanism to be diaphragm weakness due to amyloid infiltration of the diaphragm rather than parenchymal lung involvement. Thus amyloid myopathy even without the typical macroglossia and muscle pseudohypertrophy should be considered as one of the neurological causes of respiratory f...

  3. Molecular mechanisms of amyloid self-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Landreh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid is associated with both pathological protein deposits and the formation of functional protein structures. Therefore, several strategies have evolved to control the formation or inhibition of amyloid in vivo. In this thesis, three separate systems were investigated in which amyloidogenic protein segments are coupled to regulatory elements that prevent or promote fibrillation. We describe the molecular mechanism for how (a) a propeptide segment prevents the uncontrolled a...

  4. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide: Structure, Function, and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hormone islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin plays a role in glucose homeostasis but aggregates to form islet amyloid in type-2 diabetes. Islet amyloid formation contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death in the disease and to the failure of islet transplants. Recent work suggests a role for IAPP aggregation in cardiovascular complications of type-2 diabetes and hints at a possible role in type-1 diabetes. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation in vivo or in vitro are not understood and the mechanisms of IAPP induced β-cell death are not fully defined. Activation of the inflammasome, defects in autophagy, ER stress, generation of reactive oxygen species, membrane disruption, and receptor mediated mechanisms have all been proposed to play a role. Open questions in the field include the relative importance of the various mechanisms of β-cell death, the relevance of reductionist biophysical studies to the situation in vivo, the molecular mechanism of amyloid formation in vitro and in vivo, the factors which trigger amyloid formation in type-2 diabetes, the potential role of IAPP in type-1 diabetes, the development of clinically relevant inhibitors of islet amyloidosis toxicity, and the design of soluble, bioactive variants of IAPP for use as adjuncts to insulin therapy.

  5. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  6. Preclinical investigation of the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and protein and red blood cell binding of DRDE-07: a prophylactic agent against sulphur mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Verma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available DRDE-07, a newly synthesized amifostine analog currently under clinical investigation in a phase I trial, is a potent antidote against sulfur mustard toxicity. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of DRDE-07 in female Swiss Albino mice after a single oral dose of 400 or 600 mg/kg. The physicochemical properties of DRDE-07, including solubility, pKa, Log P, plasma protein binding and plasma/blood partitioning, were determined to support the pharmacokinetic characterization. DRDE-07 concentration was determined by an HPLC-UV method. The profile of plasma concentration versus time was analyzed using a non-compartmental model. Plasma protein binding was assessed using ultrafiltration. DRDE-07 appeared rapidly in plasma after oral administration with peak plasma levels (Cmax observed in less than 15 min. There was a rapid decline in the plasma levels followed by a smaller second peak about 90 min after dosing. The plasma protein binding of DRDE-07 was found to be less than 25% at all concentrations studied. Plasma clearance of DRDE-07 is expected to be ~1.5 fold higher than the blood clearance of DRDE-07. The probable metabolite of DRDE-07 was identified as phenyl-S-ethyl amine.

  7. Tafamidis, a potent and selective transthyretin kinetic stabilizer that inhibits the amyloid cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Bulawa, Christine E.; Connelly, Stephen; DeVit, Michael; Wang, Lan; Weigel, Charlotte; Fleming, James A; Packman, Jeff; Powers, Evan T.; Wiseman, R. Luke; Foss, Theodore R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Labaudinière, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The transthyretin amyloidoses (ATTR) are invariably fatal diseases characterized by progressive neuropathy and/or cardiomyopathy. ATTR are caused by aggregation of transthyretin (TTR), a natively tetrameric protein involved in the transport of thyroxine and the vitamin A–retinol-binding protein complex. Mutations within TTR that cause autosomal dominant forms of disease facilitate tetramer dissociation, monomer misfolding, and aggregation, although wild-type TTR can also form amyloid fibrils ...

  8. Amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) exhibits stronger zinc-dependent neuronal adhesion than amyloid precursor protein and APLP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Magnus C; Schauenburg, Linda; Thompson-Steckel, Greta; Dunsing, Valentin; Kaden, Daniela; Voigt, Philipp; Schaefer, Michael; Chiantia, Salvatore; Kennedy, Timothy E; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its paralogs, amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APLP2, are metalloproteins with a putative role both in synaptogenesis and in maintaining synapse structure. Here, we studied the effect of zinc on membrane localization, adhesion, and secretase cleavage of APP, APLP1, and APLP2 in cell culture and rat neurons. For this, we employed live-cell microscopy techniques, a microcontact printing adhesion assay and ELISA for protein detection in cell culture supernatants. We report that zinc induces the multimerization of proteins of the amyloid precursor protein family and enriches them at cellular adhesion sites. Thus, zinc facilitates the formation of de novo APP and APLP1 containing adhesion complexes, whereas it does not have such influence on APLP2. Furthermore, zinc-binding prevented cleavage of APP and APLPs by extracellular secretases. In conclusion, the complexation of zinc modulates neuronal functions of APP and APLPs by (i) regulating formation of adhesion complexes, most prominently for APLP1, and (ii) by reducing the concentrations of neurotrophic soluble APP/APLP ectodomains. Earlier studies suggest a function of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family proteins in neuronal adhesion. We report here that adhesive function of these proteins is tightly regulated by zinc, most prominently for amyloid precursor-like protein 1 (APLP1). Zinc-mediated APLP1 multimerization, which induced formation of new neuronal contacts and decreased APLP1 shedding. This suggests that APLP1 could function as a zinc receptor processing zinc signals to stabilized or new neuronal contacts.

  9. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  10. Amyloid-linked cellular toxicity triggered by bacterial inclusion bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aggregation of proteins in the form of amyloid fibrils and plaques is the characteristic feature of some pathological conditions ranging from neurodegenerative disorders to systemic amyloidoses. The mechanisms by which the aggregation processes result in cell damage are under intense investigation but recent data indicate that prefibrillar aggregates are the most proximate mediators of toxicity rather than mature fibrils. Since it has been shown that prefibrillar forms of the nondisease-related misfolded proteins are highly toxic to cultured mammalian cells we have studied the cytoxicity associated to bacterial inclusion bodies that have been recently described as protein deposits presenting amyloid-like structures. We have proved that bacterial inclusion bodies composed by a misfolding-prone β-galactosidase fusion protein are clearly toxic for mammalian cells but the β-galactosidase wild type enzyme forming more structured thermal aggregates does not impair cell viability, despite it also binds and enter into the cells. These results are in the line that the most cytotoxic aggregates are early prefibrilar assemblies but discard the hypothesis that the membrane destabilization is Key event to subsequent disruption of cellular processes, such as ion balance, oxidative state and the eventually cell death

  11. Interaction of serum amyloid P component with hexanoyl bis(d-proline) (CPHPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolstoe, Simon E. [University College London, Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Jenvey, Michelle C. [University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Purvis, Alan [Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Light, Mark E. [University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Thompson, Darren [University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom); Hughes, Peter; Pepys, Mark B.; Wood, Stephen P., E-mail: s.wood@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Serum amyloid P component is a pentameric plasma glycoprotein that recognizes and binds to amyloid fibres in a calcium-dependent fashion and is likely to contribute to their deposition and persistence in vivo. Five molecules of the drug CPHPC avidly cross-link pairs of protein pentamers and the decameric complex is rapidly cleared in vivo. Crystal structures of the protein in complex with a bivalent drug and cadmium ions, which improve crystal quality, allow the definition of the preferred bound drug isomers. Under physiological conditions, the pentameric human plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP) binds hexanoyl bis(d-proline) (R-1-(6-[R-2-carboxy-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-6-oxo-hexanoyl) pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid; CPHPC) through its d-proline head groups in a calcium-dependent interaction. Cooperative effects in binding lead to a substantial enhancement of affinity. Five molecules of the bivalent ligand cross-link and stabilize pairs of SAP molecules, forming a decameric complex that is rapidly cleared from the circulation by the liver. Here, it is reported that X-ray analysis of the SAP complex with CPHPC and cadmium ions provides higher resolution detail of the interaction than is observed with calcium ions. Conformational isomers of CPHPC observed in solution by HPLC and by X-ray analysis are compared with the protein-bound form. These are discussed in relation to the development of CPHPC to provide SAP depletion for the treatment of amyloidosis and other indications.

  12. Tabersonine inhibits amyloid fibril formation and cytotoxicity of Aβ(1-42).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Tianhan; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xiaoying; Jing, Aihua; Zhao, Bingqing; Yu, Xiang; Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Feimeng

    2015-06-17

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into amyloid fibrils are key events in the amyloid cascade hypothesis for the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using thioflavin-T (ThT) fluorescence assay, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, size exclusion chromatography, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and cytotoxicity tests, we demonstrate that tabersonine, an ingredient extracted from the bean of Voacanga africana, disrupts Aβ(1-42) aggregation and ameliorates Aβ aggregate-induced cytotoxicity. A small amount of tabersonine (e.g., 10 μM) can effectively inhibit the formation of Aβ(1-42) (e.g., 80 μM) fibrils or convert mature fibrils into largely innocuous amorphous aggregates. SPR results indicate that tabersonine binds to Aβ(1-42) oligomers in a dose-dependent way. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further confirm that tabersonine can bind to oligomers such as the pentamer of Aβ(1-42). Tabersonine preferentially interact with the β-sheet grooves of Aβ(1-42) containing aromatic and hydrophobic residues. The various binding sites and modes explain the diverse inhibitory effects of tabersonine on Aβ aggregation. Given that tabersonine is a natural product and a precursor for vincristine used in cancer chemotherapy, the biocompatibility and small size essential for permeating the blood-brain barrier make it a potential therapeutic drug candidate for treating AD.

  13. The Role of the 14–20 Domain of the Islet Amyloid Polypeptide in Amyloid Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Gilead

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of amyloid formation by the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP has been intensively studied since its identification in the late 1980s. The IAPP(20–29 region is considered to be the central amyloidogenic module of the polypeptide. This assumption is mainly based on the amyloidogenic properties of the region and on the large sequence diversity within this region between the human and mouse IAPP, as the mouse IAPP does not form amyloids. A few years ago, another region within IAPP was identified that seems to be at least as important as IAPP(20–29 in facilitation of molecular recognition that leads to amyloid formation. Here, we reinforce our and others' previous findings by analyzing supporting evidence from the recent literature. Moreover, we provide new proofs to our hypothesis by comparing between the amyloidogenic properties of the two regions derived from the IAPP of cats, which is also known to form amyloid fibrils.

  14. Islet amyloid polypeptide-induced membrane leakage involves uptake of lipids by forming amyloid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparr, Emma; Engel, Maarten F M; Sakharov, Dmitri V; Sprong, Mariette; Jacobs, Jet; de Kruijff, Ben; Höppener, Jo W M; Killian, J Antoinette

    2004-11-01

    Fibril formation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is associated with cell death of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. A likely cause for the cytotoxicity of human IAPP is that it destroys the barrier properties of the cell membrane. Here, we show by fluorescence confocal microscopy on lipid vesicles that the process of hIAPP amyloid formation is accompanied by a loss of barrier function, whereby lipids are extracted from the membrane and taken up in the forming amyloid deposits. No membrane interaction was observed when preformed fibrils were used. It is proposed that lipid uptake from the cell membrane is responsible for amyloid-induced membrane damage and that this represents a general mechanism underlying the cytotoxicity of amyloid forming proteins. PMID:15527771

  15. The pentraxins, C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component, are cleared and catabolized by hepatocytes in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchinson, W L; Noble, G. E.; Hawkins, P N; Pepys, M B

    1994-01-01

    The cellular sites of clearance and degradation of the pentraxin plasma proteins, C-reactive protein, the classical acute phase reactant, and serum amyloid P component (SAP), a universal constituent of amyloid deposits, were sought using the ligand 125I-tyramine cellobiose (TC) which is substantially retained within the cells in which catabolism takes place. Pentraxins labeled with 125I-TC showed the same in vitro and in vivo ligand binding and the same in vivo plasma t1/2 as the directly iod...

  16. Molecular recognition of CYP26A1 binding pockets and structure-activity relationship studies for design of potent and selective retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bin; Song, Shuai; Hao, Chen-Zhou; Huang, Wan-Xu; Liu, Chun-Chi; Xie, Hong-Lei; Lin, Bin; Cheng, Mao-Sheng; Zhao, Dong-Mei

    2015-03-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), the biologically most active metabolite of vitamin A, plays a major role in the regulation of cellular differentiation and proliferation, and it is also an important pharmacological agent particularly used in the treatment of cancer, skin, neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases. However, ATRA is very easy to be metabolized into 4-hydroxyl-RA in vivo by CYP26A1, an inducible cytochrome P450 enzyme, eventually into more polar metabolites. Therefore, it is vital to develop specific retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs) to inhibit the metabolic enzyme CYP26A1 in the treatment of relevant diseases aforementioned. In this study, CYP26A1 and its interactions with retinoic acid-competitive metabolism blocking agents were investigated by a combined ligand- and structure-based approach. First, since the crystal structure of CYP26A1 protein has not been determined, we constructed the 3D structure of CYP26A1 using homology modeling. In order to achieve a deeper insight into the mode of action of RAMBAs in the active site, the molecular superimposition model and the common feature pharmacophore model were constructed, and molecular docking was performed. The molecular superimposition model is composed of three features: the main chain groups, side chain groups, and azole groups. The common feature pharmacophore model consists of five chemical features: four hydrophobic groups and one hydrogen acceptor (HHHHA). The results of molecular docking show that the characteristic groups of RAMBAs were mapped into three different active pockets, respectively. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) was obtained by a combination of the molecular superimposition and docking results with the pharmacophore model. This study gives more insight into the interaction model inside the CYP26A1 active site and provides guidance for the design of more potent and possibly more selective RAMBAs.

  17. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W [SVIMR-A; (Hanson); (Heidelberg); (Melbourne)

    2012-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  18. Toward the discovery of functional transthyretin amyloid inhibitors: application of virtual screening methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Carlos J V; Mukherjee, Trishna; Brito, Rui M M; Jackson, Richard M

    2010-10-25

    Inhibition of amyloid fibril formation by stabilization of the native form of the protein transthyretin (TTR) is a viable approach for the treatment of familial amyloid polyneuropathy that has been gaining momentum in the field of amyloid research. The TTR stabilizer molecules discovered to date have shown efficacy at inhibiting fibrilization in vitro but display impairing issues of solubility, affinity for TTR in the blood plasma and/or adverse effects. In this study we present a benchmark of four protein- and ligand-based virtual screening (VS) methods for identifying novel TTR stabilizers: (i) two-dimensional (2D) similarity searches with chemical hashed, pharmacophore, and UNITY fingerprints, (ii) 3D searches based on shape, chemical, and electrostatic similarity, (iii) LigMatch, a new ligand-based method which uses multiple templates and combines 3D geometric hashing with a 2D preselection process, and (iv) molecular docking to consensus X-ray crystal structures of TTR. We illustrate the potential of the best-performing VS protocols to retrieve promising new leads by ranking a tailored library of 2.3 million commercially available compounds. Our predictions show that the top-scoring molecules possess distinctive features from the known TTR binders, holding better solubility, fraction of halogen atoms, and binding affinity profiles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to rationalize the utilization of a large battery of in silico screening techniques toward the identification of a new generation of TTR amyloid inhibitors.

  19. Membrane Incorporation, Channel Formation, and Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis by Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization, conformational changes, and the consequent neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's β-amyloid protein (AβP play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Mounting evidence suggests that oligomeric AβPs cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis, eventually leading to neuronal death. We have demonstrated that oligomeric AβPs directly incorporate into neuronal membranes, form cation-sensitive ion channels (“amyloid channels”, and cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis via the amyloid channels. Other disease-related amyloidogenic proteins, such as prion protein in prion diseases or α-synuclein in dementia with Lewy bodies, exhibit similarities in the incorporation into membranes and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. Here, based on our experimental results and those of numerous other studies, we review the current understanding of the direct binding of AβP into membrane surfaces and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. The implication of composition of membrane lipids and the possible development of new drugs by influencing membrane properties and attenuating amyloid channels for the treatment and prevention of AD is also discussed.

  20. Neuroprotective and nootropic drug noopept rescues α-synuclein amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xueen; Gharibyan, Anna L; Öhman, Anders; Liu, Yonggang; Olofsson, Anders; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A

    2011-12-16

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by α-synuclein (α-Syn)-containing Lewy body formation and selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. We have demonstrated the modulating effect of noopept, a novel proline-containing dipeptide drug with nootropic and neuroprotective properties, on α-Syn oligomerization and fibrillation by using thioflavin T fluorescence, far-UV CD, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Noopept does not bind to a sterically specific site in the α-Syn molecule as revealed by heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR analysis, but due to hydrophobic interactions with toxic amyloid oligomers, it prompts their rapid sequestration into larger fibrillar amyloid aggregates. Consequently, this process rescues the cytotoxic effect of amyloid oligomers on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells as demonstrated by using cell viability assays and fluorescent staining of apoptotic and necrotic cells and by assessing the level of intracellular oxidative stress. The mitigating effect of noopept against amyloid oligomeric cytotoxicity may offer additional benefits to the already well-established therapeutic functions of this new pharmaceutical. PMID:21986202

  1. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Garnett, James A; Matthews, Steve; Penades, José R; Lasa, Iñigo; Valle, Jaione

    2016-06-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Tackling amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease with A2V variants of Amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Maderna, Emanuela; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Colombo, Laura; Rossi, Alessandro; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Virgilio, Tommaso; Palamara, Luisa; Ruggerone, Margherita; Giaccone, Giorgio; Campagnani, Ilaria; Costanza, Massimo; Pedotti, Rosetta; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) exploiting the properties of a natural variant of Amyloid-β (Aβ) carrying the A2V substitution, which protects heterozygous carriers from AD by its ability to interact with wild-type Aβ, hindering conformational changes and assembly thereof. As prototypic compound we designed a six-mer mutated peptide (Aβ1-6A2V), linked to the HIV-related TAT protein, which is widely used for brain delivery and cell membrane penetration of drugs. The resulting molecule [Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D)] revealed strong anti-amyloidogenic effects in vitro and protected human neuroblastoma cells from Aβ toxicity. Preclinical studies in AD mouse models showed that short-term treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) inhibits Aβ aggregation and cerebral amyloid deposition, but a long treatment schedule unexpectedly increases amyloid burden, although preventing cognitive deterioration. Our data support the view that the AβA2V-based strategy can be successfully used for the development of treatments for AD, as suggested by the natural protection against the disease in human A2V heterozygous carriers. The undesirable outcome of the prolonged treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) was likely due to the TAT intrinsic attitude to increase Aβ production, avidly bind amyloid and boost its seeding activity, warning against the use of the TAT carrier in the design of AD therapeutics. PMID:26864599

  3. Tackling amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer’s disease with A2V variants of Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Maderna, Emanuela; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Colombo, Laura; Rossi, Alessandro; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Virgilio, Tommaso; Palamara, Luisa; Ruggerone, Margherita; Giaccone, Giorgio; Campagnani, Ilaria; Costanza, Massimo; Pedotti, Rosetta; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) exploiting the properties of a natural variant of Amyloid-β (Aβ) carrying the A2V substitution, which protects heterozygous carriers from AD by its ability to interact with wild-type Aβ, hindering conformational changes and assembly thereof. As prototypic compound we designed a six-mer mutated peptide (Aβ1-6A2V), linked to the HIV-related TAT protein, which is widely used for brain delivery and cell membrane penetration of drugs. The resulting molecule [Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D)] revealed strong anti-amyloidogenic effects in vitro and protected human neuroblastoma cells from Aβ toxicity. Preclinical studies in AD mouse models showed that short-term treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) inhibits Aβ aggregation and cerebral amyloid deposition, but a long treatment schedule unexpectedly increases amyloid burden, although preventing cognitive deterioration. Our data support the view that the AβA2V-based strategy can be successfully used for the development of treatments for AD, as suggested by the natural protection against the disease in human A2V heterozygous carriers. The undesirable outcome of the prolonged treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) was likely due to the TAT intrinsic attitude to increase Aβ production, avidly bind amyloid and boost its seeding activity, warning against the use of the TAT carrier in the design of AD therapeutics. PMID:26864599

  4. Tackling amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease with A2V variants of Amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Maderna, Emanuela; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Colombo, Laura; Rossi, Alessandro; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Virgilio, Tommaso; Palamara, Luisa; Ruggerone, Margherita; Giaccone, Giorgio; Campagnani, Ilaria; Costanza, Massimo; Pedotti, Rosetta; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) exploiting the properties of a natural variant of Amyloid-β (Aβ) carrying the A2V substitution, which protects heterozygous carriers from AD by its ability to interact with wild-type Aβ, hindering conformational changes and assembly thereof. As prototypic compound we designed a six-mer mutated peptide (Aβ1-6A2V), linked to the HIV-related TAT protein, which is widely used for brain delivery and cell membrane penetration of drugs. The resulting molecule [Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D)] revealed strong anti-amyloidogenic effects in vitro and protected human neuroblastoma cells from Aβ toxicity. Preclinical studies in AD mouse models showed that short-term treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) inhibits Aβ aggregation and cerebral amyloid deposition, but a long treatment schedule unexpectedly increases amyloid burden, although preventing cognitive deterioration. Our data support the view that the AβA2V-based strategy can be successfully used for the development of treatments for AD, as suggested by the natural protection against the disease in human A2V heterozygous carriers. The undesirable outcome of the prolonged treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) was likely due to the TAT intrinsic attitude to increase Aβ production, avidly bind amyloid and boost its seeding activity, warning against the use of the TAT carrier in the design of AD therapeutics.

  5. Staphylococcal Bap Proteins Build Amyloid Scaffold Biofilm Matrices in Response to Environmental Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglialegna, Agustina; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Garnett, James A.; Matthews, Steve; Penades, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo; Valle, Jaione

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are communities of bacteria that grow encased in an extracellular matrix that often contains proteins. The spatial organization and the molecular interactions between matrix scaffold proteins remain in most cases largely unknown. Here, we report that Bap protein of Staphylococcus aureus self-assembles into functional amyloid aggregates to build the biofilm matrix in response to environmental conditions. Specifically, Bap is processed and fragments containing at least the N-terminus of the protein become aggregation-prone and self-assemble into amyloid-like structures under acidic pHs and low concentrations of calcium. The molten globule-like state of Bap fragments is stabilized upon binding of the cation, hindering its self-assembly into amyloid fibers. These findings define a dual function for Bap, first as a sensor and then as a scaffold protein to promote biofilm development under specific environmental conditions. Since the pH-driven multicellular behavior mediated by Bap occurs in coagulase-negative staphylococci and many other bacteria exploit Bap-like proteins to build a biofilm matrix, the mechanism of amyloid-like aggregation described here may be widespread among pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27327765

  6. The effects of Betula platyphylla bark on amyloid beta-induced learning and memory impairment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Namki; Lee, Hee Kyoung; Jeon, Byung Ju; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Young Choong; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is closely associated with amyloid β (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity and oxidative stress in the brain. Betula platyphylla, which has been used to treat various oxidative-stressed related diseases, has recently received attention for its preventive activity on age-related neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we attempted to investigate the effects of B. platyphylla bark (BPB-316) on Aβ(1-42)-induced neurotoxicity and memory impairment. Oral treatment using BPB-316 significantly attenuated Aβ-induced memory impairment which was evaluated by behavioral tests including the passive avoidance, Y-maze and Morris water maze test. BPB-316 also inhibited the elevation of β-secretase activity accompanying the reduced Aβ(1-42) levels in the hippocampus of the brain. Furthermore, BPB-316 significantly decreased the acetylcholinesterase activity and increased the glutathione content in the hippocampus. In addition, we confirmed that the expression of both cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of Aβ(1-42)-injected mice were markedly upregulated by the treatment of BPB-316. Our data suggest that the extracts of B. platyphylla bark might be a potential therapeutic agent against AD.

  7. NO-flurbiprofen reduces amyloid-beta, is neuroprotective in cell culture, and enhances cognition in response to cholinergic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O; Luo, Jia; Ashghodom, Rezene T; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2009-11-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen is a selective amyloid lowering agent which has been studied clinically in Alzheimer's disease. HCT-1026 is an ester prodrug of flurbiprofen incorporating a nitrate carrier moiety that in vivo provides NO bioactivity and an improved safety profile. In vitro, HCT-1026 retained the cyclooxygenase inhibitory and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug activity of flurbiprofen, but at concentrations at which levels of amyloid-beta 1-42 amino acid were lowered by flurbiprofen, amyloid-beta 1-42 amino acid levels were elevated 200% by HCT-1026. Conversely, at lower concentrations, HCT-1026 behaved as a selective amyloid lowering agent with greater potency than flurbiprofen. The difference in concentration-responses between flurbiprofen and HCT-1026 in vitro suggests different cellular targets; and in no case did a combination of nitrate drug with flurbiprofen provide similar actions. In vivo, HCT-1026 was observed to reverse cognitive deficits induced by scopolamine in two behavioral assays; activity that was also shown by a classical nitrate drug, but not by flurbiprofen. The ability to restore aversive memory and spatial working and reference memory after cholinergic blockade has been demonstrated by other agents that stimulate NO/cGMP signaling. These observations add positively to the preclinical profile of HCT-1026 and NO chimeras in Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and plasma protein binding of sodium (±-5-bromo-2-(α-hydroxypentyl benzoate (BZP, an innovative potent anti-ischemic stroke agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Tian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Sodium (±-5-bromo-2-(α-hydroxypentyl benzoate (BZP is a potential cardiovascular drug and exerts potent neuroprotective effect against transient and long-term ischemic stroke in rats. BZP could convert into 3-butyl-6-bromo-1(3H-isobenzofuranone (Br-NBP in vitro and in vivo. However, the pharmacokinetic profiles of BZP and Br-NBP still have not been evaluated. For the purpose of investigating the pharmacokinetic profiles, tissue distribution and plasma protein binding of BZP and Br-NBP, a rapid, sensitive and specific method based on liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS has been developed for determination of BZP and Br-NBP in biological samples. The results indicated that BZP and Br-NBP showed a short elimination half-life, and pharmacokinetic profile in rats (3, 6 and 12 mg/kg; i.v. and beagle dogs (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg; i.v.gtt were obtained after single dosing of BZP. After multiple dosing of BZP, there was no significant accumulation of BZP and Br-NBP in the plasma of rats and beagle dogs. Following i.v. single dose (6 mg/kg to rats, BZP and Br-NBP were distributed rapidly into all tissues examined, with the highest concentrations of BZP and Br-NBP in lung and kidney, respectively. The brain distribution of Br-NBP in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO rats was more than in normal rats (P<0.05. The plasma protein binding degree of BZP at three concentrations (8000, 20000 and 80000 ng/mL from rat, beagle dog and human plasma were 98.1~98.7%, 88.9~92.7% and 74.8%~83.7% respectively. In conclusion, both BZP and Br-NBP showed short half-life, good dose-linear pharmacokinetic profile, wide tissue distribution and different degree protein binding to various species plasma. This was the first preclinical pharmacokinetic investigation of BZP and Br-NBP in both rats and beagle dogs, which provided vital guidance for further preclinical research and the subsequent clinical trials.

  9. Exploring the reactivity of flavonoid compounds with metal-associated amyloid-β species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoming; Park, Hyun Min; Hyung, Suk-Joon; DeToma, Alaina S; Kim, Cheal; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Lim, Mi Hee

    2012-06-01

    Metal ions associated with amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides have been suggested to be involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but this remains unclear and controversial. Some attempts to rationally design or select small molecules with structural moieties for metal chelation and Aβ interaction (i.e., bifunctionality) have been made to gain a better understanding of the hypothesis. In order to contribute to these efforts, four synthetic flavonoid derivatives FL1-FL4 were rationally selected according to the principles of bifunctionality and their abilities to chelate metal ions, interact with Aβ, inhibit metal-induced Aβ aggregation, scavenge radicals, and regulate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were studied using physical methods and biological assays. The compounds FL1-FL3 were able to chelate metal ions, but showed limited solubility in aqueous buffered solutions. In the case of FL4, which was most compatible with aqueous conditions, its binding affinities for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) (nM and μM, respectively) were obtained through solution speciation studies. The direct interaction between FL4 and Aβ monomer was weak, which was monitored by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Employing FL1-FL4, no noticeable inhibitory effect on metal-mediated Aβ aggregation was observed. Among FL1-FL4, FL3, having 3-OH, 4-oxo, and 4'-N(CH(3))(2) groups, exhibited similar antioxidant activity to the vitamin E analogue, Trolox, and ca. 60% reduction in the amount of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) generated by Cu(2+)-Aβ in the presence of dioxygen (O(2)) and a reducing agent. Overall, the studies here suggest that although four flavonoid molecules were selected based on expected bifunctionality, their properties and metal-Aβ reactivity were varied depending on the structure differences, demonstrating that bifunctionality must be well tuned to afford desirable reactivity.

  10. Inhibition of the mitochondrial enzyme ABAD restores the amyloid-β-mediated deregulation of estradiol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-An Lim

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a conformational disease that is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ deposition in the brain. Aβ exerts its toxicity in part by receptor-mediated interactions that cause down-stream protein misfolding and aggregation, as well as mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent reports indicate that Aβ may also interact directly with intracellular proteins such as the mitochondrial enzyme ABAD (Aβ binding alcohol dehydrogenase in executing its toxic effects. Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early in AD, and Aβ's toxicity is in part mediated by inhibition of ABAD as shown previously with an ABAD decoy peptide. Here, we employed AG18051, a novel small ABAD-specific compound inhibitor, to investigate the role of ABAD in Aβ toxicity. Using SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we found that AG18051 partially blocked the Aβ-ABAD interaction in a pull-down assay while it also prevented the Aβ42-induced down-regulation of ABAD activity, as measured by levels of estradiol, a known hormone and product of ABAD activity. Furthermore, AG18051 is protective against Aβ42 toxicity, as measured by LDH release and MTT absorbance. Specifically, AG18051 reduced Aβ42-induced impairment of mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress as shown by reduced ROS (reactive oxygen species levels. Guided by our previous finding of shared aspects of the toxicity of Aβ and human amylin (HA, with the latter forming aggregates in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM pancreas, we determined whether AG18051 would also confer protection from HA toxicity. We found that the inhibitor conferred only partial protection from HA toxicity indicating distinct pathomechanisms of the two amyloidogenic agents. Taken together, our results present the inhibition of ABAD by compounds such as AG18051 as a promising therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of AD, and suggest levels of estradiol as a suitable read-out.

  11. Extrahepatic production of acute phase serum amyloid A

    OpenAIRE

    Upragarin, N.; Landman, W.J.M.; Gaastra, W; Gruys, E.

    2005-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a group of diseases characterized by the extracellular deposition of protein that contains non-branching, straight fibrils on electron microscopy (amyloid fibrils) that have a high content of ß-pleated sheet conformation. Various biochemically distinct proteins can undergo transformation into amyloid fibrils. The precursor protein of amyloid protein A (AA) is the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA). The concentration of SAA in plasma increa...

  12. STIMULATED PLATELETS RELEASE AMYLOID β–PROTEIN PRECURSOR

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Gregory M.; Galasko, Douglas; Shapiro, I. Paul; Saitoh, Tsunao

    1990-01-01

    Human platelets can be stimulated by thrombin or ionomycin to secrete soluble truncated amyloid β–protein precursor and particulate membrane fragments which contain C-terminal and N-terminal immunoreactive amyloid β–protein precursor. This suggests a possible circulating source of β–protein in serum which may play a role in the formation of amyloid deposits. The release of soluble amyloid β-protein precursor could be involved in normal platelet physiology.

  13. Protein-induced Photophysical Changes to the Amyloid Indicator Dye Thioflavin T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Wolfe; M Calabrese; A Nath; D Blaho; A Miranker; Y Xiong

    2011-12-31

    The small molecule thioflavin T (ThT) is a defining probe for the identification and mechanistic study of amyloid fiber formation. As such, ThT is fundamental to investigations of serious diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, and type II diabetes. For each disease, a different protein undergoes conformational conversion to a {beta}-sheet rich fiber. The fluorescence of ThT exhibits an increase in quantum yield upon binding these fibers. Despite its widespread use, the structural basis for binding specificity and for the changes to the photophysical properties of ThT remain poorly understood. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of ThT with two alternative states of {beta}-2 microglobulin ({beta}2m); one monomeric, the other an amyloid-like oligomer. In the latter, the dye intercalates between {beta}-sheets orthogonal to the {beta}-strands. Importantly, the fluorophore is bound in such a manner that a photophysically relevant torsion is limited to a range of angles generally associated with low, not high, quantum yield. Quantum mechanical assessment of the fluorophore shows the electronic distribution to be strongly stabilized by aromatic interactions with the protein. Monomeric {beta}2m gives little increase in ThT fluorescence despite showing three fluorophores, at two binding sites, in configurations generally associated with high quantum yield. Our efforts fundamentally extend existing understanding about the origins of amyloid-induced photophysical changes. Specifically, the {beta}-sheet interface that characterizes amyloid acts both sterically and electronically to stabilize the fluorophore's ground state electronic distribution. By preventing the fluorophore from adopting its preferred excited state configuration, nonradiative relaxation pathways are minimized and quantum yield is increased.

  14. Deletion of Mint proteins decreases amyloid production in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Angela; Liu, Xinran; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2008-01-01

    Mints/X11s are neuronal adaptor proteins that bind to amyloid-β precursor protein (APP). Previous studies suggested that Mint/X11 proteins influence APP cleavage, and affect production of pathogenic Aβ-peptides in Alzheimer’s disease; however, the biological significance of Mint/X11-binding to APP and their possible role in Aβ-production remain unclear. Here, we crossed conditional and constitutive Mint1, Mint2, and Mint3 knockout mice with transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease overp...

  15. Identification of a new anti-LPS agent, geniposide, from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, and its ability of direct binding and neutralization of lipopolysaccharide in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinchuan; Yang, Dong; Liu, Xin; Wang, Ning; Li, Bin; Cao, Hongwei; Lu, Yongling; Wei, Guo; Zhou, Hong; Zheng, Jiang

    2010-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS/endotoxin) is a key pathogen recognition molecule for sepsis. Currently, one of the therapeutic approaches for severe sepsis is focusing on the neutralization of LPS, and clinical trials have shown a lot of traditional Chinese herbs possess anti-sepsis function. Herein, to elucidate the bioactive components of traditional Chinese herbs that can neutralize LPS, the lipid A-binding abilities of sixty herbs were tested using affinity biosensor technology. The aqueous extract of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, traditionally used to treat inflammation in Asian countries for centuries, was further investigated. Subsequently, a monomer, identified as geniposide, was isolated. In vitro, geniposide was found to directly bind LPS and neutralize LPS. It dose-dependently inhibited cytokines release from RAW264.7 cells induced by LPS without affecting the cell viability, and inhibited TNF-α mRNA expression up-regulated by LPS. However, geniposide did not decrease TNF-α release induced by CpG DNA, Poly I:C or IL-1β. Significantly, geniposide dose-dependently down-regulated TLR4 mRNA expression up-regulated by LPS, and suppressed the phosphorylations of p38 MAKP induced by LPS but not by IL-1β. In vivo, geniposide (40mg/kg) could significantly protect mice challenge with lethal heat-killed E. coli, and dose-dependently decreased the level of serum endotoxin which was tightly associated with the cytokine levels in endotoxemia mice. In summary, we successfully isolated geniposide from G. jasminoides Ellis. Geniposide directly bound LPS and neutralized LPS in vitro, and significantly protected sepsis model mice. Therefore, geniposide could be as a useful lead compound for anti-sepsis drug development. PMID:20655404

  16. Appropriate Use Criteria for Amyloid PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith A.; Minoshima, Satoshi; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Donohoe, Kevin J.; Foster, Norman L.; Herscovitch, Peter; Karlawish, Jason H.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Hartley, Dean M.; Hedrick, Saima; Mitchell, Kristi; Pappas, Virginia; Thies, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of brain amyloid-beta is a technology that is becoming more available, but its clinical utility in medical practice requires careful definition. In order to provide guidance to dementia care practitioners, patients and caregivers, the Alzheimer Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging convened the Amyloid Imaging Taskforce (AIT). The AIT considered a broad range of specific clinical scenarios in which amyloid PET could potentially be appropriately used. Peer-reviewed, published literature was searched to ascertain available evidence relevant to these scenarios, and the AIT developed a consensus of expert opinion. While empirical evidence of impact on clinical outcomes is not yet available, a set of specific Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) were agreed upon that define the types of patients and clinical circumstances in which amyloid PET could be used. Both appropriate and inappropriate uses were considered and formulated, and are reported and discussed here. Because both dementia care and amyloid PET technology are in active development, these AUC will require periodic reassessment. Future research directions are also outlined, including diagnostic utility and patient-centered outcomes. PMID:23360977

  17. Study of specially labeling amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer transgenic mice with targeted magnetic nano-iron contrast agent%靶向纳米铁磁共振造影剂特异性标记阿尔茨海默病鼠脑内老年斑

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    湛彦强; 张苏明; 吴军; 许杰; 尹波; 马铭; 杜桂焕; 刘祖黎; 徐威; 雷浩

    2011-01-01

    目的 开发具有高度特异性的靶向磁共振对比剂,验证其特异性显示阿尔茨海默病(AD)脑内老年斑的可能性及有效性.方法 利用热分解法获得水相的磁性纳米四氧化三铁颗粒(MNPs),经过表面官能化学修饰,完成MNPs与β淀粉样蛋白肽段1-40(Aβ40)及蛋白质转导结合域(protein transduction domain,Tat-PTD)的连接后,制备出特异性与老年斑相结合的靶向纳米铁造影剂Aβ40-MNPs-Tat PTD,通过尾静脉注射人20只AD鼠和20只阴性对照C57小鼠(4、6、9、12月龄各5只)体内,不同的时间点采用7.0 T动物磁共振检测获得磁共振图像,观察靶向纳米造影剂对脑实质内老年斑信号的强化效果,继之处死小鼠后灌流取脑做连续冰冻切片,进行铁染色和Thioflavine S染色组织学验证.结果 所获得的靶向纳米颗粒Aβ40-MNPs-Tat PTD能够在体外进入细胞内进而改变细胞磁共振T2信号强度.尾静脉注射入AD鼠体内后能特异性负性强化AD鼠脑内老年斑病变,经组织学验证,能够与老年斑染色及铁染色相对应.结论 特异靶向性的磁性纳米铁造影剂Aβ40-MNPs-Tat PTD能特异性地针对小鼠脑内的老年斑病变进行负性强化和标记.%Objective To develop specific targeted magnetic biomarkers which can selectively mark the senile plaques in Alzheimer' s disease (AD) and verify its feasibility and validity.Methods Aβ1-40 peptide and Tat-PTD ( Tat-protein transduction domain) was binded with dextran-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide ( USPIO) particles.Visualization of plaques in vivo in Alzheimer transgenic mice was investigated at 7.0 Tesla using T2 sequences after intravenous administration of the targeted nanoiron contrast agent and verified by histological staining.Results The targeted nano-iron contrast agent could enter the cultured neural stem cells,and was able to accelerate T2 relaxation rates of water protons in the cells and negatively reinforce the T2

  18. Neuropsychological Effects of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Matthew; Kirshner, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a condition of the cerebral arterioles and to a lesser extent capillaries and veins, wherein beta-amyloid is deposited. In arterioles, this preferentially targets vascular smooth muscle cells and in the later stages undermines the stability of the vessel. This condition is frequently comorbid with Alzheimer's disease and its role in cognitive impairment and dementia is a topic of considerable recent research. This article reviews recent literature which confirms that CAA independently contributes to cognitive impairment by potentiating the neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease, by predisposing to microhemorrhagic and microischemic injury to the brain parenchyma, and by interfering with the autoregulation of CNS blood flow. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, with a focus on the neuropsychological manifestations of this vasculopathy. PMID:27357378

  19. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  20. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  1. Metal based pharmacologically active agents: Synthesis, structural characterization, molecular modeling, CT-DNA binding studies and in vitro antimicrobial screening of iron(II) bromosalicylidene amino acid chelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Laila H.; El-Khatib, Rafat M.; Nassr, Lobna A. E.; Abu-Dief, Ahmed M.; Ismael, Mohamed; Seleem, Amin Abdou

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has been focused on Fe(II) Schiff base amino acid complexes as cytotoxic and antitumor drugs. Thus a series of new iron(II) complexes based on Schiff bases amino acids ligands have been designed and synthesized from condensation of 5-bromosalicylaldehyde (bs) and α-amino acids (L-alanine (ala), L-phenylalanine (phala), L-aspartic acid (aspa), L-histidine (his) and L-arginine (arg)). The structure of the investigated iron(II) complexes was elucidated using elemental analyses, infrared, ultraviolet-visible, thermogravimetric analysis, as well as conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Moreover, the stoichiometry and the stability constants of the prepared complexes have been determined spectrophotometrically. The results suggest that 5-bromosalicylaldehyde amino acid Schiff bases (bs:aa) behave as dibasic tridentate ONO ligands and coordinate to Fe(II) in octahedral geometry according to the general formula [Fe(bs:aa)2]ṡnH2O. The conductivity values between 37 and 64 ohm-1 mol-1 cm2 in ethanol imply the presence of nonelectrolyte species. The structure of the complexes was validated using quantum mechanics calculations based on accurate DFT methods. Geometry optimization of the Fe-Schiff base amino acid complexes showed that all complexes had octahedral coordination. In addition, the interaction of these complexes with (CT-DNA) was investigated at pH = 7.2, by using UV-vis absorption, viscosity and agarose gel electrophoresis measurements. Results indicated that the investigated complexes strongly bind to calf thymus DNA via intercalative mode and showed a different DNA binding according to the sequence: bsari > bshi > bsali > bsasi > bsphali. Moreover, the prepared compounds are screened for their in vitro antibacterial and antifungal activity against three types of bacteria, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus cereus and three types of anti fungal cultures, Penicillium purpurogenium, Aspergillus

  2. The effect of amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism on cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present multimodal neuroimaging study examined whether amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism are related to cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and healthy elderly controls. Structural MRI scans of eleven AD patients and ten controls were available at baseline and follow-up (mean interval 2.5 years). Change in brain structure over time was defined as percent change of cortical volume within seven a-priori defined regions that typically show the strongest structural loss in AD. In addition, two PET scans were performed at baseline: [11C]PIB to assess amyloid-β plaque load and [18F]FDG to assess glucose metabolism. [11C]PIB binding and [18F]FDG uptake were measured in the precuneus, a region in which both amyloid deposition and glucose hypometabolism occur early in the course of AD. While amyloid-β plaque load at baseline was not related to cortical volume loss over time in either group, glucose metabolism within the group of AD patients was significantly related to volume loss over time (rho = 0.56, p 11C]PIB behaves as a trait marker (i.e., all AD patients showed elevated levels of amyloid, not related to subsequent disease course), whilst hypometabolism as measured by [18F]FDG changed over time indicating that it could serve as a state marker that is predictive of neurodegeneration. (orig.)

  3. TATA-binding protein-related factor 2 is localized in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells and much of it migrates to the nucleus in response to genotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung-ae; Tanaka, Yuji; Suenaga, Yusuke; Tamura, Taka-aki

    2006-10-31

    TBP (TATA-binding protein)-related factor 2 (TRF2) regulates transcription during a nuber of cellular processes. We previously demonstrated that it is localized in the cytoplasm and is translocated to the nucleus by DNA-damaging agents. However, the cytoplasmic localization of TRF2 is controversial. In this study, we reconfirmed its cytoplasmic localization in various ways and examined its nuclear migration. Stresses such as heat shock, redox agents, heavy metals, and osmotic shock did not affect localization whereas genotoxins such as methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), cisplatin, etoposide, and hydroxyurea caused it to migrate to the nucleus. Adriamycin, mitomycin C and gamma-rays had no obvious effect. We determined optimal conditions for the nuclear migration. The proportions of cells with nuclei enriched for TRF2 were 25-60% and 5-10% for stressed cells and control cells, respectively. Nuclear translocation was observed after 1 h, 4 h and 12 h for cisplatin, etoposide and MMS and hydroxyurea, respectively. The association of TRF2 with the chromatin and promoter region of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene, a putative target of TRF2, was increased by MMS treatment. Thus TRF2 may be involved in genotoxin-induced transcriptional regulation. PMID:17085973

  4. Compressive deformation of ultralong amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-12-01

    Involved in various neurodegenerative diseases, amyloid fibrils and plaques feature a hierarchical structure, ranging from the atomistic to the micrometer scale. At the atomistic level, a dense and organized hydrogen bond network is resembled in a beta-sheet rich secondary structure, which drives a remarkable stiffness in the range of 10-20GPa, larger than many other biological nanofibrils, a result confirmed by both experiment and theory. However, the understanding of how these exceptional mechanical properties transfer from the atomistic to the nanoscale remains unknown. Here we report a multiscale analysis that, from the atomistic-level structure of a single fibril, extends to the mesoscale level, reaching size scales of hundreds of nanometers. We use parameters directly derived from full atomistic simulations of A β (1-40) amyloid fibrils to parameterize a mesoscopic coarse-grained model, which is used to reproduce the elastic properties of amyloid fibrils. We then apply our mesoscopic model in an analysis of the buckling behavior of amyloid fibrils with different lengths and report a comparison with predictions from continuum beam theory. An important implication of our results is a severe reduction of the effective modulus due to buckling, an effect that could be important to interpret experimental results of ultra-long amyloid fibrils. Our model represents a powerful tool to mechanically characterize molecular structures on the order of hundreds of nanometers to micrometers on the basis of the underlying atomistic behavior. The work provides insight into structural and mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils and may enable further analysis of larger-scale assemblies such as amyloidogenic bundles or plaques as found in disease states.

  5. The Novel Design and Manufacturing Technology of Densified RDF from Reclaimed Landfill without a Mixing Binding Agent Using a Hydraulic Hot Pressing Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerdsuwan Somrat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing of RDF (Refuse Derived Fuel from a conventional cold press extrusion machine is not suitable for producing RDF from reclaimed landfill since it is not identical in shape and form after production due to the swelling of the plastic fraction contained inside the reclaimed landfill and hence needs a very high compression force. Moreover, a binder agent is needed in order to keep the RDF in a similar shape and form. A novel design and manufacturing technology for a hydraulic hot pressing machine has been established and can produce high-quality RDF without any binder. The two electrical heaters are installed at the inner core and on the surface of the mold. The compression force on the mold is performed by a hydraulic jack. In addition, a newly-designed locking plate system which is designed by a slider to open and close along the paired horizontal slots, can reduce the cycle time of the manufacturing process and yield higher productivity. The testing properties of the RDF produced by the novel hydraulic hot pressing machine include the examination of size, shape, weight, unit density, bulk density, compression strength, moisture content, and heating value. The results showed that the RDF is suitable to be used as feedstock in an incinerator or gasifier to produce green and clean energy from reclaimed landfill.

  6. Michler’s Hydrol Blue: A Sensitive Probe for Amyloid Fibril Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Kitts, Catherine C.

    2011-05-03

    Michler\\'s hydrol blue (MHB) is investigated with respect to photophysical properties in varied solvent environment and when bound to insulin and lysozyme fibrils. The MHB chromophore is shown to act like a molecular rotor and bind well to amyloid fibrils, where it exhibits a characteristic red-shift in its excitation spectrum and an increase in the emission quantum yield upon binding. MHB is more sensitive to environmental changes than Thioflavin T (ThT) and furthermore, in contrast to the latter amyloid probe, can differentiate between insulin and lysozyme fibrils by a more red-shifted excitation spectrum for insulin fibrils. To support the experimental observations, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were performed on MHB at several levels of theory. The predicted changes of spectral properties as a function of the environment are in good agreement with the experimental results. Linear dichroism (LD) is used to determine the orientation of the MHB within the fibrils. It was shown through LD and molecular modeling that MHB aligns itself preferentially parallel with the amyloid fiber at an angle of 14°-22° to the fibril axis and along the grooves of the β-sheet. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  7. Amyloids or prions? That is the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabate, Raimon; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Batlle, Cristina; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Despite major efforts devoted to understanding the phenomenon of prion transmissibility, it is still poorly understood how this property is encoded in the amino acid sequence. In recent years, experimental data on yeast prion domains allow to start at least partially decrypting the sequence requirements of prion formation. These experiments illustrate the need for intrinsically disordered sequence regions enriched with a particularly high proportion of glutamine and asparagine. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that these regions strike a balance between sufficient amyloid nucleation propensity on the one hand and disorder on the other, which ensures availability of the amyloid prone regions but entropically prevents unwanted nucleation and facilitates brittleness required for propagation.

  8. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils.

  9. Synthesis, {sup 68}Ga labeling and preliminary evaluation of DOTA peptide binding vascular adhesion protein-1: a potential PET imaging agent for diagnosing osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ujula, Tiina [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Salomaeki, Satu [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Virsu, Pauliina [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lankinen, Petteri; Maekinen, Tatu J. [Orthopedic Research Unit, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Autio, Anu [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Yegutkin, Gennady G. [MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Knuuti, Juhani [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Jalkanen, Sirpa [MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); National Public Health Institute, Turku (Finland); Roivainen, Anne [Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Turku Center for Disease Modeling, University of Turku, Turku (Finland)], E-mail: anne.roivainen@utu.fi

    2009-08-15

    Introduction: Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an infection/inflammation-inducible endothelial glycoprotein. Based on our previous studies, the most VAP-1-selective peptide (VAP-P1) was 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N',N'',N''',N,,,,-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated, {sup 68}gallium ({sup 68}Ga)-labeled (named [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1) and evaluated preliminarily. Methods: Targeting was evaluated by using VAP-1-transfected cells. Biodistribution of [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 was studied by positron emission tomography imaging of healthy rats and rats with bone inflammation caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection. Uptake of [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 in osteomyelitis was compared with negative control peptide and competition with an excess of unlabeled DOTAVAP-P1. Results: [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 bound more efficiently to VAP-1-transfected cells than to controls. In rats, [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 cleared rapidly from blood circulation, excreted quickly in urine and showed an in vivo half-life of 26{+-}2.3 min. Imaging of osteomyelitis demonstrated modest target-to-background ratio. Studies with the negative control peptide and competitors revealed a significantly lower uptake at the infection site compared to [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1. Conclusions: The results represent a proof-of-concept that infection-induced VAP-1 can be targeted by [{sup 68}Ga]DOTA peptide. [{sup 68}Ga]DOTAVAP-P1 is just the first candidate peptide and an essential opening for developing VAP-1-specific imaging agents.

  10. Toxic β-Amyloid (Aβ) Alzheimer's Ion Channels: From Structure to Function and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    Full-length amyloid beta peptides (Aβ1-40/42) form neuritic amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and are implicated in AD pathology. Recent biophysical and cell biological studies suggest a direct mechanism of amyloid beta toxicity -- ion channel mediated loss of calcium homeostasis. Truncated amyloid beta fragments (Aβ11-42 and Aβ17-42), commonly termed as non-amyloidogenic are also found in amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in the preamyloid lesions of Down's syndrome (DS), a model system for early onset AD study. Very little is known about the structure and activity of these smaller peptides although they could be key AD and DS pathological agents. Using complementary techniques of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, atomic force microscopy (AFM), channel conductance measurements, cell calcium uptake assays, neurite degeneration and cell death assays, we have shown that non-amyloidogenic Aβ9-42 and Aβ17-42 peptides form ion channels with loosely attached subunits and elicit single channel conductances. The subunits appear mobile suggesting insertion of small oligomers, followed by dynamic channel assembly and dissociation. These channels allow calcium uptake in APP-deficient cells and cause neurite degeneration in human cortical neurons. Channel conductance, calcium uptake and neurite degeneration are selectively inhibited by zinc, a blocker of amyloid ion channel activity. Thus truncated Aβ fragments could account for undefined roles played by full length Aβs and provide a novel mechanism of AD and DS pathology. The emerging picture from our large-scale simulations is that toxic ion channels formed by β-sheets are highly polymorphic, and spontaneously break into loosely interacting dynamic units (though still maintaining ion channel structures as imaged with AFM), that associate and dissociate leading to toxic ion flux. This sharply contrasts intact conventional gated ion channels that consist of tightly

  11. Individual aggregates of amyloid beta induce temporary calcium influx through the cell membrane of neuronal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Anna; Flint, Jennie; Shivji, Nadia; Jönsson, Peter; Wirthensohn, David; De Genst, Erwin; Vincke, Cécile; Muyldermans, Serge; Dobson, Chris; Klenerman, David

    2016-01-01

    Local delivery of amyloid beta oligomers from the tip of a nanopipette, controlled over the cell surface, has been used to deliver physiological picomolar oligomer concentrations to primary astrocytes or neurons. Calcium influx was observed when as few as 2000 oligomers were delivered to the cell surface. When the dosing of oligomers was stopped the intracellular calcium returned to basal levels or below. Calcium influx was prevented by the presence in the pipette of the extracellular chaperone clusterin, which is known to selectively bind oligomers, and by the presence a specific nanobody to amyloid beta. These data are consistent with individual oligomers larger than trimers inducing calcium entry as they cross the cell membrane, a result supported by imaging experiments in bilayers, and suggest that the initial molecular event that leads to neuronal damage does not involve any cellular receptors, in contrast to work performed at much higher oligomer concentrations. PMID:27553885

  12. S14G-humanin restored cellular homeostasis disturbed by amyloid-beta protein***

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Li; Wencong Zhao; Hongqi Yang; Junhong Zhang; Jianjun Ma

    2013-01-01

    Humanin is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer’s disease, and its derivative, S14G-humanin, is 1 000-fold stronger in its neuroprotective effect against Alzheimer’s disease-relevant insults. Alt-hough effective, the detailed molecular mechanism through which S14G-humanin exerts its effects remains unclear. Data from this study showed that fibril ar amyloid-beta 40 disturbed cel ular ho-meostasis through the cel membrane, increasing intracel ular calcium, generating reactive oxygen species, and decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential. S14G-humanin restored these re-sponses. The results suggested that S14G-humanin blocked the effects of amyloid-beta 40 on the neuronal cel membrane, and restored the disturbed cel ular homeostasis, thereby exerting a neuroprotective effect on hippocampal neurons.

  13. In vivo detection of prion amyloid plaques using [11C]BF-227 PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo detection of pathological prion protein (PrP) in the brain is potentially useful for the diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). However, there are no non-invasive ante-mortem means for detection of pathological PrP deposition in the brain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the amyloid imaging tracer BF-227 with positron emission tomography (PET) for the non-invasive detection of PrP amyloid in the brain. The binding ability of BF-227 to PrP amyloid was investigated using autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy. Five patients with TSEs, including three patients with Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and two patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), underwent [11C]BF-227 PET scans. Results were compared with data from 10 normal controls and 17 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The regional to pons standardized uptake value ratio was calculated as an index of BF-227 retention. Binding of BF-227 to PrP plaques was confirmed using brain samples from autopsy-confirmed GSS cases. In clinical PET study, significantly higher retention of BF-227 was detected in the cerebellum, thalamus and lateral temporal cortex of GSS patients compared to that in the corresponding tissues of normal controls. GSS patients also showed higher retention of BF-227 in the cerebellum, thalamus and medial temporal cortex compared to AD patients. In contrast, the two CJD patients showed no obvious retention of BF-227 in the brain. Although [11C]BF-227 is a non-specific imaging marker of cerebral amyloidosis, it is useful for in vivo detection of PrP plaques in the human brain in GSS, based on the regional distribution of the tracer. PET amyloid imaging might provide a means for both early diagnosis and non-invasive disease monitoring of certain forms of TSEs. (orig.)

  14. In vivo detection of prion amyloid plaques using [{sup 11}C]BF-227 PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yanai, Kazuhiko [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Shiga, Yusei; Itoyama, Yasuhito [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Sendai (Japan); Furumoto, Shozo [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tashiro, Manabu [Tohoku University, Division of Cyclotron Nuclear Medicine, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tsuboi, Yoshio [Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Fukuoka (Japan); Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki [Institute of Development, Aging, and Cancer, Tohoku University, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Division of Brain Sciences, Sendai (Japan); Iwata, Ren [Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Kudo, Yukitsuka [Tohoku University, Innovation of New Biomedical Engineering Center, Sendai (Japan); Doh-ura, Katsumi [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Prion Research, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    In vivo detection of pathological prion protein (PrP) in the brain is potentially useful for the diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). However, there are no non-invasive ante-mortem means for detection of pathological PrP deposition in the brain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the amyloid imaging tracer BF-227 with positron emission tomography (PET) for the non-invasive detection of PrP amyloid in the brain. The binding ability of BF-227 to PrP amyloid was investigated using autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy. Five patients with TSEs, including three patients with Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and two patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), underwent [{sup 11}C]BF-227 PET scans. Results were compared with data from 10 normal controls and 17 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The regional to pons standardized uptake value ratio was calculated as an index of BF-227 retention. Binding of BF-227 to PrP plaques was confirmed using brain samples from autopsy-confirmed GSS cases. In clinical PET study, significantly higher retention of BF-227 was detected in the cerebellum, thalamus and lateral temporal cortex of GSS patients compared to that in the corresponding tissues of normal controls. GSS patients also showed higher retention of BF-227 in the cerebellum, thalamus and medial temporal cortex compared to AD patients. In contrast, the two CJD patients showed no obvious retention of BF-227 in the brain. Although [{sup 11}C]BF-227 is a non-specific imaging marker of cerebral amyloidosis, it is useful for in vivo detection of PrP plaques in the human brain in GSS, based on the regional distribution of the tracer. PET amyloid imaging might provide a means for both early diagnosis and non-invasive disease monitoring of certain forms of TSEs. (orig.)

  15. Low background and high contrast PET imaging of amyloid-{beta} with [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in Alzheimer's disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Anton; Andersson, Jan; Varnaes, Katarina; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Jureus, Anders; Swahn, Britt-Marie; Sandell, Johan; Julin, Per; Svensson, Samuel [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Cselenyi, Zsolt; Schou, Magnus; Johnstroem, Peter; Farde, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Hospital, AstraZeneca Translational Sciences Centre, PET CoE, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksdotter, Maria; Freund-Levi, Yvonne [Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jeppsson, Fredrik [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate AZD2995 side by side with AZD2184 as novel PET radioligands for imaging of amyloid-{beta} in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vitro binding of tritium-labelled AZD2995 and AZD2184 was studied and compared with that of the established amyloid-{beta} PET radioligand PIB. Subsequently, a first-in-human in vivo PET study was performed using [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in three healthy control subjects and seven AD patients. AZD2995, AZD2184 and PIB were found to share the same binding site to amyloid-{beta}. [{sup 3}H]AZD2995 had the highest signal-to-background ratio in brain tissue from patients with AD as well as in transgenic mice. However, [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 had superior imaging properties in PET, as shown by larger effect sizes comparing binding potential values in cortical regions of AD patients and healthy controls. Nevertheless, probably due to a lower amount of nonspecific binding, the group separation of the distribution volume ratio values of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 was greater in areas with lower amyloid-{beta} load, e.g. the hippocampus. Both AZD2995 and AZD2184 detect amyloid-{beta} with high affinity and specificity and also display a lower degree of nonspecific binding than that reported for PIB. Overall [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 seems to be an amyloid-{beta} radioligand with higher uptake and better group separation when compared to [{sup 11}C]AZD2995. However, the very low nonspecific binding of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 makes this radioligand potentially interesting as a tool to study minute levels of amyloid-{beta}. This sensitivity may be important in investigating, for example, early prodromal stages of AD or in the longitudinal study of a disease modifying therapy. (orig.)

  16. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  17. Bap: A New Type of Functional Amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria can build a biofilm matrix scaffold from exopolysaccharides or proteins, and DNA. In a recent report, Taglialegna and colleagues show that pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus produces a protein scaffold based on amyloid assembly of fragments from the biofilm-associated protein. Amyloidogenesis occurs in response to environmental signals.

  18. Calumenin interacts with serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Jacobsen, Christian; Honoré, Bent

    2000-01-01

    with calumenin in the presence of Ca(2+). Amino acid sequencing identified this protein as serum amyloid P component (SAP). Furthermore, we verified and characterized the calumenin-SAP interaction by the surface plasmon resonance technique. The findings indicate that calumenin may participate...

  19. Bap: A New Type of Functional Amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria can build a biofilm matrix scaffold from exopolysaccharides or proteins, and DNA. In a recent report, Taglialegna and colleagues show that pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus produces a protein scaffold based on amyloid assembly of fragments from the biofilm-associated protein. Amyloidogenesis occurs in response to environmental signals. PMID:27451288

  20. Is amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis always secondary?

    OpenAIRE

    Maury, C P; Törnroth, T; Wegelius, O

    1985-01-01

    The case is reported of a patient with systemic AA amyloidosis associated with non-specific mesenteric lymphadenitis and chronic sideropenia. Renal, small bowel, and rectal biopsies showed amyloid deposits containing AA protein, as defined by potassium permanganate sensitivity and by reactivity with AA antiserum. Reversal of the nephrotic syndrome occurred during steroid-azathioprine therapy.

  1. Detection of amyloid in Alzheimer's disease with positron emission tomography using [11C]AZD2184

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands for detection of Aβ amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not ideal for quantification. To improve the signal to noise ratio we have developed the radioligand [11C]AZD2184 and report here the first clinical evaluation. Eight AD patients and four younger control subjects underwent 93-min PET measurements with [11C]AZD2184. A ratio approach using the cerebellum as reference region was applied to determine binding parameters. Brain uptake of [11C]AZD2184 peaked within 1 min at 3-4% of injected radioactivity. AD patients had high radioactivity in cortical regions while controls had uniformly low radioactivity uptake. Specific binding peaked within 30 min at which time standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) ranged between 1.19 and 2.57. [11C]AZD2184 is a promising radioligand for detailed mapping of Aβ amyloid depositions in Alzheimer's disease, due to low non-specific binding, high signal to background ratio and reversible binding as evident from early peak equilibrium. (orig.)

  2. Current and future treatment of amyloid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankarcrona, M; Winblad, B; Monteiro, C; Fearns, C; Powers, E T; Johansson, J; Westermark, G T; Presto, J; Ericzon, B-G; Kelly, J W

    2016-08-01

    There are more than 30 human proteins whose aggregation appears to cause degenerative maladies referred to as amyloid diseases or amyloidoses. These disorders are named after the characteristic cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils that accumulate systemically or are localized to specific organs. In most cases, current treatment is limited to symptomatic approaches and thus disease-modifying therapies are needed. Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with extracellular amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils and intracellular tau neurofibrillary tangles as pathological hallmarks. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted with passive and active immunotherapy, and small molecules to inhibit Aβ formation and aggregation or to enhance Aβ clearance; so far such clinical trials have been unsuccessful. Novel strategies are therefore required and here we will discuss the possibility of utilizing the chaperone BRICHOS to prevent Aβ aggregation and toxicity. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is symptomatically treated with insulin. However, the underlying pathology is linked to the aggregation and progressive accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide as fibrils and oligomers, which are cytotoxic. Several compounds have been shown to inhibit islet amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity in vitro. Future animal studies and clinical trials have to be conducted to determine their efficacy in vivo. The transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses are a group of systemic degenerative diseases compromising multiple organ systems, caused by TTR aggregation. Liver transplantation decreases the generation of misfolded TTR and improves the quality of life for a subgroup of this patient population. Compounds that stabilize the natively folded, nonamyloidogenic, tetrameric conformation of TTR have been developed and the drug tafamidis is available as a promising treatment. PMID:27165517

  3. Herpes simplex virus interferes with amyloid precursor protein processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzhaki Ruth F

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early events underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD remain uncertain, although environmental factors may be involved. Work in this laboratory has shown that the combination of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 in brain and carriage of the APOE-ε4 allele of the APOE gene strongly increases the risk of developing AD. The development of AD is thought to involve abnormal aggregation or deposition of a 39–43 amino acid protein – β amyloid (Aβ – within the brain. This is cleaved from the much larger transmembranal protein 'amyloid precursor protein' (APP. Any agent able to interfere directly with Aβ or APP metabolism may therefore have the capacity to contribute towards AD. One recent report showed that certain HSV1 glycoprotein peptides may aggregate like Aβ; a second study described a role for APP in transport of virus in squid axons. However to date the effects of acute herpesvirus infection on metabolism of APP in human neuronal-type cells have not been investigated. In order to find if HSV1 directly affects APP and its degradation, we have examined this protein from human neuroblastoma cells (normal and transfected with APP 695 infected with the virus, using Western blotting. Results We have found that acute HSV1 (and also HSV2 infection rapidly reduces full length APP levels – as might be expected – yet surprisingly markedly increases levels of a novel C-terminal fragment of APP of about 55 kDa. This band was not increased in cells treated with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide Conclusion Herpes virus infection leads to rapid loss of full length APP from cells, yet also causes increased levels of a novel 55 kDa C-terminal APP fragment. These data suggest that infection can directly alter the processing of a transmembranal protein intimately linked to the aetiology of AD.

  4. IgG Conformer's Binding to Amyloidogenic Aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monichan Phay

    Full Text Available Amyloid-reactive IgGs isolated from pooled blood of normal individuals (pAbs have demonstrated clinical utility for amyloid diseases by in vivo targeting and clearing amyloidogenic proteins and peptides. We now report the following three novel findings on pAb conformer's binding to amyloidogenic aggregates: 1 pAb aggregates have greater activity than monomers (HMW species > dimers > monomers, 2 pAbs interactions with amyloidogenic aggregates at least partially involves unconventional (non-CDR interactions of F(ab regions, and 3 pAb's activity can be easily modulated by trace aggregates generated during sample processing. Specifically, we show that HMW aggregates and dimeric pAbs present in commercial preparations of pAbs, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, had up to ~200- and ~7-fold stronger binding to aggregates of Aβ and transthyretin (TTR than the monomeric antibody. Notably, HMW aggregates were primarily responsible for the enhanced anti-amyloid activities of Aβ- and Cibacron blue-isolated IVIg IgGs. Human pAb conformer's binding to amyloidogenic aggregates was retained in normal human sera, and mimicked by murine pAbs isolated from normal pooled plasmas. An unconventional (non-CDR component to pAb's activity was indicated from control human mAbs, generated against non-amyloid targets, binding to aggregated Aβ and TTR. Similar to pAbs, HMW and dimeric mAb conformers bound stronger than their monomeric forms to amyloidogenic aggregates. However, mAbs had lower maximum binding signals, indicating that pAbs were required to saturate a diverse collection of binding sites. Taken together, our findings strongly support further investigations on the physiological function and clinical utility of the inherent anti-amyloid activities of monomeric but not aggregated IgGs.

  5. Research progress on target therapeutic agents of HER-2 extracellular ligand-binding domain in breast cancer%乳腺癌HER-2胞外配体结合区靶点治疗的研究进展*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟锦绣; 李亚梅(综述); 关晏星(审校)

    2013-01-01

    The target therapeutic agents of HER-2 extracellular ligand-binding domain have become the core of breast cancer research. A small peptide molecule and an anti-HER2 extracellular domain monoclonal antibody conjugated with protein toxins, radioisotopes, and chemotherapeutic drugs (immunoconjugate) can improve efficacy and reduce systemic toxicity. Vaccines based on HER-2 extracellular region should protect patients from HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer growth. In this review, studies on targeted-block therapies of the HER-2 extracellular ligand-binding domain in breast cancer were discussed to provide references for clinical applications.%针对乳腺癌HER-2受体胞外结合区的靶点治疗成为当今研究的热点。小分子多肽、HER-2胞外结合区的单抗药物及其与蛋白毒素、放射性核素,化疗药物的偶联物即免疫偶联物既能增强药物的有效性,又可减少对正常组织的毒害。HER-2胞外区肽疫苗可有效预防HER-2高表达乳腺癌的生长。本文将对乳腺癌HER-2胞外区靶向阻断治疗的研究进行综述,为相应的临床应用提供参考。

  6. Serum amyloid A inhibits osteoclast differentiation to maintain macrophage function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiseon; Yang, Jihyun; Park, Ok-Jin; Kang, Seok-Seong; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Serum amyloid A is an acute phase protein that is elevated under inflammatory conditions. Additionally, the serum levels of serum amyloid A are associated with the progression of inflammatory arthritis; thus, serum amyloid A might be involved in the regulation of osteoclast differentiation. In the present study, we examined the effects of serum amyloid A on osteoclast differentiation and function. When bone marrow-derived macrophages, as osteoclast precursors, were stimulated with serum amyloid A in the presence of M-CSF and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand, osteoclast differentiation and its bone-resorption activity were substantially inhibited. TLR2 was important in the inhibitory effect of serum amyloid A on osteoclast differentiation, because serum amyloid A stimulated TLR2. The inhibitory effect was absent in bone marrow-derived macrophages obtained from TLR2-deficient mice. Furthermore, serum amyloid A inhibited the expression of c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1, which are crucial transcription factors for osteoclast differentiation, but prevented downregulation of IFN regulatory factor-8, a negative regulator of osteoclast differentiation. In contrast, serum amyloid A sustained the endocytic capacity of bone marrow-derived macrophages and their ability to induce the proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α. Taken together, these results suggest that serum amyloid A, when increased by inflammatory conditions, inhibits differentiation of macrophages to osteoclasts, likely to maintain macrophage function for host defense.

  7. ENMD-1198, a novel tubulin-binding agent reduces HIF-1alpha and STAT3 activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC cells, and inhibits growth and vascularization in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlitt Hans J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC represents a highly vascularized tumor entity and the process of angiogenesis is essential for the growth of HCC. Importantly, the pro-angiogenic transcription factors HIF-1α and STAT3 have been implicated in HCC progression, thus representing interesting targets for molecular targeted therapy. We hypothesized that therapeutic inhibition of HIF-1α could be achieved by using a novel tubulin-binding agent (ENMD-1198. ENMD-1198 is an analog of 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2 with antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activity. Methods The human HCC cell lines HUH-7 and HepG2 were used for experiments. Effects of ENMD-1198 on constitutive and inducible (hypoxia, growth factors activation of signaling cascades, including HIF-1α and STAT3, were investigated by Western blotting. Changes in VEGF expression were determined by real-time PCR. Effects of ENMD-1198 on cancer cell migration and invasion were evaluated in in vitro-assays. The growth-inhibitory effects of ENMD-1198 (200 mg/kg/day were determined in a subcutaneous tumor model (HUH-7. Results ENMD-1198 inhibited the phosphorylation of MAPK/Erk, PI-3K/Akt and FAK. Moreover, activation of HIF-1α and STAT3 was dramatically reduced by ENMD-1198, which resulted in lower VEGF mRNA expression (P In vivo, treatment with ENMD-1198 led to a significant reduction in tumor growth, tumor vascularization, and numbers of proliferating tumor cells (P Conclusion The novel microtubule destabilizing agent ENMD-1198 is suitable for inhibiting HIF-1α and STAT3 in human HCC cells and leads to reduced tumor growth and vascularization in vivo. Hence, inhibition of HIF-1α and STAT3 could prove valuable for therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  8. The nicotinic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor agonist ssr180711 is unable to activate limbic neurons in mice overexpressing human amyloid-beta1-42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soderman, A.; Spang-Thomsen, Mogens; Hansen, H.;

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that amyloid-beta1-42 (Abeta1-42) binds to the nicotinergic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor (alpha7 nAChR) and that the application of Abeta1-42 to cells inhibits the function of the alpha7 nAChR. The in vivo consequences of the pharmacological activation of the alpha...

  9. Amyloid-β peptides act as allosteric modulators of cholinergic signalling through formation of soluble BAβACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Nordberg, Agneta; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β peptides, through highly sophisticated enzymatic machinery, are universally produced and released in an action potential synchronized manner into the interstitial fluids in the brain. Yet no native functions are attributed to amyloid-β. The amyloid-β hypothesis ascribes just neurotoxicity properties through build-up of soluble homomeric amyloid-β oligomers or fibrillar deposits. Apolipoprotein-ε4 (APOE4) allele is the only confirmed genetic risk factor of sporadic Alzheimer's disease; once more it is unclear how it increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Similarly, central cholinergic signalling is affected selectively and early in the Alzheimer's disease brain, again why cholinergic neurons show this sensitivity is still unclear. However, the three main known Alzheimer's disease risk factors, advancing age, female gender and APOE4, have been linked to a high apolipoprotein-E and accumulation of the acetylcholine degrading enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase in cerebrospinal fluids of patients. Furthermore, numerous reports indicate that amyloid-β interacts with butyrylcholinesterase and apolipoprotein-E. We have proposed that this interaction leads to formation of soluble ultrareactive acetylcholine-hydrolyzing complexes termed BAβACs, to adjust at demand both synaptic and extracellular acetylcholine signalling. This hypothesis predicted presence of acetylcholine-synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in extracellular fluids to allow maintenance of equilibrium between breakdown and synthesis of acetylcholine through continuous in situ syntheses. A recent proof-of-concept study led to the discovery of this enzyme in the human extracellular fluids. We report here that apolipoprotein-E, in particular ε4 isoprotein acts as one of the strongest endogenous anti-amyloid-β fibrillization agents reported in the literature. At biological concentrations, apolipoprotein-E prevented amyloid-β fibrillization for at least 65 h. We show that amyloid

  10. The effect of amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism on cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriaanse, Sofie M. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van Dijk, Koene R.A. [Harvard University, Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Cambridge, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Ossenkoppele, Rik; Tolboom, Nelleke; Zwan, Marissa D.; Barkhof, Frederik; Berckel, Bart N.M. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reuter, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Yaqub, Maqsood; Boellaard, Ronald; Windhorst, Albert D.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    The present multimodal neuroimaging study examined whether amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism are related to cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and healthy elderly controls. Structural MRI scans of eleven AD patients and ten controls were available at baseline and follow-up (mean interval 2.5 years). Change in brain structure over time was defined as percent change of cortical volume within seven a-priori defined regions that typically show the strongest structural loss in AD. In addition, two PET scans were performed at baseline: [{sup 11}C]PIB to assess amyloid-β plaque load and [{sup 18}F]FDG to assess glucose metabolism. [{sup 11}C]PIB binding and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake were measured in the precuneus, a region in which both amyloid deposition and glucose hypometabolism occur early in the course of AD. While amyloid-β plaque load at baseline was not related to cortical volume loss over time in either group, glucose metabolism within the group of AD patients was significantly related to volume loss over time (rho = 0.56, p < 0.05). The present study shows that in a group of AD patients amyloid-β plaque load as measured by [{sup 11}C]PIB behaves as a trait marker (i.e., all AD patients showed elevated levels of amyloid, not related to subsequent disease course), whilst hypometabolism as measured by [{sup 18}F]FDG changed over time indicating that it could serve as a state marker that is predictive of neurodegeneration. (orig.)

  11. In vivo evaluation of amyloid deposition and brain glucose metabolism of 5XFAD mice using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Santiago; Herance, José Raúl; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Abad, Sergio; Torrent, Elia; Jiménez, Xavier; Pareto, Deborah; Perpiña, Unai; Sarroca, Sara; Rodríguez, Elisenda; Ortega-Aznar, Arantxa; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2013-07-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used extensively to evaluate the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in vivo. Radiotracers directed toward the amyloid deposition such as [(18)F]-FDDNP (2-(1-{6-[(2-[F]Fluoroethyl)(methyl)amino]-2-naphthyl}ethylidene)malononitrile) and [(11)C]-PIB (Pittsburg compound B) have shown exceptional value in animal models and AD patients. Previously, the glucose analogue [(18)F]-FDG (2-[(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose) allowed researchers and clinicians to evaluate the brain glucose consumption and proved its utility for the early diagnosis and the monitoring of the progression of AD. Animal models of AD are based on the transgenic expression of different human mutant genes linked to familial AD. The novel transgenic 5XFAD mouse containing 5 mutated genes in its genome has been proposed as an AD model with rapid and massive cerebral amyloid deposition. PET studies performed with animal-dedicated scanners indicate that PET with amyloid-targeted radiotracers can detect the pathological amyloid deposition in transgenic mice and rats. However, in other studies no differences were found between transgenic mice and their wild type littermates. We sought to investigate in 5XFAD mice if the radiotracers [(11)C]-PIB, and [(18)F]-Florbetapir could quantify the amyloid deposition in vivo and if [(18)F]-FDG could do so with regard to glucose consumption. We found that 5XFAD animals presented higher cerebral binding of [(18)F]-Florbetapir, [(11)C]-PIB, and [(18)F]-FDG. These results support the use of amyloid PET radiotracers for the evaluation of AD animal models. Probably, the increased uptake observed with [(18)F]-FDG is a consequence of glial activation that occurs in 5XFAD mice.

  12. Amyloid-clearing proteins and their epigenetic regulation as a therapeutic target in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia N Nalivaeva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal elevation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ levels in the brain is the primary trigger for neuronal cell death specific to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. It is now evident that Aβ levels in the brain are manipulable due to a dynamic equilibrium between its production from the amyloid precursor protein (APP and removal by amyloid clearance proteins. Clearance can be either enzymic or non-enzymic (binding/transport proteins. Intriguingly several of the main amyloid-degrading enzymes (ADEs are members of the M13 peptidase family (neprilysin (NEP, NEP2 and the endothelin converting enzymes (ECE-1 and -2. A distinct metallopeptidase, insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE, also contributes to Aβ degradation in the brain. The ADE family currently embraces more than 20 members, both membrane-bound and soluble, and of differing cellular locations. NEP plays an important role in brain function terminating neuropeptide signals. Its decrease in specific brain areas with age or after hypoxia, ischaemia or stroke contribute significantly to the development of AD pathology. The recently discovered mechanism of epigenetic regulation of NEP (and other genes by the APP intracellular domain (AICD and its dependence on the cell type and APP isoform expression suggest possibilities for selective manipulation of NEP gene expression in neuronal cells. We have also observed that another amyloid-clearing protein, namely transthyretin (TTR, is also regulated in the neuronal cell by a mechanism similar to NEP. Dependence of amyloid clearance proteins on histone deacetylases and the ability of HDAC inhibitors to up-regulate their expression in the brain opens new avenues for developing preventive strategies in AD.

  13. Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence supports a role for brain gangliosides in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Recently we deciphered the ganglioside-recognition code controlling specific ganglioside binding to Alzheimer's β-amyloid (Aβ1-42) peptide and Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein. Cracking this code allowed us to engineer a short chimeric Aβ/α-synuclein peptide that recognizes all brain gangliosides. Here we show that ganglioside-deprived neural cells do no longer sustain the formation of zinc-sensitive amyloid pore channels induced by either Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein, as assessed by single-cell Ca(2+) fluorescence microscopy. Thus, amyloid channel formation, now considered a key step in neurodegeneration, is a ganglioside-dependent process. Nanomolar concentrations of chimeric peptide competitively inhibited amyloid pore formation induced by Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein in cultured neural cells. Moreover, this peptide abrogated the intracellular calcium increases induced by Parkinson's-associated mutant forms of α-synuclein (A30P, E46K and A53T). The chimeric peptide also prevented the deleterious effects of Aβ1-42 on synaptic vesicle trafficking and decreased the Aβ1-42-induced impairment of spontaneous activity in rat hippocampal slices. Taken together, these data show that the chimeric peptide has broad anti-amyloid pore activity, suggesting that a common therapeutic strategy based on the prevention of amyloid-ganglioside interactions is a reachable goal for both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. PMID:26655601

  14. Fold modulating function: Bacterial toxins to functional amyloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Khawaja Syed

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria produce cytolytic toxins that target host cells or other competing microbes. It is well known that environmental factors control toxin expression, however recent work suggests that some bacteria manipulate the fold of these protein toxins to control their function. The β-sheet rich amyloid fold is a highly stable ordered aggregate that many toxins form in response to specific environmental conditions. When in the amyloid state, toxins become inert, losing the cytolytic activity they display in the soluble form. Emerging evidence suggest that some amyloids function as toxin storage systems until they are again needed, while other bacteria utilize amyloids as a structural matrix component of biofilms. This amyloid matrix component facilitates resistance to biofilm disruptive challenges. The bacterial amyloids discussed in this review reveal an elegant system where changes in protein fold and solubility dictate the function of proteins in response to the environment.

  15. Inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation by cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Keisuke; Misumi, Yohei; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Hayashi, Yuya; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Obayashi, Konen; Yamashita, Taro; Jono, Hirofumi; Arima, Hidetoshi; Ando, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Localized insulin-derived amyloid masses occasionally form at the site of repeated insulin injections in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes and cause subcutaneous insulin resistance. Various kinds of insulin including porcine insulin, human insulin, and insulin analogues reportedly formed amyloid fibrils in vitro and in vivo, but the impact of the amino acid replacement in insulin molecules on amyloidogenicity is largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated the difference in amyloid fibril formation kinetics of human insulin and insulin analogues, which suggests an important role of the C-terminal domain of the insulin B chain in nuclear formation of amyloid fibrils. Furthermore, we determined that cyclodextrins, which are widely used as drug carriers in the pharmaceutical field, had an inhibitory effect on the nuclear formation of insulin amyloid fibrils. These findings have significant implications for the mechanism underlying insulin amyloid fibril formation and for developing optimal additives to prevent this subcutaneous adverse effect.

  16. Oligomeric α-synuclein and β-amyloid variants as potential biomarkers for Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephanie M; Schulz, Philip; Sierks, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Oligomeric forms of α-synuclein and β-amyloid are toxic protein variants that are thought to contribute to the onset and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), respectively. The detection of toxic variants in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood has great promise for facilitating early and accurate diagnoses of these devastating diseases. Two hurdles that have impeded the use of these protein variants as biomarkers are the availability of reagents that can bind the different variants and a sensitive assay to detect their very low concentrations. We previously isolated antibody-based reagents that selectively bind two different oligomeric variants of α-synuclein and two of β-amyloid, and developed a phage-based capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with subfemtomolar sensitivity to quantify their presence. Here, we used these reagents to show that these oligomeric α-synuclein variants are preferentially present in PD brain tissue, CSF and serum, and that the oligomeric β-amyloid variants are preferentially present in AD brain tissue, CSF, and serum. Some AD samples also had α-synuclein pathology and some PD samples also had β-amyloid pathology, and, very intriguingly, these PD cases also had a history of dementia. Detection of different oligomeric α-synuclein and β-amyloid species is an effective method for identifying tissue, CSF and sera from PD and AD samples, respectively, and samples that also contained early stages of other protein pathologies, indicating their potential value as blood-based biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Solution NMR structure and inhibitory effect against amyloid-β fibrillation of Humanin containing a d-isomerized serine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsanousi, Nesreen; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Furuita, Kyoko; So, Masatomo; Lee, Young-Ho; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2016-09-01

    Humanin comprising 24 amino acid residues is a bioactive peptide that has been isolated from the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Humanin reportedly suppressed aging-related death of various cells due to amyloid fibrils and oxidative stress. There are reports that the cytoprotective activity of Humanin was remarkably enhanced by optical isomerization of the Ser14 residue from l to d form, but details of the molecular mechanism remained unclear. Here we demonstrated that Humanin d-Ser14 exhibited potent inhibitory activity against fibrillation of amyloid-β and remarkably higher binding affinity for amyloid-β than that of the Humanin wild-type and S14G mutant. In addition, we determined the solution structure of Humanin d-Ser14 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and showed that d-isomerization of the Ser14 residue enables drastic conformational rearrangement of Humanin. Furthermore, we identified an amyloid-β-binding site on Humanin d-Ser14 at atomic resolution by NMR. These biophysical and high-resolution structural analyses clearly revealed structure-function relationships of Humanin and explained the driving force of the drastic conformational change and molecular basis of the potent anti-amyloid-β fibrillation activity of Humanin caused by d-isomerization of the Ser14 residue. This is the first study to show correlations between the functional activity, tertiary structure, and partner recognition mode of Humanin and may lead to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of the cytoprotective activity of Humanin. PMID:27349871

  18. Rubber elongation factor (REF), a major allergen component in Hevea brasiliensis latex has amyloid properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Estevez, Yannick; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Bentaleb, Ahmed; Cullin, Christophe; Deffieux, Alain; Peruch, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    REF (Hevb1) and SRPP (Hevb3) are two major components of Hevea brasiliensis latex, well known for their allergenic properties. They are obviously taking part in the biosynthesis of natural rubber, but their exact function is still unclear. They could be involved in defense/stress mechanisms after tapping or directly acting on the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. The structure of these two proteins is still not described. In this work, it was discovered that REF has amyloid properties, contrary to SRPP. We investigated their structure by CD, TEM, ATR-FTIR and WAXS and neatly showed the presence of β-sheet organized aggregates for REF, whereas SRPP mainly fold as a helical protein. Both proteins are highly hydrophobic but differ in their interaction with lipid monolayers used to mimic the monomembrane surrounding the rubber particles. Ellipsometry experiments showed that REF seems to penetrate deeply into the monolayer and SRPP only binds to the lipid surface. These results could therefore clarify the role of these two paralogous proteins in latex production, either in the coagulation of natural rubber or in stress-related responses. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an amyloid formed from a plant protein. This suggests also the presence of functional amyloid in the plant kingdom.

  19. Rubber elongation factor (REF, a major allergen component in Hevea brasiliensis latex has amyloid properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Berthelot

    Full Text Available REF (Hevb1 and SRPP (Hevb3 are two major components of Hevea brasiliensis latex, well known for their allergenic properties. They are obviously taking part in the biosynthesis of natural rubber, but their exact function is still unclear. They could be involved in defense/stress mechanisms after tapping or directly acting on the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. The structure of these two proteins is still not described. In this work, it was discovered that REF has amyloid properties, contrary to SRPP. We investigated their structure by CD, TEM, ATR-FTIR and WAXS and neatly showed the presence of β-sheet organized aggregates for REF, whereas SRPP mainly fold as a helical protein. Both proteins are highly hydrophobic but differ in their interaction with lipid monolayers used to mimic the monomembrane surrounding the rubber particles. Ellipsometry experiments showed that REF seems to penetrate deeply into the monolayer and SRPP only binds to the lipid surface. These results could therefore clarify the role of these two paralogous proteins in latex production, either in the coagulation of natural rubber or in stress-related responses. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an amyloid formed from a plant protein. This suggests also the presence of functional amyloid in the plant kingdom.

  20. Simulations of nucleation and elongation of amyloid fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jianing; Muthukumar, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained model for the growth kinetics of amyloid fibrils from solutions of peptides and address the fundamental mechanism of nucleation and elongation by using a lattice Monte Carlo procedure. We reproduce the three main characteristics of nucleation of amyloid fibrils: (1) existence of lag time, (2) occurrence of a critical concentration, and (3) seeding. We find the nucleation of amyloid fibrils to require a quasi-two-dimensional configuration, where a second layer of β ...

  1. Physical and structural basis for polymorphism in amyloid fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    As our understanding of the molecular structures of amyloid fibrils has matured over the past 15 years, it has become clear that, while amyloid fibrils do have well-defined molecular structures, their molecular structures are not uniquely determined by the amino acid sequences of their constituent peptides and proteins. Self-propagating molecular-level polymorphism is a common phenomenon. This article reviews current information about amyloid fibril structures, variations in molecular structu...

  2. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Spuch; Saida Ortolano; Carmen Navarro

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP) has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both...

  3. Extracellular matrix-anchored serum amyloid A preferentially induces mast cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkoviz, R; Preciado-Patt, L; Lider, O; Fridkin, M; Dastych, J; Metcalfe, D D; Mekori, Y A

    1997-07-01

    Mast cells are known to accumulate in various inflammatory processes, some of which are known to be associated with increased local and systemic levels of acute-phase reactants such as serum amyloid A (SAA) or with amyloid deposition. The mechanism(s) by which mast cells are recruited to these sites, however, has not been fully elucidated. It has recently been shown that SAA interacts with extracellular matrix (ECM) components and thereby acts as a chemoattractant and regulator of immune cell migration. On the basis of these observations, we examined the effect of SAA on mast cell adhesion to ECM, an essential step in cellular transmigration. We could first demonstrate strong specific binding of recombinant human SAA (rSAA) to murine mast cells using flow cytometry. Moreover, radiolabeled rSAA was found to bind, in a saturable manner, to mast cells, reaching a binding affinity of 10(-8) M. When immobilized by preincubation with ECM, SAA or its proteolytically degraded amyloid A fragment (amino acid residues 2-82), which contains RGD-related adhesion motif but not the COOH-terminal portion of SAA (amino acid residues 77-104), induced the adhesion of resting mast cells to ECM or laminin. SAA and AA, in soluble or immobilized forms, did not activate mast cells to release mediators. Mast cell adhesion to the immobilized ECM-SAA complex appeared to occur through an integrin recognition, inasmuch as adhesion was calcium dependent and could be blocked by an RGD-containing peptide or by anti-CD29 monoclonal antibody. Genistein also inhibited adhesion, indicating that tyrosine kinase activity was involved. These data suggest that SAA bound to ECM may serve as an important inducer of mast cell adhesion, thus regulating mast cell recruitment and accumulation at these sites, which in turn could potentiate further pathology. PMID:9252455

  4. Characterization of in vivo MRI detectable thalamic amyloid plaques from APP/PS1 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhenain, M. [URA CEA CNRS 2210, I2BM, SHFJ, 4 Place du General Leclerc, 91401 Orsay Cedex (France); Dhenain, M.; El Tannir El Tayara, N.; Wu, T.D.; Volk, A.; Quintana, C. [U759 INSERM, Centre Universitaire, Laboratoire 112, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Dhenain, M.; El Tannir El Tayara, N.; Wu, T.D.; Volk, A.; Quintana, C. [Institut Curie, Centre Universitaire, Laboratoire 112, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Guegan, M.; Delatour, B. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid-CSIC, 8, Isaac Newton, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    Amyloid deposits are one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies, in transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease showed that, using in vivo, contrast agent-free, MRI, thalamic amyloid plaques are more easily detected than other plaques of the brain. Our study evaluated the characteristics of these thalamic plaques in a large population of APP/PS1, PS1 and C57BL/6 mice. Thalamic spots were detected in all mice but with different frequency and magnitude. Hence, the prevalence and size of the lesions were higher in APP/PS1 mice. However, even in APP/PS1 mice, thalamic spots did not occur in all the old animals. In APP/PS1 mice, spots detection was related to high iron and calcium load within amyloid plaques and thus reflects the ability of such plaque to capture large amounts of minerals. Interestingly, calcium and iron was also detected in extra-thalamic plaques but with a lower intensity. Hypointense lesions in the thalamus were not associated with the iron load in the tissue surrounding the plaques, nor with micro-hemorrhages, inflammation, or a neuro-degenerative context. (authors)

  5. Nanoparticulate Radiolabelled Quinolines Detect Amyloid Plaques in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste A. Roney

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Detecting aggregated amyloid peptides (Aβ plaques presents targets for developing biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Polymeric n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (PBCA nanoparticles (NPs were encapsulated with radiolabelled amyloid affinity I125-clioquinol (CQ, 5-chloro-7-iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline as in vivo probes. I125-CQ-PBCA NPs crossed the BBB (2.3±0.9 ID/g (P<.05 in the WT mouse (N = 210, compared to I125-CQ (1.0±0.4 ID/g. I125-CQ-PBCA NP brain uptake increased in AD transgenic mice (APP/PS1 versus WT (N = 38; 2.54×105±5.31×104 DLU/mm2; versus 1.98×105±2.22×104 DLU/mm2 and in APP/PS1/Tau. Brain increases were in mice intracranially injected with aggregated Aβ42 peptide (N = 17; 7.19×105±1.25×105 DLU/mm2, versus WT (6.07×105±7.47×104 DLU/mm2. Storage phosphor imaging and histopathological staining of the plaques, Fe2+ and Cu2+, validated results. I125-CQ-PBCA NPs have specificity for Aβ in vitro and in vivo and are promising as in vivo SPECT (I123, or PET (I124 amyloid imaging agents.

  6. Prions, amyloids, and RNA: Pieces of a puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhnikov, Anton A; Antonets, Kirill S; Bondarev, Stanislav A; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G; Derkatch, Irina L

    2016-05-01

    Amyloids are protein aggregates consisting of fibrils rich in β-sheets. Growth of amyloid fibrils occurs by the addition of protein molecules to the tip of an aggregate with a concurrent change of a conformation. Thus, amyloids are self-propagating protein conformations. In certain cases these conformations are transmissible / infectious; they are known as prions. Initially, amyloids were discovered as pathological extracellular deposits occurring in different tissues and organs. To date, amyloids and prions have been associated with over 30 incurable diseases in humans and animals. However, a number of recent studies demonstrate that amyloids are also functionally involved in a variety of biological processes, from biofilm formation by bacteria, to long-term memory in animals. Interestingly, amyloid-forming proteins are highly overrepresented among cellular factors engaged in all stages of mRNA life cycle: from transcription and translation, to storage and degradation. Here we review rapidly accumulating data on functional and pathogenic amyloids associated with mRNA processing, and discuss possible significance of prion and amyloid networks in the modulation of key cellular functions. PMID:27248002

  7. Amyloid Beta-peptide (25-35) changes (Ca2+) in hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Beatty, Diane; Morris, Stephen;

    1998-01-01

    neuroscience, Alzheimer, calcium ion, hippocampal neurons, amyloid-beta-peptide, hydrogen ion, rat......neuroscience, Alzheimer, calcium ion, hippocampal neurons, amyloid-beta-peptide, hydrogen ion, rat...

  8. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets — protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbor, Sage C.; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  9. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets - protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbor, Sage C; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  10. Formation of Toxic Amyloid Fibrils by Amyloid β-Protein on Ganglioside Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumi Matsuzaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that the conversion of the soluble, nontoxic amyloid β-protein (Aβ monomer to aggregated toxic Aβ rich in β-sheet structures is central to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the mechanism of the abnormal aggregation of Aβ in vivo is not well understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that lipid rafts (microdomains in membranes mainly composed of sphingolipids (gangliosides and sphingomyelin and cholesterol play a pivotal role in this process. This paper summarizes the molecular mechanisms by which Aβ aggregates on membranes containing ganglioside clusters, forming amyloid fibrils. Notably, the toxicity and physicochemical properties of the fibrils are different from those of Aβ amyloids formed in solution. Furthermore, differences between Aβ-(1–40 and Aβ-(1–42 in membrane interaction and amyloidogenesis are also emphasized.

  11. Partial Volume Correction in Quantitative Amyloid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Ances, Beau M.; Bateman, Randall J.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Aldea, Patricia; Cash, Lisa; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Farrar, Angela M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam M.; Klunk, William; Price, Julie C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Schofield, Peter R.; Buckles, Virginia; Morris, John C.; Benzinger, Tammie. LS.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid imaging is a valuable tool for research and diagnosis in dementing disorders. As positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have limited spatial resolution, measured signals are distorted by partial volume effects. Various techniques have been proposed for correcting partial volume effects, but there is no consensus as to whether these techniques are necessary in amyloid imaging, and, if so, how they should be implemented. We evaluated a two-component partial volume correction technique and a regional spread function technique using both simulated and human Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging data. Both correction techniques compensated for partial volume effects and yielded improved detection of subtle changes in PiB retention. However, the regional spread function technique was more accurate in application to simulated data. Because PiB retention estimates depend on the correction technique, standardization is necessary to compare results across groups. Partial volume correction has sometimes been avoided because it increases the sensitivity to inaccuracy in image registration and segmentation. However, our results indicate that appropriate PVC may enhance our ability to detect changes in amyloid deposition. PMID:25485714

  12. Design and Construction of Large Amyloid Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin M. Ridgley

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixtures of “template” and “adder” proteins self-assemble into large amyloid fibers of varying morphology and modulus. Fibers range from low modulus, rectangular cross-sectioned tapes to high modulus, circular cross-sectioned cylinders. Varying the proteins in the mixture can elicit “in-between” morphologies, such as elliptical cross-sectioned fibers and twisted tapes, both of which have moduli in-between rectangular tapes and cylindrical fibers. Experiments on mixtures of proteins of known amino acid sequence show that control of the large amyloid fiber morphology is dependent on the amount of glutamine repeats or “Q-blocks” relative to hydrophobic side chained amino acids such as alanine, isoleucine, leucine, and valine in the adder protein. Adder proteins with only hydrophobic groups form low modulus rectangular cross-sections and increasing the Q-block content allows excess hydrogen bonding on amide groups that results in twist and higher modulus. The experimental results show that large amyloid fibers of specific shape and modulus can be designed and controlled at the molecular level.

  13. Catalytic antibodies to amyloid β peptide in defense against Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Hiroaki; Planque, Stephanie; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Szabo, Paul; Weksler, Marc E.; Friedland, Robert P.; Paul, Sudhir

    2008-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) that bind amyloid β peptide (Aβ) are under clinical trials for immunotherapy of Alzheimer disease (AD). We have identified IgMs and recombinant Ig fragments that hydrolyze Aβ. Hydrolysis of peripheral Aβ by the IgMs may induce increased Aβ release from the brain. The catalytic IgMs are increased in AD patients, presumably reflecting a protective autoimmune response. Reduced Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity attributable to the catalytic function were evident. These findings provide a foundation for development of catalytic Igs for AD immunotherapy. PMID:18486927

  14. Ab initio molecular simulations on specific interactions between amyloid beta and monosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kazuya; Okamoto, Akisumi; Yano, Atsushi; Higai, Shin'ichi; Kondo, Takashi; Kamba, Seiji; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2012-09-01

    Aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which is a key pathogenetic event in Alzheimer's disease, can be caused by cell-surface saccharides. We here investigated stable structures of the solvated complexes of Aβ with some types of monosaccharides using molecular simulations based on protein-ligand docking and classical molecular mechanics methods. Moreover, the specific interactions between Aβ and the monosaccharides were elucidated at an electronic level by ab initio fragment molecular orbital calculations. Based on the results, we proposed which type of monosaccharide prefers to have large binding affinity to Aβ and inhibit the Aβ aggregation.

  15. The role of mutated amyloid beta 1-42 stimulating dendritic cells in a PDAPP transgenic mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jia-lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Amyloid plaque is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Anti-beta-amyloid (Aβ immunotherapy is effective in removing brain Aβ, but has shown to be associated with detrimental effects. To avoid severe adverse effects such as meningoencephalitis induced by amyloid beta vaccine with adjuvant, and take advantage of amyloid beta antibody's therapeutic effect on Alzheimer's disease sufficiently, our group has developed a new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating dendritic cells (DC. Our previous work has confirmed that DC vaccine can induce adequate anti-amyloid beta antibody in PDAPP Tg mice safely and efficiently. The DC vaccine can improve impaired learning and memory in the Alzheimer's animal model, and did not cause microvasculitis, microhemorrhage or meningoencephalitis in the animal model. However, the exact mechanism of immunotherapy which reduces Aβ deposition remains unknown. In this report, we studied the mechanism of the vaccine, thinking that this may have implications for better understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Methods A new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating DC which were obtained from C57/B6 mouse bone marrow was developed. Amyloid beta with Freund's adjuvant was inoculated at the same time to act as positive control. After the treatment was done, the samples of brains were collected, fixed, cut. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to observe the expression of the nuclear hormone liver X receptor (LXR, membrane-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45, the ATP-binding cassette family of active transporters (ABCA1, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE and Aβ in mouse brain tissue. Semi-quantitative analysis was used to defect CA1, CA2, CA3, DG, Rad in hippocampus region and positive neuron in cortex region. Results Aβ was significantly reduced in the

  16. Amyloid-β and Astrocytes Interplay in Amyloid-β Related Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batarseh, Yazan S; Duong, Quoc-Viet; Mousa, Youssef M; Al Rihani, Sweilem B; Elfakhri, Khaled; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology is known to promote chronic inflammatory responses in the brain. It was thought previously that Aβ is only associated with Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome. However, studies have shown its involvement in many other neurological disorders. The role of astrocytes in handling the excess levels of Aβ has been highlighted in the literature. Astrocytes have a distinctive function in both neuronal support and protection, thus its involvement in Aβ pathological process may tip the balance toward chronic inflammation and neuronal death. In this review we describe the involvement of astrocytes in Aβ related disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and frontotemporal dementia. PMID:26959008

  17. Novel ¹⁸F-labeled benzoxazole derivatives as potential positron emission tomography probes for imaging of cerebral β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mengchao; Ono, Masahiro; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Masashi; Nakamoto, Yuji; Togashi, Kaori; Okamoto, Yoko; Ihara, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Liu, Boli; Saji, Hideo

    2012-11-01

    Two radiofluoro-pegylated phenylbenzoxazole derivatives, 4-(5-(2-(2-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)benzo[d]oxazol-2-yl)-N-methylaniline ([(18)F]24) and 4-(5-(2-(2-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)benzo[d]oxazol-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylaniline ([(18)F]32), were synthesized and evaluated as probes for imaging cerebral β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in living brain tissue by PET. [(18)F]24 and [(18)F]32 displayed high affinity for Aβ(1-42) aggregates (K(i) = 9.3 and 3.9 nM, respectively). In vitro autoradiography with sections of post-mortem AD brain and transgenic mouse brain confirmed the affinity of these tracers. Initial high uptake into and rapid washout from the brain in normal mice were observed. [(18)F]24 also displayed excellent binding to Aβ plaques in ex vivo autoradiographic experiments with Tg2576 mice. Furthermore, small-animal PET studies demonstrated significant differences in the clearance profile after the administration of [(18)F]24 between Tg2576 and wild-type mice. The results suggest [(18)F]24 to be a useful PET agent for detecting Aβ plaques in the living human brain.

  18. Novel 5' untranslated region directed blockers of iron-regulatory protein-1 dependent amyloid precursor protein translation: implications for down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghamitra Bandyopadhyay

    Full Text Available We reported that iron influx drives the translational expression of the neuronal amyloid precursor protein (APP, which has a role in iron efflux. This is via a classic release of repressor interaction of APP mRNA with iron-regulatory protein-1 (IRP1 whereas IRP2 controls the mRNAs encoding the L- and H-subunits of the iron storage protein, ferritin. Here, we identified thirteen potent APP translation blockers that acted selectively towards the uniquely configured iron-responsive element (IRE RNA stem loop in the 5' untranslated region (UTR of APP mRNA. These agents were 10-fold less inhibitory of 5'UTR sequences of the related prion protein (PrP mRNA. Western blotting confirmed that the 'ninth' small molecule in the series selectively reduced neural APP production in SH-SY5Y cells at picomolar concentrations without affecting viability or the expression of α-synuclein and ferritin. APP blocker-9 (JTR-009, a benzimidazole, reduced the production of toxic Aβ in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells to a greater extent than other well tolerated APP 5'UTR-directed translation blockers, including posiphen, that were shown to limit amyloid burden in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD. RNA binding assays demonstrated that JTR-009 operated by preventing IRP1 from binding to the IRE in APP mRNA, while maintaining IRP1 interaction with the H-ferritin IRE RNA stem loop. Thus, JTR-009 constitutively repressed translation driven by APP 5'UTR sequences. Calcein staining showed that JTR-009 did not indirectly change iron uptake in neuronal cells suggesting a direct interaction with the APP 5'UTR. These studies provide key data to develop small molecules that selectively reduce neural APP and Aβ production at 10-fold lower concentrations than related previously characterized translation blockers. Our data evidenced a novel therapeutic strategy of potential impact for people with trisomy of the APP gene on chromosome 21, which is a phenotype long associated with Down

  19. Molecular dynamics studies of the inhibitory mechanism of copper(Ⅱ) on aggregation of amyloid β-peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Jiao; Pin Yang

    2007-01-01

    The inhibitory mechanism of copper(Ⅱ) on the aggregation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The binding mode of copper(Ⅱ) with Aβ is characterized by the imidazole nitrogen atom, Nπ, of the histidine residue H13,acting as the anchoring site, and the backbone's deprotoned amide nitrogen atoms as the main binding sites. Drove by the coordination bonds and their induced hydrogen bond net, the conformations of Aβ converted from β-sheet non-β-sheet conformations, which destabilized the aggregation of Aβ into fibrils.

  20. Traditional Chinese Nootropic Medicine Radix Polygalae and Its Active Constituent Onjisaponin B Reduce β-Amyloid Production and Improve Cognitive Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohang; Cui, Jin; Yu, Yang; Li, Wei; Hou, Yujun; Wang, Xin; Qin, Dapeng; Zhao, Cun; Yao, Xinsheng; Zhao, Jian; Pei, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Decline of cognitive function is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), regardless of the pathological mechanism. Traditional Chinese medicine has been used to combat cognitive impairments and has been shown to improve learning and memory. Radix Polygalae (RAPO) is a typical and widely used herbal medicine. In this study, we aimed to follow the β-amyloid (Aβ) reduction activity to identify active constituent(s) of RAPO. We found that Onjisaponin B of RAPO functioned as RAPO to suppress Aβ production without direct inhibition of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and γ-secretase activities. Our mechanistic study showed that Onjisaponin B promoted the degradation of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Further, oral administration of Onjisaponin B ameliorated Aβ pathology and behavioral defects in APP/PS1 mice. Taken together, our results indicate that Onjisaponin B is effective against AD, providing a new therapeutic agent for further drug discovery. PMID:26954017

  1. Traditional Chinese Nootropic Medicine Radix Polygalae and Its Active Constituent Onjisaponin B Reduce β-Amyloid Production and Improve Cognitive Impairments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohang Li

    Full Text Available Decline of cognitive function is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD, regardless of the pathological mechanism. Traditional Chinese medicine has been used to combat cognitive impairments and has been shown to improve learning and memory. Radix Polygalae (RAPO is a typical and widely used herbal medicine. In this study, we aimed to follow the β-amyloid (Aβ reduction activity to identify active constituent(s of RAPO. We found that Onjisaponin B of RAPO functioned as RAPO to suppress Aβ production without direct inhibition of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 and γ-secretase activities. Our mechanistic study showed that Onjisaponin B promoted the degradation of amyloid precursor protein (APP. Further, oral administration of Onjisaponin B ameliorated Aβ pathology and behavioral defects in APP/PS1 mice. Taken together, our results indicate that Onjisaponin B is effective against AD, providing a new therapeutic agent for further drug discovery.

  2. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizek, David; Cvijić, Marta; Zupan, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic light chain amyloidosis carries poor prognosis. Amyloid deposition in the myocardium can alter regional left ventricular contraction and cause dyssynchrony. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment strategy for patients with advanced heart failure and echocardiographic dyssynchrony. We report a clinical and echocardiographic response of a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy, treated with a combination of chemotherapy and CRT.

  3. Structural network alterations and neurological dysfunction in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmer, Yael D.; Fotiadis, Panagiotis; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Salat, David H.; Schultz, Aaron; Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Ayres, Alison M.; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Rosas, Diana; Schwab, Kristin; Leemans, Alexander; Biessels, Geert Jan; Rosand, Jonathan; Johnson, Keith A.; Viswanathan, Anand; Gurol, M. Edip; Greenberg, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a common form of small-vessel disease and an important risk factor for cognitive impairment. The mechanisms linking small-vessel disease to cognitive impairment are not well understood. We hypothesized that in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy, multiple small s

  4. Computational Modelling of the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby

    2014-01-01

    When proteins do not fold correctly, it can lead to very serious diseases. One such group of diseases is the amyloid diseases, of which Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are members. The amyloid diseases are characterized by the aggregation...

  5. Native human serum amyloid P component is a single pentamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Inge Juul; Andersen, Ove; Nielsen, EH;

    1995-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are members of the pentraxin protein family. SAP is the precursor protein to amyloid P component present in all forms of amyloidosis. The prevailing notion is that SAP in circulation has the form of a double pentameric molecule (decamer...

  6. The Tubular Sheaths Encasing Methanosaeta thermophila Filaments Are Functional Amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueholm, Morten S; Larsen, Poul; Finster, Kai; Stenvang, Marcel R; Christiansen, Gunna; Vad, Brian S; Bøggild, Andreas; Otzen, Daniel E; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-08-14

    Archaea are renowned for their ability to thrive in extreme environments, although they can be found in virtually all habitats. Their adaptive success is linked to their unique cell envelopes that are extremely resistant to chemical and thermal denaturation and that resist proteolysis by common proteases. Here we employ amyloid-specific conformation antibodies and biophysical techniques to show that the extracellular cell wall sheaths encasing the methanogenic archaea Methanosaeta thermophila PT are functional amyloids. Depolymerization of sheaths and subsequent MS/MS analyses revealed that the sheaths are composed of a single major sheath protein (MspA). The amyloidogenic nature of MspA was confirmed by in vitro amyloid formation of recombinant MspA under a wide range of environmental conditions. This is the first report of a functional amyloid from the archaeal domain of life. The amyloid nature explains the extreme resistance of the sheath, the elastic properties that allow diffusible substrates to penetrate through expandable hoop boundaries, and how the sheaths are able to split and elongate outside the cell. The archaeal sheath amyloids do not share homology with any of the currently known functional amyloids and clearly represent a new function of the amyloid protein fold. PMID:26109065

  7. Potential Properties of Plant Sprout Extracts on Amyloid β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Mizue; Okada, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the amyloid β (Aβ) inhibition mechanism of plant sprouts' aqueous extracts (PSAE). In this study, we screened the effects of five plant sprouts' extracts on Aβ (1–42) structure modification using gel electrophoresis. In PSAE, no band of Aβ monomer was recognized in Japanese butterbur. Similarly, the Aβ monomer band became light in buckwheat, red cabbage, broccoli, and brussels. The neuroprotective effects of PSAE were evaluated by measuring levels of Aβ in mixtures (Aβ  and PSAE) with Aβ ELISA assay. The treatment with PSAE decreased Aβ levels. The results indicated that the levels of red cabbage, Japanese butterbur, and broccoli were 9.6, 28.0, and 44.0%, respectively. The lowest value was observed with buckwheat. Furthermore, we carried out a Congo Red (CR) and Aβ binding experiment of PSAE to confirm the modification mechanism of PSAE. The correlation coefficient for the absorption spectrum peak of CR was found to be bigger than 0.8 (r = 0.882) which proved that the Aβ levels could be attributed to the peak of CR. In conclusion, we demonstrated that treatment with PSAE effectively decreases Aβ concentration. Thus, the mechanism that decreased the Aβ levels may be modification by PSAE. PMID:27429807

  8. Potential Properties of Plant Sprout Extracts on Amyloid β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizue Okada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the amyloid β (Aβ inhibition mechanism of plant sprouts’ aqueous extracts (PSAE. In this study, we screened the effects of five plant sprouts’ extracts on Aβ (1–42 structure modification using gel electrophoresis. In PSAE, no band of Aβ monomer was recognized in Japanese butterbur. Similarly, the Aβ monomer band became light in buckwheat, red cabbage, broccoli, and brussels. The neuroprotective effects of PSAE were evaluated by measuring levels of Aβ in mixtures (Aβ  and PSAE with Aβ ELISA assay. The treatment with PSAE decreased Aβ levels. The results indicated that the levels of red cabbage, Japanese butterbur, and broccoli were 9.6, 28.0, and 44.0%, respectively. The lowest value was observed with buckwheat. Furthermore, we carried out a Congo Red (CR and Aβ binding experiment of PSAE to confirm the modification mechanism of PSAE. The correlation coefficient for the absorption spectrum peak of CR was found to be bigger than 0.8 (r=0.882 which proved that the Aβ levels could be attributed to the peak of CR. In conclusion, we demonstrated that treatment with PSAE effectively decreases Aβ concentration. Thus, the mechanism that decreased the Aβ levels may be modification by PSAE.

  9. Glimepiride protects neurons against amyloid-β-induced synapse damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Craig; West, Ewan; Nolan, William; McHale-Owen, Harriet; Williams, Alun; Bate, Clive

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with the accumulation within the brain of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that damage synapses and affect memory acquisition. This process can be modelled by observing the effects of Aβ on synapses in cultured neurons. The addition of picomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ derived from brain extracts triggered the loss of synaptic proteins including synaptophysin, synapsin-1 and cysteine string protein from cultured neurons. Glimepiride, a sulphonylurea used for the treatment of diabetes, protected neurons against synapse damage induced by Aβ. The protective effects of glimepiride were multi-faceted. Glimepiride treatment was associated with altered synaptic membranes including the loss of specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins including the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) that acts as a receptor for Aβ42, increased synaptic gangliosides and altered cell signalling. More specifically, glimepiride reduced the Aβ-induced increase in cholesterol and the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in synapses that occurred within cholesterol-dense membrane rafts. Aβ42 binding to glimepiride-treated neurons was not targeted to membrane rafts and less Aβ42 accumulated within synapses. These studies indicate that glimepiride modified the membrane micro-environments in which Aβ-induced signalling leads to synapse damage. In addition, soluble PrP(C), released from neurons by glimepiride, neutralised Aβ-induced synapse damage. Such observations raise the possibility that glimepiride may reduce synapse damage and hence delay the progression of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26432105

  10. Interleukin-3 prevents neuronal death induced by amyloid peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otth Carola

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-3 (IL-3 is an important glycoprotein involved in regulating biological responses such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Its effects are mediated via interaction with cell surface receptors. Several studies have demonstrated the expression of IL-3 in neurons and astrocytes of the hippocampus and cortices in normal mouse brain, suggesting a physiological role of IL-3 in the central nervous system. Although there is evidence indicating that IL-3 is expressed in some neuronal populations, its physiological role in these cells is poorly known. Results In this study, we demonstrated the expression of IL-3 receptor in cortical neurons, and analyzed its influence on amyloid β (Aβ-treated cells. In these cells, IL-3 can activate at least three classical signalling pathways, Jak/STAT, Ras/MAP kinase and the PI 3-kinase. Viability assays indicated that IL-3 might play a neuroprotective role in cells treated with Aβ fibrils. It is of interest to note that our results suggest that cell survival induced by IL-3 required PI 3-kinase and Jak/STAT pathway activation, but not MAP kinase. In addition, IL-3 induced an increase of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Conclusion Altogether these data strongly suggest that IL-3 neuroprotects neuronal cells against neurodegenerative agents like Aβ.

  11. P-glycoprotein efflux and other factors limit brain amyloid beta reduction by beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 inhibitors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Jere E; Thompson, Lorin A; Toyn, Jeremy H; Marcin, Lawrence; Barten, Donna M; Marcinkeviciene, Jovita; Kopcho, Lisa; Kim, Young; Lin, Alan; Guss, Valerie; Burton, Catherine; Iben, Lawrence; Polson, Craig; Cantone, Joe; Ford, Michael; Drexler, Dieter; Fiedler, Tracey; Lentz, Kimberley A; Grace, James E; Kolb, Janet; Corsa, Jason; Pierdomenico, Maria; Jones, Kelli; Olson, Richard E; Macor, John E; Albright, Charles F

    2008-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. Amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides are hypothesized to cause the initiation and progression of AD based on pathologic data from AD patients, genetic analysis of mutations that cause early onset forms of AD, and preclinical studies. Based on this hypothesis, beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) inhibitors are an attractive therapeutic approach for AD because cleavage of the APP by BACE1 is required to form Abeta. In this study, three potent BACE1 inhibitors are characterized. All three inhibitors decrease Abeta formation in cultured cells with IC(50) values less than 10 nM. Analysis of APP C-terminal fragments by immunoblotting and Abeta peptides by mass spectrometry showed that these inhibitors decreased Abeta by inhibiting BACE1. An assay for Abeta1-40 in mice was developed and used to show that these BACE1 inhibitors decreased plasma Abeta1-40, but not brain Abeta1-40, in wild-type mice. Because these BACE1 inhibitors were substrates for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a member of the ATP-binding cassette superfamily of efflux transporters, these inhibitors were administered to P-gp knockout (KO) mice. These studies showed that all three BACE1 inhibitors decreased brain Abeta1-40 in P-gp KO mice, demonstrating that P-gp is a major limitation for development of BACE1 inhibitors to test the amyloid hypothesis. A comparison of plasma Abeta1-40 and brain Abeta1-40 dose responses for these three compounds revealed differences in relative ED(50) values, indicating that factors other than P-gp can also contribute to poor brain activity by BACE1 inhibitors.

  12. Amyloid imaging in Alzheimer's disease: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidlitz, P; Voisin, T; Vellas, B; Payoux, P; Gabelle, A; Formaglio, M; Delrieu, J

    2014-07-01

    Therapies targeting amyloid-β peptide currently represent approximately 50% of drugs now being developed for Alzheimer's disease. Some, including active and passive anti-Aβ immunotherapy, directly target the amyloid plaques. The new amyloid tracers are increasingly being included in the proposed updated diagnostic criteria, and may allow earlier diagnosis. Those targeting amyloid-β peptide allow identification of amyloid plaques in vivo. We need to gain insight into all aspects of their application. As florbetapir (Amyvid™) and flutemetamol (Vizamyl™) have received marketing authorization, clinicians require deeper knowledge to be rationally used in diagnosis. In this paper, we review both completed and ongoing observational, longitudinal and interventional studies of these tracers, our main objective being to show the performance of the four most commonly used tracers and their validation. PMID:25226113

  13. Prevalence of cerebral amyloid pathology in persons without dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Willemijn J; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Knol, Dirk L;

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Cerebral amyloid-β aggregation is an early pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD), starting decades before dementia onset. Estimates of the prevalence of amyloid pathology in persons without dementia are needed to understand the development of AD and to design prevention studies....... OBJECTIVE: To use individual participant data meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of amyloid pathology as measured with biomarkers in participants with normal cognition, subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). DATA SOURCES: Relevant biomarker studies identified...... for amyloid positivity. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Individual records were provided for 2914 participants with normal cognition, 697 with SCI, and 3972 with MCI aged 18 to 100 years from 55 studies. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Prevalence of amyloid pathology on positron emission tomography...

  14. Predicting sites of new hemorrhage with amyloid imaging in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierksen, Gregory; Betensky, Rebecca; Gidicsin, Christopher; Halpin, Amy; Becker, Alex; Carmasin, Jeremy; Ayres, Alison; Schwab, Kristin; Viswanathan, Anand; Salat, David; Rosand, Jonathan; Johnson, Keith A.; Greenberg, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to determine whether amyloid imaging can help predict the location and number of future hemorrhages in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Methods: We performed a longitudinal cohort study of 11 patients with CAA without dementia who underwent serial brain MRIs after baseline amyloid imaging with Pittsburgh compound B (PiB). Mean distribution volume ratio (DVR) of PiB was determined at the sites of new micro/macrobleeds identified on follow-up MRI and compared with PiB retention at “simulated” hemorrhages, randomly placed in the same subjects using a probability distribution map of CAA-hemorrhage location. Mean PiB retention at the sites of observed new bleeds was also compared to that in shells concentrically surrounding the bleeds. Finally the association between number of incident bleeds and 3 regional amyloid measures were obtained. Results: Nine of 11 subjects had at least one new microbleed on follow-up MRI (median 4, interquartile range [IQR] 1–9) and 2 had 5 new intracerebral hemorrhages. Mean DVR was greater at the sites of incident bleeds (1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23–1.46) than simulated lesions (1.14, 95% CI 1.07–1.22, p < 0.0001) in multivariable models. PiB retention decreased with increasing distance from sites of observed bleeds (p < 0.0001). Mean DVR in a superior frontal/parasagittal region of interest correlated independently with number of future hemorrhages after adjustment for relevant covariates (p = 0.003). Conclusions: Our results provide direct evidence that new CAA-related hemorrhages occur preferentially at sites of increased amyloid deposition and suggest that PiB-PET imaging may be a useful tool in prediction of incident hemorrhages in patients with CAA. PMID:22786597

  15. TDP-43 inclusion bodies formed in bacteria are structurally amorphous, non-amyloid and inherently toxic to neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Capitini

    Full Text Available Accumulation of ubiquitin-positive, tau- and α-synuclein-negative intracellular inclusions of TDP-43 in the central nervous system represents the major hallmark correlated to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions. Such inclusions have variably been described as amorphous aggregates or more structured deposits having an amyloid structure. Following the observations that bacterial inclusion bodies generally consist of amyloid aggregates, we have overexpressed full-length TDP-43 and C-terminal TDP-43 in E. coli, purified the resulting full-length and C-terminal TDP-43 containing inclusion bodies (FL and Ct TDP-43 IBs and subjected them to biophysical analyses to assess their structure/morphology. We show that both FL and Ct TDP-43 aggregates contained in the bacterial IBs do not bind amyloid dyes such as thioflavin T and Congo red, possess a disordered secondary structure, as inferred using circular dichroism and infrared spectroscopies, and are susceptible to proteinase K digestion, thus possessing none of the hallmarks for amyloid. Moreover, atomic force microscopy revealed an irregular structure for both types of TDP-43 IBs and confirmed the absence of amyloid-like species after proteinase K treatment. Cell biology experiments showed that FL TDP-43 IBs were able to impair the viability of cultured neuroblastoma cells when added to their extracellular medium and, more markedly, when transfected into their cytosol, where they are at least in part ubiquitinated and phosphorylated. These data reveal an inherently high propensity of TDP-43 to form amorphous aggregates, which possess, however, an inherently high ability to cause cell dysfunction. This indicates that a gain of toxic function caused by TDP-43 deposits is effective in TDP-43 pathologies, in addition to possible loss of function mechanisms originating from the cellular mistrafficking of the protein.

  16. TDP-43 inclusion bodies formed in bacteria are structurally amorphous, non-amyloid and inherently toxic to neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitini, Claudia; Conti, Simona; Perni, Michele; Guidi, Francesca; Cascella, Roberta; De Poli, Angela; Penco, Amanda; Relini, Annalisa; Cecchi, Cristina; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of ubiquitin-positive, tau- and α-synuclein-negative intracellular inclusions of TDP-43 in the central nervous system represents the major hallmark correlated to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions. Such inclusions have variably been described as amorphous aggregates or more structured deposits having an amyloid structure. Following the observations that bacterial inclusion bodies generally consist of amyloid aggregates, we have overexpressed full-length TDP-43 and C-terminal TDP-43 in E. coli, purified the resulting full-length and C-terminal TDP-43 containing inclusion bodies (FL and Ct TDP-43 IBs) and subjected them to biophysical analyses to assess their structure/morphology. We show that both FL and Ct TDP-43 aggregates contained in the bacterial IBs do not bind amyloid dyes such as thioflavin T and Congo red, possess a disordered secondary structure, as inferred using circular dichroism and infrared spectroscopies, and are susceptible to proteinase K digestion, thus possessing none of the hallmarks for amyloid. Moreover, atomic force microscopy revealed an irregular structure for both types of TDP-43 IBs and confirmed the absence of amyloid-like species after proteinase K treatment. Cell biology experiments showed that FL TDP-43 IBs were able to impair the viability of cultured neuroblastoma cells when added to their extracellular medium and, more markedly, when transfected into their cytosol, where they are at least in part ubiquitinated and phosphorylated. These data reveal an inherently high propensity of TDP-43 to form amorphous aggregates, which possess, however, an inherently high ability to cause cell dysfunction. This indicates that a gain of toxic function caused by TDP-43 deposits is effective in TDP-43 pathologies, in addition to possible loss of function mechanisms originating from the cellular mistrafficking of the protein.

  17. A catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammarstroem, P; Ali, M M; Mishra, R; Tengvall, P; Lundstroem, I [Department of Physics, Biology and Chemistry, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Svensson, S [Astra Zeneca R and D, SE-151 85 Soedertaelje (Sweden)], E-mail: ingemar@ifm.liu.se

    2008-03-15

    A hydrophobic surface incubated in a solution of protein molecules (insulin monomers) was made into a catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation by repeatedly incubate, rinse and dry the surface. The present contribution describes how this unexpected transformation occurred and its relation to rapid fibrillation of insulin solutions in contact with the surface. A tentative model of the properties of the catalytic surface is given, corroborated by ellipsometric measurements of the thickness of the organic layer on the surface and by atomic force microscopy. The surfaces used were spontaneously oxidized silicon made hydrophobic through treatment in dichlorodimethylsilane.

  18. Stability and cytotoxicity of crystallin amyloid nanofibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manmeet; Healy, Jackie; Vasudevamurthy, Madhusudan; Lassé, Moritz; Puskar, Ljiljana; Tobin, Mark J.; Valery, Celine; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Sasso, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils.Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ThT fluorescence graphs of buffers and solvents used for

  19. Antibiotic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... either as public health or as non-public health antimicrobial agents. What is the difference between bacteriostats, sanitizers, disinfectants ... bacteria, however, there is considerable controversy surrounding their health benefits. The ... producing agents (Table of Antibacterials) have been used for many ...

  20. The Components of Flemingia macrophylla Attenuate Amyloid β-Protein Accumulation by Regulating Amyloid β-Protein Metabolic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Lian Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flemingia macrophylla (Leguminosae is a popular traditional remedy used in Taiwan as anti-inflammatory, promoting blood circulation and antidiabetes agent. Recent study also suggested its neuroprotective activity against Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, the effects of F. macrophylla on Aβ production and degradation were studied. The effect of F. macrophylla on Aβ metabolism was detected using the cultured mouse neuroblastoma cells N2a transfected with human Swedish mutant APP (swAPP-N2a cells. The effects on Aβ degradation were evaluated on a cell-free system. An ELISA assay was applied to detect the level of Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42. Western blots assay was employed to measure the levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein and insulin degrading enzyme (IDE. Three fractions of F. macrophylla modified Aβ accumulation by both inhibiting β-secretase and activating IDE. Three flavonoids modified Aβ accumulation by activating IDE. The activated IDE pool by the flavonoids was distinctly regulated by bacitracin (an IDE inhibitor. Furthermore, flavonoid 94-18-13 also modulates Aβ accumulation by enhancing IDE expression. In conclusion, the components of F. macrophylla possess the potential for developing new therapeutic drugs for Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Reversal effects of crocin on amyloid β-induced memory deficit: Modification of autophagy or apoptosis markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Farideh; Jamshidi, Amir Hossein; Khodagholi, Fariba; Yans, Asal; Azimi, Leila; Faizi, Mehrdad; Vali, Leila; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-12-01

    Crocin, as a carotenoid, is one of the main and active constituents of saffron stigmas (Crocus sativus L.) that is widely used in folk medicine. Several studies have pointed out the potent antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of crocin which may have therapeutic values for management of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia among the elderly and is characterized by massive neuronal loss and progressive cognitive impairment. Beta amyloid hypothesis is the main theoretical research framework for Alzheimer's disease which states that extracellular aggregation of beta amyloid results in synaptic loss and eventually cell apoptosis. Recent findings suggest that autophagy and apoptosis are extensively involved in Alzheimer's disease. In order to investigate therapeutic values of crocin, we examined the effect of crocin on memory, cell apoptosis, and autophagy using in vivo models of Alzheimer's disease. We also compared the effect of crocin administration on spatial memory with nicotine as positive control. Morris water maze results show that intra-peritoneal and intra-hippocampal administration of crocin significantly improve spatial memory indicators such as escape latency, traveled distance and time spent in target quadrant when compared to beta amyloid injection. Furthermore, we measured certain biomarkers of cell autophagy and apoptosis using Western blot analysis. Our results reveal that crocin administration does not cause any significant alteration in Beclin-1 and ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I compared to the group received beta amyloid by hippocampal injection. However, in contrast to autophagy, crocin administration significantly decreases Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved Caspase-3 level. This demonstrates that crocin inhibits beta amyloid induced apoptosis, which is possibly associated with its antioxidant properties. Our results further confirm the neuroprotective properties of crocin as a

  2. Macroscopic amyloid fiber formation by staphylococcal biofilm associated SuhB protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirudha; Bhattacharyya, Sudipta; Kundu, Anirban; Dutta, Debabrata; Das, Amit Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal and opportunistic pathogen that causes lethal infections. Biofilm forming ability of S. aureus enhances its virulence since biofilm provides the bacteria protective shield against antibiotics and host immunity. Polysaccharide independent biofilm formation by several virulent S. aureus strains have been identified recently, where protein components substitute polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) involved in bacterial cell attachment. The suhB gene has been reported to be essential in staphylococcal PIA-independent biofilm formation. Overexpression of staphylococcal SuhB (SasuhB) in E. coli produces extracellular macroscopic fibers made of recombinant SaSuhB protein. The amyloidic nature of the fiber is evaluated by high resolution electron microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and amyloid specific dyes, such as Congo red and thioflavin-T binding assay. The fibers appear to be sticky in nature and bind a large number of bacterial cells. The results suggest the possible role of SaSuhB-fibers as a structural component as well as an adhesin in biofilm matrix. PMID:27497060

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Palmqvist, Sebastian; Mattsson, Niklas; Hansson, Oskar; ,

    2016-01-01

    See Rabinovici (doi:10.1093/brain/aww025) for a scientific commentary on this article. Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET ...

  4. Subjective cognitive complaints and amyloid burden in cognitively normal older individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amariglio, Rebecca E.; Becker, J. Alex; Carmasin, Jeremy; Wadsworth, Lauren P.; Lorius, Natacha; Sullivan, Caroline; Maye, Jacqueline E.; Gidicsin, Christopher; Pepin, Lesley C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Rentz, Dorene M.

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that subjective cognitive complaints (SCC) may indicate subtle cognitive decline characteristic of individuals with preclinical Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this study, we sought to build upon previous studies by associating SCC and amyloid-β deposition using Positron Emission Tomography with Pittsburg Compound B (PiB-PET) in cognitively normal older individuals. One-hundred thirty one subjects (mean age 73.5 ± 6) were administered three subjective cognitive questionnaires and a brief neuropsychological battery. A relationship between a subjective memory complaints composite score and cortical PiB binding was found to be significant, even after controlling for depressive symptoms. By contrast, there were no significant relationships between objective cognitive measures of memory and executive functions and cortical PiB binding. Our study suggests that SCC may be an early indicator of AD pathology detectable prior to significant objective impairment. PMID:22940426

  5. Baicalein reduces β-amyloid and promotes nonamyloidogenic amyloid precursor protein processing in an Alzheimer’s disease transgenic mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, She-Qing; Obregon, Demian; Ehrhart, Jared; Deng, Juan; Tian, Jun; Hou, Huayan; Giunta, Brian; Sawmiller, Darrell; Tan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Baicalein, a flavonoid isolated from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis, is known to modulate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors. Given prior reports demonstrating benefits of GABAA modulation for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) treatment, we wished to determine whether this agent might be beneficial for AD. CHO cells engineered to overexpress wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP), primary culture neuronal cells from AD mice (Tg2576) and AD mice were treated with baicalein. In the cell cultures, baicalein significantly reduced the production of β-amyloid (Aβ) by increasing APP α-processing. These effects were blocked by the GABAA antagonist bicuculline. Likewise, AD mice treated daily with i.p. baicalein for 8 weeks showed enhanced APP α-secretase processing, reduced Aβ production, and reduced AD-like pathology together with improved cognitive performance. Our findings suggest that baicalein promotes nonamyloidogenic processing of APP, thereby reducing Aβ production and improving cognitive performance, by activating GABAA receptors. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23686791

  6. Functional Hydrogel Materials Inspired by Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joel

    2012-02-01

    Protein assembly resulting in the formation of amyloid fibrils, assemblies rich in cross beta-sheet structure, is normally thought of as a deleterious event associated with disease. However, amyloid formation is also involved in a diverse array of normal biological functions such as cell adhesion, melanin synthesis, insect defense mechanism and modulation of water surface tension by fungi and bacteria. These findings indicate that Nature has evolved to take advantage of large, proteinaceous fibrillar assemblies to elicit function. We are designing functional materials, namely hydrogels, from peptides that self-assembled into fibrillar networks, rich in cross beta-sheet structure. These gels can be used for the direct encapsulation and delivery of small molecule-, protein- and cell-based therapeutics. Loaded gels exhibit shear-thinning/self-healing mechanical properties enabling their delivery via syringe. In addition to their use for delivery, we have found that some of these gels display antibacterial activity. Although cytocompatible towards mammalian cells, the hydrogels can kill a broad spectrum of bacteria on contact.

  7. Crude caffeine reduces memory impairment and amyloid β(1-42) levels in an Alzheimer's mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Chang, Wen-Han; Black, Richard M; Liu, Jia-Ren; Sompol, Pradoldej; Chen, Yumin; Wei, Huilin; Zhao, Qiuyan; Cheng, Irene H

    2012-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a chronic neurodegenerative disorder associated with the abnormal accumulations of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide and oxidative stress in the brain, is the most common form of dementia among the elderly. Crude caffeine (CC), a major by-product of the decaffeination of coffee, has potent hydrophilic antioxidant activity and may reduce inflammatory processes. Here, we showed that CC and pure caffeine intake had beneficial effects in a mouse model of AD. Administration of CC or pure caffeine for 2months partially prevented memory impairment in AD mice, with CC having greater effects than pure caffeine. Furthermore, consumption of CC, but not pure caffeine, reduced the Aβ(1-42) levels and the number of amyloid plaques in the hippocampus. Moreover, CC and caffeine protected primary neurons from Aβ-induced cell death and suppressed Aβ-induced caspase-3 activity. Our data indicate that CC may contain prophylactic agents against the cell death and the memory impairment in AD.

  8. Aloe arborescens Extract Protects IMR-32 Cells against Alzheimer Amyloid Beta Peptide via Inhibition of Radical Peroxide Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Maria Elisabetta; Tringali, Giuseppe; Triggiani, Doriana; Giardina, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Aloe arborescens is commonly used as a pharmaceutical ingredient for its effect in burn treatment and ability to increase skin wound healing properties. Besides, it is well known to have beneficial phytotherapeutic, anticancer, and radio-protective properties. In this study, we first provided evidence that A. arborescens extract protects IMR32, a neuroblastoma human cellular line, from toxicity induced by beta amyloid, the peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease. In particular, pretreatment with A. arborescens maintains an elevated cell viability and exerts a protective effect on mitochondrial functionality, as evidenced by oxygen consumption experiments. The protective mechanism exerted by A. arborescens seems be related to lowering of oxidative potential of the cells, as demonstrated by the ROS measurement compared with the results obtained in the presence of amyloid beta (1-42) peptide alone. Based on these preliminary observations we suggest that use ofA. arborescens extract could be developed as agents for the management of AD. PMID:26749845

  9. Looking for a generic inhibitor of amyloid-like fibril formation among flavone derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Šneideris, Tomas; Baranauskienė, Lina; Jonathan G Cannon; Rutkienė, Rasa; Meškys, Rolandas; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    A range of diseases is associated with amyloid fibril formation. Despite different proteins being responsible for each disease, all of them share similar features including beta-sheet-rich secondary structure and fibril-like protein aggregates. A number of proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, resembling structural features of disease-related amyloids. Given these generic structural properties of amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils, generic inhibitors of fibril formation would be of i...

  10. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high {sup 11}C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by {sup 11}C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  11. SERF Protein Is a Direct Modifier of Amyloid Fiber Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fabio Falsone

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The inherent cytotoxicity of aberrantly folded protein aggregates contributes substantially to the pathogenesis of amyloid diseases. It was recently shown that a class of evolutionary conserved proteins, called MOAG-4/SERF, profoundly alter amyloid toxicity via an autonomous but yet unexplained mode. We show that the biological function of human SERF1a originates from its atypical ability to specifically distinguish between amyloid and nonamyloid aggregation. This inherently unstructured protein directly affected the aggregation kinetics of a broad range of amyloidogenic proteins in vitro, while being inactive against nonamyloid aggregation. A representative biophysical analysis of the SERF1a:α-synuclein (aSyn complex revealed that the amyloid-promoting activity resulted from an early and transient interaction, which was sufficient to provoke a massive increase of soluble aSyn amyloid nucleation templates. Therefore, the autonomous amyloid-modifying activity of SERF1a observed in living organisms relies on a direct and dedicated manipulation of the early stages in the amyloid aggregation pathway.

  12. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows investigations without artificial overexpression of inherited Alzheimer's disease genes. PMID:25991605

  13. Computational Studies of Beta Amyloid (Aβ42 with p75NTR Receptor: A Novel Therapeutic Target in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shine Devarajan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of beta amyloid plaques (Aβ which can induce neurite degeneration and progressive dementia. It has been identified that neuronal apoptosis is induced by binding of Aβ42 to pan neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR and gave the possibility that beta amyloid oligomer is a ligand for p75NTR. However, the atomic contact point responsible for molecular interactions and conformational changes of the protein upon binding was not studied in detail. In view of this, we conducted a molecular docking and simulation study to investigate the binding behaviour of Aβ42 monomer with p75NTR ectodomain. Furthermore, we proposed a p75NTR-ectodomain-Aβ42 complex model. Our data revealed that, Aβ42 specifically recognizes CRD1 and CRD2 domains of the receptor and formed a “cap” like structure at the N-terminal of receptor which is stabilized by a network of hydrogen bonds. These findings are supported by molecular dynamics simulation that Aβ42 showed distinct structural alterations at N- and C-terminal regions due to the influence of the receptor binding site. Overall, the present study gives more structural insight on the molecular interactions of beta amyloid protein involved in the activation of p75NTR receptor.

  14. Prevalence of amyloid PET positivity in dementia syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Jansen, Willemijn J; Rabinovici, Gil D;

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Amyloid-β positron emission tomography (PET) imaging allows in vivo detection of fibrillar plaques, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Its diagnostic utility is still unclear because amyloid plaques also occur in patients with non-AD dementia. OBJECTIVE: To use...... years; noncarriers [n = 77], 7% [95% CI, 3%-18%] at 60 years to 29% [95% CI, 17%-43%] at 80 years. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among participants with dementia, the prevalence of amyloid positivity was associated with clinical diagnosis, age, and APOE genotype. These findings indicate the potential...

  15. Detection of amyloid in Alzheimer's disease with positron emission tomography using [{sup 11}C]AZD2184

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyberg, Svante; Cselenyi, Zsolt; Julin, Per; Olsson, Hans; Svensson, Samuel [AstraZeneca R and D, Neuroscience Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Eriksdotter Joenhagen, Maria; Freund-Levi, Yvonne [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, NVS Department, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge (Sweden); Halldin, Christer; Andersson, Jan; Varnaes, Katarina [Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, PET Centre, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Farde, Lars [AstraZeneca R and D, Neuroscience Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, PET Centre, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-11-15

    Current positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands for detection of A{beta} amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not ideal for quantification. To improve the signal to noise ratio we have developed the radioligand [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 and report here the first clinical evaluation. Eight AD patients and four younger control subjects underwent 93-min PET measurements with [{sup 11}C]AZD2184. A ratio approach using the cerebellum as reference region was applied to determine binding parameters. Brain uptake of [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 peaked within 1 min at 3-4% of injected radioactivity. AD patients had high radioactivity in cortical regions while controls had uniformly low radioactivity uptake. Specific binding peaked within 30 min at which time standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) ranged between 1.19 and 2.57. [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 is a promising radioligand for detailed mapping of A{beta} amyloid depositions in Alzheimer's disease, due to low non-specific binding, high signal to background ratio and reversible binding as evident from early peak equilibrium. (orig.)

  16. Amyloid-β and Astrocytes Interplay in Amyloid-β Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan S. Batarseh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-β (Aβ pathology is known to promote chronic inflammatory responses in the brain. It was thought previously that Aβ is only associated with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome. However, studies have shown its involvement in many other neurological disorders. The role of astrocytes in handling the excess levels of Aβ has been highlighted in the literature. Astrocytes have a distinctive function in both neuronal support and protection, thus its involvement in Aβ pathological process may tip the balance toward chronic inflammation and neuronal death. In this review we describe the involvement of astrocytes in Aβ related disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Down syndrome, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and frontotemporal dementia.

  17. Early oligomerization stages for the non-amyloid component of α-synuclein amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene, Cindie; Laghaei, Rozita; Mousseau, Normand

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, much effort has focused on the early stages of aggregation and the formation of amyloid oligomers. Aggregation processes for these proteins are complex and their non-equilibrium nature makes any experimental study very difficult. Under these conditions, simulations provide a useful alternative for understanding the dynamics of the early stages of oligomerization. Here, we focus on the non-Aβ amyloid component (NAC) of the monomer, dimer, and trimer of α-synuclein, an important 35-residue sequence involved in the aggregation and fibrillation of this protein associated with Parkinson's disease. Using Hamiltonian and temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations combined with the coarse grained Optimized Potential for Efficient peptide structure Prediction potential, we identify the role of the various regions and the secondary structures for the onset of oligomerization. For this sequence, we clearly observe the passage from α-helix to β-sheet, a characteristic transition of amyloid proteins. More precisely, we find that the NAC monomer is highly structured with two α-helical regions, between residues 2-13 and 19-25. As the dimer and trimer form, β-sheet structures between residues 2-14 and 26-34 appear and rapidly structure the system. The resulting conformations are much more structured than similar dimers and trimers of β-amyloid and amylin proteins and yet display a strong polymorphism at these early stages of aggregation. In addition to its inherent experimental interest, comparison with other sequences shows that NAC could be a very useful numerical model for understanding the onset of aggregation.

  18. Amyloid-β and Astrocytes Interplay in Amyloid-β Related Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Yazan S. Batarseh; Quoc-Viet Duong; Youssef M. Mousa; Al Rihani, Sweilem B.; Khaled Elfakhri; Amal Kaddoumi

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology is known to promote chronic inflammatory responses in the brain. It was thought previously that Aβ is only associated with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome. However, studies have shown its involvement in many other neurological disorders. The role of astrocytes in handling the excess levels of Aβ has been highlighted in the literature. Astrocytes have a distinctive function in both neuronal support and protection, thus its involvement in Aβ pathological process m...

  19. Amyloid β Oligomeric Species Present in the Lag Phase of Amyloid Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wolff

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD-associated amyloid β peptide (Aβ is one of the main actors in AD pathogenesis. Aβ is characterized by its high tendency to self-associate, leading to the generation of oligomers and amyloid fibrils. The elucidation of pathways and intermediates is crucial for the understanding of protein assembly mechanisms in general and in conjunction with neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., for the identification of new therapeutic targets. Our study focused on Aβ42 and its oligomeric assemblies in the lag phase of amyloid formation, as studied by sedimentation velocity (SV centrifugation. The assembly state of Aβ during the lag phase, the time required by an Aβ solution to reach the exponential growth phase of aggregation, was characterized by a dominant monomer fraction below 1 S and a population of oligomeric species between 4 and 16 S. From the oligomer population, two major species close to a 12-mer and an 18-mer with a globular shape were identified. The recurrence of these two species at different initial concentrations and experimental conditions as the smallest assemblies present in solution supports the existence of distinct, energetically favored assemblies in solution. The sizes of the two species suggest an Aβ42 aggregation pathway that is based on a basic hexameric building block. The study demonstrates the potential of SV analysis for the evaluation of protein aggregation pathways.

  20. Tensile deformation and failure of amyloid and amyloid-like protein fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-03-01

    Here we report a series of full atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of six amyloid or amyloid-like protein fibrils in order to systematically understand the effect of different secondary structure motifs on the mechanical tensile and failure response of cross-\\beta protein fibrils. We find a similar failure behavior across the six structures; an initial failure event occurs at small strains involving cooperative rupture of a group of hydrogen bonds, followed by a slow one-by-one hydrogen bond rupture process as the remaining \\beta -sheets peel off with very low applied stress. We also find that the ultimate tensile strength of the protein fibrils investigated scales directly with the number of hydrogen bonds per unit area which break in the initial rupture event. Our results provide insights into structure-property relationships in protein fibrils important for disease and engineering applications and lay the groundwork for the development of materials selection criteria for the design of de novo amyloid-based functional biomaterials.

  1. Yeast and Fungal Prions: Amyloid-Handling Systems, Amyloid Structure, and Prion Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickner, R B; Edskes, H K; Gorkovskiy, A; Bezsonov, E E; Stroobant, E E

    2016-01-01

    Yeast prions (infectious proteins) were discovered by their outré genetic properties and have become important models for an array of human prion and amyloid diseases. A single prion protein can become any of many distinct amyloid forms (called prion variants or strains), each of which is self-propagating, but with different biological properties (eg, lethal vs mild). The folded in-register parallel β sheet architecture of the yeast prion amyloids naturally suggests a mechanism by which prion variant information can be faithfully transmitted for many generations. The yeast prions rely on cellular chaperones for their propagation, but can be cured by various chaperone imbalances. The Btn2/Cur1 system normally cures most variants of the [URE3] prion that arise. Although most variants of the [PSI+] and [URE3] prions are toxic or lethal, some are mild in their effects. Even the most mild forms of these prions are rare in the wild, indicating that they too are detrimental to yeast. The beneficial [Het-s] prion of Podospora anserina poses an important contrast in its structure, biology, and evolution to the yeast prions characterized thus far.

  2. Cerebral microvascular amyloid beta protein deposition induces vascular degeneration and neuroinflammation in transgenic mice expressing human vasculotropic mutant amyloid beta precursor protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, J.; Xu, F.; Davis, J.; Otte-Holler, I.; Verbeek, M.M.; Nostrand, W.E. van

    2005-01-01

    Cerebral vascular amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) deposition, also known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy, is a common pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease. Additionally, several familial forms of cerebral amyloid angiopathy exist including the Dutch (E22Q) and Iowa (D23N) mutations of Abeta. Incr

  3. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Day, Danton H.; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer’s disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer’s disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer’s disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  4. Immunotherapy against amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Daniela; Ghezzi, Laura; Scarpini, Elio

    2013-10-15

    The first drugs developed for Alzheimer's disease (AD), anticholinesterase inhibitors (AchEI), increase acetylcholine levels, previously demonstrated to be reduced in AD. To date, four AchEI are approved for the treatment of mild to moderate AD. A further therapeutic option available for moderate to severe AD is memantine. These treatments are symptomatic, whereas drugs under development are supposed to modify pathological steps leading to AD, thus acting on the evolution of the disease. For this reason they are currently termed "disease modifying" drugs. To block the progression of the disease, they have to interfere with pathogenic steps at the basis of clinical symptoms, including the deposition of extracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques and of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. The most innovative approach is represented by the vaccination and passive immunization against Aβ peptide. In this article, current knowledge about concluded and ongoing clinical trials with both vaccination with different antigens and passive immunization will be reviewed and discussed.

  5. Tau/Amyloid Beta 42 Peptide Test (Alzheimer Biomarkers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helpful? Also known as: Alzheimer Biomarkers Formal name: Tau Protein and Amyloid Beta 42 Peptide Related tests: Phosporylated ... should know? How is it used? Tests for Tau protein and Aß42 may be used as supplemental tests ...

  6. Cellular prion protein expression is not regulated by the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Lewis

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of molecular and cellular links between Alzheimer's disease (AD and prion diseases. The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, modulates the post-translational processing of the AD amyloid precursor protein (APP, through its inhibition of the β-secretase BACE1, and oligomers of amyloidbind to PrP(C which may mediate amyloid-β neurotoxicity. In addition, the APP intracellular domain (AICD, which acts as a transcriptional regulator, has been reported to control the expression of PrP(C. Through the use of transgenic mice, cell culture models and manipulation of APP expression and processing, this study aimed to clarify the role of AICD in regulating PrP(C. Over-expression of the three major isoforms of human APP (APP(695, APP(751 and APP(770 in cultured neuronal and non-neuronal cells had no effect on the level of endogenous PrP(C. Furthermore, analysis of brain tissue from transgenic mice over-expressing either wild type or familial AD associated mutant human APP revealed unaltered PrP(C levels. Knockdown of endogenous APP expression in cells by siRNA or inhibition of γ-secretase activity also had no effect on PrP(C levels. Overall, we did not detect any significant difference in the expression of PrP(C in any of the cell or animal-based paradigms considered, indicating that the control of cellular PrP(C levels by AICD is not as straightforward as previously suggested.

  7. Structural and dynamic study of the transmembrane domain of the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadezhdin, K D; Bocharova, O V; Bocharov, E V; Arseniev, A S

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease affects people all over the world, regardless of nationality, gender or social status. An adequate study of the disease requires essential understanding of the molecular fundamentals of the pathogenesis. The amyloid β-peptide, which forms amyloid plaques in the brain of people with Alzheimer's disease, is the product of sequential cleavage of a single-span membrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). More than half of the APP mutations found to be associated with familial forms of Alzheimer's disease are located in its transmembrane domain. The pathogenic mutations presumably affect the structural-dynamic properties of the APP transmembrane domain by changing its conformational stability and/or lateral dimerization. In the present study, the structure and dynamics of the recombinant peptide corresponding to the APP fragment, Gln686-Lys726, which comprises the APP transmembrane domain with an adjacent N-terminal juxtamembrane sequence, were determined in the membrane mimetic environment composed of detergent micelles using NMR spectroscopy. The structure obtained in dodecylphosphocholine micelles consists of two α-helices: a short surface-associated juxtamembrane helix (Lys687-Asp694) and a long transmembrane helix (Gly700-Leu723), both connected via a mobile loop region. A minor bend of the transmembrane α-helix is observed near the paired residues Gly708-Gly709. A cholesterol-binding hydrophobic cavity is apparently formed under the loop region, where the juxtamembrane α-helix comes into contact with the membrane surface near the N-terminus of the transmembrane α-helix. PMID:22649674

  8. Amyloid-β positron emission tomography imaging probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C; Långström, Bengt;

    2013-01-01

    , a number of factors appear to preclude these probes from clinical utilization. As the available "amyloid specific" positron emission tomography imaging probes have failed to demonstrate diagnostic value and have shown limited utility for monitoring therapeutic interventions in humans, a debate...... on their significance has emerged. The aim of this review is to identify and discuss critically the scientific issues contributing to the extensive inconsistencies reported in the literature on their purported in vivo amyloid specificity and potential utilization in patients....

  9. Amyloid/Melanin distinctive mark in invertebrate immunity

    OpenAIRE

    A Grimaldi; R Girardello; D Malagoli; P Falabella; Tettamanti, G.; R Valvassori; E Ottaviani; M de Eguileor

    2012-01-01

    Protostomes and Deuterostomes show the same nexus between melanin production, and amyloid fibril production, i.e., the presence of melanin is indissolubly linked to amyloid scaffold that, in turn, is conditioned by the redox status/cytoplasmic pH modification, pro-protein cleavage presence, adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) overexpressions. These events represent the crucial component of immune response in invertebrates...

  10. Hereditary Amyloid Cardiomyopathy Caused by a Variant Apolipoprotein A1

    OpenAIRE

    Hamidi Asl, Ladan; Liepnieks, Juris J.; Hamidi Asl, Kamran; Uemichi, Tomoyuki; Moulin, Georges; Desjoyaux, Emmanuel; Loire, Robert; Delpech, Marc; Grateau, Gilles; Benson, Merrill D.

    1999-01-01

    Autosomal dominant hereditary amyloidosis with a unique cutaneous and cardiac presentation and death from heart failure by the sixth or seventh decade was found to be associated with a previously unreported point mutation (thymine to cytosine, nt 1389) in exon 4 of the apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1) gene. The predicted substitution of proline for leucine at amino acid position 90 was confirmed by structural analysis of amyloid protein isolated from cardiac deposits of amyloid. The subunit protein ...

  11. Medicinal Chemistry Focusing on Aggregation of Amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohma, Youhei

    2016-01-01

    The aggregation of peptides/proteins is intimately related to a number of human diseases. More than 20 have been identified which aggregate into fibrils containing extensive β-sheet structures, and species generated in the aggregation processes (i.e., oligomers and fibrils) contribute to disease development. Amyloid-β peptide (designated Aβ), related to Alzheimer's disease (AD), is the representative example. The intensive aggregation property of Aβ also leads to difficulty in its synthesis. To improve the synthetic problem, we developed an O-acyl isopeptide of Aβ1-42, in which the N-acyl linkage (amide bond) of Ser(26) was replaced with an O-acyl linkage (ester bond) at the side chain. The O-acyl isopeptide demonstrated markedly higher water-solubility than that of Aβ1-42, while it quickly converted to intact monomer Aβ1-42 via an O-to-N acyl rearrangement under physiological conditions. Inhibition of the pathogenic aggregation of Aβ1-42 might be a therapeutic strategy for curing AD. We succeeded in the rational design and identification of a small molecule aggregation inhibitor based on a pharmacophore motif obtained from cyclo[-Lys-Leu-Val-Phe-Phe-]. Moreover, the inhibition of Aβ aggregation was achieved via oxygenation (i.e., incorporation of oxygen atoms to Aβ) using an artificial catalyst. We identified a selective, cell-compatible photo-oxygenation catalyst of Aβ, a flavin catalyst attached to an Aβ-binding peptide, which markedly decreased the aggregation potency and neurotoxicity of Aβ. PMID:26726739

  12. Medicinal Chemistry Focusing on Aggregation of Amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohma, Youhei

    2016-01-01

    The aggregation of peptides/proteins is intimately related to a number of human diseases. More than 20 have been identified which aggregate into fibrils containing extensive β-sheet structures, and species generated in the aggregation processes (i.e., oligomers and fibrils) contribute to disease development. Amyloid-β peptide (designated Aβ), related to Alzheimer's disease (AD), is the representative example. The intensive aggregation property of Aβ also leads to difficulty in its synthesis. To improve the synthetic problem, we developed an O-acyl isopeptide of Aβ1-42, in which the N-acyl linkage (amide bond) of Ser(26) was replaced with an O-acyl linkage (ester bond) at the side chain. The O-acyl isopeptide demonstrated markedly higher water-solubility than that of Aβ1-42, while it quickly converted to intact monomer Aβ1-42 via an O-to-N acyl rearrangement under physiological conditions. Inhibition of the pathogenic aggregation of Aβ1-42 might be a therapeutic strategy for curing AD. We succeeded in the rational design and identification of a small molecule aggregation inhibitor based on a pharmacophore motif obtained from cyclo[-Lys-Leu-Val-Phe-Phe-]. Moreover, the inhibition of Aβ aggregation was achieved via oxygenation (i.e., incorporation of oxygen atoms to Aβ) using an artificial catalyst. We identified a selective, cell-compatible photo-oxygenation catalyst of Aβ, a flavin catalyst attached to an Aβ-binding peptide, which markedly decreased the aggregation potency and neurotoxicity of Aβ.

  13. Cardiorespiratory Fitness Attenuates the Influence of Amyloid on Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Stephanie A; Boots, Elizabeth A; Almeida, Rodrigo P; Oh, Jennifer M; Einerson, Jean; Korcarz, Claudia E; Edwards, Dorothy F; Koscik, Rebecca L; Dowling, Maritza N; Gallagher, Catherine L; Bendlin, Barbara B; Christian, Bradley T; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Asthana, Sanjay; Hermann, Bruce P; Sager, Mark A; Johnson, Sterling C; Stein, James H; Okonkwo, Ozioma C

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine cross-sectionally whether higher cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) might favorably modify amyloid-β (Aβ)-related decrements in cognition in a cohort of late-middle-aged adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Sixty-nine enrollees in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention participated in this study. They completed a comprehensive neuropsychological exam, underwent 11C Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB)-PET imaging, and performed a graded treadmill exercise test to volitional exhaustion. Peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) during the exercise test was used as the index of CRF. Forty-five participants also underwent lumbar puncture for collection of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples, from which Aβ42 was immunoassayed. Covariate-adjusted regression analyses were used to test whether the association between Aβ and cognition was modified by CRF. There were significant VO2peak*PiB-PET interactions for Immediate Memory (p=.041) and Verbal Learning & Memory (p=.025). There were also significant VO2peak*CSF Aβ42 interactions for Immediate Memory (p<.001) and Verbal Learning & Memory (p<.001). Specifically, in the context of high Aβ burden, that is, increased PiB-PET binding or reduced CSF Aβ42, individuals with higher CRF exhibited significantly better cognition compared with individuals with lower CRF. In a late-middle-aged, at-risk cohort, higher CRF is associated with a diminution of Aβ-related effects on cognition. These findings suggest that exercise might play an important role in the prevention of AD.

  14. Force generation by the growth of amyloid aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Therese W; Garcia, Gonzalo A; Michaels, Thomas C T; Grentz, Wolfgang; Dean, James; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Gang, Hongze; Müller, Thomas; Kav, Batuhan; Terentjev, Eugene M; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2015-08-01

    The generation of mechanical forces are central to a wide range of vital biological processes, including the function of the cytoskeleton. Although the forces emerging from the polymerization of native proteins have been studied in detail, the potential for force generation by aberrant protein polymerization has not yet been explored. Here, we show that the growth of amyloid fibrils, archetypical aberrant protein polymers, is capable of unleashing mechanical forces on the piconewton scale for individual filaments. We apply microfluidic techniques to measure the forces released by amyloid growth for two systems: insulin and lysozyme. The level of force measured for amyloid growth in both systems is comparable to that observed for actin and tubulin, systems that have evolved to generate force during their native functions and, unlike amyloid growth, rely on the input of external energy in the form of nucleotide hydrolysis for maximum force generation. Furthermore, we find that the power density released from growing amyloid fibrils is comparable to that of high-performance synthetic polymer actuators. These findings highlight the potential of amyloid structures as active materials and shed light on the criteria for regulation and reversibility that guide molecular evolution of functional polymers.

  15. Thermal Stability Threshold for Amyloid Formation in Light Chain Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya L. Poshusta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Light chain (AL amyloidosis is a devastating disease characterized by amyloid deposits formed by immunoglobulin light chains. Current available treatments involve conventional chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. We have recently concluded a phase III trial comparing these two treatments. AL amyloidosis patients who achieve hematological complete response (CR do not necessarily achieve organ response regardless of the treatment they received. In order to investigate the possible correlation between amyloid formation kinetics and organ response, we selected AL amyloidosis patients from the trial with kidney involvement and CR after treatment. Six patients were selected and their monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains were characterized. The proteins showed differences in their stability and their kinetics of amyloid formation. A correlation was detected at pH 7.4, showing that less stable proteins are more likely to form amyloid fibrils. AL-T03 is too unstable to form amyloid fibrils at pH 7.4. This protein was found in the only patient in the study that had organ response, suggesting that partially folded species are required for amyloid formation to occur in AL amyloidosis.

  16. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen P McWilliams-Koeppen

    Full Text Available Light chain (AL amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(PH-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. These data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  17. Binding Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  18. Agent, autonomous

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani, Annie

    2007-01-01

    The expression autonomous agents, widely used in virtual reality, computer graphics, artificial intelligence and artificial life, corresponds to the simulation of autonomous creatures, virtual (i.e. totally computed by a program), or embodied in a physical envelope, as done in autonomous robots.

  19. Human serum amyloid P component is an invariant constituent of amyloid deposits and has a uniquely homogeneous glycostructure.

    OpenAIRE

    Pepys, M B; Rademacher, T W; Amatayakul-Chantler, S.; Williams, P.; Noble, G. E.; Hutchinson, W L; Hawkins, P N; Nelson, S R; Gallimore, J. R.; Herbert, J.

    1994-01-01

    Human serum amyloid P component (SAP) is a normal plasma protein and the precursor of amyloid P component (AP), a universal constituent of the abnormal tissue deposits in amyloidosis, including Alzheimer disease. We show here that its single N-linked biantennary oligosaccharide does not display the microheterogeneity usually characteristic of glycoproteins. The protein and the glycan structures of AP were also invariant, their resistance to degradation suggesting a role in persistence of amyl...

  20. Estrogen stimulates release of secreted amyloid precursor protein from primary rat cortical neurons via protein kinase C pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun ZHANG; Ying HUANG; Yi-chun ZHU; Tai YAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanism of the action of estrogen, which stimulates the release of secreted amyloid precursor protein α (sAPPα) and decreases the gen eration of amyloid-β protein (Aβ), a dominant component in senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Methods: Experiments were carried out inprimary rat cortical neurons, and Western blot was used to detect sAPPα in aculture medium and the total amount of cellular amyloid precursor protein (APP) in neurons. Results: 17β-Estradiol (but not 17α-estradiol) and β-estradiol 6-(Ocarboxymethyl) oxime: BSA increased the secretion of sAPPα and this effect was blocked by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor calphostin C, but not by the classical estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. Meanwhile, 17β-estradiol did not alter the synthesis of cellular APP. Conclusion: The effect of 17β-estradiol on sAPPα secretion is likely mediated through the membrane binding sites, and needs molecular configuration specificity of the ligand. Furthermore, the action of the PKC dependent pathway might be involved in estrogen-induced sAPPα secretion.

  1. Steamed and Fermented Ethanolic Extract from Codonopsis lanceolata Attenuates Amyloid-β-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weon, Jin Bae; Eom, Min Rye; Jung, Youn Sik; Hong, Eun-Hye; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Lee, Hyeon Yong; Park, Dong-Sik; Ma, Choong Je

    2016-01-01

    Codonopsis lanceolata (C. lanceolata) is a traditional medicinal plant used for the treatment of certain inflammatory diseases such as asthma, tonsillitis, and pharyngitis. We evaluated whether steamed and fermented C. lanceolata (SFC) extract improves amyloid-β- (Aβ-) induced learning and memory impairment in mice. The Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests were used to evaluate the effect of SFC extract. Moreover, we investigated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in the hippocampus of mice to determine a possible mechanism for the cognitive-enhancing effect. Saponin compounds in SFC were identified by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). SFC extract ameliorated amyloid-β-induced memory impairment in the Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. SFC extract inhibited AChE activity and also significantly increased the level of CREB phosphorylation, BDNF expression, and ERK activation in hippocampal tissue of amyloid-β-treated mice. Lancemasides A, B, C, D, E, and G and foetidissimoside A compounds present in SFC were determined by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. These results indicate that SFC extract improves Aβ-induced memory deficits and that AChE inhibition and CREB/BDNF/ERK expression is important for the effect of the SFC extract. In addition, lancemaside A specifically may be responsible for efficacious effect of SFC. PMID:27313637

  2. Steamed and Fermented Ethanolic Extract from Codonopsis lanceolata Attenuates Amyloid-β-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weon, Jin Bae; Eom, Min Rye; Jung, Youn Sik; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Hyeon Yong; Park, Dong-Sik; Ma, Choong Je

    2016-01-01

    Codonopsis lanceolata (C. lanceolata) is a traditional medicinal plant used for the treatment of certain inflammatory diseases such as asthma, tonsillitis, and pharyngitis. We evaluated whether steamed and fermented C. lanceolata (SFC) extract improves amyloid-β- (Aβ-) induced learning and memory impairment in mice. The Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests were used to evaluate the effect of SFC extract. Moreover, we investigated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling in the hippocampus of mice to determine a possible mechanism for the cognitive-enhancing effect. Saponin compounds in SFC were identified by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). SFC extract ameliorated amyloid-β-induced memory impairment in the Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. SFC extract inhibited AChE activity and also significantly increased the level of CREB phosphorylation, BDNF expression, and ERK activation in hippocampal tissue of amyloid-β-treated mice. Lancemasides A, B, C, D, E, and G and foetidissimoside A compounds present in SFC were determined by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. These results indicate that SFC extract improves Aβ-induced memory deficits and that AChE inhibition and CREB/BDNF/ERK expression is important for the effect of the SFC extract. In addition, lancemaside A specifically may be responsible for efficacious effect of SFC. PMID:27313637

  3. Steamed and Fermented Ethanolic Extract from Codonopsis lanceolata Attenuates Amyloid-β-Induced Memory Impairment in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Bae Weon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Codonopsis lanceolata (C. lanceolata is a traditional medicinal plant used for the treatment of certain inflammatory diseases such as asthma, tonsillitis, and pharyngitis. We evaluated whether steamed and fermented C. lanceolata (SFC extract improves amyloid-β- (Aβ- induced learning and memory impairment in mice. The Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests were used to evaluate the effect of SFC extract. Moreover, we investigated acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling in the hippocampus of mice to determine a possible mechanism for the cognitive-enhancing effect. Saponin compounds in SFC were identified by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. SFC extract ameliorated amyloid-β-induced memory impairment in the Morris water maze and passive avoidance tests. SFC extract inhibited AChE activity and also significantly increased the level of CREB phosphorylation, BDNF expression, and ERK activation in hippocampal tissue of amyloid-β-treated mice. Lancemasides A, B, C, D, E, and G and foetidissimoside A compounds present in SFC were determined by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. These results indicate that SFC extract improves Aβ-induced memory deficits and that AChE inhibition and CREB/BDNF/ERK expression is important for the effect of the SFC extract. In addition, lancemaside A specifically may be responsible for efficacious effect of SFC.

  4. In vivo amyloid-β imaging in the APPPS1-21 transgenic mouse model with a 89Zr- labeled monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Marie eWaldron

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The accumulation of amyloid-β is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and is a target for molecular imaging probes to aid in diagnosis and disease monitoring. This study evaluated the feasibility of using a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid-β antibody (JRF/AβN/25 to non-invasively assess amyloid-β burden in aged transgenic mice (APPPS1-21 with μPET imaging.Methods: We investigated the antibody JRF/AβN/25 that binds to full-length Aβ. JRF/AβN/25 was radiolabeled with a [89Zr]-desferal chelate and intravenously injected into 12-13 month aged APPPS1-21 mice and their wild-type (WT controls. Mice underwent in vivo μPET imaging at 2, 4 and 7 days post injection and were sacrificed at the end of each time point to assess brain penetrance, plaque labeling, biodistribution and tracer stability. To confirm imaging specificity we also evaluated brain uptake of a non-amyloid targeting [89Zr]-labeled antibody (Trastuzumab as a negative control, additionally we performed a competitive blocking study with non-radiolabeled Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 and finally we assessed the possible confounding effects of blood retention. Results: Voxel-wise analysis of μPET data demonstrated significant [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 retention in APPPS1-21 mice at all time points investigated. With ex vivo measures of radioactivity, significantly higher retention of [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 was found at 4 and 7 day pi in APPPS1-21 mice. Despite the observed genotypic differences, comparisons with immunohistochemistry revealed that in vivo plaque labeling was low. Furthermore, pre-treatment with Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 only partially blocked [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 uptake indicative of a high contribution of non-specific binding. Conclusion: Amyloid plaques were detected in vivo with a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid antibody. The low brain penetrance of the antibodies in addition to non-specific binding prevented an accurate estimation of plaque

  5. Defining and Assessing Analytical Performance Criteria for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy-Detecting Amyloid Seeding Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John G; Graham, Catherine; Dudas, Sandor; Paxman, Eric; Vuong, Ben; Czub, Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are infectious, fatal neurodegenerative diseases that affect production animal health, and thus human food safety. Enhanced TSE detection methods mimic the conjectured basis for prion replication, in vitro; biological matrices can be tested for prion activity via their ability to convert recombinant cellular prion protein (PrP) into amyloid fibrils; fluorescent spectra changes of amyloid-binding fluorophores in the reaction vessel detect fibril formation. In vitro PrP conversion techniques have high analytical sensitivity for prions, comparable with that of bioassays, yet no such protocol has gained regulatory approval for use in animal TSE surveillance programs. This study describes a timed in vitro PrP conversion protocol with accurate, well-defined analytical criteria based on probability density and mass functions of TSE(+) and TSE(-) associated thioflavin T signal times, a new approach within this field. The prion detection model used is elk chronic wasting disease (CWD) in brain tissues. The protocol and analytical criteria proved as sensitive for elk CWD as two bioassay models, and upward of approximately 1.2 log10 more sensitive than the most sensitive TSE rapid test we assessed. Furthermore, we substantiate that timing in vitro PrP conversion may be used to titrate TSE infectivity, and, as a result, provide a comprehensive extrapolation of analytical sensitivity differences between bioassay, TSE rapid tests, and in vitro PrP conversion for elk CWD. PMID:27068712

  6. LINGO-1 promotes lysosomal degradation of amyloid-β protein precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rian de Laat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sequential proteolytic cleavages of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP by β-secretase and γ-secretase generate amyloid β (Aβ peptides, which are thought to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD. Much of this processing occurs in endosomes following endocytosis of AβPP from the plasma membrane. However, this pathogenic mode of processing AβPP may occur in competition with lysosomal degradation of AβPP, a common fate of membrane proteins trafficking through the endosomal system. Following up on published reports that LINGO-1 binds and promotes the amyloidogenic processing of AβPP we have examined the consequences of LINGO-1/AβPP interactions. We report that LINGO-1 and its paralogs, LINGO-2 and LINGO-3, decrease processing of AβPP in the amyloidogenic pathway by promoting lysosomal degradation of AβPP. We also report that LINGO-1 levels are reduced in AD brain, representing a possible pathogenic mechanism stimulating the generation of Aβ peptides in AD.

  7. Comparative pathobiology of β-amyloid and the unique susceptibility of humans to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Rebecca F; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Farberg, Aaron S; Dooyema, Jeromy; Ciliax, Brian; Preuss, Todd M; Neubert, Thomas A; Ghiso, Jorge A; LeVine, Harry; Walker, Lary C

    2016-08-01

    The misfolding and accumulation of the protein fragment β-amyloid (Aβ) is an early and essential event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite close biological similarities among primates, humans appear to be uniquely susceptible to the profound neurodegeneration and dementia that characterize AD, even though nonhuman primates deposit copious Aβ in senile plaques and cerebral amyloid-β angiopathy as they grow old. Because the amino acid sequence of Aβ is identical in all primates studied to date, we asked whether differences in the properties of aggregated Aβ might underlie the vulnerability of humans and the resistance of other primates to AD. In a comparison of aged squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) and humans with AD, immunochemical and mass spectrometric analyses indicate that the populations of Aβ fragments are largely similar in the 2 species. In addition, Aβ-rich brain extracts from the brains of aged squirrel monkeys and AD patients similarly seed the deposition of Aβ in a transgenic mouse model. However, the epitope exposure of aggregated Aβ differs in sodium dodecyl sulfate-stable oligomeric Aβ from the 2 species. In addition, the high-affinity binding of (3)H Pittsburgh Compound B to Aβ is significantly diminished in tissue extracts from squirrel monkeys compared with AD patients. These findings support the hypothesis that differences in the pathobiology of aggregated Aβ among primates are linked to post-translational attributes of the misfolded protein, such as molecular conformation and/or the involvement of species-specific cofactors. PMID:27318146

  8. Engineering Metal Ion Coordination to Regulate Amyloid Fibril Assembly And Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.; Canfield, J.M.; Mehta, A.K.; Shokes, J.E.; Tian, B.; Childers, W.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Mao, Z.; Scott, R.A.; Warncke, K.; Lynn, D.G.

    2009-06-02

    Protein and peptide assembly into amyloid has been implicated in functions that range from beneficial epigenetic controls to pathological etiologies. However, the exact structures of the assemblies that regulate biological activity remain poorly defined. We have previously used Zn{sup 2+} to modulate the assembly kinetics and morphology of congeners of the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) associated with Alzheimer's disease. We now reveal a correlation among A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} coordination, peptide self-assembly, and neuronal viability. By using the central segment of A{beta}, HHQKLVFFA or A{beta}(13-21), which contains residues H13 and H14 implicated in A{beta}-metal ion binding, we show that Cu{sup 2+} forms complexes with A{beta}(13-21) and its K16A mutant and that the complexes, which do not self-assemble into fibrils, have structures similar to those found for the human prion protein, PrP. N-terminal acetylation and H14A substitution, Ac-A{beta}(13-21)H14A, alters metal coordination, allowing Cu{sup 2+} to accelerate assembly into neurotoxic fibrils. These results establish that the N-terminal region of A{beta} can access different metal-ion-coordination environments and that different complexes can lead to profound changes in A{beta} self-assembly kinetics, morphology, and toxicity. Related metal-ion coordination may be critical to the etiology of other neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. APP Homodimers Transduce an Amyloid-β-Mediated Increase in Release Probability at Excitatory Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilla Fogel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ, the proteolytic products of the amyloid precursor protein (APP, induces a variety of synaptic dysfunctions ranging from hyperactivity to depression that are thought to cause cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease. While depression of synaptic transmission has been extensively studied, the mechanisms underlying synaptic hyperactivity remain unknown. Here, we show that Aβ40 monomers and dimers augment release probability through local fine-tuning of APP-APP interactions at excitatory hippocampal boutons. Aβ40 binds to the APP, increases the APP homodimer fraction at the plasma membrane, and promotes APP-APP interactions. The APP activation induces structural rearrangements in the APP/Gi/o-protein complex, boosting presynaptic calcium flux and vesicle release. The APP growth-factor-like domain (GFLD mediates APP-APP conformational changes and presynaptic enhancement. Thus, the APP homodimer constitutes a presynaptic receptor that transduces signal from Aβ40 to glutamate release. Excessive APP activation may initiate a positive feedback loop, contributing to hippocampal hyperactivity in Alzheimer’s disease.

  10. Co-evolution of affinity and stability of grafted amyloid-motif domain antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Mark C; Lee, Christine C; Tiller, Kathryn E; Rabia, Lilia A; Day, Evan K; Schick, Arthur J; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    An attractive approach for designing lead antibody candidates is to mimic natural protein interactions by grafting peptide recognition motifs into the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs). We are using this approach to generate single-domain (VH) antibodies specific for amyloid-forming proteins such as the Alzheimer's Aβ peptide. Here, we use random mutagenesis and yeast surface display to improve the binding affinity of a lead VH domain grafted with Aβ residues 33-42 in CDR3. Interestingly, co-selection for improved Aβ binding and VH display on the surface of yeast yields antibody domains with improved affinity and reduced stability. The highest affinity VH domains were strongly destabilized on the surface of yeast as well as unfolded when isolated as autonomous domains. In contrast, stable VH domains with improved affinity were reliably identified using yeast surface display by replacing the display antibody that recognizes a linear epitope tag at the terminus of both folded and unfolded VH domains with a conformational ligand (Protein A) that recognizes a discontinuous epitope on the framework of folded VH domains. Importantly, we find that selection for improved stability using Protein A without simultaneous co-selection for improved Aβ binding leads to strong enrichment for stabilizing mutations that reduce antigen binding. Our findings highlight the importance of simultaneously optimizing affinity and stability to improve the rapid isolation of well-folded and specific antibody fragments. PMID:26386257

  11. Common molecular mechanism of amyloid pore formation by Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Boutemeur, Sonia; Flores, Alessandra; Rodriguez, Léa; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-permeable pores formed by small oligomers of amyloid proteins are the primary pathologic species in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these toxic oligomers in the plasma membrane of brain cells remain unclear. Here we have analyzed and compared the pore-forming capability of a large panel of amyloid proteins including wild-type, variant and truncated forms, as well as synthetic peptides derived from specific domains of Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. We show that amyloid pore formation involves two membrane lipids, ganglioside and cholesterol, that physically interact with amyloid proteins through specific structural motifs. Mutation or deletion of these motifs abolished pore formation. Moreover, α-synuclein (Parkinson) and Aβ peptide (Alzheimer) did no longer form Ca2+-permeable pores in presence of drugs that target either cholesterol or ganglioside or both membrane lipids. These results indicate that gangliosides and cholesterol cooperate to favor the formation of amyloid pores through a common molecular mechanism that can be jammed at two different steps, suggesting the possibility of a universal therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. Finally we present the first successful evaluation of such a new therapeutic approach (coined “membrane therapy”) targeting amyloid pores formed by Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. PMID:27352802

  12. Common molecular mechanism of amyloid pore formation by Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Boutemeur, Sonia; Flores, Alessandra; Rodriguez, Léa; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-permeable pores formed by small oligomers of amyloid proteins are the primary pathologic species in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these toxic oligomers in the plasma membrane of brain cells remain unclear. Here we have analyzed and compared the pore-forming capability of a large panel of amyloid proteins including wild-type, variant and truncated forms, as well as synthetic peptides derived from specific domains of Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. We show that amyloid pore formation involves two membrane lipids, ganglioside and cholesterol, that physically interact with amyloid proteins through specific structural motifs. Mutation or deletion of these motifs abolished pore formation. Moreover, α-synuclein (Parkinson) and Aβ peptide (Alzheimer) did no longer form Ca(2+)-permeable pores in presence of drugs that target either cholesterol or ganglioside or both membrane lipids. These results indicate that gangliosides and cholesterol cooperate to favor the formation of amyloid pores through a common molecular mechanism that can be jammed at two different steps, suggesting the possibility of a universal therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. Finally we present the first successful evaluation of such a new therapeutic approach (coined "membrane therapy") targeting amyloid pores formed by Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. PMID:27352802

  13. The Y-Box Binding Protein 1 Suppresses Alzheimer's Disease Progression in Two Animal Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Bobkova

    Full Text Available The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1 is a member of the family of DNA- and RNA binding proteins. It is involved in a wide variety of DNA/RNA-dependent events including cell proliferation and differentiation, stress response, and malignant cell transformation. Previously, YB-1 was detected in neurons of the neocortex and hippocampus, but its precise role in the brain remains undefined. Here we show that subchronic intranasal injections of recombinant YB-1, as well as its fragment YB-11-219, suppress impairment of spatial memory in olfactory bulbectomized (OBX mice with Alzheimer's type degeneration and improve learning in transgenic 5XFAD mice used as a model of cerebral amyloidosis. YB-1-treated OBX and 5XFAD mice showed a decreased level of brain β-amyloid. In OBX animals, an improved morphological state of neurons was revealed in the neocortex and hippocampus; in 5XFAD mice, a delay in amyloid plaque progression was observed. Intranasally administered YB-1 penetrated into the brain and could enter neurons. In vitro co-incubation of YB-1 with monomeric β-amyloid (1-42 inhibited formation of β-amyloid fibrils, as confirmed by electron microscopy. This suggests that YB-1 interaction with β-amyloid prevents formation of filaments that are responsible for neurotoxicity and neuronal death. Our data are the first evidence for a potential therapeutic benefit of YB-1 for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. High-speed atomic force microscopy reveals structural dynamics of amyloid β1-42 aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Itami, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Teplow, David B; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-05-24

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins into insoluble amyloid fibrils is implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. This process involves protein assembly into oligomeric intermediates and fibrils with highly polymorphic molecular structures. These structural differences may be responsible for different disease presentations. For this reason, elucidation of the structural features and assembly kinetics of amyloidogenic proteins has been an area of intense study. We report here the results of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) studies of fibril formation and elongation by the 42-residue form of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ1-42), a key pathogenetic agent of Alzheimer's disease. Our data demonstrate two different growth modes of Aβ1-42, one producing straight fibrils and the other producing spiral fibrils. Each mode depends on initial fibril nucleus structure, but switching from one growth mode to another was occasionally observed, suggesting that fibril end structure fluctuated between the two growth modes. This switching phenomenon was affected by buffer salt composition. Our findings indicate that polymorphism in fibril structure can occur after fibril nucleation and is affected by relatively modest changes in environmental conditions. PMID:27162352

  15. ANTIAMNESIC POTENTIAL OF SOLASODINE AGAINST β-AMYLOID PROTEIN INDUCED AMNESIA IN MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai Alpesh B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most common form of dementia in the elderly population, is characterized by an insidious onset with memory impairment and an inexorable progression of cognitive decline. Nootropic agents are a heterogeneous groups of drugs developed for use in dementia and other cerebral disorders. Nootropics agents are being primarily used to improve memory, mood and behavior. However, the resulting adverse effects associated with these agents have limited their use. Therefore, it is worthwhile to explore the utility of traditional medicines for the treatment of various cognitive disorders. The present study was undertaken to assess the potential of solasodine on β-amyloid induced amnesia in mice. Elevated plus maze (EPM and Morris water maze (MWM was employed to evaluate learning and memory parameters. Piracetam was used as the standard drug. Solasodine (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg, p.o. was screened for claimed potential in mice. Solasodine improved both short term memory and long term memory when assessed on Elevated pluz maze and Morris Water maze respectively. Hence, solasodine might prove to be a useful memory restorative agent in the treatment of dementia seen in the Alzheimer’s disease.

  16. Synthesis and crystal structure elucidation of new copper(II)-based chemotherapeutic agent coupled with 1,2-DACH and orthovanillin: Validated by in vitro DNA/HSA binding profile and pBR322 cleavage pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Mehvash; Afzal, Mohd; Ahmad, Musheer; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2016-08-01

    New copper(II)-based complex (1) was synthesized and characterized by analytical, spectroscopic and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The in vitro binding studies of complex 1 with CT DNA and HSA have been investigated by employing biophysical techniques to examine the binding propensity of 1 towards DNA and HSA. The results showed that 1 avidly binds to CT DNA via electrostatic mode along with the hydrogen bonding interaction of NH2 and CN groups of Schiff base ligand with the base pairs of DNA helix, leads to partial unwinding and destabilization of the DNA double helix. Moreover, the CD spectral studies revealed that complex 1 binds through groove binding interaction that stabilizes the right-handed B-form of DNA. Complex 1 showed an impressive photoinduced nuclease activity generating single-strand breaks in comparison with the DNA cleavage activity in presence of visible light. The mechanistic investigation revealed the efficiency of 1 to cleave DNA strands by involving the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the time dependent DNA cleavage activity showed that there was gradual increase in the amount of NC DNA on increasing the photoexposure time. However, the interaction of 1 and HSA showed that the change of intrinsic fluorescence intensity of HSA was induced by the microenvironment of Trp residue. PMID:27289445

  17. NO-flurbiprofen reduces amyloid β, is neuroprotective in cell culture, and enhances cognition in response to cholinergic blockade

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Luo, Jia; Ashghodom, Rezene T.; Thatcher, Gregory R. J.

    2009-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory drug (NSAID) flurbiprofen is a selective amyloid lowering agent (SALA) which has been studied clinically in Alzheimer’s disease. HCT-1026 is an ester prodrug of flurbiprofen incorporating a nitrate carrier moiety that in vivo provides NO bioactivity and an improved safety profile. In vitro, HCT-1026 retained the COX inhibitory and NSAID activity of flurbiprofen, but at concentrations at which levels of Aβ1–42 were lowered by flurbiprofen, Aβ1–42 levels were e...

  18. Curcumin: A multi-target disease-modifying agent for late-stage transthyretin amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Nelson; Gonçalves, Nádia P; Saraiva, Maria J; Almeida, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Transthyretin amyloidoses encompass a variety of acquired and hereditary diseases triggered by systemic extracellular accumulation of toxic transthyretin aggregates and fibrils, particularly in the peripheral nervous system. Since transthyretin amyloidoses are typically complex progressive disorders, therapeutic approaches aiming multiple molecular targets simultaneously, might improve therapy efficacy and treatment outcome. In this study, we evaluate the protective effect of physiologically achievable doses of curcumin on the cytotoxicity induced by transthyretin oligomers in vitro by showing reduction of caspase-3 activity and the levels of endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone binding immunoglobulin protein. When given to an aged Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy mouse model, curcumin not only reduced transthyretin aggregates deposition and toxicity in both gastrointestinal tract and dorsal root ganglia but also remodeled congophilic amyloid material in tissues. In addition, curcumin enhanced internalization, intracellular transport and degradation of transthyretin oligomers by primary macrophages from aged Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy transgenic mice, suggesting an impaired activation of naïve phagocytic cells exposed to transthyretin toxic intermediate species. Overall, our results clearly support curcumin or optimized derivatives as promising multi-target disease-modifying agent for late-stage transthyretin amyloidosis.

  19. Minocycline alleviates beta-amyloid protein and tau pathology via restraining neuroinflammation induced by diabetic metabolic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhiyou; Yan, Yong; Wang, Yonglong

    2013-01-01

    Background Compelling evidence has shown that diabetic metabolic disorder plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, including increased expression of β-amyloid protein (Aβ) and tau protein. Evidence has supported that minocycline, a tetracycline derivative, protects against neuroinflammation induced by neurodegenerative disorders or cerebral ischemia. This study has evaluated minocycline influence on expression of Aβ protein, tau phosphorylation, and inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α) in the brain of diabetic rats to clarify neuroprotection by minocycline under diabetic metabolic disorder. Method An animal model of diabetes was established by high fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin. In this study, we investigated the effect of minocycline on expression of Aβ protein, tau phosphorylation, and inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α) in the hippocampus of diabetic rats via immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results These results showed that minocycline decreased expression of Aβ protein and lowered the phosphorylation of tau protein, and retarded the proinflammatory cytokines, but not amyloid precursor protein. Conclusion On the basis of the finding that minocycline had no influence on amyloid precursor protein and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 which determines the speed of Aβ generation, the decreases in Aβ production and tau hyperphosphorylation by minocycline are through inhibiting neuroinflammation, which contributes to Aβ production and tau hyperphosphorylation. Minocycline may also lower the self-perpetuating cycle between neuroinflammation and the pathogenesis of tau and Aβ to act as a neuroprotector. Therefore, the ability of minocycline to modulate inflammatory reactions may be of great importance in the selection of neuroprotective agents, especially in chronic conditions

  20. An overview on therapeutics attenuating amyloid β level in Alzheimer's disease: targeting neurotransmission, inflammation, oxidative stress and enhanced cholesterol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoling; Li, Yifei; Shi, Xiaozhe; Ma, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common underlying cause of dementia, and novel drugs for its treatment are needed. Of the different theories explaining the development and progression of AD, "amyloid hypothesis" is the most supported by experimental data. This hypothesis states that the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) leads to the formation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides that congregate with formation and deposition of Aβ plaques in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Risk factors including neurotransmitter modulation, chronic inflammation, metal-induced oxidative stress and elevated cholesterol levels are key contributors to the disease progress. Current therapeutic strategies abating AD progression are primarily based on anti-acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors as cognitive enhancers. The AChE inhibitor, donepezil, is proven to strengthen cognitive functions and appears effective in treating moderate to severe AD patients. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, memantine, is also useful, and its combination with donepezil demonstrated a strong stabilizing effect in clinical studies on AD. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs delayed the onset and progression of AD and attenuated cognitive dysfunction. Based upon epidemiological evidence and animal studies, antioxidants emerged as potential AD preventive agents; however, clinical trials revealed inconsistencies. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiling demonstrated pleiotropic functions of the hypolipidemic class of drugs, statins, potentially contributing towards the prevention of AD. In addition, targeting the APP processing pathways, stimulating neuroprotective signaling mechanisms, using the amyloid anti-aggregants and Aβ immunotherapy surfaced as well-tested strategies in reducing the AD-like pathology. Overall, this review covers mechanism of inducing the Aβ formation, key risk factors and major therapeutics prevalent in the AD treatment nowadays. It also delineates the need

  1. Cratoxylum formosum Extract Protects against Amyloid-Beta Toxicity in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keowkase, Roongpetch; Weerapreeyakul, Natthida

    2016-04-01

    Amyloid-β, one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, is toxic to neurons and causes cell death in the brain. Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in Alzheimer's disease, and there is strong evidence linking oxidative stress to amyloid-β. The herbal plant "Tiew kon" (Cratoxylum formosum ssp. pruniflorum) is an indigenous vegetable that is grown in Southeast Asia. Many reports suggested that the twig extract from C. formosum possesses an antioxidant property. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of the twig extract from C. formosum against amyloid-β toxicity using the transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model. This study demonstrated that the extract significantly delayed amyloid-β-induced paralysis in the C. elegans model of Alzheimer's disease. Using a genetic approach, we found that DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor, heat shock factor 1, and SKN-1 (Nrf2 in mammals) were required for the extract-mediated delayed paralysis. The extract ameliorated oxidative stress by reducing the level of H2O2, which appeared to account for the protective action of the extract. The extract possesses antioxidant activity against juglone-induced oxidative stress as it was shown to increase survival of the stressed worms. In addition, C. formosum decreased the expression of the heat shock protein-16.2 gene which was induced by thermal stress, indicating its ability to reduce cellular stress. The results from this study support the C. elegans model in the search for disease-modifying agents to treat Alzheimer's disease and indicate the potential of the extract from C. formosum ssp. pruniflorum as a source for the development of anti-Alzheimer's drugs. PMID:26845710

  2. Peripheral Amyloid-β Levels Regulate Amyloid-β Clearance from the Central Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Marcos A.; Kulstad, J. Jacob; Savard, Christopher E.; Green, Pattie S.; Lee, Sum P.; Craft, Suzanne; Watson, G. Stennis; Cook, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is cleared from the brain by both proteolytic digestion and transport across the blood-brain-barrier into the peripheral circulatory system. To investigate the role peripheral Aβ levels play in regulating Aβ brain clearance, we measured the clearance of [125I]-Aβ-{1-40 injected into the brains of liver-ligated rats that allowed peripheral Aβ levels to be maintained at elevated levels for approximately one hour with/without a single peripheral bolus of unlabeled Aβ-{1-40. We fou...

  3. Two memory associated genes regulated by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain ovel insights into the pathogenesis of learning and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuandong Zheng; Xi Gu; Zhimei Zhong; Rui Zhu; Tianming Gao; Fang Wang

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we employed chromatin immunoprecipitation, a useful method for studying the locations of transcription factors bound to specific DNA regions in specific cells, to investigate amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain binding sites in chromatin DNA from hippocampal neurons of rats, and to screen out five putative genes associated with the learning and memory functions. The promoter regions of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha and glutamate receptor-2 genes were amplified by PCR from DNA products immunoprecipitated by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and western blot analysis suggested that the promoter regions of these two genes associated with learning and memory were bound by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain (in complex form). Our experimental findings indicate that the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain is involved in the transcriptional regulation of learning- and memory-associated genes in hippocampal neurons. These data may provide new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the symptoms of progressive memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly

  5. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2015-12-01

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  6. Endogenously generated amyloid β increases membrane fluidity in neural 2a cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Ying; SHENG BaiYang; SONG Bo; LIU LingLing; ZHANG XiuFang; ZHAO NanMing; GONG YanDao

    2009-01-01

    The effect of endogenously generated amyloid β on membrane fluidity was investigated in Neural 2a cells stably expressing Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (APPswe). Membrane fluidity was studied by fluorescence polarizability using 1,6-Diphenyl-1,3,5-Hexatriene (DPH) as the fluorescence probe. It was found that the membrane fluidity in APPswe cells was significantly higher than that in its wild type counterparts. Alleviating the effect of amyloid β either by y secretase activity inhibition or by amyloid antibody treatment decreased membrane fluidity, which indicated an important role of amyloid β in increasing membrane fluidity. Treatment using amyloid β channel blocker, tromethamine and NA4 suggested that channel formed by amyloid β on the cell membrane is a way through which amyloid β takes its membrane fluidizing effect.

  7. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Hisashi [Research Center for Computational Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Department of Structural Molecular Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  8. Lipid Rafts: Linking Alzheimer's Amyloid-β Production, Aggregation, and Toxicity at Neuronal Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo V. Rushworth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains, enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, into which specific subsets of proteins and lipids partition, creating cell-signalling platforms that are vital for neuronal functions. Lipid rafts play at least three crucial roles in Alzheimer's Disease (AD, namely, in promoting the generation of the amyloid-β (Aβ peptide, facilitating its aggregation upon neuronal membranes to form toxic oligomers and hosting specific neuronal receptors through which the AD-related neurotoxicity and memory impairments of the Aβ oligomers are transduced. Recent evidence suggests that Aβ oligomers may exert their deleterious effects through binding to, and causing the aberrant clustering of, lipid raft proteins including the cellular prion protein and glutamate receptors. The formation of these pathogenic lipid raft-based platforms may be critical for the toxic signalling mechanisms that underlie synaptic dysfunction and neuropathology in AD.

  9. Ile-phe dipeptide self-assembly: clues to amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Natalia Sánchez; Parella, Teodor; Aviles, Francesc X; Vendrell, Josep; Ventura, Salvador

    2007-03-01

    Peptidic self-assembled nanostructures are said to have a wide range of applications in nanotechnology, yet the mechanistic details of hierarchical self-assembly are still poorly understood. The Phe-Phe recognition motif of the Alzheimer's Abeta peptide is the smallest peptide able to assemble into higher-order structures. Here, we show that the Ile-Phe dipeptide analog is also able to self-associate in aqueous solution as a transparent, thermoreversible gel formed by a network of fibrillar nanostructures that exhibit strong birefringence upon Congo red binding. Besides, a second dipeptide Val-Phe, differing only in a methyl group from the former, is unable to self-assemble. The detailed analysis of the differential polymeric behavior of these closely related molecules provides insight into the forces triggering the first steps in self-assembly processes such as amyloid formation. PMID:17172307

  10. Recent Development of Bifunctional Small Molecules to Study Metal-Amyloid-β Species in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braymer, Joseph J; Detoma, Alaina S; Choi, Jung-Suk; Ko, Kristin S; Lim, Mi Hee

    2010-12-08

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease related to the deposition of aggregated amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain. It has been proposed that metal ion dyshomeostasis and miscompartmentalization contribute to AD progression, especially as metal ions (e.g., Cu(II) and Zn(II)) found in Aβ plaques of the diseased brain can bind to Aβ and be linked to aggregation and neurotoxicity. The role of metal ions in AD pathogenesis, however, is uncertain. To accelerate understanding in this area and contribute to therapeutic development, recent efforts to devise suitable chemical reagents that can target metal ions associated with Aβ have been made using rational structure-based design that combines two functions (metal chelation and Aβ interaction) in the same molecule. This paper presents bifunctional compounds developed by two different design strategies (linkage or incorporation) and discusses progress in their applications as chemical tools and/or potential therapeutics.

  11. Gadd153 and NF-κB crosstalk regulates 27-hydroxycholesterol-induced increase in BACE1 and β-amyloid production in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdeep Marwarha

    Full Text Available β-amyloid (Aβ peptide, accumulation of which is a culprit for Alzheimer's disease (AD, is derived from the initial cleavage of amyloid precursor protein by the aspartyl protease BACE1. Identification of cellular mechanisms that regulate BACE1 production is of high relevance to the search for potential disease-modifying therapies that inhibit BACE1 to reduce Aβ accumulation and AD progression. In the present study, we show that the cholesterol oxidation product 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC increases BACE1 and Aβ levels in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. This increase in BACE1 involves a crosstalk between the two transcription factors NF-κB and the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, the growth arrest and DNA damage induced gene-153 (gadd153, also called CHOP. We specifically show that 27-OHC induces a substantial increase in NF-κB binding to the BACE1 promoter and subsequent increase in BACE1 transcription and Aβ production. The NF-κB inhibitor, sc514, significantly attenuated the 27-OHC-induced increase in NF-κB-mediated BACE1 expression and Aβ genesis. We further show that the 27-OHC-induced NF-κB activation and increased NF-κB-mediated BACE1 expression is contingent on the increased activation of gadd153. Silencing gadd153 expression with siRNA alleviated the 27-OHC-induced increase in NF-κB activation, NF-κB binding to the BACE1 promoter, and subsequent increase in BACE1 transcription and Aβ production. We also show that increased levels of BACE1 in the triple transgenic mouse model for AD is preceded by gadd153 and NF-κB activation. In summary, our study demonstrates that gadd153 and NF-κB work in concert to regulate BACE1 expression. Agents that inhibit gadd153 activation and subsequent interaction with NF-κB might be promising targets to reduce BACE1 and Aβ overproduction and may ultimately serve as disease-modifying treatments for AD.

  12. The Prion-Like Properties of Amyloid-β Assemblies: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lary C; Schelle, Juliane; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery that prion diseases can be transmitted to experimental animals by inoculation with afflicted brain matter, researchers have speculated that the brains of patients suffering from other neurodegenerative diseases might also harbor causative agents with transmissible properties. Foremost among these disorders is Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. A growing body of research supports the concept that the pathogenesis of AD is initiated and sustained by the endogenous, seeded misfolding and aggregation of the protein fragment amyloid-β (Aβ). At the molecular level, this mechanism of nucleated protein self-assembly is virtually identical to that of prions consisting of the prion protein (PrP). The formation, propagation, and spread of Aβ seeds within the brain can thus be considered a fundamental feature of AD pathogenesis. PMID:27270558

  13. Gold-nanoparticle-based multifunctional amyloid-β inhibitor against Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nan; Sun, Hanjun; Dong, Kai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Targeting amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced complex neurotoxicity has received considerable attention in the therapeutic and preventive treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The complex pathogenesis of AD suggests that it requires comprehensive treatment, and drugs with multiple functions against AD are more desirable. Herein, AuNPs@POMD-pep (AuNPs: gold nanoparticles, POMD: polyoxometalate with Wells-Dawson structure, pep: peptide) were designed as a novel multifunctional Aβ inhibitor. AuNPs@POMD-pep shows synergistic effects in inhibiting Aβ aggregation, dissociating Aβ fibrils and decreasing Aβ-mediated peroxidase activity and Aβ-induced cytotoxicity. By taking advantage of AuNPs as vehicles that can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), AuNPs@POMD-pep can cross the BBB and thus overcome the drawbacks of small-molecule anti-AD drugs. Thus, this work provides new insights into the design and synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles as multifunctional therapeutic agents for treatment of AD.

  14. Studies of amyloid toxicity in Drosophila models and effects of the BRICHOS domain

    OpenAIRE

    Hermansson Wik, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid diseases involve specific protein misfolding events and formation of fibrillar deposits. The symptoms of these diseases are broad and dependent on site of accumulation, with different amyloid proteins depositing in specific tissues or systematically. One such protein is transthyretin (TTR) associated with senile systemic amyloidosis, familial amyloid polyneuropathy and familial amyloid cardiomyopathy. We show that the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS) can be co-loc...

  15. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both proteins are known to localize to mitochondrial membranes, block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins, disrupt the electron transport chain, increase reactive oxygen species production, cause mitochondrial damage, and prevent neurons from functioning normally. In this paper, we will outline current knowledge of the intracellular localization of amyloid-beta. Moreover, we summarize evidence from AD postmortem brain as well as animal AD models showing that amyloid-beta triggers mitochondrial dysfunction through a number of pathways such as impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, elevation of reactive oxygen species production, alteration of mitochondrial dynamics, and interaction with mitochondrial proteins. Thus, this paper supports the Alzheimer cascade mitochondrial hypothesis such as the most important early events in this disease, and probably one of the future strategies on the therapy of this neurodegenerative disease.

  16. Prediction of Peptide and Protein Propensity for Amyloid Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Família, Carlos; Dennison, Sarah R; Quintas, Alexandre; Phoenix, David A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which peptides and proteins have the potential to undergo amyloid formation and what driving forces are responsible for amyloid-like fiber formation and stabilization remains limited. This is mainly because proteins that can undergo structural changes, which lead to amyloid formation, are quite diverse and share no obvious sequence or structural homology, despite the structural similarity found in the fibrils. To address these issues, a novel approach based on recursive feature selection and feed-forward neural networks was undertaken to identify key features highly correlated with the self-assembly problem. This approach allowed the identification of seven physicochemical and biochemical properties of the amino acids highly associated with the self-assembly of peptides and proteins into amyloid-like fibrils (normalized frequency of β-sheet, normalized frequency of β-sheet from LG, weights for β-sheet at the window position of 1, isoelectric point, atom-based hydrophobic moment, helix termination parameter at position j+1 and ΔG° values for peptides extrapolated in 0 M urea). Moreover, these features enabled the development of a new predictor (available at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/appnn/index.html) capable of accurately and reliably predicting the amyloidogenic propensity from the polypeptide sequence alone with a prediction accuracy of 84.9 % against an external validation dataset of sequences with experimental in vitro, evidence of amyloid formation. PMID:26241652

  17. Prediction of Peptide and Protein Propensity for Amyloid Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Família

    Full Text Available Understanding which peptides and proteins have the potential to undergo amyloid formation and what driving forces are responsible for amyloid-like fiber formation and stabilization remains limited. This is mainly because proteins that can undergo structural changes, which lead to amyloid formation, are quite diverse and share no obvious sequence or structural homology, despite the structural similarity found in the fibrils. To address these issues, a novel approach based on recursive feature selection and feed-forward neural networks was undertaken to identify key features highly correlated with the self-assembly problem. This approach allowed the identification of seven physicochemical and biochemical properties of the amino acids highly associated with the self-assembly of peptides and proteins into amyloid-like fibrils (normalized frequency of β-sheet, normalized frequency of β-sheet from LG, weights for β-sheet at the window position of 1, isoelectric point, atom-based hydrophobic moment, helix termination parameter at position j+1 and ΔG° values for peptides extrapolated in 0 M urea. Moreover, these features enabled the development of a new predictor (available at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/appnn/index.html capable of accurately and reliably predicting the amyloidogenic propensity from the polypeptide sequence alone with a prediction accuracy of 84.9 % against an external validation dataset of sequences with experimental in vitro, evidence of amyloid formation.

  18. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  19. On the adsorption of magnetite nanoparticles on lysozyme amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majorosova, Jozefina; Petrenko, Viktor I; Siposova, Katarina; Timko, Milan; Tomasovicova, Natalia; Garamus, Vasil M; Koralewski, Marceli; Avdeev, Mikhail V; Leszczynski, Błażej; Jurga, Stefan; Gazova, Zuzana; Hayryan, Shura; Hu, Chin-Kun; Kopcansky, Peter

    2016-10-01

    An adsorption of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) from electrostatically stabilized aqueous ferrofluids on amyloid fibrils of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in 2mg/mL acidic dispersions have been detected for the MNP concentration range of 0.01-0.1vol.%. The association of the MNP with amyloid fibrils has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and magneto-optical measurements. It has been observed that the extent of adsorption is determined by the MNP concentration. When increasing the MNP concentration the formed aggregates of magnetic particles repeat the general rod-like structure of the fibrils. The effect is not observed when MNP are mixed with the solution of lysozyme monomers. The adsorption has been investigated with the aim to clarify previously found disaggregation activity of MNP in amyloid fibrils dispersions and to get deeper insight into interaction processes between amyloids and MNP. The observed effect is also discussed with respect to potential applications for ordering lysozyme amyloid fibrils in a liquid crystal phase under external magnetic fields. PMID:27451367

  20. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  1. Neuro-inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide causes cognitive impairment through enhancement of beta-amyloid generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Ki

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by extensive loss of neurons in the brain of AD patients. Intracellular accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ has also shown to occur in AD. Neuro-inflammation has been known to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Methods In this study, we investigated neuro-inflammation and amyloidogenesis and memory impairment following the systemic inflammation generated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS using immunohistochemistry, ELISA, behavioral tests and Western blotting. Results Intraperitoneal injection of LPS, (250 μg/kg induced memory impairment determined by passive avoidance and water maze tests in mice. Repeated injection of LPS (250 μg/kg, 3 or 7 times resulted in an accumulation of Aβ1–42 in the hippocampus and cerebralcortex of mice brains through increased β- and γ-secretase activities accompanied with the increased expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP, 99-residue carboxy-terminal fragment of APP (C99 and generation of Aβ1–42 as well as activation of astrocytes in vivo. 3 weeks of pretreatment of sulindac sulfide (3.75 and 7.5 mg/kg, orally, an anti-inflammatory agent, suppressed the LPS-induced amyloidogenesis, memory dysfunction as well as neuronal cell death in vivo. Sulindac sulfide (12.5–50 μM also suppressed LPS (1 μg/ml-induced amyloidogenesis in cultured neurons and astrocytes in vitro. Conclusion This study suggests that neuro-inflammatory reaction could contribute to AD pathology, and anti-inflammatory agent could be useful for the prevention of AD.

  2. Trading Agents

    CERN Document Server

    Wellman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Automated trading in electronic markets is one of the most common and consequential applications of autonomous software agents. Design of effective trading strategies requires thorough understanding of how market mechanisms operate, and appreciation of strategic issues that commonly manifest in trading scenarios. Drawing on research in auction theory and artificial intelligence, this book presents core principles of strategic reasoning that apply to market situations. The author illustrates trading strategy choices through examples of concrete market environments, such as eBay, as well as abst

  3. Genetic determinants of white matter hyperintensities and amyloid angiopathy in familial Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryan, Natalie S.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Kim, Lois; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Barber, Philip A.; Walsh, Phoebe; Gami, Priya; Morris, Huw R.; Bastos-Leite, António J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Beck, Jon; Mead, Simon; Chavez-Gutierrez, Lucia; de Strooper, Bart; Rossor, Martin N.; Revesz, Tamas; Lashley, Tammaryn; Fox, Nick C.

    2015-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) treatment trials raise interest in the variable occurrence of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA); an emerging important factor in amyloid-modifying therapy. Previous pathological studies reported particularly severe CAA with postcodon 200 PSEN1 mutations and amyloid

  4. Modeling the Aggregation Propensity and Toxicity of Amyloid-β Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is directly linked to deposits of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), and multiple experimental studies have investigated the aggregation behavior of these amyloids...

  5. Whole body amyloid deposition imaging by 123I-SAP scintigraphy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rheenen, Ronald; Glaudemans, Andor; Hazenberg, Bouke

    2011-01-01

    Amyloidosis is the name of a group of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Deposition of amyloid can be localized or systemic. The 123I-SAP-scan can be used to image extent and distribution of amyloid deposition in patients with systemic AA, AL and ATTR amyloidosis.

  6. Amyloid-beta Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Probes : A Critical Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C.; Langstrom, Bengt; Zaidi, Habib; Vinters, Harry V.; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Doudet, Doris; Mishani, Eyal; Cohen, Robert M.; Hoilund-Carlsen, Poul F.; Alavi, Abass; Barrio, Jorge R.

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly rising prevalence and cost of Alzheimer's disease in recent decades has made the imaging of amyloid-beta deposits the focus of intense research. Several amyloid imaging probes with purported specificity for amyloid-beta plaques are currently at various stages of FDA approval. However, a

  7. Disaggregation ability of different chelating molecules on copper ion-triggered amyloid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linyi; Han, Yuchun; He, Chengqian; Huang, Xu; Wang, Yilin

    2014-08-01

    Dysfunctional interaction of amyloid-β (Aβ) with excess metal ions is proved to be related to the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using metal-binding compounds to reverse metal-triggered Aβ aggregation has become one of the potential therapies for AD. In this study, the ability of a carboxylic acid gemini surfactant (SDUC), a widely used metal chelator (EDTA), and an antifungal drug clioquinol (CQ) in reversing the Cu(2+)-triggered Aβ(1-40) fibers have been systematically studied by using turbidity essay, BCA essay, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and isothermal titration microcalorimetry. The results show that the binding affinity of Cu(2+) with CQ, SDUC, and EDTA is in the order of CQ > EDTA > SDUC, while the disaggregation ability to Cu(2+)-triggered Aβ(1-40) fibers is in the order of CQ > SDUC > EDTA. Therefore, the disaggregation ability of chelators to the Aβ(1-40) fibers does not only depend on the binding affinity of the chelators with Cu(2+). Strong self-assembly ability of SDUC and π-π interaction of the conjugate group of CQ also contributes toward the disaggregation of the Cu(2+)-triggered Aβ(1-40) fibers and result in the formation of mixed small aggregates. PMID:25051063

  8. Multifunctional cholinesterase and amyloid Beta fibrillization modulators. Synthesis and biological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butini, Stefania; Brindisi, Margherita; Brogi, Simone; Maramai, Samuele; Guarino, Egeria; Panico, Alessandro; Saxena, Ashima; Chauhan, Ved; Colombo, Raffaella; Verga, Laura; De Lorenzi, Ersilia; Bartolini, Manuela; Andrisano, Vincenza; Novellino, Ettore; Campiani, Giuseppe; Gemma, Sandra

    2013-12-12

    In order to identify novel Alzheimer's modifying pharmacological tools, we developed bis-tacrines bearing a peptide moiety for specific interference with surface sites of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) binding amyloid-beta (Aβ). Accordingly, compounds 2a-c proved to be inhibitors of hAChE catalytic and noncatalytic functions, binding the catalytic and peripheral sites, interfering with Aβ aggregation and with the Aβ self-oligomerization process (2a). Compounds 2a-c in complex with TcAChE span the gorge with the bis-tacrine system, and the peptide moieties bulge outside the gorge in proximity of the peripheral site. These moieties are likely responsible for the observed reduction of hAChE-induced Aβ aggregation since they physically hamper Aβ binding to the enzyme surface. Moreover, 2a was able to significantly interfere with Aβ self-oligomerization, while 2b,c showed improved inhibition of hAChE-induced Aβ aggregation. PMID:24900626

  9. Alzheimer's disease: the amyloid hypothesis and the Inverse Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrius, Lloyd A; Magistretti, Pierre J; Pellerin, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and biochemical studies show that the sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by the following hallmarks: (a) An exponential increase with age; (b) Selective neuronal vulnerability; (c) Inverse cancer comorbidity. The present article appeals to these hallmarks to evaluate and contrast two competing models of AD: the amyloid hypothesis (a neuron-centric mechanism) and the Inverse Warburg hypothesis (a neuron-astrocytic mechanism). We show that these three hallmarks of AD conflict with the amyloid hypothesis, but are consistent with the Inverse Warburg hypothesis, a bioenergetic model which postulates that AD is the result of a cascade of three events-mitochondrial dysregulation, metabolic reprogramming (the Inverse Warburg effect), and natural selection. We also provide an explanation for the failures of the clinical trials based on amyloid immunization, and we propose a new class of therapeutic strategies consistent with the neuroenergetic selection model. PMID:25642192

  10. Destroying activity of magnetoferritin on lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopcansky, Peter; Siposova, Katarina [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Melnikova, Lucia, E-mail: melnikova@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Bednarikova, Zuzana [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Institute of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Safarik University, Kosice (Slovakia); Timko, Milan; Mitroova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Garamus, Vasil M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht: Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Street 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, 141980 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, 141980 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gazova, Zuzana [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Department of Medical and Clinical Biochemistry and LABMED, Tr. SNP 1, 040 11 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-03-01

    Presence of protein amyloid aggregates (oligomers, protofilaments, fibrils) is associated with many diseases as diabetes mellitus or Alzheimer's disease. The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size. - Highlights: • The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. • Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibrils: an in silico approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Ye; Wei Wang; Cheng Jiang; Qingfen Yu; Haifeng Chen

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils play causal roles in the pathogenesis of amyloid-related degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease,type Ⅱ diabetes mellitus,and the prion-related transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.The mechanism of fibril formation and protein aggregation is still hotly debated and remains an important open question in order to develop therapeutic method of these diseases.However,traditional molecular biological and crystallographic experiments could hardly observe atomic details and aggregation process.Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations could provide explanations for experimental results and detailed pathway of protein aggregation.In this review,we focus on the applications of MD simulations on several amyloidogenic protein systems.Furthermore,MD simulations could help us to understand the mechanism of amyloid aggregation and how to design the inhibitors.

  12. Atomic-resolution structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibrils

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    To the best of the author's knowledge, there is little structural data available on the AGAAAAGA palindrome in the hydrophobic region (113-120) of prion proteins due to the unstable, noncrystalline and insoluble nature of the amyloid fibril, although many experimental studies have shown that this region has amyloid fibril forming properties and plays an important role in prion diseases. In view of this, the present study is devoted to address this problem from computational approaches such as local optimization steepest descent, conjugate gradient, discrete gradient and Newton methods, global optimization simulated annealing and genetic algorithms, canonical dual optimization theory, and structural bioinformatics. The optimal atomic-resolution structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibils reported in this Chapter have a value to the scientific community in its drive to find treatments for prion diseases or at least be useful for the goals of medicinal chemistry.

  13. Alzheimer's disease: the amyloid hypothesis and the Inverse Warburg effect

    KAUST Repository

    Demetrius, Lloyd A.

    2015-01-14

    Epidemiological and biochemical studies show that the sporadic forms of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) are characterized by the following hallmarks: (a) An exponential increase with age; (b) Selective neuronal vulnerability; (c) Inverse cancer comorbidity. The present article appeals to these hallmarks to evaluate and contrast two competing models of AD: the amyloid hypothesis (a neuron-centric mechanism) and the Inverse Warburg hypothesis (a neuron-astrocytic mechanism). We show that these three hallmarks of AD conflict with the amyloid hypothesis, but are consistent with the Inverse Warburg hypothesis, a bioenergetic model which postulates that AD is the result of a cascade of three events—mitochondrial dysregulation, metabolic reprogramming (the Inverse Warburg effect), and natural selection. We also provide an explanation for the failures of the clinical trials based on amyloid immunization, and we propose a new class of therapeutic strategies consistent with the neuroenergetic selection model.

  14. BETASCAN: probable beta-amyloids identified by pairwise probabilistic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen W Bryan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloids and prion proteins are clinically and biologically important beta-structures, whose supersecondary structures are difficult to determine by standard experimental or computational means. In addition, significant conformational heterogeneity is known or suspected to exist in many amyloid fibrils. Recent work has indicated the utility of pairwise probabilistic statistics in beta-structure prediction. We develop here a new strategy for beta-structure prediction, emphasizing the determination of beta-strands and pairs of beta-strands as fundamental units of beta-structure. Our program, BETASCAN, calculates likelihood scores for potential beta-strands and strand-pairs based on correlations observed in parallel beta-sheets. The program then determines the strands and pairs with the greatest local likelihood for all of the sequence's potential beta-structures. BETASCAN suggests multiple alternate folding patterns and assigns relative a priori probabilities based solely on amino acid sequence, probability tables, and pre-chosen parameters. The algorithm compares favorably with the results of previous algorithms (BETAPRO, PASTA, SALSA, TANGO, and Zyggregator in beta-structure prediction and amyloid propensity prediction. Accurate prediction is demonstrated for experimentally determined amyloid beta-structures, for a set of known beta-aggregates, and for the parallel beta-strands of beta-helices, amyloid-like globular proteins. BETASCAN is able both to detect beta-strands with higher sensitivity and to detect the edges of beta-strands in a richly beta-like sequence. For two proteins (Abeta and Het-s, there exist multiple sets of experimental data implying contradictory structures; BETASCAN is able to detect each competing structure as a potential structure variant. The ability to correlate multiple alternate beta-structures to experiment opens the possibility of computational investigation of prion strains and structural heterogeneity of amyloid

  15. Biotechnologically engineered protein binders for applications in amyloid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Christian; Fändrich, Marcus

    2014-10-01

    The aberrant self-assembly of polypeptide chains into amyloid structures is a common phenomenon in several neurodegenerative diseases, systemic amyloidosis, and 'normal' aging. Improvements in laboratory-scale detection of these structures, their clinical diagnosis, and the treatment of disease likely depend on the advent of new molecules that recognize particular states or induce their clearance in vivo. This review will describe what biotechnology can do to generate proteinaceous amyloid-binders, explain their molecular recognition mechanisms, and summarize possibilities to functionalize further these ligands for specific applications.

  16. Structural network alterations and neurological dysfunction in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijmer, Yael D.; Fotiadis, Panagiotis; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Salat, David H.; Schultz, Aaron; Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Ayres, Alison M.; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Rosas, Diana; Schwab, Kristin; Leemans, Alexander; Biessels, Geert-Jan; Rosand, Jonathan; Johnson, Keith A.; Viswanathan, Anand; Gurol, M. Edip

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a common form of small-vessel disease and an important risk factor for cognitive impairment. The mechanisms linking small-vessel disease to cognitive impairment are not well understood. We hypothesized that in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy, multiple small spatially distributed lesions affect cognition through disruption of brain connectivity. We therefore compared the structural brain network in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy to healthy control subjects and examined the relationship between markers of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related brain injury, network efficiency, and potential clinical consequences. Structural brain networks were reconstructed from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in 38 non-demented patients with probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy (69 ± 10 years) and 29 similar aged control participants. The efficiency of the brain network was characterized using graph theory and brain amyloid deposition was quantified by Pittsburgh compound B retention on positron emission tomography imaging. Global efficiency of the brain network was reduced in patients compared to controls (0.187 ± 0.018 and 0.201 ± 0.015, respectively, P < 0.001). Network disturbances were most pronounced in the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes. Among patients, lower global network efficiency was related to higher cortical amyloid load (r = −0.52; P = 0.004), and to magnetic resonance imaging markers of small-vessel disease including increased white matter hyperintensity volume (P < 0.001), lower total brain volume (P = 0.02), and number of microbleeds (trend P = 0.06). Lower global network efficiency was also related to worse performance on tests of processing speed (r = 0.58, P < 0.001), executive functioning (r = 0.54, P = 0.001), gait velocity (r = 0.41, P = 0.02), but not memory. Correlations with cognition were independent of age, sex, education level, and other magnetic resonance imaging

  17. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian S; Dueholm, Morten S;

    2015-01-01

    The success of Pseudomonas species as opportunistic pathogens derives in great part from their ability to form stable biofilms that offer protection against chemical and mechanical attack. The extracellular matrix of biofilms contains numerous biomolecules, and it has recently been discovered...... stiffness 20-fold. Deletion of any one of the individual members of in the fap operon (except the putative chaperone FapA) abolishes this ability to increase biofilm stiffness and correlates with the loss of amyloid. We conclude that amyloid makes major contributions to biofilm mechanical robustness....

  18. Native human serum amyloid P component is a single pentamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Inge Juul; Andersen, Ove; Nielsen, EH;

    1995-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are members of the pentraxin protein family. SAP is the precursor protein to amyloid P component present in all forms of amyloidosis. The prevailing notion is that SAP in circulation has the form of a double pentameric molecule (decamer...... by rocket immunoelectrophoresis and electron microscopy. Thus, electron micrographs of purified SAP showed a predominance of decamers. However, the decamer form of SAP reversed to single pentamers when purified SAP was incorporated into SAP-depleted serum....

  19. Self-assembling of amyloid-like proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Septins are proteins from the GTP-binding family and participate in cell division cycle performing functions such as secretion and cytoskeletal division. They can also be found in neurodegenerative conditions as Alzheimers and Parkinson's diseases, forming highly organized fiber-like aggregates known as amyloids. In this work, we used small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate the formation and time evolution of septins aggregates under the influence of temperature and concentration. The SAXS measurements were performed with the GTPase domain of human Septin 2 (SEPT2G) at 0.5 and 1 mg/mL and temperatures between 4 and 45 deg C. At 0.5 mg/mL and 4 deg C, the protein self-aggregates as a dimer, being stable over one hour of observation. When the temperature was increased to 15 deg C, the results demonstrate that cylinder-like aggregates are formed and coexist with some dimer population and a small amount of larger aggregates. However, the number of very large aggregates increases with time concomitantly with the decrease of cylinder amount in the solution. At 37 deg C cylinder-like aggregates are not longer present in solution, whereas a significant amount of dimers decreases from 50% to 20% in less than 1 hour. At 45 deg C such an effect is even more accentuated: the percentage of dimers is only 6% in solution into a favor of 94% of very larger aggregates. When we analyze the protein at 1 mg/mL, at 4 deg C cylinder-like aggregates (36 nm-long and 12 nm-cross section) are already formed, coexisting with dimers and, as occurred for lower concentration, the two populations remained unchanged over one hour of observation. Out results also indicate that the dimensions of these cylinders increase with the concentration and the percentage of cylinders and larger aggregates are higher than those found for 0.5 mg/mL. In conclusion, our results showed the coexistence of dimers of SEPT2G with small fibers and larger aggregates in solution that evolve not

  20. Self-assembling of amyloid-like proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales, E.M.; Barbosa, L.R.S.; Itri, R. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Damalio, J.C.P.; Araujo, A.P.U. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP-SC), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Spinozzi, F.; Mariani, P. [Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Septins are proteins from the GTP-binding family and participate in cell division cycle performing functions such as secretion and cytoskeletal division. They can also be found in neurodegenerative conditions as Alzheimers and Parkinson's diseases, forming highly organized fiber-like aggregates known as amyloids. In this work, we used small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate the formation and time evolution of septins aggregates under the influence of temperature and concentration. The SAXS measurements were performed with the GTPase domain of human Septin 2 (SEPT2G) at 0.5 and 1 mg/mL and temperatures between 4 and 45 deg C. At 0.5 mg/mL and 4 deg C, the protein self-aggregates as a dimer, being stable over one hour of observation. When the temperature was increased to 15 deg C, the results demonstrate that cylinder-like aggregates are formed and coexist with some dimer population and a small amount of larger aggregates. However, the number of very large aggregates increases with time concomitantly with the decrease of cylinder amount in the solution. At 37 deg C cylinder-like aggregates are not longer present in solution, whereas a significant amount of dimers decreases from 50% to 20% in less than 1 hour. At 45 deg C such an effect is even more accentuated: the percentage of dimers is only 6% in solution into a favor of 94% of very larger aggregates. When we analyze the protein at 1 mg/mL, at 4 deg C cylinder-like aggregates (36 nm-long and 12 nm-cross section) are already formed, coexisting with dimers and, as occurred for lower concentration, the two populations remained unchanged over one hour of observation. Out results also indicate that the dimensions of these cylinders increase with the concentration and the percentage of cylinders and larger aggregates are higher than those found for 0.5 mg/mL. In conclusion, our results showed the coexistence of dimers of SEPT2G with small fibers and larger aggregates in solution that evolve

  1. Radioprotective Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kelle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since1949, a great deal of research has been carried out on the radioprotective activity of various chemical substances. Thiol compounds, compounds which contain –SH radical, different classes of pharmacological agents and other compounds such as vitamine C and WR-2721 have been shown to reduce mortality when administered prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. Recently, honey bee venom as well as that of its components melittin and histamine have shown to be valuable in reduction of radiation-induced damage and also provide prophylactic alternative treatment for serious side effects related with radiotherapy. It has been suggested that the radioprotective activity of bee venom components is related with the stimulation of the hematopoetic system.

  2. First and second generation γ-secretase modulators (GSMs) modulate amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide production through different mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgegard, Tomas; Juréus, Anders; Olsson, Fredrik; Rosqvist, Susanne; Sabirsh, Alan; Rotticci, Didier; Paulsen, Kim; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Yan, Hongmei; Waldman, Magnus; Stromberg, Kia; Nord, Johan; Johansson, Jonas; Regner, Anna; Parpal, Santiago; Malinowsky, David; Radesater, Ann-Cathrin; Li, Tingsheng; Singh, Rajeshwar; Eriksson, Hakan; Lundkvist, Johan

    2012-04-01

    γ-Secretase-mediated cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) results in the production of Alzheimer disease-related amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. The Aβ42 peptide in particular plays a pivotal role in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis and represents a major drug target. Several γ-secretase modulators (GSMs), such as the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (R)-flurbiprofen and sulindac sulfide, have been suggested to modulate the Alzheimer-related Aβ production by targeting the APP. Here, we describe novel GSMs that are selective for Aβ modulation and do not impair processing of Notch, EphB2, or EphA4. The GSMs modulate Aβ both in cell and cell-free systems as well as lower amyloidogenic Aβ42 levels in the mouse brain. Both radioligand binding and cellular cross-competition experiments reveal a competitive relationship between the AstraZeneca (AZ) GSMs and the established second generation GSM, E2012, but a noncompetitive interaction between AZ GSMs and the first generation GSMs (R)-flurbiprofen and sulindac sulfide. The binding of a (3)H-labeled AZ GSM analog does not co-localize with APP but overlaps anatomically with a γ-secretase targeting inhibitor in rodent brains. Combined, these data provide compelling evidence of a growing class of in vivo active GSMs, which are selective for Aβ modulation and have a different mechanism of action compared with the original class of GSMs described.

  3. Minocycline alleviates beta-amyloid protein and tau pathology via restraining neuroinflammation induced by diabetic metabolic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Z

    2013-08-01

    neuroinflammation, which contributes to Aβ production and tau hyperphosphorylation. Minocycline may also lower the self-perpetuating cycle between neuroinflammation and the pathogenesis of tau and Aβ to act as a neuroprotector. Therefore, the ability of minocycline to modulate inflammatory reactions may be of great importance in the selection of neuroprotective agents, especially in chronic conditions like diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, minocycline, tau protein, β-amyloid protein

  4. Amyloid Cardiomyopathy in Hereditary Transthyretin V30M Amyloidosis - Impact of Sex and Amyloid Fibril Composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Arvidsson

    Full Text Available Transthyretin V30M (ATTR V30M amyloidosis is a phenotypically diverse disease with symptoms ranging from predominant neuropathy to exclusive cardiac manifestations. The aims of this study were to determine the dispersion of the two types of fibrils found in Swedish ATTR V30M patients -Type A consisting of a mixture of truncated and full length ATTR fibrils and type B fibrils consisting of full length fibrils, and to estimate the severity of cardiac dysfunction in relation to fibril composition and sex.Echocardiographic data were analysed in 107 Swedish ATTR V30M patients with their fibril composition determined as either type A or type B. Measurements of left ventricular (LV dimensions and evaluation of systolic and diastolic function including speckle tracking derived strain were performed. Patients were grouped according to fibril type and sex. Multivariate linear regression was utilised to determine factors of significant impact on LV thickness.There was no significant difference in proportions of the two types of fibrils between men and women. In patients with type A fibrils, women had significantly lower median septal (p = 0.007 and posterior wall thicknesses (p = 0.010, lower median LV mass indexed to height (p = 0.008, and higher septal strain (p = 0.037, as compared to males. These differences were not apparent in patients with type B fibrils. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that fibril type, sex and age all had significant impact on LV septal thickness.This study demonstrates a clear difference between sexes in the severity of amyloid heart disease in ATTR V30M amyloidosis patients. Even though type A fibrils were associated with more advanced amyloid heart disease compared to type B, women with type A fibrils generally developed less cardiac infiltration than men. The differences may explain the better outcome for liver transplanted late-onset female patients compared to males.

  5. Presence of non-fibrillar amyloid beta protein in skin biopsies of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Down's syndrome and non-AD normal persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, G Y; Wisniewski, H M; Blondal, H;

    1994-01-01

    -24 of synthetic amyloid beta protein (A beta), and 4G8-Fab (the antigen-binding fragment of 4G8 IgG, reactive only to amyloid plaque) was observed in the epidermis-dermis junction or the basement membrane of the epidermis and in some blood vessels of the biopsy skins of 13/18 (72%) AD, 9/10 (90%) DS, and 14....../38 (37%) non-AD control cases. The Fisher exact probability test revealed a significant difference (P = 0.0415 one-tailed) in immunoreactivity between AD and age-matched controls. There was also a significant difference (P = 0.0152 one-tailed; P = 0.0200 two-tailed) between DS and age-matched control...

  6. Difference in aggregation between functional and toxic amyloids studied by atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo Pacheco, Martin; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloids are highly structured protein aggregates, normally associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, a number of nontoxic amyloids with physiologically normal functions, called functional amyloids, have been found. It is known that soluble small oligomers are more toxic than large fibrils. Thus, we study with atomistic explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations the oligomer formation of the amyloid- β peptide Aβ25 - 35, associated with Alzheimer's disease, and two functional amyloid-forming tachykinin peptides: kassinin and neuromedin K. Our simulations show that monomeric peptides in extended conformations aggregate faster than those in collapsed hairpin-like conformations. In addition, we observe faster aggregation by functional amyloids than toxic amyloids, which could explain their lack of toxicity.

  7. High throughput virtual screening and in silico ADMET analysis for rapid and efficient identification of potential PAP248-286 aggregation inhibitors as anti-HIV agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ruchi; Bunkar, Devendra; Choudhary, Bhanwar Singh; Srivastava, Shubham; Mehta, Pakhuri; Sharma, Manish

    2016-10-01

    Human semen is principal vehicle for transmission of HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses. Several endogenous peptides present in semen, including a 39-amino acid fragments of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP248-286) assemble into amyloid fibrils named as semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI) that promote virion attachment to target cells which dramatically enhance HIV virus infection by up to 105-fold. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenolic compound, is the major catechin found in green tea which disaggregates existing SEVI fibers, and inhibits the formation of SEVI fibers. The aim of this study was to screen a number of relevant polyphenols to develop a rational approach for designing PAP248-286 aggregation inhibitors as potential anti-HIV agents. The molecular docking based virtual screening results showed that polyphenolic compounds 2-6 possessed good docking score and interacted well with the active site residues of PAP248-286. Amino acid residues of binding site namely; Lys255, Ser256, Leu258 and Asn265 are involved in binding of these compounds. In silico ADMET prediction studies on these hits were also found to be promising. Polyphenolic compounds 2-6 identified as hits may act as novel leads for inhibiting aggregation of PAP248-286 into SEVI.

  8. An agent framework for dynamic agent retraining: Agent academy

    OpenAIRE

    Mitkas, P.; A. Symeonidis; Kechagias, D.; Athanasiadis, I.N.; Laleci, G.; KURT, G.; Kabak, Y.; Acar, A.; Dogac, A.

    2004-01-01

    Agent Academy (AA) aims to develop a multi-agent society that can train new agents for specific or general tasks, while constantly retraining existing agents in a recursive mode. The system is based on collecting information both from the environment and the behaviors of the acting agents and their related successes/failures to generate a body of data, stored in the Agent Use Repository, which is mined by the Data Miner module, in order to generate useful knowledge about the application domai...

  9. Unusual cerebral vascular prion protein amyloid distribution in scrapie-infected transgenic mice expressing anchorless prion protein

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Alejandra; Race, Brent; Klingeborn, Mikael; Striebel, James; Chesebro, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Background In some prion diseases, misfolded aggregated protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres) is found in brain as amyloid, which can cause cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Small diffusible precursors of PrPres amyloid might flow with brain interstitial fluid (ISF), possibly accounting for the perivascular and intravascular distribution of PrPres amyloid. We previously reported that PrPres amyloid in scrapie-infected transgenic mice appeared to delay clearance of microinjected brain ISF trace...

  10. Amyloid in biopsies of the gastrointestinal tract-a retrospective observational study on 542 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenthaler, Sophie; Hegenbart, Ute; Schönland, Stefan; Behrens, Hans-Michael; Krüger, Sandra; Röcken, Christoph

    2016-05-01

    In this retrospective observational study, we investigated the histopathological and demographic characteristics of amyloid in gastrointestinal biopsies. From the Amyloid Registry Kiel, we retriev