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Sample records for amorphous state

  1. Solid-state diffusion in amorphous zirconolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Zarkadoula, E. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6138 (United States); Todorov, I. T. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 1EP (United Kingdom); Geisler, T. [Steinmann-Institut für Geologie, Mineralogie und Paläontologie, University of Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Brazhkin, V. V. [Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, 142190 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    We discuss how structural disorder and amorphization affect solid-state diffusion, and consider zirconolite as a currently important case study. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we disentangle the effects of amorphization and density, and show that a profound increase of solid-state diffusion takes place as a result of amorphization. Importantly, this can take place at the same density as in the crystal, representing an interesting general insight regarding solid-state diffusion. We find that decreasing the density in the amorphous system increases pre-factors of diffusion constants, but does not change the activation energy in the density range considered. We also find that atomic species in zirconolite are affected differently by amorphization and density change. Our microscopic insights are relevant for understanding how solid-state diffusion changes due to disorder and for building predictive models of operation of materials to be used to encapsulate nuclear waste.

  2. Metastable states in amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Mikla, Victor I

    2009-01-01

    This book addresses an interesting and technologically important class of materials, the amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors. Experimental results on the structural and electronic metastable states in Se-rich chalcogenides are presented. Special attention is paid to the states in the mobility gap and their sensitivity to various factors such as irradiation, annealing and composition. Photoinduced changes of structure and physical properties are also considered and structural transformation at photocrystallization is studied in detail. Finally, the authors discuss potential applications of th

  3. Superconducting State Parameters of Bulk Amorphous Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya M. Vora

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Well recognized empty core (EMC pseudopotential of Ashcroft is used to investigate the superconducting state parameters viz; electron-phonon coupling strength λ, Coulomb pseudopotential μ*, transition temperature TC, isotope effect exponent α and effective interaction strength NOV of some (Ni33Zr671 – xVx (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 bulk amorphous alloys. We have incorporated five different types of local field correction functions, proposed by Hartree (H, Taylor (T, Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU, Farid et al. (F and Sarkar et al. (S to show the effect of exchange and correlation on the aforesaid properties. Very strong influence of the various exchange and correlation functions is concluded from the present study. The TC obtained from Sarkar et al. (S local field correction function are found an excellent agreement with available theoretical data. Quadratic TC equation has been proposed, which provide successfully the TC values of bulk amorphous alloys under consideration. Also, the present results are found in qualitative agreement with other such earlier reported data, which confirms the superconducting phase in the s bulk amorphous alloys.

  4. Solid state amorphization kinetic of alpha lactose upon mechanical milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Vincent; Willart, Jean-François; Lefort, Ronan; Derollez, Patrick; Danède, Florence; Descamps, Marc

    2011-11-29

    It has been previously reported that α-lactose could be totally amorphized by ball milling. In this paper we report a detailed investigation of the structural and microstructural changes by which this solid state amorphization takes place. The investigations have been performed by Powder X-ray Diffraction, Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((13)C CP-MAS) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The results reveal the structural complexity of the material in the course of its amorphization so that it cannot be considered as a simple mixture made of a decreasing crystalline fraction and an increasing amorphous fraction. Heating this complexity can give rise to a fully nano-crystalline material. The results also show that chemical degradations upon heating are strongly connected to the melting process. PMID:21983262

  5. Anharmonic Decay of Vibrational States in Amorphous Silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Fabian, Jaroslav; Allen, Philip B.

    1996-01-01

    Anharmonic decay rates are calculated for a realistic atomic model of amorphous silicon. The results show that the vibrational states decay on picosecond timescales and follow the two-mode density of states, similar to crystalline silicon, but somewhat faster. Surprisingly little change occurs for localized states. These results disagree with a recent experiment.

  6. Role of localized states in amorphous silicon tunnel barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of an experimental study of the role of localized states in amorphous silicon tunneling barriers are reported. Composite barriers formed of multilayers of SiOx and a-Si, the latter containing a known density of localized states, have been developed in which the dominant tunneling mechanism can be made to be either direct or resonant tunneling. The effect of these localized states on the behavior of the conductance with barrier thickness, and on the superconducting tunneling current-voltage characteristics, is described

  7. Density of states in Mo-Ru amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The density of states is calculated for several compositions of amorphous Mo1-x Rux. In order to simulate amorphous clusters, the structures (atomic positions) utilized in the calculations were built from a small dense randomly packed unit of hard spheres with periodic boundary conditions. The density of states is calculated from a tight-binding Hamiltonian with hopping integrals parametrized in terms of the ddσ, ddΠ and ddδ molecular integrals. The results for pure Mo and pure Ru, compared in the canonical band aproximation, agree well with the literature. For binary alloys, the comparison of the calculated density of states with the rigid band aproximation results indicates that a more complex approach than the rigid band model must be used, even when the two atoms have similar bands, with band centers at nearly the same energy. The results also indicate that there is no relation between the peak in the superconducting critical temperature as a function of the number of valence eletrons per atom (e/a) in the region near Mo(e/a=6) and the peak of the density of states at the Fermi level in the same region, as has been sugested by some authors. (Author)

  8. Superconducting state parameters of monovalent and polyvalent amorphous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study deals, we have calculated superconducting state parameter (SSP) like electron-phonon coupling strength λ, coulomb pseudo potential, μ*, transition temperature Tc, isotope effect exponent α and effective interaction strength N0V of monovalent (Li), divalent (Zn), trivalent (In) and tetravalent (Pb) amorphous. To carry out this work we have used our newly constructed model pseudo potential to describe electron ion interaction along with three different local field correction functions like Hartree, Taylor and Sarkar et al. The present results are found in good agreement with other available theoretical as well as experimental data

  9. Optical analysis of trap states in amorphous organic semiconductor films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graaf, Harald; Borczyskowski, Christian von [Center of Nanostructured Materials and Analytics, Chemnitz University of Technology (Germany); Friedriszk, Frank [Center of Nanostructured Materials and Analytics, Chemnitz University of Technology (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Increasing interest is drawn on thin organic semiconductor films in opto-electronic devices. While for applications like field-effect transistors and photovoltaic cells highly ordered morphologies resulting in higher charge carrier mobilities are requested, for other purposes like organic light emitting diodes amorphous arrangement of the molecules is needed. Here lower mobilities increase the recombination rate leading to a higher photon yield. In such systems trap states can influence dramatically the luminescence in its intensity and spectral regime. We show recent results on amorphous films of a perylene dye with a rather high concentration of trap states. These trap states act as sinks for the excitons and leads therefore to a clear shift of the luminescence to the red compared to the monomer emission. Temperature depended and time resolved measurements give a clear hint for the population of the traps from the exciton band. Comparisons with previous electrical measurements lead us to the assumption, that these traps are also dominating the charge carrier mobility within the material.

  10. Optoelectronic properties of valence-state-controlled amorphous niobium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozato, Takaki; Katase, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Katayama, Shota; Matsushima, Koichi; Itagaki, Naho; Yoshida, Hisao; Ohta, Hiromichi

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand the optoelectronic properties of amorphous niobium oxide (a-NbO x ), we have investigated the valence states, local structures, electrical resistivity, and optical absorption of a-NbO x thin films with various oxygen contents. It was found that the valence states of Nb ion in a-NbO x films can be controlled from 5+  to 4+  by reducing oxygen pressure during film deposition at room temperature, together with changing the oxide-ion arrangement around Nb ion from Nb2O5-like to NbO2-like local structure. As a result, a four orders of magnitude reduction in the electrical resistivity of a-NbO x films was observed with decreasing oxygen content, due to the carrier generation caused by the appearance and increase of an oxygen-vacancy-related subgap state working as an electron donor. The tunable optoelectronic properties of a-NbO x films by valence-state-control with oxygen-vacancy formation will be useful for potential flexible optoelectronic device applications.

  11. Optoelectronic properties of valence-state-controlled amorphous niobium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozato, Takaki; Katase, Takayoshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Katayama, Shota; Matsushima, Koichi; Itagaki, Naho; Yoshida, Hisao; Ohta, Hiromichi

    2016-06-29

    In order to understand the optoelectronic properties of amorphous niobium oxide (a-NbO x ), we have investigated the valence states, local structures, electrical resistivity, and optical absorption of a-NbO x thin films with various oxygen contents. It was found that the valence states of Nb ion in a-NbO x films can be controlled from 5+  to 4+  by reducing oxygen pressure during film deposition at room temperature, together with changing the oxide-ion arrangement around Nb ion from Nb2O5-like to NbO2-like local structure. As a result, a four orders of magnitude reduction in the electrical resistivity of a-NbO x films was observed with decreasing oxygen content, due to the carrier generation caused by the appearance and increase of an oxygen-vacancy-related subgap state working as an electron donor. The tunable optoelectronic properties of a-NbO x films by valence-state-control with oxygen-vacancy formation will be useful for potential flexible optoelectronic device applications. PMID:27168317

  12. Structural characterisation of amorphous materials by solid state NMR

    CERN Document Server

    Mollison, N B

    2002-01-01

    Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a structural elucidation technique that is ideal as a probe in the investigation of atomic structure of highly complex amorphous materials. In this study, NMR is employed in the structural characterisation of a series of sodium-lithium disilicate glasses. These so-called 'mixed-alkali' glasses are of great scientific interest, since they exhibit non-linear ionic transport related properties; the theory of which is not understood, but is thought to be related to the cation distribution in the disilicate network. This project attempts to utilise solid state NMR to its fullest potential, by combining several techniques, including the novel MQMAS experiment and a series of double resonance measurements. The double resonance techniques TRAPDOR and SEDOR have been attempted to measure sup 2 sup 9 Si-left brace sup 2 sup 3 Na right brace and sup 6 sup , sup 7 Li-left brace sup 7 sup , sup 6 Li right brace interactions respectively. Since these experiments rely on the d...

  13. Solid state amorphization of nanocrystalline nickel by cryogenic laser shock peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, complete solid state amorphization in nanocrystalline nickel has been achieved through cryogenic laser shock peening (CLSP). High resolution transmission electron microscopy has revealed the complete amorphous structure of the sample after CLSP processing. A molecular dynamic model has been used to investigate material behavior during the shock loading and the effects of nanoscale grain boundaries on the amorphization process. It has been found that the initial nanoscale grain boundaries increase the initial Gibbs free energy before plastic deformation and also serve as dislocation emission sources during plastic deformation to contribute to defect density increase, leading to the amorphization of pure nanocrystalline nickel

  14. Hydrogen-free amorphous silicon with no tunneling states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Queen, Daniel R; Metcalf, Thomas H; Karel, Julie E; Hellman, Frances

    2014-07-11

    The ubiquitous low-energy excitations, known as two-level tunneling systems (TLSs), are one of the universal phenomena of amorphous solids. Low temperature elastic measurements show that e-beam amorphous silicon (a-Si) contains a variable density of TLSs which diminishes as the growth temperature reaches 400 °C. Structural analyses show that these a-Si films become denser and more structurally ordered. We conclude that the enhanced surface energetics at a high growth temperature improved the amorphous structural network of e-beam a-Si and removed TLSs. This work obviates the role hydrogen was previously thought to play in removing TLSs in the hydrogenated form of a-Si and suggests it is possible to prepare "perfect" amorphous solids with "crystal-like" properties for applications. PMID:25062205

  15. Exchange bias and bistable magneto-resistance states in amorphous TbFeCo thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous TbFeCo thin films sputter deposited at room temperature on thermally oxidized Si substrate are found to exhibit strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Atom probe tomography, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping have revealed two nanoscale amorphous phases with different Tb atomic percentages distributed within the amorphous film. Exchange bias accompanied by bistable magneto-resistance states has been uncovered near room temperature by magnetization and magneto-transport measurements. The exchange anisotropy originates from the exchange interaction between the ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic components corresponding to the two amorphous phases. This study provides a platform for exchange bias and magneto-resistance switching using single-layer amorphous ferrimagnetic thin films that require no epitaxial growth

  16. Exchange bias and bistable magneto-resistance states in amorphous TbFeCo thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaopu, E-mail: xl6ba@virginia.edu; Ma, Chung T.; Poon, S. Joseph, E-mail: sjp9x@virginia.edu [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Lu, Jiwei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Devaraj, Arun [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Spurgeon, Steven R.; Comes, Ryan B. [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Amorphous TbFeCo thin films sputter deposited at room temperature on thermally oxidized Si substrate are found to exhibit strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Atom probe tomography, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping have revealed two nanoscale amorphous phases with different Tb atomic percentages distributed within the amorphous film. Exchange bias accompanied by bistable magneto-resistance states has been uncovered near room temperature by magnetization and magneto-transport measurements. The exchange anisotropy originates from the exchange interaction between the ferrimagnetic and ferromagnetic components corresponding to the two amorphous phases. This study provides a platform for exchange bias and magneto-resistance switching using single-layer amorphous ferrimagnetic thin films that require no epitaxial growth.

  17. Origin of deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide: Chemically disordered coordination of oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallis, S.; Williams, D. S. [Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Butler, K. T.; Walsh, A. [Center for Sustainable Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Quackenbush, N. F. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Junda, M.; Podraza, N. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States); Fischer, D. A.; Woicik, J. C. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); White, B. E.; Piper, L. F. J., E-mail: lpiper@binghamton.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States)

    2014-06-09

    The origin of the deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO), whether intrinsic to the amorphous structure or not, has serious implications for the development of p-type transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors. We report that the deep subgap feature in a-IGZO originates from local variations in the oxygen coordination and not from oxygen vacancies. This is shown by the positive correlation between oxygen composition and subgap intensity as observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also demonstrate that the subgap feature is not intrinsic to the amorphous phase because the deep subgap feature can be removed by low-temperature annealing in a reducing environment. Atomistic calculations of a-IGZO reveal that the subgap state originates from certain oxygen environments associated with the disorder. Specifically, the subgap states originate from oxygen environments with a lower coordination number and/or a larger metal-oxygen separation.

  18. Origin of deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide: Chemically disordered coordination of oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origin of the deep subgap states in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO), whether intrinsic to the amorphous structure or not, has serious implications for the development of p-type transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors. We report that the deep subgap feature in a-IGZO originates from local variations in the oxygen coordination and not from oxygen vacancies. This is shown by the positive correlation between oxygen composition and subgap intensity as observed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also demonstrate that the subgap feature is not intrinsic to the amorphous phase because the deep subgap feature can be removed by low-temperature annealing in a reducing environment. Atomistic calculations of a-IGZO reveal that the subgap state originates from certain oxygen environments associated with the disorder. Specifically, the subgap states originate from oxygen environments with a lower coordination number and/or a larger metal-oxygen separation.

  19. Transportation properties of amorphous state InSb and its metastable middle phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variation of the substrate temperature induces the metal-semiconductor transition in the condensation InSb films at low temperatrue. The electron conduction is dominant in the metal-type amorphous InSb and the hole in semiconductor-type one. In the metal-type amorphous InSb the electron-electron is correlated under the field above 0.1T in the temperature region of liquid nitrogen. The structure relaxation leads to not only the increase of the short range order but also the change of electron structure in metal-type amorphous InSb. The first conductance jump originates mainly from the increase of Hall mobility of the carrier, i.e. the increase of the short range order, and the system relaxes from the liquid-like to the lattice-like amorphous state. The three types of the crystallization phase transition for the metal-type amorphous InSb present obviously different transportation behaviours. Both metal-type amorphous state and metastable middle phase of InSb all are one of superconducting system with the lowest carrier concentration (n0∼1018 cm-3). Superconducting Tc of the metastable middle phase is related to the state density near Fermi surface, i.e. the higher Tc corresponds to the higher state density. The quasi-two-dimensional structure is favourable to superconductivity

  20. Athermal character of the solid state amorphization of lactose induced by ball milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willart, J. F.; Caron, V.; Lefort, R.; Danède, F.; Prévost, D.; Descamps, M.

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we report the possibility to reach pure glassy amorphous lactose by ball milling of crystalline α lactose under a dry nitrogen atmosphere. This route to the glassy state is found to be free of mutarotation towards the anomer β while this mutarotation is unavoidable using the usual thermal route, i.e. the quench of the liquid. This result definitely makes the 'local quench melting' hypothesis unsuitable to account for amorphization by ball milling.

  1. Processing Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors from amorphous state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, C. K.; Wong-Ng, W.; Cook, L. P.; Freiman, S. W.; Hwang, N. M.; Vaudin, M.; Hill, M. D.; Shull, R. D.; Shapiro, A. J.; Swartzendruber, L. J.

    1991-01-01

    The bismuth based high T sub c superconductors can be processed via an amorphous Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu oxide. The amorphous oxides were prepared by melting the constituent powders in an alumina crucible at 1200 C in air followed by pouring the liquid onto an aluminum plate, and rapidly pressing with a second plate. In the amorphous state, no crystalline phase was identified in the powder x ray diffraction pattern of the quenched materials. After heat treatment at high temperature the amorphous materials crystallized into a glass ceramic containing a large fraction of the Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O(x) phase T sub c = 110 K. The processing method, crystallization, and results of dc electrical resistivity and ac magnetic susceptibility measurements are discussed.

  2. Processing Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors from amorphous state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bismuth based high T sub c superconductors can be processed via an amorphous Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu oxide. The amorphous oxides were prepared by melting the constituent powders in an alumina crucible at 1200 C in air followed by pouring the liquid onto an aluminum plate, and rapidly pressing with a second plate. In the amorphous state, no crystalline phase was identified in the powder x ray diffraction pattern of the quenched materials. After heat treatment at high temperature the amorphous materials crystallized into a glass ceramic containing a large fraction of the Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O(x) phase T sub c = 110 K. The processing method, crystallization, and results of dc electrical resistivity and ac magnetic susceptibility measurements are discussed

  3. Optical characterization and density of states determination of silicon nanocrystals embedded in amorphous silicon based matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a non-destructive measurement and simple analysis method for obtaining the absorption coefficient of silicon nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in an amorphous matrix. This method enables us to pinpoint the contribution of silicon NCs to the absorption spectrum of NC containing films. The density of states (DOS) of the amorphous matrix is modelled using the standard model for amorphous silicon while the NCs are modelled using one Gaussian distribution for the occupied states and one for the unoccupied states. For laser annealed a-Si0.66O0.34:H films, our analysis shows a reduction of the NC band gap from approximately 2.34–2.08 eV indicating larger mean NC size for increasing annealing laser fluences, accompanied by a reduction in NC DOS distribution width from 0.28–0.26 eV, indicating a narrower size distribution. (paper)

  4. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Study of Crystallization Reaction of Fe/Dy Multilayers Form Amorphous State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To give further insight into the behavior of Fe/Dy multilayers in the crystallization from as-deposited amorphous state, free energy diagram of Fe/Dy system was constructed based on Miedema semiempirical theory. It is shown that the crystallization of amorphous films is controlled by both thermodynamic and kinetic conditions. The calculated free energies of crystalline Fe and Dy are significantly lower than those in the amorphous states, which provide thermodynamic driving force for crystallization. During annealing, the kinetic phase evolution of the multilayers is controlled by free energy barrier of nucleation and critical-size of new phase nucleus. Thus it explains the experimental results that Fe crystallites formed first followed by Dy grains, whereas crystalline Fe-Dy intermetallic compounds were not observed during annealing at moderate temperatures.

  5. Characterization of Two Distinct Amorphous Forms of Valsartan by Solid-State NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotnicki, Marcin; Apperley, David C; Aguilar, Juan A; Milanowski, Bartłomiej; Pyda, Marek; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Valsartan (VAL) is an antihypertensive drug marketed in an amorphous form. Amorphous materials can have different physicochemical properties depending on preparation method, thermal history, etc., but the nature of such materials is difficult to study by diffraction techniques. This study characterizes two different amorphous forms of valsartan (AR and AM) using solid-state NMR (SSNMR) as a primary investigation tool, supported by solution-state NMR, FT-IR, TMDSC, and dissolution tests. The two forms are found to be clearly distinct, with a significantly higher level of structural arrangement in the AR form, as observed in (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H SSNMR. (13)C and (15)N NMR indicates that the fully amorphous material (AM) contains an approximately equal ratio of cis-trans conformers about the amide bond, whereas the AR form exists mainly as one conformer, with minor conformational "defects". (1)H ultrafast MAS NMR shows significant differences in the hydrogen bonding involving the tetrazole and acid hydrogens between the two materials, while (15)N NMR shows that both forms exist as a 1,2,3,4-tetrazole tautomer. NMR relaxation times show subtle differences in local and bulk molecular mobility, which can be connected with the glass transition, the stability of the glassy material, and its response to aging. Counterintuitively the fully amorphous material is found to have a significantly lower dissolution rate than the apparently more ordered AR material. PMID:26602457

  6. Compression behavior and equation of state of Ni77P23 amorphous alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gong; GAO YunPeng; SUN YiNan; MA MingZhen; LIU Jing; LIU RiPing

    2007-01-01

    The compression behavior of Ni77P23 amorphous alloy is investigated at room temperature in a diamond-anvil cell instrument using in-situ high pressure energy dispersive X-ray diffraction with a synchrotron radiation source. The equation of state is determined by fitting the experimental data according to Birch-Murnaghan equation: -△V/V0=0.08606P-3.2×10-4P2+5.7×10-6P3. It is found that the structure of Ni77P23 amorphous alloy is stable under pressures up to 30.5 Gpa.

  7. Polymeric Amorphous Solid Dispersions: A Review of Amorphization, Crystallization, Stabilization, Solid-State Characterization, and Aqueous Solubilization of Biopharmaceutical Classification System Class II Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Shrawan; Cathcart, Helen; O'Reilly, Niall J

    2016-09-01

    Poor water solubility of many drugs has emerged as one of the major challenges in the pharmaceutical world. Polymer-based amorphous solid dispersions have been considered as the major advancement in overcoming limited aqueous solubility and oral absorption issues. The principle drawback of this approach is that they can lack necessary stability and revert to the crystalline form on storage. Significant upfront development is, therefore, required to generate stable amorphous formulations. A thorough understanding of the processes occurring at a molecular level is imperative for the rational design of amorphous solid dispersion products. This review attempts to address the critical molecular and thermodynamic aspects governing the physicochemical properties of such systems. A brief introduction to Biopharmaceutical Classification System, solid dispersions, glass transition, and solubility advantage of amorphous drugs is provided. The objective of this review is to weigh the current understanding of solid dispersion chemistry and to critically review the theoretical, technical, and molecular aspects of solid dispersions (amorphization and crystallization) and potential advantage of polymers (stabilization and solubilization) as inert, hydrophilic, pharmaceutical carrier matrices. In addition, different preformulation tools for the rational selection of polymers, state-of-the-art techniques for preparation and characterization of polymeric amorphous solid dispersions, and drug supersaturation in gastric media are also discussed. PMID:26886314

  8. Impact of amorphization on the magnetic state and magnetocaloric properties of Gd{sub 3}Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishkin, D.A.; Baranov, N.V.; Gubkin, A.F. [Russian Academy of Science, Institute of Metal Physics, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ural Federal University, Institute of Natural Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Volegov, A.S. [Ural Federal University, Institute of Natural Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Gerasimov, E.G.; Terentev, P.B.; Stashkova, L.A. [Russian Academy of Science, Institute of Metal Physics, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-15

    Rapid quenching and ball milling have been used to modify the magnetic state and magnetocaloric properties of the intermetallic compound Gd{sub 3}Ni. The melt-spun and ball-milled Gd{sub 3}Ni samples are found to exhibit a soft ferromagnetic-like behavior below 120 K, whereas in the crystalline state, the Gd{sub 3}Ni compound is an antiferromagnet with a Neel temperature of about 99 K. The reduced value of the saturation magnetization observed in amorphous Gd{sub 3}Ni samples is ascribed to the appearance of a magnetic moment on Ni atoms. After amorphization, the Gd{sub 3}Ni samples exhibit substantially improved magnetocaloric properties in a low field region in comparison with crystalline Gd{sub 3}Ni. (orig.)

  9. Correlation between Structures of Bulk Amorphous Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be Alloy in Different States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The structures of the bulk amorphous Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10.0Be22.5 alloy have been analyzed in solid, supercooled liquid and liquid with X-ray diffraction. The first coordination sphere radii and the first coordination numbers are 0.312 nm, 11.2 in solid state, 0.301 nm, 10.932 in supercooled liquid region and 0.305 nm, 11.296 in liquid state. The structures are the same in different states. But it shows some tendency to crystallizing that the first coordination sphere radius and the first coordination number drop in supercooled liquid region.

  10. Structures of bulk amorphous Zr41Ti14Ni10Cu12.5Be22.5 alloy in amorphous, crystalline, supercooled liquid and liquid states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The amorphous and crystal structures of Zr41Ti14Ni10Cu12.5Be22.5 alloy have been analyzed with X-ray diffractometer. The structures of bulk amorphous Zr41Ti14Ni10Cu12.5B22.5 alloy in solid, supercooled liquid and liquid states are almost of the same structure. The RDFs (Radius Distribution Function), the first coordination number, the first coordination radius, the correlation radius and atom number of the cluster were calculated for bulk amorphous Zr41Ti14Ni10Cu12.5B22.5 alloy in different states. The first coordination sphere radii and the first coordination numbers are 0.312nm, 11.2 in solid state, 0.301nm, 10.932 in supercooled liquid region and 0.305nm, 11.296 in liquid state. The crystal structure of Zr41Ti14Ni10Cu12.5B22.5 alloy is consisted of several intermetallic compounds which are CuZr2, Be2Zr, etc. The reason of formation glass for this alloy is that there is a larger resistance for atoms to rearrange and form intermetallic compounds in a long range order.

  11. Influence of solid-state acidity on the decomposition of sucrose in amorphous systems. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamis, Khouloud A

    2008-10-01

    It was of interest to develop a method for solid-state acidity measurements using pH indicators and to correlate this method to the degradation rate of sucrose. Amorphous samples containing lactose 100mg/ml, sucrose 10mg/ml, citrate buffer (1-50mM) and sodium chloride (to adjust the ionic strength) were prepared by freeze-drying. The lyophiles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and Karl Fischer titremetry. The solid-state acidity of all lyophiles was measured using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and suitable indicators (thymol blue or bromophenol blue). The prepared lyophiles were subjected to a temperature of 60 degrees C and were analyzed for degradation using the Trinder kit. The results obtained from this study have shown that the solid-state acidity depends mainly on the molar ratio of the salt and the acid used in buffer preparation and not on the initial pH of the solution. The degradation of sucrose in the lyophiles is extremely sensitive to the solid-state acidity and the ionic strength. Reasonable correlation was obtained between the Hammett acidity function and sucrose degradation rate. The use of cosolvents (in the calibration plots) can provide good correlations with the rate of an acid-catalyzed reaction, sucrose inversion, in amorphous lyophiles. PMID:18647642

  12. Density-functional theory study of stability and subgap states of crystalline and amorphous Zn-Sn-O

    OpenAIRE

    Körner, Wolfgang; Elsässer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We present a density-functional theory analysis of stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric crystalline and amorphous Zn-Sn-O systems (c-ZTO, a-ZTO) which connects structural features with electronic properties in order to contribute to the understanding of the recently discovered subgap states in a-ZTO and other amorphous oxide films. In particular we show that defect levels originating from oxygen vacancies are too high in energy to be responsible for levels above the valence band edge. We offe...

  13. Generalized molybdenum oxide surface chemical state XPS determination via informed amorphous sample model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas, E-mail: job314@lehigh.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University, B336 Iacocca Hall, 111 Research Drive, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Mendoza-Sanchez, Beatriz [CRANN, Chemistry School, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Fernandez, Vincent [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Veenstra, Rick [PhotoCatalytic Synthesis group, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, Meander 229, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Dukstiene, Nijole [Department of Physical and Inorganic Chemistry, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilenu pl. 19, LT-50254 Kaunas (Lithuania); Roberts, Adam [Kratos Analytical Ltd, Trafford Wharf Road, Wharfside, Manchester, M17 1GP (United Kingdom); Fairley, Neal [Casa Software Ltd, Bay House, 5 Grosvenor Terrace, Teignmouth, Devon TQ14 8NE (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • We analyzed and modeled spectral envelopes of complex molybdenum oxides. • Molybdenum oxide films of varying valence and crystallinity were synthesized. • MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 2} line shapes from experimental data were created. • Informed amorphous sample model (IASM) developed. • Amorphous molybdenum oxide XPS envelopes were interpreted. - Abstract: Accurate elemental oxidation state determination for the outer surface of a complex material is of crucial importance in many science and engineering disciplines, including chemistry, fundamental and applied surface science, catalysis, semiconductors and many others. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is the primary tool used for this purpose. The spectral data obtained, however, is often very complex and can be subject to incorrect interpretation. Unlike traditional XPS spectra fitting procedures using purely synthetic spectral components, here we develop and present an XPS data processing method based on vector analysis that allows creating XPS spectral components by incorporating key information, obtained experimentally. XPS spectral data, obtained from series of molybdenum oxide samples with varying oxidation states and degree of crystallinity, were processed using this method and the corresponding oxidation states present, as well as their relative distribution was elucidated. It was shown that monitoring the evolution of the chemistry and crystal structure of a molybdenum oxide sample due to an invasive X-ray probe could be used to infer solutions to complex spectral envelopes.

  14. Determining the equation of state of amorphous solids at high pressure using optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Samrat A.; Rissi, Erin N.; McKiernan, Keri; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2012-03-01

    A method to determine the volumetric equation of state of amorphous solids using optical microscopy in a diamond anvil cell is described. The method relies on two- dimensional image acquisition and analysis to quantify changes in the projected image area with compression. The area analysis methods prove to be robust against improper focusing and lighting conditions while providing the accuracy necessary to deduce small area changes, which correspond to small volume changes in an isotropic material. The image capture, area analysis method is used to determine the compression of cubic crystals, yielding results in good agreement with diffraction and volumetric measurements. As a proof of concept, the equation of state of amorphous red phosphorus is measured up to 12 GPa under hydrostatic conditions where the quantified volume change between the red and black phases is approximately ΔV/V0 ≈ 0.05 after a reduction of volume nearing 35% at 8 GPa. A large hysteresis is present during decompression and eventually results in a 15% permanent densification relative to the starting volume, which is attributed to a pressure induced crystallization from red to black phosphorus. The robustness of the technique is also demonstrated by measuring the equation of state of GeSe2 glasses for semi transparent samples and As2O3 in which gold coating is used as a contrasting aid.

  15. Nucleation of Organic Molecules via a Hot Precursor State: Pentacene on Amorphous Mica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Adolf; Tumbek, Levent

    2013-12-01

    Organic thin films have attracted considerable interest due to their applicability in organic electronics. The classical scenario for thin film nucleation is the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA). Recently, it has been shown that organic thin film growth is better described by attachment-limited aggregation (ALA). However, in both cases, an unusual relationship between the island density and the substrate temperature was observed. Here, we present an aggregation model that goes beyond the classical DLA or ALA models to explain this behavior. We propose that the (hot) molecules impinging on the surface cannot immediately equilibrate to the substrate temperature but remain in a hot precursor state. In this state, the molecules can migrate considerable distances before attaching to a stable or unstable island. This results in a significantly smaller island density than expected by assuming fast equilibration and random diffusion. We have applied our model to pentacene film growth on amorphous Muscovite mica. PMID:24340130

  16. Carbohydrate polymers in amorphous states: an integrated thermodynamic and nanostructural investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Duncan; Claude, Johanna; Schweizer, Thomas; Alam, Ashraf; Ubbink, Job

    2005-01-01

    The effect of water on the structure and physical properties of amorphous polysaccharide matrices is investigated by combining a thermodynamic approach including pressure- and temperature-dependent dilatometry with a nanoscale analysis of the size of intermolecular voids using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Amorphous polysaccharides are of interest because of a number of unusual properties which are likely to be related to the extensive hydrogen bonding between the carbohydrate chains. Uptake of water by the carbohydrate matrices leads to a strong increase in the size of the holes between the polymer chains in both the glassy and rubbery states while at the same time leading to an increase in matrix free volume. Thermodynamic clustering theory indicates that, in low-moisture carbohydrate matrices, water molecules are closely associated with the carbohydrate chains. Based on these observations, we propose a novel model of plasticization of carbohydrate polymers by water in which the water dynamically disrupts chains the hydrogen bonding between the carbohydrates, leading to an expansion of the matrix originating at the nanolevel and increasing the number of degrees of freedom of the carbohydrate chains. Consequently, even in the glassy state, the uptake of water leads to increased rates of matrix relaxation and mobility of small permeants. In contrast, low-molecular weight sugars plasticize the carbohydrate matrix without appreciably changing the structure and density of the rubbery state, and their role as plasticizer is most likely related to a reduction of the number of molecular entanglements. The improved molecular packing in glassy matrices containing low molecular weight sugars leads to a higher matrix density, explaining, despite the lower glass transition temperature, the reduced mobility of small permeants in such matrices. PMID:15762653

  17. Electronic structure and defect states of transition films from amorphous to microcrystalline silicon studied by surface photovoltage spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wei; Wang Chun-Sheng; Lu Wan-Bing; He Jie; Han Xiao-Xia; Fu Guang-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) is used to determine the electronic structure of the hydro-genated transition Si films. All samples are prepared by using helicon wave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique, the films exhibit a transition from the amorphous phase to the microcrystalline phase with increasing temperature. The film deposited at lower substrate temperature has the amorphous-like electronic structure with two types of dominant defect states corresponding to the occupied Si dangling bond states (D0/D-) and the empty Si dangling states (D+). At higher substrate temperature, the crystallinity of the deposited films increases, while their band gap energy decreases. Meanwhile, two types of additional defect states is incorporate into the films as compared with the amorphous counterpart, which is attributed to the interface defect states between the microcrystalline Si grains and the amorphous matrix. The relative SPS intensity of these two kinds of defect states in samples deposited above 300 C increases first and decreases afterwards, which may be interpreted as a result of the competition between hydrogen release and crystalline grain size increment with increasing substrate temperature.

  18. Far tails of the density of states in amorphous organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, S. V., E-mail: novikov@elchem.ac.ru [A. N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Leninsky Prospect 31, 119071 Moscow, Russia and National Research University Higher School of Economics, Myasnitskaya Ulitsa 20, Moscow 101000 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    Far tails of the density of state (DOS) are calculated for the simple models of organic amorphous material, the model of dipolar glass and model of quadrupolar glass. It was found that in both models far tails are non-Gaussian. In the dipolar glass model, the DOS is symmetric around zero energy, while for the model of quadrupolar glass, the DOS is generally asymmetric and its asymmetry is directly related to the particular geometry of quadrupoles. Far tails of the DOS are relevant for the quasi-equilibrium transport of the charge carriers at low temperature. Asymmetry of DOS in quadrupolar glasses means a principal inequivalence of the random energy landscape for the transport of electrons and holes. Possible effect of the non-Gaussian shape of the far tails of the DOS on the temperature dependence of carrier drift mobility is discussed.

  19. Far tails of the density of states in amorphous organic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Far tails of the density of state (DOS) are calculated for the simple models of organic amorphous material, the model of dipolar glass and model of quadrupolar glass. It was found that in both models far tails are non-Gaussian. In the dipolar glass model, the DOS is symmetric around zero energy, while for the model of quadrupolar glass, the DOS is generally asymmetric and its asymmetry is directly related to the particular geometry of quadrupoles. Far tails of the DOS are relevant for the quasi-equilibrium transport of the charge carriers at low temperature. Asymmetry of DOS in quadrupolar glasses means a principal inequivalence of the random energy landscape for the transport of electrons and holes. Possible effect of the non-Gaussian shape of the far tails of the DOS on the temperature dependence of carrier drift mobility is discussed

  20. Large-area solid state detector for radiology using amorphous selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Rowlands, John A.

    1992-06-01

    A large area self-scanned solid-state detector is being developed for digital radiology. It consists of an x-ray sensitive flat-panel employing amorphous selenium ((alpha) )-Se) as the x- ray transducer and active matrix integrated circuit for readout. In principle such detectors could be used for all the currently applied radiological modalities -- radiography, photofluorography, and fluoroscopy. Layers of (alpha) )-Se up to 500 micrometers thick are readout with an array of thin film field effect transistors. The whole structure is integrated onto a glass plate. For all practical purposes the resolution of the system is dictated by the pixel size and readout could be in real-time (i.e., 30 frames/sec).

  1. Estimation of the impact of electrostatic discharge on density of states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin-film transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tosic Golo, Natasa; Wal, van der Siebrigje; Kuper, F.G.; Mouthaan, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this letter is to give an estimation of the impact of an electrostatic discharge (ESD) stress on the density of states (DOS) within the energy gap of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistors. ESD stresses were applied by means of a transmission line model tester

  2. Variation of the electronic densities of states as a function of impurity concentration in amorphous bismuth alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Pinzon, Zaahel; Valladares, Ariel Alberto; Valladares, Alexander; Valladares, Renela Maria

    2014-03-01

    The properties of materials are strongly related to their atomic topology, especially when we compare properties related to the ordered and disordered phases. Using Density Functional Theory methods on 64-atom supercells we obtain the structure and calculate the electronic density of states (eDOS) as a function of the concentration of lead, thallium or antimony in an amorphous bismuth supercell. This is done to investigate how the eDOS affects the superconducting transition temperature (Tc), taking into account the measurements made by Shier and Ginsberg[2] on contaminated amorphous bismuth thin films. Supported by CONACYT and DGAPA (UNAM).

  3. Multivariate Quantification of the Solid State Phase Composition of Co-Amorphous Naproxen-Indomethacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, Andreas; Grohganz, Holger; Löbmann, Korbinian;

    2015-01-01

    To benefit from the optimized dissolution properties of active pharmaceutical ingredients in their amorphous forms, co-amorphisation as a viable tool to stabilize these amorphous phases is of both academic and industrial interest. Reports dealing with the physical stability and recrystallization...

  4. AMORPHIZATION OF CRYSTALLINE COBALT AND TIN MULTILAYERS BY SOLID STATE REACTION AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

    OpenAIRE

    Guilmin, P.; Guyot, P.; Marcha, G.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous Cox Sn1-x alloys have been obtained, at room temperature, by interdiffusion from initially crystalline multilayers. The properties of these alloys (forming ability range, temperature variation of electrical resistance, crystallization temperature and magnetic behaviour) are compared to those of Cox, Sn1-x amorphous alloys formed by co-evaporation at 77 K.

  5. Solid state amorphization in the Al-Fe binary system during high energy milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, P., E-mail: purban@us.es; Montes, J. M.; Cintas, J. [University of Seville, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, ETSI, Camino de los Descubrimientos s/n, Seville, 41092 (Spain); Cuevas, F. G., E-mail: fgcuevas@dqcm.uhu.es [University of Huelva, Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, ETSI, Campus La Rábida, Carretera Palos s/n, Palos de la Frontera, Huelva, 21819 (Spain)

    2013-12-16

    In the present study, mechanical alloying (MA) of Al75Fe25 elemental powders mixture was carried out in argon atmosphere, using a high energy attritor ball mill. The microstructure of the milled products at different stages of milling was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results showed that the amorphous phase content increased by increasing the milling time, and after 50 hours the amorphization process became complete. Heating the samples resulted in the crystallization of the synthesized amorphous alloys and the appearance of the equilibrium intermetallic compounds Al{sub 5}Fe{sub 2}.

  6. Phase transition of nano-sized amorphous tungsten to a crystalline state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, some thermal properties of nano-sized amorphous W oxide and WO2 were measured. It was shown that amorphous nanoscale metal is crystallized at the temperature 1000-1370 degree C and this generates 170 ± 25 J/g energy substantially coincident, as expected, with a heat of phase transition point. As is typical for all nanosized amorphous material, phase transition temperature considerably less than half of the melting temperature of the material and does not have a strict threshold character observed for normal phase transition in crystalline materials

  7. Charge transport model in solid-state avalanche amorphous selenium and defect suppression design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Miranda, Yesenia; Liu, Hongyu; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) in a layer of High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) is being investigated for its use in large area medical imagers. Avalanche multiplication of photogenerated charge requires electric fields greater than 70 V μm-1. For a-Se to withstand this high electric field, blocking layers are used to prevent the injection of charge carriers from the electrodes. Blocking layers must have a high injection barrier and deep trapping states to reduce the electric field at the interface. In the presence of a defect in the blocking layer, a distributed resistive layer (DRL) must be included into the structure to build up space charge and reduce the electric field in a-Se and the defect. A numerical charge transport model has been developed to optimize the properties of blocking layers used in various HARP structures. The model shows the incorporation of a DRL functionality into the p-layer can reduce dark current at a point defect by two orders of magnitude by reducing the field in a-Se to the avalanche threshold. Hole mobility in a DRL of ˜10-8 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 100 V μm-1 as demonstrated by the model can be achieved experimentally by varying the hole mobility of p-type organic or inorganic semiconductors through doping, e.g., using Poly(9-vinylcarbozole) doped with 1%-3% (by weight) of poly(3-hexylthiopene).

  8. Solid-state properties and dissolution behaviour of tablets containing co-amorphous indomethacin-arginine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, Elisabeth; Jensen, Katrine Birgitte Tarp; Blaabjerg, Lasse Ingerslev;

    2015-01-01

    Co-amorphous drug formulations provide the possibility to stabilize a drug in its amorphous form by interactions with low molecular weight compounds, e.g. amino acids. Recent studies have shown the feasibility of spray drying as a technique to manufacture co-amorphous indomethacin–arginine in a...... larger production scale. In this work, a tablet formulation was developed for a co-amorphous salt, namely spray dried indomethacin–arginine (SD IND–ARG). The effects of compaction pressure on tablet properties, physical stability and dissolution profiles under non-sink conditions were examined....... Dissolution profiles of tablets with SD IND–ARG (TAB SD IND–ARG) were compared to those of tablets containing a physical mixture of crystalline IND and ARG (TAB PM IND–ARG) and to the dissolution of pure spray dried powder. Concerning tableting, the developed formulation allowed for the preparation of tablets...

  9. Pressure-volume-temperature and excess molar volume prediction of amorphous and crystallizable polymer blends by equation of state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fakhri Yousefi; Hajir Karimi; Maryam Gomar

    2015-01-01

    In this work the statistical mechanical equation of state was developed for volumetric properties of crystal ine and amorphous polymer blends. The Ihm–Song–Mason equations of state (ISMEOS) based on temperature and density at melting point (Tm andρm) as scaling constants were developed for crystalline polymers such as poly(propylene glycol)+poly(ethylene glycol)-200 (PPG+PEG-200), poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether-300 (PEGME-350)+PEG-200 and PEGME-350+PEG-600. Furthermore, for amorphous polymer blends con-taining poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO)+polystyrene (PS) and PS+poly(vinylmethylether) (PVME), the density and surface tension at glass transition (ρg andγg) were used for estimation of second Virial coefficient. The calculation of second Virial coefficients (B2), effective van der Waals co-volume (b) and correction factor (α) was required for judgment about applicability of this model. The obtained results by ISMEOS for crys-talline and amorphous polymer blends were in good agreement with the experimental data with absolute aver-age deviations of 0.84%and 1.04%, respectively.

  10. State transformations and ice nucleation in glassy or (semi-solid amorphous organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Baustian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Glassy or amorphous (semi-solid organic aerosol particles have the potential to serve as surfaces for heterogeneous ice nucleation in cirrus clouds. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy have been used in conjunction with a cold stage to examine water uptake and ice nucleation on individual aqueous organic glass particles at atmospherically relevant temperatures (200–273 K. Three organic compounds considered proxies for atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA were used in this investigation: sucrose, citric acid and glucose. Internally mixed particles consisting of each organic species and ammonium sulfate were also investigated.

    Results from water uptake experiments were used to construct glass transition curves and state diagrams for each organic and corresponding mixture. A unique glass transition point on each state diagram, Tg', was used to quantify and compare results from this study to previous works. Values of Tg' determined for aqueous sucrose, glucose and citric acid glasses were 236 K, 230 K and 220 K, respectively. Values of Tg' for internally mixed organic/sulfate particles were always significantly lower; 210 K, 207 K and 215 K for sucrose/sulfate, glucose/sulfate and citric acid/sulfate, respectively.

    All investigated organic species were observed to serve as heterogeneous ice nuclei at tropospheric temperatures. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on pure organic particles occurred at Sice=1.1–1.4 for temperatures between 235 K and 200 K. Particles consisting of 1:1 organic-sulfate mixtures remained liquid over a greater range of conditions but were in some cases also observed to depositionally nucleate ice at temperatures below 202 K (Sice=1.25–1.38.

    Glass transition curves constructed from experimental data were incorporated into the Community Aerosol Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA along with the

  11. Comparison of the electronic structure of amorphous versus crystalline indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor: structure, tail states and strain effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jamblinne de Meux, A.; Pourtois, G.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.

    2015-11-01

    We study the evolution of the structural and electronic properties of crystalline indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) upon amorphization by first-principles calculation. The bottom of the conduction band (BCB) is found to be constituted of a pseudo-band of molecular orbitals that resonate at the same energy on different atomic sites. They display a bonding character between the s orbitals of the metal sites and an anti-bonding character arising from the interaction between the oxygen and metal s orbitals. The energy level of the BCB shifts upon breaking of the crystal symmetry during the amorphization process, which may be attributed to the reduction of the coordination of the cationic centers. The top of the valence band (TVB) is constructed from anti-bonding oxygen p orbitals. In the amorphous state, they have random orientation, in contrast to the crystalline state. This results in the appearance of localized tail states in the forbidden gap above the TVB. Zinc is found to play a predominant role in the generation of these tail states, while gallium hinders their formation. Last, we study the dependence of the fundamental gap and effective mass of IGZO on mechanical strain. The variation of the gap under strain arises from the enhancement of the anti-bonding interaction in the BCB due to the modification of the length of the oxygen-metal bonds and/or to a variation of the cation coordination. This effect is less pronounced for the amorphous material compared to the crystalline material, making amorphous IGZO a semiconductor of choice for flexible electronics. Finally, the effective mass is found to increase upon strain, in contrast to regular materials. This counterintuitive variation is due to the reduction of the electrostatic shielding of the cationic centers by oxygen, leading to an increase of the overlaps between the metal orbitals at the origin of the delocalization of the BCB. For the range of strain typically met in flexible electronics, the induced

  12. Effect of the formation conditions on the local density of electronic states of amorphous films of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of ultrafine x-ray emission spectroscopy was used to examine the effect of the formation conditions (power of the rf discharge and substrate temperature) on the nature of energy distribution of the valency states of silicon in amorphous films of silicon carbide produced by rf sputtering a target made of polycrystalline carbide. The results show the existence of optimum conditions under which the coordination of silicon atoms is closest to their coordination in the crystal. Under these conditions, the density of occupied localised states is minimum. (author)

  13. Corrosion resistant amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of publication data on corrosion resistance of amorphous alloys and the methods of amorphization of surface layers of massive materials (laser treatment, iron implantation, detonation-gas spraying, cathode and ion sputtering, electrodeposition) was made. A study was made on corrosion properties of Fe66Cr11B10Si4 alloy in cast state and after laser irradiation, rendering the surface amorphous as well as the samples of Arenco iron and steel 20 with ion-plasma coatings of Fe-Cr-Ni-Ti alloy. It was established that amorphous coatings posses much higher corrosion resistance as compared to crystalline alloys on the same base

  14. Amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors for solid state dosimetric systems of high-energetic ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpotyuk, O. [Pedagogical University, Czestochowa (Poland)]|[Institute of Materials, Lvov (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The application possibilities of amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors use as radiation-sensitive elements of high-energetic (E > 1 MeV) dosimetric systems are analysed. It is shown that investigated materials are characterized by more wide region of registered absorbed doses and low temperature threshold of radiation information bleaching in comparison with well-known analogies based on coloring oxide glasses. (author). 16 refs, 1 tab.

  15. Electronic state modification in laser deposited amorphous carbon films by the inclusion of nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Miyajima; Adamopoulos, G; Henley, SJ; V.Stolojan; Tison, Y; Garcia-Caurel, E; Drevillon, B.; Shannon, JM; Silva, SRP

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of the inclusion of nitrogen in amorphous carbon thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition, which results in stress induced modifications to the band structure and the concomitant changes to the electronic transport properties. The microstructural changes due to nitrogen incorporation were examined using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and Raman scattering. The band structure was investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry data in the range o...

  16. Solid state photochemistry. Subpanel A-2(b): Metastability in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, D. [Solarex Corporation, Newton, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    All device quality amorphous silicon based materials exhibit degradation in electronic properties when exposed to sunlight. The photo-induced defects are associated with Si dangling bonds that are created by the recombination and/or trapping of photogenerated carriers. The defects are metastable and can be annealed out at temperatures of about 150 to 200 degrees Centigrade. The density of metastable defects is larger in films that are contaminated with > 10{sup 19} per cubic cm of impurities such as oxygen, carbon and nitrogen. However, recent experimental results indicate that some metastable defects are still present in films with very low impurity concentrations. The photo-induced defects typically saturate after 100 to 1000 hours of exposure to one sun illumination depending on the deposition conditions. There is also experimental evidence that photo-induced structural changes are occurring in the amorphous silicon based materials and that hydrogen may be playing an important role in both the photo-induced structural changes and in the creation of metastable defects.

  17. Structural and band tail state photoluminescence properties of amorphous SiC films with different amounts of carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Guang-Sheng; Wang Xin-Zhan; Lu Wan-Bing; Dai Wan-Le; Li Xing-Kuo; Yu Wei

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide films are deposited by the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique,and optical emissions from the near-infrared to the visible are obtained.The optical band gap of the films increases from 1.91 eV to 2.92 eV by increasing the carbon content,and the photoluminescence (PL) peak shifts from 1.51 eV to 2.16 eV.The band tail state PL mechanism is confirmed by analysing the optical band gap,PL intensity,the Stocks shift of the PL,and the Urbach energy of the film.The PL decay times of the samples are in the nanosecond scale,and the dependence of the PL lifetime on the emission energy also supports that the optical emission is related to the radiative recombination in the band tail state.

  18. Influence of solid-state acidity on the decomposition of sucrose in amorphous systems II (effect of buffer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamis, Khouloud A

    2009-04-01

    It was of interest to investigate the solid-state acidity using indicator probe molecules and sucrose degradation. Amorphous samples containing lactose, sucrose, buffers (citrate, malate, tartarate, or phosphate) with different pH values, and sodium chloride (to adjust the ionic strength) were prepared by freeze-drying. The lyophiles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Karl Fischer titrimetry. The solid-state acidity of all lyophiles was measured using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and suitable indicators (thymol blue or bromophenol blue). Selected lyophiles were subjected to a temperature of 60 degrees C and were analyzed for sucrose degradation using the Trinder kit. The results obtained from this study have shown that good correlation can be obtained between the solid-state acidity and the molar ratio of the salt and the acid in solution. The degradation of sucrose in the lyophiles is extremely sensitive to the solid-state acidity and might be able to provide a better estimate for the acidity than the indicator probe molecules. The Hammett acidity-rate profile for sucrose degradation in the lyophiles (using four different buffers) was also obtained. The profile showed similarity to the pH-rate profile in solution, and no buffer catalysis for sucrose degradation was detected in this study. PMID:19016102

  19. Development of solid-state avalanche amorphous selenium for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuermann, James R., E-mail: James.Scheuermann@stonybrook.edu; Goldan, Amir H.; Zhao, Wei [Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Tousignant, Olivier; Léveillé, Sébastien [Analogic Canada, Montreal, Ontario H4R 2P1 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have limited performance in low dose applications due to the electronic noise of the thin film transistor (TFT) array. A uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) called high gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) allows for signal amplification prior to readout from the TFT array, largely eliminating the effects of the electronic noise. The authors report preliminary avalanche gain measurements from the first HARP structure developed for direct deposition onto a TFT array. Methods: The HARP structure is fabricated on a glass substrate in the form of p-i-n, i.e., the electron blocking layer (p) followed by an intrinsic (i) a-Se layer and finally the hole blocking layer (n). All deposition procedures are scalable to large area detectors. Integrated charge is measured from pulsed optical excitation incident on the top electrode (as would in an indirect AMFPI) under continuous high voltage bias. Avalanche gain measurements were obtained from samples fabricated simultaneously at different locations in the evaporator to evaluate performance uniformity across large area. Results: An avalanche gain of up to 80 was obtained, which showed field dependence consistent with previous measurements from n-i-p HARP structures established for vacuum tubes. Measurements from multiple samples demonstrate the spatial uniformity of performance using large area deposition methods. Finally, the results were highly reproducible during the time course of the entire study. Conclusions: We present promising avalanche gain measurement results from a novel HARP structure that can be deposited onto a TFT array. This is a crucial step toward the practical feasibility of AMFPI with avalanche gain, enabling quantum noise limited performance down to a single x-ray photon per pixel.

  20. Electric and magnetic properties of Al86Ni8R6 (R=Sm, Gd, Ho) alloys in liquid and amorphous states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, V.; Svec, P.; Svec, P.; Janickovic, D.; Mikhailov, V.; Sidorova, E.; Son, L.

    2016-06-01

    Electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of Al86Ni8Sm6, Al86Ni8Gd6 and Al86Ni8Ho6 alloys are studied in a wide temperature range including amorphous, crystalline and liquid states. The negative value of resistivity temperature coefficient in amorphous ribbons is explained by the structural separation starting much before the beginning of their crystallization. The effective magnetic moments per Gd and Ho atoms are found to be essentially lower than for R3+ ions. The results are discussed in supposition of directed bonds between rare earth and aluminum atoms.

  1. The local physical structure of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide: insights from magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Michelle M; Li, Wenjing; Sky Driver, M; Karki, Sudarshan; Caruso, A N; Oyler, Nathan A

    2011-11-01

    Magic angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are applied to the elucidation of the local physical structure of an intermediate product in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (B(x)C:H(y)) from an orthocarborane precursor. Experimental chemical shifts are compared with theoretical shift predictions from ab initio calculations of model molecular compounds to assign atomic chemical environments, while Lee-Goldburg cross-polarization and heteronuclear recoupling experiments are used to confirm atomic connectivities. A model for the B(x)C:H(y) intermediate is proposed wherein the solid is dominated by predominantly hydrogenated carborane icosahedra that are lightly cross-linked via nonhydrogenated intraicosahedral B atoms, either directly through B-B bonds or through extraicosahedral hydrocarbon chains. While there is no clear evidence for extraicosahedral B aside from boron oxides, ∼40% of the C is found to exist as extraicosahedral hydrocarbon species that are intimately bound within the icosahedral network rather than in segregated phases. PMID:21959982

  2. The local physical structure of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide: insights from magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magic angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are applied to the elucidation of the local physical structure of an intermediate product in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (BxC:Hy) from an orthocarborane precursor. Experimental chemical shifts are compared with theoretical shift predictions from ab initio calculations of model molecular compounds to assign atomic chemical environments, while Lee-Goldburg cross-polarization and heteronuclear recoupling experiments are used to confirm atomic connectivities. A model for the BxC:Hy intermediate is proposed wherein the solid is dominated by predominantly hydrogenated carborane icosahedra that are lightly cross-linked via nonhydrogenated intraicosahedral B atoms, either directly through B-B bonds or through extraicosahedral hydrocarbon chains. While there is no clear evidence for extraicosahedral B aside from boron oxides, ∼40% of the C is found to exist as extraicosahedral hydrocarbon species that are intimately bound within the icosahedral network rather than in segregated phases. (paper)

  3. The local physical structure of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide: insights from magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquette, Michelle M; Sky Driver, M; Karki, Sudarshan; Caruso, A N [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Li Wenjing; Oyler, Nathan A, E-mail: oylern@umkc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)

    2011-11-02

    Magic angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are applied to the elucidation of the local physical structure of an intermediate product in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (B{sub x}C:H{sub y}) from an orthocarborane precursor. Experimental chemical shifts are compared with theoretical shift predictions from ab initio calculations of model molecular compounds to assign atomic chemical environments, while Lee-Goldburg cross-polarization and heteronuclear recoupling experiments are used to confirm atomic connectivities. A model for the B{sub x}C:H{sub y} intermediate is proposed wherein the solid is dominated by predominantly hydrogenated carborane icosahedra that are lightly cross-linked via nonhydrogenated intraicosahedral B atoms, either directly through B-B bonds or through extraicosahedral hydrocarbon chains. While there is no clear evidence for extraicosahedral B aside from boron oxides, {approx}40% of the C is found to exist as extraicosahedral hydrocarbon species that are intimately bound within the icosahedral network rather than in segregated phases. (paper)

  4. Reduction of tail state on boron doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide films prepared at high hydrogen dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinjoo; Iftiquar, S M; Lee, Sunwha; Park, Hyeongsik; Shin, Chonghoon; Jung, Junhee; Lee, Youn-Jung; Balaji, Nagarajan; Yi, Junsin

    2013-12-01

    In this report, we have investigated on the defect state of diborane (B2H6) doped wide bandgap hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (p-type a-SiO:H) films prepared using silane (SiH4), hydrogen (H2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in a radio frequency (RF) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system with different hydrogen dilutions. The films prepared with higher hydrogen dilution show lower Urbach energy (Eu), lower microstructure (R*), lower short and medium range disorder (omegaTO, Gamma(TO), I(TA)/I(TO), I(LA)/I(TO)), higher dark conductivity (sigma d) and higher refractive index (n) with high optical gap (Eg). Eu decreases from 248 meV to 153 meV, and R* decreases from 0.46 to 0.26, Raman peak omegaTO-TO mode position shifts from 480.24 to 483.28, GammaTO-full width half maximum of omegaTO decreases from 78.16 to 63.87, I(TA)/I(TO)-the ratio of integrated area of TA and TO mode decreases from 0.624 to 0.474, I(LA)/I(TO)-the ratio of integrated area of LA and TO mode deceases from 0.272 to 0.151, sigma d increases from 4.6 x 10(-7) S/cm to 1.1 x 10(-6) S/cm, n increases from 3.70 to 3.86. Reduced Nd, Eu and R* at wide Eg indicates that the films are more useful for solar cell window layer. Applying this layer to a single junction solar cell shows open circuit voltage (Voc) = 0.80 V, short circuit current density (Jsc) = 16.3 mA/cm2, fill factor (FF) = 72%, efficiency (eta) = 9.4%. PMID:24266147

  5. Structure analyses using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure for amorphous MS3 (M: Ti, Mo) electrodes in all-solid-state lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Takuya; Deguchi, Minako; Mitsuhara, Kei; Ohta, Toshiaki; Mori, Takuya; Orikasa, Yuki; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Kowada, Yoshiyuki; Hayashi, Akitoshi; Tatsumisago, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Electronic structure changes of sulfurs in amorphous TiS3 and MoS3 for positive electrodes of all-solid-state lithium batteries are examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). The all-solid-state cell with amorphous TiS3 electrode shows the reversible capacity of about 510 mAh g-1 for 10 cycles with sulfur-redox in amorphous TiS3 during charge-discharge process. On the other hand, the cell with amorphous MoS3 shows the 1st reversible capacity of about 720 mAh g-1. The obtained capacity is based on the redox of both sulfur and molybdenum in amorphous MoS3. The irreversible capacity of about 50 mAh g-1 is observed at the 1st cycle, which is attributed to the irreversible electronic structure change of sulfur during the 1st cycle. The electronic structure of sulfur in amorphous MoS3 after the 10th charge is similar to that after the 1st charge. Therefore, the all-solid-state cell with amorphous MoS3 electrode shows relatively good cyclability after the 1st cycle.

  6. Synthesis and characterisation of composite based biohydroxyapatite bovine bone mandible waste (BHAp) doped with 10 wt % amorphous SiO2 from rice husk by solid state reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmi, Dwi; Sulaiman, Ahmad; Oktavia, Irene Lucky; Badaruddin, Muhammad; Zulfia, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Effect of 10 wt% amorphous SiO2 from rice husk addition on the microstructures of biohydroxyapatite (BHAp) obtained from bovine bone was synthesized by solid state reaction. In this study, biohydroxyapatite powder was obtained from bovine bone mandible waste heat treated at 800 °C for 5 h and amorphous SiO2 powder was extracted from citric acid leaching of rice husk followed by combustion at 700°C for 5 h. The composite powder then mixed and sintered at 1200 °C for 3 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques are utilized to characterize the phase relations, functional group present and morphology of the sample. The study has revealed that the processing procedures played an important role in microstructural development of BHAp-10 wt% SiO2 composite. The XRD study of the raw material revealed that the primary phase material in the heat treated of bovine bone mandible waste is hydroxyapatite and in the combustion of rice husk is amorphous SiO2. However, in the composite the hydroxyapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium phosphate silicate were observed. The FTIR result show that the hydroxyl stretching band in the composite decrease compared with those of hydroxyapatite spectra and the evolution of morphology was occurred in the composite.

  7. Ultrafast optical response of the amorphous and crystalline states of the phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T. A.; Rudé, M.; Pruneri, V.; Wall, S.

    2016-07-01

    We examine the ultrafast optical response of the crystalline and amorphous phases of the phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) below the phase transformation threshold. Simultaneous measurement of the transmissivity and reflectivity of thin film samples yields the time-dependent evolution of the dielectric function for both phases. We then identify how lattice motion and electronic excitation manifest in the dielectric response. The dielectric response of both phases is large but markedly different. At 800 nm, the changes in amorphous GST are well described by the Drude response of the generated photocarriers, whereas the crystalline phase is better described by the depopulation of resonant bonds. We find that the generated coherent phonons have a greater influence in the amorphous phase than the crystalline phase. Furthermore, coherent phonons do not influence resonant bonding. For fluences up to 50% of the transformation threshold, the structure does not exhibit bond softening in either phase, enabling large changes of the optical properties without structural modification.

  8. Room temperature photoluminescence spectrum modeling of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide thin films by a joint density of tail states approach and its application to plasma deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiCx:H) thin films was modeled by a joint density of tail states approach. In the frame of these analyses, the density of tail states was defined in terms of empirical Gaussian functions for conduction and valance bands. The PL spectrum was represented in terms of an integral of joint density of states functions and Fermi distribution function. The analyses were performed for various values of energy band gap, Fermi energy and disorder parameter, which is a parameter that represents the width of the energy band tails. Finally, the model was applied to the measured room temperature PL spectra of a-SiCx:H thin films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, with various carbon contents, which were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The energy band gap and disorder parameters of the conduction and valance band tails were determined and compared with the optical energies and Urbach energies, obtained by UV–Visible transmittance measurements. As a result of the analyses, it was observed that the proposed model sufficiently represents the room temperature PL spectra of a-SiCx:H thin films. - Highlights: ► Photoluminescence spectra (PL) of the films were modeled. ► In the model, joint density of tail states and Fermi distribution function are used. ► Various values of energy band gap, Fermi energy and disorder parameter are applied. ► The model was applied to the measured PL of the films. ► The proposed model represented the room temperature PL spectrum of the films.

  9. Amorphous Phase Properties Of Oriented Polyethylene Solids

    OpenAIRE

    Zahran, R. R; Kardos, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Solid-state deformation of polyethylene results in a preferential orientation of both crystalline and amorphous regions. Usually, one major problem in the prediction of the mechanical and thermal expansion properties of anisotropic polyethylene lies in determining values for the amorphous phase properties and, particularly, at a given level of solid-state deformation. This paper outlines simple procedures for determining the two-dimensional amorphous orientation function and values for the...

  10. Solvent-shift strategy to identify suitable polymers to inhibit humidity-induced solid-state crystallization of lacidipine amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengchi; Wu, Chunnuan; Fu, Qiang; Di, Donghua; Kuang, Xiao; Wang, Chao; He, Zhonggui; Wang, Jian; Sun, Jin

    2016-04-30

    The solvent-shift strategy was used to identify appropriate polymers that inhibit humidity-induced solid-state crystallization of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs). Lacidipine with the polymers, PVP-K30, HPMC-E5 or Soluplus, were combined to form amorphous solid dispersions prepared by solvent evaporation. The formulations were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and were subjected to in vitro dissolution testing. The moisture had a significant impact on the amount dissolved for the solid dispersions. Molecular docking studies established that hydrogen bonding was critical for the stabilization of the solid dispersions. The rank order of the binding energy of the drug-polymer association was Soluplus (-6.21kcal/mol)>HPMC-E5 (-3.21kcal/mol)>PVP-K30 (-2.31kcal/mol). PVP-K30 had the highest water uptake among the polymers, as did ASD system of lacidipine-PVP-K30 ASDs. In the Soluplus ASDs, with its strong drug-polymer interactions and low water uptake, moisture-induced solid-state crystallization was not observed. PMID:26869398

  11. Development of hot melt co-formulated antimalarial solid dispersion system in fixed dose form (ARLUMELT): Evaluating amorphous state and in vivo performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fule, Ritesh; Dhamecha, Dinesh; Maniruzzaman, Mohammed; Khale, Anubha; Amin, Purnima

    2015-12-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the industrial feasibility of developing a co-formulated solid dispersion (SD) containing two antimalarial drugs artemether (ARTM) and lumefantrine (LUMF). Soluplus(®) (polyethyleneglycol-polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate grafted copolymer) was used as primary carrier matrices via hot-melt extrusion processing to improve solubility profile and the oral bioavailability of the combination. Based on the preliminary screening, the optimized quantities of PEG 400, Lutrol F127 and Lutrol F68 were incorporated as surfactant with soluplus in different ratios to improve extrudability, increase wettability and the melt viscosity of the HME process. Soluplus(®) was proved to successfully stabilize both the drugs inside its polymeric network during extrusion via forming a stable solid dispersion. Physicochemical properties of the APIs and the SDs characterized by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), MDSC, FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) revealed the amorphous existence of the drug in all SDs developed. Molecular level morphology of solid dispersion characterized by using advanced physicochemical characterization techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and 2D NMR showed the transformation of the crystalline drugs to its stable amorphous state. All manufactured SDs retained their amorphicity even after a stability study conducted in accelerated condition over 6 months. The solubility and in vitro dissolution performance of both drugs in SD formulations was improved significantly when compared with pure drugs and marketed product while the in vivo studies revealed the same.The pharmacokinetic studies in rats revealed that the SD (AL1) shows a 44.12-65.24 folds increase in the AUC(0-72) and 42.87-172.61 folds increase in Cmax compared to that of pure drugs and a better bioavailability than that of commercial product. PMID:26471056

  12. Controlling interfacial states in amorphous/crystalline LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures by electric fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dennis; Trier, Felix; Chen, Yunzhong;

    2013-01-01

    amorphous LaAlO3 films on SrTiO3. Here, we present a non-volatile and reversible tuning of the interface conductivity by more than 3 orders of magnitude at room temperature by applying an electric field to such amorphous/crystalline heterostructures with amorphous LaAlO3 film thicknesses of 2 nm. We show...

  13. Modeling of current–voltage characteristics for dual-gate amorphous silicon thin-film transistors considering deep Gaussian density-of-state distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accounting for the deep Gaussian and tail exponential distribution of the density of states, a physical approximation for potentials of amorphous silicon thin-film transistors using a symmetric dual gate (sDG a-Si:H TFT) has been presented. The proposed scheme provides a complete solution of the potentials at the surface and center of the layer without solving any transcendental equations. A channel current model incorporating features of gate voltage-dependent mobility and coupling factor is derived. We show the parameters required for accurately describing the current–voltage (I–V) characteristics of DG a-Si:H TFT and just how sensitively these parameters affect TFT current. Particularly, the parameters' dependence on the I–V characteristics with respect to the density of deep state and channel thickness has been investigated in detail. The resulting scheme and model are successively verified through comparison with numerical simulations as well as the available experimental data. (paper)

  14. Robust topological surface states of Bi2Se3 thin films on amorphous SiO2/Si substrate and a large ambipolar gating effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Namrata; Koirala, Nikesh; Brahlek, Matthew; Han, Myung-Geun; Zhu, Yimei; Cao, Yue; Waugh, Justin; Dessau, Daniel S.; Oh, Seongshik

    2014-06-01

    The recent emergence of topological insulators (TI) has spurred intensive efforts to grow TI thin films on various substrates. However, little is known about how robust the topological surface states (TSS) are against disorders and other detrimental effects originating from the substrates. Here, we report the observation of a well-defined TSS on Bi2Se3 films grown on amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2) substrates and a large gating effect on these films using the underneath doped-Si substrate as the back gate. The films on a-SiO2 were composed of c-axis ordered but random in-plane domains. However, despite the in-plane randomness induced by the amorphous substrate, the transport properties of these films were superior to those of similar films grown on single-crystalline Si(111) substrates, which are structurally better matched but chemically reactive with the films. This work sheds light on the importance of chemical compatibility, compared to lattice matching, for the growth of TI thin films, and also demonstrates that the technologically important and gatable a-SiO2/Si substrate is a promising platform for TI films.

  15. A solid-state approach to enable early development compounds: selection and animal bioavailability studies of an itraconazole amorphous solid dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engers, David; Teng, Jing; Jimenez-Novoa, Jonathan; Gent, Philip; Hossack, Stuart; Campbell, Cheryl; Thomson, John; Ivanisevic, Igor; Templeton, Alison; Byrn, Stephen; Newman, Ann

    2010-09-01

    A solid-state approach to enable compounds in preclinical development is used by identifying an amorphous solid dispersion in a simple formulation to increase bioavailability. Itraconazole (ITZ) was chosen as a model crystalline compound displaying poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability. Solid dispersions were prepared with different polymers (PVP K-12, K29/32, K90; PVP VA S-630; HPMC-P 55; and HPMC-AS HG) at varied concentrations (1:5, 1:2, 2:1, 5:1 by weight) using two preparation methods (evaporation and freeze drying). Physical characterization and stability data were collected to examine recommended storage, handling, and manufacturing conditions. Based on generated data, a 1:2 (w/w) ITZ/HPMC-P dispersion was selected for further characterization, testing, and scale-up. Thermal data and computational analysis suggest that it is a possible solid nanosuspension. The dispersion was successfully scaled using spray drying, with the materials exhibiting similar physical properties as the screening samples. A simple formulation of 1:2 (w/w) ITZ/HPMC-P dispersion in a capsule was compared to crystalline ITZ in a capsule in a dog bioavailability study, with the dispersion being significantly more bioavailable. This study demonstrated the utility of using an amorphous solid form with desirable physical properties to significantly improve bioavailability and provides a viable strategy for evaluating early drug candidates. PMID:20602348

  16. The long-range ordering, electron spectrum, and properties of amorphous silicon films - II. Defect states and optical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of this article, the semi-empirical generalized Skettrup model (GSM) was presented and used to simulate the effect of a spatial extent of long-range potential fluctuations (LRPF) on the parameters of the single-electron spectrum N(E) of non-homogeneous amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films. Here, the GSM is applied to the modelling of optical parameters and structural defects (dangling bonds) of such films. The spectral dependence of the optical absorption coefficient, simulated by N(E) convolution, was found to contain the Tauc, Urbach and 'defect' sub-ranges. Changes in temperature and spatial extent of the LRPF provide almost linear dependencies of the optical gap versus the Urbach tail slope in the model. Simulated parameters of the a-Si:H films prepared by both radio frequency sputtering (RFS) and glow discharge (GD) decomposition of silane showed good agreement with existing experimental data. The optical gap and Urbach tail slope energies under the GSM model were found to be typical of 'device quality' a-Si:H films when the LRPF spatial extent was of the order of 1 μm. Differences in the properties of a-Si and a-Si:H films, specific features of the GD and RFS a-Si:H materials, as well as the fundamental nature of the 'hydrogen dilution' regime were also interpreted within the framework of the GSM

  17. Photoelectron emission yield experiments on evolution of sub-gap states in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin films with post deposition hydrogen treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total photoyield emission spectroscopy (TPYS) was applied to study the evolution of sub-gap states in hydrogen-treated amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) thin films. The a-IGZO thin films were subjected to hydrogen radicals and subsequently annealed in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. A clear onset of the electron emission was observed at around 4.3 eV from the hydrogen-treated a-IGZO thin films. After successive UHV annealing at 300 °C, the onset in the TPYS spectra was shifted to 4.15 eV, and the photoelectron emission from the sub-gap states was decreased as the annealing temperature was increased. In conjunction with the results of thermal desorption spectrometer, it was deduced that the hydrogen atoms incorporated in the a-IGZO thin films induced metastable sub-gap states at around 4.3 eV from vacuum level just after the hydrogenation. It was also suggested that the defect configuration was changed due to the higher temperature UHV annealing, and that the hydrogen atoms desorbed with the involvement of Zn atoms. These experiments produced direct evidence to show the formation of sub-gap states as a result of hydrogen incorporation into the a-IGZO thin films

  18. Nanoscale physics and defect state chemistry at amorphous-Si/In0.53Ga0.47As interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, C.; El Kazzi, M.; Czornomaz, L.; Pierucci, D.; Silly, M.; Sirotti, F.; Abel, S.; Uccelli, E.; Sousa, M.; Fompeyrine, J.

    2014-02-01

    Interface and surface passivation of thin layers of III-V compound semiconductors is a key enabler of many technological applications spanning from nano-electronics to nano-photonics. The interaction between thin amorphous Si (a-Si) layers and clean, group-III-rich reconstructed In0.53Ga0.47As interfaces is studied by combining high-resolution synchrotron radiation x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-dependent surface photovoltage (SPV) experiments. From 0.6 to 2.4 monolayers (ML) of a-Si are deposited on non-intentionally doped, p- and n-type In0.53Ga0.47As. For each deposition step, the observed surface and interface chemistry is directly correlated to the measured surface Fermi level position, band bending and SPV. Group-III-reconstructed In0.53Ga0.47As surfaces are observed to be intrinsically unstable against reaction with Si and two different instability regimes have been identified. First, for low deposition temperature, Si reacts strongly and intermixes with the In0.53Ga0.47As surface inducing In and Ga out-diffusion even at a sub-monolayer amount. For 2.4 ML of a-Si, a net positive interface charge of 1.24 × 1012 #/cm2 and a band of defects close to the conduction band are detected. For post-annealing at temperatures lower than 380 °C, the interface rearranges. At temperatures higher than 380 °C, out-diffusion of As in the a-Si is found to be the main instability driver.

  19. Nanoscale physics and defect state chemistry at amorphous-Si/In0.53Ga0.47As interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interface and surface passivation of thin layers of III–V compound semiconductors is a key enabler of many technological applications spanning from nano-electronics to nano-photonics. The interaction between thin amorphous Si (a-Si) layers and clean, group-III-rich reconstructed In0.53Ga0.47As interfaces is studied by combining high-resolution synchrotron radiation x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-dependent surface photovoltage (SPV) experiments. From 0.6 to 2.4 monolayers (ML) of a-Si are deposited on non-intentionally doped, p- and n-type In0.53Ga0.47As. For each deposition step, the observed surface and interface chemistry is directly correlated to the measured surface Fermi level position, band bending and SPV. Group-III-reconstructed In0.53Ga0.47As surfaces are observed to be intrinsically unstable against reaction with Si and two different instability regimes have been identified. First, for low deposition temperature, Si reacts strongly and intermixes with the In0.53Ga0.47As surface inducing In and Ga out-diffusion even at a sub-monolayer amount. For 2.4 ML of a-Si, a net positive interface charge of 1.24 × 1012 #/cm2 and a band of defects close to the conduction band are detected. For post-annealing at temperatures lower than 380 °C, the interface rearranges. At temperatures higher than 380 °C, out-diffusion of As in the a-Si is found to be the main instability driver. (paper)

  20. Amorphous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    agents constructed by engineered cells, but we have few ideas for programming them effectively: How can one engineer prespecified, coherent behavior from the cooperation of immense numbers of unreliable parts that are interconnected in unknown, irregular, and time-varying ways? This is the challenge of Amorphous Computing.

  1. Modeling of current-voltage characteristics for dual-gate amorphous silicon thin-film transistors considering deep Gaussian density-of-state distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Qin; Ruohe, Yao

    2015-12-01

    Accounting for the deep Gaussian and tail exponential distribution of the density of states, a physical approximation for potentials of amorphous silicon thin-film transistors using a symmetric dual gate (sDG a-Si:H TFT) has been presented. The proposed scheme provides a complete solution of the potentials at the surface and center of the layer without solving any transcendental equations. A channel current model incorporating features of gate voltage-dependent mobility and coupling factor is derived. We show the parameters required for accurately describing the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of DG a-Si:H TFT and just how sensitively these parameters affect TFT current. Particularly, the parameters' dependence on the I-V characteristics with respect to the density of deep state and channel thickness has been investigated in detail. The resulting scheme and model are successively verified through comparison with numerical simulations as well as the available experimental data. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61274085) and the Cadence Design System, Inc.

  2. Subgap states, doping and defect formation energies in amorphous oxide semiconductor a-InGaZnO{sub 4} studied by density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Toshio [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); ERATO-SORST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, in Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Nomura, Kenji [ERATO-SORST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, in Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Hosono, Hideo [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); ERATO-SORST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, in Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    Amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) is expected for channel layers in thin-film transistors (TFTs). It is known that a-IGZO is sensitive to an O/H-containing atmosphere; therefore, it is important to clarify the roles of oxygen and hydrogen in a-IGZO. This paper provides atomic and electronic structures, formation energies of defects and bond energies in a-IGZO calculated by first-principles density functional theory (DFT). It was confirmed that oxygen deficiencies having small formation energies (2-3.6 eV) form either deep fully-occupied localized states near the valence band maximum or donor states, which depend on their local structures. All the hydrogen doping form -OH bond and work as a donor. The stable -OH bonds have small formation energy of {proportional_to}0.45 eV and consist of three metal cations coordinated to the O ion. The bond energy of Ga-O is calculated to be {proportional_to}2.0 eV, which is the largest among the chemical bonds in a-IGZO (1.7 eV for In-O and 1.5 eV for ZnO). This result supports the idea that the incorporation of Ga stabilizes a-IGZO TFTs. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Amorphous yttrium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic properties of amorphous yttrium-iron alloys Ysub(1-x)Fesub(x) have been studied over a wide concentration range 0.32 2Fe17 alloys, lead in the amorphous state to spin-glass behaviour and asperomagnetic order. The dominant positive interactions produce short-range ferromagnetic correlations which persist up to room temperature. However magnetic saturation cannot be achieved for any of the alloys in applied fields of up to 180 kOe, indicating that strong negative interactions are also present. Exchange interactions become increasingly positive with increasing x, and the magnetic properties of iron-rich alloys approach those of a normal ferromagnet. (author)

  4. Modelling the light induced metastable effects in amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Munyeme, G.; Chinyama, G.K.; Zeman, M.; R. E. I. Schropp; Weg, W

    2008-01-01

    We present results of computer simulations of the light induced degradation of amorphous silicon solar cells. It is now well established that when amorphous silicon is illuminated the density of dangling bond states increases. Dangling bond states produce amphoteric electronic mid-gap states which act as efficient charge trapping and recombination centres. The increase in dangling bond states causes a decrease in the performance of amorphous silicon solar cells. To show this effect, a modelli...

  5. Atomic structure of the amorphous state of TiC-modified Nd2Fe14B as revealed by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy utilizing the Doppler broadening of the annihilation radiation (DBAR) method was performed on stoichiometric Nd2Fe14B ribbons containing 0, 2, and 6 wt% Ti - C that were melt spun to the x-ray amorphous state at a wheel speed of 40 m/s. DBAR data indicate that the as-spun samples are very homogeneous. It is found that an increase in the concentration of alloying additions promotes an increase in the shape parameter (open-quotes S parameterclose quotes) of the symmetric Doppler-broadened positron - electron annihilation peak. This increase in the S parameter may be interpreted as an increase in the amount of open volume in the quenched glass. The presence of increased open volume is concurrent with an increased stability of the glass against crystallization. However, at the present time it is not clear if the increased thermal stability is a direct product of the increased open volume, or if stereochemical considerations determine the stability of the glass. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  6. Small atom diffusion in the glassy and supercooled liquid states of bulk amorphous ZrTiCuNiBe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New bulk metallic ZrTiCuNiBe glass forming alloys exhibit an excellent stability over a large supercooled liquid region and offer the opportunity to investigate atomic transport in the supercooled liquid state. We present measurements of atomic diffusion of beryllium in Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 and Zr46.7Ti8.3Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 in the temperature range between 530 K and 710 K. Below the glass transition temperature, Tg∼625 K, the data suggest a single atomic jump diffusion behavior of Be with a migration enthalpy of about 1 eV/atom in both alloys. Below Tg, Be diffusivity in Zr46.7Ti8.3Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 is by one order of magnitude higher than in Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be27.5 which can be explained by a larger fraction of free volume in this alloy. Above the glass transition the temperature dependence of Be diffusivity increases in both alloys, leading to apparent activation energies of 4.5 eV/atom in Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 and 1.9 eV/atom in Zr46.7Ti8.3Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5. By taking into account the change in configurational entropy due to the glass transition, we explain the mechanism for diffusion of Be in the supercooled liquid states of the ZrTiNiCuBe alloys by single atomic jumps in a continously changing configuration of neighboring atoms. The corresponding migration enthalpies are the same as in the solid states, and the larger activation energies above Tg are mimiced by the increase of configurational entropy with temperature which is smaller in Zr46.7Ti8.3Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 than in Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5. A comparison of Be diffusivity and viscosity of Zr46.7Ti8.3Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 above Tg reveals a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, indicating cooperative processes in the supercooled liquid state. (orig.)

  7. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO2. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia

  8. Structural relaxation in amorphous silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High purity single crystal and chemically vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide have been amorphized under fast neutron irradiation. The gradual transition in physical properties from the as-amorphized state to a more relaxed amorphous state prior to crystallization is studied. For the three bulk properties studied: density, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity, large property changes occur upon annealing between the amorphization temperature and the point of crystallization. These physical property changes occur in the absence of crystallization and are attributed to short and perhaps medium range ordering during annealing. It is demonstrated that the physical properties of amorphous SiC (a-SiC) can vary greatly and are likely a function of the irradiation state producing the amorphization. The initiation of crystallization as measured using bulk density and in situ TEM is found to be ∼875 deg. C, though the kinetics of crystallization above this point are seen to depend on the technique used. It is speculated that in situ TEM and other thin-film approaches to study crystallization of amorphous SiC are flawed due to thin-film effects

  9. Iron - based bulk amorphous alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Babilas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents a structure characterization, thermal and soft magnetic properties analysis of Fe-based bulk amorphous materials in as-cast state and after crystallization process. In addition, the paper gives some brief review about achieving, formation and structure of bulk metallic glasses as a special group of amorphous materials.Design/methodology/approach: The studies were performed on Fe72B20Si4Nb4 metallic glass in form of ribbons and rods. The amorphous structure of tested samples was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM methods. The thermal properties of the glassy samples were measured using differential thermal analysis (DTA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The magnetic properties contained initial and maximum magnetic permeability, coercive force and magnetic after-effects measurements were determined by the Maxwell-Wien bridge and VSM methods.Findings: The X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy investigations revealed that the studied as-cast bulk metallic glasses in form of ribbons and rods were amorphous. Two stage crystallization process was observed for studied bulk amorphous alloy. The differences of crystallization temperature between ribbons and rods with chosen thickness are probably caused by different amorphous structures as a result of the different cooling rates in casting process. The SEM images showed that studied fractures could be classified as mixed fractures with indicated two zones contained “river” and “smooth” areas. The changing of chosen soft magnetic properties (μr, Bs, Hc obtained for samples with different thickness is a result of the non-homogenous amorphous structure of tested metallic glasses. The annealing process in temperature range from 373 to 773 K causes structural relaxation of tested amorphous materials, which leads to changes in their physical properties. The qualitative

  10. Characterization of Poly-Amorphous Indomethacin by Terahertz Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Makoto; Nishizawa, Jun-ichi; Fukura, Naomi; Sasaki, Tetsuo

    2012-09-01

    Since the stability of amorphous solids of pharmaceuticals differs depending on the method of preparation, there are several solid-state chemical structures in amorphous solids, which like poly-amorphous solids might have different characteristics the same as in crystalline solids. However, it is not easy to identify the differences in solid-state characteristics between amorphous solids using conventional analytical methods, such as powder X-ray diffraction analysis, since all of the poly-amorphous solids had similar halo X-ray diffraction patterns. However, terahertz spectroscopy can distinguish the amorphous solids of indomethacin with different physicochemical properties, and is expected to provide a rapid and non-destructive qualitative analysis for the solid materials, it would be useful for the qualitative evaluation of amorphous solids in the pharmaceutical industry.

  11. Spectroscopic ellipsometry-based study of optical properties of amorphous and crystalline ZnSnO alloys and Zn2SnO4 thin films grown using sputtering deposition: Dielectric function and subgap states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kun Hee; So, Hyeon Seob; Jung, Dae Ho; Park, Jun Woo; Lee, Hosun

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the optical properties of amorphous and crystalline zinc tin oxide (ZTO) thin films grown on SiO2/Si substrates with varying compositions via a co-sputtering deposition method at room temperature. The co-sputtering targets consist of SnO2 and ZnO. By varying the relative power ratio of the two targets, we demonstrate the ability to control the Sn and Zn composition of the resulting ZTO thin films. The ratio of [Sn]/([Sn] + [Zn]) atomic compositions was estimated at 11%, 29%, 42%, 54%, and 60%. Using a 600 °C annealing process, the as-grown amorphous ZTO films were transformed into crystalline ZTO films. The dielectric functions were obtained based on the measured ellipsometric angles, ψ and Δ. We determined the dielectric functions, absorption coefficients, and optical gap energies of ZTO thin films with varying compositions. The dielectric functions, absorption coefficients, and optical gap energies of amorphous and crystalline Zn2SnO4 thin films were obtained at 29 at. % of Sn. Subgap states at 1.6 eV (A) and 2.8 eV (B) of ZnSnO alloys and Zn2SnO4 films were found in the imaginary part of the dielectric function spectra. The subgap state intensities were reduced via a nitrogen gas annealing. Possible origins of the observed subgap states will be discussed.

  12. Modelling the light induced metastable effects in amorphous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munyeme, G.; Chinyama, G.K.; Zeman, M.; Schropp, R.E.I.; van der Weg, W.

    2008-01-01

    We present results of computer simulations of the light induced degradation of amorphous silicon solar cells. It is now well established that when amorphous silicon is illuminated the density of dangling bond states increases. Dangling bond states produce amphoteric electronic mid-gap states which a

  13. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states. (focus issue)

  14. Bulk amorphous Mg-based alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    The present paper describes the preparation and properties of bulk amorphous quarternary Mg-based alloys and the influence of additional elements on the ability of the alloy to form bulk amorphous. The main goal is to find a Mg-based alloy system which shows both high strength to weight ratio and a...... low glass transition temperature. The alloys were prepared by using a relatively simple technique, i.e. rapid cooling of the melt in a copper wedge mould. The essential structural changes that are achieved by going from the amorphous to the crystalline state through the supercooled liquid state are...... discussed in this paper. On the basis of these measurements phase diagrams of the different systems were constructed. Finally, it is demonstrated that when pressing the bulk amorphous alloy onto a metallic dies at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region, the alloy faithfully replicates the surface...

  15. Moringa Coagulant as a Stabilizer for Amorphous Solids: Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Bhende, Santosh; Jadhav, Namdeo

    2012-01-01

    Stabilization of amorphous state is a focal area for formulators to reap benefits related with solubility and consequently bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In the present work, an attempt has been made to explore the potential of moringa coagulant as an amorphous state stabilizer by investigating its role in stabilization of spray-dried (amorphous) ibuprofen, meloxicam and felodipine. Thermal studies like glass forming ability, glass transition temperature, hot stage microscopy and DS...

  16. Free volume in imidazolium triflimide ([C3MIM][NTf2]) ionic liquid from positron lifetime: amorphous, crystalline, and liquid states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlubek, G; Yu, Yang; Krause-Rehberg, R; Beichel, W; Bulut, S; Pogodina, N; Krossing, I; Friedrich, Ch

    2010-09-28

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is used to study the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [C(3)MIM][NTf(2)] in the temperature range between 150 and 320 K. The positron decay spectra are analyzed using the routine LifeTime-9.0 and the size distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer-size holes) is calculated. This distribution is in good agreement with Fürth's classical hole theory of liquids when taking into account Fürth's hole coalescence hypothesis. During cooling, the liquid sample remains in a supercooled, amorphous state and shows the glass transition in the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime at 187 K. The mean hole volume varies between 70 Å(3) at 150 K and 250 Å(3) at 265-300 K. From a comparison with the macroscopic volume, the hole density is estimated to be constant at 0.20×10(21) g(-1) corresponding to 0.30 nm(-3) at 265 K. The hole free volume fraction varies from 0.023 at 185 K to 0.073 at T(m)+12 K=265 K and can be estimated to be 0.17 at 430 K. It is shown that the viscosity follows perfectly the Cohen-Turnbull free volume theory when using the free volume determined here. The heating run clearly shows crystallization at 200 K by an abrupt decrease in the mean and standard deviation σ(3) of the o-Ps lifetime distribution and an increase in the o-Ps intensity I(3). The parameters of the second lifetime component and σ(2) behave parallel to the o-Ps parameters, which also shows the positron's (e(+)) response to structural changes. During melting at 253 K, all lifetime parameters recover to the initial values of the liquid. An abrupt decrease in I(3) is attributed to the solvation of e(-) and e(+) particles. Different possible interpretations of the o-Ps lifetime in the crystalline state are briefly discussed. PMID:20886945

  17. Free volume in imidazolium triflimide ([C3MIM][NTf2]) ionic liquid from positron lifetime: Amorphous, crystalline, and liquid states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) is used to study the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [C3MIM][NTf2] in the temperature range between 150 and 320 K. The positron decay spectra are analyzed using the routine LifeTime-9.0 and the size distribution of local free volumes (subnanometer-size holes) is calculated. This distribution is in good agreement with Fuerth's classical hole theory of liquids when taking into account Fuerth's hole coalescence hypothesis. During cooling, the liquid sample remains in a supercooled, amorphous state and shows the glass transition in the ortho-positronium (o-Ps) lifetime at 187 K. The mean hole volume varies between 70 A3 at 150 K and 250 A3 at 265-300 K. From a comparison with the macroscopic volume, the hole density is estimated to be constant at 0.20x1021 g-1 corresponding to 0.30 nm-3 at 265 K. The hole free volume fraction varies from 0.023 at 185 K to 0.073 at Tm+12 K=265 K and can be estimated to be 0.17 at 430 K. It is shown that the viscosity follows perfectly the Cohen-Turnbull free volume theory when using the free volume determined here. The heating run clearly shows crystallization at 200 K by an abrupt decrease in the mean 3> and standard deviation σ3 of the o-Ps lifetime distribution and an increase in the o-Ps intensity I3. The parameters of the second lifetime component 2> and σ2 behave parallel to the o-Ps parameters, which also shows the positron's (e+) response to structural changes. During melting at 253 K, all lifetime parameters recover to the initial values of the liquid. An abrupt decrease in I3 is attributed to the solvation of e- and e+ particles. Different possible interpretations of the o-Ps lifetime in the crystalline state are briefly discussed.

  18. Amorphous-crystalline transition in thermoelectric NbO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Density functional theory was employed to design enhanced amorphous NbO2 thermoelectrics. The covalent-ionic nature of Nb–O bonding is identical in amorphous NbO2 and its crystalline counterpart. However, the Anderson localisation occurs in amorphous NbO2, which may affect the transport properties. We calculate a multifold increase in the absolute Seebeck coefficient for the amorphous state. These predictions were critically appraised by measuring the Seebeck coefficient of sputtered amorphous and crystalline NbO2 thin films with the identical short-range order. The first-order phase transition occurs at approximately 550 °C, but amorphous NbO2 possesses enhanced transport properties at all temperatures. Amorphous NbO2, reaching  −173 μV K−1, exhibits up to a 29% larger absolute Seebeck coefficient value, thereby validating the predictions. (paper)

  19. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  20. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  1. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  2. Amorphous boron nitride at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2016-06-01

    The pressure-induced phase transformation in hexagonal boron nitrite and amorphous boron nitrite is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The hexagonal-to-wurtzite phase transformation is successfully reproduced in the simulation with a transformation mechanism similar to one suggested in experiment. Amorphous boron nitrite, on the other hand, gradually transforms to a high-density amorphous phase with the application of pressure. This phase transformation is irreversible because a densified amorphous state having both sp3 and sp2 bonds is recovered upon pressure release. The high-density amorphous state mainly consists of sp3 bonds and its local structure is quite similar to recently proposed intermediate boron nitrite phases, in particular tetragonal structure (P42/mnm), rather than the known the wurtzite or cubic boron nitrite due to the existence of four membered rings and edge sharing connectivity. On the basis of this finding we propose that amorphous boron nitrite might be best candidate as a starting structure to synthesize the intermediate phase(s) at high pressure and temperature (probably below 800 °C) conditions.

  3. Amorphous silicon thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon glass resistance thermometers (CGRT) shows an unstable drift by heat cycles. Since we were looking for a more stable element of thermometer for cryogenic and high magnetic field environments, we selected amorphous silicon as a substitute for CGRT. The resistance of many amorphous samples were measured at 4K, at 77K, and 300K. We eventually found an amorphous silicon (Si-H) alloy whose the sensitivity below 77K was comparable to that of the germanium resistance thermometer with little magnetic field influence. (author)

  4. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    OpenAIRE

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphou...

  5. Photothermal deflection spectroscopy for solar cell amorphous semiconductor energy gap states sensitivity determination. Spettroscopia a deflessione fototermica per la determinazione della densita' degli stati nella banda proibita dei semiconduttori amorfi per celle fotovoltaiche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menna, P.; Nobile, G.; Rubino, A.; Sansores, E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for photothermal deflection spectroscopy was developed and set up at the CRIF lab of ENEA (Italian Commission for Nuclear and Alternative Energy Sources), Photovoltaic Research Center in Portici, Italy. The transport equations governing heat transfer phenomena, the experimental set up, and the calibration procedures are described in this paper. Results are reported of measurements of the absorption coefficent, the density of localized states in the gap and the Urbach energy inferred by this technique for a series of thin film amorphous silicon germanium samples in the whole range of Ge content.

  6. Electrons and phonons in amorphous semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Kiran; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The coupling between lattice vibrations and electrons is one of the central concepts of condensed matter physics. The subject has been deeply studied for crystalline materials, but far less so for amorphous and glassy materials, which are among the most important for applications. In this paper, we explore the electron-lattice coupling using current tools of a first-principles computer simulation. We choose three materials to illustrate the phenomena: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se) and amorphous gallium nitride (a-GaN). In each case, we show that there is a strong correlation between the localization of electron states and the magnitude of thermally induced fluctuations in energy eigenvalues obtained from the density-functional theory (i.e. Kohn–Sham eigenvalues). We provide a heuristic theory to explain these observations. The case of a-GaN, a topologically disordered partly ionic insulator, is distinctive compared to the covalent amorphous examples. Next, we explore the consequences of changing the charge state of a system as a proxy for tracking photo-induced structural changes in the materials. Where transport is concerned, we lend insight into the Meyer–Neldel compensation rule and discuss a thermally averaged Kubo–Greenwood formula as a means to estimate electrical conductivity and especially its temperature dependence. We close by showing how the optical gap of an amorphous semiconductor can be computationally engineered with the judicious use of Hellmann–Feynman forces (associated with a few defect states) using molecular dynamics simulations. These forces can be used to close or open an optical gap, and identify a structure with a prescribed gap. We use the approach with plane-wave density functional methods to identify a low-energy amorphous phase of silicon including several coordination defects, yet with a gap close to that of good quality a-Si models.

  7. Influence of production method on the magnetic parameters and structure of Fe{sub 61}Co{sub 10}Y{sub 8}Nb{sub 1}B{sub 20} amorphous alloys in the as-quenched state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrusiewicz, Paweł, E-mail: pietrusiewicz@wip.pcz.pl [Czestochowa University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Processing Technology and Applied Physics, Institute of Physics, 19 Armii Krajowej Av., 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Nabiałek, Marcin; Dośpiał, Marcin; Gruszka, Konrad; Błoch, Katarzyna [Czestochowa University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Processing Technology and Applied Physics, Institute of Physics, 19 Armii Krajowej Av., 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Gondro, Joanna; Brągiel, Piotr [Jan Dlugosz University in Czestochowa, The Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institute of Physics, Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland); Szota, Michał; Stradomski, Zbigniew [Czestochowa University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Processing Technology and Applied Physics, Materials Engineering Institute, 19 Armii Krajowej Av., 42-200 Czestochowa (Poland)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • The paper presents the influence of rapid quenching method on structure and magnetic properties. • Classical and bulk Fe-based amorphous alloy in the as-cast state. • Samples were obtained by the use of three casting methods i.e. suction, injection and melt-spinning. • XRD and Mössbauer effect studies were used to confirm amorphous structure of samples. • The reduction of saturation of magnetization in BMGs was resulting from higher packing density of atoms. - Abstract: In this paper, the influence of production method on the basic magnetic properties and structure of amorphous alloys, in the forms of ribbons and plates, was investigated. The samples used in the investigations were obtained by three different production methods: ultrafast cooling of the liquid alloy on a rotating copper wheel (the melt-spinning method), and the injection or suction of the molten alloy into a water-cooled copper die injection- and suction-casting, respectively. The structure of the resulting samples of Fe{sub 61}Co{sub 10}Y{sub 8}Nb{sub 1}B{sub 20} alloy was investigated by means of X-ray diffractometry, Mössbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results of the microstructural investigations confirmed that the obtained samples were amorphous and without crystalline precipitations. The images from the scanning electron microscope were typical for amorphous materials. Magnetic measurements were performed using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) using magnetic fields of up to 2 T. The highest value of the saturation magnetization was achieved for the sample which was in the form of a ribbon. The values of this parameter for the samples which were in the form of plates were similar to each other, regardless of the production method. The values of the coercivity showed much greater differences, depending on the production method. The smallest value of coercivity was found for the sample in plate-form obtained by injection-casting; this is

  8. Influence of production method on the magnetic parameters and structure of Fe61Co10Y8Nb1B20 amorphous alloys in the as-quenched state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The paper presents the influence of rapid quenching method on structure and magnetic properties. • Classical and bulk Fe-based amorphous alloy in the as-cast state. • Samples were obtained by the use of three casting methods i.e. suction, injection and melt-spinning. • XRD and Mössbauer effect studies were used to confirm amorphous structure of samples. • The reduction of saturation of magnetization in BMGs was resulting from higher packing density of atoms. - Abstract: In this paper, the influence of production method on the basic magnetic properties and structure of amorphous alloys, in the forms of ribbons and plates, was investigated. The samples used in the investigations were obtained by three different production methods: ultrafast cooling of the liquid alloy on a rotating copper wheel (the melt-spinning method), and the injection or suction of the molten alloy into a water-cooled copper die injection- and suction-casting, respectively. The structure of the resulting samples of Fe61Co10Y8Nb1B20 alloy was investigated by means of X-ray diffractometry, Mössbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results of the microstructural investigations confirmed that the obtained samples were amorphous and without crystalline precipitations. The images from the scanning electron microscope were typical for amorphous materials. Magnetic measurements were performed using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) using magnetic fields of up to 2 T. The highest value of the saturation magnetization was achieved for the sample which was in the form of a ribbon. The values of this parameter for the samples which were in the form of plates were similar to each other, regardless of the production method. The values of the coercivity showed much greater differences, depending on the production method. The smallest value of coercivity was found for the sample in plate-form obtained by injection-casting; this is connected with the highest value

  9. Crystallization inhibition of an amorphous sucrose system using raffinose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEINEN K.M.; LABUZA T.P.

    2006-01-01

    The shelf life of pure amorphous sucrose systems, such as cotton candy, can be very short. Previous studies have shown that amorphous sucrose systems held above the glass transition temperature will collapse and crystallize. One study,however, showed that adding a small percent of another type of sugar, such as trehalose, to sucrose can extend the shelf life of the amorphous system by slowing crystallization. This study explores the hypothesis that raffinose increases the stability of an amorphous sucrose system. Cotton candy at 5 wt% raffinose and 95 wt% sucrose was made and stored at room temperature and three different relative humidities (%RH) 11%RH, 33%RH, and 43%RH. XRD patterns, and glass transition temperatures were obtained to determine the stability as a function of %RH. The data collected showed that raffinose slows sucrose crystallization in a low moisture amorphous state above the glass transition temperature and therefore improves the stability of amorphous sucrose systems.

  10. Thermal properties of amorphous/crystalline silicon superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France-Lanord, Arthur; Merabia, Samy; Albaret, Tristan; Lacroix, David; Termentzidis, Konstantinos

    2014-09-01

    Thermal transport properties of crystalline/amorphous silicon superlattices using molecular dynamics are investigated. We show that the cross-plane conductivity of the superlattices is very low and close to the conductivity of bulk amorphous silicon even for amorphous layers as thin as ≃ 6 Å. The cross-plane thermal conductivity weakly increases with temperature which is associated with a decrease of the Kapitza resistance with temperature at the crystalline/amorphous interface. This property is further investigated considering the spatial analysis of the phonon density of states in domains close to the interface. Interestingly, the crystalline/amorphous superlattices are shown to display large thermal anisotropy, according to the characteristic sizes of elaborated structures. These last results suggest that the thermal conductivity of crystalline/amorphous superlattices can be phonon engineered, providing new directions for nanostructured thermoelectrics and anisotropic materials in thermal transport. PMID:25105883

  11. Inelastic scattering from amorphous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of inelastic neutron scattering techniques for surveying various aspects of the dynamics of amorphous solids is briefly reviewed. The recent use of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source to provide detailed information on the optical vibrations of glasses is discussed in more detail. The density of states represents an averaged quantity which gives information about the general characteristics of the structure and bonding. More extensive information can be obtained by studying the detailed wavevector dependence of the dynamic structure factor. 15 refs., 7 figs

  12. Moringa coagulant as a stabilizer for amorphous solids: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhende, Santosh; Jadhav, Namdeo

    2012-06-01

    Stabilization of amorphous state is a focal area for formulators to reap benefits related with solubility and consequently bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In the present work, an attempt has been made to explore the potential of moringa coagulant as an amorphous state stabilizer by investigating its role in stabilization of spray-dried (amorphous) ibuprofen, meloxicam and felodipine. Thermal studies like glass forming ability, glass transition temperature, hot stage microscopy and DSC were carried out for understanding thermodynamic stabilization of drugs. PXRD and dissolution studies were performed to support contribution of moringa coagulant. Studies showed that hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions between drug and moringa coagulant are responsible for amorphous state stabilization as explored by ATR-FTIR and molecular docking. Especially, H-bonding was found to be predominant mechanism for drug stabilization. Therein, arginine (basic amino acid in coagulant) exhibited various interactions and played important role in stabilization of aforesaid amorphous drugs. PMID:22359158

  13. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  14. Structural studies of amorphous Se under pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Keiji

    1990-01-01

    X-ray-diffraction patterns, macroscopic compressibility, and crystallization in amorphous Se subject to pressure have been investigated. The material exhibits pressure-induced structural modifications in the glassy state and a phase transformation to the hexagonal phase at 120±20 kbar. The observations are discussed on the basis of microscopic and thermodynamic models.

  15. Amorphization kinetics of Zr3Fe under electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous investigations using 40Ar ion bombardments have revealed that Zr3 Fe, which has an orthorhombic crystal structure, undergoes an irradiation-induced transformation from the crystalline to the amorphous state. In the present investigation, 0.9 MeV electron irradiations were performed at 28 - 220 K in a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM). By measuring the onset, spread and final size of the amorphous region, factoring in the Gaussian distribution of the beam, a kinetic description of the amorphization in terms of dose, dose rate and temperature was obtained. The critical temperature for amorphization by electron irradiation was found to be ∼ 220 K, compared with 570 - 625 K for 40Ar ion irradiation. Also, the dose-to-amorphization increased exponentially with temperature. Results indicated that the rate of growth of the amorphous region under the electron beam decreased with increasing temperature and the dose-to-amorphization decreased with increasing dose rate. The size of the amorphous region saturated after a given dose, the final size decreasing with increasing temperature, and it is argued that this is related to the existence of a critical dose rate, which increases with temperature, and below which no amorphization occurs. (author). 26 refs., 6 figs

  16. Amorphous Fe-based metal foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A foam synthesis method that takes advantage of the viscous high-temperature liquid state of Fe-based bulk glass-forming alloys to produce amorphous steel foam is introduced. Zirconium hydride is utilized as a foaming agent taking advantage of the low hydrogen solubility of these glass-forming alloys. Amorphous foams with porosities up to 65% were produced having homogenous cellular morphologies that exhibit cell-size uniformity. Even though intracellular solid regions as thin as a few micrometers are detected, on a global scale the cellular structure is determined to be incapable of alleviating the foam from the brittle nature of the monolithic glass

  17. Neutron scattering studies of amorphous Invar alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Baca, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews recent inelastic neutron scattering experiments performed to study the spin dynamics of two amorphous Invar systems: Fe/sub 100-x/B/sub x/ and Fe/sub 90-x/Ni/sub x/Zr/sub 10/. As in crystalline Invar Fe/sub 65/Ni/sub 35/ and Fe/sub 3/Pt, the excitation of conventional long-wavelength spin waves in these amorphous systems cannot account for the relatively rapid change of their magnetization with temperature. These results are discussed in terms of additional low-lying excitations which apparently have a density of states similar to the spin waves.

  18. Effect of ion irradiation on the stability of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The archival life of phase-change memories (PCM) is determined by the thermal stability of amorphous phase in a crystalline matrix. In this paper, we report the effect of ion beam irradiation on the crystallization kinetics of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy (GST). The transition rate of amorphous GST films was measured by in situ time resolved reflectivity (TRR). The amorphous to crystal transformation time decreases considerably in irradiated amorphous GST samples when ion fluence increases. The stability of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 thin films subjected to ion irradiation is discussed in terms of the free energy variation of the amorphous state because of damage accumulation

  19. Fabrication and application of amorphous semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns the design and manufacture of elecric switching or memorisation components with amorphous semiconductors. As is known some compounds, particularly the chalcogenides, have a resistivity of the semiconductor type in the amorphous solid state. These materials are obtained by the high temperature homogeneisation of several single elements such as tellurium, arsenic, germanium and sulphur, followed by water or air quenching. In particular these compounds have useful switching and memorisation properties. In particular they have the characteristic of not suffering deterioration when placed in an environment subjected to nuclear radiations. In order to know more about the nature and properties of these amorphous semiconductors the French patent No. 71 28048 of 30 June 1971 may be consulted with advantage

  20. Transverse and longitudinal vibrations in amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltukov, Y. M.; Fusco, C.; Tanguy, A.; Parshin, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    We show that harmonic vibrations in amorphous silicon can be decomposed to transverse and longitudinal components in all frequency range even in the absence of the well defined wave vector q. For this purpose we define the transverse component of the eigenvector with given ω as a component, which does not change the volumes of Voronoi cells around atoms. The longitudinal component is the remaining orthogonal component. We have found the longitudinal and transverse components of the vibrational density of states for numerical model of amorphous silicon. The vibrations are mostly transverse below 7 THz and above 15 THz. In the frequency interval in between the vibrations have a longitudinal nature. Just this sudden transformation of vibrations at 7 THz from almost transverse to almost longitudinal ones explains the prominent peak in the diffusivity of the amorphous silicon just above 7 THz.

  1. A Molecular-Orbital Model for Amorphous Group IV Semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    M. Grado-Caffaro; M. A. Grado-Caffaro

    1997-01-01

    A theoretical model based on standard molecular-orbital theory and extended Hückel approach is proposed. This model is valid for amorphous group IV semiconductors and represents a substantial improvement of the state of the art.

  2. Amorphous Photonic Lattices: Band Gaps, Effective Mass and Suppressed Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Rechtsman, Mikael; Dreisow, Felix; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Nolte, Stefan; Segev, Mordechai

    2010-01-01

    We present, theoretically and experimentally, amorphous photonic lattices exhibiting a band-gap yet completely lacking Bragg diffraction: 2D waveguides distributed randomly according to a liquid-like model responsible for the absence of Bragg peaks as opposed to ordered lattices containing disorder, which always exhibit Bragg peaks. In amorphous lattices the bands are comprised of localized states, but we find that defect states residing in the gap are more localized than the Anderson localization length. Finally, we show how the concept of effective mass carries over to amorphous lattices.

  3. Composition Range of Amorphous Mg-Ni-Y Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈红梅; 钟夏平; 欧阳义芳

    2003-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamic point of view, a method for predication of the composition range of amorphous ternary alloys was proposed. The composition range of amorphous ternary alloys is determined by the comparison of the excess free energy of the amorphous alloy and the free energy of competing crystalline states. The free energy is extrapolated from the data of three binary alloys by using Toop′s model. The method was applied to predict the composition range of amorphous Mg-Ni-Y alloys. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the available experimental results. It indicates that the present method can be used to predict the composition range for amorphous ternary alloys.

  4. Properties and atomic structure of amorphous early transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, we studied the properties of amorphous Zr-TL alloys (TL = Ni, Cu) in order to obtain parameters associated with the electronic structure and interatomic bonding of amorphous Zr. Here, we provide new data for the magnetic, superconducting and mechanical properties of amorphous Hf-TL and Ti-TL alloys. We combine our results with published data in order to obtain parameters appropriate to hypothetical amorphous Hf and Ti. These parameters are very different from those of the stable crystalline phases (hcp) of Hf and Ti and indicate, as for Zr, an fcc-like short range order for amorphous Hf and Ti. This results in an enhanced electronic density of states at the Fermi level, but in weakened interatomic bonding.

  5. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses. PMID:24052052

  6. A STUDY OF TIN IMPURITY ATOMS IN AMORPHOUS SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Rabchanova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Using the Mössbauer spectroscopy method for the 119 Sn isotope the state of tin impurity atoms in amorphous a-Si silicon is studied. The electrical and optical properties of tin doped films of thermally spray-coated amorphous silicon have been studied. It is shown that in contrast to the crystalline silicon where tin is an electrically inactive substitution impurity, in vacuum deposited amorphous silicon it produces an acceptor band near the valence band and a fraction of the tin atoms become...

  7. Pressure-induced crystallization of amorphous red phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissi, Erin N.; Soignard, Emmanuel; McKiernan, Keri A.; Benmore, Chris. J.; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2012-03-01

    Structural transitions in amorphous red phosphorus were studied at ambient temperature and pressures up to 12 GPa. Amorphous (red) phosphorus was observed to transform into crystalline black phosphorus at 7.5 ± 0.5 GPa using diamond anvil cell Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and a direct equation of state (EoS) measurement. The transition was found to be irreversible and the material recovered upon pressure cycling to 10 to 12 GPa was crystalline orthorhombic black phosphorus. A third order Birch-Murnaghan EoS was fit to the data and a bulk modulus (B0) of 11.2 GPa was measured for amorphous red phosphorus.

  8. Amorphous silicon based particle detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrsch, N; Franco, A; Riesen, Y.; Despeisse, M; S. Dunand; Powolny, F; Jarron, P.; Ballif, C.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation hard monolithic particle sensors can be fabricated by a vertical integration of amorphous silicon particle sensors on top of CMOS readout chip. Two types of such particle sensors are presented here using either thick diodes or microchannel plates. The first type based on amorphous silicon diodes exhibits high spatial resolution due to the short lateral carrier collection. Combination of an amorphous silicon thick diode with microstrip detector geometries permits to achieve micromete...

  9. Influence of Amorphous Structure on Polymorphism in Vanadia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Kevin H.; Schelhas, Laura T.; Garten, Lauren M.; Shyam, Badri; Mehta, Apurva; Ndione, Paul F.; Ginley, David S.; Toney, Michael F.

    2016-07-07

    Normally we think of the glassy state as a single phase and therefore crystallization from chemically identical amorphous precursors should be identical. Here we show that the local structure of an amorphous precursor is distinct depending on the initial deposition conditions, resulting in significant differences in the final state material. Using grazing incidence total x-ray scattering, we have determined the local structure in amorphous thin films of vanadium oxide grown under different conditions using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Here we show that the subsequent crystallization of films deposited using different initial PLD conditions result in the formation of different polymorphs of VO2. This suggests the possibility of controlling the formation of metastable polymorphs by tuning the initial amorphous structure to different formation pathways.

  10. Stable Transistors in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon

    OpenAIRE

    J. M. Shannon

    2004-01-01

    Thin-film field-effect transistors in hydrogenated amorphous silicon are notoriously unstable due to the formation of silicon dangling bond trapping states in the accumulated channel region during operation. Here, we show that by using a source-gated transistor a major improvement in stability is obtained. This occurs because the electron quasi-Fermi level is pinned near the center of the band in the active source region of the device and strong accumulation of electrons is prevented. The use...

  11. Systematic Study of Electron Localization in an Amorphous Semiconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Biswas, Parthapratim; Ordejon, Pablo; Drabold, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structure of gap and band tail states in amorphous silicon. Starting with two 216-atom models of amorphous silicon with defect concentration close to the experiments, we systematically study the dependence of electron localization on basis set, density functional and spin polarization using the first principles density functional code Siesta. We briefly compare three different schemes for characterizing localization: information entropy, inverse participation rat...

  12. PHOTOEMISSION STUDIES OF THE TRANSITION FROM AMORPHOUS TO MICROCRYSTALLINE SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, H.; Ley, L.

    1981-01-01

    We have studied a series of samples spanning the range from purely amorphous to microcrystalline silicon prepared by chemical transport in a hydrogen plasma or by sputtering in a H2/Ar mixture. The first order Raman spectra show a superposition of amorphous and crystalline contribution, showing some features of wurtzite-silicon. The electronic density of states, as deduced from X-ray photoelectron-spectroscopy, shows a gradual change from microcrystalline structure for samples prepared by che...

  13. Molecular dynamics in electrospun amorphous plasticized polylactide fibers

    OpenAIRE

    MONNIER, X; DELPOUVE, N; BASSON, N; GUINAULT, A; DOMENEK, S; Saiter, A; MALLON, P.E; Dargent, E

    2015-01-01

    The molecular dynamics in the amorphous phase of electrospun fibers of polylactide (PLA) has been investigated using the cooperative rearranging region concept. An unusual and significant increase of the cooperativity length at the glass transition induced by the electrospinning has been observed. This behavior is attributed to the singularity of the amorphous phase organization. Electrospun PLA fibers rearrange in a pre-ordered metastable state which is characterized by highly oriented but n...

  14. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodyard, James R.; Payson, J. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films were irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15 cm(-2). The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy and photoconductivity measurements. The investigations show that the radiation introduces sub-band-gap states 1.35 eV below the conduction band and the states increase supralinearly with fluence. Photoconductivity measurements suggest the density of states above the Fermi energy is not changing drastically with fluence.

  15. Ion-irradiation-induced amorphization of cobalt nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amorphization of Co nanoparticles embedded in SiO2 has been investigated by measuring their structure and size, before and after ion irradiation, by x-ray absorption spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering, respectively. Compared to bulk material, unirradiated crystalline nanoparticles exhibited increased structural disorder and a decreased average coordination number as a result of finite-size effects. Upon irradiation, there was no variation in nanoparticle size yet significant structural change. The coordination number decreased further while the mean value (bondlength), variance (Debye-Waller factor), and asymmetry (third cumulant) of the interatomic distance distribution all increased, as consistent with theoretical predictions for an amorphous elemental metal. Furthermore, the interatomic distance distribution for irradiated Co nanoparticles was in excellent agreement with our molecular dynamics simulations for bulk amorphous Co, and we have thus attributed the observed structural changes to the formation of an amorphous phase. Though such a crystalline-to-amorphous phase transformation is not readily achievable in bulk material by ion irradiation, we suggest that the perturbed structural state prior to irradiation and the amorphous surrounding matrix both contribute to nucleating and stabilizing the amorphous phase in irradiated Co nanoparticles. In addition to the structural properties, the vibrational properties of the amorphous phase were also probed, using temperature-dependent x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements. The Einstein temperature of the unirradiated crystalline nanoparticles was lower than that of bulk material due to loosely bonded surface/interfacial atoms. In contrast, that of the irradiated amorphous nanoparticles was substantially higher than the bulk value. We attribute this apparent bond stiffening to the influence of the rigid surrounding matrix.

  16. Solid-state synthesis of alpha-Fe and iron carbide nanoparticles by thermal treatment of amorphous Fe2O3

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schneeweiss, Oldřich; Zbořil, R.; David, Bohumil; Heřmánek, M.; Mašláň, M.

    New York: Springer, 2009 - (Kuzmann, E.; Lazar, K.), s. 167-173 ISBN 978-3-642-01369-0. [International Symposium on the Industrial Applications of the Mossbauer Effect (ISIAME 2008) /7./. Budapest (HU), 17.08.2008-22.08.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/08/1440; GA MŠk 1M0512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Iron oxides * Solid-state synthesis * Nanocrystalline powder Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  17. High performance non-volatile memory with the control of charge trapping states in an amorphous InSnZnO active channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phu Thi Nguyen, Cam; Thuy Trinh, Thanh; Raja, Jayapal; Le, Anh Huy Tuan; Jang, Kyungsoo; Lee, Youn-Jung; Yi, Junsin

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the influence of interface states between an indium tin zinc oxide (ITZO) active layer and a gate insulator on memory characteristics was examined as a function of annealing temperature. The annealing nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices have shown the best electrical characteristics such as high field effect mobility (27.22 cm2 V-1 s-1), low threshold voltage (0.15 V), low subthreshold slope (0.17 V dec-1), and high on/off current ratio (7.57 × 107) in comparison with as-deposited devices. By annealing at 250 °C, the number of ITZO/insulator interface trap densities was reduced. The effect of the remaining trap states on the retention characteristic of memory devices is negligible. The performance of NVM devices using different annealing temperatures of ITZO and a multi-stack gate insulator SiO2/SiOx/SiOxNy with Si-rich SiOx for the charge storage layer was also reported. The 250 °C annealed ITZO-based NVM device showed a retention exceeding ˜94% of the threshold voltage shift after 104 s and greater than ˜90% after 10 years with a low operating voltage of +11 V at only 1 μs programming duration time. Therefore, the NVM devices, which were fabricated by the low ITZO/insulator interface trap densities, were highly suitable for potential application in memory systems.

  18. The electrochemical characteristics and applicability of an amorphous sulfide based solid ion conductor for the next generation solid-state lithium secondary batteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi eAihara

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide based solid electrolytes are of considerable practical interest for all solid-state batteries due to their high ionic conductivity and softness at room temperature. In particular, iodine containing lithium thiophosphate is known to exhibit high ionic conductivity but its applicability in solid-state battery remains to be examined. To demonstrate the possibility of the iodine doped solid electrolyte (SE, LiI-Li3PS4 was used to construct two different types of test cells were prepared, Li/SE/S and Li/SE/LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05 cells. The solid electrolyte, LiI-Li3PS4 showed a high ionic conductivity approximately 1.2 mScm-1 at 25 ℃. Within 100 cycles, the capacity retention was better in Li/SE/S cell, and the red-ox shuttle was not observed due to physical blockage of SE layer. The capacity fade was approximately 4% from the maximum capacity observed at 10th cycle, after 100 cycles in Li/SE/S cell. On the contrary, the capacity fade was much larger in Li/SE/LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05 cell, probably due to the decomposition of the electrolyte at the operating potential range. Nevertheless, both the Li/SE/LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05 and Li/SE/S cells exhibited the high coulombic efficiencies above 99.6% and 99.9% during charge-discharge cycle test, respectively. This fact indicates that a high energy density can be possible without an excess lithium metal anode. In addition, it was particularly interesting that the SE showed a reversible capacity about 260 mAhg-1-SE. This electrolyte may have not only as a role of the ion conduction, but also as a catholite.

  19. Shear amorphization of boron suboxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report for the first time the shear-induced local amorphization of boron suboxide subjected to nanoindentation. The amorphous bands have a width of ∼1–3 nm and a length of 200–300 nm along the (01¯11) crystal plane. We show direct experimental evidence that the amorphous shear bands of boron suboxide are driven from the coalescence of dislocation loops under high shear stresses. These observations provide insights into the microscopic deformation and failure of high-strength and lightweight ceramics

  20. Simulation in Amorphous Silicon and Amorphous Silicon Carbide Pin Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Dora; Fernandes, Miguel; Louro, Paula; Fantoni, Alessandro; Vieira, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Part 21: Electronics: Devices International audience Photodiodes are devices used as image sensors, reactive to polychromatic light and subsequently color detecting, and they are also used in optical communication applications. To improve these devices performance it is essential to study and control their characteristics, in fact their capacitance and spectral and transient responses. This study considers two types of diodes, an amorphous silicon pin and an amorphous silicon carbide pi...

  1. Structure of amorphous Al2O3 produced by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amorphous state can be produced in α-Al2O3 by ion beam induced displacements at 77 K or by displacements combined with chemical effects at room temperature. Progress toward understanding the amorphization process has been made from studies of the short-range order, electronic charge on implanted species, and the critical composition for amorphization. Results are presented for implantation of Al + O in the stoichiometric ratio, zirconium, iron, and tin. 10 refs., 6 figs

  2. Formation of amorphous Fe 50Si 50 alloy by diffusion reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhihua; Wang, Wenkui; Li, Jingfeng; Wang, Yuming

    1989-02-01

    The solid state reaction in the multilayer film with alternative polycrystalline Fe and amorphous Si layers has been studied with X-ray diffraction. Amorphous Fe 50Si 50 phase was formed after annealing isothermally at 300°C, which is explained in view of the consideration that an amorphous phase can be more favorable to form than a supersaturated solution in thermodynamics as well as than an equilibrium compound FeSi in kenetics.

  3. Nitrosyl isomerism in amorphous Mn(TPP)(NO) solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtikyan, Tigran S; Hayrapetyan, Vardan A; Martirosyan, Garik G; Ghazaryan, Robert K; Iretskii, Alexei V; Zhao, Hailiang; Pierloot, Kristine; Ford, Peter C

    2012-12-25

    Reaction of NO with amorphous Mn(TPP) layers gives two Mn(TPP)(NO) isomers with linear and bent Mn-N-O geometries that reversibly interconvert with changes in temperature. DFT computations predict that the linear complex is the singlet ground state while the bent structure is a triplet state. PMID:23143019

  4. Amorphous drugs and dosage forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grohganz, Holger; Löbmann, K.; Priemel, P.;

    2013-01-01

    The transformation to an amorphous form is one of the most promising approaches to address the low solubility of drug compounds, the latter being an increasing challenge in the development of new drug candidates. However, amorphous forms are high energy solids and tend to recry stallize. New...... formulation principles are needed to ensure the stability of amorphous drug forms. The formation of solid dispersions is still the most investigated approach, but additional approaches are desirable to overcome the shortcomings of solid dispersions. Spatial separation by either coating or the use of micro......-containers has shown potential to prevent or delay recrystallization. Another recent approach is the formation of co-amorphous mixtures between either two drugs or one drug and one low molecular weight excipient. Molecular interactions between the two molecules provide an energy barrier that has to be overcome...

  5. Problems of substance amorphization, relationship with electroplasticity and superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of copper samples as wires enriched by stable isotopes 63Cu and 65Cu were carried out. Temperatures of abnormal deviation from the smooth shape of CTE curves are determined. It is shown that in each curve one of temperature abnormality was related with the amorphous state of the substance, while another-with crystalline state of the substance. Debay's maximum characteristic temperatures for each isotopes in it's different phases are determined. Evidence of the fact that EPD promotes amorphization of substances has been obtained.

  6. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranber Singh; S Prakash

    2003-07-01

    The problem of hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is studied semiclassically. It is found that the local hydrogen concentration fluctuations-induced extra potential wells, if intense enough, lead to the localized electronic states in a-Si:H. These localized states are metastable. The trapping of electrons and holes in these states leads to the electrical degradation of the material. These states also act as recombination centers for photo-generated carriers (electrons and holes) which in turn may excite a hydrogen atom from a nearby Si–H bond and breaks the weak (strained) Si–Si bond thereby apparently enhancing the hydrogen diffusion and increasing the light-induced dangling bonds.

  7. Recent advances in the characterization of amorphous pharmaceuticals by X-ray diffractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, Seema; Terban, Maxwell W; Thakral, Naveen K; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-05-01

    For poorly water soluble drugs, the amorphous state provides an avenue to enhance oral bioavailability. The preparation method, in addition to sample history, can dictate the nature and the stability of the amorphous phase. Conventionally, X-ray powder diffractometry is of limited utility for characterization, but structural insights into amorphous and nanocrystalline materials have been enabled by coupling X-ray total scattering with the pair distribution function. This has shown great promise for fingerprinting, quantification, and even modeling of amorphous pharmaceutical systems. A consequence of the physical instability of amorphous phases is their crystallization propensity, and recent instrumental advances have substantially enhanced our ability to detect and quantify crystallization in a variety of complex matrices. The International Centre for Diffraction Data has a collection of the X-ray diffraction patterns of amorphous drugs and excipients and, based on the available supporting information, provides a quality mark of the data. PMID:26712710

  8. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF AMORPHOUS CVD SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Hirose, M.

    1981-01-01

    Amorphous silicon produced from the chemical vapor decomposition of silane at ~600 °C offers a pure silicon network containing no bonded-hydrogen and involving native defects of the order of 1 x 1019 cm-3. Doped phosphorus or boron atoms in the CVD a-Si interact with the defects to reduce the gap states and the spin density as well. The mechanism of the defect compensation has been interpreted in terms of complex-defect formation through the reaction between three-fold dopant atoms and divaca...

  9. The properties of amorphous GaN

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Bin; Drabold, David A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present three amorphous GaN models obtained from the first principles simulation. We find that a chemically ordered continuous random network is the ideal structure for a-GaN. If we exclude the tail states, we predict a 3.0eV optical gap for 64-atom model and 2.3eV for 250-atom models. We observe a highly localized valence tail and a remarkably delocalized exponential conduction tail which we associate with different hybridization in the two tails. Based upon these results, ...

  10. Amorphous silicon crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, Wolfgang Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells deals with some typical properties of heterojunction solar cells, such as their history, the properties and the challenges of the cells, some important measurement tools, some simulation programs and a brief survey of the state of the art, aiming to provide an initial framework in this field and serve as a ready reference for all those interested in the subject. This book helps to ""fill in the blanks"" on heterojunction solar cells. Readers will receive a comprehensive overview of the principles, structures, processing techniques and the curre

  11. Mechanical response of melt-spun amorphous filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-speed melt spinning of a cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) and a copolyamide (CoPA) have been performed. Differential scanning calorimetry curves of the resulting monofilaments show that they remain in an amorphous state even after hot drawing. Wide angle x-ray diffraction patterns of undrawn and drawn COP filaments show that although the material remains in an amorphous state, a degree of orientation is induced in the polymer after drawing. The amorphous filaments show an enhanced bending recovery with respect to different semi-crystalline monofilaments commercially available. However, single fiber axial compressive testing indicates that the amorphous filaments exhibit a compressive modulus value which is 50% lower than what is observed for a reference semi-crystalline PET filament. Analysis of the compressive strains applied by the bending recovery test indicates that while the maximum applied strains remain well within the region of elastic deformation of the amorphous materials, the threshold between elastic and plastic deformation is reached for the semi-crystalline materials. (paper)

  12. Fundamentals of amorphous solids structure and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Stachurski, Zbigniew H

    2014-01-01

    Long awaited, this textbook fills the gap for convincing concepts to describe amorphous solids. Adopting a unique approach, the author develops a framework that lays the foundations for a theory of amorphousness. He unravels the scientific mysteries surrounding the topic, replacing rather vague notions of amorphous materials as disordered crystalline solids with the well-founded concept of ideal amorphous solids. A classification of amorphous materials into inorganic glasses, organic glasses, glassy metallic alloys, and thin films sets the scene for the development of the model of ideal amorph

  13. Research Update: Direct conversion of amorphous carbon into diamond at ambient pressures and temperatures in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on fundamental discovery of conversion of amorphous carbon into diamond by irradiating amorphous carbon films with nanosecond lasers at room-temperature in air at atmospheric pressure. We can create diamond in the form of nanodiamond (size range <100 nm) and microdiamond (>100 nm). Nanosecond laser pulses are used to melt amorphous diamondlike carbon and create a highly undercooled state, from which various forms of diamond can be formed upon cooling. The quenching from the super undercooled state results in nucleation of nanodiamond. It is found that microdiamonds grow out of highly undercooled state of carbon, with nanodiamond acting as seed crystals

  14. Structural analysis of amorphous and hydrogen absorption alloys by neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural studies of amorphous alloys and hydrogen absorption amorphous alloys by taking advantage of neutron and X-ray diffractions and using the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling for getting information of the three dimensional atom configuration are reviewed. Voronoi analysis of the RMC models is powerful to elucidate the structural origin of the stability of amorphous state, since Ni-Zr amorphous alloys are unstable in comparison with Cu-Zr ones. The polyhedra around Ni atoms are dominated by trigonal prism-like polyhedra. In contrast, icosahedron-like polyhedra are preferred for Cu. The Ni-Zr amorphous alloys have been reported to stabilize by adding Al. The Voronoi analysis informs us that trigonal prism-like polyhedra decreased in number by adding Al to the Ni-Zr system. On the contrary, the number of icosahedron-like polyhedra was found to increase. The results apparently indicate that the icosahedron-like polyhedra play an important role to stabilize the amorphous state. Moreover, neutron diffraction is a powerful tool to clarify the location of hydrogen atoms in the hydrogen absorption materials. For TbFe2D3.8 and TbNi2D2.4 amorphous alloys, the RMC model structure based on the diffraction data teach us that about 98% of hydrogen atoms occupy tetrahedral sites formed by metal atoms and stabilize the amorphous state. (author)

  15. Hidden structure in amorphous solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inam, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Lewis, James P. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Drabold, D.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Trinity College, Cambridge CB2 1TQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    Recent theoretical studies of amorphous silicon (a-Si) [Pan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 206403 (2008)] have revealed subtle but significant structural correlations in network topology: the tendency for short (long) bonds to be spatially correlated with other short (long) bonds. These structures were linked to the electronic band tails in the optical gap. In this paper, we further examine these issues for a-Si, and demonstrate that analogous correlations exist in amorphous SiO{sub 2}, and in the organic molecule, {beta}-carotene. We conclude with a discussion of the origin of the effects and its possible generality. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Stabilization of amorphous structure in silicon thin film by adding germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stabilization of the amorphous structure in amorphous silicon film by adding Ge atoms was studied using Raman spectroscopy. Amorphous Si1−xGex (x = 0.0, 0.03, 0.14, and 0.27) films were deposited on glass substrates from electron beam evaporation sources and annealed in N2 atmosphere. The change in the amorphous states and the phase transition from amorphous to crystalline were characterized using the TO, LO, and LA phonons in the Raman spectra. The temperature of the transition from the amorphous phase to the crystalline phase was higher for the a-Si1−xGex (x = 0.03, 0.14) films, and the crystallization was hindered. The reason why the addition of a suitable quantity of Ge atoms into the three-dimensional amorphous silicon network stabilizes its amorphous structure is discussed based on the changes in the Raman signals of the TO, LO, and LA phonons during annealing. The characteristic bond length of the Ge atoms allows them to stabilize the random network of the amorphous Si composed of quasi-tetrahedral Si units, and obstruct its rearrangement

  17. On the dynamics of the reentrant spin-glass state of the Fe{sub 100−x}Zr{sub x} (x = 9, 10) amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, P. R. T.; Machado, F. L. A., E-mail: flam@df.ufpe.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901 Recife-Pernambuco (Brazil); Dahlberg, E. Dan [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Low temperature magnetization (M) and ac susceptibility (χ{sub ac}) data were used to investigate the reentrant spin-glass state in lengths of melt-spun ribbons of Fe{sub 100−x}Zr{sub x} (x = 9, 10) amorphous alloys. The temperature range investigated was from 2 to 300 K, while the applied magnetic field H was varied in the range of ±85 kOe. The magnetic properties were found to be strongly influenced by the sample composition despite the fact that the amount of Fe varies by 1 at. %. For instance, the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) is reduced from 232.5 K to 213.0 K with decreasing Fe concentration, while M for the lower Fe concentration, measured at the highest applied magnetic field (H = 85 kOe) was nearly double the value for that of the higher; the coercivity in the ferromagnetic regime is reduced by a factor close to five when x is increased from 9 at. % to 10 at. %. The ac susceptibility measured for frequencies f in the range of 10–10{sup 4 }Hz showed a sharp drop in the magnitude of the in-phase contribution (χ{sub ac}{sup ′}) and a peak at the out-of-phase component (χ{sub ac}{sup ″}), which shifts to higher temperatures with increasing values of f. The Voguel-Fulcher law applied to the χ{sub ac}{sup ″} data yielded an activation energy E{sub a}/k{sub B} = 21.3 K (40.1 K), the glassy temperature T{sub G} = 15.5 K (38.2 K), and a relaxation time τ{sub 0}=9.1×10{sup −7} s (8.3×10{sup −7} s), for the sample with x = 10 (x = 9). A plot of χ{sub ac}{sup ″}vsχ{sub ac}{sup ′} for a broad range of T and f yielded a broad maximum near the glassy temperature T{sub G} for both sample concentrations.

  18. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited by ion-beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, V. E.; Henin, N.; Tu, C.-W.; Tavakolian, H.; Sites, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films 1/2 to 1 micron thick were deposited on metal and glass substrates using ion-beam sputtering techniques. The 800 eV, 2 mA/sq cm beam was a mixture of argon and hydrogen ions. The argon sputtered silicon from a pure (7.6 cm) single crystal wafer, while the hydrogen combined with the sputtered material during the deposition. Hydrogen to argon pressure ratios and substrate temperatures were varied to minimize the defect state density in the amorphous silicon. Characterization was done by electrical resistivity, index of refraction and optical absorption of the films.

  19. Unveiling the complex electronic structure of amorphous metal oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Arhammar, C.; Pietzsch, A; Bock, N.; Holmstrom, E.; Araujo, C. M.; Grasjo, J.; Zhao, S.; Green, S; Peery, T.; Hennies, F.; Amerioun, S.; Fohlisch, A.; Schlappa, J.; Schmitt, T; Strocov, V. N.

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous materials represent a large and important emerging area of material’s science. Amorphous oxides are key technological oxides in applications such as a gate dielectric in Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor devices and in Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon and TANOS (TaN-Al2O3-Si3N4-SiO2-Silicon) flash memories. These technologies are required for the high packing density of today’s integrated circuits. Therefore the investigation of defect states in these structures is crucial....

  20. Clathrate hydrate formation in amorphous cometary ice analogs in vacuo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David; Allamandola, Louis; Sandford, Scott; Hudgins, Doug; Freund, Friedemann

    1991-01-01

    Experiments conducted in clathrate hydrates with a modified electron microscope have demonstrated the possibility of such compounds' formation during the warming of vapor-deposited amorphous ices in vacuo, through rearrangements in the solid state. Subsolidus crystallization of compositionally complex amorphous ices may therefore be a general and ubiquitous process. Phase separations and microporous textures thus formed may be able to account for such anomalous cometary phenomena as the release of gas at large radial distances from the sun and the retention of volatiles to elevated temperatures.

  1. Amorphous-silicon cell reliability testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The work on reliability testing of solar cells is discussed. Results are given on initial temperature and humidity tests of amorphous silicon devices. Calibration and measurement procedures for amorphous and crystalline cells are given. Temperature stress levels are diagrammed.

  2. Amorphization of hard crystalline materials by electrosprayed nanodroplet impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam of electrosprayed nanodroplets impacting on single-crystal silicon amorphizes a thin surface layer of a thickness comparable to the diameter of the drops. The phase transition occurs at projectile velocities exceeding a threshold, and is caused by the quenching of material melted by the impacts. This article demonstrates that the amorphization of silicon is a general phenomenon, as nanodroplets impacting at sufficient velocity also amorphize other covalently bonded crystals. In particular, we bombard single-crystal wafers of Si, Ge, GaAs, GaP, InAs, and SiC in a range of projectile velocities, and characterize the samples via electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy to determine the aggregation state under the surface. InAs requires the lowest projectile velocity to develop an amorphous layer, followed by Ge, Si, GaAs, and GaP. SiC is the only semiconductor that remains fully crystalline, likely due to the relatively low velocities of the beamlets used in this study. The resiliency of each crystal to amorphization correlates well with the specific energy needed to melt it except for Ge, which requires projectile velocities higher than expected

  3. Crystallization of amorphous water ice in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, P.; Blake, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    Electron diffraction studies of vapor-deposited water ice have characterized the dynamical structural changes during crystallization that affect volatile retention in cometary materials. Crystallization is found to occur by nucleation of small domains, while leaving a significant part of the amorphous material in a slightly more relaxed amorphous state that coexists metastably with cubic crystalline ice. The onset of the amorphous relaxation is prior to crystallization and coincides with the glass transition. Above the glass transition temperature, the crystallization kinetics are consistent with the amorphous solid becoming a "strong" viscous liquid. The amorphous component can effectively retain volatiles during crystallization if the volatile concentration is approximately 10% or less. For higher initial impurity concentrations, a significant amount of impurities is released during crystallization, probably because the impurities are trapped on the surfaces of micropores. A model for crystallization over long timescales is described that can be applied to a wide range of impure water ices under typical astrophysical conditions if the fragility factor D, which describes the viscosity behavior, can be estimated.

  4. Amorphous Dielectric Thin Films with Extremely Low Mechanical Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous low-energy excitations are one of the universal phenomena of amorphous solids. These excitations dominate the acoustic, dielectric, and thermal properties of structurally disordered solids. One exception has been a type of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H with 1 at.% H. Using low temperature elastic and thermal measurements of electron-beam evap-orated amorphous silicon (a-Si, we show that TLS can be eliminated in this system as the films become denser and more structurally ordered under certain deposition conditions. Our results demonstrate that TLS are not intrinsic to the glassy state but instead reside in low density regions of the amorphous network. This work obviates the role hydrogen was previously thought to play in removing TLS in a-Si:H and favors an ideal four-fold covalently bonded amorphous structure as the cause for the disappearance of TLS. Our result supports the notion that a-Si can be made a “perfect glass” with “crystal-like” properties, thus offering an encouraging opportunity to use it as a simple crystal dielectric alternative in applications, such as in modern quantum devices where TLS are the source of dissipation, decoherence and 1/f noise.

  5. Features of exoelectron emission in amorphous metallic alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Veksler, A S; Morozov, I L; Semenov, A L

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of the photothermostimulated exoelectron emission in amorphous metallic alloys of the Fe sub 6 sub 4 Co sub 2 sub 1 B sub 1 sub 5 composition are studied. It is established that the temperature dependences of the exoelectron emission spectrum adequately reflect the two-stage character of the amorphous alloy transition into the crystalline state. The exoelectron emission spectrum is sensitive to the variations in the modes of the studied sample thermal treatment. The thermal treatment of the amorphous metallic alloy leads to growth in the intensity of the exoelectrons yield. The highest growth in the intensify of the exoelectron emission was observed in the alloys at the initial stage of their crystallization

  6. Molecular Hydrogen Formation on Amorphous Silicates Under Interstellar Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Perets, H B; Biham, O; Vidali, G; Li, L; Swords, S; Congiu, E; Roser, J; Manico, G; Brucato, J R; Pirronello, V; Perets, Hagai B.; Lederhendler, Adina; Biham, Ofer; Vidali, Gianfranco; Li, Ling; Swords, Sol; Congiu, Emanuele; Roser, Joe; Manico, Giulio; Brucato, John Robert; Pirronello, Valerio

    2007-01-01

    Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented for the first time and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained earlier for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. These barriers are used in order to evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H_2 formation within a temperature range which is relevant to diffuse interstellar clouds (but not to photo-dissociation regions, where grain temperatures are higher). The results also indicate that the hydrogen molecules are thermalized with the surface and desorb with low kinetic energy. Thus, they are unlikely to occupy highly excited states.

  7. Electrochromic colour centres in amorphous tungsten trioxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous tungsten trioxide films, investigated by the Raman scattering method, are shown to be composed of a spatial network of tightly bound (WO6)sub(n).mH2O clusters with a large number of terminal oxygen W(double bond)O and W-O-W bonds between clusters. The injected electrons in an amorphous tungsten trioxide film are localized in the tungsten 5d orbitals in an axially distorted octahedron, as is shown by ESR analysis. The optical absorption of a coloured amorphous tungsten trioxide film, as has previously been proposed, can be satisfactorily described by an intervalence charge-transfer transition between localized W5+ and W6+ states. (Auth.)

  8. Investigation of Sb diffusion in amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Csik, A.; Langer, G A; Erdelyi, G.; Beke, D. L.; Erdelyi, Z.; Vad, K.

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous silicon materials and its alloys become extensively used in some technical applications involving large area of the microelectronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the amorphous-crystalline transition, segregation and diffusion processes still have numerous unanswered questions. In this work we study the Sb diffusion into an amorphous Si film by means of Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS). Amorphous Si/Si1-xSbx/Si tri-layer samples with 5 at% antimony concentration were...

  9. Fracture Phenomena in Amorphous Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard-Andersen, Asger; Dahle, Birgit

    1966-01-01

    Fracture surfaces of amorphous selenium broken in flexure at room temperature have been studied. The fracture velocity was found to vary in different regions of the fracture surface. Peculiar features were observed in a transition zone between fast and slower fracture. In this zone cleavage steps...

  10. Amorphous metal matrix composite ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite ribbons with amorphous matrix and ceramic (SiC, WC, MoB) particles were produced by modified planar melt flow casting methods. Weldability, abrasive wear and wood sanding examinations were carried out in order to find optimal material and technology for elevated wear resistance and sanding durability. The correlation between structure and composite properties is discussed. (author)

  11. Atomistic Models of Amorphous Semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarolimek, K.

    2011-01-01

    Crystalline silicon is probably the best studied material, widely used by the semiconductor industry. The subject of this thesis is an intriguing form of this element namely amorphous silicon. It can contain a varying amount of hydrogen and is denoted as a-Si:H. It completely lacks the neat long ran

  12. Molecular simulation of freestanding amorphous nickel thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, T.Q. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 Boulevard Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée, Cedex 2 (France); Hoang, V.V., E-mail: vvhoang2002@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Institute of Technology, National University of Ho Chi Minh City, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet Street, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Lauriat, G. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 Boulevard Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée, Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-10-31

    Size effects on glass formation in freestanding Ni thin films have been studied via molecular dynamics simulation with the n-body Gupta interatomic potential. Atomic mechanism of glass formation in the films is determined via analysis of the spatio-temporal arrangements of solid-like atoms occurred upon cooling from the melt. Solid-like atoms are detected via the Lindemann ratio. We find that solid-like atoms initiate and grow mainly in the interior of the film and grow outward. Their number increases with decreasing temperature and at a glass transition temperature they dominate in the system to form a relatively rigid glassy state of a thin film shape. We find the existence of a mobile surface layer in both liquid and glassy states which can play an important role in various surface properties of amorphous Ni thin films. We find that glass formation is size independent for models containing 4000 to 108,000 atoms. Moreover, structure of amorphous Ni thin films has been studied in details via coordination number, Honeycutt–Andersen analysis, and density profile which reveal that amorphous thin films exhibit two different parts: interior and surface layer. The former exhibits almost the same structure like that found for the bulk while the latter behaves a more porous structure containing a large amount of undercoordinated sites which are the origin of various surface behaviors of the amorphous Ni or Ni-based thin films found in practice. - Highlights: • Glass formation is analyzed via spatio-temporal arrangements of solid-like atoms. • Amorphous Ni thin film exhibits two different parts: surface and interior. • Mobile surface layer enhances various surface properties of the amorphous Ni thin films. • Undercoordinated sites play an important role in various surface activities.

  13. Nanovoid formation by change in amorphous structure through the annealing of amorphous Al2O3 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation mechanism of a high density of nanovoids by annealing amorphous Al2O3 thin films prepared by an electron beam deposition method was investigated. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that nanovoids ∼1-2 nm in size were formed by annealing amorphous Al2O3 thin films at 973 K for 1-12 h, where the amorphous state was retained. The elastic stiffness, measured by a picosecond laser ultrasound method, and the density, measured by X-ray reflectivity, increased drastically after the annealing process, despite nanovoid formation. These increases indicate a change in the amorphous structure during the annealing process. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that an increase in stable AlO6 basic units and the change in the ring distribution lead to a drastic increase in both the elastic stiffness and the density. It is probable that a pre-annealed Al2O3 amorphous film consists of unstable low-density regions containing a low fraction of stable AlO6 units and stable high-density regions containing a high fraction of stable AlO6 units. Thus, local density growth in the unstable low-density regions during annealing leads to nanovoid formation (i.e., local volume shrinkage).

  14. Amorphous nickel/cobalt tungsten sulfide electrocatalysts for high-efficiency hydrogen evolution reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Amorphous nickel/cobalt tungsten sulfides were synthesized by a thermolytic process. • Amorphous NiWS and CoWS could realize hydrogen evolution efficiently. • Ni/Co promotion and annealing alter the porous structure and chemical bonding states. • Active sites on the surface of amorphous WSx are increased with Ni or Co doping. • Amorphous NiWS and CoWS have immense potentials in water splitting devices. - Abstract: The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), an appealing solution for future energy supply, requires efficient and inexpensive electrocatalysts with abundant active surface sites. Although crystalline MoS2 and WS2 are promising candidates, their activity is dominated by edge sites. Amorphous tungsten sulfide prepared so far lacks the required active sites and its application has thus been hampered. In this work, nickel and cobalt incorporated amorphous tungsten sulfide synthesized by a thermolytic process is demonstrated to enhance the HER efficiency dramatically. The amorphous nickel tungsten sulfide (amorphous NiWS) annealed at 210 °C delivers the best HER performance in this system boasting a Tafel slope of 55 mV per decade and current density of 8.6 mA cm−2 at 250 mV overpotential in a sustained test for 24 h. The introduction of Ni or Co into the catalyst and subsequent thermal treatment alters the porous structure and chemical bonding states thereby increasing the density of active sites on the surface

  15. Heterogeneous nucleation of the amorphous phase and dissolution of nanocrystalline grains in bilayer Al-Ge thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan, G.; Divakar, R.; Sundari, T.; Sundararaman, D.; Tyagi, A.K.; Krishan, K. [Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1997-12-18

    Solid State Amorphization Reaction (SSAR) was first reported in thin film couples of Au-La by Schwarz et al. Since then, many other systems have been shown to undergo SSAR. Various issues involved in SSAR have been extensively investigated and reviewed. The existence of a large negative heat of mixing, anomalous fast diffusion of one component, the requirement of heterogeneous nucleation sites such as grain boundaries are found to be some of the key features of solid state amorphization. The authors present in this paper evidence of heterogeneous nucleation and growth of the amorphous phase followed by the precipitation of germanium from the amorphous phase in Al-Ge bilayer films.

  16. An amorphous phase formation at palladium / silicon oxide (Pd/SiOx) interface through electron irradiation - electronic excitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Pd-Si amorphous phase was formed at a palladium/silicon oxide (Pd/SiOx) interface at room temperature by electron irradiation at acceleration voltages ranging between 25 kV and 200 kV. Solid-state amorphization was stimulated without the electron knock-on effects. The total dose required for the solid-state amorphization decreases with decreasing acceleration voltage. This is the first report on electron irradiation induced metallic amorphous formation caused by the electronic excitation at metal/silicon oxide interface

  17. An amorphous phase formation at palladium / silicon oxide (Pd/SiOx) interface through electron irradiation - electronic excitation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Takeshi; Yamashita, Ryo; Yabuuchi, Atsushi; Lee, Jung-Goo

    2015-11-01

    A Pd-Si amorphous phase was formed at a palladium/silicon oxide (Pd/SiOx) interface at room temperature by electron irradiation at acceleration voltages ranging between 25 kV and 200 kV. Solid-state amorphization was stimulated without the electron knock-on effects. The total dose required for the solid-state amorphization decreases with decreasing acceleration voltage. This is the first report on electron irradiation induced metallic amorphous formation caused by the electronic excitation at metal/silicon oxide interface.

  18. An amorphous phase formation at palladium / silicon oxide (Pd/SiOx interface through electron irradiation - electronic excitation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nagase

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A Pd-Si amorphous phase was formed at a palladium/silicon oxide (Pd/SiOx interface at room temperature by electron irradiation at acceleration voltages ranging between 25 kV and 200 kV. Solid-state amorphization was stimulated without the electron knock-on effects. The total dose required for the solid-state amorphization decreases with decreasing acceleration voltage. This is the first report on electron irradiation induced metallic amorphous formation caused by the electronic excitation at metal/silicon oxide interface.

  19. Traveling cluster approximation for uncorrelated amorphous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors apply the TCA concepts to spatially disordered, uncorrelated systems (e.g., fluids or amorphous metals without short-range order). This is the first approximation scheme for amorphous systems that takes cluster effects into account while preserving the Herglotz property for any amount of disorder. They have performed some computer calculations for the pair TCA, for the model case of delta-function potentials on a one-dimensional random chain. These results are compared with exact calculations (which, in principle, taken into account all cluster effects) and with the CPA, which is the single-site TCA. The density of states for the pair TCA clearly shows some improvement over the CPA, and yet, apparently, the pair approximation distorts some of the features of the exact results. They conclude that the effects of large clusters are much more important in an uncorrelated liquid metal than in a substitutional alloy. As a result, the pair TCA, which does quite a nice job for alloys, is not adequate for the liquid. Larger clusters must be treated exactly, and therefore an n-TCA with n > 2 must be used

  20. The Influence of Pressure on the Intrinsic Dissolution Rate of Amorphous Indomethacin

    OpenAIRE

    Korbinian Löbmann; Konstantina Flouda; Danwen Qiu; Theodosia Tsolakou; Wenbo Wang; Thomas Rades

    2014-01-01

    New drug candidates increasingly tend to be poorly water soluble. One approach to increase their solubility is to convert the crystalline form of a drug into the amorphous form. Intrinsic dissolution testing is an efficient standard method to determine the intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR) of a drug and to test the potential dissolution advantage of the amorphous form. However, neither the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) nor the European Pharmacopeia (Ph.Eur) state specific limitations for ...

  1. Preparation and characterization of spray-dried co-amorphous drug-amino acid salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Birgitte Tarp; Blaabjerg, Lasse Ingerslev; Lenz, Elisabeth;

    2016-01-01

    scale. In this study, spray-drying was investigated as a scale up preparation method for co-amorphous indomethacin (IND)-amino acid mixtures. In addition, the physico-chemical properties of the different co-amorphous systems were investigated with respect to the amino acids' ability towards co...... dissolution behaviour, and physical stability at various storage conditions, were examined. KEY FINDINGS: Results showed that IND could be converted into an amorphous form in combination with the amino acids arginine (ARG), histidine (HIS) and lysine (LYS) by spray-drying. Solid state characterization...... mixtures were physically stable (>10 months) at room temperature and 40°C under dry conditions. Intrinsic dissolution of the co-amorphous mixtures showed an improved dissolution behaviour under intestinal pH conditions for IND-ARG compared with the crystalline and amorphous forms of the drug. On the other...

  2. Exoelectron analysis of amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekhtyar, Yu. D.; Vinyarskaya, Yu. A.

    1994-04-01

    The method based on registration of photothermostimulated exoelectron emission (PTSE) is used in the proposed new field of investigating the structural defects in amorphous silicon (a-Si). This method can be achieved if the sample under investigation is simultaneously heated and illuminated by ultraviolet light. The mechanism of PTSE from a-Si has been studied in the case of a hydrogenized amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film grown by glow discharge method. The electronic properties and annealing of defects were analyzed in the study. It has been shown from the results that the PTSE from a-Si:H takes place as a prethreshold single-photon external photoeffect. The exoemission spectroscopy of a-Si:H was shown to be capable in the study of thermally and optically stimulated changes in the electronic structure of defects, their annealing, as well as diffusion of atomic particles, such as hydrogen.

  3. Amorphous metal based nanoelectromechanical switch

    KAUST Repository

    Mayet, Abdulilah M.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switch is an interesting ultra-low power option which can operate in the harsh environment and can be a complementary element in complex digital circuitry. Although significant advancement is happening in this field, report on ultra-low voltage (pull-in) switch which offers high switching speed and area efficiency is yet to be made. One key challenge to achieve such characteristics is to fabricate nano-scale switches with amorphous metal so the shape and dimensional integrity are maintained to achieve the desired performance. Therefore, we report a tungsten alloy based amorphous metal with fabrication process development of laterally actuated dual gated NEM switches with 100 nm width and 200 nm air-gap to result in <5 volts of actuation voltage (Vpull-in). © 2013 IEEE.

  4. A Universal Flying Amorphous Computer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrů, Lukáš; Wiedermann, Jiří

    Berlin: Springer, 2011 - (Calude, C.; Kari, J.; Petre, I.; Rozenberg, G.), s. 189-200. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science. 6714). ISBN 978-3-642-21340-3. ISSN 0302-9743. [UC 2011. Unconventional Computation /10/. Turku (FI), 06.06.2011-10.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP202/10/1333 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : amorphous computing * model of computation * universality Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  5. Amorphous silicon based betavoltaic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrsch, N; Riesen, Y.; Franco, A; S. Dunand; Kind, H.; Schneider, S.; Ballif, C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon betavoltaic devices are studied both by simulation and experimentally. Devices exhibiting a power density of 0.1 μW/cm2 upon Tritium exposure were fabricated. However, a significant degradation of the performance is taking place, especially during the first hours of the exposure. The degradation behavior differs from sample to sample as well as from published results in the literature. Comparisons with degradation from beta particles suggest an effect of tritium...

  6. Electronic structure of a realistic model of amorphous graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapko, V.; Thorpe, M.F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Drabold, D.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

    2010-05-15

    In this note, we calculate the electronic properties of a realistic atomistic model of amorphous graphene. The model contains odd-membered rings, particularly five and seven membered rings and no coordination defects. We show that odd-membered rings increase the electronic density of states at the Fermi level relative to crystalline graphene; a honeycomb lattice with semi-metallic character. Some graphene samples contain amorphous regions, which even at small concentrations, may strongly affect many of the exotic properties of crystalline graphene, which arise because of the linear dispersion and semi-metallic character of perfectly crystalline graphene. Estimates are given for the density of states at the Fermi level using a tight-binding model for the {pi} states. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Linear and Nonlinear Wave Dynamics in Amorphous Photonic Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechtsman, Mikael; Szameit, Alexander; Segev, Mordechai

    Conventional intuition in solid-state physics holds that in order for a solid to have an electronic band-gap, it must be periodic, allowing the use of Bloch's theorem. Indeed, the free-electron approximation seems to imply that Bragg scattering in periodic potentials is a necessary condition for the formation of a band-gap. But this is obviously untrue: looking through a window reveals that glassy silica (SiO2), although possessing no order at all, still displays a band-gap spanning the entire photon energy range of visible light, without absorption. Several experimental studies have probed the properties of the band-gap in such "amorphous" electronic systems using spectroscopic techniques [1], time-of-flight measurements [2], and others. With the major progress in photonic crystals [3, 4], it is natural to explore amorphous photonic structures with band-gaps, where the actual wavefunction can be observed directly, and hence, many physical issues can be studied at an unprecedented level. Indeed, amorphous photonic media have been studied theoretically in several pioneering papers (e.g., [5, 6]), and experiments in the microwave regime have demonstrated the existence of a band-gap [5]. However, amorphous band-gap media have never been studied experimentally in the optical regime. Particularly in optics, the full beauty of disorder can be revealed: optics offers the possibility to precisely engineer the potential strength and period, as well as the unique opportunity to employ nonlinearity under controlled conditions, which could unravel unknown features that are much harder to access experimentally in other systems. Here, we present the first experimental study of amorphous photonic lattices: a two-dimensional array of randomly organized evanescently coupled waveguides. We demonstrate that the bands in this medium, comprising inherently localized Anderson states, are separated by gaps, despite the total lack of Bragg scattering. We find that amorphous photonic

  8. Charge ordering in amorphous WOx films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelevich, Yakov; da Silva, Robson R.; Rougier, Aline; Luk'yanchuk, Igor A.

    2007-08-01

    We report on the observation of highly anisotropic viscous electronic conducting phase in amorphous WO1.55 films that occurs below a current (I)- and frequency (f)-dependent temperature T(I,f). At Tstates. A rich dynamic behavior of the electronic matter occurring at T

  9. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  10. Tendency of metallic crystals to amorphization in the process of severe (Megaplastic) deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, A. M.; Sundeev, R. V.; Shalimova, A. V.

    2012-11-01

    The main features of the transition of crystalline Ni50Ti30Hf20, Ti50Ni25Cu25, Zr50Ni18Ti17Cu15, and Fe78B8.5Si9P4.5 alloys with various tendencies to amorphization into an amorphous state upon melt quenching and in the course of severe deformation in Bridgman anvils have been considered. The crystalline state of these alloys has been produced using various methods of annealing. In the iron-based alloy, single-phase and two-phase crystalline states have been studied. The nickel- and titanium-based alloys after annealing were in a single-phase crystalline state; the zirconium-based alloy, in a two-phase state. It is shown that at the same degree of deformation the rates of amorphization of crystalline alloys differ substantially; namely, the single-phase crystalline titanium- and iron-based alloys amorphize easily, whereas the Zr-based alloy amorphizes only poorly, just like the two-phase iron-based alloy. It can be assumed that the tendency to deformation-induced amorphization of crystalline alloys and the corresponding crystalline phases is mainly determined by three factors: mechanical, thermodynamic, and concentration-related.

  11. Influence of polymer content on stabilizing milled amorphous salbutamol sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balani, P N; Wong, S Y; Ng, W K; Widjaja, E; Tan, R B H; Chan, S Y

    2010-05-31

    The study investigates the influence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) concentration on stabilizing the amorphous form of salbutamol sulphate (SS) before and after storage under ambient and elevated humidity conditions. Different mass ratios of SS and PVP (0-90wt%) were co-milled using a planetary ball mill. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), high sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (HSDSC), dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman microscopy (RM) were used to analyze the stability of the co-milled mixtures against heat and humidity treatments as well as storage at different humidity conditions. Prior storage, DSC and DVS analyses revealed that re-crystallization of amorphous SS was suppressed above PVP content of 33 wt%. Probable hydrogen bond interaction between SS and PVP was found in FT-IR analysis. XRPD diffractograms and SEM analysis showed stability against re-crystallization was achieved in the co-milled mixtures with a minimum PVP content of 80 wt% after storage. Homogeneous distribution of SS and PVP from RM analysis showed fine clustering of SS and PVP, suggesting the formation of an amorphous dispersion at molecular level. The results provide insights on the application of thermal and humidity treatments, accelerated stability testing and investigations on drug-excipient interactions to predict the minimum ratio of an excipient for stabilizing the amorphous state of a milled API. PMID:20211717

  12. Joint ESRF-Cecam workshop polymorphous in liquid and amorphous matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This workshop is dedicated to new trends in the simulation and experimental studies of liquid and amorphous matter. Particular emphasis is given to polymorphism in equilibrium and under-cooled metastable liquids, glasses and to amorphous network-forming systems. 5 mains sessions over the 3 days have been organized: 1) under-cooled liquid metals, 2) liquid, glassy and amorphous semiconductors, 3) water and related systems, 4) colloids, macro-molecules and biological cells, and 5) state-of-the-art in experimental and theoretical investigations. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations

  13. Joint ESRF-Cecam workshop polymorphous in liquid and amorphous matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, D.L.; Hennet, L.; Krishnan, S.; Sinn, H.; Alp, E.E.; Saboungi, M.L.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Mossa, S.; Tarjus, G.; Trapananti, A.; Di Cicco, A.; Filipponi, A.; Tanaka, H.; Soper, A.K.; Strassle, Th.; Klotz, S.; Hamel, G.; Nelmes, R.J.; Loveday, J.S.; Rousse, G.; Canny, B.; Chervin, J.C.; Saitta, M.; Marek Koza, M.; Schober, H.; Geiger, A.; Brovchenko, I.; Oleinikova, A.; Strassle, T.; Reichert, H.; Jakse, N.; Lebacq, O.; Pasturel, A.; Salmon, P.S.; Martin, R.A.; Massobrio, C.; Poon, W.C.K.; Pham, K.N.; Voigtmann, Th.; Egelhaaf, S.U.; Pusey, P.N.; Petukhov, A.V.; Dolbnya, I.P.; Vroege, G.J.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Konig, H.; Keen, D.A.; Benedetti, L.R.; Sihachakr, D.; Dewaele, A.; Weck, G.; Crichton, W.; Mezouar, M.; Loubeyre, P.; Shimojo, F.; Ferlat, G.; San Miguel, A.; Xu, H.; Martinez-Garcia, D.; Zuniga, J.; Munoz-Sanjose, V.; Felipponi, A.; Panfilis, S. de; Di Cicco, A.; Guthrie, M.; Tulk, C.A.; Bemore, C.J.; Xu, J.; Yarger, J.L.; Mao, H.K.; Hemley, R.J

    2004-07-01

    This workshop is dedicated to new trends in the simulation and experimental studies of liquid and amorphous matter. Particular emphasis is given to polymorphism in equilibrium and under-cooled metastable liquids, glasses and to amorphous network-forming systems. 5 mains sessions over the 3 days have been organized: 1) under-cooled liquid metals, 2) liquid, glassy and amorphous semiconductors, 3) water and related systems, 4) colloids, macro-molecules and biological cells, and 5) state-of-the-art in experimental and theoretical investigations. This document gathers the abstracts of the presentations.

  14. The physics and applications of amorphous semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Madan, Arun

    1988-01-01

    This comprehensive, detailed treatise on the physics and applications of the new emerging technology of amorphous semiconductors focuses on specific device research problems such as the optimization of device performance. The first part of the book presents hydrogenated amorphous silicon type alloys, whose applications include inexpensive solar cells, thin film transistors, image scanners, electrophotography, optical recording and gas sensors. The second part of the book discusses amorphous chalcogenides, whose applications include electrophotography, switching, and memory elements. This boo

  15. Amorphous powders for inhalation drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lan; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Lu, Xiang-Yun; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-05-01

    For inhalation drug delivery, amorphous powder formulations offer the benefits of increased bioavailability for poorly soluble drugs, improved biochemical stability for biologics, and expanded options of using various drugs and their combinations. However, amorphous formulations usually have poor physicochemical stability. This review focuses on inhalable amorphous powders, including the production methods, the active pharmaceutical ingredients and the excipients with a highlight on stabilization of the particles. PMID:26780404

  16. Hydrophobic transition in porous amorphous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Realistic models of amorphous silica surfaces with different silanol densities are built using Monte Carlo annealing. Water-silica interfaces are characterized by their energy interaction maps, adsorption isotherms, self-diffusion coefficients, and Poiseuille flows. A hydrophilic to hydrophobic transition appears as the surface becomes purely siliceous. These results imply significant consequences for the description of surfaces. First, realistic models are required for amorphous silica interfaces. Second, experimental amorphous silica hydrophilicity is attributed to charged or uncharged defects, and not to amorphousness. In addition, auto irradiation in nuclear waste glass releases hydrogen atoms from silanol groups and can induce such a transition. (authors)

  17. Plasma Deposition of Amorphous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcote, H. F.

    1982-01-01

    Strongly adhering films of silicon are deposited directly on such materials as Pyrex and Vycor (or equivalent materials) and aluminum by a non-equilibrium plasma jet. Amorphous silicon films are formed by decomposition of silicon tetrachloride or trichlorosilane in the plasma. Plasma-jet technique can also be used to deposit an adherent silicon film on aluminum from silane and to dope such films with phosphorus. Ability to deposit silicon films on such readily available, inexpensive substrates could eventually lead to lower cost photovoltaic cells.

  18. Amorphous silicon based solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Al Tarabsheh, Anas

    2007-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films bymeans of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). This technique allows the growth of device quality a-Si:H at relatively low deposition temperatures, below 140 °C and, therefore, enables the use of low-cost substrates, e.g. plastic foils. The maximum efficiencies of a-Si:H solar cells in this work are η= 6.8 % at a deposition temperature Tdep = 180 °C and η = 4.9 % at a deposition ...

  19. Amorphous silicon based radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the characteristics of thin(1 μm) and thick (>30μm) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and γ rays. For x-ray, γ ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. 13 refs., 7 figs

  20. Charged particle detectors made from thin layers of amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments was conducted to determine the feasibility of using hydrogenated amorphous silicon (α-Si:H) as solid state thin film charged particle detectors. 241Am alphas were successfully detected with α-Si:H devices. The measurements and results of these experiments are presented. The problems encountered and changes in the fabrication of the detectors that may improve the performance are discussed

  1. Charge Ordering in Amorphous WO$_{x}$ Films

    OpenAIRE

    Kopelevich, Yakov; da Silva, Robson R.; Rougier, Aline; Lukyanchuk, Igor A.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the observation of highly anisotropic viscous electronic conducting phase in amorphous WO$_{1.55}$ films that occurs below a current (I)- and frequency (f)- dependent temperature T*(I, f). At T < T*(I, f) the rotational symmetry of randomly disordered electronic background is broken leading to the appearance of mutually perpendicular metallic- and insulating-like states. A rich dynamic behavior of the electronic matter occurring at T < T*(I, f) provides evidence for an interplay ...

  2. Polymeric amorphous carbon as p-type window within amorphous silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, R.U.A.; Silva, S.R.P.; Van Swaaij, R.A.C.M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) has been shown to be intrinsically p-type, and polymeric a-C (PAC) possesses a wide Tauc band gap of 2.6 eV. We have replaced the p-type amorphous silicon carbide layer of a standard amorphous silicon solar cell with an intrinsic ultrathin layer of PAC. The thickness of the p

  3. Surface passivation of crystalline silicon by Cat-CVD amorphous and nanocrystalline thin silicon films

    OpenAIRE

    Voz Sánchez, Cristóbal; Martin, I.; Orpella, A.; Puigdollers i González, Joaquim; Vetter, M.; Alcubilla González, Ramón; Soler Vilamitjana, David; Fonrodona Turon, Marta; Bertomeu i Balagueró, Joan; Andreu i Batallé, Jordi

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we study the electronic surface passivation of crystalline silicon with intrinsic thin silicon films deposited by Catalytic CVD. The contactless method used to determine the effective surface recombination velocity was the quasi-steady-state photoconductance technique. Hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon films were evaluated as passivating layers on n- and p-type float zone silicon wafers. The best results were obtained with amorphous silicon films, which allowed ...

  4. Experimental and Computer Modelling Studies of Metastability of Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Munyeme, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    We present a combination of experimental and computer modelling studies of the light induced degradation in the performance of amorphous silicon based single junction solar cells. Of particular interest in this study is the degradation kinetics of different types of amorphous silicon single junction solar cells and the role of dangling bond states in mediating or driving the degradation mechanism. The approach taken in this study has enabled has to examine how light induced degradation is aff...

  5. Laser surface treatment of amorphous metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakam, Shravana K.

    Amorphous materials are used as soft magnetic materials and also as surface coatings to improve the surface properties. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline materials derived from their amorphous precursors show superior soft magnetic properties than amorphous counter parts for transformer core applications. In the present work, laser based processing of amorphous materials will be presented. Conventionally, the nanocrystalline materials are synthesized by furnace heat treatment of amorphous precursors. Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline materials due to their low cost and superior magnetic properties are the most widely used soft magnetic materials. However, achieving nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B ternary system becomes very difficult owing its rapid growth rate at higher temperatures and sluggish diffusion at low temperature annealing. Hence, nanocrystallization in this system is achieved by using alloying additions (Cu and Nb) in the ternary Fe-Si-B system. Thus, increasing the cost and also resulting in reduction of saturation magnetization. laser processing technique is used to achieve extremely fine nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B amorphous precursor. Microstructure-magnetic Property-laser processing co-relationship has been established for Fe-Si-B ternary system using analytical techniques. Laser processing improved the magnetic properties with significant increase in saturation magnetization and near zero coercivity values. Amorphous materials exhibit excellent corrosion resistance by virtue of their atomic structure. Fe-based amorphous materials are economical and due to their ease of processing are of potential interest to synthesize as coatings materials for wear and corrosion resistance applications. Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B amorphous system was used to develop thick coatings on 4130 Steel substrate and the corrosion resistance of the amorphous coatings was improved. It is also shown that the mode of corrosion depends on the laser processing

  6. A model for amorphous phase formation in aluminium induced by high-energy nickel implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of amorphous zones in pure polycrystalline Al is observed after high-energy (about 30 MeV) Ni ion implantations for doses between 0.59 and 3.05 at.%. In order to explain the crystalline-to-amorphous state transition the formation, the structure and the stability of the amorphous zones have been studied by transmission electron microscopy observations on cross-sectional samples completed by Ni atomic concentration measurements. It appears that the observed amorphous zones have a composition close to Al3Ni. Molecular dynamic calculations based on the embedded-atom method were undertaken to simulate the formation and stability of amorphous phase in the Al(Ni) system. The results suggest that the formation of precipitates with Al3Ni phase composition is a necessary condition for amorphization to succeed. We propose that each ion induced cascade gives rise to a 'volume of influence' in which Ni atoms tend to segregate during cooling and that such Al3Ni precipitates that are likely to become amorphous are formed after a sufficiently high number of cascades. A model supported by numerical simulations has been developed and is presented here. (author)

  7. Photoexcitation-induced processes in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theories for the mechanism of photo-induced processes of photodarkening (PD), volume expansion (VE) in amorphous chalcogenides are presented. Rates of spontaneous emission of photons by radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors are also calculated and applied to study the excitonic photoluminescence in a-Si:H. Results are compared with previous theories

  8. Applied research on amorphous magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous magnetic materials are increasingly becoming an industrial reality, which a variety of applications to electronics and electrical engineering. Many research lines are in progress for what concerns the production techniques, the understanding of the structure and properties of amorphous ribbons, the optimization and extension of their applications. The fast quenching methods used to obtain amorphous materials will first be reviewed, also describing an experimental apparatus set up by the authors for laboratory investigations of rapid solidification processes. Because of the non equilibrium structure of amorphous metallic alloys, various relaxation effects are expected to occur, which may partially limit the use of these materials. Studies of these relaxation phenomena, performed by different methods, including Moessbauer spectroscopy will also be reviewed, showing their importance in better understanding the amorphous structure. Finally much attention will be devoted to actual applications of amorphous magnetic materials. Emphasis will be placed on the prospective applications of amorphous ribbons characterized by very low power losses to magnetic cores of distribution transformers, pointing to the possible advantages, but also to the technical problems involved with the substitution of crystalline laminations with the new amorphous materials. (orig.)

  9. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  10. Band Gaps of an Amorphous Photonic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi-Quan; FENG Zhi-Fang; HU Xiao-Yong; CHENG Bing-Ying; ZHANG Dao-Zhong

    2004-01-01

    @@ A new kind of amorphous photonic materials is presented. Both the simulated and experimental results show that although the disorder of the whole dielectric structure is strong, the amorphous photonic materials have two photonic gaps. This confirms that the short-range order is an essential factor for the formation of the photonic gaps.

  11. Theoretical Considerations in Developing Amorphous Solid Dispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Priemel, Petra Alexandra; Surwase, Sachin; Graeser, Kirsten; Strachan, Clare J.; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas

    Before pursuing the laborious route of amorphous solid dispersion formulation and development, which is the topic of many of the subsequent chapters in this book, the formulation scientist would benefit from a priori knowledge whether the amorphous route is a viable one for a given drug and how m...

  12. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  13. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 x 1025 n/m2. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C

  14. Stochastic approach to plasticity and yield in amorphous solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, H G E; Jaiswal, Prabhat K; Procaccia, Itamar; Sastry, Srikanth

    2015-12-01

    We focus on the probability distribution function (PDF) P(Δγ;γ) where Δγ are the measured strain intervals between plastic events in a athermal strained amorphous solids, and γ measures the accumulated strain. The tail of this distribution as Δγ→0 (in the thermodynamic limit) scales like Δγ(η). The exponent η is related via scaling relations to the tail of the PDF of the eigenvalues of the plastic modes of the Hessian matrix P(λ) which scales like λ(θ), η=(θ-1)/2. The numerical values of η or θ can be determined easily in the unstrained material and in the yielded state of plastic flow. Special care is called for in the determination of these exponents between these states as γ increases. Determining the γ dependence of the PDF P(Δγ;γ) can shed important light on plasticity and yield. We conclude that the PDF's of both Δγ and λ are not continuous functions of γ. In slowly quenched amorphous solids they undergo two discontinuous transitions, first at γ=0(+) and then at the yield point γ=γ(Y) to plastic flow. In quickly quenched amorphous solids the second transition is smeared out due to the nonexisting stress peak before yield. The nature of these transitions and scaling relations with the system size dependence of 〈Δγ〉 are discussed. PMID:26764687

  15. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  16. Anatomy of plastic events in magnetic amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, H. George E.; Procaccia, Itamar; Gupta, Bhaskar Sen

    2016-03-01

    Plastic events in amorphous solids can be much more than just "shear transformation zones" when the positional degrees of freedom are coupled nontrivially to other degrees of freedom. Here we consider magnetic amorphous solids where mechanical and magnetic degrees of freedom interact, leading to rather complex plastic events whose nature must be disentangled. In this paper we uncover the anatomy of the various contributions to some typical plastic events. These plastic events are seen as Barkhausen noise or other "serrated noises." Using theoretical considerations we explain the observed statistics of the various contributions to the considered plastic events. The richness of contributions and their different characteristics imply that in general the statistics of these serrated noises cannot be universal, but rather highly dependent on the state of the system and on its microscopic interactions.

  17. Optical properties of amorphous tungsten oxide films: Effect of stoichiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical properties of sputter deposited amorphous tungsten oxide films have been measured in-situ during slow electrochemical cycling in a lithium containing electrolyte. Amorphous films exhibit coloration under Li insertion and bleaching under Li extraction. Substoichiometric films show almost reversible optical changes already in the first electrochemical cycle and are completely reversible thereafter. Tungsten oxide films sputtered in a large excess of oxygen were found to be slightly overstoichiometric, as determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. They exhibit irreversible charge transfer and coloration in the first cycle. Thereafter they cannot be completely bleached and exhibit transmittance contrast between coloured and partially bleached states. The irreversible colouration of the stoichiometric films is associated with a feature at 2.6 to 2.9 eV vs. Li in electrochemical measurements. Possible chemical reactions giving rise to this behaviour are discussed

  18. Qualitative and quantitative methods to determine miscibility in amorphous drug-polymer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan; Dave, Vivek; Chauhan, Harsh

    2015-09-18

    Amorphous drug-polymer systems or amorphous solid dispersions are commonly used in pharmaceutical industry to enhance the solubility of compounds with poor aqueous solubility. The degree of miscibility between drug and polymer is important both for solubility enhancement as well as for the formation of a physically stable amorphous system. Calculation of solubility parameters, Computational data mining, Tg measurements by DSC and Raman mapping are established traditional methods used to qualitatively detect the drug-polymer miscibility. Calculation of Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, computational analysis of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) data, solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Atomic Forced Microscopy (AFM) have been recently developed to quantitatively determine the miscibility in amorphous drug-polymer systems. This brief review introduces and compiles these qualitative and quantitative methods employed in the evaluation of drug-polymer miscibility. Combination of these techniques can provide deeper insights into the true miscibility of the drug-polymer systems. PMID:26006307

  19. Micromagnetic study of magnetic domain structure and magnetization reversal in amorphous wires with circular anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betancourt, I., E-mail: israelb@correo.unam.m [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Hrkac, G. [Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin St., Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Schrefl, T. [Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin St., Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); St. Poelten University of Applied Sciences (Austria)

    2011-05-15

    In this work we present a detailed numerical investigation on the magnetic domain formation and magnetization reversal mechanism in sub-millimeter amorphous wires with negative magnetostriction by means of micromagnetic calculations. The formation of circular magnetic domains surrounding a multidomain axially oriented central nucleus was observed for the micromagnetic model representing the amorphous wire. The magnetization reversal explained by micromagnetic computations for the M-H curve is described in terms of a combined nucleation-propagation-rotational mechanism after the saturated state. Results are interpreted in terms of the effective magnetic anisotropy. - Research highlights: > Magnetic domain formation in small amorphous wires is studied by micromagnetic calculations. > Magnetization reversal in small amorphous wires is studied by micromagnetic calculations. > Formation of circular domains around an axially oriented central core was observed. > Magnetization reversal is described in terms of nucleation-propagation-rotational mechanisms. > Magnetic domains and reversal mechanism are consistent with experimental reports.

  20. Recrystallization of almost fully amorphous zircon under hydrothermal conditions: An infrared spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrothermal experiments were carried out with powder from an almost fully amorphous, natural zircon under various P-T-t conditions mainly in a 0.1 N HCl solution. Powder infrared spectroscopic measurements on the experimental products reveal that first structural changes occurred at a fluid temperature as low as 75 deg. C. Significant recrystallization started at 200 deg. C, as indicated by an increase in the absorption intensity of the zircon fundamental IR bands and the formation of sharp OH stretching bands at 3385 and 3420 cm-1. Although the powder has fully reacted at 400 deg. C, the zircon fundamental absorption bands are not fully recovered, indicating the occurrence of significant amounts of amorphous remnants. The experimental results in neutral to acidic solutions are consistent with the idea that water (H+ and possibly H2O) diffuses into the amorphous network where it 'catalyses' solid state recrystallization. During this process, Zr and Si were leached from the amorphous network

  1. STUDY ON MAXIMUM HYDROGEN CAPACITY FOR Zr-Ni AMORPHOUS ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To design the amorphous hydrogen storage alloy efficiently, the maximum hydrogen capacities for Zr-Ni amorphous alloy were calculated. Based on the Rhomb Unit Structure Model(RUSM) for amorphous alloy and the experimental result that hydrogen atoms exist in 3Zr1Ni and 4Zr tetrahedron interstices in Zr-Ni amorphous alloy, the numbers of 3Zr-1Ni and 4Zr tetrahedron interstices in a RUSM were calculated which correspond to the hydrogen capacity. The two extremum Zr distribution states were calculated, such as highly heterogeneous Zr distribution and homogeneous Zr distribution. The calculated curves of hydrogen capacity with different Zr contents at two states indicate that the hydrogen capacity increases with increasing Zr content and reaches its maximum when Zr is 75%. The theoretical maximum hydrogen capacity for Zr-Ni amorphous alloy is 2.0(H/M). Meanwhile, the hydrogen capacity of heterogeneous Zr distribution alloy is higher than that of homogenous one at the same Zr content. The experimental results prove the calculated results reasonable, and accordingly, the experimental results that the distribution of Zr atom in amorphous alloy occur heterogeneous after a few hydrogen absorption-desorption cycles can be explained.

  2. An amorphous phase formation at palladium / silicon oxide (Pd/SiO{sub x}) interface through electron irradiation - electronic excitation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagase, Takeshi, E-mail: t-nagase@uhvem.osaka-u.ac.jp [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, 7-1, Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yamashita, Ryo; Yabuuchi, Atsushi [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1, Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Lee, Jung-Goo [Powder & Ceramics Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science, 66 Sangnam-dong, Changwon, Kyungsangnam-Do 641-101 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    A Pd-Si amorphous phase was formed at a palladium/silicon oxide (Pd/SiO{sub x}) interface at room temperature by electron irradiation at acceleration voltages ranging between 25 kV and 200 kV. Solid-state amorphization was stimulated without the electron knock-on effects. The total dose required for the solid-state amorphization decreases with decreasing acceleration voltage. This is the first report on electron irradiation induced metallic amorphous formation caused by the electronic excitation at metal/silicon oxide interface.

  3. Recent developments in the Raman and infrared investigations of amorphous pharmaceuticals and protein formulations: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hédoux, Alain

    2016-05-01

    The success rate for drug discovery and the development of innovative therapeutic strategies are intimately related to the physical properties of the solid-state condensed matter, which have direct influence on the bioavailability of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients. In order to transform a new molecule in efficient drug, the material is brought into an amorphous state using various manufacturing processes including freeze drying, spray drying, hot melt extrusion and loading in different delivery devices. The infrared and Raman spectroscopic analyses used for exploring disordered and amorphous states, for the monitoring of the drug physical stability in drug delivery systems are described in this review. PMID:26686831

  4. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-09-14

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  5. Barkhausen effect during hydrogen interaction with amorphous alloy 2NSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Barkhausen effect electromotive force measurements by the two-side saturation of the 2NSR (Fe78B12Si19Ni1) alloy amorphous band through hydrogen is carried out. The multiple increase in the Barkhausen effect electromotive force by hydrogen saturation is determined. It is assumed that in the metallic alloy over-saturated by hydrogen there originates a special structural state providing for decrease in the potential barrier by transition of the 180 deg boundary of the magnetic domain from the equilibrium state to another one. The value of the Barkhausen effect link with the hydrogen content in the material is indicated

  6. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  7. Quantification of surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy: the concept of effective amorphous surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Jeffrey; Burnett, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the use of dispersive surface energy in quantifying surface amorphous content, and the concept of effective amorphous surface area is introduced. An equation is introduced employing the linear combination of surface area normalized square root dispersive surface energy terms. This equation is effective in generating calibration curves when crystalline and amorphous references are used. Inverse gas chromatography is used to generate dispersive surface energy values. Two systems are investigated, and in both cases surface energy data collected for physical mixture samples comprised of amorphous and crystalline references fits the predicted response with good accuracy. Surface amorphous content of processed lactose samples is quantified using the calibration curve, and interpreted within the context of effective amorphous surface area. Data for bulk amorphous content is also utilized to generate a thorough picture of how disorder is distributed throughout the particle. An approach to quantifying surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy is presented. Quantification is achieved by equating results to an effective amorphous surface area based on reference crystalline, and amorphous materials. PMID:21725707

  8. Amorphous nickel/cobalt tungsten sulfide electrocatalysts for high-efficiency hydrogen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lun [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Institute of Acoustics and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, Xinglong, E-mail: hkxlwu@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Institute of Acoustics and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Physics, NingBo University, NingBo 315001 (China); Zhu, Xiaoshu [Center for Analysis and Testing, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210093 (China); He, Chengyu; Meng, Ming; Gan, Zhixing [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, MOE, Institute of Acoustics and Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-06-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Amorphous nickel/cobalt tungsten sulfides were synthesized by a thermolytic process. • Amorphous NiWS and CoWS could realize hydrogen evolution efficiently. • Ni/Co promotion and annealing alter the porous structure and chemical bonding states. • Active sites on the surface of amorphous WS{sub x} are increased with Ni or Co doping. • Amorphous NiWS and CoWS have immense potentials in water splitting devices. - Abstract: The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), an appealing solution for future energy supply, requires efficient and inexpensive electrocatalysts with abundant active surface sites. Although crystalline MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2} are promising candidates, their activity is dominated by edge sites. Amorphous tungsten sulfide prepared so far lacks the required active sites and its application has thus been hampered. In this work, nickel and cobalt incorporated amorphous tungsten sulfide synthesized by a thermolytic process is demonstrated to enhance the HER efficiency dramatically. The amorphous nickel tungsten sulfide (amorphous NiWS) annealed at 210 °C delivers the best HER performance in this system boasting a Tafel slope of 55 mV per decade and current density of 8.6 mA cm{sup −2} at 250 mV overpotential in a sustained test for 24 h. The introduction of Ni or Co into the catalyst and subsequent thermal treatment alters the porous structure and chemical bonding states thereby increasing the density of active sites on the surface.

  9. Mechanism for amorphization of boron carbide B4C under uniaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Sitaram; Rulis, Paul; Ching, W. Y.

    2011-11-01

    Boron carbide undergoes an amorphization transition under high-velocity impacts, causing it to suffer a catastrophic loss in strength. The failure mechanism is not clear and this limits the ways to improve its resistance to impact. To help uncover the failure mechanism, we used ab initio methods to carry out large-scale uniaxial compression simulations on two polytypes of stoichiometric boron carbide (B4C), B11C-CBC, and B12-CCC, where B11C or B12 is the 12-atom icosahedron and CBC or CCC is the three-atom chain. The simulations were performed on large supercells of 180 atoms. Our results indicate that the B11C-CBC (B12-CCC) polytype becomes amorphous at a uniaxial strain s = 0.23 (0.22) and with a maximum stress of 168 (151) GPa. In both cases, the amorphous state is the consequence of structural collapse associated with the bending of the three-atom chain. Careful analysis of the structures after amorphization shows that the B11C and B12 icosahedra are highly distorted but still identifiable. Calculations of the elastic coefficients (Cij) at different uniaxial strains indicate that both polytypes may collapse under a much smaller shear strain (stress) than the uniaxial strain (stress). On the other hand, separate simulations of both models under hydrostatic compression up to a pressure of 180 GPa show no signs of amorphization, in agreement with experimental observation. The amorphized nature of both models is confirmed by detailed analysis of the evolution of the radial pair distribution function, total density of states, and distribution of effective charges on atoms. The electronic structure and bonding of the boron carbide structures before and after amorphization are calculated to further elucidate the mechanism of amorphization and to help form the proper rationalization of experimental observations.

  10. CVD of refractory amorphous metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, a novel process is described for the fabrication of multi-metallic amorphous metal alloy coatings using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Of special interest in this work are amorphous metal alloys containing Mo and/or Cr which have high crystallization temperatures and readily available low decomposition temperature metal-bearing precursors. The conditions for amorphous alloy formation via CVD are described as well as the chemical properties of these materials. High temperature, aqueous corrosion tests have shown these materials (especially those containing Cr) are among the most corrosion resistant metal alloys known

  11. Structural relaxation of amorphous silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined amorphous structures of silicon carbide (SiC) using both transmission electron microscopy and a molecular-dynamics approach. Radial distribution functions revealed that amorphous SiC contains not only heteronuclear (Si-C) bonds but also homonuclear (Si-Si and C-C) bonds. The ratio of heteronuclear to homonuclear bonds was found to change upon annealing, suggesting that structural relaxation of the amorphous SiC occurred. Good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimentally measured radial distribution functions

  12. Structural relaxation of amorphous silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Bae, In-Tae; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Matsumura, Syo; Sickafus, Kurt E

    2002-07-29

    We have examined amorphous structures of silicon carbide (SiC) using both transmission electron microscopy and a molecular-dynamics approach. Radial distribution functions revealed that amorphous SiC contains not only heteronuclear (Si-C) bonds but also homonuclear (Si-Si and C-C) bonds. The ratio of heteronuclear to homonuclear bonds was found to change upon annealing, suggesting that structural relaxation of the amorphous SiC occurred. Good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimentally measured radial distribution functions. PMID:12144449

  13. Particle-induced amorphization of complex ceramics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition is of fundamental importance. Particle irradiations provide an important, highly controlled means of investigating this phase transformation and the structure of the amorphous state. The interaction of heavy-particles with ceramics is complex because these materials have a wide range of structure types, complex compositions, and because chemical bonding is variable. Radiation damage and annealing can produce diverse results, but most commonly, single crystals become aperiodic or break down into a polycrystalline aggregate. The authors continued the studies of the transition from the periodic-to-aperiodic state in natural materials that have been damaged by α-recoil nuclei in the uranium and thorium decay series and in synthetic, analogous structures. The transition from the periodic to aperiodic state was followed by detailed x-ray diffraction analysis, in-situ irradiation/transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy/x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and other spectroscopic techniques. These studies were completed in conjunction with bulk irradiations that can be completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory or Sandia National Laboratories. Principal questions addressed in this research program included: (1) What is the process at the atomic level by which a ceramic material is transformed into a disordered or aperiodic state? (2) What are the controlling effects of structural topology, bond-type, dose rate, and irradiation temperature on the final state of the irradiated material? (3) What is the structure of the damaged material? (4) What are the mechanisms and kinetics for the annealing of interstitial and aggregate defects in these irradiated ceramic materials? (5) What general criteria may be applied to the prediction of amorphization in complex ceramics?

  14. The influence of pressure on the intrinsic dissolution rate of amorphous indomethacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löbmann, Korbinian; Flouda, Konstantina; Qiu, Danwen;

    2014-01-01

    and to test the potential dissolution advantage of the amorphous form. However, neither the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) nor the European Pharmacopeia (Ph.Eur) state specific limitations for the compression pressure in order to obtain compacts for the IDR determination. In this study, the...

  15. Amorphous Alloy Surpasses Steel and Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In the same way that the inventions of steel in the 1800s and plastic in the 1900s sparked revolutions for industry, a new class of amorphous alloys is poised to redefine materials science as we know it in the 21st century. Welcome to the 3rd Revolution, otherwise known as the era of Liquidmetal(R) alloys, where metals behave similar to plastics but possess more than twice the strength of high performance titanium. Liquidmetal alloys were conceived in 1992, as a result of a project funded by the California Institute of Technology (CalTech), NASA, and the U.S. Department of Energy, to study the fundamentals of metallic alloys in an undercooled liquid state, for the development of new aerospace materials. Furthermore, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center contributed to the development of the alloys by subjecting the materials to testing in its Electrostatic Levitator, a special instrument that is capable of suspending an object in midair so that researchers can heat and cool it in a containerless environment free from contaminants that could otherwise spoil the experiment.

  16. High performance amorphous selenium lateral photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    Lateral amorphous selenium (a-Se) detectors based on the metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device structure have been studied for indirect detector medical imaging applications. These detectors have raised interest due to their simple structure, ease of fabrication, high-speed, low dark current, low capacitance per unit area and better light utilization. The lateral device structure has a benefit that the electrode spacing may be easily controlled to reduce the required bias for a given desired electric field. In indirect conversion x-ray imaging, the scintillator is coupled to the top of the a-Se MSM photodetector, which itself is integrated on top of the thin-film-transistor (TFT) array. The carriers generated at the top surface of the a-Se layer experience a field that is parallel to the surface, and does not initially sweep them away from the surface. Therefore these carriers may recombine or get trapped in surface states and change the field at the surface, which may degrade the performance of the photodetector. In addition, due to the finite width of the electrodes, the fill factor of the device is less than unity. In this study we examine the effect of lateral drift of carriers and the fill factor on the photodetector performance. The impact of field magnitude on the performance is also investigated.

  17. Deep subgap feature in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide: Evidence against reduced indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) is the archetypal transparent amorphous oxide semiconductor. Despite the gains made with a-IGZO over amorphous silicon in the last decade, the presence of deep subgap states in a-IGZO active layers facilitate instabilities in thin film transistor properties under negative bias illumination stress. Several candidates could contribute to the formation of states within the band gap. Here, we present evidence against In+ lone pair active electrons as the origin of the deep subgap features. No In+ species are observed, only In0 nano-crystallites under certain oxygen deficient growth conditions. Our results further support under coordinated oxygen as the source of the deep subgap states. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Deep subgap feature in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide: Evidence against reduced indium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallis, Shawn; Williams, Deborah S. [Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York, 13902 (United States); Quackenbush, Nicholas F.; Senger, Mikell [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York, 13902 (United States); Woicik, Joseph C. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland, 20899 (United States); White, Bruce E.; Piper, Louis F.J. [Materials Science and Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York, 13902 (United States); Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Binghamton University, Binghamton, New York, 13902 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) is the archetypal transparent amorphous oxide semiconductor. Despite the gains made with a-IGZO over amorphous silicon in the last decade, the presence of deep subgap states in a-IGZO active layers facilitate instabilities in thin film transistor properties under negative bias illumination stress. Several candidates could contribute to the formation of states within the band gap. Here, we present evidence against In{sup +} lone pair active electrons as the origin of the deep subgap features. No In{sup +} species are observed, only In{sup 0} nano-crystallites under certain oxygen deficient growth conditions. Our results further support under coordinated oxygen as the source of the deep subgap states. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. New sunscreen materials based on amorphous cerium and titanium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium-titanium pyrophosphates Ce1-xTi xP2O7 (with x = 0, 0.50, and 1.0), which are novel phosphate materials developed as UV-shielding agents for use in cosmetics, were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescent analysis, UV-vis reflectance, and Raman spectroscopy. Since the optical reflectance shifted to lower wavelengths by the crystallization of the phosphates and the stabilization of the amorphous state of the cerium-titanium pyrophosphates was carried out by doping niobium (Nb). Raman spectroscopic study of the phosphate showed that P-O-P bending and stretching modes decreased with the loading of Nb, accompanying with the formation of Nb-O stretching mode. Therefore, the increase in the amount of the non-bridging oxygen in the amorphous phosphate should be the reason for the inhibition of the crystallization. This stabilization is a significant improvement, which enables to apply these amorphous phosphates not only to cosmetics and paints, but also plastics and films

  20. Electrochromic study on amorphous tungsten oxide films by sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuan, E-mail: cli10@yahoo.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, J.H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan, Taipei 24301, Taiwan (China); Hung, Ming-Tsung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Huang, B.Q. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China)

    2015-07-31

    Tungsten oxide films under different oxygen flow rates are deposited by DC sputtering. The voltage change at target and analyses for the deposited films by X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet–visible-near infrared spectroscopy consistently indicate that low oxygen flow rate (5 sccm) only creates metal-rich tungsten oxide films, while higher oxygen flow rate (10–20 sccm) assures the deposition of amorphous WO{sub 3} films. To explore the electrochromic function of deposited WO{sub 3} films, we use electrochemical tests to perform the insertion of lithium ions and electrons into films. The WO{sub 3} films switch between color and bleach states effectively by both potentiostat and cyclic voltammetry. Quantitative evaluation on electrochemical tests indicates that WO{sub 3} film with composition close to its stoichiometry is an optimal choice for electrochromic function. - Highlights: • Amorphous WO{sub 3} films are deposited by DC sputtering under different O{sub 2} flow rates. • Higher oxygen flow rate (> 10 sccm) assures the deposition of amorphous WO{sub 3} films. • Both potentiostat and cyclic voltammetry make WO{sub 3} films switch its color. • An optimal electrochromic WO{sub 3} is to make films close to its stoichiometry.

  1. Electrochromic study on amorphous tungsten oxide films by sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten oxide films under different oxygen flow rates are deposited by DC sputtering. The voltage change at target and analyses for the deposited films by X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet–visible-near infrared spectroscopy consistently indicate that low oxygen flow rate (5 sccm) only creates metal-rich tungsten oxide films, while higher oxygen flow rate (10–20 sccm) assures the deposition of amorphous WO3 films. To explore the electrochromic function of deposited WO3 films, we use electrochemical tests to perform the insertion of lithium ions and electrons into films. The WO3 films switch between color and bleach states effectively by both potentiostat and cyclic voltammetry. Quantitative evaluation on electrochemical tests indicates that WO3 film with composition close to its stoichiometry is an optimal choice for electrochromic function. - Highlights: • Amorphous WO3 films are deposited by DC sputtering under different O2 flow rates. • Higher oxygen flow rate (> 10 sccm) assures the deposition of amorphous WO3 films. • Both potentiostat and cyclic voltammetry make WO3 films switch its color. • An optimal electrochromic WO3 is to make films close to its stoichiometry

  2. Developments in the Ni-Nb-Zr amorphous alloy membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, S.; Chandra, D.; Hirscher, M.; Dolan, M.; Isheim, D.; Wermer, J.; Viano, D.; Baricco, M.; Udovic, T. J.; Grant, D.; Palumbo, O.; Paolone, A.; Cantelli, R.

    2016-03-01

    Most of the global H2 production is derived from hydrocarbon-based fuels, and efficient H2/CO2 separation is necessary to deliver a high-purity H2 product. Hydrogen-selective alloy membranes are emerging as a viable alternative to traditional pressure swing adsorption processes as a means for H2/CO2 separation. These membranes can be formed from a wide range of alloys, and those based on Pd are the closest to commercial deployment. The high cost of Pd (USD ~31,000 kg-1) is driving the development of less-expensive alternatives, including inexpensive amorphous (Ni60Nb40)100- x Zr x alloys. Amorphous alloy membranes can be fabricated directly from the molten state into continuous ribbons via melt spinning and depending on the composition can exhibit relatively high hydrogen permeability between 473 and 673 K. Here we review recent developments in these low-cost membrane materials, especially with respect to permeation behavior, electrical transport properties, and understanding of local atomic order. To further understand the nature of these solids, atom probe tomography has been performed, revealing amorphous Nb-rich and Zr-rich clusters embedded in majority Ni matrix whose compositions deviated from the nominal overall composition of the membrane.

  3. Amorphous cyclosporin A nanoparticles for enhanced dermal bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Gregori B; Arntjen, Anja; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2016-02-10

    Cylosporin A (CyA) was formulated as amorphous nanoparticle suspension to increase dermal penetration, e.g. applicable in psoriasis. The suspension consisted of 5% CyA in water, stabilized with vitamin E polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS, Kolliphor TPGS) and was produced by bead milling. The diameter of the bulk population was about 350 nm, laser diffraction diameter 99% was 690 nm. The suspension was physically stable over one year of storage at room temperature, and most important the amorphous state also remained stable. Despite the high dispersitivity and related large surface area in contact with water, the drug content reduced only by 5% over 1 year of storage. i.e. the formulation is feasible as commercial product with expiry date. The CyA nanoparticles and μm-sized CyA particles were incorporated into hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) gels and the penetration studied into fresh pig ear skin applying the tape stripping method. At tape number 30, the penetrated cumulative amount of CyA from nanoparticles was 6.3 fold higher compared to the μm-sized raw drug powder (450.1 μg/cm(2) vs. 71.3 μg/cm(2)). A theoretical mechanism is presented to explain the observed superiority in penetration. Based on amorphous CyA nanoparticles, dermal formulations for improved dermal CyA delivery seem to be feasible. PMID:26688038

  4. New sunscreen materials based on amorphous cerium and titanium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masui, Toshiyuki [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Handai Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hirai, Hidekazu [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Handai Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Imanaka, Nobuhito [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering and Handai Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: imanaka@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Gin-ya [Juri Institute for Environmental Science and Chemistry, College of Analytical Chemistry, 2-1-8 Temma, Kita-ku, Osaka 530-0043 (Japan)

    2006-02-09

    Cerium-titanium pyrophosphates Ce{sub 1-x}Ti {sub x}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} (with x = 0, 0.50, and 1.0), which are novel phosphate materials developed as UV-shielding agents for use in cosmetics, were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescent analysis, UV-vis reflectance, and Raman spectroscopy. Since the optical reflectance shifted to lower wavelengths by the crystallization of the phosphates and the stabilization of the amorphous state of the cerium-titanium pyrophosphates was carried out by doping niobium (Nb). Raman spectroscopic study of the phosphate showed that P-O-P bending and stretching modes decreased with the loading of Nb, accompanying with the formation of Nb-O stretching mode. Therefore, the increase in the amount of the non-bridging oxygen in the amorphous phosphate should be the reason for the inhibition of the crystallization. This stabilization is a significant improvement, which enables to apply these amorphous phosphates not only to cosmetics and paints, but also plastics and films.

  5. Surface Acidity of Amorphous Aluminum Hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. FUKUSHI; K. TSUKIMURA; H. YAMADA

    2006-01-01

    The surface acidity of synthetic amorphous Al hydroxide was determined by acid/base titration with several complementary methods including solution analyses of the reacted solutions and XRD characterization of the reacted solids. The synthetic specimen was characterized to be the amorphous material showing four broad peaks in XRD pattern. XRD analyses of reacted solids after the titration experiments showed that amorphous Al hydroxide rapidly transformed to crystalline bayerite at the alkaline condition (pH>10). The solution analyses after and during the titration experiments showed that the solubility of amorphous aluminum hydroxide, Ksp =aAl3+/a3H+,was 1010.3,The amount of consumption of added acid or base during the titration experiment was attributed to both the protonation/deprotonation of dissolved Al species and surface hydroxyl group. The surface acidity constants, surface hydroxyl density and specific surface area were estimated by FITEQL 4.0.

  6. LOCAL ATOMIC STRUCTURE OF AMORPHOUS METALS

    OpenAIRE

    Egami, T.; Maed, K.; Srolovitz, D.; Vitek, V.

    1980-01-01

    The local parameters are introduced to describe the local atomic structure of amorphous metals. They define the structural defects which facilitate the explanation of various properties, including the volume change by annealing.

  7. Diode Based on Amorphous SiC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Zakhvalinskii

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diode structure on the basis of amorphous silicon carbide and p-type polycrystalline silicon (Eurosolar were obtained with magnetron RF-nonreactive sputtering method from solid-phase target in argon atmosphere.

  8. Diode Based on Amorphous SiC

    OpenAIRE

    V.S. Zakhvalinskii; L.V. Borisenko; A.J. Aleynikov; E.A. Piljuk; I. Goncharov; S.V. Taran

    2013-01-01

    Diode structure on the basis of amorphous silicon carbide and p-type polycrystalline silicon (Eurosolar) were obtained with magnetron RF-nonreactive sputtering method from solid-phase target in argon atmosphere.

  9. Amorphous carbon and its surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Some examples of 2.0 g/cm3 surfaces. The cell contained 64 atoms. The top figure shows some tube-like formation, the central figure is an example of a wave-like surface, and the bottom figure is an example of the bending over of the carbons at the surface to form a surface sheet when the sheets in the bulk are not parallel to the surface. - Abstract: We have investigated bulk amorphous carbon at three densities (3.2, 2.6, and 2.0 g/cm3) using density functional theory (DFT). The variation in the structure with density is discussed. The bulk structures are used to create surface structures. If the surfaces are relaxed at 700 K, the surface structures, as a function of density, are more similar than the analogous bulk structures. The relaxed surfaces appear to be graphene sheets with defects, sizable distortions, and have covalently bonded carbon chains holding the sheets together.

  10. Structure of Amorphous Titania Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Chen, B.; Banfield, J. F.; Waychunas, G. A.

    2008-12-01

    Ultrafine (2 - 3 nm) titania (TiO2) nanoparticles show only diffuse scattering by both conventional powder x-ray diffraction and electron diffraction. We used synchrotron wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) to probe the atomic correlations in this amorphous material. The atomic pair-distribution function (PDF) derived from Fourier transform of the WAXS data was used for reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) simulations of the atomic structure of the small nanoparticles. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to generate input structures for the RMC. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) simulations were used to screen candidate structures obtained from the RMC. The structure model that best describes both the WAXS and XAS data consists of particles with a highly distorted shell and a small strained anatase-like crystalline core. The average coordination number of Ti is 5.3 and the Ti-O bond length peaks at 1.940 Å. Relative to bulk titania, the reduction of the coordination number is primarily due to the truncation of the Ti-O octahedra at the titania nanoparticle surface, and the shortening of the Ti-O bond length is due to bond contraction in the distorted shell. Core-shell structures in ultrafine nanoparticles may be common in many materials (e.g. ZnS).

  11. The Influence of Pressure on the Intrinsic Dissolution Rate of Amorphous Indomethacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korbinian Löbmann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available New drug candidates increasingly tend to be poorly water soluble. One approach to increase their solubility is to convert the crystalline form of a drug into the amorphous form. Intrinsic dissolution testing is an efficient standard method to determine the intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR of a drug and to test the potential dissolution advantage of the amorphous form. However, neither the United States Pharmacopeia (USP nor the European Pharmacopeia (Ph.Eur state specific limitations for the compression pressure in order to obtain compacts for the IDR determination. In this study, the influence of different compression pressures on the IDR was determined from powder compacts of amorphous (ball-milling indomethacin (IND, a glass solution of IND and poly(vinylpyrrolidone (PVP and crystalline IND. Solid state properties were analyzed with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD and the final compacts were visually observed to study the effects of compaction pressure on their surface properties. It was found that there is no significant correlation between IDR and compression pressure for crystalline IND and IND–PVP. This was in line with the observation of similar surface properties of the compacts. However, compression pressure had an impact on the IDR of pure amorphous IND compacts. Above a critical compression pressure, amorphous particles sintered to form a single compact with dissolution properties similar to quench-cooled disc and crystalline IND compacts. In such a case, the apparent dissolution advantage of the amorphous form might be underestimated. It is thus suggested that for a reasonable interpretation of the IDR, surface properties of the different analyzed samples should be investigated and for amorphous samples the IDR should be measured also as a function of the compression pressure used to prepare the solid sample for IDR testing.

  12. Laser annealing of hydrogen implanted amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous silicon, prepared by silicon bombardment at energies of 200 to 250 keV, was implanted with 40 keV H2+ to peak concentrations up to 15 at .% and recrystallized in air by single 20 nsec pulses at 1.06 μm from a Nd:glass laser. Amorphous layer formation and recrystallization were verified using Raman spectroscopy and ion backscattering/channeling analysis

  13. A Magnetic Sensor with Amorphous Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfeng He

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a FeCoSiB amorphous wire and a coil wrapped around it, we have developed a sensitive magnetic sensor. When a 5 mm long amorphous wire with the diameter of 0.1 mm was used, the magnetic field noise spectrum of the sensor was about 30 pT/ÖHz above 30 Hz. To show the sensitivity and the spatial resolution, the magnetic field of a thousand Japanese yen was scanned with the magnetic sensor.

  14. Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Progress in identification of strengths and weaknesses of amorphous-silicon technology detailed. Report describes achievements in testing reliability of solar-power modules made of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic cells. Based on investigation of modules made by U.S. manufacturers. Modules subjected to field tests, to accelerated-aging tests in laboratory, and to standard sequence of qualification tests developed for modules of crystalline-silicon cells.

  15. DEFECTS IN AMORPHOUS CHALCOGENIDES AND SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, D.

    1981-01-01

    Our comprehension of the physical properties of amorphous semiconductors has improved considerably over the past few years, but many puzzles remain. From our present perspective, the major features of chalcogenide glasses appear to be well understood, and some of the fine points which have arisen recently have been explained within the same general model. On the other hand, there are a grear number of unresolved mysteries with regard to amorphous silicon-based alloys. In this paper, the valen...

  16. Amorphous Silicon Carbide for Photovoltaic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    JANZ, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Within this work amorphous SiC is investigated for its applicability in photovoltaic devices. The temperature stability and dopability of SiC makes this material very attractive for applications in this area. Physical basics of amorphous SiC networks and plasma processes are discussed and first measurements with FTIR of the different layer types show the complexity of the network. The special features of the plasma reactor such as high temperature deposition and two-source excitation are also...

  17. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  18. Unipolar time-differential charge sensing in non-dispersive amorphous solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldan, A. H. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-8460 (United States); Rowlands, J. A. [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6V4 (Canada); Tousignant, O. [ANRAD Corporation, 4950 Levy Street, Saint-Laurent, Quebec H4R 2P1 (Canada); Karim, K. S. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-06-14

    The use of high resistivity amorphous solids as photodetectors, especially amorphous selenium, is currently of great interest because they are readily produced over large area at substantially lower cost compared to grown crystalline solids. However, amorphous solids have been ruled out as viable radiation detection media for high frame-rate applications, such as single-photon-counting imaging, because of low carrier mobilities, transit-time-limited photoresponse, and consequently, poor time resolution. To circumvent the problem of poor charge transport in amorphous solids, we propose unipolar time-differential charge sensing by establishing a strong near-field effect using an electrostatic shield within the material. For the first time, we have fabricated a true Frisch grid inside a solid-state detector by evaporating amorphous selenium over photolithographically prepared multi-well substrates. The fabricated devices are characterized with optical, x-ray, and gamma-ray impulse-like excitations. Results prove the proposed unipolar time-differential property and show that time resolution in non-dispersive amorphous solids can be improved substantially to reach the theoretical limit set by spatial spreading of the collected Gaussian carrier cloud.

  19. Unipolar time-differential charge sensing in non-dispersive amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, A. H.; Rowlands, J. A.; Tousignant, O.; Karim, K. S.

    2013-06-01

    The use of high resistivity amorphous solids as photodetectors, especially amorphous selenium, is currently of great interest because they are readily produced over large area at substantially lower cost compared to grown crystalline solids. However, amorphous solids have been ruled out as viable radiation detection media for high frame-rate applications, such as single-photon-counting imaging, because of low carrier mobilities, transit-time-limited photoresponse, and consequently, poor time resolution. To circumvent the problem of poor charge transport in amorphous solids, we propose unipolar time-differential charge sensing by establishing a strong near-field effect using an electrostatic shield within the material. For the first time, we have fabricated a true Frisch grid inside a solid-state detector by evaporating amorphous selenium over photolithographically prepared multi-well substrates. The fabricated devices are characterized with optical, x-ray, and gamma-ray impulse-like excitations. Results prove the proposed unipolar time-differential property and show that time resolution in non-dispersive amorphous solids can be improved substantially to reach the theoretical limit set by spatial spreading of the collected Gaussian carrier cloud.

  20. Effect of crystalline/amorphous interfaces on thermal transport across confined thin films and superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Braun, Jeffrey L.; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2016-06-01

    We report on the thermal boundary resistances across crystalline and amorphous confined thin films and the thermal conductivities of amorphous/crystalline superlattices for Si/Ge systems as determined via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Thermal resistances across disordered Si or Ge thin films increase with increasing length of the interfacial thin films and in general demonstrate higher thermal boundary resistances in comparison to ordered films. However, for films ≲3 nm, the resistances are highly dependent on the spectral overlap of the density of states between the film and leads. Furthermore, the resistances at a single amorphous/crystalline interface in these structures are much lower than those at interfaces between the corresponding crystalline materials, suggesting that diffusive scattering at an interface could result in higher energy transmissions in these systems. We use these findings, together with the fact that high mass ratios between amorphous and crystalline materials can lead to higher thermal resistances across thin films, to design amorphous/crystalline superlattices with very low thermal conductivities. In this regard, we study the thermal conductivities of amorphous/crystalline superlattices and show that the thermal conductivities decrease monotonically with increasing interface densities above 0.1 nm-1. These thermal conductivities are lower than that of the homogeneous amorphous counterparts, which alludes to the fact that interfaces non-negligibly contribute to thermal resistance in these superlattices. Our results suggest that the thermal conductivity of superlattices can be reduced below the amorphous limit of its material constituent even when one of the materials remains crystalline.

  1. Challenges in amorphous silicon solar cell technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon is nowadays extensively used for a range of devices, amongst others solar cells. Solar cell technology has matured over the last two decades and resulted in conversion efficiencies in excess of 15%. In this paper the operation of amorphous silicon solar cells is briefly described. For tandem solar cell, amorphous silicon germanium is often used as material for the intrinsic layer of the bottom cell. This improves the red response of the cell. In order to optimize the performance of amorphous silicon germanium solar cells, profiling of the germanium concentration near the interfaces is applied. We show in this paper that the performance is strongly dependent on the width of the grading near the interfaces. The best performance is achieved when using a grading width that is as small as possible near the p-i interface and as wide as possible near the i-n interface. High-rate deposition of amorphous silicon is nowadays one of the main issues. Using the Expanding Thermal Plasma deposition method very high deposition rates can be achieved. This method has been applied for the fabrication of an amorphous silicon solar cell with a conversion efficiency of 5,8%. (authors)

  2. Can amorphization take place in nanoscale interconnects?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trend of miniaturization has highlighted the problems of heat dissipation and electromigration in nanoelectronic device interconnects, but not amorphization. While amorphization is known to be a high pressure and/or temperature phenomenon, we argue that defect density is the key factor, while temperature and pressure are only the means. For nanoscale interconnects carrying modest current density, large vacancy concentrations may be generated without the necessity of high temperature or pressure due to the large fraction of grain boundaries and triple points. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) experiments on 200 nm thick (80 nm average grain size) aluminum specimens. Electron diffraction patterns indicate partial amorphization at modest current density of about 105 A cm−2, which is too low to trigger electromigration. Since amorphization results in drastic decrease in mechanical ductility as well as electrical and thermal conductivity, further increase in current density to about 7 × 105 A cm−2 resulted in brittle fracture failure. Our molecular dynamics (MD) simulations predict the formation of amorphous regions in response to large mechanical stresses (due to nanoscale grain size) and excess vacancies at the cathode side of the thin films. The findings of this study suggest that amorphization can precede electromigration and thereby play a vital role in the reliability of micro/nanoelectronic devices. (paper)

  3. A Comparison of Photo-Induced Hysteresis Between Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon and Amorphous IGZO Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Cho, Won-Ju; Chung, Hong-Bay; Koo, Sang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    We investigate photo-induced instability in thin-film transistors (TFTs) consisting of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) as active semiconducting layers by comparing with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). An a-IGZO TFT exhibits a large hysteresis window in the illuminated measuring condition but no hysteresis window in the dark condition. On the contrary, a large hysteresis window measured in the dark condition in a-Si:H was not observed in the illuminated condition. Even though such materials possess the structure of amorphous phase, optical responses or photo instability in TFTs looks different from each other. Photo-induced hysteresis results from initially trapped charges at the interface between semiconductor and dielectric films or in the gate dielectric which possess absorption energy to interact with deep trap-states and affect the movement of Fermi energy level. In order to support our claim, we also perform CV characteristics in photo-induced hysteresis and demonstrate thermal-activated hysteresis. We believe that this work can provide important information to understand different material systems for optical engineering which includes charge transport and band transition. PMID:26716230

  4. Saturation magnetization and amorphous Curie point changes during the early stage of amorphous-nanocrystalline transformation of a FINEMET-type alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saturation magnetization and thermomagnetic curves were determined on FINEMET-type glassy precursors after different heat treatments below the nanocrystallization temperature. Saturation magnetization (Ms) shows a maximum at the early stage of nanocrystallization, then it drops to below the Ms characteristic for the as-quenched state. Curie temperature of the amorphous phase (Tcam) increases continuously due to structural relaxation up to the beginning of nanocrystallization. The results are interpreted on the basis of irreversible structural relaxation as well as Si redistribution between the Fe(Si) nanograins and the intergranular amorphous shell

  5. Chromic mechanism in amorphous WO{sub 3} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J G; Benson, D K; Tracy, C E; Deb, S K; Czanderna, A W [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bechinger, C [Universitaet Konstanz (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    The authors propose a new model for the chromic mechanism in amorphous tungsten oxide films (WO{sub 3{minus}y}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O). This model not only explains a variety of seemingly conflicting experimental results reported in the literature that cannot be explained by existing models, it also has practical implications with respect to improving the coloring efficiency and durability of electrochromic devices. According to this model, a typical as-deposited tungsten oxide film has tungsten mainly in W{sup 6+} and W{sup 4+} states and can be represented as W{sub 1{minus}y}{sup 6+} W{sub y}{sup 4+}O{sub 3{minus}y}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O. The proposed chromic mechanism is based on the small polaron transition between the charge-induced W{sup 5+} state and the original W{sup 4+} state instead of the W{sup 5+} and W{sup 6+} states as suggested in previous models. The correlation between the electrochromic and photochromic behavior in amorphous tungsten oxide films is also discussed.

  6. Spectroscopic and mechanical studies on the Fe-based amorphous alloy 2605SA1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral P, A.; Garcia S, I. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Contreras V, J. A.; Garcia S, F. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, El Cerrillo Piedras Blancas, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Nava, N., E-mail: agustin.cabral@inin.gob.m [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The Vickers micro-hardness of this alloy was unusually dependent on the heat treatment from 300 to 634 K, inferring important micro-structural changes and the presence of amorphous grains before its phase transition. Once the alloy is crystallized, the micro-hardness is characteristic of a brittle alloy, the main problem of these alloys. Within the amorphous state, other properties like free-volume, magnetic states and Fe-Fe distances were followed by Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy, respectively, to analyze those micro-structural changes, thermally induced, which are of paramount interest to understand their brittleness problem. (Author)

  7. Stability of amorphous azithromycin in a tablet formulation / Prasanna Kumar Obulapuram

    OpenAIRE

    Obulapuram, Prasanna Kumar

    2014-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that drugs can exist in different solid-state forms. These solid-state forms can be either crystalline or amorphous. Furthermore, significant differences are identified between the different solid-state forms of the same drug. Physico-chemical properties that are affected by the solid-state include: melting point, solubility, dissolution rate, stability, compressibility, processability, to name but a few. During the last two decades a significant amount of attention wa...

  8. The improvement of hole transport property and optical band gap for amorphous Cu2O films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents an interesting observation that the suppression of crystallization for p-type Cu2O facilitates the transition of transport behaviors from variable-range-hopping (VRH) to Arrhenius-like mechanism and further lead to a great reduction of thermal activation energy. Raman spectroscopy analysis shows a distortion of symmetrical O–Cu–O crosslink structure in the amorphous Cu2O. The disruption of symmetry is revealed to increase dispersion of upper valence band and reduce Fermi as well, which results in possible intrusion of the Fermi level into a band tail state adjacent to the upper valence band level. Meanwhile, the amorphous Cu2O film shows an optical band gap of 2.7 eV, much larger than 2.0 eV for the crystalline counterparts. The blue shift is consistent with the variation of energy band structure with the film changing from crystalline to amorphous state, suggesting that the O-mediated d–d interaction can be weakened with the nonsymmetrical structure in amorphous phase. - Graphical abstract: Suppression of crystallization for p-type Cu2O is observed to facilitate the transition of transport behaviors from variable-range-hopping to the Arrhenius-like behavior based on the band tail transport mode. The amorphous Cu2O film also shows a blue shift as compared to its crystalline counterpart. The effect of amorphous structure on the performances is discussed in combination with Raman spectroscopy and band structure calculation. - Highlights: • Amorphous Cu2O films show Arrhenius-like p-type conductivity. • Raman spectroscopy is analyzed on the change of crystallization. • Physical origin of the transport behavior is clarified with electronic structure. • Optical band gap can be widened by suppressing crystallization of Cu2O

  9. Hydrogen, microstructure and defect density in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Roca I Cabarrocas, Pere; Djebbour, Z.; Kleider, J.; Longeaud, C.; Mencaraglia, D.; Sib, J.; Bouizem, Y.; Thèye, M.; Sardin, G.; Stoquert, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is well established that by bonding with the dangling bonds of silicon, hydrogen reduces the density of states of amorphous silicon and renders this material suitable to electronic applications. For so-called “standard” a-Si : H films deposited by the RF glow discharge decomposition of silane at low deposition rates (≈1 Å/s) and over a large range of deposition temperatures, we observed the usual correlation between the hydrogen bonding and the defect density in the as-deposited material o...

  10. Eigenmode Splitting in all Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Nitride Coupled Microcavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xian-Gao; HUANG Xin-Fan; CHEN Kun-Ji; QIAN Bo; CHEN San; DING Hong-Lin; LIU Sui; WANG Xiang; XU Jun; LI Wei

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride based coupled optical microcavity is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical calculation of the transmittance spectra of optical microcavity with one cavity and coupled microcavity with two-cavity is performed.The optical eigenmode splitting for coupled microcavity is found due to the interaction between the neighbouring localized cavities.Experimentally,the coupled cavity samples are prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition and characterized by photoluminescence measurements.It is found that the photoluminescence peak wavelength agrees well with the cavity mode in the calculated transmittance spectra.This eigenmode splitting is analogous to the electron state energy splitting in diatom molecules.

  11. EPR and NMR studies of amorphous aluminum borates

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, S.; Pol, A.; Reijerse, E.J.; Kentgens, A.P.M.; Moorsel, G.J.M.P. van; de Boer, E

    1994-01-01

    Amorphous aluminium borates, Al2(1–x)B2xO3 with O [less-than-or-eq]x[less-than-or-eq] 0.5, prepared from mixtures of aluminium nitrate, boric acid and glycerol, have been studied by EPR and 27Al MASNMR as a function of composition and heat-treatment temperature (Tt[less-than-or-eq] 860 °C). EPR studies showed the presence of physisorbed NO2, NO and O2 molecules, produced by decomposition reactions during the thermal treatment. The O2 molecules in the gaseous state were observed in a narrow te...

  12. Amorphous magnetism in Mnx Sn1-x alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systematic low temperature in situ 119Sn Moessbauer effect (ME) studies in vapor quenched amorphous Mnx Sn1-x (0.09≤ x ≤0,95) alloys between 150 and 4.2 K, are presented. Its is shown that the magnetic behavior of the system is correctly displayed by the transferred magnetic hyperfine (hf) interactions, at the 119Sn site. A complete magnetic phase diagram is proposed, and the effect of an external magnetic field (up to about 3T) on the spin correlations in the spin-glass state is also discussed. (author)

  13. Microstructural analyses of amorphic diamond, i-C, and amorphous carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, C. B.; Davanloo, F.; Jander, D.R.;

    1992-01-01

    comparative examinations of the microstructures of samples of amorphic diamond, i-C, and amorphous carbon. Four distinct morphologies were found that correlated closely with the energy densities used in preparing the different materials. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of...... Physics....

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of amorphous segregation inAg-Rh alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jingxiang; BIAN Xiufang

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was carried out to investigate the liquid and amorphous microstructures of binary Agx-Rh(100-x) (x = 25, 50, 75 in atom fraction) alloys. Segregation feature of homogeneous interatomic binding of Ag-Rh liquid was found and probed, which can be retained into amorphous solids upon rapid cooling. Homogeneous binding may occur when the difference in the elemental atomic sizes is less than 10%. The icosahedra in liquid before the formation of amorphous state exist in a stable state and the network formed by 1551-clusters in molten alloys would inhibit the crystallization and diffusion of atoms. A higher degree of 155 1-clusters will be favorable to form metallic glasses.

  15. Improving Co-Amorphous Drug Formulations by the Addition of the Highly Water Soluble Amino Acid, Proline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrine Tarp Jensen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Co-amorphous drug amino acid mixtures were previously shown to be a promising approach to create physically stable amorphous systems with the improved dissolution properties of poorly water-soluble drugs. The aim of this work was to expand the co-amorphous drug amino acid mixture approach by combining the model drug, naproxen (NAP, with an amino acid to physically stabilize the co-amorphous system (tryptophan, TRP, or arginine, ARG and a second highly soluble amino acid (proline, PRO for an additional improvement of the dissolution rate. Co-amorphous drug-amino acid blends were prepared by ball milling and investigated for solid state characteristics, stability and the dissolution rate enhancement of NAP. All co-amorphous mixtures were stable at room temperature and 40 °C for a minimum of 84 days. PRO acted as a stabilizer for the co-amorphous system, including NAP–TRP, through enhancing the molecular interactions in the form of hydrogen bonds between all three components in the mixture. A salt formation between the acidic drug, NAP, and the basic amino acid, ARG, was found in co-amorphous NAP–ARG. In comparison to crystalline NAP, binary NAP–TRP and NAP–ARG, it could be shown that the highly soluble amino acid, PRO, improved the dissolution rate of NAP from the ternary co-amorphous systems in combination with either TRP or ARG. In conclusion, both the solubility of the amino acid and potential interactions between the molecules are critical parameters to consider in the development of co-amorphous formulations.

  16. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  17. Effect of the nanocrystallization of amorphous soft magnetic Fe-P-Nb alloys on corrosion resistance in a damp SO2-polluted atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilova, V. V.; Zabolotnyi, V. T.; Korneev, V. P.; Anosova, M. O.; Baldokhin, Yu. V.

    2014-09-01

    The effect of the nanocrystallization of amorphous soft magnetic Fe-P-Nb alloys on their electrochemical behavior in a damp SO2-polluted industrial atmosphere is studied. It is shown that their electro-chemical characteristics shit toward positive values when the phosphorus content in the Fe-P-Nb alloys increases and when they undergo nanocrystallization from an amorphous state.

  18. Pressure-induced structural evolution and amorphization in Eu3Ga5O12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. L.; Li, Y. C.; Li, X. D.; Li, R.; Lin, J. F.; Liu, J.

    2013-10-01

    Crystal structural evolution of europium gallium garnet (Eu3Ga5O12; EGG) has been investigated by a combination of synchrotron x-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, and photoluminescence spectroscopy in a high-pressure diamond anvil cell. The cubic garnet EGG mostly collapses into an amorphous state upon compression to 85 GPa at room temperature. High-pressure Raman and photoluminescence spectra indicate that the amorphization process is related to the interaction and deformation of the tetrahedra GaO4 and octahedra GaO6 under compression, leading to the increase of the asymmetry of the local oxygen environment around the Eu3+ site with increasing pressures. The amorphization of EGG is associated with the overlapping of the tetrahedra and octahedra and the increase of the average coordination numbers of the Ga3+ ions in the amorphous state. X-ray diffraction spectra of EGG taken from a laser-heated diamond anvil cell demonstrate that the pressure-induced garnet-to-amorphous transition could result from the kinetic hindrance of a crystal-to-crystal phase transition at room temperature, rather than the decomposition reported earlier.

  19. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, M. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Perez-Mendez, V. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  20. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters ε2τ's are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs

  1. Crystallization of amorphous Zr-Be alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovkova, E. A.; Surkov, A. V.; Syrykh, G. F.

    2015-02-01

    The thermal stability and structure of binary amorphous Zr100 - x Be x alloys have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry and neutron diffraction over a wide concentration range (30 ≤ x ≤ 65). The amorphous alloys have been prepared by rapid quenching from melt. The studied amorphous system involves the composition range around the eutectic composition with boundary phases α-Zr and ZrBe2. It has been found that the crystallization of alloys with low beryllium contents ("hypoeutectic" alloys with x ≤ 40) proceeds in two stages. Neutron diffraction has demonstrated that, at the first stage, α-Zr crystallizes and the remaining amorphous phase is enriched to the eutectic composition; at the second stage, the alloy crystallizes in the α-Zr and ZrBe2 phases. At higher beryllium contents ("hypereutectic" alloys), one phase transition of the amorphous phase to a mixture of the α-Zr and ZrBe2 phases has been observed. The concentration dependences of the crystallization temperature and activation energy have been revealed.

  2. LOW TEMPERATURE OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF AMORPHOUS OXIDE NANOCLUSTERS IN POLYMETHYL METHACRYLATE MATRIX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. V. VOLKOV; WANG ZHONG-LIN; Zou BING-SUO; XIE SI-SHEN

    2000-01-01

    We studied the temperature-dependent steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence properties of very small (1-2 nm) ZnO, CdO, and PbO amorphous nanoclusters prepared in AOT reverse micelles and imbedded in polymethyl methacrylate(PMMA) films. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction and imaging indicate that these structures are amorphous. These amorphous oxide nanoclusters demonstrate similar structural, electronic, and optical properties. Properties of steady-state fluorescence spectra indicate the unique localization of electronic states due to the amorphous structure. ZnO and CdO show double-band fluorescence structure, which is due to the spin-orbital splitting, similar to Cu2O. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of the nanoclusters in the polymer reveal two lifetime components, as found in solution. The slow component reflects relaxation processes from band-tail states while the fast component may be related to high-lying extended states. The temperature dependence of fast fluorescence component reveals the presence of exciton hopping between anharmonic wells at temperatures higher than 200K. We correlate the barrier height between two wells formed around local atoms with the inter-atomic distance and bond ionicity.

  3. Short range ordering and microstructure property relationship in amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shariq, A.

    2006-07-01

    A novel algorithm, ''Next Neighbourhood Evaluation (NNE)'', is enunciated during the course of this work, to elucidate the next neighbourhood atomic vicinity from the data, analysed using tomographic atom probe (TAP) that allows specifying atom positions and chemical identities of the next neighbouring atoms for multicomponent amorphous materials in real space. The NNE of the Pd{sub 55}Cu{sub 23}P{sub 22} bulk amorphous alloy reveals that the Pd atoms have the highest probability to be the next neighbours to each other. Moreover, P-P correlation corroborates earlier investigations with scattering techniques that P is not a direct next neighbour to another P atom. Analogous investigations on the Fe{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}B{sub 20} metallic glass ribbons, in the as quenched state and for a state heat treated at 350 C for 1 hour insinuate a pronounced elemental inhomogeneity for the annealed state, though, it also depicts glimpse of a slight inhomogeneity for B distribution even for the as quenched sample. Moreover, a comprehensive microstructural investigation has been carried out on the Zr{sub 53}Co{sub 23.5}Al{sub 23.5} glassy system. TEM and TAP investigations evince that the as cast bulk samples constitutes a composite structure of an amorphous phase and crystalline phase(s). The crystallization is essentially triggered at the mould walls due to heterogeneous nucleation. The three dimensional atomic reconstruction maps of the volume analysed by TAP reveal a complex stereological interconnected network of two phases. The phase that is rich in Zr and Al concentration is depleted in Co concentration while the phase that is rich in Co concentration is depleted both in Zr and Al. Zr{sub 53}Co{sub 23.5}Al{sub 23.5} glassy splat samples exhibit a single exothermic crystallization peak contrary to the as cast bulk sample with a different T{sub g} temperature. A single homogeneous amorphous phase revealed by TEM investigations depicts that the faster cooling

  4. Origin of “memory glass” effect in pressure-amorphized rare-earth molybdate single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The memory glass effect (MGE) describes the ability of some materials to recover the initial structure and crystallographic orientation after pressure-induced amorphization (PIA). In spite of numerous studies the nature and underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon are still not clear. Here we report investigations of MGE in β′-Eu2(MoO4)3 single crystal samples subjected to high pressure amorphization. Using the XRD and TEM techniques we carried out detailed analysis of the structural state of high pressure treated single crystal samples as well as structural transformations due to subsequent annealing at atmospheric pressure. The structure of the sample has been found to be complex, mainly amorphous, however, the amorphous medium contains evenly distributed nanosize inclusions of a paracrystalline phase. The inclusions are highly correlated in orientation and act as “memory units” in the MGE. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of pressure-induced amorphization and “memory glass” effect in rare-earth molybdate single crystals. The XRD and TEM measurements have revealed the presence of the residual identically oriented paracrystalline nanodomains in the pressure-amorphized state. These domains preserve the information about initial structure and orientation of the sample. They act as memory units and crystalline seeds during transformation of the amorphous phase back to the starting single crystalline one. - Highlights: • Pressure-amorphized Eu2(MoO4)3 single crystals were studied ex-situ by XRD and TEM. • Tiny residual crystalline inclusions were found in amorphous matrix of sample. • The inclusions keep in memory the parent crystal structure and orientation. • The inclusions account for “memory glass” effect in rare-earth molibdates

  5. Strain Rate Induced Amorphization in Metallic Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Y.; Cagin, T.; Goddard, W.A. III [Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Ikeda, H.; Samwer, K.; Johnson, W.L. [Keck Laboratory of Engineering Materials, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations with a many-body force field, we studied the deformation of single crystal Ni and NiCu random alloy nanowires subjected to uniform strain rates but kept at 300thinspthinspK. For all strain rates, the Ni nanowire is elastic up to 7.5{percent} strain with a yield stress of 5.5thinspthinspGPa, far above that of bulk Ni. At high strain rates, we find that for both systems the crystalline phase transforms continuously to an amorphous phase, exhibiting a dramatic change in atomic short-range order and a near vanishing of the tetragonal shear elastic constant perpendicular to the tensile direction. This amorphization which occurs directly from the homogeneous, elastically deformed system with no chemical or structural inhomogeneities exhibits a new mode of amorphization. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  7. Co-Amorphous Combination of Nateglinide-Metformin Hydrochloride for Dissolution Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wairkar, Sarika; Gaud, Ram

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to prepare a co-amorphous mixture (COAM) of Nateglinide and Metformin hydrochloride to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly soluble Nateglinide. Nateglinide (120 mg) and Metformin hydrochloride (500 mg) COAM, as a dose ratio, were prepared by ball-milling technique. COAMs were characterized for saturation solubility, amorphism and physicochemical interactions (X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)), SEM, in vitro dissolution, and stability studies. Solubility studies revealed a sevenfold rise in solubility of Nateglinide from 0.061 to 0.423 mg/ml in dose ratio of COAM. Solid-state characterization of COAM suggested amorphization of Nateglinide after 6 h of ball milling. XRPD and DSC studies confirmed amorphism in Nateglinide, whereas FTIR elucidated hydrogen interactions (proton exchange between Nateglinide and Metformin hydrochloride). Interestingly, due to low energy of fusion, Nateglinide was completely amorphized and stabilized by Metformin hydrochloride. Consequently, in vitro drug release showed significant increase in dissolution of Nateglinide in COAM, irrespective of dissolution medium. However, little change was observed in the solubility and dissolution profile of Metformin hydrochloride, revealing small change in its crystallinity. Stability data indicated no traces of devitrification in XRPD of stability sample of COAM, and % drug release remained unaffected at accelerated storage conditions. Amorphism of Nateglinide, proton exchange with Metformin hydrochloride, and stabilization of its amorphous form have been noted in ball-milled COAM of Nateglinide-Metformin hydrochloride, revealing enhanced dissolution of Nateglinide. Thus, COAM of Nateglinide-Metformin hydrochloride system is a promising approach for combination therapy in diabetic patients. PMID:26314243

  8. Ion bombardment and disorder in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of ion bombardment during growth on the structural and optical properties of amorphous silicon are presented. Two series of films were deposited under electrically grounded and positively biased substrate conditions. The biased samples displayed lower growth rates and increased hydrogen content relative to grounded counterparts. The film structure was examined using Raman spectroscopy. The transverse optic like phonon band position was used as a parameter to characterize network order. Biased samples displayed an increased order of the amorphous network relative to grounded samples. Furthermore, biased samples exhibited a larger optical gap. These results are correlated and attributed to reduced ion bombardment effects

  9. Raman Amplifier Based on Amorphous Silicon Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    M.A. Ferrara; Rendina, I.; S. N. Basu; Dal Negro, L.; Sirleto, L.

    2012-01-01

    The observation of stimulated Raman scattering in amorphous silicon nanoparticles embedded in Si-rich nitride/silicon superlattice structures (SRN/Si-SLs) is reported. Using a 1427 nm continuous-wavelength pump laser, an amplification of Stokes signal up to 0.9 dB/cm at 1540.6 nm and a significant reduction in threshold power of about 40% with respect to silicon are experimentally demonstrated. Our results indicate that amorphous silicon nanoparticles are a great promise for Si-based Raman la...

  10. Nanoindentation-induced amorphization in silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2004-07-01

    The nanoindentation-induced amorphization in SiC is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The load-displacement response shows an elastic shoulder followed by a plastic regime consisting of a series of load drops. Analyses of bond angles, local pressure, and shear stress, and shortest-path rings show that these drops are related to dislocation activities under the indenter. We show that amorphization is driven by coalescence of dislocation loops and that there is a strong correlation between load-displacement response and ring distribution.

  11. Characterization of inhomogeneities in amorphous superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and superconducting properties of rapidly quenched Zr-Ni and Zr-V alloys have been studied by XRD, EXAFS spectroscopy, TEM, electron diffraction, ED, electrical resistivity and ac susceptibility measurements. Amorphous Zr66Ni34 ribbons quenched with different cooling rates were also examined by flux pinning measurements. Characteristic differences are observed in the flux pinning mechanisms of microcrystalline and amorphous samples. The temperature dependence of upper critical fields have been measured down to 0.4 K and the results are analyzed in terms of WHH theory

  12. Amino acids as co-amorphous excipients for simvastatin and glibenclamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger;

    2014-01-01

    -amorphous systems using cryomilling and combinations of two poorly water-soluble drugs (simvastatin and glibenclamide) with the amino acids aspartic acid, lysine, serine, and threonine was investigated. Solid-state characterization with X-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier...

  13. Interfacial electrical properties of ion-beam sputter deposited amorphous carbon on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A. A.; Woollam, J. A.; Chung, Y.; Banks, B.

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous, 'diamond-like' carbon films have been deposited on Si substrates, using ion-beam sputtering. The interfacial properties are studied using capacitance and conductance measurements. Data are analyzed using existing theories for interfacial electrical properties. The density of electronic states at the interface, along with corresponding time constants are determined.

  14. Amorphous 5f ferromagnetic hydrides UH.sub.3./sub.Mo.sub.x./sub

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tkach, I.; Kim-Ngan, N.-T.H.; Mašková, S.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Matěj, Z.; Havela, L.

    Vol. 126 č1. Warsaw : Polish Academy of Sciences, 2014, s. 292-293. ISSN 0587-4246. [Czech and Slovak Conference on Magnetism /15./. Košice (CZ), 17.06.2013-21.06.2013] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranium * hydrides * amorphous state * ferromagnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  15. Relaxation and crystallization of amorphous carbamazepine studied by terahertz pulsed spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeitler, J Axel; Taday, Philip F; Pepper, Michael; Rades, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    At the example of carbamazepine the crystallization of a small organic molecule from its amorphous phase was studied using in situ variable temperature terahertz pulsed spectroscopy (TPS). Even though terahertz spectra of disordered materials in the glassy state exhibit no distinct spectral featu...

  16. Spin correlations in amorphous Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero and longitudinal field μSR has been used to probe the magnetic state of amorphous Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox prepared by rapid quenching from the melt. The results suggest quasi-static spin correlations between extremely dilute Cu2+ ions. (orig.)

  17. Temperature and external magnetic field dependence of the spin freezing in amorphous Fe93Zr7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rotation of the Fe magnetic moments toward the collinear state was studied by 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy as a function of temperature in applied magnetic fields up to 7 T in amorphous Fe93Zr7 exhibiting a single paramagnetic to spin glass transition. The spin freezing temperature decreases linearly as a function of the external magnetic field. ((orig.))

  18. Polymeric amorphous carbon as p-type window within amorphous silicon solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, R U A; Silva, S. R. P.; Van Swaaij, R.A.C.M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) has been shown to be intrinsically p-type, and polymeric a-C (PAC) possesses a wide Tauc band gap of 2.6 eV. We have replaced the p-type amorphous silicon carbide layer of a standard amorphous silicon solar cell with an intrinsic ultrathin layer of PAC. The thickness of the p layer had to be reduced from 9 to 2.5 nm in order to ensure sufficient conduction through the PAC film. Although the resulting external parameters suggest a decrease in the device efficiency from 9...

  19. Amorphous silicon sensor arrays for X-ray and document imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large area amorphous silicon image sensor arrays are important for X-ray medical imaging and document scanning as well as a variety of other applications where large sensor size is required. The paper first summarizes the present state of the flat panel X-ray imager technology, and compares the two main approaches for X-ray detection. The authors then describe the performance of a new, large area, high resolution, radiographic imager based o a single amorphous silicon array with 2,304 x 3,200 pixels, and an active area of 30 x 40 cm (12 x 16 inches)

  20. Compression Behaviour of Ni77P23 Amorphous Alloy up to 30.5 GPa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gong; ZHANG Xin-Yu; SUN Yi-Nan; QIAN Yu-Qing; LIU Jing; LIU Ri-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ The compression behaviour of Ni77P23 amorphous alloy is investigated at room temperature in a diamond-anvil cell instrument using in-situ high pressure energy dispersive x-ray diffraction with a synchrotron radiation source.The equation of state is determined by fitting the experimental data according to the Birch-Murnaghan equation.It is found that the structure of Ni77P23 amorphous alloy is stable under pressures up to 30.5GPa. Within the pressure range from zero to the experimental one, the pressure-induced structural relaxation is reversible.

  1. Magnetic, magnetocaloric properties and phenomenological model in amorphous Fe60Ru20B20 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutahar, A.; Lassri, H.; Hlil, E. K.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic, magnetocaloric properties and phenomenological model of amorphous Fe60Ru20B20 alloy are investigated in detail. The amorphous alloy has been synthesized using melt spinning method. The magnetic transition nature undergoes a second-order magnetic phase transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic states with a Curie temperature of 254 K. Basis on the thermodynamic Maxwell's relation, magnetic entropy change (-ΔSM) is calculated. Further, we also report a theoretical investigation of the magnetocaloric effect using a phenomenological model. The best model parameters and their variation with temperature and the magnetic field were determined. The theoretical predictions are found to agree closely with experimental measurements.

  2. AuPd CATALYTIC NANOPARTICLE SIZE EFFECT ON THE FORMATION OF AMORPHOUS SILICON NANOWIRES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU ZU-QIN; SUN LIAN-FENG; TANG DONG-SHENG; ZHOU WEI-YA; LI YU-BAO; Zou XIAO-PING

    2000-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) nanowires have been prepared on SiO2/Si substrates by AuPd nanoparticles / silane reaction method. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the samples. The typical a-Si nanowires we obtained are of a uniform diameter about 20 nm and length up to several micrometers. The growth mechanism of the nanowires seems to be the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. The catalytic particle size effect on the formation of the nanowires and the cause of forming amorphous state Si nanowires are discussed.

  3. Room-temperature fabrication of light-emitting thin films based on amorphous oxide semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Junghwan, E-mail: JH.KIM@lucid.msl.titech.ac.jp; Miyokawa, Norihiko; Ide, Keisuke [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Toda, Yoshitake [Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox SE-6, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-4, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox SE-6, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    We propose a light-emitting thin film using an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) because AOS has low defect density even fabricated at room temperature. Eu-doped amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin films fabricated at room temperature emitted intense red emission at 614 nm. It is achieved by precise control of oxygen pressure so as to suppress oxygen-deficiency/excess-related defects and free carriers. An electronic structure model is proposed, suggesting that non-radiative process is enhanced mainly by defects near the excited states. AOS would be a promising host for a thin film phosphor applicable to flexible displays as well as to light-emitting transistors.

  4. Room-temperature fabrication of light-emitting thin films based on amorphous oxide semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghwan; Miyokawa, Norihiko; Ide, Keisuke; Toda, Yoshitake; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Hosono, Hideo; Kamiya, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    We propose a light-emitting thin film using an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) because AOS has low defect density even fabricated at room temperature. Eu-doped amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin films fabricated at room temperature emitted intense red emission at 614 nm. It is achieved by precise control of oxygen pressure so as to suppress oxygen-deficiency/excess-related defects and free carriers. An electronic structure model is proposed, suggesting that non-radiative process is enhanced mainly by defects near the excited states. AOS would be a promising host for a thin film phosphor applicable to flexible displays as well as to light-emitting transistors.

  5. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  6. Low-Temperature Crystallization of Amorphous Silicate in Astrophysical Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Kyoko K; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We construct a theoretical model for low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate grains induced by exothermic chemical reactions. As a first step, the model is applied to the annealing experiments, in which the samples are (1) amorphous silicate grains and (2) amorphous silicate grains covered with an amorphous carbon layer. We derive the activation energies of crystallization for amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon from the analysis of the experiments. Furthermore, we apply the model to the experiment of low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate core covered with an amorphous carbon layer containing reactive molecules. We clarify the conditions of low-temperature crystallization due to exothermic chemical reactions. Next, we formulate the crystallization conditions so as to be applicable to astrophysical environments. We show that the present crystallization mechanism is characterized by two quantities: the stored energy density Q in a grain and the duration of the chemical reaction...

  7. Clozapine-carboxylic acid plasticized co-amorphous dispersions: Preparation, characterization and solution stability evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmed Mahmoud Abdelhaleem

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study addressed the possibility of forming of co-amorphous systems between clozapine (CZ and various carboxylic acid plasticizers (CAPs. The aim was to improve the solubility and oral bioavailability of clozapine. Co-amorphous dispersions were prepared using modified solvent evaporation methodology at drug/plasticizer stoichiometric ratios of 1:1, 1:1.5 and 1:2. Solid state characterization was performed using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and infra red spectroscopy. Highly soluble homogeneous co-amorphous dispersions were formed between clozapine and CAPs via hydrogen bonding. The co-amorphous dispersions formed with tartaric acid (1:2 showed the highest dissolution percentage (> 95 % in 20 minutes compared to pure crystalline CZ (56 %. Highly stable solutions were obtained from co-amorphous CZ-citric and CZ-tartaric acid at 1:1.5 molar ratio. The prepared dispersions suggest the possibility of peroral or sublingual administration of highly soluble clozapine at a reduced dose with the great chance to bypass the first pass metabolism.

  8. Inhibition of Recrystallization of Amorphous Lactose in Nanocomposites Formed by Spray-Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellrup, Joel; Alderborn, Göran; Mahlin, Denny

    2015-11-01

    This study aims at investigating the recrystallization of amorphous lactose in nanocomposites. In particular, the focus is on the influence of the nano- to micrometer length scale nanofiller arrangement on the amorphous to crystalline transition. Further, the relative significance of formulation composition and manufacturing process parameters for the properties of the nanocomposite was investigated. Nanocomposites of amorphous lactose and fumed silica were produced by co-spray-drying. Solid-state transformation of the lactose was studied at 43%, 84%, and 94% relative humidity using X-ray powder diffraction and microcalorimetry. Design of experiments was used to analyze spray-drying process parameters and nanocomposite composition as factors influencing the time to 50% recrystallization. The spray-drying process parameters showed no significant influence. However, the recrystallization of the lactose in the nanocomposites was affected by the composition (fraction silica). The recrystallization rate constant decreased as a function of silica content. The lowered recrystallization rate of the lactose in the nanocomposites could be explained by three mechanisms: (1) separation of the amorphous lactose into discrete compartments on a micrometer length scale (compartmentalization), (2) lowered molecular mobility caused by molecular interactions between the lactose molecules and the surface of the silica (rigidification), and/or (3) intraparticle confinement of the amorphous lactose. PMID:26182904

  9. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon films embedded with nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of substrate bias on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon (a-C:N) films embedded with nanoparticles deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique is discussed. High resolution transmission electron microscope exhibited initially the amorphous structure but on closer examination the film was constituted of amorphous phase with the nanoparticle embedded in the amorphous matrix. X-ray diffraction study reveals dominantly an amorphous nature of the film. A straight forward method of deconvolution of XPS spectra has been used to evaluate the sp3 and sp2 contents present in these a-C:N films. The carbon (C 1s) peaks have been deconvoluted into four different peaks and nitrogen (N 1s) peaks have been deconvoluted into three different peaks which attribute to different bonding state between C, N and O. The full width at half maxima (FWHM) of C 1s peak, sp3 content and sp3/sp2 ratio of a-C:N films increase up to -150 V substrate bias and beyond -150 V substrate bias these parameters are found to decrease. Thus, the parameters evaluated are found to be dependent on the substrate bias which peaks at -150 V substrate bias.

  10. Stability of (Fe-Tm-B) amorphous alloys: relaxation and crystallization phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fe-Tm-B base (TM = transition metal) amorphous alloys (metallic glasses) are thermodynamically metastable. This limits their use as otherwise favourable materials, e.g. magnetically soft, corrosion resistant and mechanically firm. By analogy of the mechanical strain-stress dependence, at a certain degree of thermal activation the amorphous structure reaches its limiting state where it changes its character and physical properties. Relaxation and early crystallization processes in amorphous alloys, starting already around 100 C, are reviewed involving subsequently stress relief, free volume shrinking, topological and chemical ordering, pre-crystallization phenomena up to partial (primary) crystallization. Two diametrically different examples are demonstrated from among the soft magnetic materials: relaxation and early crystallization processes in the Fe-Co-B metallic glasses and controlled crystallization of amorphous ribbons yielding rather modern nanocrystalline ''Finemet'' alloys where late relaxation and pre-crystallization phenomena overlap when forming extremely dispersive and fine-grained nanocrystals-in-amorphous-sauce structure. Moessbauer spectroscopy seems to be unique for magnetic and phase analysis of such complicated systems. (orig.)

  11. Clozapine-carboxylic acid plasticized co-amorphous dispersions: Preparation, characterization and solution stability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed Mahmoud Abdelhaleem; Ali, Adel Ahmed; Maghrabi, Ibrahim Abdullah

    2015-06-01

    This study addressed the possibility of forming of co-amorphous systems between clozapine (CZ) and various carboxylic acid plasticizers (CAPs). The aim was to improve the solubility and oral bioavailability of clozapine. Co-amorphous dispersions were prepared using modified solvent evaporation methodology at drug/plasticizer stoichiometric ratios of 1:1, 1:1.5 and 1:2. Solid state characterization was performed using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and infra red spectroscopy. Highly soluble homogeneous co-amorphous dispersions were formed between clozapine and CAPs via hydrogen bonding. The co-amorphous dispersions formed with tartaric acid (1:2) showed the highest dissolution percentage (>95% in 20 minutes) compared to pure crystalline CZ (56%). Highly stable solutions were obtained from co-amorphous CZ-citric and CZ-tartaric acid at 1:1.5 molar ratio. The prepared dispersions suggest the possibility of peroral or sublingual administration of highly soluble clozapine at a reduced dose with the great chance to bypass the first pass metabolism. PMID:26011930

  12. Photonic-band-gap effects in two-dimensional polycrystalline and amorphous structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study numerically the density of optical states (DOS) in two-dimensional photonic structures with short-range positional order and observe a transition from polycrystalline to amorphous photonic systems. In polycrystals, photonic band gaps (PBGs) are formed within individual domains, which leads to a depletion of the DOS similar to that in periodic structures. In amorphous photonic media, the domain sizes are too small to form PBGs, thus the depletion of the DOS is weakened significantly. The critical domain size that separates the polycrystalline and amorphous regimes is determined by the attenuation length of Bragg scattering, which depends not only on the degree of positional order but also the refractive-index contrast of the photonic material. Even with relatively low-refractive-index contrast, we find that modest short-range positional order in photonic structures enhances light confinement via collective scattering and interference.

  13. Ab initio investigation of the structural and electronic properties of amorphous HgTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the structure and electronic properties of amorphous mercury telluride obtained from first-principle calculations. The initial configuration of amorphous mercury telluride is created by computation alchemy. According to different exchange–correlation functions in our calculations, we establish two 256-atom models. The topology of both models is analyzed in terms of radial and bond angle distributions. It is found that both the Te and the Hg atoms tend to be fourfold, but with a wrong bond rate of about 10%. The fraction of threefold and fivefold atoms also shows that there are a significant number of dangling and floating bonds in our models. The electronic properties are also obtained. It is indicated that there is a bandgap in amorphous HgTe, in contrast to the zero bandgap for crystalline HgTe. The structures of the band tail and defect states are also discussed. (paper)

  14. Preparation and Properties of Mg-Cu-Y-Al bulk Amorphous Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Ohnuma, M.; Pedersen, Allan Schrøder; Hattel, J.; Linderoth, Søren

    2000-01-01

    Bulk amorphous (Mg(1-gamma)Al(gamma))(60)CU(30)Y(10) alloys were prepared using a relatively simple technique of rapid cooling of the melt in a copper wedge mould. The temperature vs, time was recorded during the cooling and solidification process of the melt and compared with a spacial and......-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for different alloy compositions and annealing temperatures. On annealing into the supercooled liquid state (441 K), specimens with no Al content remain basically amorphous while nanoparticles are formed and remain stable also at higher...... temperatures in specimens containing a few percent Al. The alloy with no Al crystallises apparently without the formation of nanoparticles. The critical cooling rate for the formation of an amorphous Mg(60)CU(30)Y(10) specimen was determined experimentally by a combination of DSC data and temperature vs, time...

  15. The magnetic entropy change on amorphous FeMnZr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetization behaviors have been measured for amorphous Fe90-xMnxZr10 (x=0,4,6) alloys. The Curie temperature is decreased from 243 to 218K with increasing Mn concentration (x=0-6). The magnetization measurements were conducted at temperatures above the Curie temperature in the paramagnetic region. In all samples, the magnetic properties showed superparamagnetic behavior above Tc where the mean magnetic moment of the superparamagnetic spin clusters decreased with increasing temperature. A large magnetic entropy change ΔSM, which is calculated from H vs. M curves associated with the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transitions in amorphous state, has been observed. The maximum of ΔSM was found to appear in the vicinity of the Curie temperature of the amorphous phase. The value is 2.96, 2.51 and 2.29J/kgK at x=0,4 and 6, respectively

  16. Atomistic modeling of amorphous silicon carbide using a bond-order potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed with a Brenner-type bond-order potential to study the melting of silicon carbide (SiC), the structure of amorphous SiC produced by quenching from the melt, and the evolution of the amorphous state after isochronal annealing at elevated temperatures. The simulations reveal that SiC melts above 3700 K with an enthalpy of fusion of about 0.6 eV/atom. The density of the quenched liquid is about 2820 kg/m3, in excellent agreement with the experimental value for SiC amorphized by neutron irradiation. In addition to the loss of long-range order, the quenched liquid shows short-range disorder as measured by the C homonuclear bond ratio. Upon annealing, there is partial recovery of short-range order

  17. Vibrational properties of amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for the lattice dynamics of a-Si1-X NX is introduced. This model is based on a Born hamiltonian, solved in the Bethe lattice approximation. Starting from the local density of vibrational states, we analize the infrared absoption spectra of this material. (author)

  18. Amorphization of complex ceramics by heavy-particle irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex ceramics, for the purpose of this paper, include materials that are generally strongly bonded (mixed ionic and covalent), refractory and frequently good insulators. They are distinguished from simple, compact ceramics (e.g., MgO and UO2) by structural features which include: (1) open network structures, best characterized by a consideration of the shape, size and connectivity of coordination polyhedra; (2) complex compositions which characteristically lead to multiple cation sites and lower symmetry; (3) directional bonding; (4) bond-type variations within the structure. The heavy particle irradiations include ion-beam irradiations and recoil-nucleus damage resulting from a-decay events from constituent actinides. The latter effects are responsible for the radiation-induced transformation to the metamict state in minerals. The responses of these materials to irradiation are complex, as energy may be dissipated ballistically by transfer of kinetic energy from an incident projectile or radiolytically by conversion of radiation-induced electronic excitations into atomic motion. This results in isolated Frenkel defect pairs, defect aggregates, isolated collision cascades or bulk amorphization. Thus, the amorphization process is heterogeneous. Only recently have there been systematic studies of heavy particle irradiations of complex ceramics on a wide variety of structure-types and compositions as a function of dose and temperature. In this paper, we review the conditions for amorphization for the tetragonal orthosilicate, zircon [ZrSiO4]; the hexagonal orthosilicate/phosphate apatite structure-type [X10(ZO4)6(F,Cl,O)2]; the isometric pyrochlores [A1-2B2O6(O,OH,F)0-1pH2O] and its monoclinic derivative zirconotite [CaZrTi2O7]; the olivine (derivative - hcp) structure types, α-VIA2IVBO4, and spinel (ccp), γ-VIA2IVBO4

  19. Removing and Recovering Phosphate from Poultry Wastewater Using Amorphous Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Youhui Xie; Qin Li; Xianzhi Zhao; Yi Luo; Yangming Wang; Xiangwei Peng; Qigui Wang; Jian Su; Yin Lu

    2014-01-01

    A novel and effective technique for phosphate from poultry wastewater was developed using amorphous ceramics. Amorphous ceramics, which showed high performance for phosphate removal and recovery from poultry wastewater, were synthesized using unlimitedly available, inexpensive materials such as silica fume and lime. Dissolved phosphate in poultry wastewater can be deposited as a solid on the surface of amorphous ceramics. Phosphate content on the surface of amorphous ceramics could reach 14.2...

  20. Amorphization of embedded Cu nanocrystals by ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While bulk crystalline elemental metals cannot be amorphized by ion irradiation in the absence of chemical impurities, the authors demonstrate that finite-size effects enable the amorphization of embedded Cu nanocrystals. The authors form and compare the atomic-scale structure of the polycrystalline, nanocrystalline, and amorphous phases, present an explanation for the extreme sensitivity to irradiation exhibited by nanocrystals, and show that low-temperature annealing is sufficient to return amorphized material to the crystalline form

  1. The beneficial effect of nanocrystalline and amorphous nature on the anode performance of manganese oxide for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A soft-chemical redox reaction yields efficient anode material of amorphous MnO2 nanocrystal. • Amorphous MnO2 nanocrystal shows better anode performance than well-crystalline homologue. • This result highlights the merit of nanocrystalline nature for the electrode performance of MnO2. • The present redox reaction provides a scalable and economic route to efficient anode material. - Abstract: The effect of the amorphous structure and nanocrystalline nature of metal oxide on its anode performance in lithium ion batteries is investigated with two nanocrystalline and one well-crystallized layered manganese oxides. X-ray amorphous manganese oxide nanocrystals are synthesized by soft-chemical redox reactions using reducing agents of KBH4 and LiI at room temperature, whereas well-crystallized layered manganese oxide is obtained by solid state reaction at elevated temperature. Although both of the amorphous manganese oxides lack a long-range structural order, they are crystallized with a layered MnO2-type local structure, which is nearly identical to the crystal structure of the well-crystallized K0.45MnO2. In comparison with the well-crystallized K0.45MnO2, both the amorphous manganese oxides commonly possess smaller particle sizes with larger surface areas and better homogeneity of composite structure. The amorphous manganese oxide nanocrystals show better anode performance with greater discharge capacity for lithium ion batteries than does the well-crystallized K0.45MnO2, which is attributable to the greater surface area, higher structural and electrochemical stability, more homogeneous composite structure, and better charge-transfer characteristics of the amorphous materials. This result highlights the merit of the nanocrystalline and amorphous nature for optimizing the electrode performance of manganese oxide. The present solution-based redox reaction can provide a facile, economic, and scalable route for synthesizing efficient manganese

  2. Radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theory for calculating the radiative lifetime of excitons in amorphous semiconductors is presented. Four possibilities of excitonic radiative recombination are considered and the corresponding rates are derived at thermal equilibrium. The radiative lifetime is calculated from the inverse of the maximum rate for all the four possibilities. Results agree very well with experiments

  3. A Robust Universal Flying Amorphous Computer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrů, Lukáš; Wiedermann, Jiří

    Cham: Springer, 2014 - (Calude, C.; Freivalds, R.; Kazuo, I.), s. 421-435. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science. 8808). ISBN 978-3-319-13349-2 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP202/10/1333 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : amorphous computing * universal computation * computational complexity Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  4. Noise and degradation of amorphous silicon devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.P.R.

    2003-01-01

    Electrical noise measurements are reported on two devices of the disordered semiconductor hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The material is applied in sandwich structures and in thin-film transistors (TFTs). In a sandwich configuration of an intrinsic layer and two thin doped layers, the obse

  5. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  6. Trap level spectroscopy in amorphous semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Mikla, Victor V

    2010-01-01

    Although amorphous semiconductors have been studied for over four decades, many of their properties are not fully understood. This book discusses not only the most common spectroscopic techniques but also describes their advantages and disadvantages.Provides information on the most used spectroscopic techniquesDiscusses the advantages and disadvantages of each technique

  7. Preparation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon tin alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Vergnat, M.; Marchal, G.; Piecuch, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a new method to obtain hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor alloys. The method is reactive co-evaporation. Silicon tin hydrogenated alloys are prepared under atomic hydrogen atmosphere. We discuss the influence of various parameters of preparation (hydrogen pressure, tungsten tube temperature, substrate temperature, annealing...) on electrical properties of samples.

  8. Neutron diffraction studies of amorphous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief survey is presented of the role of neutron diffraction in structural studies of amorphous solids. The inherent limitations of the diffraction technique are discussed, together with modern instrumentation and methods for separating individual component correlation functions. An introduction is given to the use of modelling and the extraction of structural parameters from experimental data. (author)

  9. Ion-assisted recrystallization of amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priolo, F.; Spinella, C.; La Ferla, A.; Rimini, E.; Ferla, G.

    1989-12-01

    Our recent work on ion-beam-assisted epitaxial growth of amorphous Si layers on single crystal substrates is reviewed. The planar motion of the crystal-amorphous interface was monitored in situ, during irradiations, by transient reflectivity measurements. This technique allows the measurement of the ion-induced growth rate with a very high precision. We have observed that this growth rate scales linearly with the number of displacements produced at the crystal-amorphous interface by the impinging ions. Moreover the regrowth onto oriented substrates is a factor of ≈ 4 faster with respect to that on substrates. Impurities dissolved in the amorphous layer influence the kinetics of recrystallization. For instance, dopants such as As, B and P enhance the ion-induced growth rate while oxygen has the opposite effect. The dependence of the rate on impurity concentration is however less strong with respect to pure thermal annealing. For instance, an oxygen concentration of 1 × 1021 / cm3 decreases the ion-induced growth rate by a factor of ≈ 3; this same concentration would have decreased the rate of pure thermal annealing by more than 4 orders of magnitude. The reduced effects of oxygen during ion-beam crystallization allow the regrowth of deposited Si layers despite the presence of a high interfacial oxygen content. The process is investigated in detail and its possible application to the microelectronic technology is discussed.

  10. Amorphous track models: A numerical comparison study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, L.; Bassler, N.; Andersen, Claus Erik; Jäkel, O.

    2010-01-01

    We present an open-source code library for amorphous track modelling which is suppose to faciliate the application and numerical comparability as well as serve as a frame-work for the implementation of new models. We show an example of using the library indicating the choice of submodels has a...

  11. 13C NMR spectroscopy of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the 13C NMR spectrum of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and boron carbide. The amorphous hydrogenated carbon spectra consist primarily of an sp3 line at 40 ppm and an sp2 line at 140 ppm and are in reasonable agreement with the recent theoretical calculations of Mauri, Pfrommer, and Louie, but there are some notable discrepancies. The amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide spectra are very different from those of amorphous hydrogenated carbon, being dominated by one line at 15 ppm. We interpret this line as due to carbon bound in boron carbide icosahedra, because polycrystalline boron carbide with boron carbide icosahedra as the unit cell gives very similar NMR spectra. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  12. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger;

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co......-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that in...... studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from...

  13. AMORPHOUS COATING FORMING IN THE CONDITIONS OF GAS THERMAL SPRAYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Artemchuk

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the issues of forming amorphous coatings in the conditions of gas thermal spraying of coating are considered. On the basis of theoretical analysis the technological factors, determining possibility of obtaining the amorphous coatings at detonation spraying, are formulated. Two groups of factors, influencing on formation of amorphous structure in detonation sprayed coatings from metallic alloys, are marked.

  14. Topology-mediated electro-optical behaviour of a wide-temperature liquid crystalline amorphous blue phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Su; Chien, Liang-Chy

    2015-10-28

    A wide-temperature liquid crystalline amorphous blue phase based on polymer network stabilization exhibits high thermodynamic stability with an extended temperature ranging from a few °C to more than 80 °C (including room temperature). Analyses using confocal laser scanning microscopy show that the polymer network imitates the aperiodic disclination-entangled structure of an amorphous blue phase and involves a highly intertwined interaction with liquid crystal molecules. The stabilized amorphous blue phase manifests a tens of microseconds response time, a consistent achromatic dark state and it is intrinsically hysteresis-free during the application of an electric field. The topological and electro-optical features of the stabilized amorphous blue phase are further compared with the stabilized isotropic and cubic blue phases. These results not only provide a physical perspective on the electro-optical response of a liquid crystal and polymer composite but also open up a new direction for electro-optical device applications. PMID:26329894

  15. The Infrared Spectra and Absorption Intensities of Amorphous Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Our research group is carrying out new IR measurements of icy solids relevant to the outer solar system and to the interstellar medium, with an emphasis on amorphous and crystalline ices below ~ 120 K. Our goal is to update and add to the relatively meager literature on this subject and to provide electronic versions of state-of-the-art data, since the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate reference spectra and IR band strengths. In the past year, we have focused on three of the simplest and most abundant components of interstellar and solar-system ices: methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methanol (CH3OH). Infrared spectra from ∼ 4500 to 500 cm-1 have been measured for each of these molecules in μm-thick films at temperatures from 10 to 120 K. All known amorphous and crystalline phases have been reproduced and, for some, presented for the first time. We also report measurements of the index of refraction at 670 nm and the mass densities for each ice phase. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible. Electronic versions of our new results are available at http://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/691/cosmicice/ constants.html.

  16. Two-level tunneling systems in amorphous alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Irina V.; Paz, Alejandro P.; Tokatly, Ilya V.; Rubio, Angel

    2014-03-01

    The decades of research on thermal properties of amorphous solids at temperatures below 1 K suggest that their anomalous behaviour can be related to quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms between two nearly equivalent states that can be described as a two-level system (TLS). This theory is also supported by recent studies on microwave spectroscopy of superconducting qubits. However, the microscopic nature of the TLS remains unknown. To identify structural motifs for TLSs in amorphous alumina we have performed extensive classical molecular dynamics simulations. Several bistable motifs with only one or two atoms jumping by considerable distance ~ 0.5 Å were found at T=25 K. Accounting for the surrounding environment relaxation was shown to be important up to distances ~ 7 Å. The energy asymmetry and barrier for the detected motifs lied in the ranges 0.5 - 2 meV and 4 - 15 meV, respectively, while their density was about 1 motif per 10 000 atoms. Tuning of motif asymmetry by strain was demonstrated with the coupling coefficient below 1 eV. The tunnel splitting for the symmetrized motifs was estimated on the order of 0.1 meV. The discovered motifs are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The financial support from the Marie Curie Fellowship PIIF-GA-2012-326435 (RespSpatDisp) is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Theory of the transition temperature of superconducting amorphous transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper first the transition temperature Tsub(c) is shown to be a local quantity, which depends on the (average) short range order, and second it is demonstrated how to calculate local electronic properties in the framework of a short range order model and the transition temperature of amorphous systems based on accepted structure models of the amorphous state. In chapter I the theoretical basis of this work is presented in brief. The model used to study the role of short range order (in periodically ordered as well as in disordered system) is described in chapter II. The results of this model for the periodically ordered case are compared in chapter III with band structure calculations. In chapter IV it is shown how to establish short range order models for disordered systems and what kind of information can be obtained with respect to the electronic properties. Finally in chapter V it is discussed to what extend the interpretation of the transition temperature Tsub(c) as being determined by short range order effects can be supported by the electronic properties, which are calculated in the chapters III and IV. (orig.)

  18. Vibrations of icosahedron-based networks: Application to amorphous boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of amorphous boron is believed to be an icosahedron-based random network. The vibrational properties of such a network are studied theoretically using a Bethe lattice of connected icosahedra. The local symmetry of each icosahedron, along with the use of effective fields, greatly reduces the complexity of the problem. We show that many intraicosahedral vibrations are not affected by the intericosahedral forces. The peak with the highest frequency, which appears commonly in various spectra of amorphous boron, has been ascribed to the intericosahedral vibrations. It is therefore concluded that the intericosahedral force is stronger than the intraicosahedral force. Examination of the density of states at the low-frequency side leads to a relatively large noncentral force for the intericosahedral bond. These conclusions support the view that the intericosahedral bond has a strong covalent character, which is consistent with available experimental data. Raman scattering and infrared absorption are discussed using the shell model and the bond-polarizability model. In these calculations, the spectra are analyzed using the correlations of atomic displacements between different molecular units. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  19. AMORPHOUS MATTER IN KAOLINS AND ITS GEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Selective dissolution with ammonium oxalate was carried out toextract amorphous matter in some kaolins from China.Ammonium oxalate extraction is an effective method to extract amorphous constituents without destroying the kaolinite crystalline structure.The study showed that,absolute amounts of amorphous constituents in kaolins are in the order Al>Si>Fe,but that relative amounts are in the order Fe>Al>Si.The amorphous phases are probably mainly in the form of separate particles,or colloidal particles absorbed on the surface of kaolinite particles.Compared to older kaolins,younger kaolins contain much more amorphous iron content.

  20. Self-diffusion of 58Co in amorphous Co79Nb14B7 during isothermal crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-diffusion of 58Co radiotracer atoms in amorphous or isothermally crystallized Co79Nb14B7 was investigated using ion-beam sputtering for serial sectioning. As in other amorphous metallic alloys, the self-diffusivity DT in the as-produced melt-spun specimens decreased in the course of time to a final value that is characteristic of the relaxed amorphous state. The influence of isothermal crystallization at 713 K or 750 K on DT (663 K) was studied. The state of crystallization was monitored by transmission electron microscopy. Initially DT (663 K) decreases by two orders of magnitude as a function of the duration t of crystallization according to a t-1 law, and then shows a t-2/3 dependence. From this, a crystallization enthalpy of 2.8 eV was deduced. The diffusion enthalpy increases from 1.8 eV in the relaxed amorphous state to 2.2 eV after crystallization for 100 h at 750 K. It is proposed that diffusion occurs via a direct diffusion mechanism in both the relaxed amorphous and the nanocrystalline states. (orig.)

  1. Ion beam irradiation of relaxed amorphous silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ transmittance measurements at λ=633 nm are used during ion irradiation to probe the defect generation in relaxed amorphous silicon carbide (SiC). The optical constants of amorphous SiC are strongly correlated to the thermal history of the material and the transmittance of ion implanted amorphous SiC (unrelaxed amorphous) increases after annealing in the temperature range 100-700 deg. C. The transmittance of annealed amorphous SiC (relaxed) during subsequent implantation decreases and saturates to the value of unrelaxed amorphous. In-situ transmittance measurements allow to follow directly the defect generation and to measure the fluence at which the transmittance saturates (derelaxation fluence). The effect of different ions (He and Ar) on these phenomena is explored. The obtained results are compared and discussed with similar measurements performed on amorphous silicon

  2. Charge deep-level transient spectroscopy study of high-energy-electron-beam-irradiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, A.; Nádaždy, V.; Zeman, M.; Swaaiij, R.A.C.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of changes in the defect density of states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) due to high-energy electron irradiation using charged deep-level transient spectroscopy. It was found that defect states near the conduction band were removed, while in other band gap regions the

  3. Chemical and Phase Evolution of Amorphous Molybdenum Sulfide Catalysts for Electrochemical Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Benck, Jesse D; Tsai, Charlie; Park, Joonsuk; Koh, Ai Leen; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Jaramillo, Thomas F; Sinclair, Robert

    2016-01-26

    Amorphous MoSx is a highly active, earth-abundant catalyst for the electrochemical hydrogen evolution reaction. Previous studies have revealed that this material initially has a composition of MoS3, but after electrochemical activation, the surface is reduced to form an active phase resembling MoS2 in composition and chemical state. However, structural changes in the MoSx catalyst and the mechanism of the activation process remain poorly understood. In this study, we employ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to image amorphous MoSx catalysts activated under two hydrogen-rich conditions: ex situ in an electrochemical cell and in situ in an environmental TEM. For the first time, we directly observe the formation of crystalline domains in the MoSx catalyst after both activation procedures as well as spatially localized changes in the chemical state detected via electron energy loss spectroscopy. Using density functional theory calculations, we investigate the mechanisms for this phase transformation and find that the presence of hydrogen is critical for enabling the restructuring process. Our results suggest that the surface of the amorphous MoSx catalyst is dynamic: while the initial catalyst activation forms the primary active surface of amorphous MoS2, continued transformation to the crystalline phase during electrochemical operation could contribute to catalyst deactivation. These results have important implications for the application of this highly active electrocatalyst for sustainable H2 generation. PMID:26624225

  4. Intrinsic nature of visible-light absorption in amorphous semiconducting oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngho Kang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To enlighten microscopic origin of visible-light absorption in transparent amorphous semiconducting oxides, the intrinsic optical property of amorphous InGaZnO4 is investigated by considering dipole transitions within the quasiparticle band structure. In comparison with the crystalline InGaZnO4 with the optical gap of 3.6 eV, the amorphous InGaZnO4 has two distinct features developed in the band structure that contribute to significant visible-light absorption. First, the conduction bands are down-shifted by 0.55 eV mainly due to the undercoordinated In atoms, reducing the optical gap between extended states to 2.8 eV. Second, tail states formed by localized oxygen p orbitals are distributed over ∼0.5 eV near the valence edge, which give rise to substantial subgap absorption. The fundamental understanding on the optical property of amorphous semiconducting oxides based on underlying electronic structure will pave the way for resolving instability issues in recent display devices incorporating the semiconducting oxides.

  5. Tuning electronic properties of graphene heterostructures by amorphous-to-crystalline phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulju, S.; Akola, J.; Prendergast, D.; Jones, R. O.

    2016-05-01

    The remarkable ability of phase change materials (PCM) to switch between amorphous and crystalline states on a nanosecond time scale could provide new opportunities for graphene engineering. We have used density functional calculations to investigate the structures and electronic properties of heterostructures of thin amorphous and crystalline films of the PCM GeTe (16 Å thick) and Ge2Sb2Te5 (20 Å) between graphene layers. The interaction between graphene and PCM is very weak, charge transfer is negligible, and the structures of the chalcogenide films differ little from those of bulk phases. A crystalline GeTe (111) layer induces a band gap opening of 80 meV at the Dirac point. This effect is absent for the amorphous film, but the Fermi energy shifts down along the Dirac cone by -60 meV. Ge2Sb2Te5 shows similar features, although inherent disorder in the crystalline rocksalt structure reduces the contrast in band structure from that in the amorphous structure. These features originate in charge polarization within the crystalline films, which show electromechanical response (piezoelectricity) upon compression, and show that the electronic properties of graphene structures can be tuned by inducing ultrafast structural transitions within the chalcogenide layers. Graphene can also be used to manipulate the structural state of the PCM layer and its electronic and optical properties.

  6. Role of Amorphous Manganese Oxide in Nitrogen Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LILIANG-MO; WUQI-TU

    1991-01-01

    Studies have been made,by 15N-tracer technique on nitrogen loss resulting from adding amorphous manganese oxide to NH4+-N medium under anaerobic conditions.The fact that the total nitrogen recovery was decreased and that 15NO2,15N2O,15N14NO,15NO,15N2 and 15N14N were emitted has proved that,like amorphous iron oxide,amorphous manganese oxide can also act as an electron acceptor in the oxidation of NH4+-N under anaerobic conditions and give rise to nitrogen loss.This once again illustrates another mechanism by which the loss of ammonium nitrogen in paddy soils is brought about by amorphous iron and manganese oxides.The quantity of nitrogen loss by amorphous manganese oxide increased with an increase in the amount of amorphous manganese oxide added and lessened with time of its aging.The nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss by cooperation of amorphous manganese oxide and microorganisms (soil suspension) was larger than that by amorphous manganese oxide alone.In the system,nitrogen loss was associated with the specific surface ares and oxidation-reduction of amorphous manganese oxide.However,their quantitative relationship and the exact reaction processes of nitrogen loss induced by amorphous manganese oxide remain to be further studied.

  7. A technique for extracting the density of states of the linear region in an amorphous InGaZnO thin film transistor%一个非晶InGaZnO薄膜晶体管线性区陷阱态的提取方法∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐飘荣; 强蕾; 姚若河

    2015-01-01

    Defects and weak bonds generated in the fabricating process of amorphous InGaZnO(a-IGZO) films distribute non-uniformly in the band gap of the a-IGZO film in the form of traps. These traps would capture the charges induced by gate voltage, and affect the linear region mobility, channel carrier density and so on, then the electrical properties in the linear region of a-IGZO thin film transistor. The model used is based on the mobility in linear region which is in direct proportion to the ratio of the free charge to the total induced charge in the channel, and then the free charge and the trapped charge are separated. From the ratio of the density of free carriers to that of the trapped, a direct relationship with the derivative of the free charge with respect to surface potential, and the derivative of the trapped charge with respect to surface potential is calculated by bringing in the gate voltage that serves as an intermediate variable between the linear region mobility and the total induced charge. In this way, the free carrier density and the trapped carrier density can be separated by using the transfer characteristic and capacitor-voltage characteristic. Poisson’s equation and Gauss theorem are applied to the interface between the channel layer and the insulating layer. In consideration of the non-uniform characteristic between the surface potential and the gate voltage, the relationship between the free carrier density and the surface potential, the trapped carrier density and the surface potential are obtained. Finally, the density of states in the linear region could be gained by differentiating the trapped carrier density with respect to surface potential.

  8. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  9. The Local Structure of Amorphous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treacy, M. M. J.; Borisenko, K. B.

    2012-02-01

    It is widely believed that the continuous random network (CRN) model represents the structural topology of amorphous silicon. The key evidence is that the model can reproduce well experimental reduced density functions (RDFs) obtained by diffraction. By using a combination of electron diffraction and fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) variance data as experimental constraints in a structural relaxation procedure, we show that the CRN is not unique in matching the experimental RDF. We find that inhomogeneous paracrystalline structures containing local cubic ordering at the 10 to 20 angstrom length scale are also fully consistent with the RDF data. Crucially, they also matched the FEM variance data, unlike the CRN model. The paracrystalline model has implications for understanding phase transformation processes in various materials that extend beyond amorphous silicon.

  10. Disappearance and Creation of Constrained Amorphous Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Peggy; Lu, Sharon X.

    1997-03-01

    We report observation of the disappearance and recreation of rigid, or constrained, amorphous phase by sequential thermal annealing. Tempera- ture modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) is used to study the glass transition and lower melting endotherm after annealing. Cold crystallization of poly(phenylene sulfide), PPS, at a temperature just above Tg creates an initial large fraction of rigid amorphous phase (RAP). Brief, rapid annealing to a higher temperature causes RAP almost to disappear completely. Subsequent reannealing at the original lower temperature restores RAP to its original value. At the same time that RAP is being removed, Tg decreases; when RAP is restored, Tg also returns to its initial value. The crystal fraction remains unaffected by the annealing sequence.

  11. Compaction of amorphous iron–boron powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Mørup, Steen; Koch, Christian;

    1993-01-01

    Large scale practical use of bulk amorphous alloys requires the capability of molding the material to a desired design, for instance by compaction of an amorphous powder. This is a difficult task because the sintering temperature is limited by the crystallization temperature of the alloy.1 Here we......, should facilitate a compaction. The passivation layer, however, impedes a compaction. Isostatic pressing at 540 K at a pressure of 200 MPa clearly illustrated this; pellets pressed from passivated powder were much more brittle than pellets pressed from unpassivated powder. The density of the pellets...... was very low ([approximately-equal-to]25% of the density of bulk FeB). We have designed a die for uniaxial pressing in which the compaction can be performed without exposing the powder to air and have obtained densities larger than 60% of that of bulk FeB. We have reported studies of the dependence...

  12. NMR INVESTIGATIONS OF HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    J. Reimer

    1981-01-01

    A review is presented of the N.M.R. (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) studies to date of hydrogenated amorphous silicon-hydrogen films. Structural features of proton N.M.R. lineshapes, dynamics of hydrogen containing defect sites, and the promise of quantitative determinations of local silicon-hydrogen bonding environments are discussed in detail. Finally, some comments are given on future directions for N.M.R. studies of hydrogenated thin films.

  13. Amorphous silicon for thin-film transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Schropp, Rudolf Emmanuel Isidore

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has considerable potential as a semiconducting material for large-area photoelectric and photovoltaic applications. Moreover, a-Si:H thin-film transistors (TFT’s) are very well suited as switching devices in addressable liquid crystal display panels and addressable image sensor arrays, due to a new technology of low-cost, Iow-temperature processing overlarge areas. ... Zie: Abstract

  14. Transverse and longitudinal vibrations in amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Beltukov, Y. M.; De Fusco, C; Tanguy, A.; Parshin, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    We show that harmonic vibrations in amorphous silicon can be decomposed to transverse and longitudinal components in all frequency range even in the absence of the well defined wave vector ${\\bf q}$. For this purpose we define the transverse component of the eigenvector with given $\\omega$ as a component, which does not change the volumes of Voronoi cells around atoms. The longitudinal component is the remaining orthogonal component. We have found the longitudinal and transverse components of...

  15. Amorphous computing: examples, mathematics and theory

    OpenAIRE

    Stark, W. Richard

    2013-01-01

    The cellular automata model was described by John von Neumann and his friends in the 1950s as a representation of information processing in multicellular tissue. With crystalline arrays of cells and synchronous activity, it missed the mark (Stark and Hughes, BioSystems 55:107–117, 2000). Recently, amorphous computing, a valid model for morphogenesis in multicellular information processing, has begun to fill the void. Through simple examples and elementary mathematics, this paper begins a comp...

  16. A neutron diffraction study of amorphous boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaplane, R. G.; Lundström, T.; Dahlborg, U.; Howells, W. S.

    1991-07-01

    The structure of amorphous boron has been studied with pulsed neutron diffraction techniques using the ISIS facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The experimental static structure factor S(Q) and radial distribution function support a structural model based on units of B12 icosahedra resembling those found in crystalline β-rhombohedral boron, but with a certain degree of disorder occurring in the linking between these subunits.

  17. Room temperature photoluminescence from nanostructured amorphous carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Henley, SJ; Carey, JD; Silva, SRP

    2004-01-01

    Visible room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) was observed from hydrogen-free nanostructured amorphous carbon films deposited by pulsed laser ablation in different background pressures of argon (PAr). By varying PAr from 5 to 340 mTorr, the film morphology changed from smooth to rough and at the highest pressures, low-density filamentary growth was observed. Over the same pressure regime an increase in the ordering of sp2 bonded C content was observed using visible Raman spectroscopy. Th...

  18. Amorphization and recrystallization of covalent tetrahedral networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper recent studies on the amorphization and recrystallization of the light covalent ceramics SiC, Si3N4 and SiO2 (and in comparison Si) shall be reviewed. By combining long and short range order sensitive analysis techniques new insights into the disordering/reordering mechanisms and the structure of the disordered materials were gained. The results will be discussed in the light of a topological approach of the transition between periodic and aperiodic networks

  19. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  20. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid solidification, sputtering and electroless chemical deposition have been used to produce amorphous metal alloys which possess excellent corrosion and abrasion resistance. This paper discusses a new technique for obtaining amorphous metal alloy coatings. Plasma decomposition of Ni(CO)4 and PH3 in argon and hydrogen carrier gases [Ni(CO4/PH3--8/1] yielded films that were black and silver, respectively, in appearance. Both films were amorphous as determined by transmission electron microscopy. Films deposited using a hydrogen carrier gas were three orders of magnitude more conductive than those deposited using an argon carrier gas. Analysis of both films using electron microprobe analysis and inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy showed an enrichment of P in the films over the P content in the plasma gas mixtures. Reducing the P content of the plasma gas mixture [Ni(CO)4/PH3--17/11 yielded crystalline films with no P enrichment. The grain size in these films was --60Δ as determined by x-ray line-broadening

  1. Impact of amorphization on the electronic properties of Zn-Ir-O systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Ramo, David; Bristowe, Paul D

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the geometry and electronic structure of a series of amorphous Zn-Ir-O systems using classical molecular dynamics followed by density functional theory taking into account two different charge states of Ir (+3 and  +4). The structures obtained consist of a matrix of interconnected metal-oxygen polyhedra, with Zn adopting preferentially a coordination of 4 and Ir a mixture of coordinations between 4 and 6 that depend on the charge state of Ir and its concentration. The amorphous phases display reduced band gaps compared to crystalline ZnIr2O4 and exhibit localized states near the band edges, which harm their transparency and hole mobility. Increasing amounts of Ir in the Ir(4+) phases decrease the band gap further while not altering it significantly in the Ir(3+) phases. The results are consistent with recent transmittance and resistivity measurements. PMID:27357345

  2. Influence of excipients in comilling on mitigating milling-induced amorphization or structural disorder of crystalline pharmaceutical actives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balani, Prashant N; Ng, Wai Kiong; Tan, Reginald B H; Chan, Sui Yung

    2010-05-01

    The feasibility of using excipients to suppress the amorphization or structural disorder of crystalline salbutamol sulphate (SS) during milling was investigated. SS was subjected to ball-milling in the presence of alpha-lactose monohydrate (LAC), adipic acid (AA), magnesium stearate (MgSt), or polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP). X-ray powder diffraction, dynamic vapor sorption (DVS), high sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry (HSDSC) were used to analyze the crystallinity of the milled mixtures. Comilling with crystalline excipients, LAC, AA, and MgSt proved effective in reducing the amorphization of SS. LAC, AA, or MgSt acting as seed crystals to induce recrystallization of amorphous SS formed by milling. During comilling, both SS and LAC turned predominantly amorphous after 45 min but transformed back to a highly crystalline state after 60 min. Amorphous content was below the detection limits of DVS (0.5%) and HSDSC (5%). Comilled and physical mixtures of SS and ALM were stored under normal and elevated humidity conditions. This was found to prevent subsequent changes in crystallinity and morphology of comilled SS:LAC as compared to significant changes in milled SS and physical mixture. These results demonstrate a promising application of comilling with crystalline excipients in mitigating milling induced amorphization of pharmaceutical actives. PMID:19902526

  3. Structure and thermal stability of biodegradable Mg–Zn–Ca based amorphous alloys synthesized by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Room temperature solid state diffusion reaction induced by mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental blends of Mg, Zn and Ca of nominal composition 60 at.% Mg–35 at.% Zn–5 at.% Ca has been studied. Formation of fully amorphous structure has been identified after 5 h of MA performed in a SPEX 8000M shaker mill, with milling continued up to 8 h to confirm the formation of homogeneous amorphous phase. Thermal stability of the amorphous phase has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal heat treatment at different temperatures. The amorphous powder consolidated using cold isostatic pressing (CIP) showed an envelope density ∼80% of absolute density, which increased to an envelope density ∼84% of absolute density after sintering at an optimized temperature of ∼523 K for 9 h. Electrochemical bio-corrosion testing of the CIP compacted amorphous pellet as well as the sintered pellet performed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium, showed improved corrosion resistance in comparison to the as-cast pure Mg. Cytotoxicity testing of the CIP compacted amorphous pellet, performed using the MTT assay with MC3T3 osteoblastic cells, showed low cytotoxicity in comparison to the as-cast pure Mg.

  4. Crystal-amorphous transformation via defect-templating in phase-change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukala, Pavan

    Phase-change materials (PCM) such as GeTe and Ge-Sb-Te alloys are potential candidates for non-volatile memory applications, because they can reversibly and rapidly transform between a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase with medium-range order. Traditionally, crystal-amorphous transformation in these materials has been carried out via melt-quench pathway, where the crystalline phase is heated beyond its melting point by the rising edge of an electric pulse, and the melt phase is quenched by the falling edge into a glassy phase. Formation of an intermediate melt phase in this transformation pathway requires usage of large switching current densities, resulting in energy wastage, and device degradation issues. Furthermore, melt-quench pathway is a brute force strategy of amorphizing PCM, and does not utilize the peculiar structural properties in crystalline phase. It will be beneficial from a device perspective that crystal-amorphous transformation is carried out via subtler solid-state pathways. Single-crystalline nanowire phase-change memory, owing to its lateral geometry and large volumes of active material, offers a platform to construct a crystal-amorphous transformation pathway via gradually increasing disorder in the crystalline phase, and study it. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy on GeTe and Ge2Sb2Te5 systems, we showed that the application of an electric pulse (heat-shock) creates dislocations in the PCM that migrate with the hole-wind force, and interact with the already existing ferroelectric boundaries in case of GeTe, changing their nature. We adapted novel tools such as optical second harmonic generation polarimety to carefully study these defect interactions. These defects accumulate at a region of local inhomogeneity, and upon addition of defects beyond a critical limit to that region via electrical pulsing, an amorphous phase "nucleates". We also studied the effect of defect dynamics on carrier transport using temperature

  5. Microstructural analysis of the radial distribution function for liquid and amorphous Al

    CERN Document Server

    Li, G X; Zhu, Z G; Liu, C S

    2003-01-01

    Constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of the local atomic structures have been performed to study the conventional and 'inherent' structural evolution of liquid Al during rapid solidification. The results show that the radial distribution functions g(r) exhibit a second-peak splitting feature not only for the general structures of the amorphous states but also for the inherent structure of liquid states. The second peak of g(r) decomposes into three main components, each corresponding to different pairs. The first subpeak in the inherent structure of the liquid arises from 2211 and 2331 pairs (which correspond to triangles with a common side and the tetrahedra sharing a face respectively), while the first subpeak in the amorphous state arises from 2331 pairs; in both cases the second subpeak is due to the 2101 pairs (linear trimers). The existence of a shoulder or the splitting in the second peak of g(r) in the amorphous state, and even in the undercooled liquid state, results mainly f...

  6. Microstructural analysis of the radial distribution function for liquid and amorphous Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of the local atomic structures have been performed to study the conventional and 'inherent' structural evolution of liquid Al during rapid solidification. The results show that the radial distribution functions g(r) exhibit a second-peak splitting feature not only for the general structures of the amorphous states but also for the inherent structure of liquid states. The second peak of g(r) decomposes into three main components, each corresponding to different pairs. The first subpeak in the inherent structure of the liquid arises from 2211 and 2331 pairs (which correspond to triangles with a common side and the tetrahedra sharing a face respectively), while the first subpeak in the amorphous state arises from 2331 pairs; in both cases the second subpeak is due to the 2101 pairs (linear trimers). The existence of a shoulder or the splitting in the second peak of g(r) in the amorphous state, and even in the undercooled liquid state, results mainly from the increase in number of and aggregation of the tetrahedra, which in turn give rise to the presence of entities with local icosahedral order

  7. Properties and application of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, J.

    1985-04-12

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films have found increasing applications in the last few years, in particular for thin film solar cells. Efficiencies of around 10% have been achieved and the field is still rapidly developing. Three main methods are used to deposite a-Si:H, i.e. the decomposition of silane in a glow discharge, the reactive sputtering of silicon in an Ar-H2 atmosphere and the reactive evaporation of silicon in atomic hydrogen. The basic properties of the film, i.e. structure, electrical and photoelectrical properties and the density of states in the gap, are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of the three methods are discussed, also with regard to the applications. (orig.).

  8. Investigations on silicon/amorphous-carbon and silicon/nanocrystalline palladium/ amorphous-carbon interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, M; Sengupta, P; Tyagi, A K; Kale, G B

    2008-08-01

    Our previous work revealed that significant enhancement in sp3-carbon content of amorphous carbon films could be achieved when grown on nanocrystalline palladium interlayer as compared to those grown on bare silicon substrates. To find out why, the nature of interface formed in both the cases has been investigated using Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) technique. It has been found that a reactive interface in the form of silicon carbide and/silicon oxy-carbide is formed at the interface of silicon/amorphous-carbon films, while palladium remains primarily in its native form at the interface of nanocrystalline palladium/amorphous-carbon films. However, there can be traces of dissolved oxygen within the metallic layer as well. The study has been corroborated further from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. PMID:19049221

  9. Long ferromagnetic correlation length in amorphous TbFe2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and magnetic-force microscopy (MFM) have been used to characterize the temperature dependence of the ferromagnetic correlation length and the domain structure in amorphous TbFe2 below its magnetic ordering temperature. Amorphous TbFe2 is classified as a random anisotropy magnet, in the exchange-dominated limit, and previous SANS observations had shown a correlation length limited to 50 Angstrom at low temperatures. In the present study, samples were prepared by both sputtering and electron beam coevaporation and were either grown or preannealed at 200 degree C in order to permit measurements above Tc without structural relaxation. Samples grown by vapor deposition processes possess a large macroscopic perpendicular anisotropy constant Ku, which can be reduced or eliminated by annealing. A strong SANS signal is seen in all samples, with a magnitude strongly correlated with the temperature-dependent sample magnetization and with the inverse length scale of the domain structure seen in MFM. For all samples, the magnetic correlation length determined from SANS is 300 - 500 Angstrom in the thermally demagnetized state, and increases beyond measurement range after magnetizing. This long correlation length is consistent with theoretical predictions of a ferromagnetic ground state in exchange-dominated random anisotropy magnets in the presence of coherent anisotropy. The SANS signal is dominated by a Lorentzian squared term, which is best understood as resulting from ferromagnetic domains with meandering domain walls, similar to the Debye-Bueche model developed for materials consisting of two strongly segregated, interpenetrating phases. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  10. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying

    OpenAIRE

    Goedele Craye; Korbinian Löbmann; Holger Grohganz; Thomas Rades; Riikka Laitinen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin–lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon sp...

  11. Electrical and optical properties of thin film of amorphous silicon nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical and optical properties of thin film of amorphous silicon nanoparticles (a-Si) are studied. Thin film of silicon is synthesized on glass substrate under an ambient gas (Ar) atmosphere using physical vapour condensation system. We have employed Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to study the morphology and microstructure of this film. It is observed that this silicon film contains almost spherical nanoparticles with size varying between 10 and 40 nm. The average surface roughness is about 140 nm as evident from the AFM image. X-ray diffraction analysis is also performed. The XRD spectrum does not show any significant peak which indicates the amorphous nature of the film. To understand the electrical transport phenomena, the temperature dependence of dc conductivity for this film is studied over a temperature range of (300-100 K). On the basis of temperature dependence of dc conductivity, it is suggested that the conduction takes place via variable range hopping (VRH). Three-dimensional Mott's variable range hopping (3D VRH) is applied to explain the conduction mechanism for the transport of charge carriers in this system. Various Mott's parameters such as density of states, degree of disorder, hopping distance, hopping energy are estimated. In optical properties, we have studied Fourier transform infra-red spectra and the photoluminescence of this amorphous silicon thin film. It is found that these amorphous silicon nanoparticles exhibits strong Si-O-Si stretching mode at 1060 cm-1, which suggests that the large amount of oxygen is adsorbed on the surface of these a-Si nanoparticles. The photoluminescence observed from these amorphous silicon nanoparticles has been explained with the help of oxygen related surface state mechanism.

  12. Inorganic glasses, glass-forming liquids and amorphizing solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, G. N.; Sen, S.

    2007-01-01

    We take familiar inorganic oxide glasses and non-oxide glasses and the liquids from which they derive to review the current understanding of their atomic structure, ranging from the local environments of individual atoms to the long-range order which can cover many interatomic distances. The structural characteristics of important glasses and melts, like silicates, borates, alumino-silicates, halides and chalcogenides, are drawn from the results of recent spectroscopy and scattering experiments. The techniques include Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS), Neutron Scattering (NS) and Small- and Wide-angle X-ray Scattering measurements (SAXS/WAXS), and are often combined with computer simulation experiments in order to obtain detailed images of structure and diffusion in the glassy as well as in the molten state. We then review the current understanding of relaxation in glasses, liquids and polyamorphic states. This includes phenomenological models and theories of relaxation in different dynamical regimes, spectroscopic studies of atomic-scale mechanisms of viscous flow in inorganic glass-formers and the signatures of relaxational behaviour embedded in the low-frequency vibrational dynamics of glasses including the Boson peak and the Two-Level Systems (TLS) that control conformational transformation. We conclude this review by extending concepts of the dynamics of the glass transition from the supercooled liquid in order to understand the solid-state amorphization of crystals under temperature and pressure and to determine the thermodynamic limits of the crystalline and glassy state.

  13. The improvement of hole transport property and optical band gap for amorphous Cu{sub 2}O films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qin; Li, Jin; Bi, Xiaofang

    2015-10-25

    This work presents an interesting observation that the suppression of crystallization for p-type Cu{sub 2}O facilitates the transition of transport behaviors from variable-range-hopping (VRH) to Arrhenius-like mechanism and further lead to a great reduction of thermal activation energy. Raman spectroscopy analysis shows a distortion of symmetrical O–Cu–O crosslink structure in the amorphous Cu{sub 2}O. The disruption of symmetry is revealed to increase dispersion of upper valence band and reduce Fermi as well, which results in possible intrusion of the Fermi level into a band tail state adjacent to the upper valence band level. Meanwhile, the amorphous Cu{sub 2}O film shows an optical band gap of 2.7 eV, much larger than 2.0 eV for the crystalline counterparts. The blue shift is consistent with the variation of energy band structure with the film changing from crystalline to amorphous state, suggesting that the O-mediated d–d interaction can be weakened with the nonsymmetrical structure in amorphous phase. - Graphical abstract: Suppression of crystallization for p-type Cu{sub 2}O is observed to facilitate the transition of transport behaviors from variable-range-hopping to the Arrhenius-like behavior based on the band tail transport mode. The amorphous Cu{sub 2}O film also shows a blue shift as compared to its crystalline counterpart. The effect of amorphous structure on the performances is discussed in combination with Raman spectroscopy and band structure calculation. - Highlights: • Amorphous Cu{sub 2}O films show Arrhenius-like p-type conductivity. • Raman spectroscopy is analyzed on the change of crystallization. • Physical origin of the transport behavior is clarified with electronic structure. • Optical band gap can be widened by suppressing crystallization of Cu{sub 2}O.

  14. Development of empirical potentials for amorphous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carre, A.

    2007-09-15

    Amorphous silica (SiO{sub 2}) is of great importance in geoscience and mineralogy as well as a raw material in glass industry. Its structure is characterized as a disordered continuous network of SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra. Many efforts have been undertaken to understand the microscopic properties of silica by classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this method the interatomic interactions are modeled by an effective potential that does not take explicitely into account the electronic degrees of freedom. In this work, we propose a new methodology to parameterize such a potential for silica using ab initio simulations, namely Car-Parrinello (CP) method [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)]. The new potential proposed is compared to the BKS potential [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1955 (1990)] that is considered as the benchmark potential for silica. First, CP simulations have been performed on a liquid silica sample at 3600 K. The structural features so obtained have been compared to the ones predicted by the classical BKS potential. Regarding the bond lengths the BKS tends to underestimate the Si-O bond whereas the Si-Si bond is overestimated. The inter-tetrahedral angular distribution functions are also not well described by the BKS potential. The corresponding mean value of the SiOSi angle is found to be {approx_equal} 147 , while the CP yields to a SiOSi angle centered around 135 . Our aim is to fit a classical Born-Mayer/Coulomb pair potential using ab initio calculations. To this end, we use the force-matching method proposed by Ercolessi and Adams [Europhys. Lett. 26, 583 (1994)]. The CP configurations and their corresponding interatomic forces have been considered for a least square fitting procedure. The classical MD simulations with the resulting potential have lead to a structure that is very different from the CP one. Therefore, a different fitting criterion based on the CP partial pair correlation functions was applied. Using this approach the resulting

  15. Emerging trends in the stabilization of amorphous drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Löbmann, Korbinian; Strachan, Clare J.;

    2013-01-01

    The number of active pharmaceutical substances having high therapeutic potential but low water solubility is constantly increasing, making it difficult to formulate these compounds as oral dosage forms. The solubility and dissolution rate, and thus potentially the bioavailability, of these poorly...... water-soluble drugs can be increased by the formation of stabilized amorphous forms. Currently, formulation as solid polymer dispersions is the preferred method to enhance drug dissolution and to stabilize the amorphous form of a drug. The purpose of this review is to highlight emerging alternative...... methods to amorphous polymer dispersions for stabilizing the amorphous form of drugs. First, an overview of the properties and stabilization mechanisms of amorphous forms is provided. Subsequently, formulation approaches such as the preparation of co-amorphous small-molecule mixtures and the use of...

  16. Amorphous-silicon module hot-spot testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    Hot spot heating occurs when cell short-circuit current is lower than string operating current. Amorphous cell hot spot are tested to develop the techniques required for performing reverse bias testing of amorphous cells. Also, to quantify the response of amorphous cells to reverse biasing. Guidelines are developed from testing for reducing hot spot susceptibility of amorphous modules and to develop a qualification test for hot spot testing of amorphous modules. It is concluded that amorphous cells undergo hot spot heating similarly to crystalline cells. Comparison of results obtained with submodules versus actual modules indicate heating levels lower in actual modules. Module design must address hot spot testing and hot spot qualification test conducted on modules showed no instabilities and minor cell erosion.

  17. Formation of amorphous silicon by light ion damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphization by implantation of boron ions (which is the lightest element generally used in I.C. fabrication processes) has been systematically studied for various temperatures, various voltages and various dose rates. Based on theoretical considerations and experimental results, a new amorphization model for light and intermediate mass ion damage is proposed consisting of two stages. The role of interstitial type point defects or clusters in amorphization is emphasized. Due to the higher mobility of interstitials out-diffusion to the surface particularly during amorphization with low energy can be significant. From a review of the idealized amorphous structure, diinterstitial-divacancy pairs are suggested to be the embryos of amorphous zones formed during room temperature implantation. The stacking fault loops found in specimens implanted with boron at room temperature are considered to be the origin of secondary defects formed during annealing

  18. Preparation and Cycling Performance of Iron or Iron Oxide Containing Amorphous Al-Li Alloys as Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Thoss

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline phase transitions cause volume changes, which entails a fast destroying of the electrode. Non-crystalline states may avoid this circumstance. Herein we present structural and electrochemical investigations of pre-lithiated, amorphous Al39Li43Fe13Si5-powders, to be used as electrode material for Li-ion batteries. Powders of master alloys with the compositions Al39Li43Fe13Si5 and Al39Li43Fe13Si5 + 5 mass-% FeO were prepared via ball milling and achieved amorphous/nanocrystalline states after 56 and 21.6 h, respectively. In contrast to their Li-free amorphous pendant Al78Fe13Si9, both powders showed specific capacities of about 400 and 700 Ah/kgAl, respectively, after the third cycle.

  19. Soft magnetic and microstructural investigation in Fe-based amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Samples were obtained using the injection-casting method. • The samples were manufactured in the shape of plates of the thickness 0.5 mm. • The amorphous and nanocrystalline structure was confirmed using XRD, SEM, TEM, CT. • Magnetic properties were analysed in terms of contents of the spin waves stiffness parameter b. - Abstract: In this paper, the results of investigations concerning Fe61Co10Y8W1B20 alloy are presented. The alloy samples were produced, using an injection-casting method, in the form of plates of approximate thickness 0.5 mm. Analysis of the results facilitates the description of structural transformations which occurred within the amorphous material as a result of isothermal annealing, the latter having been carried out under specified conditions. This thermal treatment led to the creation within the amorphous matrix of evenly distributed nanometric sized crystalline grains. The structure and microstructure of the samples in the as-quenched and nanocrystalline states were analysed by means of: X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and computer tomography (CT). The influence of the structural changes on the magnetic properties was studied using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Detailed analysis of the microstructure was performed on the ferromagnetic alloy samples with amorphous and nanocrystalline structure; this, in connection with the magnetic studies, facilitated full description of the influence of changes in the microstructure, and imperfections created during the production process, on the magnetic properties

  20. Photoluminescence properties of BaMoO4 amorphous thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BaMoO4 amorphous and crystalline thin films were prepared from polymeric precursors. The BaMoO4 was deposited onto Si wafers by means of the spinning technique. The structure and optical properties of the resulting films were characterized by FTIR reflectance spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical reflectance. The bond Mo-O present in BaMoO4 was confirmed by FTIR reflectance spectra. XRD characterization showed that thin films heat-treated at 600 and 200 deg. C presented the scheelite-type crystalline phase and amorphous, respectively. AFM analyses showed a considerable variation in surface morphology by comparing samples heat-treated at 200 and 600 deg. C. The reflectivity spectra showed two bands, positioned at 3.38 and 4.37 eV that were attributed to the excitonic state of Ba2+ and electronic transitions within MoO2-4, respectively. The optical band gaps of BaMoO4 were 3.38 and 2.19 eV, for crystalline (600 deg. C/2 h) and amorphous (200 deg. C/8 h) films, respectively. The room-temperature luminescence spectra revealed an intense single-emission band in the visible region. The PL intensity of these materials was increased upon heat-treatment. The excellent optical properties observed for BaMoO4 amorphous thin films suggested that this material is a highly promising candidate for photoluminescent applications

  1. Transition metal oxide window layer in thin film amorphous silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells have been fabricated by replacing state of the art silicon based window layer with more transparent transition metal oxide (TMO) materials. Three kinds of TMOs: vanadium oxide, tungsten oxide, and molybdenum oxide (MoOx) were comparatively investigated to reveal the design principles of metal oxide window layers. It was found that MoOx exhibited the best performance due to its higher work function property compared to other materials. In addition, the band alignment between MoOx and amorphous Si controls the series resistance, which was verified through compositional variation of MoOx thin films. The design principles of TMO window layer in amorphous Si solar cells are summarized as follows: A wide optical bandgap larger than 3.0 eV, a high work function larger than 5.2 eV, and a band alignment condition rendering efficient hole collection from amorphous Si absorber layer. - Highlights: • High work function metal oxides can potentially replace the conventional p-a-SiC. • V2Ox, WOx, and MoOx are comparatively investigated in this study. • MoOx is the most relevant material due to its highest work function. • Slightly oxygen deficient MoOx exhibited performance enhancement at x = 2.9

  2. Amorphous Dielectric Thin Films with Extremely Low Mechanical Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Liu X; Queen D.R.; Metcalf T.H.; Karel J.E.; Hellman F.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous low-energy excitations are one of the universal phenomena of amorphous solids. These excitations dominate the acoustic, dielectric, and thermal properties of structurally disordered solids. One exception has been a type of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) with 1 at.% H. Using low temperature elastic and thermal measurements of electron-beam evap-orated amorphous silicon (a-Si), we show that TLS can be eliminated in this system as the films become denser and more structur...

  3. First Principles Prediction of Amorphous Phases Using Evolutionary Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Nahas, Suhas; Gaur, Anshu; Bhowmick, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the efficacy of evolutionary method for the purpose of structural analysis of amorphous solids. At present ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) based melt-quench technique is used and this deterministic approach has proven to be successful to study amorphous materials. We show that a stochastic approach motivated by Darwinian evolution can also be used to simulate amorphous structures. Applying this method, in conjunction with density functional theory (DFT) based electronic, ionic an...

  4. Memory effect under pressure in low density amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Nandini; Pandey, K. K.; K. V. Shanavas; Betty, C. A.; Sharma, Surinder M

    2010-01-01

    Our investigations on porous Si show that on increase of pressure it undergoes crystalline phase transitions instead of pressure induced amorphization - claimed earlier, and the amorphous phase appears only on release of pressure. This amorphous phase, when subjected to higher pressures, transforms reversibly to a higher coordinated primitive hexagonal phase showing a kind of memory effect which may be the only example of its kind in the elemental solids. First principles calculations and the...

  5. Electronic structure and optical properties of B/P-doped amorphous Si calculated by first-principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Short-range order in a-Si lead to the similar electronic structure and optical properties with c-Si. • Long-range disorder of a-Si lead to the different electronic structure and optical properties. • Localized states predominately determine the optical properties in visible-light region of a-Si. • B/P-doping have no obvious effects for the electronic structure and optical properties of a-Si. - Abstract: In order to understand the electronic structures, optical properties, and explain the experimental observations of B/P-doped amorphous Si, the relevant micro-structure and properties have been calculated by simulated annealing and DFT+U methods. Based on the calculated results, the short-range order features of micro-structure in amorphous Si lead to the similar electronic structure and optical properties with crystalline Si, owing to the short-range order reflects the nature of atomic chemical bonding and plays a major role in the decision of fundamental characteristics of amorphous Si. What is important, the long-range disorder features of micro-structure lead to the different electronic structure and optical properties of amorphous Si, in compared with crystalline Si. Especially, the localized states caused by structural defects predominately determined the optical properties in visible-light region. The findings in the present work could well explain the experimental observations in literatures, and are helpful for the development of amorphous Si based functional materials

  6. Thermal stability of magnetron sputtered amorphous Si{sub 2}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustus, R. [Institut fuer Energieforschung und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Institut fuer Metallurgie, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Gruber, W. [Institut fuer Metallurgie, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Wegewitz, L. [Institut fuer Energieforschung und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Clausthaler Zentrum fuer Materialtechnik, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Schmidt, H. [Institut fuer Metallurgie, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Clausthaler Zentrum fuer Materialtechnik, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Maus-Friedrichs, W., E-mail: w.maus-friedrichs@pe.tu-clausthal.de [Institut fuer Energieforschung und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Clausthaler Zentrum fuer Materialtechnik, Technische Universitaet Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    The thermal stability of amorphous Si{sub 2}C films was studied by means of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffractometry (GIXRD), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The films were deposited by magnetron sputtering onto silicon single crystals. The as-deposited films show a homogenous amorphous structure with a variety of bonding states reaching from homonuclear silicon-like Si-Si over mixed Si-Si-C to heteronuclear Si-C bonds. Annealing at 800 Degree-Sign C for 1 h leads to a depletion of Si-Si-C bonding states and to the formation of additional Si-C bonds. AFM and SEM images showed particles with a remarkable faceting on the surface of the annealed film. In accordance with GIXRD and AES measurements, these observations confirmed the crystallization of silicon during thermal annealing. Besides, no crystallized silicon carbide could be detected.

  7. Structure of amorphous Ag/Ge/S alloys: experimentally constrained density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akola, J.; Beuneu, B.; Jones, R. O.; Jóvári, P.; Kaban, I.; Kolář, J.; Voleská, I.; Wágner, T.

    2015-12-01

    Density functional/molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to determine structural and other properties of amorphous Ag/Ge/S and Ge/S alloys. In the former, the calculations have been combined with experimental data (x-ray and neutron diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure). Ag/Ge/As alloys have high ionic conductivity and are among the most promising candidates for future memristor technology. We find excellent agreement between the experimental results and large-scale (500 atoms) simulations in Ag/Ge/S, and we compare and contrast the structures of Ge/S and Ag/Ge/S. The calculated electronic structures, vibrational densities of states, ionic mobilities, and cavity distributions of the amorphous materials are discussed and compared with data on crystalline phases where available. The high mobility of Ag in solid state electrolyte applications is related to the presence of cavities and can occur via jumps to a neighbouring vacant site.

  8. Improved Photo-Induced Stability in Amorphous Metal-Oxide Based TFTs for Transparent Displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Sang-Mo; Ha, Tae-Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the origin of photo-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin-film transistors (oxide-TFTs) by exploring threshold voltage (Vth) shift in transfer characteristics. The combination of photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress enhanced the shift in Vth in amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc-oxide (a-HfIZO) TFTs. Such results stem from the extended trapped charges at the localized defect states related to oxygen vacancy which play a role in a screening effect on the electric field induced by gate voltage. We also demonstrate the chemically clean interface in oxide-TFTs by employing oxygen annealing which reduces the density of trap states, thereby resulting in improved photo-induced stability. We believe that this work stimulates the research society of transparent electronics by providing a promising approach to suppress photo-induced instability in metal-oxide TFTs. PMID:26726416

  9. Molecular dynamics study of structural and dynamical properties of amorphous Si-Ge alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural and dynamical properties of amorphous silicon-germanium (a-Si1-xGex) alloys have been examined by molecular dynamics simulations using the Tersoff interatomic potential. Amorphous networks were generated by rapid quenching from liquid Si1-xGex alloys. Good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimentally measured radial distribution functions and phonon densities of states, suggesting that the Tersoff potential is useful for analyzing the atomic configurations and vibrational properties of a-Si1-xGex alloys. Local atomistic structures, such as topological and chemical short-range order states, were also examined in detail, and we compared them with experimental and theoretical results reported previously. On the basis of the results obtained here, we proposed that the bond length and bond angle around Ge atoms have more distortion than those around Si atoms in a-Si1-xGex networks

  10. Hydrogen diffusion in Zr35Ni55V10 amorphous alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiao-ying; WAHG Fang

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion in Zr35Ni55V10 amorphous alloy was measured by chronopotentiometry. The results show that at lower molar ratio of hydrogen (x<0.06, x=n(H)/n(M)), the diffusivity of hydrogen increases rapidly with increasing the molar ratio of hydrogen. However, when x(H)>0.1, the diffusivity of hydrogen decreases slightly with increasing the molar ratio of hydrogen, which is similar to the change in crystalline alloy. It is proposed that hydrogen atoms mainly occupy the sites corresponding to tetrahedra with 4 Zr atoms at lower molar ratio of hydrogen. When the molar ratio of hydrogen is higher, the additional hydrogen atoms are in sites with higher energy and these sites in amorphous state are similar to these in crystalline states.

  11. Structure and magnetic properties of Fe-based amorphous alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Błoch

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper presents studies relating to the structure, magnetic properties and thermal stability of the following bulk amorphous alloys: Fe61Co10Ti3-xY6+xB20 (where x = 0 or 1 Design/methodology/approach: The investigated samples were prepared in the form of rods by using the suction-casting method. The material structures were investigated using X-ray diffractometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal stability was determined on the basis of Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC plots The magnetic properties were studied using a completely automated set up for measuring susceptibility and its disaccommodation. Findings: It was found that both alloys were amorphous in the as-cast state. The DSC curve obtained for Fe61Co10Ti2Y7B20 alloy exhibited one exothermic peak, while for the Fe61Co10Ti3Y6B20 sample, two peaks were distinguishable, corresponding to the crystallization of the sample. The bifurcation of the maximum on the DSC curve for the Fe61Co10Ti3Y6B20 sample may also testify to the presence of the primary crystallizing phase (FeCo23B6 [1,2]. Data obtained from the analysis of the magnetic susceptibility disaccommodation curves clearly show that in the Fe61Co10Ti3Y6B20 alloy there is less free volumes than in the second of the investigated alloys, this results in a lesser range of relaxation time. Moreover, Fe61Co10Ti3Y6B20 alloy exhibits the better time and thermal stability of magnetic properties In both of the studied alloys, at low frequencies, the total losses were comparable with those observed in classical silicon-iron alloys. Practical implications: A Ferrometer was used for the determination of core losses. Originality/value: The paper presents some researches of the Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys obtained by the suction-casting method.

  12. Excessively High Vapor Pressure of Al-based Amorphous Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Im Jeong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum-based amorphous alloys exhibited an abnormally high vapor pressure at their approximate glass transition temperatures. The vapor pressure was confirmed by the formation of Al nanocrystallites from condensation, which was attributed to weight loss of the amorphous alloys. The amount of weight loss varied with the amorphous alloy compositions and was inversely proportional to their glass-forming ability. The vapor pressure of the amorphous alloys around 573 K was close to the vapor pressure of crystalline Al near its melting temperature, 873 K. Our results strongly suggest the possibility of fabricating nanocrystallites or thin films by evaporation at low temperatures.

  13. Thermodynamical modeling of nuclear glasses: coexistence of amorphous phases; Modelisation thermodynamique des verres nucleaires: coexistence entre phases amorphes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adjanor, G

    2007-11-15

    Investigating the stability of borosilicate glasses used in the nuclear industry with respect to phase separation requires to estimate the Gibbs free energies of the various phases appearing in the material. In simulation, using current computational resources, a direct state-sampling of a glassy system with respect to its ensemble statistics is not ergodic and the estimated ensemble averages are not reliable. Our approach consists in generating, at a given cooling rate, a series of quenches, or paths connecting states of the liquid to states of the glass, and then in taking into account the probability to generate the paths leading to the different glassy states in ensembles averages. In this way, we introduce a path ensemble formalism and calculate a Landau free energy associated to a glassy meta-basin. This method was validated by accurately mapping the free energy landscape of a 38-atom glassy cluster. We then applied this approach to the calculation of the Gibbs free energies of binary amorphous Lennard-Jones alloys, and checked the correlation between the observed tendencies to order or to phase separate and the computed Gibbs free energies. We finally computed the driving force to phase separation in a simplified three-oxide nuclear glass modeled by a Born-Mayer-Huggins potential that includes a three-body term, and we compared the estimated quantities to the available experimental data. (author)

  14. Three-Terminal Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Hung Tai; Chu-Hsuan Lin; Chih-Ming Wang; Chun-Chieh Lin

    2011-01-01

    Many defects exist within amorphous silicon since it is not crystalline. This provides recombination centers, thus reducing the efficiency of a typical a-Si solar cell. A new structure is presented in this paper: a three-terminal a-Si solar cell. The new back-to-back p-i-n/n-i-p structure increased the average electric field in a solar cell. A typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was also simulated for comparison using the same thickness and material parameters. The 0.28 μm-thick three-terminal a-Si...

  15. Magnetoimpedance response in current annealed amorphous wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the magnetoimpedance (MI) effect in amorphous wires submitted to current annealing treatment in vacuum is presented. The influence of circular anisotropy and stress relaxation induced during the annealing on the impedance dependence on external magnetic field is shown. An increase in the MI ratio for the annealed wires is observed up to a maximum value which is approximately three times higher than the maximum value obtained for the as-cast wire. For high enough times of current annealing treatment a decrease in the MI ratio is observed due to the formation of crystalline phase

  16. Magnetoimpedance response in current annealed amorphous wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, D. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)]. E-mail: danielgg@usal.es; Raposo, V. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Borza, F. [Wolfson Centre for Magnetics Technology, Cardiff University, New Port Road, P.O. Box 925, CF24 0YF Cardiff (United Kingdom); Montero, O. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Iniguez, J. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2006-09-15

    In this work, the magnetoimpedance (MI) effect in amorphous wires submitted to current annealing treatment in vacuum is presented. The influence of circular anisotropy and stress relaxation induced during the annealing on the impedance dependence on external magnetic field is shown. An increase in the MI ratio for the annealed wires is observed up to a maximum value which is approximately three times higher than the maximum value obtained for the as-cast wire. For high enough times of current annealing treatment a decrease in the MI ratio is observed due to the formation of crystalline phase.

  17. Inconspicuous Appeal of Amorphous Computing Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wiedermann, Jiří

    Opava: Institute of Computer Science, Silesian University, 2014 - (Gheorghe, M.; Sosík, P.; Vavrečková, Š.), s. 15-18 ISBN 978-80-7510-036-8. [CMC15. International Conference on Membrane Computing /15./. Prague (CZ), 20.08.2014-22.08.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP202/10/1333 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : amorphous computing * computational universality * computational complexity Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.cs.us.es/~marper/investigacion/cmc15_proceedings.pdf#page=27

  18. Rapid Annealing Of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Pouch, John J.; Warner, Joseph D.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments to determine effects of rapid annealing on films of amorphous hydrogenated carbon. Study represents first efforts to provide information for applications of a-C:H films where rapid thermal processing required. Major finding, annealing causes abrupt increase in absorption and concomitant decrease in optical band gap. Most of change occurs during first 20 s, continues during longer annealing times. Extend of change increases with annealing temperature. Researchers hypothesize abrupt initial change caused by loss of hydrogen, while gradual subsequent change due to polymerization of remaining carbon into crystallites or sheets of graphite. Optical band gaps of unannealed specimens on silicon substrates lower than those of specimens on quartz substrates.

  19. Amorphous computing: examples, mathematics and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, W Richard

    2013-01-01

    The cellular automata model was described by John von Neumann and his friends in the 1950s as a representation of information processing in multicellular tissue. With crystalline arrays of cells and synchronous activity, it missed the mark (Stark and Hughes, BioSystems 55:107-117, 2000). Recently, amorphous computing, a valid model for morphogenesis in multicellular information processing, has begun to fill the void. Through simple examples and elementary mathematics, this paper begins a computation theory for this important new direction. PMID:23946719

  20. Electrochromism of amorphous ruthenium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Se-Hee; Liu, Ping; Tracy, C. Edwin; Deb, Satyen K. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Center for Basic Sciences, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Cheong, Hyeonsik M. [Sogang University, Shinsoo-Dong, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-01

    We report on the electrochromic behavior of amorphous ruthenium oxide thin films and their electrochemical characteristics for use as counterelectrodes for electrochromic devices. Hydrous ruthenium oxide thin films were prepared by cyclic voltammetry on ITO coated glass substrates from an aqueous ruthenium chloride solution. The cyclic voltammograms of this material show the capacitive behavior including two redox reaction peaks in each cathodic and anodic scan. The ruthenium oxide thin film electrode exhibits a 50% modulation of optical transmittance at 670 nm wavelength with capacitor charge/discharge.

  1. Self-Diffusion in Amorphous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauß, Florian; Dörrer, Lars; Geue, Thomas; Stahn, Jochen; Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Mattauch, Stefan; Schmidt, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The present Letter reports on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon. Experiments were done on 29Si/natSi heterostructures using neutron reflectometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The diffusivities follow the Arrhenius law in the temperature range between 550 and 700 °C with an activation energy of (4.4 ±0.3 ) eV . In comparison with single crystalline silicon the diffusivities are tremendously higher by 5 orders of magnitude at about 700 °C , which can be interpreted as the consequence of a high diffusion entropy.

  2. Low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicon and amorphous germanium by soft X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low-temperature-crystallization effects of soft X-ray irradiation on the structural properties of amorphous Si and amorphous Ge films were investigated. From the differences in crystallization between Si and Ge, it was found that the effects of soft X-ray irradiation on the crystallization strongly depended on the energy band gap and energy level. The crystallization temperatures of the amorphous Si and amorphous Ge films decreased from 953 K to 853 K and 773 K to 663 K, respectively. The decrease in crystallization temperature was also related to atoms transitioning into a quasi-nucleic phase in the films. The ratio of electron excitation and migration effects to thermal effects was controlled using the storage-ring current (photon flux density). Therefore, we believe that low-temperature crystallization can be realized by controlling atomic migration through electron excitation. - Highlights: • This work investigates the crystallization mechanism for soft X-ray irradiation. • The soft X-ray crystallization depended on the energy band gap and energy level. • The decrease in the crystallization temperature for Si and Ge films was 100 K. • This decrement was related to atoms transitioning into a quasi-nucleic phase

  3. Solvent-mediated amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of nitrendipine in amorphous particle suspensions containing polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Dengning; Wu, Jian-Xiong; Cui, Fude;

    2012-01-01

    The amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of nitrendipine was investigated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The nucleation and growth rate of crystalline nitrendipine in a medium containing poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG 200) were quantitati...

  4. Magneto-optical switch with amorphous silicon waveguides on magneto-optical garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Eiichi; Miura, Kengo; Shoji, Yuya; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2016-08-01

    We fabricated a magneto-optical (MO) switch with a hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguide on an MO garnet. The switch is composed of a 2 × 2 Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI). The switch state is controlled by an MO phase shift through a magnetic field generated by a current flowing in an electrode located on the MZI. The switching operation was successfully demonstrated with an extinction ratio of 11.7 dB at a wavelength of 1550 nm.

  5. Vibrational properties of amorphous silicon from tight-binding O(N) calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Parthapratim

    2001-01-01

    We present an O(N) algorithm to study the vibrational properties of amorphous silicon within the framework of tight-binding approach. The dynamical matrix elements have been evaluated numerically in the harmonic approximation exploiting the short-range nature of the density matrix to calculate the vibrational density of states which is then compared with the same obtained from a standard O($N^4$) algorithm. For the purpose of illustration, an 1000-atom model is studied to calculate the locali...

  6. Decomposition of amorphous Si{sub 2}C by thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustus, R. [Institut für Energieforschung und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universität Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Institut für Metallurgie, Technische Universität Clausthal, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Institut für Elektrochemie, Technische Universität Clausthal, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Straße 6, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Gruber, W. [Institut für Metallurgie, Technische Universität Clausthal, Robert-Koch-Str. 42, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Wegewitz, L. [Institut für Energieforschung und Physikalische Technologien, Technische Universität Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Clausthaler Zentrum für Materialtechnik, Technische Universität Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 4, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Geckle, U. [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Institute for Applied Materials, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Prang, R.; Kübel, C. [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Institute of Nanotechnology and Karlsruher Micro Nano Facility, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); and others

    2014-02-03

    In the present paper, the decomposition and the crystallization behaviour of amorphous Si{sub 2}C films, which were deposited by r.f. magnetron co-sputtering on Si wafer substrates, are investigated. For analysis, the following methods were used: x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), grazing incidence x-ray diffractometry (GIXRD), atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. After deposition, the films exhibited a homogenous amorphous structure with a variety of bonding states reaching from homonuclear silicon-like Si-Si bonds over mixed Si-Si-C bonds to heteronuclear Si-C bonds. Annealing at 1200 °C for 2 h leads to the crystallization of silicon and silicon carbide with grain diameters of several nanometers within the amorphous matrix, as evidenced by GIXRD and TEM. With XPS also a distinct change of the bonding states is detected. After 2 h of annealing, only Si-Si and Si-C bonds are detectable. After prolonged annealing at 1200 °C for 20 h, XPS shows only Si-C bonding states but no more Si-Si bonding. In addition, GIXRD verifies the absence of any polycrystalline silicon in the film. The microstructure of the film changed dramatically towards a jagged and porous structure. The vanishing of silicon during isothermal annealing is explained on base of in situ and ex situ TEM measurements, and a possible model for decomposition is suggested. - Highlights: • We investigated the thermal stability of thin films of amorphous Si{sub 2}C at 1200 °C. • Annealing led to a distinct change of bonding states and of the microstructure. • Two hours of annealing is accompanied with the formation of Si and SiC crystallites. • After 20 h of annealing, the Si decomposes and is transferred to interfaces. • The microstructure of the film changed dramatically.

  7. The boron-tailing myth in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stuckelberger, M.; Park, B.-S.; Bugnon, G.; Despeisse, M; Schüttauf, J.-W.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.

    2015-01-01

    The boron-tailing effect in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells describes the reduced charge collection specifically in the blue part of the spectrum for absorber layers deposited above a critical temperature. This effect limits the device performance of state-of-the art solar cells: For enhanced current density (reduced bandgap), the deposition temperature should be as high as possible, but boron tailing gets detrimental above 200°C. To investigate this limitation and to show...

  8. Magnetostriction Dependence of the Relaxation Frequency in the Magnetoimpedance Effect for Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Ribbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.L.Sánchez; V.M.Prida; B.Hernando; G.V.Kurlyandskaya; J.D.Santos; M.Tejedor; M.Vázquez

    2002-01-01

    The magnetoimpedance effect and changes of the relaxation frequency fx are studied in CoFeSiB and CoFeMoSiB amorphous and FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline ribbons. The evolution of the magnetostriction constant λs and relaxation frequency is analysed for the states with different magnetic anisotropies induced in the same ribbons.A monotonic decrease of the relaxation frequency is observed for shifting of λs towards positive values.

  9. RECENT PROGRESS OF THE AMORPHOUS SILICON SOLAR CELLS AND THEIR TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Hamakawa, Y.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given on the current state of the art in the field of amorphous silicon solar cells and key technology to improve cell performance. Remarkable advantages of this new material for low cost photovoltaic devices are pointed out, and discussed in view of both device physics and manufacturability. A new concept of the drift type photovoltaic effect in terms of the field dependent photocarrier generation process and carrier collection efficiency is introduced. Optimization of photovolta...

  10. Pressure-induced amorphization of antiferromagnetic FePO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, M. P.; Rozenberg, G. Kh.; Milner, A. P.; Amanowicz, M.; Brister, K. E.; Taylor, R. D.

    1998-03-01

    In this paper we describe for the first time an unusual phenomenon, occurring in FePO 4 ( TN=25 K), where pressure drives the crystalline low-pressure phase (I) into two, coexisting antiferromagnetic states; one amorphous designated as IIa, the other crystalline (IIb) with an enhanced coordination number. This is unlike the case of berlinite (AlPO 4), which completely amorphizes above 15 GPa. Measurements were carried out with Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) at CHESS, over the pressure range 0-30 GPa. XRD shows that the double transformation starts at ˜2 GPa reaching saturation at 7 GPa. MS, however, show that the FePO 4-I phase coexists to the highest pressure, indicating possible formation of clusters with sizes undetected by XRD. The abundance of the FePO 4 IIa and IIb phases are about equal. Both XRD and the new TN (=60 K) value obtained by MS, show that the FePO 4-IIa phase is isostructural to CrVO 4. No change is observed in the relative abundance of the three phases at P>7 GPa in which the I-phase constitutes about 10% of the total. The TN value of the FePO 4-II phases increases with increasing pressure, from 50 K at 2.5 GPa to 65 at 25 GPa. The pressure transitions at room temperature are not reversible; after pressure release to ambient value, the FePO 4-I is completely restored only after heat treatment in air at T=700°C.

  11. Study of irradiation-induced amorphization in intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation-induced amorphization was studied in situ in the high voltage electron microscope interfaced to a tandem accelerator. Variation of elastic properties during irradiation was studied with Brillouin scattering spectroscopy, and its relation to amorphization were explored. Four important topics were investigated. (1) The temperature dependence of the critical dose for amorphization and its correlation with chemical disordering were studied in CuTi and Zr3Al with 1-MeV electron irradiation from 10 to 295 K. Similar temperature dependence was observed in CuTi between the critical dose for amorphization and the chemical disordering rate. Chemical disordering is a major driving force for amorphization. The critical dose for amorphization of Zr3Al was twenty times larger than that of CuTi and attributed to the differences in point defect mobility and ordering energy. (2) Projectile mass dependence of amorphization behavior was studied in CuTi irradiated with Ne+,Kr+,Xe+ions. The dose dependence of the amorphous volume fraction indicated that with increasing mass from Ne+ to Kr+ amorphization kinetics changes from the cascade overlap to the direct-impact amorphization. In relation to the kinetics variation, the critical temperature increased with increasing projectile mass and explained in terms of the thermal stability of the primary damage. (3) Effects of simultaneous and sequential irradiation with Kr+ and electrons were studied in CuTi and Zr3Al. Both additive and retardation effects were observed depending on temperature and the electron-to-Kri dose rate ratio and explained as the interaction between point defects and cascade damages. (4) Study of elastic properties during Kr+ irradiation revealed that in FeTi, a large dilation and shear modulus softening accompanied with chemical disordering preceded amorphization, but not observed in NiAl

  12. Swift heavy ion-beam induced amorphization and recrystallization of yttrium iron garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Miro, Sandrine; Beuneu, François; Toulemonde, Marcel

    2015-12-01

    Pure and (Ca and Si)-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12 or YIG) epitaxial layers and amorphous films on gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd3Ga5O12, or GGG) single crystal substrates were irradiated by 50 MeV 32Si and 50 MeV (or 60 MeV) 63Cu ions for electronic stopping powers larger than the threshold value (~4 MeV μm-1) for amorphous track formation in YIG crystals. Conductivity data of crystalline samples in a broad ion fluence range (1011-1016 cm-2) are modeled with a set of rate equations corresponding to the amorphization and recrystallization induced in ion tracks by electronic excitations. The data for amorphous layers confirm that a recrystallization process takes place above ~1014 cm-2. Cross sections for both processes deduced from this analysis are discussed in comparison to previous determinations with reference to the inelastic thermal-spike model of track formation. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was also used to follow the related structural modifications. Raman spectra show the progressive vanishing and randomization of crystal phonon modes in relation to the ion-induced damage. For crystalline samples irradiated at high fluences (⩾1014 cm-2), only two prominent broad bands remain like for amorphous films, thereby reflecting the phonon density of states of the disordered solid, regardless of samples and irradiation conditions. The main band peaked at ~660 cm-1 is assigned to vibration modes of randomized bonds in tetrahedral (FeO4) units.

  13. In vitro characterization of a novel polymeric system for preparation of amorphous solid drug dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Zahra N; Upadhye, Sampada B; Ferrizzi, David; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R

    2014-07-01

    Preparation of amorphous solid dispersions using polymers is a commonly used formulation strategy for enhancing the solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs. However, often a single polymer may not bring about a significant enhancement in solubility or amorphous stability of a poorly water-soluble drug. This study describes application of a unique and novel binary polymeric blend in preparation of solid dispersions. The objective of this study was to investigate amorphous solid dispersions of glipizide, a BCS class II model drug, in a binary polymeric system of polyvinyl acetate phthalate (PVAP) and hypromellose (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, HPMC). The solid dispersions were prepared using two different solvent methods: rotary evaporation (rotavap) and fluid bed drug layering on sugar spheres. The performance and physical stability of the dispersions were evaluated with non-sink dissolution testing, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC). PXRD analysis demonstrated an amorphous state for glipizide, and mDSC showed no evidence of phase separation. Non-sink dissolution testing in pH 7.5 phosphate buffer indicated more than twofold increase in apparent solubility of the drug with PVAP-HPMC system. The glipizide solid dispersions demonstrated a high glass transition temperature (Tg) and acceptable chemical and physical stability during the stability period irrespective of the manufacturing process. In conclusion, the polymeric blend of PVAP-HPMC offers a unique formulation approach for developing amorphous solid dispersions with the flexibility towards the use of these polymers in different ratios and combined quantities depending on drug properties. PMID:24789531

  14. Swift heavy ion-beam induced amorphization and recrystallization of yttrium iron garnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Miro, Sandrine; Beuneu, François; Toulemonde, Marcel

    2015-12-16

    Pure and (Ca and Si)-substituted yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12 or YIG) epitaxial layers and amorphous films on gadolinium gallium garnet (Gd3Ga5O12, or GGG) single crystal substrates were irradiated by 50 MeV (32)Si and 50 MeV (or 60 MeV) (63)Cu ions for electronic stopping powers larger than the threshold value (~4 MeV μm(-1)) for amorphous track formation in YIG crystals. Conductivity data of crystalline samples in a broad ion fluence range (10(11)-10(16) cm(-2)) are modeled with a set of rate equations corresponding to the amorphization and recrystallization induced in ion tracks by electronic excitations. The data for amorphous layers confirm that a recrystallization process takes place above ~10(14) cm(-2). Cross sections for both processes deduced from this analysis are discussed in comparison to previous determinations with reference to the inelastic thermal-spike model of track formation. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was also used to follow the related structural modifications. Raman spectra show the progressive vanishing and randomization of crystal phonon modes in relation to the ion-induced damage. For crystalline samples irradiated at high fluences (⩾10(14) cm(-2)), only two prominent broad bands remain like for amorphous films, thereby reflecting the phonon density of states of the disordered solid, regardless of samples and irradiation conditions. The main band peaked at ~660 cm(-1) is assigned to vibration modes of randomized bonds in tetrahedral (FeO4) units. PMID:26580459

  15. Structural morphology of amorphous conducting carbon film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Vishwakarma; V Prasad; S V Subramanyam; V Ganesan

    2005-10-01

    Amorphous conducting carbon films deposited over quartz substrates were analysed using X-ray diffraction and AFM technique. X-ray diffraction data reveal disorder and roughness in the plane of graphene sheet as compared to that of graphite. This roughness increases with decrease in preparation temperature. The AFM data shows surface roughness of carbon films depending on preparation temperatures. The surface roughness increases with decrease in preparation temperature. Also some nucleating islands were seen on the samples prepared at 900°C, which are not present on the films prepared at 700°C. Detailed analysis of these islands reveals distorted graphitic lattice arrangement. So we believe these islands to be nucleating graphitic. Power spectrum density (PSD) analysis of the carbon surface indicates a transition from the nonlinear growth mode to linear surface-diffusion dominated growth mode resulting in a relatively smoother surface as one moves from low preparation temperature to high preparation temperature. The amorphous carbon films deposited over a rough quartz substrate reveal nucleating diamond like structures. The density of these nucleating diamond like structures was found to be independent of substrate temperature (700–900°C).

  16. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time. PMID:26924339

  17. Effect of Viscosity on the Microformability of Bulk Amorphous Alloy in Supercooled Liquid Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously published results have shown that viscosity greatly influences on the deformation behavior of the bulk amorphous alloy in supercooled liquid region during microforming process. And viscosity is proved to be a component of the evaluation index which indicating microformability. Based on the fluid flow theory and assumptions, bulk amorphous alloy can be regarded as the viscous materials with a certain viscosity. It is helpful to understand how the viscosity plays an important role in viscous materials with various viscosities by numerical simulation on the process. Analysis is carried out by linear state equation in FEM with other three materials, water, lubricant oil and polymer melt, whose viscosities are different obviously. The depths of the materials flow into the U-shaped groove during the microimprinting process are compared in this paper. The result shows that the deformation is quite different when surface tension effect is not considered in the case. With the lowest viscosity, water can reach the bottom of micro groove in a very short time. Lubricant oil and polymer melt slower than it. Moreover bulk amorphous alloys in supercooled liquid state just flow into the groove slightly. Among the alloys of different systems including Pd-, Mg- and Zr-based alloy, Pd-based alloy ranks largest in the depth. Mg-based alloy is the second. And Zr-based alloy is the third. Further more the rank order of the viscosities of the alloys is Pd-, Mg- and Zr-based. It agrees well with the results of calculation. Therefore viscosity plays an important role in the microforming of the bulk amorphous alloy in the supercooled liquid state.

  18. Low temperature irradiation of FeB amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These experiments show that low temperature electron irradiation induce localized defects in the short range order of the amorphous structure. These defects are assumed to be of Frenkel pair type. At low temperature, 2.5 MeV electron irradiation induces an higher concentration of defects in the amorphous than in its crystallized counterpart

  19. Generation of correlated photons in hydrogenated amorphous-silicon waveguides

    OpenAIRE

    Clemmen, S.; Perret, A; Selvaraja, Shankar Kumar; Bogaerts, Wim; Van Thourhout, Dries; Baets, Roel; Emplit, Ph.; Massar, S.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first (to our knowledge) observation of correlated photon emission in hydrogenated amorphous- silicon waveguides. We compare this to photon generation in crystalline silicon waveguides with the same geome- try. In particular, we show that amorphous silicon has a higher nonlinearity and competes with crystalline silicon in spite of higher loss.

  20. Endurance Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.; Sugimura, Russell S.

    1989-01-01

    Failure mechanisms in high-power service studied. Report discusses factors affecting endurance of amorphous-silicon solar cells. Based on field tests and accelerated aging of photovoltaic modules. Concludes that aggressive research needed if amorphous-silicon modules to attain 10-year life - value U.S. Department of Energy established as goal for photovoltaic modules in commercial energy-generating plants.

  1. Magnetic Properties of Nanometer-sized Crystalline and Amorphous Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Bødker, Franz; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Jiang, Jianzhong

    Amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloy particles can be prepared by chemical preparation techniques. We discuss the preparation of transition metal-boron and iron-carbon particles and their magnetic properties. Nanometer-sized particles of both crystalline and amorphous magnetic materials are...

  2. Modeling SiC swelling under irradiation: Influence of amorphization

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, A; Defranceschi, M; Yip, S

    2003-01-01

    Irradiation-induced swelling of SiC is investigated using a molecular dynamics simulation-based methodology. To mimic the effect of heavy ion irradiation extended amorphous areas of various sizes are introduced in a crystalline SiC sample, and the resulting configurations are relaxed using molecular dynamics at constant pressure. Simulation results compare very well with data from existing ion implantation experiments. Analysis of the relaxed configurations shows very clearly that SiC swelling does not scale linearly with the amorphous fraction introduced. Two swelling regimes are observed depending on the size of the initial amorphous area: for small amorphous zones swelling scales like the amorphous fraction to the power 2/3, while for larger areas it scales like the amorphous fraction to the powers 2/3 and 4/3. Similar dependences on the amorphous fraction are obtained for the number of homonuclear bonds present in the initial amorphous volume and for the number of short bonds created at the interface betw...

  3. SUSCEPTIBILITIES, CORRELATION FUNCTIONS AND NEUTRON SCATTERING LAW IN AMORPHOUS MAGNETS

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, K

    1988-01-01

    We calculated the static and dynamic susceptibilities χ (Q) and χ (Q, ω), the neutron scattering cross-section S (Q), and the scattering law S (Q, ω) for amorphous magnets with small random anisotropy. These results agree fairly well with those of a recent neutron-spin echo experiment on amorphous TbNi2.

  4. Invar behavior of NANOPERM-type amorphous Fe–(Pt)–Zr–Nb–Cu–B alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondro, J.; Świerczek, J., E-mail: swiercz@wip.pcz.pl; Rzącki, J.; Ciurzyńska, W.; Olszewski, J.; Zbroszczyk, J.; Błoch, K.; Osyra, M.; Łukiewska, A.

    2013-09-15

    Transmission Mössbauer spectra of amorphous Fe{sub 86}Zr{sub 7}Nb{sub 1}Cu{sub 1}B{sub 5}, Fe{sub 81}Zr{sub 7}Nb{sub 1}Cu{sub 1}B{sub 10} and Fe{sub 81}Pt{sub 5}Zr{sub 7}Nb{sub 1}Cu{sub 1}B{sub 5} alloys in the as-quenched state and subjected to the accumulative annealing for 15 min in the temperature range from 573 K up to 750 K are presented. After these heat treatments the alloys remain in the amorphous state. The accumulative annealing for 15 min at 573 K and then 600 K of the Fe{sub 86}Zr{sub 7}Nb{sub 1}Cu{sub 1}B{sub 5} and Fe{sub 81}Zr{sub 7}Nb{sub 1}Cu{sub 1}B{sub 10} alloys causes the narrowing of the transmission Mössbauer spectra as compared to the as-quenched state and the decrease of the average hyperfine field induction which is connected with the invar effect. For similar behavior in Fe{sub 81}Pt{sub 5}Zr{sub 7}Nb{sub 1}Cu{sub 1}B{sub 5} alloy the accumulative annealing up to 700 K is needed. With further increase of the annealing temperature up to 750 K the broadening of the Mössbauer spectra and the increase of the average hyperfine field induction occur. The lowest value of the average hyperfine field induction of amorphous samples is accompanied by the lowest value of the Curie temperature. The investigated amorphous alloys do not reach the magnetic saturation up to the magnetizing field of 2 T and the coefficient in Holstein–Primakoff term is about one order in magnitude larger than in other classical FeCo-based amorphous alloys due to the non-collinear magnetic structure. The Mössbauer spectra and hysteresis loops of the amorphous Fe{sub 86}Zr{sub 7}Nb{sub 1}Cu{sub 1}B{sub 5} alloy in the as-quenched state and after the accumulative annealing at 573+620 K for 15 min are sensitive to the tensile stresses subjected to the sample. Such behavior is ascribed to the invar anomalies. - Highlights: • Complex magnetic transformations found in the amorphous Fe{sub 86}Zr{sub 7}Nb{sub 1}Cu{sub 1}B{sub 5}, Fe{sub 81}Zr{sub 7}Nb{sub 1}Cu{sub 1}B

  5. Atomistic simulation of damage accumulation and amorphization in Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Selles, Jose L., E-mail: joseluis.gomezselles@imdea.org; Martin-Bragado, Ignacio [IMDEA Materials Institute, Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Claverie, Alain [CEMES/CNRS, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Sklenard, Benoit [CEA, LETI, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Benistant, Francis [GLOBALFOUNDRIES Singapore Pte Ltd., 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2015-02-07

    Damage accumulation and amorphization mechanisms by means of ion implantation in Ge are studied using Kinetic Monte Carlo and Binary Collision Approximation techniques. Such mechanisms are investigated through different stages of damage accumulation taking place in the implantation process: from point defect generation and cluster formation up to full amorphization of Ge layers. We propose a damage concentration amorphization threshold for Ge of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup −3} which is independent on the implantation conditions. Recombination energy barriers depending on amorphous pocket sizes are provided. This leads to an explanation of the reported distinct behavior of the damage generated by different ions. We have also observed that the dissolution of clusters plays an important role for relatively high temperatures and fluences. The model is able to explain and predict different damage generation regimes, amount of generated damage, and extension of amorphous layers in Ge for different ions and implantation conditions.

  6. Atomistic simulation of damage accumulation and amorphization in Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damage accumulation and amorphization mechanisms by means of ion implantation in Ge are studied using Kinetic Monte Carlo and Binary Collision Approximation techniques. Such mechanisms are investigated through different stages of damage accumulation taking place in the implantation process: from point defect generation and cluster formation up to full amorphization of Ge layers. We propose a damage concentration amorphization threshold for Ge of ∼1.3 × 1022 cm−3 which is independent on the implantation conditions. Recombination energy barriers depending on amorphous pocket sizes are provided. This leads to an explanation of the reported distinct behavior of the damage generated by different ions. We have also observed that the dissolution of clusters plays an important role for relatively high temperatures and fluences. The model is able to explain and predict different damage generation regimes, amount of generated damage, and extension of amorphous layers in Ge for different ions and implantation conditions

  7. Synthesis of amorphous TiO{sub 2} modified ZnO nanorod film with enhanced photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Shanshan; Zhao, Lei; Leng, Xuning; Lang, Xingyou; Lian, Jianshe, E-mail: lianjs@jlu.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis of amorphous TiO{sub 2} modified ZnO nanorod films. • A thin layer of amorphous TiO{sub 2} was dispersed over the surface of nanorod. • Disordered TiO{sub 2} phase improved the optical absorption. • The samples showed enhanced photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Amorphous TiO{sub 2} modified ZnO nanorod films were synthesized via multi-step processes: ZnO nanorod films were prepared by a wet chemical method. Amorphous TiO{sub 2} was then anchored on the tops and sides of the nanorods through immersion in tetrabutyltitanate solution for hydrolysis. The as-prepared samples were characterized for the phase structure, chemical state and surface morphology as well as optical absorption using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectrophotometer. The results showed that the nanorod films were covered by amorphous TiO{sub 2} layers, and their visible light absorption ability was strengthened. The photocatalytic studies revealed that TiO{sub 2} modified films exhibited enhanced photocatalytic efficiency for decomposition of methyl orange under ultraviolet–visible excitation, which might be attributed to the increased UV–vis light absorption and the separation of the charge carrier and prolonged electron lifetime due to the interface between TiO{sub 2} and ZnO.

  8. Synthesis of amorphous TiO2 modified ZnO nanorod film with enhanced photocatalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Synthesis of amorphous TiO2 modified ZnO nanorod films. • A thin layer of amorphous TiO2 was dispersed over the surface of nanorod. • Disordered TiO2 phase improved the optical absorption. • The samples showed enhanced photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Amorphous TiO2 modified ZnO nanorod films were synthesized via multi-step processes: ZnO nanorod films were prepared by a wet chemical method. Amorphous TiO2 was then anchored on the tops and sides of the nanorods through immersion in tetrabutyltitanate solution for hydrolysis. The as-prepared samples were characterized for the phase structure, chemical state and surface morphology as well as optical absorption using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectrophotometer. The results showed that the nanorod films were covered by amorphous TiO2 layers, and their visible light absorption ability was strengthened. The photocatalytic studies revealed that TiO2 modified films exhibited enhanced photocatalytic efficiency for decomposition of methyl orange under ultraviolet–visible excitation, which might be attributed to the increased UV–vis light absorption and the separation of the charge carrier and prolonged electron lifetime due to the interface between TiO2 and ZnO

  9. The influence of co-formers on the dissolution rates of co-amorphous sulfamerazine/excipient systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gniado, Katarzyna; Löbmann, Korbinian; Rades, Thomas; Erxleben, Andrea

    2016-05-17

    A comprehensive study on the dissolution properties of three co-amorphous sulfamerazine/excipient systems, namely sulfamerazine/deoxycholic acid, sulfamerazine/citric acid and sulfamerazine/sodium taurocholate (SMZ/DA, SMZ/CA and SMZ/NaTC; 1:1 molar ratio), is reported. While all three co-formers stabilize the amorphous state during storage, only co-amorphization with NaTC provides a dissolution advantage over crystalline SMZ and the reasons for this were analyzed. In the case of SMZ/DA extensive gelation of DA protects the amorphous phase from crystallization upon contact with buffer, but at the same time prevents the release of SMZ into solution. Disk dissolution studies showed an improved dissolution behavior of SMZ/CA compared to crystalline SMZ. However, enhanced dissolution properties were not seen in powder dissolution testing due to poor dispersibility. Co-amorphization of SMZ and NaTC resulted in a significant increase in dissolution rate, both in powder and disk dissolution studies. PMID:26992818

  10. Study on effects of carbon impurities and oxygen vacancies in amorphous alumina phosphor prepared via a solution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amorphous alumina phosphors without containing expensive or toxic elements were prepared via a solution method. The obtained sample indicates bluish-white emission centered at 390–430 nm by UV excitation. According to the measurement results of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and organic microanalysis, it is found that the carbon impurities exist in the sample and they are essential for luminescence. On the other hand, 27Al NMR measurements indicate the presence of Al of 5-coordination. Moreover, there is good correspondence among the excitation spectra of the emission samples, the experimental optical properties of amorphous alumina, and the calculated oxygen vacancies levels in amorphous alumina model. Therefore, the new luminescence mechanism can be proposed as follows; the electrons in valence band are excited to oxygen vacancies bands by UV light and return to ground state through the carbon impurities band, being accompanied by the bluish-white emission. - Highlights: • The amorphous alumina prepared via solution method shows bluish-white emission. • According to the ESR results, carbon impurities are necessary for luminescence. • FT-IR, NMR and UV–vis measurements of the samples were conducted. • Our results indicated that oxygen vacancies play an important role. • We proposed the new luminescence mechanism for amorphous alumina phosphor

  11. Identification of open-volume defects in disordered and amorphized Si: A depth-resolved positron annihilation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depth-resolved positron beam studies have been carried out on Ar-irradiated Si using Doppler S parameter and lifetime measurements. Si samples have been irradiated with 140-keV Ar ions to a dose of 2x1013 and 5x1016 Ar/cm2, respectively, so as to produce disordered and amorphous states in near-surface regions. The observed features of the defect sensitive line shape S parameter indicate the presence of small vacancylike defects in the disordered sample and higher-order vacancy clusters in an amorphous sample. Pulsed positron beam lifetime results indicate that the disordered Si sample exhibits lifetime distribution ascribable to mostly divacancies. In the case of an amorphous sample, the lifetime distribution is broad with larger lifetime values indicating the presence of a distribution of large vacancy clusters or nanovoids. By using theoretical lifetime values for Si reported in the literature, an empirical fit to the lifetime variation as a function of vacancy cluster size is obtained. By comparing the experimental lifetime distribution with this data, the vacancy cluster size distribution in disordered and amorphous Si is deduced. In disordered Si, divacancies are found to be the dominant defects species followed by small concentration of V3. In amorphous Si, nanovoids in the size range of four to seven vacancy clusters are present with V5 and V6 clusters being the dominant defect species. The implication of these results is discussed in light of recent computer-simulation studies

  12. Study on effects of carbon impurities and oxygen vacancies in amorphous alumina phosphor prepared via a solution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakui, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Kanako [Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Shan, Yue Jin, E-mail: shan@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Tezuka, Keitaro; Imoto, Hideo [Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Hosokawa, Shogo; Shinozaki, Norifumi [Tatsumori Ltd., 50 Minami-Kawada, Kami-Yukiai, Tamura-cho, Koriyama-shi, Fukushima 963-0724 (Japan); Ando, Mariko; Maekawa, Hideki [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-04 Aramaki Aoba, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    The amorphous alumina phosphors without containing expensive or toxic elements were prepared via a solution method. The obtained sample indicates bluish-white emission centered at 390–430 nm by UV excitation. According to the measurement results of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and organic microanalysis, it is found that the carbon impurities exist in the sample and they are essential for luminescence. On the other hand, {sup 27}Al NMR measurements indicate the presence of Al of 5-coordination. Moreover, there is good correspondence among the excitation spectra of the emission samples, the experimental optical properties of amorphous alumina, and the calculated oxygen vacancies levels in amorphous alumina model. Therefore, the new luminescence mechanism can be proposed as follows; the electrons in valence band are excited to oxygen vacancies bands by UV light and return to ground state through the carbon impurities band, being accompanied by the bluish-white emission. - Highlights: • The amorphous alumina prepared via solution method shows bluish-white emission. • According to the ESR results, carbon impurities are necessary for luminescence. • FT-IR, NMR and UV–vis measurements of the samples were conducted. • Our results indicated that oxygen vacancies play an important role. • We proposed the new luminescence mechanism for amorphous alumina phosphor.

  13. Charge transport in amorphous organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukyanov, Alexander

    2011-03-15

    Organic semiconductors with the unique combination of electronic and mechanical properties may offer cost-effective ways of realizing many electronic applications, e. g. large-area flexible displays, printed integrated circuits and plastic solar cells. In order to facilitate the rational compound design of organic semiconductors, it is essential to understand relevant physical properties e. g. charge transport. This, however, is not straightforward, since physical models operating on different time and length scales need to be combined. First, the material morphology has to be known at an atomistic scale. For this atomistic molecular dynamics simulations can be employed, provided that an atomistic force field is available. Otherwise it has to be developed based on the existing force fields and first principle calculations. However, atomistic simulations are typically limited to the nanometer length- and nanosecond time-scales. To overcome these limitations, systematic coarse-graining techniques can be used. In the first part of this thesis, it is demonstrated how a force field can be parameterized for a typical organic molecule. Then different coarse-graining approaches are introduced together with the analysis of their advantages and problems. When atomistic morphology is available, charge transport can be studied by combining the high-temperature Marcus theory with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The approach is applied to the hole transport in amorphous films of tris(8- hydroxyquinoline)aluminium (Alq{sub 3}). First the influence of the force field parameters and the corresponding morphological changes on charge transport is studied. It is shown that the energetic disorder plays an important role for amorphous Alq{sub 3}, defining charge carrier dynamics. Its spatial correlations govern the Poole-Frenkel behavior of the charge carrier mobility. It is found that hole transport is dispersive for system sizes accessible to simulations, meaning that calculated

  14. Carrier transport in amorphous silicon utilizing picosecond photoconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A. M.

    1981-08-01

    The development of a high-speed electronic measurement capability permitted the direct observation of the transient photoresponse of amorphous silicon (a-Si) with a time resolution of approximately 10ps. This technique was used to measure the initial mobility of photogenerated (2.1eV) free carriers in three types of a-Si having widely different densities of structural defects (i.e., as prepared by: (1) RF glow discharge (a-Si:H); (2) chemical vapor deposition; and (3) evaporation in ultra-high vacuum). In all three types of a-Si, the same initial mobility of approximately 1 cu cm/Vs at room temperature was found. This result tends to confirm the often-made suggestion that the free carrier mobility is determined by the influence of shallow states associated with the disorder in the random atomic network, and is an intrinsic property of a-Si which is unaffected by the method of preparation. The rate of decay of the photocurrent correlates with the density of structural defects and varies from 4ps to 200ps for the three types of a-Si investigated. The initial mobility of a-Si:H was found to be thermally activated. The possible application of extended state transport controlled by multiple trapping and small polaron formation is discussed.

  15. Imaging of Crystalline and Amorphous Surface Regions Using Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS): Application to Pharmaceutical Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuraş, Andreea; Scurr, David J; Boissier, Catherine; Nicholas, Mark L; Roberts, Clive J; Alexander, Morgan R

    2016-04-01

    The structure of a material, in particular the extremes of crystalline and amorphous forms, significantly impacts material performance in numerous sectors such as semiconductors, energy storage, and pharmaceutical products, which are investigated in this paper. To characterize the spatial distribution for crystalline-amorphous forms at the uppermost molecular surface layer, we performed time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) measurements for quench-cooled amorphous and recrystallized samples of the drugs indomethacin, felodipine, and acetaminophen. Polarized light microscopy was used to localize crystallinity induced in the samples under controlled conditions. Principal component analysis was used to identify the subtle changes in the ToF-SIMS spectra indicative of the amorphous and crystalline forms for each drug. The indicators of amorphous and crystalline surfaces were common in type across the three drugs, and could be explained in general terms of crystal packing and intermolecular bonding, leading to intramolecular bond scission in the formation of secondary ions. Less intramolecular scission occurred in the amorphous form, resulting in a greater intensity of molecular and dimer secondary ions. To test the generality of amorphous-crystalline differentiation using ToF-SIMS, a different recrystallization method was investigated where acetaminophen single crystals were recrystallized from supersaturated solutions. The findings indicated that the ability to assign the crystalline/amorphous state of the sample using ToF-SIMS was insensitive to the recrystallization method. This demonstrates that ToF-SIMS is capable of detecting and mapping ordered crystalline and disordered amorphous molecular materials forms at micron spatial resolution in the uppermost surface of a material. PMID:26916467

  16. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Liquid and Amorphous Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popel, Pjotr; Gelchinskii, Boris; Sidorov, Valeriy; Son, Leonid; Sabirzjanov, Alexandre

    2007-06-01

    The state of the art in the field of liquid and amorphous metals and alloys is regularly updated through two series of complementary international conferences, the LAM (Liquid and Amorphous Metals) and the RQ (Rapidly Quenched Materials). The first series of the conferences started as LM-1 in 1966 at Brookhaven for the basic understanding of liquid metals. The subsequent LM conferences were held in Tokyo (1972) and Bristol (1976). The conference was renewed in Grenoble (1980) as a LAM conference including amorphous metals and continued in Los Angeles (1983), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (1986), Kyoto (1989), Vienna (1992), Chicago (1995), Dortmund (1998), Yokohama (2001) and Metz (2004). The conferences are mainly devoted to liquid and amorphous metals and alloys. However, communications on some non-metallic systems such as semi conductors, quasicrystals etc, were accepted as well. The conference tradition strongly encourages the participation of junior researchers and graduate students. The 13th conference of the LAM series was organized in Ekaterinburg, Russia, by the Institute of Metallurgy of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IMet UB RAS) and Ural State Pedagogical University (USPU) and held on 8-13 July 2007 under the chairmanship of Professors Pjotr Popel (USPU) and Boris Gelchinskii (IMet UB RAS). There were 242 active and about 60 guest participants from 20 countries who attended the conference. There were no parallel sessions and all oral reports were separated into three groups: invited talks (40 min), full-scale (25 min) and brief (15 min) oral reports. The program included 10 sessions, ranging from purely theoretical subjects to technological application of molten and amorphous alloys. The following sessions took place: A) Electronic structure and transport, magnetic properties; B) Phase transitions; C) Structure; D) Atomic dynamics and transport; E) Thermodynamics; F) Modelling, simulation; G) Surface and interface; H) Mechanical properties

  17. Effect of doping on electronic structure and photocatalytic behavior of amorphous TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghuman, Kulbir Kaur; Veer Singh, Chandra

    2013-11-01

    Visible light photocatalysts based on doped crystalline forms of titanium dioxide (TiO2) have attracted significant scientific attention in recent decades. Amorphous TiO2, despite many merits over crystalline phases, has not been studied as thoroughly. In this paper, an in-depth analysis of the electronic properties of doped amorphous TiO2 is performed using density functional theory with Hubbard’s energy correction (DFT + U). Monodoping with p-type (N) and n-type (Nb) dopants shows appreciable bandgap reduction, but leads to recombination centers due to the presence of uncompensated charges. To resolve this issue, charge compensation via codoping is attempted. The charge compensated codoping not only reduces the bandgap by 0.4 eV but also eliminates the bandgap states present in monodoped systems responsible for charge carrier recombination. Furthermore, the localized tail states present in the aTiO2 system are eliminated to a large extent which leads to a decrease in the charge recombination and an increase in the charge migration. Thus, appropriate doping of amorphous TiO2 may lead to an alternative route for the development of visible light photocatalysts.

  18. 57Fe NMR study of amorphous and rapidly quenched crystalline Fe-B alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokatilov, V. S.

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous and crystalline Fe-B alloys (5-25 at % B) were studied using pulsed 57Fe nuclear magneticr esonance at 4.2 K. The alloy samples were prepared from a mixture of the 57Fe and 10B isotopes by rapid quenching from the melt. In the microcrystalline Fe-(5-12 at %) B alloys, the resonance frequencies were measured for local states of 57Fe nuclei in the tetragonal and orthorhombic Fe3B phases and also in α-Fe. The resonance frequencies characteristic of 57Fe nuclei in α-Fe crystallites with substitutional impurity boron atoms in the nearest neighborhood were also revealed. In the resonance frequency distribution P( f) in the amorphous Fe-(18-25) at % B alloys, there are frequencies corresponding to local Fe atom states with short-range order of the tetragonal and orthorhombic Fe3B phases. As the boron content decreases below 18 at %, the P( f) distributions are shifted to higher frequencies corresponding to 57Fe NMR for atoms exhibiting a short-range order of the α-Fe type. The local magnetic structure of the amorphous Fe-B alloys is also considered.

  19. Spray-dried amorphous isomalt and melibiose, two potential protein-stabilizing excipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiäinen, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Marikki; Räikkönen, Heikki; Juppo, Anne

    2016-08-20

    The possibility of producing amorphous isomalt and melibiose by spray drying was studied. The impact of process parameters on yield and solid-state stability was compared to sucrose and trehalose. All powders remained amorphous during 2-3 weeks. Processing was challenging due to powder stickiness. Low-temperature and low-humidity drying processes generally performed best. Most isomalt and sucrose powder was retrieved when using 60°C inlet temperature, 800L/h atomizing rate, 1.4ml/min feed rate, 15% concentration and 100% aspirator rate, giving 42-43°C outlet temperature. Isomalt was the most problematic, because it had the lowest Tg and became sticky very easily, therefore process parameters needed to be precisely balanced. There was more freedom in designing processes for melibiose but best yields were obtained with low-temperature (50°C inlet temperature, 800L/h atomizing rate, 4.9ml/min feed rate, 10% concentration and 100% aspirator, 39°C outlet temperature). Trehalose was different in that higher temperatures resulted in better yields. Yet, trehalose generally contained the highest moisture contents. The possibility to produce amorphous isomalt and melibiose at low-temperature process conditions makes them promising considering spray drying applications for heat-sensitive proteins. Melibiose is a better candidate than isomalt because of easier processability and superior solid-state stability. PMID:27321131

  20. The influence of post-deposition annealing upon amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikolášek, Miroslav, E-mail: miroslav.mikolasek@stuba.sk [Slovak University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Nemec, Michal; Kováč, Jaroslav [Slovak University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Foti, Marina; Gerardi, Cosimo [IMS-R and D, STMicroelectronics, Stradale Primosole, 50, 95121 Catania (Italy); Mannino, Giovanni; Valenti, Luca; Lombardo, Salvatore [CNR-IMM, Zona Industriale, Ottava Strada, 5, 95121 Catania (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We studied the impact of the thermal annealing on the silicon heterojunction solar cells. • Compared were samples deposited by ICP-CVD and PE-CVD methods. • Annealing up to 250 °C improves output performance of both solar cells. • Annealing above 250 °C increases defect states density at the interface and in the amorphous emitter. • Samples deposited by ICP-CVD shows better resistance against annealing. - Abstract: This paper presents a comparative study of the influence of post-deposition annealing on amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells deposited by ICP-CVD and PE-CVD techniques. Two major effects on the solar cell efficiency occur caused by thermal annealing. The first effect is a slight improvement of the performance on annealing up to 250 °C. The second effect, for annealing temperatures above 250 °C, reveals deterioration of the solar cell performance. It is suggested that both effects are related to thermally activated diffusion of hydrogen. For low annealing temperatures, diffusion of weakly bonded hydrogen allows to passivate the defects in the amorphous emitter and at the heterointerface. In the high temperature annealing region, outdiffusion of hydrogen is assumed to be responsible for an increase of defect states in the structures. The results indicate a better stability after high temperature treatment for the sample prepared by ICP-CVD technology.

  1. Amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microchannel plates (MCP) based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) were recently introduced to overcome some of the limitations of crystalline silicon and glass MCP. The typical thickness of a-Si:H based MCPs (AMCP) ranges between 80 and 100 μm and the micromachining of the channels is realized by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). Advantages and issues regarding the fabrication process are presented and discussed. Electron amplification is demonstrated and analyzed using Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) technique. The gain increases as a function of the bias voltage, limited to −340 V on account of high leakage currents across the structure. EBIC maps on 10° tilted samples confirm that the device active area extend to the entire channel opening. AMCP characterization with the electron beam shows gain saturation and signal quenching which depends on the effectiveness of the charge replenishment in the channel walls.

  2. Amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.franco@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and thin-film electronics laboratory, Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Riesen, Yannick; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Dunand, Sylvain [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and thin-film electronics laboratory, Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Powolny, Francois; Jarron, Pierre [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ballif, Christophe [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and thin-film electronics laboratory, Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2012-12-11

    Microchannel plates (MCP) based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) were recently introduced to overcome some of the limitations of crystalline silicon and glass MCP. The typical thickness of a-Si:H based MCPs (AMCP) ranges between 80 and 100 {mu}m and the micromachining of the channels is realized by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). Advantages and issues regarding the fabrication process are presented and discussed. Electron amplification is demonstrated and analyzed using Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) technique. The gain increases as a function of the bias voltage, limited to -340 V on account of high leakage currents across the structure. EBIC maps on 10 Degree-Sign tilted samples confirm that the device active area extend to the entire channel opening. AMCP characterization with the electron beam shows gain saturation and signal quenching which depends on the effectiveness of the charge replenishment in the channel walls.

  3. Spray drying formulation of amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2016-05-01

    Spray drying is a well-established manufacturing technique which can be used to formulate amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) which is an effective strategy to deliver poorly water soluble drugs (PWSDs). However, the inherently complex nature of the spray drying process coupled with specific characteristics of ASDs makes it an interesting area to explore. Numerous diverse factors interact in an inter-dependent manner to determine the final product properties. This review discusses the basic background of ASDs, various formulation and process variables influencing the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the ASDs and aspects of downstream processing. Also various aspects of spray drying such as instrumentation, thermodynamics, drying kinetics, particle formation process and scale-up challenges are included. Recent advances in the spray-based drying techniques are mentioned along with some future avenues where major research thrust is needed. PMID:26705850

  4. A tissue-inspired amorphous photonic metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Bi, Dapeng

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by how cells pack in dense biological tissues, we design an amorphous material which possesses a complete photonic band gap. A physical parameter inspired by how cells adhere with one another and regulate their shapes can continuously tune the photonic band gap size as well as the bulk mechanical property of the material. The material can be further tuned to undergo a solid-fluid phase transition during which the shear modulus vanishes yet the photonic band gap persists, hence giving rise to a photonic fluid that is robust to flow and rearrangements. Experimentally this design should lead to the engineering of self-assembled non-rigid photonic structures with photonic band gaps that can be controlled in real time.

  5. Three-Terminal Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hung Tai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many defects exist within amorphous silicon since it is not crystalline. This provides recombination centers, thus reducing the efficiency of a typical a-Si solar cell. A new structure is presented in this paper: a three-terminal a-Si solar cell. The new back-to-back p-i-n/n-i-p structure increased the average electric field in a solar cell. A typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was also simulated for comparison using the same thickness and material parameters. The 0.28 μm-thick three-terminal a-Si solar cell achieved an efficiency of 11.4%, while the efficiency of a typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was 9.0%. Furthermore, an efficiency of 11.7% was achieved by thickness optimization of the three-terminal solar cell.

  6. ENHANCING ADHESION OF TETRAHEDRAL AMORPHOUS CARBON FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Yuqing; Lin Yi; Wang Xiaoyan; Wang Yanwu; Wei Xinyu

    2005-01-01

    Objective The high energy ion bombardment technique is applied to enhancing the adhesion of the tetrahedral amorphous carbon (TAC) films deposited by the filtered cathode vacuum arc (FCVA). Methods The abrasion method, scratch method, heating and shaking method as well as boiling salt solution method is used to test the adhesion of the TAC films on various material substrates. Results The test results show that the adhesion is increased as the ion bombardment energy increases. However, if the bombardment energy were over the corresponding optimum value, the adhesion would be enhanced very slowly for the harder material substrates and drops quickly, for the softer ones. Conclusion The optimum values of the ion bombardment energy are larger for the harder materials than that for the softer ones.

  7. Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriver, Maria; Regan, Will; Loster, Matthias; Zettl, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Taking advantage of the ability to fabricate large area graphene and carbon nanotube networks (buckypaper), we produce Schottky junction solar cells using undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and nanostructured carbon films. These films are useful as solar cell materials due their combination of optical transparency and conductance. In our cells, they behave both as a transparent conductor and as an active charge separating layer. We demonstrate a reliable photovoltaic effect in these devices with a high open circuit voltage of 390mV in buckypaper devices. We investigate the unique interface properties which result in an unusual J-V curve shape and optimize fabrication processes for improved solar conversion efficiency. These devices hold promise as a scalable solar cell made from earth abundant materials and without toxic and expensive doping processes.

  8. Short range atomic migration in amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauß, F.; Jerliu, B.; Geue, T.; Stahn, J.; Schmidt, H.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments on self-diffusion in amorphous silicon between 400 and 500 °C are presented, which were carried out by neutron reflectometry in combination with 29Si/natSi isotope multilayers. Short range diffusion is detected on a length scale of about 2 nm, while long range diffusion is absent. Diffusivities are in the order of 10-19-10-20 m2/s and decrease with increasing annealing time, reaching an undetectable low value for long annealing times. This behavior is strongly correlated to structural relaxation and can be explained as a result of point defect annihilation. Diffusivities for short annealing times of 60 s follow the Arrhenius law with an activation enthalpy of (0.74 ± 0.21) eV, which is interpreted as the activation enthalpy of Si migration.

  9. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold. PMID:23876200

  10. Nickel-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J A; Arce, R D; Buitrago, R H [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, S3000GLN Santa Fe (Argentina); Budini, N; Rinaldi, P, E-mail: jschmidt@intec.unl.edu.a [FIQ - UNL, Santiago del Estero 2829, S3000AOM Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2009-05-01

    The nickel-induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is used to obtain large grained polycrystalline silicon thin films on glass substrates. a-Si:H is deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition at 200 deg. C, preparing intrinsic and slightly p-doped samples. Each sample was divided in several pieces, over which increasing Ni concentrations were sputtered. Two crystallization methods are compared, conventional furnace annealing (CFA) and rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The crystallization was followed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations, X-ray diffraction, and reflectance measurements in the UV region. The large grain sizes obtained - larger than 100{mu}m for the samples crystallized by CFA - are very encouraging for the preparation of low-cost thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells.

  11. Amorphous Silicon Display Backplanes on Plastic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striakhilev, Denis; Nathan, Arokia; Vygranenko, Yuri; Servati, Peyman; Lee, Czang-Ho; Sazonov, Andrei

    2006-12-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) backplanes are very promising for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays (AMOLEDs) on plastic. The technology benefits from a large manufacturing base, simple fabrication process, and low production cost. The concern lies in the instability of the TFTs threshold voltage (VT) and its low device mobility. Although VT-instability can be compensated by means of advanced multi-transistor pixel circuits, the lifetime of the display is still dependent on the TFT process quality and bias conditions. A-Si TFTs with field-effect mobility of 1.1 cm2/V · s and pixel driver circuits have been fabricated on plastic substrates at 150 °C. The circuits are characterized in terms of current drive capability and long-term stability of operation. The results demonstrate sufficient and stable current delivery and the ability of the backplane on plastic to meet AMOLED requirements.

  12. Chemical vapour deposition of amorphous Ru(P) thin films from Ru trialkylphosphite hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, W Jeffrey; Yang, Xiaoping; DePue Anderson, Lauren J; Jones, Richard A

    2012-11-21

    The ruthenium phosphite hydride complexes H(2)Ru(P(OR)(3))(4) (R = Me (1), Et (2), (i)Pr (3)) were used as CVD precursors for the deposition of films of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloys. The as-deposited films were X-ray amorphous and XPS analysis revealed that they were predominantly comprised of Ru and P in zero oxidation states. XPS analysis also showed the presence of small amounts of oxidized ruthenium and phosphorus. The composition of the films was found to depend on ligand chemistry as well as the deposition conditions. The use of H(2) as the carrier gas had the effect of increasing the relative concentrations of P and O for all films. Annealing films to 700 °C under vacuum produced films of polycrystalline hcp Ru while a flowing stream of H(2) resulted in polycrystalline hcp RuP. PMID:23018487

  13. The origin of GEMS in IDPs as deduced from microstructural evolution of amorphous silicates with annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Davoisne, C; Leroux, H; D'Hendecourt, L B; Jones, A; Deboffle, D

    2006-01-01

    We present laboratory studies of the micro-structural evolution of an amorphous ferro-magnesian silicate, of olivine composition, following thermal annealing under vacuum. Annealing under vacuum was performed at temperatures ranging from 870 to 1020 K. After annealing spheroidal metallic nano-particles (2-50 nm) are found within the silicate films. We interpret this microstructure in terms of a reduction of the initial amorphous silicate FeO component, because of the carbon-rich partial pressure in the furnace due to pumping mechanism. Annealing in a controlled oxygen-rich atmosphere confirms this interpretation. The observed microstructures closely resemble those of the GEMS (Glass with Embedded Metal and Sulphides) found in chondritic IDPs (Interplanetary Dust Particles). Since IDPs contain abundant carbonaceous matter, a solid-state reduction reaction may have occurred during heating in the hot inner regions of the proto-solar disc. Related to this, the presence of forsterite grains grown from the amorphou...

  14. A non-resonant RF cavity loaded with amorphous alloy for proton cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Makita, Y; Nayayama, T; Tsuchidate, H; Tsukishima, C; Yoshida, K

    1999-01-01

    A non-resonant RF cavity loaded with amorphous alloy cores has been designed and tested. The cavity has a re-entrant structure loaded with 8 amorphous alloy toroidal core and its characteristic impedance is designed as 450 Omega . The RF power is fed by 1 kW solid state amplifier using a step-up transformer with 1:9 impedance ratio. In the high power test, an accelerating gap voltage of more than 900 V was measured with input power of 1 kW in the frequency range of 1 to 10 MHz. The voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) was less than 2.0. The results prove that the cavity may be used successfully within a compact proton synchrotron for a cancer therapy facility. (3 refs).

  15. The structural and electronic properties of amorphous HgCdTe from first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous mercury cadmium telluride (a-MCT) model structures, with x being 0.125 and 0.25, are obtained from first-principles calculations. We generate initial structures by computation alchemy method. It is found that most atoms in the network of amorphous structures tend to be fourfold and form tetrahedral structures, implying that the chemical ordered continuous random network with some coordination defects is the ideal structure for a-MCT. The electronic structure is also concerned. The gap is found to be 0.30 and 0.26 eV for a-Hg0.875Cd0.125Te and a-Hg0.75Cd0.25Te model structures, independent of the composition. By comparing with the properties of crystalline MCT with the same composition, we observe a blue-shift of energy band gap. The localization of tail states and its atomic origin are also discussed. (paper)

  16. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in tetrahedral amorphous carbon: carrier trapping versus electron-hole recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the investigation of the ultrafast carrier dynamics in thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon films by means of femtosecond time-resolved reflectivity. We estimated the electron-phonon relaxation time of a few hundred femtoseconds and we observed that under low optical excitation photo-generated carriers decay according to two distinct mechanisms attributed to trapping by defect states and direct electron-hole recombination. With high excitation, when photo-carrier and trap densities are comparable, a unique temporal evolution develops, as the time dependence of the trapping process becomes degenerate with the electron-hole recombination. This experimental evidence highlights the role of defects in the ultrafast electronic dynamics and is not specific to this particular form of carbon, but has general validity for amorphous and disordered semiconductors

  17. On the stability of metastable and amorphous PVD-compound films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In using low temperature physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques new metastable and amorphous materials can be deposited. Structural order in a coating is produced largely by the mobility of the adatoms. Low mobility does not allow the formation of equilibrium phases and metastable and/or amorphous structures are observed. These coatings have sufficient thermal stability for tools, and for both wear- and corrosion-protection. Examples are given within the systems Al-O-N, Ti-Al-N and Cr-Al-N and the properties, crystalline and thermodynamic state of the coatings are characterized. An example of decomposition phenomena is given in metastable thin coatings by the Ti-Zr-N system

  18. Magnetic Properties Of Amorphous And Nanocrystalline FeNiZrCuB Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coercive fields Hc, saturation magnetizations Js and magnetostrictions λs of the amorphous Fe86-xNixZr7Cu1B6 alloys different contents of Ni(0-86 at.%) were investigated at room temperature. Thermomagnetic analyses by means of initial AC permeability and resistivity at the amorphous and nanocrystalline states of the investigated alloys were performed up to 5500 C. It was found that additions of Ni up to x = 33 at.% cause an increase of Hc, Js, λs. Additions of Ni (x = 0 - 43) cause drastic increase of the Curie temperature from 71 deg C for x 0at.% to 373 deg C for x = 43at.% of Ni. Higher concentration of Ni causes a decrease of Hc, Js, λs and Tc. (Authors)

  19. Room-temperature fabrication of light-emitting thin films based on amorphous oxide semiconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghwan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a light-emitting thin film using an amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS because AOS has low defect density even fabricated at room temperature. Eu-doped amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin films fabricated at room temperature emitted intense red emission at 614 nm. It is achieved by precise control of oxygen pressure so as to suppress oxygen-deficiency/excess-related defects and free carriers. An electronic structure model is proposed, suggesting that non-radiative process is enhanced mainly by defects near the excited states. AOS would be a promising host for a thin film phosphor applicable to flexible displays as well as to light-emitting transistors.

  20. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Hydrogen in Disordered and Amorphous Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bowman, Robert

    1986-01-01

    This is the second volume in the NATO ASI series dealing with the topic of hydrogen in solids. The first (V. B76, Metal Hydrides) appeared five years ago and focussed primarily on crystalline phases of hydrided metallic systems. In the intervening period, the amorphous solid state has become an area of intense research activity, encompassing both metallic and non-metallic, e.g. semiconducting, systems. At the same time the problem of storage of hydrogen, which motivated the first ASI, continues to be important. In the case of metallic systems, there were early indications that metallic glasses and disordered alloys may be more corrosion resistant, less susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and have a higher hydrogen mobility than ordered metals or intermetallics. All of these properties are desirable for hydrogen storage. Subsequent research has shown that thermodynamic instability is a severe problem in many amorphous metal hydrides. The present ASI has provided an appropriate forum to focus on these issu...

  1. Molecular dynamics study of the mechanical loss in amorphous pure and doped silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravitational wave detectors and other precision measurement devices are limited by the thermal noise in the oxide coatings on the mirrors of such devices. We have investigated the mechanical loss in amorphous oxides by calculating the internal friction using classical, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We have implemented the trajectory bisection method and the non-local ridge method in the DL-POLY molecular dynamics simulation software to carry out those calculations. These methods have been used to locate the local potential energy minima that a system visits during a molecular dynamics trajectory and the transition state between any two consecutive minima. Using the numerically calculated barrier height distributions, barrier asymmetry distributions, relaxation times, and deformation potentials, we have calculated the internal friction of pure amorphous silica and silica mixed with other oxides. The results for silica compare well with experiment. Finally, we use the numerical calculations to comment on the validity of previously used theoretical assumptions

  2. Electonic properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullot, J.; Galin, M.; Gauthier, M. (Universite de Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)); Bourdon, B. (CIT-Alcatel Transmission, Marcoussis (France))

    1983-06-01

    The electronic properties of some binary hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium alloys a-Sisub(x)Gesub(1-x):H in the silicon rich region (x > 0.6) are investigated. Experimental evidence is presented of photo-induced effects similar to those described in Si:H (Staebler-Wronski effect). The electronic properties are then studied from the dual point of view of the germanium content dependence and of the photo and thermal histories of the films. The dark conductivity changes between the annealed state and the light-soaked state are interpreted in terms of the variation of the temperature coefficient of the Fermi level. The photoconductivity efficiency is shown to remain close to that of a-Si:H for 1 > x >= 0.9 and to strongly decrease when the germanium content is further increased: the photoresponse of the Sisub(0.62)Gesub(0.38) alloy is 10/sup 4/ times smaller than that of a-Si:H. This deterioration of the photoconductive properties is explained in terms of the increase of the density of gap states following Ge substitution. This conclusion is based on the study of the width of the exponential absorption edge and on the results of photoconductivity time response studies. The latter data are interpreted by means of the model of Rose of trapping and recombination kinetics and it is found that for x approximately 0.6 the density of states at 0.4-0.5 eV below the mobility edge is 7 x 10/sup 17/ eV/sup -1/ cm/sup -3/ as compared to 2.4 x 10/sup 16/ eV/sup -1/ cm/sup -3/ for x = 0.97.

  3. High-pressure behavior of amorphous selenium from ultrasonic measurements and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-pressure behavior of melt-quenched amorphous selenium (a-Se) has been investigated via ultrasonic measurements and Raman scattering at room temperature. The ultrasonic measurements were conducted on a-Se in a multi-anvil apparatus with two different sample assemblies at pressures of up to 4.5 and 4.8 GPa. We discovered that similar kinks occur in the slopes of the pressure dependence characteristics of the travel time and the sound velocity in both shear and longitudinal waves in the 2.0–2.5 GPa range. These kinks are independent of the sample assemblies, indicating an intrinsic transformation of the a-Se. Additionally, we deduced the pressure-volume relationship of a-Se from the sound velocity characteristics using the Birch–Murnaghan equation of state, and the results agreed well with those of previous reports. In situ high-pressure Raman scattering measurements of a-Se were conducted in a diamond anvil cell with an 830 nm excitation line up to a pressure of 4.3 GPa. We found that the characteristic band of a-Se at ∼250 cm−1 experienced a smooth shift to a lower frequency with pressure, but a sharp slope change in the band intensity versus pressure occurred near 2.5 GPa. The results of X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry measurements indicate that the samples remain in their amorphous states after decompression. Thus, we proposed that the abnormal compression behavior of a-Se in the 2.0–2.5 GPa range can be attributed to pressure-induced local atomic reconfiguration, implying an amorphous-amorphous transition of the elementary selenium.

  4. High-pressure behavior of amorphous selenium from ultrasonic measurements and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Z.; Liu, X. R.; Hong, S. M., E-mail: hpswjtu@gmail.com, E-mail: smhong@home.swjtu.edu.cn [Laboratory of High Pressure Physics, Southwest Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education of China, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang, Z. G. [National Key Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhu, H. Y. [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Peng, J. P. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2014-07-07

    The high-pressure behavior of melt-quenched amorphous selenium (a-Se) has been investigated via ultrasonic measurements and Raman scattering at room temperature. The ultrasonic measurements were conducted on a-Se in a multi-anvil apparatus with two different sample assemblies at pressures of up to 4.5 and 4.8 GPa. We discovered that similar kinks occur in the slopes of the pressure dependence characteristics of the travel time and the sound velocity in both shear and longitudinal waves in the 2.0–2.5 GPa range. These kinks are independent of the sample assemblies, indicating an intrinsic transformation of the a-Se. Additionally, we deduced the pressure-volume relationship of a-Se from the sound velocity characteristics using the Birch–Murnaghan equation of state, and the results agreed well with those of previous reports. In situ high-pressure Raman scattering measurements of a-Se were conducted in a diamond anvil cell with an 830 nm excitation line up to a pressure of 4.3 GPa. We found that the characteristic band of a-Se at ∼250 cm{sup −1} experienced a smooth shift to a lower frequency with pressure, but a sharp slope change in the band intensity versus pressure occurred near 2.5 GPa. The results of X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry measurements indicate that the samples remain in their amorphous states after decompression. Thus, we proposed that the abnormal compression behavior of a-Se in the 2.0–2.5 GPa range can be attributed to pressure-induced local atomic reconfiguration, implying an amorphous-amorphous transition of the elementary selenium.

  5. Silicon Monoxide at 1 atm and Elevated Pressures: Crystalline or Amorphous?

    KAUST Repository

    AlKaabi, Khalid

    2014-03-05

    The absence of a crystalline SiO phase under ordinary conditions is an anomaly in the sequence of group 14 monoxides. We explore theoretically ordered ground-state and amorphous structures for SiO at P = 1 atm, and crystalline phases also at pressures up to 200 GPa. Several competitive ground-state P = 1 atm structures are found, perforce with Si-Si bonds, and possessing Si-O-Si bridges similar to those in silica (SiO2) polymorphs. The most stable of these static structures is enthalpically just a little more stable than a calculated random bond model of amorphous SiO. In that model we find no segregation into regions of amorphous Si and amorphous SiO2. The P = 1 atm structures are all semiconducting. As the pressure is increased, intriguing new crystalline structures evolve, incorporating Si triangular nets or strips and stishovite-like regions. A heat of formation of crystalline SiO is computed; it is found to be the most negative of all the group 14 monoxides. Yet, given the stability of SiO2, the disproportionation 2SiO (s) → Si(s)+SiO2(s) is exothermic, falling right into the series of group 14 monoxides, and ranging from a highly negative ΔH of disproportionation for CO to highly positive for PbO. There is no major change in the heat of disproportionation with pressure, i.e., no range of stability of SiO with respect to SiO2. The high-pressure SiO phases are metallic. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  6. History dependent vortex configurations in superconducting disks of amorphous MoGe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated spatial configurations of vortices in superconducting disks of amorphous MoGe as a function of field history. Employing a scanning SQUID microscope technique, we observe quasi-symmetric distributions of the vortices imposed by the disk geometry. For a field cool measurement, a single vortex state appears after the Meissner state and it is followed by multi-vortex states at higher fields. In a zero field cool (ZFC) measurement, however, different behaviors are observed. On increasing magnetic field, the Meissner state switches directly to the multi-vortex state without showing the single vortex state. The corresponding magnetization curves of the disks are strikingly history dependent. These results indicate that the ZFC procedure results in an unusual penetration of the vortices in the small superconducting disks.

  7. Characterization of defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited on different substrates by capacitance techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwich, R., E-mail: rdarwich@aec.org.sy [Physics Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P. O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de physique des interfaces et des couches minces, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau France (France)

    2011-06-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited on crystalline silicon and Corning glass substrate were analyzed using different capacitance techniques. The distribution of localized states and some electronic properties were studied using the temperature, frequency and bias dependence of the Schottky barrier capacitance and deep level transient spectroscopy. Our results show that the distribution of the gap states depends on the type of substrate. We have found that the films deposited on c-Si substrate represent only one positively charged or prerelaxed neutral deep state and one interface state, while the films deposited on glass substrate have one interface state and three types of deep defect states, positively or prerelaxed neutral, neutral and negatively charged.

  8. Characterization of defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited on different substrates by capacitance techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited on crystalline silicon and Corning glass substrate were analyzed using different capacitance techniques. The distribution of localized states and some electronic properties were studied using the temperature, frequency and bias dependence of the Schottky barrier capacitance and deep level transient spectroscopy. Our results show that the distribution of the gap states depends on the type of substrate. We have found that the films deposited on c-Si substrate represent only one positively charged or pre relaxed neutral deep state and one interface state, while the films deposited on glass substrate have one interface state and three types of deep defect states, positively or pre relaxed neutral, neutral and negatively charged. (author)

  9. Characterization of defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited on different substrates by capacitance techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited on crystalline silicon and Corning glass substrate were analyzed using different capacitance techniques. The distribution of localized states and some electronic properties were studied using the temperature, frequency and bias dependence of the Schottky barrier capacitance and deep level transient spectroscopy. Our results show that the distribution of the gap states depends on the type of substrate. We have found that the films deposited on c-Si substrate represent only one positively charged or prerelaxed neutral deep state and one interface state, while the films deposited on glass substrate have one interface state and three types of deep defect states, positively or prerelaxed neutral, neutral and negatively charged.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of the structural, vibrational, and electronic properties of amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous silicon models have been computer-generated by melt-quenching and film deposition molecular dynamics simulations, employing classical interatomic Si-potentials. The structural, vibrational and electronic properties of these models is described. Dangling-bond gap states are well localized whereas, floating bonds gap states are considerably less localized with wavefunction amplitudes on the neighbors of the five-coordinated atom. In contrast to melt-quenched models, the a-Si films displayed voids, a 15-28% lower density than c-Si, and no five- coordinated atoms. A-Si:H models with 5 and 22% hydrogen, and both monohydride and dihydride species, have also been developed

  11. Saturation magnetostriction of Co-rich glass-covered amorphous wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neagu, Maria E-mail: mneagu@phys-iasi.ro; Chiriac, H.; Vazquez, M.; Borza, Firuta; Ovari, T.A

    2003-01-01

    The influence of Fe addition on saturation magnetostriction at zero applied stress, {lambda}{sub s}(0), for Co{sub 72.5-x}Fe{sub x}Si{sub 12.5}B{sub 15} (x=0, 3, 4.35, 5, and 7 at%) glass-covered amorphous wires was investigated. Samples were tested in as-cast state and after AC Joule-heating under applied stress. In as-cast state the alloys with 0, 3 and 4.35 at% Fe have negative {lambda}{sub s}(0) while the alloys with 5 and 7 at% Fe have positive {lambda}{sub s}(0)

  12. Saturation magnetostriction of Co-rich glass-covered amorphous wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of Fe addition on saturation magnetostriction at zero applied stress, λs(0), for Co72.5-xFexSi12.5B15 (x=0, 3, 4.35, 5, and 7 at%) glass-covered amorphous wires was investigated. Samples were tested in as-cast state and after AC Joule-heating under applied stress. In as-cast state the alloys with 0, 3 and 4.35 at% Fe have negative λs(0) while the alloys with 5 and 7 at% Fe have positive λs(0)

  13. THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF A MODEL DEFECT IN HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    DiVincenzo, D.; Bernholc, J.; Brodsky, M.

    1981-01-01

    We calculate the electronic properties of a model defect for hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous Si. Our model is a vacancy in crystal Si with four H's satisfying the dangling bonds. Using a Green's function technique, we find the change in the density of states caused by the defect, as well as the local density of states for the Si-H bond and surrounding bonds. From several approaches, we extract information on band edge localization. Each approach gives a mobility edge of order tenths of an ...

  14. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Based-Microparticles for Peptide Pulmonary Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewes, Frederic; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Healy, Anne Marie

    2016-01-20

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to interact with proteins, for example, in biogenic ACC, to form stable amorphous phases. The control of amorphous/crystalline and inorganic/organic ratios in inhalable calcium carbonate microparticles may enable particle properties to be adapted to suit the requirements of dry powders for pulmonary delivery by oral inhalation. For example, an amorphous phase can immobilize and stabilize polypeptides in their native structure and amorphous and crystalline phases have different mechanical properties. Therefore, inhalable composite microparticles made of inorganic (i.e., calcium carbonate and calcium formate) and organic (i.e., hyaluronan (HA)) amorphous and crystalline phases were investigated for peptide and protein pulmonary aerosol delivery. The crystalline/amorphous ratio and polymorphic form of the inorganic component was altered by changing the microparticle drying rate and by changing the ammonium carbonate and HA initial concentration. The bioactivity of the model peptide, salmon calcitonin (sCT), coprocessed with alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), a model protein with peptidase inhibitor activity, was maintained during processing and the microparticles had excellent aerodynamic properties, making them suitable for pulmonary aerosol delivery. The bioavailability of sCT after aerosol delivery as sCT and AAT-loaded composite microparticles to rats was 4-times higher than that of sCT solution. PMID:26692360

  15. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merget, R; Bauer, T; Küpper, H U; Philippou, S; Bauer, H D; Breitstadt, R; Bruening, T

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic ("thermal" or "fumed") silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physicochemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or emphysema cannot be excluded. There is no study

  16. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic (''thermal'' or ''fumed'') silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physico-chemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or emphysema cannot be excluded. There is no

  17. Amorphous Molybdenum Phosphide Nanoparticles for Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    McEnaney, Joshua M.; Crompton, J. Chance; Callejas, Juan F.; Popczun, Eric J.; Biacchi, Adam J.; Nathan S. Lewis; Schaak, Raymond E.

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous molybdenum phosphide (MoP) nanoparticles have been synthesized and characterized as electrocatalysts for the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) in 0.50 M H_2SO_4 (pH 0.3). Amorphous MoP nanoparticles (having diameters of 4.2 ± 0.5 nm) formed upon heating Mo(CO)6 and trioctylphosphine in squalane at 320 °C, and the nanoparticles remained amorphous after heating at 450 °C in H_2(5%)/Ar(95%) to remove the surface ligands. At mass loadings of 1 mg cm^–2, MoP/Ti electrodes exhibited overp...

  18. Substrate induced crystallization of amorphous solid water at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that N2 monolayer desorption from ice surfaces is a quantitative, highly sensitive method for following the surface crystallization kinetics at low temperatures. Vapor deposited water films on a crystalline ice substrate exhibit amorphous growth at temperatures below ∼110 K. The rate of crystallization for these amorphous films is dramatically accelerated compared to the rate of crystallization observed for the amorphous films deposited directly on Pt(111). We find that the crystalline ice substrate acts as a two-dimensional nucleus for the growth of the crystalline phase, thereby accelerating the crystallization kinetics. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  19. An infrared and luminescence study of tritiated amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium has been incorporated into amorphous silicon. Infrared spectroscopy shows new infrared vibration modes due to silicon-tritium (Si-T) bonds in the amorphous silicon network. Si-T vibration frequencies are related to Si-H vibration frequencies by simple mass relationships. Inelastic collisions of β particles, produced as a result of tritium decay, with the amorphous silicon network results in the generation of electron-hole pairs. Radiative recombination of these carriers is observed. Dangling bonds associated with the tritium decay reduce luminescence efficiency

  20. Depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X Q; Tang, Z; Zhang, L; Guo, J J; Jin, C Q; Zhang, Y; Goto, T; McCauley, J W; Chen, M W

    2009-02-20

    We report depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide (B4C) investigated by in situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy. It was found that localized amorphization of B4C takes place during unloading from high pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses play a critical role in the high-pressure phase transition. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the depressurization amorphization results from pressure-induced irreversible bending of C-B-C atomic chains cross-linking 12 atom icosahedra at the rhombohedral vertices. PMID:19257688

  1. Formation and Corrosion Resistance of Amorphous Ti Base Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Naka, M.; Okada, T.; T. Matsui

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion resistant amorphous Ti-B and Ti-Si alloys were prepared on various substrates by RF sputtering. The alloying of B content of 8 at% or more stabilizes the amorphous structure. The corrosion properties of Ti alloys were evaluated by measuring the polarization curves in 1N HCl. Although the addition of B to crystalline bulky Ti shifts the corrosion potentials of Ti to the less nobles of -0.5 V(SCE) or less, that of B to amorphous sputtered Ti moves the corrosion potentials to the noble...

  2. Formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ling; Congiu, Emanuele; Roser, Joe; Swords, Sol; Perets, Hagai B; Lederhendler, Adina; Biham, Ofer; Brucato, John Robert; Pirronello, Valerio; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2007-01-01

    Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. Using these barriers we evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H_2 formation in diffuse interstellar clouds.

  3. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  4. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C; Haslam, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D' Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2008-01-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  5. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) and SAM1651 (Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and nickel-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear

  6. Electrical characteristics of nitrogen incorporated hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen incorporation into hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films has recently attracted a wide range of interest due to its contribution in reducing film stress and improving field emission properties. In this work we characterize the electrical properties of nitrogen containing a-C:H films. The a-C:H films were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition in an acetylene (C2H2) environment with a range of bias voltages. Nitrogen incorporation was achieved by exposing the films to an atomic nitrogen flux from a rf plasma with up to 40% dissociation and atomic nitrogen fluxes of up to 0.85x1018 atoms s-1. Raman results indicate that the doping process is accompanied by some structural changes seen by the G-band peak shifts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra suggest that the dopant levels exceed those previously reported. Capacitance probe and I-V techniques showed a decrease in contact potential difference and density of states for doped films, indicating a rise in the Fermi level

  7. Power change in amorphous silicon technology by low temperature annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal Ankit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous silicon (a-Si is one of the best established thin-film solar-cell technologies. Despite its long history of research, it still has many critical issues because of its defect rich material and its susceptibility to degrade under light also called as Staebler-Wronski effect (SWE. This leads to an increase in the defect density of a-Si, but as a metastable effect it can be completely healed at temperatures above 170 °C. Our study is focused on investigating the behavior of annealing of different a-Si modules under low temperature conditions below 80 °C indicated by successive change of module power. These conditions reflect the environmental temperature impact of the modules in the field, or integrated in buildings as well. The power changes were followed by STC power rating and investigation of module-power evolution under low irradiance conditions at 50 W/m2. Our samples were recovered close to their initial state of power, reaching as high as 99% from its degraded value. This shows the influence of low temperature annealing and light on metastable module behavior in a-Si thin-film modules.

  8. Anisotropic phase separation in amorphous Fe--Ge alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetron sputtered amorphous FexGe100-x films have been examined with anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering (ASAXS) in an attempt to characterize composition fluctuations which have been previously reported in this system. Films grown under various deposition conditions have been studied, with the scattering vector both in and oblique to the plane of the films, to search for anisotropy. By manipulating the deposited power flux and rates of growth, films which have the same composition can be grown to different states of phase separation. The total correlation functions have been calculated from the oblique scattering experiments. The anisotropy can be successfully modeled as a close-packing of oriented prolate ellipsoidal particles, with the elongated axis along the direction of film growth. A method for using these measurements to determine the compositions of the phase-separating species has been developed and utilized. The results indicate phase separation into a-Ge and a-FeGe2 for the a-FexGe100-x (x<33) alloy

  9. Electrical characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Takashi; Katayama, Ryuichi; Yamakawa, Koki; Matsui, Kento; Saito, Masaru; Sugiyama, Shuhichiroh; Sichanugrist, Porponth; Nonomura, Shuichi; Konagai, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    The electrical characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiOx:H) films was performed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and electrical conductivity measurements. In the ESR spectra of the a-SiOx:H films, two ESR peaks with g-values of 2.005 and 2.013 were observed. The ESR peak with the g-value of 2.013 was not observed in the ESR spectra of a-Si:H films. The photoconductivity of the a-SiOx:H films decreased with increasing spin density estimated from the ESR peak with the g-value of 2.005. On the other hand, photoconductivity was independent of spin density estimated from the ESR peak with the g-value of 2.013. The optical absorption coefficient spectra of the a-SiOx:H films were also measured. The spin density estimated from the ESR peak with the g-value of 2.005 increased proportionally with increasing optical absorption owing to the gap-state defect.

  10. Amorphous solid dispersions of piroxicam and Soluplus(®): Qualitative and quantitative analysis of piroxicam recrystallization during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Andres; Strachan, Clare J; Veski, Peep; Aaltonen, Jaakko; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko; Kogermann, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) from amorphous to crystalline form is the primary stability issue in formulating amorphous solid dispersions (SDs). The aim of the present study was to carry out qualitative and quantitative analysis of the physical solid-state stability of the SDs of poorly water-soluble piroxicam (PRX) and polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene-glycol graft copolymer (Soluplus(®)). The SDs were prepared by a solvent evaporation method and stored for six months at 0% RH/6 °C, 0% RH/25 °C, 40% RH/25 °C and 75% RH/25 °C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy equipped with attenuated total reflection accessory (ATR-FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy were used for characterizing the physical solid-state changes and drug-polymer interactions. The principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) were used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of Raman spectra collected during storage. When stored at 0% RH/6 °C and at 0% RH/25 °C, PRX in SDs remained in an amorphous form since no recrystallization was observed by ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy coupled with PCA and MCR-ALS and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy enabled to detect the recrystallization of amorphous PRX in the samples stored at higher humidity. PMID:25843761

  11. An investigation into the crystallization tendency/kinetics of amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredients: A case study with dipyridamole and cinnarizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Shrawan; Cathcart, Helen; Redington, Wynette; O'Reilly, Niall J

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous drug formulations have great potential to enhance solubility and thus bioavailability of BCS class II drugs. However, the higher free energy and molecular mobility of the amorphous form drive them towards the crystalline state which makes them unstable. Accurate determination of the crystallization tendency/kinetics is the key to the successful design and development of such systems. In this study, dipyridamole (DPM) and cinnarizine (CNZ) have been selected as model compounds. Thermodynamic fragility (mT) was measured from the heat capacity change at the glass transition temperature (Tg) whereas dynamic fragility (mD) was evaluated using methods based on extrapolation of configurational entropy to zero [Formula: see text] , and heating rate dependence of Tg [Formula: see text] . The mean relaxation time of amorphous drugs was calculated from the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) equation. Furthermore, the correlation between fragility and glass forming ability (GFA) of the model drugs has been established and the relevance of these parameters to crystallization of amorphous drugs is also assessed. Moreover, the crystallization kinetics of model drugs under isothermal conditions has been studied using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine the Avrami constant 'n' which provides an insight into the mechanism of crystallization. To further probe into the crystallization mechanism, the non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of model systems were also analysed by statistically fitting the crystallization data to 15 different kinetic models and the relevance of model-free kinetic approach has been established. The crystallization mechanism for DPM and CNZ at each extent of transformation has been predicted. The calculated fragility, glass forming ability (GFA) and crystallization kinetics are found to be in good correlation with the stability prediction of amorphous solid dispersions. Thus, this research work involves a multidisciplinary approach to

  12. Temperature dependence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesen, Y.; Stuckelberger, M.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.; Wyrsch, N.

    2016-01-01

    Thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar (a-Si:H) cells are known to have better temperature coefficients than crystalline silicon cells. To investigate whether a-Si:H cells that are optimized for standard conditions (STC) also have the highest energy yield, we measured the temperature and irradiance dependence of the maximum power output (Pmpp), the fill factor (FF), the short-circuit current density (Jsc), and the open-circuit voltage (Voc) for four series of cells fabricated with different deposition conditions. The parameters varied during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) were the power and frequency of the PE-CVD generator, the hydrogen-to-silane dilution during deposition of the intrinsic absorber layer (i-layer), and the thicknesses of the a-Si:H i-layer and p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide layer. The results show that the temperature coefficient of the Voc generally varies linearly with the Voc value. The Jsc increases linearly with temperature mainly due to temperature-induced bandgap reduction and reduced recombination. The FF temperature dependence is not linear and reaches a maximum at temperatures between 15 °C and 80 °C. Numerical simulations show that this behavior is due to a more positive space-charge induced by the photogenerated holes in the p-layer and to a recombination decrease with temperature. Due to the FF(T) behavior, the Pmpp (T) curves also have a maximum, but at a lower temperature. Moreover, for most series, the cells with the highest power output at STC also have the best energy yield. However, the Pmpp (T) curves of two cells with different i-layer thicknesses cross each other in the operating cell temperature range, indicating that the cell with the highest power output could, for instance, have a lower energy yield than the other cell. A simple energy-yield simulation for the light-soaked and annealed states shows that for Neuchâtel (Switzerland) the best cell at STC also has the best energy

  13. Thermoluminescent dosimetry of beta radiations of 90 Sr/ 90 Y using amorphous ZrO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the results of studying the thermoluminescent properties (Tl) of the zirconium oxide in its amorphous state (ZrO2-a) before beta radiations of 90 Sr/ 90 Y are presented. The amorphous powders of the zirconium oxide were synthesized by means of the sol-gel technique. The sol-gel process using alkoxides like precursors, is an efficient method to prepare a matrix of zirconium oxide by hydrolysis - condensation of the precursor to form chains of Zr-H3 and Zr-O2. One of the advantages of this technique is the obtention of gels at low temperatures with very high purity and homogeneity. The powders were characterized by means of thermal analysis and by X-ray diffraction. The powders of ZrO2-a, previously irradiated with beta particles of 90 Sr/90 Y, presented a thermoluminescent curve with two peaks at 150 and 257 C. The dissipation of the information of the one ZrO2-a was of 40% the first 2 hours remaining constant the information for the following 30 days. The reproducibility of the information was of ± 2.5% in standard deviation. The studied characteristics allow to propose to the amorphous zirconium oxide as thermoluminescent dosemeter for the detection of beta radiation. (Author)

  14. Light induced hydrophilicity and osteoblast adhesion promotion on amorphous TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terriza, Antonia; Díaz-Cuenca, Aránzazu; Yubero, Francisco; Barranco, Angel; González-Elipe, Agustín R; Gonzalez Caballero, Juan Luis; Vilches, José; Salido, Mercedes

    2013-04-01

    We have studied the effect of the UV induced superhydrophilic wetting of TiO(2) thin films on the osteoblasts cell adhesion and cytoskeletal organization on its surface. To assess any effect of the photo-catalytic removal of adventitious carbon as a factor for the enhancement of the osteoblast development, 100 nm amorphous TiO(2) thin layers were deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a substrate well known for its poor adhesion and limited wettability and biocompatibility. The TiO(2) /PET materials were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy and their wetting behavior under light illumination studied by the sessile drop method. The amorphous TiO(2) thin films showed a very poor photo-catalytic activity even if becoming superhydrophilic after illumination. The illuminated samples recovered partially its initial hydrophobic state only after their storage in the dark for more than 20 days. Osteoblasts (HOB) were seeded both on bare PET and on TiO(2) /PET samples immediately after illumination and also after four weeks storage in darkness. Cell attachment was much more efficient on the immediately illuminated TiO(2)/PET samples, with development of focal adhesions and cell traction forces. Although we cannot completely discard some photo-catalytic carbon removal as a factor contributing to this cell enhanced attachment, our photodegradation experiments on amorphous TiO(2) are conclusive to dismiss this effect as the major cause for this behavior. PMID:22965473

  15. Neutron interactions with germanium isotopes and amorphous and crystalline GeO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, L.; Knopf, K.; Waschkowski, W.

    1987-06-01

    Coherent neutron scattering lengths and total cross sections have been measured on elemental and oxide samples of ordinary Ge and of isotopically enriched substances. From the experimental results the following values were obtained: the coherent scattering lengths (in fm) of the bound atoms Ge(8.185±0.020);70Ge(10.0±0.1);72Ge(8.51±0.10);73Ge(5.02±0.04);74Ge(7.58±0.10) and76Ge(8.2 ±1.5); the absorption cross sections at 0.0253 eV (in barn) for Ge(2.20±0.04);70Ge(2.9±0.2);72Ge(0.8±0.2);73Ge(14.4±0.4) and74Ge(0.4±0.2); the free cross sections for epithermal neutrons and the zero energy scattering cross sections. On the basis of this data, the isotopic- and spin-incoherent cross sections and the s-wave resonance contributions to the coherent scattering lengths have been determined and discussed. Transmission measurements at 0.57 meV on amorphous and crystalline GeO2 yielded for the amorphous sample an inelastic cross section eight times larger than for the crystalline samples. This effect corresponds to a clearly higher density of low energy states in the amorphous than in the crystalline substances.

  16. Neutron interactions with germanium isotopes and amorphous and crystalline GeO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coherent neutron scattering lengths and total cross sections have been measured on elemental and oxide samples of ordinary Ge and of isotopically enriched substances. From the experimental results the following values were obtained: - the coherent scattering lengths (in fm) of the bound atoms Ge(8.185±0.020); 70Ge(10.0±0.1); 72Ge(8.51±0.10); 73Ge(5.02±0.04); 74Ge(7.58±0.10) and 76Ge(8.2±1.5); - the absorption cross section at 0.0253 eV (in barn) for Ge(2.20±0.04); 70Ge(2.9±0.2); 72Ge(0.8±0.2); 73Ge(14.4±0.4) and 74Ge(0.4±0.2); - the free cross sections for epithermal neutrons and the zero energy scattering cross sections. On the basis of this data, the isotopic- and spin-incoherent cross sections and the s-wave resonance contributions to the coherent scattering lengths have been determined and discussed. Transmission measurements at 0.57 meV on amorphous and crystalline GeO2 yielded for the amorphous sample an inelastic cross section eight times larger than for the crystalline samples. This effect corresponds to a clarly higher density of low energy states in the amorphous than in the crystalline substances. (orig.)

  17. Developments in the Ni-Nb-Zr amorphous alloy membranes. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, S.; Chandra, D. [University of Nevada, Materials Science and Engineering, Reno, NV (United States); Hirscher, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Intelligente Systeme, Stuttgart (Germany); Dolan, M.; Viano, D. [CSIRO, QCAT, Energy, Pullenvale, QLD (Australia); Isheim, D. [Northwestern University, Materials Science and Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Wermer, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baricco, M. [University of Turin, Department of Chemistry and NIS, Turin (Italy); Udovic, T.J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Grant, D. [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Palumbo, O.; Paolone, A. [CNR-ISC, U.O.S. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Cantelli, R. [University of Rome, La Sapienza, Roma (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Most of the global H{sub 2} production is derived from hydrocarbon-based fuels, and efficient H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation is necessary to deliver a high-purity H{sub 2} product. Hydrogen-selective alloy membranes are emerging as a viable alternative to traditional pressure swing adsorption processes as a means for H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation. These membranes can be formed from a wide range of alloys, and those based on Pd are the closest to commercial deployment. The high cost of Pd (USD ∝31,000 kg{sup -1}) is driving the development of less-expensive alternatives, including inexpensive amorphous (Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 40}){sub 100-x} Zr{sub x} alloys. Amorphous alloy membranes can be fabricated directly from the molten state into continuous ribbons via melt spinning and depending on the composition can exhibit relatively high hydrogen permeability between 473 and 673 K. Here we review recent developments in these low-cost membrane materials, especially with respect to permeation behavior, electrical transport properties, and understanding of local atomic order. To further understand the nature of these solids, atom probe tomography has been performed, revealing amorphous Nb-rich and Zr-rich clusters embedded in majority Ni matrix whose compositions deviated from the nominal overall composition of the membrane. (orig.)

  18. Amorphous nanodrugs prepared by complexation with polysaccharides: carrageenan versus dextran sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheow, Wean Sin; Kiew, Tie Yi; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2015-03-01

    Amorphous nanodrugs prepared by electrostatic complexation of drug molecules with oppositely charged polysaccharides represent a promising bioavailability enhancement strategy for poorly-soluble drugs owed to their high supersaturation generation capability and simple preparation. Using ciprofloxacin (CIP) as the model drug, we investigated the effects of using dextran sulfate (DXT) or carrageenan (CGN) on the (1) preparation efficiency, (2) physical characteristics, (3) supersaturation generation, (4) antimicrobial activity, and (5) cytotoxicity of the amorphous drug-polysaccharide nanoparticle complex (nanoplex) produced. Owing to the higher charge density and chain flexibility of DXT, coupled with the greater hydrophobicity of CGN, the CIP-DXT nanoplex exhibited superior preparation efficiency and larger size than the CIP-CGN nanoplex. Whereas the low solubility and high gelation tendency of CGN resulted in superior supersaturation generation capability for the CIP-DXT nanoplex. The non-cytotoxicity, antimicrobial activity, colloidal, and amorphous state stability were established for both nanoplexes, making them an ideal supersaturated drug delivery system. PMID:25498670

  19. Rapid decolorization of Acid Orange Ⅱ aqueous solution by amorphous zero-valent iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changqin Zhang; Zhengwang Zhu; Haifeng Zhang; Zhuangqi Hu

    2012-01-01

    Some problems including low treatment capacity,agglomeration and clogging phenomena,and short working life,limit the application of pre-treatment methods involving zero-valent iron (ZVI).In this article,ZVI was frozen in an amorphous state through a melt-spinning technique,and the decolorization effect of amorphous ZVI on Acid Orange Ⅱ solution was investigated under varied conditions of experimental variables such as reaction temperature,ribbon dosage,and initial pH.Batch experiments suggested that the decolorization rate was enhanced with the increase of reaction temperature and ribbon dosage,but decreased with increasing initial solution pH.Kinetic analyses indicated that the decolorization process followed a first order exponential kinetic model,and the surface-normalized decolorization rate could reach 2.09 L/(m2·min) at room temperature,which was about ten times larger than any previously reported under similar conditions.Recycling experiments also proved that the ribbons could be reused at least four times without obvious decay of decolorization rate and efficiency.This study suggests a tremendous application potential for amorphous ZVI in remediation of groundwater or wastewater contaminated with azo dyes.

  20. Stability of amorphous pharmaceutical solids: crystal growth mechanisms and effect of polymer additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Zhu, Lei; Wu, Tian; Cai, Ting; Gunn, Erica M; Yu, Lian

    2012-09-01

    We review recent progress toward understanding and enhancing the stability of amorphous pharmaceutical solids against crystallization. As organic liquids are cooled to become glasses, fast modes of crystal growth can emerge. One such growth mode, the glass-to-crystal or GC mode, occurs in the bulk, and another exists at the free surface, both leading to crystal growth much faster than predicted by theories that assume diffusion defines the kinetic barrier of crystallization. These phenomena have received different explanations, and we propose that GC growth is a solid-state transformation enabled by local mobility in glasses and that fast surface crystal growth is facilitated by surface molecular mobility. In the second part, we review recent findings concerning the effect of polymer additives on crystallization in organic glasses. Low-concentration polymer additives can strongly inhibit crystal growth in the bulk of organic glasses, while having weaker effect on surface crystal growth. Ultra-thin polymer coatings can inhibit surface crystallization. Recent work has shown the importance of molecular weight for crystallization inhibitors of organic glasses, besides "direct intermolecular interactions" such as hydrogen bonding. Relative to polyvinylpyrrolidone, the VP dimer is far less effective in inhibiting crystal growth in amorphous nifedipine. Further work is suggested for better understanding of crystallization of amorphous organic solids and the prediction of their stability. PMID:22434258