WorldWideScience

Sample records for amputation

  1. Amputations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... machine components are hazardous? The following types of mechanical components present amputation hazards: s Point of operation —the area of a machine where it performs work on material. s Power-transmission apparatuses — flywheels, pulleys, belts, chains, couplings, spindles, cams, ...

  2. Amputation - traumatic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... critical care management. A well-fitting and functional prosthesis can speed rehabilitation. Causes Traumatic amputations usually result ... More Bleeding Cuts and puncture wounds Leg or foot amputation Shock Patient Instructions Foot amputation - discharge Leg ...

  3. Amputation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnur, David; Meier, Robert H

    2014-02-01

    The best level of amputation must take into consideration the newest socket designs, methods of prosthetic suspension, and technologically advanced components. In some instances stump revision should be considered, to provide a better prosthetic fitting and function. Targeted reinnervation is a new neural-machine interface that has been developed to help improve the function of electrically powered upper prosthetic limbs. Osseointegrated implants for prosthetic suspension offer amputees an alternative to the traditional socket suspension, and are especially useful for transfemoral and transhumeral levels of amputation. Cadaver bone can be used to lengthen an extremely short residual bony lever arm.

  4. [Upper leg amputation. Transfemoral amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, R

    2011-10-01

    Objective. Amputation through the diaphysis of the femur at the most peripheral level possible. The stump, covered with soft tissue flaps, is free from pain. It can be fitted with a total contact prosthetic socket. The hip joint is preserved with its full range of motion.Indications. When no possibility to amputate at a more distal level through the tibia or the knee joint exists.Contraindications. When it is possible to amputate at a more distal level.Surgical technique. Symmetrical flaps in the frontal plane are recommended. Asymmetrical flaps and flaps in the sagittal plane can also be made. Their muscles are fixed to each other (myodesis) or the bone end by means of transosseous sutures (myopexy). The ischial nerve has to be shortened about 2 inches proximal to the end of the femur.In peripheral vascular diseases, this procedure is not suitable. An alternative technique is suggested.In chronic osteomyelitis (e.g., after intramedullary nailing), the ventral half of the femur can be removed and the medullary cavity cleansed and filled with a muscular flap in order to maintain length. Lengthening procedures of the femur are discussed.Postoperative management. Avoid active or passive movement of the stump for the first 2 weeks in order not to disturb healing of the muscle sutures. Physical therapy, prosthetic fitting after 4–6 weeks, according to the expected functional level 0–4. Aids: crutches, wheel chair, adjustable bed, modified hand-controlled automobile.The walking ability of a patient with a double amputation above the knee is severely limited and in patients with peripheral artery disease remains the exception.

  5. Upper extremity amputations and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadia, Steven A; Askari, Morad

    2015-02-01

    Upper extremity amputations are most frequently indicated by severe traumatic injuries. The location of the injury will determine the level of amputation. Preservation of extremity length is often a goal. The amputation site will have important implications on the functional status of the patient and options for prosthetic reconstruction. Advances in amputation techniques and prosthetic reconstructions promote improved quality of life. In this article, the authors review the principles of upper extremity amputation, including techniques, amputation sites, and prosthetic reconstructions.

  6. Amputations and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzur, M S

    1999-01-01

    The author presents in a condensed way an overview of the principles of limb amputations and further treatment of patients who underwent such a procedure. The metabolic cost of walking, load transfer, and wound healing are reviewed in a concise manner. Particular attention is given to blood supply to the wound and methods to determine adequate perfusion with a clear analysis of the pro and cons of the Doppler method. Pediatric amputations, because of their specificity, are considered apart. Disarticulation of limbs is the method of choice in children, because of it retains growth potential of the bone and prevents bony overgrowth of the stump. The article discusses the main indications for limb amputations: trauma, peripheral vascular disease, musculoskeletal tumors and gas gangrene. In every case the specificity of the amputation is considered by the author. Postoperative care is also presented, with a short description of possible complications. Pain is the most common and treatment strategies should be similar to those used in treating patients with major reflex sympathetic causalgia. Edema, joint contracture, wound failure and dermatologic problems are all shortly reviewed. The last part of the article treats with the principles of prosthetics in both the upper and lower limb. These principles are presented basing on the level of amputation: for the upper limb hand, transradial, transhumeral amputations and shoulder disarticulation. For the lower limb foot and ankle, transtibial and transfemoral amputations are considered.

  7. Epidemiology of leg amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebskov, L B; Schroeder, T V; Holstein, P E

    1994-01-01

    The number of amputations performed for vascular disease in Denmark has decreased from 1777 (34.5 per 100,000 population) in 1983 to 1288 (25.0 per 100,000) in 1990, a reduction of 28 per cent. This decline coincided with an increase in vascular surgical activity of up to 100 per cent, including ...

  8. Stump problems in traumatic amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, M; Tokuhiro, A; Takechi, H

    1993-12-01

    Stump problems in amputations resulting from employment related injuries were investigated in 397 cases in the Chugoku and Shikoku districts of Japan between 1987 and 1991. Ninety-seven patients (24%) had stump problems which interfered the prosthetic fitting. Stump problems of the upper extremity were seen in about 9% (17 amputees), two thirds of which were skin troubles. Stump problems of the lower extremity were seen in about 37% (80 amputees). Certain complaints were associated with specific methods of amputation; abnormal keratosis in Syme's amputation, equinus deformity in Chopart's amputation, reduced muscle power in above the knee (A/K) amputation and joint dysfunction in below the knee (B/K) amputation. Adequate prosthetic fitting was achieved by the modification of the socket and alignment in almost all amputees with stump problems. In only two cases, Chopart's amputation required subsequent Syme's amputation due to equinus deformity with abnormal keratosis. In almost every case, stump problems are avoidable by means of surgeons' deliberate evaluation of the affected limb and adequate choice of the amputation level.

  9. Traumatic hand amputation while wakeboarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodacre, Timothy; Marshall, Morwena

    2011-01-01

    Wakeboarding is a sport increasing in popularity in the UK and the rest of the world. It is known to be associated with a high incidence of relatively minor injuries to the participating sportsperson. The authors present the case of a traumatic hand amputation to an associated third party and highlight the potential for serious injuries to all those directly involved with the sport. The authors demonstrate the successful application of military principles to a traumatic amputation in a civilian setting. PMID:22693318

  10. Return to sport following amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, D; Sukeik, M; Haddad, F

    2014-08-01

    Amputation in athletes has a substantial impact on lifestyle and sporting activity, as well as self-perception and quality of life. The impact of limb loss on athletic ability will vary depending on the cause of amputation and the anatomical location of the amputation. The use of sporting activity for rehabilitation of amputees was first introduced in 1944 at Stoke Mandeville Hospital. The first international paralympic games were founded in 1960. Following these events the opportunity to participate in sport following limb loss has increased significantly. Sport participation has been aided by the development of sporting prostheses, however multiple factors will determine the exact prosthesis used. These include the nature of the sporting activity as well as the level of the amputation. The biomechanics involved in walking and running are altered following the loss of a limb or part thereof. This can cause subsequent degenerative changes within the remaining joints on the amputated limb as well as the contralateral limb. Factors affecting return to sporting activity are multivariate and inter-related, including patient factors, surgical factors, nature and level of the sporting activity and prosthetic factors. The authors review current literature, detail predictive factors of return to sport and the physical and psychosocial impact on patients following limb amputation.

  11. Amputation and prostheses in Khartoum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, I A; Ahmed, A R; Ahmed, M E

    1997-08-01

    One hundred and seventy patients with major lower limb amputation (MLLA) presenting to The National Prosthetic-Orthotic Centre (NPOC) in Khartoum over a 1-year period were studied. There were 141 males and 29 females giving a M:F ratio of 4.9: 1.0, with mean age of 37 years (range 5-72 years). Forty-one patients (24%) underwent amputation of diabetic septic foot, 30 patients (17.6%) underwent amputation as a result of trauma from road traffic accidents and Madura foot, and war injuries accounted for 29 amputations (17%). One hundred and eleven patients had below knee amputation (BKA), 52 had above knee amputation (AKA) and seven patients had Syme's amputation. Diabetic amputees had higher rate of revisional surgery compared with others because of sepsis and/or flap necrosis. Stump pain was reported by amputees with excessive scarring of the stump and those with undue prominence of bony ends. There are two types of prostheses provided by the NPOC for both BKA and AKA: the peg leg and the conventional prostheses. The Syme's amputees were fitted with either simple hoof or articulated prostheses with solid ankle cushion heel (SACH). The peg leg consists of a leather lined side bearing metal socket connected to a rocker base by side steels. It is used by the country natives as it suits different weather and job conditions, particularly farming, and it can be repaired locally. The urban population use the conventional prostheses which is lighter in weight, can be put on and taken off easily and is cosmetically acceptable. However, these prostheses are more expensive and require frequent repair or replacement. The functional outcome of patient's rehabilitation with the prostheses was significantly affected by the level and indication of amputation. Those with BKA and those amputated because of trauma or Madura foot experienced better functional outcome compared with the diabetics, independent of age. 50% of patients with the AKA and 19% of those with BKA reported poor

  12. Physiologic amputation: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeri; Hall, Virginia

    2014-03-01

    Acute limb ischemia is a complication of severe peripheral arterial disease that can be a threatening limb as well as life. Multiple procedures exist today to help revascularize extremities; however, even with the latest technologies, surgical amputation of the limb may still be necessary. Cryoamputation, or physiologic amputation, is a method used to treat patients who are hemodynamically unstable for the operating room and who are in need of urgent amputation owing to arterial ischemia. This procedure is used in the rare instance where not only a persons' limb is threatened, but also their life. This is a case study regarding one patient who presented to the hospital with limb-threatening ischemia who became hemodynamically unstable owing to the rhabdomyolysis associated with the ischemia of his lower extremity. Cryoamputation was used to stabilize the patient and prevent further deterioration, so that he could safely undergo surgical amputation of the limb without an increase in mortality risk. Cryoamputation must be followed by formal surgical amputation when the patient is hemodynamically stabilized. It is not a limb salvaging, procedure but it is a life-saving procedure. This case study demonstrates the usefulness of the procedure and discusses the technique used for cryoamputation.

  13. Elective amputation of a "healthy limb"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Rianne M; Guglielmi, Valeria; Denys, D.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with body integrity identity disorder (BIID) experience a strong desire for amputation from very early on. BIID patients are often dismissed when they share their wish for amputation with surgeons. Consequently, patients resort to self-amputation, including complications and sometimes death

  14. INCIDENCE OF AMPUTATION IN EMERGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rojaramani Kumbha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Advanced Technology and early detection of disease by recent improvements in investigation modalities lead to decreased incidents of amputations while Road Traffic Accidents (RTA increase. Furthermore, it leads to variation and decreased morbidity, mortality and accidents (crush injuries, and better equipped and trained staff, specialist services, diabetic food, rehabilitation centres, and giving good support physically and psychologically for Amputated patients. OBJECTIVE To know incidence rates of Emergency Amputation who attended causality with advanced disease and severe Trauma. METHODOLOGY The study is done over a period of one year i.e. between June 2015 to June 2016 who attended causality with advanced and severe disease affecting the limbs either due to diabetes, trauma or vascular diseases. RESULTS During one-year period, total 6,371 patients attended for general surgery OP. In those, 187 patients needed emergency surgery which included both major and minor operations. Among those, 81 patients were amputated. CONCLUSION As per our available records and observation, even though there is increased literacy and access to advanced technology, there is still increased incidence of patients undergoing amputations due to diseases. Therefore, there is a need to improve awareness and importance of early detection of diabetes, hazards of smoking, and regular general health checkups for patients at root level. With that we can treat diabetes and/or any disease in time. So there must be awareness in peripheral health staff i.e. PHC, subcentres, and community health centres about early detection of disease which in turn improves the quality of life of the patient. Due to diabetes slight injury to the glucose laden tissue may cause chronic infection and ulcer formation.(1 The tumours are seen commonly in the age group of 20-40 years after bone fusion, bones affected commonly are those around the knee (lower end of knee, upper end of tibia. A lytic

  15. Phantom pain after eye amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Prause, Jan U; Toft, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. Methods: The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation......, orbital exenteration or secondary implantation of an orbital implant in the period between 1993 and 2003. A total of 267 patients were identified and invited to participate; of these, 173 agreed to participate. These patients’ medical records were reviewed. A structured interview focusing on pain...... was conducted by a trained interviewer. Results: Of the 173 patients in the study, 39 experienced phantom pain. The median age of patients who had experienced phantom pain was 45 years (range: 19–88). Follow-up time from eye amputation to participation in the investigation was 4 years (range: 2–46). Phantom...

  16. Pathophysiology of Post Amputation Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    nociception and pain : analysis through imaging. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1999;96:7668-74. 44. Casey KL, Minoshima S, Morrow TJ, Koeppe RA. Comparison of...trials. Eur J Pain 2006;10:77-88. 95. Dotson RM. Clinical neurophysiology laboratory tests to assess the nociceptive system in humans. J Clin...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0815 TITLE: Pathophysiology of Post Amputation Pain PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. R. Norman Harden CONTRACTING

  17. Replantation of ring avulsion amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabapathy R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Replantation of ring avulsion injuries is a challenge because of the long segment damage to the vessels and intrinsic damage caused to soft tissues at the proximal edge of the amputation. Eight patients with total ring avulsion amputations underwent microsurgical replantation in the period 1994 to 2002. Arterial repair was done by direct vessel suture in three patients, interposition vein grafts in two and cross anastomosis of the digital arteries in three patients. Venous anastomosis was carried out by mobilization and direct suture in seven patients and vessel transfer from the adjacent finger in one patient. Seven of the eight replantations were successful, while one patient had a partial failure. At a minimum follow-up of one year, these patients showed good functional and cosmetic recovery. All successful patients were happy with the outcome and none have requested for amputation, even those whose results were not functionally adequate. However, in addition to technical factors, it is important to evaluate the patient's motivation to undergo not only the long surgery, but also multiple secondary procedures and regular supervised physiotherapy. We also describe a simple method which prevents the soft tissues inside the degloved digit from becoming wrapped around the K wire during bony fixation, thus making one step of this technically challenging procedure a little easier.

  18. Case Reports: Thumb Reconstruction Using Amputated Fingers

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Nguyen T.; Staudenmaier, R.; Hoehnke, C.

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction of an irreparably amputated thumb in multiple digit amputations using amputated fingers can considerably improve hand function and allows creation of a newly transplanted thumb with acceptable cosmetic and functional attributes. However, the surgery is challenging and rarely reported. We report six cases using this procedure in patients with crushed thumbs unsuitable for replantation. In four of the patients, the remnant of the index finger was replanted on the thumb stump and ...

  19. Forequarter amputation for recurrent breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna N. Pundi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Forequarter amputation can be judiciously used for patients with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. Patients with recurrent disease without evidence of distant metastases may be considered for curative amputation, while others may receive palliative benefit; disappointingly our patient achieved neither of these outcomes. In the long term, these patients may still have significant psychological problems.

  20. Functional results after a Krukenberg amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freire, J; Schiappacasse, C; Heredia, A; Martina, JD; Geertzen, JHB

    2005-01-01

    This case report presents a 51 year old female patient who had a train accident in 1999. She suffered bilateral trans-tibial and bilateral trans-radial amputations. In this paper, the evolution of the right trans-radial amputation where eventually a Krukenberg procedure was performed, is described a

  1. A retrospective analysis of amputation rates in diabetic patients: can lower extremity amputations be further prevented?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarsson Alexandra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lower extremity amputations are costly and debilitating complications in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. Our aim was to investigate changes in the amputation rate in patients with DM at the Karolinska University Hospital in Solna (KS following the introduction of consensus guidelines for treatment and prevention of diabetic foot complications, and to identify risk groups of lower extremity amputations that should be targeted for preventive treatment. Methods 150 diabetic and 191 nondiabetic patients were amputated at KS between 2000 and 2006; of these 102 diabetic and 99 nondiabetic patients belonged to the catchment area of KS. 21 diabetic patients who belonged to KS catchment area were amputated at Danderyd University Hospital. All patients' case reports were searched for diagnoses of diabetes, vascular disorders, kidney disorders, and ulcer infections of the foot. Results There was a 60% reduction in the rate of amputations performed above the ankle in patients with DM during the study period. Patients with DM who underwent amputations were more commonly affected by foot infections and kidney disorders compared to the nondiabetic control group. Women with DM were 10 years older than the men when amputated, whereas men with DM underwent more multiple amputations and had more foot infections compared to the women. 88% of all diabetes-related amputations were preceded by foot ulcers. Only 30% of the patients had been referred to the multidisciplinary foot team prior to the decision of amputation. Conclusions These findings indicate a reduced rate of major amputations in diabetic patients, which suggests an implementation of the consensus guidelines of foot care. We also propose further reduced amputation rates if patients with an increased risk of future amputation (i.e. male sex, kidney disease are identified and offered preventive treatment early.

  2. Special Considerations for Multiple Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquina, Paul F; Miller, Matthew; Carvalho, A J; Corcoran, Michael; Vandersea, James; Johnson, Elizabeth; Chen, Yin-Ting

    2014-01-01

    It has been estimated that more than 1.6 million individuals in the United States have undergone at least one amputation. The literature abounds with research of the classifications of such injuries, their etiologies, epidemiologies, treatment regimens, average age of onset (average age of amputation), and much more. The subpopulation that is often overlooked in these evaluations, however, is comprised of individuals who have suffered multiple limb loss. The challenges faced by those with single-limb loss are amplified for those with multiple limb loss. Pain, lifestyle adjustment, and quality of life return are just a few key areas of concern in this population. Along with amputations resulting from trauma, many individuals with multiple amputations have endured them as a result of dysvascular disease. Over recent years, amputations as a result of dysvascular disease have risen to comprise more than 80 % of new amputations occurring in the United States every year. This compares to just 54 % of total current prevalence. Those with diabetes comorbid with dysvascular disease make up 74 % of those with dysvascular amputations, and these individuals with diabetes comorbid with dysvascular disease have a 55 % chance of enduring an amputation of their contralateral limb within 2-3 years of their initial amputation. With the well-documented aging of the nation's population and the similarly skyrocketing prevalence of dysvascular disease and diabetes, it can be expected that the number of individuals with multiple limb loss will continue to increase in the United States. This article outlines the recommended measures of care for this particular subpopulation, including pain management, behavioral health considerations, strategies for rehabilitation for various levels and variations of multiple limb loss, and the assistive technology and adaptive equipment that might be available for these individuals to best enable them to continue healthy, fulfilling lives following

  3. Amputation for histiocytic sarcoma in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Takahiro; Hata, Takashi; Nezu, Yoko; Michishita, Masaki; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Mizutani, Hisashi; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Koyama, Hidekazu

    2012-02-01

    A 9-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat presented with a skin lesion of the left tarsus. The lesion was biopsied and, based on the microscopic appearance and immunohistochemical characteristics, histiocytic sarcoma was diagnosed. Amputation was performed with improved demeanor seen postoperatively. However, between 44 and 60 days following the surgery, relapse of skin lesions appeared in multiple locations, including at the previous amputation site, and euthanasia was elected. This is the first report of a histiocytic sarcoma treated with amputation in a cat.

  4. Ideal functional outcomes for amputation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Robert H; Melton, Danielle

    2014-02-01

    This article provides a generalized overview of amputation classifications and the idealized outcomes for upper and lower amputations at their respective levels. The following levels are discussed: above knee/transfemoral, below knee/transtibial, above elbow/transhumeral, below elbow/transradial, and bilateral for upper and lower extremities. This classification defines a framework for clinicians to share with patients so that they understand the potential for their expected functional outcomes regarding mobility and activities of daily living, both with and without a prosthesis. Moreover, it addresses some of the vocational and avocational needs of the individual regarding amputation.

  5. Association between Functional Severity and Amputation Type with Rehabilitation Outcomes in Patients with Lower Limb Amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Karmarkar, Amol M.; Graham, James E.; Reistetter, Timothy A.; Amit Kumar; Jacqueline M. Mix; Paulette Niewczyk; Granger, Carl V.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine independent influences of functional level and lower limb amputation type on inpatient rehabilitation outcomes. We conducted a secondary data analysis for patients with lower limb amputation who received inpatient medical rehabilitation (N = 26,501). The study outcomes included length of stay, discharge functional status, and community discharge. Predictors included the 3-level case mix group variable and a 4-category amputation variable. Age of the ...

  6. Principles of contemporary amputation rehabilitation in the United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Robert H; Heckman, Jeffrey T

    2014-02-01

    Providing rehabilitation services for the person with an amputation has become more difficult in today's health care environment. Amputation rehabilitation calls for specialized, multidisciplinary rehabilitation training. In examining the principles of amputation rehabilitation, one must understand the lessons learned from the Veterans Affairs Amputation System of Care and return to the founding principles of rehabilitation medicine. Persons with amputations must be reevaluated in a tight program of follow-up care.

  7. Delayed amputation in lower limb trauma: an analysis of factors leading to delayed amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, P

    1999-03-01

    An in-depth analysis of the course of events leading to 49 delayed amputation of the lower extremity in 47 patients with open lower limb fractures is presented. Seventeen amputations were performed within one month mainly for vascular reasons. Eleven were between one month and one year, due to persistent sepsis and 21 amputations were performed more than a year after the original injury for infected non-union. Below-knee amputation was done in 32 limbs, above-knee amputation in 13 limbs and Symes' amputation in 4 limbs. The delay in timing of the amputation was analysed with respect to the nature of the injury, the primary treatment and the Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS). The MESS score was computed for all injuries and a score of 7 or more predicted an early amputation. We suggest that in all severe lower limb injuries, particularly in Type III C fractures with associated neurological injury, the benefits of an early amputation be considered as an alternative to a limb salvage procedure.

  8. Evolving techniques in foot and ankle amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Vincent Y; Berlet, Gregory C

    2010-04-01

    Multiple clinical pathways lead to lower extremity amputation, including trauma, dysvascular disease, congenital defects, and malignancy. However, the principles of successful amputation-careful preoperative planning, coordination of a multidisciplinary team, and good surgical technique-remain the same. Organized rehabilitation and properly selected prostheses are integral components of amputee care. In the civilian setting, amputation is usually performed as a planned therapy for an unsalvageable extremity, not as an emergency procedure. The partial loss of a lower limb often represents a major change in a person's life, but patients should be encouraged to approach amputation as the beginning of a new phase of life and not as the culmination of previous treatment failures.

  9. Case reports: thumb reconstruction using amputated fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Nguyen T; Staudenmaier, R; Hoehnke, C

    2008-08-01

    Reconstruction of an irreparably amputated thumb in multiple digit amputations using amputated fingers can considerably improve hand function and allows creation of a newly transplanted thumb with acceptable cosmetic and functional attributes. However, the surgery is challenging and rarely reported. We report six cases using this procedure in patients with crushed thumbs unsuitable for replantation. In four of the patients, the remnant of the index finger was replanted on the thumb stump and in another two patients, an amputated middle finger and ring finger were used. The patients had a minimum followup of 12 months (mean, 18 months; range, 12-45 months). All newly transplanted thumbs survived resulting in the patients having satisfactory postoperative hand function and appearance.

  10. Pain Management: Post-Amputation Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain Management Post-Amputation Pain Volume 8 · Issue 2 · March/April 1998 Text size Larger text Smaller text Java ... of the most frequently asked questions. Ideas about management are one of the frequent topics of conversation ...

  11. Transfemoral amputation after failed knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Morville Schrøder, Henrik; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfemoral amputation is considered the last treatment option for failed knee arthroplasty. The extent to which this procedure is performed is not well known. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and causes of amputation following failure of knee arthroplasty...... in a nationwide population. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register. With use of individual data linkage, 92,785 primary knee arthroplasties performed from 1997 to 2013 were identified. Of these, 258...... for causes related to failed knee arthroplasty. The 15-year cumulative incidence of amputation was 0.32% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23% to 0.48%). The annual incidence of amputation following arthroplasties performed from 1997 to 2002 was 0.025% compared with 0.018% following arthroplasties performed...

  12. Special Considerations for Multiple Limb Amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Pasquina, Paul F.; Miller, Matthew; CARVALHO, A. J. de; Corcoran, Michael; Vandersea, James; Johnson, Elizabeth; Chen, Yin-Ting

    2014-01-01

    It has been estimated that more than 1.6 million individuals in the United States have undergone at least one amputation. The literature abounds with research of the classifications of such injuries, their etiologies, epidemiologies, treatment regimens, average age of onset (average age of amputation), and much more. The subpopulation that is often overlooked in these evaluations, however, is comprised of individuals who have suffered multiple limb loss. The challenges faced by those with sin...

  13. Functional results after a Krukenberg amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, J; Schiappacasse, C; Heredia, A; Martina, J D; Geertzen, J H B

    2005-04-01

    This case report presents a 51 year old female patient who had a train accident in 1999. She suffered bilateral trans-tibial and bilateral trans-radial amputations. In this paper, the evolution of the right transradial amputation where eventually a Krukenberg procedure was performed, is described as is its good functional outcome after rehabilitation treatment. After this first procedure the patient also asked for the Krukenberg procedure for her left arm.

  14. Functional results after a Krukenberg amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Freire, J.; Schiappacasse, C; Heredia, A.; Martina, JD; Geertzen, JHB

    2005-01-01

    This case report presents a 51 year old female patient who had a train accident in 1999. She suffered bilateral trans-tibial and bilateral trans-radial amputations. In this paper, the evolution of the right trans-radial amputation where eventually a Krukenberg procedure was performed, is described as is its good functional outcome after rehabilitation treatment. After this first procedure the patient also asked for the Krukenberg procedure for her left arm.

  15. Association between Functional Severity and Amputation Type with Rehabilitation Outcomes in Patients with Lower Limb Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol M. Karmarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine independent influences of functional level and lower limb amputation type on inpatient rehabilitation outcomes. We conducted a secondary data analysis for patients with lower limb amputation who received inpatient medical rehabilitation (N = 26,501. The study outcomes included length of stay, discharge functional status, and community discharge. Predictors included the 3-level case mix group variable and a 4-category amputation variable. Age of the sample was 64.5 years (13.4 and 64% were male. More than 75% of patients had a dysvascular-related amputation. Patients with bilateral transfemoral amputations and higher functional severity experienced longest lengths of stay (average 13.7 days and lowest functional rating at discharge (average 79.4. Likelihood of community discharge was significantly lower for those in more functionally severe patients but did not differ between amputation categories. Functional levels and amputation type are associated with rehabilitation outcomes in inpatient rehabilitation settings. Patients with transfemoral amputations and those in case mix group 1003 (admission motor score less than 36.25 generally experience poorer outcomes than those in other case mix groups. These relationships may be associated with other demographic and/or health factors, which should be explored in future research.

  16. Fingertip Amputation Treatment: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew J; Rivlin, Michael; Kirkpatrick, William; Abboudi, Jack; Jones, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Distal fingertip amputations are common injuries in work- and non-work-related accidents. There is a paucity of evidence to support use of any one treatment. We conducted a study to better understand how surgeon and patient factors influence the treatment preferences for distal fingertip amputations among a cross section of US and international hand surgeons. We sent a 16-question survey to the American Association for Hand Surgery and reciprocal international hand societies and analyzed the response data using a logistic regression model. We hypothesized that hand surgeons' treatment preferences would be varied and influenced by surgeon and patient demographics. One hundred ninety-eight hand surgeons (62% US, 38% international) responded to the survey. For each clinical scenario (Allen levels 2, 3, and 4 and volar oblique amputations), there were wide variations in treatment preferences. Wound care was less likely performed by surgeons with more than 30 years of experience or plastic surgery backgrounds. Replantation was less likely performed by US surgeons and private practice surgeons. Pedicle and homodigital flaps were more commonly performed internationally. Surgeons in practice for less than 5 years were more likely to perform skeletal shortening. For all levels and orientations of fingertip amputation queried, there is a wide range of treatment preferences. Our survey results highlight the need for a prospective randomized trial to elucidate the most effective treatments for fingertip amputations.

  17. Quality of life of eye amputated patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Ekholm, Ola; Prause, Jan U

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate eye-amputated patients’ health-related quality of life, perceived stress, self-rated health, job separation because of illness or disability and socioeconomic position. Methods: Patients were recruited from a tertiary referral centre situated in Copenhagen. Inclusion criteria......-administered questionnaire containing health-related quality of life (SF-36), the perceived stress scale and answered questions about self-rated health, job changes because of illness or disability and socioeconomic status. These results were compared with findings from the Danish Health Interview Survey 2005. Results......% of the study population has retired or changed to a part-time job because of eye disease. The percentage of eye amputated patients, who were divorced or separated, was twice as high as in the general population. Conclusion: The impact of an eye amputation is considerable. The quality of life, perceived stress...

  18. Advanced prosthetic techniques for below knee amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, T B

    1985-02-01

    Recent advances in the evaluation of the amputation stump, the materials that are available for prosthetic application, techniques of improving socket fit, and prosthetic finishings promise to dramatically improve amputee function. Precision casting techniques for providing optimal fit of the amputation stump using materials such as alginate are described. The advantages of transparent check sockets for fitting the complicated amputation stump are described. Advances in research that promise to provide more functional prosthetic feet and faster and more reliable socket molding are the use of CAD-CAM (computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing) and the use of gait analysis techniques to aid in the alignment of the prosthesis after socket fitting. Finishing techniques to provide a more natural appearing prosthesis are described. These advances will gradually spread to the entire prosthetic profession.

  19. Successful microsurgical replantation of an amputated penis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchit Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile amputation is an uncommon injury for which immediate surgical replantation is warranted. Microsurgical replantation is the “standard” method for penile replantation. Early replantation yields a high success and low complication rate. We report a case of a 34-year-old male who presented with amputation at the proximal penile shaft which was successfully replanted using microsurgical techniques. Minor skin necrosis was noted post-operatively which was debrided and covered with skin graft. Follow-up at 6 months showed satisfactory cosmetic appearance, normal voiding, return of sensations and erectile function. The level of evidence was V.

  20. Successful Replantation of Amputated Penile Shaft following Industrial Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ariafar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Penile amputation is an uncommon urological emergency. Although rare, traumatic amputation of penis is a challenging injury to treat. However, modern microsurgical reconstruction techniques have improved success rate of penile replantation and become the procedure of choice for managing these patients. Herein, we report on a case of penile amputation following an industrial accident.

  1. Level selection in leg amputation for arterial occlusive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P

    1982-01-01

    In 102 leg amputations for arterial occlusion including 84 below-knee (BK), 16 above-knee (AD) and 2 through-knee (TK) amputations, the amputation level was determined by means of clinical criteria. The healing results and the selection of levels were then compared with sealed preoperative measur...

  2. Rehabilitacija ljudi po amputaciji: Rehabilitation of people after amputation: Rehabilitation of people after amputation:

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The article presents the level of the evidence that exists in the literature on rehabilitation of people after lower and upper limb amputation. We found that there is not much high-quality evidence available in this field of rehabilitation.

  3. The mangled limb: salvage versus amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinsky, Philip R; Webb, Lawrence X; Harvey, Edward J; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2011-01-01

    A mangled extremity is defined as a limb with injury to three of four systems in the extremity. The decision to salvage or amputate the injured limb has generated much controversy in the literature, with studies to support advantages of each approach. Various scoring systems have proved unreliable in predicting the need for amputation or salvage; however, a recurring theme in the literature is that the key to limb viability seems to be the severity of the soft-tissue injury. Factors such as associated injuries, patient age, and comorbidities (such as diabetes) also should be considered. Attempted limb salvage should be considered only if a patient is hemodynamically stable enough to tolerate the necessary surgical procedures and blood loss associated with limb salvage. For persistently hemodynamically unstable patients and those in extremis, life comes before limb. Recently, the Lower Extremity Assessment Project study attempted to answer the question of whether amputation or limb salvage achieves a better outcome. The study also evaluated other factors, including return-to-work status, impact of the level of and bilaterality of the amputation, and economic cost. There appears to be no significant difference in return to work, functional outcomes, or the cost of treatment (including the prosthesis) between the two groups. A team approach with different specialties, including orthopaedics, plastic surgery, vascular surgery and trauma general surgery, is recommended for treating patients with a mangled extremity.

  4. Contralateral Total Hip Arthroplasty After Hindquarter Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, Scott M. M.; Patton, James T.; Luscombe, Jonathan C.; Grimer, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the management and outcome of a 62-year old lady who developed severe osteoarthritis of the hip, nine years after a hindquarter amputation for radiation-induced sarcoma of the contralateral pelvis. The difficulties of stabilising the pelvis intraoperatively and the problems of postoperative rehabilitation are outlined. The operation successfully relieved her pain and restored limited mobility. PMID:17496994

  5. Contralateral Total Hip Arthroplasty After Hindquarter Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. M. Sommerville

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the management and outcome of a 62-year old lady who developed severe osteoarthritis of the hip, nine years after a hindquarter amputation for radiation-induced sarcoma of the contralateral pelvis. The difficulties of stabilising the pelvis intraoperatively and the problems of postoperative rehabilitation are outlined. The operation successfully relieved her pain and restored limited mobility.

  6. Functional and Clinical Outcomes of Upper Extremity Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbons, Peter; Medvedev, Gleb

    2015-12-01

    Upper extremity amputation is an uncommon but often necessary procedure. It can be required as a result of trauma, infection, or malignancy. Amputation is a life-changing procedure. Careful planning for it must not only include the level of amputation and assurance of durable soft-tissue coverage of the amputation site, but it must also consider patients' goals and occupations, as well as social factors affecting amputees. The choice of prosthesis is an individual matter, but new technology permits lighter and more multifunctional prostheses. Targeted muscle reinnervation can be used to achieve improved myoelectric signaling and possibly decrease limb pain following amputation. Rehabilitation is crucial to achieving favorable results.

  7. Obesity paradox in amputation risk among nonelderly diabetic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Min-Woong; Budiman-Mak, Elly; Oh, Elissa H; Park, Michael S; Stuck, Rodney M; Stone, Neil J; Pearce, William B

    2012-02-01

    The association between BMI and amputation risk is not currently well known. We used data for a cohort of diabetic patients treated in the US Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System in 2003. Men aged amputation risk and amputation-free survival during the next 5 years (2004-2008). Compared to overweight individuals (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)), the risks of amputation and treatment failure (amputation or death) were higher for patients with BMI amputations (HR = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.39-0.73) during follow-up as overweight individuals. While the amputation risk continued to decrease for higher BMI, amputation-free survival showed a slight upturn at BMI >40 kg/m(2). The association between obesity and amputation risk in our data shows a pattern consistent with "obesity paradox" observed in many health conditions. More research is needed to better understand pathophysiological mechanisms that may explain the paradoxical association between obesity and lower-extremity amputation (LEA) risk.

  8. Amputations in Sickle Cell Disease: Case Series and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximo, Claudia; Olalla Saad, Sara T; Thome, Eleonora; Queiroz, Ana Maria Mach; Lobo, Clarisse; Ballas, Samir K

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we describe four new patients with sickle cell disease who had limb amputations. Two of the patients had sickle cell anemia [Hb S (HBB: c.20A > T) (β(S)/β(S))] with refractory leg ulcers that required amputations. The third patient had sickle cell trait with an extensive leg ulcer that was associated with epidermoid carcinoma. The fourth patient had amputations of both forearms and feet due to a misdiagnosis of dactylitis. Review of the literature showed that the indications for amputations in sickle cell disease included three distinct categories: mythical beliefs, therapeutic and malpractice. All therapeutic amputations were for severely painful, large, recalcitrant leg ulcers that failed non-interventional therapies. Amputation resulted in pain relief and better quality of life. Phantom neuropathic pain was not a major issue post-operatively. It was absent, transient or well controlled with antidepressants. Limb function was restored post-amputation with prosthetic artificial limbs, wheelchairs or crutches. Malpractice amputations were due to misdiagnosis or to cryotherapy by exposing the painful limb to ice water resulting in thrombosis, gangrene and amputation. We strongly suggest that leg amputations should be considered in the management of certain patients with severe extensive refractory leg ulcers, and topical cryotherapy should never be used to manage sickle cell pain.

  9. Bilateral lower limb amputations as a result of landmine injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atesalp, A S; Erler, K; Gür, E; Köseğlu, E; Kirdemir, V; Demiralp, B

    1999-04-01

    Landmine explosions cause most of the war injuries in the battlefield. Amputations resulting from severe injuries reveal serious problems despite the improvements in surgery. Bilateral lower limb amputations have more impact than unilateral on social life. Some 29 cases with lower limb amputations due to landmine injuries were treated in the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Gülhane Military Medical Academy between January 1992 and December 1996. Amputation levels were as follows: 1 case had hip disarticulation and a trans-femoral amputation, 6 had bilateral trans-femoral amputations, 6 had trans-femoral and trans-tibial amputations, 12 had bilateral trans-tibial amputations, 1 had trans-femoral and Chopart amputations and the remaining 3 cases had trans-tibial and Chopart amputations. The initial treatment was done for all cases in the first 6-8 hours after injury at the field hospitals. Aggressive debridement, excision and primary closure were performed. None of the stumps required reamputations and/or revision. No case had gas gangrene or tetanus. Postoperative, pre-prosthetic training programme which ranged between 30-120 days with an average 48 days; and prosthesis fitting and adequate post-prosthetic training programme which ranged 32-126 (average 94) days was applied. All the cases were followed-up with a mean of 38.5 months (14-72 months). Nine (9) cases (31%) returned to their previous occupation, while 20 (69%) cases had to change their jobs.

  10. Amputation of polymelia in a layer chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Seida, Ashraf M

    2014-06-01

    Polymelia was rarely recorded in birds; therefore, this report records the clinical and radiographic findings in a case of polymelia in a 7-mo-old layer Fayoumi chicken and the outcome of its amputation. The hen had two pericloacal extra limbs located caudal to the normal ones in an inverted position. The extra limbs were immovable and loosely attached to the underlying tissues. The supernumerary limbs had normal skin with ill-developed feathers. The extra limbs were fused proximally and crossed distally. Plain radiographic examination showed unequal numbers of bones and digits in both extra limbs. The right extra limb had a femur and tarsometatarsus while the left extra one had femur, tibiotarsus, and tarsometatarsus bones. The extra limbs appeared smaller than the normal ones and had neither muscles nor tendons. Amputation of the extra limbs under local infiltration analgesia was easy, safe, and curative.

  11. [Psychological adjustment following lower limb amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyi, Lilla Krisztina; Lábadi, Beatrix

    2015-09-27

    Rehabilitation of lower limb amputees and the fitting of their prosthesis depend highly on the psychological adjustment process and motivational state of the patient. The loss of a limb is extremely challenging and can cause various physical and psychological problems. Depression, anxiety, decreased well-being and quality of life, body image dissatisfaction and changes in self-concept and identity are frequent after lower limb amputation. In the interest of adjustment patients have to cope with the emerging changes and difficulties in their lifes as well as the problems in psychological functioning. It is important for them to accept the alterations in their body and identity, and integrate them in a new self-concept in which process motivation is a fundamental issue. The aim of this article is to review the literature on psychological consequences of lower limb amputation, and to propose an integrative way of rehabilitation for lower limb amputees.

  12. Forequarter amputation for recurrent breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pundi, Krishna N.; AlJamal, Yazan N.; Ruparel, Raaj K.; Farley, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Localized excision combined with radiation and chemotherapy represents the current standard of care for recurrent breast cancer. However, in certain conditions a forequarter amputation may be employed for these patients. Presentation of case: We present a patient with recurrent breast cancer who had a complicated treatment history including multiple courses of chemotherapy, radiation, and local surgical excision. With diminishing treatment options, she opted for a forequarter...

  13. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Stapanian, Adrienne M.P.; Staley, Keith E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  14. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A; Stapanian, Adrienne M P; Staley, Keith E

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  15. [Amputation or reconstruction of a circulatory compromised severely injured extremity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høiness, P; Røise, O

    1999-11-20

    18 patients treated with primary or secondary amputations after severe lower limb open fractures were studied. All limbs had clinical signs of a compromised circulation at the primary evaluation. The various injuries are described and discussed with respect to the general guidelines for primary amputation. The Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) and Nerve, Ischemia, Soft tissues, Skeletal, Shock, Age (NISSSA) scores were calculated. In view of the described injuries, primary amputation was indicated in ten patients according to the general recommendations, 11 patients according to NISSSA and 15 patients according to MESS. Delayed amputation leads t a significantly (p = 0.005) higher number of operative procedures than early amputation (9.2 vs. 2.9 treatments). The decision of whether to amputate or not should be based on sound clinical judgement, but injury scores such as MESS and NISSSA may be helpful.

  16. Prosthetic fitting problems of the quasi-Syme amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, G

    1981-10-01

    Unless the original Syme amputation technique has been precisely followed, an amputation stump capable of tolerating little or no end-bearing will frequently result. Such a stump must be fitted with a below knee type of prosthesis as if the patient were a below-knee amputee. Even though it is not designed for other than a below-knee amputation, the socket can be modified to provide a satisfactory prosthesis for a Quasi-Syme stump.

  17. Lower-limb amputation and body weight changes in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson J. Littman, PhD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the relationship between lower-limb amputation (LLA and subsequent changes in body weight. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using clinical and administrative databases to identify and follow weight changes in 759 males with amputation (partial foot amputation [PFA], n = 396; transtibial amputation [TTA], n = 267; and transfemoral amputation [TFA], n = 96 and 3,790 men without amputation frequency-matched (5:1 on age, body mass index, diabetes, and calendar year from eight Department of Veterans Affairs medical care facilities in the Pacific Northwest. We estimated and compared longitudinal percent weight change from baseline up to 39 mo of follow-up in men with and without amputation. Weight gain in the 2 yr after amputation was significantly more in men with an amputation than without, and in men with a TTA or TFA (8%–9% increase than in men with a PFA (3%–6% increase. Generally, percent weight gain peaked at 2 yr and was followed by some weight loss in the third year. These findings indicate that LLA is often followed by clinically important weight gain. Future studies are needed to better understand the reasons for weight gain and to identify intervention strategies to prevent excess weight gain and the deleterious consequences that may ensue.

  18. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, OCS

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p < 0.001. African American race, longer length of hospital stay, older age, congestive heart failure, paralysis, other neurological disease, renal failure, and admission from a nursing facility were negatively associated with prosthetic prescription. Being married was positively associated. After adjusting for patient characteristics, people with ankle amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why.

  19. Amputation of extremity in patients with atherosclerotic gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsareva Yu.O.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of investigation — to analyze the results of treatment of patients with atherosclerotic gangrene of a limb, to identify the causes of adverse outcomes amputation. Materials and methods: We analyzed the results of examination and treatment of 218 patients with atherosclerotic gangrene of the limb. Good outcome of amputation was considered the primary surgical wound healing of the stump. Suppuration, secondary healing, re-amputation and death we attributed to the adverse results of amputation. Results: The adverse outcomes of amputation due to technical errors in surgery, properly chosen level, inadequate drainage of the wound stump, an unsuccessful operation on the arteries of a limb, inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy, patient's age, functional capabilities of myocardium, the duration of critical ischemia, as well as the lack of psychological adaptation of patients before amputation. Conclusion: To decide the need for amputation in patients with atherosclerotic gangrene follows the assessment of possible vascular reconstructive surgery. In determining the level of amputation is necessary to objectively assess the degree of disruption of regional blood flow using multilevel manometry and laser Dopplerflowmetry. In preparation for amputation should be paid special attention to the correction of rheological and coagulation properties of blood, normalization of the functional state of the myocardium, as well as specialized psychotherapeutic training for timely and adequate psychological adaptation of the patient

  20. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs) were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why.

  1. Estetske proteze po delni amputaciji prstov: Aesthetic prostheses after partial finger amputation: Aesthetic prostheses after partial finger amputation:

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Partial finger amputation affects patients from the functional as well as from the aesthetic point of view. In accordance with the number of amputated fingers, abilities and capabilities of the hand are reduced and the patient's self-image is altered. The amputated part of the finger can be replaced by an aesthetic silicone prosthesis, which is individually coloured and fitted. In anaplastology, as the field of aesthetic prosthetics is nowadays called, several different approaches to prosthes...

  2. Classification of the pattern of intrauterine amputations of the upper limb in constriction ring syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qattan, M M

    2000-06-01

    Twenty patients with congenital upper limb amputations caused by constriction rings were reviewed to classify the pattern of these amputations. In the 20 patients studied, 31 upper limbs had congenital amputations. The pattern of amputation was classified into three types. Proximal upper limb amputation was considered type I and was only seen in one limb. The most common pattern of amputation was digital amputation associated with "coning" or "superimposition" of the digits (type II) and was seen in 20 hands. Type II amputations were subclassified according to the involvement of all, ulnar, radial, or central digits by the constriction ring. In type III amputations (N = 10 limbs), there was no associated coning or superimposition of the digits. This type of amputation was subclassified into type IIIA (multiple-digit amputations within the same hand) and type III B (single-digit amputation). Associated anomalies are reviewed and the pathogenesis of constriction rings is discussed.

  3. Mucormycosis: a rare complication of an amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chaumont, Arthus; Pierret, Charles; Janvier, Frédéric; Goudard, Yvain; de Kerangal, Xavier; Chapuis, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare but serious opportunistic fungal infection. Several clinical forms have been described, including cutaneous localization that is frequently associated with soft tissue trauma or burns. We report a case of cutaneous mucormycosis in a diabetic patient with severe occlusive arterial disease. The diagnosis was made early with mold growth on an amputation wound and the presence of nonseptate hyphae on direct microscopic examination, later identified on culture as Lichtheimia ramosa. Aggressive treatment, including the control of underlying diseases, systemic and local amphotericin B, and extensive surgical debridement permitted successful outcomes.

  4. Lower-limb amputation and body weight changes in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Alyson J; Thompson, Mary Lou; Arterburn, David E; Bouldin, Erin; Haselkorn, Jodie K; Sangeorzan, Bruce J; Boyko, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between lower-limb amputation (LLA) and subsequent changes in body weight. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using clinical and administrative databases to identify and follow weight changes in 759 males with amputation (partial foot amputation [PFA], n = 396; transtibial amputation [TTA], n = 267; and transfemoral amputation [TFA], n = 96) and 3,790 nondisabled persons frequency-matched (5:1) on age, body mass index, diabetes, and calendar year from eight Department of Veterans Affairs medical care facilities in the Pacific Northwest. We estimated and compared longitudinal percent weight change from baseline during up to 39 mo of follow-up in participants with and without amputation. Weight gain in the 2 yr after amputation was significantly more in men with an amputation than without, and in men with a TTA or TFA (8%-9% increase) than in men with a PFA (3%-6% increase). Generally, percent weight gain peaked at 2 yr and was followed by some weight loss in the third year. These findings indicate that LLA is often followed by clinically important weight gain. Future studies are needed to better understand the reasons for weight gain and to identify intervention strategies to prevent excess weight gain and the deleterious consequences that may ensue.

  5. Differences in minor amputation rate in diabetic foot disease throughout Europe are in part explained by differences in disease severity at presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Battum, P; Schaper, N; Prompers, L

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of minor amputation may vary significantly, and determinants of minor amputation have not been studied systematically. We evaluated minor amputation rate, the determinants of minor amputation and differences in amputation rate between European centres....

  6. [Amputation and prosthesis attachment of the lower extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, I; Beirau, M; Ekkernkamp, A; Matthes, G

    2015-06-01

    Approximately 61,000 amputations are performed in Germany per year. In most cases the lower limbs are affected. The reasons for amputations are arteriosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, severe infections, tumors and complex trauma to the extremities. A decision must be made concerning whether a salvage procedure or amputation is appropriate, specially after trauma. In cases where the need for amputation is clear, the site of amputation needs to be planned in advance with the aim of creating a stump which allows sufficient prosthetic attachment. Adjuvant pain therapy is mandatory, especially in order to avoid subsequent phantom pain. The type of prosthetic restoration is influenced by the grade of mobility and personal requirements of patients. Moreover, aftercare and adjusted rehabilitation are recommended.

  7. Influence of adjustments to amputation and artificial limb on quality of life in patients following lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, Richa; van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the relationship between adjustments to amputation and artificial limb, and quality of life (QoL), and to analyse the influence of sociodemographic, medical and amputation-related factors on this relationship. Patients with unilateral and noncongenital

  8. The Mangled Extremity: When Should It Be Amputated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirschl; Dahners

    1996-07-01

    Amputation of a mangled extremity is repugnant to the patient and the surgeon. However, prolonged unsuccessful attempts at salvage are costly, highly morbid, and sometimes lethal. Much discussion has taken place regarding which criteria predict successful salvage, and predictive indices have been proposed in an attempt to identify limbs for which attempted salvage is unlikely to succeed. The Mangled Extremity Severity Score, or MESS, system is the most thoroughly validated of the various classification systems, but at present there is no predictive scale that can be used with confidence to determine whether to amputate or attempt to salvage a mangled lower extremity. Therefore, these systems should serve only as guides to supplement the surgeon's clinical judgment and experience. Although salvage for severe injuries below the knee can be difficult and the functional outcome unpredictable, prosthetic function after transtibial amputation is generally good. Conversely, prosthetic function after transfemoral or transradial amputation is often poor, while salvage of some useful function for injuries above the knee is often successful. When limb loss is inevitable, immediate amputation is desirable. If obvious criteria for primary amputation are not met, however, it is reasonable to consider an initial salvage attempt, observation, and subsequent early secondary amputation.

  9. Hel igen efter amputation - og vejen dertil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Elisabeth Bomholt

    2009-01-01

    & Maclachlan 2004). Antallet af benamputationer i Danmark er steget, og skyldes i Vesten hovedsagelig (85-90%) karsygdomme, hvoraf ca. 1/3 skyldes diabetes. To af Danmarks otte folkesygdomme er netop hjertekarsygdomme og type 2-diabetes (SIF 2005), som for en stor del skyldes livsstil. I Danmark har mellem 200.000...... og 300.000 mennesker type 2- diabetes og forekomsten er kraftigt stigende og forekommer i stadig yngre aldersgrupper (Dansk Sygeplejeråd 2006) med amputation som mulig konsekvens. Formål Opnå indsigt i hvad der kan medvirke til, at mennesker kan føle sig hele igen efter en benamputation, føle sig...

  10. Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis leading to an amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgeniou, Evgenios; Iyer, Srinivasan

    2012-08-24

    Flexor tenosynovitis is an aggressive closed-space infection of the digital flexor tendon sheaths of the hand. We present a case of pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis in an immunocompromised patient and discuss the importance of early diagnosis and referral to a specialist hand surgery unit. A 61-year-old man visited his general practitioner because of swelling and tenderness of his left index finger. The patient was discharged on oral antibiotics but returned 4 days after because of deterioration of his symptoms and was referred to a plastic surgery unit. A diagnosis of flexor tenosynovitis was made and the patient required multiple debridements in theatre, resulting in the amputation of the infected finger. Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is a relatively common but often misdiagnosed hand infection. Patients with suspected flexor tenosynovitis should be referred and treated early to avoid significant morbidity, especially when risk factors for poor prognosis are present.

  11. Minor amputations for diabetic foot salvage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Y. Habel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulceration in diabetic patients is a frequent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM, necessitating hospitalization for control of infection, wound care and glycemic control. These patients are at risk for potential loss of the involved limb as well as for future loss of the contralateral limb. Diabetic foot is the consequence of peripheral neuropathy complicated by infrapopliteal peripheral vascular disease. Most of the patients present with chronic plantar ulceration and with cellulitis or an abscess. In a significant number of patients, it is observed that the frequency of life or limb threatening infection is less with an intact skin cover. Limb salvage employs the use of culture specific antibiotics, sharp debridement or a minor amputation, wound care and/or skin cover as the situation demands.

  12. FROM CULTURAL IMPOTENCE TO CULTURAL AMPUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вячеслав Владимирович Суханов

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cultural space of any state is formed by a population that is within its borders. In this article, the author introduces a new cultural definitions «cultural impotence» and «cultural amputation», justifying their use, both in terms of population of the Russian Federation and the European Union and America. The article analyzes the state of society and the cultural factors that influence the development of society in Russia, there are options to bring the country out of a deep cultural crisis. Also established a close relationship between the domestic policy of the state and development of culture.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-2-1

  13. The social and economic consequences of finger amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovgaard, C; Angermann, P; Hovgaard, D

    1994-06-01

    120 patients with amputation of at least 1 of the 4 ulnar fingers were admitted to hospital. In none was replantation considered to be possible because of serious damage to the soft tissues and bone. 12 (3-18) years after the accident 80 percent of the patients assessed their condition as good or fair, even those with proximal amputation or loss of 2 or 3 fingers. Our observations do not support replantation when only one of the second-to-fifth fingers have been amputated.

  14. Obesity and metabolic disorders in adults with lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdibaylo, S F

    1996-10-01

    Anthropometric and biochemical research was conducted on 94 subjects with various levels of lower limb amputation. The purpose of the work was to investigate the features of obesity progression and disorders of cholesterin metabolism, as well as to develop adequate training exercises. Anthropometric research was conducted by calipermetry; the biochemical research was done by various methods to determine exempt and total cholesterin and triglycerides in the blood serum. The research establishes the frequency of obesity progression relative to the level of amputation, as well as the features of the excessive body mass. Type 11A hyperlipoproteidemia was evident. It is characterized by rapid progress of atherosclerotic vascular disease and coronary disease (CD). Cyclic and acyclic exercises were developed for prophylaxis and therapy. Anthropometric research on the determination of body fat mass was conducted on 68 subjects with various levels of lower limb amputation. The nondirect method of measuring skin folds of several parts of the body was used to determine the extent of lipogenesis. Biochemical research of cholesterin metabolism was conducted on 26 subjects with lower limb amputation (a different group). Anthropometric research revealed an increase of body fat mass directly related to the level of amputation. The largest amount of fat in the body mass was noted for the subjects with bilateral transfemoral (above-knee) amputation or transfemoral plus transtibial (below-knee) amputation. Both groups averaged 25.9%. The body fat mass increased chiefly in the subcutaneous fat. Increase of the internal fat mass was less noticeable. The frequency of obesity progression in subjects with unilateral transtibial amputation equaled 37.9%; in subjects with transfemoral amputation, 48.0%; and in subjects with bilateral transfemoral or transfemoral plus transtibial amputation, 64.2%. Young subjects demonstrated obesity progression during the first year after amputation

  15. Incidence of repeat amputation after partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy: an 11-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkosky, Sara L; Roukis, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    The reliability and durability of partial first ray amputation in patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy has recently been questioned. In an effort to determine the repeat amputation rate after a partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy at our institution, we performed an 11-year retrospective review. A total of 59 patients (40 males and 19 females), with a mean age of 63 (range 39 to 97) years, were included. The mean follow-up was 33.8 (range 1 to 123) months, with initial incision healing occurring in all 59 patients. Despite the initial healing, 69% developed a mean of 3.1 subsequent foot ulcerations at a mean of 10.5 months, 36% required ancillary surgical procedures, and more than 90% of patients were prescribed multiple courses of antibiotics at a mean of 26.6 clinic visits during the follow-up period. A total of 25 patients (42.4%) underwent more proximal repeat amputation at a mean of 25 (range 1 to 97) months after the initial partial first ray amputation. The results of our retrospective review revealed that nearly 1 of every 2 patients with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy who undergo a partial first ray amputation will progress to a more proximal repeat amputation, despite initial healing. These data question the reliability and durability of this level of amputation as a primary procedure in this patient population. A more proximal level amputation, such as a balanced transmetatarsal, might provide a better functional and reliable residual weightbearing foot and should be considered at the initial presentation. This is especially true given that nearly one half of the patients died during the follow-up period. However, this remains a matter for conjecture because of the limited data available; therefore, additional prospective investigations are warranted.

  16. Amputation in the diabetic: ten years experience in a district general hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Britton, J P; Barrie, W. W.

    1987-01-01

    Over a period of 10 years, 149 amputations were performed for lower limb ischaemia in 119 diabetic patients. Thirty patients required amputation of the second limb. Ninety per cent of the patients were over the age of 60 years. Sixty four ischaemic limbs were treated by primary local amputation or debridement--29 healed successfully, 30 proceeded to a higher amputation. The incidence of multiple local operations was high. A below knee amputation was performed in 56 limbs--7 failed to heal and...

  17. Pain Management in Four-Limb Amputation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Nafisseh S; Warner, Matthew A; Moeschler, Susan M; Hoelzer, Bryan C

    2015-09-01

    Acute pain following amputation can be challenging to treat due to multiple underlying mechanisms and variable clinical responses to treatment. Furthermore, poorly controlled preoperative pain is a risk factor for developing chronic pain. Evidence suggests that epidural analgesia and peripheral nerve blockade may decrease the severity of residual limb pain and the prevalence of phantom pain after lower extremity amputation. We present the perioperative analgesic management of a patient with gangrene of the bilateral upper and lower extremities as a result of septic shock and prolonged vasopressor administration who underwent four-limb amputation in a single procedure. A multimodal analgesic regimen was utilized, including titration of preoperative opioid and neuropathic pain agents, perioperative intravenous, epidural and peripheral nerve catheter infusions, and postoperative oral medication titration. More than 8 months postoperatively, the patient has satisfactory pain control with no evidence for phantom limb pain. To our knowledge, there have been no publications to date concerning analgesic regimens in four-limb amputation.

  18. Estimation of amputation level with a laser Doppler flowmeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Jørgensen, J P; Vollmer-Larsen, B;

    1989-01-01

    Leg amputation levels were decided in 24 patients suffering from atherosclerosis, using the conventional techniques of segmental blood pressure and radioisotope skin clearance. The skin microcirculation was measured and recorded before operation with a laser doppler flowmeter. A high correlation ...

  19. Esthetic prostheses in minor and major upper limb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, M E; Pho, R W; Pereira, B P

    2001-08-01

    In summary, the impact and value of esthetic prostheses on amputee rehabilitation and their long-term use were demonstrated in this study to have no correlation with the severity of injury and level of amputation. All patients with traumatic amputation should be given equal opportunity to receive prostheses if the service is readily available. Whether use of prostheses is temporary or long-term, they help patients cope with the traumatic life experience of limb loss.

  20. Replantation of multiple digits and hand amputations: four case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Salah, Mohammed Murshid; Khalid, Khalid N

    2008-01-01

    This study reports four cases of hand avulsion at the proximal wrist level and multiple digits amputation were received in plastic and hand surgery unit during the year 2007–2008. All patients were male labors between 22–30 years old, and the amputation due to machine injuries. Successful replantation were achieved, after a period of follow up with occupational therapy all patients regain good functional and cosmetic results. This study proves the strong indication of replantation of multiple...

  1. Ten Years at War: Comprehensive Analysis of Amputation Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    ceptionally difficult to manage .11,12 There have been numerous studies published examining major amputations caused by extremity trauma during the OIF, OEF...Disarticulation, knee disarticulation, elbow disarticulation, wrist disarticulation 1 0 Total 366 30 (of all amputees) J Trauma Acute Care Surg Volume 73...to amputation, Injury Severity Score (ISS), age, rank, number of trauma admissions, and number of troops deployed. RESULTS: There were 1,221 amputees

  2. Quality of Life of Nigerians with Unilateral Lower Limb Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Olusanjo Akosile

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the QoL of Nigerians with lower limb amputation and to investigate the influence of some clinical and socio-demographic variables on it. Method: Forty-seven individuals with lower limb amputation participated in this study. Participants’ age, gender, marital status, occupation, time since amputation, level of amputation, affected limb and use of prosthesis were recorded. Quality of life was then measured using the WHO QOL-BREF. Data were analysed using mean and standard deviation, Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test at 0.05 alpha levels. Results: Participants’ overall health and QoL scores were 3.6(SD 0.9 and 3.9(SD 0.7 respectively. Male subjects had significantly higher scores than females in the domains of physical health (p = 0.007, social relationships (p = 0.024 and overall health (p = 0.012. Prosthesis-wearing subjects scored significantly higher in the domains of physical health (p = 0.015, psychological health (p = 0.008 and environment (p = 0.011 and overall health (0.033, than those not wearing prosthesis. Level of amputation, leg dominance and pre-amputation occupational category had no significant influence on participants’ QoL. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that the QoL of individuals with lower limb amputation in Nigeria is moderate. The only factors which have significant influence on some QoL domains are gender and use of prosthesis.Implications: Individuals with lower limb amputation, particularly females and those not wearing prosthesis, require special attention. Clinicians should identify barriers to the use of prosthesis so as to enhance their quality of life.

  3. Primary amputation: is there still a place for it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setacci, F; Sirignano, P; De Donato, G; Galzerano, G; Cappelli, A; Palasciano, G; Setacci, C

    2012-02-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) continues to present a significant challenge to the vascular surgeon. Despite great advances in the treatment of DF, including open revascularization and endovascular techniques, significant numbers of amputations are still performed. The effect of aggressive revascularization on ultimate limb salvage rates continues to be debated. In the US the amputation rate has increased from 19 to 30 per 100000 persons years over the last two decades primarily due to an increase in diabetes and advancing age. Despite advances in cardiovascular treatment, in patients over 85 year of age an amputation rate of 140 per 100000 persons/year has been reported with a primary amputation (PA) still carrying an excessively high mortality rate of 13-17%. Amputation has been historically regarded as a life saving therapeutic measure. At the time the advances of surgical techniques in revascularization, diagnostic modalities and effectiveness in antimicrobial agents have unintentionally designated amputation to be the last treatment option. Nowadays we have a variety of therapeutic options to correct, modify, or circumvent the obstructive vascular pathology, such as angioplasty, atherectomy, stenting, stent graft and the traditional open surgical approach using endarterectomy, patch angioplasty, or bypass revascularization and even sympathectomy to enhance cutaneous perfusion to the toes. However it is understandable that many older patients who have received multiple limb preservation procedures have spent most of the remaining days of their lives in and out of the hospital or in a long-term care facility where high technical and sophisticated wound care techniques can be provided.

  4. Vascular surgery reduces the frequency of lower limb major amputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Bøvling, Søren; Fasting, H;

    1994-01-01

    In June 1988 a Department of Vascular Surgery was established in the county of Viborg, Denmark. In this retrospective study of the periods 1986-87 and 1989-90, we have observed a significant rise in the number of patients evaluated by a vascular surgeon before amputation, from 19 to 49...... surgical activity. The frequency of major amputations in the county in 1986-87 of 40.9 per 100,000 per year declined by 25% to 30.9 per 100,000 per year in 1989-90. We conclude that vascular surgery reduces the number of major lower limb amputations and consequently all patients threatened with amputation......%. At the same time the number of major lower limb amputations significantly decreased. This reduction was most marked in 1990 probably due to a rise of 43% in the number of distal reconstructions. The distribution between below knee, through knee and mid-thigh amputation was unaffected by the increased vascular...

  5. Rehabilitation for patients with paraplegia and lower extremity amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangyong; Hong, Yi

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] To study the characteristics and treatment strategy for patients with paraplegia and lower extremity amputation. [Subjects] Six cases were selected from among the patients admitted to the China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1991 to 2014. The criteria for the six cases were spinal cord injury with amputation immediately or in a short time (1 week) after the trauma. [Methods] General information, clinical diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and other data were analyzed. [Results] All the six cases were injured by high energy or complex energy accidents: two cases by falls after high voltage electric shock, one by an oil pipeline explosion, one by the impact of a falling tower crane and received high energy traffic accident injuries (one was hit by a train, and the other was hit by a truck at high speed). All the six cases had thoracic and lumbar vertebral injuries and complete paraplegia. Amputation stump infection occurred in four cases. After comprehensive rehabilitation treatment, patients' functional independence measure (FIM) scores improved significantly, but American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scores and ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) grades showed no significant improvement. [Conclusion] When formulating the clinical treatment and rehabilitation for spinal cord injury with amputation patients, simultaneous consideration of the characteristics of the spinal cord injury and amputation is needed to develop an individualized strategy. For spinal cord injury with limb amputation patients, prostheses should allow the improvement of patients' self-care ability.

  6. Physical and social factors determining quality of life for veterans with lower-limb amputation(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan; Ipsen, Thomas; Doherty, Patrick;

    2016-01-01

    , years of education, as well as duration and severity of phantom pain were found to be determining factors for HRQoL among veterans with lower-limb amputation. Conclusions The identified physical and social determinants were similar to those found in civilian traumatic amputees. More high quality......Purpose Most veterans live for many years after their war-related traumatic lower-limb amputation, which is why understanding which factors influence health-related quality of life (HRQoL) remains important to their long-term management. The objective of this study was to perform a review...... of the literature to summarize any evidence on the physical and social determinants for HRQoL in veterans with uni- or bilateral lower-limb amputation(s). Method MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, CINAHL, Scopus and Cochrane databases were searched systematically for eligible studies. Inclusion criteria were: traumatic lower...

  7. Dutch evidence-based guidelines for amputation and prosthetics of the lower extremity : Amputation surgery and postoperative management. Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, Jan; van der Linde, Harmen; Rosenbrand, Kitty; Conradi, Marcel; Deckers, Jos; Koning, Jan; Rietman, Hans S.; van der Schaaf, Dick; van der Ploeg, Rein; Schapendonk, Johannes; Schrier, Ernst; Duijzentkunst, Rob Smit; Spruit-van Eijk, Monica; Versteegen, Gerbrig; Voesten, Harrie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgeons still use a range of criteria to determine whether amputation is indicated. In addition, there is considerable debate regarding immediate postoperative management, especially concerning the use of immediate/delayed fitting' versus conservative elastic bandaging. Objectives: To p

  8. Tourniquets do not increase the total blood loss or re-amputation risk in transtibial amputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wied, Christian; Tengberg, Peter T; Holm, Gitte

    2017-01-01

    with sagittal flaps. The pneumatic tourniquet, when used, was inflated around the femur to a pressure of 100 mmHg above the systolic blood pressure. The number of blood transfusions within the first four postoperative days was recorded. The intraoperative blood loss (OBL), which is defined as the volume...... portion, which equals 55 g/L of haemoglobin. The TBL during the first four postoperative days was calculated based on the haemoglobin level and the estimated blood volume. The re-amputation rate was evaluated within 30 d. RESULTS: Seventy-four out of 86 consecutive patients who underwent TTA within...

  9. Influence of adjustments to amputation and artificial limb on quality of life in patients following lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Richa; van den Heuvel, Wim J A; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam; van Dijk, Jitse P

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the relationship between adjustments to amputation and artificial limb, and quality of life (QoL), and to analyse the influence of sociodemographic, medical and amputation-related factors on this relationship. Patients with unilateral and noncongenital lower limb amputation who were using artificial limb were interviewed (n=368) using structured questionnaires. The Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales (TAPES) were used to assess adjustments to amputation and artificial limb and the MOS Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) was used to assess the physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) component summary of QoL. Absence of comorbidity and residual stump pain, being employed, young age, less functional restriction, being more adjusted to limitation, increased social adjustment and less restriction in athletic activity were related to better PCS scores. Absence of comorbidity and phantom limb pain, nonuse of assistive device, being more adjusted to limitation, increased social adjustment and being less functionally restricted were related to higher MCS scores. Comorbidity had a modifying effect on both PCS and MCS scores. In addition, age, being employed and residual stump pain had a modifying influence on PCS, whereas assistive device use and phantom limb pain had a modifying influence on MCS. Our findings show that TAPES subscales have a modifying effect on the associations between several background (sociodemographic and amputation characteristics) and QoL (PCS and MCS). This indicates that adjustments to amputation and artificial limb are the key determinants of QoL in individuals following lower limb amputation.

  10. Proximal sural traction neurectomy during transtibial amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintle, Scott M; Donohue, Michael A; Shawen, Scott; Forsberg, Jonathan A; Potter, Benjamin K

    2012-02-01

    Symptomatic neuroma formation after trauma-related transtibial amputations remains a clinical problem. The sural nerve is frequently overlooked in its vulnerable subcutaneous location in the posterior myofasciocutaneous flap and commonly leads to chronic pain and decreased prosthesis use. The standard sural traction neurectomy may actually predispose the sural neuroma to form in a region that becomes symptomatic with prosthesis wear. The proposed modified proximal sural traction neurectomy using a standard or extended posterior flap begins with identification of the sural nerve in the subcutaneous tissue of the distal flap in identical fashion to a standard sural neurectomy. In the proximal posterior flap, a limited anterior approach is then performed and gentle traction on the distal end of the sural nerve aids in the identification of the most proximally accessible portion of the medial sural cutaneous nerve. After locating the medial sural cutaneous nerve proximally, a neurectomy at this location is performed, allowing the retraction of the nerve into a healthy tissue bed substantially more proximal than with a standard sural neurectomy. This technique ensures that the resulting neuroma does not form directly at the distal end of the residual limb where it is, in our experience, more likely to become symptomatic.

  11. The Diabetic Foot in a Multidisciplinary Team Setting. Number of Amputations below Ankle Level and Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbek, T E; Jansen, R B; Jørgensen, B

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To describe the number of minor lower extremity amputations and mortality for diabetes patients treated by a specialized multidisciplinary foot care team. Methods: A retrospective descriptive study of medical records from patients with diabetes treated with minor amputations at the Copenhagen...... Wound Healing Center (CWHC) at Bispebjerg Hospital from 1996-2013. Results: 777 diabetes patients treated with minor amputations were included. 77% were males and 23% were females. 80% had T2 diabetes and 20% had T1 diabetes. 89% of the patients had a foot ulcer at first contact. There was a total of 1...... 231 minor amputations. The amputations were mainly trans-metatarsal amputations and partial amputations of toes. There was an increase in the number of minor amputations, but there was also an increase in the number of referred diabetes patients, thus the ratio of amputations per admitted diabetes...

  12. From Wheelchair to Cane: Elective Transtibial Amputations in a Patient with Spina Bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Amanda; Berbrayer, David

    2015-11-01

    Spina bifida is associated with foot deformities, which may lead to foot ulcers, osteomyelitis, and limb amputation. Calcanectomy and Symes amputations have been reported successful in spina bifida. There is lack of evidence for transtibial amputations. This case describes a 27-yr-old woman with L4 level spina bifida who underwent bilateral transtibial amputations. She ambulated with bilateral ankle foot orthoses and canes until age 22. At age 22, she had bilateral foot reconstructive surgeries complicated by nonunion, ulcerations, and osteomyelitis. She was using a wheelchair by age 25. She had elective bilateral transtibial amputations at age 27 for progressive osteomyelitis. Four weeks after amputations, she was fit with bilateral prostheses. On completion of 2 mos of rehabilitation, she ambulated with a cane. This case demonstrates good functional outcomes after transtibial amputations in a young spina bifida patient. Prosthetic fitting should be considered for similar, previously high functioning spina bifida patients with transtibial amputation(s).

  13. Treatment of Fingertip Amputation in Adults by Palmar Pocketing of the Amputated Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Sun Jung

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background First suggested by Brent in 1979, the pocket principle is an alternative methodfor patients for whom a microsurgical replantation is not feasible. We report the successfulresults of a modified palmar pocket method in adults.Methods Between 2004 and 2008, we treated 10 patients by nonmicrosurgical replantationusing palmar pocketing. All patients were adults who sustained a complete fingertip amputationfrom the tip to lunula in a digits. In all of these patients, the amputation occurred due to a crushor avulsion-type injury, and a microsurgical replantation was not feasible. We used the palmarpocketing method following a composite graft in these patients and prepared the pocket in thesubcutaneous layer of the ipsilateral palm.Results Of a total of 10 cases, nine had complete survival of the replantation and one had20% partial necrosis. All of the cases were managed to conserve the fingernails, which led toacceptable cosmetic results.Conclusions A composite graft and palmar pocketing in adult cases of fingertip injuryconstitute a simple, reliable operation for digital amputation extending from the tip to thelunula. These methods had satisfactory results.

  14. Major limb amputations: A tertiary hospital experience in northwestern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalya Phillipo L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major limb amputation is reported to be a major but preventable public health problem that is associated with profound economic, social and psychological effects on the patient and family especially in developing countries where the prosthetic services are poor. The purpose of this study was to outline the patterns, indications and short term complications of major limb amputations and to compare our experience with that of other published data. Methods This was a descriptive cross-sectional study that was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre between March 2008 and February 2010. All patients who underwent major limb amputation were, after informed consent for the study, enrolled into the study. Data were collected using a pre-tested, coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 11.5 computer software. Results A total of 162 patients were entered into the study. Their ages ranged between 2–78 years (mean 28.30 ± 13.72 days. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 2:1. The majority of patients (76.5% had primary or no formal education. One hundred and twelve (69.1% patients were unemployed. The most common indication for major limb amputation was diabetic foot complications in 41.9%, followed by trauma in 38.4% and vascular disease in 8.6% respectively. Lower limbs were involved in 86.4% of cases and upper limbs in 13.6% of cases giving a lower limb to upper limb ratio of 6.4:1 Below knee amputation was the most common procedure performed in 46.3%. There was no bilateral limb amputation. The most common additional procedures performed were wound debridement, secondary suture and skin grafting in 42.3%, 34.5% and 23.2% respectively. Two-stage operation was required in 45.4% of patients. Revision amputation rate was 29.6%. Post-operative complication rate was 33.3% and surgical site infection was the most common complication accounting for 21.0%. The mean length of hospital stay was 22.4 days and mortality

  15. Risk factors for major amputation in hospitalised diabetic foot patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgoong, Sik; Jung, Suyoung; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the main cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients. Eight hundred and sixty diabetic patients were admitted to the diabetic wound centre of the Korea University Guro Hospital for foot ulcers between January 2010 and December 2013. Among them, 837 patients were successfully monitored until complete healing. Ulcers in 809 patients (96·7%) healed without major amputation and those in 28 patients (3·3%) healed with major amputation. Data of 88 potential risk factors including demographics, ulcer condition, vascularity, bioburden, neurology and serology were collected from patients in the two groups and compared. Among the 88 potential risk factors, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed in 26 risk factors. In the univariate analysis, which was carried out for these 26 risk factors, statistically significant differences were observed in 22 risk factors. In a stepwise multiple logistic analysis, six of the 22 risk factors remained statistically significant. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were 11·673 for ulcers penetrating into the bone, 8·683 for dialysis, 6·740 for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, 6·158 for hind foot ulcers, 0·641 for haemoglobin levels and 1·007 for fasting blood sugar levels. The risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients were bony invasions, dialysis, GI disorders, hind foot locations, low levels of haemoglobin and elevated fasting blood sugar levels.

  16. The scope of amputations in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solagberu, B A

    2001-09-01

    In developing countries, amputations have been performed due to trauma and infections; whereas in developed counties, trauma, diabetes and peripheral vascular diseases are the usual indications. Current practice in Nigeria suggests a change of relative indications, hence, this study. A five-year (July 1994 to June 1999) review of amputation records from the medical records, operating theatre, wards and physiotherapy department was carried out retrospectively. Amputation types, age, sex and indications were analysed. Fifty-eight amputations were performed in 56 patients (47 males, nine females, M: F = 5.2 : 1, age range 7-70 years, mean 33.3 +/- S.D 18.2). There were 42 lower and 16 upper limbs. Trauma accounted for 48.3%; followed by diabetes (29.3%), tumours (12.1%), infections (8.6%) and one indeterminate cause (1.7%). There was bias for sex, age and type of extremity as trauma was the commonest indication in male patients aged 30 years and below (and in the upper limb) whereas diabetes predominated in female patients above 30 years (and in the lower limb). Infection, as an indication for amputation, has now become a rear guard indication. Diabetes, previously uncommon, now appears in the forefront. These findings call for early detection and aggressive management of diabetic foot lesions.

  17. Major limb amputations in Seremban Hospital: a review of 204 cases from 1997-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazmy, W; Mahamud, M; Ashikin, N; Jamilah, S; Yee, L E; Shong, H K

    2001-06-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of 3 years duration beginning from the 1st January 1997 to the 31st December 1999 in order to identify the epidemiology of major limb amputations in Seremban Hospital. Two hundred and four patients were included in this study out of which 65.7% were male and 34.3% were female. The mean age of the amputees was 39.7 years old. Non traumatic amputations constitute 85.8% of the cases mainly due to diabetic ulcers or gangrene (91%) followed by peripheral vascular disease (7%) and malignancy (2%). Traumatic amputations represent 14.2% of the cases with road-traffic accident as the major cause (82.8%) followed by industrial accident (17.2%). Lower limb amputations were performed in 97.5% of the cases with below knee amputations as the commonest procedure (72%), followed by above knee amputations (27%) and Syme amputations (1%). Five patients had upper limb amputations done. Four of them were below elbow amputations while one had forequarter amputation done of the left shoulder. Of note, there were increasing number of amputations done over the last three years with alarming increasing trends of traumatic amputation. The three main risk factors for major limb amputations are diabetes mellitus, male gender and road traffic accident.

  18. Objective criteria accurately predict amputation following lower extremity trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, K; Daines, M; Howey, T; Helfet, D; Hansen, S T

    1990-05-01

    MESS (Mangled Extremity Severity Score) is a simple rating scale for lower extremity trauma, based on skeletal/soft-tissue damage, limb ischemia, shock, and age. Retrospective analysis of severe lower extremity injuries in 25 trauma victims demonstrated a significant difference between MESS values for 17 limbs ultimately salvaged (mean, 4.88 +/- 0.27) and nine requiring amputation (mean, 9.11 +/- 0.51) (p less than 0.01). A prospective trial of MESS in lower extremity injuries managed at two trauma centers again demonstrated a significant difference between MESS values of 14 salvaged (mean, 4.00 +/- 0.28) and 12 doomed (mean, 8.83 +/- 0.53) limbs (p less than 0.01). In both the retrospective survey and the prospective trial, a MESS value greater than or equal to 7 predicted amputation with 100% accuracy. MESS may be useful in selecting trauma victims whose irretrievably injured lower extremities warrant primary amputation.

  19. Amputation and prosthesis implantation shape body and peripersonal space representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canzoneri, Elisa; Marzolla, Marilena; Amoresano, Amedeo; Verni, Gennaro; Serino, Andrea

    2013-10-03

    Little is known about whether and how multimodal representations of the body (BRs) and of the space around the body (Peripersonal Space, PPS) adapt to amputation and prosthesis implantation. In order to investigate this issue, we tested BR in a group of upper limb amputees by means of a tactile distance perception task and PPS by means of an audio-tactile interaction task. Subjects performed the tasks with stimulation either on the healthy limb or the stump of the amputated limb, while wearing or not wearing their prosthesis. When patients performed the tasks on the amputated limb, without the prosthesis, the perception of arm length shrank, with a concurrent shift of PPS boundaries towards the stump. Conversely, wearing the prosthesis increased the perceived length of the stump and extended the PPS boundaries so as to include the prosthetic hand, such that the prosthesis partially replaced the missing limb.

  20. Transmetatarsal Amputation: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan McCallum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulceration is a major cause of morbidity amongst patients with diabetes. In severe cases of ulceration, osteomyelitis and amputation can ensue. A distinct lack of agreement exists on the most appropriate level of amputation in cases of severe foot ulceration/infection to provide predictable healing rates. This paper provides an overview of the transmetatarsal amputation (TMA as a limb salvage procedure and is written with the perspective and experiences of the Department of Podiatric Surgery at West Middlesex University Hospital (WMUH. We have reflected on the cases of 11 patients (12 feet and have found the TMA to be an effective procedure in the management of cases of severe forefoot ulceration and infection.

  1. Microneurovascular reimplantation in a case of total penile amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt Yogesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Amputation of the penis is a rare condition reported from various parts of the world as isolated cases or small series of patients; the common aetiology is self-mutilating sharp amputation or an avulsion or crush injury in an industrial accident. A complete reconstruction of all penile structures should be attempted in one stage which provides the best chance for full rehabilitation of the patient. We report here a single case of total amputation of the penis, which was successfully reattached by using a microsurgical technique. After surgery, near-normal appearance and function including a good urine flow and absence of urethral stricture, capabilities of erection and near normal sensitivity were observed.

  2. Factors related to successful job reintegration of people with a lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoppen, Tanneke; Boonstra, Antje; Groothoff, JW; van Sonderen, E; Goeken, LN; Eisma, Willem

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study demographically, amputation-, and employment-related factors that show a relationship to successful job reintegration of patients after lower limb amputation. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University hospital. Patients: Subjects had an acquired unilateral major amputati

  3. The use of bone bridges in transtibial amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Auro Mitsuo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to describe the bone bridge technique in adults, and present a variation for use in children, as well as to present its applicability as an option in elective transtibial amputations. This paper presents a prospective study of 15 transtibial amputations performed between 1992 and 1995 in which the bone bridge technique was employed. The patients' ages ranged from 8 to 48 years, with an average of 22.5 years. This technique consisted of the preparation of a cylinder of periosteum extracted from the tibia and with cortical bone fragments attached to it to promote a tibiofibular synostosis on the distal extremity of the amputation stump. We noted that the cortical bone fragments were dispensable when the technique was employed in children, due to the increased osteogenic capacity of the periosteum. This led to a variation of the original technique, a bone bridge without the use of the cortical bone fragments. RESULTS: The average time spent with this procedure, without any significant variation between adults and children, was 171 minutes. The adaptation to the definitive prosthesis was accomplished between 20 and 576 days, with an average of 180 days. Revision of the procedure was necessary in 3 amputations. CONCLUSIONS: This technique may be employed in transtibial amputations in which the final length of the stump lies next to the musculotendinous transition of the gastrocnemius muscle, as well as in the revision of amputation stumps in children, where the procedure has been shown to be effective in the prevention of lesions due to excessive bone growth.

  4. [Antibiotic treatment in patients amputated for ischemic diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Montequín, J I; McCook Martínez, J; Lima Santana, B; Velasco Armas, N; Montalvo Diago, J; Mahía Vilas, M

    1991-01-01

    Thirty diabetic patients submitted to a major amputation were tested by humo-celullar assays (retarded hypersensibility assays). Reactive patients were subdivided into two groups: one group was treated postoperatively with antibiotics, and the other group was not treated. Both groups were homogeneous in age, hemoglobin concentrations, hematocrit, total proteins, glucemy and history of sepsis or leukocytosis. Five patients treated with antibiotics (33.3%) presented sepsis, one patient was reamputated and one patient died. Between the not treated patients, only three presented sepsis (20%) without any other complications. Authors conclude that the development of sepsis in reactive, diabetic, amputated patients is independent of antibiotic treatment.

  5. Amputation and prosthesis implantation shape body and peripersonal space representations

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about whether and how multimodal representations of the body (BRs) and of the space around the body (Peripersonal Space, PPS) adapt to amputation and prosthesis implantation. In order to investigate this issue, we tested BR in a group of upper limb amputees by means of a tactile distance perception task and PPS by means of an audio-tactile interaction task. Subjects performed the tasks with stimulation either on the healthy limb or the stump of the amputated limb, while wearin...

  6. [Chances of avoiding amputation in an arteritis patient with gangrene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, J; Firouz-Abadie, H; Maraval, M; Kieffer, E

    1975-01-01

    During the period 1970-1974, restorative surgery was carried out 324 times in patients with gangrene or severe ischaemia caused by arteritis of the lower limbs. In 67 percent of the cases major excision surgery, such as amputation at the thigh or of the whole leg, was avoided and the support was retained. In 61 cases (19 percent) amputation was necessary either immediately or within a few weeks or months. Death occurred in 47 patients (14 percent) either in the operative period or in the 3 following years.

  7. Reduced incidence of lower-extremity amputations in a Danish diabetes population from 2000 to 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M E; Almdal, T P; Faerch, K

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot disease and amputations severely reduce quality of life and have major economic consequences. The aim of this study was to estimate time trends in the incidence of lower-extremity amputations in Danish people with diabetes.......Diabetic foot disease and amputations severely reduce quality of life and have major economic consequences. The aim of this study was to estimate time trends in the incidence of lower-extremity amputations in Danish people with diabetes....

  8. Effect of Traumatic Brain Injury Among U.S. Servicemembers with Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    admitted with TBI and limb amputation, only 50 percent used a prosthesis and only 33 percent were considered able to use a prosthesis independently in the...to use a prosthesis was related to ataxia; inability to withstand shear or load- ing on the residual limb; bilateral spasticity; contractures...or foot amputation (or in some instances, multiple amputations). We excluded ser- vicemembers whose amputation involved only the fin- ger(s) or toe

  9. Difficult to predict early failure after major lower-extremity amputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Holm, Gitte; Gebuhr, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The successful outcome of a major amputation depends on several factors, including stump wound healing. The purpose of this study was to examine the criteria upon which the index amputation was based and to identify factors associated with early amputation failure after major non-tr...

  10. THE FEASIBILITY OF HIND FOOT AMPUTATION IN SELECTED SARCOMAS OF THE FOOT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAM, SJ; HOEKSTRA, HJ; EISMA, WH; OLDHOFF, J; KOOPS, HS

    1992-01-01

    The treatment of foot sarcomas is generally a below knee amputation. In selected sarcomas of the forefoot, however, a transtarsal amputation according to Chopart, a calcaneotibial arthrodesis according to Pirogoff, or a supramalleolar amputation according to Syme can be considered the treatment of c

  11. Racial Variation in Treatment of Traumatic Finger/Thumb Amputation: A National Comparative Study of Replantation and Revision Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Elham; Swiatek, Peter R.; Chung, Kevin C.; Ayanian, John Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic finger/thumb amputations are some of the most prevalent traumatic injuries affecting Americans each year. Rates of replantation after traumatic finger/thumb amputation, however, have been steadily declining across U.S. hospitals, which may make these procedures less accessible to minorities and vulnerable populations. The specific aim of this study was to examine racial variation in finger replantation after traumatic finger/thumb amputation. Methods Using a two-level hierarchical model, we retrospectively compared replantation rates for African-American patients with those of Whites, adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics. Patients younger than 65 with traumatic finger/thumb amputation injuries who sought care at a U.S. trauma center between 2007 and 2012 were included in the study sample. Results We analyzed 13,129 patients under 65 years of age with traumatic finger/thumb amputation. Replantation rates declined over time from 19% to 14% (p = 0.004). Adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics, African-Americans (OR=0.81; CI: 0.66–0.99; p = 0.049) were less likely to undergo replantation procedures than Whites, and uninsured patients (OR=0.73; CI: 0.62–0.84; p advancements in microsurgical techniques and the increasing use of reconstructive surgery in other fields, finger/thumb replantation rates are declining in the U.S. and vulnerable populations are less likely to undergo replantation after amputation injuries. Regionalization of care for these injuries may not only provide a higher quality care but also reduce variations in treatment. PMID:26910702

  12. Incidence of re-amputation following partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral sensory neuropathy: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Borkosky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus with peripheral sensory neuropathy frequently results in forefoot ulceration. Ulceration at the first ray level tends to be recalcitrant to local wound care modalities and off-loading techniques. If healing does occur, ulcer recurrence is common. When infection develops, partial first ray amputation in an effort to preserve maximum foot length is often performed. However, the survivorship of partial first ray amputations in this patient population and associated re-amputation rate remain unknown. Therefore, in an effort to determine the actual re-amputation rate following any form of partial first ray amputation in patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy, the authors conducted a systematic review. Only studies involving any form of partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral sensory neuropathy but without critical limb ischemia were included. Our search yielded a total of 24 references with 5 (20.8% meeting our inclusion criteria involving 435 partial first ray amputations. The weighted mean age of patients was 59 years and the weighted mean follow-up was 26 months. The initial amputation level included the proximal phalanx base 167 (38.4% times; first metatarsal head resection 96 (22.1% times; first metatarsal-phalangeal joint disarticulation 53 (12.2% times; first metatarsal mid-shaft 39 (9% times; hallux fillet flap 32 (7.4% times; first metatarsal base 29 (6.7% times; and partial hallux 19 (4.4% times. The incidence of re-amputation was 19.8% (86/435. The end stage, most proximal level, following re-amputation was an additional digit 32 (37.2% times; transmetatarsal 28 (32.6% times; below-knee 25 (29.1% times; and LisFranc 1 (1.2% time. The results of our systematic review reveal that one out of every five patients undergoing any version of a partial first ray amputation will eventually require more proximal re-amputation. These results reveal that partial first ray

  13. Vocational reintegration after a lower limb amputation: A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, Ria; Bruins, M.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Groothoff, J.W.; Schoppen, T.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the process of job reintegration, to obtain more detailed information about workplace adjustments, and to assess the positive and negative experiences of amputees (in the Netherlands) who returned to paid work after their lower limb amputation. The study

  14. Reduction of residual limb volume in people with transtibial amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey T. Tantua, MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The early postoperative phase after transtibial amputation is characterized by rapid residual limb volume reduction. Accurate measurement of residual limb volume is important for the timing of fitting a prosthesis. The aim of this study was to analyze the reduction of residual limb volume in people with transtibial amputation and to correlate residual limb volume with residual limb circumference. In a longitudinal cohort study of 21 people who had a transtibial amputation, residual limb volume was measured using a laser scanner and circumference was measured using a tape measure 1 wk postamputation and every 3 wk thereafter until 24 wk postamputation. A linear mixed model analysis was performed with weeks postamputation transformed according to the natural logarithm as predictor. Residual limb volume decreased significantly over time, with a large variation between patients. Residual limb volume did not correlate well with circumference. On average, residual limb volume decreased 200.5 mL (9.7% of the initial volume per natural logarithm of the weeks postamputation. The decrease in residual limb volume following a transtibial amputation was substantial in the early postamputation phase, followed by a leveling off. It was not possible to determine the specific moment at which the residual limb volume stabilized.

  15. Psychological effects of amputation: A review of studies from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amputation is a major health burden on the families, society, and on medical services as well. Traumatic limb amputation is a catastrophic injury and an irreversible act which is sudden and emotionally devastating for the victims. In addition, it causes inability to support self and the family and driving many patients toward various psychiatric disorders. Extensive information regarding the effects of amputation has not been ascertained and therefore it was decided to do a systematic review. The goal of this review was to provide comprehensive information of peer-reviewed papers examining the psychological distress among amputees in India. A search of the literature resulted in a total of 12 articles with varied sample size from 16 to 190. The sample has been largely comprised males with lower limb amputation caused by primarily traumatic ones, i.e., motor vehicle accident, railway track accidents, machinery injury, blasts, etc., The prevalence of psychiatric disorders among amputees has been found to be in the range of 32% to 84% including depression rates 10.4%–63%, posttraumatic stress disorder 3.3%–56.3%, and phantom limb phenomenon 14%–92%. Although the studies reported that symptoms of anxiety and depression become better over the course of time, however surgical treatment providers need to liaise with psychiatrists and psychologists to support and deal with the psychological disturbances.

  16. Delayed, bilateral, non-microvascular ear replantation after violent amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Murray, E; Adán-Rivas, O; Salcido-Calzadilla, H

    2009-06-01

    Amputation of any body part is undoubtedly a traumatic experience leaving a terrible deformity, especially when the part or parts involved are visible and constitute an essential component of someone's facial whole. Bilateral ear amputation and successful subsequent replantation has been reported historically, but not in the modern surgical literature. We report the case of a 27-year-old female who was abducted and suffered a bilateral ear amputation at the hands of one of her captors to speed delivery of ransom money; the severed parts were sent to the parents approximately 2 hours after the amputation had taken place, and the girl was released some 48 hours after the ears were delivered. Microvascular replantation was attempted immediately after admission to the hospital some 2 hours after her release, but failed, and so a non-microvascular replantation was performed and was successful, after approximately 54 hours of ischaemia time. We consider this the first report of a complete bilateral, delayed, non-microvascular, successful ear replantation in a human being in the modern literature.

  17. The incidence of symptomatic neuroma in amputation and neurorrhaphy patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Avoort, D. J. J. C.; Hovius, S. E. R.; Selles, R. W.; van Neck, J. W.; Coert, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The incidence of symptomatic neuroma in finger nerve injuries varies widely in the literature. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the incidence of symptomatic neuroma after repair of digital nerve injuries (neurorrhaphy) and after amputation of one or more fingers. We also determined

  18. Carpal myxosarcoma and forelimb amputation in a ferret

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeeland, Y.R.A.; Hernandez-Divers, S.J.; Blasier, M.W.; Vila-Garcia, G.; Delong, D.; Stedman, N.L.

    2006-01-01

    Vet Rec. 2006 Dec 2;159(23):782-5. Carpal myxosarcoma and forelimb amputation in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo). van Zeeland YR, Hernandez-Divers SJ, Blasier MW, Vila-Garcia G, Delong D, Stedman NL. Department of Small Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Utrecht, Utrecht

  19. Take Care of Yourself After an Amputation or Other Surgery

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-18

    This podcast provides health information for amputees on how to take care of yourself after an amputation or other surgery.  Created: 2/18/2010 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disability, Disability and Health Program.   Date Released: 2/18/2010.

  20. Vocational reintegration after a lower limb amputation : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, M.; Geertzen, J.H.; Groothoff, J.W.; Schoppen, T.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the process of job reintegration, to obtain more detailed information about workplace adjustments, and to assess the positive and negative experiences of amputees (in the Netherlands) who returned to paid work after their lower limb amputation. The study

  1. Natural control capabilities of robotic hands by hand amputated subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Caputo, Barbara; Muller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    People with transradial hand amputations who own a myoelectric prosthesis currently have some control capabilities via sEMG. However, the control systems are still limited and not natural. The Ninapro project is aiming at helping the scientific community to overcome these limits through the creation of publicly available electromyography data sources to develop and test machine learning algorithms. In this paper we describe the movement classification results gained from three subjects with an homogeneous level of amputation, and we compare them with the results of 40 intact subjects. The number of considered subjects can seem small at first sight, but it is not considering the literature of the field (which has to face the difficulty of recruiting trans-radial hand amputated subjects). The classification is performed with four different classifiers and the obtained balanced classification rates are up to 58.6% on 50 movements, which is an excellent result compared to the current literature. Successively, for each subject we find a subset of up to 9 highly independent movements, (defined as movements that can be distinguished with more than 90% accuracy), which is a deeply innovative step in literature. The natural control of a robotic hand in so many movements could lead to an immediate progress in robotic hand prosthetics and it could deeply change the quality of life of amputated subjects.

  2. Effect of primary and secondary wartime below-knee amputation on length of hospitalization and rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The results of below-knee amputations in 36 war wounded (mean age 35,42) were reviewed. The majority of the patients was wounded by land mines (94.4%). Most of them were between 25 and 35 years old. Bilateral amputation was done in 2.8% of cases. The amputation was performed on the day of wounding (primary below-knee amputation) in 30 (83.3%) amputees. Secondary amputation after the attempt to save the severely injured lower-limb was performed in 6 patients (16,7%) average 4.61 ± 11.67 days a...

  3. Analysis of predictor factors of limb amputation in patients with high-voltage electrical burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo García Álvarez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Limb amputation is considered one of the most devastating consequences of electrical injury. Any factors that correlate with the degree of muscle damage can be used to predict the necessity of limb amputation. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that can be used to predict limb amputation in high-voltage electrically injured patients. Methods: Eighty-two high-voltage electrically injured patients were admitted to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Burns of National Arzobispo Loayza Hospital on a 5 year period. A retrospective analysis of the possible related risk factors between amputation and non-amputation patients was performed. Results: A total of 68 patients were enrolled for analysis. Thirteen patients underwent limb amputations. Multivariate analysis of the risk factors between amputation and non-amputation groups showed statistical significance for first 24 hour creatine kinase-isoenzyme MB (CKMB level. A serum CK-MB level above 14,955 U/L predicted high risk of limb amputation with high specificity (84% and sensitivity (77%. Only one patient with a remarkable decrease of creatine kinase (CPKt and CK-MB levels after fasciotomy avoided a major limb amputation. Conclusion: Our results suggest that CPK-MB level is an independent factor for prediction of limb amputation in patients with high-voltage electrical burns. We suggest that the addition of CPK-MB evaluation to clinical symptom screening may be a valuable method for early detection of muscle damage.

  4. Risk factors for and results of late or delayed amputation following combat-related extremity injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Melvin D; Potter, Benjamin K; Burns, Travis C; Hayda, Roman A; Gajewski, Donald A

    2010-09-07

    We studied patients with combat-related injuries that required delayed amputation at least 4 months after the initial injury due to dysfunction, persistent pain, and patient desires. Late amputations were performed 22 times in 22 patients (21 men, 1 woman) since 2003. Fourteen patients underwent transtibial amputation, 5 transfemoral amputations, 1 knee disarticulation, and 2 transradial amputations. The primary indications for late amputation were neurologic dysfunction in 6 patients, persistent or recurrent infection in 6, neurogenic pain in 3, non-neurogenic pain in 5, and a globally poor functional result in 2. Sixteen of 22 patients reported multiple indications for electing to undergo amputation, with an average of 2.1 specific indications per patient. At final clinical follow-up an average of 13 months after amputation, all patients reported subjectively improved function and reported that they would undergo amputation again under similar circumstances. When medically and functionally practicable, every effort is given to limb salvage following severe combat-related extremity injuries. There is no single risk factor that increases the likelihood of delayed amputation, but the combination of complex pain symptoms with neurologic dysfunction appears to increase the risk, particularly if the initial insult is a severe hindfoot injury or distal tibia fracture. With appropriately selected and counseled patients, elective late amputation results in a high degree of patient satisfaction and subjectively improved function.

  5. Assessment of quality of life in patients after lower limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Lower extremity amputation is a surgical procedure resulting in important anatomical, functional, psychological, and social consequences that can influence the quality of life of these patients. The aim of this research was to compare the quality of life of patients with lower extremity amputation and people without amputation taking into account gender differences as well as the amputation level. Material and Methods. The study was designed as a cross-sectional study which included 56 subjects. The patients from the experimental group underwent prosthetic rehabilitation treatment at the Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Clinical Centre of Vojvodina. The experimental group included 28 patients (21 male, 7 female with lower extremity amputation, their average age being 65.36±13.64. The control group consisted of 28 age and gender matching subjects without amputation. Research ANd Development (RAND 36 - Item Health Survey 1.0 (SF - 36 was used to measure the quality of life. Results. The results showed that patients with lower extremity amputation scored lower than the control group on all SF- 36 variables (p0.05. Seventeen (61% patients were with transfemoral, and 11 (39% with transtibial level of amputation. The patients with transtibial amputations scored higher on physical functioning and general health status variables (p<0.05. Conclusion. The patients with lower extremity amputations have numerous limitations compared to the control group, regardless of gender, while the patients with lower level of amputation have a higher level of physical functioning.

  6. A Comparison of Four-Year Health Outcomes following Combat Amputation and Limb Salvage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jay; Bhatnagar, Vibha; Richard, Erin; Sechriest, V. Franklin; Galarneau, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Little research has described the long-term health outcomes of patients who had combat-related amputations or leg-threatening injuries. We conducted retrospective analysis of Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs health data for lower extremity combat-injured patients with (1) unilateral amputation within 90 days postinjury (early amputation, n = 440), (2) unilateral amputation more than 90 days postinjury (late amputation, n = 78), or (3) leg-threatening injuries without amputation (limb salvage, n = 107). Patient medical records were analyzed for four years postinjury. After adjusting for group differences, early amputation was generally associated with a lower or similar prevalence for adverse physical and psychological diagnoses (e.g., pain, osteoarthritis, posttraumatic stress disorder) versus late amputation and/or limb salvage. By contrast, early amputation was associated with an increased likelihood of osteoporosis during the first year postinjury. The prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder increased for all patient groups over four years postinjury, particularly in the second year. The different clinical outcomes among combat extremity injured patients treated with early amputation, late amputation, or limb salvage highlight their different healthcare requirements. These findings can inform and optimize the specific treatment pathways that address the physical and psychological healthcare needs of such patients over time. PMID:28122002

  7. Composite graft including bone tissue: a case report of successful reattachment of multiple fingertip oblique amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Suk; Lim, Yun sub; Choi, Jaehoon; Kim, Nam Gyun; Kim, Jun Sik

    2013-02-01

    A composite graft for reattachment of an amputated fingertip is a very controversial and challenging procedure. An osteocutaneous composite graft is rarely conducted and has a low success rate following fingertip amputation. A 21-year-old male patient was referred to our emergency clinic with dorsal oblique amputation of the middle, ring and small fingers of the left hand through the distal interphalangeal joint and middle phalanx. The amputated parts of the middle and ring fingers were reattached with osteocutaneous composite grafts. The amputated part of the small finger was revascularised to the ulnar palmar digital artery of the small finger. The composite grafts of the middle and ring fingers and the revascularised small finger survived completely. We suggest that careful patient selection will allow an osteocutaneous composite graft to become an acceptable method for the treatment of fingertip amputation. A large-scale study of osteocutaneous graft of amputated fingertips is required to improve the survival rate.

  8. Pattern of injury in those dying from traumatic amputation caused by bomb blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J B; Bowyer, G W; Cooper, G J; Crane, J

    1994-08-01

    Traumatic amputation of limbs caused by bomb blast carries a high risk of mortality. This paper describes 73 amputations in 34 deaths from bomb blast in Northern Ireland. The principal aim was to determine the sites of traumatic amputation to provide a biophysical basis for the development of protective measures. Few amputations were through joints; nearly all were through the bone shafts. The most common site in the tibia was the upper third. The distribution of femoral sites resulting from car bombs differed from that characterizing other types of explosion. For car bombs the principal site of amputation was the upper third; for other types of device it was the lower third. It is concluded that flailing is not a notable contributor to limb avulsion. The pattern of amputation is consistent with direct local pressure loads leading to bone fracture; the amputation itself is a secondary event arising from the flow of combustion products.

  9. Epidemiology of post-traumatic limb amputation: a National Trauma Databank analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmparas, Galinos; Inaba, Kenji; Teixeira, Pedro G R; Dubose, Joseph J; Criscuoli, Michele; Talving, Peep; Plurad, David; Green, Donald; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the epidemiology and outcomes of posttraumatic upper (UEA) and lower extremity amputations (LEA). The National Trauma Databank version 5 was used to identify all posttraumatic amputations. From 2000 to 2004 there were 8910 amputated patients (1.0% of all trauma patients). Of these, 6855 (76.9%) had digit and 2055 (23.1%) had limb amputation. Of those with limb amputation, 92.7 per cent (1904/2055) had a single limb amputation. LEA were more frequent than UEA among patients in the single limb amputation group (58.9% vs 41.1%). The mechanism of injury was blunt in 83 per cent; most commonly after motor vehicle collisions (51.0%), followed by machinery accidents (19.4%). Motor vehicle collision occupants had more UEA (54.5% vs 45.5%, P amputation is not uncommon after trauma in the civilian population and is associated with significant morbidity. Although single limb amputation did not impact mortality, the need for multiple limb amputation was an independent risk factor for death.

  10. Impairment variables predicting activity limitation in individuals with lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, Michele A; Gailey, Robert S; Fiebert, Ira M; Roach, Kathyrn E

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether measures of impairment (i.e., muscle strength, balance), personal factors (i.e., comorbidities, demographic information) and amputation specific variables (i.e., time since amputation, cause of amputation, level of amputation) were able to predict performance on the six-minute walk test, a measure of activity limitation, in individuals with lower limb amputation. A total of 72 individuals with lower limb amputation ranging in age from 21-83 were tested for balance, limb muscle strength and function. Medical comorbidities were recorded and activity limitation was measured using the six-minute walk test. Data were analyzed and multivariate relationships were examined using multiple linear regression. Impairment variables of strength, balance, subject demographics, time since amputation, cause of amputation and level of amputation were all significant predictors and explained 72% of the variance in the outcome variable. Strength of the hip extensors was the strongest predictor, accounting for 30.9% of the total variance. Multiple factors impact six minute walk scores in individuals with lower limb amputation. Impairments in hip strength and balance appear to be the two most significant. The findings of this study support the use of the six-minute walk test to underscore impairments of the musculoskeletal system that can affect ambulation ability in the amputee.

  11. [Prosthetic possibilities after amputations in the upper extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüttner, B; Frohnauer, G; Burgkart, R

    2004-06-24

    Whereas passive prostheses are fitted onto the patient after the amputation of an arm, hand or finger and are mostly cosmetic in function, active prostheses have much more potential. They can transform the movements of other body regions to movement in the artificial limb. Belts or harnesses, for example, effect the direct transfer of the power from the muscle to the prosthesis. The range of movement possible depends upon the level of the amputation, the length of the residual limb, the age of the patient, his body build and fitness. Myoelectrically controlled prostheses possess their own drive and power source. They control movement through the electrical action potentials of the residual limb muscles, which are detected, amplified and transmitted with help of electrodes.

  12. Ethical considerations in elective amputation after traumatic peripheral nerve injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Keith P.; Holloway, Robert G.; Landau, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries often complicate extremity trauma, and may cause substantial functional deficits. We have encountered patients who request amputation of such injured extremities, with the goal of prosthetic replacement as a means to restore function. Data on long-term outcomes of limb salvage vs amputation are limited and somewhat contradictory, leaving how to respond to such requests in the hands of the treating physician. We present example cases, drawn from our experience with wounded soldiers in a peripheral nerve injury clinic, in order to facilitate discussion of the ways in which these patients stress the system of medical decision-making while identifying ethical questions central to responding to these requests. PMID:25279253

  13. Regulating bodily integrity: cosmetic surgery and voluntary limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Aileen

    2012-12-01

    Cosmetic surgery and voluntary limb amputation share a number of features. Both procedures are patient-driven forms of body shaping that can only be performed by surgeons, and therefore the procedures require the imprimatur of the medical profession to be lawful. Both invoke identity construction as a central legitimating factor that renders the procedures therapeutic. The legal regulation of surgery is subsumed within general principles regulating medical practice, where autonomy and consent are constituted as fundamental authorising principles. The legitimacy of consent to surgical intervention operates unevenly in relation to these two forms of surgery. Amputation of healthy limbs is presumed to be non-therapeutic. Capacity is closely interrogated and minutely scrutinised. Consent to cosmetic surgery, by contrast, is presumed to be a valid expression of autonomy and self-determination.

  14. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Amputated Thumb: A Simplified Approach

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This case report presents a case of prosthetic rehabilitation of an amputated thumb. It emphasizes that prosthetic replacement is a better option for aesthetic and psychological improvement, particularly in cases where the victim is unwilling to undergo complicated surgical procedures for reconstruction of thumb or where functioning of thumb cannot be restored even by multiple surgeries. In the present case, a 20 years old female patient, with missing thumb of her right hand was rehabilitated...

  15. Classifying prosthetic use via accelerometry in persons with transtibial amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan T. Redfield, MSEE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of how persons with amputation use their prostheses and how this use changes over time may facilitate effective rehabilitation practices and enhance understanding of prosthesis functionality. Perpetual monitoring and classification of prosthesis use may also increase the health and quality of life for prosthetic users. Existing monitoring and classification systems are often limited in that they require the subject to manipulate the sensor (e.g., attach, remove, or reset a sensor, record data over relatively short time periods, and/or classify a limited number of activities and body postures of interest. In this study, a commercially available three-axis accelerometer (ActiLife ActiGraph GT3X+ was used to characterize the activities and body postures of individuals with transtibial amputation. Accelerometers were mounted on prosthetic pylons of 10 persons with transtibial amputation as they performed a preset routine of actions. Accelerometer data was postprocessed using a binary decision tree to identify when the prosthesis was being worn and to classify periods of use as movement (i.e., leg motion such as walking or stair climbing, standing (i.e., standing upright with limited leg motion, or sitting (i.e., seated with limited leg motion. Classifications were compared to visual observation by study researchers. The classifier achieved a mean +/– standard deviation accuracy of 96.6% +/– 3.0%.

  16. Ray amputation for the treatment of foot macrodactyly in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Park, J W; Hong, S W; Jeong, J Y; Gong, H S; Baek, G H

    2015-10-01

    Macrodactyly of the foot is a rare but disabling condition. We present the results of surgery on 18 feet of 16 patients, who underwent ray amputation and were followed-up for more than two years at a mean of 80 months (25 to 198). We radiologically measured the intermetatarsal width and forefoot area pre-operatively and at six weeks and two years after surgery. We also evaluated the clinical results using the Oxford Ankle Foot Questionnaire for children (OxAFQ-C) and the Questionnaire for Foot Macrodactyly. The intermetatarsal width and forefoot area ratios were significantly decreased after surgery. The mean OxAFQ-C score was 42 (16 to 57) pre-operatively, improving to 47 (5 to 60) at two years post-operatively (p = 0.021). The mean questionnaire for Foot Macrodactyly score two years after surgery was 8 (6 to 10). Ray amputation gave a measurable reduction in foot size with excellent functional results. For patients with metatarsal involvement, a motionless toe, or involvement of multiple digits, ray amputation is a clinically effective option which is acceptable to patients.

  17. Classifying prosthetic use via accelerometry in persons with transtibial amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Morgan T; Cagle, John C; Hafner, Brian J; Sanders, Joan E

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of how persons with amputation use their prostheses and how this use changes over time may facilitate effective rehabilitation practices and enhance understanding of prosthesis functionality. Perpetual monitoring and classification of prosthesis use may also increase the health and quality of life for prosthetic users. Existing monitoring and classification systems are often limited in that they require the subject to manipulate the sensor (e.g., attach, remove, or reset a sensor), record data over relatively short time periods, and/or classify a limited number of activities and body postures of interest. In this study, a commercially available three-axis accelerometer (ActiLife ActiGraph GT3X+) was used to characterize the activities and body postures of individuals with transtibial amputation. Accelerometers were mounted on prosthetic pylons of 10 persons with transtibial amputation as they performed a preset routine of actions. Accelerometer data was postprocessed using a binary decision tree to identify when the prosthesis was being worn and to classify periods of use as movement (i.e., leg motion such as walking or stair climbing), standing (i.e., standing upright with limited leg motion), or sitting (i.e., seated with limited leg motion). Classifications were compared to visual observation by study researchers. The classifier achieved a mean +/- standard deviation accuracy of 96.6% +/- 3.0%.

  18. Tetanus following replantation of an amputated finger: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashida Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Tetanus is an infectious disease caused by tetanus toxin produced by Clostridium tetani and induces severe neurological manifestations. We treated a patient who developed tetanus during hospitalization for replantation of an amputated finger. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case report of such an entity. Case presentation A 49-year-old Japanese man had an amputation of his right middle finger at the distal interphalangeal joint region in an accident at work. His middle finger was successfully replanted, but his fingertip was partially necrotized because of crushing and so additional reconstruction with a reverse digital arterial flap was performed 15 days after the injury. Tetanus developed 21 days after replantation of the middle finger, but symptoms remitted via rapid diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions In replantation after finger trauma with exposure of nerve and blood vessel bundles, concern over injuring nerves and blood vessels may prevent irrigation and debridement from being performed sufficiently; these treatments may have been insufficiently performed in this patient. It is likely that the replanted middle finger partially adhered, and Clostridium tetani colonized the partially necrotized region. Even when there is only limited soil contamination, administration of tetanus toxoid and anti-tetanus immunoglobulin is necessary when the fingers are injured outdoors and the finger nerves and blood vessels are exposed. The drugs should be administered just after replantation if the finger has been amputated. However, if clinicians pay attention to the possibility of tetanus development, treatment can be rapidly initiated.

  19. Exploring ethical justification for self-demand amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasini, Floris

    2006-01-01

    Self-demand amputees are persons who need to have one or more healthy limbs or digits amputated to fit the way they see themselves. They want to rid themselves of a limb that they believe does not belong to their body-identity. The obsessive desire to have appendages surgically removed to fit an alternative body-image is medically and ethically controversial. My purpose in this paper is to provide a number of normative and professional ethical perspectives on whether or not it is possible to justify surgery for self-demand amputees. In doing so I proceed dialogically, moving between empirical context and normative theory, revealing the taken for granted normative assumptions (what I call the natural attitude--a technical term borrowed from phenomenology) that provide ethical limits to justifying the treatment of self-demand amputees. While I critically examine both Kantian responses against as well as Utilitarian responses for amputation on demand, I conclude that neither normative tradition can fully incorporate an understanding of what it is like to be a self-demand amputee. Since neither theory can justify the apparent non-rational desire of amputation on demand, ethical justification, I argue, falls short of the recognition that there may be a problem. To end, I introduce a meta-ethical idea, "the struggle for recognition," opening up the theoretical possibility of a hermeneutics of recognition before ethical justification that may be more sensitive to the problem of radical embodied difference exemplified by self-demand amputees.

  20. What are the key conditions associated with lower limb amputations in a major Australian teaching hospital?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzarini Peter A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lower extremity amputation results in significant global morbidity and mortality. Australia appears to have a paucity of studies investigating lower extremity amputation. The primary aim of this retrospective study was to investigate key conditions associated with lower extremity amputations in an Australian population. Secondary objectives were to determine the influence of age and sex on lower extremity amputations, and the reliability of hospital coded amputations. Methods Lower extremity amputation cases performed at the Princess Alexandra Hospital (Brisbane, Australia between July 2006 and June 2007 were identified through the relevant hospital discharge dataset (n = 197. All eligible clinical records were interrogated for age, sex, key condition associated with amputation, amputation site, first ever amputation status and the accuracy of the original hospital coding. Exclusion criteria included records unavailable for audit and cases where the key condition was unable to be determined. Chi-squared, t-tests, ANOVA and post hoc tests were used to determine differences between groups. Kappa statistics were used to measure reliability between coded and audited amputations. A minimum significance level of p  Results One hundred and eighty-six cases were eligible and audited. Overall 69% were male, 56% were first amputations, 54% were major amputations, and mean age was 62 ± 16 years. Key conditions associated included type 2 diabetes (53%, peripheral arterial disease (non-diabetes (18%, trauma (8%, type 1 diabetes (7% and malignant tumours (5%. Differences in ages at amputation were associated with trauma 36 ± 10 years, type 1 diabetes 52 ± 12 years and type 2 diabetes 67 ± 10 years (p  Conclusions This study, the first in over 20 years to report on all levels of lower extremity amputations in Australia, found that people undergoing amputation are more likely to be older, male and have

  1. Difficult to predict early failure after major lower-extremity amputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Holm, Gitte; Gebuhr, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The successful outcome of a major amputation depends on several factors, including stump wound healing. The purpose of this study was to examine the criteria upon which the index amputation was based and to identify factors associated with early amputation failure after major non......-traumatic lower-extremity amputation. METHODS: We studied a consecutive one-year series of 36 men and 34 women with a median (25-75% quartiles) age of 72 (63-83) years who were treated in an acute orthopaedic ward; 44 below-knee and 26 above-knee amputees of whom 47 had an American Society of Anesthesiologists...... rating above two. Patient characteristics and other factors potentially influencing early amputation failure within 30 days were evaluated. RESULTS: Eleven patients died (16%) and 11 (16%) had a re-amputation at a higher level, whereas four (6%) had a major revision at the same level within 30 days...

  2. Ectopic banking of amputated great toe for delayed thumb reconstruction: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Ian L; Hui-Chou, Helen G; Zelken, Jonathan; Basile, Patrick L; Ipsen, Derek; Higgins, James P

    2014-07-01

    Ectopic banking of amputated parts is a recognized technique for delayed replantation of an amputated part when the amputation stump will not permit immediate replantation. This is conventionally performed with the intent of transferring the injured part back to its anatomic position when the amputation stump is more appropriate for replantation. Current warfare conditions have led to a commonly encountered military trauma injury pattern of multiple extremity amputations with protected trunk and core structures. This pattern poses many challenges, including the limit or absence of donor sites for immediate or delayed flap reconstructive procedures. We describe a case in which we ectopically banked the great toe of an amputated lower extremity for delayed thumb reconstruction.

  3. Lower-limb amputation and effect of posttraumatic stress disorder on Department of Veterans Affairs outpatient cost trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Vibha; Richard, Erin; Melcer, Ted; Walker, Jay; Galarneau, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient costs were analyzed for combat Veterans injured in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2001 to 2008. Patients had serious lower-limb injuries (n = 170) or unilateral (n = 460) or bilateral (n = 153) lower-limb amputation(s). Total costs over the follow-up period (2003 to 2012) and annual costs were analyzed. Unadjusted mean costs per year in 2012 U.S. dollars were $7,200, $14,700 and $18,700 for limb injuries and unilateral and bilateral lower-limb amputation(s), respectively (p amputation(s) (p Amputation status was associated with an adjusted 3.12-fold increase in mean prosthetic cost per year (p amputation status (p amputation. Finally, PTSD affected cost for multiple domains of health, highlighting the importance of accurate diagnosis, treatment, and support for PTSD.

  4. Analysis of predictor factors of limb amputation in patients with high-voltage electrical burns

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Limb amputation is considered one of the most devastating consequences of electrical injury. Any factors that correlate with the degree of muscle damage can be used to predict the necessity of limb amputation. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that can be used to predict limb amputation in high-voltage electrically injured patients. Methods: Eighty-two high-voltage electrically injured patients were admitted to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surg...

  5. Factors influencing the early outcome of major lower limb amputation for vascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, W. B.; Marriott, S; Eve, R; Mapson, E.; Sexton, S.; Thompson, J F

    2001-01-01

    A consecutive series of 349 primary lower limb amputations for vascular disease, done during 1992-1998, were reviewed for amputation level, revision, complications and death, seeking associations with the American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) grade and pre-operative co-morbidities of patients. Attempted revascularisation, and seniority of surgeon supervising the amputation were also examined for their possible influence on outcome. There were 312 patients (163 male) aged 39-92 years (media...

  6. Effective local anesthesia for onabotulinumtoxin A injections to treat hyperhidrosis associated with traumatic amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Lucy L; Sargen, Michael R.; Chen, Suephy C.; Arbiser, Jack L.; Pollack, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injections are an effective treatment for controlling hyperhidrosis at sites of amputation. Hyperesthesia associated with amputated limbs is a major barrier to performing this procedure under local anesthesia. Objective: To present a novel method for improving local anesthesia with BTX-A injections. Methods & Results: A 29-year-old military veteran with a below-the-knee amputation of his right leg was suf...

  7. Feedforward control strategies of subjects with transradial amputation in planar reaching

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony J. Metzger, MBE; Alexander W. Dromerick, MD; Christopher N. Schabowsky, MS; Rahsaan J. Holley, MS; Brian Monroe, BS; Peter S. Lum, PhD

    2010-01-01

    The rate of upper-limb amputations is increasing, and the rejection rate of prosthetic devices remains high. People with upper-limb amputation do not fully incorporate prosthetic devices into their activities of daily living. By understanding the reaching behaviors of prosthesis users, researchers can alter prosthetic devices and develop training protocols to improve the acceptance of prosthetic limbs. By observing the reaching characteristics of the nondisabled arms of people with amputation...

  8. Management of Complex Extremity Injuries: Tourniquets, Compartment Syndrome Detection, Fasciotomy, and Amputation Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    E mail address: robert.rush1@us.army.mil KEYWORDS Extremity injury Mangled extremity Amputation Compartment syndrome Fasciotomy Prosthesis ...definitive repair. For ray amputations of the foot , removing the big toe in most cases is worse than a transmetatarsal amputation due to lack of...from lack of total contact with the prosthesis and requires refitting. Heterotopic ossification (HO), the aberrant formation of mature, lamellar bone in

  9. Lower extremity amputations in diabetic Mexican American elders: incidence, prevalence and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otiniano, Max E; Du, Xianglin; Ottenbacher, Kenneth; Black, Sandra A; Markides, Kyriakos S

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the incidence and prevalence of amputations in diabetic Mexican American elders and to identify correlates of lower extremity amputations. Data for this study came from baseline and two follow-up interviews of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly (EPESE) conducted in five southwestern states (Texas, California, New Mexico, Colorado and Arizona) in 1993-1994. Of the 3050 subjects aged 65 and older, 690 reported diabetes, and from these, 60 (8%) reported having at least one lower extremity amputation. Losing a leg was the most common type of amputation (53%). Twelve percent of respondents reported a new amputation and 40% of amputees reported a second amputation during follow-up. Mortality among amputees was 46% during a 5-year follow-up. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that being male and having eye problems, hip fracture and diabetes for 10 or more years were significantly associated with lower extremity amputations at baseline, whereas obesity, stroke and 10 or more years with diabetes were significantly associated with new amputations at 5-year follow-up. Gender and disease history were associated with lower extremity amputations at baseline and follow-up. These variables may be useful in developing patient education and intervention programs.

  10. A Clinical and Histological Analysis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    Ischemia; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Peripheral Vascular Disease; Vascular Disease; Arterial Occlusive Disease; Arteriosclerosis; Atherosclerosis; Cardiovascular Disease; Pathologic Processes; Orthopedic Procedures; Amputation

  11. Analysis of 24 Patients Who Were Amputated Due to a Malignant Tumor in the Skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Gocer

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of the study was to assess the cases that were amputated in our clinic due to primary malignant and metastatic bone and soft tissue tumor. Material and Method: 24 cases that were amputated due to primary malignant and metastatic bone and soft tissue tumor between January 1987 and January 2012 were examined retrospectively. The cases were assessed in terms of age, gender, pathological diagnosis, localization, type of amputation, survival and characteristics. The data obtained were transferred to SPSS 15.0 program and analyzed. Normality distributions of the data were analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test. Results: Of the 24 cases, 17 (70% were men, while 7 (30% were women and the average age was 42 (between 12 and 68. The most common reasons for amputation were skin cancer (25%, Ewing sarcoma (20.8%, Osteosarcoma (16.6% and others (Malignant mesenchymal tumor, chondrosarcoma, synovial sarcoma, metastatic tumor. 16 of these patients had previously received an intervention in a different centre at least once. The most common type of amputation was above-knee amputation (58.3%, below-knee amputation (25% and others (hip disarticulation, below-elbow amputation. 8 patients were found to have skin problems and debridement was performed on 6. 14 cases died within the postoperative first year. Discussion: Amputation can be performed for the treatment of the patient’s other health problems and fast and local controls of advanced malignant extremity tumors.

  12. Complete penile amputation during ritual neonatal circumcision and successful replantation using postoperative leech therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihani, Omaya I; Fox, Janelle A; Gander, Brian H; Grunwaldt, Lorelei J; Cannon, Glenn M

    2014-08-01

    Circumcision is the most common surgical procedure in males in the United States, and minor complications are not uncommon. Major complications like partial penile amputations have been reported with successful replantation. Complete penile amputations in adult males have been described, and successful replantation has been reported with increasing success. We report a case of complete penile amputation at the penopubic junction using a Mogen clamp in a 7-day-old neonate with replantation using postoperative leech therapy. To our knowledge this is the first time leech therapy has been used postoperatively for neonatal penile amputation.

  13. Prosthetic options for below knee amputations after osteomyelitis and nonunion of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshirfar, A; Showers, D; Logan, P; Esterhai, J L

    1999-03-01

    Below the knee amputation after trauma is an appropriate option for many patients with recalcitrant infection and nonunion of the tibia. Patients who have had transtibial amputations have lower energy expenditure, heart rate, and oxygen cost when ambulating with their prostheses than when using a three-point gait with crutches without their artificial limb. Innovative prosthetists have improved each of the five essential components of the limb amputated below the knee: socket, insert, shaft and pylon, foot and ankle assembly, and suspension system. Prosthetists are integral members of the patient's healthcare team. Their recommendations and direct patient care are essential to optimizing the functional ability of patients who have had amputations.

  14. Chronic kidney disease predicts long-term mortality after major lower extremity amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Assi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite low peri-operative mortality after major lower extremity amputation, long-term mortality remains substantial. Metabolic syndrome is increasing in incidence and prevalence at an alarming rate in the USA. Aim: This study was to determine whether metabolic syndrome predicts outcome after major lower extremity amputation. Patients and Methods: A retrospective review of charts between July 2005 and June 2010. Results: Fifty-four patients underwent a total of 60 major lower extremity amputations. Sixty percent underwent below-knee amputation and 40% underwent above-knee amputation. The 30-day mortality was 7% with no difference in level (below-knee amputation, 8%; above-knee amputation, 4%; P = 0.53. The mean follow-up time was 39.7 months. The 5-year survival was 54% in the whole group, and was independent of level of amputation (P = 0.24 or urgency of the procedure (P = 0.51. Survival was significantly decreased by the presence of underlying chronic kidney disease (P = 0.04 but not by other comorbidities (history of myocardial infarction, P = 0.79; metabolic syndrome, P = 0.64; diabetes mellitus, P = 0.56. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is not associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes after lower extremity amputation. However, patients with chronic kidney disease constitute a sub-group of patients at higher risk of postoperative long-term mortality and may be a group to target for intervention.

  15. Reducing treatment by means of physical rehabilitation after lower limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Dugina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the main approaches to the assignment of physical rehabilitation restorative treatment after lower limb amputations. Material and Methods: theoretical analysis and synthesis of modern scientific and methodological literature data on methods of comprehensive rehabilitation after lower limb amputations. Results: the features of the application of physical rehabilitation after lower limb amputations, tasks and presents the main approaches to the appointment of medical physical training, therapeutic massage and physical therapy in preparation for prosthetics. Conclusions: demonstrated that therapeutic physical training, therapeutic massage and physical therapy are effective means of physical rehabilitation of patients after lower limb amputations.

  16. Effect of primary and secondary wartime below-knee amputation on length of hospitalization and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandrić Slavica

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of below-knee amputations in 36 war wounded (mean age 35,42 were reviewed. The majority of the patients was wounded by land mines (94.4%. Most of them were between 25 and 35 years old. Bilateral amputation was done in 2.8% of cases. The amputation was performed on the day of wounding (primary below-knee amputation in 30 (83.3% amputees. Secondary amputation after the attempt to save the severely injured lower-limb was performed in 6 patients (16,7% average 4.61 ± 11.67 days after wounding. Reamputation was necessary in 6 cases (16.7%. Time period from the beginning of rehabilitation to the fitting of prosthesis, was 36.25 ± 14.97 days for primary amputations, 32 ± 17.8 days for secondary amputations and 68.66 ± 33.52 days for reamputations. There was no significant correlation between the duration of rehabilitation to prosthetic management and the period between wounding and amputation (r = -0.102. The attempt to save the limb after severe below-knee injuries and the secondary amputation afterwards, did not significantly influence the ensuing rehabilitation and prosthetic works.

  17. Substantial reduction in the number of amputations among patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin S B; Yderstraede, Knud B; Carstensen, Bendix;

    2016-01-01

    as well as the incidence of further amputations, subdivided by level of amputation. RESULTS: During the period 1996-2011, a total of 2,832 amputations were performed, of which 1,285 were among patients with diabetes and 1,547 among individuals without diabetes. Relative to persons without diabetes...... in BAA rates among patients with diabetes of 9.8%, and the annual reduction in BKA for patients with diabetes was 15.1%. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The amputation rate in patients with diabetes is still several-fold higher than in persons without diabetes, but the improvements in diabetes care in recent...

  18. Predictive factors for lower extremity amputations in diabetic foot infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zameer Aziz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology of diabetic foot infections (DFIs and its predictive factors for lower extremity amputations. A prospective study of 100 patients with DFIs treated at the National University Hospital of Singapore were recruited in the study during the period of January 2005–June 2005. A protocol was designed to document patient's demographics, type of DFI, presence of neuropathy and/or vasculopathy and its final outcome. Predictive factors for limb loss were determined using univariate and stepwise logistic regression analysis. The mean age of the study population was 59.8 years with a male to female ratio of about 1:1 and with a mean follow-up duration of about 24 months. All patients had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Common DFIs included abscess (32%, wet gangrene (29%, infected ulcers (19%, osteomyelitis (13%, necrotizing fasciitis (4% and cellulitis (3%. Thirteen patients were treated conservatively, while surgical debridement or distal amputation was performed in 59 patients. Twenty-eight patients had major amputations (below or above knee performed. Forty-eight percent had monomicrobial infections compared with 52% with polymicrobial infections. The most common pathogens found in all infections (both monomicrobial and polymicrobial were Staphylococcus aureus (39.7%, Bacteroides fragilis (30.3%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26.0% and Streptococcus agalactiae (21.0%. Significant univariate predictive factors for limb loss included age above 60 years, gangrene, ankle-brachial index (ABI <0.8, monomicrobial infections, white blood cell (WBC count ≥ 15.0×109/L, erythrocyte sedimentation rate ≥100 mm/hr, C-reactive protein ≥15.0 mg/dL, hemoglobin (Hb ≤10.0g/dL and creatinine ≥150 µmol/L. Upon stepwise logistic regression, only gangrene, ABI <0.8, WBC ≥ 15.0×109/L and Hb ≤10.0g/dL were significant.

  19. Iatrogenic Penile Glans Amputation: Major Novel Reconstructive Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Nasr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Circumcision is a very common urological practice. Even though it is relatively safe, it is not a complication-free procedure. We describe a patient that underwent a neonatal circumcision complicated by iatrogenic complete glans amputation. Reconstructive repair of a neoglans using a modified traditional method was used. Postoperative followup to 90 days is illustrated. Despite being a simple procedure, circumcision in unprofessional hands can have major complication impacting the emotional and sexual life of patients. Surgical reconstruction is possible with varying satisfactory results.

  20. Glanuloplasty with Oral Mucosa Graft following Total Glans Penis Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwaku Appiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a report on the technique of neoglans reconstruction in a patient with amputated glans penis following guillotine neonatal circumcision. A 4 cm long and 2 cm wide lower lip oral mucosa graft was harvested and used to graft the distal 2 cm of the corporal bodies after 2 cm of the distal penile skin had been excised. One edge of the lower lip oral mucosa graft was anastomosed to the urethral margins distally and proximally to the skin. At six months of followup, patient had both satisfactory cosmetic and functional outcomes.

  1. A case of psychosis who amputated his finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Cemal Kaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-harm behavior is defined as the person’s intentional,direct injuring of some body tissue or the whole body mostoften done without suicidal intentions. Mild types of selfmutilationis seen frequently however more severe onesare rarely seen. Severe self-mutilation is generally a signof a serious psychiatric disorder and it can result in organand/or organ functionality loss. In this study we aimed topresent a schizophrenic patient with repetitive self-mutilation.As a conclusion, practicing clinicians should takeinto consideration the possibility of self-harm behavior inschizophrenia patients especially if they have high riskproperties.Key words: Schizophrenia, self-mutilation, amputation

  2. [Expanded pedicled forearm flap for reconstruction of multiple finger amputations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Jorge, A; Martelo Villar, F

    2000-05-01

    Soft-tissue injuries of the hand frequently require flap coverage to preserve structures damaged at the time of injury or to facilitate later reconstruction. The radial forearm flap makes local tissue readily available and offers a simple method of reconstruction. Secondary augmentation of the skin flap by means of tissue expansion appears to be a useful alternative to improve the possibilities of reconstruction. This case report describes a primary reconstruction of a hand with multiple finger amputations using both techniques: Forearm flap and tissue expansion.

  3. Traumatic Amputation of Finger From an Alligator Snapping Turtle Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert D; Nielsen, Cynthia L

    2016-06-01

    Legend states that the alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii) should be handled with extreme caution as it has jaw strength powerful enough to bite a wooden broomstick in half. Tales of bite injuries from what is the largest freshwater turtle in North America exist anecdotally, yet there are few descriptions of medical encounters for such. The risk of infection from reptilian bites to the hand in an aquatic environment warrants thorough antibiotic treatment in conjunction with hand surgery consultation. We present the first case report of a near total amputation of an index finger in an adolescent boy who had been bitten by a wild "gator snapper."

  4. People with lower limb amputation and their sexual functioning and sexual well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Jesse Elisabeth; Geertzen, Jan H.; Enzlin, Paul; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Dekker, Rienk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Following a lower limb amputation, people may experience limitations in performing sexual activities. However, only little research efforts have been devoted to unravel how people experience their sexuality after such an amputation. Therefore, the purpose of the current study is to describe

  5. Predicting prosthetic use in elderly patients after major lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, Monica Spruit-; van der Linde, Harmen; Buijck, Bianca; Geurts, Alexander; Zuidema, Sytse; Koopmans, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main determinants of prosthetic use known from literature apply to the younger patient with lower limb amputation. Studies aimed at identifying determinants of outcome of lower limb amputation in elderly patients with multimorbidity that rehabilitate in skilled nursing facilities (SN

  6. Risk Factors for Foot Amputation in Patients Hospitalized for Diabetic Foot Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilici, Maria Teresa Verrone; Del Fiol, Fernando de Sá; Vieira, Alexandre Eduardo Franzin; Toledo, Maria Inês

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify risk factors for amputation in diabetic patients hospitalized for foot infections. This cross-sectional study comprised 100 patients with diabetic infectious complications in the lower limbs. The variables investigated were related to diabetes, infection, and treatment compliance. Multiple Cox regression analysis was performed to identify the variables independently associated with the outcome of amputation. The most prevalent chronic complications were neuropathy and hypertension. Most patients presented with a neuroischemic foot (86%). The Morisky test showed that 72% were not compliant with diabetes treatment. Regarding patient outcome, 61% progressed to amputation, 14% to debridement, and 9% to revascularization. The results showed a 42% higher risk for progression to amputation in patients with previous use of antimicrobials. Also, the amputation risk was 26% higher for those less compliant with diabetes treatment. An increase of one point in the Wagner ulcer classification criteria corresponded to a 65% increase in the risk of amputation. Undergoing conservative, nonsurgical procedures prior to admission provided a 63% reduction in the risk of amputation. Knowledge of these factors is critical to enable multidisciplinary teams to develop treatment plans for these patients so as to prevent the need for amputation.

  7. Trends in traumatic limb amputation in Allied Forces in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Wallace

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Limb amputation has been a common injury occurring in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Compared to other injuries, less attention has been given to this serious, disabling wound. Purpose: The article describes the Allied military experience of traumatic limb amputation in Iraq and Afghanistan. It intends to inform health care personnel involved in the care of serving military personnel and veterans about the scale of these casualties. Methods: A literature search of both civilian and military academic databases was conducted. Results: Both the US and UK have incurred very significant numbers of casualties involving traumatic limb amputation, many of whom have suffered multiple limb loss. The rate of blast injuries causing traumatic limb amputation among US forces has increased since the surge of troops in Afghanistan. Dismounted Complex Blast Injury (DCBI consisting of multiple limb amputations with pelvic, abdominal or genito-urinary injuries has been reported as increasing in frequency among US troops in Afghanistan since 2010. Australian Defence Force casualties suffering traumatic limb amputation remain low. Conclusions: Significant casualties involving traumatic limb amputation are likely to continue among Allied troops while current counter-insurgency tactics are continued. Planned troop withdrawals should eventually result in fewer casualties, including reduced numbers of traumatic limb amputation.

  8. Grade IV frostbite requiring bilateral below knee amputations: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdass, Michael J

    2009-04-08

    A rare case of grade IV frostbite is presented resulting in bilateral below knee amputations. This case highlights the importance of early versus late amputation as well as the importance of close collaboration between the rehabilitation, surgical, psychosocial, and public health disciplines in this rare and challenging problem that still may be encountered in the United Kingdom.

  9. Grade IV frostbite requiring bilateral below knee amputations: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Michael J. Ramdass

    2009-01-01

    A rare case of grade IV frostbite is presented resulting in bilateral below knee amputations. This case highlights the importance of early versus late amputation as well as the importance of close collaboration between the rehabilitation, surgical, psychosocial, and public health disciplines in this rare and challenging problem that still may be encountered in the United Kingdom.

  10. Peak Oxygen Consumption in Older Adults With a Lower Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, Daphne; de Haan, Arnold; Faber, Willemijn X.; Slootman, Hans J.; van der Woude, Lucas H.; Houdijk, Han

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether the aerobic capacity of older adults who underwent a lower limb amputation is associated with the presence, cause (traumatic or vascular), and level of amputation (transtibial or transfemoral). Design: Cross-sectional descriptive. Setting: Human motion laboratory at

  11. Spinal, pelvic, and hip movement asymmetries in people with lower-limb amputation: Systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemakumar Devan, MPhty

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Following amputation, people with transfemoral amputation (TFA and transtibial amputation (TTA adapt with asymmetrical movements in the spinal and lower-limb joints. The aim of this review is to describe the trunk, lumbopelvic, and hip joint movement asymmetries of the amputated limb of people with TFA and TTA during functional tasks as compared with the intact leg and/or referent leg of nondisabled controls. Electronic databases were searched from inception to February 2014. Studies with kinematic data comparing (1 amputated and intact leg and (2 amputated and referent leg of nondisabled controls were included (26 articles. Considerable heterogeneity in the studies precluded data pooling. During stance phase of walking in participants with TFA, there is moderate evidence for increased trunk lateral flexion toward the amputated limb as compared with the intact leg and increased anterior pelvic tilt as compared with nondisabled controls. None of the studies investigated spinal kinematics during other functional tasks such as running, ramp walking, stair climbing, or obstacle crossing in participants with TFA or TTA. Overall, persons with TFA adapt with trunk and pelvic movement asymmetries at the amputated limb to facilitate weight transfer during walking. Among participants with TTA, there is limited evidence of spinal and pelvic asymmetries during walking.

  12. Spinal, pelvic, and hip movement asymmetries in people with lower-limb amputation: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devan, Hemakumar; Carman, Allan; Hendrick, Paul; Hale, Leigh; Ribeiro, Daniel Cury

    2015-01-01

    Following amputation, people with transfemoral amputation (TFA) and transtibial amputation (TTA) adapt with asymmetrical movements in the spinal and lower-limb joints. The aim of this review is to describe the trunk, lumbopelvic, and hip joint movement asymmetries of the amputated limb of people with TFA and TTA during functional tasks as compared with the intact leg and/or referent leg of nondisabled controls. Electronic databases were searched from inception to February 2014. Studies with kinematic data comparing (1) amputated and intact leg and (2) amputated and referent leg of nondisabled controls were included (26 articles). Considerable heterogeneity in the studies precluded data pooling. During stance phase of walking in participants with TFA, there is moderate evidence for increased trunk lateral flexion toward the amputated limb as compared with the intact leg and increased anterior pelvic tilt as compared with nondisabled controls. None of the studies investigated spinal kinematics during other functional tasks such as running, ramp walking, stair climbing, or obstacle crossing in participants with TFA or TTA. Overall, persons with TFA adapt with trunk and pelvic movement asymmetries at the amputated limb to facilitate weight transfer during walking. Among participants with TTA, there is limited evidence of spinal and pelvic asymmetries during walking.

  13. Adjustments to amputation and an artificial limb in lower limb amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, Richa; van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Positive adjustments to amputation and an artificial limb play important roles in the rehabilitation process. Objectives: To study the different facets of adjustments to amputation and an artificial limb in lower limb amputees and to assess the possible role of different background and a

  14. Lower limb amputation Part 2: Rehabilitation - A 10 year literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; Martina, J.D.; Rietman, H.S.

    2001-01-01

    Ten years after the ISPO consensus conference on amputation surgery, a search of relevant publications in the Rehabilitation-prosthetics-literature over the years 1990-2000 was performed. The main key-words in this research were: "lower limb, amputation, human and rehabilitation". One hundred and fo

  15. Lower limb amputation - Part 2 : Rehabilitation - a 10 year literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, JHB; Martina, JD; Rietman, HS

    2001-01-01

    Ten years after the ISPO consensus conference on amputation surgery, a search of relevant publications in the Rehabilitation-prosthetics-literature over the years 1990-2000 was performed. The main key-words in this research were: "lower limb, amputation, human and rehabilitation". One hundred and fo

  16. Screening of patients for first time prostheses after amputation of lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetra A.

    2016-01-01

    More than 25% of those who followed the recommended treatment and rehabilitation programme to prepare the amputation stump, reduced contracture and enhanced physical working abilities were declared to be appropriate for further prostheses. This indicates serious shortcomings in medical treatments during the early post-amputation period.

  17. Sexuality in people with a lower limb amputation : a topic too hot to handle?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, J. E. A.; Enzlin, P.; Geertzen, J. H. B.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Dekker, R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze whether, and by whom sexuality is discussed in amputation departments. The focus was on whether professionals received questions about sexuality from their patients with a lower limb amputation and whether they addressed sexuality themselves, as well

  18. Replantation versus Prosthetic Fitting in Traumatic Arm Amputations: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris A Otto

    Full Text Available Traumatic arm amputations can be treated with replantation or surgical formalization of the stump with or without subsequent prosthetic fitting. In the literature, many authors suggest the superiority of replantation. This systematic review compared available literature to analyze whether replantation is functionally and psychologically more profitable than formalization and prosthetic fitting in patients with traumatic arm amputation.Functional outcome and satisfaction levels were recorded of patients with amputation levels below elbow, through elbow, and above elbow.Functional outcomes of 301 replantation patients and 172 prosthesis patients were obtained. In the replantation group, good or excellent functional scores were reported in 39% of above elbow, 55% of through elbow, and 50% of below elbow amputation cases. Nearly 100% of patients were satisfied with the replanted limb. In the prosthesis group, full use of the prosthesis was attained in 48% of above elbow and in 89% of below elbow amputation patients. Here, 29% of patients elected not to use the prosthesis for reasons including pain and functional superfluity. In both replantation patients and prosthesis wearers, a below elbow amputation yielded better functional results than higher amputation levels.Replantation of a traumatically amputated arm leads to good function and higher satisfaction rates than a prosthesis, regardless of the objective functional outcome. Sensation and psychological well-being seem the two major advantages of replantation over a prosthesis. The current review of the available literature shows that in carefully selected cases replantation could be the preferred option of treatment.

  19. Amputation for Long-Standing, Therapy-Resistant Type-I Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krans-Schreuder, H.K.; Bodde, M.I.; Schrier, E.; Dijkstra, P.U.; van den Dungen, J.A.; den Dunnen, W.F.; Geertzen, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Some patients with long-standing, therapy-resistant typed complex regional pain syndrome consider an amputation. There is a lack of evidence regarding the risk of recurrence of the pain syndrome and patient outcomes after amputation. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the impa

  20. Shoe adaptation after amputation of the II-V phalangeal bones of the foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommers, G. M.; Diepstraten, H. J. M.; Bakker, E.; Lindeman, E.

    2006-01-01

    In The Netherlands, about 50% of all amputations of the lower limb are toes and forefoot amputations. Traumata of toes and mid-foot are rare. Preservation of the foot is the primary goal for treatment. Crush injuries of the foot may be associated with prolonged morbidity. This case study presents an

  1. Very low survival rates after non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a consecutive series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Holm, Gitte; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate factors potentially influencing short- and long-term mortality in patients who had a non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a university hospital. A consecutive series of 93 amputations (16% toe/foot, 33% trans-tibial, 9% through knee and 42...

  2. The eye amputated - consequences of eye amputation with emphasis on clinical aspects, phantom eye syndrome and quality of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie Louise Roed

    2010-01-01

    used with an increasing tendency until 2003. The Phantom eye syndrome is frequent among EA patients. Visual hallucinations were described by 42% of the patients. The content were mainly elementary visual hallucinations, with white or colored light as a continuous sharp light or as moving dots. The most...... limitations due to emotional problems and mental health. Patients with the indication painful blind eye are having lower scores in all aspects of health related quality of life and perceived stress than patients with the indication neoplasm and trauma. The percentage of eye amputated which is divorced...

  3. Amputations of Upper and Lower Extremities, Active and Reserve Components, U.S. Armed Forces, 2000-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    bilateral amputations reported here remain unclear. Th e current case defi nition was repeat- edly refi ned to optimize the sensitivity of the case ...6,144 incident cases of traumatic amputations among 5,694 service members. Over one-third of these service members (n=2,037) had major amputations ...calendar years 2005 through 2011. For surveillance purposes, a case of traumatic amputation was defi ned as an individual with: 1) a hospitalization

  4. Reconstruction of an Amputated Glans Penis With a Buccal Mucosal Graft: Case Report of a Novel Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Aboutaleb, Hamdy

    2014-01-01

    Penile amputation is a rare catastrophe and a serious complication of circumcision. Reconstruction of the glans penis may be indicated following amputation. Our report discusses a novel technique for reconfiguration of an amputated glans penis 1 year after a complicated circumcision. A 2-year-old male infant presented to us with glans penis amputation that had occurred during circumcision 1 year previously. The parents complained of severe meatal stenosis with disfigurement of the penis. Peni...

  5. Reduced Incidence of Foot-Related Hospitalisation and Amputation amongst Persons with Diabetes in Queensland, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Lazzarini

    Full Text Available To determine trends in the incidence of foot-related hospitalisation and amputation amongst persons with diabetes in Queensland (Australia between 2005 and 2010 that coincided with changes in state-wide ambulatory diabetic foot-related complication management.All data from cases admitted for the principal reason of diabetes foot-related hospitalisation or amputation in Queensland from 2005-2010 were obtained from the Queensland Hospital Admitted Patient Data Collection dataset. Incidence rates for foot-related hospitalisation (admissions, bed days used and amputation (total, minor, major cases amongst persons with diabetes were calculated per 1,000 person-years with diabetes (diabetes population and per 100,000 person-years (general population. Age-sex standardised incidence and age-sex adjusted Poisson regression models were also calculated for the general population.There were 4,443 amputations, 24,917 hospital admissions and 260,085 bed days used for diabetes foot-related complications in Queensland. Incidence per 1,000 person-years with diabetes decreased from 2005 to 2010: 43.0% for hospital admissions (36.6 to 20.9, 40.1% bed days (391 to 234, 40.0% total amputations (6.47 to 3.88, 45.0% major amputations (2.18 to 1.20, 37.5% minor amputations (4.29 to 2.68 (p < 0.01 respectively. Age-sex standardised incidence per 100,000 person-years in the general population also decreased from 2005 to 2010: 23.3% hospital admissions (105.1 to 80.6, 19.5% bed days (1,122 to 903, 19.3% total amputations (18.57 to 14.99, 26.4% major amputations (6.26 to 4.61, 15.7% minor amputations (12.32 to 10.38 (p < 0.01 respectively. The age-sex adjusted incidence rates per calendar year decreased in the general population (rate ratio (95% CI; hospital admissions 0.949 (0.942-0.956, bed days 0.964 (0.962-0.966, total amputations 0.962 (0.946-0.979, major amputations 0.945 (0.917-0.974, minor amputations 0.970 (0.950-0.991 (p < 0.05 respectively.There were significant

  6. Surgical reimplantation of penile glans amputation in children during circumcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouassida Khaireddine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circumcision is one of the oldest and most commonly performed surgical procedures. Unfortunately, various complications may occur during circumcision, ranging from trivial to tragic such as penile amputation which is a serious complication and a challenging injury to treat. We describe two cases of non-microsurgical successful reattachment of a distal penile glans which were amputated during circumcision. In the first case, a 5-year-old child underwent circumcision by an urologist under local anesthesia. In the second one, a 3-year-old child underwent circumcision by a general practitioner who used to make circumcision. In this article, the literature is reviewed; results and potential complications of this surgery are also discussed. Glans sensation was present, early morning erection was maintained, and there was an erectile response during penile manipulation in both cases. Although circumcision is not technically difficult, it should be taken seriously. The use of microsurgical reattachment is not always possible, especially in pediatric cases; it also requires special equipment and training.

  7. Kinematic analysis of males with transtibial amputation carrying military loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barri L. Schnall, MPT

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The biomechanical responses to load carriage, a common task for dismounted troops, have been well studied in nondisabled individuals. However, with recent shifts in the rehabilitation and retention process of injured servicemembers, there remains a substantial need for understanding these responses in persons with lower-limb amputations. Temporal-spatial and kinematic gait parameters were analyzed among 10 male servicemembers with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA and 10 uninjured male controls. Participants completed six treadmill walking trials in all combinations of two speeds (1.34 and 1.52 m/s and three loads (none, 21.8, and 32.7 kg. Persons with TTA exhibited biomechanical compensations to carried loads that are comparable to those observed in uninjured individuals. However, several distinct gait changes appear to be unique to those with TTA, notably, increased dorsiflexion (deformation of the prosthetic foot/ankle, less stance knee flexion on the prosthetic limb, and altered trunk forward lean/excursion. Such evidence supports the need for future work to assess the risk for overuse injuries with carried loads in this population in addition to guiding the development of adaptive prosthetic feet/components to meet the needs of redeployed servicemembers or veterans/civilians in physically demanding occupations.

  8. Rehabilitation after Amputation: Psychotherapeutic Intervention Module in Indian Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychological aspects of adjustment to amputation are varied and not addressed in the present treatment regime. There is no research evidence available of psychological intervention and outcome in Indian scenario. One hundred and seventy-three consecutive patients with limb amputations were randomly assigned to psychotherapeutic intervention module (PIM, study group (n=90 and treatment as usual group (TAU, control group (n=83. Patients with psychotic disorder were excluded from the study. Carroll Rating Scale for Depression (CRSD, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Amputees Body Image Scale (ABIS, and Impact of Event Scale (IES along with specially designed information schedule were administered individually. Structured psychotherapeutic module was developed for the intervention. Patients in PIM group were given six therapy sessions, addressing the specific areas of concern. All patients were evaluated on the same tools after two months of therapy. Analysis showed that after treatment a significant reduction in scores was noted on CRSD, STAI, ABIS, and IES in the PIM group. On the TAU group a significant reduction was seen only in the ABIS. The psychological intervention module proposed by authors was efficacious in alleviating the psychological distress, depression, and anxiety and thus was vastly superior to the conventional method of management of amputees.

  9. Hemipelvectomy: high-level amputation surgery and prosthetic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdek, Matthew T; Kralovec, Michael E; Andrews, Karen L

    2014-07-01

    The hemipelvectomy, most commonly performed for pelvic tumor resection, is one of the most technically demanding and invasive surgical procedures performed today. Adequate soft tissue coverage and wound complications after hemipelvectomy are important considerations. Rehabilitation after hemipelvectomy is optimally managed by a multidisciplinary integrated team. Understanding the functional outcomes for this population assists the rehabilitation team to counsel patients, plan goals, and determine discharge needs. The most important rehabilitation goal is the optimal restoration of the patient's functional independence. Factors such as age, sex, etiology, level of amputation, and general health play important roles in determining prosthetic use. The three main criteria for successful prosthetic rehabilitation of patients with high-level amputation are comfort, function, and cosmesis. Recent advances in hip and knee joints have contributed to increased function. Prosthetic use after hemipelvectomy improves balance and decreases the need for a gait aid. Using a prosthesis helps maintain muscle strength and tone, cardiovascular health, and functional mobility. With new advances in prosthetic components, patients are choosing to use their prostheses for primary mobility.

  10. Rehabilitation after amputation: psychotherapeutic intervention module in Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Kalpana; Chaudhury, Suprakash

    2014-01-01

    Psychological aspects of adjustment to amputation are varied and not addressed in the present treatment regime. There is no research evidence available of psychological intervention and outcome in Indian scenario. One hundred and seventy-three consecutive patients with limb amputations were randomly assigned to psychotherapeutic intervention module (PIM, study group) (n = 90) and treatment as usual group (TAU, control group) (n = 83). Patients with psychotic disorder were excluded from the study. Carroll Rating Scale for Depression (CRSD), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Amputees Body Image Scale (ABIS), and Impact of Event Scale (IES) along with specially designed information schedule were administered individually. Structured psychotherapeutic module was developed for the intervention. Patients in PIM group were given six therapy sessions, addressing the specific areas of concern. All patients were evaluated on the same tools after two months of therapy. Analysis showed that after treatment a significant reduction in scores was noted on CRSD, STAI, ABIS, and IES in the PIM group. On the TAU group a significant reduction was seen only in the ABIS. The psychological intervention module proposed by authors was efficacious in alleviating the psychological distress, depression, and anxiety and thus was vastly superior to the conventional method of management of amputees.

  11. Lower extremity amputation in peripheral artery disease: improving patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaminathan A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aparna Swaminathan,1 Sreekanth Vemulapalli,1,2 Manesh R Patel,1,2 W Schuyler Jones1,2 1Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Peripheral artery disease affects over eight million Americans and is associated with an increased risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, functional limitation, and limb loss. In its most severe form, critical limb ischemia, patients are often treated with lower extremity (LE amputation (LEA, although the overall incidence of LEA is declining. In the US, there is significant geographic variation in the performing of major LEA. The rate of death after major LEA in the US is approximately 48% at 1 year and 71% at 3 years. Despite this significant morbidity and mortality, the use of diagnostic testing (both noninvasive and invasive testing in the year prior to LEA is low and varies based on patient, provider, and regional factors. In this review we discuss the significance of LEA and methods to reduce its occurrence. These methods include improved recognition of the risk factors for LEA by clinicians and patients, strong advocacy for noninvasive and/or invasive imaging prior to LEA, improved endovascular revascularization techniques, and novel therapies. Keywords: peripheral artery disease, lower extremity amputation, mortality

  12. Early interfaced neural activity from chronic amputated nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshitija Garde

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation, currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative on-dependent multi-electrode arrays of open design allow the early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. .

  13. [Incidence of major lower limb amputation in Geneva: twenty-one years of observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, G A; Lacraz, A; Hoffmeyer, P; Assal, M

    2014-10-22

    Between 1990 and 2010 the incidence of major lowerlimb amputations (by definition any level of amputation above the foot) in the canton of Geneva was 10.02 per 100,000 inhabitants/ year. The analysis of various population groups revealed that the presence of diabetes increased the relative risk of amputation by a factor of 20, and age 65 years or older by a factor of 9. During this 21 years period we observed a gradual decline in the incidence of amputation and an increased age at the time of amputation, despite the increasing prevalence of diabetes and an aging population. This was a reflection on the efforts of primary and secon- dary prevention, initiated in the 1980s in which Geneva was a pioneer.

  14. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in combat veterans after traumatic leg amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, H G; Schweitzer, P; Charoenkul, V; Schwartz, E

    1987-01-01

    Traumatic leg amputation, but not arm amputation, in World War II combat veterans has been associated with subsequent increased ischemic heart disease mortality. In a pilot project we examined a group of 19 high-risk Vietnam War veterans with bilateral above-knee amputations in comparison with a control group with unilateral below-elbow amputations. Nine of the 19 above-knee amputees were hypertensive (p = 0.05) and obese by hydrostatic weighing (p less than 0.001). Obesity was strongly associated with hypertension, decreased glucose tolerance, and marked hyperinsulinemia. Cigarette smoking, blood lipid abnormalities, and decreased cardiovascular fitness were not implicated as significant risk factors. Long-term risks of amputation may be related to metabolic and hemodynamic sequelae of excessive maturity-onset weight gain in young men immobilized by loss of lower limbs.

  15. Check list of symptoms SCL-90-R at persons with extremities amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapidzić-Duraković, Suada; Karabegović, Azra; Halilbegović, Emir; Cićkusić, Amela; Osmanović, Nusret; Kudumović, Zijada

    2006-02-01

    Multidimensional Inventory Check List of Symptoms (SCL-90-r) is based on self-evaluation and it has been used for determination of level of: somatisation, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobias, paranoia and psychosis at persons which are exposed to long term emotional and physical stress. Our goal was to determine relations of physical trauma and psychological changes at persons with lower extremities amputations and to determine factors which influence those changes. Thirty seven persons with lower extremities amputations were examined. The sample included 26 (70.2 %) veterans and 11 (29.7 %) civilians with diseases related amputations. They voluntarily filled Check List of Symptoms SCL-90-r. Symptoms Inventory includes 9 dimensions of primary symptoms: SCL1-somatisation, SCL2-obsessive-compulsive symptoms, SCL3-interpersonal sensitivity, SCL4-depression, SCL5-anxiety, SCL6-hostility, SCL7-phobias, SCL8-paranoia, SCL9-psychosis and SCL10-extra scale. Inventory includes 90 statements, each evaluated with five-level scale of disorder. Every answer is graded with 0-4 points. Thirty seven persons with lower extremities amputations and average chronological age 46.2 +/- 10.92 years were analyzed. Considering marital status 30 (81.1 %) of them were married, 4 (10.8 %) were not married and 3 (8.1 %) were widowers. Considering level of amputation 27 of them (73.0 %) had amputation below knee, 5 (13.5 %) of them amputation above knee and 5 of them (13.5 %) foot amputation. SCL-90-r in both groups determined high level of sensitivity, anxiety, hostility and paranoia. Veterans showed higher level of paranoia comparing to civilians (p<0.002), and younger veterans and married ones had higher level of paranoia comparing to other veterans (p<0.01). Persons with amputations below and above knee showed higher level of paranoia comparing those with foot amputation (p<0.001). Persons with lower extremities amputations have

  16. [Therapeutic approach in vascular injuries of the lower extremity: Amputation or limb salvage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozal, E; Us, M H; Bingöl, H; Oz, B S; Kuralay, E; Tatar, H

    2001-07-01

    The management of lower extremity trauma with vasculary involvement should be directed toward to the salvage of the extremity or to the primary amputation according to the additional pathologies, parameters of the patient and the extremity. We investigated the efficiency of Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) system which is proposed as an grading system to evaluate the change to extremity salvage or the risk for onset of systemic complications. 81 patients with lower extremity trauma were analyzed according to MESS criteria. 79 of the patients were men and mean age was 23 +/- 4. Fourteen patients had higher MESS score. (MESS > 7). Seven of them were older than 50 years. Primary amputation was performed in four of these 7 patients. Vascular repair was performed in three of patients. Multiorgan failure was developed in two of them and both patients died. Secondary amputation was performed to another patients underwent vasculary repair who had MESS > 7 score. Primary amputation was not performed directly in young patients who had MESS > 7. Secondary amputation was required in two of these patients. MESS scoring system can easily predict amputation in older patients but may cause unnecessary amputation in young patients.

  17. Validation of an algorithm to predict reulceration in amputation patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molines-Barroso, Raúl J; Lázaro-Martínez, José L; Álvaro-Afonso, Francisco J; Sanz-Corbalán, Irene; García-Klepzig, José L; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier

    2016-08-09

    The aim of this article was to assess the ability to predict reulceration in people with diabetes and a history of minor amputation according to the formula proposed by Miller et al. A retrospective study was performed on 156 consecutive records of patients with a recent history of simple or multiple forefoot amputation. The sample was divided according to Miller's formula into patients at low risk of reulceration and those at high risk; those were further divided into two subgroups according to whether or not the first segment of the forefoot had been amputated. Forty-eight (47·1%) individuals suffered forefoot reulceration, showing a median reulceration-free survival time of 8 months [interquartile range (IR) 3·6-14·8]. Nephropathy (P = 0.005) and Miller's formula (P = 0.028) were risk factors for reulceration-free survival time in the univariate analysis. The pattern relating to the first segment amputated [hazard ratio (HR) 2·853; P = 0·004; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·391-5·849] and nephropathy (HR 2·468; P = 0.004; 95% CI 1.328-4.587) showed a significant hazard ratio in the multivariate Cox model. Participants with first segment amputation and one other amputation showed an association with the probability of reulceration in comparison with any other specific type of minor amputation.

  18. Mediolateral angular momentum changes in persons with amputation during perturbed walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Riley C; Beltran, Eduardo J; Dingwell, Jonathan B; Wilken, Jason M

    2015-03-01

    Over 50% of individuals with lower limb amputation fall at least once each year. These individuals also exhibit reduced ability to effectively respond to challenges to frontal plane stability. The range of whole body angular momentum has been correlated with stability and fall risk. This study determined how lateral walking surface perturbations affected the regulation of whole body and individual leg angular momentum in able-bodied controls and individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation. Participants walked at fixed speed in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment with no perturbations and continuous, pseudo-random, mediolateral platform oscillations. Both the ranges and variability of angular momentum for both the whole body and both legs were significantly greater (pangular momentum range or variability during unperturbed walking. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was significantly greater for those with amputation than for controls for all segments (pangular momentum ranges were greater for patients with amputation. However, for the prosthetic leg, angular momentum ranges were less for patients than controls. Patients with amputation were significantly more affected by the perturbations. Though patients with amputation were able to maintain similar patterns of whole body angular momentum during unperturbed walking, they were more highly destabilized by the walking surface perturbations. Individuals with transtibial amputation appear to predominantly use altered motion of the intact limb to maintain mediolateral stability.

  19. Physical functioning, pain and quality of life after amputation for musculoskeletal tumours: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, S; Grimer, R J; Cool, P; Murray, S A; Briggs, T; Fulton, J; Grant, K; Gerrand, C H

    2015-09-01

    Patients who have limb amputation for musculoskeletal tumours are a rare group of cancer survivors. This was a prospective cross-sectional survey of patients from five specialist centres for sarcoma surgery in England. Physical function, pain and quality of life (QOL) outcomes were collected after lower extremity amputation for bone or soft-tissue tumours to evaluate the survivorship experience and inform service provision. Of 250 patients, 105 (42%) responded between September 2012 and June 2013. From these, completed questionnaires were received from 100 patients with a mean age of 53.6 years (19 to 91). In total 60 (62%) were male and 37 (38%) were female (three not specified). The diagnosis was primary bone sarcoma in 63 and soft-tissue tumour in 37. A total of 20 tumours were located in the hip or pelvis, 31 above the knee, 32 between the knee and ankle and 17 in the ankle or foot. In total 22 had hemipelvectomy, nine hip disarticulation, 35 transfemoral amputation, one knee disarticulation, 30 transtibial amputation, two toe amputations and one rotationplasty. The Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS) differed by amputation level, with poorer scores at higher levels (p amputation level is linked to physical function, but not QOL or pain measures. Pain and physical function significantly impact on QOL. These results are helpful in managing the expectations of patients about treatment and addressing their complex needs.

  20. Patterns of extremity traumas leading to amputation in lran:results of Iranian National Trauma Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Majid Moini; Mohammad R Rasouli; Ali Khaji; Farshad Farshidfar; Pedram Heidari

    2009-01-01

    Obiective: To determine the patterns of traumatic extremity injuries leading to amputation in Iran.Methotis: Data of Iranian National Trauma Project was used to identify patients with upper and lower extremity traumas undergoing amputation.This project was conducted in 8 major cities during 2000-2004.Results: of 17 753 traumatic Patients,164 (0.92%) had injuries to the extremities that resulted in the limb amputation.Of these,143 (87.2%) were men.The patient's mean age was 29.0 years±15.4 years and the highest incidence was seen in the age group of 21 to 30 years (34.1%).One hundred and four cases were occupational accidents (63.4%).Blunt trauma was in 54.9% of the cases.The most common reasons for amputation were respectively stabbings (37.8%) and crush injuries (31.7%).Amputation of hand fingers was the most frequent type of amputation (125 cases,76.2%).One patient died from severe associated injuries.Conclusions: This study shows the patterns of traumatic limb amputation in Iran,a developing country.Resuits of this study may be used in preventive strategic planning.

  1. Transmetatarsal amputation in the setting of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Jacob M; Brantigan, Charles O; Alix, Kristen; Kruse, Dustin L; Stone, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is a hypercoagulable disease that can present foot and ankle surgeons with a unique challenge in treating patients who present with thrombosis and ischemia despite having normal pedal pulses. Appropriate perioperative management is imperative in these patients, because limb- and life-threatening complications can occur postoperatively, despite aggressive anticoagulation. We present the case of a 46-year-old male who underwent a transmetatarsal amputation and, despite aggressive therapy, developed a myriad of complications postoperatively. At 10 months postoperatively, the patient was doing well in an accommodative orthotic with minimal pain while receiving continued aggressive therapy and follow-up examinations by a number of specialists to treat his antiphospholipid syndrome.

  2. Prosthetic pollicization following thumb amputation: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The thumb contributes over 50% hand function, which is generally divided into motional, sensory and cosmetic functions. Optimal management of thumb loss necessitates individual consideration of surgical versus prosthetic options, in relation to the needs and circumstances of each patient. This paper presents a case of prosthetic pollicization of an amputated thumb and emphasizes on the fact that the prosthetic replacement has a definite edge over surgical procedures, where amputees refuse to undergo more complicated surgical procedures. The patient was rehabilitated successfully by a noninvasive and cost-effective approach by using high temperature-vulcanized (HTV silicone material and retaining the prosthesis with medical adhesives. On 3 months recall appointment, no complications were found. The prosthesis was in good shape, without need for any repairs.

  3. [Tests of hand functionality in upper limb amputation with prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzini, G; Orlandini, D; Moscato, T A; Nicita, D; Panigazzi, M

    2007-01-01

    The need for standardized instruments for clinical measurements has become pressing in the fields of occupational rehabilitation and ergonomics. This is particularly the case for instruments that allow a quantitative evaluation of upper limb function, and especially hand function in patients who have undergone an amputation and then application of an upper limb prosthesis. This study presents a review of the main tests used to evaluate hand function, with a critical analysis of their use in subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. The tests are divided into: tests to evaluate strength, tests to evaluate co-ordination and dexterity, tests of global or overall function, and tests proposed specifically for subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. Of the various tests presented, the authors give their preference to the Bimanual Functional Assessment, Abilhand and/or the ADL Questionnaire, because of the practical usefulness, clinimetric features, simplicity and ease of administration of these tests.

  4. A developing world experience with distal foot amputations for diabetic limb salvage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Salahuddin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the functional outcome, morbidity, and viability of foot salvage in diabetic patients. Materials and methods: This prospective case series was conducted from March 2007 to December 2012 at the department of surgery Pakistan Ordnance Factories Hospital, Wah Cantt, Pakistan. 123 males and 26 female patients were included in the study. All the patients were treated after getting admitted in the hospital and wounds were managed with daily dressings, nursing care and debridement of necrotic tissue with adequate antibiotic coverage. Results: In total, 149 patients (mean age: 56±7.52 years with 171 amputations were included in the study. The mean duration of diabetes mellitus (DM was 9±4.43 years. Ninety-seven percent of the patients were diagnosed with type 2 DM. Wound debridement was performed under general anesthesia in 48 (33.2% patients, whereas local anesthesia was used for the rest of the patients after having good glycemic control and improvement in general health. The most common pathogen isolated from the infected wounds was Staphylococcus aureus in approximately 46% cases. Regarding the types of amputation, partial toe amputation was performed in 21 (12.2% cases, second-toe amputation in 60 (35% cases, hallux amputation in 41 (24% cases, multiple toe amputations in 29 (17% cases, bilateral feet involvement was observed in 16 (9.3% cases, and transmetatarsal amputation was performed in 4 (2.3% cases. The wounds healed well except in 19 cases where amputation had to be revised to a more proximal level. Thirty-nine patients died during the study period: 3 died of wound-related complications and 36 died of systemic complications. Conclusion: With the ever-increasing epidemic of DM, the number of patients with diabetic foot ulcers has also significantly risen. Early surgical management with good glycemic control and foot care with close monitoring can decrease amputations and thus foot salvage can be successfully

  5. Assessment of anxiety and depression after lower limb amputation in Jordanian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad M Hawamdeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Ziad M Hawamdeh1, Yasmin S Othman2, Alaa I Ibrahim31Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; 2Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; 3Lecturer, Department of Physical Therapy for Pediatrics and Pediatric surgery, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, EgyptObjective: This study aimed to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depression among Jordanian lower limb amputees with different clinical characteristics and sociodemographic data (gender, marital status, social support, income, type and level of amputation, and occupation.Methods: Participants were 56 patients with unilateral lower limb amputation with mean duration (8.4 ± 5.75 years. They were recruited from inpatient and outpatient clinics of Jordan University hospital, Royal Farah Rehabilitation Center, and Al-basheer hospital in Amman, Jordan. Participants responded to a questionnaire that included a battery of questions requesting brief information about sociodemographic variables and characteristics of amputation. The level of depression and anxiety in each participating patient was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS.Results: The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms were 37% and 20%, respectively. Factors associated with high prevalence of psychological symptoms included female gender, lack of social support, unemployment, traumatic amputation, shorter time since amputation, and amputation below the knee. These findings were confirmed by a significant reduction of anxiety and depression scores in patients who received social support, patients with amputation due to disease, and patients with amputation above the knee. Presence of pain and use of prosthesis had no effect on the prevalence.Conclusions: The findings of the present study highlight the high incidence of psychiatric disability and

  6. Assessment of gait stability, harmony, and symmetry in subjects with lower-limb amputation evaluated by trunk accelerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosa, Marco; Paradisi, Francesco; Brunelli, Stefano; Delussu, Anna Sofia; Pellegrini, Roberto; Zenardi, Daniele; Paolucci, Stefano; Traballesi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of upper-body accelerations is a promising and simple technique for quantitatively assessing some general features of gait such as stability, harmony, and symmetry. Despite the growing literature on elderly healthy populations and neurological patients, few studies have used accelerometry to investigate these features in subjects with lower-limb amputation. We enrolled four groups of subjects: subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with a locked knee prosthesis, subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with an unlocked knee prosthesis, subjects with transtibial amputation, and age-matched nondisabled subjects. We found statistically significant differences for stability (p amputation. This study is the first to investigate upper-body acceleration of subjects with unilateral lower-limb amputation during walking who were evaluated upon dismissal from a rehabilitation hospital; it is also the first study to differentiate the sample in terms of level of amputation and type of prosthesis used.

  7. [Self-amputation of the penis treated immediately: Case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odzébé, A W S; Bouya, P A; Otiobanda, G F; Banga Mouss, R; Nzaka Moukala, C; Ondongo Atipo, A M; Ondziel Opara, A S

    2015-12-01

    Self-amputation of the penis treated immediately: case report and review of the literature. Self-amputation of the penis is rare in urological practice. It occurs more often in a context psychotic disease. It can also be secondary to alcohol or drugs abuse. Treatment and care vary according on the severity of the injury, the delay of consultation and the patient's mental state. The authors report a case of self-amputation of the penis in an alcoholic context. The authors analyze the etiological and urological aspects of this trauma.

  8. The onset of pain related behaviours following partial beak amputation in the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentle, M J; Hunter, L N; Waddington, D

    1991-07-08

    The number of pecks delivered by birds to an attractive visual stimulus was measured before and again 6, 26 and 32 h after partial beak amputation. There was a significant reduction in the number of pecks by birds 26 h after amputation but not at 6 h after. This reduction was considered to be a quantitative measure of pain related guarding behaviour. The results indicated the presence of a pain-free period immediately following amputation which may last in some birds for as long as 26 h.

  9. Recent advances in lower extremity amputations and prosthetics for the combat injured patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergason, John; Keeling, John J; Bluman, Eric M

    2010-03-01

    Blast-related extremity trauma represents a serious challenge because of the extent of bone and soft tissue damage. Fragmentation and blast injuries account for 56% of all injuries produced within the Iraqi and Afghan theaters where, as of July 2009, 723 combatants have sustained lower extremity limb loss. If limb salvage is not practical, or fails, then amputation should be considered. Amputation can be a reliable means toward pain relief and improvement of function. Optimizing functional outcome is paramount when deciding on definitive amputation level. Preservation of joint function improves limb biomechanics in many cases. Increased limb length also allows for the benefits associated with articular and distal limb proprioception. Amputees with improved lower extremity function also usually exhibit less energy consumption. Function and length are generally directly correlated, whereas energy consumption and length are inversely related. This article discusses the surgical principles of lower extremity amputation and postoperative management of amputees, and the various prosthetic options available.

  10. Can patterns of segmental injuries of the foot and ankle predict amputation and disability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantry, Jacob M; Perumal, Venkatachalapathy; Roberts, Craig S

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the risk of digital or distal segmental amputation and permanent unemployment in patients with these injury patterns. A retrospective chart review of 23 patients with multiple, ipsilateral injuries of the foot and ankle was performed. Amputations occurred in five patients (21.7%) and were most common in those with three-level injuries. Odds ratios showed that patients with an amputation were 9.75 times more likely to have a three-level injury than a two-level injury. At a mean follow-up of 12.9 months, 12 patients had not returned to work (60%), seven returned with restrictions, and only one patient returned to preinjury activities. It was concluded that patients with segmental foot and ankle injuries are at risk for amputation of the distal portion of the involved extremity and inability to return to their preinjury employment level (disability).

  11. Predictors of lower-extremity amputation in patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickwell, Kirsty; Siersma, Volkert; Kars, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Infection commonly complicates diabetic foot ulcers and is associated with a poor outcome. In a cohort of individuals with an infected diabetic foot ulcer, we aimed to determine independent predictors of lower-extremity amputation and the predictive value for amputation...... of the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF) classification system and to develop a risk score for predicting amputation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We prospectively studied 575 patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer presenting to 1 of 14 diabetic foot clinics in 10 European countries...... the IWGDF system (area under the ROC curves 0.80, 0.78, and 0.67, respectively). CONCLUSIONS For individuals with an infected diabetic foot ulcer, we identified independent predictors of amputation, validated the prognostic value of the IWGDF classification system, and developed a new risk score...

  12. Motor cortex changes after amputation are modulated by phantom limb motor control rather than pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffin, Estelle E.; Pascal, Giraux,; Karen, Reilly,;

    Amputation of a limb induces reorganization within the contralateral primary motor cortex (M1-c) (1-3). In the case of hand amputation, M1-c areas evoking movements in the face and the remaining part of the upper-limb expand toward the hand area. Despite this expansion, the amputated hand still...... retains a residual M1-c activity when amputees perform phantom limb movements (4-5). Except a correlation between phantom limb pain and M1-c expansion of the face (2-3), the relationship between the ability to voluntary move the phantom hand, the level of phantom limb pain, the degree of M1-c...... reorganization and the residual M1-c activity of the amputated hand is unknown. This fMRI study aimed to determine this relationship...

  13. Physical rehabilitation of patients with amputation stump of thigh because of trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efremova O.V.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is exposition essence of problem of renewal of ability to work of a problem of restoration after amputation at the hip. The analysis of the standard program of the standard in traumatology programs of physical rehabilitation of patients after amputation and presents the results of the developed physical rehabilitation of patients with amputating the thigh stumps due to injury. The authors propose to use the means of physical rehabilitation in accordance with the flow dynamics of the reparative processes after amputation and clinical features of injury. All this contributes to the development of compensatory own human capabilities, resulting in remission. Since these funds most physiological, their correct application does not cause complications.

  14. Replantation versus prosthetic fitting in traumatic arm amputations : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Iris A.; Kon, Moshe; Schuurman, AH; Van Minnen, L. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traumatic arm amputations can be treated with replantation or surgical formalization of the stump with or without subsequent prosthetic fitting. In the literature, many authors suggest the superiority of replantation. This systematic review compared available literature to analyze whethe

  15. Hallux amputation after a freshwater stingray injury in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Oliveira, Sâmella Silva de; Sachett, Jacqueline de Almeida Gonçalves; Silva, Iran Mendonça da; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater stingray injuries are a common problem in the Brazilian Amazon, affecting mostly riverine and indigenous populations. These injuries cause severe local and regional pain, swelling and erythema, as well as complications, such as local necrosis and bacterial infection. Herein, we report a case of bacterial infection and hallux necrosis, after a freshwater stingray injury in the Brazilian Amazon, which eventually required amputation. Different antimicrobial regimens were administered at different stages of the disease; however, avoiding amputation through effective treatment was not achieved.

  16. Gangrene of the penis in a diabetic male with multiple amputations and follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Vijayan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old insulin dependent, diabetic male with severe atherosclerosis requiring multiple amputations in the extremities in the past, with normal renal function presented with gangrene of glans penis. He was initially treated with debridement but as the gangrene progressed, partial penile amputation was performed. He showed no further progress of the disease and had no voiding difficulties even after 4 years of follow up.

  17. Incidence, severity, and impact of hyperhidrosis in people with lower-limb amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Colby Hansen, MD; Bradeigh Godfrey, DO; Jody Wixom, MD; Molly McFadden, MS

    2015-01-01

    To assess the incidence and severity of self-reported hyperhidrosis in patients with amputation and understand its effects on prosthetic fit or function, a cross-sectional survey of patients at two amputee clinics was performed. Responses from 121 subjects with lower-limb amputation were analyzed. Of these subjects, 66% reported sweating to a degree that it interfered with daily activities, as measured by the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale. There was a significant association between sw...

  18. Salvage of a Below Knee Amputation Utilizing Rotationplasty Principles in a Patient with Chronic Tibial Osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Moralle, Matthew R.; Stekas, Nicholas D.; Reilly, Mark C.; Sirkin, Michael S.; Adams, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic osteomyelitis is a disease that requires fastidious treatment to eliminate. However, when eradication is unable to be achieved through exhaustive modalities of antibiotic therapy and multiple debridements, significant resection of the infected bone and soft tissue must be considered, including amputation. Here we report of a salvage procedure for chronic osteomyelitis of the left tibia by employing a rotationplasty to avoid an above knee amputation and instead provide th...

  19. Trends in traumatic limb amputation in Allied Forces in Iraq and Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Background: Limb amputation has been a common injury occurring in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Compared to other injuries, less attention has been given to this serious, disabling wound. Purpose: The article describes the Allied military experience of traumatic limb amputation in Iraq and Afghanistan. It intends to inform health care personnel involved in the care of serving military personnel and veterans about the scale of these casualties. Methods: A literature se...

  20. Risk Factors for Foot Amputation in Patients Hospitalized for Diabetic Foot Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Teresa Verrone Quilici; Fernando de Sá Del Fiol; Alexandre Eduardo Franzin Vieira; Maria Inês de Toledo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify risk factors for amputation in diabetic patients hospitalized for foot infections. This cross-sectional study comprised 100 patients with diabetic infectious complications in the lower limbs. The variables investigated were related to diabetes, infection, and treatment compliance. Multiple Cox regression analysis was performed to identify the variables independently associated with the outcome of amputation. The most prevalent chronic complic...

  1. Crossover replantation after bilateral traumatic lower limb amputations: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Jun; Li Huazhuang; Dou Honglei; Chen Jingchun; Xu Aiping; Liu Wenguo; Ding Gang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Replantation of a limb to the contralateral stump after bilateral traumatic amputations is rare. To the best of our knowledge, there are only a few reports of crossover lower limb replantation in the literature. Case presentation We treated a 37-year-old Chinese woman with bilateral lower limb crush injuries sustained in a traffic accident. Her lower limb injuries were at different anatomic levels. We performed emergency bilateral amputations followed by crossover replan...

  2. Bilateral microvascular second toe transfer for bilateral post-traumatic thumb amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendra Nehete; Anita Nehete; Sandeep Singla; Harshad Adhav

    2012-01-01

    In bilateral thumb amputations, the functional impairment is serious and every attempt should be made to reconstruct the thumb. We report a case of bilateral post traumatic thumb amputation, reconstructed with bilateral second toe transfer. Only two such cases have been reported in literature so far. Though there are various modalities for the reconstruction of thumb, microvascular toe transfer has its own merits. The convalescent period is minimal with excellent function. It is bilaterally s...

  3. Bilateral upper limb amputations in victims of high tension electrical injuries: Three case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cajetan Nwadinigwe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral upper limb amputations result in severe disability. High voltage electrical injury is a rare cause of such an outcome and injuries often occur as occupational hazards. We present three case reports of accidental high voltage injuries that occurred in a non-occupational setting. Victims were all initially managed at other centres before referral to our hospital and all subsequently had bilateral upper limb amputations. The high cost of treatment, importance of prevention, and need for rehabilitation are highlighted.

  4. Partial amputation of the tongue--self-inflicted or physical assault?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthal, S; Bayer, R; Doerre, A; Dreßler, J

    2016-05-01

    Injuries of the tongue are generally self-inflicted lesions and occur during different diseases or external incidents. The amputation of the tongue is a rare event. In this article, we report about a woman presenting with a complete amputation of the anterior third of the tongue. The morphological findings, which are essential for the differentiation of self-inflicted injuries and injuries caused by a third party, are demonstrated.

  5. [The importance of soft tissue stabilization in trans-femoral amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, F

    2015-06-01

    Transfemoral amputations with more proximal amputation levels have the problem of secondary development into flexion and abduction contractures. This is induced by muscle imbalance, especially the loss of adductor muscle insertions when abductor muscle insertions are preserved. This causes considerable problems when fitting prosthetics. Myodesis with insertion of the distally detached adductor magnus muscle to the lateral femoral cortex, introduced here, results in a stronger stump with good muscle balance, and prosthetics fitting is significantly improved.

  6. Hip arthroplasty in a patient with transfemoral amputation: a new tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussakri, Hassan; Alassaf, Ihab; Hamoudi, Samir; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Ntarataz, Philbert; ELMrini, Abdelmajid; Dumez, Jean Francois

    2015-01-01

    Femoral fractures in amputation stump are challenging injuries to manage. The authors describe a case of a 51-year-old patient with a right above knee amputation, who had a right hip femoral neck fracture. In this technical note, we describe a technical and surgical procedure with intraoperative tips and tricks, in which we use commonly available materials, for the safe management in such clinical situations.

  7. Hip Arthroplasty in a Patient with Transfemoral Amputation: A New Tip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Boussakri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Femoral fractures in amputation stump are challenging injuries to manage. The authors describe a case of a 51-year-old patient with a right above knee amputation, who had a right hip femoral neck fracture. In this technical note, we describe a technical and surgical procedure with intraoperative tips and tricks, in which we use commonly available materials, for the safe management in such clinical situations.

  8. The importance of soft tissue stabilization in trans-femoral amputation : English version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, F

    2016-03-01

    Transfemoral amputations with more proximal amputation levels have the problem of secondary development into flexion and abduction contractures. This is induced by muscle imbalance, especially the loss of adductor muscle insertions when abductor muscle insertions are preserved. This causes considerable problems when fitting prosthetics. Myodesis with insertion of the distally detached adductor magnus muscle to the lateral femoral cortex, introduced here, results in a stronger stump with good muscle balance, and prosthetics fitting is significantly improved.

  9. Does size matter? Examining the effect of obesity on inpatient amputation rehabilitation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Lilian L Y; Pauley, Tim; Dilkas, Steven; Devlin, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated whether obesity impacted clinical outcomes of patients at discharge from inpatient amputation rehabilitation. Method This was a retrospective chart review examining admissions for lower extremity amputation rehabilitation at a Canadian Regional Amputee Rehabilitation Programme between December 2011 and June 2014. Discharge outcomes were predefined as the two-minute walk test (2MWT), the L-test of functional mobility and the SIGAM score. These were compared between each body mass index (BMI) group (underweight   amputation groups. Results Of the 289 admissions meeting inclusion criteria, only underweight patients walked significantly less distance on the 2MWT than normal weight patients. There were group differences in the L-test, but post hoc testing was unable to qualify the differences. No significant difference was found in the SIGAM score. There were no significant differences found in the 2MWT, L-test or SIGAM when patients were grouped by amputation level. Conclusions Obesity does not appear to significantly impact inpatient amputation rehabilitation outcomes such as the 2MWT, L-test or SIGAM score. As such, obesity should not be a deciding factor as to whether a patient is offered rehabilitation. Implications for Rehabilitation Obesity is increasing in prevalence and is comorbid with peripheral vascular disease and diabetes, the leading causes of lower extremity amputation. Function is compromised in the obese general population when compared to non-obese individuals. Obesity does not seem to confer a disadvantage with regards to validated outcomes, such as the 2-min walk test, L-test or SIGAM score at discharge after inpatient amputation rehabilitation. Obesity should not be a barrier to offering inpatient rehabilitation to amputation patients.

  10. Metabolic and body composition changes in first year following traumatic amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carly S. Eckard, MS, RD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Body composition and metabolism may change considerably after traumatic amputation because of muscle atrophy and an increase in adiposity. The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in weight, body composition, and metabolic rate during the first year following traumatic amputation in military servicemembers. Servicemembers without amputation were included for comparison. Participants were measured within the first 12 wk after amputation (baseline and at 6, 9, and 12 mo after amputation. Muscle mass, fat mass, weight, and metabolic rate were measured at each time point. There was a significant increase in weight and body mass index in the unilateral group between baseline and all follow-up visits (p < 0.01. Over the 12 mo period, total fat mass and trunk fat mass increased in both unilateral and bilateral groups; however, these changes were not statistically significant over time. Muscle mass increased in both the unilateral and bilateral groups despite percent of lean mass decreasing. No changes in resting metabolism or walking energy expenditure were observed in any group. The results of this study conclude that weight significantly increased because of an increase in both fat mass and muscle mass in the first year following unilateral and bilateral amputation.

  11. Does unilateral transtibial amputation lead to greater metabolic demand during walking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Russell Esposito, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous literature reports greater metabolic demand of walking following transtibial amputation. However, most research focuses on relatively older, less active, and often dysvascular amputees. Servicemembers with traumatic amputation are typically young, fit, and highly active before and often following surgical amputation of their lower limb. This study compared the metabolic demand of walking in young, active individuals with traumatic unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA and nondisabled controls. Heart rate (HR, rate of oxygen consumption, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE were calculated as subjects walked at a self-selected velocity and at five standardized velocities based on leg length. The TTA group completed a Prosthetics Evaluation Questionnaire. Oxygen consumption (p = 0.89, net oxygen consumption (p = 0.32, and RPE (p = 0.14 did not differ between groups. Compared with controls, HR was greater in the TTA group and increased to a greater extent with velocity (p < 0.001. Overall, the TTA group rated their walking abilities as high (mean: 93% out of 100%. This is the first study to report equivalent metabolic demand between persons with amputation and controls walking at the same velocity. These results may reflect the physical fitness of the young servicemembers with traumatic amputations and may serve to guide outcome expectations in the future.

  12. Incidence, severity, and impact of hyperhidrosis in people with lower-limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colby Hansen, MD

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the incidence and severity of self-reported hyperhidrosis in patients with amputation and understand its effects on prosthetic fit or function, a cross-sectional survey of patients at two amputee clinics was performed. Responses from 121 subjects with lower-limb amputation were analyzed. Of these subjects, 66% reported sweating to a degree that it interfered with daily activities, as measured by the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale. There was a significant association between sweating and interference with prosthetic fit and function. Sweating was more severe in cases of transtibial amputations, patients under the age of 60 yr, warm weather, and vigorous activity. There was no relationship between severity of sweating and time since amputation, etiology of amputation, duration of daily prosthetic use, or reported ability to perform functional tasks. Subjects reported trying multiple interventions, but the self-reported effectiveness of these treatments was low. Hyperhidrosis, a common problem associated with prosthetic usage, varies in severity and often interferes with daily activities. Sweating severity is associated with poor prosthetic fit and function. Risk factors include younger age and transtibial amputation status. Treatment strategies generally lack efficacy. The results of this study may provide guidance for future interventions and treatment options.

  13. Maximum-speed curve-running biomechanics of sprinters with and without unilateral leg amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboga, Paolo; Kram, Rodger; Grabowski, Alena M

    2016-03-01

    On curves, non-amputees' maximum running speed is slower on smaller radii and thought to be limited by the inside leg's mechanics. Similar speed decreases would be expected for non-amputees in both counterclockwise and clockwise directions because they have symmetric legs. However, sprinters with unilateral leg amputation have asymmetric legs, which may differentially affect curve-running performance and Paralympic competitions. To investigate this and understand the biomechanical basis of curve running, we compared maximum curve-running (radius 17.2 m) performance and stride kinematics of six non-amputee sprinters and 11 sprinters with a transtibial amputation. Subjects performed randomized, counterbalanced trials: two straight, two counterclockwise curves and two clockwise curves. Non-amputees and sprinters with an amputation all ran slower on curves compared with straight running, but with different kinematics. Non-amputees ran 1.9% slower clockwise compared with counterclockwise (Prunning. Sprinters with an amputation also reduced stride length in both curve-running directions, but reduced stride frequency only on curves with the affected leg on the inside. During curve running, non-amputees and athletes with an amputation had longer contact times with their inside compared with their outside leg, suggesting that the inside leg limits performance. For sprinters with an amputation, the prolonged contact times of the affected versus unaffected leg seem to limit maximum running speed during both straight running and running on curves with the affected leg on the inside.

  14. Quality of Life Following Amputation or Limb Preservation in Patients with Lower Extremity Bone Sarcoma

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    Gary E Mason

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Although functional differences have been described between patients with lower extremity bone sarcoma with amputation and limb preservation surgery, differences have not clearly been shown between the two groups related to quality of life. The aim of the study was to determine if there is a difference in overall quality of life in lower extremity bone sarcoma survivors related to whether they had an amputation or a limb preservation procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-two long-term survivors of lower extremity bone sarcoma were studied to make a comparison of the overall quality of life, pain assessment and psychological evaluations in limb preservation and amputation patients. Forty-eight patients with limb preservation and thirty-four patients with amputations were enrolled in the study. Validated psychometric measures including the Quality of Life Questionnaire, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and visual analog scales were utilized.RESULTS: The overall quality of life of patients with limb preservation was significantly higher than patients with amputation (p-value < 0.01. Significant differences were noted in the categories of material well being, job satisfiers and occupational relations. CONCLUSION: The overall quality of life of patients with limb preservation appears to be better than for those patients with amputation based on the quality of life questionnaire in patients surviving lower extremity bone sarcoma. Further analysis needs to verify the results and focus on the categories that significantly affect the overall quality of life.

  15. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyao Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA of white matter (WM were investigated. In amputees, a thinning trend was seen in the left premotor cortex (PMC. Smaller clusters were also noted in the visual-to-motor regions. In addition, the amputees also exhibited a decreased FA in the right superior corona radiata and WM regions underlying the right temporal lobe and left PMC. Fiber tractography from these WM regions showed microstructural changes in the commissural fibers connecting the bilateral premotor cortices, compatible with the hypothesis that amputation can lead to a change in interhemispheric interactions. Finally, the lower limb amputees also displayed significant FA reduction in the right inferior frontooccipital fasciculus, which is negatively correlated with the time since amputation. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the amputation of lower limb could induce changes in the cortical representation of the missing limb and the underlying WM connections.

  16. Incidence, severity, and impact of hyperhidrosis in people with lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Colby; Godfrey, Bradeigh; Wixom, Jody; McFadden, Molly

    2015-01-01

    To assess the incidence and severity of self-reported hyperhidrosis in patients with amputation and understand its effects on prosthetic fit or function, a cross-sectional survey of patients at two amputee clinics was performed. Responses from 121 subjects with lower-limb amputation were analyzed. Of these subjects, 66% reported sweating to a degree that it interfered with daily activities, as measured by the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale. There was a significant association between sweating and interference with prosthetic fit and function. Sweating was more severe in cases of transtibial amputations, patients under the age of 60, warm weather, and vigorous activity. There was no relationship between severity of sweating and time since amputation, etiology of amputation, duration of daily prosthetic use, or reported ability to perform functional tasks. Subjects reported trying multiple interventions, but the self-reported effectiveness of these treatments was low. Hyperhidrosis, a common problem associated with prosthetic usage, varies in severity and often interferes with daily activities. Sweating severity is associated with poor prosthetic fit and function. Risk factors include younger age and transtibial amputation status. Treatment strategies generally lack efficacy. The results of this study may provide guidance for future interventions and treatment options.

  17. Persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation have altered lumbosacral kinetics during sitting and standing movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Brad D; Wolf, Erik J

    2015-07-01

    Increases in spinal loading have been related to altered movements of the lower back during gait among persons with lower limb amputation, movements which are self-perceived by these individuals as contributing factors in the development of low back pain. However, the relationships between altered trunk kinematics and associated changes in lumbosacral kinetics during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements in this population have not yet been assessed. Three-dimensional lumbosacral kinetics (joint moments and powers) were compared between 9 persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation (wearing both a powered and passive knee device), and 9 uninjured controls, performing five consecutive sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements. During sit-to-stand movements, lumbosacral joint moments and powers were significantly larger among persons with transfemoral amputation relative to uninjured controls. During stand-to-sit movements, lumbosacral joint moments and powers were also significantly larger among persons with transfemoral amputation relative to uninjured controls, with the exception of sagittal joint powers. Minimal differences in kinetic measures were noted between the powered and passive knee devices among persons with transfemoral amputation across all conditions. Altered lumbosacral kinetics during sitting and standing movements, important activities of daily living, may play a biomechanical role in the onset and/or recurrence of low back pain or injury among persons with lower-limb amputation.

  18. Prosthesis intolerance in patients with transfemoral amputation: a videocapillaroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Claudio; Cassigoli, Silvia; Lova, Raffaele Molino; Roccuzzo, Aurelio; Miniati, Benedetta; Ceppatelli, Simone; Conti, Andrea A; Gensini, Gian Franco

    2004-06-01

    Videocapillaroscopy is a new technique allowing a noninvasive examination of the capillary framework of the skin by using a contact probe with magnifying lenses and a cold-light epiluminescence system. The aim of this article was to investigate, by videocapillaroscopy, the microcirculation of the skin of the stump in 70 consecutive patients with unilateral transfemoral amputation. Patients were divided into two subgroups according to their tolerance (A) or intolerance (B) to a prosthesis with an Icelandic-Swedish-New York socket. Subgroup A included 48 patients, 17 diabetic and 31 nondiabetic, and subgroup B included 22 patients, 16 diabetic and 6 nondiabetic. In subgroup B, the caliber of capillary loops was significantly larger (mean +/-standard deviation, 23.6 +/-2.04 vs. 16.2 +/-1.96 microm; P < 0.001), neoangiogenesis was significantly more frequent (82%vs. 25%, P < 0.001), and the presence of microaneurysms (64%vs. 15%, P < 0.001) and microhemorrhages (36%vs. 4%, P < 0.001) was also more frequent. Surprisingly, some such diabetes-like microvascular changes were also found in the six nondiabetic patients of subgroup B. By using multiple logistic regression analysis, intolerance to the prosthesis was significantly related to microvascular changes (P = 0.001) but not to diabetes (P = 0.601), although diabetes was unequally distributed in the two subgroups.

  19. Prevention of bilateral amputation in a non-concordant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeanette

    As chronic wounds, venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are costly and impact significantly on a patient's quality of life. This case study focuses on the key considerations for wound management of bilateral venous leg ulcers in a 45-year-old mother who had undergone multiple admissions with sepsis secondary to the ulcers and whose life was considered at risk. The primary concern was to stabilise the patient, and then to determine the aetiology of the leg ulcers and develop a treatment plan. Kerraboot (Crawford Healthcare) was chosen to dress the wound initially as it is relatively quick and easy to apply while being atraumatic, manages exudate and facilitates autolytic debridement (Harvey, 2006). After 12 days debridement was complete and granulation tissue was observed to the skin surface level. At this time, the patient's condition had stabilised and the wound aetiology could then be determined. The ulcers were confirmed as venous and were subsequently managed with compression bandaging. They continued to heal, reducing in size by 60% after a further 3 months. By agreeing a highly individualised wound treatment plan with the patient that was tailored to both her needs and those of the wound, and by continually reviewing and revising this plan, bilateral amputation was avoided in this previously non-concordant patient.

  20. Lower extremity amputation in peripheral artery disease: improving patient outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Aparna; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Patel, Manesh R; Jones, W Schuyler

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease affects over eight million Americans and is associated with an increased risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, functional limitation, and limb loss. In its most severe form, critical limb ischemia, patients are often treated with lower extremity (LE) amputation (LEA), although the overall incidence of LEA is declining. In the US, there is significant geographic variation in the performing of major LEA. The rate of death after major LEA in the US is approximately 48% at 1 year and 71% at 3 years. Despite this significant morbidity and mortality, the use of diagnostic testing (both noninvasive and invasive testing) in the year prior to LEA is low and varies based on patient, provider, and regional factors. In this review we discuss the significance of LEA and methods to reduce its occurrence. These methods include improved recognition of the risk factors for LEA by clinicians and patients, strong advocacy for noninvasive and/or invasive imaging prior to LEA, improved endovascular revascularization techniques, and novel therapies. PMID:25075192

  1. Four-fold increase in foot ulcers in type 2 diabetic subjects without an increase in major amputations by a multidisciplinary setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedetoft, Christoffer; Rasmussen, Anne; Fabrin, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: We observed a large increase in type 2 diabetic subjects with foot ulcers in our diabetic outpatient foot clinic and wanted to identify the amputations rate and individuals at risk of amputations by comparing those who had had a regular control in the multidisciplinary foot clinic prior...... to the amputations and those who had not. METHODS: We examined all clinical records from the orthopaedic surgery department and the diabetic outpatient foot clinic of diabetic patients who underwent amputations for 6 years. RESULTS: Eighty-eight patients with type 2 diabetes underwent 142 amputations; 42 major...... and 100 minor amputations. There was no increase in the number of major amputations in this period. In the group not followed in the foot clinic prior to amputations we showed a greater major amputations rate (pdiabetes and less retinopathy...

  2. Postural control in persons with unilateral trans-femoral amputation using center of pressure : effect of socket types

    OpenAIRE

    河野, 一郎; 飛松, 好子; 前島, 洋; 森山, 英樹; 武本,秀徳; 坂, ゆかり; 大谷, 拓哉; 高杉, 紳一郎; 岩本, 幸英

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics of postural control in persons with amputation and to examine the influence of two socket types. A group of six men with unilateral trans-femoral amputation (amputation group, AG) participated in this study. A group of twenty healthy men (control group, CG), matched for age, were also tested. The subjects performed two tests as follows: (1)quiet upright standing task (single-task, ST) and (2)upright standing and concurrent attention...

  3. Amputation history and rehabilitation of black men living in the greater Durban area who have had traumatic amputations of the lower limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kubheka

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available A survey was undertaken amongst twenty five black men living in the greater Durban area who had had amputations of the lower limbs. The type of amputation care and the rehabilitation programme they underwent post-operatively is described. The sample included men from 24 to 50 years of age, of whom the majority were from rural areas. The amputation care intra and post-operatively was marked by the lack of emotional preparation pre-operatively, and lack of rehabilitation information and teaching afterwards. Most respondents had to find information for themselves. This lack of information and teaching seemed to impede physical rehabilitation, with stump sores and limited use of prostheses being the main problems. Vocational rehabilitation was almost totally absent. In contrast to the twenty two respondents who worked before their amputations, only four worked afterwards. The majority had to support their families alone; sixteen of them were totally reliant on a Disability Grant. These problems lead to social isolation, depression, loneliness and other psycho-social problems.

  4. Reducing major lower extremity amputations after the introduction of a multidisciplinary team for the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, José Antonio; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Jiménez, Sara; Guadalix, Gregorio; Albarracín, Agustín; Salido, Carmen; Sanz-Moreno, José; Ruiz-Grande, Fernando; Gil-Fournier, Nuria; Álvarez, Julia

    2014-03-01

    We analyzed the incidence of lower extremity amputations (LEAs) in the 3rd Health Care Area of Madrid before and after the March 2008 introduction of a multidisciplinary team for managing diabetic foot disease. We compared the amputation rates in people with and without diabetes during 2 periods: before (2001-2007) and after (2008-2011) the introduction of a Multidisciplinary Diabetic Foot Unit (MDFU). We also analyzed the trend of the amputation rates by joinpoint regression analysis and measured the annual percentage change (APC). During the study period, 514 nontraumatic LEAs were performed, 374 (73%) in people with diabetes and 140 (27%) in people without the disease. The incidence of LEAs showed a significant reduction in major amputations in people with diabetes, from 6.1 per 100 000 per year (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9 to 7.2), in the 2001 to 2007 period, to 4.0 per 100 000 per year (95% CI = 2.6 to 5.5) in the 2008 to 2011 period (P = .020). There were no changes in incidence of minor or total amputations in the diabetic population or in amputations in the nondiabetic population during the study period. Joinpoint regression analysis showed a significant reduction in the incidence of major LEAs in diabetic population with an APC of -6.6% (95% CI = -10.2 to -2.8; P = .003), but there were no other significant changes. This study demonstrates that the introduction of a multidisciplinary team, coordinated by an endocrinologist and a podiatrist, for managing diabetic foot disease is associated with a reduction in the incidence of major amputations in patients with diabetes.

  5. Influence of Hallux Rigidus on Reamputation in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus After Partial Hallux Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Noah G; Attinger, Christopher E; Steinberg, John S; Evans, Karen K; Vieweger, David; Kim, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration of the plantar hallux is a challenging condition and can require partial hallux amputation when complicated by infection. Lower extremity biomechanics play an important role in the development of hallux ulcers, and hallux rigidus (HR) could influence the outcomes after partial hallux amputation. We hypothesized that radiographic evidence of HR in patients with diabetes would be associated with greater ulcer recurrence and reamputation rates after partial hallux amputation. We performed a retrospective review of all patients with diabetes who had undergone a partial hallux amputation from January 2005 to December 2012. The subjects were divided into 2 cohorts according to the presence or absence of HR identified on preoperative radiographs. Baseline characteristics and outcomes were compared using a 2-sample Student's t test for continuous variables, and categorical variables were compared using the chi-square test for homogeneity and Fisher's exact test. A total of 52 patients were included, with 16 (31%) positive for radiographic evidence of HR at partial hallux amputation. Differences in the patient demographics and comorbidities were not significant between 2 cohorts with and without HR or reamputation. Reamputation was required in 5 subjects (31%) with HR and 2 (6%) without HR (p = .023). The average follow-up duration was 126 ± 89 weeks. Our results have demonstrated that the reamputation rate after partial hallux amputation is significantly greater in patients with than in those without radiographic evidence of HR. Surgeons should evaluate patients for HR when planning partial hallux amputation and use adjuvant methods of offloading when HR is evident to prevent recurrent ulceration and reamputation.

  6. Predictors of major lower limb amputation among type II diabetic patients admitted for diabetic foot problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Nazri Mohd; Rahman, Jamalludin Ab; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Che-Ahmad, Aminudin; Khalid, Kamarul Ariffin; Sulong, Ahmad Fadzli; Vijayasingham, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of amputations in Malaysia. This study aimed to identify the predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with type 2 DM (T2DM) who were admitted to a hospital, in order to reduce its likelihood. METHODS This cross-sectional study involved 218 patients with T2DM who were admitted to Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan, Kuantan, Malaysia, for diabetic foot problems from June 2011 to July 2012. A form was developed to document the patients’ profiles, comorbidities, complications, investigations, treatment and clinical outcomes. The predictors for major lower limb amputations were determined using univariate and stepwise logistic regression analysis. RESULTS A total of 31 patients underwent major lower limb amputations (25 transtibial, 6 transfemoral). The following factors were found to be associated with the incidence of major lower limb amputations: T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, presentation with gangrene, diabetic foot conditions of Wagner grade 4 or 5, and necrotising fasciitis. Patients who underwent major amputations had significantly lower haemoglobin and albumin levels, and higher total white blood cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and C-reactive protein, urea and creatinine levels. However, only T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and albumin levels were significant on stepwise logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and low albumin levels were found to be significant predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with T2DM admitted for diabetic foot problems. PMID:26668408

  7. Mobility in elderly people with a lower limb amputation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortington, Lauren V; Rommers, Gerardus M; Geertzen, Jan H B; Postema, Klaas; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2012-05-01

    Elderly people with a lower limb amputation impose a heavy burden on health resources, requiring extensive rehabilitation and long term care. Mobility is key to regaining independence; however, the impact of multiple comorbidities in this patient group can make regaining mobility a particularly challenging task. An evidence-based prognosis for mobility is needed for rehabilitation and long term care planning. This systematic review summarizes the prosthetic and nonprosthetic mobility outcomes achieved by elderly people with a lower limb amputation, to determine whether an accurate prognosis for mobility can be made. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched for studies published before May 2010 in English, German, Dutch, or French, using keywords and synonyms for elderly, mobility, rehabilitation, and amputation. Mobility focused on actual movement (moving from one place to another) and was limited to long-term measurements, 6 months after amputation or 3 months after discharge from rehabilitation. The 15 included studies featured a diversity of objective outcome measures and mobility grades that proved difficult to compare meaningfully. In general, studies that included selected populations of prosthetic walkers showed that advanced prosthetic mobility skills can be achieved by the elderly person with a lower limb amputation, including outdoor/community walking. Studies that included all subjects undergoing a lower limb amputation reported that less than half of the elderly population achieved a household level of prosthetic mobility. The predominant findings from the included studies were incomplete reporting of study populations and poor reporting of the reliability of the mobility measures used. The strength of conclusions from this review was therefore limited and the prognosis for mobility in elderly people after lower limb amputation remains unclear. Further research into mobility outcomes of this population is needed to provide evidence that enables more

  8. Limb salvage versus amputation. Preliminary results of the Mangled Extremity Severity Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfet, D L; Howey, T; Sanders, R; Johansen, K

    1990-07-01

    Objective criteria can predict amputation after lower-extremity trauma. The authors examined the hypothesis that objective data, available early in the evaluation of patients with severe skeletal/soft-tissue injuries of the lower extremity with vascular compromise, might discriminate the salvageable from the unsalvageable limbs. The Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) was developed by reviewing 25 trauma victims with 26 severe lower-extremity open fractures with vascular compromise. The four significant criteria (with increasing points for worsening prognosis) were skeletal/soft-tissue injury, limb ischemia, shock, and patient age. (There was a significant difference in the mean MESS scores; 4.88 in 17 limbs salvaged and 9.11 in nine limbs amputated; p less than 0.01). This scoring system was then prospectively evaluated in 26 lower-extremity open fractures with vascular injury over a 12-month period at two trauma centers. Again, there was a significant difference in the mean MESS scores; 4.00 for the 14 salvaged limbs and 8.83 for the 12 amputated limbs (p less than 0.01). In both the prospective and retrospective studies, a MESS score of greater than or equal to 7 had a 100% predictable value for amputation. This relatively simple, readily available scoring system of objective criteria was highly accurate in acutely discriminating between limbs that were salvageable and those that were unsalvageable and better managed by primary amputation.

  9. [Amputation and equipment of the lower limb during the Revolution and the Empire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesselle, Benoît

    2014-01-01

    During the French Revolution and Napoleon's campaigns, above-knee or below-knee amputations were performed either immediately or with a delay, which favoured septic problems. A rapidly operated amputation by a well-trained surgeon was the best way to save the life of a soldier who suffered from an open comminuted fracture of a limb. The conditions on military campaigns were indeed hard ones: doctors and surgeons had practically no resources and the transportation of severely injured persons was difficult. Such conditions favoured the pain and the danger caused by an injury, and it was rather impossible for the medical corps to lavish repeated treatments on the wounds. The amputated soldiers were then given prostheses: either a traditional peg-leg, with a flexed knee joint for trans-tibial amputations, or an "imitative" prosthesis, which tended to look like a real leg with eventually an articulated knee or foot. The author mentions famous or unrecognized amputated men, describing significant events.

  10. [The endo-exo prosthesis for patients with a problematic amputation stump].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölke, Jan Paul M; van de Meent, Henk

    2010-01-01

    Following lower limb amputation, quality of life is highly related to the ability to use a prosthetic limb. The conventional way to attach a prosthetic limb to the body is with a socket. Many patients experience serious discomfort wearing a conventional prosthesis because of pain, instability during walking, pressure sores, bad smell or skin irritation. In addition, sitting is uncomfortable and pelvic and lower back pain due to unstable gait is often seen in these patients. The main disadvantage of the current prosthesis is the attachment of a rigid prosthesis socket to a soft and variable body. The socket must fit tightly for stability during walking but should also be comfortable for sitting. The implantation of an osseointegrated, intramedullary, transcutaneously conducted prosthesis is a new procedure for attaching a limb prosthesis to the human body without the disadvantages of the conventional prosthesis. The intramedullary prosthesis is designed with a rough surface resembling cancellous bone to enable a secure solid integration with the long bone. We treated two patients with this new prosthesis, a 44-year-old man after a transfemoral amputation, and a 32-year-old woman after a lower leg amputation; both amputations were necessary because of trauma. Those two patients are now, more than one year after the operation, showing excellent functional results without infectious complications. We assume that endo-exo prosthesis may be a promising option for selected patients unable to use a conventional prosthesis because of a problematic amputation stump.

  11. Clinical Factors affecting Minor Amputation in Diabetic Foot Disease at Tengku Ampuan Afzan Hospital, Kuantan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZAKARIA, Zamzuri; AFIFI, Mustaqim; SHARIFUDIN, Mohd Ariff

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic foot disease poses a substantial problem in Malaysian diabetic population. We evaluate the clinical factors affecting minor amputation in diabetic foot disease. Methods: A cross-sectional study enrolling patients admitted to orthopaedic wards of a single tertiary hospital for diabetic foot disease was conducted. Patients who had undergone major amputation or with medical condition above the ankle joint were not included. Clinical data were collected by measurement of ankle brachial systolic index and Semmes-Weinstein 5.07 gauge monofilament test with foot clinical evaluation using King’s classification respectively. Results: The total number of patients included was 138, with mean age of 59.7 years (range 29 to 94 years old). Fifty patients (36.2%) had minor amputations. Poor compliance to diabetic treatment, King’s classification stage 5, low measures of ankle brachial systolic index, sensory neuropathy, high serum C-Reactive protein and high serum creatinine are significant predictive factors for minor amputation (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Identifying these risk factors may help in prevention of minor amputation and subsequently reduce limb loss in diabetic foot. PMID:26023294

  12. Somatotype of the individuals with lower extremity amputation and its association with cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozumdar, Arupendra; Roy, Subrata K

    2008-03-01

    Anthropometric somatotyping is one of the methods to describe the shape of the human body, which shows some associations with an individual's health and disease condition, especially with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Individuals with lower extremity amputation (LEA) are known to be more vulnerable to the cardiovascular risk. The objectives of the present study are to report the somatotype of the individuals having lower extremity amputation, to study the possible variation in somatotype between two groups of amputated individuals, and to study the association between cardiovascular disease risk factor and somatotype components among individuals with locomotor disability. 102 adult male individuals with unilateral lower-extremity amputation residing in Calcutta and adjoining areas were investigated. The anthropometric data for somatotyping and data on cardiovascular risk traits (such as body mass index, blood pressure measurements, blood lipids) have been collected. The somatotyping technique of Carter & Heath (1990) has been followed. The result shows high mean values of endomorphy and mesomorphy components and a low mean value of the ectomorphy component among the amputated individuals having cardiovascular risks. The results of both discriminant analysis and logistic regression analysis show a significant relationship between somatotype components and CVD risk among the individuals with LEA. The findings of the present study support the findings of similar studies conducted on the normal population. Diagnosis of CVD risk condition through somatotyping can be utilized in prevention/treatment management for the individuals with LEA.

  13. Long-term clinical outcomes of war-related bilateral lower extremities amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hosein; Moradi, Ali; Khorasani, Mohammad Reza; Hallaj-Moghaddam, Mohammad; Kachooei, Amir Reza

    2015-02-01

    In a cross-sectional study, 291 out of 500 veterans with war-related bilateral lower limb amputations from Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988) accepted to participate in our study. Information related to amputees and amputated limbs were gathered and a Persian version of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) was filled. To evaluate the effect of amputation level on health related quality of life, we classified patients to seven types according to the functional remainder of major joints (ankles, knees, hips). 97% of patients were male and the average age at the time of injury was 20 years. The major cause of war injury was shells in 50. 54% of amputees were involved in sport activities. The most common amputation level was transtibial (48%).The major stump complaint was muscle spasm. History of being hospitalized for a psychiatric disorder was reported in 5.6%. The average SF-36 score in type 2 to type 6 were 68, 60, 60, 56, and 62, respectively. Except Energy/Fatigue domain, all the other domains were different from normal population. There was not any significant statistical correlation between amputation type and any domain of the SF-36. Type 6 amputees showed an increase in physical health domains compared with former types.

  14. The relationship between pelvis-trunk coordination and low back pain in individuals with transfemoral amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell Esposito, Elizabeth; Wilken, Jason M

    2014-09-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is common in individuals with transfemoral amputation and may result from altered gait mechanics associated with prosthetic use. Inter-segmental coordination, assessed through continuous relative phase (CRP), has been used to identify specific patterns as risk factors. The purpose of this study was to explore pelvis and trunk inter-segmental coordination across three walking speeds in individuals with transfemoral amputations with and without LBP. Nine individuals with transfemoral amputations with LBP and seven without pain were compared to twelve able-bodied subjects. Subjects underwent a gait analysis while walking at slow, moderate, and fast speeds. CRP and CRP variability were calculated from three-dimensional pelvis and trunk segment angles. A two-way ANOVA and post hoc tests assessed statistical significance. Individuals with transfemoral amputation demonstrated some coordination patterns that were different from able-bodied individuals, but consistent with previous reports on persons with LBP. The patient groups maintained transverse plane CRP consistent with able-bodied participants (p = 0.966), but not sagittal (p amputations and without LBP exhibited few differences. Only frontal and transverse CRP shifted toward out-of-phase as speed increased in the patient group with LBP. Although a cause and effect relationship between CRP and future development of back pain has yet to be determined, these results add to the literature characterizing biomechanical parameters of back pain in high-risk populations.

  15. Prosthetic fitting, use, and satisfaction following lower-limb amputation: A prospective study

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    Joseph B. Webster, MD

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Providing a satisfactory, functional prosthesis following lower-limb amputation is a primary goal of rehabilitation. The objectives of this study were to describe the rate of successful prosthetic fitting over a 12 mo period; describe prosthetic use after amputation; and determine factors associated with greater prosthetic fitting, function, and satisfaction. The study design was a multicenter prospective cohort study of individuals undergoing their first major lower-limb amputation because of vascular disease and/or diabetes. At 4 mo, unsuccessful prosthetic fitting was significantly associated with depression, prior arterial reconstruction, diabetes, and pain in the residual limb. At 12 mo, 92% of all subjects were fit with a prosthetic limb and individuals with transfemoral amputation were significantly less likely to have a prosthesis fit. Age older than 55 yr, diagnosis of a major depressive episode, and history of renal dialysis were associated with fewer hours of prosthetic walking. Subjects who were older, had experienced a major depressive episode, and/or were diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had greater functional restriction. Thus, while most individuals achieve successful prosthetic fitting by 1 yr following a first major nontraumatic lower-limb amputation, a number of medical variables and psychosocial factors are associated with prosthetic fitting, utilization, and function.

  16. Identifying obstacles to return to duty in severely injured combat-related servicemembers with amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Richard K; Rivera, Jessica C; Wenke, Joseph C; Krueger, Chad A

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of servicemembers with amputation to return to duty after combat-related amputation and the associated disabilities remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the disabling conditions and return to duty rates of servicemembers with amputation across all service branches following major limb amputations from September 2001 through July 2011. Pertinent medical information, military occupation status, return to duty designation, disabling conditions, and disability ratings for each servicemember were obtained from the Physical Evaluation Board Liaison Office (PEBLO). Across all service branches, 16 (2%) servicemembers were found fit for duty (Fit) and allowed to continue with their preinjury occupation. Another 103 (11%) were allowed to continue on Active Duty (COAD) in a less physically demanding role. More than half (554, 56%) were determined fully disabled (PEBLO rating > 75); the average disability rating was 73. COAD and Fit Army servicemembers had lower Injury Severity Scores than other servicemembers (17.4, p = 0.009 and 11.2, p rehabilitation, only 13% of all servicemembers with amputation are able to return to Active Duty and many have multiple disabling conditions that contribute to a very high level of disability.

  17. A review of the long-term health outcomes associated with war-related amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Christopher B; Vreeman, Daniel J; Sothmann, Mark S; Wilson, Stephen L; Oldridge, Neil B

    2009-06-01

    The rate of war-related amputations in current U.S. military personnel is now twice that experienced by military personnel in previous wars. We reviewed the literature for health outcomes following war-related amputations and 17 studies were retrieved with evidence that (a) amputees are at a significant risk for developing cardiovascular disease; (b) insulin may play an important role in regulating blood pressure in maturity-onset obesity; (c) lower-extremity amputees are at risk for joint pain and osteoarthritis; (d) transfemoral amputees report a higher incidence of low back pain than transtibial amputees; and (e) 50 to 80% report phantom limb pain, with many amputees stating they were either told that their pain was imagined or their mental state was questioned. The consistency of the observations on health outcomes in these studies warrants careful examination for their implication in the contemporary treatment of war-related amputation.

  18. Successful microsurgical penile replantation following self amputation in a schizophrenic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Gyan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Amputation of the penis is a rare condition reported from various parts of the world as isolated cases or small series of patients; the common etiology is self-mutilating sharp amputation or an avulsion or crush injury in an industrial accident. A complete reconstruction of all penile structures should be attempted in one stage which provides the best chance for full rehabilitation of the patient. We report here a single case of total amputation of the penis in an acute paranoid schizophrenic patient .The penis was successfully reattached using a microsurgical technique. After surgery, near-normal appearance and function including a good urine flow and absence of urethral stricture, capabilities of erection and near normal sensitivity were observed.

  19. Traumatic partial amputation of the tongue. Case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Méndez, José Roberto; Rodríguez-Luna, María Rita; Guarneros-Zárate, Joaquín Eugenio; Vélez-Palafox, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The traumatic injuries to the tongue can go form section to partial or complete amputation, the latter being a rare presentation in the setting of facial trauma or even in patients with mental illness. Case report We present 25-year-old patient with traumatic partial amputation of the tongue who presented to the emergency department with successful surgical repair with good functional and esthetic outcome. Discussion The tongue can suffer a broad type of traumatic injuries, in the setting of active bleeding, the muscular planes must be closed with absorbable sutures to stop the hemorrhage and prevent hematoma formation. Tongue surgical repair in the setting of a total section requires integrity of arterial and venous flow, so anastomosis must be executed. Conclusion Amputation of the tongue can put the patient's life at risk and its management needs to be mastered by the surgeons treating polytraumatized patients. PMID:26900463

  20. [Cross-hand replantation in bilateral upper limb amputation: An anatomical emergency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, A; Rongieres, M; Laffosse, J-M; Pailhe, R; Lauwers, F; Grolleau, J-L

    2015-08-01

    Bilateral amputations of upper limbs are excessively rare clinical situations. We report an exceptional clinical case of bilateral amputation of upper limbs at different levels: destruction of the right hand and left transhumeral amputation in a patient after an attempted suicide on train lines. This special situation led us to perform a cross-hand replantation of the left hand to the right forearm. Only 4 other similar cases have been published in the literature. Once the surgical indication had been formulated collectively, and taking into account all the ethical issues surrounding such a decision, we had to solve the issue of inverting anatomical structures in emergency. We have provided a detailed description of our surgical technique. The aim was to save at least one organ used for grasping. The result obtained is presented and reviewed.

  1. Preoperative blood glucose and prognosis in diabetic patients undergoing lower extremity amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayak, Raj Kumar; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous work has shown that uncontrolled diabetes mellitus is associated with adverse surgical outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to establish if a high peri-operative random blood sugar (RBS) concentration among patients with diabetes with non-traumatic lower......: A total of 270 patients underwent non-traumatic LEA of whom 105 had diabetes, whereas 81 patients were included for this study. The mean age was 71 years (standard deviation: ± 11.8). Mortality was 27% and 16% were re-amputated within three months after their first amputation.The median pre-operative RBS.......50-7.22), with the Q1 tertile as the reference group. CONCLUSIONS: This study does not confirm that a high peri-operative RBS level can predict increased mortality or re-amputation among patients with diabetes who undergo non-traumatic LEA. Furthermore, based on our results, we cannot inform clinical decision...

  2. Symmetrical kinematics does not imply symmetrical kinetics in people with transtibial amputation using cycling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, W Lee; Kogler, Géza F

    2014-01-01

    People with amputation move asymmetrically with regard to kinematics (joint angles) and kinetics (joint forces and moments). Clinicians have traditionally sought to minimize kinematic asymmetries, assuming kinetic asymmetries would also be minimized. A cycling model evaluated locomotor asymmetries. Eight individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation pedaled with 172 mm-length crank arms on both sides (control condition) and with the crank arm length shortened to 162 mm on the amputated side (CRANK condition). Pedaling kinetics and limb kinematics were recorded. Joint kinetics, joint angles (mean and range of motion [ROM]), and pedaling asymmetries were calculated from force pedals and with a motion capture system. A one-way analysis of variance with tukey post hoc compared kinetics and kinematics across limbs. Statistical significance was set to p kinetic asymmetries as clinically assumed. We propose that future research should concentrate on defining acceptable asymmetry.

  3. Amputation in the perception of those who experience it: a study under the phenomenological.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Chini, Gislaine Cristina; Boemer, Magali Roseira

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the implications and feelings associated with the experience of amputation. The literature review allowed the knowledge of this phenomenon under several perspectives, besides the appropriation of some ideas of the philosopher Merleau-Ponty about body and perception. After this initial knowledge, interviews were performed with people who underwent amputation, by living in their world and listening to their statements. By sharing these moments, it was possible to understand meanings from the perspective of those who experience it, which led to six thematic categories. In addition to understanding those who underwent amputation in their context and in their essence, some facets of this phenomenon were revealed through the phenomenological referential.

  4. Botulinum toxin: An effective treatment for prosthesis-related hyperhidrosis in patients with traumatic amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Lezanski Gujda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhidrosis-related to prosthesis use in patients who have suffered a traumatic limb amputation presents itself as a barrier to comfort, prosthesis use and overall quality of life. This review intends to encourage dermatologists to consider the use of botulinum toxin A or B for the treatment of hyperhidrosis in the residual limb and may serve as a stimulus for a modern, in-depth, and more comprehensive study. A review of the literature was conducted using the PubMed database, focusing on hyperhidrosis treatment after traumatic limb amputation. Articles discussing hyperhidrosis treatment for amputations secondary to chronic medical conditions were excluded. Seven case studies published over the last 12 years have demonstrated positive outcomes of this treatment strategy. Overall, there is little data examining this topic and current publications focus primarily on small case series. A larger, double-blind, placebo-controlled study would likely benefit veterans, service members, and civilians.

  5. Clinical outcomes of toe amputation in patients with type 2 diabetes in Tianjin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yue-Jie; Li, Xi-Wen; Wang, Peng-Hua; Xu, Jun; Sun, Hao-Jie; Ding, Min; Jiao, Jiao; Ji, Xiao-Yan; Feng, Shu-hong

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the predictors for reulceration, reamputation and mortality in patients with diabetes following toe amputation, and the impact of activities of daily living on clinical outcomes. This prospective cohort study included 245 patients who had undergone toe amputation (202 healing and 43 non-healing) and was followed for a 5-year period. Data regarding new foot ulceration, reamputation and mortality were recorded, and the patients' activities of daily living were evaluated. The rate of wound healing was 82·4%. The rate of follow-up in the healed group was 91·6%. In years 1, 3 and 5, the cumulative incidence of patients who developed a new foot ulcer was 27·3%, 57·2% and 76·4%, respectively, leading to reamputation in 12·5%, 22·3% and 47·1%, respectively. The cumulative mortality was 5·8%, 15·1% and 32·7% at 1, 3 and 5 years, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that GHbA1c > 9% (75 mmol/mol) was identified as an independent predictor of impaired wound healing, reulceration and reamputation. An age of >70 years was identified as an independent predictor of reamputation, mortality and impairment of activities of daily living. Despite a satisfactory initial healing rate after the first toe amputation, with the extension course after the toe amputation, the long-term outcomes are not optimistic. In developing countries like China, taking measures to prevent reulceration and reamputation is very important for patients with diabetic foot minor amputations, especially following toe amputation.

  6. Ectopic major transplantation for salvage of upper and lower extremity amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazerani Shahram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Ectopic tissue transplanta- tion is not a new idea. Godina and his colleagues pioneered this method in the 1980s. This method is a last resort method of preserving an amputated body part, which consists of banking the amputated segment in an ectopic area and re- turning it to its native place at a later date. In this article we present our experience with this demanding procedure. Methods: Debridement was the mainstay of this procedure. The stump and amputated part are carefully de- brided and the stump was either closed primarily or covered by a flap. The amputated part was transplanted to one of several banking sites in the body and at a later date it will be transferred to its native site in an elective setting. Results: Seven patients meeting the set criteria for ectopic transplantation were enrolled in this study. The over- all success rate was about 70%, lower than expected but these are cases of severe crush injury. Although the func- tional recovery of these patients are very low, all of the successful cases except one could find a job as a janitor or light manual worker. No patient could return to his previous job. Conclusion: Ectopic transplantation of body parts is an accepted method of treatment of severely crushed ex- tremity or finger injuries. In our country an amputee has very little chance of finding a job instead a disabled person can. In addition in Iran cultures amputation is seen as pu- nishment of either the God or the society, so it is not well accepted and many patients persist on saving the limb even with no functional recovery. None of our successful cases could return to his previous occupation but almost all of them could find a job as janitors or light manual workers. Key words: Replantation; Transplantation; Extremities; Amputation, traumatic

  7. Physical activity, functional capacity, and step variability during walking in people with lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Suh-Jen; Winston, Katie D; Mitchell, Jill; Girlinghouse, Jacob; Crochet, Karleigh

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity is important for general health. For an individual with amputation to sustain physical activity, certain functional capacity might be needed. Gait variability is related to the incidence of falls. This study explored the relationship between physical activity and a few common performance measures (six-minute walk test, step length variability, step width variability, and comfortable walking speed) in individuals with unilateral lower-limb amputation. Twenty individuals completed the study (age: 50±11yrs). Twelve of them had transtibial amputation, seven had transfemoral amputation, and one had through-knee amputation. Gait data was collected by the GaitRite instrumented walkway while participants performed a 3-min comfortable walking trial followed by a six-minute walk test. Physical activity was indicated by the mean of 7-day step counts via a pedometer. Gait variability was calculated by the coefficient of variation. Pearson correlation analysis was conducted between physical activity level and the 4 performance measures. Significance level was set at 0.05. Physical activity correlates strongly to comfortable walking speed (r=0.76), six-minute walk distance (r=0.67), and correlates fairly to step width variability (r=0.44). On the contrary, physical activity is inversely related to step length variability of the prosthetic leg (r=-0.46) and of the sound leg (r=-0.47). Having better functional capacity and lateral stability might enable an individual with lower-limb amputation to engage in a higher physical activity level, or vise versa. However, our conclusions are only preliminary as limited by the small sample size.

  8. Barriers and Facilitators of Participation in Sports : A Qualitative Study on Dutch Individuals with Lower Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragaru, Mihai; van Wilgen, C. P.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Ruijs, Suzette G. J. B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Dekker, Rienk

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Although individuals with lower limb amputation may benefit from participation in sports, less than 40% do so. Aim: To identify the barriers and facilitators that influence participation in sports for individuals with lower limb amputation. Design: Qualitative study. Participants: Twen

  9. Four limb amputations due to peripheral gangrene from inotrope use – Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Chuan Han

    2015-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Microvascular spasm is a rare complication of inotrope use which may lead to extensive peripheral gangrene. Anecdotal reports of reversal agents have been discussed. Four limb amputations are a reasonable option especially if done in an elective setting after the gangrene has demarcated itself. Rehabilitation with prosthesis after 4 limb amputations can result in good functional outcome.

  10. Prevalence and Characteristics of Phantom Limb Pain and Residual Limb Pain in the Long Term after Upper Limb Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Deirdre M.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe the prevalence and characteristics of phantom limb pain and residual limb pain after upper limb amputation. One-hundred and forty-one participants (139 males; mean age 74.8 years; mean time since amputation 50.1 years) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing residual and phantom limb pain experience. Prevalence…

  11. Hallux amputation after a freshwater stingray injury in the Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuelton Marcelo Monteiro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Freshwater stingray injuries are a common problem in the Brazilian Amazon, affecting mostly riverine and indigenous populations. These injuries cause severe local and regional pain, swelling and erythema, as well as complications, such as local necrosis and bacterial infection. Herein, we report a case of bacterial infection and hallux necrosis, after a freshwater stingray injury in the Brazilian Amazon, which eventually required amputation. Different antimicrobial regimens were administered at different stages of the disease; however, avoiding amputation through effective treatment was not achieved.

  12. Bilateral microvascular second toe transfer for bilateral post-traumatic thumb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehete, Rajendra; Nehete, Anita; Singla, Sandeep; Adhav, Harshad

    2012-01-01

    In bilateral thumb amputations, the functional impairment is serious and every attempt should be made to reconstruct the thumb. We report a case of bilateral post traumatic thumb amputation, reconstructed with bilateral second toe transfer. Only two such cases have been reported in literature so far. Though there are various modalities for the reconstruction of thumb, microvascular toe transfer has its own merits. The convalescent period is minimal with excellent function. It is bilaterally symmetric and aesthetically superior to the osteoplastic reconstruction. The technical details are discussed, and the long term functional and aesthetic results are presented.

  13. Bilateral microvascular second toe transfer for bilateral post-traumatic thumb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Nehete

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In bilateral thumb amputations, the functional impairment is serious and every attempt should be made to reconstruct the thumb. We report a case of bilateral post traumatic thumb amputation, reconstructed with bilateral second toe transfer. Only two such cases have been reported in literature so far. Though there are various modalities for the reconstruction of thumb, microvascular toe transfer has its own merits. The convalescent period is minimal with excellent function. It is bilaterally symmetric and aesthetically superior to the osteoplastic reconstruction. The technical details are discussed, and the long term functional and aesthetic results are presented.

  14. Crossover replantation as a salvage procedure following bilateral transhumeral upper limb amputation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, Ismail Bülent; Mersa, Berkan; Kabakaş, Fatih; Saçak, Bülent; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi

    2011-04-01

    Cross-over replantation is a salvage option for cases with bilateral extremity amputations where the wound conditions do not enable an orthotopic replantation. Here, we present a 24-year-old patient who applied to our center with bilateral transhumeral amputations. Due to the wound conditions, a cross-over replantation was performed. 24 months after the initial operation, the patient exhibits good protective sensation at the distal levels and function to some degree, whereas the active range of motion is not as promising as previously expected. In this article, we present this case together with its immediate and long-term outcomes and the consequences of the cross-over replantation.

  15. Cross-arm replantation for traumatic bilateral upper extremity amputations: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kailu; Zhong, Gang; Yin, Jiahui; Xiang, Zhou; Cen, Shiqiang; Huang, Fuguo

    2011-02-01

    A 40-year-old woman had her right extremity avulsed at the proximal upper arm level and the wrist and hand of her left extremity irretrievably injured in a traffic accident. The right distal forearm was surgically amputated and replanted onto the stump of the left distal forearm. New strategy for nerve repair was applied and the function recovery of the cross-replanted hand was favorable. We thought that cross-extremity replantation was indicated when the patient suffered from bilateral total or subtotal amputation at different levels and orthotopic replantation was impossible.

  16. Stepwise surgical approach to diabetic partial foot amputations with autogenous split thickness skin grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal L. Ramanujam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the surgical treatment of severe diabetic foot infections, substantial soft tissue loss often accompanies partial foot amputations. These sizeable soft tissue defects require extensive care with the goal of expedited closure to inhibit further infection and to provide resilient surfaces capable of withstanding long-term ambulation. Definitive wound closure management in the diabetic population is dependent on multiple factors and can have a major impact on the risk of future diabetic foot complications. In this article, the authors provide an overview of autogenous skin grafting, including anatomical considerations, clinical conditions, surgical approach, and adjunctive treatments, for diabetic partial foot amputations.

  17. Impact of a diabetic foot care education program on lower limb amputation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Wahbi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah M Al-WahbiDepartment of Surgery, King Abdulaziz Medical City and King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyahd, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: Diabetic foot complications are a leading cause of lower extremity amputation. With the increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in the Arab world, specifically in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the rate of amputation will rise significantly. A diabetic foot care program was implemented at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in 2002. The program was directed at health care staff and patients to increase their awareness about diabetic foot care and prevention of complications. The purpose of this study was to perform a primary evaluation of the program’s impact on the rate of lower extremity amputation due to diabetic foot complications.Method: This pilot study was the first analysis of the diabetic foot care program and examined two groups of participants for comparison, ie, a “before” group having had diabetic foot ulcers managed between 1983, when the hospital was first established, and 2002 when the program began and an “after group” having had foot ulcers managed between 2002 and 2004, in the program’s initial phase. A total of 41 charts were randomly chosen retrospectively. A data sheet containing age, gender, medical data, and the presentation, management, and outcome of diabetic foot cases was used for the analysis.Results: The before group contained 20 patients (17 males and the after group contained 21 patients (16 males. There was no difference between the two groups with regard to age and comorbidities. The rate of amputation was 70% in the before group and 61.9% in the after group. There was a decrease in the percentage of toe amputation in the after group and an increase in the percentage of below-knee amputation in the before group. However, these changes were not significant.Conclusion: The program, although evaluated at an early

  18. Risk factors for amputation in extremities vascular injuries in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Wahbi A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Al Wahbi, Salman Aldakhil, Saud Al Turki, Abdulrahman El Kayali, Hussein Al Kohlani , Abdulaziz Al Showmer Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular Surgery, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Amputation is most closely associated with blunt, lower limb injuries associated with vascular trauma. These vascular injuries require a special attention to prevent life and limb loss. Patient outcomes can also be improved by organizing vascular trauma data into appropriate systems to facilitate future studies. Keywords: vascular injuries, extremities trauma, amputation, ischemia

  19. Reconstruction of an amputated glans penis with a buccal mucosal graft: case report of a novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboutaleb, Hamdy

    2014-12-01

    Penile amputation is a rare catastrophe and a serious complication of circumcision. Reconstruction of the glans penis may be indicated following amputation. Our report discusses a novel technique for reconfiguration of an amputated glans penis 1 year after a complicated circumcision. A 2-year-old male infant presented to us with glans penis amputation that had occurred during circumcision 1 year previously. The parents complained of severe meatal stenosis with disfigurement of the penis. Penis length was 3 cm. Complete penile degloving was performed. The distal part of the remaining penis was prepared by removing fibrous tissue. A buccal mucosal graft was applied to the distal part of the penis associated with meatotomy. The use of a buccal mucosal graft is a successful and simple procedure with acceptable cosmetic and functional results for late reconfiguration of the glans penis after amputation when penile size is suitable.

  20. Osseocutaneous integration of an intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prosthesis implant used for reconstruction of a transhumeral amputee: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Norbert V; Pendegrass, Catherine; Marks, Linda; Blunn, Gordon

    2010-07-01

    Exoprosthetic replacement with an artificial limb is the main option for reconstruction after traumatic amputation of an upper limb. Direct skeletal attachment using an osseointegrated implant improves the ease of fixation of the exoprosthesis to the amputation stump. We now report the use of an intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prosthesis that is designed to achieve osseocutaneous integration. Osseocutaneous integration differs from osseointegration because the aim is to create a stable interface among the implant, the bone, and the soft tissues. This reduces the risk of soft tissue infection and troublesome discharge, which are problems encountered with current osseointegrated implants that focus largely on the bone-implant interface. We describe our experience with an intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prosthesis in a case of transhumeral amputation with 2 years of follow-up.

  1. Let's talk about sex : lower limb amputation, sexual functioning and sexual well-being: a qualitative study of the partner's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Jesse E. A.; Zhdanova, Mariya A.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Enzlin, Paul; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Dekker, Rienk

    2013-01-01

    Aims and objectivesTo describe the impact of patients' lower limb amputations on their partners' sexual functioning and well-being. BackgroundAnnually, about 3300 major lower limb amputations are performed in the Netherlands. An amputation may induce limitations in performing marital activities, inc

  2. Change in health-related quality of life in the first 18 months after lower limb amputation : A prospective, longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortington, L.V.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Bosmans, J.C.; Post, W.J.; Geertzen, J.H.B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe changes in health-related quality of life in people with lower limb amputation, from time of amputation to 18 months, taking into consideration the influence of age and walking distance. In addition, quality of life for people with amputation is compared with the Dutch populat

  3. Does the benefit of salvage amputation always outweigh disability in drug-failure mycetoma?: A tale of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanta K Maiti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is popularly believed that eumycetoma cases should be dealt with using surgical amputation for a better chance of cure especially when chemotherapy has failed. However, amputation leads to disability on one hand and on the other it may also fail to be curative. We present two cases with contrasting treatment options and outcome. In the eumycetoma case reported here, a 40-year-old male presented with right foot swelling for 16 years, from which Scedosporium apiospermum was isolated. He responded poorly to antifungal therapy and refused below-knee amputation 12 years ago. With counseling and wound care his condition improved, and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM score remained almost stable at 90% for 16 years, which is much better than the average functional outcome after amputation. Another 46-year-old female underwent below-knee amputation after receiving incomplete courses of antibiotics and antifungals for mycetoma of unknown etiology. She presented to us after recurrence of mycetoma on an amputated stump and was successfully treated by proper courses of antibiotics after detecting the causal agent, Actinomadura madurae. Her post-amputation disability and depression could have been avoided if the hasty decision of amputation had not been taken. In our opinion, living with drug-non-responsive mycetoma, supported by symptomatic management, may be a better option than amputation and its associated morbidities. So before taking the path of salvage amputation, we must consider many aspects, including patient′s livelihood, psychological aspects and chances of recurrence even after the procedure.

  4. Sequential compression biomechanical device versus primary amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tawfick, Wael A

    2013-10-01

    Introduction: Patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI), who are unsuitable for intervention, face the consequence of primary amputation. Sequential compression biomechanical device (SCBD) therapy provides a limb salvage option for these patients. Objectives: To assess the outcome of SCBD in patients with severe CLI who are unsuitable for revascularization. Primary end points were limb salvage and 30-day mortality. Methods: From 2005 to 2012, 189 patients with severe CLI were not suitable for revascularization. In all, 171 joined the SCBD program. We match controlled 75 primary amputations. Results: All patients were Rutherford category 4 or higher. Sustained clinical improvement was 68% at 1 year. Mean toe pressure increased from 19.9 to 35.42 mm Hg, P < .0001. Mean popliteal flow increased from 35.44 to 55.91 cm\\/sec, P < .0001. The 30-day mortality was 0.6%. Limb salvage was 94% at 5 years. Freedom from major adverse clinical events was 62.5%. All-cause survival was 69%. Median cost of managing a primary amputation patient is €29 815 compared to €3985 for SCBD. We treated 171 patients with artassist at a cost of €681 965. However, primary amputation for 75 patients cost €2 236 125. Conclusion: The SCBD therapy is a cost-effective and clinically effective solution in patients with CLI having no option of revascularization. It provides adequate limb salvage while providing relief of rest pain without any intervention.

  5. An ICF-based education programme in amputation rehabilitation for medical residents in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Rommers, G. M.; Dekker, Rienk

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim: Education programmes of the International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics (ISPO) are directed primarily at prosthetists and orthotists. In a multidisciplinary setting, greater attention should be given to other professionals working in the field of amputation, prosthetics a

  6. Pruritus induced self injury behavior: an overlooked risk factor for amputation in diabetic neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, David; George, Mary Catherine; Tamler, Ronald; Lushing, Julia; Nmashie, Alexandra; Simpson, David M

    2014-03-01

    Pruritus is a risk factor for self-injury behavior (SIB) in sensory polyneuropathies. Although diabetes patients have elevated risk for pruritus, there are no reports of SIB in diabetic neuropathy. We present the case of a diabetes patient with neuropathy, whose pruritus induced SIB, resulted in partial amputation of a toe.

  7. Climbing Stairs After Outpatient Rehabilitation for a Lower-Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Fred A.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Roorda, Leo D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the necessity and ability to climb stairs in persons after a lower-limb amputation (LLA) and the relation of this ability with personal and clinical variables. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Outpatient department of a rehabilitation center. Participants: Persons with an

  8. Blindness, Diabetes, and Amputation: Alleviation of Depression and Pain through Thermal Biofeedback Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, W. E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A 39-year-old man who was blind, diabetic, and had a double amputation with chronic renal failure and peripheral vascular disease was treated with thermal biofeedback to reduce his depression through increased self-control, to minimize pain, and to facilitate healing of a pregangrenous hand. On treatment discharge, his mental and physical states…

  9. Motor adaptation to prosthetic cycling in people with trans-tibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Childers, W; Prilutsky, Boris I; Gregor, Robert J

    2014-07-18

    The neuromusculoskeletal system interacts with the external environment via end-segments, e.g. feet. A person with trans-tibial amputation (TTAmp) has lost a foot and ankle; hence the residuum with prosthesis becomes the new end-segment. We investigated changes in kinetics and muscle activity in TTAmps during cycling with this altered interface with the environment. Nine unilateral TTAmps and nine subjects without amputation (NoAmp) pedaled at a constant torque of 15 Nm and a constant cadence of 90 rpm (~150 watts). Pedal forces and limb kinematics were used to calculate resultant joint moments. Electromyographic activity was recorded to determine its magnitude and timing. Biomechanical and EMG variables of the amputated limb were compared to those of the TTAmp sound limb and to the dominant limb in the NoAmp group using a one-way ANOVA. Results showed maximum angular displacement between the residuum and prosthesis was 4.8±1.8 deg. The amputated limb compared to sound limb and NoAmp group produced lower extensor moments averaged over the cycle about the ankle (13±2.3, 20±5.7, and 19±5.3 Nm, respectfully) and knee (8.4±5.0, 15±4.5, and 12.7±5.9 Nm, respectfully) (pprosthetic socket control and highlight prosthetic control as an interaction between the residuum, prosthesis and external environment.

  10. Lower limb amputation. Part 3: Prosthetics--a 10 year literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, H; Orsi, K; Reilly, P

    2001-04-01

    This paper is intended as a follow-up to the ISPO Consensus Conference on Amputation Surgery. It reviews all the literature on lower limb prosthetics published after 1990. The review was considered under six categories: feet, knees, hips, thermoplastics, liners/suspension and computers.

  11. Children with congenital deficiencies or acquired amputations of the lower limbs : functional aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, AM; Rijnders, LJM; Groothoff, J W; Eisma, W H

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the use of prostheses, some secondary complications and functional aspects among children who had a congenital leg deficiency or an acquired leg amputation. Rehabilitation physicians were asked to refer children, aged 1-18 years, with a leg deficiency or amputati

  12. Effects of lower limb amputation on the mental rotation of feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtze, Carolin; Otten, Bert; Postema, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    What happens to the mental representation of our body when the actual anatomy of our body changes? We asked 18 able-bodied controls, 18 patients with a lower limb amputation and a patient with rotationplasty to perform a laterality judgment task. They were shown illustrations of feet in different or

  13. Mobility in Elderly People With a Lower Limb Amputation : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortington, Lauren V.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Postema, Klaas; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2012-01-01

    Elderly people with a lower limb amputation impose a heavy burden on health resources, requiring extensive rehabilitation and long term care. Mobility is key to regaining independence; however, the impact of multiple comorbidities in this patient group can make regaining mobility a particularly chal

  14. Total hip arthroplasty in a patient with arthrogryphosis and an ipsilateral above knee amputation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, Michael

    2010-10-01

    The authors present the case of a young man with arthrogryphosis multiplex congenita and an above knee amputation who underwent an ipsilateral total hip replacement. The unique aspects of the case and technical difficulties are highlighted. Follow-up at five years revealed an excellent clinical and radiological outcome.

  15. Identification of trunk and pelvis movement compensations in patients with transtibial amputation using angular momentum separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, Brecca M; Murray, Amanda M; Christiansen, Cory L; Davidson, Bradley S

    2016-03-01

    Patients with unilateral dysvascular transtibial amputation (TTA) have a higher risk of developing low back pain than their healthy counterparts, which may be related to movement compensations used in the absence of ankle function. Assessing components of segmental angular momentum provides a unique framework to identify and interpret these movement compensations alongside traditional observational analyses. Angular momentum separation indicates two components of total angular momentum: (1) transfer momentum and (2) rotational momentum. The objective of this investigation was to assess movement compensations in patients with dysvascular TTA, patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and healthy controls (HC) by examining patterns of generating and arresting trunk and pelvis segmental angular momenta during gait. We hypothesized that all groups would demonstrate similar patterns of generating/arresting total momentum and transfer momentum in the trunk and pelvis in reference to the groups (patients with DM and HC). We also hypothesized that patients with amputation would demonstrate different (larger) patterns of generating/arresting rotational angular momentum in the trunk. Patients with amputation demonstrated differences in trunk and pelvis transfer angular momentum in the sagittal and transverse planes in comparison to the reference groups, which indicates postural compensations adopted during walking. However, patients with amputation demonstrated larger patterns of generating and arresting of trunk and pelvis rotational angular momentum in comparison to the reference groups. These segmental rotational angular momentum patterns correspond with high eccentric muscle demands needed to arrest the angular momentum, and may lead to consequential long-term effects such as low back pain.

  16. Amputation after failure or complication of total knee arthroplasty: prevalence, etiology and functional outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan de Paula Mozella

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Identify the etiology and incidence, as well to assess functional outcomes of patients, undergoing lower limb amputation after failure or complication of total knee arthroplasty. These patients were treated at the Center for Knee Surgery at the National Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics (INTO, during the period of January 2001 to December 2010. METHODS: The patients were interviewed and their charts were retrospectively analyzed to evaluate their functional outcome. RESULTS: The incidence of amputation due to failure or complication of total knee arthroplasty was 0.41% in 2409 cases. Recurrent deep infection was the cause of amputation in 81% of cases, being Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa the most frequent germs. Vascular complications and periprosthetic fracture associated to metaphyseal bone loss were also causes of amputation. In our study, 44% of amputees patients were using orthesis and 62.5% have had the ability to walk. CONCLUSION: Incidence of 0.41%, being the main cause recurrent infection. The functional outcome is limited, and the fitting achieved in 44% of patients and only 62.5% are ambulatory.

  17. Taking Care of Your New Arm or Leg After an Amputation

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-18

    This podcast provides health information on taking care of a new arm or leg after an amputation.  Created: 2/18/2010 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disability, Disability and Health Program.   Date Released: 2/18/2010.

  18. Decrease in (Major Amputations in Diabetics: A Secondary Data Analysis by AOK Rheinland/Hamburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie May

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. In two German regions with 11.1 million inhabitants, 6 networks for specialized treatment of DFS were implemented until 2008. Data provided for accounting purposes was analysed in order to determine changes in the rate of diabetics requiring amputations in the years before and after the implementation. Method. Data covering 2.9 million people insured by the largest insurance company between 2007 and 2013 was analysed by the use of log-linear Poisson regression adjusted for age, gender and region. Results. The rate of diabetics needing major amputations fell significantly by 9.5% per year (p<0.0001 from 217 to 126 of 100,000 patients per year. The rate of diabetics needing amputations of any kind fell from 504 to 419 of 100,000 patients per year (p=0.0038. Discussion. The networks integrate health care providers in an organised system of shared care. They educate members of the medical community and the general public. At the same time, a more general disease management program for people with diabetes was implemented, which may also have contributed to this decrease. At the end of the observation period, the rate of diabetics requiring amputations was still high. For this reason, further expansion of organised specialized care is urgently needed.

  19. Gait adjustments in obstacle crossing, gait initiation and gait termination after a recent lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, Aline H.; van Keeken, Helco G.; Schoppen, Tanneke; Hof, At L.; Otten, Bert; Halbertsma, Jan P. K.; Postema, Klaas

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the adjustments in gait characteristics of obstacle crossing, gait initiation and gait termination that occur in subjects with a recent lower limb amputation during the rehabilitation process. Design: Prospective and descriptive study. Subjects: Fourteen subjects with a recent

  20. Instrumented Measurement of Balance and Postural Control in Individuals with Lower Limb Amputation: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakaran, Prasath; Johnson, Gillian M.; Sullivan, S. John; Nitz, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of balance and postural performance that underpins activities of daily living is important in the rehabilitation of individuals with a lower limb amputation (LLA), and there are a number of methods and strategies available for this purpose. To provide an evidence-based choice of approach, this review aims to critically review the tasks…

  1. The morphology and functions of the muscles around the hip joint after a unilateral transfemoral amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaegers, Sonja Maria Héléne José

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation is concerned with the consequences of a transfemoral amputation for the morphology and functions of the muscles around the hip joint. Knowledge about and insight into the changes appearing in the morphology and functions of the hip muscles of transfemoral amputees are important to

  2. Lower limb amputation in Northern Netherlands : Unchanged incidence from 1991-1992 to 2003-2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortington, Lauren V.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Postema, Klaas; van Netten, Jaap J.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Investigating population changes gives insight into effectiveness and need for prevention and rehabilitation services. Incidence rates of amputation are highly varied, making it difficult to meaningfully compare rates between studies and regions or to compare changes over time. Study Des

  3. Influence of physical capacities of males with transtibial amputation on gait adjustments on sloped surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Karine; Villa, Coralie; Bonnet, Xavier; Lavaste, François; Fodé, Pascale; Martinet, Noel; Pillet, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how kinematic and kinetic adjustments between level and slope locomotion of persons with transtibial amputation are related to their individual muscular and functional capacities. A quantified gait analysis was conducted on flat and slope surfaces for seven patients with transtibial amputation and a control group of eight subjects to obtain biomechanical parameters. In addition, maximal isometric muscular strength (knee and hip extensors) and functional scores were measured. The results of this study showed that most of the persons with transtibial amputation could adapt to ramp ascent either by increasing ankle, knee, and hip flexion angles of the residual limb and/or by recruiting their hip extensors to guarantee enough hip extension power during early stance. Besides, 6-minute walk test score was shown to be a good predictor of adaptation capacities to slope ascent. In ramp descent, the increase of knee flexion moment was correlated with knee extensor strength and residual-limb length. However, no correlation was observed with functional parameters. Results show that the walking strategy adopted by persons with transtibial amputation to negotiate ramp locomotion mainly depends on their muscular capacities. Therefore, muscular strengthening should be a priority during rehabilitation.

  4. [Amputation in low-income countries: particularities in epidmiological features and management practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisseriex, H; Rogez, D; Thomas, M; Truffaut, S; Compere, S; Mercier, H; Dochez, F; Lapeyre, E; Thefenne, L

    2011-12-01

    The epidemiological features and management practices associated with amputation in low-income countries, generally synonymous with the tropics, are different from those observed in Western countries. Unlike developed countries, amputation most frequently involves traumatic injury in young active people. However, Westernization of the lifestyle is leading to an increasing number of cases involving diabetes and atherosclerotic disease. In the developing world, leprosy and Buruli ulcer are still significant etiologic factors for amputation. In war-torn countries, use of antipersonnel landmines is another major cause of amputation with characteristic features. Management of amputees in the developing world is hindered by the lack of facilities for rehabilitation and prosthetic fitting. Many international organizations are supporting national programs to develop such facilities. In addition to being affordable, prosthetics and orthotics must be adapted to the living conditions of a mostly rural amputee population, i.e., heat, humidity, and farm work. The rehabilitation process must be part of a global handicap policy aimed at changing attitudes about disability and reintegrating amputees both socially and professionally.

  5. Points to Know and Consider When Preparing for and Undergoing an Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... system” called the “K” level to quantify a patient’s outcome potential. The components considered medically appropriate are tied ... of bone density, back pain, amputation of another limb, and even some forms of cancer. ... and care of the prosthesis Care of the residual limb Care of the ...

  6. Salvage versus amputation: Utility of mangled extremity severity score in severely injured lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility of Mangled extremity severity score (MESS in severely injured lower limbs. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively 25 and prospectively 36 lower limbs in 58 patients with high-energy injuries were evaluated with the use of MESS, to assist in the decision-making process for the care of patients with such injuries. Difference between the mean MESS scores for amputated and salvaged limbs was analyzed. Results: In the retrospective study 4.65 (4.65 ± 1.32 was the mean score for the salvaged limbs and 8.80 (8.8 ± 1.4 for the amputated limbs. In the prospective study 4.53 (4.53 ± 2.44 was the mean score for the salvaged limbs and 8.83 (8.83 ± 2.34 for the amputated limbs. There was a significant difference in the mean scores for salvaged and amputated limbs. Retrospective 21 (84% and prospective 29 (80.5% limbs remained in the salvage pathway six months after the injury. Conclusion: MESS could predict amputation of severely injured lower limbs, having score of equal or more than 7 with 91% sensitivity and 98% specificity. There was a significant difference in the mean MESS scores in the prospective study (n=36, 4.53 (4.53 ± 2.44 in thirty salvaged limbs (83.33% and 8.83 (8.83 ± 2.34 in six amputated limbs (16.66% with a P -value 0.002 ( P -value < 0.01. Similarly there was a significant difference in the mean MESS score in the retrospective study (n=25, 4.65 (4.65 ± 1.32 in twenty salvaged limbs (80% and 8.80 (8.8 ± 1.4 in five amputated limbs (20% with a P -value 0.00005 ( P -value < 0.01. MESS is a simple and relatively easy and readily available scoring system which can help the surgeon to decide the fate of the lower extremity with a high-energy injury.

  7. Pain and pain-related interference in adults with lower-limb amputation: comparison of knee-disarticulation, transtibial, and transfemoral surgical sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, James; Friedly, Janna; Molton, Ivan; Morgenroth, David; Jensen, Mark P; Smith, Douglas G

    2009-01-01

    Pain and pain-related interference with physical function have not been thoroughly studied in individuals who have undergone knee-disarticulation amputations. The principal aim of this study was to determine whether individuals with knee-disarticulation amputations have worse pain and pain-related interference with physical function than do individuals with transtibial or transfemoral amputations. We analyzed cross-sectional survey data provided by 42 adults with lower-limb amputations. These individuals consisted of 14 adults reporting knee-disarticulation amputation in one limb and best-matched cases (14 reporting transfemoral amputation and 14 reporting transtibial amputation) from a larger cross-sectional sample of 472 individuals. Participants were rigorously matched based on time since amputation, reason for amputation, age, sex, diabetes diagnosis, and pain before amputation. Continuous outcome variables were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance. Categorical outcomes were analyzed by Pearson chi-square statistic. Given the relatively small sample size and power concerns, mean differences were also described by estimated effect size (Cohen's d). Of the 42 participants, 83% were male. They ranged in age from 36 to 85 (median = 55.1, standard deviation = 11.0). Most amputations were of traumatic origin (74%), and participants were on average 12.4 years from their amputations at the time of the survey. Individuals with transtibial amputation reported significantly more prosthesis use than did individuals with knee-disarticulation amputation. Amputation levels did not significantly differ in phantom limb pain, residual limb pain, back pain, and pain-related interference with physical function. Estimates of effect size, however, indicated that participants with knee-disarticulation amputation reported less phantom limb pain, phantom limb pain-related interference with physical function, residual limb pain, residual limb pain-related interference with physical

  8. Ectopic major transplantation for salvage of upper and lower extremity amputations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahram Nazerani; Hamed Vaseghi; Saied Hesami; Tina Nazerani

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Ectopic tissue transplantation is not a new idea.Godina and his colleagues pioneered this method in the 1980s.This method is a last resort method of preserving an amputated body part,which consists of banking the amputated segment in an ectopic area and returning it to its native place at a later date.In this article we present our experience with this demanding procedure.Methods:Debridement was the mainstay of this procedure.The stump and amputated part are carefully debrided and the stump was either closed primarily or covered by a flap.The amputated part was transplanted to one of several banking sites in the body and at a later date it will be transferred to its native site in an elective setting.Results:Seven patients meeting the set criteria for ectopic transplantation were enrolled in this study.The overall success rate was about 70%,lower than expected but these are cases of severe crush injury.Although the functional recovery of these patients are very low,all of the successful cases except one could find a job as a janitor or light manual worker.No patient could return to his previous job.Conclusion:Ectopic transplantation of body parts is an accepted method of treatment of severely crushed extremity or finger injuries.In our country an amputee has very little chance of finding a job instead a disabled person can.In addition in Iran cultures amputation is seen as punishment of either the God or the society,so it is not well accepted and many patients persist on saving the limb even with no functional recovery.None of our successful cases could return to his previous occupation but almost all of them could find a job as janitors or light manual workers.

  9. Development of the Tardivo Algorithm to Predict Amputation Risk of Diabetic Foot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Tardivo

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects almost 19% of the elderly population in Brazil and similar percentages around the world. Amputation of lower limbs in diabetic patients who present foot complications is a common occurrence with a significant reduction of life quality, and heavy costs on the health system. Unfortunately, there is no easy protocol to define the conditions that should be considered to proceed to amputation. The main objective of the present study is to create a simple prognostic score to evaluate the diabetic foot, which is called Tardivo Algorithm. Calculation of the score is based on three main factors: Wagner classification, signs of peripheral arterial disease (PAD, which is evaluated by using Peripheral Arterial Disease Classification, and the location of ulcers. The final score is obtained by multiplying the value of the individual factors. Patients with good peripheral vascularization received a value of 1, while clinical signs of ischemia received a value of 2 (PAD 2. Ulcer location was defined as forefoot, midfoot and hind foot. The conservative treatment used in patients with scores below 12 was based on a recently developed Photodynamic Therapy (PDT protocol. 85.5% of these patients presented a good outcome and avoided amputation. The results showed that scores 12 or higher represented a significantly higher probability of amputation (Odds ratio and logistic regression-IC 95%, 12.2-1886.5. The Tardivo algorithm is a simple prognostic score for the diabetic foot, easily accessible by physicians. It helps to determine the amputation risk and the best treatment, whether it is conservative or surgical management.

  10. Assessment of gait stability, harmony, and symmetry in subjects with lower-limb amputation evaluated by trunk accelerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Iosa, PhD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of upper-body accelerations is a promising and simple technique for quantitatively assessing some general features of gait such as stability, harmony, and symmetry. Despite the growing literature on elderly healthy populations and neurological patients, few studies have used accelerometry to investigate these features in subjects with lower-limb amputation. We enrolled four groups of subjects: subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with a locked knee prosthesis, subjects with transfemoral amputation who walked with an unlocked knee prosthesis, subjects with transtibial amputation, and age-matched nondisabled subjects. We found statistically significant differences for stability (p < 0.001, harmony (p < 0.001, and symmetry (p < 0.001 of walking, with general trends following the noted order of subjects, but with the lowest laterolateral harmony in subjects with transtibial amputation. This study is the first to investigate upper-body acceleration of subjects with unilateral lower-limb amputation during walking who were evaluated upon dismissal from a rehabilitation hospital; it is also the first study to differentiate the sample in terms of level of amputation and type of prosthesis used.

  11. Popliteal artery injuries in an urban trauma center with a rural catchment area: do delays in definitive treatment affect amputation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Jon D; Gunter, Joseph W; Schmieg, Robert E; Manley, Justin D; Rushton, Fred W; Porter, John M; Mitchell, Marc E

    2011-11-01

    Extended length of time from injury to definitive vascular repair is considered to be a predictor of amputation in patients with popliteal artery injuries. In an urban trauma center with a rural catchment area, logistical issues frequently result in treatment delays, which may affect limb salvage after vascular trauma. We examined how known risk factors for amputation after popliteal trauma are affected in a more rural environment, where patients often experience delays in definitive surgical treatment. All adult patients admitted to the Level I trauma center, the University of Mississippi Medical Center, with a popliteal artery injury between January 2000 and December of 2007 were identified. Demographic information management and outcome data were collected. Body mass index, mangled extremity severity score (MESS), Guistilo open fracture score, injury severity score, and time from injury to vascular repair were examined. Fifty-one patients with popliteal artery injuries (53% blunt and 47% penetrating) were identified, all undergoing operative repair. There were nine amputations (17.6%) and one death. Patients requiring amputation had a higher MESS, 7.8 versus 5.3 (P score, Guistilo open fracture score, or time from injury to repair were not different between the two groups. Patients with a blunt mechanism of injury had a slightly higher amputation rate compared with those with penetrating trauma, 25.9 per cent versus 8.3 per cent (P = non significant). MESS, though not perfect, is the best predictor of amputation in patients with popliteal artery injuries. Morbid obesity is not a significant predictor for amputation in patients with popliteal artery injuries. Time from injury to repair of greater than 6 hours was not predictive of amputation. This study further demonstrates that a single scoring system should be used with caution when determining the need for lower extremity amputation.

  12. Walking Ability and Quality of Life in Subjects With Transfemoral Amputation: A Comparison of Osseointegration With Socket Prostheses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meent, H. van de; Hopman, M.T.E.; Frolke, J.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate walking ability and quality of life of osseointegrated leg prostheses compared with socket prostheses. DESIGN: Prospective case-control study. SETTING: University medical center. PARTICIPANTS: Subjects (N=22) with transfemoral amputation (1 bilateral) referred to our center

  13. Penile amputation and successful reattachment and the role of winter shunt in postoperative viability: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuoco, Michael; Cox, Leonard; Kinahan, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic self-amputation of the penis by a psychotic patient is rare. Microvascular replantation is the favored management approach. There are no known cases of self-amputation followed by ingestion of the stump and subsequent replantation. A 51-year-old patient with paranoid schizophrenia presented 2 hours following penile amputation. He had swallowed the excised portion, which was endoscopically retrieved from the stomach in the emergency department. Successful reattachment was achieved including microvascular repair of the dorsal penile arteries without cavernosal arterial anastamoses. A Winter's shunt was performed to improve venous circulation. The patient has been followed for 3 years from the date of repair. He has adequate erection for intercourse and good urinary function, but has experienced sensory loss over the dorsal aspect and glans and urethral stricture dilation. This is the first report of replantation following ingestion of an amputated penis.

  14. Contribution of Near-InfraRed Spectroscopy (NIRS) to the Evaluation of Healing After Amputation of the Leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-14

    A Stabilized Definitive Prosthesis (Procedure 1); Definitive Prosthesis With a Contact Socket (Procedure 1); Patients in the Initial Phase (Temporary Prosthesis, Rehabilitation) Following Unilateral Post- Transtibial Amputation (Procedure 2)

  15. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Yao; Albert Chen; Todd Kuiken; Carolina Carmona; Julius Dewald

    2015-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR). As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via th...

  16. Hip fracture fixation in a patient with below-knee amputation presents a surgical dilemma: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Rethnam Ulfin; Yesupalan Rajam; Shoaib Amer; Ratnam Thanga K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Hip fracture fixation surgery in patients with below-knee amputations poses a challenging problem to the surgeon in terms of obtaining traction for reduction of the fracture. The absence of the foot and part of the leg in these patients makes positioning on the fracture table difficult. We highlight this difficult problem and suggest techniques to overcome it. Case presentation A 73-year-old man with bilateral below-knee amputations presented with a history of fall. Radi...

  17. A path of perpetual resilience: exploring the experience of a diabetes-related amputation through grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Wendy; Mortel, Thea F van de; Taylor, Beverly

    2011-08-01

    Little research has been done on the experience of diabetes-related amputation. The aim of this study was to allow amputees to describe their experiences of amputation and to generate grounded theory that will lead health professionals towards a more comprehensive understanding of the realities of post-amputation life. Unstructured interviews were conducted with five participants with a diabetes-related amputation living in a rural setting, and their respective carers. The interviews were analysed using Grounded Theory methods. Data analysis revealed three categories: 'imposed powerlessness', 'adaptive functionality' and 'endurance'. The impact of participant's amputations were influenced by continuing limb problems post-amputation and co-existing complications affecting their physical function. Medical errors and lack of awareness of the risks for diabetic amputations resulted in uncertainty and fear. The participants' sense of grief, loss and shock post operatively continued later as they came to terms with their awkwardness of movement, yet they moved forward developing their own sense of hope through a coping process that revealed remarkable ability to endure and exert control over lives that seemed to be at the whim of an ongoing disease process. The substantive theory resulting from this grounded theory study was conceptualised as 'A Path of Perpetual Resilience'. It is important that psychosocial and not just physical adjustment is considered an indicator for determining outcomes for these people, and that future care involves strategies to promote this. A greater sample size is required to determine if these findings are transferable to the general diabetes-related amputation population.

  18. Dynamic Stability of Superior vs. Inferior Body Segments in Individuals with Transtibial Amputation Walking in Destabilizing Environments✰

    OpenAIRE

    Beurskens, Rainer; Wilken, Jason M.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Interestingly, young and highly active people with lower limb amputation appear to maintain a similar trunk and upper body stability during walking as able bodied individuals. Understanding the mechanisms underlying how this stability is achieved after lower leg amputation is important to improve training regimens for improving walking function in these patients. This study quantified how superior (i.e., head, trunk, and pelvis) and inferior (i.e., thigh, shank, and feet) segments of the body...

  19. Retrospective study on predictive scoring system for amputation in open fracture of tibia type III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made Bramantya Karna

    2016-08-01

    Results: Patients who undergo amputation were 12 people and who successfully maintained limb were 46 people. The sensitivity ranged from 50% (MESI until 75% (HFS, a specificity ranging from 61% (HFS until 85% (NISSA. Positive predictive value ranged between 23% (PSI and 53% (NISSA and negative predictive value ranged from 81% (PSI until 91% (NISSA. Conclusions: This study failed to demonstrate the usefulness of the six counting system because it only shows the sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing limb amputation injuries that require immediate and that allows it to be maintained. Some have incorrectly predicted the counting system, where some patients were successfully maintained limb had been predicted for amputees and vice versa. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(8.000: 3521-3524

  20. Wound healing in above-knee amputations in relation to skin perfusion pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P; Dovey, H; Lassen, N A

    1979-01-01

    In 59 above-knee amputations healing of the stumps was correlated with the local skin perfusion pressure (SPP) measured preoperatively as the external pressure required to stop isotope washout using 1318-- or 125I--antipyrine mixed with histamine. Out of the 11 cases with an SPP below 30 mm......Hg no less than nine (82 per cent) suffered severe wound complications. Out of the 48 cases with an SPP above 30 mmHg severe wound complications occurred in only four cases (8 per cent). The difference in wound complication rate is highly significant (P less than 0.01). The postoperative SPP measured...... on the stumps was on average only slightly and insignificantly higher than the preoperative values, explaining why the preoperative values related so closely to the postoperative clinical course. We conclude that the SPP can be used to predict ischaemic wound complications in above-knee amputations as has...

  1. Prosthetic ambulation in a paraplegic patient with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J C; Park, C; Kim, D Y; Choi, Y S; Kim, Y K; Seong, Y J

    2000-08-01

    Great importance and caution should be placed on prosthetic fitting for a paraplegic patient with an anesthetic residual limb if functional ambulation is to be achieved. The combination of paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy is a complex injury that makes the rehabilitation process difficult. This article describes a case of L2 paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy on the right side. Following the rehabilitation course, the patient independently walked using a walker at indoor level with a transfemoral prosthesis with ischial containment socket, polycentric knee assembly, endoskeletal shank and multiaxis foot assembly and a knee ankle foot orthosis on the sound side. The difficulties of fitting a functional prosthesis to an insensate limb and the rehabilitation stages leading to functional ambulation are reviewed.

  2. Dynamic stability of running: The effects of speed and leg amputations on the maximal Lyapunov exponent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Look, Nicole [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Arellano, Christopher J.; Grabowski, Alena M.; Kram, Rodger [Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); McDermott, William J. [The Orthopedic Specialty Hospital, Murray, Utah 84107 (United States); Bradley, Elizabeth [Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA and Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, we study dynamic stability during running, focusing on the effects of speed, and the use of a leg prosthesis. We compute and compare the maximal Lyapunov exponents of kinematic time-series data from subjects with and without unilateral transtibial amputations running at a wide range of speeds. We find that the dynamics of the affected leg with the running-specific prosthesis are less stable than the dynamics of the unaffected leg and also less stable than the biological legs of the non-amputee runners. Surprisingly, we find that the center-of-mass dynamics of runners with two intact biological legs are slightly less stable than those of runners with amputations. Our results suggest that while leg asymmetries may be associated with instability, runners may compensate for this effect by increased control of their center-of-mass dynamics.

  3. Hand reconstruction using heterotopic replantation of amputated index and little fingers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gong-lin; CHEN Ke-ming; ZHANG Jun-hua; WANG Shi-yong

    2011-01-01

    In cases of severe segmental injury across the hand and wrist, but one or other fingers are still in peak condition, the fingers can be selected for replantation at the forearm bones to restore pinch function. Here we reported an unusual case with a severe crush-avulsion amputated injury to the right hand caused by a machine accident. We conducted hand reconstruction using heterotopic replantation of the amputated index and little fingers.During 19 months follow-up, the bone union healed well with satisfactory outcome. The interphalangeal and metacarpophalangeal joint of the fingers after the heterotopic replantation had a good holding activity. This is a worthwhile procedure and the patient is satisfied with the result. The major disadvantage of this method is the poor appearance of the reconstructed fingers.

  4. Types of psychological reactions in patients with lower-extremity amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Platiša Nedeljko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish types of psychological reactions and conditions in patients with lower-extremity amputations. Apart from using psychological interviews, detection was performed using psychometric tests: Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory. Psychometric parameters were analyzed in a group of 20 examinees treated at the Medical Rehabilitation Clinic in Novi Sad. Out of the whole sample. 45% of patients presented with adaptive reactions to amputation and consequent disability, whereas 55% presented with maladaptive responses. The registered psychopathological symptoms included nosologic categories: reaction to stressful events and adjustment disorder (predominantly affecting other emotions: mixed disorder of conduct and emotions: prolonged depressive reaction and dysthymia. When working with lower-extremity amputees, apart from adaptive, nonpathological forms of behavior, one also encounters maladaptive responses with predomination of mood disorders due to severe somatic stress. .

  5. Painful neuroma requiring surgical excision after lower limb amputation caused by landmine explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehirlioglu, Ali; Ozturk, Cagatay; Yazicioglu, Kamil; Tugcu, Ilknur; Yilmaz, Bilge; Goktepe, Ahmet Salim

    2009-04-01

    This article reports an analysis of 75 consecutive lower limb amputees who developed painful neuroma requiring surgical excision after lower limb amputation following landmine explosions. This retrospective study analyses the results of 75 patients who were treated for painful neuroma after lower limb amputation following landmine explosions between the years 2000 and 2006. The average time period from use of prosthesis to start of symptoms suggesting neuroma was 9.6 months. The average time period from start of pain symptoms to neuroma surgery was 7.8 months. All clinically proven neuromas were surgically resected. In the mean follow-up of 2.8 years, all patients were satisfied with the end results and all were free of any pain symptoms. Painful stump with clinical diagnostic findings of neuroma described above may be regarded as neuroma without requiring any further imaging modalities and is an indication for surgery if conservative measures fail.

  6. Prepuce and partial penile amputation for treatment of preputial gland neoplasia in two ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zeeland, Y R A; Lennox, A; Quinton, J F; Schoemaker, N J

    2014-11-01

    Preputial tumours in ferrets are frequently malignant and therefore warrant prompt investigation. As many cases do not respond favourably to surgery, even in combination with radiation therapy, wide surgical resection has been recommended. Such a procedure may necessitate partial or total penile resection but outcomes have thus far not been well described. The current case series describes two ferrets in which surgical resection, including penile amputation, was performed using 10 and 5 mm margins, respectively. In the first case, no recurrence of preputial gland adenocarcinoma was noted for 32 months postsurgery, whereas multiple attempts at surgery and radiation therapy were unsuccessful in the second. These cases suggest that margins of at least 1 cm may help achieve a better outcome. Penile amputation for the treatment of preputial tumours appears to be well tolerated by ferrets, as demonstrated by these cases.

  7. [Mirror therapy for the treatment of phantom limb pain after bilateral thigh amputation. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnitzka, M; Papenhoff, M; Reinersmann, A; Maier, C

    2014-12-01

    This case study is the first to report successful treatment of bilateral phantom limb pain (PLP) in a patient with bilateral thigh amputation and inefficacious medical treatment using a protocol of graded interventions including mirror therapy (MT). MT is a common treatment for PLP but requires the induction of a visual illusion of an intact limb in the mirror, usually achieved by mirroring the healthy extremity. Here, we illustrate how application of a unilateral prosthesis sufficed to induce the necessary illusion. After sequential imagery, then lateralization training, which alleviated pain attacks, the patient received a further 3-week treatment of mirror treatment. Pain intensity was reduced by more than 85 %; the number of attacks were decreased by more than 90% per day. The analgesic efficacy lasted until the unexpected death of the patient several months later. This case illustrates the mechanisms of MT through overcoming the sensory incongruences underlying the distorted body schema and its efficacy in patients with bilateral amputation.

  8. Crossover replantation after bilateral traumatic lower limb amputations: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Jun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Replantation of a limb to the contralateral stump after bilateral traumatic amputations is rare. To the best of our knowledge, there are only a few reports of crossover lower limb replantation in the literature. Case presentation We treated a 37-year-old Chinese woman with bilateral lower limb crush injuries sustained in a traffic accident. Her lower limb injuries were at different anatomic levels. We performed emergency bilateral amputations followed by crossover replantation. Five years later, the woman had recovered well, and had perfect movement and stability in her replanted leg. After reviewing the literature, we thought that presentation of our patient’s case might provide useful information for clinicians. Conclusions Crossover replantation should be considered when evaluating a patient with bilateral lower limb injuries, thus allowing the patient to touch the ground and stand using their own foot.

  9. Bilateral transtibial amputation with concomitant thoracolumbar vertebral collapse in a Sichuan earthquake survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Caroline Ngar-Chi; Yu, Joseph Man-Kit; Law, Sheung-Wai; Lau, Herman Mun-Cheung; Chan, Cavor Kai-Ming

    2010-07-14

    The devastating earthquake in Sichuan, China on 12 May 2008 left thousands of survivors requiring medical care and intensive rehabilitation. In view of this great demand, the Chinese Speaking Orthopaedic Society established the "Stand Tall" project to provide voluntary services to aid amputee victims in achieving total rehabilitation and social integration. This case report highlights the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of a girl who suffered thoracolumbar vertebral collapse and underwent bilateral transtibial amputation. The rehabilitation team was involved in all stages of the care process from the pre-operative phase, through amputation, into prosthetic training, and during her life thereafter. Despite this catastrophic event, early rehabilitation and specially designed bilateral prostheses allowed her a high level of functional ability. The joint efforts of the multidisciplinary team and the advancement of new technology have revolutionized the care process for amputees.

  10. Traumatic bilateral knee dislocations, unilateral hip dislocation, and contralateral humeral amputation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, James E; Heyworth, Benton E; Piasecki, Dana P; Henn, R Frank; MacGillivray, John D

    2009-02-01

    Bilateral traumatic knee dislocations are a rarity. We report a case of bilateral traumatic knee dislocations with concomitant right hip dislocation and complete traumatic amputation of the left, nondominant upper extremity at the level of the proximal one-third of the humerus. Angiograms revealed no evidence of popliteal artery injury. Orthopedic treatment consisted of immediate reduction of the dislocations and urgent revision amputation of the upper extremity. Staged, bilateral knee ligamentous reconstructions were performed on hospital days 24 and 29, respectively. Despite this constellation of devastating injuries, the patient had a satisfactory outcome. In patients with high-energy hip or knee dislocations, the bilateral hips and knees should be carefully examined to check for associated fractures and/or dislocations.

  11. Amputation-Free Survival after Crural Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Critical Limb Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, M; Konge, L; Lönn, L;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: To evaluate the amputation-free survival after below the knee percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in a consecutive group of patients with critical ischemia of the lower extremity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 70 consecutive patients with critical ischemia were treated...... with below the knee percutaneous transluminal angioplasty at the vascular center at Rigshospitalet with the purpose of limb salvage. All patients were deemed unfit for major surgery due to anatomical limitations or severe co-morbidity, and no prior attempts of revascularization were performed. Follow...... within the first year. Complications after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty were rare. Cumulative mortality after 1 and 2 years was 22% and 34%, respectively. Amputation-free survival at 1 and 2 years of follow-up was 68% and 58%, respectively. There were no association between known risk factors...

  12. Trip recoveries of people with unilateral, transfemoral or knee disarticulation amputations: Initial findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crenshaw, Jeremy R; Kaufman, Kenton R; Grabiner, Mark D

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide novel findings from the kinematics of five amputees following a laboratory-induced trip. Only amputees with a unilateral, transfemoral or knee disarticulation amputation were included in this study. When the prosthesis was obstructed, all subjects used a lowering strategy, resulting in three harness-assisted recoveries and one fall. When the non-prosthetic limb was obstructed, one subject fell using an elevating strategy, one subject fell using a lowering strategy, and one subject, who was harness-assisted, used a hopping strategy. These results can be used to guide further studies of how to limit prosthetic knee flexion due to weight-bearing during a lowering strategy, implement compensatory step training to reduce fall risk, and identify appropriate, context-specific recovery strategies for people with transfemoral or knee disarticulation amputations.

  13. Motor and sensory rehabilitation after lower limb amputation: state of art and perspective of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Roberto; Maini, Maurizio; Bettinardi, Ornella; Labeeb, Alaa; Rosati, Vanessa; Damiani, Carlo; Mallik, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    The rehabilitation of the amputated patient is based on a coordinated sequence of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic procedures carried out by an interdisciplinary rehabilitation team, that works globally on all patient problems. The objectives of the different phases of the rehabilitation treatment were reviewed. Due to their relevance in conditioning the final outcome of the treatment, aspects requiring further studies and remarks, were also reviewed. Among these the psychological aspects, the alterations of all sensory inputs, the secondary alterations at the bone, articular and muscular level, pain of the residual limb and the phantom limb. Finally, the basic criteria to be used to choose the kind of prosthesis in relation to the characteristics and expectations of the amputated person, and the results of the recovery of the autonomy and walking ability, will be schematically described.

  14. Bilateral transtibial amputation with concomitant thoracolumbar vertebral collapse in a Sichuan earthquake survivor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Herman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The devastating earthquake in Sichuan, China on 12 May 2008 left thousands of survivors requiring medical care and intensive rehabilitation. In view of this great demand, the Chinese Speaking Orthopaedic Society established the "Stand Tall" project to provide voluntary services to aid amputee victims in achieving total rehabilitation and social integration. This case report highlights the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of a girl who suffered thoracolumbar vertebral collapse and underwent bilateral transtibial amputation. The rehabilitation team was involved in all stages of the care process from the pre-operative phase, through amputation, into prosthetic training, and during her life thereafter. Despite this catastrophic event, early rehabilitation and specially designed bilateral prostheses allowed her a high level of functional ability. The joint efforts of the multidisciplinary team and the advancement of new technology have revolutionized the care process for amputees.

  15. Primary amputation vs limb salvage in mangled extremity: a systematic review of the current scoring system

    OpenAIRE

    Schirò, Giuseppe Rosario; Sessa, Sergio; Piccioli, Andrea; MACCAURO, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Background In the last decades a lot of new reconstructive techniques were developed for the treatment of mangled lower extremity. However failed attempt to limb salvage is related to high risk of mortality for the patient. Several scores were developed to establish guidelines for the decision to amputate or not, however in literature there is no consensus about the reliability of this scores. Methods The authors focused their attention on the most used score system to provide guidance of the...

  16. Salvage versus amputation: Utility of mangled extremity severity score in severely injured lower limbs

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar M; Badole C; Patond K

    2007-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility of Mangled extremity severity score (MESS) in severely injured lower limbs. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively 25 and prospectively 36 lower limbs in 58 patients with high-energy injuries were evaluated with the use of MESS, to assist in the decision-making process for the care of patients with such injuries. Difference between the mean MESS scores for amputated and salvaged limbs was analyzed. Results: ...

  17. Dating and intimate relationships of women with below-knee amputation: An exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Mathias, Zoë; Harcourt, D

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates experiences of dating and intimate relationships amongst women who use a below-knee prosthesis. Method: Four women took part in semi-structured online interviews. Transcripts were subject to interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Results: Five themes were identified: Revealing and Exposing: Disclosing the Amputation and Prosthesis; Judging and Judged: Internal Fears and Self-Doubt; Trusting and Accepting: Good Guy/Bad Guy Elimination; Taking it Further: The Ne...

  18. Regional Anesthesia and Valproate Sodium for the Prevention of Chronic Post-Amputation Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale. It aims to differentiate neuropathic pain from somatic or nociceptive pain . The S-LANSS...LANSS is in differentiating neuropathic pain from nociceptive pain , which makes this instrument ideal for the proposed study. Thomas Buchheit, MD...Award Number: W81XWH-12-2-0129 TITLE: Regional Anesthesia and Valproate Sodium for the Prevention of Chronic Post-Amputation Pain PRINCIPAL

  19. Tophaceous gout in an amputation stump in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Christine B.; Mohana-Borges, Aurea; Pathria, Mini [Department of Radiology, UCSD and VAHCS, 3350 La Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Gout is a common rheumatologic disorder that can have an unusual clinical presentation. This case report describes the development of a gouty tophus at a site of remote traumatic forearm amputation in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). It further addresses the imaging characteristics of tophaceous gout as well as the differential diagnostic considerations as regards both the imaging findings and the clinical presentation. (orig.)

  20. Bionic ankle–foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, Hugh M.; Grabowski, Alena M.

    2011-01-01

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biolog...

  1. Mobility of people with lower limb amputations: scales and questionnaires: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Rommers, G. M.; Groothoff, J. W.; Eisma, W.H.

    2001-01-01

    Objective and design: A systematic literature review to compare mobility scales used for lower limb amputees. A literature search was carried out by computerized search of biomedical literature including Medline and Embase. The studies included were published between 1978 and 1998 and including the following keywords: amputation, artificial limbs, prosthesis, lower limb, activities of daily living, mobility. Results: Thirty-five studies were identified; 19 had a measurement of separate levels...

  2. Chiropractic management of low back pain in a patient with a transfemoral amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Jennifer D.; Maola, Chad J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic management of a patient with a unilateral transfemoral amputation and low back pain (LBP). Clinical Features A 20-year-old woman with right transfemoral amputation and a right upper extremity amputation due to amniotic band syndrome had approximately 40 different prosthetic lower extremities in the prior 20 years. She presented for chiropractic care for LBP (5/10 numeric pain scale) that she experienced after receiving a new right prosthetic leg. The pain increased with walking, attempts to exercise, and lying supine. Physical evaluation revealed asymmetrical leg length (long right limb); restricted left ankle dorsiflexion; restricted lumbopelvic motion; and hypertonicity of the left triceps surae muscle complex as well as the gluteus maximus, quadratus lumborum, and erector spinae bilaterally. Gait examination revealed a right Trendelenberg gait as well as a pattern of left vaulting. The working diagnosis was sacroiliac joint dysfunction, with lumbar facet syndrome secondary to a leg length inequality causing alteration in gait. Intervention and Outcome Chiropractic management included manipulative therapy to the lumbar spine and pelvis, trigger point therapy of hypertonic musculature, and strengthening of pelvic musculature. In addition, the patient's prosthetist shortened her new prosthetic device. After 18 treatments, LBP severity was resolved (0/10); and there was an overall improvement with gait biomechanics. Conclusion This case illustrates the importance of considering leg length inequality in patients with amputations as a possible cause of lower back pain, and that proper management may include adjusting the length of the prosthetic device and strengthening of the hip flexors and abductors, in addition to trigger point therapy and chiropractic manipulation. PMID:23450067

  3. Solitary Giant Intramuscular Myxoid Neurofibroma Resulting in an above Elbow Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gururajaparasad Chennakeshaviah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromas are uncommon benign tumours and are still rarer in intramuscular locations. They are not detected until they cause a significant damage to the neighbouring tissues. We present a case of a giant intramuscular myxoid neurofibroma of the left forearm which eroded the radius and ulna, restricting the movements at the elbow and wrist joints and causing wrist drop resulting in an above elbow amputation. It was diagnosed by histopathology and was later confirmed by immunohistochemistry.

  4. Solitary Giant Intramuscular Myxoid Neurofibroma Resulting in an above Elbow Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennakeshaviah, Gururajaparasad; Ravishankar, Sunila; Maggad, Rangaswamy; Manjunath, G. V.

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibromas are uncommon benign tumours and are still rarer in intramuscular locations. They are not detected until they cause a significant damage to the neighbouring tissues. We present a case of a giant intramuscular myxoid neurofibroma of the left forearm which eroded the radius and ulna, restricting the movements at the elbow and wrist joints and causing wrist drop resulting in an above elbow amputation. It was diagnosed by histopathology and was later confirmed by immunohistochemistry. PMID:23198230

  5. Major lower extremity amputation after multiple revascularizations: was it worth it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Amy B; Delvecchio, Cindy; Giglia, Joseph S

    2008-01-01

    Lower extremity revascularization is often described as excessively lesion-centric, with insufficient focus on the patient. We investigated patients' perspectives of multiple procedures for limb salvage that culminated in major lower extremity amputation. A prospective vascular surgery database was queried from January 2000 to December 2005 for patients who had undergone below-knee (BKA) or above-knee (AKA) amputation after failed lower extremity revascularization. Patients were surveyed via telephone by a vascular nurse regarding thoughts on undergoing multiple procedures for limb salvage, involvement in decision making, functional status (work, meal preparation, shopping, driving), use of prosthesis, and independence. The Social Security Death Index was utilized to verify patient survival. Amputations for infection were excluded. Seventy-eight patients underwent AKA or BKA after failed revascularization. Forty-six patients (59%) were alive at 5 years. Thirteen patients were lost to follow-up, leaving 33 available for survey. A total of 142 lower extremity revascularizations (median = 4/patient) were performed on these patients including 94 surgical bypasses (median = 3/patient) and 48 percutaneous interventions (median = 1/patient). Eighty-five percent (28 of 33 patients) of amputees surveyed would do everything to save the leg if faced with a similar scenario, regardless of the number of procedures. Fifty-four percent (18/33) of patients actively used a prosthesis, and 91% (30/33) resided at home. In retrospect, patients are willing to undergo multiple revascularizations--percutaneous or open--to attempt limb salvage even if the eventual result is major amputation. Independence and functional status appear to be obtainable in a majority of patients. Patient-oriented outcomes are necessary to guide revascularization, whether it is by a percutaneous or open technique.

  6. Amputated limb by cerclage wire of femoral diaphyseal fracture: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yougun; Yang, Kyu-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Kyoun; Weaver, M J; Allen, Elizabeth M

    2016-12-01

    An entrapment of the femoral artery by cerclage wiring is a rare complication after spiral diaphyseal femoral fractures. We report the case of an 82-year-old female treated by an antegrade intramedullary nailing and multiple cable augmentation, which was then complicated by injury to the femoral artery that resulted in ipsilateral leg necrosis and amputation. The entrapment was caused by direct belting by the cable and resulted in a total obstruction of the femoral artery.

  7. [Management of bilateral hand amputations in low-resources setting: the Krukenberg procedure is still indicated].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, L; Gaillard, C; Mottier, F; Bertani, A; Rongiéras, F; Chauvin, F

    2013-01-01

    Double hand amputation leads to complete loss of prehensive function and touch sense. Patients become totally dependent on others for survival. In developing countries, where sophisticated myoelectric prosthesis are not available, the Krukenberg procedure gives to these patients elementary self-sufficiency for daily-life. This procedure can be performed in low-resources setting and requires minimal rehabilitation. However, patient selection and preparation are critical because of an unattractive aesthetic aspect which limits this operation use in occidental countries.

  8. Newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes complicated by ketoacidosis and peripheral thrombosis leading to transfemoral amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Line Bisgaard; Skov, Ole; Yderstræde, Knud

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral vascular thromboembolism is a rarely described complication of diabetic ketoacidosis. We report a 41-year-old otherwise healthy man admitted with ketoacidosis and ischaemia of the left foot. The patient was unsuccessfully treated with thromboendarterectomy, and the extremity was ultimately amputated. The patient had no family history of cardiovascular disease, and all blood sample analyses for hypercoagulability were negative. We recommend an increased focus on peripheral thromboembolism, when treating patients with severe ketoacidosis.

  9. Asymmetrical loading demands associated with vertical jump landings in people with unilateral transtibial amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Marlene Schoeman, PhD; Ceri E. Diss, PhD; Siobhan C. Strike, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Loading symmetry during vertical jump landings between a person with amputation’s intact and prosthetic limbs was assessed to determine the role of each limb in controlling the downward momentum of the center of mass during landing. Six participants with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA) and ten nondisabled participants completed 10 maximal vertical jumps, of which the highest jump was analyzed. Contralateral symmetry was assessed through the Symmetry Index (SI), while symmetry at the g...

  10. Plantar rotational flap technique for panmetatarsal head resection and transmetatarsal amputation: a revision approach for second metatarsal head transfer ulcers in patients with previous partial first ray amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffeli, Troy J; Reinking, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Transfer ulcers beneath the second metatarsal head are common after diabetes-related partial first ray amputation. Subsequent osteomyelitis of the second ray can further complicate this difficult situation. We present 2 cases depicting our plantar rotational flap technique for revision surgery involving conversion to either panmetatarsal head resection or transmetatarsal amputation (TMA). These cases are presented to demonstrate our indications, procedure selection criteria, flap technique, operative pearls, and staging protocol. The goals of this surgical approach are to excise and close the plantar ulcer beneath the second metatarsal head, remove any infected bone, allow staged surgery if needed, remove all remaining metatarsal heads to decrease the likelihood of repeat transfer ulcers, preserve the toes when practical, avoid excessive shortening of the foot, avoid multiple longitudinal dorsal incisions, and create a functional and cosmetically appealing foot. The flap is equally suited for either panmetatarsal head resection or TMA. The decision to pursue panmetatarsal head resection versus TMA largely depends on the condition of the remaining toes. Involvement of osteomyelitis in the base of the second proximal phalanx, the soft tissue viability of the remaining toes, the presence of a preoperative digital deformity, and the likelihood that saving the lesser toes will be beneficial from a cosmetic or footwear standpoint are factors we consider when deciding between panmetatarsal head resection and TMA. Retrospective chart review identified prompt healing of the flap in both patients. Neither patient experienced recurrent ulcers or required subsequent surgery within the first 12 months postoperatively.

  11. The utility of scores in the decision to salvage or amputation in severely injured limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuganathan, Rajasekaran

    2008-10-01

    The decision to amputate or salvage a severely injured limb can be very challenging to the trauma surgeon. A misjudgment will result in either an unnecessary amputation of a valuable limb or a secondary amputation after failed salvage. Numerous scores have been proposed to provide guidelines to the treating surgeon, the notable of which are Mangled extremity severity score (MESS); the predictive salvage index (PSI); the Limb Salvage Index (LSI); the Nerve Injury, Ischemia, Soft tissue injury, Skeletal injury, Shock and Age of patient (NISSSA) score; and the Hannover fracture scale-97 (HFS-97). These scores have all been designed to evaluate limbs with combined orthopaedic and vascular injuries and have a poor sensitivity and specificity in evaluating IIIB injuries. Recently the Ganga Hospital Score (GHS) has been proposed which is specifically designed to evaluate a IIIB injury. Another notable feature of GHS is that it offers guidelines in the choice of the appropriate reconstruction protocol. The basis of the commonly used scores with their utility have been discussed in this paper.

  12. The utility of scores in the decision to salvage or amputation in severely injured limbs

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    Rajasekaran Shanmuganathan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The decision to amputate or salvage a severely injured limb can be very challenging to the trauma surgeon. A misjudgment will result in either an unnecessary amputation of a valuable limb or a secondary amputation after failed salvage. Numerous scores have been proposed to provide guidelines to the treating surgeon, the notable of which are Mangled extremity severity score (MESS; the predictive salvage index (PSI; the Limb Salvage Index (LSI; the Nerve Injury, Ischemia, Soft tissue injury, Skeletal injury, Shock and Age of patient (NISSSA score; and the Hannover fracture scale-97 (HFS-97. These scores have all been designed to evaluate limbs with combined orthopaedic and vascular injuries and have a poor sensitivity and specificity in evaluating IIIB injuries. Recently the Ganga Hospital Score (GHS has been proposed which is specifically designed to evaluate a IIIB injury. Another notable feature of GHS is that it offers guidelines in the choice of the appropriate reconstruction protocol.The basis of the commonly used scores with their utility have been discussed in this paper.

  13. Cardiovascular risk factors among males with war-related bilateral lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriar, S H; Masumi, M; Edjtehadi, F; Soroush, M R; Soveid, M; Mousavi, B

    2009-10-01

    This study was conducted to determine the cardiovascular risk factors among 327 Iranian males with bilateral lower limb amputation.The average age at the time of amputation and at the time of the study was 20.6 (SD = 5.4) and 42 years (SD = 6.3), respectively. Below both knees was the most common level of amputation (37.6%). About 95.4% had at least one modifiable risk factor. Prevalence of risk factors included: hyperglycemia 13.1%, systolic hypertension 18.9%, diastolic hypertension 25.6%, abdominal obesity 82.5%, high total cholesterol 36.7%, low HDL 25.9%, high LDL 24.7%, high triglycerides 32.1%, and smoking 31.8%. The most common risk factor was abdominal obesity. Prevalence of coronary artery disease was similar to the general Iranian population but prevalence of risk factors was higher significantly. The majority of the cases seem to be susceptible to cardiovascular disease in near future. Some strategies are needed as a primary prevention to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  14. Bionic ankle–foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh M.; Grabowski, Alena M.

    2012-01-01

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75–1.75 m s−1 and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation. PMID:21752817

  15. Active dorsiflexing prostheses may reduce trip-related fall risk in people with transtibial amputation

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    Noah J. Rosenblatt, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available People with amputation are at increased risk of falling compared with age-matched, nondisabled individuals. This may partly reflect amputation-related changes to minimum toe clearance (MTC that could increase the incidence of trips and fall risk. This study determined the contribution of an active dorsiflexing prosthesis to MTC. We hypothesized that regardless of speed or incline the active dorsiflexion qualities of the ProprioFoot would significantly increase MTC and decrease the likelihood of tripping. Eight people with transtibial amputation walked on a treadmill with their current foot at two grades and three velocities, then repeated the protocol after 4 wk of accommodation with the ProprioFoot. A mixed-model, repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare MTC. Curves representing the likelihood of tripping were derived from the MTC distributions and a multiple regression was used to determine the relative contributions of hip, knee, and ankle angles to MTC. Regardless of condition, MTC was approximately 70% larger with the ProprioFoot (p < 0.001 and the likelihood of tripping was reduced. Regression analysis revealed that MTC with the ProprioFoot was sensitive to all three angles, with sensitivity of hip and ankle being greater. Overall, the ProprioFoot may increase user safety by decreasing the likelihood of tripping and thus the pursuant likelihood of a fall.

  16. [Forequarter amputation of the right upper chest: limitations of ultra radical interdisciplinary oncological surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragu, A; Hohenberger, W; Lang, W; Schmidt, J; Horch, R E

    2011-09-01

    Total forearm free flap procedures after forequarter amputations have been sparsely described in the literature. Using the amputated arm as a "free filet flap" remains a viable surgical option after radical forequarter amputations performed for the resection of large, invasive tumors of the shoulder or thoracic wall region. Using the forequarter specimen as a donor site seems favorable in that it eliminates the usual donor site morbidity. Nevertheless, in our patient with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast and a fibrosarcoma suffering from severe pain and septic conditions - which failed to respond properly to conservative therapy - as well as rapidly progressive tumor ulceration despite repeated radiation therapy, we decided to attempt complete tumor removal by hemithoracectomy as a last resort. This decision was taken following multiple interdisciplinary consultations and thorough patient information. Although technically feasible with complete tumor removal and safe soft tissue free flap coverage, the postoperative course raises questions about the advisability of such ultra radical surgical procedures, as well as about the limitations of respiratory recovery after hemithoracectomy with removal of the sternum. Hence, based on our experience with such radical tumor surgery, we discuss the issues of diminished postoperative pulmonary function, intensive care possibilities and ethical issues. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under "Supplemental").

  17. Active dorsiflexing prostheses may reduce trip-related fall risk in people with transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Noah J; Bauer, Angela; Rotter, David; Grabiner, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    People with amputation are at increased risk of falling compared with age-matched, nondisabled individuals. This may partly reflect amputation-related changes to minimum toe clearance (MTC) that could increase the incidence of trips and fall risk. This study determined the contribution of an active dorsiflexing prosthesis to MTC. We hypothesized that regardless of speed or incline the active dorsiflexion qualities of the ProprioFoot would significantly increase MTC and decrease the likelihood of tripping. Eight people with transtibial amputation walked on a treadmill with their current foot at two grades and three velocities, then repeated the protocol after 4 wk of accommodation with the ProprioFoot. A mixed-model, repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare MTC. Curves representing the likelihood of tripping were derived from the MTC distributions and a multiple regression was used to determine the relative contributions of hip, knee, and ankle angles to MTC. Regardless of condition, MTC was approximately 70% larger with the ProprioFoot (p < 0.001) and the likelihood of tripping was reduced. Regression analysis revealed that MTC with the ProprioFoot was sensitive to all three angles, with sensitivity of hip and ankle being greater. Overall, the ProprioFoot may increase user safety by decreasing the likelihood of tripping and thus the pursuant likelihood of a fall.

  18. [Contralateral replantation after bilateral traumatic lower leg amputation. Case report with 6 year follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, A; Stock, W; Hierner, R; Sebisch, E; Schweiberer, L

    1995-05-01

    A 66-year-old patient attempted suicide by jumping in front of a train. The lower extremities were amputated at different levels. On the right side, there was a complete amputation within the distal third of the lower leg. Proximal to the amputation site, there was an extensive soft-tissue and bone defect. On the left side, there was a crush injury of the tarsal and mid-tarsal bones. The left lower leg showed only few injuries. An ipsilateral (anatomical) replantation was not possible. In order to save one lower extremity, we decided to carry out a cross-over (contralateral) replantation of the right foot to the left lower leg. After a follow-up of six years, the patient is able to walk well with her prosthesis on the right side and the right foot hooked up to the left lower leg. Functionally, this treatment (cross-over replantation-one-side prosthesis of the lower leg) is much better than the prosthesis on both extremities, as the result has shown. Also from a psychological point of view, it seems to be better for the patient to preserve one extremity even with a cross-over replanted foot.

  19. Risk factors for ulceration and amputation in diabetic foot: study in a cohort of 496 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura Neto, Arnaldo; Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz; Nery, Marcia; Parisi, Maria Candida Ribeiro

    2013-08-01

    Treatment strategies for foot at risk and diabetic foot are mainly preventive. Studies describing demographic data, clinical and impacting factors continue to be, however, scarce. Our objective was to determine the epidemiological presentation of diabetic foot and understand whether there were easily assessable variables capable of predicting the development of diabetic foot. This was a retrospective study of 496 patients with established foot at risk or diabetic foot, who were evaluated based on age, gender, type and duration of diabetes, foot at risk classification, and the presence of deformities, ulceration, and amputation. The presence of deformities, ulceration, and amputation was recorded in 45.9, 25.3, and 12.9 % of patients, respectively. As for diabetic foot classification, the great majority of our cohort had diabetic neuropathy (92.9 %). Approximately 30 % had neuro-ischemic disease and only 7.1 % had ischemic disease alone. Sixty-two percent of patients presented neuropathy with no signs of arteriopathy. Foot classification was as a significant predictor for the presence of ulcer (p = 0.009; OR = 3.2; 95 % CI = 1.18-7.3). Only male gender was a significant predictor for ulceration (p diabetic foot (p diabetic foot were male gender and the presence of neuropathy. The combination of neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease adds significantly to the risk for amputation among patients with the diabetic foot syndrome. Men, presenting combined risk factors, should be a group receiving special attention and in the foot clinic, due to their potentially worse evolution.

  20. An effective method for decreasing ischaemia period on major amputations: feeding catheter

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    Mehmet Veli Karaaltin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ischaemia period is the most important factor among those affecting success chance in replantation outcomes of major amputations. The excess amount of muscle tissue in amputation reduces critical ischaemia period and increases the risk for development of ischaemia-reperfusion damage. A significant increase is observed in tissue necrosis due to ischaemia-reperfusion damage even if cell death and circulation in tissue are provided after exceeding critical ischaemia period. There is a common consensus for especially protecting amputation materials in a hypothermic environment in order to prevent ischaemia-reperfusion damage. There are various methods to reduce ischaemia period which has a significant importance for increasing replantation success. We assert that the success is significantly increased when circulation is provided within the first hour by placing temporary feeding catheter on a reciprocal way as artery to artery and vein to vein before bone fixation as in our case presented in this report. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(1.000: 37-39

  1. Revisiting risks associated with mortality following initial transtibial or transfemoral amputation

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    Barbara E. Bates, MD, MBA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study’s objective was to determine how treatment-, environmental-, and facility-level characteristics contribute to postdischarge mortality prediction. The study included 4,153 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation in Department of Veterans Affairs facilities during fiscal years 2003 and 2004. Veterans were followed 1 yr postamputation. A Cox regression identified characteristics associated with mortality risk after hospital discharge following amputation. Older age, higher amputation level, and more comorbidities increased mortality likelihood. Patients who had inpatient procedures for pulmonary and renal problems had higher hazards of postdischarge death than those who did not (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.10, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.16–3.77, and HR = 2.22, 95% CI = 1.80–2.74, respectively. Patients who had central nervous system procedures had higher hazards of death early postdischarge (HR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.60–3.11 at 0 d, but this association became insignificant by 180 d. Patients in a surgical intensive care unit (ICU, medical ICU, or medical bed section at the time of discharge were more likely to die than patients on a surgical bed section. Patients hospitalized in the Midwest were less likely to die early after discharge than patients in the Mountain Pacific region, but this regional effect became insignificant by 90 d. Adding treatment-, environmental-, and facility-level characteristics contributed additional information to a mortality risk model.

  2. Evaluation of Gait Performance of a Hemipelvectomy Amputation Walking with a Canadian Prosthesis

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    M. T. Karimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hemipelvectomy amputation is a surgical procedure in which lower limb and a portion of pelvic are removed. There are a few studies in the literature regarding the performance of subjects with hip disarticulation during walking. However, there is no study on gait analysis of hemipelvectomy subject. Therefore, the aim of this paper was to evaluate the gait and stability of subject with hemipelvectomy amputation. Case Description and Methods. A subject with hemipelvectomy amputation at right side was involved in this study. He used a Canadian prosthesis with single axis ankle joint, 3R21 knee joint, and 7E7 hip joint for more than 10 years. The kinetic and kinematic parameters were collected by a motion analysis system and a Kistler force platform. Findings and Outcomes. There was a significant difference between knee, hip, and ankle range of motions and their moments in the sound and prosthesis sides. In the other side, the stability of the subject in the anteroposterior direction seems to be better than that in the mediolateral direction. Conclusions. There was a significant asymmetry between the kinetic and kinematic performance of the sound and prosthesis sides, which may be due to lack of muscular power and alignment of prosthesis components.

  3. Bionic ankle-foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh M; Grabowski, Alena M

    2012-02-07

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75-1.75 m s(-1) and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation.

  4. Simultaneous toe-to-hand transfer and lower extremity amputations for severe upper and lower limb defects: the use of spare parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J; Jones, N F

    2002-06-01

    From 1995 to 2000, five microvascular toe-to-hand transfers were performed in three children who were simultaneously undergoing lower extremity amputations. Their ages at time of transfer ranged from 4 to 10 years and the types of lower extremity amputation included toe amputation, foot amputation and through-knee amputation. The resulting toe-to-hand transfers included three great toe-to-thumb transfers and one combined great and second toe-to-hand transfer. The toe-to-hand transfers were all successful and all the lower extremity amputations healed without complications. In all cases, improved hand function and lower extremity function was noted by the families. These unique cases represent the ultimate use of spare parts in congenital hand surgery.

  5. A Case of Nonisland Pedicled Foot Fillet Flap for Below-Knee Amputation Stump Wound: Treatment Option for Compartment Syndrome after Fibular Free Flap Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Jae Ha; Kim, Kwang Seog; Lee, Sam Yong

    2014-01-01

    Despite the frequent use of the fibular free flap, there have been no reports of severe compartment syndrome of the donor leg that necessitated limb amputation. A 66-yr-old man had a fibular osseous free flap transfer from the left leg to the mandible that was complicated by postoperative compartment syndrome. An extensive chronic leg wound resulted, which was treated with multiple debridements and finally with below-knee amputation. Successful coverage of the below-knee amputation stump was ...

  6. Association of lower extremity arterial calcification with amputation and mortality in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease.

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    Chi-Lun Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The clinical implication of the coronary artery calcium score (CS is well demonstrated. However, little is known about the association between lower extremity arterial calcification and clinical outcomes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-two patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (age 61.0±12.4 years were followed for 21±11 months. CSs, ranging from the common iliac artery bifurcation to the ankle area, were analyzed through noncontrast multidetector computed tomography images retrospectively. The primary endpoints of this study were amputation and mortality. Old age, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and end-stage renal disease were associated with higher CSs. Patients with more advanced Fontaine stages also tended to have significantly higher CSs (p = 0.03. During the follow-up period (21±11 months, 29 (35% patients underwent amputation, and 24 (29% patients died. Among the patients who underwent amputation, there were no significant differences in CSs between the amputated legs and the non-amputated legs. In the Cox proportional hazard model with CS divided into quartiles, patients with CS in the highest quartile had a 2.88-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-12.72, p = 0.03 and a 5.16-fold (95% CI 1.13-21.61, p = 0.04 higher risk for amputation and all-cause mortality, respectively, than those with CS in the lowest quartile. These predictive effects remained after conventional risk factor adjustment. CONCLUSION: Lower extremity arterial CSs are associated with disease severity and outcomes, including amputation and all-cause mortality, in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease. However, the independent predictive value needs further investigation in large scale, prospective studies.

  7. Demographics of Lower Limb Amputations in the Pakistan Military: A Single Center, Three-Year Prospective Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Saeed B; Mansoor, Sahibzada N; Qureshi, Ali R; Fahim, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  The Pakistan military has been actively engaged in the war against terror for more than a decade. Many officers and soldiers have lost their limbs in this war. But the data on traumatic lower limb amputations in Pakistan is sparse. The aim of this study is to prospectively document the epidemiological profile of lower limb military amputees presenting at the largest rehabilitation centre of Pakistan over a three-year period. Materials & methods  A prospective three-year survey was conducted at the Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Pakistan. One hundred twenty-three consecutive patients with lower limb amputations were enrolled in the survey. The demographic data, etiology, associated injuries, complications profile, and type of prosthesis provided were documented. The data analysis was done using the statistical analysis tool SPSS V 20 (IBM®,NY, USA).  Results  All patients were male. Most had traumatic amputation (119), were between 20–40 years (106), with unilateral amputation (115). Mine blast injury was the leading cause in 73 (59.3%) and most (58.5%) were fitted with modular prosthesis. Transtibial amputation was the commonest level (65), followed by transfemoral (30). The time of surgical amputation was not documented in 87% of the patients. Half of the patients (54%) had associated injuries. Seventy-nine patients had at least one complication with phantom pain being the commonest in 25% cases. Conclusions  This is the largest prospective demographic survey of lower limb amputees in Pakistan military to date. Scores of soldiers and civilians in Pakistan have suffered lower limb amputation. The availability of demographic data can improve the trauma and rehabilitation services for better understanding and management of such cases. There is a need to conduct large scale community-based epidemiological surveys to direct future policies and develop amputee rehabilitation services in the public sector. PMID:27186448

  8. Temporal Trends and Geographic Variation of Lower Extremity Amputation in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease: Results from U.S. Medicare 2000–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. Schuyler; Patel, Manesh R.; Dai, David; Subherwal, Sumeet; Stafford, Judith; Calhoun, Sarah; Peterson, Eric D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We sought to characterize temporal trends, patient-specific factors and geographic variation associated with amputation in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (LE PAD) during the study period. Background Amputation represents the end stage failure for those with LE PAD and little is known about the rates and geographic variation in use of LE amputation. Methods Using data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2008, we examined national patterns of LE amputation among patients 65 years or older with PAD. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust regional results for other patient demographic and clinical factors. Results Among 2,730,742 older patients with identified PAD, the overall rate of LE amputation declined from 7,258 per 100,000 PAD patients to 5,790 per 100,000 (p < 0.001 for trend). Male sex, black race, diabetes mellitus and renal disease were all independent predictors of LE amputation. The adjusted odds ratio of LE amputation per year between 2000 and 2008 was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.95-0.95, p<0.001). Conclusions From 2000 to 2008, LE amputation rates decreased significantly among PAD patients. There however remains significant patient and geographic variation in amputation rates across the United States. PMID:23103040

  9. [Amputation or reconstruction of IIIB and IIIC open tibial fracture. Decision criteria in the acute phase and late functional outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seekamp, A; Regel, G; Ruffert, S; Ziegler, M; Tscherne, H

    1998-05-01

    In IIIB and IIIC type open tibial fractures (according to Gustilo) the primary decision that has to be made regarding therapy is wether or not the limb can be salvaged. To standardize the criteria for amputation different salvage scores have been established in recent years. In this study the Hannover Fracture Scale (HFS), the Predictive Salvage Index (PSI), the Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) and the NISSSA score were evaluated regarding their clinical relevance. When ROC Analysis was performed for all these scores in our patients the HFS revealed the highest sensitivity (0.91), but low specificity (0.71). The highest specificity was noted for the MESS (0.97), which in parallel showed the lowest sensitivity (0.59). In general it seems to be essential to make the right decision initially in order to avoid secondary amputation. All the scores mentioned here appear to be helpful in decision making. Salvaged limbs in IIIB and IIIC fractures presented a comparable good outcome, whereas salvaged IIIC injuries with a high score presented an outcome which was as bad as in secondary amputations. Secondary amputated patients required not only significant longer hospitalization but also resulted in poor outcome compared with the patients having received reconstruction or primary amputation.

  10. Consequences of non-vascular trans-femoral amputation: a survey of quality of life, prosthetic use and problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, K; Brånemark, R

    2001-12-01

    Individuals with unilateral trans-femoral amputations due to non-vascular causes were studied in a mailed survey designed to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQL), prosthetic use and problems. The Swedish SF-36 Health Survey and a structured questionnaire designed for trans-femoral amputees were used. The series consisted of 97 subjects (60 men, 37 women), aged 20 to 69 years with a mean of 22 years since the amputation. Trauma was the cause of amputation in 55%, tumour in 35% and other causes in 10%. Ninety-two (92) subjects (95%) had a prosthesis and 80 (82%) used it daily. General HRQL was significantly lower than Swedish age- and gender-matched norms in all dimensions as measured by SF-36. Most frequently reported problems that had led to reduction in quality of life were heat/sweating in the prosthetic socket (72%), sores/skin irritation from the socket (62%), inability to walk in woods and fields (61%) and inability to walk quickly (59%). Close to half were troubled by stump pain (51%), phantom limb pain (48%), back pain (47%) and pain in the other leg (46%). One fourth considered themselves to have a poor or extremely poor overall situation. Transfemoral amputation, due to non-vascular causes, has an evident impact on quality of life and there are considerable problems related to the amputation and the prosthesis. Efforts to improve the physical and the psychological well-being for this group, with a long life expectancy, are needed.

  11. Muscle transposition and skin grafting for salvage of below-knee amputation level after bilateral lower extremity thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açikel, C; Peker, F; Akmaz, I; Ulkür, E

    2001-12-01

    Thermal injury to the lower extremity sometimes necessitates amputation around the knee joint. Knee function is so critical to prosthetic rehabilitation that every attempt should be made to salvage the knee joint. This report presents an unusual case of bilateral lower extremity flame burn requiring amputations. While the distal two-thirds of the legs and both feet were totally necrotic, the thermal damage was limited to skin and subcutaneous tissue sparing muscle and bone in the proximal one-third of the legs and posterior thighs. The below-knee amputation level was salvaged by muscle transposition over the anterior tibia and resurfacing of muscle cuffs with thick split-thickness skin grafts. The post-operative period was uneventful. Amputation stumps tolerated the below-knee prosthesis well and the patient attained independent functional prosthetic ambulation at the post-operative fourth month. It is known from the reconstruction of the plantar foot that skin-grafted muscle tissue tolerates weight bearing and shearing forces well. This principle can also be used for salvage aspects of the below-knee amputation level.

  12. Comparison of gait of persons with partial foot amputation wearing prosthesis to matched control group: observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Michael P; Barker, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Our understanding of the gait mechanics of persons with partial foot amputation and the influence of prosthetic intervention has been limited by the reporting of isolated gait parameters in specific amputation levels and limited interpretation and discussion of results. This observational study aimed to more completely describe the gait patterns of persons with partial foot amputation wearing their existing prosthesis and footwear in comparison with a nonamputee control group. Major adaptations occurred once the metatarsal heads were compromised. Persons with transmetatarsal and Lisfranc amputation who were wearing insoles and slipper sockets maintained the center of pressure behind the end of the residuum until after contralateral heel contact. This gait pattern may be a useful adaptation to protect the residuum, moderate the requirement of the calf musculature, or compensate for the compliance of the forefoot. Power generation across the affected ankle was virtually negligible, necessitating increased power generation across the hip joints. The clamshell devices fitted to the persons with Chopart amputation restored their effective foot length and normalized many aspects of gait. These persons' ability to adopt this gait pattern may be the result of the broad anterior shell of the socket, a relatively stiff forefoot, and immobilization of the ankle. The hip joints still contributed significantly to the power generation required to walk.

  13. Chopart prosthesis and semirigid foot orthosis in traumatic forefoot amputation. Comparative gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, G; McBride, M E; Murray, D D; Sanderson, D J; Dukes, I; Menard, M R

    1996-01-01

    Gait was analyzed in seven otherwise healthy males at least 11 mo after they had recovered from a traumatic unilateral transmetatarsal amputation incurred during the course of their usual occupation. All seven were fitted with a semirigid foot orthosis. Four were also fitted with a Chopart prosthesis. Gait was evaluated with forceplate measurements of ground reaction force during free walking, by clinical observation of such ambulation on videotape, and by the subjective impression of the men as obtained by a questionnaire. In all men, with unmodified footwear, with the orthosis, and with the prosthesis, the forceplate data showed an abnormal pattern characterized by reduced stance duration and deficient forward propulsion on the amputated side. The abnormality and asymmetry of ground-reaction forces were less with greater preserved stump length and for a given stump length were with the above-ankle concept (Chopart) prosthesis than with the below-ankle concept. These features were recognized during the clinical analysis of all footwear, but there was an extra irregularity of weight progression noted with the fixed ankle of the Chopart prosthesis. The questionnaire reported stump problems to be the principal difficulty, and the follow-up revealed persistent attempts at surgical management including consideration of amputation at a higher level. It was concluded that the patient and the surgeons are likely to choose preservation of limb length over considerations of function during acute care and that the prosthetic concept best suited to deal with the resulting stump should emphasize unloading the distal part of the stump and smoothing out the impulsive force peak on the stump in late stance to minimize pain and to enhance ambulation capacity.

  14. Clinico-microbiological study of diabetic limb amputations in a tertiary care hospital in North India

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    Rajpal Singh Punia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The diabetic population faces 80% increased risk of cellulitis, 4-fold increased risk of osteomyelitis and 2-fold risk of both sepsis and death caused by infections.Study objectives.The present study was carried out to assess the clinical aspects and microbiological profile of organisms isolated from 25 patients undergoing diabetic limb amputations.Materials and Methods. In 25 diabetes persons who underwent limb amputation, grading of ulcers was done according to Wagner system. Material was stained with Gram stain. Potassium hydroxide wet mounts were also studied. Culture was done in blood agar, MacConkey agar, Sabouraud dextrose agar tube slants and brain heart infusion broth and examined for growth. The histopathology sections were also studied and special stains were done.Results. Of 25 cases, 16 were males and 9 were females. The age ranged from 30 to 90 years (mean: 58±10.91. Majority of ulcers were grade 3. Osteomyelitis was seen in 13 (52% cases; acute in 2 (8%, chronic in 3 (12% and acute exacerbation of chronic osteomyelitis in 8 (32% cases. On culture Proteus mirabilis was isolated in majority of cases followed by Escherichia coli. In 20 cases more than one bacterium were isolated. Candida was cultured in 8 cases followed by Trichosporon in 2 and Fusarium in one case. On histopathology Candida was seen in 3 cases, while one case showed spores of Trichosporon. 80% cases with osteomyelitis had polymicrobial infection.Conclusions. The isolation of etiologic agent helps in administering appropriate antibiotic regimens, thus reducing the problem of multidrug resistance, morbidity and surgical limb amputations in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus.

  15. Reduced prosthetic stiffness lowers the metabolic cost of running for athletes with bilateral transtibial amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Owen N; Taboga, Paolo; Grabowski, Alena Marie

    2017-01-19

    Inspired by the spring-like action of biological legs, running-specific prostheses are designed to enable athletes with lower-limb amputations to run. Yet, manufacturer recommendations for prosthetic stiffness and height may not optimize running performance. Therefore, we investigated the effects of using different prosthetic configurations on the metabolic cost and biomechanics of running. Five athletes with bilateral transtibial amputations each performed fifteen trials on a force-measuring treadmill at 2.5 or 3.0 m/s. Athletes ran using each of three different prosthetic models (Freedom Catapult FX6, Össur Flex-Run, and Ottobock 1E90 Sprinter) with five combinations of stiffness categories (manufacturer recommended and ± 1) and heights (International Paralympic Committee's maximum competition height and ± 2 cm) while we measured metabolic rates and ground reaction forces. Overall, prosthetic stiffness (fixed effect (β)=0.036; p=0.008) but not height (p≥0.089) affected the net metabolic cost of transport; less stiff prostheses reduced metabolic cost. While controlling for prosthetic stiffness (kN/m), using the Flex-Run (β=-0.139; p=0.044) and 1E90 Sprinter prostheses (β=-0.176; p=0.009) reduced net metabolic costs by 4.3% to 4.9% compared to using the Catapult prostheses, respectively. The metabolic cost of running improved when athletes used prosthetic configurations that decreased peak horizontal braking ground reaction forces (β=2.786; p=0.001), stride frequencies (β=0.911; p<0.001), and leg stiffness values (β=0.053; p=0.009). Remarkably, athletes did not maintain overall leg stiffness across prosthetic stiffness conditions. Rather, the in-series prosthetic stiffness governed overall leg stiffness. The metabolic cost of running in athletes with bilateral transtibial amputations is influenced by prosthetic model and stiffness, but not height.

  16. Prosthetic programme after above-knee amputation in children with sarcomata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, W G; Klein, R W; van Lith, M; Jarvis, R

    1982-01-01

    A programme for early mobilisation using a temporary prosthesis was evaluated in 17 children who had had an amputation above the knee for sarcomata. The temporary prosthesis had a performed adjustable polypropylene quadrilateral socket which was able to accommodate changes in the size of the stump during the first few months after amputation. The adjustable sockets were assembled onto wooden knee-shank-foot units or onto modular components covered with foam. The wooden units were better for routine use as more adjustment was possible between the socket and the knee and because they were more durable in active children. Prosthetic fitting usually took one hour and was carried out 10 days after the amputation to coincide with the start of the chemotherapy programme. The prosthesis was cosmetically acceptable, easy to use and provided a simple and economical way of rehabilitating the amputees and restoring their morale. After two to three months a new prosthesis with a laminated socket suspended by a waistband was supplied. The skin tolerated the closer fit of this socket and the small fluctuations in the size of the stump that occurred with each course of chemotherapy were easily accommodated by varying the thickness of the stump sock. A self-suspending laminated socket was provided after completion of the chemotherapy. The permanent sockets were assembled onto wooden components but the girls usually preferred the modular system covered with foam. The chemotherapy and rehabilitation programmes were successfully co-ordinated so that the children spent as little time as possible away from their normal activities.

  17. PREDICTING WALKING ABILITY FOLLOWING LOWER LIMB AMPUTATION: AN UPDATED SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Jason T.; Highsmith, M. Jason; Schaepper, Hans; Johannesson, Anton; Orendurff, Michael S.; Kaufman, Kenton

    2016-01-01

    There is not a clear clinical recommendation for the determination of prosthetic candidacy. Guidelines do not delineate which member(s) of the multidisciplinary team are responsible for prosthetic candidacy decisions and which factors will best predict a positive outcome. Also not clearly addressed is a patient-centered decision-making role. In a previous systematic review (SR), Sansam et al. reported on the prediction of walking ability following lower limb amputation using literature up to 2007. The search strategy was designed from the previous Sansam SR as an update of previously valuable predictive factors of prosthetic candidacy. An electronic literature search was executed from August 8, 2007, to December 31, 2015, using MEDLINE (Pubmed), Embase, The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (Ovid), and Cochrane. A total of 319 studies were identified through the electronic search. Of these, 298 were eliminated, leaving a total of 21 for full evaluation. Conclusions from this updated study are drawn from a total recruited sample (n) of 15,207 subjects. A total of 12,410 subjects completed the respective studies (18% attrition). This updated study increases the size of the original Sansam et al. report by including 137% more subjects for a total of 21,490 between the two articles Etiology, physical fitness, pre-amputation living status, amputation level, age, physical fitness, and comorbidities are included as moderate to strongly supported predictive factors of prosthetic candidacy. These factors are supported in an earlier literature review and should be strongly considered in a complete history and physical examination by a multidisciplinary team. Predictive factors should be part of the patient’s healthcare record. PMID:28066522

  18. Conservative Surgery of Diabetic Forefoot Osteomyelitis: How Can I Operate on This Patient Without Amputation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Lázaro-Martínez, Jose L; Alvaro-Afonso, Francisco Javier; Molinés-Barroso, Raúl

    2015-06-01

    Surgery is necessary in many cases of diabetic foot osteomyelitis. The decision to undertake surgery should be based on the clinical presentation of diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Surgery is required when the bone is protruding through the ulcer, there is extensive bone destruction seen on x-ray or progressive bone damage on sequential x-ray while undergoing antibiotic treatment, the soft tissue envelope is destroyed, and there is gangrene or spreading soft tissue infection. Several issues should be taken into account when considering surgery for treating diabetic foot osteomyelitis. It is necessary to have a surgeon available with diabetic foot expertise. Regarding location of diabetic foot osteomyelitis, it is important to consider whether isolated bone or a joint is involved. In cases in which osteomyelitis is associated with a bone deformity, surgery should be able to correct this. The surgeon should always reflect about whether extensive/radical surgery could destabilize the foot. The forefoot is the most frequent location of diabetic foot osteomyelitis and is associated with better prognosis than midfoot and hindfoot osteomyelitis. Many surgical procedures can be performed in patients with diabetes and forefoot ulcers complicated by osteomyelitis while avoiding amputations. Performing conservative surgeries without amputations of any part of the foot is not always feasible in cases in which the infection has destroyed the soft tissue envelope. Attempting conservative surgery in such cases risks infected tissues remaining in the wound bed leading to failure. The election of different surgical options depends on the expertise of the surgeons selected for the multidisciplinary teams. It is the aim of this article to provide a sample of surgical techniques in order to remove the bone infection from the forefoot while avoiding amputations.

  19. The modified Pirogoff's amputation in treating diabetic foot infections: surgical technique and case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This paper describes the surgical technique of a modified Pirogoff's amputation performed by the senior author and reports the results of this operation in a single surgeon case series for patients with diabetic foot infections. Methods: Six patients with diabetic foot infections were operated on by the National University Hospital (NUH diabetic foot team in Singapore between November 2011 and January 2012. All patients underwent a modified Pirogoff's amputation for diabetic foot infections. Inclusion criteria included the presence of a palpable posterior tibial pulse, ankle brachial index (ABI of more than 0.7, and distal infections not extending proximally beyond the midfoot level. Clinical parameters such as presence of pulses and ABI were recorded. Preoperative blood tests performed included a glycated hemoglobin level, hemoglobin, total white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, albumin, and creatinine levels. All patients were subjected to 14 sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy postoperatively and were followed up for a minimum of 10 months. Results: All six patients had good wound healing. Tibio-calcaneal arthrodesis of the stump was achieved in all cases by 6 months postoperatively. All patients were able to walk with the prosthesis. Conclusions: The modified Pirogoff's amputation has been found to show good results in carefully selected patients with diabetic foot infections. The selection criteria included a palpable posterior tibial pulse, distal infections not extending proximally beyond the midfoot level, ABI of more than 0.7, hemoglobin level of more than 10 g/dL, and serum albumin level of more than 30 g/L.

  20. [Device to assess in-socket pressure distribution for partial foot amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Camacho, Michelín; Urrusti, José Luis; Acero, María Del Carmen; Galván Duque-Gastélum, Carlos; Rodríguez-Reyes, Gerardo; Mendoza-Cruz, Felipe

    2014-07-01

    A device for dynamic acquisition and distribution analysis of in-socket pressure for patients with partial foot amputation is presented in this work. By using the developed system, we measured and generated pressure distribution graphs, obtained maximal pressure, and calculated pressure-time integral (PTI) of three subjects with partial foot amputation and of a group of Healthy subjects (Hs) (n = 10). Average maximal pressure in the healthy group was 19.4 ± 4.11 PSI, while for the three amputated patients, this was 27.8 ± 1.38, 17.6 ± 1.15, 29.10 ± 3.9 PSI, respectively. Maximal pressure-time integral for healthy subjects was 11.56 ± 2.83 PSI*s, and for study subjects was 19.54 ± 1.9, 12.35 ± 1.48, and 13.17 ± 1.31 PSI*s, respectively. The results of the control group agree with those previously reported in the literature. The pressure distribution pattern showed clear differences between study subjects and those of the control group; these graphs allowed us to identify the pressure in regions-of-interest that could be critical, such as surgical scars. The system presented in this work will aid to assess the effectiveness with which prosthetic systems distribute load, given that the formation of ulcers is highly linked to the pressure exercised at the point of contact; in addition, these results will help to investigate the comfort perception of the prosthesis, a factor directly influenced by the stump's pressure distribution.

  1. Treatment of stump complications after above-knee amputation using negative-pressure wound therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Srđan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The stump wound complications after above-knee amputation lead to other problems, such as prolonged rehabilitation, delayed prosthetic restoration, the increase in total treatment cost and high mortality rates. Objective. To evaluate the safety and outcomes of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT using Vacuum-Assisted Closure (VACR therapy in patients with stump complication after above-knee amputation (AKA. Methods. From January 2011 to July 2014, AKA was performed in 137 patients at the University Cardiovascular Clinic. Nineteen (12.4% of these patients (mean age 69.3 Ѓ} 9.2 years were treated with NPWT. The following variables were recorded: wound healing and hospitalization time, rate of NPWT treatment failure, and mortality. Results. AKA was performed in 17 (89.5% patients after the vascular or endovascular procedures had been exhausted, while urgent AKA was performed in two (10.5% patients due to uncontrolled infection. The time before NPWT application was 3.1 Ѓ} 1.9 days and the duration of the NPWT use ranged from 15 to 54 days (mean 27.95 Ѓ} 12.1 days. During NPWT treatment, operative debridement was performed in 12 patients. All the patients were kept on culture-directed intravenous antibiotics. The average hospital length of stay was 34.7 days (range 21-77 days. There were four (20.9% failures during the treatment which required secondary amputation. During the treatment, one (5.3% patient died due to multi-organ failure after 27 days. Conclusions. The use of NPWT therapy in the treatment of AKA stump complication is a safe and effective procedure associated with low risk and positive outcome in terms of wound healing time and further complications.

  2. Comprehensive prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with partial finger amputations using silicone biomaterial: A technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kini, Ashwini Y; Byakod, Preeti P; Angadi, Gangadhar S; Pai, Umesh; Bhandari, Aruna J

    2010-12-01

    Finger and partial finger amputations are some of the most frequently encountered forms of partial hand loss. A high quality aesthetic prosthesis with passive function can be helpful to the patient since loss or congenital absence or malformation have both a social and psychological impact on the patient. Prosthetics is an art and science which provides a lifelike appearance to the lost structures of the patient. This case report presents the fabrication of a silicone finger prosthesis which had good suspension, adequate function, was comfortable to use and aesthetically acceptable to the patient.

  3. Yubitsume: ritualistic self-amputation of proximal digits among the Yakuza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Bosmia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Yubitsume is the ritualistic self-amputation of the proximal digits at the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP among members of the Japanese mafia, or yakuza. This practice of self-mutilation is done as a sign of apology for making a mistake deemed punishable by higher-ranking members or violating the code of the yakuza. Members of the yakuza may present to emergency departments seeking medical assistance to stop hemorrhage or treat infection at the site of injury following selfamputation or to have the severed portion of the injured finger reattached.

  4. Glans reconstruction with the use of an inverted urethral flap after distal penile amputation for carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Sansalone

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of adequate cosmesis and preservation of sexual and urinary function are the main goals of penile reconstructive surgery following amputation for carcinoma. Split thickness skin grafts and oral mucosa grafts have been widely used for the creation of a pseudoglans with excellent cosmetic and functional results. The main drawbacks associated with the use of grafts are donor site morbidity, the lack of engorgement of the pseudoglans and the risk of poor graft take, which may lead to contracture and poor cosmetic results. In the present series the long term cosmetic and functional outcomes of glans reconstruction with an inverted distal urethral flap are described.

  5. [Indications for replantation of lower limbs after their traumatic amputation at the shin level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanov, N O; Gusami, G M

    1994-09-01

    From analysis of the results of replantation of 37 lower limbs at the level of the leg, which were amputated as the result of injury in 33 patients, the authors determine the tactical approach to the choice of indications for replantation. The authors believe that replantation at the level of the leg is always indicated in children if it is executable technically and the patient's somatic status presents no general contraindications. In other cases the formation of a stump and subsequent prosthetics should be considered more advisable.

  6. Controlled environment treatment (CET) for patients with below-knee amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, B

    1976-12-01

    This paper describes a new approach to early postsurgical wound management of the patient with a below-knee amputation. The method involves using the Controlled Environment Treatment (CET) machine, which wasdeveloped in England. A brief explanation of the components of the machine and its capabilities are listed. Ambient pressure, temperature, sterility, and humidity are easily controllable; advantages and disadvantages of this device over immediate post-operative plaster and conventional dressings as they relate both to wound environment and to physical therapy are mentioned. The early postsurgical therapy program used at Prosthetics Research Study is outlined.

  7. The distal blood pressure predicts healing of amputations on the feet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P

    1984-01-01

    The healing of digital and transmetatarsal forefoot amputations was compared with the systolic digital and ankle blood pressure, both measured with a strain-gauge, and with the skin perfusion pressure on the forefoot measured with the isotope washout technique. In 85 out of 134 legs (63 per cent)...... 20-29 mm Hg: 13 out of 22; SDBP greater than or equal to 30 mm Hg: 51 out of 65. Ankle pressures and skin perfusion pressures were less useful. Invasive infection was present in 40 out of 102 diabetic legs and, next to ischaemia, was the major determinant of the healing results....

  8. A proximal femur aneurysmal bone cyst resulting in amputation: a rare case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodamorad Jamshidi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC is blood filled expansile cystic lesion that most commonly occurs in patients during the second decade of their lives. Traditionally it has been described as a benign lesion but can be locally aggressive and result in the destruction of the involved bone. Treatment methods include surgical excision and curettage with or without bone grafting. We report a proximal femur aneurysmal bone cyst, which resulted in the amputation of the lower extremity, even though all available classic methods of treatment were applied for it.

  9. Patient safety in the rehabilitation of the adult with an amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latlief, Gail; Elnitsky, Christine; Hart-Hughes, Stephanie; Phillips, Samuel L; Adams-Koss, Laurel; Kent, Robert; Highsmith, M Jason

    2012-05-01

    This article reviews and summarizes the literature on patient safety issues in the rehabilitation of adults with an amputation. Safety issues in the following areas are discussed; the prosthesis, falls, wound care, pain, and treatment of complex patients. Specific recommendations for further research and implementation strategies to prevent injury and improve safety are also provided. Communication between interdisciplinary team members and patient and caregiver education are crucial to executing a safe treatment plan. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team members should feel comfortable discussing safety issues with patients and be able to recommend preventive approaches to patients as appropriate.

  10. Physical Rehabilitation for Disabled People with Insulin-independent Diabetes after Single Leg Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya A. Pilosyan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the program of physical rehabilitation for the disabled people with insulin-independent diabetes, who came through single leg amputation. The program includes phantom-impulsive gymnastics, exercises for the remaining leg, back and shoulders, for the improvement of stump functional state, equilibrium exercises and exercises for arms supporting function development. Set of therapeutic exercises involves exercise machine training. The application of the developed physical rehabilitation program at the stage of preparation for fitting the prosthesis and learning to walk on prosthetic leg has proved its efficiency according to test results, biomedical methods of research and increases the motor activity of 100% percent of patients.

  11. Évolution des prothèses des sprinters amputés de membre inférieur

    OpenAIRE

    Pailler, D.; SAUTREUIL, P.; PIERA, J-B; GENTY, M.; Goujon, Hélène

    2004-01-01

    Depuis une quinzaine d'années, les progrès techniques en appareillage ont été le facteur déterminant de la progression des performances des sportifs amputés de membre inférieur. Pour l'amputé tibial, la prothèse de course comprend un manchon gel et une emboîture solidarisés par un accrochage distal ou un vide virtuel. Par ses qualités dynamiques, le pied en fibre de carbone, garni de pointes, assure des performances remarquables. Pour l'amputé fémoral, équipé des mêmes pieds prothétiques, le ...

  12. Reverse Anterolateral Thigh Flap to Revise a Below-knee Amputation Stump at the Mid-tibial Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Lionel Sadigh, MB ChB

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The reconstruction of defects around the knee often poses a challenge due to the limited availability of local soft tissues. Indeed, this same problem is encountered when attempting to revise a below-knee amputation stump. Moreover, due to a paucity of recipient vessels in those who have undergone previous amputation secondary to trauma, free-flap reconstruction is often challenging and not always successful. We report a case of a reverse anterolateral thigh (ALT flap used to revise a long below-knee amputation stump. Previous reports in the literature attest to the versatility of the reverse ALT to cover defects around the knee and proximal tibia, but to our knowledge, this is the first report of a reverse ALT reaching to the mid-tibial level.

  13. Intra-articular synovial sarcoma treated with a transfemoral amputation: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresswell, Steven D; Corsini, Anthony A; Balsamo, Luke H; Miles, Edward F

    2013-08-01

    A case of monophasic intra-articular synovial sarcoma in the right knee of a 39-year-old active duty serviceman treated with a transfemoral amputation is presented. The patient was evaluated for right knee pain and fullness. After further workup, the patient underwent computed tomography guided biopsy, with the tissue specimen consistent with intra-articular synovial sarcoma. The patient elected for a transfemoral amputation rather than limb or joint-sparing surgery. The gross specimen measured 3.5 × 3.0 × 1.7 cm in the posteromedial knee. No metastatic lesions were seen on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy have not been utilized. The transfemoral amputation adds to the uniqueness of this report and is discussed with a review of the multimodality treatment toward intra-articular synovial sarcoma in prior published literature.

  14. Dynamic stability of superior vs. inferior body segments in individuals with transtibial amputation walking in destabilizing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurskens, Rainer; Wilken, Jason M; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2014-09-22

    Interestingly, young and highly active people with lower limb amputation appear to maintain a similar trunk and upper body stability during walking as able-bodied individuals. Understanding the mechanisms underlying how this stability is achieved after lower-leg amputation is important to improve training regimens for improving walking function in these patients. This study quantified how superior (i.e., head, trunk, and pelvis) and inferior (i.e., thigh, shank, and feet) segments of the body respond to continuous visual or mechanical perturbations during walking. Nine persons with transtibial amputation (TTA) and 12 able-bodied controls (AB) walked on a 2 m × 3 m treadmill in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN). Subjects were perturbed by continuous pseudo-random mediolateral movements of either the treadmill platform or the visual scene. TTA maintained a similar local and orbital stability in their superior body segments as AB throughout both perturbation types. However, for their inferior body segments, TTA subjects exhibited greater dynamic instability during perturbed walking. In TTA subjects, these increases in instability were even more pronounced in their prosthetic limb compared to their intact leg. These findings demonstrate that persons with unilateral lower leg amputation maintain upper body stability in spite of increased dynamic instability in their impaired lower leg. Thus, transtibial amputation does significantly impair sensorimotor function, leading to substantially altered dynamic movements of their lower limb segments. However, otherwise relatively healthy patients with unilateral transtibial amputation appear to retain sufficient remaining sensorimotor function in their proximal and contralateral limbs to adequately compensate for their impairment.

  15. Trends in the incidence of lower extremity amputations in people with and without diabetes over a five-year period in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Buckley, Claire M

    2012-01-01

    To describe trends in the incidence of non-traumatic amputations among people with and without diabetes and estimate the relative risk of an individual with diabetes undergoing a lower extremity amputation compared to an individual without diabetes in the Republic of Ireland.

  16. The Use of the 6-Min Walk Test as a Proxy for the Assessment of Energy Expenditure during Gait in Individuals with Lower-Limb Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kark, Laurena; McIntosh, Andrew S.B; Simmons, Annea

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine, and compare, the utility of the 6-min walk test (6 MWT) and self-selected walking speed over 15 m as proxies for the assessment of energy expenditure during gait in individuals with lower-limb amputation. Patients with unilateral, transfemoral amputation (n = 6) and patients with unilateral,…

  17. Calcaneal fillet flap: a new osteocutaneous free tissue transfer for emergency salvage of traumatic below-knee amputation stumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz, J S; Mehrotra, O N; Brown, G E

    1996-09-01

    Traumatic below-knee amputations do not always leave enough soft tissue of bone with which to fashion a stump of sufficient length and durability to support a prosthesis. Composite free flaps can often be harvested from the amputated limb to provide immediate one-stage stump salvage and to preserve knee function. We report a new technique to increase stump length by incorporating the calcaneus into a foot fillet flap as a vascularized bone transfer. The calcaneal fillet flap is a useful addition to the inventory of available composite flaps. It is recommended for knee joint salvage when there is less than 11 cm of tibial remnant length.

  18. Total hip replacement in an ipsilateral above-the-knee amputation: surgical technique, rehabilitation, and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagelada, Francesc; Coll Rivas, Moisès; Jiménez Obach, Albert; Auleda, Jaume; Guirao, Lluis; Pleguezuelos, Eulogio

    2013-03-01

    In this article, we present a case report of a 62-year-old patient who previously underwent an above-the-knee amputation for vascular disease and we performed a total hip replacement on him because of hip osteoarthritis. As the only postoperative complication, the patient developed a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection, which was successfully treated. The surgical technique and the postoperative rehabilitation program are described in detail in an attempt to detect and face the challenges that patients with major lower limb amputations may present. The literature is reviewed and all known cases of hip replacements in amputees are presented.

  19. An enhanced treatment program with markedly reduced mortality after a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten T; Holm, Gitte; Krasheninnikoff, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Historically, high 30-day and 1-year mortality post-amputation rates (> 30% and 50%, respectively) have been reported in patients with a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation (LEA). We evaluated whether allocating experienced staff and implementing...... was compared with historical and concurrent national controls in Denmark. Results - The 30-day and 1-year mortality rates were 16% and 37%, respectively, in the intervention group, as compared to 35% and 59% in the historical control group treated in the same orthopedic ward. Cox proportional harzards models...

  20. Immunocalization of telomerase in cells of lizard tail after amputation suggests cell activation for tail regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, L

    2016-02-01

    Tail amputation (autotomy) in most lizards elicits a remarkable regenerative response leading to a new although simplified tail. No information on the trigger mechanism following wounding is known but cells from the stump initiate to proliferate and form a regenerative blastema. The present study shows that telomerases are mainly activated in the nuclei of various connective and muscle satellite cells of the stump, and in other tissues, probably responding to the wound signals. Western blotting detection also indicates that telomerase positive bands increases in the regenerating blastema in comparison to the normal tail. Light and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry localization of telomerase shows that 4-14 days post-amputation in lizards immunopositive nuclei of sparse cells located among the wounded tissues are accumulating into the forming blastema. These cells mainly include fibroblasts and fat cells of the connective tissue and satellite cells of muscles. Also some immature basophilic and polychromatophilic erytroblasts, lymphoblasts and myelocytes present within the Bone Marrow of the vertebrae show telomerase localization in their nuclei, but their contribution to the formation of the regenerative blastema remains undetermined. The study proposes that one of the initial mechanisms triggering cell proliferation for the formation of the blastema in lizards involve gene activation for the production of telomerase that stimulates the following signaling pathways for cell division and migration.

  1. The morphology of amputated human teeth and its relation to mechanical properties after restoration treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugger, Jonas; Krastl, Gabriel; Huser, Marius; Deyhle, Hans; Müller, Bert

    2010-09-01

    The increased susceptibility to fracture of root canal- and post-treated teeth is less affected by alterations of the dentin structure, but seems to crucially depend on the loss of coronal tooth substance. The surface, available for adhesion of the composite material in the root canal and in the coronal part of the tooth, is assumed to be of key importance for the fracture resistance. Thus, an appropriate three-dimensional method should be identified to determine the adhesive surface with necessary precision. For this purpose, severely decayed teeth were simulated decapitating clinical crowns. After root canal filling and post space preparation, impressions of the root canal and the amputation surface were obtained using silicone. Micro computed tomography scans of these impressions were acquired. For one selected specimen, an additional high-resolution scan was recorded at a synchrotron radiation source. Software of ImageLab served for the extraction of the amputation interface, the post surface and the post volume from the tomography data, which have been finally correlated with the Young's modulus and the maximal load derived from mechanical tests. The morphological parameters show a realistic relationship to the mechanical tests performed after the restoration treatments and are consequently important for improving the dental skills.

  2. Financial analysis of diabetic patients hospitalizations submitted to lower limb amputation in a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Santos Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study is a documental descriptive analysis which aimed to verify the cost established in 2006, in relation to the hospitalization of 21 diabetic patients submitted to the lower limb amputation in a public hospital and the value transferred by the Unified Health System (SUS regarding this procedure. Among the studied patients, 57.14% were female and 42.86% male, aged 40 to 90 years. The time of diagnosis varied from 5 to 25 years. The average of hospitalization was 14 days per patient. The cost to the hospital was R$ 99,455.74, average cost per patient was R$ 4,735.98. The total amount transferred by SUS to the hospital was R$ 27,740.15, a cost 3.6 times lower than the hospital costs. The SUS transferring is in accordance with the predetermined values for its table of procedure. Prevention is the only alternative to reduce the rate of amputation and improve survival of diabetes patients. It is necessary an early diagnosis and better control of diabetes mellitus with appropriate government and institutional policies.

  3. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurdeman, Shane R., E-mail: shanewurdeman@gmail.com [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Advanced Prosthetics Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68134 (United States); Myers, Sara A. [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Stergiou, Nicholas [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed “more appropriate” and the other “less appropriate” based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a “more appropriate” prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a “less appropriate” prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  4. Leg amputation following intramuscular injection of iron dextran in a 32 year old woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Shalviri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To inform healthcare professionals of a rare serious reaction leading to leg amputation following intramuscular injection of iron dextran and report comments for preventing such reactions.A case of leg amputation following intramuscular injection of iron dextran reported to Iranian Pharmacovigilance Center was reviewed. Patient and reaction data was collected by assessing the reported yellow card, patient chart review and interviewing with patient and physicians. World Health Organization definition for serious reactions was used to determine the seriousness of the reaction. Naranjo algorithm was used to determine probability scale. The probability of the reaction was determined based on questionnaire of Schumock et al. The studied case is classified as a rare and serious but preventable reaction induced by intramuscular injection of iron dextran in a 32 year old woman. The probability of the reaction is appeared to be “probable” based on Naranjo algorithm. It seems that Iron dextran could cause serious and life threatening adverse effects. It is necessary for healthcare professionals to be informed of such rare but serious reaction in order to apply preventive actions.

  5. Partial calcanectomy and Ilizarov external fixation may reduce amputation need in severe diabetic calcaneal ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkurt, Mehmet Orçun; Demirkale, Ismail; Öznur, Ali

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The treatment of diabetic hindfoot ulcers is a challenging problem. In addition to serial surgical debridements, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and local wound care play important roles in the surgeon’s armamentarium, for both superficial infection and gangrene of the soft tissue, often complicated by osteomyelitis of the calcaneus. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of an aggressive approach from diagnosis to treatment of calcaneal osteomyelitis in foot-threatening diabetic calcaneal ulcers. Methods: The study included 23 patients with diabetic hindfoot ulcers who were treated with radical excision of the necrotic tissue and application of circular external fixation. The treatment protocol was a combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided debridement of the necrotic tissues and application of an Ilizarov external fixator in plantarflexion to decrease the soft-tissue defect. Primary outcome measures were total cure of infection and obvious healing of the osteomyelitis at 12 weeks determined by MRI, and clinical cure through objective assessment of the appearance of the wound. Results: The wounds healed in 18 of the 23 patients (78%), partial recovery occurred and subsequent flap operation was performed in three patients (13%), and below-the-knee amputation was performed in two patients (9%). Conclusions: This surgical protocol is effective in ameliorating diabetic hindfoot ulcers with concomitant calcaneal osteomyelitis, and satisfactorily reduces the need for amputation.

  6. Transtibial amputation with plantar flap for congenital deficiency of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hiroshi; Doi, Kazuteru; Baliarsing, Amresh S

    2002-10-01

    Disarticulation of the knee has been the preferred treatment for the severe type (Type Ia and Type Ib classification of Jones et al) of congenital deficiency of the tibia because of marked flexion contracture of the knee and loss of quadriceps function. In such cases, the disarticulated stump is often small and poorly covered by soft tissues because of dysplastic femoral condyles and calf muscles. Therefore, stump complications after disarticulation may prevent early aggressive walking exercises and delay independent ambulation. To overcome this problem, a greater weightbearing surface was created by a transtibial amputation with a short stump of the fibula using the flexed knee. By this method, the distal femoral condyle and the anterior surface of the fibula were used for weightbearing. In addition, coverage of the new weightbearing area by a neurovascular pedicled sensate plantar flap provided a more tolerable weightbearing site. The purpose of the current study was to report a 5-year-old boy with bilateral congenital total deficiency of both tibias, who was treated using this technique. The patient was ambulating independently 15 weeks after surgery. A transtibial amputation with a plantar flap is an alternative procedure to knee disarticulation for the severe type of congenital deficiency of the tibia.

  7. Regeneration of soft tissues is promoted by MMP1 treatment after digit amputation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    Full Text Available The ratio of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs to the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs in wounded tissues strictly control the protease activity of MMPs, and therefore regulate the progress of wound closure, tissue regeneration and scar formation. Some amphibians (i.e. axolotl/newt demonstrate complete regeneration of missing or wounded digits and even limbs; MMPs play a critical role during amphibian regeneration. Conversely, mammalian wound healing re-establishes tissue integrity, but at the expense of scar tissue formation. The differences between amphibian regeneration and mammalian wound healing can be attributed to the greater ratio of MMPs to TIMPs in amphibian tissue. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of MMP1 to effectively promote skeletal muscle regeneration by favoring extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling to enhance cell proliferation and migration. In this study, MMP1 was administered to the digits amputated at the mid-second phalanx of adult mice to observe its effect on digit regeneration. Results indicated that the regeneration of soft tissue and the rate of wound closure were significantly improved by MMP1 administration, but the elongation of the skeletal tissue was insignificantly affected. During digit regeneration, more mutipotent progenitor cells, capillary vasculature and neuromuscular-related tissues were observed in MMP1 treated tissues; moreover, there was less fibrotic tissue formed in treated digits. In summary, MMP1 was found to be effective in promoting wound healing in amputated digits of adult mice.

  8. Modern treatment of infection and ischaemia to reduce major amputation in the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic patients suffer a high rate of amputation. There are two main reasons; infection which can spread rapidly leading to overwhelming tissue destruction and severe peripheral arterial disease. Studies that have stratified patients according to the presence or absence of both peripheral arterial disease and infection have shown significantly worse outcomes in patients with both peripheral arterial disease and infection. There have been two crucial significant advances in diabetic foot care to improve the outlook of these diabetic patients. First, there has been the realisation that diabetic foot patients experience repeated crises from the rapid onset infection and need a special form of easily accessible care within a multidisciplinary diabetic foot service to provide prompt treatment of infection before it progresses to necrosis. Secondly, within such a service, prompt diagnosis of ischaemia and urgent revascularisation has been established as a further important aspect of successful management. The critical factor in saving limbs is making a rapid diagnosis of infection and ischaemia and administering the appropriate treatment early. In this way speedy healing can be achieved and this can prevent patients from needing amputations.

  9. Registering a methodology for imaging and analysis of residual-limb shape after transtibial amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Dickinson, PhD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Successful prosthetic rehabilitation following lower-limb amputation depends upon a safe and comfortable socket-residual limb interface. Current practice predominantly uses a subjective, iterative process to establish socket shape, often requiring several visits to a prosthetist. This study proposes an objective methodology for residual-limb shape scanning and analysis by high-resolution, automated measurements. A 3-D printed "analog" residuum was scanned with three surface digitizers on 10 occasions. Accuracy was measured by the scan-height error between repeat analog scans and the computer-aided design (CAD geometry and the scan versus CAD volume. Subsequently, 20 male residuum casts from ambulatory individuals with transtibial amputation were scanned by two observers, and 10 were repeat-scanned by one observer. The shape files were aligned spatially, and geometric measurements were extracted. Repeatability was evaluated by intraclass correlation, Bland-Altman analysis of scan volumes, and pairwise root-mean-square error ranges of scan area and width profiles. Submillimeter accuracy was achieved when scanning the analog shape using white light and laser scanning technologies. Scanning male residuum casts was highly repeatable within and between observers. The analysis methodology technique provides clinical researchers and prosthetists the capability to establish their own quantitative, objective, multipatient datasets. This could provide an evidence base for training, long-term follow-up, and interpatient outcome comparison, for decision support in socket design.

  10. Transcutaneous oxygen pressure. An effective measure for prosthesis fitting on below-knee amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillas, J M; Michel, C; Aurelle, B; Becker, F; Marcer, I; Schultz, S; Didier, J P

    1993-02-01

    After amputation for arterial occlusive disease of the lower limbs, healing and local adaptation to a prosthesis depend on the oxygen ratio in the tissue. Transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2) is a noninvasive microcirculatory exploration. Forty six below-knee stumps were selected without any prosthetic problem excepting vascular, with a follow-up mean duration of 23 months. They were classified into different prosthetic categories. The first was the worst because it required further amputation on the thigh and the fourth the best, which displayed complete adaptation to a socket contact. These groups were related to their TcPO2 values on the anterior and exterior face of the stumps in both reclined and seated positions. It seems that it is impossible to achieve healing when the TcPO2 value is lower than 15 mm Hg in lying position. However, healing is possible above 20 mm Hg but socket contact is not possible when TcPO2 values are under 40 mm Hg. When TcPO2 values are above 40 mm Hg, a good prosthesis fitting is possible when no problems are encountered other than vascular ones.

  11. Persons with lower-limb amputation have impaired trunk postural control while maintaining seated balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Brad D; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2013-07-01

    Abnormal mechanics of movement resulting from lower-limb amputation (LLA) may increase stability demands on the spinal column and/or alter existing postural control mechanisms and neuromuscular responses. A seated balance task was used to investigate the effects of LLA on trunk postural control and stability, among eight males with unilateral LLA (4 transtibial, 4 transfemoral), and eight healthy, non-amputation controls (matched by age, stature, and body mass). Traditional measures derived from center of pressure (COP) time series, and measures obtained from non-linear stabilogram diffusion analyses, were used to characterize trunk postural control. All traditional measures of postural control (95% ellipse area, RMS distance, and mean velocity) were significantly larger among participants with LLA. Non-linear stabilogram diffusion analyses also revealed significant differences in postural control among persons with LLA, but only in the antero-posterior direction. Normalized trunk muscle activity was also larger among participants with LLA. Larger COP-based sway measures among participants with LLA during seated balance suggest an association between LLA and reduced trunk postural control. Reductions in postural control and spinal stability may be a result of adaptations in functional tissue properties and/or neuromuscular responses, and may potentially be caused by repetitive exposure to abnormal gait and movement. Such alterations could then lead to an increased risk for spinal instability, intervertebral motions beyond physiological limits, and pain.

  12. Expression of secreted Wnt pathway components reveals unexpected complexity of the planarian amputation response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, Kyle A; Elliott, Sarah A; Simakov, Oleg; Schmidt, Heiko A; Holstein, Thomas W; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2010-11-01

    Regeneration is widespread throughout the animal kingdom, but our molecular understanding of this process in adult animals remains poorly understood. Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays crucial roles throughout animal life from early development to adulthood. In intact and regenerating planarians, the regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling functions to maintain and specify anterior/posterior (A/P) identity. Here, we explore the expression kinetics and RNAi phenotypes for secreted members of the Wnt signaling pathway in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Smed-wnt and sFRP expression during regeneration is surprisingly dynamic and reveals fundamental aspects of planarian biology that have been previously unappreciated. We show that after amputation, a wounding response precedes rapid re-organization of the A/P axis. Furthermore, cells throughout the body plan can mount this response and reassess their new A/P location in the complete absence of stem cells. While initial stages of the amputation response are stem cell independent, tissue remodeling and the integration of a new A/P address with anatomy are stem cell dependent. We also show that WNT5 functions in a reciprocal manner with SLIT to pattern the planarian mediolateral axis, while WNT11-2 patterns the posterior midline. Moreover, we perform an extensive phylogenetic analysis on the Smed-wnt genes using a method that combines and integrates both sequence and structural alignments, enabling us to place all nine genes into Wnt subfamilies for the first time.

  13. Soccer Practice and Functional and Social Performance of Men With Lower Limb Amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Rogeria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Practicing sports together with rehabilitative treatment improves the development of motor, social and emotional abilities of lower limb amputees. The aim of this study was to compare the functional and social performance of individuals with lower limb amputations between those who played soccer and those who did not engage in any sports activities. A total of 138 individuals participated in the study and were divided into two groups: soccer players (n = 69, 34 ± 8.1 years and non-athletes (n = 69, 38 ± 8.9 years. A checklist, based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, was used. Data were analyzed using the Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. The soccer players group showed significantly better performance than the non-athletes group in most items of body function, body structure, occupational performance components and daily activities (p < 0.001 for all, and also in some important items of social and environment factors (p < 0.001 for all. The results strongly suggest that amputee soccer significantly improves the functional and social performance in individuals with lower limb amputations.

  14. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurdeman, Shane R.; Myers, Sara A.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed "more appropriate" and the other "less appropriate" based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a "more appropriate" prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a "less appropriate" prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  15. Regeneration of soft tissues is promoted by MMP1 treatment after digit amputation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaodong; Bellayr, Ian; Pan, Haiying; Choi, Yohan; Li, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The ratio of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in wounded tissues strictly control the protease activity of MMPs, and therefore regulate the progress of wound closure, tissue regeneration and scar formation. Some amphibians (i.e. axolotl/newt) demonstrate complete regeneration of missing or wounded digits and even limbs; MMPs play a critical role during amphibian regeneration. Conversely, mammalian wound healing re-establishes tissue integrity, but at the expense of scar tissue formation. The differences between amphibian regeneration and mammalian wound healing can be attributed to the greater ratio of MMPs to TIMPs in amphibian tissue. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of MMP1 to effectively promote skeletal muscle regeneration by favoring extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling to enhance cell proliferation and migration. In this study, MMP1 was administered to the digits amputated at the mid-second phalanx of adult mice to observe its effect on digit regeneration. Results indicated that the regeneration of soft tissue and the rate of wound closure were significantly improved by MMP1 administration, but the elongation of the skeletal tissue was insignificantly affected. During digit regeneration, more mutipotent progenitor cells, capillary vasculature and neuromuscular-related tissues were observed in MMP1 treated tissues; moreover, there was less fibrotic tissue formed in treated digits. In summary, MMP1 was found to be effective in promoting wound healing in amputated digits of adult mice.

  16. [Pain syndromes following amputation. Analysis of 100 affected patients with chronic stump and phantom pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörz, R; Wörz, E

    1990-02-10

    One hundred amputees (m = 95, f = 5) with a pain syndrome were analysed. In 80 patients post-amputation pain of the lower, in 20 of the upper, extremities presented. Thirty-two patients suffered bouts of pain, 68 constant pain of various types. The most commonly cited type of pain in the patients with intermittent pain was lancinating, in the case of constant pain a burning sensation. In some patients pain occurred immediately after the loss of the limb, in others not until several years, or even decades, later. Forty per cent of our patients indicated that the incidence and intensity of the pain increased with time. Neurological, orthopedic and internistic causes of stump or phantom pain have been described. In 72% of the patients with constant pain and in 34% of those suffering from bouts of pain, an algogenic psychosyndrome had developed. Complications and late sequelae of amputations are of considerable significance for the development and intensity of stump and phantom pain.

  17. [Peripheral arterial disease and diabetes related lower limb amputations. Presentation of the epidemiological data and the analysis of potentialities in preventive strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolossváry, Endre; Járai, Zoltán; Farkas, Katalin

    2016-08-01

    Lower limb amputation as one of the most devastating consequences of peripheral arterial disease and diabetes mellitus needs peculiar attention. This review aims at comparing Hungarian and international amputation data. Realizing the great variability of the global amputation incidence and trends data, the main determinants of this variety are assessed. These factors involve methodological differences in reporting, demographic, epidemiological, economic, societal and cultural variation of the affected populations and differences in the health care service. The amputation hazard can be considered as an example of lifetime risk that can be characterized by complex interaction of contionuously changing risk factor pattern. In that sense an effective preventive strategy planning needs complex measure implementations that associate with multidisciplinary approach, timely complex preventive interventions and centralized vascular care. Research and development on amputation field shows clear priority that can contribute to the better understanding of this extremely complex scenario with significant public health consequences. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(32), 1266-1274.

  18. Prosthetics / Amputations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Va REsEaRch adVancEs minDinG the Gap (Between prosthesis anD skin)— Researchers with the Center for Restorative ... including shoe-mounted motion sensors that translate subtle foot movements into signals for the arm. Virtual reality— ...

  19. Lower-Limb Amputation and Effect of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder on Department of Veterans Affairs Outpatient Cost Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    highlighting the importance of accurate diagnosis, treatment, and support for PTSD. Key words: amputation, amputee, Department of Veterans Affairs...2014;51(5):697–710. [PMID:25509056] http://dx.doi.org/10.1682/JRRD.2013.06.0143 33. Reger MA, Gahm GA, Swanson RD, Duma SJ. Associa- tion between number

  20. Antihypertensive drug therapy and the risk of lower extremity amputations in pharmacologically treated type 2 diabetes patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, JA; Klungel, OH; Stolk, RP; Spoelstra, JA; Grobbee, DE; Leufkens, HGM

    2004-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to determine the association between different antihypertensive drug therapies and lower extremity amputations (LEAs) in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods Data were obtained from the PHARMO Record Linkage System comprising pharmacy records and data on hospital

  1. It's About Time Physical Disabilities Came Out in the Open: Part I. Amputation, Monoplegia, Hemiplegia, Triplegia, Quadruplegia, Paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kay

    After a definition of the term, mobility impairments, and a discussion of the causes and problems associated with amputation, this document covers, under the major section, Paralysis, six handicapping conditions in terms of how each may affect a student's ability to be successful in both a vocational program and a job. Topics under this section…

  2. The Desire for Amputation or Paralyzation : Evidence for Structural Brain Anomalies in Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Rianne M; van Wingen, Guido A; van der Wal, Sija J; Luigjes, Judy; van Dijk, Milenna T; Scholte, H Steven; Denys, D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID) is a condition in which individuals perceive a mismatch between their internal body scheme and physical body shape, resulting in an absolute desire to be either amputated or paralyzed. The condition is hypothesized to be of congenital nature, but e

  3. Comparison of Functional Outcomes Following Bridge Synostosis with Non-Bone-Bridging Transtibial Combat-Related Amputations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    bearing and tolerability. The original surgical procedure consisted of using flexible cortico- periosteal flaps harvested after subcortico- periosteal ...trans- tibial amputation. Prosthet Orthot Int. 2004 Dec;28(3):220-4. 13. Pinzur MS, Pinto MA, Saltzman M, Batista F, Gottschalk F, Juknelis D. Health

  4. Operant conditioning of a multiple degree-of-freedom brain-machine interface in a primate model of amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Karthikeyan; Southerland, Joshua; Vaidya, Mukta; Qian, Kai; Eleryan, Ahmed; Fagg, Andrew H; Sluzky, Marc; Oweiss, Karim; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Operant conditioning with biofeedback has been shown to be an effective method to modify neural activity to generate goal-directed actions in a brain-machine interface. It is particularly useful when neural activity cannot be mathematically mapped to motor actions of the actual body such as in the case of amputation. Here, we implement an operant conditioning approach with visual feedback in which an amputated monkey is trained to control a multiple degree-of-freedom robot to perform a reach-to-grasp behavior. A key innovation is that each controlled dimension represents a behaviorally relevant synergy among a set of joint degrees-of-freedom. We present a number of behavioral metrics by which to assess improvements in BMI control with exposure to the system. The use of non-human primates with chronic amputation is arguably the most clinically-relevant model of human amputation that could have direct implications for developing a neural prosthesis to treat humans with missing upper limbs.

  5. Curcumin upregulates S100 expression and improves regeneration of the sciatic nerve following its complete amputation in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-min Liu; Kun Xu; Juan Li; Yun-gang Luo

    2016-01-01

    The repair of peripheral nerve injury after complete amputation is dififcult, and even with anastomosis, the rapid recovery of nerve function remains challenging. Curcumin, extracted from plants of the genus Curcuma, has been shown to have anti-oxidant and anti-inlfammatory properties and to improve sciatic nerve crush injury in rats. Here, we determined whether curcumin had neuroprotective effects following com-plete peripheral nerve amputation injury. BALB/c mice underwent complete sciatic nerve amputation, followed by an immediate epineurium anastomosis. Mice were intragastrically administered curcumin at doses of 40 (high), 20 (moderate), and 10 mg/kg/d (low) for 1 week. We found that myelin in the mice of the high-and moderate-dose curcumin groups appeared with regular shape, uniform thickness, clear boundary, and little hyperplasia surrounding the myelin. High and moderate doses of curcumin markedly improved both action potential amplitude of the sciatic nerves and the conduction velocity of the corresponding motor neurons, and upregulated mRNA and protein ex-pression of S100, a marker for Schwann cell proliferation, in L4–6 spinal cord segments. These results suggest that curcumin is effective in promoting the repair of complete sciatic nerve amputation injury and that the underlying mechanism may be associated with upregulation of S100 expression.

  6. PERCEIVED INDEPENDENCE AND LIMITATIONS IN RISING AND SITTING DOWN AFTER REHABILITATION FOR A LOWER-LIMB AMPUTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Fred A.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Roorda, Leo D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study perceived independence in rising and perceived limitations in rising and sitting down in persons after a lower-limb amputation and the relationship of these perceptions with personal and clinical characteristics. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects/patients: Persons with a lo

  7. Prosthetic fitting in a patient with a transtibial amputation due to a congenital vascular malformation of the right leg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simmelink, Elisabeth K.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Gardeniers, Jean W. M.; Zijlstra, Henk

    2014-01-01

    Background: The problems of prescribing a prosthesis for a young girl with severe congenital vascular malformation deformity leading to a transtibial amputation. Case description and methods: Due to the high risk of recurrent bleeding and limitations regarding full weight bearing of the stump, a nor

  8. Primary motor cortex changes after amputation correlate with phantom limb pain and the ability to move the phantom limb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffin, Estelle; Richard, Nathalie; Giraux, Pascal;

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence documents massive reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices following hand amputation, the extent of which is correlated with phantom limb pain. Many therapies for phantom limb pain are based upon the idea that plastic changes after amputation are maladap......A substantial body of evidence documents massive reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices following hand amputation, the extent of which is correlated with phantom limb pain. Many therapies for phantom limb pain are based upon the idea that plastic changes after amputation...... are maladaptive and attempt to normalize representations of cortical areas adjacent to the hand area. Recent data suggest, however, that higher levels of phantom pain are associated with stronger local activity and more structural integrity in the missing hand area rather than with reorganization of neighbouring...... body parts. While these models appear to be mutually exclusive they could co-exist, and one reason for the apparent discrepancy between them might be that no single study has examined the organisation of lip, elbow, and hand movements in the same participants. In this study we thoroughly examined the 3...

  9. Can external lateral stabilization reduce the energy cost of walking in persons with a lower limb amputation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJmker, T.; Noten, S.; Lamoth, C. J.; Beek, P. J.; van der Woude, L. H. V.; Houdijk, H.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether impaired balance control is partly responsible for the increased energy cost of walking in persons with a lower limb amputation (LLA). Previous studies used external lateral stabilization to evaluate the energy cost for balance control; this caused a decr

  10. Dutch evidence-based guidelines for amputation and prosthetics of the lower extremity : Rehabilitation process and prosthetics. Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, Jan; van der Linde, Harmen; Rosenbrand, Kitty; Conradi, Marcel; Deckers, Jos; Koning, Jan; Rietman, Hans S.; van der Schaaf, Dick; van der Ploeg, Rein; Schapendonk, Johannes; Schrier, Ernst; Duijzentkunst, Rob Smit; Spruit-van Eijk, Monica; Versteegen, Gerbrig; Voesten, Harrie

    2015-01-01

    Background: A structured, multidisciplinary approach in the rehabilitation process after amputation is needed that includes a greater focus on the involvement of both (para)medics and prosthetists. There is considerable variation in prosthetic prescription concerning the moment of initial prosthesis

  11. REHABILITATION IN SKILLED NURSING CENTRES FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE WITH LOWER LIMB AMPUTATIONS : A MIXED-METHODS, DESCRIPTIVE STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortington, Lauren V.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Wind-Kral, Anne; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the current set-up, barriers and potential for providing rehabilitation to people with lower limb amputation in skilled nursing centres. Design: Survey and interviews. Subjects/participants: Elderly care physicians, physiotherapists. Methods: In 2011, clinicians from 34 skill

  12. Construct Validity and Test-Retest Reliability of the Walking Questionnaire in People With a Lower Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Fred A.; Rommers, Gerardus M.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Roorda, Leo D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the construct validity and test-retest reliability of the Walking Questionnaire, a patient-reported measure of activity limitations in walking in people with a lower limb amputation. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Outpatient department of a rehabilitation center. P

  13. How Depressive Levels Are Related to the Adults' Experiences of Lower-Limb Amputation: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senra, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    The current pilot study aims to explore whether different adults' experiences of lower-limb amputation could be associated with different levels of depression. To achieve these study objectives, a convergent parallel mixed methods design was used in a convenience sample of 42 adult amputees (mean age of 61 years; SD = 13.5). All of them had…

  14. The role of amputation as an outcome measure in cellular therapy for critical limb ischemia: implications for clinical trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl Gregory J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells have been ascribed an important therapeutic role in No-Option Critical limb Ischemia (NO-CLI. One primary endpoint for evaluating NO-CLI therapy is major amputation (AMP, which is usually combined with mortality for AMP-free survival (AFS. Only a trial which is double blinded can eliminate physician and patient bias as to the timing and reason for AMP. We examined factors influencing AMP in a prospective double-blinded pilot RCT (2:1 therapy to control of 48 patients treated with site of service obtained bone marrow cells (BMAC as well as a systematic review of the literature. Methods Cells were injected intramuscularly in the CLI limbs as either BMAC or placebo (peripheral blood. Six month AMP rates were compared between the two arms. Both patient and treating team were blinded of the assignment in follow-up examinations. A search of the literature identified 9 NO-CLI trials, the control arms of which were used to determine 6 month AMP rates and the influence of tissue loss. Results Fifteen amputations occurred during the 6 month period, 86.7% of these during the first 4 months. One amputation occurred in a Rutherford 4 patient. The difference in amputation rate between patients with rest pain (5.6% and those with tissue loss (46.7%, irrespective of treatment group, was significant (p = 0.0029. In patients with tissue loss, treatment with BMAC demonstrated a lower amputation rate than placebo (39.1% vs. 71.4%, p = 0.1337. The Kaplan-Meier time to amputation was longer in the BMAC group than in the placebo group (p = 0.067. Projecting these results to a pivotal trial, a bootstrap simulation model showed significant difference in AFS between BMAC and placebo with a power of 95% for a sample size of 210 patients. Meta-analysis of the literature confirmed a difference in amputation rate between patients with tissue loss and rest pain. Conclusions BMAC shows promise in improving AMP

  15. Wound healing in below-knee amputations in relation to skin perfusion pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P; Sager, P; Lassen, N A

    1979-01-01

    In 60 below-knee amputations the healing of the stumps was correlated with the local skin perfusion pressure (SPP) measured preoperatively as the external pressure required to stop isotope washout using 131I- or 125I--antipyrine mixed with histamine. Of the eight cases with an SPP below 20 mm......Hg, no less than six (75 per cent) failed to heal and required reamputation at the above-knee level. Of the 12 cases with an SPP between 20 and 30 mmHg four cases (33 per cent) failed to heal but of the 40 cases with an SPP above 30 mmHg, there were only four cases (10 per cent) which did not heal...... closely to the postoperative clinical course. We conclude that a low SPP can be used to predict ischaemic wound complications, leading to reamputation at a higher level....

  16. [Self-inflicted finger-amputation: insurance fraud or accidental injury?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, E; Hitzer, K; Püschel, K

    2006-03-01

    A 50-year-old surgeon was working with his electrical circle saw as a do-it-yourselfer. He was alone, nobody witnessed his mishap when he amputated his left index finger. He claimed high financial compensation from two accident insurance companies because of his disability. A long series of medical expertises followed. The juridical procedures took 12 years in total. All higher authorities had to deal with the forensic medical implications. Finally, the high court (Bundesgerichtshof) decided that the complainant would receive no compensation because he gave two very different descriptions. Concerning the reconstruction of the accident, the first version was unlikely from a biomechanical point of view. The decision of the court was solely based on the violation of the obligation to give a clear presentation of the course of events (Obliegenheitsverletzung).

  17. Severe Burns and Amputation of Both Arms in the First Psychotic Episode of a Schizophrenic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizardo Cruzado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An alleged reduction of sensitivity to pain in people with schizophrenia has been reported, but the nature of this complex phenomenon has not been elucidated yet. Reports of insensitivity to burns from people with schizophrenia are extremely rare. We report the case of a 24-year-old man who set both of his arms on fire during the first break of paranoid schizophrenia. As a result of severe tissue damage, both of his limbs had to be amputated. Today, at the age of 59, the patient is physically and mentally rehabilitated and is adherent to treatment. Additionally, given the uncertainty about the true nature of the alleged hypoalgesia in schizophrenia, we postulate the need for a comprehensive phenomenological approach in the study of embodiment in people with this condition.

  18. Replantation of an avulsive amputation of a foot after recovering the foot from the sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, F; Karacaoğlu, E; Ulkür, E; Güler, M M

    2000-04-01

    A foot avulsion case, with the dismembered body part submerged in sea water for 1 hour, is presented. This report is unique in that it is the first to document the reattachment of a body part that had been submerged in sea water. It was not known how salt-water exposure would affect wound management. Differences in osmolarity and bacterial flora between the sea water and foot tissues have not caused any problems, and the patient has not suffered any vascular or infectious complications after replantation. Neurotization of the plantar surface by the tibial nerve, which was stripped off during amputation and replaced in its original traces, was the most critical part of convalescence. After management of such an interesting case, we conclude that exposure to sea water of the dismembered part should not be a contraindication for replantation surgery.

  19. The Progression of Male 100 m Sprinting with a Lower-Limb Amputation 1976–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce Dyer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sprinting with a lower-limb amputation over 100 m has taken place in the Paralympic Games for over three decades. The aim of this paper is to statistically evaluate the performances and participation levels of such athletes during this period. The level of performance improvement over a 36-year period was proposed to be significantly greater than the able-bodied equivalent. Coupled with this, a major spike in amputee running performance improvement was shown to occur from 1984–1988. This supports previously recorded accounts of a major technological change being made at this time. Finally, whilst the average performance of the medallists has increased consistently over the 36-year history, the overall participation in the event fell significantly after 1988 and did not recover until 2012.

  20. Upper extremity myonecrosis caused by Edwardsiella tarda resulting in transhumeral amputation: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Samuel N; Snoddy, Mark C; Atkinson, Cameron T; Lee, Donald H; Weikert, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing soft tissue infections are rapidly progressive infections with a high rate of mortality. One type of necrotizing soft tissue infection is caused by marine gram-negative bacteria and commonly occurs in immunocompromised hosts. These types of infections are more common in patients with chronic liver disease, possibly because of impaired iron metabolism. We present the case of a rapidly progressive necrotizing soft tissue infection caused by Edwardsiella tarda, a marine gram-negative pathogen common in catfish. Few extraintestinal infections of E tarda have been described previously. Our patient had hepatitis C and was exposed to the bacteria by a puncture injury from a wild catfish. His infection required multiple debridements and ultimately required a transhumeral amputation for local control of the infection.

  1. Bilateral lower extremity gangrene requiring amputation associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Brian P; Lawrence, Peter F

    2007-01-01

    Heparin is a common cause of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients. Between 10% and 15% of patients receiving therapeutic doses of heparin develop thrombocytopenia. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) can cause severe bleeding and thrombosis owing to intravascular platelet aggregation. HIT must be distinguished from other causes of thrombocytopenia. Importantly, heparin use is often associated with an early fall in the platelet count that usually occurs within the first 4 days of initiation and recovers without cessation of heparin treatment. This nonimmune heparin-associated thrombocytopenia has not been found to be associated with thrombosis and does not necessitate discontinuation of heparin. The authors present a case report of a 70-year-old man who received heparin therapy following aortic tissue valve replacement and aortic root repair with graft and developed bilateral lower extremity arterial clots 6 days postoperatively in the setting of positive heparin antibody titers. Ultimately the patient required bilateral above-knee amputations.

  2. A case of congenital afibrinogenemia complicated with thromboembolic events that required repeated amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Mehmet A; Işik, Bilgen; Patiroglu, Turkan; Karakukcu, Musa; Mutlu, Fatma T; Yilmaz, Ebru; Unal, Ekrem

    2015-04-01

    Although congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder, it can be more frequently encountered in countries where consanguineous marriages are common. Congenital afibrinogenemia is characterized by the undetectable low level of fibrinogen, which causes hemorrhagic diathesis. Paradoxically, arterial and venous thromboembolic complications can develop in patients with afibrinogenemia, which may cause a diagnostic problem to anyone unfamiliar with its clinical features. We report a case of congenital afibrinogenemia presenting with bilateral ischemic lesions of bilateral foot and ankle that required amputations. The patient was treated with fibrinogen concentrate, low-molecular-weight heparin, aspirin, and nifedipine. In conclusion, arterial and venous thromboembolic complications are rare, but severe complications of afibrinogenemia. The management of thromboembolic complications in patients with afibrinogenemia is a balance game. At one end of the scale, there is a bleeding disorder, and at the other end, there is a thrombosis. This fine adjustment is a job of mastery.

  3. Bilateral lower extremity gangrene requiring amputation associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Brian P; De Ugarte, Daniel A; Reil, Todd D; Beseth, Bryce D; Lawrence, Peter F

    2006-01-01

    Heparin use, both prophylactically and therapeutically, is prevalent among hospitalized patients. Patients on heparin may develop a thrombocytopenia that is self-limited. Fewer patients develop a heparin-induced thrombocytopenia that can cause severe bleeding and thrombosis owing to intravascular platelet aggregation. The authors present a case report of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in a patient who underwent aortic arch and aortic valve replacement that resulted in bilateral above-knee amputations. The patient developed limb ischemia related to heparin-associated thrombosis, but had a delay in antibody seroconversion. Early and accurate diagnosis of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia requires a high clinical suspicion and may be present despite the absence of serum antibodies.

  4. Bilateral above knee amputations after prolonged exposure to sorafenib and trebananib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Sulsal; Choe, Kyuran; Olowokure, Olugbenga

    2014-12-01

    Sorafenib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that acts on many targets including RAF kinases, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 1, 2, 3, platelet derived growth factor and c-kit receptor and is currently FDA approved for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Trebananib (AMG 386) is an angiopoietin 1/2 antagonist and acts as anti-angiogenic agent and may possess synergistic effects with sorafenib. Here we report a case of a 66-year-old male with a history of Hepatitis C, and a 22 pack year (PY) smoking history with unresectable multifocal HCC who was placed on both therapies for an extended period of time with an excellent clinical response but ended up developing bilateral critical limb ischemia requiring above knee amputations.

  5. Donovanosis with auto-amputation of penis in a HIV-2 infected person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Gupta T

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Donovanosis is a slowly progressive, granulomatous ulcerative disease , caused by Klebsiella (Calymmatobacterium granulomatis. The disease is known to persist for years together, leading to complications. A male patient aged 30 years with underlying HIV-2 infection presented to the department of STD with painful ulceration over the genital region of 5 months duration, with absence of penis. Tissue smear from the ulcer and histopathological examination revealed large histiocytes with intracellular Donovan bodies (Pund cell. A final diagnosis of donovanosis with auto-amputation of penis with HIV-2 infection was made. The old conventional medicines, viz. streptomycin, doxycycline and amoxycillin, were effective. Though HIV-2 infections are milder than HIV-1 infections in all aspects, donovanosis in this HIV-2 infected case presented with complications. However, since the CD4 count was 748 cells/cmm, the severity is attributed to the long standing nature and negligence by the patient, and not to possible immunodeficiency.

  6. Genital self-amputation or the Klingsor syndrome: Successful non-microsurgical penile replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Harrech, Y; Abaka, N; Ghoundale, O; Touiti, D

    2013-10-01

    Self-mutilations of the external genitals in psychiatric patients also known as Klingsor syndrome is a rare urologic trauma. Men with religious conflicts, low self-esteem, unresolved transsexual issues and feelings of guilt are the most vulnerable. This condition requires immediate surgical intervention. Currently replantation involves meticulous microsurgery and has become the primary method for managing these patients. In this paper, we report a case of self amputation of penis in a patient with a psychiatric history significant for schizopfrenia. Because of the unavailability of a microscope in our department, a non-microsurgical replantation without microscopic magnification was attempted. After surgery, normal appearance and function including a good normal voiding, sensation, and erections were observed.

  7. Genital self-amputation or the Klingsor syndrome: Successful non-microsurgical penile replantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y El harrech

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-mutilations of the external genitals in psychiatric patients also known as Klingsor syndrome is a rare urologic trauma. Men with religious conflicts, low self-esteem, unresolved transsexual issues and feelings of guilt are the most vulnerable. This condition requires immediate surgical intervention. Currently replantation involves meticulous microsurgery and has become the primary method for managing these patients. In this paper, we report a case of self amputation of penis in a patient with a psychiatric history significant for schizopfrenia. Because of the unavailability of a microscope in our department, a non-microsurgical replantation without microscopic magnification was attempted. After surgery, normal appearance and function including a good normal voiding, sensation, and erections were observed.

  8. Prostheses, pain and sequelae of amputation, as seen by the amputee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadderton, H C

    1978-04-01

    Results of a survey of 19 organizations belonging to World Veterans Federation indicate that major complains of amputees include; poor fitting, poor dissemination of knowledge to doctors and amputees regarding new prostheses, lack of opportunity for "input" from amputees at research level and inadequate measures to deal with phantom and stump pain. Suggested improvements by amputees; decrease in weight of prostheses, reduction in maintenance for swing and stance-phase control units development of recreational prostheses, more frequent checks through use of X-ray and film techniques, particularly during the "break-in" of a new appliance. Older veterans showed increasing concern in regard to development of consequential disabilities arising from amputation; premature arthritic changes in spine and remaining limb, circulatory problems and gastro-intestinal problems due to ingestion of drugs to control pain.

  9. High probability of healing without amputation of plantar forefoot ulcers in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örneholm, Hedvig; Apelqvist, Jan; Larsson, Jan; Eneroth, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer is an important entity which in many cases is the first serious complication in diabetes. Although a plantar forefoot location is common, there are few studies on larger cohorts and in such studies there is often a combination of various types of ulcer and ulcer locations. The purpose of this study is to discern the outcome of plantar forefoot ulcers and their specific characteristics in a large cohort. All patients (n = 770), presenting with a plantar forefoot ulcer at a multidisciplinary diabetes foot clinic from January 1, 1983 to December 31, 2012 were considered for the study. Seven hundred one patients (median age 67 [22-95]) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were followed according to a preset protocol until final outcome (healing or death). Severe peripheral vascular disease was present in 26% of the patients and 14% had evidence of deep infection upon arrival at the foot clinic. Fifty-five percent (385/701) of the patients healed without foot surgery, 25% (173/701) healed after major debridement, 9% (60/701) healed after minor or major amputation and 12% (83/701) died unhealed. Median healing time was 17 weeks. An ulcer classified as Wagner grade 1 or 2 at inclusion and independent living were factors associated with a higher healing rate. Seventy-nine percent of 701 patients with diabetes and a plantar forefoot ulcer treated at a multidisciplinary diabetes foot clinic healed without amputation. For one third some form of foot surgery was needed to achieve healing.

  10. Geographic Variation of the Incidence Rate of Lower Limb Amputation in Australia from 2007-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortington, Lauren V.; Akram, Muhammad; Erbas, Bircan; Kohler, Friedbert

    2017-01-01

    In Australia, little is known about how the incidence rate (IR) of lower limb amputation (LLA) varies across the country. While studies in other economically developed countries have shown considerable geographic variation in the IR-LLA, mostly these have not considered whether the effect of common risk factors are the same across regions. Mapping variation of the IR-LLA, and the effect of common risk factors, is an important first step to focus research into areas of greatest need and support the development of regional specific hypotheses for in-depth examination. The aim of this study was to describe the geographic variation in the IR-LLA across Australia and understand whether the effect of common risk factors was the same across regions. Using hospital episode data from the Australian National Hospital Morbidity database and Australian Bureau of Statistics, the all-cause crude and age-standardised IR-LLA in males and females were calculated for the nation and each state and territory. Generalised Linear Models were developed to understand which factors influenced geographic variation in the crude IR-LLA. While the crude and age-standardised IR-LLA in males and females were similar in most states and territories, they were higher in the Northern Territory. The effect of older age, being male and the presence of type 2 diabetes was associated with an increase of IR-LLA in most states and territories. In the Northern Territory, the younger age at amputation confounded the effect of sex and type 2 diabetes. There are likely to be many factors not included in this investigation, such as Indigenous status, that may explain part of the variation in the IR-LLA not captured in our models. Further research is needed to identify regional- and population- specific factors that could be modified to reduce the IR-LLA in all states and territories of Australia. PMID:28118408

  11. Asymmetrical loading demands associated with vertical jump landings in people with unilateral transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, Marlene; Diss, Ceri E; Strike, Siobhan C

    2013-01-01

    Loading symmetry during vertical jump landings between a person with amputation's intact and prosthetic limbs was assessed to determine the role of each limb in controlling the downward momentum of the center of mass during landing. Six participants with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA) and ten nondisabled participants completed 10 maximal vertical jumps, of which the highest jump was analyzed. Contralateral symmetry was assessed through the Symmetry Index (SI), while symmetry at the group level was assessed through a Mann-Whitney U test. Participants with TTA performed quasi-unilateral landings onto the intact limbs, resulting from either the incapability of the prosthetic ankle to plantar flex or increased residual-limb knee and hip flexion. In the loading phase, the participants with TTA displayed reduced prosthetic-side peak vertical forces (p = 0.04) along with reduced prosthetic-side ankle range of motion (p work generated (p = 0.00). Individual asymmetries were evident in the peak vertical force magnitudes (SI = 51%-140%), duration from touchdown to peak vertical force (SI = 52%-157%), ankle joint angles at touchdown (SI = 100%-538%), ranges of motion (SI = 147%-200%), knee (SI = 66%-179%) and hip (SI = 87%-132%) extensor moments, and work done at the ankle (SI = 155%-199%) and hip (SI = 83%-204%). High peak forces (25.25 +/- 4.89 N·kg(-1) intact limb and 14.61 +/- 8.28 N·kg(-1) prosthetic limb) from significantly lower (p heights than the nondisabled participants indicate a potential injury risk associated with landing for people with TTA.

  12. Pendulating—A grounded theory explaining patients’ behavior shortly after having a leg amputated due to vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Ulla Riis; Hommel, Ami; Bååth, Carina; Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although the group of vascular leg amputated patients constitutes some of the most vulnerable and frail on the orthopedic wards, previous research of amputated patients has focused on patients attending gait training in rehabilitation facilities leaving the patient experience shortly after surgery unexplored. Understanding patients’ behavior shortly after amputation could inform health professionals in regard to how these vulnerable patients’ needs at hospital can be met as well as how to plan for care post-discharge. Aim To construct a grounded theory (GT) explaining patients’ behavior shortly after having a leg amputated as a result of vascular disease. Method In line with constructivist GT methodology, data from ethnographic observations and interviews were simultaneously collected and analyzed using the constant comparative method covering the patients’ experiences during the first 4 weeks post-surgery. Data collection was guided by theoretical sampling and comprised 11 patients. A GT was constructed. Results Patients went through a three-phased process as they realized they were experiencing a life-changing event. The first phase was “Losing control” and comprised the sub-categories “Being overwhelmed” and “Facing dependency.” The second phase was “Digesting the shock” and comprised the sub-categories “Swallowing the life-changing decision,” “Detecting the amputated body” and “Struggling dualism.” The third phase was “Regaining control” and comprised the sub-categories “Managing consequences” and “Building-up hope and self-motivation.” “Pendulating” was identified as the core category describing the general pattern of behavior and illustrated how patients were swinging both cognitively and emotionally throughout the process. Conclusion The theory of “Pendulating” offers a tool to understand the amputated patients’ behavior and underlying concerns and to recognize where they are in the

  13. Pendulating—A grounded theory explaining patients’ behavior shortly after having a leg amputated due to vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulla Riis Madsen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although the group of vascular leg amputated patients constitutes some of the most vulnerable and frail on the orthopedic wards, previous research of amputated patients has focused on patients attending gait training in rehabilitation facilities leaving the patient experience shortly after surgery unexplored. Understanding patients’ behavior shortly after amputation could inform health professionals in regard to how these vulnerable patients’ needs at hospital can be met as well as how to plan for care post-discharge. Aim: To construct a grounded theory (GT explaining patients’ behavior shortly after having a leg amputated as a result of vascular disease. Method: In line with constructivist GT methodology, data from ethnographic observations and interviews were simultaneously collected and analyzed using the constant comparative method covering the patients’ experiences during the first 4 weeks post-surgery. Data collection was guided by theoretical sampling and comprised 11 patients. A GT was constructed. Results: Patients went through a three-phased process as they realized they were experiencing a life-changing event. The first phase was “Losing control” and comprised the sub-categories “Being overwhelmed” and “Facing dependency.” The second phase was “Digesting the shock” and comprised the sub-categories “Swallowing the life-changing decision,” “Detecting the amputated body” and “Struggling dualism.” The third phase was “Regaining control” and comprised the sub-categories “Managing consequences” and “Building-up hope and self-motivation.” “Pendulating” was identified as the core category describing the general pattern of behavior and illustrated how patients were swinging both cognitively and emotionally throughout the process. Conclusion: The theory of “Pendulating” offers a tool to understand the amputated patients’ behavior and underlying concerns and to recognize

  14. A case of nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap for below-knee amputation stump wound: treatment option for compartment syndrome after fibular free flap surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Ha; Kim, Kwang Seog; Lee, Sam Yong

    2014-02-01

    Despite the frequent use of the fibular free flap, there have been no reports of severe compartment syndrome of the donor leg that necessitated limb amputation. A 66-yr-old man had a fibular osseous free flap transfer from the left leg to the mandible that was complicated by postoperative compartment syndrome. An extensive chronic leg wound resulted, which was treated with multiple debridements and finally with below-knee amputation. Successful coverage of the below-knee amputation stump was accomplished with a nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap. Various foot fillet flaps may be used acutely as a free or an island pedicled flap, but dissection of the vascular pedicle may be difficult in a chronically inflamed wound because of inflammation and adhesions to surrounding tissue. The nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap may be considered as a useful option for treatment of a chronically inflamed stump wound after below-knee amputation.

  15. Post-amputation pain is associated with the recall of an impaired body representation in dreams-results from a nation-wide survey on limb amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Schredl, Michael; Diers, Martin; Reinhard, Iris; Foell, Jens; Trojan, Jörg; Fuchs, Xaver; Flor, Herta

    2015-01-01

    The experience of post-amputation pain such as phantom limb pain (PLP) and residual limb pain (RLP), is a common consequence of limb amputation, and its presence has negative effects on a person's well-being. The continuity hypothesis of dreams suggests that the presence of such aversive experiences in the waking state should be reflected in dream content, with the recalled body representation reflecting a cognitive proxy of negative impact. In the present study, we epidemiologically assessed the presence of post-amputation pain and other amputation-related information as well as recalled body representation in dreams in a sample of 3,234 unilateral limb amputees. Data on the site and time of amputation, residual limb length, prosthesis use, lifetime prevalence of mental disorders, presence of post-amputation pain, and presence of non-painful phantom phenomena were included in logistic regression analyses using recalled body representation in dreams (impaired, intact, no memory) as dependent variable. The effects of age, sex, and frequency of dream recall were controlled for. About 22% of the subjects indicated that they were not able to remember their body representation in dreams, another 24% of the amputees recalled themselves as always intact, and only a minority of less than 3% recalled themselves as always impaired. Almost 35% of the amputees dreamed of themselves in a mixed fashion. We found that lower-limb amputation as well as the presence of PLP and RLP was positively associated with the recall of an impaired body representation in dreams. The presence of non-painful phantom phenomena, however, had no influence. These results complement previous findings and indicate complex interactions of physical body appearance and mental body representation, probably modulated by distress in the waking state. The findings are discussed against the background of alterations in cognitive processes after amputation and hypotheses suggesting an innate body model.

  16. A simple technique to position patients with bilateral above-knee amputations for operative fixation of intertrochanteric fractures of the femur: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Dramis Asterios; Desai Aravind; Aqil Adeel; Hossain Saqif

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Intertrochanteric fractures of the femur are common fractures in the elderly, and management includes operative fixation after patient positioning on the fracture table. Patients with bilateral above-knee amputations are challenging in terms of positioning on the table. We describe a simple technique to overcome this special problem. Case presentation A 75-year-old wheelchair-bound Caucasian man with bilateral above-knee amputations presented to our hospital after a fall...

  17. Management of diabetic foot disease and amputation in the Irish health system: a qualitative study of patients' attitudes and experiences with health services.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delea, Sarah

    2015-07-01

    Diabetes is an increasingly prevalent chronic illness that places a huge burden on the individual, the health system and society. Patients with active foot disease and lower limb amputations due to diabetes have a significant amount of interaction with the health care services. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and experiences of foot care services in Ireland among people with diabetes and active foot disease or lower limb amputations.

  18. Amputations and foot ulcers in patients newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and observed for 19 years. The role of age, gender and co-morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, C; Siersma, V.; Guassora, A.D.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of foot ulcers and the incidence of amputations in patients with Type 2 diabetes observed for 19 years after diagnosis. We investigated the role of gender, age and co-morbidities.......To determine the prevalence of foot ulcers and the incidence of amputations in patients with Type 2 diabetes observed for 19 years after diagnosis. We investigated the role of gender, age and co-morbidities....

  19. The persistence of gender and racial disparities in vascular lower extremity amputation: an examination of HCUP-NIS data (2002-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Kristin M; Chevan, Julia

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine trends in racial and gender disparities in the severity of lower extremity amputation among individuals with peripheral artery disease (PAD) over the period of a decade (2002-2011). This is a longitudinal secondary analysis of data from the Healthcare Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Survey (HCUP-NIS) for the years 2002-2011. Level of amputation was determined from ICD-9-CM procedure and coded as either transfemoral (TF) or transtibial (TT). The main predictors were gender and race; covariates including age, race, income, insurance status and presence of vascular disease were incorporated as control variables in regression analysis. A total 121,587 cases of non-traumatic dysvascular amputations were identified. Female gender (odds ratio (OR) 1.35; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32, 1.39) and black race (OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.12, 1.23) are both significantly associated with increased odds for receiving TF amputation with no change in these odds over the decade of study. Other covariates with significant associations with TF amputation level include increased age (OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.99, 1.09), low income (OR 1.21; 95% CI 1.15, 1.27), Medicaid insurance (OR 1.36; 95% CI 1.29, 1.44), Medicare insurance (OR 1.27; 95% CI 1.21, 1.32), and cerebrovascular disease (OR 2.12; 95% CI 2.03, 2.23). In conclusion, although overall rates of amputation have decreased, disparities in level of amputation related to female gender and black race have not significantly changed over time. Higher-level amputation has significant consequences from a quality-of-life, medical and economic perspective.

  20. Traction avulsion amputation of the major upper limb: a proposed new classification, guidelines for acute management, and strategies for secondary reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, D C; Lai, J B; Cheng, S L; Jain, V; Lin, C H; Chen, H C

    2001-11-01

    Major replantation of a traction avulsion amputation is undertaken with the goal of not only the reestablishment of circulation, but also functional outcome. This type of amputation is characterized by different levels of soft-tissue divisions involving crushing, traction, and avulsion injuries to various structures. Between 1985 and 1998, 27 cases were referred for secondary reconstruction following amputation of the upper extremity involving both arm and forearm. Replantation was performed by at least 12 qualified plastic surgeons using different approaches and management, resulting in different outcomes. Initial replantation management significantly affects the later reconstruction. For comparing studies and prognostic implications, the authors propose a new classification according to the level of injury to muscles and innervated nerves: type I, amputation at or close to the musculotendinous aponeurosis with muscles remaining essentially intact; type II, amputation within the muscle bellies but with the proximal muscles still innervated; type III, amputation involving the motor nerve or neuromuscular junction, thereby causing total loss of muscle function; and type IV, amputation through the joint; i.e., disarticulation of the elbow or shoulder joint. Some patients required further reconstruction for functional restoration after replantation, but some did not. Through this retrospective study based on the proposed classification system, prospective guidelines for the management of different types of traction avulsion amputation are provided, including the value of replantation, length of bone shortening, primary or delayed muscle or nerve repair, necessity of fasciotomy, timing for using free tissue transfer for wound coverage, and the role of functioning free muscle transplantation for late reconstruction. The final functional outcome can also be anticipated prospectively through this classification system.

  1. Incidence and causes of lower-limb amputations in the city of Ribeirão Preto from 1985 to 2008: evaluation of the medical records from 3,274 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Maria Bueno Barbosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Objective: It was to identify trends of traumatic and non-traumatic causes of lower limb amputations, as well as the role played by population aging, traffic violence increase, public health policy of diabetes control program and drivers anti-alcohol laws on these amputations. Method: Hospitalization data recorded in the discharge forms of 32 hospitals located in the region of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, from 1985 to 2008 were analyzed. Result: A total of 3,274 lower-limb amputations were analyzed, of which 95.2% were related to non-traumatic causes, mainly infectious and ischemic complications of diabetes mellitus. Cancer (2.8% and congenital (1.3% causes were included in this group. Only 4.8% were related to traumatic causes. Traumatic amputation average rate was 1.5 amputations in 100,000 habitants with a slight tendency of increase in the last 5 years. Non-traumatic causes showed an average rate of 30.0 amputations for 100,000 habitants and remained relatively constant during the whole period. Non-traumatic were much more predominant in patients older than 60 years and traumatic amputations occurred more frequently in patients younger than 39 years. Conclusion: The overall rates of amputation and the rates of traumatic and non-traumatic amputations remained nearly constant during the study period. The impact of diabetes control policies and the introduction of traffic safety laws could not be identified on the amputation rates.

  2. Applying Space Technology to Enhance Control of an Artificial Arm for Children and Adults With Amputations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Diane J.

    1998-01-01

    The first single function myoelectric prosthetic hand was introduced in the 1960's. This hand was controlled by the electric fields generated by muscle contractions in the residual limb of the amputee user. Electrodes and amplifiers, embedded in the prosthetic socket, measured these electric fields across the skin, which increase in amplitude as the individual contracts their muscle. When the myoelectric signal reached a certain threshold amplitude, the control unit activated a motor which opened or closed a hand-like prosthetic terminal device with a pincher grip. Late in the 1990's, little has changed. Most current myoelectric prostheses still operate in this same, single-function way. To better understand the limitations of the current single-function myoelectric hand and the needs of those who use them, The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research (TIRR), sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NUH), surveyed approximately 2,500 individuals with upper limb loss [1]. When asked to identify specific features of their current myoelectric prostheses that needed improvement, the survey respondents overwhelmingly identified the lack of wrist and finger movement, as well as poor control capability. However, simply building a mechanism with individual finger and wrist motion is not enough. In the 1960's and 1970's, engineers built a number of more dexterous prosthetic hands. Unfortunately, these were rejected during clinical trials due to a difficult and distracting control interface. The goal of this project, "Applying Space Technology to Enhance Control of an Artificial Arm for Children and Adults with Amputations," was to lay the foundation for a multi-function, intuitive myoelectric control system which requires no conscious thought to move the hand. We built an extensive myoelectric signal database for six motions from ten amputee volunteers, We also tested a control system based on new artificial intelligence techniques on the data from two of these

  3. [The psychosocial characteristics of the patient who has undergone amputation for vascular reasons. The work, family and sex life aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Viniegras, C R; Rial Blanco, N; Molina Martínez, O; Salazar Fernández, N; Almeida Hernández, L; Herrera Rodríguez, G

    1991-01-01

    Forty-one amputee patients because vascular disease, 20 of them diabetics and 21 non-diabetics, with a mean of 68 years, were studied--from psychosocial aspect--by interviewing them 3 or 4 years after their amputation. Different factors were evaluated, like prosthesis usage, personal cares that patient could do by him self, home activities made by the patients, sexual life quality and labor status. For this evaluation different variables were considered, like age, sex, scholar level, familial economic level, original pathology, amputation level, stump status and phantom [correction of fantasm] limb perception. The most important variables correlated with good psychosocial conditions of amputee patients are noted, and considerations and recommendations for a rehabilitation program are established.

  4. Toe-to-hand transfer from a cross-foot replantation in a traumatic four-extremity amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Serkan; Akan, Mithat; Aköz, Tayfun

    2005-10-01

    Treatment of mutilating hand injuries often requires multiple innovative procedures. This report describes a case of multi-limbed amputations from a train injury and the extraordinary microsurgical approaches for a two-hand reconstruction. The first stage of the procedure was a cross replantation of the left foot to the right leg. The second stage was a combined second and third toe transfer from the cross replantation of the left foot to the right hand, and a sensate fibular osteocutaneous flap transfer for left hand reconstruction. Satisfactory function was restored, including good protective sensation. These kinds of extraordinary microsurgical approaches are useful salvage procedures for hand reconstruction, when presented with a case of multi-limb amputation.

  5. Through-knee amputation for a patient with proximal femur focal deficiency and tibial hemimelia: surgical anatomy and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Selvyn; Rashid, Abdul Halim Abd; Das, Srijit; Ibrahim, Sharaf

    2014-03-01

    Tibial hemimelia is a rare anomaly of unknown etiology. This condition can occur sporadically or may have a familial inheritance. It is characterized by deficiency of the tibia with a relatively intact fibula. The anomaly may be unilateral or bilateral. We report a case of a 2-year-old girl who presented with right lower limb deformity since birth. She was diagnosed with proximal femur focal deficiency with absence of the ipsilateral tibia. She presented with a shorter right lower limb and a deformed foot. She was treated with a through-knee amputation. Anatomical dissection of the amputated limb was carried out to verify the anomalies. The dissection showed that the distal phalanx of the great toe was trifid. The anatomical and clinical significance of this interesting case is discussed.

  6. Motivation, effort and life circumstances as predictors of foot ulcers and amputations in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Christine; Guassora, Ann Dorrit; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract AIM: To investigate the predictive value of both patients' motivation and effort in their management of Type 2 diabetes and their life circumstances for the development of foot ulcers and amputations. METHODS: This study was based on the Diabetes Care in General Practice study and Danish...... population and health registers. The associations between patient motivation, effort and life circumstances and foot ulcer prevalence 6 years after diabetes diagnosis and the incidence of amputation in the following 13 years were analysed using odds ratios from logistic regression and hazard ratios from Cox...... regression models, respectively. RESULTS: Foot ulcer prevalence 6 years after diabetes diagnosis was 2.93% (95% CI 1.86-4.00) among 956 patients. General practitioners' indication of 'poor' vs 'very good' patient motivation for diabetes management was associated with higher foot ulcer prevalence (odds ratio...

  7. A novel osseointegrated percutaneous prosthetic system for the treatment of patients with transfemoral amputation: A prospective study of 51 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brånemark, R; Berlin, O; Hagberg, K; Bergh, P; Gunterberg, B; Rydevik, B

    2014-01-01

    Patients with transfemoral amputation (TFA) often experience problems related to the use of socket-suspended prostheses. The clinical development of osseointegrated percutaneous prostheses for patients with a TFA started in 1990, based on the long-term successful results of osseointegrated dental implants. Between 1999 and 2007, 51 patients with 55 TFAs were consecutively enrolled in a prospective, single-centre non-randomised study and followed for two years. The indication for amputation was trauma in 33 patients (65%) and tumour in 12 (24%). A two-stage surgical procedure was used to introduce a percutaneous implant to which an external amputation prosthesis was attached. The assessment of outcome included the use of two self-report questionnaires, the Questionnaire for Persons with a Transfemoral Amputation (Q-TFA) and the Short-Form (SF)-36. The cumulative survival at two years' follow-up was 92%. The Q-TFA showed improved prosthetic use, mobility, global situation and fewer problems (all p < 0.001). The physical function SF-36 scores were also improved (p < 0.001). Superficial infection was the most frequent complication, occurring 41 times in 28 patients (rate of infection 54.9%). Most were treated effectively with oral antibiotics. The implant was removed in four patients because of loosening (three aseptic, one infection). Osseointegrated percutaneous implants constitute a novel form of treatment for patients with TFA. The high cumulative survival rate at two years (92%) combined with enhanced prosthetic use and mobility, fewer problems and improved quality of life, supports the 'revolutionary change' that patients with TFA have reported following treatment with osseointegrated percutaneous prostheses.

  8. When a diabetic foot ulcer results in amputation: a qualitative study of the lived experience of 15 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, DeSales; Lauver, Lori S

    2014-11-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that can lead to complications resulting in diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), foot infections, osteomyelitis, and amputations. Almost 50,000 amputations performed every year in the United States are due to DFUs. A qualitative analysis using Colaizzi's step-by-step approach to phenomenology was conducted to describe the experiences of 15 patients with diabetes living with a foot amputation. Semi-structured interviews were recorded digitally,transcribed, and analyzed. The analysis included reading transcripts multiple times, identifying noteworthy verbatim statements, then abstracting key words and phrases; similar key words and phrases were grouped into a meaning unit. The researchers rereviewed original transcripts, verbatim statements, and extracted key words and phrases and devised meaning units to identify main themes. Rigor in this study was ensured by developing an audit trail that linked the meaning units and themes back to key words and verbatim statements in the original transcripts and then allowing the participant to ensure accuracy of recounted information. Five major themes emerged from the data regarding patient concern about the ability to be productive members of society (i.e., transitioning from having a nonhealing wound to living as a new amputee)--financial burden, powerlessness, social support, placing blame, and uncertainty in one's continued ability--each having implications for health care providers as well as patients. By considering the experience from the patient perspective, health care professionals may be better prepared to discuss patient concerns with follow-up care and day to-day living, especially in getting help with finances. Additional research is needed to uncover models of care that may help these patients remain productive members of society and reduce the burden of amputation on patient quality of life.

  9. [Underfoot pressure distribution of a patient after fracture of the calcaneal bone and bilateral hallux amputation--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorkowski, Jacek; Trybus, Marek; Hładki, Waldemar; Brongel, Leszek

    2006-01-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate underfoot pressure distribution of a patient after bilateral hallux amputation and the unilateral calcaneal bone fracture on the left side at the end of orthopaedic end rehabilitation treatment. The pedobarographic examination during bipedal standing revealed localisation of maximal pressure at H region on the side of fracture and on MT1 and H foot regions on the other side. After the and of orthopaedic treatment underfoot pressure distribution changes persists in spite of pain regression.

  10. Four limb amputations due to peripheral gangrene from inotrope use – Case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ang Chuan Han; Koo Oon Thien; Howe Tet Sen

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We present a rare case of 4 limb amputations due to peripheral gangrene which resulted from the use of inotropes for septic shock. PRESENTATION OF CASE: A 72-year-old woman with no past medical history presented with fever and pain in bilateral big toes. She was diagnosed with Streptococcal pneumoniae septicaemia and was started on broad spectrum antibiotics, dopamine and noradrenaline in the medical intensive care unit. She developed peripheral gangrene of all 4 extremities ...

  11. Feasibility of the Nintendo WiiFit™ for improving walking in individuals with a lower limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Imam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of the Nintendo WiiFit™ as an adjunct to usual therapy in individuals with a lower limb amputation. Methods: The study was a Multiple Baseline (AB Single Subject Research Design. Subjects were ≥19 years old, had their first unilateral transtibial or transfemoral amputation  ≤12 months ago, and were participating in prosthetic training. WiiFit training was provided for 30 min, 5 times a week, for a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 6 weeks in addition to usual therapy. Feasibility indicators were safety, post-intervention fatigue and pain levels, adherence, and subject’s acceptability of the program as measured by the Short Feedback Questionnaire–modified (SFQ-M. The primary clinical outcome was walking capacity assessed by the 2 Minute Walk Test (2MWT. The secondary clinical outcomes were the Short Physical Performance Battery, L-test, and Activities-Specific Balance Confidence. Results: Subjects (4 transtibial; 2 transfemoral had a median age of 48.5 years (range = 45–59 years. No adverse events associated with the intervention occurred. Median pain and fatigue levels were 1.3 (range = 0.5–3.5 and 3.1 (range = 1.4–4.1, respectively. Median adherence was 80%. Subjects found the WiiFit enjoyable and acceptable (median SFQ-M = 35. Five subjects showed statistical improvement on the 2MWT and four on the secondary outcomes (p < 0.05. Conclusion: The WiiFit intervention was found to be feasible in individuals with unilateral lower limb amputation. This research provides the foundation for future clinical research investigating the use of the WiiFit as a viable adjunctive therapy to improve outcomes in individuals with unilateral lower limb amputation who are participating in prosthetic training.

  12. ErbB2 and ErbB3 regulate amputation-induced proliferation and migration during vertebrate regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Muñoz, Agustin; Rajadhyksha, Shibani; Gilmour, Darren; van Bebber, Frauke; Antos, Christopher; Rodríguez Esteban, Concepción; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Izpisúa Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2009-03-01

    Epimorphic regeneration is a unique and complex instance of postembryonic growth observed in certain metazoans that is usually triggered by severe injury [Akimenko et al., 2003; Alvarado and Tsonis, 2006; Brockes, 1997; Endo et al., 2004]. Cell division and migration are two fundamental biological processes required for supplying replacement cells during regeneration [Endo et al., 2004; Slack, 2007]. However, the connection between the early stimuli generated after injury and the signals regulating proliferation and migration during regeneration remain largely unknown. Here we show that the oncogenes ErbB2 and ErbB3, two members of the EGFR family, are essential for mounting a successful regeneration response in vertebrates. Importantly, amputation-induced progenitor proliferation and migration are significantly reduced upon genetic and/or chemical modulation of ErbB function. Moreover, we also found that NRG1 and PI3K functionally interact with ErbB2 and ErbB3 during regeneration and interfering with their function also abrogates the capacity of progenitor cells to regenerate lost structures upon amputation. Our findings suggest that ErbB, PI3K and NRG1 are components of a permissive switch for migration and proliferation continuously acting across the amputated fin from early stages of vertebrate regeneration onwards that regulate the expression of the transcription factors lef1 and msxB.

  13. Hip fracture fixation in a patient with below-knee amputation presents a surgical dilemma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rethnam Ulfin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hip fracture fixation surgery in patients with below-knee amputations poses a challenging problem to the surgeon in terms of obtaining traction for reduction of the fracture. The absence of the foot and part of the leg in these patients makes positioning on the fracture table difficult. We highlight this difficult problem and suggest techniques to overcome it. Case presentation A 73-year-old man with bilateral below-knee amputations presented with a history of fall. Radiographs revealed an inter-trochanteric fracture of the femur. A dynamic hip screw fixation was planned for the fracture but the dilemma was on how to position the patient on the fracture table for the surgery. Special attention was needed in positioning the patient and in surgical fixation of the fracture. Conclusion Hip fracture fixation in patients with below-knee amputations poses a special problem in positioning for fracture reduction and fixation. In this case report, we share our experience and suggest techniques to use when encountering this difficult problem.

  14. The impact of lower limb amputation on community reintegration of a population in Johannesburg: A Qualitative perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Godlwana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To explore the experiences and perceptions of people with lower limb amputations from the Johannesburg metropolitan area on the impact that their amputations had on their lives and their return to their communities. Methods: Semi-structured audio-taped in-depth interviews were used to collect data on 12 purposively selected participants. Ethical clearance was obtained. A General Inductive Approach was used to generate or discover themes within the data using a process of systematic coding. Results: Emerging from the qualitative data were psychological, social and religious themes. Suicidal thoughts, dependence, poor acceptance, public perception about body image, phantom limb related falls and hopes of obtaining prostheses were reported. Some reported poor social involvement due to mobility problems and employment concerns, while families and friends were found to be supportive. Participants had faith in God. Conclusion: Generally, most participants had come to terms with the amputation and were managing well while some expressed that they were struggling with reintegration to their communities of origin three months postoperatively with both functional and psychosocial challenges.

  15. Responsiveness to a novel preening stimulus long after partial beak amputation (beak trimming) in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Liere, D W

    1995-07-01

    Thirty beak-trimmed and thirty intact hens were reared in mixed groups and individually housed in battery cages; partial beak amputation took place 6 weeks after hatching. All hens were tested with a novel stimulus when they were 42 weeks old: a small paper sticker (36 mm(2)) was attached to the distal parts of the feathers at the back of the hen. It took beak-trimmed hens on average 27 seconds and the intact ones 8 s to start preening the sticker. This difference was statistically significant. Beak-trimmed hens tended to preen the sticker less than intact birds. Lighting conditions had no effect on the response latency, while the amount of eating and drinking did not differ between both groups, indicating that lack of light, anxiety or other types of disturbances did not affect the preening responses. It is concluded that beak trimming has long lasting consequences in reducing the responsiveness to a novel preening stimulus. This result is in agreement with the long term passivity in beak-trimmed hens found in other studies. The development of a reduced responsiveness as a result of beak trimming suggests poor animal welfare.

  16. Enhancing the soft tissue seal around intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses using silanized fibronectin titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimutengwende-Gordon, M; Pendegrass, C; Blunn, G, E-mail: mukai.cg@mac.com [Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Science, University College London, Brockley Hill, Stanmore, HA7 4LP (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    The success of intraosseous transcutaneous amputation prostheses (ITAP) relies on achieving a tight seal between the soft tissues and the implant in order to avoid infection. Fibronectin (Fn) may be silanized onto titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) in order to promote soft-tissue attachment. The silanization process includes passivation with sulphuric acid, which alters surface characteristics. This study aimed to improve in vitro fibroblast adhesion to silanized fibronectin (SiFn) titanium alloy by omitting the passivation stage. Additionally, the study assessed the effects of SiFn on in vivo dermal attachment, comparing the results with adsorbed Fn, hydroxyapatite (HA), Fn adsorbed onto HA (HAFn) and uncoated controls. Surface topography was assessed using scanning electron microscopy, profilometry and contact angle measurement. Anti-vinculin antibodies were used to immunolocalize fibroblast adhesion sites. A histological assessment of soft-tissue attachment and cell alignment relative to implants in an in vivo ovine model was performed. Passivation resulted in rougher, more hydrophobic, microcracked surfaces and was associated with poorer fibroblast adhesion than unpassivated controls. SiFn and HAFn surfaces resulted in more favourable cell alignment in vivo, implying that dermal attachment was enhanced. These results suggest that SiFn and HAFn surfaces could be useful in optimizing the soft tissue seal around ITAP.

  17. Effect of load on the bone around bone-anchored amputation prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Patrik; Trobos, Margarita; Lausmaa, Jukka; Brånemark, Rickard; Thomsen, Peter; Palmquist, Anders

    2016-06-24

    Osseointegrated transfemoral amputation prostheses have proven successful as an alternative method to the conventional socket-type prostheses. The method improves prosthetic use and thus increases the demands imposed on the bone-implant system. The hypothesis of the present study was that the loads applied to the bone-anchored implant system of amputees would result in locations of high stress and strain transfer to the bone tissue and thus contribute to complications such as unfavourable bone remodeling and/or elevated inflammatory response and/or compromised sealing function at the tissue-abutment interface. In the study, site-specific loading measurements were made on amputees and used as input data in finite element analyses to predict the stress and strain distribution in the bone tissue. Furthermore, a tissue sample retrieved from a patient undergoing implant revision was characterized in order to evaluate the long-term tissue response around the abutment. Within the limit of the evaluated bone properties in the present experiments, it is concluded that the loads applied to the implant system may compromise the sealing function between the bone and the abutment, contributing to resorption of the bone in direct contact with the abutment at the most distal end. This was supported by observations in the retrieved clinical sample of bone resorption and the formation of a soft tissue lining along the abutment interface. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  18. [Transcutaneous osseointegrated prosthesis (TOP) after limb amputation : Status quo and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Christian; Krettek, Christian

    2017-04-10

    The majority of transfemoral and transtibial amputees can be functionally fitted with conventional suspension sockets; however, due to socket problems using conventional stump care, 60% of the patients have limited function and even in younger patients approximately one sixth are unable to wear the prosthesis daily. After the introduction of transcutaneous osseointegrated prostheses (TOP) the inherent problems of socket-stump care can be avoided for these patients. Against this background this article reviews the recent clinical development of TOP in Sweden, Germany, the Netherlands, Australia and USA currently in nine centers. Unanimously, all groups show that TOP enables physiological weight bearing, improved range of motion in the proximal joint, as well as osseoperceptive sensory feedback and better control of the artificial limb. Likewise, there is agreement that as a rule that there is a clinically less relevant superficial contamination of the stoma. Furthermore, TOP is nowadays also used for transhumeral amputees and after thumb amputation and the development of the indications for this technique are increasing. Future aspects include novel treatment options using implanted intramedullary electrodes allowing permanent and unlimited bidirectional communication with the human body (osseointegrated human-machine gateway). This could possibly realize an innovative form of prosthesis control as well as the combination of TOP and targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) surgery to create more advanced prosthesis systems for upper and lower extremity amputees.

  19. [Lower limb salvage with a free fillet fibula flap harvested from the contralateral amputated leg].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyer, M; Corcella, D; Forli, A; Mesquida, V; Semere, A; Moutet, F

    2015-06-01

    We report a unusual case of "fillet flap" to reconstruct the lower limb with the amputated contralateral leg. This kind of procedure was first described by Foucher et al. in 1980 for traumatic hand surgery as the "bank finger". A 34-year-old man suffered a microlight accident with bilateral open legs fractures. A large skin defect of the left leg exposed the ankle, the calcaneus and a non-vascularized part of the tibial nerve (10 cm). The patient came to the OR for surgical debridement and had massive bone resection of the left calcaneus. The right leg showed limited skin defect at the lower part, exposing the medial side of the ankle and a tibial bone defect, measuring 10 cm. Salvage the left leg was impossible due to complex nerve, bones and skin associated injuries, so this leg was sacrificed and used as a donor limb, to harvest a free fibula flap for contralateral tibial reconstruction. At 18 months of follow-up, the patient was very satisfied, the clinical result was very good on both lower limbs and X-rays showed excellent integration of the free fibula flap. The patient had normal dailies occupations, can run and have bicycle sport practice with a functional left leg fit prosthesis. This case showed an original application of the "fillet flap concept" to resolve complex and rare traumatic situations interesting the both lower limbs. In our opinion, this strategy must be a part of the plastic surgeon skills in uncommon situations.

  20. Rehabilitation for Translumbar Amputation (review)%经腰椎离断术后的康复

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨平; 曹学军

    2011-01-01

    经腰椎离断术又名半体切除,是指经某一腰椎将骨盆、盆腔内容物、双下肢及外生殖器全部切除.手术使患者失去了直立能力,通过医生、护士、假肢技师、物理治疗师、心理治疗师、职业康复和社会康复工作者等多学科合作,对患者进行术后综合康复,可以恢复人体外形,重建直立活动能力、生活自理能力、社会交往及职业劳动能力.本文主要从术后综合康复方面进行综述.%Translumbar amputation, also known as hemicorporectomy, is a life-saying procedure for patients with a life-threatening diagnosis but with a normal life expectancy. In the surgical procedure, the pelvis, pelvic contents, lower extremities and external genitalia are removed following transection of the lumbar spine. The operation makes the patient lose the ability of being upright.With the interdisciplinary cooperation of doctors, nurses, prosthetists, psychologists, vocational rehabilitation workers and social rehabilitation workers, the patient can realize most of independent activities of daily living through rehabilitation. The rehabilitation associated with the procedure is reviewed.

  1. Impact of rehabilitation programs on dependency and functional performance of patients with major lower limb amputations

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSofyani, Mohammad A.; AlHarthi, Abdulaziz S.; Farahat, Fayssal M.; Abuznadah, Wesam T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine pattern and impact of physical rehabilitation on dependency and functional performance of patients. Methods: This retrospective chart review was carried out between July and August 2012 at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Data were collected using demographic, clinical, and dependency assessment checklists. Results: Patients who underwent major lower limb amputations between January 2007 and April 2012 (n=121) were included in the study. There were 84 (69.4%) male and 37 (30.6%) female patients with a mean ± standard deviation of 63.3±17.4 years old. Diabetes mellitus was the most frequent cause in 63.6% of patients. Only one-third of the amputees (32.2%) have records of completion of their rehabilitation programs, although 20.7% of them completed the <50% of the scheduled rehabilitation sessions, 17.2% attended between 50% and 80%, and the remaining 62.1% attended more than 80% of the scheduled sessions. Muscle power scores in each side of the upper and lower limbs were significantly better following rehabilitation (p<0.0001). Basic functions of mobility and transfer have also significantly improved (p<0.05). Conclusions: Overall dependency and functional performance were significantly better following implementation of the physical rehabilitation programs. A multidisciplinary team approach is mandatory to improve compliance of patients toward the rehabilitation programs. PMID:27652362

  2. Toe clearance when walking in people with unilateral transtibial amputation: effects of passive hydraulic ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Louise; De Asha, Alan R; Munjal, Ramesh; Kulkarni, Jai; Buckley, John G

    2014-01-01

    Most clinically available prosthetic feet have a rigid attachment or incorporate an "ankle" device allowing elastic articulation during stance, with the foot returning to a "neutral" position at toe-off. We investigated whether using a foot with a hydraulically controlled articulating ankle that allows the foot to be relatively dorsiflexed at toe-off and throughout swing would increase minimum toe clearance (MTC). Twenty-one people with unilateral transtibial amputation completed overground walking trials using their habitual prosthetic foot with rigid or elastic articulating attachment and a foot with a hydraulic ankle attachment (hyA-F). MTC and other kinematic variables were assessed across multiple trials. When using the hyA-F, mean MTC increased on both limbs (p = 0.03). On the prosthetic limb this was partly due to the device being in its fully dorsiflexed position at toe-off, which reduced the "toes down" foot angle throughout swing (p = 0.01). Walking speed also increased when using the hyA-F (p = 0.001) and was associated with greater swing-limb hip flexion on the prosthetic side (p = 0.04), which may have contributed to the increase in mean MTC. Variability in MTC increased on the prosthetic side when using the hyA-F (p = 0.03), but this did not increase risk of tripping.

  3. Smoking synthetic marijuana leads to self-mutilation requiring bilateral amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Karim A; Russo, Russell R; Adhvaryu, Dhaval V

    2014-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids have become a worldwide epidemic because they provide a sometimes legal, easily accessible, and presumably safe alternative to marijuana. Recently published reports have linked acute psychosis, myocardial infarctions, convulsions, self-harm, and even terrorist organizations to these designer substances. This case report outlines the first reported case of Black Diamond, a synthetic cannabis, leading to a self-inflicted burn to the bilateral upper extremities requiring a transradial amputation of the right arm and a toe transfer procedure of the left hand after loss of all digits. The patient presented to the emergency department with self-inflicted fourth-degree burns to the bilateral hands and forearms with second-degree burns of the face, for a total body surface area of 14.5%. The patient was found by firefighters with his hands aflame on his kitchen stove. With no previous medical or psychiatric history and collateral information to confirm the patient's mental status prior to use of Black Diamond, the patient's acute psychotic episode was attributed to Black Diamond. After multiple procedures and a lengthy recovery, the patient completed his post-graduate education and entered the professional world. As orthopedic surgeons, we should be involved in educating the public on the harm of these designer drugs, including self-mutilation. The popularity of synthetic drugs in the United States will continue to present a major challenge to all health care providers. Orthopedists are on the front lines of this epidemic because these drugs push patients into risky, traumatic behavior.

  4. Functional and structural regeneration in the axolotl heart (Ambystoma mexicanum) after partial ventricular amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Martínez, Agustina; Vargas-González, Alvaro; Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Prado-Zayago, Esteban; León-Oleda, Martha; Nieto-Lima, Betzabé

    2010-01-01

    "In the present study we evaluated the effect of partial ventricular amputation (PVA) in the heart of the adult urodele amphibian (Ambystoma mexicanum) in vivo on spontaneous heart contractile activity recorded in vitro in association to the structural recovery at one, five, 30 and 90 days after injury. One day after PVA, ventricular-tension (VT) (16 ± 3%), atrium-tension (AT) (46 ± 4%) and heart rate (HR) (58+10%) resulted lower in comparison to control hearts. On days five, 30 and 90 after damage, values achieved a 61 ± 5, 93 ± 3, and 98 ± 5% (VT), 60 ± 4, 96 ± 3 and 99 ± 5% (AT) and 74 ± 5, 84 ± 10 and 95 ± 10% (HR) of the control values, respectively. Associated to contractile activity recovery we corroborated a gradual tissue restoration by cardiomyocyte proliferation. Our results represent the first quantitative evidence about the recovery of heart of A. mexicanum restores its functional capacity concomitantly to the structural recovery of the myocardium by proliferation of cardiomyocytes after PVA. These properties make the heart of A. mexicanum a potential model to study the mechanisms underlying heart regeneration in adult vertebrates in vivo.

  5. Instrumented measurement of balance and postural control in individuals with lower limb amputation: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakaran, Prasath; Johnson, Gillian M; Sullivan, S John; Nitz, Jennifer C

    2012-09-01

    Measurement of balance and postural performance that underpins activities of daily living is important in the rehabilitation of individuals with a lower limb amputation (LLA), and there are a number of methods and strategies available for this purpose. To provide an evidence-based choice of approach, this review aims to critically review the tasks and outcome measures utilized in studies investigating static and dynamic balance using instrumented measurement devices in individuals with a LLA. A systematic search was conducted on multiple databases using keyword or subject headings appropriate to the respective database. Articles investigating static or dynamic balance in adults with LLA by means of instrumented measures were considered for the review. A total of 21 articles were included in the review. The static balance ability of individuals with an LLA has been investigated thoroughly, but their dynamic balance attributes remain relatively unexplored. Although the individual studies do provide valuable information on balance ability in the LLA, the heterogeneity in study designs and measures did not allow an overall analysis of the tasks and the outcome measures used. On the basis of these findings, this review provides an insight into the measurement of balance in amputees to inform novice researchers and clinicians working with individuals with an LLA.

  6. Spatiotemporal Parameters of 100-m Sprint in Different Levels of Sprinters with Unilateral Transtibial Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Hashizume, Satoru; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Mochmaru, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate differences of the spatiotemporal parameters in a 100-m sprint among elite, sub-elite, and non-elite sprinters with a unilateral transtibial amputation. Using publicly available Internet broadcasts, we analyzed 125, 19, and 33 records from 30 elite, 12 sub-elite, and 22 non-elite sprinters, respectively. For each sprinter’s run, the average velocity, step frequency, and step length were calculated using the number of steps in conjunction with the official race time. Average velocity was greatest in elite sprinters (8.71±0.32 m/s), followed by the sub-elite (8.09±0.06 m/s) and non-elite groups (7.72±0.27 m/s). Although there was a significant difference in average step frequency between the three groups, the effect size was small and the relative difference among the three groups was 3.1%. Statistical analysis also revealed that the average step length was longest in elite sprinters, followed by the sub-elite and non-elite groups. These results suggest that the differences in sprint performance between the three groups is mainly due to the average step length rather than step frequency. PMID:27701443

  7. Behavioral outcomes following below-knee amputation in the coordination between balance and leg movement.

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    Mouchnino, L; Mille, M-L; Martin, N; Baroni, G; Cincera, M; Bardot, A; Delarque, A; Massion, J; Pedotti, A

    2006-08-01

    Lateral leg movement is accompanied by opposite movements of the supporting leg and trunk segments. This kinematic synergy shifts the center of mass (CM) towards the supporting foot and stabilizes its final position, while the leg movement is being performed. The aim of the present study was to provide insight in the behavioral substitution process responsible for the performance of this kinematic synergy. The kinematic synergy was assessed by the principal component analysis (PCA) applied to both hip joints and supporting ankle joint. Patients after unilateral below-knee amputation and control subjects were asked to perform a lateral leg raising. The first principal component (PC(1)) accounted for more than 99% of the total angular variance for all subjects (amputees and controls). PC(1) thus well represents the possibility to describe this complex multi-joint movement as a one degree of freedom movement with fixed ratios between joint angular time course. In control subjects, the time covariation between joints changes holds during all phases of the leg movement (postural phase, ascending and braking phases). In amputees, PC(1) score decreased during the ascending phase of the movement (i.e. when the body weight transfer is completed, while the movement is initiated). We conclude that a feedback mechanism is involved and discuss the hypothesis that this inter-joint coordination in amputees results from a failure in the pre-setting of the inter-joint coupling.

  8. Epidural electrocorticography of phantom hand movement following long-term upper-limb amputation

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    Alireza eGharabaghi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostheses for upper-limb amputees are currently controlled by either myoelectric or peripheral neural signals. Performance and dexterity of these devices is still limited, particularly when it comes to controlling hand function. Movement-related brain activity might serve as a complementary bio-signal for motor control of hand prosthesis. Methods: We introduced a methodology to implant a cortical interface without direct exposure of the brain surface in an upper-limb amputee. This bi-directional interface enabled us to explore the cortical physiology following long-term transhumeral amputation. In addition, we investigated neurofeedback of electrocorticographic brain activity related to the patient’s motor imagery to open his missing hand, i.e. phantom hand movement, for real-time control of a virtual hand prosthesis.Results: Both event-related brain potentials and cortical stimulation revealed mutually overlapping cortical representations of the phantom hand. Phantom hand movements could be robustly classified and the patient required only three training sessions to gain reliable control of the virtual hand prosthesis in an online closed-loop paradigm that discriminated between hand opening and rest. Conclusion: Epidural implants may constitute a powerful and safe alternative communication pathway between the brain and external devices for upper-limb amputees, thereby facilitating the integrated use of different signal sources for more intuitive and specific control of multi-functional devices in clinical use.

  9. Long-term activity in and among persons with transfemoral amputation

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    Elizabeth G. Halsne, CPO

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Although physical limitations associated with transfemoral amputation (TFA have been studied in laboratory settings, little is known about habitual activity within free-living environments. A retrospective analysis of 12 mo of step activity data was performed to quantify activity levels, variations, and patterns in 17 adults with unilateral TFA. Yearly, seasonal, and monthly average daily step counts and coefficients of variation (CoVs were examined to characterize mobility. Analysis by Medicare Functional Classification Level (MFCL was performed to explore relationships between clinical classification and performance. Subjects averaged 1,540 prosthetic steps/day, and activity generally increased with MFCL. Activity between MFCL-2 and -3 subjects was not significantly different, suggesting that ability to engage in habitual physical activity may be similar for these groups. Relative variation (CoV was 0.65 across subjects but was lower for those with higher activity levels. No significant differences in CoV by group were detected. Marked seasonal and monthly patterns in activity were identified. Warmer seasons and months generally promoted higher activity, but peak temperatures and humidity depressed activity. Results suggest that persons with TFA are greatly limited in regards to activity. Further, large variations within and between subjects may challenge the interpretation of step activity gathered over short periods of time.

  10. Long-term activity in and among persons with transfemoral amputation.

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    Halsne, Elizabeth G; Waddingham, Matthew G; Hafner, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    Although physical limitations associated with transfemoral amputation (TFA) have been studied in laboratory settings, little is known about habitual activity within free-living environments. A retrospective analysis of 12 mo of step activity data was performed to quantify activity levels, variations, and patterns in 17 adults with unilateral TFA. Yearly, seasonal, and monthly average daily step counts and coefficients of variation (CoVs) were examined to characterize mobility. Analysis by Medicare Functional Classification Level (MFCL) was performed to explore relationships between clinical classification and performance. Subjects averaged 1,540 prosthetic steps/day, and activity generally increased with MFCL. Activity between MFCL-2 and -3 subjects was not significantly different, suggesting that ability to engage in habitual physical activity may be similar for these groups. Relative variation (CoV) was 0.65 across subjects but was lower for those with higher activity levels. No significant differences in CoV by group were detected. Marked seasonal and monthly patterns in activity were identified. Warmer seasons and months generally promoted higher activity, but peak temperatures and humidity depressed activity. Results suggest that persons with TFA are greatly limited in regards to activity. Further, large variations within and between subjects may challenge the interpretation of step activity gathered over short periods of time.

  11. Transfemoral unilateral computerized analysis of march in amputated individuals with endoskeletal and exoskeletal prothesis

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    Claudia Patricia Pinzón✝,

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Title: Computerized Gait Analysis in UnilateralTrans-Femoral Amputees with Endo-Skeleticand Exo-Skeletic Prosthesis. Case Study.The purpose of this study is to perform a computerized gait analysis in subjects with unilateraltrans-femoral amputation with endo-skeleticand exo-skeletic prosthesis. Method: Theparticipants were two soldiers of The ColombianNational Army, with trans-femoral (AK unilateralamputation, because of traumatic cause, age(25+/-10 years. The Software Ariel PerformanceAnalysis System (APAS was employed forthe movement analysis. Information onkinematics, parameters and decisive of the gait,tilt of pelvis, length of step, the length long stride,the broad of step, the march of cadense, the indexof energy, consumption and the percentage ofthe periods of duration of the gait cycle was obtained. Results: The heady data werecompared among if and with a normal gait. Theresults are present in a comparative board.Conclusions: The use of this technology in theintervention physical therapy with amputatedpeople, throws exact data in all the variables of thestudy, what can improve the boarding of thesepeople in the prosthetic and to provide them thegait pattern’s reeducation the nearest thing to thenormal thing.

  12. Elective amputation and bionic substitution restore functional hand use after critical soft tissue injuries

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    Aszmann, Oskar C.; Vujaklija, Ivan; Roche, Aidan D.; Salminger, Stefan; Herceg, Malvina; Sturma, Agnes; Hruby, Laura A.; Pittermann, Anna; Hofer, Christian; Amsuess, Sebastian; Farina, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Critical soft tissue injuries may lead to a non-functional and insensate limb. In these cases standard reconstructive techniques will not suffice to provide a useful outcome, and solutions outside the biological arena must be considered and offered to these patients. We propose a concept which, after all reconstructive options have been exhausted, involves an elective amputation along with a bionic substitution, implementing an actuated prosthetic hand via a structured tech-neuro-rehabilitation program. Here, three patients are presented in whom this concept has been successfully applied after mutilating hand injuries. Clinical tests conducted before, during and after the procedure, evaluating both functional and psychometric parameters, document the benefits of this approach. Additionally, in one of the patients, we show the possibility of implementing a highly functional and natural control of an advanced prosthesis providing both proportional and simultaneous movements of the wrist and hand for completing tasks of daily living with substantially less compensatory movements compared to the traditional systems. It is concluded that the proposed procedure is a viable solution for re-gaining highly functional hand use following critical soft tissue injuries when existing surgical measures fail. Our results are clinically applicable and can be extended to institutions with similar resources. PMID:27721419

  13. Is the trend of amputation in Nigeria changing? A review of 51 consecutives cases seen at Federal medical centre Ebute Metta, Lagos, Nigeria

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    A A Dada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many previous studies from Nigeria have recognized trauma and complications of management of musculo-skeletal conditions by traditional bone setters (TBS as the leading cause of amputation in Nigeria. However, of recent, a number of the studies are showing that diabetes gangrene which used to be an uncommon indication is becoming an important cause of extremity amputations. In view of the effect of amputation on the individual and the society and the success of well designed preventive programs, it is important that the indications for amputation be kept in constant view. The objective of this study is to draw attention to the increasing importance of diabetes gangrene as a leading cause of amputation in Nigeria. Patient and Methods: This is a three-year prospective study (October 2006 - September 2009 using observer- administered questionnaires after consents were obtained from all patients or proxy during the period of study. All recruited patients were followed up and evaluated after surgery to determine the outcome. The following data were obtained and analyzed - age, sex, amputation type, indication and use of prosthesis. Results: Fifty-one amputations were performed in fifty patients (37 males and 13 females. M.F = 2.8:1, age range 5 - 85 years, mean 47.6+/- S.D 20.7. Major limb amputations accounted for 35 cases (68.6 % with diabetes gangrene accounting for 23 cases (45% followed by Trauma accounting for 16 cases (31%. Wound infection was the commonest complication occurring in 16 cases (31.4%, Escherichia coli being the commonest causative organism. Only 6 patients (12% eventually used prosthesis and the mortality in this series was 8 patients (16%. Conclusion: Diabetic gangrene is the leading cause of amputation in this series. This is the first study in this environment to the best of the authors′ knowledge where diabetes gangrene will emerge the leading indication. A number of other reports from Nigeria in the last few

  14. Development of Transvaginal Uterus Amputation Device for Laparoscopic Hysterectomies in Gynecologic Surgeries

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    Serkan DİKİCİ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hysterectomy, that is removal of uterus, is one of the most common major operations in gynecologic surgeries. Laparoscopy technique is preferred in hysterectomy because of its advantages such as lower intra-operative blood loss, decreased surrounding tissue/organ damage, less operating time, lower postoperative infection and frequency of fever, shorter duration of hospitalization and post-operative returning time to normal activity. During total laparoscopic hysterectomy, first uterine vessels and ligaments are cauterized respectively, and then cervicovaginal connections are cauterized and coagulated to remove uterus completely. Uterine manipulators are used during laparoscopy to maximize the endoscopic vision of surgeons by moving related organs. However, conventional uterine manipulators have important drawbacks particularly to move uterus in three dimensions and to show cervicovaginal landmark during laparoscopic circular cauterization and amputation of the uterine cervix. A new transvaginal uterine manipulator may overcome these two important drawbacks of these currently available devices. For this reason, a3D scanned technique was used to get uterus sizes and computer aided design software is used in designing of the new manipulator and then 3D printer was used in prototyping. Special light emitting diodes (LEDs were mounted on the cervical cap of the manipulator to guide light beams from inside of cervicovaginal tissue to abdominal cavity to facilitate the visualization of tissue landmarks. Moreover, performances of different caps and LED systems will be evaluated. Furthermore, after integration of self-cutting and self-suturing mechanisms into our system, final prototype will be produced by using titanium which is biologically and mechanically appropriate. Therefore, aim of this study was to design and produce a new uterine manipulator with three dimensional movements, LED illumination, self-cutting and self-suturing systems to facilitate

  15. Gait biomechanics of individuals with transtibial amputation: effect of suspension system.

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    Arezoo Eshraghi

    Full Text Available Prosthetic suspension system is an important component of lower limb prostheses. Suspension efficiency can be best evaluated during one of the vital activities of daily living, i.e. walking. A new magnetic prosthetic suspension system has been developed, but its effects on gait biomechanics have not been studied. This study aimed to explore the effect of suspension type on kinetic and kinematic gait parameters during level walking with the new suspension system as well as two other commonly used systems (the Seal-In and pin/lock. Thirteen persons with transtibial amputation participated in this study. A Vicon motion system (six cameras, two force platforms was utilized to obtain gait kinetic and kinematic variables, as well as pistoning within the prosthetic socket. The gait deviation index was also calculated based on the kinematic data. The findings indicated significant difference in the pistoning values among the three suspension systems. The Seal-In system resulted in the least pistoning compared with the other two systems. Several kinetic and kinematic variables were also affected by the suspension type. The ground reaction force data showed that lower load was applied to the limb joints with the magnetic suspension system compared with the pin/lock suspension. The gait deviation index showed significant deviation from the normal with all the systems, but the systems did not differ significantly. Main significant effects of the suspension type were seen in the GRF (vertical and fore-aft, knee and ankle angles. The new magnetic suspension system showed comparable effects in the remaining kinetic and kinematic gait parameters to the other studied systems. This study may have implications on the selection of suspension systems for transtibial prostheses. Trial registration: Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials IRCT2013061813706N1.

  16. Asymmetrical loading demands associated with vertical jump landings in people with unilateral transtibial amputation

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    Marlene Schoeman, PhD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Loading symmetry during vertical jump landings between a person with amputation’s intact and prosthetic limbs was assessed to determine the role of each limb in controlling the downward momentum of the center of mass during landing. Six participants with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA and ten nondisabled participants completed 10 maximal vertical jumps, of which the highest jump was analyzed. Contralateral symmetry was assessed through the Symmetry Index (SI, while symmetry at the group level was assessed through a Mann-Whitney U test. Participants with TTA performed quasi-unilateral landings onto the intact limbs, resulting from either the incapability of the prosthetic ankle to plantar flex or increased residual-limb knee and hip flexion. In the loading phase, the participants with TTA displayed reduced prosthetic-side peak vertical forces (p = 0.04 along with reduced prosthetic-side ankle range of motion (p < 0.001, extensor moments (p = 0.03, and negative work generated (p = 0.00. Individual asymmetries were evident in the peak vertical force magnitudes (SI = 51%–140%, duration from touchdown to peak vertical force (SI = 52%–157%, ankle joint angles at touchdown (SI = 100%–538%, ranges of motion (SI = 147%–200%, knee (SI = 66%–179% and hip (SI = 87%–132% extensor moments, and work done at the ankle (SI = 155%–199% and hip (SI = 83%–204%. High peak forces (25.25 +/– 4.89 N·kg−1 intact limb and 14.61 +/– 8.28 N·kg−1 prosthetic limb from significantly lower (p < 0.001 landing heights than the nondisabled participants indicate a potential injury risk associated with landing for people with TTA.

  17. Trunk-pelvis motion, joint loads, and muscle forces during walking with a transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Adam J; Petrella, Anthony J; Silverman, Anne K

    2015-03-01

    People with unilateral, transtibial amputation (TTA) have an increased prevalence of chronic low back pain (LBP) relative to able-bodied people. However, a definitive cause of increased LBP susceptibility has not been determined. The purpose of this work was to compare dynamic trunk-pelvis biomechanics between people with (n=6) and without (n=6) unilateral TTA during walking using a computational modeling approach. A generic, muscle-actuated whole body model was scaled to each participant, and experimental walking data were used in a static optimization framework to calculate trunk-pelvis motion, L4L5 joint contact forces, and muscle forces within the trunk-pelvis region. Results included several significant between-group differences in trunk-pelvis biomechanics during different phases of the gait cycle. Most significant was greater lateral bending toward the residual side during residual single-limb stance (p<0.01), concurrent with an elevated L4L5 joint contact force (p=0.02) and greater muscle force from the intact-side obliques (p<0.01) in people with TTA relative to able-bodied people. During both double-limb support phases, people with TTA also had a greater range of axial trunk rotation away from the leading limb, concurrent with greater ranges of muscle forces in the erector spinae and obliques. In addition, a greater range of force (p=0.03) in residual-side psoas was found during early residual limb swing in people with TTA. Repeated exposure to atypical motion and joint/muscle loading in people with TTA may contribute to the development of secondary musculoskeletal disorders, including chronic, mechanical LBP.

  18. Myocutaneous Mucormycosis in a Diabetic Burnt Patient Led to Upper Extremity Amputation; A Case Report

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    Mehdi Ayaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic fungal infection that can implicate cranial sinuses, brain, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and skin. Although it can occur in patients with competent and incompetent immunity such as patients with diabetes mellitus, lymphoma, leukemia and burns, but it has an aggressive, malignant and lethal course in patients with incompetent immunity. To enforce the importance of burn in patients with underlaying diseases such as diabetes, we are going to report a rare case of diabetic burnt patient complicated by right upper extremity myocutaneous mucormycosis. We selected this case to emphasis the importance of underlying disease (diabetes mellitus with cutaneous burn, aggressive treatment of fungal infection in these patients and referring such case to burn center to prevent catastrophic results. A 50-year-old woman was introduced to us after several days of medical and surgical care of right upper extremity and trunk split-thickness burn. Due to gross muscle necrosis of right upper extremity and poor general condition of the patient, she was taken to the operating room that led to right upper extremity amputation and several times of aggressive debridement to save her life. Pathologic report was indicative of mucormycosis. We can conclude from this case that: 1 Burn, even partially thickness and with little body surface area, should be referred to burn center for better care 2 No response to usual medical treatment should make us more sensitive to consider the unusual causes of infection such as fungi 3 Suspected dead tissues should be excised aggressively especially if suspiciousness to wound sepsis and fungal infection is present especially in an immunocompromised patient.

  19. Performance of prognostic markers in the prediction of wound healing or amputation among patients with foot ulcers in diabetes: a systematic review.

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    Brownrigg, J R W; Hinchliffe, R J; Apelqvist, J; Boyko, E J; Fitridge, R; Mills, J L; Reekers, J; Shearman, C P; Zierler, R E; Schaper, N C

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of wound healing and major amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulceration is clinically important to stratify risk and target interventions for limb salvage. No consensus exists as to which measure of peripheral artery disease (PAD) can best predict outcomes. To evaluate the prognostic utility of index PAD measures for the prediction of healing and/or major amputation among patients with active diabetic foot ulceration, two reviewers independently screened potential studies for inclusion. Two further reviewers independently extracted study data and performed an assessment of methodological quality using the Quality in Prognostic Studies instrument. Of 9476 citations reviewed, 11 studies reporting on 9 markers of PAD met the inclusion criteria. Annualized healing rates varied from 18% to 61%; corresponding major amputation rates varied from 3% to 19%. Among 10 studies, skin perfusion pressure ≥ 40 mmHg, toe pressure ≥ 30 mmHg (and ≥ 45 mmHg) and transcutaneous pressure of oxygen (TcPO2 ) ≥ 25 mmHg were associated with at least a 25% higher chance of healing. Four studies evaluated PAD measures for predicting major amputation. Ankle pressure 70 mmHg and fluorescein toe slope mmHg or an ankle brachial index (ABI) mmHg or an ABI < 0.5 is associated with a significant increase in the incidence of major amputation.

  20. An orthotopic xenograft model with survival hindlimb amputation allows investigation of the effect of tumor microenvironment on sarcoma metastasis.

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    Goldstein, Seth D; Hayashi, Masanori; Albert, Catherine M; Jackson, Kyle W; Loeb, David M

    2015-10-01

    Overall survival rates for pediatric high-grade sarcoma have improved greatly in the past few decades, but prevention and treatment of distant metastasis remain the most compelling problems facing these patients. Traditional preclinical mouse models have not proven adequate to study the biology and treatment of spontaneous distant sarcoma metastasis. To address this deficit, we developed an orthotopic implantation/amputation model in which patient-derived sarcoma xenografts are surgically implanted into mouse hindlimbs, allowed to grow, then subsequently amputated and the animals observed for development of metastases. NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγ-null mice were implanted with either histologically intact high grade sarcoma patient-derived xenografts or cell lines in the pretibial space and affected limbs were amputated after tumor growth. In contrast to subcutaneous flank tumors, we were able to consistently detect spontaneous distant spread of the tumors using our model. Metastases were seen in 27-90 % of animals, depending on the xenograft, and were repeatable and predictable. We also demonstrate the utility of this model for studying the biology of metastasis and present preliminary new insights suggesting the role of arginine metabolism and macrophage phenotype polarization in creating a tumor microenvironment that facilitates metastasis. Subcutaneous tumors express more arginase than inducible nitric oxide synthase and demonstrate significant macrophage infiltration, whereas orthotopic tumors express similar amounts of inducible nitric oxide synthase and arginase and have only a scant macrophage infiltrate. Thus, we present a model of spontaneous distant sarcoma metastasis that mimics the clinical situation and is amenable to studying the biology of the entire metastatic cascade.