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Sample records for amodiaquine-associated adverse effects

  1. Amodiaquine-associated adverse effects after inadvertent overdose and after a standard therapeutic dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjei, G O; Goka, B Q; Rodrigues, O P

    2009-01-01

    A case of an acute dystonic reaction in a child presumptively treated for malaria with amodiaquine, and a case of persistent asymptomatic bradycardia in another child with mild pulmonary stenosis treated with a standard dose of amodiaquine for parasitologically confirmed uncomplicated malaria, is...

  2. Adverse effects of bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    and are tolerated by the majority of patients, but serious adverse events have been recorded in some cases. Only the most common of adverse effects are robustly observable in clinical trials. In general, studies were not powered to detect effects that were lower in incidence than fractures. This review of adverse...

  3. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  4. [Papillomavirus vaccines: adverse effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, Maria E; Valero, Edith; Valero, Edith Gil; Gutiérrez, Herance; Martín Zafra, Antonia; Valverde Caballero, Inocencia; Aizpurua Galdeano, María Pilar

    2011-11-01

    The Health Department of Catalunya laun- ched the first vaccination campaign against human papillo- mavirus (HPV) in the 2008-09 school year This study des- cribes the side effects of HPV vaccine and compared them with those of the vaccine against Hepatitis. This is a prospective observational study Nurses of our primary health centre went to the area's schools to administer the HPV vaccine and hepatitis vaccine (when necessary). Afterwards, between 24 to 72 hours, they went back to schools in order to control the adverse effects. The frequency of general symptoms (syn- cope, fever, headache, muscle aches, malaise) was less than 5% with the first two doses. With the third, 9.8% of girls referred headache. Pain was the most common local symptom: 28.3% of girls reported pain with the first dose, 53.4% with the second and 53.6% with the third. Local reactions appear more often with HPV than with hepatitis vaccine, especially in the second and third doses (McNemar test p HPV vaccine was generally well tolerated. General side effects were rare. Local symptoms were com- mon and increased with each new dose. The vaccine against hepatitis produced fewer side effects.

  5. Adverse Effects of Bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Use of bisphosphonates has been growing steadily in the last decade. This follows the introduction of simpler dosing regimes, the availability of lower-priced generics, and concerns about the safety of hormone-replacement therapy. Bisphosphonates have a relatively good safety record...... events in bisphosphonate-treated patients was based on published information from case reports, case series, claims databases, national databases, surveys, adverse event reporting databases, and single or pooled clinical trials. The most common acute adverse events with bisphosphonates for osteoporosis...... are gastrointestinal discomfort and acute influenza-like illness. Renal complications are very rare with oral bisphosphonates and rare with i.v. bisphosphonates when used appropriately. Based on our current knowledge, skeletal events in the form of osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical fragility fractures are rare...

  6. Adverse effects of bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Use of bisphosphonates has been growing steadily in the last decade. This follows the introduction of simpler dosing regimes, the availability of lower-priced generics, and concerns about the safety of hormone-replacement therapy. Bisphosphonates have a relatively good safety record...... events in bisphosphonate-treated patients was based on published information from case reports, case series, claims databases, national databases, surveys, adverse event reporting databases, and single or pooled clinical trials. The most common acute adverse events with bisphosphonates for osteoporosis...... are gastrointestinal discomfort and acute influenza-like illness. Renal complications are very rare with oral bisphosphonates and rare with i.v. bisphosphonates when used appropriately. Based on our current knowledge, skeletal events in the form of osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical fragility fractures are rare...

  7. Cardiovascular adverse effects of phenytoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldiken, B; Rémi, J; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2016-05-01

    Phenytoin is an established drug in the treatment of acute repetitive seizures and status epilepticus. One of its main advantages over benzodiazepines is the less sedative effect. However, the possibility of cardiovascular adverse effects with the intravenous use of phenytoin cause a reluctance to its usage, and this has lead to a search for safer anticonvulsant drugs. In this study, we aimed to review the studies which evaluated the safety of phenytoin with respect to cardiovascular adverse effects. The original clinical trials and case reports listed in PUBMED in English language between the years of 1946-2014 were evaluated. As the key words, "phenytoin, diphenylhydantoin, epilepsy, seizure, cardiac toxicity, asystole, arrhythmia, respiratory arrest, hypotension, death" were used. Thirty-two clinical trials and ten case reports were identified. In the case reports, a rapid infusion rate (>50 mg/min) of phenytoin appeared as the major cause of increased mortality. In contrast, no serious cardiovascular adverse effects leading to death were met in the clinical trials which applied the recommended infusion rate and dosages. An infusion rate of 50 mg/min was reported to be safe for young patients. For old patients and patients with a cardiovascular co-morbidity, a slower infusion rate was recommended with a careful follow-up of heart rhythm and blood pressure. No cardiovascular adverse effect was reported in oral phenytoin overdoses except one case with a very high serum phenytoin level and hypoalbuminemia. Phenytoin is an effective and well tolerated drug in the treatment of epilepsy. Intravenous phenytoin is safe when given at recommended infusion rates and doses.

  8. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects.

  9. Adverse effects of teenage pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, I M R; Deeyagaha Waduge, R P K

    2005-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that teenage pregnancies are not as hazardous as thought to be earlier. To compare the sociodemographic data, obstetric complications and attitudes towards family planning in teenagers and older women. A prospective cohort study at the University Obstetrics Unit, Teaching Hospital, Galle. Sociodemographic data, details of antenatal care and family support, antenatal complications, gestation at delivery, mode of delivery, the proportion of unplanned pregnancies, and the possible effects of contraceptive counselling, in two groups of pregnant teenagers (13-16 years, n = 95 and 17-19 years, n = 250) were compared with a control group of pregnant women (20-24 years, n = 275). The teenagers were from lower socioeconomic strata and the younger teenagers were significantly less educated than the controls. Teenagers had a significantly higher risk of anaemia (Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.3, 95%CI = 1.7-3.3, p teenagers had a significantly higher risk of gestational hypertension (OR = 4.8, 95%CI = 1.8-13.0, p teenagers had a significantly higher risk of delivery before 34 weeks of gestation (OR = 13.6, 95%CI = 1.8-287, p = 0.001). There were no significant differences in the mode of delivery. The younger teenagers had a much higher proportion (54%) of unplanned pregnancies compared to the controls (16 %). A significantly higher proportion of younger teenagers (48%) and older teenagers (25 %), if counselled, would have delayed their pregnancies compared to the controls (10 %). Teenage pregnancies, especially those below 17 years of age have a significantly higher risk of adverse outcomes. A large proportion of these pregnancies is unplanned and could be prevented by counselling.

  10. Adverse effects of breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odle, Teresa G

    2014-01-01

    As breast cancer outcomes improve and more people with breast cancer survive longer following diagnosis, many survivors must deal with the effects of treatment. Some adverse effects last a short time and have little influence on breast cancer patients' quality of life, yet others can cause long-term complications and add to increased morbidity and mortality among survivors. This article reviews the adverse effects of breast cancer treatments and how they affect the health and quality of life of those receiving treatment. The article also explains how adverse effects can interrupt treatment and how physicians and survivors can manage adverse effects of breast cancer treatment.

  11. The adverse effects of kava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kava, R

    2001-03-01

    In Fiji, kava is also known as yaqona or grog. A convenient sample of 300 kava drinkers in Nadi, Lautoka, Ba and Sigatoka were studied to see whether local people in Fiji experienced side effects of kava use. Because males usually consume kava in Fiji, we approached specific groups of people and asked them to participate in the survey. To evaluate the side effects of kava consumption, we interviewed housewives of male kava drinkers regarding specific effects of kava. We interviewed these housewives during kava drinking sessions since they were usually not taking part in the kava drinking. We also interviewed employers of these kava drinkers and the market vendors in Nadi Town since they were closely involved with kava drinkers. Wives of kava users felt deprived of basic family needs due to the amount of money spent on kava. In Urban schools, 64% males and 46.2% had tried kava. The present study aims to assess the prevalence of side effects of kava usage among a community sample of kava drinkers in Fiji and to compare the result with some of the side effects provided by other studies. The questionnaire also asked how much kava was consumed and the reasons. Since kava use is very much part of our everyday culture and existence, convincing people to change their behavior and kava consumption is a major tasks. I hope that this study would emphasize the need at a national level to educate people on the harmful effects of kava and the need for the health ministry to view very heavy kava intake as contributing to morbidity in Fiji.

  12. Perspective on Lithotripsy Adverse Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Thomas; Wendt-Nordahl, Gunnar

    2008-09-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is an effective and without any doubt the least invasive procedure to treat upper urinary tract calculi. Acute complications are rarely reported and do not require specific treatment in most cases. However, one should be aware that energy levels sufficient for stone breakage are capable of damaging tissue as well, and significant hematoma—not only in the kidney but as well in surrounding organs—has been observed. Furthermore, only little is known about the long-term effects of SWL. Some authors have reported an increased incidence of hypertension and possibly also diabetes mellitus. Such chronic diseases—if indeed related to prior SWL—may be a late result of acute SWL-related trauma but the discussion on the underlying pathogenesis is controversial. Many factors have to be considered, such as the natural history of recurrent stone formers, technical principles of SWL, and differences in treatment protocols. Promising studies are currently underway to optimize stone breakage while limiting potential collateral damage. With this progress, SWL remains a safe treatment option for most urinary calculi.

  13. Psychiatric Adverse Effects of Dermatological Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Özmen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dermatological drugs, mostly corticosteroids and isotretinoin, cause different psychiatric adverse effects. During steroid therapy, a wide range of psychiatric conditions, from minor clinical symptoms like insomnia and anxiety to serious psychiatric syndromes like psychosis and delirium might be seen. In medical literature, a causal connection is usually suggested between “isotretinoin”, which is used for treatment of acne vulgaris and depression and suicide attempts. However, there are no statistically significant double-blind randomized studies that support this connection. Clinicians must know patient’s psychiatric history before using any dermatological treatment known as causing psychiatric adverse effects, and psychiatric consultation should be established whenever necessary.

  14. Adverse Effects of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists

    OpenAIRE

    Filippatos, Theodosios D.; Panagiotopoulou, Thalia V.; Elisaf, Moses S.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are a class of injective anti-diabetic drugs that improve glycemic control and many other atherosclerosis-related parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the use of this relatively new class of drugs may be associated with certain adverse effects. Concerns have been expressed regarding the effects of these drugs on pancreatic and thyroid tissue, since animal studies and analyses of drug databases indicate an association of ...

  15. Adverse Effects of Nutraceuticals and Dietary Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronis, Martin J J; Pedersen, Kim B; Watt, James

    2018-01-06

    Over 70% of Americans take some form of dietary supplement every day, and the supplement industry is currently big business, with a gross of over $28 billion. However, unlike either foods or drugs, supplements do not need to be registered or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) prior to production or sales. Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, the FDA is restricted to adverse report monitoring postmarketing. Despite widespread consumption, there is limited evidence of health benefits related to nutraceutical or supplement use in well-nourished adults. In contrast, a small number of these products have the potential to produce significant toxicity. In addition, patients often do not disclose supplement use to their physicians. Therefore, the risk of adverse drug-supplement interactions is significant. An overview of the major supplement and nutraceutical classes is presented here, together with known toxic effects and the potential for drug interactions.

  16. [Metabolism of xenobiotics: beneficial and adverse effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuy, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The systems developed by living organisms for the metabolism of xenobiotics play a key role in the adaptation of living species to their chemical environment. Recent data about mammalian cytochrome P450 structures have led to a better understanding of the molecular basis for the adaptability of these enzymes to xenobiotics exhibiting highly variable structures. The action of these enzymes on xenobiotics leads to other beneficial effects such as the bioactivation of some drugs, but also to adverse effects with the formation of aggressive metabolites for the cell that are responsible for the appearance of many toxicities. © Société de Biologie, 2013.

  17. Industrial wind turbines and adverse health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Roy D; Krogh, Carmen M E; Horner, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Some people living in the environs of industrial wind turbines (IWTs) report experiencing adverse health and socioeconomic effects. This review considers the hypothesis that annoyance from audible IWTs is the cause of these adverse health effects. We searched PubMed and Google Scholar for articles published since 2000 that included the terms "wind turbine health," "wind turbine infrasound," "wind turbine annoyance," "noise annoyance" or "low frequency noise" in the title or abstract. Industrial wind turbines produce sound that is perceived to be more annoying than other sources of sound. Reported effects from exposure to IWTs are consistent with well-known stress effects from persistent unwanted sound. If placed too close to residents, IWTs can negatively affect the physical, mental and social well-being of people. There is sufficient evidence to support the conclusion that noise from audible IWTs is a potential cause of health effects. Inaudible low-frequency noise and infrasound from IWTs cannot be ruled out as plausible causes of health effects.

  18. Consequences of emergency contraceptives: the adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomin, Anne; Keller, Valentin; Daraï, Emile; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie

    2014-07-01

    Emergency contraception (EC) offers women an important strategy to prevent unintended pregnancy following intercourse. Despite the constant improvement of availability of different molecules and techniques already existing (Yuzpe regimen, levonorgestrel, intrauterine device) and the emergence of ulipristal acetate, the numbers of unintended pregnancies and unplanned births could still be reduced. This review will evaluate all the information about the potential adverse effects and tolerability of each method of EC by putting them in balance with their safety and effectiveness. A literature search until December 2013 was performed to identify all trials studying the safety data available concerning EC. Different means of EC have been demonstrated to be generally safe and well tolerated. These data support women information in order to improve use and efficacy of EC.

  19. 36 CFR 800.6 - Resolution of adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resolution of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.6 Resolution of adverse effects. (a) Continue... the undertaking that could avoid, minimize, or mitigate adverse effects on historic properties. (1...

  20. 36 CFR 800.5 - Assessment of adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assessment of adverse effects... PROTECTION OF HISTORIC PROPERTIES The section 106 Process § 800.5 Assessment of adverse effects. (a) Apply criteria of adverse effect. In consultation with the SHPO/THPO and any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian...

  1. Adverse Effects of Waste Generation in Calabar Urban, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adverse Effects of Waste Generation in Calabar Urban, Nigeria. ... In this study, we determined the adverse effects of wastes on an urban environment. ... of the adverse effects of wastes, except as it concerned death, birth defect or cancer, environmental degradation, blocking of drainage and emission of greenhouse gases.

  2. Beneficial and adverse effects of chemopreventive agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Mu; Park, Kwang-Kyun

    2003-03-01

    The beneficial and adverse effects of some chemopreventive agents, such as Vitamins A, C, E, beta-carotene, indole-3-carbinol, capsaicin, garlic, and aloe are reviewed. Two large randomized trials with a lung cancer endpoint, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Prevention Study and the Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET), suggested that antioxidants might be harmful in smokers. However, the results of the Linxian study and of the ATBC or the CARET studies were significantly different in this respect, and therefore, the relationship between antioxidant and carcinogenesis remains open to debate. Indole-3-carbinol has cancer promoting activities in the colon, thyroid, pancreas, and liver, whereas capsaicin alters the metabolism of chemical carcinogens and may promote carcinogenesis at high doses. Organosulfur compounds and selenium from garlic have no or a little enhancing effect on cancer promotion stage. Information upon chemopreventive mechanisms that inhibit carcinogenesis is imperfect, although the causes and natures of certain human cancers are known. Therefore, definitive preventive guidelines should be carefully offered for various types of tumors, which properly consider ethnic variations, and the efficacies and the safety of chemopreventive agents.

  3. Beneficial and adverse effects of chemopreventive agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Mu; Park, Kwang-Kyun

    2003-01-01

    The beneficial and adverse effects of some chemopreventive agents, such as Vitamins A, C, E, beta-carotene, indole-3-carbinol, capsaicin, garlic, and aloe are reviewed. Two large randomized trials with a lung cancer endpoint, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Prevention Study and the Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET), suggested that antioxidants might be harmful in smokers. However, the results of the Linxian study and of the ATBC or the CARET studies were significantly different in this respect, and therefore, the relationship between antioxidant and carcinogenesis remains open to debate. Indole-3-carbinol has cancer promoting activities in the colon, thyroid, pancreas, and liver, whereas capsaicin alters the metabolism of chemical carcinogens and may promote carcinogenesis at high doses. Organosulfur compounds and selenium from garlic have no or a little enhancing effect on cancer promotion stage. Information upon chemopreventive mechanisms that inhibit carcinogenesis is imperfect, although the causes and natures of certain human cancers are known. Therefore, definitive preventive guidelines should be carefully offered for various types of tumors, which properly consider ethnic variations, and the efficacies and the safety of chemopreventive agents

  4. Psychiatric adverse effects of chloroquine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bogaczewicz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chloroquine is a prototype antimalarial drug, widely used in several branches of medicine. Antimalarial drugs are used in the treatment of various dermatological, immunological, rheumatological and infectious diseases. Examples of off-labelled indications for chloroquine analogues use include dermatomyositis, sarcoidosis, polymorphous light eruption, disseminated granuloma annulare and porfiria cutanea tarda. There is a relatively small number of adverse effects related to chloroquine analogues used in standard doses, such as gastrointestinal disturbances, headaches, skin reactions, hypotension, convulsions, extrapyramidal symptoms and visual disturbances. Psychiatric side effects of chloroquine seem to be rare, but may manifest in a wide range of symptoms, such as confusion, disorientation, ideas of persecution, agitation, outbursts of violence, loss of interest, feeling sad, suicidal ideas and impaired insight. There is also a report of a manic episode with psychotic features in the course of bipolar disorder, and another case report of persecutory delusions, anxiety, derealisation and visual illusions triggered by chloroquine. The duration of psychiatric symptoms usually ranges from one to two weeks, and symptoms usually disappear within several days following cessation of chloroquine usage and starting psychiatric treatment where indicated. This article reviews the case studies of patients diagnosed with mental disorders resulting from the use of chloroquine, and discusses the management in such cases.

  5. The oral adverse effects of isotretinoin treatment in acne vulgaris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Isotretinoin is the most effective therapy to treat severe acne vulgaris and its systemic adverse effects have been well documented, but little is known on dental side effects over the course of treatment. Objectives: This prospective case-control study aimed to evaluate the oral adverse effects of isotretinoin in ...

  6. Effectiveness of adverse effects search filters: drugs versus medical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Farrah, MLIS, AHIP

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study tested the performance of adverse effects search filters when searching for safety information on medical devices, procedures, and diagnostic tests in MEDLINE and Embase. Methods: The sensitivity of 3 filters was determined using a sample of 631 references from 131 rapid reviews related to the safety of health technologies. The references were divided into 2 sets by type of intervention: drugs and nondrug health technologies. Keyword and indexing analysis were performed on references from the nondrug testing set that 1 or more of the filters did not retrieve. Results: For all 3 filters, sensitivity was lower for nondrug health technologies (ranging from 53%– 87% than for drugs (88%–93% in both databases. When tested on the nondrug health technologies set, sensitivity was lower in Embase (ranging from 53%–81% than in MEDLINE (67%–87% for all filters. Of the nondrug records that 1 or more of the filters missed, 39% of the missed MEDLINE records and 18% of the missed Embase records did not contain any indexing terms related to adverse events. Analyzing the titles and abstracts of nondrug records that were missed by any 1 filter, the most commonly used keywords related to adverse effects were: risk, complications, mortality, contamination, hemorrhage, and failure. Conclusions: In this study, adverse effects filters were less effective at finding information about the safety of medical devices, procedures, and tests compared to information about the safety of drugs.

  7. Adverse effects of iodine thyroid blocking: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spallek, L.; Krille, L.; Reiners, C.; Schneider, R.; Yamashita, S.; Zeeb, H.

    2008-01-01

    131 I, when released in a radiological or nuclear accident as happened recently in Fukushima (Japan)), may cause thyroid cancer as a long-term consequence. Iodine thyroid blocking (ITB) is known to reduce the risk of developing thyroid cancer. Potential adverse effects of ITB have not been systematically investigated so far. This article summarises the results of a review on adverse effects of ITB based on a systematic literature search in scientific medical databases. A meta-analysis was not performed as identified studies displayed major heterogeneity. The search resulted in 14 articles relevant to the topic, reporting mostly on surveys, ecological and intervention studies. Only one study from Poland focused on effects (both desired and adverse) of an ITB intervention following the Chernobyl accident. All other studies reported on iodine administration in a different context. Overall, the studies did not reveal severe adverse reactions to potassium iodide in the general public. Since ITB is a protective measure only applied in very specific circumstances, scientifically sound studies of adverse effects are scarce and consequently the evidence base is weak. The assessment of adverse effects of ITB relies on indirect evidence from related areas. This study may contribute to ongoing developments in pharmaco-epidemiology aiming to better quantify adverse effects of medications and health care interventions including ITB. All rights reserved. (authors)

  8. Systematic reviews of adverse effects: framework for a structured approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herxheimer Andrew

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As every healthcare intervention carries some risk of harm, clinical decision making needs to be supported by a systematic assessment of the balance of benefit to harm. A systematic review that considers only the favourable outcomes of an intervention, without also assessing the adverse effects, can mislead by introducing a bias favouring the intervention. Much of the current guidance on systematic reviews is directed towards the evaluation of effectiveness; but this differs in important ways from the methods used in assessing the safety and tolerability of an intervention. A detailed discussion of why, how and when to include adverse effects in a systematic review, is required. Methods This discussion paper, which presupposes a basic knowledge of systematic review methodology, was developed by consensus among experienced reviewers, members of the Adverse Effects Subgroup of The Cochrane Collaboration, and supplemented by a consultation of content experts in reviews methodology, as well as those working in drug safety. Results A logical framework for making decisions in reviews that incorporate adverse effects is provided. We explore situations where a comprehensive investigation of adverse effects is warranted and suggest strategies to identify practicable and clinically useful outcomes. The advantages and disadvantages of including observational and experimental study designs are reviewed. The consequences of including separate studies for intended and unintended effects are explained. Detailed advice is given on designing electronic searches for studies with adverse effects data. Reviewers of adverse effects are given general guidance on the assessment of study bias, data collection, analysis, presentation and the interpretation of harms in a systematic review. Conclusion Readers need to be able to recognize how strategic choices made in the review process determine what harms are found, and how the findings may affect

  9. Probable Nootropicinduced Psychiatric Adverse Effects: A Series of Four Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Talih, Farid; Ajaltouni, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The misuse of nootropics—any substance that may alter, improve, or augment cognitive performance, mainly through the stimulation or inhibition of certain neurotransmitters—may potentially be dangerous and deleterious to the human brain, and certain individuals with a history of mental or substance use disorders might be particularly vulnerable to their adverse effects. We describe four cases of probable nootropic-induced psychiatric adverse effects to illustrate this theory. To the best of ou...

  10. Adverse effects of stress on microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complex communities of microorganisms that colonize the gastrointestinal tract impact the health status of an animal. The health of an animal as well as production traits are also affected by exposure to stress. The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of dehorning stress on the gut ...

  11. Adverse effects of herbal medicines: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzki, Paul; Watson, Leala K; Ernst, Edzard

    2013-02-01

    This overview of systematic reviews (SRs) aims to evaluate critically the evidence regarding the adverse effects of herbal medicines (HMs). Five electronic databases were searched to identify all relevant SRs, with 50 SRs of 50 different HMs meeting our inclusion criteria. Most had only minor weaknesses in methods. Serious adverse effects were noted only for four HMs: Herbae pulvis standardisatus, Larrea tridentate, Piper methysticum and Cassia senna. The most severe adverse effects were liver or kidney damage, colon perforation, carcinoma, coma and death. Moderately severe adverse effects were noted for 15 HMs: Pelargonium sidoides, Perna canaliculus, Aloe vera, Mentha piperita, Medicago sativa, Cimicifuga racemosa, Caulophyllum thalictroides, Serenoa repens, Taraxacum officinale, Camellia sinensis, Commifora mukul, Hoodia gordonii, Viscum album, Trifolium pratense and Stevia rebaudiana. Minor adverse effects were noted for 31 HMs: Thymus vulgaris, Lavandula angustifolia Miller, Boswellia serrata, Calendula officinalis, Harpagophytum procumbens, Panax ginseng, Vitex agnus-castus, Crataegus spp., Cinnamomum spp., Petasites hybridus, Agave americana, Hypericum perforatum, Echinacea spp., Silybum marianum, Capsicum spp., Genus phyllanthus, Ginkgo biloba, Valeriana officinalis, Hippocastanaceae, Melissa officinalis, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Lagerstroemia speciosa, Cnicus benedictus, Salvia hispanica, Vaccinium myrtillus, Mentha spicata, Rosmarinus officinalis, Crocus sativus, Gymnema sylvestre, Morinda citrifolia and Curcuma longa. Most of the HMs evaluated in SRs were associated with only moderately severe or minor adverse effects.

  12. Adverse reproductive effects of beer drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, William F

    2007-07-01

    This short communication represents a systematic review of the literature about beer drinking during gestation. A Medline search was undertaken of articles based on the criterion that beer and pregnancy were in the abstract and central to the article. Manuscripts were to be published in English in peer review medical journals from 1981 to 2006. Beer is a commonly consumed alcoholic beverage among reproductive-age adults. Beer drinking males have an increased risk of contributing to pregnancy waste. Women consume beer before and after pregnancy recognition. Binge drinking appears to be a common drinking behavior, and those who binge drink have an increased risk of impaired fetal growth and offspring behavior. Beer consumption by lactating women might temporarily impair motor function of nursing infants. Evidence for potentiation of beer effects by congeners and by simultaneous use of substances of abuse is inconclusive.

  13. Neuro-, Cardio-, and Immunoplasticity: Effects of Early Adversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakulak, Eric; Stevens, Courtney; Neville, Helen

    2018-01-04

    The relationship between early adversity and outcomes across the lifespan is apparent in a striking range of measures. Evidence suggests that many of these outcomes can be traced to the impacts of early adversity on multiple and integrated biological systems mediated by the brain. In this review, we integrate empirical and theoretical advances in the understanding of relationships among the brain and the functions of the endocrine, autonomic, and immune systems. We emphasize the effects of environmental experiences related to caregiver relationships because it is these experiences, in particular, that shape regulatory and threat response systems in ways that increase vulnerability and may underlie the wide range of poor outcomes associated with early adversity. Thus, we metaphorically extend the concept of plasticity to highlight our goal of a broader consideration of these interconnected mechanisms. We conclude by discussing implications for neurobiologically informed interventions that can potentially ameliorate the broad and costly effects of early adversity.

  14. Cannabis; adverse effects from an oromucosal spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, C

    2007-09-22

    An oromucosal spray has been developed from the major components of marijuana (cannabis), including tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), in alcohol with a peppermint flavouring, designed to be administered as a spray under the tongue or on the buccal mucosa to relieve pain in multiple sclerosis. Although the available evidence indicates its efficacy in this respect, some patients develop oral burning sensation, stinging or white lesions, probably burns. To investigate the oral side-effects of oromucosal cannabis spray in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. A small open observational study. A series of nine patients with MS who had been using a marijuana oromucosal spray for at least four weeks, were asked to attend for oral examination. Patients were asked whether they had ever experienced symptoms (dryness; bad taste; stinging) associated with use of the spray. A standard oral examination was carried out using a dental light, and the presence of any mucosal lesions recorded. Where mucosal lesions were present, patients were advised to discontinue the spray and re-attend after four weeks for re-examination. For ethical reasons, biopsies were not undertaken at the first visit. Of nine patients invited to participate, eight attended. All admitted to a stinging sensation on using the oromucosal cannabis spray, and four had visible oral mucosal white lesions in the floor of the mouth. Although the white lesions observed were almost certainly burns, resolving or improving on discontinuation of use of the medication, the high alcohol concentration of the oromucosal cannabis spray raises concern in relation to chronic oral use.

  15. The adverse effects of mefloquine in deployed military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adshead, S

    2014-01-01

    Mefloquine (Lariam®) is an effective anti-malarial prescribed to over 35 million travellers world-wide as chemoprophylaxis. However, it has been the subject of increased scrutiny and media attention due to its association with significant neuropsychiatric adverse events. Anecdotal evidence suggests that patient trust in the drug is waning. A prospective questionnaire-based cohort study of 150 deployed military personnel prescribed mefloquine as anti-malaria chemoprophylaxis. The primary study objective was to assess the rate of adverse reactions. In addition, an audit of mefloquine prescriptions and subsequent patient follow-up was conducted. Among a cohort of 111 individuals taking mefloquine, 54% reported at least one adverse effect and 13% required a change in prescription to a second-line anti-malarial, due to significant side-effects. All females prescribed mefloquine reported at least one adverse reaction. There were two cases of clinically significant adverse reactions. There was a higher rate of adverse events reported amongst deployed military personnel than has been reported among civilian patients. This may be partly due to the stressful environment in which deployed personnel operate.

  16. Misuse of topical corticosteroids: A clinical study of adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Dey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Misuse of topical corticosteroids is a widespread phenomenon among young people in India, especially women. The practice is associated with significant adverse effects and poor awareness of these effects among the general public. Aim: This study was conducted to examine the misuse and adverse effects of topical corticosteroids among the people in Bastar region in Chhattisgarh state of India. Materials and Methods: Data collected from patients presenting with at least one of the adverse effects of topical corticosteroids as the chief complaint, from November 2010 to October 2011. Results: Out of the 6723 new patients, 379 (5.63% had presented with misuse and adverse effects of topical corticosteroids, of whom 78.89% were females. More than 65% of the patients were in the age group 10-29 years. The main reason for using the topical corticosteroids was to lighten skin colour and treat melasma and suntan. Acne (37.99% and telangiectasia (18.99% were the most common adverse effects noted. Conclusions: Misuse of topical corticosteroids has a huge impact on dermatological practice, leading to a significant proportion of visits to the dermatologist. This hydra-headed problem needs multi-dimensional interventions, involving educational, legal and managerial approaches with cooperation from different sectors of society.

  17. Adverse effects of voriconazole: Over a decade of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Miriam T; Chandrasekar, Pranatharthi H

    2016-11-01

    Voriconazole use has increased since the drug's introduction in 2002, and new and unique adverse effects are emerging as patients undergo prolonged therapy. Most concerning is the increased risk of cutaneous malignancies, primarily squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); this risk is duration dependent and the associated malignancies tend to be more aggressive and multifocal. Voriconazole is also associated with phototoxicity (which may be a precursor to malignancy), periostitis, hallucinations and encephalopathy, peripheral neuropathy, alopecia, nail changes, hyponatremia, and other adverse effects. Some toxicities (neuropsychiatric and gastrointestinal including hepatic) are seen in clear association with supratherapeutic serum voriconazole levels; thus, careful monitoring of voriconazole levels is a critical component of safe drug use. Guidelines for screening for adverse effects after long-term voriconazole use may be beneficial and need to be established. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Adverse effects of plant food supplements and botanical preparations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Ceschi, Alessandro; Kupferschmidt, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this review was to collect available data on the following: (i) adverse effects observed in humans from the intake of plant food supplements or botanical preparations; (ii) the misidentification of poisonous plants; and (iii) interactions between plant food supplements/botanicals...... evaluated according to the World Health Organization Guidelines for causality assessment. Data were obtained for 66 plants that are common ingredients of plant food supplements; of the 492 papers selected, 402 (81.7%) dealt with adverse effects directly associated with the botanical and 89 (18.1%) concerned...... interactions with conventional drugs. Only one case was associated with misidentification. Adverse effects were reported for 39 of the 66 botanical substances searched. Of the total references, 86.6% were associated with 14 plants, including Glycine max/soybean (19.3%), Glycyrrhiza glabra/liquorice (12...

  19. Adverse Health Effects in Relation to Urban Residential Soundscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    SKÅNBERG, A.; ÖHRSTRÖM, E.

    2002-02-01

    Noise pollution from road traffic in residential areas is a growing environmental problem. New approaches to turn the negative trend are needed. The programme “Soundscape Support to Health” will achieve new knowledge about the adverse health effects of noise pollution on humans and will investigate the link between well-being and health and perceived soundscapes for optimizing the acoustic soundscapes in urban residential areas. This paper will briefly present the programme and presents preliminary results from the first study of how various adverse health effects are related to individual noise exposures among individuals in residential areas with and without access to a quiet side of the dwelling.

  20. Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on the Adverse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on the Adverse Cardiovascular. Profile in Women with Polycystic ... KEY WORDS: Autonomic functions, cardiovascular system, polycystic ovarian syndrome, stress. INTRODUCTION. The polycystic ..... Training involved tensing the specific muscle groups for 7-10 seconds, followed by ...

  1. 15 CFR 971.602 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL RECOVERY PERMITS... significant adverse environmental effect or impact (for the purposes of sections 103(a)(2)(D), 105(a)(4), 106.... Determinations will be based upon the best information available, including relevant environmental impact...

  2. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS TRADE SECRECY CLAIMS FOR EMERGENCY PLANNING AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims... adverse health effects associated with each of the chemicals claimed as trade secret and shall make this...

  3. 81-85 Community Awareness of Adverse Effects of No

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secretary

    should have a medical background in order to enable them educate patients on the adverse effects of NSAIDs and other drugs. REFERENCES. [1] S. Rossi. Australian Medicines. Handbook. Australian Medicines. Handbook Pty Ltd., Adelaide. 2006. [2] G.A. Green. Clin. Cornerstone 3(5),. 2001, 50-59. [3] M.C. Thomas. Med.

  4. Methylmercury exposure and adverse cardiovascular effects in Faroese whalingmen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Anna L; Weihe, Pál; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Methylmercury (MeHg), a worldwide contaminant found in fish and seafood, has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. OBJECTIVE: We examined 42 Faroese whaling men (30-70 years of age) to assess possible adverse effects within a wide range of MeHg exposures from c...

  5. Adverse effects of corticosteroids on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholter, D E; Armstrong, P W

    2000-04-01

    To review the potential adverse effects of glucocorticoid therapy on the cardiovascular system and to provide insight into the mechanisms of these effects. Case reports and studies demonstrating adverse effects of glucocorticoid therapy on the cardiovascular system were examined from a MEDLINE search. Animal data and in vitro studies were identified to provide insight on the mechanisms of these effects. Undesirable effects identified were dyslipidemia, hypertension and left ventricular free wall rupture after myocardial infarction. Elevations of total plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and high density lipoprotein cholesterol are often reported. The elevation of various lipid subfractions is likely mediated by increased plasma insulin levels, impaired lipid catabolism and increased lipid production in the liver. Hypertension was shown to be more prevalent in patients treated with high doses of glucocorticoid. The mechanisms are complex, but final pathways include increased systemic vascular resistance, increased extracellular volume and increased cardiac contractility. Glucocorticoids were demonstrated to increase the incidence of left ventricular free wall rupture by delaying myocardial scar formation in the postmyocardial infarction period. The major adverse effects of glucocorticoids on the cardiovascular system include dyslipidemia and hypertension. These effects may predispose treated patients to coronary artery disease if high doses and prolonged courses are used. Accordingly, corticosteroids should be employed judiciously in patients with other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and attention should be paid to risk modification. Low dose and alternate day therapy may reduce the incidence of complications in corticosteroid therapy. The mechanisms of these adverse effects are complex and have not yet been fully explained.

  6. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    reduces neurogenesis and cerebral volume, impairs memory and increases the incidence of cerebral palsy. Cerebral effects of glucocorticoids in later childhood have been less thoroughly studied, but apparent brain atrophy, reduced size of limbic structures and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported....... Glucocortioids affect several cellular structures and functions, which may explain the observed adverse effects. Glucocorticoids can impair neuronal glucose uptake, decrease excitability, cause atrophy of dendrites, compromise development of myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and disturb important cellular...

  7. Adverse effects of creatine supplementation : fact or fiction?

    OpenAIRE

    Poortmans, J R; Francaux, Marc

    2000-01-01

    The consumption of oral creatine monohydrate has become increasingly common among professional and amateur athletes. Despite numerous publications on the ergogenic effects of this naturally occurring substance, there is little information on the possible adverse effects of this supplement. The objectives of this review are to identify the scientific facts and contrast them with reports in the news media, which have repeatedly emphasised the health risks of creatine supplementation and do not ...

  8. PPARγ deacetylation dissociates thiazolidinedione's metabolic benefits from its adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Kraakman, Michael; Liu, Qiongming; Postigo-Fernandez, Jorge; Ji, Ruiping; Kon, Ning; Larrea, Delfina; Namwanje, Maria; Fan, Lihong; Chan, Michelle; Area-Gomez, Estela; Fu, Wenxian; J Creusot, Remi; Qiang, Li

    2018-03-27

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are PPARγ agonists with potent insulin-sensitizing effects. However, their use has been curtailed by significant adverse effects on weight, bone, heart, and hemodynamic balance. TZDs induce the deacetylation of PPARγ on K268 and K293 to cause the browning of white adipocytes. Here we showed that targeted PPARγ mutations resulting in constitutive deacetylation (K268R/K293R, 2KR) increased energy expenditure, and protected from visceral adiposity and diet-induced obesity by augmenting brown remodeling of white adipose tissues. Strikingly, when 2KR mice were treated with rosiglitazone, they maintained the insulin-sensitizing, glucose-lowering response to TZDs, while displaying little, if any, adverse effects on fat deposition, bone density, fluid retention, and cardiac hypertrophy. Thus, deacetylation appears to fulfill the goal of dissociating the metabolic benefits of PPARγ activation from its adverse effects. Strategies to leverage PPARγ deacetylation may lead to the design of safer, more effective agonists of this nuclear receptor in the treatment of metabolic diseases.

  9. Categories of adverse health effects from indoor air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weetman, D.F.; Munby, J.

    1994-01-01

    There is a lack of precision in the definition of health, which leads to confusion in the assessment of adverse effects arising from indoor air pollution. Adverse health effects range from annoyance to life-threatening conditions. Survey responses suggest that males and females differ in their perception of a healthy person, but both sexes envisage a male in terms of positive fitness, strength, energy and the possession of an athletic body, rather than how long one was likely to live. Psychological fitness was relatively unimportant in describing the health of others, but was rates as very important with respect to one's own health. Mortality statistics tend to obscure the proportion of the population who suffer chronic illness that is not life threatening. Although health is largely determined by genetic constitution, lifestyle and environmental factors, the morale of an individual is also important. A new classification of the adverse effects on health of indoor air pollution is proposed: this includes 'comfort' responses, such as sick building syndrome (category 1); acute chemical effects, the nature of which depends upon the specific intoxicant (category 2B), and perceived chronic grave risk, including cancer causation (category 3). The magnitude of risk in this latter category is imprecise, because its measurement involves the technique of quantitative risk assessment. (author) 1 fig., 2 tabs., 158 refs

  10. Lithium in older patients: treatment patterns and somatic adverse effects

    OpenAIRE

    van Melick, E.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium has been used in psychiatry for over 60 years and is still one of the first-line treatments in bipolar disorder. It is also used as augmentation to antidepressants in treatment resistant depression. Age-dependent changes in lithium pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics may influence lithium use patterns in an ageing population. Multimorbidity and polypharmacy could make older patients more vulnerable to the adverse effects of lithium. The main objectives of this thesis were to study t...

  11. Adverse health effects associated with Islamic fasting -A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Nania Mohamed Pakkir Maideen; Aََََbdurazak Jumale; Rajkapoor Balasubramaniam

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Millions of Muslims across the world observe Islamic fasting during the holy month of Ramadan, as well as the other specific dates in the lunar calendar year. While fasting during this month, Muslims refrain from eating or drinking from dawn to dusk. Islamic fasting is similar to alternate day fasting (ADF) since it incorporates an average of 12 hours of fasting and 12 hours of feasting periods. This present review study is aimed to find out the common adverse health effects ass...

  12. Ketamine for Pain Management-Side Effects & Potential Adverse Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Cheryl A; Ivester, Julius R

    2017-12-01

    An old anesthetic agent, ketamine is finding new use in lower doses for analgesic purposes. There are concerns stemming from its potential side effects-specifically psychomimetic effects. These side effects are directly related to dose amount. The doses used for analgesic purposes are much lower than those used for anesthesia purposes. A literature review was performed to ascertain potential side effects and/or adverse events when using ketamine for analgesia purposes. The search included CINAHL, PubMed, and Ovid using the search terms "ketamine," "ketamine infusion," "pain," "adverse events," "practice guideline," and "randomized controlled trial." Searches were limited to full-text, peer-reviewed articles and systematic reviews. Initially 1,068 articles were retrieved. The search was then narrowed by using the Boolean connector AND with various search term combinations. After adjusting for duplication, article titles and abstracts were reviewed, leaving 25 articles for an in-depth analysis. Specific exclusion criteria were then applied. The literature supports the use of ketamine for analgesic purposes, and ketamine offers a nonopioid option for the management of some pain conditions. Because ketamine is still classified as an anesthetic agent, health care institutions should develop their own set of policies and protocols for the administration of ketamine. By using forethought and understanding of the properties of ketamine, appropriate care may be planned to mitigate potential side effects and adverse events so that patients are appropriately cared for and their pain effectively managed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neurological Adverse Effects after Radiation Therapy for Stage II Seminoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbeskov Lauritsen, Liv; Meidahl Petersen, Peter; Daugaard, Gedske

    2012-01-01

    We report 3 cases of patients with testicular cancer and stage II seminoma who developed neurological symptoms with bilateral leg weakness about 4 to 9 months after radiation therapy (RT). They all received RT to the para-aortic lymph nodes with a total dose of 40 Gy (36 Gy + 4 Gy as a boost....../or to the spinal cord. RT is believed to produce plexus injury by both direct toxic effects and secondary microinfarction of the nerves, but the exact pathophysiology of RT-induced injury is unclear. Since reported studies of radiation-induced neurological adverse effects are limited, it is difficult to estimate...

  14. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damsted, Sara K; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B; Uldall, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used in treatment of paediatric diseases, but evidence of associated adverse cerebral effects is accumulating. The various pharmacokinetic profiles of the exogenous glucocorticoids and the changes in pharmacodynamics during childhood, result in different exposure of nervous tissue to exogenous glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoids activate two types of intracellular receptors, the mineralocorticoid receptor and the glucocorticoid receptor. The two receptors differ in cerebral distribution, affinity and effects. Exogenous glucocorticoids favor activation of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids reduces neurogenesis and cerebral volume, impairs memory and increases the incidence of cerebral palsy. Cerebral effects of glucocorticoids in later childhood have been less thoroughly studied, but apparent brain atrophy, reduced size of limbic structures and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported. Glucocortioids affect several cellular structures and functions, which may explain the observed adverse effects. Glucocorticoids can impair neuronal glucose uptake, decrease excitability, cause atrophy of dendrites, compromise development of myelin-producing oligodendrocytes and disturb important cellular structures involved in axonal transport, long-term potentiation and neuronal plasticity. Significant maturation of the brain continues throughout childhood and we hypothesize that exposure to exogenous glucocorticoids during preschool and school age causes adverse cerebral effects. It is our opinion that studies of associations between exposure to glucocorticoids during childhood and impaired neurodevelopment are highly relevant. Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology

  15. The effects of early life adversity on the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwenspoek, Martha M C; Kuehn, Annette; Muller, Claude P; Turner, Jonathan D

    2017-08-01

    Early life adversity (ELA) is associated with a higher risk for diseases in adulthood. Although the pathophysiological effects of ELA are varied, there may be a unifying role for the immune system in all of the long-term pathologies such as chronic inflammatory disorders (autoimmune diseases, allergy, and asthma). Recently, significant efforts have been made to elucidate the long-term effects ELA has on immune function, as well as the mechanisms underlying these immune changes. In this review, we focus on data from human studies investigating immune parameters in relation to post-natal adverse experiences. We describe the current understanding of the 'ELA immune phenotype', characterized by inflammation, impairment of the cellular immune system, and immunosenescence. However, at present, data addressing specific immune functions are limited and there is a need for high-quality, well powered, longitudinal studies to unravel cause from effect. Besides the immune system, also the stress system and health behaviors are altered in ELA. We discuss probable underlying mechanisms based on epigenetic programming that could explain the ELA immune phenotype and whether this is a direct effect of immune programming or an indirect consequence of changes in behavior or stress reactivity. Understanding the underlying mechanisms will help define effective strategies to prevent or counteract negative ELA-associated outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurological Adverse Effects of Antipsychotics in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Amador, Margarita; Merchán-Naranjo, Jessica; Tapia, Cecilia; Moreno, Carmen; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Baeza, Inmaculada; de la Serna, Elena; Alda, José A; Muñoz, Daniel; Andrés Nestares, Patricia; Cantarero, Carmen Martínez; Arango, Celso

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate demographic, clinical, and treatment factors that may impact on neurological adverse effects in naive and quasi-naive children and adolescents treated with antipsychotics. This was a 1-year, multicenter, observational study of a naive and quasi-naive pediatric population receiving antipsychotic treatment. Two subanalyses were run using the subsample of subjects taking the 3 most used antipsychotics and the subsample of antipsychotic-naive subjects. Total dyskinesia score (DyskinesiaS) and total Parkinson score (ParkinsonS) were calculated from the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center Involuntary Movement Scale, total UKU-Cognition score was calculated from the UKU Side Effect Rating Scale. Risk factors for tardive dyskinesias (TDs) defined after Schooler-Kaine criteria were studied using a logistic regression. Two hundred sixty-five subjects (mean age, 14.4 [SD, 2.9] years) with different Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Axis I disorders were recruited. DyskinesiaS (P < 0.001) and ParkinsonS (P < 0.001) increased at 1-year follow-up. Risperidone was associated with higher increases in DyskinesiaS compared with quetiapine (P < 0.001). Higher increases in ParkinsonS were found with risperidone (P < 0.001) and olanzapine (P = 0.02) compared with quetiapine. Total UKU-Cognition Score decreased at follow-up. Findings were also significant when analyzing antipsychotic-naive subjects. Fifteen subjects (5.8%) fulfilled Schooler-Kane criteria for TD at follow-up. Younger age, history of psychotic symptoms, and higher cumulative exposure time were associated with TD at follow-up. Antipsychotics increased neurological adverse effects in a naive and quasi-naive pediatric population and should be carefully monitored. Risperidone presented higher scores in symptoms of dyskinesia and parkinsonism. Quetiapine was the antipsychotic with less neurological adverse effects. Younger subjects, psychosis, and

  17. Review article. Adverse hematological effects of hexavalent chromium: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Rina Rani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Workers of tanneries, welding industries, factories manufacturing chromate containing paints are exposed to hexavalent chromium that increas¬es the risk of developing serious adverse health effects. This review elucidates the mode of action of hexavalent chromium on blood and its adverse effects. Both leukocyte and erythrocyte counts of blood sharply decreased in Swiss mice after two weeks of intraperitoneal treatment with Cr (VI, with the erythrocytes transforming into echinocytes. The hexavalent chromium in the blood is readily reduced to trivalent form and the reductive capacity of erythrocytes is much greater than that of plasma. Excess Cr (VI, not reduced in plasma, may enter erythrocytes and lymphocytes and in rodents it induces microcytic anemia. The toxic effects of chromium (VI include mitochondrial injury and DNA damage of blood cells that leads to carcinogenicity. Excess Cr (VI increases cytosolic Ca2+ activity and ATP depletion thereby inducing eryptosis. Se, vitamin C, and quercetin are assumed to have some protective effect against hexavalent chromium induced hematological disorders.

  18. Adverse Psychiatric Effects Associated with Herbal Weight-Loss Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, F Saverio; Coviello, Marialuce; Imperatori, Claudio; Francesconi, Marta; Hough, Christina M; Valeriani, Giuseppe; De Stefano, Gianfranco; Bolzan Mariotti Posocco, Flaminia; Santacroce, Rita; Minichino, Amedeo; Corazza, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and overeating are among the most prevalent health concerns worldwide and individuals are increasingly using performance and image-enhancing drugs (PIEDs) as an easy and fast way to control their weight. Among these, herbal weight-loss products (HWLPs) often attract users due to their health claims, assumed safety, easy availability, affordable price, extensive marketing, and the perceived lack of need for professional oversight. Reports suggest that certain HWLPs may lead to onset or exacerbation of psychiatric disturbances. Here we review the available evidence on psychiatric adverse effects of HWLPs due to their intrinsic toxicity and potential for interaction with psychiatric medications.

  19. Adverse Psychiatric Effects Associated with Herbal Weight-Loss Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saverio Bersani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and overeating are among the most prevalent health concerns worldwide and individuals are increasingly using performance and image-enhancing drugs (PIEDs as an easy and fast way to control their weight. Among these, herbal weight-loss products (HWLPs often attract users due to their health claims, assumed safety, easy availability, affordable price, extensive marketing, and the perceived lack of need for professional oversight. Reports suggest that certain HWLPs may lead to onset or exacerbation of psychiatric disturbances. Here we review the available evidence on psychiatric adverse effects of HWLPs due to their intrinsic toxicity and potential for interaction with psychiatric medications.

  20. [Serious adverse effect of combined oral contraceptive pills among teenagers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylander, Malin Chatarina; Clausen, Helle V

    2014-06-23

    PubMed-search found studies investigating adverse effects of combined oral contraceptive pills (COC) among teenagers. Four studies found a small negative impact of COC on acquisition of bone mineral density. COC is associated with elevated risk of venous thrombotic events (VTE), especially during the first year of usage. VTE risk increases with EE dose and progestin of 3rd and 4th generation. There are several difficulties in studying COC use in teenagers: high dropout rates, ethical considerations and many different COC formulas.

  1. The adverse effects of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Boroumand Rezazadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the important role of thyroid disorders on reproductive health of the women of childbearing age, pregnancy outcome, fetal health, and neurodevelopment of the infant, providing comprehensive assessment of the treatments used for preventing hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism seems to be essential. Therefore, evaluating the efficacy of different treatments of the thyroid disorders would be beneficial in better managing and controlling the disease during pregnancy. Hypothyroidism (a deficiency of thyroid hormone is a common thyroid disorder, which might increase the incidence rate of miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, placental abruption, and preterm delivery. Hyperthyroidism, which is not a common disorder during the pregnancy not only leads to similar adverse effects as hypothyroidism but also can result in stillbirth and intrauterine growth restriction. Levothyroxine is the preferred treatment of hypothyroidism and the only drug therapy recommended for treating hyperthyroidism during pregnancy. In this study, we aimed to briefly review the adverse effects of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism during pregnancy and review the effects of recent suggested treatments for controlling thyroid disorders on pregnancy outcomes.

  2. Adverse effects of outdoor pollution in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldacci, Sandra; Maio, Sara; Cerrai, Sonia; Sarno, Giuseppe; Viegi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    With fewer newborns and people living longer, older people are making up an increasing fraction of the total population. Epidemiological evidence shows that older-age-related health problems affect a wide and expanding proportion of the world population. One of the major epidemiological trends of this century is the rise of chronic diseases that affect more elderly than younger people. A total of 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2012 are attributable to outdoor air pollution; the susceptibility to adverse effects of air pollution is expected to differ widely between people and within the same person, and also over time. Frailty history, a measure of multi-system decline, modifies cumulative associations between air pollution and lung function. Moreover, pre-existing diseases may determine susceptibility. In the elderly, due to comorbidity, exposure to air pollutants may even be fatal. Rapid and not-well-planned urbanization is associated with high level of ambient air pollution, mainly caused by vehicular exhausts. In general, there is sufficient evidence of the adverse effects related to short-term exposure, while fewer studies have addressed the longer-term health effects. Increased pollution exposures have been associated with increased mortality, hospital admissions/emergency-room visits, mainly due to exacerbations of chronic diseases or to respiratory tract infections (e.g., pneumonia). These effects may also be modulated by ambient temperature and many studies show that the elderly are mostly vulnerable to heat waves. The association between heat and mortality in the elderly is well-documented, while less is known regarding the associations with hospital admissions. Chronic exposure to elevated levels of air pollution has been related to the incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic bronchitis (CB), asthma, and emphysema. There is also growing evidence suggesting adverse effects on lung function related to long-term exposure

  3. Symptomatic sinus bradycardia: A rare adverse effect of intravenous ondansetron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shahnawaz Moazzam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ondansetron is a serotonin receptor antagonist which has been used frequently to reduce the incidence of post-operative nausea and vomiting in laparoscopic surgery. It has become very popular drug for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting due to its superiority in-terms of efficacy as well as lack of side effects and drug interactions. Although cardiovascular adverse effects of this drug are rare, we found a case of symptomatic sinus bradycardia in a 43-year-old female patient, going for laparoscopic cholecystectomy, who developed the same after she was given intravenous ondansetron in operation theater during premedication. Hence, we report this case, as the rare possibility of encountering bradycardia effect after intravenous administration of ondansetron should be born in mind.

  4. Pharmacovigilance, risks and adverse effects of self-medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Bondon-Guitton, Emmanuelle; Abadie, Delphine; Lacroix, Isabelle; Berreni, Aurélia; Pugnet, Grégory; Durrieu, Geneviève; Sailler, Laurent; Giroud, Jean-Paul; Damase-Michel, Christine; Montastruc, François

    2016-04-01

    Self-medication means resorting to one or more drugs in order to treat oneself without the help of a doctor. This phenomenon is developing fast. In this review, we will discuss the main definitions of self-medication; we will then present a few important characteristics of this therapeutic practice: prevalence, reasons, populations involved and drugs used. Whilst the theoretical risks of self-medication have been abundantly discussed in the literature (adverse effects, interactions, product, dosage or treatment duration errors, difficulty in self-diagnosis, risk of addiction or abuse…), there is in fact very little detailed pharmacovigilance data concerning the characteristics and the consequences of this usage in real life. This study therefore describes the all too rare data that is available: patients, clinical characteristics, "seriousness" and drugs involved in the adverse effects of self-medication. It also discusses leads to be followed in order to minimize medication risks, which are obviously not well known and clearly not sufficiently notified. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanisms and assessment of statin-related muscular adverse effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Mörike, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Statin-associated muscular adverse effects cover a wide range of symptoms, including asymptomatic increase of creatine kinase serum activity and life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Different underlying pathomechanisms have been proposed. However, a unifying concept of the pathogenesis of statin-related muscular adverse effects has not emerged so far. In this review, we attempt to categorize these mechanisms along three levels. Firstly, among pharmacokinetic factors, it has been shown for some statins that inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic biotransformation and hepatic uptake by transporter proteins contribute to an increase of systemic statin concentrations. Secondly, at the myocyte membrane level, cell membrane uptake transporters affect intracellular statin concentrations. Thirdly, at the intracellular level, inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase results in decreased intracellular concentrations of downstream metabolites (e.g. selenoproteins, ubiquinone, cholesterol) and alteration of gene expression (e.g. ryanodine receptor 3, glycine amidinotransferase). We also review current recommendations for prescribers. PMID:25069381

  6. Adverse testicular effects of Botox® in mature rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breikaa, Randa M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Mosli, Hisham A. [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Nagy, Ayman A. [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta (Egypt); Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B., E-mail: abnaim.pharma@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-03-01

    Botox® injections are taking a consistently increasing place in urology. Intracremasteric injections, particularly, have been applied for cryptorchidism and painful testicular spasms. Studies outlining their safety for this use are, however, scanty. Thus, the present study aimed at evaluating possible testicular toxicity of Botox® injections and their effect on male fertility. Mature rats were given intracremasteric Botox® injections (10, 20 and 40 U/kg) three times in a two-week interval. Changes in body and testes weights were examined and gonadosomatic index compared to control group. Semen quality, sperm parameters, fructose, protein, cholesterol and triglycerides contents were assessed. Effects on normal testicular function were investigated by measuring testosterone levels and changes in enzyme activities (lactate dehydrogenase-X and acid phosphatase). To draw a complete picture, changes in oxidative and inflammatory states were examined, in addition to the extent of connective tissue deposition between seminiferous tubules. In an attempt to have more accurate information about possible spermatotoxic effects of Botox®, flowcytometric analysis and histopathological examination were carried out. Botox®-injected rats showed altered testicular physiology and function. Seminiferous tubules were separated by dense fibers, especially with the highest dose. Flowcytometric analysis showed a decrease in mature sperms and histopathology confirmed the findings. The oxidative state was, however, comparable to control group. This study is the first to show that intracremasteric injections of Botox® induce adverse testicular effects evidenced by inhibited spermatogenesis and initiation of histopathological changes. In conclusion, decreased fertility may be a serious problem Botox® injections could cause. - Highlights: • Botox® injections are the trend nowadays, for both medical and non-medical uses. • They were recently suggested for cryptorchidism and

  7. Exogenous glucocorticoids and adverse cerebral effects in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsted, Sara K.; Born, A P; Paulson, Olaf B

    2011-01-01

    structures involved in axonal transport, long-term potentiation and neuronal plasticity. Significant maturation of the brain continues throughout childhood and we hypothesize that exposure to exogenous glucocorticoids during preschool and school age causes adverse cerebral effects. It is our opinion...... of the glucocorticoid receptor, which is associated with unfavorable cellular outcomes. Prenatal treatment with glucocorticoids can compromise brain growth and is associated with periventricular leukomalacia, attentions deficits and poorer cognitive performance. In the neonatal period exposure to glucocorticoids...... reduces neurogenesis and cerebral volume, impairs memory and increases the incidence of cerebral palsy. Cerebral effects of glucocorticoids in later childhood have been less thoroughly studied, but apparent brain atrophy, reduced size of limbic structures and neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported...

  8. Aloe vera: A review of toxicity and adverse clinical effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Mei, Nan

    2016-04-02

    The Aloe plant is employed as a dietary supplement in a variety of foods and as an ingredient in cosmetic products. The widespread human exposure and its potential toxic and carcinogenic activities raise safety concerns. Chemical analysis reveals that the Aloe plant contains various polysaccharides and phenolic chemicals, notably anthraquinones. Ingestion of Aloe preparations is associated with diarrhea, hypokalemia, pseudomelanosis coli, kidney failure, as well as phototoxicity and hypersensitive reactions. Recently, Aloe vera whole leaf extract showed clear evidence of carcinogenic activity in rats, and was classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a possible human carcinogen (Group 2B). This review presents updated information on the toxicological effects, including the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, and adverse clinical effects of Aloe vera whole leaf extract, gel, and latex.

  9. Neurological Adverse Effects after Radiation Therapy for Stage II Seminoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbeskov Lauritsen, Liv; Meidahl Petersen, Peter; Daugaard, Gedske

    2012-01-01

    against the tumour bed) with a conventional fractionation of 2 Gy/day, 5 days per week. RT was applied as hockey-stick portals, also called L-fields. In 2 cases, the symptoms fully resolved. Therapeutic irradiation can cause significant injury to the peripheral nerves of the lumbosacral plexus and/or...... to the spinal cord. RT is believed to produce plexus injury by both direct toxic effects and secondary microinfarction of the nerves, but the exact pathophysiology of RT-induced injury is unclear. Since reported studies of radiation-induced neurological adverse effects are limited, it is difficult to estimate......We report 3 cases of patients with testicular cancer and stage II seminoma who developed neurological symptoms with bilateral leg weakness about 4 to 9 months after radiation therapy (RT). They all received RT to the para-aortic lymph nodes with a total dose of 40 Gy (36 Gy + 4 Gy as a boost...

  10. Does cannabidiol protect against adverse psychological effects of THC?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond J.M. eNiesink

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The recreational use of cannabis can have persistent adverse effects on mental health. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC is the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, and most, if not all, of the effects associated with the use of cannabis are caused by THC. Recent studies have suggested a possible protective effect of another cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD. A literature search was performed in the bibliographic databases PubMed, PsycINFO and Web of Science using the keyword ‘cannabidiol.’ After removing duplicate entries, 1295 unique titles remained. Based on the titles and abstracts, an initial selection was made. The reference lists of the publications identified in this manner were examined for additional references. Cannabis is not a safe drug. Depending on how often someone uses, the age of onset, the potency of the cannabis that is used and someone's individual sensitivity, the recreational use of cannabis may cause permanent psychological disorders. Most recreational users will never be faced with such persistent mental illness, but in some individuals cannabis use leads to undesirable effects: cognitive impairment, anxiety, paranoia and increased risks of developing chronic psychosis or drug addiction. Studies examining the protective effects of CBD have shown that CBD can counteract the negative effects of THC. However, the question remains of how the laboratory results translate to the types of cannabis that are encountered by real-world recreational users.

  11. Identifying and managing adverse environmental health effects: 3. Lead exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Margaret D.; Abelsohn, Alan; Campbell, Monica; Weir, Erica

    2002-01-01

    LEAD LEVELS IN NORTH AMERICAN CHILDREN AND ADULTS have declined in the past 3 decades, but lead persists in the environment in lead paint, old plumbing and contaminated soil. There are also a number of occupations and hobbies that carry a high risk of lead exposure. There is no evidence for a threshold below which lead has no adverse health effects. Blood lead levels previously considered safe are now known to cause subtle, chronic health effects. The health effects of lead exposure include developmental neurotoxicity, reproductive dysfunction and toxicity to the kidneys, blood and endocrine systems. Most lead exposures are preventable, and diagnosing lead poisoning is relatively simple compared with diagnosing health effects of exposures to other environmental toxins. Accurate assessment of lead poisoning requires specific knowledge of the sources, high-risk groups and relevant laboratory tests. In this article we review the multiple, systemic toxic effects of lead and provide current information on groups at risk, prevention, diagnosis and clinical treatment. We illustrate how the CH2OPD2 mnemonic (Community, Home, Hobbies, Occupation, Personal habits, Diet and Drugs) and specific screening questions are useful tools for physicians to quickly obtain an environmental exposure history and identify patients at high risk of lead exposure. By applying effective primary prevention, case-finding and treatment interventions for lead exposure, both the individual patient and the larger community reap the benefits of better health. PMID:12041847

  12. Adverse health effects associated with Islamic fasting -A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nania Mohamed Pakkir Maideen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Millions of Muslims across the world observe Islamic fasting during the holy month of Ramadan, as well as the other specific dates in the lunar calendar year. While fasting during this month, Muslims refrain from eating or drinking from dawn to dusk. Islamic fasting is similar to alternate day fasting (ADF since it incorporates an average of 12 hours of fasting and 12 hours of feasting periods. This present review study is aimed to find out the common adverse health effects associated with Islamic fasting and the preventive measures to be followed to avoid them. Methods: The literature was reviewed through searching in databases such as PubMed, Google Scholar, and reference lists to identify the related articles. Results: Many health benefits have been attributed to Islamic fasting, including the reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer, hypertension, and asthma. On the other hand, some studies have mentioned a few health problems associated with Islamic fasting, such as headaches, heartburn, constipation, dehydration, decreased sleep quality, and anemia, which may occur in some fasting individuals during Ramadan. Conclusion: Islamic fasting could be beneficial for health if it is performed correctly. During Ramadan, fasting individuals are advised to adhere to a balanced diet that contains sufficient portions of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, pulses, meat, fish, milk, and dairy products. Moreover, fasting individuals must drink adequate fluids, such as water, fresh fruit juices, and soups, in order to prevent the possible adverse health effects associated with Islamic fasting.

  13. The Adverse Effects of Air Pollution on the Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Sermin; Zadeoglulari, Zeynep; Fuss, Stefan H.; Genc, Kursad

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution is a serious and common public health concern associated with growing morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the last decades, the adverse effects of air pollution on the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems have been well established in a series of major epidemiological and observational studies. In the recent past, air pollution has also been associated with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and neurodevelopmental disorders. It has been demonstrated that various components of air pollution, such as nanosized particles, can easily translocate to the CNS where they can activate innate immune responses. Furthermore, systemic inflammation arising from the pulmonary or cardiovascular system can affect CNS health. Despite intense studies on the health effects of ambient air pollution, the underlying molecular mechanisms of susceptibility and disease remain largely elusive. However, emerging evidence suggests that air pollution-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, microglial activation, cerebrovascular dysfunction, and alterations in the blood-brain barrier contribute to CNS pathology. A better understanding of the mediators and mechanisms will enable the development of new strategies to protect individuals at risk and to reduce detrimental effects of air pollution on the nervous system and mental health. PMID:22523490

  14. Adverse effects of aromatherapy: a systematic review of case reports and case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzki, Paul; Alotaibi, Amani; Ernst, Edzard

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review was aimed at critically evaluating the evidence regarding the adverse effects associated with aromatherapy. Five electronic databases were searched to identify all relevant case reports and case series. Forty two primary reports met our inclusion criteria. In total, 71 patients experienced adverse effects of aromatherapy. Adverse effects ranged from mild to severe and included one fatality. The most common adverse effect was dermatitis. Lavender, peppermint, tea tree oil and ylang-ylang were the most common essential oils responsible for adverse effects. Aromatherapy has the potential to cause adverse effects some of which are serious. Their frequency remains unknown. Lack of sufficiently convincing evidence regarding the effectiveness of aromatherapy combined with its potential to cause adverse effects questions the usefulness of this modality in any condition.

  15. CORAL: model for no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Pizzo, Fabiola; Lombardo, Anna; Gadaleta, Domenico; Benfenati, Emilio

    2015-08-01

    The in vivo repeated dose toxicity (RDT) test is intended to provide information on the possible risk caused by repeated exposure to a substance over a limited period of time. The measure of the RDT is the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) that is the dose at which no effects are observed, i.e., this endpoint indicates the safety level for a substance. The need to replace in vivo tests, as required by some European Regulations (registration, evaluation authorization and restriction of chemicals) is leading to the searching for reliable alternative methods such as quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Considering the complexity of the RDT endpoint, for which data quality is limited and depends anyway on the study design, the development of QSAR for this endpoint is an attractive task. Starting from a dataset of 140 organic compounds with NOAEL values related to oral short term toxicity in rats, we developed a QSAR model based on optimal descriptors calculated with simplified molecular input-line entry systems and the graph of atomic orbitals by the Monte Carlo method, using CORAL software. Three different splits into the training, calibration, and validation sets are studied. The mechanistic interpretation of these models in terms of molecular fragment with positive or negative contributions to the endpoint is discussed. The probabilistic definition for the domain of applicability is suggested.

  16. The adverse effects of nitrates on stone monuments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikiotis, Denis; Kirkitsos, Philip [Department of Environmental Studies, University of the Aegean, Mytilene (Greece)

    1995-08-23

    The adverse effects of nitrates on Pentelic marble and other calcareous stones have been investigated in the field and the laboratory. The concentrations of photochemically formed nitrates in the atmosphere of central Athens were measured over a period of 1 year and were found to be as high as in other polluted cities. The surface density of nitrates on the Parthenon at the end of the dry season was found to be 6.9 {mu}g cm{sup {sub 2}}. The extent of corrosion of Pentelic marble by the dry deposition of nitrates and sulphates on the Acropolis hill were compared with the aid of a specially designed reactor. It was found that they were of the same order of magnitude. A modified version of this reactor was used to compare the corrosive action of the nitrates and sulphates with that of NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2}. Finally, a nitric acid generator was used in the laboratory to investigate the corrosive action of this acid on Pentelic marble. The variables studied were the surface area of stone, concentration of nitric acid, flow rate of the corrosive mixture and relative humidity. It was found that nitric acid, under almost all conditions, is a very corrosive agent for marble stones

  17. Fidget spinners: Purported benefits, adverse effects and accepted alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schecter, Rachel A; Shah, Jay; Fruitman, Kate; Milanaik, Ruth Lynn

    2017-10-01

    In the span of a few months, fidget spinners have caught the eyes of millions of children, parents, educators and paediatricians. Fidget spinners, hand-held toys designed to spin freely in your grasp, have become a source of entertainment for consumers of all ages. Despite a lack of scientific evidence, toy marketers have advertised the benefits of fidget spinners for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and other disorders (e.g. autism, anxiety, sensory issues). Parents are incentivized by these purported benefits to purchase fidget spinners to improve their child's concentration and decrease stress. While fidget spinners are a new phenomenon, existing therapy toys (e.g. sensory putty) have been used by occupational therapists for similar reasons, with comparably little research supporting these claims. The purpose of this review is to explore literature regarding sensory toys and examine educator/professional-reported concerns and medical adverse effects of using fidget spinners. Due to a recent surge in popularity, fidget spinners and other self-regulatory occupational therapy toys have yet to be subjected to rigorous scientific research. Thus, their alleged benefits remain scientifically unfounded. Paediatricians should be aware of potential choking hazards with this new fad, and inform parents that peer-reviewed studies do not support the beneficial claims.

  18. Second-Generation Antipsychotics and Extrapyramidal Adverse Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevena Divac

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal adverse effects are well recognized in the context of first-generation antipsychotic drugs. However, the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, with atypical mechanism of action, especially lower dopamine receptors affinity, was met with great expectations among clinicians regarding their potentially lower propensity to cause extrapyramidal syndrome. This review gives a brief summary of the recent literature relevant to second-generation antipsychotics and extrapyramidal syndrome. Numerous studies have examined the incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome with first- and second-generation antipsychotics. The majority of these studies clearly indicate that extrapyramidal syndrome does occur with second-generation agents, though in lower rates in comparison with first generation. Risk factors are the choice of a particular second-generation agent (with clozapine carrying the lowest risk and risperidone the highest, high doses, history of previous extrapyramidal symptoms, and comorbidity. Also, in comparative studies, the choice of a first-generation comparator significantly influences the results. Extrapyramidal syndrome remains clinically important even in the era of second-generation antipsychotics. The incidence and severity of extrapyramidal syndrome differ amongst these antipsychotics, but the fact is that these drugs have not lived up to the expectation regarding their tolerability.

  19. Hidden Suffering and the Effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Fulford

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To understand suffering is to understand what it means to be human. Suffering focuses our attention on our vulnerability, which we would rather ignore or deny. As health care professionals (HCP we need to be able to listen, to attune and be empathic to the suffering patient. If we act as an “enlightened witness” we provide a safe place for a suffering patient to grieve their loss and be vulnerable. This is skilled and demanding work, it is also important to tend to our own needs through a practice of self-care and reflection to prevent burn-out and compassion fatigue. The topic of adverse childhood experiences (ACE, which are common in the general population, are addressed in the second part of this paper. Their effects are profound, and increase with the degree of maltreatment. The maltreatment and suffering of these children usually remains hidden into adulthood beneath years of shame and denial. One aspect of our job in health care is to help patients acknowledge, experience, and bear the reality of life with all its pleasures and heartache. In order to do this well, we need to keep in touch with our own humanity, but also continue to take care of ourselves.

  20. Adverse effects of benfluorex on heart valves and pulmonary circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Catherine; Andréjak, Michel; Peltier, Marcel; Maréchaux, Sylvestre; Tribouilloy, Christophe

    2014-07-01

    Benfluorex is responsible for the development of restrictive valvular regurgitation due to one of its metabolites, norfenfluramine. The 5-HT2B receptor, expressed on heart valves, acts as culprit receptor for drug-induced valvular heart disease (VHD). Stimulation of this receptor leads to the upregulation of target genes involved in the proliferation and stimulation of valvular interstitial cells through different intracellular pathways. Valve lesions essentially involve the mitral and/or aortic valves. The randomised prospective REGULATE trial shows a threefold increase in the incidence of valvular regurgitation in patients exposed to benfluorex. A cross-sectional trial shows that about 7% of patients without a history of VHD previously exposed to benfluorex present echocardiographic features of drug-induced VHD. The excess risks of hospitalisation for cardiac valvular insufficiency and of valvular replacement surgery were respectively estimated to 0.5 per 1000 and 0.2 per 1000 exposed patients per year. Recent data strongly suggest an aetiological link between benfluorex exposure and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The PAH development may be explained by serotonin, which creates a pulmonary vasoconstriction through potassium-channel blockade. Further studies should be conducted to determine the subsequent course of benfluorex-induced VHD and PAH, and to identify genetic, biological and clinical factors that determine individual susceptibility to developing such adverse effects. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of adverse effects in tamoxifen exposed healthy female dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Wanessa L F; Lavalle, Gleidice E; Figueiredo, Mariana S; Souza, Aline G; Bertagnolli, Angelica C; Viana, Fernando A B; Paes, Paulo R O; Carneiro, Rubens A; Cavalcanti, Guilherme A O; Melo, Marilia M; Cassali, Geovanni D

    2010-12-22

    Mammary tumors are among the most frequent neoplasms in female dogs, but the strategies employed in animal treatment are limited. In human medicine, hormone manipulation is used in cancer therapy. Tamoxifen citrate is a selective inhibitor of oestrogen receptors and exerts a potent anti-oestrogen effect on the mammary gland. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adverse effects when exposing healthy female dogs to tamoxifen. Tamoxifen was administered for 120 days at a dose of 0.5 or 0.8 mg/kg/day to either intact or spayed female dogs. The effects were assessed through clinical examination, haematology, serum biochemistry, ophthalmology and bone marrow aspirate examination. Ovariohysterectomy was performed and the uterus examined by histopathology. Vulva oedema and purulent vaginal discharge developed with 10 days of tamoxifen exposure in all groups. Pyometra was diagnosed after around 90 days of exposure in intact females with frequencies increasing during the following 30 days of exposure. Up to 50% of dogs within the groups developed retinitis but none of the dogs had signs of reduced visual acuity. The prevalence of retinitis in each group was similar after 120 days of exposure. Haematological, biochemical and bone marrow changes were not observed. Due to the high risk of developing pyometra after prolonged exposure to tamoxifen, only spayed animals should be given this medication. A dose of 0.8 mg tamoxifen/kg body weight/day is recommended when treating tamoxifen-responsive canine mammary tumors. Due to the high risk of developing pyometra, ovariohysterectomy is recommended.

  2. PERTINENT DRY NEEDLING CONSIDERATIONS FOR MINIMIZING ADVERSE EFFECTS - PART ONE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, John S; Halle, Rob J

    2016-08-01

    Dry needling is an evidence-based treatment technique that is accepted and used by physical therapists in the United States. This treatment approach focuses on releasing or inactivating muscular trigger points to decrease pain, reduce muscle tension, and assist patients with an accelerated return to active rehabilitation. While commonly used, the technique has some patient risk and value of the treatment should be based on benefit compared to the potential risk. Adverse effects (AEs) with dry needling can be mild or severe, with overall incidence rates varying from zero to rates of approximately 10 percent. While mild AEs are the rule, any procedure that involves a needle insertion has the potential for an AE, with select regions and the underlying anatomy increasing the risk. Known significant AEs from small diameter needle insertion include pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, hematoma, infection, central nervous system injury, and other complications. Underlying anatomy across individuals has variability, requiring an in-depth knowledge of anatomy prior to any needle placement. This commentary is an overview of pertinent anatomy in the region of the thorax, with a 'part two' that addresses the abdomen, pelvis, back, vasovagal response, informed consent and other pertinent issues. The purpose of the commentary is to minimize the risk of a dry needling AE. Dry needling is an effective adjunct treatment procedure that is within the recognized scope of physical therapy practice. Physical therapy education and training provides practitioners with the anatomy, basic sciences, and clinical foundation to use this intervention safely and effectively. A safe and evidenced-based implementation of the procedure is based on a thorough understanding of the underlying anatomy and the potential risks, with risks coordinated with patients via informed consent. Level 5.

  3. Evaluation of adverse effects in tamoxifen exposed healthy female dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalcanti Guilherme AO

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammary tumors are among the most frequent neoplasms in female dogs, but the strategies employed in animal treatment are limited. In human medicine, hormone manipulation is used in cancer therapy. Tamoxifen citrate is a selective inhibitor of oestrogen receptors and exerts a potent anti-oestrogen effect on the mammary gland. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adverse effects when exposing healthy female dogs to tamoxifen. Methods Tamoxifen was administered for 120 days at a dose of 0.5 or 0.8 mg/kg/day to either intact or spayed female dogs. The effects were assessed through clinical examination, haematology, serum biochemistry, ophthalmology and bone marrow aspirate examination. Ovariohysterectomy was performed and the uterus examined by histopathology. Results Vulva oedema and purulent vaginal discharge developed with 10 days of tamoxifen exposure in all groups. Pyometra was diagnosed after around 90 days of exposure in intact females with frequencies increasing during the following 30 days of exposure. Up to 50% of dogs within the groups developed retinitis but none of the dogs had signs of reduced visual acuity. The prevalence of retinitis in each group was similar after 120 days of exposure. Haematological, biochemical and bone marrow changes were not observed. Due to the high risk of developing pyometra after prolonged exposure to tamoxifen, only spayed animals should be given this medication. Conclusions A dose of 0.8 mg tamoxifen/kg body weight/day is recommended when treating tamoxifen-responsive canine mammary tumors. Due to the high risk of developing pyometra, ovariohysterectomy is recommended.

  4. Eliciting adverse effects data from participants in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Elizabeth N; Chandler, Clare Ir; Mandimika, Nyaradzo; Leisegang, Cordelia; Barnes, Karen

    2018-01-16

    Analysis of drug safety in clinical trials involves assessing adverse events (AEs) individually or by aggregate statistical synthesis to provide evidence of likely adverse drug reactions (ADR). While some AEs may be ascertained from physical examinations or tests, there is great reliance on reports from participants to detect subjective symptoms, where he/she is often the only source of information. There is no consensus on how these reports should be elicited, although it is known that questioning methods influence the extent and nature of data detected. This leaves room for measurement error and undermines comparisons between studies and pooled analyses. This review investigated comparisons of methods used in trials to elicit participant-reported AEs. This should contribute to knowledge about the methodological challenges and possible solutions for achieving better, or more consistent, AE ascertainment in trials. To systematically review the research that has compared methods used within clinical drug trials (or methods that would be specific for such trials) to elicit information about AEs defined in the protocol or in the planning for the trial. Databases (searched to March 2015 unless indicated otherwise) included: Embase; MEDLINE; MEDLINE in Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations; Cochrane Methodology Register (July 2012); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (February 2015); Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (January 2015); Health Technology Assessment database (January 2015); CINAHL; CAB Abstracts; BIOSIS (July 2013); Science Citation Index; Social Science Citation Index; Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science. The search used thesaurus headings and synonyms for the following concepts: (A): Adverse events AND measurement; (B): Participants AND elicitation (also other synonyms for extraction of information about adverse effects from people); (C): Participants AND checklists (also other

  5. A signal detection method for temporal variation of adverse effect with vaccine adverse event reporting system data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yi; Du, Jingcheng; Huang, Jing; Ellenberg, Susan S; Hennessy, Sean; Tao, Cui; Chen, Yong

    2017-07-05

    To identify safety signals by manual review of individual report in large surveillance databases is time consuming; such an approach is very unlikely to reveal complex relationships between medications and adverse events. Since the late 1990s, efforts have been made to develop data mining tools to systematically and automatically search for safety signals in surveillance databases. Influenza vaccines present special challenges to safety surveillance because the vaccine changes every year in response to the influenza strains predicted to be prevalent that year. Therefore, it may be expected that reporting rates of adverse events following flu vaccines (number of reports for a specific vaccine-event combination/number of reports for all vaccine-event combinations) may vary substantially across reporting years. Current surveillance methods seldom consider these variations in signal detection, and reports from different years are typically collapsed together to conduct safety analyses. However, merging reports from different years ignores the potential heterogeneity of reporting rates across years and may miss important safety signals. Reports of adverse events between years 1990 to 2013 were extracted from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) database and formatted into a three-dimensional data array with types of vaccine, groups of adverse events and reporting time as the three dimensions. We propose a random effects model to test the heterogeneity of reporting rates for a given vaccine-event combination across reporting years. The proposed method provides a rigorous statistical procedure to detect differences of reporting rates among years. We also introduce a new visualization tool to summarize the result of the proposed method when applied to multiple vaccine-adverse event combinations. We applied the proposed method to detect safety signals of FLU3, an influenza vaccine containing three flu strains, in the VAERS database. We showed that it had high

  6. PERTINENT DRY NEEDLING CONSIDERATIONS FOR MINIMIZING ADVERSE EFFECTS - PART TWO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, John S; Halle, Rob J

    2016-10-01

    Dry needling (DN) is an evidence based treatment technique that is accepted and used by physical therapists in the United States. This clinical commentary is the second in a two-part series outlining some of the pertinent anatomy and other issues that are needed for optimal utilization of this treatment modality. Part one was an overview of the thorax with a summary of reported adverse effects (AEs) and the underlying anatomy that could be used to minimize patient risk. As is the case with any intervention, the technique of dry needling has some inherent patient risk. The incidence of AEs with this procedure is typically low, ranging from zero to approximately 10 percent. Knowledge of the underlying anatomy can be a key factor associated with decreasing the likelihood of an AE. The second part of this clinical commentary goes beyond the thorax, to explore the anatomy associated with dry needling the abdomen, pelvis, and back. In the abdomen, pelvis and back, dry needling can penetrate the peritoneal cavity or adjacent organs, resulting in AEs. A physiological reaction that is an AE secondary to a needle insertion, pain or fear, is an autonomic vasovagal response. Additionally, suggestions for dealing with the fearful patient, the obese patient, universal precautions, and other clinical considerations, are discussed. The purpose of parts one and part two of this clinical commentary is to minimize the risk of a dry needling AE. Dry needling is an effective adjunctive treatment procedure that is within the recognized scope of practice of the physical therapist. An evidence-based implementation of the procedure must be based on a thorough understanding of the underlying anatomy and the potential risks, with risks communicated to patients via informed consent. Level 5.

  7. Bacillary Prostatitis after Intravesical Immunotherapy:A Rare Adverse Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Joaquim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the most efficient form of intravesical immunotherapy for superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is the instillation of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG, proceeding from an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis. In up to 40% of cases, its instillation is associated with significantly elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA levels. In these cases, prostate biopsy should be withheld for 3 months and PSA should be monitored. Bacillary prostatitis is a rare occurrence in patients treated with intravesical BCG immunotherapy. Although symptomatic bacillary prostatitis is even rarer, it is the worst type of this condition. The aims of this study are to report a case of bacillary prostatitis as a rare adverse effect of intravesical BCG immunotherapy and to make a theoretical review about how to manage this complication. A 58-year-old man, former smoker, underwent a transurethral resection of the bladder in February 2004 because of a papillary transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (pT1G2N0M0. After surgery, BCG instillation therapy was given in a total of 15 instillations, the last one in March 2007. In the last 3 months of therapy, until May 2007, a progressive increase in his PSA level was registered, and he underwent a prostate biopsy revealing granulomatous prostatitis of bacillary etiology. The semen culture was positive for M. bovis. After 3 months of a two-drug (isoniazid and rifampin antituberculous regimen, the semen culture became negative and the PSA level decreased. The early identification of intravesical BCG immunotherapy complications allows their effective treatment. However, when a histological diagnosis of asymptomatic granulomatous prostatitis is made, the execution and type of treatment are controversial.

  8. Adverse effect after external radiotherapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Takano, Shingo; Yanaka, Kiyoyuki

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses the effects on normal brain tissue of radiotherapy in relation to age and irradiation dose as determined from whole-brain sections of the autopsied brains with tumors. Twenty four patients (7 glioblastomas, 2 benign gliomas, 12 brain metastases, 2 malignant lymphomas, and 1 pituitary adenoma) older than 65 years (aged), and 17 younger than 65 years (non-aged) were treated by cobalt- or linear accelerator radiotherapy. Nine patients without brain disease (4 aged and 5 non-aged) were used as a control group. The histological findings were evaluated by grading the small and capillary vessels, fibrinoid necrosis, and myelination in the white matter in whole-brain sections. Those findings were compared to the irradiation doses within all radiation fields in whole-brain sections corresponding to CT scans. Hyalinization of the small vessels was observed within the postradiation 12 months in fields exposed to total doses of less than 800 neuret. Hyalinization of the capillary vessels was greater in the irradiated group than in the control group. Demyelination was observed within the postradiation 12 months in fields irradiated by more than 800 neuret in aged patients and in fields irradiated by less than 800 neuret in non-aged patients. Fibrinoid necrosis was observed after the post-radiation 12 months in fields irradiated by less than 800 neuret in aged patients and in fields irradiated by more than 800 neuret in non-aged patients. It is worth noting that in non-aged patients with brain tumors, adverse effects of radiotherapy on vessels and parenchyma were very high even in low-dose radiation areas; and in aged patients fibrinoid necrosis, which indicates irreversible damage of vessels, was observed in low-dose radiation areas. (author)

  9. The effect of hospitalist discontinuity on adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Kevin J; Turner, Jonathan; Christensen, Nicholas; Ma, Madeleine; Lee, Jungwha; Williams, Mark V; Hansen, Luke O

    2015-03-01

    Patient-physician continuity is difficult to achieve in hospital settings because of the need to provide care continuously. The impact of hospital physician discontinuity on patient safety is unknown. To determine the association between hospital physician continuity and the incidence of adverse events (AEs). Retrospective observational study using multivariable models to adjust for patient characteristics. Patients admitted to a nonteaching hospitalist service in a large academic hospital between March 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011. Two measures of continuity were used. The Number of Physicians Index (NPI) was the total number of unique hospitalists caring for a patient. The Usual Provider of Care (UPC) Index was the proportion of encounters with the most frequently encountered hospitalist. Outcome measures were AEs detected by automated queries of information systems and confirmed by 2 physician researchers. Our analysis included data from 474 hospitalizations. In unadjusted models, each 1-unit increase in the NPI (ie, less continuity) was significantly associated with the incidence of 1 or more AEs (odds ratio = 1.75; P < 0.001). However, UPC was not associated with incidence of AEs. Across all adjusted models, neither NPI nor UPC was significantly associated with the incidence of AEs. The direction of the effect of discontinuity on AEs was also inconsistent across models. Hospitalist physician continuity does not appear to be associated with the incidence of AEs. Because hospital care is provided by teams of clinicians, future research should evaluate the impact of team complexity and dynamics on patient outcomes. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  10. The contribution of different information sources for adverse effects data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golder, Su; Loke, Yoon K

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the relative value and contribution of searching different sources to identify adverse effects data. The process of updating a systematic review and meta-analysis of thiazolidinedione-related fractures in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus was used as a case study. For each source searched, a record was made for each relevant reference included in the review noting whether it was retrieved with the search strategy used and whether it was available but not retrieved. The sensitivity, precision, and number needed to read from searching each source and from different combinations of sources were also calculated. There were 58 relevant references which presented sufficient numerical data to be included in a meta-analysis of fractures and bone mineral density. The highest number of relevant references were retrieved from Science Citation Index (SCI) (35), followed by BIOSIS Previews (27) and EMBASE (24). The precision of the searches varied from 0.88% (Scirus) to 41.67% (CENTRAL). With the search strategies used, the minimum combination of sources required to retrieve all the relevant references was; the GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) website, Science Citation Index (SCI), EMBASE, BIOSIS Previews, British Library Direct, Medscape DrugInfo, handsearching and reference checking, AHFS First, and Thomson Reuters Integrity or Conference Papers Index (CPI). In order to identify all the relevant references for this case study a number of different sources needed to be searched. The minimum combination of sources required to identify all the relevant references did not include MEDLINE.

  11. Adverse effects profile of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study population, 72.6% of patients were HIV positive, and 85% were concomitantly on HAART and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment. Adverse events were significantly more common in patients who were HIV positive than in patients who were HIV negative with regard to peripheral neuropathy (p-value ...

  12. [Defense mechanisms and perceived adverse effects in a population of 70 HIV infected adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouvernet, B; Combaluzier, S; Viaux, J-L

    2011-02-01

    We assessed the relations between defense mechanisms and perceived adverse effects of ART in a population of 70 HIV positive patients. The Bond Defense Style questionnaire was used to evaluate defense mechanisms. We used Justice's questionnaire to assess adverse effects and their psychological impact. We carried out multiple regression and mediation analyses to define the relations between the number of adverse effects, defensive styles, and the impact of adverse effects. The global model accounts for nearly 40 % of the score variance. Mature and immature defense styles bring significant contribution to understanding the impact of adverse effects, even when their number is controlled. Working on defense mechanisms should lower the psychological impact of adverse effects, therefore, improving the patient's quality of life and compliance. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Sources of patients' knowledge of the adverse effects of psychotropic medication and the perceived influence of adverse effects on compliance among service users attending community mental health services.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Agyapong, Vincent I O

    2009-12-01

    Noncompliance with medication has been a complex issue with patients with severe mental illness during the last few decades, and adverse effects of medication have been identified as a major contributor to noncompliance.

  14. The lifelong effects of early childhood adversity and toxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, W Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A rapidly expanding body of research indicates that early social environments characterized by adversity, subordination and stress, along with individual differences in susceptibility to such environments, create risks for lifelong chronic diseases, including declines in oral health. Emerging findings suggest that gene-environment interplay, resulting in epigenetically regulated differences in gene expression, underlie many such declines in health. The origins of these processes in early life reveal how many of the chronic morbidities of adulthood should be viewed as developmental disorders, with etiologic roots in childhood.

  15. Effect of Pregnancy on Adverse Outcomes After General Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Hunter B; Juarez-Colunga, Elizabeth; Bronsert, Michael; Hammermeister, Karl E; Henderson, William G; Moore, Ernest E; Meguid, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    The literature regarding the occurrence of adverse outcomes following nonobstetric surgery in pregnant compared with nonpregnant women has conflicting findings. Those differing conclusions may be the result of inadequate adjustment for differences between pregnant and nonpregnant women. It remains unclear whether pregnancy is a risk factor for postoperative morbidity and mortality of the woman after general surgery. To compare the risk of postoperative complications in pregnant vs nonpregnant women undergoing similar general surgical procedures. In this retrospective cohort study, data were obtained from the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program participant user file from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2011. Propensity-matched females based on 63 preoperative characteristics were matched 1:1 with nonpregnant women undergoing the same operations by general surgeons. Operations performed between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011, were analyzed for postoperative adverse events occurring within 30 days of surgery. Rates of 30-day postoperative mortality, overall morbidity, and 21 individual postoperative complications were compared. The unmatched cohorts included 2764 pregnant women (50.5% underwent emergency surgery) and 516,705 nonpregnant women (13.2% underwent emergency surgery) undergoing general surgery. After propensity matching, there were no meaningful differences in all 63 preoperative characteristics between 2539 pregnant and 2539 nonpregnant patients (all standardized differences, general surgical operations. General surgery appears to be as safe for pregnant women as it is for nonpregnant women.

  16. The Course of Adverse Effects of Nortriptyline and Venlafaxine in Elderly Patients with Major Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Rob M.; Aartsen, Marja; Nolen, Willem A.; Heeren, Thea J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate tolerability and course of adverse effects of antidepressants in elderly patients and to study the association between number and severity of adverse effects and age, physical comorbidity, antidepressant dose. and depression severity. DESIGN Double-blind, randomized controlled

  17. Energy drink usage among university students in a Caribbean country: Patterns of use and adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra D. Reid

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Energy drink usage is prevalent among students. The use is not excessive, but associated with high rates of adverse effects and occurs in potentially dangerous situations like during exercise and with alcohol. There is a need to educate students about the potential adverse effects of energy drinks.

  18. Childhood adversity specificity and dose-response effect in non-affective first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauelsen, Anne Marie; Bendall, Sarah; Jansen, Jens Einar; Nielsen, Hanne-Grethe Lyse; Pedersen, Marlene Buch; Trier, Christopher Høier; Haahr, Ulrik H; Simonsen, Erik

    2015-06-01

    Reviews conclude that childhood and adolescence sexual, physical, emotional abuse and emotional and physical neglect are all risk factors for psychosis. However, studies suggest only some adversities are associated with psychosis. Dose-response effects of several adversities on risk of psychosis have not been consistently found. The current study aimed to explore adversity specificity and dose-response effects of adversities on risk of psychosis. Participants were 101 persons with first-episode psychosis (FEP) diagnosed with ICD-10 F20 - F29 (except F21) and 101 non-clinical control persons matched by gender, age and parents' socio-economic status. Assessment included the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and parts of the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. Eighty-nine percent of the FEP group reported one or more adversities compared to 37% of the control group. Childhood and adolescent sexual, physical, emotional abuse, and physical and emotional neglect, separation and institutionalization were about four to 17 times higher for the FEP group (all p<0.01). The risk of psychosis increased two and a half times for each additional adversity. All associations between specific adversities and psychosis decreased when they were adjusted for other adversities. Our findings suggest that there is a large shared effect of adversities on the risk of psychosis. Contrary to the call for further research into specific adversities, we suggest a search for mechanisms in the shared effects of traumatization. Clinical implications are thorough assessment of adversities and their possible effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The basic science of dermal fillers: past and present Part II: adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Erin; Hui, Andrea; Meehan, Shane; Waldorf, Heidi A

    2012-09-01

    The ideal dermal filler should offer long-lasting aesthetic improvement with a minimal side-effect profile. It should be biocompatible and stable within the injection site, with the risk of only transient undesirable effects from injection alone. However, all dermal fillers can induce serious and potentially long-lasting adverse effects. In Part II of this paper, we review the most common adverse effects related to dermal filler use.

  20. Factors modifying stress from adverse effects of immunosuppressive medication in kidney transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberger, J.; Geckova, A.M.; van Dijk, J.P.; Roland, R.; Groothoff, J.W.

    Introduction: The adverse effects of immunosuppression appear in the majority of patients with a negative impact on morbidity, mortality and quality of life. The group of adverse symptoms manifested as changes in appearance, mood and energy are often more stressful than serious metabolic changes

  1. Separate and Cumulative Effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences in Predicting Adult Health and Health Care Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Mariette J.; Walker, John R.; Naimark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Objectives of this population-based study were: (1) to examine the relative contribution of childhood abuse and other adverse childhood experiences to poor adult health and increased health care utilization and (2) to examine the cumulative effects of adverse childhood experiences on adult health and health care utilization. Methods:…

  2. Childhood adversity specificity and dose-response effect in non-affective first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trauelsen, Anne Marie; Bendall, Sarah; Jansen, Jens Einar

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reviews conclude that childhood and adolescence sexual, physical, emotional abuse and emotional and physical neglect are all risk factors for psychosis. However, studies suggest only some adversities are associated with psychosis. Dose-response effects of several adversities on risk...... of psychosis have not been consistently found. The current study aimed to explore adversity specificity and dose-response effects of adversities on risk of psychosis. METHOD: Participants were 101 persons with first-episode psychosis (FEP) diagnosed with ICD-10 F20 - F29 (except F21) and 101 non......% of the control group. Childhood and adolescent sexual, physical, emotional abuse, and physical and emotional neglect, separation and institutionalization were about four to 17 times higher for the FEP group (all ppsychosis increased two and a half times for each additional adversity. All...

  3. Multidisciplinary approach to identification and remedial intervention for adverse late effects of cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCalla, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Because of advances in surgical technique, radiation therapy, and combined chemotherapy regimens, there has been a dramatic improvement in the survival of children with pediatric malignancies. All treatment modalities are associated with adverse effects that may be manifested months to years after therapy. This article has provided an overview of the physiologic and psychologic adverse effects of antineoplastic therapy and described the multidisciplinary approach used by one institution to identify and initiate appropriate remedial intervention. Nurses can learn to assist in the identification of adverse late effects, provide support to the family, and facilitate appropriate intervention

  4. Alcohol and cannabis: Comparing their adverse health effects and regulatory regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Wayne

    2017-04-01

    The claim that the adverse health effects of cannabis are much less serious than those of alcohol has been central to the case for cannabis legalisation. Regulators in US states that have legalised cannabis have adopted regulatory models based on alcohol. This paper critically examines the claim about adverse health effects and the wisdom of regulating cannabis like alcohol. First, it compares what we know about the adverse health effects of alcohol and cannabis. Second, it discusses the uncertainties about the long term health effects of sustained daily cannabis use. Third, it speculates about how the adverse health effects of cannabis may change after legalisation. Fourth, it questions the assumption that alcohol provides the best regulatory model for a legal cannabis market. Fifth, it outlines the major challenges in regulating cannabis under the liberal alcohol-like regulatory regimes now being introduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The adverse effects of albendazole and praziquantel in mass drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and headache. This shows that more pupils from Mwea, (albendazole and praziquantel) than from Ndia (albendazole alone) experienced minor side effects. These results show that both drugs have temporary, minor side effects, which can be managed by trained schoolteachers by ensuring that the school children do not ...

  6. Sleep board review questions: medications and their adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budhiraja

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. Question: Which of the following medications is not matched with a characteristic side effect? 1. Pramipexole -Pathological gambling 2. Eszopiclone - Unpleasant taste 3. Modafinil - Headache 4. Mirtazapine - Weight Loss

  7. Comprehensive evaluations of the adverse effects of drugs: importance of appropriate study selection and data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Yoon K; Golder, Su P; Vandenbroucke, Jan P

    2011-04-01

    While systematic reviews and meta-analyses are at the top of the evidence hierarchy, most of the methodology has focused on assessing treatment benefit. Hence, we propose a structured framework for the initial steps of searching and identifying relevant data sources so that adverse effects can be evaluated in a comprehensive, unbiased manner. The unique methodological challenges stem from the difficulties of addressing diverse outcomes encompassing common, mild symptoms to rare, fatal events. Retrieval of the most appropriate studies should be specifically tailored to fit the nature of the adverse effects, according to the primary objective and study question. In our framework, the structure of the review takes different forms depending on whether the main aim is on scoping/hypothesis generation, or evaluating statistically the magnitude of risk (hypothesis testing), or clarifying characteristics and risk factors of the adverse effect. The wide range of data sources covering adverse effects all have distinct strengths and limitations, and selection of appropriate sources depends on characteristics of the adverse effect (e.g. background incidence and effect size of the drug, clinical presentation, time of onset after drug exposure). Reviewers need to retrieve particular study designs that are most likely to yield robust data on the adverse effects of interest, rather than rely on studies that cannot reliably detect adverse effects, and may yield 'false negatives'. Type II errors (a particular problem when evaluating rare adverse effects) can lull us into a false sense of security (e.g. wrongly concluding that there was no significant difference in harm between drug and control, with the drug erroneously judged as safe). Given the rapid rate at which methodological improvements occur, this proposed framework is by no means definitive, but aims to stimulate further debate and discussion amongst the pharmacoepidemiological and systematic review communities to reach a

  8. The interpersonal adverse effects reported by 1008 users of antidepressants; and the incremental impact of polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, John; Gee, Aimee; Diggle, Jacob; Butler, Helen

    2017-10-01

    Antidepressant drugs are being prescribed at ever increasing rates internationally, despite marginal benefit compared to placebo and a range of adverse effects. Most studies of adverse effects focus on biological phenomena. This article presents the results of an online survey of 1008 self-selected anti-depressant users in Britain, which asked about five adverse effects in the interpersonal domain. The most commonly reported among participants who took only antidepressants were: Sex Life - 43.7%, Work or Study - 27.0% and Social Life - 23.5%. These rates of interpersonal adverse effects were even higher for the 52% of participants who were also taking one or more other psychiatric drugs. Only about a half (48%) felt they had been given enough information about side effects by the prescriber. Those initially prescribed medication by a psychiatrist were more likely to be on several types of drugs and reported more adverse effects than those whose prescriber was a General Practitioner (GP). Researchers and prescribers are encouraged to pay greater attention to interpersonal adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The development of search filters for adverse effects of surgical interventions in medline and Embase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golder, Su; Wright, Kath; Loke, Yoon Kong

    2018-03-31

    Search filter development for adverse effects has tended to focus on retrieving studies of drug interventions. However, a different approach is required for surgical interventions. To develop and validate search filters for medline and Embase for the adverse effects of surgical interventions. Systematic reviews of surgical interventions where the primary focus was to evaluate adverse effect(s) were sought. The included studies within these reviews were divided randomly into a development set, evaluation set and validation set. Using word frequency analysis we constructed a sensitivity maximising search strategy and this was tested in the evaluation and validation set. Three hundred and fifty eight papers were included from 19 surgical intervention reviews. Three hundred and fifty two papers were available on medline and 348 were available on Embase. Generic adverse effects search strategies in medline and Embase could achieve approximately 90% relative recall. Recall could be further improved with the addition of specific adverse effects terms to the search strategies. We have derived and validated a novel search filter that has reasonable performance for identifying adverse effects of surgical interventions in medline and Embase. However, we appreciate the limitations of our methods, and recommend further research on larger sample sizes and prospective systematic reviews. © 2018 The Authors Health Information and Libraries Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Health Libraries Group.

  10. Identifying and managing adverse environmental health effects: 4. Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Margaret D.; Cole, Donald; Abelsohn, Alan; Weir, Erica

    2002-01-01

    PESTICIDE EXPOSURE CAN CAUSE MANY DIFFERENT HEALTH EFFECTS, from acute problems such as dermatitis and asthma exacerbation to chronic problems such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cancer. The resulting clinical presentations are undifferentiated, and specific knowledge of the links to environmental exposures is often required for effective diagnosis. In this article we illustrate the use of the CH2OPD2 mnemonic (Community, Home, Hobbies, Occupation, Personal habits, Drugs and Diet), a history-taking tool that assists physicians in quickly identifying possible environmental exposures. We also provide clinical information on the epidemiology, clinical presentations, treatment and prevention of pesticide exposures. PMID:12054413

  11. Indoor allergens: assessing and controlling adverse health effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pope, Andrew MacPherson; Patterson, Roy; Burge, Harriet

    1993-01-01

    ... on the Health Effects of Indoor Allergens Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1993 i Copyrightthe cannot be not from book, paper however, version for formatting, original authoritative the typesetting-specific the as from created publication files XML from other this and...

  12. Self-reported adverse effects as barriers to adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A survey of patients, who started antiretroviral treatment between July 2004 and August 2005, was conducted by means of a semi-struc-tured ... barriers to optimal adherence included the use of non-prescribed drugs, and the presence of side effects such as insomnia, headaches and abdominal pain; while eating ...

  13. Late adverse effects of radiation therapy for rectal cancer - a systematic overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birgisson, Helgi; Paahlman, Lars; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Glimelius, Bengt

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. The use of radiation therapy (RT) together with improvement in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer improves survival and reduces the risk for local recurrences. Despite these benefits, the adverse effects of radiation therapy limit its use. The aim of this review was to present a comprehensive overview of published studies on late adverse effects related to the RT for rectal cancer. Methods. Meta-analyses, reviews, randomised clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies on late adverse effects, due to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy and chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer, were systematically searched. Most information was obtained from the randomised trials, especially those comparing preoperative short-course 5x5 Gy radiation therapy with surgery alone. Results. The late adverse effects due to RT were bowel obstructions; bowel dysfunction presented as faecal incontinence to gas, loose or solid stools, evacuation problems or urgency; and sexual dysfunction. However, fewer late adverse effects were reported in recent studies, which generally used smaller irradiated volumes and better irradiation techniques; although, one study revealed an increased risk for secondary cancers in irradiated patients. Conclusions. These results stress the importance of careful patient selection for RT for rectal cancer. Improvements in the radiation technique should further be developed and the long-term follow-up of the randomised trials is the most important source of information on late adverse effects and should therefore be continued

  14. Late adverse effects of radiation therapy for rectal cancer - a systematic overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgisson, Helgi; Paahlman, Lars; Gunnarsson, Ulf [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Dept. of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose. The use of radiation therapy (RT) together with improvement in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer improves survival and reduces the risk for local recurrences. Despite these benefits, the adverse effects of radiation therapy limit its use. The aim of this review was to present a comprehensive overview of published studies on late adverse effects related to the RT for rectal cancer. Methods. Meta-analyses, reviews, randomised clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies on late adverse effects, due to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy and chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer, were systematically searched. Most information was obtained from the randomised trials, especially those comparing preoperative short-course 5x5 Gy radiation therapy with surgery alone. Results. The late adverse effects due to RT were bowel obstructions; bowel dysfunction presented as faecal incontinence to gas, loose or solid stools, evacuation problems or urgency; and sexual dysfunction. However, fewer late adverse effects were reported in recent studies, which generally used smaller irradiated volumes and better irradiation techniques; although, one study revealed an increased risk for secondary cancers in irradiated patients. Conclusions. These results stress the importance of careful patient selection for RT for rectal cancer. Improvements in the radiation technique should further be developed and the long-term follow-up of the randomised trials is the most important source of information on late adverse effects and should therefore be continued.

  15. The performance of adverse effects search filters in MEDLINE and EMBASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golder, Su; Loke, Yoon K

    2012-06-01

     Search filters can potentially improve the efficiency of searches involving electronic databases such as medline and embase. Although search filters have been developed for identifying records that contain adverse effects data, little is known about the sensitivity of such filters.  This study measured the sensitivity of using available adverse effects filters to retrieve papers with adverse effects data.   A total of 233 included studies from 26 systematic reviews of adverse effects were used for analysis. Search filters from medline and embase were tested for their sensitivity in retrieving the records included in these reviews. In addition, the sensitivity of each individual search term used in at least one search filter was measured.  Subheadings proved the most useful search terms in both medline and embase. No indexing terms in medline achieved over 12% sensitivity. The sensitivity of published search filters varied in medline from 3% to 93% and in embase from 57% to 97%. Whether this level of sensitivity is acceptable will be dependent on the purpose of the search.  Although no adverse effects search filter captured all the relevant records, high sensitivity could be achieved. Search filters may therefore be useful in retrieving adverse effects data. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group Health Information and Libraries Journal.

  16. Energy drink usage among university students in a Caribbean country: Patterns of use and adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Sandra D; Ramsarran, Jonathan; Brathwaite, Rachel; Lyman, Sarika; Baker, Ariane; Cornish, D'Andra C; Ganga, Stefan; Mohammed, Zahrid; Sookdeo, Avinash T; Thapelo, Cathrine K

    2015-06-01

    There has been little inquiry addressing whether or not concerns about adverse effects of energy drink usage are relevant in the Caribbean. This survey investigated energy drink usage and adverse consequences among tertiary level students in Trinidad and Tobago. A cross-sectional survey of 1994 students from eight institutions was conducted using a de novo questionnaire based on findings from a focus group of students. Chi-squared analyses and logistic regression were used to assess relationships between energy drink usage, adverse effects and other factors affecting energy drink use, and to verify predictors of energy drink use. Prevalence of use was 86%; 38% were current users. Males were more likely to use, used more frequently and at an earlier age. Energy drinks were used most commonly to increase energy (50%), combat sleepiness (45%) and enhance academic performance (40%), and occurred during sports (23%) and mixed with alcohol (22.2%). The majority (79.6%) consumed one energy drink per sitting; 62.2% experienced adverse effects, most commonly restlessness (22%), jolt and crash (17.1%) and tachycardia (16.6%). Awareness of adverse effects was associated with no use (p=0.004), but adverse effects were not a deterrent to continued use. Energy drink usage is prevalent among students. The use is not excessive, but associated with high rates of adverse effects and occurs in potentially dangerous situations like during exercise and with alcohol. There is a need to educate students about the potential adverse effects of energy drinks. Copyright © 2014 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The uses and adverse effects of beryllium on health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Ross G.; Harrison, Adrian Paul

    2009-01-01

    Context: This review describes the health effects of beryllium exposure in the workplace and the environment. Aim: To collate information on the consequences of occupational and environmental exposure to beryllium on physiological function and well being. Materials and Methods: The criteria used...... published in sources unobtainable through requests at the British Library, and some had no impact factor and were excluded. Conclusion: Beryllium has some useful but undoubtedly harmful effects on health and well-being. Measures needed to be taken to prevent hazardous exposure to this element, making its...... in the current review for selecting articles were adopted from proposed criteria in The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Articles were classified based on acute and chronic exposure and toxicity of beryllium. Results: The proportions of utilized and nonutilized articles were...

  18. Adverse effects of fluoride towards thyroid hormone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enggar Abdullah Idris MZ

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An easily ionized fluoride compound like Sodium Fluoride (NaF has been used thus far as a dental caries prevention substance. However, fluoride ions also have a negative effect because it is very toxic. Several types of research on the effect of fluoride on guinea pigs and human beings indicate the presence synthesis obstruction of T3 and T4 that causes declined production, known as hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism condition may obstruct tissue growth process and metabolism so as to impact various body organ systems. Preventive efforts against hypothyroidism caused by fluoride include avoiding diffusible fluoride compound intake, like NaF, in a long run systemic use, whereas efforts to overcome fluoride intoxication include consuming food that is rich in calcium, vitamin D, and antioxidant.

  19. Pulmonary Adverse Effects of Welding Fume in Automobile Assembly Welders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Akbar Sharifian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Welding is one of the key components of numerous manufacturing industries, which has potential physical and chemical health hazards. Many components of welding fumes can potentially affect the lung function. This study investigates the effects of welding fumes on lung function and respiratory symptoms among welders of an automobile manufacturing plant in Iran. This historical cohort study assesses 43 male welders and 129 office workers by a questionnaire to record demographic data, smoking habits, work history and respiratory symptoms as well as lung function status by spirometry. The average pulmonary function values of welders were lower relative to controls with dose-effect relationship between work duration and pulmonary function impairment. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was higher in welders than controls. Our findings suggest that welders are at risk for pulmonary disease.

  20. Adverse effects of the automotive industry on carbon dioxide emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Mpho Bosupeng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effects of the automotive industry on carbon dioxide emissions for the period from 1997 to 2010 for diverse economies, as well as the relationships between carbon dioxide discharges and output. The study applies cointegration and causality tests to validate these associations. The results of the Johansen cointegration test depict long-run associations between the quantity of passenger cars and carbon dioxide emissions in France, Sweden, Spain, Hungary and Japa...

  1. Abuse potential and adverse cognitive effects of mitragynine (kratom).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Nurul H M; Suhaimi, Farah W; Vadivelu, Raja K; Hassan, Zurina; Rümler, Anne; Rotter, Andrea; Amato, Davide; Dringenberg, Hans C; Mansor, Sharif M; Navaratnam, Visweswaran; Müller, Christian P

    2016-01-01

    Mitragynine is the major psychoactive alkaloid of the plant kratom/ketum. Kratom is widely used in Southeast Asia as a recreational drug, and increasingly appears as a pure compound or a component of 'herbal high' preparations in the Western world. While mitragynine/kratom may have analgesic, muscle relaxant and anti-inflammatory effects, its addictive properties and effects on cognitive performance are unknown. We isolated mitragynine from the plant and performed a thorough investigation of its behavioural effects in rats and mice. Here we describe an addictive profile and cognitive impairments of acute and chronic mitragynine administration, which closely resembles that of morphine. Acute mitragynine has complex effects on locomotor activity. Repeated administration induces locomotor sensitization, anxiolysis and conditioned place preference, enhances expression of dopamine transporter- and dopamine receptor-regulating factor mRNA in the mesencephalon. While there was no increase in spontaneous locomotor activity during withdrawal, animals showed hypersensitivity towards small challenging doses for up to 14 days. Severe somatic withdrawal signs developed after 12 hours, and increased level of anxiety became evident after 24 hours of withdrawal. Acute mitragynine independently impaired passive avoidance learning, memory consolidation and retrieval, possibly mediated by a disruption of cortical oscillatory activity, including the suppression of low-frequency rhythms (delta and theta) in the electrocorticogram. Chronic mitragynine administration led to impaired passive avoidance and object recognition learning. Altogether, these findings provide evidence for an addiction potential with cognitive impairments for mitragynine, which suggest its classification as a harmful drug. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  2. Concrete blocks' adverse effects on indoor air and recommended solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruppersberger, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    Air infiltration through highly permeable concrete blocks can allow entry of various serious indoor air pollutants including radon. An easy approach to avoiding these pollutants is to select a less-air-permeable concrete block. Tests show that air permeability of concrete blocks can vary by a factor greater than 50 (0.63--35 standard L/min/m 2 at 3 Pa). The surface texture of the blocks correlates well with air permeability; test results of smoother, closed-surface-texture blocks were usually less air-permeable. During construction, air infiltration can be minimized by capping walls and carefully sealing around openings for utilities or other penetrations. Structures with indoor air-quality problems due to soil-gas entry can be mitigated more effectively with less coating material if the blocks have a closed surface texture. All coatings evaluated--cementaceous block filler (which has the lowest applied cost and is more than 99.5% effective), surface bonding cement, water-based epoxy, polysulfide vinyl acrylic, and latex (three coats)--were highly effective (more than 98%) in reducing air permeability when adequately applied. Coating selection should be influenced by expected service life, considering surface condition and cost

  3. Adverse health effects of air pollutants in a nonsmoking population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, C A

    1996-07-17

    Utah Valley has provided an interesting and unique opportunity to evaluate the health effects of respirable particulate air pollution (PM10). Residents of this valley are predominantly nonsmoking members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons). The area has moderately high average PM10 levels with periods of highly elevated PM10 concentrations due to local emissions being trapped in a stagnant air mass near the valley floor during low-level temperature inversion episodes. Due to a labor dispute, there was intermittent operation of the single largest pollution source, an old integrated steel mill. Levels of other common pollutants including sulfur dioxide, ozone, and acidic aerosol are relatively low. Studies specific to Utah Valley have observed that elevated PM10 concentrations are associated with: (1) decreased lung function; (2) increased incidence of respiratory symptoms; (3) increased school absenteeism; (4) increased respiratory hospital admissions; and (5) increased mortality, especially respiratory and cardiovascular mortality.

  4. Adverse effects of the automotive industry on carbon dioxide emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpho Bosupeng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the effects of the automotive industry on carbon dioxide emissions for the period from 1997 to 2010 for diverse economies, as well as the relationships between carbon dioxide discharges and output. The study applies cointegration and causality tests to validate these associations. The results of the Johansen cointegration test depict long-run associations between the quantity of passenger cars and carbon dioxide emissions in France, Sweden, Spain, Hungary and Japan. In addition, significant relations were observed between output and carbon dioxide discharges in Spain, Canada, India and Japan. Changes in output had substantial impact on emissions in Germany, Canada and India. The results also show that the number of passenger cars influences the magnitude of emissions in multiple economies. In conclusion, the automotive industry has to be considered in policies that aim to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

  5. Thermal Dose and the Probability of Adverse Effects from HIFU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Charles C.

    2007-05-01

    The absorption of high-intensity, focused ultrasound (HIFU) by the body results in brief, intense heating capable of killing cells, tissues or entire organisms, thereby providing the basis for many applications in medical therapy. The object of such therapy is in assuring the destruction of diseased tissue while sparing adjacent, healthy tissue. However, even moderate heating to a few degrees above normal physiological temperatures can perturb biological systems, e.g., by altering normal metabolic processes. In modeling the bioeffects produced by ultrasound-induced heating, the physicist typically relies on bulk tissue properties and ultrasound exposure parameters to calculate the thermal `dose' delivered to the tissue. Although thermal dose is currently given in units of time rather than energy, the concept is quite useful, and its use in quantifying the probability and extent of biological effects expected from therapeutic exposures is demonstrated. The results demonstrate the need for additional experimental data to validate and advance existing theoretical approaches for HIFU exposures.

  6. Adverse side effects of statins in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual Cruz, Montserrat; Chimenos Küstner, Eduardo; García Vicente, José António; Mezquiriz Ferrero, Xavier; Borrell Thio, Eulalia; López López, José

    2008-02-01

    Increased plasma levels of cholesterol are high risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Statins are drugs that inhibit cholesterol synthesis at both pancreatic and extrahepathic levels, being the treatment of choice for hypercholesterolemia. To analyze the side effects of statins in the mouth cavity, and to analyze the symptoms after interruption of the treatment. Observational study, preliminary. Patients aged 50-70, diagnosed with hypercholesterolemia and undergoing treatment with statins, referred from their primary care physician to the dentist's office. Anamnesis over oral symptoms was performed in the first visit. Statin treatment was discontinued, followed by lab tests and control visits seven and fifteen days later. We monitored the improvement and/or remission of oral symptoms. Statin treatment was resumed, sending out a report of the patient evolution to the PCP. Symptoms were registered in sheet specially designed for the study. patient refusal, use of drugs for dry mouth treatment, Sjögren's syndrome. n=26 patients. Dry mouth patients: improvement in 17 out of 23 patients (88.5%). Itchiness: 6 out of 15 cases improved (57.7%). Bitterness: improvement in 13 out of 14 patients (53.8%). Cough: improvement in 11 out of 12 patients (46.1%). A high percentage of oral symptoms are associated to treatment with statins. There is a marked improvement after temporary interruption of the treatment. Little is known regarding the side effects of oral treatment with statins. This preliminary study includes a relatively small number of patients. The design of experimental treatments will be required to establish a true correlation between statin treatment and oral symptoms.

  7. Are the adverse effects of stressors on amphibians mediated by their effects on stress hormones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Caitlin R; Knutie, Sarah A; Roznik, Elizabeth A; Rohr, Jason R

    2018-02-01

    Adverse effects of anthropogenic changes on biodiversity might be mediated by their impacts on the stress response of organisms. To test this hypothesis, we crossed exposure to metyrapone, a synthesis inhibitor of the stress hormone corticosterone, with exposure to the herbicide atrazine and the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) to assess whether the effects of these stressors on tadpoles and post-metamorphic frogs were mediated by corticosterone. Metyrapone countered atrazine- and Bd-induced corticosterone elevations. However, atrazine- and Bd-induced reductions in body size were not mediated by corticosterone because they persisted despite metyrapone exposure. Atrazine lowered Bd abundance without metyrapone but increased Bd abundance with metyrapone for tadpoles and frogs. In contrast, atrazine reduced tolerance of Bd infections because frogs exposed to atrazine as tadpoles had reduced growth with Bd compared to solvent controls; this effect was not countered by metyrapone. Our results suggest that the adverse effects of atrazine and Bd on amphibian growth, development, and tolerance of infection are not mediated primarily by corticosterone. A possible mechanism for these effects is energy lost from atrazine detoxification, defense against Bd, or repair from damage caused by atrazine and Bd. Additional studies are needed to evaluate how often the effects of anthropogenic stressors are mediated by stress hormones.

  8. Adverse effects of organic arsenical compounds towards Vibrio fischeri bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulladosa, Elena; Murat, Jean-Claude; Bollinger, Jean-Claude; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2007-05-15

    The most frequently encountered forms of organic arsenic, namely, dimethylarsinic acid, monomethylarsonic acid, arsenobetaine, arsenocholine and Roxarsone (4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzene arsonic acid) were tested for toxicity either by using the Microtox bioassay, based on the rapid (within 15 min) fading of luminescence emitted by Vibrio fischeri marine bacteria, or by monitoring growth rate of the same bacteria for 3 days. Organic arsenic was generally found to be less toxic to these biological models than inorganic arsenic. In many cases, EC50 values for DMA, MMA or HNAA when using luminescence or growth inhibition assays could not be determined because of the low toxicity of the compounds. Nevertheless, results from the luminescence inhibition assay, which was found to be more sensitive than the growth inhibition assay, allowed to rank toxicity as follows: arsenate at pH 8>HNAA at pH 5>arsenate at pH 5>MMA at pH 5>HNAA at pH 8>DMA at pH 5. Arsenobetaine and monomethylarsonic acid were unexpectedly found to stimulate bacterial growth (hormesis effect). pH was found to have a strong influence on the observed toxicity as a consequence of the pH-induced changes in the chemical speciation of the tested molecules. In most cases it appeared that negatively charged forms were less toxic than the uncharged ones.

  9. Measured moisture in buildings and adverse health effects: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendell, Mark J; Macher, Janet M; Kumagai, Kazukiyo

    2018-04-23

    It has not yet been possible to quantify dose-related health risks attributable to indoor dampness or mold (D/M), to support the setting of health-related limits for D/M. An overlooked target for assessing D/M is moisture in building materials, the critical factor allowing microbial growth. A search for studies of quantified building moisture and occupant health effects identified three eligible studies. Two studies assessed associations between measured wall moisture content and respiratory health in the UK. Both reported dose-related increases in asthma exacerbation with higher measured moisture, with one study reporting an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 7.0 for night-time asthma symptoms with higher bedroom moisture. The third study assessed relationships between infrared camera-determined wall moisture and atopic dermatitis in South Korea, reporting an adjusted OR of 14.5 for water-damaged homes and moderate or severe atopic dermatitis. Measuring building moisture has, despite extremely limited available findings, potential promise for detecting unhealthy D/M in homes and merits more research attention. Further research to validate these findings should include measured "water activity," which directly assesses moisture availability for microbial growth. Ultimately, evidence-based, health-related thresholds for building moisture, across specific materials and measurement devices, could better guide assessment and remediation of D/M in buildings. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Remembering Statins: Do Statins Have Adverse Cognitive Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzur, Rafael

    2016-08-01

    The issue of statin-associated cognitive impairment has been a hot topic among both patients and health care providers, especially since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a statement regarding rare postmarketing reports of ill-defined cognitive impairment associated with statin use. This statement was based on case reports, and no objective measures of cognitive function were used. Nevertheless, many patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease have expressed concerns about possible cognitive decline and may have opted to forgo statin therapy. In this overview, the evidence leading to the statement by the FDA is reviewed. Potential mechanisms of the effect of LDL cholesterol reduction and statin therapy on cognition are discussed. Evidence from observational and prospective randomized trials is summarized, leading to the conclusion that as for now, there is no good evidence that statins cause cognitive impairment to a significant degree. Reported cases seem to be rare, and a causal relationship has not been established. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. Assessment of Aerobic Exercise Adverse Effects during COPD Exacerbation Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaut, Caroline; Mesquita, Carolina Bonfanti; Caram, Laura M O; Ferrari, Renata; Dourado, Victor Zuniga; de Godoy, Irma; Tanni, Suzana Erico

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Aerobic exercise performed after hospital discharge for exacerbated COPD patients is already recommended to improve respiratory and skeletal muscle strength, increase tolerance to activity, and reduce the sensation of dyspnea. Previous studies have shown that anaerobic activity can clinically benefit patients hospitalized with exacerbated COPD. However, there is little information on the feasibility and safety of aerobic physical activity performed by patients with exacerbated COPD during hospitalization. Objective. To evaluate the effects of aerobic exercise on vital signs in hospitalized patients with exacerbated COPD. Patients and Methods. Eleven COPD patients (63% female, FEV1: 34.2 ± 13.9% and age: 65 ± 11 years) agreed to participate. Aerobic exercise was initiated 72 hours after admission on a treadmill; speed was obtained from the distance covered in a 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Vital signs were assessed before and after exercise. Results. During the activity systolic blood pressure increased from 125.2 ± 13.6 to 135.8 ± 15.0 mmHg ( p = 0.004) and respiratory rate from 20.9 ± 4.4 to 24.2 ± 4.5 rpm ( p = 0.008) and pulse oximetry (SpO 2 ) decreased from 93.8 ± 2.3 to 88.5 ± 5.7% ( p Aerobic activity was considered intense, heart rate ranged from 99.2 ± 11.5 to 119.1 ± 11.1 bpm at the end of exercise ( p = 0.092), and patients reached on average 76% of maximum heart rate. Conclusion. Aerobic exercise conducted after 72 hours of hospitalization in patients with exacerbated COPD appears to be safe.

  12. Adverse Effects of Antidepressants for Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Riediger

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAntidepressants are widely used in the treatment of chronic pain. Applied doses are lower than those needed to unfold an antidepressive effect. While efficacy of antidepressants for chronic pain has been reported in large randomized-controlled trials (RCT, there is inconsistent data on adverse effects and tolerability. We aimed at synthesizing data from RCT to explore adverse effect profiles and tolerability of antidepressants for treatment of chronic pain.MethodsSystematic literature research and meta-analyses were performed regarding side effects and safety of different antidepressants in the treatment of chronic pain according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The National Center for Biotechnology Information library and MEDLINE were searched. Randomized placebo-controlled trials were included in quantitative data synthesis.ResultsOut of 1,975 screened articles, 33 papers published between 1995 and 2015 were included in our review and 23 studies were included in the meta-analyses. A higher risk for adverse effects compared to placebo was observed in all antidepressants included in our analyses, except nortriptyline. The most prevalent adverse effects were dry mouth, dizziness, nausea, headache, and constipation. Amitriptyline, mirtazapine, desipramine, venlafaxine, fluoxetine, and nortriptyline showed the highest placebo effect-adjusted risk of adverse effects. Risk for withdrawal due to adverse effects was highest in desipramine (risk ratio: 4.09, 95%-confidence interval [1.31; 12.82] followed by milnacipran, venlafaxine, and duloxetine. The most common adverse effects under treatment with antidepressants were dry mouth, dizziness, nausea, headache, and constipation followed by palpitations, sweating, and drowsiness. However, overall tolerability was high. Each antidepressant showed distinct risk profiles of adverse effects.ConclusionOur synthesized data analysis confirmed overall

  13. Influence of the ventilatory mode on acute adverse effects and facial thermography after noninvasive ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Suzy Maria Montenegro; Melo, Luiz Henrique de Paula; Maia, Nathalia Parente de Sousa; Nogueira, Andrea da Nóbrega Cirino; Vasconcelos, Thiago Brasileiro; Pereira, Eanes Delgado Barros; Bastos, Vasco Pinheiro Diógenes; Holanda, Marcelo Alcantara

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the incidence and intensity of acute adverse effects and the variation in the temperature of facial skin by thermography after the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Methods: We included 20 healthy volunteers receiving NIV via oronasal mask for 1 h. The volunteers were randomly divided into two groups according to the ventilatory mode: bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Facial thermography was performed in order to determine the temperature of the face where it was in contact with the mask and of the nasal dorsum at various time points. After removal of the mask, the volunteers completed a questionnaire about adverse effects of NIV. Results: The incidence and intensity of acute adverse effects were higher in the individuals receiving BiPAP than in those receiving CPAP (16.1% vs. 5.6%). Thermographic analysis showed a significant cooling of the facial skin in the two regions of interest immediately after removal of the mask. The more intense acute adverse effects occurred predominantly among the participants in whom the decrease in the mean temperature of the nasal dorsum was lower (14.4% vs. 7.2%). The thermographic visual analysis of the zones of cooling and heating on the face identified areas of hypoperfusion or reactive hyperemia. Conclusions: The use of BiPAP mode was associated with a higher incidence and intensity of NIV-related acute adverse effects. There was an association between acute adverse effects and less cooling of the nasal dorsum immediately after removal of the mask. Cutaneous thermography can be an additional tool to detect adverse effects that the use of NIV has on facial skin. PMID:28538774

  14. Influence of the ventilatory mode on acute adverse effects and facial thermography after noninvasive ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzy Maria Montenegro Pontes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the incidence and intensity of acute adverse effects and the variation in the temperature of facial skin by thermography after the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV. Methods: We included 20 healthy volunteers receiving NIV via oronasal mask for 1 h. The volunteers were randomly divided into two groups according to the ventilatory mode: bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. Facial thermography was performed in order to determine the temperature of the face where it was in contact with the mask and of the nasal dorsum at various time points. After removal of the mask, the volunteers completed a questionnaire about adverse effects of NIV. Results: The incidence and intensity of acute adverse effects were higher in the individuals receiving BiPAP than in those receiving CPAP (16.1% vs. 5.6%. Thermographic analysis showed a significant cooling of the facial skin in the two regions of interest immediately after removal of the mask. The more intense acute adverse effects occurred predominantly among the participants in whom the decrease in the mean temperature of the nasal dorsum was lower (14.4% vs. 7.2%. The thermographic visual analysis of the zones of cooling and heating on the face identified areas of hypoperfusion or reactive hyperemia. Conclusions: The use of BiPAP mode was associated with a higher incidence and intensity of NIV-related acute adverse effects. There was an association between acute adverse effects and less cooling of the nasal dorsum immediately after removal of the mask. Cutaneous thermography can be an additional tool to detect adverse effects that the use of NIV has on facial skin.

  15. Decreasing the adverse effects of endotracheal suctioning during mechanical ventilation by changing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Salvatore Maurizio; Lellouche, François; Pignataro, Claudia; Girou, Emmanuelle; Maitre, Bernard; Richard, Jean-Christophe M; Lemaire, François; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Brochard, Laurent

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about the incidence of and risk factors for adverse effects from endotracheal suctioning. We studied the incidence and risk factors, and evaluated the effect of suctioning practice guidelines. During a 3-month period, in 79 mechanically ventilated subjects, we recorded the adverse effects in 4,506 suctioning procedures. Then practice guidelines were implemented, and 1 year later, during another 3-month period, in 68 subjects, we recorded the adverse effects in 4,994 suctioning procedures. In the first period, adverse effects occurred frequently: oxygen desaturation in 46.8% of subjects and 6.5% of suctionings, hemorrhagic secretions in 31.6% of subjects and 4% of suctionings, blood pressure change in 24.1% of subjects and 1.6% of suctionings, and heart rate change in 10.1% of subjects and 1.1% of suctionings. After guidelines implementation, all complications, both separately and all together, were reduced. The incidence of all complications together decreased from 59.5% to 42.6% of subjects, and from 12.4% to 4.9% of procedures (both P 5 cm H2O was an independent risk factor for oxygen desaturation. Receiving > 6 suctionings per day was a risk factor for desaturation and hemorrhagic secretions. The use of guidelines was independently associated with fewer complications. Endotracheal suctioning frequently induces adverse effects. Technique, suctioning frequency, and higher PEEP are risk factors for complications. Their incidence can be reduced by the implementation of suctioning guidelines.

  16. Care-seeking behavior of Japanese gynecological cancer survivors suffering from adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshima Sumiko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-treatment follow-up visits for gynecological cancer survivors should provide opportunities for management of adverse physical/psychological effects of therapy and early recurrence detection. However, the adequacy of such visits in Japan is poorly documented. We qualitatively explored care-seeking experiences of Japanese gynecological cancer survivors and deduced factors influencing care-seeking behaviors and treatment access. Methods We conducted 4 semi-structured focus groups comprising altogether 28 Japanese gynecological cancer survivors to collect a variety of participants’ post-treatment care-seeking behaviors through active interaction with participants. Factors influencing access to treatment for adverse effects were analyzed qualitatively. Results Survivors sought care through specialty clinic visits when regular post-treatment gynecological follow-ups were inadequate or when symptoms seemed to be non-treatment related. Information provided by hospital staff during initial treatment influenced patients’ understanding and response to adverse effects. Lack of knowledge and inaccurate symptom interpretation delayed help-seeking, exacerbating symptoms. Gynecologists’ attitudes during follow-ups frequently led survivors to cope with symptoms on their own. Information from mass media, Internet, and support groups helped patients understand symptoms and facilitated care seeking. Conclusions Post-treatment adverse effects are often untreated during follow-up visits. Awareness of possible post-treatment adverse effects is important for gynecological cancer survivors in order to obtain appropriate care if the need arises. Consultation during the follow-up visit is essential for continuity in care.

  17. Statin related adverse effects and patient education: a study from resource limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulchandani, Rubina; Lyngdoh, Tanica; Chakraborty, Praloy; Kakkar, Ashish Kumar

    2017-11-27

    Statins are the most widely prescribed class of drugs for coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and yet literature on the prevalence of statin related adverse effects (AEs) and gaps in patient education is quite limited especially in resource-limited settings of developing world. The present study was conducted to determine the prevalence of myopathy (muscle ailments) and other statin associated adverse effects among CAD patients on statin therapy. The study also aimed to assess patient perceptions, attitudes and awareness concerning the use of statins. It was a cross-sectional study conducted among 300 adult CAD patients visiting the out-patient department of a tertiary care hospital in North India, who were receiving statins for their diagnosis. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect data on statin use among patients and adverse effects experienced. Myopathy or muscle related ailments like muscle pain, cramps and muscle weakness were the most prevalent (32, 34 and 47%, respectively), followed by numbness, tingling and burning in the extremities (31%). Joint pain and cognitive impairments were seen in nearly 20% of the patients. The level of awareness among participants regarding the use of statins was sub-optimal. Lack of knowledge and under-reporting of adverse effects were major concerns. The study shows that a considerable proportion of statin users experience adverse effects and knowledge and awareness amongst patients is inadequate. Awareness programmes and counselling for patients, sensitisation of healthcare professionals and better screening systems for monitoring AEs can help improve the scenario.

  18. Finasteride adverse effects and post-finasteride syndrome; implications for dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stana Paunica

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Finasteride is a 5α-reductase inhibitor widely used in present in the therapeutic approach of androgenic alopecia. Adverse effects consist in variable sign and symptoms, the most common being represented by mental troubles (reduced feeling of life pleasure or emotions, depression, physical impairments (loss of muscle tone and/or mass and sexual complains (loss of libido and sexual potency. An increasing number of studies identify and describe even a post-finasteride syndrome (persistent adverse affects three months or more after finasteride cessation or new adverse effects including but not limited at the skin level or oral cavity (marginal periodontium. We intend to present in this study several oral adverse effects encountered during finasteride administration, represented by mild and moderate signs which generally responded to topical procedures without to require the stop of the drug administration. New studies on large samples will further document the existing relation between the described oral adverse effects and the implied pathophysiological mechanisms. For this moment, we are taking into account as possible mechanisms- a direct action of finasteride administration, possible indirect consequences due to hormonal interferences, or coexisting factors with finasteride administration that were not detected.

  19. Effect of Anti-inflammatory Treatment on Depression, Depressive Symptoms, and Adverse Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler, Karl Ole; Benros, Michael E; Nordentoft, Merete

    2014-01-01

    -controlled trials assessing the efficacy and adverse effects of pharmacologic anti-inflammatory treatment in adults with depressive symptoms, including those who fulfilled the criteria for depression. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Data were extracted by 2 independent reviewers. Pooled standard mean difference (SMD...... investigated cytokine inhibitors (n=2,004). The pooled effect estimate suggested that anti-inflammatory treatment reduced depressive symptoms (SMD, -0.34; 95% CI, -0.57 to -0.11; I2=90%) compared with placebo. This effect was observed in studies including patients with depression (SMD, -0.54; 95% CI, -1.......08 to -0.01; I2=68%) and depressive symptoms (SMD, -0.27; 95% CI, -0.53 to -0.01; I2=68%). The heterogeneity of the studies was not explained by differences in inclusion of clinical depression vs depressive symptoms or use of NSAIDs vs cytokine inhibitors. Subanalyses emphasized the antidepressant...

  20. Effect of taurine on attenuating chemotherapy-induced adverse effects in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islambulchilar, Mina; Asvadi, Iraj; Sanaat, Zohreh; Esfahani, Ali; Sattari, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine supplementation on the incidence of chemotherapy-induced adverse drug reactions during chemotherapy in young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Forty young adult (aged over 16 years) with ALL, at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy, were recruited to the study. The study population was randomized in a double blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo. Life quality and adverse drug reactions were assessed using questionnaire. Blood cell count, hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), serum bilirubin, transaminases, urea, and creatinine concentrations were evaluated. Data was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Of total participants, 43.8% were female and 56.3% were male. The mean age was 19.16 ± 1.95 years (range: 16-23 years). The results indicated that the levels of white blood cells were significantly (P taurine treated group, but other hematological values did not differ significantly in either group. Taurine administration improved liver and kidney functions, indicated by decline of serum bilirubin, transaminases, urea, and creatinine, respectively in comparison to the controls (P taurine significantly reduced serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels (P taurine supplementation could be a protection against chemotherapy-induced toxicities probably by its antioxidant capacity. Present study showed effectiveness of taurineon the chemotherapy-related toxicities and some of the complications during the maintenance period of treatment following coadministration in young adults with ALL.

  1. Pharmacovigilance of oral bisphosphonates: adverse effects manifesting in the soft tissue of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharazmi, Mohammad; Persson, Ulf; Warfvinge, Gunnar

    2012-12-01

    It is well known that oral bisphosphonates can induce necrosis of the osseous structures of the jaws. However, there seems to be a limited awareness that oral bisphosphonates can also induce adverse effects in the soft tissues of the oral cavity, as indicated by the paucity of reported cases in the literature. Because oral bisphosphonates are widely used drugs for several skeletal conditions, it is reasonable to assume that mucosal adverse effects are more common than the small number of published cases indicates. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether this adverse effect of bisphosphonates is represented as reports from health practitioners in an adverse drug reaction database, as well as to gain knowledge about which substances are being associated with adverse drug reactions affecting the oral mucosa. The database of the Medical Products Agency-Sweden was searched for adverse effects from oral bisphosphonates manifesting in the oral and maxillofacial region. Reports of reactions limited to the soft tissues of the oral cavity were selected and further analyzed. Only those reports showing recovery or improvement after the cessation of bisphosphonate use were included in the study. A total of 83 cases of adverse reactions to oral bisphosphonates were retrieved from the search. Of these, 12 were included in the study. They were associated with the use of alendronate, etidronate and risedronate, in descending order. Sixteen percent of the reports comprising the oral and maxillofacial region were limited to the oral mucosa and reported recovery or improvement after discontinuation of the drug. Adverse effects of oral bisphosphonates with manifestations in the soft tissue of the oral cavity seem to be more common than the small number of published cases indicates. However, considering that oral bisphosphonates are widely used drugs, the incidence is still low. These adverse drug reactions are not limited to alendronate and may also be induced by

  2. Confounding and Statistical Significance of Indirect Effects: Childhood Adversity, Education, Smoking, and Anxious and Depressive Symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashhood Ahmed Sheikh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The life course perspective, the risky families model, and stress-and-coping models provide the rationale for assessing the role of smoking as a mediator in the association between childhood adversity and anxious and depressive symptomatology (ADS in adulthood. However, no previous study has assessed the independent mediating role of smoking in the association between childhood adversity and ADS in adulthood. Moreover, the importance of mediator-response confounding variables has rarely been demonstrated empirically in social and psychiatric epidemiology. The aim of this paper was to (i assess the mediating role of smoking in adulthood in the association between childhood adversity and ADS in adulthood, and (ii assess the change in estimates due to different mediator-response confounding factors (education, alcohol intake, and social support. The present analysis used data collected from 1994 to 2008 within the framework of the Tromsø Study (N = 4,530, a representative prospective cohort study of men and women. Seven childhood adversities (low mother's education, low father's education, low financial conditions, exposure to passive smoke, psychological abuse, physical abuse, and substance abuse distress were used to create a childhood adversity score. Smoking status was measured at a mean age of 54.7 years (Tromsø IV, and ADS in adulthood was measured at a mean age of 61.7 years (Tromsø V. Mediation analysis was used to assess the indirect effect and the proportion of mediated effect (% of childhood adversity on ADS in adulthood via smoking in adulthood. The test-retest reliability of smoking was good (Kappa: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.63; 0.71 in this sample. Childhood adversity was associated with a 10% increased risk of smoking in adulthood (Relative risk: 1.10, 95% CI: 1.03; 1.18, and both childhood adversity and smoking in adulthood were associated with greater levels of ADS in adulthood (p < 0.001. Smoking in adulthood did not significantly

  3. Characterization of scientific studies usually cited as evidence of adverse effects of GM food/feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Miguel A; Parrott, Wayne A

    2017-10-01

    GM crops are the most studied crops in history. Approximately 5% of the safety studies on them show adverse effects that are a cause for concern and tend to be featured in media reports. Although these reports are based on just a handful of GM events, they are used to cast doubt on all GM crops. Furthermore, they tend to come from just a few laboratories and are published in less important journals. Importantly, a close examination of these reports invariably shows methodological flaws that invalidate any conclusions of adverse effects. Twenty years after commercial cultivation of GM crops began, a bona fide report of an adverse health effect due to a commercialized modification in a crop has yet to be reported. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Antiangiogenic agents and the skin: cutaneous adverse effects of sorafenib, sunitinib, and bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, M; Pastushenko, E

    2014-12-01

    As new antiangiogenic therapies have been introduced and added to the therapeutic arsenal against various types of cancer, previously unknown adverse effects have been detected. These effects negatively impact patients' quality of life and can even make it necessary to suspend treatment. Adverse skin reactions occur in 90% of patients treated with angiogenesis inhibitors. In some cases, a correlation has been observed between the severity of reactions and treatment efficacy and tumor response. It is therefore extremely important that dermatologists be able to recognize and manage these reactions. Moreover, in order to avoid the unjustified withdrawal of potentially life-extending treatments, dermatologists must be able to differentiate between non-life-threatening reactions and life-threatening reactions that necessitate the suspension of treatment. In this review article, we analyze the main cutaneous adverse effects of the most common antiangiogenic agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  5. Switching, Adverse Effects and Use of Over-the-Counter Analgesics among Users of Oral Anticoagulants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Hyllested, Lea Maria Ronneberg; Meegaard, Line

    2017-01-01

    collected information concerning the patients' knowledge of their anticoagulant treatment including prior drug switching. Further, patients were asked about use of over-the-counter analgesics, adverse effects, and how the treatment affected their everyday life. Among 335 eligible patients, 301 (90%) agreed......) to a NOAC. Switching was most frequently caused by inconvenience (34%) and adverse effects (23%). Although half of all patients had recently bought over-the-counter analgesics, purchase of ibuprofen and aspirin was rare (6%). More VKA users than NOAC users felt limited in their everyday life because...... of anticoagulant treatment (18% vs. 9%). Among non-incident NOAC users, 21% had experienced adverse effects during their current treatment. Based on first-hand information from a large sample of anticoagulant users, we conclude that the main drug-related issues leading to anticoagulant switching and perceived...

  6. Possible adverse effects of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in the Region of Southern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramon, Cecilie; Lindegaard Poulsen, Christina; Hartling, Ulla Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Since the introduction of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine, young girls and women have reported a broad range of symptoms. These have been described as possible adverse effects of the vaccine. In this study, we describe demographic characteristics, symptomatology......, clinical and laboratory test results in patients referred with suspected adverse effects in the Region of Southern Denmark. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study. The patients filled out a questionnaire, were interviewed by a doctor and received a standard physical examination...... still in diagnostic workup when the present study concluded. CONCLUSIONS: The patients reported a wide range of symptoms. We found an overall low prevalence of POTS. It should be further investigated whether these patients might suffer from a functional disorder rather than from adverse effects...

  7. The value of glucocorticoid co-therapy in different rheumatic diseases - positive and adverse effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a pivotal role in the management of many inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The therapeutic effects range from pain relief in arthritides, to disease-modifying effects in early rheumatoid arthritis, and to strong immunosuppressive actions in vasculitides and systemic lupus erythematosus. There are multiple indications that adverse effects are more frequent with the longer use of glucocorticoids and use of higher dosages, but high-quality data on the occurrence of adverse effects are scarce especially for dosages above 10 mg prednisone daily. The underlying rheumatic disease, disease activity, risk factors and individual responsiveness of the patient should guide treatment decisions. Monitoring for adverse effects should also be tailored to the patient. Continuously balancing the benefits and risks of glucocorticoid therapy is recommended. There is an ongoing quest for new drugs with glucocorticoid actions without the potential to cause harmful effects, such as selective glucocorticoid receptor agonists, but the application of a new compound in clinical practice will probably not occur within the next few years. In the meantime, basic research on glucocorticoid effects and detailed reports on therapeutic efficacy and occurrence of adverse effects will be valuable in weighing benefits and risks in clinical practice. PMID:25608693

  8. Adverse health effects of cigarette smoke: aldehydes Crotonaldehyde, butyraldehyde, hexanal and malonaldehyde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andel I van; Sleijffers A; Schenk E; Rambali B; Wolterink G; Werken G van de; Aerts LAGJM van; Vleeming W; Amsterdam JGC van; TOX

    2006-01-01

    Crotonaldehyde in cigarette smoke can be concluded to induce airway damage in humans. This is one conclusion derived from the existing data found in the literature and reported here in the discussion on adverse health effects and possible addictive effects due to the exposure of crotonaldehyde,

  9. Energy drinks and their adverse health effects: A systematic review of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Fahad; Rehman, Hiba; Babayan, Zaruhi; Stapleton, Dwight; Joshi, Divya-Devi

    2015-04-01

    With the rising consumption of so-called energy drinks over the last few years, there has been a growing body of literature describing significant adverse health events after the ingestion of these beverages. To gain further insight about the clinical spectrum of these adverse events, we conducted a literature review. Using PubMed and Google-Scholar, we searched the literature from January 1980 through May 2014 for articles on the adverse health effects of energy drinks. A total of 2097 publications were found. We then excluded molecular and industry-related studies, popular media reports, and case reports of isolated caffeine toxicity, yielding 43 reports. Energy drink consumption is a health issue primarily of the adolescent and young adult male population. It is linked to increased substance abuse and risk-taking behaviors. The most common adverse events affect the cardiovascular and neurological systems. The most common ingredient in energy drinks is caffeine, and it is believed that the adverse events are related to its effects, as well as potentiating effects of other stimulants in these drinks. Education, regulation, and further studies are required.

  10. Iohexol and iopamidol myelography in the dog: a clinical trial comparing adverse effects and myelographic quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmer, W.R.; Blevins, W.E.; Jakovljevic, S.; Teclaw, R.F.; Han, C.M.; Hurd, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    In a blind clinical trial, adverse effects after iohexol and iopamidol myelography were evaluated in 151 dogs. Eighty-one dogs were given iohexol (240 mgI/ml) and 70 dogs were given iopamidol (200 mgI/ml) by pre-determined assignment. Each dog was evaluated postmyelographically for seizures, hyperthermia, prolonged recovery from anesthesia and intensification of pre-existing neural signs. Myelographic quality was evaluated with a subjective scoring method. In comparing iohexol and iopamidol groups, there was not a statistically significant difference in the incidence of adverse effects or in myelographic quality. Iopamidol and iohexol appeared to be equally efficacious for routine canine myelography

  11. Pretreatment Predictors of Adverse Radiation Effects After Radiosurgery for Arteriovenous Malformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayhurst, Caroline; Monsalves, Eric; Prooijen, Monique van; Cusimano, Michael; Tsao, May; Menard, Cynthia; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Schwartz, Michael; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify vascular and dosimetric predictors of symptomatic T2 signal change and adverse radiation effects after radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformation, in order to define and validate preexisting risk models. Methods and Materials: A total of 125 patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVM) were treated at our institution between 2005 and 2009. Eighty-five patients have at least 12 months of clinical and radiological follow-up. Any new-onset headaches, new or worsening seizures, or neurological deficit were considered adverse events. Follow-up magnetic resonance images were assessed for new onset T2 signal change and the volume calculated. Pretreatment characteristics and dosimetric variables were analyzed to identify predictors of adverse radiation effects. Results: There were 19 children and 66 adults in the study cohort, with a mean age of 34 (range 6–74). Twenty-three (27%) patients suffered adverse radiation effects (ARE), 9 patients with permanent neurological deficit (10.6%). Of these, 5 developed fixed visual field deficits. Target volume and 12 Gy volume were the most significant predictors of adverse radiation effects on univariate analysis (p 3 , above which the rate of ARE increased dramatically. Multivariate analysis target volume and the absence of prior hemorrhage are the only significant predictors of ARE. The volume of T2 signal change correlates to ARE, but only target volume is predictive of a higher volume of T2 signal change. Conclusions: Target volume and the absence of prior hemorrhage is the most accurate predictor of adverse radiation effects and complications after radiosurgery for AVMs. A high percentage of permanent visual field defects in this series suggest the optic radiation is a critical radiosensitive structure.

  12. The adverse effects of oral desmopressin lyophilisate (MELT): personal experience on enuretic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Pietro; Franceschini, Giulia; Mercurio, Serena; Del Vescovo, Ester; Ianniello, Francesca; Petitti, Tommasangelo

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate adverse effects of oral desmopressin lyophilisate (MELT) in enuretic children. We enrolled 260 children with nocturnal enuresis (NE) referred to the Pediatric Service, 'Campus Bio-Medico' University of Rome, from April 2014 to April 2017 in the study, of these 23 were excluded. The study was characterized by 2 phases. During Phase 1 a careful patient's medical history was obtained and physical examination was performed. After 3 months of treatment with MELT (Minirin/DDAVP ® ) at the dose of 120 mcg a day, a micturition diary was kept, adherence to therapy and any possible adverse effects were checked during the Phase 2. The study was carried out in compliance with the Helsinki Declaration. Among 237 patients included in the study 11 male and 6 female (n=17; 7.2%) patients with a mean age 10.06±2.49 years, reported 22 adverse effects, with an absolute risk of 7.17%. In particular, 5 neurological symptoms, 3 gastrointestinal effects, 4 sleep disturbances, 8 psycho-behavioral disorders, 2 symptoms of fatigue were reported. In our study MELT with its higher bioavailability guaranteed lower frequency of adverse effects which resolved spontaneously and rapidly. The MELT formulation actually represents the first line and safe treatment for the NE.

  13. The Adverse Events and Hemodynamic Effects of Adenosine-Based Cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigtlander, Thomas; Magedanz, Annett; Schmermund, Axel [Cardiovascular Center Bethanien (CCB), Frankfurt (Germany); Bramlage, Peter [Technical University of Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Elsaesser, Amelie [University of Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Mohrs, Oliver K. [University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    We wanted to prospectively assess the adverse events and hemodynamic effects associated with an intravenous adenosine infusion in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease and who were undergoing cardiac MRI. One hundred and sixty-eight patients (64 {+-} 9 years) received adenosine (140 {mu}g/kg/min) during cardiac MRI. Before and during the administration, the heart rate, systemic blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were monitored using a MRI-compatible system. We documented any signs and symptoms of potential adverse events. In total, 47 out of 168 patients (28%) experienced adverse effects, which were mostly mild or moderate. In 13 patients (8%), the adenosine infusion was discontinued due to intolerable dyspnea or chest pain. No high grade atrioventricular block, bronchospasm or other life-threatening adverse events occurred. The hemodynamic measurements showed a significant increase in the heart rate during adenosine infusion (69.3 {+-} 11.7 versus 82.4 {+-} 13.0 beats/min, respectively; p < 0.001). A significant but clinically irrelevant increase in oxygen saturation occurred during adenosine infusion (96 {+-} 1.9% versus 97 {+-} 1.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). The blood pressure did not significantly change during adenosine infusion (systolic: 142.8 {+-} 24.0 versus 140.9 {+-} 25.7 mmHg; diastolic: 80.2 {+-} 12.5 mmHg versus 78.9 {+-} 15.6, respectively). This study confirms the safety of adenosine infusion during cardiac MRI. A considerable proportion of all patients will experience minor adverse effects and some patients will not tolerate adenosine infusion. However, all adverse events can be successfully managed by a radiologist. The increased heart rate during adenosine infusion highlights the need to individually adjust the settings according to the patient, e.g., the number of slices of myocardial perfusion imaging.

  14. The Adverse Events and Hemodynamic Effects of Adenosine-Based Cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigtlander, Thomas; Magedanz, Annett; Schmermund, Axel; Bramlage, Peter; Elsaesser, Amelie; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Mohrs, Oliver K.

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to prospectively assess the adverse events and hemodynamic effects associated with an intravenous adenosine infusion in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease and who were undergoing cardiac MRI. One hundred and sixty-eight patients (64 ± 9 years) received adenosine (140 μg/kg/min) during cardiac MRI. Before and during the administration, the heart rate, systemic blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were monitored using a MRI-compatible system. We documented any signs and symptoms of potential adverse events. In total, 47 out of 168 patients (28%) experienced adverse effects, which were mostly mild or moderate. In 13 patients (8%), the adenosine infusion was discontinued due to intolerable dyspnea or chest pain. No high grade atrioventricular block, bronchospasm or other life-threatening adverse events occurred. The hemodynamic measurements showed a significant increase in the heart rate during adenosine infusion (69.3 ± 11.7 versus 82.4 ± 13.0 beats/min, respectively; p < 0.001). A significant but clinically irrelevant increase in oxygen saturation occurred during adenosine infusion (96 ± 1.9% versus 97 ± 1.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). The blood pressure did not significantly change during adenosine infusion (systolic: 142.8 ± 24.0 versus 140.9 ± 25.7 mmHg; diastolic: 80.2 ± 12.5 mmHg versus 78.9 ± 15.6, respectively). This study confirms the safety of adenosine infusion during cardiac MRI. A considerable proportion of all patients will experience minor adverse effects and some patients will not tolerate adenosine infusion. However, all adverse events can be successfully managed by a radiologist. The increased heart rate during adenosine infusion highlights the need to individually adjust the settings according to the patient, e.g., the number of slices of myocardial perfusion imaging.

  15. Adverse effects of radical vaginal surgery and radiotherapy on ureteral function, their prevention and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pockrandt, H.; Jorde, A.

    1973-03-01

    The adverse effects of carcinoma therapy on ureteral function are described and placed in relationship to each other. The most essential precautions in prophylaxis and therapy before, during, and after surgery are described in detail. A delayed prophylaxis of a urological study in conjunction with recidivism study must be made. (JSR)

  16. Evaluation of the Quebec Healthy Enterprise Standard: Effect on Adverse Psychosocial Work Factors and Psychological Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, Marie-Claude; Duchaine, Caroline S; Aubé, Karine; Talbot, Denis; Mantha-Bélisle, Marie-Michèle; Sultan-Taïeb, Hélène; St-Hilaire, France; Biron, Caroline; Vézina, Michel; Brisson, Chantal

    2018-02-28

    Adverse psychosocial work factors are recognized as a significant source of psychological distress, resulting in a considerable socioeconomic burden. The impact of occupational health standards that aim to reduce these adverse work factors, such as the Quebec Healthy Enterprise Standard (QHES), is of great interest for public health. The aim of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, the effect of QHES interventions targeting adverse psychosocial work factors on the prevalence of these factors and of psychological distress among ten Quebec organizations. These outcomes were assessed by questionnaire using validated instruments before (T1, n = 2849) and 2-3 years following (T2, n = 2560) QHES implementation. Beneficial effects of interventions were observed for two adverse psychosocial work factors: low rewards (ratio of prevalence ratios (PRs) = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.66-0.91) and low social support at work (ratio of PRs = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.77-1.03). Moreover, beneficial effects of interventions were also observed on the prevalence of high psychological distress (ratio of PRs = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.75-0.998). Psychosocial interventions implemented in the context of this standard improved the psychosocial work environment and had beneficial effects on workers' mental health.

  17. Early and late renal adverse effects after potentially nephrotoxic treatment for childhood cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knijnenburg, Sebastiaan L.; Mulder, Renée L.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y. N.; Bökenkamp, Arend; Blufpand, Hester; van Dulmen-den Broeder, Eline; Veening, Margreet A.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.; Jaspers, Monique W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Great improvements in diagnostics and treatment for malignant disease in childhood have led to a major increase in survival. However, childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are at great risk for developing adverse effects caused by multimodal treatment for their malignancy. Nephrotoxicity is one of these

  18. An overview of adverse health effects caused by mycotoxins and bioassays for their detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands LM; Leusden van FM; MGB

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to moulds and their (toxic) metabolites (mycotoxins) is a menace to human and animal health. A risk analysis can shed light on the actual risk of adverse health effects. In a previously published RIVM report (nr. 257852 002) on hazard identification the genera, Aspergillus, Penicillium,

  19. The Risk of Adverse Impact in Selections Based on a Test with Known Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Corte, Wilfried; Lievens, Filip

    2005-01-01

    The authors derive the exact sampling distribution function of the adverse impact (AI) ratio for single-stage, top-down selections using tests with known effect sizes. Subsequently, it is shown how this distribution function can be used to determine the risk that a future selection decision on the basis of such tests will result in an outcome that…

  20. Alkaloids in the human food chain - Natural occurrence and possible adverse effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, I.; Beek, van T.A.; Soffers, A.E.M.F.; Dusemund, B.; Rietjens, I.

    2012-01-01

    Alkaloid-containing plants are an intrinsic part of the regular Western diet. The present paper summarizes the occurrence of alkaloids in the food chain, their mode of action and possible adverse effects including a safety assessment. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are a reason for concern because of their

  1. Caregiver Acceptance of Adverse Effects and Use of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremus, Mark; Wolfson, Christina; Vandal, Alain C.; Bergman, Howard; Xie, Qihao

    2007-01-01

    Caregivers play a determining role in choosing treatments for persons with Alzheimer's disease. The objective of this study was to examine caregivers' willingness to have persons with Alzheimer's disease continue taking cholinesterase inhibitors in the event that any 1 of 11 adverse effects was to occur. Data were gathered via postal questionnaire…

  2. Trastuzumab-associated cardiac adverse effects in the herceptin adjuvant trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suter, Thomas M.; Procter, Marion; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Muscholl, Michael; Bergh, Jonas; Carlomagno, Chiara; Perren, Timothy; Passalacqua, Rodolfo; Bighin, Claudia; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Ageev, Fail T.; Hitre, Erika; Groetz, Juergen; Iwata, Hiroji; Knap, Malgorzata; Gnant, Michael; Muehlbauer, Susanne; Spence, Alison; Gelber, Richard D.; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this analysis was to investigate trastuzumab- associated cardiac adverse effects in breast cancer patients after completion of ( neo) adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy. Patients and Methods The Herceptin Adjuvant ( HERA) trial is a three- group, multicenter,

  3. Adverse effects associated with intravenous pentamidine isethionate as treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in AIDS patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, U; Nielsen, T L

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the adverse effects of intravenous pentamidine isethionate, a retrospective study was carried out over a four-year period. Twenty-one acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients received intravenous pentamidine as treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). This was 13...

  4. Rodenticide incidents of exposure and adverse effects on non-raptor birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Nimish B

    2017-12-31

    Interest in the adverse effects of rodenticides on birds has focused primarily on raptors. However, non-raptor birds are also poisoned (rodenticide exposure resulting in adverse effects including mortality) by rodenticides through consumption of the rodenticide bait and contaminated prey. A literature search for rodenticide incidents (evidence of exposure to a rodenticide, adverse effects, or exposure to placebo baits) involving non-raptor birds returned 641 records spanning the years 1931 to 2016. The incidents included 17 orders, 58 families, and 190 non-raptor bird species. Nineteen anticoagulant and non-anticoagulant rodenticide active ingredients were associated with the incidents. The number of incidents and species detected were compared by surveillance method. An incident was considered to have been reported through passive surveillance if it was voluntarily reported to the authorities whereas the report of an incident found through field work that was conducted with the objective of documenting adverse effects on birds was determined to be from active surveillance. More incidents were reported from passive surveillance than with active surveillance but a significantly greater number of species were detected in proportion to the number of incidents found through active surveillance than with passive surveillance (z=7.61, praptor bird poisonings from rodenticides may increase incident reportings and can strengthen the predictions of harm characterized by risk assessments. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Adverse effects of extra-articular corticosteroid injections: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Brinks (Tineke); B.W. Koes (Bart); A.C. Volkers (Aloysius); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. To estimate the occurrence and type of adverse effects after application of an extra-articular (soft tissue) corticosteroid injection. Methods. A systematic review of the literature was made based on a PubMed and Embase search covering the period 1956 to January 2010. Case

  6. Evaluation of the Quebec Healthy Enterprise Standard: Effect on Adverse Psychosocial Work Factors and Psychological Distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Claude Letellier

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Adverse psychosocial work factors are recognized as a significant source of psychological distress, resulting in a considerable socioeconomic burden. The impact of occupational health standards that aim to reduce these adverse work factors, such as the Quebec Healthy Enterprise Standard (QHES, is of great interest for public health. The aim of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, the effect of QHES interventions targeting adverse psychosocial work factors on the prevalence of these factors and of psychological distress among ten Quebec organizations. These outcomes were assessed by questionnaire using validated instruments before (T1, n = 2849 and 2–3 years following (T2, n = 2560 QHES implementation. Beneficial effects of interventions were observed for two adverse psychosocial work factors: low rewards (ratio of prevalence ratios (PRs = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.66–0.91 and low social support at work (ratio of PRs = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.77–1.03. Moreover, beneficial effects of interventions were also observed on the prevalence of high psychological distress (ratio of PRs = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.75–0.998. Psychosocial interventions implemented in the context of this standard improved the psychosocial work environment and had beneficial effects on workers’ mental health.

  7. Adverse renal effects of hydrochlorothiazide in rats with myocardial infarction treated with an ACE inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westendorp, Bart; Hamming, Inge; Szymanski, Mariusz K.; Navis, Gerjan; van Goor, Harry; Buikema, Hendrik; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Schoemaker, Regien G.

    2009-01-01

    Diuretics, when added to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) treatment, can augment the response to ACE inhibitors, but may have adverse effects on renal function, which negatively affect prognosis. While in heart failure rats combined therapy initially improved cardiac

  8. The economic cost of adverse health effects from wildfire-smoke exposure: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuho Kochi; Geoffrey H. Donovan; Patricia A. Champ; John B. Loomis

    2010-01-01

    The economic costs of adverse health effects associated with exposure to wildfire smoke should be given serious consideration in determining the optimal wildfire management policy. Unfortunately, the literature in this research area is thin. In an effort to better understand the nature of these economic costs, we review and synthesise the relevant literature in three...

  9. Late adverse effects of whole cranial irradiation in childhood hematological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Someya, Masanori; Nakata, Kensei; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Oouchi, Atsushi; Sakata, Kohichi; Hareyama, Masato [Sapporo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the late adverse effects of childhood hematological disorders treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy including whole cranial irradiation at Sapporo Medical University Hospital. Twenty-eight patients were treated with chemotherapy and 18-24 Gy of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 14 patients were treated with 3-12.8 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for ALL, acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), malignant lymphoma, and aplastic anemia (AA). Age at diagnosis ranged from 2 to 15 years old, and 28 were males and 14 were females. All patients were disease-free more than 2 years after diagnosis. Of 42 patients, 4 patients had decreased height (less than -2 S.D.), 3 patients required hormone replacement therapy, 2 patients had mental retardation, 3 patients had leukoencephalopathy, and 1 patient had a second malignancy. Except for the cases of decreased height, 3 of 7 late adverse effects were occurred in patients who had relapse of disease, and the risk of the adverse effects seemed to be higher for those patients whose doses of PCI were 22 Gy or more, or who received an additional craniospinal irradiation due to relapse of disease, and 18 Gy of PCI did not increase the risk of adverse effects. (author)

  10. A Serious Adverse Effect of Pseudoephedrine Used For Common Cold Treatment : Ventricular Arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Aypak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Common cold is one of the frequently seen disease in childhood. Pseudoephedrine hydrochloride (PEH is a sympathomimetic drug which is widely used for treatment of common cold as a decongestant on children. The aim of this case report is, to draw attention to serious adverse effects of PEH treatment. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(3.000: 506-510

  11. Social Adversity and Antisocial Behavior: Mediating Effects of Autonomic Nervous System Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Shawn E; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yu

    2017-11-01

    The display of antisocial behaviors in children and adolescents has been of interest to criminologists and developmental psychologists for years. Exposure to social adversity is a well-documented predictor of antisocial behavior. Additionally, measures of autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, including heart rate variability (HRV), pre-ejection period (PEP), and heart rate, have been associated with antisocial behaviors including rule-breaking and aggression. Social neuroscience research has begun to investigate how neurobiological underpinnings affect the relationship between social adversity and antisocial/psychopathic behavior in children and adolescents. This study investigated the potential mediating effects of ANS activity on the relationship between social adversity and antisocial behavior in a group of 7- to 10-year-old children from the community (N = 339; 48.2% male). Moderated multiple mediation analyses revealed that low resting heart rate, but not PEP or HRV, mediated the relationship between social adversity and antisocial behavior in males only. Social adversity but not ANS measures were associated with antisocial behavior in females. Findings have implications for understanding the neural influences that underlie antisocial behavior, illustrate the importance of the social environment regarding the expression of these behaviors, and highlight essential gender differences.

  12. The Role of Mindfulness in Reducing the Adverse Effects of Childhood Stress and Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Robin; Sibinga, Erica M

    2017-02-28

    Research suggests that many children are exposed to adverse experiences in childhood. Such adverse childhood exposures may result in stress and trauma, which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality into adulthood. In general populations and trauma-exposed adults, mindfulness interventions have demonstrated reduced depression and anxiety, reduced trauma-related symptoms, enhanced coping and mood, and improved quality of life. Studies in children and youth also demonstrate that mindfulness interventions improve mental, behavioral, and physical outcomes. Taken together, this research suggests that high-quality, structured mindfulness instruction may mitigate the negative effects of stress and trauma related to adverse childhood exposures, improving short- and long-term outcomes, and potentially reducing poor health outcomes in adulthood. Future work is needed to optimize implementation of youth-based mindfulness programs and to study long-term outcomes into adulthood.

  13. The Role of Mindfulness in Reducing the Adverse Effects of Childhood Stress and Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Ortiz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that many children are exposed to adverse experiences in childhood. Such adverse childhood exposures may result in stress and trauma, which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality into adulthood. In general populations and trauma-exposed adults, mindfulness interventions have demonstrated reduced depression and anxiety, reduced trauma-related symptoms, enhanced coping and mood, and improved quality of life. Studies in children and youth also demonstrate that mindfulness interventions improve mental, behavioral, and physical outcomes. Taken together, this research suggests that high-quality, structured mindfulness instruction may mitigate the negative effects of stress and trauma related to adverse childhood exposures, improving short- and long-term outcomes, and potentially reducing poor health outcomes in adulthood. Future work is needed to optimize implementation of youth-based mindfulness programs and to study long-term outcomes into adulthood.

  14. Adverse effects and Drug Interactions Associated with Inhaled Recreational and Medical Marijuana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisha Kelly Freeman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To provide an overview of the addiction potential; adverse effects (e.g., cardiovascular, immune dysfunction, respiratory system, mental health disorders; drug interactions; effects of accidental exposure; crime statistics; and pharmacist’s considerations for the use of inhaled medical marijuana. Methods: A PubMed search was conducted from 1966 to March 2016 to identify articles in which the safety of inhaled medical marijuana was assessed. Key MeSH search terms included medical marijuana with a subheading for adverse effect. Only articles in adult patients were considered. In addition, medical marijuana or cannabis plus one of the following search terms were searched: drug interactions, herb-drug interactions, drug-related side effects and adverse drug reactions, substance-related disorders, addiction, and abuse. A free-text search was also conducted to identify articles not included in the MeSH term search. A bibliographic search was also conducted. Articles were included if they addressed adverse effects of medical marijuana for the treatment of a condition. Meta-analyses, randomized controlled clinical trials, and case reports were included in the review if the primary focus of the article related to the adverse effect profile of inhaled medical marijuana. Medical marijuana efficacy studies were not assessed. In the absence of this information, case reports or reports of inhaled recreational marijuana use was used. Studies were excluded if published in languages other than English. In addition, studies highlighting mechanisms of action, studies of pharmacodynamics or pharmacokinetic effects were excluded, unless these effects were due to drug-drug interactions. Prescription products containing marijuana or derivatives were excluded from evaluation. An Internet search was conducted to locate the most up-to-date information on the laws concerning medical marijuana. Key findings: A PubMed search revealed 58 articles and 28 of

  15. Orlistat-associated adverse effects and drug interactions: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippatos, Theodosios D; Derdemezis, Christos S; Gazi, Irene F; Nakou, Eleni S; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Elisaf, Moses S

    2008-01-01

    Orlistat, an anti-obesity drug, is a potent and specific inhibitor of intestinal lipases. In light of the recent US FDA approval of the over-the-counter sale of orlistat (60 mg three times daily), clinicians need to be aware that its use may be associated with less well known, but sometimes clinically relevant, adverse effects. More specifically, the use of orlistat has been associated with several mild-to-moderate gastrointestinal adverse effects, such as oily stools, diarrhoea, abdominal pain and faecal spotting. A few cases of serious hepatic adverse effects (cholelithiasis, cholostatic hepatitis and subacute liver failure) have been reported. However, the effects of orlistat on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are beneficial. Orlistat-induced weight loss seems to have beneficial effects on blood pressure. No effect has been observed on calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, copper or zinc balance or on bone biomarkers. Interestingly, the use of orlistat has been associated with rare cases of acute kidney injury, possibly due to the increased fat malabsorption resulting from the inhibition of pancreatic and gastric lipase by orlistat, leading to the formation of soaps with calcium and resulting in increased free oxalate absorption and enteric hyperoxaluria. Orlistat has a beneficial effect on carbohydrate metabolism. No significant effect on cancer risk has been reported with orlistat.Orlistat interferes with the absorption of many drugs (such as warfarin, amiodarone, ciclosporin and thyroxine as well as fat-soluble vitamins), affecting their bioavailability and effectiveness. This review considers orlistat-related adverse effects and drug interactions. The clinical relevance and pathogenesis of these effects is also discussed.

  16. The adverse effect of real effective exchange rate change on trade balance in European transition countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selena Begović

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most European transition countries have fixed or highly managed flexible exchange rate regimes. This exchange rate rigidity is sometimes argued to worsen the trade balance by keeping the currency overvalued. However, there is no unambiguous evidence that currency depreciation/devaluation positively affects trade balance and leads towards the adjustment, even in the short-run. Therefore, we examine the effect of real effective exchange rate (hereafter REER on trade balance in European transition economies over the period 2000-2015. By using fixed effect model for static and generalised method of moments for dynamic estimation, we find that there is an adverse effect of the REER on trade balance in European transition countries over the period 2000-2015. Namely, depreciation of REER deteriorates trade balance in European transition countries, which could be explained by high import dependence and low export capacity. This implies that policymakers in European transition countries should not use exchange rate policy to improve trade balance. This is important in the light of their accession towards European economic and monetary integration, implying that these countries should focus more on using fiscal, rather than monetary (and exchange rate, policy to adjust trade balance, which is one of the required real convergence towards the EU standards.

  17. Genetic Predictors of Adverse Radiotherapy Effects: The Gene-PARE project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Alice Y.; Atencio, David P.; Peters, Sheila; Stock, Richard G.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Green, Sheryl; Haffty, Bruce; Drumea, Karen; Leitzin, Larisa M.D.; Kuten, Abraham; Azria, David; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Overgaard, Jens; Andreassen, Christian N.; Trop, Cynthia S.; Park, Janelle; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The development of adverse effects resulting from the radiotherapy of cancer limits the use of this treatment modality. The validation of a test capable of predicting which patients would be most likely to develop adverse responses to radiation treatment, based on the possession of specific genetic variants, would therefore be of value. The purpose of the Genetic Predictors of Adverse Radiotherapy Effects (Gene-PARE) project is to help achieve this goal. Methods and Materials: A continuously expanding biorepository has been created consisting of frozen lymphocytes and DNA isolated from patients treated with radiotherapy. In conjunction with this biorepository, a database is maintained with detailed clinical information pertaining to diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. The DNA samples are screened using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and the Surveyor nuclease assay for variants in ATM, TGFB1, XRCC1, XRCC3, SOD2, and hHR21. It is anticipated that additional genes that control the biologic response to radiation will be screened in future work. Results: Evidence has been obtained that possession of variants in genes, the products of which play a role in radiation response, is predictive for the development of adverse effects after radiotherapy. Conclusions: It is anticipated that the Gene-PARE project will yield information that will allow radiation oncologists to use genetic data to optimize treatment on an individual basis

  18. Adverse effects of the antimalaria drug, mefloquine: due to primary liver damage with secondary thyroid involvement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herxheimer Andrew

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mefloquine is a clinically important antimalaria drug, which is often not well tolerated. We critically reviewed 516 published case reports of mefloquine adverse effects, to clarify the phenomenology of the harms associated with mefloquine, and to make recommendations for safer prescribing. Presentation We postulate that many of the adverse effects of mefloquine are a post-hepatic syndrome caused by primary liver damage. In some users we believe that symptomatic thyroid disturbance occurs, either independently or as a secondary consequence of the hepatocellular injury. The mefloquine syndrome presents in a variety of ways including headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, nervousness, fatigue, disorders of sleep, mood, memory and concentration, and occasionally frank psychosis. Previous liver or thyroid disease, and concurrent insults to the liver (such as from alcohol, dehydration, an oral contraceptive pill, recreational drugs, and other liver-damaging drugs may be related to the development of severe or prolonged adverse reactions to mefloquine. Implications We believe that people with active liver or thyroid disease should not take mefloquine, whereas those with fully resolved neuropsychiatric illness may do so safely. Mefloquine users should avoid alcohol, recreational drugs, hormonal contraception and co-medications known to cause liver damage or thyroid damage. With these caveats, we believe that mefloquine may be safely prescribed in pregnancy, and also to occupational groups who carry out safety-critical tasks. Testing Mefloquine's adverse effects need to be investigated through a multicentre cohort study, with small controlled studies testing specific elements of the hypothesis.

  19. Adverse effects of the antimalaria drug, mefloquine: due to primary liver damage with secondary thyroid involvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Ashley M; Herxheimer, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background Mefloquine is a clinically important antimalaria drug, which is often not well tolerated. We critically reviewed 516 published case reports of mefloquine adverse effects, to clarify the phenomenology of the harms associated with mefloquine, and to make recommendations for safer prescribing. Presentation We postulate that many of the adverse effects of mefloquine are a post-hepatic syndrome caused by primary liver damage. In some users we believe that symptomatic thyroid disturbance occurs, either independently or as a secondary consequence of the hepatocellular injury. The mefloquine syndrome presents in a variety of ways including headache, gastrointestinal disturbances, nervousness, fatigue, disorders of sleep, mood, memory and concentration, and occasionally frank psychosis. Previous liver or thyroid disease, and concurrent insults to the liver (such as from alcohol, dehydration, an oral contraceptive pill, recreational drugs, and other liver-damaging drugs) may be related to the development of severe or prolonged adverse reactions to mefloquine. Implications We believe that people with active liver or thyroid disease should not take mefloquine, whereas those with fully resolved neuropsychiatric illness may do so safely. Mefloquine users should avoid alcohol, recreational drugs, hormonal contraception and co-medications known to cause liver damage or thyroid damage. With these caveats, we believe that mefloquine may be safely prescribed in pregnancy, and also to occupational groups who carry out safety-critical tasks. Testing Mefloquine's adverse effects need to be investigated through a multicentre cohort study, with small controlled studies testing specific elements of the hypothesis. PMID:11914150

  20. Adverse effect of the CCR5 promoter -2459A allele on HIV-1 disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, T B; Kristiansen, T B; Katzenstein, T L

    2001-01-01

    HIV positive individuals heterozygous for a 32 basepair deletion in the CCR5 encoding gene (CCR5 Delta32) have a reduced number of CCR5 receptors on the cell surface and a slower progression towards AIDS and death. Other human polymorphisms, such as the CCR2 64I and the CCR5 promoter -2459 A....... Genotypes were determined in 119 individuals enrolled in the Copenhagen AIDS Cohort. When including the concurrent effects of the CCR5 Delta32 and CCR2 64I mutations, homozygous carriers of the CCR5 promoter -2459A allele had a significantly faster progression towards death than heterozygous A/G individuals...... (P = 0.03), whereas this adverse effect was not significant when comparing A/A and G/G individuals. However, independent analysis revealed a significant adverse effect of the CCR5 promoter -2459A allele. Homozygous carriers of the -2459A allele that lack the protective effects of the CCR5 Delta32...

  1. Adverse effects and Drug Interactions Associated with Inhaled Recreational and Medical Marijuana

    OpenAIRE

    Maisha Kelly Freeman; Pilar Z Murphy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To provide an overview of the addiction potential; adverse effects (e.g., cardiovascular, immune dysfunction, respiratory system, mental health disorders); drug interactions; effects of accidental exposure; crime statistics; and pharmacist’s considerations for the use of inhaled medical marijuana. Methods: A PubMed search was conducted from 1966 to March 2016 to identify articles in which the safety of inhaled medical marijuana was assessed. Key MeSH search terms included med...

  2. Systematic Review of Adverse Effects: A Further Step towards Modernization of Acupuncture in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junyi; Hu, Yanmei; Zhu, Yin; Yin, Ping; Xu, Shifen

    2015-01-01

    As a further step towards the modernization of acupuncture, the objective of this review was to figure out the frequency and severity of adverse complications and events in acupuncture treatment reported from 1980 to 2013 in China. All first-hand case reports of acupuncture-related complications and adverse events that could be identified in the scientific literature were reviewed and classified according to the type of complication and adverse event, circumstance of the event, and long-term patient outcome. The selected case reports were published between 1980 and 2013 in 3 databases. Relevant papers were collected and analyzed by 2 reviewers. Over the 33 years, 182 incidents were identified in 133 relevant papers. Internal organ, tissue, or nerve injury is the main complications of acupuncture especially for pneumothorax and central nervous system injury. Adverse effects also included syncope, infections, hemorrhage, allergy, burn, aphonia, hysteria, cough, thirst, fever, somnolence, and broken needles. Qualifying training of acupuncturists should be systemized and the clinical acupuncture operations should be standardized in order to effectively prevent the occurrence of acupuncture accidents, enhance the influence of acupuncture, and further popularize acupuncture to the rest of the world. PMID:26339265

  3. Systematic Review of Adverse Effects: A Further Step towards Modernization of Acupuncture in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As a further step towards the modernization of acupuncture, the objective of this review was to figure out the frequency and severity of adverse complications and events in acupuncture treatment reported from 1980 to 2013 in China. All first-hand case reports of acupuncture-related complications and adverse events that could be identified in the scientific literature were reviewed and classified according to the type of complication and adverse event, circumstance of the event, and long-term patient outcome. The selected case reports were published between 1980 and 2013 in 3 databases. Relevant papers were collected and analyzed by 2 reviewers. Over the 33 years, 182 incidents were identified in 133 relevant papers. Internal organ, tissue, or nerve injury is the main complications of acupuncture especially for pneumothorax and central nervous system injury. Adverse effects also included syncope, infections, hemorrhage, allergy, burn, aphonia, hysteria, cough, thirst, fever, somnolence, and broken needles. Qualifying training of acupuncturists should be systemized and the clinical acupuncture operations should be standardized in order to effectively prevent the occurrence of acupuncture accidents, enhance the influence of acupuncture, and further popularize acupuncture to the rest of the world.

  4. ADVERSE EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM CORTICOSTEROID THERAPY OF NEPHROTIC SYNDROME IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Nastausheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long-term corticosteroid therapy in children leads to plenty of adverse effects with negative influence on health. Objective: analysis of adverse effects of corticosteroids in children with steroid-sensitive  nephrotic syndrome and development of recommendations of their early detection.Methods: A retrospective study is conducted on children with this syndrome aged 3–18 who applied to Voronezh Regional Children’s Clinical Hospital № 1 in 2011–2014.  Complications  of corticosteroid  therapy revealed during clinical examination of children were taken into account. Data on 118 healthy children examined in 2012–2014 were used to calculate integral index.Results: The study analyses treatment results of 18 children who received glucocorticosteroids  during 6 months before hospitalization and 13 children who were withdrawn from glucocorticosteroids  for 6 months or more before hospitalization. Among adverse reactions in group 1 there prevailed overweight/obesity  (78%, reactive pancreatitis (72%, leukemoid reactions (67%, liver damage (61%, Cushingoid syndrome (44%, chronic gastroduodenitis  (33%. Hyperglycemia (11%, hypertension (6% and infection (6% were less common. In group 2 only 2 (15% patients had chronic gastroduodenitis,  other complications were not documented. Indices that change in children with nephrotic syndrome during corticosteroid treatment (body mass index, blood serum glucose and amylase were measured by a single scale using modifications coefficients. Average value of the coefficients is suggested to be a new diagnostic criterion (metabolic reaction index which allows to reveal corticosteroid adverse effects before any clinical manifestations.Conclusion: Most adverse reactions of glucocorticosteroids are short-term and continue after 6 months in a small number of patients.

  5. Adverse effects induced by ecgonine methyl ester to the zebra mussel: A comparison with the benzoylecgonine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parolini, Marco; Binelli, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine and its metabolites are the prevalent psychotropic substances in aquatic environment. However, to date the knowledge on their adverse effects to non-target organisms is inadequate. The aims of this study were to investigate sub-lethal effects induced by the ecgonine methyl ester (EME) to the freshwater bivalve Dreissena polymorpha and to compare its toxicity to that by benzoylecgonine (BE), the other main cocaine metabolite. EME sub-lethal effects were investigated by 14 days in-vivo exposures and a multi-biomarker approach. Slight variations in biomarker responses were found at 0.15 μg/L treatment. 0.5 μg/L EME treatment induced destabilization of lysosome membranes, an overall inactivation of defense enzymes, increases in lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and DNA fragmentation, but no variations in fixed genetic damage. The use of a biomarker response index (BRI) showed that at 0.5 μg/L both cocaine metabolites had the same toxicity to zebra mussels specimens. -- Highlights: •Sub-lethal effects induced by ecgonine methyl ester (EME) to D. polymorpha were investigated. •Realistic EME concentrations caused notable adverse effects in treated bivalves. •EME induced oxidative injuries to treated-mussel lipids, protein and DNA. •EME toxicity was comparable to the benzoylecgonine one. -- Environmentally relevant ecgonine methyl ester concentrations induced adverse effects to zebra mussels

  6. Adverse breast cancer treatment effects: the economic case for making rehabilitative programs standard of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Kathryn H; DiSipio, Tracey; Gordon, Louisa G; Hayes, Sandra C

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the patient-borne financial cost of common, adverse breast cancer treatment-associated effects, comparing cost across women with or without these side effects. Two hundred eighty-seven Australian women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer were prospectively followed starting at 6 months post-surgery for 12 months, with three monthly assessments of detailed treatment-related side effects and their direct and indirect patient costs attributable to breast cancer. Bootstrapping statistics were used to analyze cost data, and adjusted logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between costs and adverse events from breast cancer. Costs were inflated and converted from 2002 Australian to 2014 US dollars. More than 90 % of women experienced at least one adverse effect (i.e., post-surgical issue, reaction to radiotherapy, upper-body symptoms or reduced function, lymphedema, fatigue, or weight gain). On average, women paid $5,636 (95 % confidence interval (CI), $4,694, $6,577) in total costs. Women with any one of the following symptoms (fatigue, reduced upper-body function, upper-body symptoms) or women who report ≥4 adverse treatment-related effects, have 1.5 to nearly 4 times the odds of having higher healthcare costs than women who do not report these complaints (p treatment-related health problems, which may persist beyond the treatment period. Improving breast cancer care by incorporating prospective surveillance of treatment-related side effects and strategies for prevention and treatment of concerns (e.g., exercise) has real potential for reducing patient-borne costs.

  7. Technical evaluation report, AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel Symposium on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinmann, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting on Effects of Adverse Weather on Aerodynamics was to provide an update of the stae-of-the-art with respect to the prediction, simulation, and measurement of the effects of icing, anti-icing fluids, and various precipitation on the aerodynamic characteristics of flight vehicles. Sessions were devoted to introductory and survey papers and icing certification issues, to analytical and experimental simulation of ice frost contamination and its effects of aerodynamics, and to the effects of heavy rain and deicing/anti-icing fluids.

  8. Proximal muscular atrophy and weakness: An unusual adverse effect of deferasirox iron chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vill, K; Müller-Felber, W; Teusch, V; Blaschek, A; Gerstl, L; Huetker, S; Albert, M H

    2016-01-01

    Deferasirox is a standard treatment for chronic transfusional iron overload. Adverse effects of deferasirox have been reported in large prospective studies. We report two cases of monozygotic twins manifesting with proximal muscular atrophy and weakness under deferasirox. Discontinuation of deferasirox resulted in symptom improvement and ultimately in complete remission five months after successful haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Broad diagnostic work-up could not bring evidence of another aetiology of muscular weakness. Iron overload or beta thalassemia itself as a cause is considered unlikely in our patients because the chronological coincidence of muscular symptoms was contra-directional to serum ferritin levels and significant clinical improvement was observed promptly after cessation of deferasirox even before transplantation. These observations suggest that the development of muscular weakness in patients on deferasirox should be recognised as a possible adverse effect of the drug. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A Cohort Study on Long-Term Adverse Effects of Parental Drinking: Background and Study Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingunn Olea Lund

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although many studies have addressed adverse outcomes in children of parents with alcohol abuse/dependence, less is known about the possible long-term effects of more normative patterns of parental alcohol consumption, including drinking at lower risk levels and heavy episodic or binge drinking. The extent of harm from parental drinking may therefore be underestimated. With this research proposal, we describe a project that aims to assess possible long-term adverse effects of parental drinking by combining survey and nationwide registry data. Advantages of a longitudinal general population cohort design include that it allows for detailed information on parental drinking through survey data and identification of possible negative long-term health and social outcomes from exposure to parental drinking 1–19 years after exposure through continuously updated nationwide registers. The rich information available from combining survey and registry data allows us to take into account important confounders, mediators, and moderators.

  10. [Management of adverse effects related to human immunoglobulin therapy: Recommendations for clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, I; Chérin, P; Michallet, M; Pelus, E; Dantal, J; Crave, J-C; Delain, J-C; Viallard, J-F

    2017-05-01

    Both intravenous and subcutaneous immunoglobulins are therapeutic modalities approved in various conditions, including primary and secondary immune deficiencies and autoimmune disorders. To date, immunoglobulins have more often been considered as a safe medication, with minor adverse effects such as hypertension, fever and chills, nausea, myalgia or headache. However, with the wider use of immunoglobulins in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, severe side effects have also been reported to occur in immunoglobulin-treated patients, especially anaphylaxis, aseptic meningitis, acute renal impairment, thrombotic events as well as haematological manifestations. This paper reviews all the potential adverse events related to immunoglobulin therapy and establishes a comprehensive guideline for the management of these events. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are frequent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Nørgaard, Astrid; Burcharth, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are potentially life-threatening. Due to screening, transmission of infectious diseases has decreased; however, the risk is still present. Various immune reactions are common including simple allergic reactions as well as devastating...... conditions such as transfusion-related acute lung injury and circulatory overload in patients with heart disease. Knowledge of the clinical signs of transfusion-related complications is important for clinicians in order to provide the best possible treatment....

  12. The Adverse Effects and Treatment Results of Smoking Cessation Pharmacotherapy During Fasting/Non-Fasting State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliaz, Sinem; Tural Onur, Seda; Uysal, Mehmet Atilla; Chousein, Efsun Gonca Uğur; Tanriverdi, Elif; Bagci, Belma Akbaba; Bahadir, Ayse; Hattatoglu, Didem Gorgun; Ortakoylu, Mediha Gonenc; Yurt, Sibel

    2017-07-03

    Cigarette smoking is one of the most common addictions worldwide. Muslim smokers reduce the number of cigarettes they smoke during Ramadan due to the long fasting hours. We aimed to share our experience in a smoking cessation clinic during Ramadan by analyzing the efficacy and adverse effects of once-daily dosing of bupropion or varenicline in a fasting group compared with conventional dosing in a non-fasting group. We analyzed 57 patients who attended our smoking cessation clinic during Ramadan of 2014 and 2015, and at least one follow-up visit. For the fasting patients, we prescribed bupropion or varenicline after dinner (once daily) as the maintenance therapy. We recorded demographic characteristics of the patients, fasting state, drugs taken for smoking cessation, and the dosage of the medication. At the first follow-up visit, adverse effects seen with the treatment were recorded. We conducted telephone interviews 6 months after the first visits of the patients to learn the current smoking status of the groups. Of the total 57 patients, 20 (35.1%) were fasting and 37 (64.9%) were not fasting. Fasting and non-fasting patients were similar for sex, age, smoking pack-years, marital status, educational status, and mean Fagerström scores (p >.05). Adverse effects and quit rates after 6 months of follow-up were similar between the fasting and non-fasting groups (p >.05). Although our sample size was small, we found no difference in the rates of adverse effects or smoking cessation using a single daily oral dose of bupropion or varenicline between a fasting group and a non-fasting group that received conventional dosing.

  13. Topiramate-induced somnambulism in a migraineur: a probable idiosyncratic adverse effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Thomas; Sarma, G R K; Nadig, Raghunandan; Varghese, Raji

    2012-04-15

    Somnambulism (sleepwalking) is a disorder of arousal that falls under "parasomnia" group and is more common in children. These phenomena occur as primary sleep events or secondary to systemic disease or can be drug induced. Medications that can cause sleepwalking include neuroleptics, hypnotics, lithium, amitriptyline, and β-blockers. This report presents an unusual adverse effect of topiramate on sleep in a patient with migraine.

  14. Predicting Nonauditory Adverse Radiation Effects Following Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannoma: A Volume and Dosimetric Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayhurst, Caroline; Monsalves, Eric; Bernstein, Mark; Gentili, Fred [Gamma Knife Unit, Division of Neurosurgery, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Heydarian, Mostafa; Tsao, May [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Schwartz, Michael [Radiation Oncology Program and Division of Neurosurgery, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Prooijen, Monique van [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Millar, Barbara-Ann; Menard, Cynthia [Radiation Oncology Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Kulkarni, Abhaya V. [Division of Neurosurgery, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto (Canada); Laperriere, Norm [Radiation Oncology Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Zadeh, Gelareh, E-mail: Gelareh.Zadeh@uhn.on.ca [Gamma Knife Unit, Division of Neurosurgery, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To define clinical and dosimetric predictors of nonauditory adverse radiation effects after radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma treated with a 12 Gy prescription dose. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed our experience of vestibular schwannoma patients treated between September 2005 and December 2009. Two hundred patients were treated at a 12 Gy prescription dose; 80 had complete clinical and radiological follow-up for at least 24 months (median, 28.5 months). All treatment plans were reviewed for target volume and dosimetry characteristics; gradient index; homogeneity index, defined as the maximum dose in the treatment volume divided by the prescription dose; conformity index; brainstem; and trigeminal nerve dose. All adverse radiation effects (ARE) were recorded. Because the intent of our study was to focus on the nonauditory adverse effects, hearing outcome was not evaluated in this study. Results: Twenty-seven (33.8%) patients developed ARE, 5 (6%) developed hydrocephalus, 10 (12.5%) reported new ataxia, 17 (21%) developed trigeminal dysfunction, 3 (3.75%) had facial weakness, and 1 patient developed hemifacial spasm. The development of edema within the pons was significantly associated with ARE (p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, only target volume is a significant predictor of ARE (p = 0.001). There is a target volume threshold of 5 cm3, above which ARE are more likely. The treatment plan dosimetric characteristics are not associated with ARE, although the maximum dose to the 5th nerve is a significant predictor of trigeminal dysfunction, with a threshold of 9 Gy. The overall 2-year tumor control rate was 96%. Conclusions: Target volume is the most important predictor of adverse radiation effects, and we identified the significant treatment volume threshold to be 5 cm3. We also established through our series that the maximum tolerable dose to the 5th nerve is 9 Gy.

  15. Rodenticide incidents of exposure and adverse effects on non-raptor birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Nimish B.

    2017-01-01

    Interest in the adverse effects of rodenticides on birds has focused primarily on raptors. However, non-raptor birds are also poisoned (rodenticide exposure resulting in adverse effects including mortality) by rodenticides through consumption of the rodenticide bait and contaminated prey. A literature search for rodenticide incidents (evidence of exposure to a rodenticide, adverse effects, or exposure to placebo baits) involving non-raptor birds returned 641 records spanning the years 1931 to 2016. The incidents included 17 orders, 58 families, and 190 non-raptor bird species. Nineteen anticoagulant and non-anticoagulant rodenticide active ingredients were associated with the incidents. The number of incidents and species detected were compared by surveillance method. An incident was considered to have been reported through passive surveillance if it was voluntarily reported to the authorities whereas the report of an incident found through field work that was conducted with the objective of documenting adverse effects on birds was determined to be from active surveillance. More incidents were reported from passive surveillance than with active surveillance but a significantly greater number of species were detected in proportion to the number of incidents found through active surveillance than with passive surveillance (z = 7.61, p of incidents that have occurred and the number of species that are affected. Although rodenticides are used worldwide, incident records were found from only 15 countries. Therefore, awareness of the breadth of species diversity of non-raptor bird poisonings from rodenticides may increase incident reportings and can strengthen the predictions of harm characterized by risk assessments.

  16. Modifying effect of prenatal care on the association between young maternal age and adverse birth outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, C L; Coeli, C M; Pinheiro, R S; Brandão, E R; Camargo, K R; Aguiar, F P

    2012-06-01

    The objectives were to investigate the prevalence of adverse birth outcomes according to maternal age range in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2002, and to evaluate the association between maternal age range and adverse birth outcomes using additive interaction to determine whether adequate prenatal care can attenuate the harmful effect of young age on pregnancy outcomes. A cross-sectional analysis was performed in women up to 24 years of age who gave birth to live children in 2002 in the city of Rio de Janeiro. To evaluate adverse outcomes, the exposure variable was maternal age range, and the outcome variables were very preterm birth, low birth weight, prematurity, and low 5-minute Apgar score. The presence of interaction was investigated with the composite variable maternal age plus prenatal care. The proportions and respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated for adequate schooling, delivery in a public maternity hospital, and adequate prenatal care, and the outcomes according to maternal age range. The chi-square test was used. The association between age range and birth outcomes was evaluated with logistic models adjusted for schooling and type of hospital for each prenatal stratum and outcome. Attributable proportion was calculated in order to measure additive interaction. Of the 40,111 live births in the sample, 1.9% corresponded to children of mothers from 10-14 years of age, 38% from 15-19 years, and 59.9% from 20-24 years. An association between maternal age and adverse outcomes was observed only in adolescent mothers with inadequate prenatal care, and significant additive interaction was observed between prenatal care and maternal age for all the outcomes. Adolescent mothers and their newborns are exposed to greater risk of adverse outcomes when prenatal care fails to comply with current guidelines. Copyright © 2012 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The efficacy and adverse effects of dicobalt edetate in cyanide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Timothy Clive; Thompson, John Paul

    2016-09-01

    Dicobalt edetate is one of a number of cobalt compounds that have been studied in the treatment of cyanide poisoning, their efficacy being based upon the fact that cyanide combines with cobalt to form relatively non-toxic complexes. Inorganic cobalt salts are quite toxic (cyanide and cobalt antagonise one another's toxicity) and complexes such as dicobalt edetate were studied with the aim of identifying compounds that were less acutely toxic, but which retained the antidotal properties of cobalt salts. The proprietary preparation, Kelocyanor™, contains free cobalt and glucose as well as dicobalt edetate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the published evidence for the efficacy and adverse effects of dicobalt edetate. A Pubmed search was undertaken for the period 1961-September 2015. The search terms were "dicobalt edetate", "cobalt edetate" and "Kelocyanor", which produced 24 relevant citations. A review of the references in four relevant books (L'intoxication cyanhydrique et son traitement, Clinical and Experimental Toxicology of Cyanides, Antidotes for Poisoning by Cyanide and Antidotes) produced three further relevant papers, making a total of 27 papers. Efficacy of dicobalt edetate: There is evidence from animal pharmacodynamic studies that dicobalt edetate is an effective cyanide antidote in experimental animals. Some 39 cases of human poisoning treated with dicobalt edetate have been reported, but in only nine cases were blood cyanide concentrations measured, although administration of dicobalt edetate procured survival in four of the seven patients with concentrations in the lethal range (>3.0 mg/L). It is unlikely that death in any of the adequately documented fatal cases was attributable to treatment failure with dicobalt edetate, as it is probable that they all had suffered anoxic brain damage before treatment could be initiated. Furthermore, in one case, acute gold toxicity contributed substantially to death. Adverse effects of dicobalt edetate

  18. Air pollution in India and related adverse respiratory health effects: past, present, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khilnani, Gopi C; Tiwari, Pawan

    2018-03-01

    The review describes current status of air pollution in India, summarizes recent research on adverse health effects of ambient and household air pollution, and outlines the ongoing efforts and future actions required to improve air quality and reduce morbidity and mortality because of air pollution in India. Global burden of disease data analysis reveals more than one million premature deaths attributable to ambient air pollution in 2015 in India. More than one million additional deaths can be attributed to household air pollution. Particulate matter with diameter 2.5 μm or less has been causatively linked with most premature deaths. Acute respiratory tract infections, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, exacerbations of preexisting obstructive airway disease and lung cancer are proven adverse respiratory effects of air pollution. Targeting air quality standards laid by WHO can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality because of air pollution in India. India is currently exposed to high levels of ambient and household air pollutants. Respiratory adverse effects of air pollution are significant contributors to morbidity and premature mortality in India. Substantial efforts are being made at legislative, administrative, and community levels to improve air quality. However, much more needs to be done to change the 'status quo' and attain the target air quality standards. VIDEO ABSTRACT: http://links.lww.com/COPM/A24.

  19. The Potential Return on Public Investment in Detecting Adverse Drug Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybrechts, Krista F; Desai, Rishi J; Park, Moa; Gagne, Joshua J; Najafzadeh, Mehdi; Avorn, Jerry

    2017-06-01

    Many countries lack fully functional pharmacovigilance programs, and public budgets allocated to pharmacovigilance in industrialized countries remain low due to resource constraints and competing priorities. Using 3 case examples, we sought to estimate the public health and economic benefits resulting from public investment in active pharmacovigilance programs to detect adverse drug effects. We assessed 3 examples in which early signals of safety hazards were not adequately recognized, resulting in continued exposure of a large number of patients to these drugs when safer and effective alternative treatments were available. The drug examples studied were rofecoxib, cerivastatin, and troglitazone. Using an individual patient simulation model and the health care system perspective, we estimated the potential costs that could have been averted by early systematic detection of safety hazards through the implementation of active surveillance programs. We found that earlier drug withdrawal made possible by active safety surveillance would most likely have resulted in savings in direct medical costs of $773-$884 million for rofecoxib, $3-$10 million for cerivastatin, and $38-$63 million for troglitazone in the United States through the prevention of adverse events. By contrast, the yearly public investment in Food and Drug Administration initiated population-based pharmacovigilance activities in the United States is about $42.5 million at present. These examples illustrate a critical and economically justifiable role for active adverse effect surveillance in protecting the health of the public.

  20. Nano-hydroxyapatite could Compensate the Adverse Effect of soft carbonated Drinks on Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Mohammad B; Rouhollahi, Mohammad R; Andalib, Fahimeh; Hamze, Faeze

    2016-08-01

    Since one of the most important disadvantages of soft drinks includes their adverse effect on mineral content of enamel because of their low pH, this study examined the microhardness of enamel before and after exposure to a soft drink containing different concentrations of nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) as an additive. Sixty caries free human premolars were mounted in epoxy resin. After polishing, the baseline micro-hardness was recorded three times for each specimen using a Vickers indenter at 50 gm load. Subsequently, the samples were divided into six groups, which were treated for 5 minutes at 9°C by a cola-based drink contacting 0, 0.5, 1, 5, and 10 wt.% of nano-HA while the control group was immersed in artificial saliva. Ultimately, the final microhardness was assessed three times again for each specimen. Paired t-test showed that in groups containing 0 and 0.5 wt.% of nano-HA, the microhardness was significantly reduced after treatment protocol (p = 0.00 and 0.01 respectively). Whereas in the other groups the microhardness was not significantly changed after treatment (p > 0.05). Pure cola-based drink has a pronounced adverse effect on enamel microhardness, while admixing it with nano-HA could act as a protective factor. Although soft beverages are hazardous to tooth structure, some additives could compensate their adverse effect.

  1. Multi-omic landscape of Rheumatoid Arthritis: re-evaluation of drug adverse effects

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    Paolo eTieri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide a frame to estimate the systemic impact (side/adverse events of (novel therapeutic targets by taking into consideration drugs potential on the numerous districts involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA from the inflammatory and immune response to the gut-intestinal (GI microbiome.Methods: We curated the collection of molecules from high-throughput screens of diverse (multi-omic biochemical origin, experimentally associated to RA. Starting from such collection we generated RA-related protein-protein interaction (PPI networks (interactomes based on experimental PPI data. Pharmacological treatment simulation, topological and functional analyses were further run to gain insight into the proteins most affected by therapy and by multi-omic modelling.Results: Simulation on the administration of MTX results in the activation of expected (apoptosis and adverse (nitrogenous metabolism alteration effects. Growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2 and Interleukin-1 Receptor Associated Kinase-4 (IRAK4, already an RA target emerge as relevant nodes. The former controls the activation of inflammatory, proliferative and degenerative pathways in host and pathogens. The latter controls immune alterations and blocks innate response to pathogens.Conclusions: This multi-omic map properly recollects in a single analytical picture known, yet complex, information like the adverse/side effects of MTX, and provides a reliable platform for in silico hypothesis testing or recommendation on novel therapies. These results can support the development of RA translational research in the design of validation experiments and clinical trials, as such we identify GRB2 as a robust potential new target for RA for its ability to control both synovial degeneracy and dysbiosis, and, conversely, warn on the usage of IRAK4-inhibitors recently promoted, as this involves potential adverse effects in the form of impaired innate response to pathogens.

  2. Adverse effects of parenteral dexamethasone in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris

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    Mohammad Jamal Uddin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pemphigus vulgaris is associated with high morbidity as well as significant mortality rate. Today the risk of death in pemphigus from the side effect of oral prednisolone is greater than risk of death from the disease itself. Objec­tive: To observe the adverse effects of parenteral dexamethasone compared with oral prednisolone in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris. Methods: An interventional study was carried out in the department of Dermatology and Venereol­ogy, Bangabandu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Total number of patients was thirty and among them fifteen patients were treated with parenteral dexamethasone (Group-A and other fifteen were treated with oral prednisolone (Group-B. Results: The study showed statistically significant differences of skin lesion as well as mucosal lesion of pemphigus after 6 weeks of therapy between of two groups (P<0.05. The most common adverse effects were increased body weight(40%, increased appetite(40%, and puffy face(40% in dexamethasone group. In prednisolone group, these side effects were 60% of the subjects. Other side effects in dexamethasone group were hyperglycemia (33.33%, hypertension (26.66%, and sleep disturbance (13.33%. In prednisolone group, other side effects were hyperglycemia(33.33%, hypertension(40%, gastritis (33.33%, nausea, vomiting (13.33% in each , reactivation of tuberculosis, herpes zoster infection, sleep disturbance, and mood change were 6.66% in each group. Conclusion: In the light of the findings of the study, we conclude that each of the treatment of dexamethasone group and prednisolone group is individually effective and safe in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris but adverse effects are less in parenteral dexamethasone group than oral prednisolone group. So parenteral dexamethasone can be used as an alternative drug in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris.

  3. Parent Report of Antidepressant, Anxiolytic, and Antipsychotic Medication Use in Individuals with Williams Syndrome: Effectiveness and Adverse Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Marilee A.; Seyfer, Daisha L.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Foster, Jessica E. A.; Chowdhury, Monali; McClure, Kelsey E.; Coury, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder characterized in part by anxiety and behavioral difficulties. We examine the effectiveness and adverse effects of antidepressant, anxiolytic, and antipsychotic medications in individuals with WS. A total of 513 parents/caregivers completed a survey of psychotropic medication usage…

  4. Mefloquine adverse effects with atypical facial lesions in an overweight patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, Elodie; De Monbrison, Frédérique; Basselin, Cécile; Vial, Thierry; Peyron, François

    2010-09-01

    The recommended dosage of mefloquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infection is 25 mg/kg, with no recommendation for dosage exceeding 1500 mg. We describe an original case of adverse reaction to mefloquine in an overweight patient. Case report. A 32-year-old woman weighing 139 kg presented with uncomplicated P. falciparum infection after returning from Cameroon. She received 3250 mg of mefloquine (i.e. 23 mg/kg) administered in four doses. On day 2, she developed neuropsychiatric disorders and facial lesions. Nasal mucocutaneous vesicles and bullae, depressive mood, mild thrombocytopenia and hepatic cytolysis were evidenced. Parasitemia was negative. Recovery was complete on day 17. High mefloquine serum levels were measured (8.030 mg/L on day 3, 6.880 mg/L on day 8, and 3.370 mg/L on day 17). The causal relationship between mefloquine and the occurrence of these adverse effects is probable. However, as no viral or bacteriological investigations were performed, the drug responsibility remains uncertain. Mefloquine-induced bullous and facial lesions reversible upon drug withdrawal have already been described. The associated neuropsychiatric symptoms were strongly suggestive of mefloquine adverse effects, as such events are more frequently observed in cases of overdosage. Our case emphasizes the difficulties of dosage adaptation in overweight patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Adverse Renal Effects of Novel Molecular Oncologic Targeted Therapies: A Narrative Review

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    Kenar D. Jhaveri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel targeted anti-cancer therapies have resulted in improvement in patient survival compared to standard chemotherapy. Renal toxicities of targeted agents are increasingly being recognized. The incidence, severity, and pattern of renal toxicities may vary according to the respective target of the drug. Here we review the adverse renal effects associated with a selection of currently approved targeted cancer therapies, directed to EGFR, HER2, BRAF, MEK, ALK, PD1/PDL1, CTLA-4, and novel agents targeted to VEGF/R and TKIs. In summary, electrolyte disorders, renal impairment and hypertension are the most commonly reported events. Of the novel targeted agents, ipilumumab and cetuximab have the most nephrotoxic events reported. The early diagnosis and prompt recognition of these renal adverse events are essential for the general nephrologist taking care of these patients.

  6. A Review of the Effects of Chronic Arsenic Exposure on Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Abul H; Hussain, Sumaira; Akter, Shahnaz; Rahman, Mijanur; Mouly, Tafzila A; Mitchell, Kane

    2017-05-23

    Exposure to arsenic has a number of known detrimental health effects but impact on pregnancy outcomes is not as widely recognized. This narrative review examines existing epidemiological evidence investigating the association between arsenic exposure via drinking water and adverse pregnancy outcomes. We reviewed published epidemiological studies from around the world on impact of chronic arsenic exposure on spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, neonatal death, post neonatal death, low birth weight and preterm baby. Plausible mechanisms of arsenic toxicity causing adverse pregnancy outcomes were also determined through literature review. There is convincing evidence to support the association between high inorganic arsenic exposure (>50 ppb) and spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and low birth weight. Limitations of certain studies include study design, small sample size, recall constraints and exposure assessment. There needs to be further research investigating the dose metered impact of arsenic exposure on pregnancy outcomes. Further research on impact of low-moderate arsenic concentration exposure on pregnancy outcomes will allow for appropriate public health policy recommendations.

  7. Adverse Childhood Experiences, Commitment Offense, and Race/Ethnicity: Are the Effects Crime-, Race-, and Ethnicity-Specific?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt DeLisi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Adverse childhood experiences are associated with an array of health, psychiatric, and behavioral problems including antisocial behavior. Criminologists have recently utilized adverse childhood experiences as an organizing research framework and shown that adverse childhood experiences are associated with delinquency, violence, and more chronic/severe criminal careers. However, much less is known about adverse childhood experiences vis-à-vis specific forms of crime and whether the effects vary across race and ethnicity. Using a sample of 2520 male confined juvenile delinquents, the current study used epidemiological tables of odds (both unadjusted and adjusted for onset, total adjudications, and total out of home placements to evaluate the significance of the number of adverse childhood experiences on commitment for homicide, sexual assault, and serious persons/property offending. The effects of adverse childhood experiences vary considerably across racial and ethnic groups and across offense types. Adverse childhood experiences are strongly and positively associated with sexual offending, but negatively associated with homicide and serious person/property offending. Differential effects of adverse childhood experiences were also seen among African Americans, Hispanics, and whites. Suggestions for future research to clarify the mechanisms by which adverse childhood experiences manifest in specific forms of criminal behavior are offered.

  8. In-hospital gastric protection with proton pump inhibitors: adverse effects beyond (overutilization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Montanari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs have provided important benefits in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, peptic ulcer disease and in the prevention of non steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and aspirin-related ulcer complications. PPIs are also the most commonly used medications for stress ulcer prophylaxis, despite little evidence to support their use in non-intensive care unit. Discussion: Considering the widespread use of PPIs, these agents’ overall safety profile is unquestionable. However, there is growing evidence that PPIs use may be associated with an increased risk of enteric infections, pneumonia, hip fractures, vitamin B12 deficiency. Overall, until now, none of these adverse effects have discouraged the PPIs treatment. Recently attention has been placed on a more important potential adverse effect of PPIs, their interaction with clopidogrel to which they are associated for the prophylaxis of gastrointestinal bleeding. Preliminary results of laboratory tests suggest that omeprazole reduces clopidogrel’s antiplatelet effect. The interaction seems to involve the competitive inhibition of the CYP2C19 isoenzyme. The effect appears to be clinically important, as some retrospective studies have shown an increase in adverse cardiovascular outcomes when PPIs and clopidogrel are used concomitantly. Some studies indicate that pantoprazole and esomeprazole are not associated with impaired response to clopidogrel. However, the available data for PPIs other than omeprazole do not allow definitive conclusions to be drawn about whether is a class effect. Conclusions: Specifically designed and randomized clinical studies are needed to define the interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel. Moreover, alternative treatment strategies with histamine- 2 receptor antagonists that are not dependent on cytochrome p450 2C19 should be tested in future studies.

  9. The effect of adverse information and positive promotion on women's preferences for prescribed contraceptive products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Stephanie A; Viney, Rosalie C; Gu, Yuanyuan; Hole, Arne R; Fiebig, Denzil G; Street, Deborah J; Haas, Marion R; Weisberg, Edith; Bateson, Deborah

    2013-04-01

    Recent rapid growth in the range of contraceptive products has given women more choice, but also adds complexity to the resultant decision of which product to choose. This paper uses a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to investigate the effect of adverse information and positive promotion on women's stated preferences for prescribed contraceptive products. In November 2007, 527 Australian women aged 18-49 years were recruited from an online panel. Each was randomly allocated to one of three information conditions. The control group only received basic information on contraceptive products. One treatment group also received adverse information on the risks of the combined oral pill. The other group received basic information and promotional material on the vaginal ring, newly introduced into Australia and on the transdermal patch, which is unavailable in Australia. Respondents completed 32 choice sets with 3 product options where each option was described by a product label: either combined pill, minipill, injection, implant, hormonal IUD, hormonal vaginal ring, hormonal transdermal patch or copper IUD; and by the attributes: effect on acne, effect on weight, frequency of administration, contraceptive effectiveness, doctor's recommendation, effect on periods and cost. Women's choices were analysed using a generalized multinomial logit model (G-MNL) and model estimates were used to predict product shares for each information condition. The predictions indicated that adverse information did not affect women's preferences for products relative to only receiving basic information. The promotional material increased women's preferences for the transdermal patch. Women in all groups had a low preference for the vaginal ring which was not improved by promotion. The findings highlight the need for researchers to pay attention to setting the context when conducting DCEs as this can significantly affect results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Are the adverse effects of glitazones linked to induced testosterone deficiency?

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    Jankowska E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse side-effects of the glitazones have been frequently reported in both clinical and animal studies, especially with rosiglitazone (RGZ and pioglitazone (PGZ, including congestive heart failure, osteoporosis, weight gain, oedema and anaemia. These led to consideration of an evidence-based hypothesis which would explain these diverse effects, and further suggested novel approaches by which this hypothesis could be tested. Presentation of hypothesis The literature on the clinical, metabolic and endocrine effects of glitazones in relation to the reported actions of testosterone in diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease is reviewed, and the following unifying hypothesis advanced: "Glitazones induce androgen deficiency in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus resulting in pathophysiological changes in multiple tissues and organs which may explain their observed clinical adverse effects." This also provides further evidence for the lipocentric concept of diabetes and its clinical implications. Testing of the hypothesis Clinical studies to investigate the endocrine profiles, including measurements of TT, DHT, SHBG, FT and estradiol, together with LH and FSH, in both men and women with T2DM before and after RGZ and PGZ treatment in placebo controlled groups, are necessary to provide data to substantiate this hypothesis. Also, studies on T treatment in diabetic men would further establish if the adverse effects of glitazones could be reversed or ameliorated by androgen therapy. Basic sciences investigations on the inhibition of androgen biosynthesis by glitazones are also warranted. Implications of the hypothesis Glitazones reduce androgen biosynthesis, increase their binding to SHBG, and attenuate androgen receptor activation, thus reducing the physiological actions of testosterone, causing relative and absolute androgen deficiency. This hypothesis explains the adverse effects of glitazones on the heart and

  11. When "embedded" means "stuck": Moderating effects of job embeddedness in adverse work environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David G; Peltokorpi, Vesa; Rubenstein, Alex L

    2016-12-01

    Job embeddedness is predominately assumed to benefit employees, work groups, and organizations (e.g., higher performance, social cohesion, and lower voluntary turnover). Challenging this assumption, we examined the potentially negative outcomes that may occur if employees are embedded in an adverse work environment-feeling "stuck," yet unable to exit a negative situation. More specifically, we considered two factors representing adverse work conditions: abusive supervision and job insecurity. Drawing from conservation of resources theory, we hypothesized that job embeddedness would moderate the relationship between these conditions and outcomes of voluntary turnover, physical health, emotional exhaustion, and sleep quality/quantity, such that employees embedded in more adverse environments would be less likely to quit, but would experience more negative personal outcomes. Results from two independent samples, one in Japan (N = 597) and one in the United States (N = 283), provide support for the hypothesized pattern of interaction effects, thereby highlighting a largely neglected "dark side" of job embeddedness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee: Recommended ("Best") Practices for Determining, Communicating, and Using Adverse Effect Data from Nonclinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlin, Roy; Bolon, Brad; Burkhardt, John; Francke, Sabine; Greaves, Peter; Meador, Vince; Popp, James

    2016-02-01

    Recommendations (best practices) are provided by the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's Adversity Working Group for making consistent interpretations of test article-related effects as "adverse" and assigning a "no observed adverse effect level" (NOAEL) in nonclinical toxicity studies. Adverse is a term indicating "harm" to the test animal, while nonadverse indicates lack of harm. Adverse findings in the study reports should be defined in relation to effects on the test species used and within the context of the given study. Test article-related effects should be described on their own merits, and decisions to consider them as adverse or nonadverse should be justified. Related effects may be discussed together; in particular, markers of toxicity that are not in and of themselves adverse ideally should be discussed in conjunction with the causal toxicity to determine adversity. Adverse findings should be identified in subreports (clinical data, pathology data, etc.) if sufficient information is available, and/or in the final study report as individual or grouped findings, but study NOAELs should be established at the level of the overall study report. Interpretations such as "not biologically relevant" or "not toxicologically important" should be avoided unless defined and supported by scientific rationale. Decisions defining adverse findings and the NOAEL in final study reports should combine the expertise of all contributing scientific disciplines. Where possible, use of NOAELs in data tables should be linked to explanatory text that places them in context. Ideally, in nonclinical summary documents, NOAELs from multiple studies are considered together in defining the most important adverse responses in the most sensitive species. These responses are then considered along with an understanding of their likely mechanisms, as well as other information such as variability in species sensitivity, comparative pathology, reversibility and progression, kinetics, and

  13. Industrial PM2.5cause pulmonary adverse effect through RhoA/ROCK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Junyan; Lai, Chia-Hsiang; Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Chen, Chongjun; Wang, Wen-Cheng; Huang, Pin-I; Lin, Chia-Hua

    2017-12-01

    According to the Chinese Ministry of Health, industrial pollution-induced health impacts have been the leading cause of death in China. While industrial fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) is associated with adverse health effects, the major action mechanisms of different compositions of PM 2.5 are currently unclear. In this study, we treated normal human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells with industrial organic and water-soluble PM 2.5 extracts under daily alveolar deposition dose to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying adverse pulmonary effects induced by PM 2.5 , including oxidative damage, inflammatory response, lung epithelial barrier dysfunction, and the recruitment of macrophages. We found that water-soluble PM 2.5 extracts caused more severe cytotoxic effects on BEAS-2B cells compared with that of organic extracts. Both organic and water-soluble PM 2.5 extracts induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Inflammatory response, epithelial barrier dysfunction, and the activation of NF-кB caused by both PM 2.5 extracts were attenuated by ROCK inhibitor Y-27632. This indicated that both PM 2.5 extracts could cause damage to epithelial cells through RhoA/ROCK-dependent NF-кB activation. Furthermore, the upregulation of macrophage adhesion induced by both PM 2.5 extracts was also attenuated by Y-27632 in a co-culture model of macrophages and the epithelial cells. Therefore, our results support that industrial PM 2.5 extracts-induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK-dependent NF-кB pathway induces pulmonary adverse effect. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of ROCK activation might have therapeutic potential in preventing lung disease associated with PM 2.5 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A comprehensive review of regulatory test methods for endocrine adverse health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manibusan, M K; Touart, L W

    2017-07-01

    Development of new endocrine disruption-relevant test methods has been the subject of intensive research efforts for the past several decades, prompted in part by mandates in the 1996 Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA). While scientific understanding and test methods have advanced, questions remain on whether current scientific methods are capable of adequately addressing the complexities of the endocrine system for regulatory health and ecological risk assessments. The specific objective of this article is to perform a comprehensive, detailed evaluation of the adequacy of current test methods to inform regulatory risk assessments of whether a substance has the potential to perturb endocrine-related pathways resulting in human adverse effects. To that end,  approximately 42 existing test guidelines (TGs) were considered in the evaluation of coverage for endocrine-related adverse effects. In addition to evaluations of whether test methods are adequate to capture endocrine-related effects, considerations of further enhancements to current test methods, along with the need to develop novel test methods to address existing test method gaps are described. From this specific evaluation, up to 35 test methods are capable of informing whether a chemical substance perturbs known endocrine related biological pathways. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that current validated test methods are adequate to discern substances that may perturb the endocrine system, resulting in an adverse health effect. Together, these test methods predominantly form the core data requirements of a typical food-use pesticide registration submission. It is recognized, however, that the current state of science is rapidly advancing and there is a need to update current test methods to include added enhancements to ensure continued coverage and public health and environmental protection.

  15. Mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings: absorbed dose and the potential for adverse health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackert, J R; Berglund, A

    1997-01-01

    This review examines the question of whether adverse health effects are attributable to amalgam-derived mercury. The issue of absorbed dose of mercury from amalgam is addressed first. The use of intra-oral Hg vapor measurements to estimate daily uptake must take into account the differences between the collection volume and flow rate of the measuring instrument and the inspiratory volume and flow rate of air through the mouth during inhalation of a single breath. Failure to account for these differences will result in substantial overestimation of the absorbed dose. Other factors that must be considered when making estimates of Hg uptake from amalgam include the accurate measurement of baseline (unstimulated) mercury release rates and the greater stimulation of Hg release afforded by chewing gum relative to ordinary food. The measured levels of amalgam-derived mercury in brain, blood, and urine are shown to be consistent with low absorbed doses (1-3 micrograms/day). Published relationships between the number of amalgam surfaces and urine levels are used to estimate the number of amalgam surfaces that would be required to produce the 30 micrograms/g creatinine urine mercury level stated by WHO to be associated with the most subtle, pre-clinical effects in the most sensitive individuals. From 450 to 530 amalgam surfaces would be required to produce the 30 micrograms/g creatinine urine mercury level for people without any excessive gum-chewing habits. The potential for adverse health effects and for improvement in health following amalgam removal is also addressed. Finally, the issue of whether any material can ever be completely exonerated of claims of producing adverse health effects is considered.

  16. Effect of monthly vitamin D3 supplementation in healthy adults on adverse effects of earthquakes: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slow, Sandy; Florkowski, Christopher M; Chambers, Stephen T; Priest, Patricia C; Stewart, Alistair W; Jennings, Lance C; Livesey, John H; Camargo, Carlos A; Scragg, Robert; Murdoch, David R

    2014-12-15

    To determine whether supplementation with vitamin D improves resilience to the adverse effects of earthquakes. Opportunistic addition to an established randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. Christchurch, New Zealand, where a prolonged series of catastrophic earthquakes beginning on 4 September 2010 occurred, which caused widespread destruction, fatalities, and extensive psychological damage. 322 healthy adults (241 women; 81 men) aged 18-67 who were already participating in the vitamin D and acute respiratory infections study (VIDARIS) between February 2010 and November 2011. Participants were randomised to receive an oral dose of either 200,000 IU vitamin D3 monthly for two months then 100,000 IU monthly (n=161) or placebo (n=161) for a total of 18 months. This is a post hoc analysis from the previously published VIDARIS trial. The primary endpoint in the current analysis was the self reported effects and overall adverse impact of the Christchurch earthquakes as assessed by questionnaire four months after the most destructive earthquake on 22 February 2011, which was used as the index event. The secondary end point was the number of "psychological" adverse events that participants reported at their usual monthly appointments as part of the original VIDARIS trial. 308 participants completed the earthquake impact questionnaire (n=152 in the vitamin D group and 156 in the placebo group). There was no significant difference in the number of self reported adverse effects between those receiving vitamin D supplementation and those receiving placebo. There was also no difference in the overall adverse impact score between treatment groups (χ(2) P=0.44). The exception was that those in the vitamin D group experienced more adverse effects on family relationships (22% v 13%; χ(2) P=0.03). The number of psychological adverse events-such as fatigue, stress, anxiety, and insomnia-that participants reported at their usual monthly appointments was significantly

  17. Polytraumatization and Trauma Symptoms in Adolescent Boys and Girls: Interpersonal and Noninterpersonal Events and Moderating Effects of Adverse Family Circumstances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Doris Kristina; Gustafsson, Per E.; Svedin, Carl Goran

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cumulative effect of interpersonal and noninterpersonal traumatic life events (IPEs and nIPEs, respectively) on the mental health of adolescents and to determine if the adverse impacts of trauma were moderated by adverse family circumstances (AFC). Adolescents (mean age 16.7 years) from the…

  18. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 1. General concepts and specific precepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Considers in detail the general concepts and principles relevant to the adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Explains the molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Includes chapters on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 1 of this two-volume work focuses on the general concepts and principles relevant to late effects and on the dynamic interplay of molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Chapters are also included on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life.

  19. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 1. General concepts and specific precepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2014-01-01

    Considers in detail the general concepts and principles relevant to the adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Explains the molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Includes chapters on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 1 of this two-volume work focuses on the general concepts and principles relevant to late effects and on the dynamic interplay of molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Chapters are also included on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life.

  20. Adverse Side Effects of Psychotropic Medication and Challenging Behavior: Pilot Work Assessing Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdovinos, Maria G; Schieber, Elizabeth; McMahon, Meara; Beard, Lisa; Wilkinson, Alyssa; Carpenter, Jaimie

    2017-12-01

    Psychotropic medications are often prescribed to reduce challenging behavior in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Functional analyses (FAs) have demonstrated utility in assessing medication impact on behavior; however, the impact of adverse side effects (ASE) on challenging behavior is under-assessed. The purpose of this study was to develop a methodology, similar to FAs, to explore potential medication ASE impact on challenging behavior in seven individuals with IDD. Results revealed response rate differences in designed ASE conditions for most participants. Outcomes support further development and use of this methodology to assess the presence and impact of ASEs.

  1. Adverse effects of biologics: a network meta-analysis and Cochrane overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, J. A.; Wells, G. A.; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard

    2011-01-01

    Background Biologics are used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and many other conditions. While the efficacy of biologics has been established, there is uncertainty regarding the adverse effects of this treatment. Since serious risks such as tuberculosis (TB) reactivation, serious...... results We included 163 RCTs with 50,010 participants and 46 extension studies with 11,954 participants. The median duration of RCTs was six months and 13 months for OLEs. Data were limited for tuberculosis (TB) reactivation, lymphoma, and congestive heart failure. Adjusted for dose, biologics as a group...

  2. Renal function and symptoms/adverse effects in opioid-treated patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, G P; Lundström, S; Sjøgren, P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Renal impairment and the risk of toxicity caused by accumulation of opioids and/or active metabolites is an under-investigated issue. This study aimed at analysing if symptoms/adverse effects in opioid-treated patients with cancer were associated with renal function. METHODS: Cross...... and cognitive dysfunction were assessed (EORTC QLQ-C30). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated using Cockcroft-Gault (CG), Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI Creatinine) equations. RESULTS: Mild to severe low GFR was observed...... in routine cancer pain care....

  3. Adverse effects of perioperative paracetamol, NSAIDs, glucocorticoids, gabapentinoids and their combinations: a topical review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, O; Wetterslev, J; Kontinen, V K

    2014-01-01

    with the most common perioperative non-opioid analgesics: paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids (GCCs), gabapentinoids and their combinations. The review is based on data from systematic reviews with meta-analyses of analgesic efficacy and/or adverse effects...... of perioperative non-opioid analgesics, and randomised trials and cohort/retrospective studies. Generally, data on AE are sparse and related to the immediate post-operative period. For paracetamol, the incidence of AEs appears trivial. Data are inconclusive regarding an association of NSAIDs with mortality...

  4. Adverse effects of homeopathy, what do we know? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stub, Trine; Musial, Frauke; Kristoffersen, Agnete A; Alræk, Terje; Liu, Jianping

    2016-06-01

    Homeopathy is a popular treatment modality among patient, however there is sparse research about adverse effects of homeopathy. A concept unique for homeopathy, is homeopathic aggravation that is understood as a transient worsening of the patients' symptoms before an expected improvement occurs. From a risk perspective it is vital that a distinction between homeopathic aggravations and adverse effects is established. There is a lack of systematic information on how frequent adverse effects and homeopathic aggravations are reported in studies. Therefore, a systematic review and meta-analysis were performed. Sixteen electronic databases were searched for Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs). The searches were limited from the year 1995 to January 2011. Forty-one RCTs, with a total of 6.055 participants were included. A subtotal of 39 studies was included in the additional meta-analysis. A total of 28 trials (68%) reported adverse effects and five trials (12%) reported homeopathic aggravations. The meta-analysis (including six subgroup comparisons) demonstrated that no significant difference was found between homeopathy and control with OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.86-1.14, I(2)=54%. More than two third of the adverse effects were classified as grade 1 (68%) and two third were classified as grade 2 (25%) and grade 3 (6%) according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects. Homeopathic aggravation was classified as grade 1 (98%) and grade 3 (2%), suggesting that homeopathic aggravations were reported to be less severe than adverse effects. The methodological quality according to a method recommended in the Cochrane handbook for RCTs, was high. Adverse effects including the concept of homeopathic aggravations are commonly reported in trials. The meta-analysis demonstrated that the proportion of patients experiencing adverse effects to be similar for patients randomized to homeopathic treatment compared to patients randomized to placebo and conventional medicine

  5. Seeking optimal management for radioactive iodine therapy-induced adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Charalambous

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive iodine therapy (RAIT is one of the important treatment modalities in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC. RAIT with iodine-131 has long been used in the management of DTC for the ablation of residual thyroid or treatment of its metastases. Despite being reasonably safe, radioiodine therapy is not always without side effects. Even relatively low administered activities of RAIT used for remnant ablation have been associated with the more clinically significant side effects of sialadenitis, xerostomia, salivary gland pain and swelling, dry eyes, excessive tearing, or alterations in taste in as many as 25% of patients. Given that there is a lack of comprehensive management of these RAIT-induced adverse effects, this paper explores the use of other nonpharmacological measures and their effectiveness as interventions to minimize salivary gland damage.

  6. Efficacy and adverse effects of intravenous lignocaine therapy in fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treharne GJ

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effects of intravenous lignocaine infusions (IV lignocaine in fibromyalgia. Methods Prospective study of the adverse effects of IV lignocaine in 106 patients with fibromyalgia; retrospective questionnaire study of the efficacy of IV lignocaine in 50 patients with fibromyalgia. Results Prospective study: Two major (pulmonary oedema and supraventricular tachycardia and 42 minor side-effects were reported. None had long-term sequelae. The commonest was hypotension (17 cases. Retrospective study: Pain and a range of psychosocial measures (on single 11-point scales improved significantly after treatment. There was no effect of the treatment on work status. The average duration of pain relief after the 6-day course of treatment was 11.5 ± 6.5 weeks. Conclusions Intravenous lignocaine appears to be both safe and of benefit in improving pain and quality of life for patients with fibromyalgia. This needs to be confirmed in prospective randomised controlled trials.

  7. Effects of social adversity and HIV on subcortical shape and neurocognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thames, April D; Kuhn, Taylor P; Mahmood, Zanjbeel; Bilder, Robert M; Williamson, Timothy J; Singer, Elyse J; Arentoft, Alyssa

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the independent and interactive effects of social adversity (SA) and HIV infection on subcortical shape alterations and cognitive functions. Participants included HIV+ (n = 70) and HIV- (n = 23) individuals who underwent MRI, neurocognitive and clinical assessment, in addition to completing questionnaires from which responses were used to create an SA score. Bilateral amygdalae and hippocampi were extracted from T1-weighted images. Parametric statistical analyses were used to compare the radial distance of the structure surface to a median curve to determine the presence of localized shape differences as a function of HIV, SA and their interaction. Next, multiple regression was used to examine the interactive association between HIV and SA with cognitive performance data. An HIV*SA interactive effect was found on the shape of the right amygdala and left hippocampus. Specifically, HIV-infected participants (but not HIV-uninfected controls) who evidenced higher levels of SA displayed an inward deformation of the surface consistent with reduced volume of these structures. We found interactive effects of HIV and SA on learning/memory performance. These results suggest that HIV+ individuals may be more vulnerable to neurological and cognitive changes in the hippocampus and amygdala as a function of SA than HIV- individuals, and that SA indicators of childhood SES and perceived racial discrimination are important components of adversity that are associated with cognitive performance.

  8. Adverse psychosocial working conditions and risk of severe depressive symptoms. Do effects differ by occupational grade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugulies, Reiner; Aust, Birgit; Madsen, Ida E H; Burr, Hermann; Siegrist, Johannes; Bültmann, Ute

    2013-06-01

    Depression is a major concern for public health. Both adverse working conditions and low socio-economic position are suspected to increase risk of depression. In a representative sample of the Danish workforce we investigated (i) whether adverse psychosocial working conditions, defined by the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model, predicted onset of severe depressive symptoms after 5-year follow-up and (ii) whether the effect of ERI was differential across occupational grades. A cohort of 2701 Danish employees filled in a questionnaire on work and health in 2000 and 2005. ERI was measured with four effort and seven reward items. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the five-item Mental Health Inventory. Participants scoring ≤ 52 points were defined as cases. We used logistic regression to investigate the association of ERI and occupational grade in 2000 with onset of severe depressive symptoms in 2005. Analyses were adjusted for socio-demographics, health behaviours, survey method, self-rated health, sleep disturbances and non-severe depressive symptoms at baseline. High ERI predicted onset of severe depressive symptoms at follow-up, after adjustment for co-variates and occupational grade (OR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.12-4.25). Participants with high ERI and low occupational grade showed a considerably higher OR (2.43, 95% CI = 1.07-5.53) compared to participants with low/medium ERI and low grade (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 0.72-2.92), high ERI and high grade (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 0.59-2.70) and low/medium ERI and high grade (reference group). Adverse psychosocial working conditions predicted onset of severe depressive symptoms. The effect was stronger among employees of lower occupational grades compared to those of higher grades.

  9. Are adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs different in symptomatic partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsies? The Portuguese-Brazilian validation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, H H; Alonso, N B; Vidal-Dourado, M; Carbonel, T D; de Araújo Filho, G M; Caboclo, L O; Yacubian, E M; Guilhoto, L M

    2011-11-01

    We report the results of administration of the Portuguese-Brazilian translation of the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP) to 100 patients (mean age=34.5, SD=12.12; 56 females), 61 with symptomatic partial epilepsy (SPE) and 39 with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) (ILAE, 1989) who were on a stable antiepileptic drug (AED) regimen and being treated in a Brazilian tertiary epilepsy center. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used AED (43.0%), followed by valproic acid (32.0%). Two or more AEDs were used by 69.0% of patients. The mean LAEP score (19 questions) was 37.6 (SD=13.35). The most common adverse effects were sleepiness (35.0%), memory problems (35.0%), and difficulty in concentrating (25.0%). Higher LAEP scores were associated with polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.005), female gender (P0.001) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Depression: r=0.637, P<0.001; Anxiety: r=0.621, P<0.001) dimensions. LAEP overall scores were similar in people with SPE and IGE and were not helpful in differentiating adverse effects in these two groups. Clinical variables that influenced global LAEP were seizure frequency (P=0.050) and generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the last month (P=0.031) in the IGE group, and polytherapy with three or more AEDs (P=0.003 and P=0.003) in both IGE and SPE groups. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The use of exercise interventions to overcome adverse effects of androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergren, Peter Busch; Kistorp, Caroline; Bennedbæk, Finn Noe

    2016-01-01

    existing cardiovascular disease. In this initial phase of ADT, metabolic changes are also most prominent. In addition, ADT increases the rate of bone loss and fracture risk. Currently available evidence supports the use of exercise interventions to improve physical function and mitigate ADT-induced fatigue......Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) induces severe hypogonadism and is associated with several adverse effects that negatively affect health and quality of life in patients with prostate cancer. ADT changes body composition characterized by an increase in fat mass and a reduction in muscle mass....... Some studies also indicate that exercise might moderate ADT-related changes in body composition. However, beneficial effects of exercise interventions on other ADT-related conditions have not been conclusively proven. Trials investigating the effects of ADT on fracture risk and development of diabetes...

  11. Gratitude buffers the adverse effect of viewing the thin ideal on body dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Kristin J; Sedlak, Brittany L; Boyd, Elizabeth A

    2014-06-01

    Gratitude has robust associations with multiple aspects of well-being. However, little research has explored whether the psychological benefits of gratitude extend to body image. We used a repeated measures experimental design to test whether a brief period of grateful reflection would buffer the adverse effect of exposure to thin-ideal media. Female undergraduates (N=67) completed three sessions one week apart. The conditions were specifically designed to isolate (a) the effects of viewing thin models on body dissatisfaction and (b) the moderating effect of grateful contemplation. Results showed that body dissatisfaction scores were lower for women who engaged in a brief period of grateful contemplation before viewing photographs of thin models than for women who reflected upon life hassles before viewing the same photographs. The magnitude of this decrease depended on BMI. Gratitude offers an innovative direction for future research directed toward helping women to accept their bodies. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Organophosphate pesticides exposure among farmworkers: pathways and risk of adverse health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suratman, Suratman; Edwards, John William; Babina, Kateryna

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds are the most widely used pesticides with more than 100 OP compounds in use around the world. The high-intensity use of OP pesticides contributes to morbidity and mortality in farmworkers and their families through acute or chronic pesticides-related illnesses. Many factors contributing to adverse health effects have been investigated by researchers to determine pathways of OP-pesticide exposure among farmers in developed and developing countries. Factors like wind/agricultural pesticide drift, mixing and spraying pesticides, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), knowledge, perceptions, washing hands, taking a shower, wearing contaminated clothes, eating, drinking, smoking, and hot weather are common in both groups of countries. Factors including low socioeconomic status areas, workplace conditions, duration of exposure, pesticide safety training, frequency of applying pesticides, spraying against the wind, and reuse of pesticide containers for storage are specific contributors in developing countries, whereas housing conditions, social contextual factors, and mechanical equipment were specific pathways in developed countries. This paper compares existing research in environmental and behavioural exposure modifying factors and biological monitoring between developing and developed countries. The main objective of this review is to explore the current depth of understanding of exposure pathways and factors increasing the risk of exposure potentially leading to adverse health effects specific to each group of countries.

  13. Noise monitoring and adverse health effects in residents in different functional areas of Luzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhi-Xia; Lei, Zhang-Heng; Zhang, Chun-Lian; Xiong, Wei; Gan, Zhong-Lin; Hu, Ping; Zhang, Qing-Bi

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the noise pollution situation and the resulting adverse effect on residents' health in Luzhou, China, to provide data for noise pollution prevention policies and interventions. Four different functional areas (commercial, construction, residential, and transportation hub areas) were chosen to monitor noise level for 3 months. The survey was performed by questionnaire on the spot on randomly selected individuals; it collected data on the impact of noise on residents' health (quality of sleep, high blood pressure, subjective feeling of nervous system damage, and attention) as well as the knowledge of noise-induced health damage, the degree of adaptation to noise, and their solutions. The noise levels of residential, commercial, transportation, and construction areas exceeded the national standards (P noise; 64.57% of residents have adapted to the current noise environment. Most of them have to close the doors and windows to reduce noise. The noise pollution situation in Luzhou, China, is serious, especially the traffic noise pollution. Residents pay less attention to it and adopt single measures to reduce the noise. We should work toward the prevention and control of traffic noise and improve the residents' awareness to reduce the adverse health effects of noise. © 2014 APJPH.

  14. Wood combustion particles induce adverse effects to normal and diseased airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapf, Manuel; Künzi, Lisa; Allenbach, Sandrine; Bruns, Emily A; Gavarini, Ilaria; El-Haddad, Imad; Slowik, Jay G; Prévôt, André S H; Drinovec, Luka; Močnik, Griša; Dümbgen, Lutz; Salathe, Matthias; Baumlin, Nathalie; Sioutas, Constantinos; Baltensperger, Urs; Dommen, Josef; Geiser, Marianne

    2017-04-19

    Residential wood burning is a major source of poorly characterized, deleterious particulate matter, whose composition and toxicity may vary with wood type, burning condition and photochemical age. The causative link between ambient wood particle constituents and observed adverse health effects is currently lacking. Here we investigate the relationship between chemical properties of primary and atmospherically aged wood combustion particles and acute toxicity in human airway epithelial cells. Emissions from a log wood burner were diluted and injected into a smog chamber for photochemical aging. After concentration-enrichment and removal of oxidizing gases, directly emitted and atmospherically aged particles were deposited on cell cultures at the air-liquid interface for 2 hours in an aerosol deposition chamber mimicking physiological conditions in lungs. Cell models were fully differentiated normal and diseased (cystic fibrosis and asthma) human bronchial epithelia (HBE) and the bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B. Cell responses were assessed at 24 hours after aerosol exposure. Atmospherically relevant doses of wood combustion particles significantly increased cell death in all but the asthma cell model. Expression of oxidative stress markers increased in HBE from all donors. Increased cell death and inflammatory responses could not be assigned to a single chemical fraction of the particles. Exposure to primary and aged wood combustion particles caused adverse effects to airway epithelia, apparently induced by several interacting components.

  15. Physical basis of adverse and therapeutic effects of low intensity microwave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, G J

    2008-05-01

    A physical basis of adverse and therapeutic effects of low intensity microwave radiation is presented based on the concept of oscillatory similitude between the frequency of an external microwave field (together with any lower frequency modulations thereof) and those of certain endogenous dipolar coherent excitations allied to aliveness, which play the role of 'tuned circuits' via which a living organism is electromagnetically sensitised in a non-linear way to external fields too weak to be able to cause heating. From this perspective, an external electromagnetic field affects a living system not as a toxin but rather by perturbing its endogenous electromagnetic activity. The possibility of adverse perturbation is illustrated by reference to the microwave fields used in mobile telecommunications whose signals interfere in a non-thermal way with biofunctionality--in particular, undermining the efficacy of processes that would otherwise afford natural protection against the development of pathology. Therapeutic modalities of microwave exposure, on the other hand, are illustrated using the example of microwave resonance therapy--which can be considered as an electromagnetic version of acupuncture, and as an example of 'quantum medicine'--whose normalising effect on a wide range of pathologies is striking, and which affords a novel alternative to conventional pharmacological interventions.

  16. The Impact of Exercise on Cancer Mortality, Recurrence, and Treatment-Related Adverse Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; Zopf, Eva M; Zhang, Xiaochen; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2017-01-01

    The combination of an increasing number of new cancer cases and improving survival rates has led to a large and rapidly growing population with unique health-care requirements. Exercise has been proposed as a strategy to help address the issues faced by cancer patients. Supported by a growing body of research, major health organizations commonly identify the importance of incorporating exercise in cancer care and advise patients to be physically active. This systematic review comprehensively summarizes the available epidemiologic and randomized controlled trial evidence investigating the role of exercise in the management of cancer. Literature searches focused on determining the potential impact of exercise on 1) cancer mortality and recurrence and 2) adverse effects of cancer and its treatment. A total of 100 studies were reviewed involving thousands of individual patients whose exercise behavior was assessed following the diagnosis of any type of cancer. Compared with patients who performed no/less exercise, patients who exercised following a diagnosis of cancer were observed to have a lower relative risk of cancer mortality and recurrence and experienced fewer/less severe adverse effects. The findings of this review support the view that exercise is an important adjunct therapy in the management of cancer. Implications on cancer care policy and practice are discussed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. HPV vaccines: their pathology-based discovery, benefits, and adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Alcina F; de Andrade, Cecilia V; Russomano, Fabio B; Rodrigues, Luana S L; Oliveira, Nathalia S; Provance, David William; Nuovo, Gerard J

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine illustrates the power of in situ-based pathologic analysis in better understanding and curing diseases. The 2 available HPV vaccines have markedly reduced the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, genital warts, and cervical cancer throughout the world. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, health care officials, and parents to refuse providing the recommended vaccination to the target population. The aims of the study were to discuss the discovery of HPV vaccine and review scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines. The strong type-specific immunity against HPV in humans has been known for more than 25 years. Multiple studies confirm the positive risk benefit of HPV vaccination with minimal documented adverse effects. The most common adverse effect, injection site pain, occurred in about 10% of girls and was less than the rate reported for other vaccines. Use of HPV vaccine should be expanded into more diverse populations, mainly in low-resource settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril reverses the adverse cardiovascular effects of polymerized hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zhou, Ronghua; Yao, Yusheng; Yang, Qian; Zhou, Cheng; Wu, Wei; Li, Qian; You, Zhen; Zhao, Xiaolin; Yang, Linhui; Li, Chen; Zhu, Da; Qiu, Yanhua; Luo, Ming; Tan, Zhaoxia; Li, Huan; Chen, Yanfang; Gong, Gu; Feng, Yuan; Dian, Ke; Liu, Jin

    2014-11-20

    Cell-free hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) may increase the risk of myocardial infarction and death. We studied the effect of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on HBOC-induced adverse cardiovascular outcomes and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. With a dog cardiopulmonary bypass model, we demonstrated that a high-dose HBOC (3%, w/v) did not reduce-but aggravated-cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury. Animals administered a high-dose HBOC experienced coronary artery constriction and depression of cardiac function. Exposure of isolated coronary arteries or human umbilical vein endothelial cells to high-dose HBOC caused impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, increased endothelial cell necrosis/apoptosis, and elevated NAD(P)H oxidase expression (gp91(phox), p47(phox), p67(phox), and Nox1) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All observed adverse outcomes could be suppressed by the ACE inhibitor captopril (100 μM). Co-incubation with free radical scavenger tempol or NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin had no effect on captopril action, suggesting that the positive effects of captopril are ROS- and NAD(P)H oxidase dependent. ACE inhibition by captopril also contributed to these effects. In addition, bioavailable nitrite oxide (NO) reduced by high-dose HBOC was preserved by captopril. Furthermore, HBOC, at concentrations greater than 0.5%, inhibited large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel currents in vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner, although captopril failed to improve current activity, providing additional evidence that captopril's effects are mediated by the endothelium, but not by the smooth muscle. Captopril alleviates high-dose HBOC-induced endothelial dysfunction and myocardial toxicity, which is mediated by synergistic depression of NAD(P)H oxidase subunit overproduction and increases in vascular NO bioavailability.

  19. Adverse Cardiovascular Effects of Nitrous Oxide: It is not all about Hyperhomocysteinaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Mahmoodpoor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Once admired for its supposed safety, nitrous oxide is presently blamed to increase adverse cardiovascular effects through augmenting plasma homocysteine concentrations (1, 2. Hemodynamic alterations following the administration of nitrous oxide are extremely complicated and sometimes contradictory. Enhanced venous return, arterial pressure, pulmonary and systemic vascular resistance, cardiac output, pupillary dilation and diaphoresis occur under nitrous oxide administration consistent with sympathomimetic properties of nitrous oxide (3. Conversely, reductions in arterial pressure are also probable, especially in patients with coronary artery disease. Nitrous oxide can also depress myocardial contractility due to decreased availability of Ca2+ for contractile activation; yet, myocardial relaxation kinetics remains intact (4. In the presence of a volatile anesthetic, nitrous oxide decreases MVO2 (Myocardial oxygen consumption and myocardial O2 extraction which may exacerbate myocardial ischemia during concomitant reductions in arterial pressure in patients with coronary artery disease. Consequently, it could be conjectured that probable adverse cardiovascular effects following nitrous oxide administration are variable and consequent of a multi-variable phenomenon rather than a single variable such as increased levels of homocysteine. Studied purely focusing on the effects of nitrous oxide are difficult to conduct due to the numerous confounding factors. In a study by Myles et al., hyperhomocysteinemia has been introduced as the source of the adverse cardiovascular effects of nitrous oxide. However, in this study, increased inspired oxygen concentrations were used to overcome arterial desaturation (1. Given the fact that a constant volume and flow rates are used throughout the anesthesia in a particular patient, increasing the concentrations of oxygen would be associated with decreased delivered nitrous oxide and volatile anesthetic concentrations

  20. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 2. Normal tissue specific sites and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue sites in the human body. Considers in detail the detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects and discusses prognostic outcomes. Clearly presents radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects. Provides the most current evidence-based medicine for cancer care survivorship guidelines. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 2 of this two-volume work comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue anatomic sites in the human body. The detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects are all considered in detail, and prognostic outcomes are discussed. Radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects are clearly presented. The text is accompanied by numerous supportive illustrations and tables.

  1. Oculocutaneous albinism in sub-Saharan Africa: adverse sun-associated health effects and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Caradee Y; Norval, Mary; Hertle, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a genetically inherited autosomal recessive condition. Individuals with OCA lack melanin and therefore are susceptible to the harmful effects of solar ultraviolet radiation, including extreme sun sensitivity, photophobia and skin cancer. OCA is a grave public health issue in sub-Saharan Africa with a prevalence as high as 1 in 1000 in some tribes. This article considers the characteristics and prevalence of OCA in sub-Saharan African countries. Sun-induced adverse health effects in the skin and eyes of OCA individuals are reviewed. Sun exposure behavior and the use of photoprotection for the skin and eyes are discussed to highlight the major challenges experienced by these at-risk individuals and how these might be best resolved. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  2. Air pollution and adverse cardiac remodeling: clinical effects and basic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonggang; Goodson, Jamie M; Zhang, Bo; Chin, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has long been known to trigger cardiovascular events, primarily through activation of local and systemic inflammatory pathways that affect the vasculature. Detrimental effects of air pollution exposure on heart failure and cardiac remodeling have also been described in human populations. Recent studies in both human subjects and animal models have provided insights into the basic physiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms that play a role in adverse cardiac remodeling. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between air pollution and cardiovascular disease, describe the clinical effects of air pollution exposure on cardiac remodeling, describe the basic mechanisms that affect remodeling as described in human and animal systems and will discuss future areas of investigation.

  3. Early life adversity potentiates the effects of later life stress on cumulative physiological dysregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, Nadya; Hansen, Åse Marie; Avlund, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Previous research indicates that early life adversity may heighten stress reactivity and impair mechanisms for adaptive coping, suggesting that experience of stress in early life may also potentiate adults' physiological vulnerability to stress in later life. The study...... tested this hypothesis by investigating whether experience of stressful events and circumstances (SEC) in childhood or adolescence amplified the effect of adulthood SEC on physiological dysregulation (allostatic load, AL) in later midlife. Design: Observational data were used in the present study......-economic and family factors. The AL index was based on 9 cardiovascular, metabolic and immune biomarkers. Results. Experience of SEC in both early life and adulthood independently predicted higher AL. In men, experience of SEC in early life also potentiated the effect of SEC in adulthood on AL. Conclusions...

  4. A Study on the Adverse Effect of AOVs in AFWS Recirculation Paths on Plant Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huong, Ho Thi Thanh [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Dae-Wook [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Auxiliary feedwater system (AFWS) recirculation flow paths adopted air operated valves (AOVs) which could fail close on loss of instrument air (LOIA) event. So the AOVs and recirculation paths are closed on LOIA event, which could result in Auxiliary feedwater (AFW) pump(s) damage, which contributes greatly to core damage frequency (CDF).. On February 2002, the USNRC issued an inspection finding related to potential common cause failure of AOVs in AFWS recirculation flow paths on loss of instrument air system in Point Beach nuclear power plant (Pt. Beach). The AOVs have been removed from AFWS recirculation paths in the design of Korea standard nuclear power plant (KSNP). So, there is no possibility of above mentioned failure event in KSNP. It would be beneficial to evaluate the significance of adverse effect of AOVs in AFWS recirculation paths to realize the importance of maintaining AFWS recirculation paths always open. In this study, the AFWS modeling of Ulchin unit 3 and 4 was modified to model the AOVs in AFW recirculation flow paths to evaluate the change in CDF, which is caused by the adverse effect of AOV with operation mode of 'fails close' on LOIA event. It is concluded that the existence of AOV with 'fail close' design in AFWS MDP recirculation paths results in CDF increase of 131%, which is significant adverse effect on plant safety.. In this regard, the improved Westinghouse design and KSNP design had removed the AOVs from AFWS MDP recirculation paths. However, a couple of units with old Westinghouse design, Kori 1 and 2, still have AOVs in AFWS MDP recirculation paths and throttle back operation of AFWS is in effect. Although those AOVs adopt 'fail open' design to prevent above mentioned inadvertent closure, considering the big increase in CDF, there still exists considerable risk from the possibility of 'failure to open' during this throttle back operation. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that any

  5. Childhood adversity moderates the effect of ADH1B on risk for alcohol-related phenotypes in Jewish Israeli drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Jacquelyn L; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Wall, Melanie M; Keyes, Katherine M; Aharonovich, Efrat; Spivak, Baruch; Weizman, Abraham; Frisch, Amos; Edenberg, Howard J; Gelernter, Joel; Grant, Bridget F; Hasin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Childhood adversity and genetic variant ADH1B-rs1229984 have each been shown to influence heavy alcohol consumption and disorders. However, little is known about how these factors jointly influence these outcomes. We assessed the main and additive interactive effects of childhood adversity (abuse, neglect and parental divorce) and the ADH1B-rs1229984 on the quantitative phenotypes 'maximum drinks in a day' (Maxdrinks) and DSM-Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) severity, adjusting for demographic variables, in an Israeli sample of adult household residents (n = 1143) evaluated between 2007 and 2009. Childhood adversity and absence of the protective ADH1B-rs1229984 A allele were associated with greater mean Maxdrinks (mean differences: 1.50; 1.13, respectively) and AUD severity (mean ratios: 0.71; 0.27, respectively). In addition, childhood adversity moderated the ADH1B-rs1229984 effect on Maxdrinks (P childhood adversity compared with those who had not. ADH1B-rs1229984 impacts alcohol metabolism. Therefore, among those at risk for greater consumption, e.g. those who experienced childhood adversity, ADH1B-rs1229984 appears to have a stronger effect on alcohol consumption and consequently on risk for AUD symptom severity. Evidence for the interaction of genetic vulnerability and early life adversity on alcohol-related phenotypes provides further insight into the complex relationships between genetic and environmental risk factors. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Mediators and Adverse Effects of Child Poverty in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, John M; Wood, David L; Duffee, James H; Kuo, Alice

    2016-04-01

    The link between poverty and children's health is well recognized. Even temporary poverty may have an adverse effect on children's health, and data consistently support the observation that poverty in childhood continues to have a negative effect on health into adulthood. In addition to childhood morbidity being related to child poverty, epidemiologic studies have documented a mortality gradient for children aged 1 to 15 years (and adults), with poor children experiencing a higher mortality rate than children from higher-income families. The global great recession is only now very slowly abating for millions of America's children and their families. At this difficult time in the history of our nation's families and immediately after the 50th anniversary year of President Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty, it is particularly germane for the American Academy of Pediatrics, which is "dedicated to the health of all children," to publish a research-supported technical report that examines the mediators associated with the long-recognized adverse effects of child poverty on children and their families. This technical report draws on research from a number of disciplines, including physiology, sociology, psychology, economics, and epidemiology, to describe the present state of knowledge regarding poverty's negative impact on children's health and development. Children inherit not only their parents' genes but also the family ecology and its social milieu. Thus, parenting skills, housing, neighborhood, schools, and other factors (eg, medical care) all have complex relations to each other and influence how each child's genetic canvas is expressed. Accompanying this technical report is a policy statement that describes specific actions that pediatricians and other child advocates can take to attenuate the negative effects of the mediators identified in this technical report and improve the well-being of our nation's children and their families. Copyright © 2016 by the

  7. Rebound effect of modern drugs: serious adverse event unknown by health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Marcus Zulian

    2013-01-01

    Supported in the Hippocratic aphorism primum non nocere, the bioethical principle of non-maleficence pray that the medical act cause the least damage or injury to the health of the patient, leaving it to the doctor to assess the risks of a particular therapy through knowledge of possible adverse events of drugs. Among these, the rebound effect represents a common side effect to numerous classes of modern drugs, may cause serious and fatal disorders in patients. This review aims to clarify the health professionals on clinical and epidemiological aspects of rebound phenomenon. A qualitative, exploratory and bibliographic review was held in the PubMed database using the keywords 'rebound', 'withdrawal', 'paradoxical', 'acetylsalicylic acid', 'anti-inflammatory', 'bronchodilator', 'antidepressant', 'statin', 'proton pump inhibitor' and 'bisphosphonate'. The rebound effect occurs after discontinuation of numerous classes of drugs that act contrary to the disease disorders, exacerbating them at levels above those prior to treatment. Regardless of the disease, the drug and duration of treatment, the phenomenon manifests itself in a small proportion of susceptible individuals. However, it may cause serious and fatal adverse events should be considered a public health problem in view of the enormous consumption of drugs by population. Bringing together a growing and unquestionable body of evidence, the physician needs to have knowledge of the consequences of the rebound effect and how to minimize it, increasing safety in the management of modern drugs. On the other hand, this rebound can be used in a curative way, broadening the spectrum of the modern therapeutics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Observational Studies on Evaluating the Safety and Adverse Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jin-Ling; Wang, Jung-Der

    2013-01-01

    Background. This study aims to share our experiences when carrying out observational studies of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Methods. We have proactively monitored the safety profiles of Duhuo Jisheng Tang (DJT), Suan Zao Ren Tang (SZRT), and TMN-1. A list of adverse events (AEs), complete blood counts, and liver and kidney function tests were obtained from the participants during their scheduled hospital visits. Retrospective observational studies were conducted based on the reimbursement database of the National Health Insurance system, Taiwan, to explore the relationship between the use of TCM that have been adulterated by aristolochic acid and the risk from both nephrotoxins and carcinogens. Results. A total of 221, 287, and 203 AEs were detected after SZRT, DJT, and TMN-1 had been taken, respectively. Dizziness, headache, stomach ache, and diarrhea were judged to be probably related to SZRT treatment. Retrospective observational studies found an association between the consumption of aristolochic acid-containing Chinese formulae such as Mu Tong and an increased risk of CKD, ESRD, and urinary tract cancer. Conclusion. Prospective and retrospective observational studies seem to have specific advantages when investigating the safety and adverse effects of TCM therapies, as well as possibly other alternative/complementary therapies. PMID:24159351

  9. Observational Studies on Evaluating the Safety and Adverse Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Nein Lai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aims to share our experiences when carrying out observational studies of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. Methods. We have proactively monitored the safety profiles of Duhuo Jisheng Tang (DJT, Suan Zao Ren Tang (SZRT, and TMN-1. A list of adverse events (AEs, complete blood counts, and liver and kidney function tests were obtained from the participants during their scheduled hospital visits. Retrospective observational studies were conducted based on the reimbursement database of the National Health Insurance system, Taiwan, to explore the relationship between the use of TCM that have been adulterated by aristolochic acid and the risk from both nephrotoxins and carcinogens. Results. A total of 221, 287, and 203 AEs were detected after SZRT, DJT, and TMN-1 had been taken, respectively. Dizziness, headache, stomach ache, and diarrhea were judged to be probably related to SZRT treatment. Retrospective observational studies found an association between the consumption of aristolochic acid-containing Chinese formulae such as Mu Tong and an increased risk of CKD, ESRD, and urinary tract cancer. Conclusion. Prospective and retrospective observational studies seem to have specific advantages when investigating the safety and adverse effects of TCM therapies, as well as possibly other alternative/complementary therapies.

  10. Effects of consanguineous marriage on reproductive behaviour, adverse pregnancy outcomes and offspring mortality in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M Mazharul

    2013-05-01

    The long tradition of high prevalence of consanguineous marriages in Omani society may have ramifications for reproductive behaviour and health of offspring. To examine the relevance of consanguinity to reproductive behaviour, adverse pregnancy outcome and offspring mortality in Oman. The data analysed came from the 2000 Oman National Health Survey. Selected indicators that are related to reproductive behaviour, adverse pregnancy outcome and offspring mortality were considered as explanatory variables. Various statistical methods and tests were used for data analysis. Consanguineous marriage was found to be associated with lower age at first birth, higher preference for larger family size, lower level of husband-wife communication about use of family planning methods and lower rate of contraceptive use. Although bivariate analysis showed elevated fertility and childhood mortality among the women with consanguineous marriage, after controlling for relevant socio-demographic factors in multivariate analysis, fertility, childhood mortality and foetal loss showed no significant association with consanguinity in Oman. Consanguinity plays an important role in determining some of the aspects of reproduction and health of newborns, but did not show any detrimental effects on fertility and offspring mortality. The high level of consanguinity and its relevance to reproduction in Oman need to be considered in its public health strategy in a culturally acceptable manner.

  11. Linking Adverse Childhood Effects and Attachment: A Theory of Etiology for Sexual Offending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Melissa D; Levenson, Jill S; Bolder, Tess

    2016-01-25

    Sexual violence continues to be a significant public health problem affecting significant portions of the population. Unfortunately, an agreed upon theory of etiology remains elusive leading to challenges in developing effective prevention and treatment interventions. Recently, there is a growing body of literature examining the role of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in the development of sexually violent behavior. This research has begun to explore the rates of various types of child maltreatments and family dysfunction in individuals who have been convicted of a sexual crime. These empirical inquiries have been primarily descriptive in nature and have not yet provided a cohesive theoretical model as to why the presence of ACEs might contribute to sexually abusive behavior. This article suggests that attachment theory offers an explanatory link between early adversity and sexually abusive behavior in adulthood. We first summarize important attachment theory concepts, then integrate them with research in the area of developmental psychopathology and ACEs, and finally propose a model by which attachment can be used as an explanatory theory for subsequent sexualized coping and sexually abusive behaviors. Finally, this article explores the implications for practice, policy, and research using this explanatory theory as a framework for understanding sexual violence. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Review for carrageenan-based pharmaceutical biomaterials: favourable physical features versus adverse biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingjing; Zhan, Xiudan; Wan, Jianbo; Wang, Yitao; Wang, Chunming

    2015-05-05

    Carrageenan (CRG) is a family of natural polysaccharides derived from seaweeds and has widely been used as food additives. In the past decade, owing to its attractive physicochemical properties, CRG has been developed into versatile biomaterials vehicles for drug delivery. Nevertheless, studies also emerged to reveal its adverse effects on the biological system. In this review, we critically appraise the latest literature (two thirds since 2008) on the development of CRG-based pharmaceutical vehicles and the perspective of using CRG for broader biomedical applications. We focus on how current strategies exploit the unique gelling mechanisms, strong water absorption and abundant functional groups of the three major CRG varieties. Notably, CRG-based matrices are demonstrated to increase drug loading and drug solubility, enabling release of orally administrated drugs in zero-order or in a significantly prolonged period. Other amazing features, such as pH-sensitivity and adhesive property, of CRG-based formulations are also introduced. Finally, we discuss the adverse influence of CRG on the human body and then suggest some future directions for the development of CRG-based biomaterials for broader applications in biomedicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Long-Term Adverse Effects of Early Growth Acceleration or Catch-Up Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Atul

    2017-01-01

    Whilst prevention of growth faltering has both short- and long-term health benefits, whether too fast or accelerated infant growth adversely affects later health outcomes is controversial and a major focus of research. Many observational studies suggest that rapid weight gain in infancy (upward centile crossing) increases the long-term risk of obesity and non-communicable disease. This association has been seen in infants from low- and high-income countries, in infants born preterm or at term, and those born with normal or low birth weight for gestation. Experimental (randomized) studies in both breast- and formula-fed infants support a causal link between early growth acceleration and infant nutrition and later risk of obesity. These observations suggest that strategies to optimize the pattern of infant growth could make a major contribution to stemming the current global epidemic of non-communicable disease. Key Messages: The optimal pattern of infant weight gain is likely to differ in different populations. The benefits of rapid infant weight gain for later neurodevelopment favors the promotion of rapid growth in infants born preterm. However, growth acceleration in healthy infants born at term (either normal or low birth weight for gestation) is likely to have adverse effects for long-term health. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Renal Tubular Acidosis an Adverse Effect of PD-1 Inhibitor Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy El Bitar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune checkpoint blockade therapy is gaining popularity among oncologists for treatment of solid and hematologic malignancies. The widespread use of these agents resulted in increasing incidence of renal immune-related adverse events. Reported renal toxicity described so far includes acute interstitial nephritis, minimal change disease, and immune complex glomerulonephritis. We report the case of a 79-year-old female with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer on anti-PD-1 therapy nivolumab. After the 4th administration of nivolumab, the treatment course was complicated with normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Urine and blood studies were in favor of distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA. Following a negative workup for an underlying etiology, immunotherapy-induced RTA was suspected. Withholding of the offending agent and initiation of steroid therapy resulted in adequate response. The present report provides the first presentation of RTA as a renal immune-related adverse event secondary to nivolumab. Nephrologists and oncologists should be familiar with potentially life-threatening renal side effects induced by immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  15. EFFECT OF LOW-DOSE NIACIN ON DYSLIPIDEMIA, SERUM PHOSPHORUS LEVELS AND ADVERSE EFFECTS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Suk An

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Niacin supplementation improves dyslipidemia and lowers serum phosphorus levels in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. However, its adverse effects, including hot flusing, hinder the administration of niacin. We evaluated whether low-dose niacin supplementation can improve dyslipidemia, lower serum phosphorus levels, and be administered with a low frequency of adverse effects in patients with CKD. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of CKD patients who had taken niacin from January, 2009 to June, 2011. We excluded patients with CKD1 and CKD 5. We then enrolled 31 CKD patients who had taken niacin at a fixed-dose of 500mg/day for 6 months. We also randomly selected 30 CKD patients who had been taking statin for 9 months as a control group. Among 34 CKD patients prescribed niacin, 5 patients (14% complained of adverse effects, and 3 CKD patients (8% discontinued niacin. There were no significant differences in baseline data between the niacin group and the control group. The proportion of patients in the niacin group who had been taking a statin, or omega-3 fatty acids was 67.7% and 48.8%, respectively. In the niacin group, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL levels was significantly increased (p<0.05, and triglyceride (p<0.05 at 12 weeks and 24 weeks compared to baseline levels. In the niacin group, phosphorous levels (p<0.05 were significantly decreased, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR was significantly increased (p=0.016 at 24 weeks compared to baseline values; however, serum creatinine levels did not significantly change. Low dose niacin (500mg/day had a low freqeuncy of adverse effects and also improved dyslipidemia, lowered serum phosphorus levels, and increased GFR in CKD patients. Further studies are needed to evaluate the long term effects of low-dose niacin for renal progression of CKD.

  16. Drugs with potential cardiac adverse effects: Retrospective study in a large cohort of parkinsonian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heranval, A; Lefaucheur, R; Fetter, D; Rouillé, A; Le Goff, F; Maltête, D

    2016-01-01

    Drugs with potential cardiac adverse effects are commonly prescribed in Parkinson's disease (PD). To describe demographic and clinical characteristics in a group of PD patients with cardiac events and to evaluate risk factors. We sampled 506 consecutive PD patients (211 women/295 men), median age 68.3±10.6 years (range 36-95) and median disease duration 11.2±6.5 years (range 1-49). Medications with potential cardiac effects, i.e. QT prolongation (citalopram, escitalopram, venlafaxine, sertraline, domperidone, amantadine, solifenacin), ventricular arrhythmia (rivastigmine, clozapine, midodrine, sildenafil, tadalafil) and ischemic heart disease (rasagiline, entacapone, tadalafil) were recorded. Demographic and clinical data were collected prospectively; cardiac events were obtained retrospectively. Twenty-four patients (4.7%) (9 women/15 men) presented a cardiac event. Fifteen (62.5%) patients had dysautonomia, 4 (16.6%) a history of heart disease and 8 (33.3%) were taking one or more drugs with a definite potential cardiac adverse effect. Age (75.9±6.6 yr vs. 67.8±11 yr), disease duration (14.7±3.6 yr vs. 11±6.5 yr), dysautonomia (62.5% vs. 24.5%) and dementia associated with PD (37.5% vs. 14.6%) were significantly higher in the group with cardiac events (Pdysautonomia. Our results indicate that the neurodegenerative process in Parkinson's disease is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgical correction of scoliosis in children with spastic quadriplegia: benefits, adverse effects, and patient selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Julian; Davies, Evan; Raich, Annie L; Dettori, Joseph R; Sherry, Ned

    2014-04-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a group of nonprogressive syndromes of posture and motor impairment associated with lesions of the immature brain. Spastic quadriplegia is the most severe form with a high incidence of scoliosis, back pain, respiratory compromise, pelvic obliquity, and poor sitting balance. Surgical stabilization of the spine is an effective technique for correcting deformity and restoring sitting posture. The decision to operate in this group of patients is challenging. The aim of this study is to determine the benefits of surgical correction of scoliosis in children with spastic quadriplegia, the adverse effects of this treatment, and what preoperative factors affect patient outcome after surgical correction. A systematic review was undertaken to identify studies describing benefits and adverse effects of surgery in spastic quadriplegia. Factors affecting patient outcome following surgical correction of scoliosis were assessed. Studies involving adults and nonspastic quadriplegia were excluded. A total of 10 case series and 1 prospective and 3 retrospective cohort studies met inclusion criteria. There was significant variation in the overall risk of complications (range, 10.9-70.9%), mortality (range, 2.8-19%), respiratory/pulmonary complications (range, 26.9-57.1%), and infection (range, 2.5-56.8%). Factors associated with a worse outcome were a significant degree of thoracic kyphosis, days in the intensive care unit, and poor nutritional status. Caregivers report a high degree of satisfaction with scoliosis surgery for children with spastic quadriplegia. There is limited evidence of preoperative factors that can predict patient outcome after scoliosis. There is a need for well-designed prospective studies of scoliosis surgery in spastic quadriplegia.

  18. The Adverse Effects of Environmental Noise Exposure on Oxidative Stress and Cardiovascular Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzel, Thomas; Sørensen, Mette; Schmidt, Frank; Schmidt, Erwin; Steven, Sebastian; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Daiber, Andreas

    2018-03-20

    Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that traffic noise exposure is linked to cardiovascular diseases such as arterial hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Noise is a nonspecific stressor that activates the autonomous nervous system and endocrine signaling. According to the noise reaction model introduced by Babisch and colleagues, chronic low levels of noise can cause so-called nonauditory effects, such as disturbances of activity, sleep, and communication, which can trigger a number of emotional responses, including annoyance and subsequent stress. Chronic stress in turn is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, comprising increased blood pressure and dyslipidemia, increased blood viscosity and blood glucose, and activation of blood clotting factors, in animal models and humans. Persistent chronic noise exposure increases the risk of cardiometabolic diseases, including arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus type 2, and stroke. Recently, we demonstrated that aircraft noise exposure during nighttime can induce endothelial dysfunction in healthy subjects and is even more pronounced in coronary artery disease patients. Importantly, impaired endothelial function was ameliorated by acute oral treatment with the antioxidant vitamin C, suggesting that excessive production of reactive oxygen species contributes to this phenomenon. More recently, we introduced a novel animal model of aircraft noise exposure characterizing the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to noise-dependent adverse oxidative stress-related effects on the vasculature. With the present review, we want to provide an overview of epidemiological, translational clinical, and preclinical noise research addressing the nonauditory, adverse effects of noise exposure with focus on oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 873-908.

  19. Leukocytes and transfusion related adverse events: the effects of leuko-reduction process in the prevention of adverse reactions resulted from the transfusion of blood components: review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehteramolsadat Hosseini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is commonly implemented to manage life and health-threatening conditions on a rapid and short-term basis. Over the years, ongoing technical advances have dramatically improved transfusion medicine to provide more safety and effectiveness. However, transfusion is still complicated with different adverse events that mainly induced by the presence of allogeneic leukocytes in the blood products. Several lines of evidence have shown that leukocytes in blood components are involved in the induction of febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs, HLA alloimmunization and platelet refractoriness as well as the increased risk of the infectious diseases transmitted by leukotropic viruses including cytomegalovirus (CMV, human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-I/II and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. During current decades, introducing various leuko-reduction techniques have shown to be associated with less transfusion related adverse events and improved clinical outcomes. The lower incidence and severity of febrile transfusion reactions; reduced risk of transfusion related transmission of CMV or other leukocyte-associated infections, lowered incidence of alloimmune platelet refractoriness in addition to reducing risk of mortality and morbidity in patients are considered as clinical benefits of leuko-reduced products. Currently, by the use of 3rd and 4th generation of filters, the highest levels of leukoreduction in blood components have been achieved. Filtration techniques have also the advantages of being performed shortly after preparation of components (pre-storage or post-storage even at the patient’s bedside. However, it seems that pre-storage depletion of leukocytes provides better protection than post-storage techniques due to the elimination of leukocyte-derived cytokines effects which are increasingly released during storage. Particularly in platelet products, the earlier depletion of leukocyte also favors less platelet

  20. Mouth breathing: adverse effects on facial growth, health, academics, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, Yosh

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of health care professionals are unaware of the negative impact of upper airway obstruction (mouth breathing) on normal facial growth and physiologic health. Children whose mouth breathing is untreated may develop long, narrow faces, narrow mouths, high palatal vaults, dental malocclusion, gummy smiles, and many other unattractive facial features, such as skeletal Class II or Class III facial profiles. These children do not sleep well at night due to obstructed airways; this lack of sleep can adversely affect their growth and academic performance. Many of these children are misdiagnosed with attention deficit disorder (ADD) and hyperactivity. It is important for the entire health care community (including general and pediatric dentists) to screen and diagnose for mouth breathing in adults and in children as young as 5 years of age. If mouth breathing is treated early, its negative effect on facial and dental development and the medical and social problems associated with it can be reduced or averted.

  1. Propolis: a review of properties, applications, chemical composition, contact allergy, and other adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Anton C

    2013-01-01

    Propolis (bee glue) is the resinous substance that bees collect from living plants for the construction and adaptation of their nests. It has antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties and may have a wide range of other beneficial biological activities. Propolis is available as a dietary supplement, in products for the protection of health and prevention of diseases, in biopharmaceuticals, and as a constituent of (bio)cosmetics. In this article, the following aspects of propolis are reviewed: the nature and chemical composition, its biological properties and applications, contact allergy and allergic contact dermatitis (sensitizing potential, products causing contact allergy, clinical picture, frequency of sensitization, coreactivity and cross-reactivity, the allergens in propolis), and other adverse effects.

  2. Diagnostic criteria for adverse health effects in the environs of wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Carmen ME

    2014-01-01

    Summary In an effort to address climate change, governments have pursued policies that seek to reduce greenhouse gases. Alternative energy, including wind power, has been proposed by some as the preferred approach. Few would debate the need to reduce air pollution, but the means of achieving this reduction is important not only for efficiency but also for health protection. The topic of adverse health effects in the environs of industrial wind turbines (AHE/IWT) has proven to be controversial and can present physicians with challenges regarding the management of an exposure to IWT. Rural physicians in particular must be aware of the possibility of people presenting to their practices with a variety of sometimes confusing complaints. An earlier version of the diagnostic criteria for AHE/IWT was published in August 2011. A revised case definition and a model for a study to establish a confirmed diagnosis is proposed. PMID:25383200

  3. Evidence for the Adverse Effect of Starvation on Bone Quality: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Kueper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition and starvation’s possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200–800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in several case series and descriptive reports addressing the medical issues of these individuals. A severe effect of severely diminished food intake and frequently concomitant calcium- and Vitamin D deficiencies was subsequently proven in both animal models and the most common cause of starvation in developed countries is anorexia nervosa. This review attempts to summarize the literature available on the impact of the metabolic response to Starvation on overall bone health and bone quality.

  4. Study on the adverse effects of hydropower development on international shipping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changhong

    2017-04-01

    The Lancang - Mekong river is an important international waterway to Southeast Asia and South Asia, which has important strategic significance for promoting regional economic cooperation and safeguarding national economic and security interests. On the Mekong River, the main aim is to develop hydropower resources utilization and shipping. River Hydropower Stations are in Laos and designed by foreign enterprises according to the construction of BOT. In this study, on the basis of a lot of research work and extensive collection of relevant information, and, through in-depth analysis of research, it reveals that the upper Mekong River hydropower development have many adverse effects on international shipping, put forward related suggestions for the healthy and sustainable development of international shipping.

  5. Diagnostic criteria for adverse health effects in the environs of wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtry, Robert Y; Krogh, Carmen Me

    2014-10-01

    In an effort to address climate change, governments have pursued policies that seek to reduce greenhouse gases. Alternative energy, including wind power, has been proposed by some as the preferred approach. Few would debate the need to reduce air pollution, but the means of achieving this reduction is important not only for efficiency but also for health protection. The topic of adverse health effects in the environs of industrial wind turbines (AHE/IWT) has proven to be controversial and can present physicians with challenges regarding the management of an exposure to IWT. Rural physicians in particular must be aware of the possibility of people presenting to their practices with a variety of sometimes confusing complaints. An earlier version of the diagnostic criteria for AHE/IWT was published in August 2011. A revised case definition and a model for a study to establish a confirmed diagnosis is proposed.

  6. Evidence for the Adverse Effect of Starvation on Bone Quality: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueper, Janina; Beyth, Shaul; Liebergall, Meir; Kaplan, Leon; Schroeder, Josh E.

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and starvation's possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200–800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in several case series and descriptive reports addressing the medical issues of these individuals. A severe effect of severely diminished food intake and frequently concomitant calcium- and Vitamin D deficiencies was subsequently proven in both animal models and the most common cause of starvation in developed countries is anorexia nervosa. This review attempts to summarize the literature available on the impact of the metabolic response to Starvation on overall bone health and bone quality. PMID:25810719

  7. Evolution of pharmacological obesity treatments: focus on adverse side-effect profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krentz, A J; Fujioka, K; Hompesch, M

    2016-06-01

    Pharmacotherapy directed toward reducing body weight may provide benefits for both curbing obesity and lowering the risk of obesity-associated comorbidities; however, many weight loss medications have been withdrawn from the market because of serious adverse effects. Examples include pulmonary hypertension (aminorex), cardiovascular toxicity, e.g. flenfluramine-induced valvopathy, stroke [phenylpropanolamine (PPA)], excess non-fatal cardiovascular events (sibutramine), and neuro-psychiatric issues (rimonabant; approved in Europe, but not in the USA). This negative experience has helped mould the current drug development and approval process for new anti-obesity drugs. Differences between the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency, however, in perceptions of risk-benefit considerations for individual drugs have resulted in discrepancies in approval and/or withdrawal of weight-reducing medications. Thus, two drugs recently approved by the FDA, i.e. lorcaserin and phentermine + topiramate extended release, are not available in Europe. In contrast, naltrexone sustained release (SR)/bupropion SR received FDA approval, and liraglutide 3.0 mg was recently approved in both the USA and Europe. Regulatory strategies adopted by the FDA to manage the potential for uncommon but potentially serious post-marketing toxicity include: (i) risk evaluation and mitigation strategy programmes; (ii) stipulating post-marketing safety trials; (iii) considering responder rates and limiting cumulative exposure by discontinuation if weight loss is not attained within a reasonable timeframe; and (iv) requiring large cardiovascular outcome trials before or after approval. We chronicle the adverse effects of anti-obesity pharmacotherapy and consider how the history of high-profile toxicity issues has shaped the current regulatory landscape for new and future weight-reducing drugs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Mitigating Adverse Effects of a Human Mission on Possible Martian Indigenous Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupisella, M. L.

    2000-07-01

    Although human beings are, by most standards, the most capable agents to search for and detect extraterrestrial life, we are also potentially the most harmful. While there has been substantial work regarding forward contamination with respect to robotic missions, the issue of potential adverse effects on possible indigenous Martian ecosystems, such as biological contamination, due to a human mission has remained relatively unexplored and may require our attention now as this presentation will try to demonstrate by exploring some of the relevant scientific questions, mission planning challenges, and policy issues. An informal, high-level mission planning decision tree will be discussed and is included as the next page of this abstract. Some of the questions to be considered are: (1) To what extent could contamination due to a human presence compromise possible indigenous life forms? (2) To what extent can we control contamination? For example, will it be local or global? (3) What are the criteria for assessing the biological status of Mars, both regionally and globally? For example, can we adequately extrapolate from a few strategic missions such as sample return missions? (4) What should our policies be regarding our mission planning and possible interaction with what are likely to be microbial forms of extraterrestrial life? (5) Central to the science and mission planning issues is the role and applicability of terrestrial analogs, such as Lake Vostok for assessing drilling issues, and modeling techniques. Central to many of the policy aspects are scientific value, international law, public concern, and ethics. Exploring this overall issue responsibly requires an examination of all these aspects and how they interrelate. A chart is included, titled 'Mission Planning Decision Tree for Mitigating Adverse Effects to Possible Indigenous Martian Ecosystems due to a Human Mission'. It outlines what questions scientists should ask and answer before sending humans to Mars.

  9. Adverse effect of outdoor air pollution on cardiorespiratory fitness in Chinese children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Chan, Emily Y. Y.; Zhu, Yingjia; Wong, Tze Wai

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the health impact of air pollution on children's cardiovascular health. A cross-sectional study was conducted and data was analysed in 2048 Chinese schoolchildren (aged 8-10 years) in three districts of Hong Kong to examine the association between exposure to outdoor air pollution and cardiorespiratory fitness. Annual means of ambient PM10, SO2, NO2 and O3 from 1996 to 2003 were used to estimate individual exposure of the subjects. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured for maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), predicted by the multistage fitness test (MFT). Height and weight were measured and other potential confounders were collected with questionnaires. Analysis of covariance was performed to estimate the impact of air pollution on complete speed in the MFT and predicted VO2max. The results showed that children in high-pollution district had significantly lower complete speed and predicted VO2max compared to those in low- and moderate-pollution districts. Complete speed and predicted VO2max was estimated to reduce 0.327 km h-1 and 1.53 ml kg-1 min-1 per 10 μg m-3 increase in PM10 annual mean respectively, with those in girls being greater than in boys. Being physically active could not significantly result in improved cardiorespiratory fitness in polluted districts. The adverse effect seems to be independent of short-term exposure to air pollution. We concluded that long-term exposure to higher outdoor air pollution levels was negatively associated with cardiorespiratory fitness in Chinese schoolchildren, especially for girls. PM10 is the most relevant pollutant of the adverse effect. Elevated cardiorespiratory fitness observed in physically activate children could be negated by increased amount of inhaled pollutants during exercise.

  10. ADVERPred-Web Service for Prediction of Adverse Effects of Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Sergey M; Lagunin, Alexey A; Rudik, Anastasia V; Filimonov, Dmitry A; Poroikov, Vladimir V

    2018-01-22

    Application of structure-activity relationships (SARs) for the prediction of adverse effects of drugs (ADEs) has been reported in many published studies. Training sets for the creation of SAR models are usually based on drug label information which allows for the generation of data sets for many hundreds of drugs. Since many ADEs may not be related to drug consumption, one of the main problems in such studies is the quality of data on drug-ADE pairs obtained from labels. The information on ADEs may be included in three sections of the drug labels: "Boxed warning," "Warnings and Precautions," and "Adverse reactions." The first two sections, especially Boxed warning, usually contain the most frequent and severe ADEs that have either known or probable relationships to drug consumption. Using this information, we have created manually curated data sets for the five most frequent and severe ADEs: myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, cardiac failure, severe hepatotoxicity, and nephrotoxicity, with more than 850 drugs on average for each effect. The corresponding SARs were built with PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances) software and had balanced accuracy values of 0.74, 0.7, 0.77, 0.67, and 0.75, respectively. They were implemented in a freely available ADVERPred web service ( http://www.way2drug.com/adverpred/ ), which enables a user to predict five ADEs based on the structural formula of compound. This web service can be applied for estimation of the corresponding ADEs for hits and lead compounds at the early stages of drug discovery.

  11. Metabolic and renal adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuny, Clàudia; Deyà-Martínez, Ángela; Chiappini, Elena; Galli, Luisa; de Martino, Maurizio; Noguera-Julian, Antoni

    2015-05-01

    Worldwide, the benefits of combined antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in morbidity and mortality due to perinatally acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection are beyond question and outweigh the toxicity these drugs have been associated with in HIV-infected children and adolescents to date. In puberty, abnormal body fat distribution is stigmatizating and leads to low adherence to ARV treatment. The other metabolic comorbidities (mitochondrial toxicity, dyslipidemias, insulin resistance and low bone mineral density) and renal toxicity, albeit nonsymptomatic in most children, are increasingly being reported and potentially put this population at risk for early cardiovascular or cerebrovascular atherosclerotic disease, diabetes, pathologic fractures or premature renal failure in the third and fourth decades of life. Evidence from available studies is limited because of methodological limitations and also because of several HIV-unrelated factors influencing, to some degree, the development of these conditions. Current recommendations for the prevention, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of metabolic and renal adverse effects in HIV-children and adolescents are based on adult studies, observational pediatric studies and experts' consensus. Healthy lifestyle habits (regarding diet, exercise and refraining from toxic substances) and wise use of ARV options are the only preventive tools for the majority of patients. Should abnormal findings arise, switches in one or more ARV drugs have proved useful. Specific therapies are also available for some of these comorbidities, although the experience in the pediatric age is still very scarce. We aim to summarize the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic aspects of metabolic and renal adverse effects in vertically HIV-infected children and adolescents.

  12. Dermal Abrasion Experienced as an Adverse Effect of the EZ-IO(®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbey, Jamie K; Kon, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, an update was released to the pediatric and neonatal septic shock guidelines, which emphasized early use of therapies, specifically, first-hour fluid resuscitation and inotrope therapy. This has led to increased use of intraosseous (IO) access as a source of vascular access. Previously, IO access could be obtained only via a manual IO placement. New semi-automatic devices, such as EZ-IO(®) (Vidacare, Shavano Park, TX), allow for safer and quicker IO access. Data support the use of semi-automatic devices during the acute resuscitation period. The patient was a 7-month old girl with VACTERL association (Vertebral defects, Anal atresia, Cardiac defects, Tracheo-Esophageal fistula, Renal anomalies, Limb abnormalities) and complex past medical history. The patient experienced a "choking episode," which led to subsequent apnea and cyanosis. The patient presented in shock to a local pediatric emergency department. After multiple unsuccessful intravenous line attempts, IO access was obtained using the EZ-IO(®). Once in the pediatric intensive care unit with venous access, the IO device was removed and the site had "red bulls-eye target shape" damage to the skin, which appeared consistent with the EZ-IO(®) flange. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: IO device use is increasing due to the most recent pediatric and neonatal septic shock guidelines, which emphasize first-hour fluid resuscitation and inotrope therapy. It is vital that emergency physicians be aware of the adverse effects of semi-automatic IO devices, including dermal abrasion, which has not been reported previously. With proper training and familiarity, it is possible to avoid dermal abrasion as an adverse effect of the semi-automatic IO device. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Doping with anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS): Adverse effects on non-reproductive organs and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Vorona, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Since the 1970s anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused at ever increasing rates in competitive athletics, in recreational sports and in bodybuilding. Exceedingly high doses are often consumed over long periods, in particular by bodybuilders, causing acute or chronic adverse side effects frequently complicated by additional polypharmacy. This review summarizes side effects on non-reproductive organs and functions; effects on male and female reproduction have been recently reviewed in a parallel paper. Among the most striking AAS side effects are increases in haematocrit and coagulation causing thromboembolism, intracardiac thrombosis and stroke as well as other cardiac disturbances including arrhythmias, cardiomyopathies and possibly sudden death. 17α-alkylated AAS are liver toxic leading to cholestasis, peliosis, adenomas and carcinomas. Hyperbilirubinaemia can cause cholemic nephrosis and kidney failure. AAS abuse may induce exaggerated self-confidence, reckless behavior, aggressiveness and psychotic symptoms. AAS withdrawal may be accompanied by depression and suicidal intentions. Since AAS abuse is not or only reluctantly admitted physicians should be aware of the multitude of serious side effects when confronted with unclear symptoms.

  14. Effectiveness, Medication Patterns, and Adverse Events of Traditional Chinese Herbal Patches for Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the evidence whether traditional Chinese herbal patches (TCHPs for osteoarthritis (OA are effective and safe and analyze their medication patterns. Methods. A systematic literature search was performed using all the possible Medical Subject Headings (MeSH and keywords from January 1979 to July 2013. Both randomized controlled trials (RCTs and observational studies were included. Estimated effects were analyzed using mean difference (MD or relative risk (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CI and meta-analysis. Results. 86 kinds of TCHPs were identified. RCTs and controlled clinical trials (CCTs which were mostly of low quality favored TCHPs for local pain and dysfunction relief. TCHPs, compared with diclofenac ointment, had significant effects on global effectiveness rate (RR = 0.50; 95% CI (0.29, 0.87. Components of formulae were mainly based on the compounds “Xiao Huo Luo Dan” (Minor collateral-freeing pill and “Du Huo Ji Sheng Tang” (Angelicae Pubescentis and Loranthi decoction. Ten kinds of adverse events (AEs, mainly consisting of itching and/or local skin rashes, were identified after 3-4 weeks of follow-up. Conclusions. TCHPs have certain evidence in improving global effectiveness rate for OA; however, more rigorous studies are warranted to support their use.

  15. Sensitivity and precision of adverse effects search filters in MEDLINE and EMBASE: a case study of fractures with thiazolidinediones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golder, Su; Loke, Yoon K

    2012-03-01

    Search filters have been developed in MEDLINE and EMBASE to help overcome the challenges of searching electronic databases for information on adverse effects. However, little evaluation of their effectiveness has been carried out. To measure the sensitivity and precision of available adverse effects search filters in MEDLINE and EMBASE. A case study systematic review of fracture related adverse effects associated with the use of thiazolidinediones was used. Twelve MEDLINE search strategies and three EMBASE search strategies were tested. Nineteen relevant references from MEDLINE and 24 from EMBASE were included in the review. Four search filters in MEDLINE achieved high sensitivity (95 or 100%) with an improved level of precision from searches without any adverse effects filter. High precision in MEDLINE could also be achieved (up to 53%) using search filters that rely on Medical Subject Headings. No search filter in EMBASE achieved high precision (all were under 5%) and the highest sensitivity in EMBASE was 83%. Adverse effects search filters appear to be effective in MEDLINE for achieving either high sensitivity or high precision. Search filters in EMBASE, however, do not appear as effective, particularly in improving precision. © 2011 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2011 Health Libraries Group.

  16. Cutaneous adverse effect during concomitant therapy with phenytoin and holoencefalica radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terradas, M.; Jachoian, A.; Santini, A.; Mara, C.; Ferreira, V.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Phenytoin is one of anticonvulsant drugs (AC) which together with the Corticosteroids are used frequently in patients with intracranial tumors either early or metastatic; the association of treatments can cause adverse effects within which are skin reactions called erythema multiforme (EM) syndrome Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) whose incidence is 5 to 10%, with an increased risk are used when the AC associated with treatment with radiotherapy (RT).Case report: A 48 year old woman in whom primitive brain metastases were diagnosed breast cancer, so phenytoin, corticosteroids and performed RT presenting holoencefálica for such treatment maculo-papular skin reaction symmetrical onset zone Radiant treatment extension neck, thorax, abdomen and pelvis, oral mucositis, conjunctivitis and fever, which improved after stopping treatment altogether. Discussion: The clinical picture presented matches the description of the 30 Reported SJS / TEN in the literature with the use of AC and RT cases. The clinical course of the skin reactions in our patient represents the possible combined effect of phenytoin and RT as causative agents and analyzed the occurrence of side effects occurred in the third week of starting treatment with both therapeutic modalities such as what described in these reactions and improved frankly to stop treatment until disappear entirely. Cutaneous adverse reactions may occur as a complication severe in patients treated with RT and phenytoin and both treatments should suspend the first sign of side effects must continue once the patient recovered with AC radiant modifying drug treatment if necessary. There are differences of opinion regarding the prophylactic use of drug therapy in patients with AC intracranial tumors both early and metastatic. The American Academy of Neurology held a consensus in 2000 whose recommendations are non-routine use of AC in patients diagnosed intracerebral tumor that has not

  17. The Effect of Adverse Childhood Experience on Clinical Diagnosis of a Substance Use Disorder: Results of a Nationally Representative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeTendre, McKenzie Lynn; Reed, Mark B

    2017-05-12

    Substance abuse is one of the most common health outcomes associated with adverse childhood experience, and poses a significant public health threat. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a relationship between adverse childhood experience and a substance use disorder using nationally representative data as well as to test whether religion moderates this relationship. We conducted a secondary analysis using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (n = 11,279). Three types of adverse childhood experiences were considered; physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. Logistic regression was used to determine whether risk for developing an alcohol use, cannabis use, or other drug use disorder in adulthood increased as exposure to multiple types of adverse childhood experiences increased while controlling for prior substance use and other demographic variables that have shown associations with substance use. In addition, religiosity was investigated as a possible moderator of the relationship between adverse childhood experience and substance abuse. The likelihood of developing a substance use disorder later in life increased as the score on the adverse childhood experience index increased. While religiosity did significantly reduce the likelihood of developing a substance use disorder, no moderating effects were observed. Conclusions/importance: This study underscores the long-term consequences of exposure to childhood adversity.

  18. Adverse Effect of Post-Discharge Care Fragmentation on Outcomes after Readmissions after Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Anai N; Loy, Veronica M; Brownlee, Sarah A; Ezure, Yoshiki; Schaidle-Blackburn, Colleen; Cotler, Scott J; di Sabato, Diego; Kuo, Paul C; Lu, Amy D

    2017-07-01

    Post-discharge surgical care fragmentation is defined as readmission to any hospital other than the hospital at which surgery was performed. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of fragmented readmissions within the first year after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases for Florida and California from 2006 to 2011 were used to identify OLT patients. Post-discharge fragmentation was defined as any readmission to a non-index hospital, including readmitted patients transferred to the index hospital after 24 hours. Outcomes included adverse events, defined as 30-day mortality and 30-day readmission after a fragmented readmission. All statistical analyses considered a hierarchical data structure and were performed with multilevel, mixed-effects models. We analyzed 2,996 patients with 7,485 readmission encounters at 299 hospitals; 1,236 (16.5%) readmissions were fragmented. After adjustment for age, sex, readmission reason, index liver transplantation cost, readmission length of stay, number of previous readmissions, and time from transplantation, post-discharge fragmentation increased the odds of both 30-day mortality (odds ratio [OR] = 1.75; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.65) and 30-day readmission (OR = 2.14; 95% CI 1.83 to 2.49). Predictors of adverse events after a fragmented readmission included increased number of previous readmissions (OR = 1.07; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.14) and readmission within 90 days of OLT (OR = 2.19; 95% CI 1.61 to 2.98). Post-discharge fragmentation significantly increases the risk of both 30-day mortality and subsequent readmission after a readmission in the first year after OLT. More inpatient visits before a readmission and less time elapsed from index surgery increase the odds of an adverse event after discharge from a fragmented readmission. These parameters could guide transfer decisions for patients with post-discharge fragmentation. Copyright © 2017 American

  19. Some effects of favorable and adverse electric fields on pool boiling in dielectric fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, Viviana

    2001-01-01

    The effects of the application of an electric field on pool boiling in dielectric fluids were studied in this work.Two different geometries were used: one which is favorable to the bubble detachment (favorable electric field) and other which attract the bubbles toward the heater (adverse electric field).In the favorable electric field experiments, the void fraction and impact rate were calculated from the measured indicator function.Those parameters were obtained varying the probe-heater distance and the power to the heater.The results show a reduction of the void fraction with increasing applied voltage, probably caused by the combination of the dielectrophoretic force and a smaller bubble size due to the electric field application. Also, the impact rate decreases when a voltage is applied and the heat fluxes are close to the critical heat flux (CHF).On the other hand, the impact rate increases with voltage for moderate heat fluxes.Another interesting result is the approximately exponential decay of the void fraction and impact rate with the distance to the heater. Both the void fraction and the impact rate grow with heat flux if the heat fluxes are moderate, with or without applied voltage.For highest heat fluxes the void fraction still grows with heat flux if there are no applied electric fields while decreases with heat flux when there is an applied voltage. Similar behavior is observed in the impact rate.The boiling regimes was measured with adverse electric fields using two techniques.The heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime was measured on an electrically powered heater.The results in these experiments show a reduction in the CHF of 10 % for saturation conditions and 10 kV of applied voltage, and a reduction of up to 40 % for 20 oC of liquid subcooling.The boiling curve corresponding to the transition and film boiling was performed with quenching experiments.An increase in the heat flux was achieved when an electric field was applied in spite of the

  20. Clinical review: kinase inhibitors: adverse effects related to the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Maya B

    2013-04-01

    The use of kinase inhibitors (KIs) in the treatment of cancer has become increasingly common, and practitioners must be familiar with endocrine-related side effects associated with these agents. This review provides an update to the clinician regarding the management of potential endocrinological effects of KIs. PubMed was employed to identify relevant manuscripts. A review of the literature was conducted, and data were summarized and incorporated. KIs, including small molecule KIs and monoclonal antibodies directed against kinases, have emerged over the past decade as an important class of anticancer agents. KIs specifically interfere with signaling pathways that are dysregulated in certain types of cancers and also target common mechanisms of growth, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Currently, at least 20 KIs are approved as cancer therapeutics. However, KIs may affect a broad spectrum of targets and may have additional, unidentified mechanisms of action at the cellular level due to overlap between signaling pathways in the tumor cell and endocrine system. Recent reports in the literature have identified side effects associated with KIs, including alterations in thyroid function, bone metabolism, linear growth, gonadal function, fetal development, adrenal function, and glucose metabolism. Clinicians need to monitor the thyroid functions of patients on KIs. In addition, bone density and vitamin D status should be assessed. Special care should be taken to follow linear growth and development in children taking these agents. Clinicians should counsel patients appropriately on the potential adverse effects of KIs on fetal development.

  1. DRD4-exonIII-VNTR moderates the effect of childhood adversities on emotional resilience in young-adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debjani Das

    Full Text Available Most individuals successfully maintain psychological well-being even when exposed to trauma or adversity. Emotional resilience or the ability to thrive in the face of adversity is determined by complex interactions between genetic makeup, previous exposure to stress, personality, coping style, availability of social support, etc. Recent studies have demonstrated that childhood trauma diminishes resilience in adults and affects mental health. The Dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4 exon III variable number tandem repeat (VNTR polymorphism was reported to moderate the impact of adverse childhood environment on behaviour, mood and other health-related outcomes. In this study we investigated whether DRD4-exIII-VNTR genotype moderates the effect of childhood adversities (CA on resilience. In a representative population sample (n = 1148 aged 30-34 years, we observed an interactive effect of DRD4 genotype and CA (β = 0.132; p = 0.003 on resilience despite no main effect of the genotype when effects of age, gender and education were controlled for. The 7-repeat allele appears to protect against the adverse effect of CA since the decline in resilience associated with increased adversity was evident only in individuals without the 7-repeat allele. Resilience was also significantly associated with approach-/avoidance-related personality measures (behavioural inhibition/activation system; BIS/BAS measures and an interactive effect of DRD4-exIII-VNTR genotype and CA on BAS was observed. Hence it is possible that approach-related personality traits could be mediating the effect of the DRD4 gene and childhood environment interaction on resilience such that when stressors are present, the 7-repeat allele influences the development of personality in a way that provides protection against adverse outcomes.

  2. Review shows that maternal obesity induces serious adverse neonatal effects and is associated with childhood obesity in their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitanchez, Delphine; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale

    2018-02-08

    Obesity at the start of pregnancy has been rising worldwide, increasing the risk of maternal complications. We reviewed the independent effects of maternal obesity during pregnancy on neonatal adverse outcomes and the risk of childhood obesity and adverse cardio-metabolic profiles. We searched MEDLINE for papers published in English between December 2007 and November 2017, focusing primarily on human studies published in the last five years. However, we also chose to highlight examples derived from model animals that could bring mechanistic insight and preventive and therapeutic avenues. Our review showed that maternal obesity had independent effects on neonatal adverse outcomes such as macrosomia, perinatal mortality and birth defects. Maternal obesity alone increased the risks for adverse neonatal outcomes, including macrosomia, perinatal mortality, induced preterm birth and birth defects. In association with excess gestational weight gain, mainly early in pregnancy, increased the risks of childhood obesity, higher fat mass and, to a smaller extent, adverse cardio-metabolic profiles. Animal models highlighted sexually dimorphic responses to maternal obesity. Maternal obesity induced serious adverse neonatal effects and was associated with childhood obesity in their offspring. The peri-conceptional period is critical for metabolic programming, and obese women need close monitoring from conception. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The Development of Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Adverse Health Effects Ann R. Kennedy Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 195 John Morgan Building, 3620 Hamilton Walk, Philadelphia, PA, United States 19104-6072 The development of countermeasures for radiation induced adverse health effects is a lengthy process, particularly when the countermeasure/drug has not yet been evaluated in human trials. One example of a drug developed from the bench to the clinic is the soybean-derived Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), which has been developed as a countermeasure for radiation induced cancer. It was originally identified as a compound/drug that could prevent the radiation induced carcinogenic process in an in vitro assay system in 1975. The first observation that BBI could inhibit carcinogenesis in animals was in 1985. BBI received Investigational New Drug (IND) Status with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1992 (after several years of negotiation with the FDA about the potential IND status of the drug), and human trials began at that time. Phase I, II and III human trials utilizing BBI have been performed under several INDs with the FDA, and an ongoing Phase III trial will be ending in the very near future. Thus, the drug has been in development for 35 years at this point, and it is still not a prescription drug on the market which is available for human use. A somewhat less time-consuming process is to evaluate compounds that are on the GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) list. These compounds would include some over-the-counter medications, such as antioxidant vitamins utilized in human trials at the levels for which Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) have been established. To determine whether GRAS substances are able to have beneficial effects on radiation induced adverse health effects, it is still likely to be a lengthy process involving many years to potentially decades of human trial work. The

  4. Adverse effects of caffeinated energy drinks among youth and young adults in Canada: a Web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, David; Reid, Jessica L; Zukowski, Sara

    2018-01-09

    Energy drink consumption has increased dramatically among young Canadians, with anecdotal evidence of adverse health effects. There is a lack of population-based studies to examine the prevalence of adverse events from energy drinks, particularly among young people. The current study sought to assess adverse events from energy drinks among a population-based sample of youth and young adults in Canada. An online survey was conducted in 2015 with a national sample of youth (aged 12-17 yr) and young adults (aged 18-24 yr) recruited from a consumer panel. Respondents reported prior consumption of energy drinks as well as adverse outcomes, concurrent activities associated with the outcomes and whether medical attention was sought or considered. Adverse events from coffee were also assessed for comparison. Weighted analyses are reported. Of the 2055 respondents, 1516 (73.8%) reported having ever consumed an energy drink, and 1741 (84.7%) reported having ever consumed coffee (unweighted). Overall, 55.4% of respondents who had ever consumed an energy drink reported that they had experienced at least 1 adverse event, including fast heartbeat (24.7%), difficulty sleeping (24.1%), headache (18.3%), nausea/vomiting/diarrhea (5.1%), chest pain (3.6%) and seizures (0.2%); 3.1% had sought or had considered seeking medical help for an adverse event. The prevalence of reported adverse events was significantly greater among energy drink consumers than among coffee consumers (36.0%) (odds ratio [OR] 2.67 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.01-2.56]), as was the proportion who reported seeking or considering seeking medical help for adverse events (3.1% v. 1.4%) (OR 2.18 [95% CI 1.39-3.41]). More than half of youth and young adults who had consumed energy drinks reported adverse outcomes, some serious enough to warrant seeking medical help. The adverse outcomes were consistent with the physiologic effects of caffeine but were significantly more prevalent than with other sources of

  5. Adverse effects of parental zinc deficiency on metal homeostasis and embryonic development in a zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Laura M; Nkrumah-Elie, Yasmeen M; Truong, Lisa; Barton, Carrie L; Knecht, Andrea L; Gonnerman, Greg D; Wong, Carmen P; Tanguay, Robert L; Ho, Emily

    2017-05-01

    The high prevalence of zinc deficiency is a global public health concern, and suboptimal maternal zinc consumption has been associated with adverse effects ranging from impaired glucose tolerance to low birthweights. The mechanisms that contribute to altered development and poor health in zinc deficient offspring are not completely understood. To address this gap, we utilized the Danio rerio model and investigated the impact of dietary zinc deficiency on adults and their developing progeny. Zinc deficient adult fish were significantly smaller in size, and had decreases in learning and fitness. We hypothesized that parental zinc deficiency would have an impact on their offspring's mineral homeostasis and embryonic development. Results from mineral analysis showed that parental zinc deficiency caused their progeny to be zinc deficient. Furthermore, parental dietary zinc deficiency had adverse consequences for their offspring including a significant increase in mortality and decreased physical activity. Zinc deficient embryos had altered expression of genes that regulate metal homeostasis including several zinc transporters (ZnT8, ZnT9) and the metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF-1). Zinc deficiency was also associated with decreased expression of genes related to diabetes and pancreatic development in the embryo (Insa, Pax4, Pdx1). Decreased expression of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmt4, Dnmt6) was also found in zinc deficient offspring, which suggests that zinc deficiency in parents may cause altered epigenetic profiles for their progeny. These data should inform future studies regarding zinc deficiency and pregnancy and suggest that supplementation of zinc deficient mothers prior to pregnancy may be beneficial. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Mycorrhiza Reduces Adverse Effects of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE) on Growth of Conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininger, Vanessa; Sieber, Thomas N.

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal roots are frequently colonized by fungi of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l. – Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). These ascomycetes are common and widespread colonizers of tree roots. Some PAC strains reduce growth increments of their hosts but are beneficial in protecting roots against pathogens. Nothing is known about the effects of PAC on mycorrhizal fungi and the PAC-mycorrhiza association on plant growth, even though these two fungal groups occur closely together in natural habitats. We expect reduced colonization rates and reduced negative effects of PAC on host plants if roots are co-colonized by an ectomycorrhizal fungus (ECM). Depending on the temperature regime interactions among the partners in this tripartite ECM-PAC-plant system might also change. To test our hypotheses, effects of four PAC genotypes (two pathogenic and two non-pathogenic on the Norway spruce), mycorrhization by Laccaria bicolor (strain S238N) and two temperature regimes (19°C and 25°C) on the biomass of the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings were studied. Mycorrhization compensated the adverse effects of PAC on the growth of the Norway spruce at both temperatures. The growth of the Douglas-fir was not influenced either by PAC or mycorrhization at 19°C, but at 25°C mycorrhization had a similar protective effect as in the Norway spruce. The compensatory effects probably rely on the reduction of the PAC-colonization density by mycorrhizae. Temperature and the PAC strain only had a differential effect on the biomass of the Norway spruce but not on the Douglas-fir. Higher temperature reduced mycorrhization of both hosts. We conclude that ectomycorrhizae form physical and/or physiological barriers against PAC leading to reduced PAC-colonization of the roots. Additionally, our results indicate that global warming could cause a general decrease of mycorrhization making primary roots more accessible to other symbionts and

  7. Honeybees Produce Millimolar Concentrations of Non-Neuronal Acetylcholine for Breeding: Possible Adverse Effects of Neonicotinoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignaz Wessler

    Full Text Available The worldwide use of neonicotinoid pesticides has caused concern on account of their involvement in the decline of bee populations, which are key pollinators in most ecosystems. Here we describe a role of non-neuronal acetylcholine (ACh for breeding of Apis mellifera carnica and a so far unknown effect of neonicotinoids on non-target insects. Royal jelly or larval food are produced by the hypopharyngeal gland of nursing bees and contain unusually high ACh concentrations (4-8 mM. ACh is extremely well conserved in royal jelly or brood food because of the acidic pH of 4.0. This condition protects ACh from degradation thus ensuring delivery of intact ACh to larvae. Raising the pH to ≥5.5 and applying cholinesterase reduced the content of ACh substantially (by 75-90% in larval food. When this manipulated brood was tested in artificial larval breeding experiments, the survival rate was higher with food supplemented by 100% with ACh (6 mM than with food not supplemented with ACh. ACh release from the hypopharyngeal gland and its content in brood food declined by 80%, when honeybee colonies were exposed for 4 weeks to high concentrations of the neonicotinoids clothianidin (100 parts per billion [ppb] or thiacloprid (8,800 ppb. Under these conditions the secretory cells of the gland were markedly damaged and brood development was severely compromised. Even field-relevant low concentrations of thiacloprid (200 ppb or clothianidin (1 and 10 ppb reduced ACh level in the brood food and showed initial adverse effects on brood development. Our findings indicate a hitherto unknown target of neonicotinoids to induce adverse effects on non-neuronal ACh which should be considered when re-assessing the environmental risks of these compounds. To our knowledge this is a new biological mechanism, and we suggest that, in addition to their well documented neurotoxic effects, neonicotinoids may contribute to honeybee colony losses consecutive to a reduction of the ACh

  8. The effect size of type 2 diabetes mellitus on tuberculosis drug resistance and adverse treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Navarro, Lucia Monserrat; Restrepo, Blanca I; Fuentes-Dominguez, Francisco Javier; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Morales-Romero, Jaime; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Comas, Iñaki; Zenteno-Cuevas, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effect size of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on tuberculosis (TB) treatment outcomes and multi drug resistance (MDR). A cohort with 507 individuals with diagnosed TB included 183 with coexistence of T2DM and TB (TB-T2DM). Participants were identified at the time of TB diagnosis and followed during the course of TB treatment. Then we computed relative risks and adjustments by Cox proportional hazards for outcome variables (drug resistance, death, relapse, treatment failure), and the size of their effect as Cohen's-d. Patients with TB-T2DM were more likely to remain positive for acid-fast bacilli after two months of anti-TB treatment RR = [2.01 (95% CI: 1.3, 3.1)], to have drug resistant (DR) [OR 3.5 (95% CI: 1.8, 6.7)] and multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB [OR 3.5 (95% CI: 1.8, 7.1)]. The Cohen's-d for DR or MDR in T2DM was 0.69 when compared with non-DM subjects. The T2DM patients had higher odds of resistance to isoniazid (OR 3.9, 95% CI: 2.01, 7.9), rifampicin (OR 3.4, 95% CI: 1.6, 7.2) and pyrazinamide (OR 9.4, 95% CI: 2.8, 25.6), and their effect sizes were ≥0.67. Patients with TB-T2DM (versus no DM) were more likely to present with MDR TB (HR 3.1; 95% CI: 1.7, 5.8; p < 0.001), treatment failure (HR 2.04; 95% CI: 1.07, 3.8; p = 0.02) and relapse (HR 1.86; 95% CI: 1.09, 3.1; p = 0.02), with effect size ≥0.34. T2DM showed a substantial contribution to the presence of DR or MDR-TB and to adverse clinical outcomes during and after TB treatment. Our findings support the importance for routine screening of T2DM among newly-diagnosed TB patients in order to stratify them for immediate DR assessment, and highlight the need for clinical trials to evaluate variations to the standard TB treatment in TB-T2DM to prevent adverse treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Agricultural sources of contaminants of emerging concern and adverse health effects on freshwater fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillitt, Donald E.; Buxton, Herbert T.

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) are generally thought of as certain classes of chemicals associated with animal feeding and production facilities. Veterinary pharmaceuticals used in animal food production systems represent one of the largest groups of CECs. In our review, we discuss the extensive increase in use of antibiotics in animal feeding operations (AFOs) around the world. AFOs are a major consumer of antibiotics and other veterinary pharmaceuticals and over the past decade there has been growing information on the occurrence, release, and fate of CECs from animal food production operations, including the application of pharmaceutical-containing manure to agricultural fields and releases from waste lagoons. Concentrations of CECs in surface and ground water in proximity to AFOs correspond to their presence in the AFO wastes. In many cases, the environmental concentrations of agriculturally-derived CECs are below toxicity thresholds. Hormones and hormone replacement compounds are a notable exception, where chemical concentrations near AFOs can exceed concentrations known to cause adverse effects on endocrine-related functions in fish. In addition, some agricultural pesticides, once thought to be safe to non-target organisms, have demonstrated endocrine-related effects that may pose threats to fish populations in agricultural regions. That is, we have pesticides with emerging concerns, thus, the concern is emerging and not necessarily the chemical. In this light, one must consider certain agricultural pesticides to be included in the list of CECs. Even though agricultural pesticides are routinely evaluated in regulatory testing schemes which have been used for decades, the potential hazards of some pesticides have only recently been emerging. Emerging concerns of pesticides in fish include interference with hormone signaling pathways; additive (or more than additive) effects from pesticide mixtures; and adverse population-level effects at

  10. Adverse psychosocial working conditions and risk of severe depressive symptoms. Do effects differ by occupational grade?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rugulies, Reiner; Aust, Birgit; Madsen, Ida E. H.; Burr, Hermann; Siegrist, Johannes; Bultmann, Ute

    Background: Depression is a major concern for public health. Both adverse working conditions and low socio-economic position are suspected to increase risk of depression. In a representative sample of the Danish workforce we investigated (i) whether adverse psychosocial working conditions, defined

  11. REDD1 functions at the crossroads between the therapeutic and adverse effects of topical glucocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baida, Gleb; Bhalla, Pankaj; Kirsanov, Kirill; Lesovaya, Ekaterina; Yakubovskaya, Marianna; Yuen, Kit; Guo, Shuchi; Lavker, Robert M; Readhead, Ben; Dudley, Joel T; Budunova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous atrophy is the major adverse effect of topical glucocorticoids; however, its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we identify stress-inducible mTOR inhibitor REDD1 (regulated in development and DNA damage response 1) as a major molecular target of glucocorticoids, which mediates cutaneous atrophy. In REDD1 knockout (KO) mice, all skin compartments (epidermis, dermis, subcutaneous fat), epidermal stem, and progenitor cells were protected from atrophic effects of glucocorticoids. Moreover, REDD1 knockdown resulted in similar consequences in organotypic raft cultures of primary human keratinocytes. Expression profiling revealed that gene activation by glucocorticoids was strongly altered in REDD1 KO epidermis. In contrast, the down-regulation of genes involved in anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid response was strikingly similar in wild-type and REDD1 KO mice. Integrative bioinformatics analysis of our and published gene array data revealed similar changes of gene expression in epidermis and in muscle undergoing glucocorticoid-dependent and glucocorticoid-independent atrophy. Importantly, the lack of REDD1 did not diminish the anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids in preclinical model. Our findings suggest that combining steroids with REDD1 inhibitors may yield a novel, safer glucocorticoid-based therapies. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  12. A Review of Epidemiological Research on Adverse Neurological Effects of Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohui; Ha, Sandie Uyen; Basnet, Rakshya

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of epidemiological research reporting the neurological effects of ambient air pollution. We examined current evidence, identified the strengths and weaknesses of published epidemiological studies, and suggest future directions for research in this area. Studies were identified through a systematic search of online scientific databases, in addition to a manual search of the reference lists from the identified papers. Despite being a relatively new area of investigation, overall, there is mounting evidence implicating adverse effects of air pollution on neurobehavioral function in both adults and children. Further research is needed to expand our understanding of these relationships, including improvement in the accuracy of exposure assessments; focusing on specific toxicants and their relationships to specific health endpoints, such as neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases; investigating the combined neurological effects of multiple air pollutants; and further exploration of genetic susceptibility for neurotoxicity of air pollution. In order to achieve these goals collaborative efforts are needed from multidisciplinary teams, including experts in toxicology, biostatistics, geographical science, epidemiology, and neurology. PMID:27547751

  13. Effectiveness of Germination on Protein Hydrolysis as a Way To Reduce Adverse Reactions to Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukid, Fatma; Prandi, Barbara; Buhler, Sofie; Sforza, Stefano

    2017-11-15

    In this work, the aim is to study the effectiveness of germination on wheat protein degradation, with a specific focus on proteins involved in adverse reactions to wheat. The effects of 8 days of germination at 25 °C on the chemical composition and the protein profile were determined. Germination did not have a significant effect on starch, protein, lipid, and ash contents. General protein profile, as indicated by SDS-PAGE analysis, revealed that germination induced a relevant degradation in protein fraction. After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, gluten peptides involved in celiac disease (CD) were identified and quantified using UPLC/ESI-MS technique. Also, CM3 protein, involved in baker's asthma and intestinal inflammation, was quantified by measuring a marker peptide. Statistical analysis underlined that germination and genotype had significant impact on the amount of both components. Regarding gluten peptides related to CD, germination enabled an average reduction of 47% in peptides eliciting adaptive immune response and 46% in peptides eliciting innate immune response. CM3 protein showed also a high average reduction (56%). Thus, this study suggests that germination might be a good bioalternative to provide a low "impact" raw ingredient for special wheat-based foodstuffs.

  14. Oral contraceptive use and the ECG: evidence of an adverse QT effect on corrected QT interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlak, Tara; Shufelt, Chrisandra; Iribarren, Carlos; Lyon, Liisa L; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2013-07-01

    A prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval is a marker for an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. We evaluated the relationship between oral contraceptive (OC) use, type of OC, and QTc interval. We identified 410,782 ECGs performed at Northern California Kaiser Permanente on female patients between 15 and 53 years from January, 1995 to June, 2008. QT was corrected for heart rate using log-linear regression. OC generation (first, second and third) was classified by increasing progestin androgenic potency, while the fourth generation was classified as antiandrogenic. Among 410,782 women, 8.4% were on OC. In multivariate analysis after correction for comorbidities, there was an independent shortening effect of OCs overall (slope = -0.5 ms; SE = 0.12, P effect on the QTc. Shorter QTc is seen with first and second generation OC while fourth generation OC use has a lengthening effect on the QTc. Careful examination of adverse event rates in fourth generation OC users is needed. ©2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Curcumin Inhibits The Adverse Effects of Sodium Arsenite in Mouse Epididymal Sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Hamid Reza; Eskandari, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of curcumin on epididy- mal sperm parameters in adult male Navel Medical Research Institute (NMRI) mice ex- posed to sodium arsenite. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we divided the animals into four groups: control, sodium arsenite (5 mg/kg), curcumin (100 mg/kg) and curcumin+sodium arsenite. Exposures were performed by intraperitoneal injections for a 5-week period. After the exposure period, we recorded the animals’ body and left testes weights. The left caudal epididymis was used to count the sperm number and analyze motility, viability, morphological abnormalities, acrosome reaction, DNA integrity, and histone-protamine replacement in the spermatozoa. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey’s test was used to assess the statistical significance of the data with SPSS 16.0. Pcurcumin+sodium arsenite group, curcumin significantly reversed these adverse effects to the point where they approximated the control. In addition, the application of curcumin alone had no significant difference in these parameters compared to the control and curcumin+sodium arsenite groups. However, we observed no significant differences in the body and the testis weight as well as the DNA integrity and histone-protamine replacement in the spermatozoa of the four groups. Conclusion Curcumin compensated for the toxic effects of sodium arsenite on a number of sperm parameters in adult mice. PMID:27441059

  16. ADVERSE EFFECT VERSUS QUALITY CONTROL OF THE FUENZALIDA-PALACIOS ANTIRABIES VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeda L. NOGUEIRA

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the components of the Fuenzalida-Palacios antirabies vaccine, which is till used in most developing countries in human immunization for treatment and prophylaxis. This vaccine is prepared from newborn mouse brains at 1% concentration. Even though the vaccine is considered to have a low myelin content, it is not fully free of myelin or of other undesirable components that might trigger adverse effects after vaccination. The most severe effect is a post-vaccination neuroparalytic accident associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome. In the present study we demonstrate how the vaccines produced and distributed by different laboratories show different component patterns with different degrees of impurity and with varying protein concentrations, indicating that production processes can vary from one laboratory to another. These differences, which could be resolved using a better quality control process, may affect and impair immunization, with consequent risks and adverse effects after vaccination. We used crossed immunoelectrophoresis to evaluate and demonstrate the possibility of quality control in vaccine production, reducing the risk factors possibly involved in these immunizing products.Avaliamos os componentes da vacina anti-rábica tipo Fuenzalida-Palacios que é ainda utilizada na maioria dos países em desenvolvimento na imunização humana para o tratamento profilático. Essa vacina é feita em cérebros de camundongos neonatos diluida a 1%, apesar de ser considerada uma vacina com pouco teor de mielina, no entanto ela não é totalmente livre de mielina, bem como de outros componentes indesejáveis que podem desencadear efeitos adversos a vacinação, o efeito mais grave está relacionado com o acidente neuroparalítico pós vacinal associado a síndrome de Guillain Barré. Neste trabalho demonstramos como as vacinas produzidas e distribuidas pelos diversos laboratórios produtores apresentam padrões diferentes de seus

  17. Adverse health effects due to arsenic exposure: modification by dietary supplementation of jaggery in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nrashant; Kumar, D; Lal, Kewal; Raisuddin, S; Sahu, Anand P

    2010-02-01

    Populations of villages of eastern India and Bangladesh and many other parts of the world are exposed to arsenic mainly through drinking water. Due to non-availability of safe drinking water they are compelled to depend on arsenic-contaminated water. Generally, poverty level is high in those areas and situation is compounded by the lack of proper nutrition. The hypothesis that the deleterious health effects of arsenic can be prevented by modification of dietary factors with the availability of an affordable and indigenous functional food jaggery (sugarcane juice) has been tested in the present study. Jaggery contains polyphenols, vitamin C, carotene and other biologically active components. Arsenic as sodium-m-arsenite at low (0.05 ppm) and high (5 ppm) doses was orally administered to Swiss male albino mice, alone and in combination with jaggery feeding (250 mg/mice), consecutively for 180 days. The serum levels of total antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase were substantially reduced in arsenic-exposed groups, while supplementation of jaggery enhanced their levels in combined treatment groups. The serum levels of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6 and TNF-alpha were significantly increased in arsenic-exposed groups, while in the arsenic-exposed and jaggery supplemented groups their levels were normal. The comet assay in bone marrow cells showed the genotoxic effects of arsenic, whereas combination with jaggery feeding lessened the DNA damage. Histopathologically, the lung of arsenic-exposed mice showed the necrosis and degenerative changes in bronchiolar epithelium with emphysema and thickening of alveolar septa which was effectively antagonized by jaggery feeding. These results demonstrate that jaggery, a natural functional food, effectively antagonizes many of the adverse effects of arsenic. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gold Bead Implantation in Acupoints for Coxofemoral Arthrosis in Dogs: Method Description and Adverse Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Moe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gold bead implantation has been used for years as an alternative method to improve function in chronic joint disease both in humans and dogs. The aims of the present study were to describe the technique of implanting 24-karat gold beads around the hip joints of dogs with chronic hip dysplasia, and to record any side effects or complications of such treatment. A prospective placebo-controlled double-blinded clinical trial was performed. Eighty dogs were randomly allocated to treatment or placebo, with 38 in the gold implantation group and 42 in the placebo group, and followed intensely for six months. The implantation technique was simple to perform, using fluoroscopy and with the dogs under inhalation anesthesia for about 30 minutes. Adverse effects, measured as pain or discomfort, were seen for a period of up to four weeks in 15 of the dogs in the gold implantation group, compared to six dogs in the placebo group. During implantation, a technical difficulty occurred as 82% of the dogs showed leakage of blood and/or synovia from the needles. The dogs in the gold implantation group were radiographed 18 months later. Of the 30 dogs that were radiographed at both inclusion and 24 months, 80% (24 dogs showed a deterioration of the coxofemoral arthrosis, the other six had stable disease evaluated by radiography. Migration of gold beads was only observed in one dog.

  19. Systemic changes and adverse effects induced by retinopathy of prematurity screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing-Bo; Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Jia-Wen; Wang, Yan-Li; Nie, Chuan; Luo, Xian-Qiong

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the potential systemic events during and after retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) screening. A prospective and descriptive designed study was conducted to detect the physiologic and pathological changes 24h before, during, and 72h after ROP screening. Control blood pressure (BP), saturation, pulse rate, and body temperature were routinely taken at various time internals before and after screening. Adverse effects pertain to cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastric system, urinary system and nervous system were retrospect 0-72h after ROP screening at a 24-hour interval. Totally 1254 prematurity babies receiving ROP screening during Jan. 1(st) 2013 to Dec. 31(th) 2013 were enrolled in our survey. Compared to control vital sign data taken before the examination, there was a fluctuation in the diastolic BP with the increased 3.03 mm Hg (P=0.04) after 3 doses of mydriatic drops. Immediately after the examination, there was a further 12.64 mm Hg (Pprematurity with postconceptional age less than 31wk, the incidence of apnea (23.5%), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) (8.7%), gastric residual (25.4%) and upper digestive tract hemorrhage (6.4%) also demonstrated a significant rise (P<0.01). In our study sample, ROP screening was associated with NEC, gastric residual and upper digestive tract hemorrhage. These gastrointestinal side effects, along with breath activity pattern change and vital signs indicators fluctuation, may be results of additional stress responses.

  20. Adverse effects of levamisole in cocaine users: a review and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Tibor Markus; van den Berg, Jorrit; Pennings, Ed; Venhuis, Bastiaan

    2017-06-01

    The immunomodulatory adjuvant and antihelminth levamisole is increasingly used as an adulterant in cocaine worldwide. An accumulating body of clinical and toxicological literature has appeared since 2010 describing neutropenia, agranulocytosis, leukoencephalopathy and vasculitis in cases associated with levamisole-adulterated cocaine. Mostly, neutropenia and agranulocytosis were reported, characterized by a decimation of neutrophils. A large proportion of cases also involved vasculopathy, characterized by pronounced black and purple skin purpura with cutaneous necrosis. Females are more susceptible for both agranulocytosis and vasculitis. Another complication reported with levamisole-adulterated cocaine is leukoencephalopathy, a disabling and potentially fatal neurological disorder caused by cerebral demyelination. In this review, all adverse effects associated with therapeutic levamisole and levamisole-adulterated cocaine are described. In addition, this review provides an update of the pharmacology of levamisole, its metabolism, including toxic metabolites and metabolites that are relevant for levamisole's addition to cocaine. Special emphasis is put on the immunopathology and the dose-effect relationship of chronic levamisole exposure. Finally, a risk assessment is provided based on the current level of levamisole adulteration in street cocaine, the dose range calculated per gram and the pattern of chronic exposure in heavy or dependent users.

  1. Calcium channel blockers as tocolytics: principles of their actions, adverse effects and therapeutic combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gáspár, Róbert; Hajagos-Tóth, Judit

    2013-05-23

    Dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel blockers (CCBs) are widely accepted in the treatment of premature labour. Their mechanism of action in tocolysis involves the blockade of L-type Ca2+ channels, influenced by the Ca2+-activated K+ channels, beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) and sexual hormones. In clinical practice, most experience has been gained with the use of nifedipine, whose efficacy is superior or comparable to those of β-agonists and oxytocin antagonists. Additionally, it has a favourable adverse effect profile as compared with the majority of other tocolytics. The most frequent and well-tolerated side-effects of CCBs are tachycardia, headache and hypotension. In tocolytic therapy efforts are currently being made to find combinations of tocolytic agents that yield better therapeutic action. The available human and animal studies suggest that the combination of CCBs with β-AR agonists is beneficial, although such combinations can pose risk of pulmonary oedema in multiple pregnancies and maternal cardiovascular diseases. Preclinical data indicate the potential benefit of combinations of CCBs and oxytocin antagonists. However, the combinations of CCBs with progesterone or cyclooxygenase inhibitors may decrease their efficacy. The CCBs are likely to remain one of the most important groups of drugs for the rapid inhibition of premature uterine contractions. Their significance may be magnified by further clinical studies on their combined use for tocolysis.

  2. In vitro assessment of the adverse effects of antiretroviral drugs on the human male gamete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, G; Moinard, N; Jouanolou, V; Daudin, M; Gandia, P; Bujan, L

    2011-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the in vitro effects of didanosine, zidovudine, saquinavir and indinavir, commonly used in highly active antiretroviral therapy, on human sperm fertility parameters. Thirty semen samples from healthy men were collected and prepared by gradient density method. Aliquots of 90% fractions with >80% motile spermatozoa were incubated for 1, 3, and 6h with different concentrations of the antiretroviral drugs (20, 40, and 80 μg/ml). Sperm motility was evaluated by computer assisted sperm analysis system. Sperm mitochondrial potential was evaluated using 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide (DIOC(6)) and the acrosome reaction was examined using pisum sativum agglutinin method. A dose-dependent decrease in sperm motility was observed with saquinavir. Saquinavir also induced a significant time and dose-dependent decrease in mitochondrial potential and an increase in spontaneous acrosome reaction. These findings indicate that, in vitro, higher doses of saquinavir have adverse effects on sperm motility, mitochondrial potential and acrosome reaction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Potential adverse effects of applying phosphate amendments to immobilize soil contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majs, Frantisek

    2011-01-01

    Seven-day batch equilibrium experiments were conducted to measure the efficacy of four phosphate amendments (trisodium trimetaphosphate [TP3], dodecasodium phytate [Na-IP6], precipitated calcium phytate [Ca-IP6], and hydroxyapatite [HA]) for immobilizing Ni and U in organic-rich sediment. Using the eight-step modified Miller's sequential extraction procedure and the USEPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, the effect of these amendments on the distribution of Ni and U was assessed. Relative to unamended controls, equilibrium aqueous-phase U concentrations were lower following HA and Ca-IP6 additions but higher following TP3 and Na-IP6 amendments, whereas aqueous Ni concentrations were not decreased only in the Na-IP6 amended treatment relative to the control. The poor rates of contaminant immobilization following TP3 and Na-IP6 amendments correlate with the dispersion of organic matter and organo-mineral colloids, which probably contain sorbed U and Ni. While all amendments shifted the U distribution toward more recalcitrant soil fractions, Ni was redistributed to more labile soil fractions. This study cautions that the addition of orthophosphates and organophosphates as contaminant immobilizing amendments may in fact have adverse effects, especially in high-organic soils. Particular attention is warranted at sites with mixed contaminants with varying geochemical behaviors. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Prudent diet may attenuate the adverse effects of Western diet on cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakersain, Behnaz; Santoni, Giola; Larsson, Susanna C; Faxén-Irving, Gerd; Fastbom, Johan; Fratiglioni, Laura; Xu, Weili

    2016-02-01

    The influence of mixed dietary patterns on cognitive changes is unknown. A total of 2223 dementia-free participants aged ≥60 were followed up for 6 years to examine the impact of dietary patterns on cognitive decline. Mini-mental state examination (MMSE) was administered. Diet was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. By factor analysis, Western and prudent dietary patterns emerged. Mixed-effect models for longitudinal data with repeated measurements were used. Compared with the lowest adherence to each pattern, the highest adherence to prudent pattern was related to less MMSE decline (β = 0.106, P = .011), whereas the highest adherence to Western pattern was associated with more MMSE decline (β = -0.156, P Western diet was attenuated when accompanied by high adherence to prudent pattern. High adherence to prudent diet may diminish the adverse effects of high adherence to Western diet on cognitive decline. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Adverse Structural and Functional Effects of Marijuana on the Brain: Evidence Reviewed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, David E; de la Monte, Suzanne M

    2017-01-01

    The growing use and legalization of cannabis are leading to increased exposures across all age groups, including in adolescence. The touting of its medicinal values stems from anecdotal reports related to treatment of a broad range of illnesses including epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, muscle spasms, arthritis, obesity, cancer, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, post-traumatic stress, inflammatory bowel disease, and anxiety. However, anecdotal data and the high level of interest in this treatment must not obscure objective assessments of any potential and realized short- and long-term adverse effects of cannabis, particularly with respect to age of onset and chronicity of exposure. This critical review focuses on evidence-based research designed to assess both therapeutic benefits and harmful effects of cannabis exposure and is combined with an illustration of the neuropathologic findings in a fatal case of cannabis-induced psychosis. The literature and reported case provide strong evidence that chronic cannabis abuse causes cognitive impairment and damages the brain, particularly white matter, where cannabinoid 1 receptors abound. Contrary to popular perception, there are few objective data supporting preferential use of cannabis over conventional therapy for restoration of central nervous system structure and function in disease states such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, or schizophrenia. Additional research is needed to determine if subsets of individuals with various neurological and psychiatric diseases derive therapeutic benefits from cannabis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Beneficial and adverse effects of testosterone on the cardiovascular system in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruige, Johannes B; Ouwens, D Margriet; Kaufman, Jean-Marc

    2013-11-01

    The widespread use of T therapy, particularly in aging males, necessitates knowledge of the relationship between T and the cardiovascular system. The review is based on a 1970 to 2013 PubMed search with terms related to androgens in combination with cardiovascular disease, including T, dihydrotestosterone, trial, mortality, cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, blood pressure, endothelial function, dyslipidemia, thrombosis, ventricular function, and arrhythmia. Original articles, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and relevant citations were screened. Low T has been linked to increased blood pressure, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, arrhythmia, thrombosis, endothelial dysfunction, as well as to impaired left ventricular function. On the one hand, a modest association is suggested between low endogenous T and incident cardiovascular disease or cardiovascular mortality, implying unrecognized beneficial T effects, residual confounding, or a relationship with health status. On the other hand, treatments with T to restore "normal concentrations" have so far not been proven to be beneficial with respect to cardiovascular disease; neither have they definitely shown specific adverse cardiovascular effects. The cardiovascular risk-benefit profile of T therapy remains largely evasive in view of a lack of well-designed and adequately powered randomized clinical trials. The important knowledge gap as to the exact relationship between T and cardiovascular disease would support a cautious, restrained approach to T therapy in aging men, pending clarification of benefits and risks by adequately powered clinical trials of sufficient duration.

  7. Effects of an educational patient safety campaign on patients' safety behaviours and adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwappach, David L B; Frank, Olga; Buschmann, Ute; Babst, Reto

    2013-04-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives  The study aims to investigate the effects of a patient safety advisory on patients' risk perceptions, perceived behavioural control, performance of safety behaviours and experience of adverse incidents. Method  Quasi-experimental intervention study with non-equivalent group comparison was used. Patients admitted to the surgical department of a Swiss large non-university hospital were included. Patients in the intervention group received a safety advisory at their first clinical encounter. Outcomes were assessed using a questionnaire at discharge. Odds ratios for control versus intervention group were calculated. Regression analysis was used to model the effects of the intervention and safety behaviours on the experience of safety incidents. Results  Two hundred eighteen patients in the control and 202 in the intervention group completed the survey (75 and 77% response rates, respectively). Patients in the intervention group were less likely to feel poorly informed about medical errors (OR = 0.55, P = 0.043). There were 73.1% in the intervention and 84.3% in the control group who underestimated the risk for infection (OR = 0.51, CI 0.31-0.84, P = 0.009). Perceived behavioural control was lower in the control group (meanCon  = 3.2, meanInt  = 3.5, P = 0.010). Performance of safety-related behaviours was unaffected by the intervention. Patients in the intervention group were less likely to experience any safety-related incident or unsafe situation (OR for intervention group = 0.57, CI 0.38-0.87, P = 0.009). There were no differences in concerns for errors during hospitalization. There were 96% of patients (intervention) who would recommend other patients to read the advisory. Conclusions  The results suggest that the safety advisory decreases experiences of adverse events and unsafe situations. It renders awareness and perceived behavioural control without increasing concerns for safety and

  8. Poor sleep quality has an adverse effect on childhood asthma control and lung function measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Youn Ho; Choi, Sun Hee; Jang, Sun Jung; Baek, Ji Hyeon; Jee, Hye Mi; Kim, Mi Ae; Chae, Kyu Young; Han, Man Yong

    2017-08-01

    It is unclear as to whether sleep respiratory breathing disorder (SRBD) is a risk factor for uncontrolled asthma in children. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate whether SRBD may have an adverse effect on childhood asthma control and lung function measures. This was a cross-sectional study of 220 children with well-controlled (n = 108), partly controlled (n = 92), and uncontrolled asthma (n = 20) according to the Global Initiative for Asthma guideline. SRBD was assessed using the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ). The association of SRBD with partly controlled/uncontrolled asthma was investigated on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Of 220 children with asthma, 43 (19.6%) had SRBD: well-controlled, 16.7% (18/108); partly controlled, 21.7% (20/92); and uncontrolled, 25.0% (5/20; P = 0.54). There was a significant difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FEV 1 /FVC; P = 0.007) and childhood asthma control test (C-ACT) score (P asthma control status, but not in PSQ score (P = 0.18). Children with obstructive sleep apnea (PSQ >0.33) had a lower C-ACT score compared with controls (PSQ ≤0.33; 19.6 ± 5.1 vs 22.0 ± 4.2, P = 0.002). PSQ score was negatively correlated with FEV 1 /FVC (r = -0.16, P = 0.02). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, high PSQ score increased the odds of having partly controlled/uncontrolled asthma by 9.12 (95% CI: 1.04-79.72, P = 0.046) after adjusting for confounding factors. SRBD is an independent risk factor for partly controlled/uncontrolled asthma and has an adverse effect on lung function measures in children. Further research is warranted to determine whether the improvement of sleep quality may also enhance level of asthma control and lung function in children. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. A systematic review on reporting and assessment of adverse effects associated with transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunoni, Andre Russowsky; Amadera, Joao; Berbel, Bruna; Volz, Magdalena Sarah; Rizzerio, Brenno Gomes; Fregni, Felipe

    2011-09-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive method of brain stimulation that has been intensively investigated in clinical and cognitive neuroscience. Although the general impression is that tDCS is a safe technique with mild and transient adverse effects (AEs), human data on safety and tolerability are largely provided from single-session studies in healthy volunteers. In addition the frequency of AEs and its relationship with clinical variables is unknown. With the aim of assessing tDCS safety in different conditions and study designs, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of tDCS clinical trials. We assessed Medline and other databases and reference lists from retrieved articles, searching for articles from 1998 (first trial with contemporary tDCS parameters) to August 2010. Animal studies, review articles and studies assessing other neuromodulatory techniques were excluded. According to our eligibility criteria, 209 studies (from 172 articles) were identified. One hundred and seventeen studies (56%) mentioned AEs in the report. Of these studies, 74 (63%) reported at least one AE and only eight studies quantified AEs systematically. In the subsample reporting AEs, the most common were, for active vs. sham tDCS group, itching (39.3% vs. 32.9%, p>0.05), tingling (22.2% vs. 18.3%, p>0.05), headache (14.8% vs. 16.2%, p>0.05), burning sensation (8.7% vs. 10%, p>0.05) and discomfort (10.4% vs. 13.4%, p>0.05). Meta-analytical techniques could be applied in only eight studies for itching, but no definite results could be obtained due to between-study heterogeneity and low number of studies. Our results suggested that some AEs such as itching and tingling were more frequent in the tDCS active group, although this was not statistically significant. Although results suggest that tDCS is associated with mild AEs only, we identified a selective reporting bias for reporting, assessing and publishing AEs of tDCS that hinders further

  10. Protective Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Grape Pomace against the Adverse Effects of Cypermethrin on Weanling Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Tawab H. Mossa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The adverse effect of cypermethrin on the liver and kidney of weanling female rats and the protective effect of ethanolic extract of grape pomace were investigated in the present study. Weanling female rats were given cypermethrin oral at a dose of 25 mg kg−1 body weight for 28 consecutive days. An additional two Cyp-trated groups received extract at a dose of 100 and 200 mg kg−1 body weight, respectively, throughout the experimental duration. Three groups more served as extract and control groups. Administration of Cyp resulted in a significant increase in serum marker enzymes, for example, aminotransferases (AST and ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT, and increases the level of urea nitrogen and creatinine. In contrast, Cyp caused significant decrease in levels of total protein and albumin and caused histopathological alterations in liver and kidneys of female rats. Coadministration of the extract to Cyp-treated female rats restored most of these biochemical parameters to within normal levels especially at high dose of extract. However, extract administration to Cyp-treated rats resulted in overall improvement in liver and kidney damage. This study demonstrated the adverse biohistological effects of Cyp on the liver and kidney of weanling female rats. The grape pomace extract administration prevented the toxic effect of Cyp on the above serum parameters. The present study concludes that grape pomace extract has significant antioxidant and hepatorenal protective activity.

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α activation induces hepatic steatosis, suggesting an adverse effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Yan

    adverse effect of fibrates on the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis.

  12. A joint ERS/ATS policy statement: what constitutes an adverse health effect of air pollution? : An analytical framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurston, George D; Kipen, Howard; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Balmes, John; Brook, Robert D; Cromar, Kevin; De Matteis, Sara; Forastiere, Francesco; Forsberg, Bertil; Frampton, Mark W; Grigg, Jonathan; Heederik, Dick; Kelly, Frank J; Kuenzli, Nino; Laumbach, Robert; Peters, Annette; Rajagopalan, Sanjay T; Rich, David; Ritz, Beate; Samet, Jonathan M; Sandstrom, Thomas; Sigsgaard, Torben; Sunyer, Jordi; Brunekreef, Bert

    The American Thoracic Society has previously published statements on what constitutes an adverse effect on health of air pollution in 1985 and 2000. We set out to update and broaden these past statements that focused primarily on effects on the respiratory system. Since then, many studies have

  13. A joint ERS/ATS policy statement: what constitutes an adverse health effect of air pollution? An analytical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, George D; Kipen, Howard; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Balmes, John; Brook, Robert D; Cromar, Kevin; De Matteis, Sara; Forastiere, Francesco; Forsberg, Bertil; Frampton, Mark W; Grigg, Jonathan; Heederik, Dick; Kelly, Frank J; Kuenzli, Nino; Laumbach, Robert; Peters, Annette; Rajagopalan, Sanjay T; Rich, David; Ritz, Beate; Samet, Jonathan M; Sandstrom, Thomas; Sigsgaard, Torben; Sunyer, Jordi; Brunekreef, Bert

    2017-01-01

    The American Thoracic Society has previously published statements on what constitutes an adverse effect on health of air pollution in 1985 and 2000. We set out to update and broaden these past statements that focused primarily on effects on the respiratory system. Since then, many studies have documented effects of air pollution on other organ systems, such as on the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. In addition, many new biomarkers of effects have been developed and applied in air pollution studies.This current report seeks to integrate the latest science into a general framework for interpreting the adversity of the human health effects of air pollution. Rather than trying to provide a catalogue of what is and what is not an adverse effect of air pollution, we propose a set of considerations that can be applied in forming judgments of the adversity of not only currently documented, but also emerging and future effects of air pollution on human health. These considerations are illustrated by the inclusion of examples for different types of health effects of air pollution. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  14. A joint ERS/ATS policy statement: what constitutes an adverse health effect of air pollution? An analytical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, George D.; Kipen, Howard; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Balmes, John; Brook, Robert D.; Cromar, Kevin; De Matteis, Sara; Forastiere, Francesco; Forsberg, Bertil; Frampton, Mark W.; Grigg, Jonathan; Heederik, Dick; Kelly, Frank J.; Kuenzli, Nino; Laumbach, Robert; Peters, Annette; Rajagopalan, Sanjay T.; Rich, David; Ritz, Beate; Samet, Jonathan M.; Sandstrom, Thomas; Sigsgaard, Torben; Sunyer, Jordi; Brunekreef, Bert

    2017-01-01

    The American Thoracic Society has previously published statements on what constitutes an adverse effect on health of air pollution in 1985 and 2000. We set out to update and broaden these past statements that focused primarily on effects on the respiratory system. Since then, many studies have documented effects of air pollution on other organ systems, such as on the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. In addition, many new biomarkers of effects have been developed and applied in air pollution studies. This current report seeks to integrate the latest science into a general framework for interpreting the adversity of the human health effects of air pollution. Rather than trying to provide a catalogue of what is and what is not an adverse effect of air pollution, we propose a set of considerations that can be applied in forming judgments of the adversity of not only currently documented, but also emerging and future effects of air pollution on human health. These considerations are illustrated by the inclusion of examples for different types of health effects of air pollution. PMID:28077473

  15. Quantitative Adverse Outcome Pathway for Neurodevelopmental Effects of Thyroid Peroxidase-Induced Thyroid Hormone Synthesis Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adequate levels of thyroid hormones (TH) are needed for proper brain development and deficiencies lead to adverse neurological outcomes in humans and in animal models. Environmental chemicals have been shown to disrupt TH levels, yet the relationship between developmental exposur...

  16. Quantitative Adverse Outcome Pathway for Neurodevelopmental Effects of Thyroid Peroxidase-Induced Thyroid Hormone Synthesis Inhibition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Adequate levels of thyroid hormones (TH) are needed for proper brain development, deficiencies may lead to adverse neurological outcomes in humans and animal models....

  17. Modeling risks: effects of area deprivation, family socio-economic disadvantage and adverse life events on young children's psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouri, Eirini; Mavroveli, Stella; Tzavidis, Nikos

    2010-06-01

    The effects of contextual risk on young children's behavior are not appropriately modeled. To model the effects of area and family contextual risk on young children's psychopathology. The final study sample consisted of 4,618 Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) children, who were 3 years old, clustered in lower layer super output areas in nine strata in the UK. Contextual risk was measured by socio-economic disadvantage (SED) at both area and family level, and by distal and proximal adverse life events at family level. Multivariate response multilevel models that allowed for correlated residuals at both individual and area level, and univariate multilevel models estimated the effect of contextual risk on specific and broad psychopathology measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. The area SED/broad psychopathology association remained significant after family SED was controlled, but not after maternal qualifications and family adverse life events were added to the model. Adverse life events predicted psychopathology in all models. Family SED did not predict emotional symptoms or hyperactivity after child characteristics were added to the model with the family-level controls. Area-level SED predicts child psychopathology via family characteristics; family-level SED predicts psychopathology largely by its impact on development; and adverse life events predict psychopathology independently of earlier adversity, SED and child characteristics, as well as maternal psychopathology, parenting and education.

  18. Healthy worker effect and pregnancy: role of adverse obstetric history and social characteristics.

    OpenAIRE

    Stengel, B; Saurel-Cubizolles, M J; Kaminski, M

    1987-01-01

    Data from a survey conducted in 1981 on a national sample of 5508 births in France were used to analyse the role of a history of previous adverse pregnancy outcome (spontaneous abortion, perinatal death or adverse fetal condition) in the selection mechanisms of women with regard to occupational activity, and the impact on the relation between work and preterm delivery. The study, carried out separately in each parity group, showed that occupational activity was associated with a more favourab...

  19. Effects of early life adverse experiences on brain activity: Implications from maternal separation models in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi eNishi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During postnatal development, adverse early life experiences can affect the formation of neuronal circuits and exert long-lasting influences on neural function. Many studies have shown that daily repeated MS, an animal model of early life stress, can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis and can affect subsequent brain function and emotional behavior during adulthood. However, the molecular basis of the long-lasting effects of early life stress on brain function has not been completely elucidated. In this review, we introduce various cases of MS in rodents and illustrate the alterations in HPA axis activity by focusing on corticosterone (CORT, an end product of the HPA axis in rodents. We then present a characterization of the brain regions affected by various patterns of MS, including repeated MS and single time MS at various stages before weaning, by investigating c-Fos expression, a biological marker of neuronal activity. These CORT and c-Fos studies suggest that repeated early life stress may affect neuronal function in region- and temporal-specific manners, indicating a critical period for habituation to early life stress. Next, we discuss how early life stress can impact behavior, namely by inducing depression, anxiety or eating disorders. Furthermore, alterations in gene expression in adult mice exposed to MS, especially epigenetic changes of DNA methylation, are discussed.

  20. Avoiding adverse employment effects from electricity taxation in Norway: What does it cost?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjertnaes, Geir H.

    2011-01-01

    Welfare analyses of energy taxes typically show that systems with uniform rates perform better than differentiated systems. However, most western countries include some exemptions for their energy-intensive export industries and thereby avoid this potential welfare gain. find that uniform taxation of carbon emissions in combination with a wage subsidy preserves jobs in these industries at a lower welfare cost compared with a differentiated system. The wage subsidy scheme generates a substantial welfare gain per job saved. This study, however, finds that welfare costs are substantial when less accurate policy measures, represented by production-dependent subsidies, protect jobs in Norwegian electricity-intensive industries. The welfare cost per job preserved by this subsidy scheme amounts to approximately 60% of the wage cost per job, suggesting that these jobs are expensive to preserve. A uniform electricity tax combined with production-dependent subsidies preserves jobs at a lower welfare cost compared with the current differentiated electricity tax system. - Highlights: → Avoiding adverse employment effects from electricity taxation is costly in Norway. → Uniform Norwegian electricity tax with job-preserving subsidies improves welfare. → The welfare cost of Norwegian job-saving subsidies amounts to 60% of the wage.

  1. Biomarkers in natural fish populations indicate adverse biological effects of offshore oil production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Balk

    Full Text Available Despite the growing awareness of the necessity of a sustainable development, the global economy continues to depend largely on the consumption of non-renewable energy resources. One such energy resource is fossil oil extracted from the seabed at offshore oil platforms. This type of oil production causes continuous environmental pollution from drilling waste, discharge of large amounts of produced water, and accidental spills.Samples from natural populations of haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua in two North Sea areas with extensive oil production were investigated. Exposure to and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were demonstrated, and biomarker analyses revealed adverse biological effects, including induction of biotransformation enzymes, oxidative stress, altered fatty acid composition, and genotoxicity. Genotoxicity was reflected by a hepatic DNA adduct pattern typical for exposure to a mixture of PAHs. Control material was collected from a North Sea area without oil production and from remote Icelandic waters. The difference between the two control areas indicates significant background pollution in the North Sea.It is most remarkable to obtain biomarker responses in natural fish populations in the open sea that are similar to the biomarker responses in fish from highly polluted areas close to a point source. Risk assessment of various threats to the marine fish populations in the North Sea, such as overfishing, global warming, and eutrophication, should also take into account the ecologically relevant impact of offshore oil production.

  2. Knowledge synthesis of benefits and adverse effects of measles vaccination: the Lasbela balance sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledogar, Robert J; Fleming, John; Andersson, Neil

    2009-10-14

    In preparation for a cluster-randomized controlled trial of a community intervention to increase the demand for measles vaccination in Lasbela district of Pakistan, a balance sheet summarized published evidence on benefits and possible adverse effects of measles vaccination. The balance sheet listed: 1) major health conditions associated with measles; 2) the risk among the unvaccinated who contract measles; 3) the risk among the vaccinated; 4) the risk difference between vaccinated and unvaccinated; and 5) the likely net gain from vaccination for each condition. Two models revealed very different projections of net gain from measles vaccine. A Lasbela-specific combination of low period prevalence of measles among the unvaccinated, medium vaccination coverage and low vaccine efficacy rate, as revealed by the baseline survey, resulted in less-than-expected gains attributable to vaccination. Modelled on estimates where the vaccine had greater efficacy, the gains from vaccination would be more substantial. Specific local conditions probably explain the low rates among the unvaccinated while the high vaccine failure rate is likely due to weaknesses in the vaccination delivery system. Community perception of these realities may have had some role in household decisions about whether to vaccinate, although the major discouraging factor was inadequate access. The balance sheet may be useful as a communication tool in other circumstances, applied to up-to-date local evidence.

  3. Does partial expander deflation exacerbate the adverse effects of radiotherapy in two-stage breast reconstruction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celet Ozden Burcu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimum protocol for expander volume adjustment with respect to the timing and application of radiotherapy remains controversial. Methods Eighteen New Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups. Metallic port integrated anatomic breast expanders of 250 cc were implanted on the back of each animal and controlled expansion was performed. Group I underwent radiotherapy with full expanders while in Group II, expanders were partially deflated immediately prior to radiotherapy. Control group did not receive radiotherapy. The changes in blood flow at different volume adjustments were investigated in Group II by laser Doppler flowmetry. Variations in the histopathologic properties of the irradiated tissues including the skin, capsule and the pocket floor, were compared in the biopsy specimens taken from different locations in each group. Results A significant increase in skin blood flow was detected in Group II with partial expander deflation. Overall, histopathologic exam revealed aggravated findings of chronic radiodermatitis (epidermal atrophy, dermal inflammation and fibrosis, neovascularisation and vascular changes as well as increased capsule thickness especially around the lower expander pole, in Group II. Conclusions Expander deflation immediately prior to radiotherapy, may augment the adverse effects, especially in the lower expander pole, possibly via enhanced radiosensitization due to a relative increase in the blood flow and tissue oxygenation.

  4. Does partial expander deflation exacerbate the adverse effects of radiotherapy in two-stage breast reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celet Ozden, Burcu; Guven, Erdem; Aslay, Isik; Kemikler, Gonul; Olgac, Vakur; Soluk Tekkesin, Merva; Serarslan, Bengul; Tumerdem Ulug, Burcak; Bilgin Karabulut, Aylin; Arinci, Atilla; Emekli, Ufuk

    2012-02-20

    The optimum protocol for expander volume adjustment with respect to the timing and application of radiotherapy remains controversial. Eighteen New Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups. Metallic port integrated anatomic breast expanders of 250 cc were implanted on the back of each animal and controlled expansion was performed. Group I underwent radiotherapy with full expanders while in Group II, expanders were partially deflated immediately prior to radiotherapy. Control group did not receive radiotherapy.The changes in blood flow at different volume adjustments were investigated in Group II by laser Doppler flowmetry. Variations in the histopathologic properties of the irradiated tissues including the skin, capsule and the pocket floor, were compared in the biopsy specimens taken from different locations in each group. A significant increase in skin blood flow was detected in Group II with partial expander deflation. Overall, histopathologic exam revealed aggravated findings of chronic radiodermatitis (epidermal atrophy, dermal inflammation and fibrosis, neovascularisation and vascular changes as well as increased capsule thickness) especially around the lower expander pole, in Group II. Expander deflation immediately prior to radiotherapy, may augment the adverse effects, especially in the lower expander pole, possibly via enhanced radiosensitization due to a relative increase in the blood flow and tissue oxygenation.

  5. Alkaloids in the human food chain--natural occurrence and possible adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, Irina I; van Beek, Teris A; Soffers, Ans E M F; Dusemund, Birgit; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2012-01-01

    Alkaloid-containing plants are an intrinsic part of the regular Western diet. The present paper summarizes the occurrence of alkaloids in the food chain, their mode of action and possible adverse effects including a safety assessment. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are a reason for concern because of their bioactivation to reactive alkylating intermediates. Several quinolizidine alkaloids, β-carboline alkaloids, ergot alkaloids and steroid alkaloids are active without bioactivation and mostly act as neurotoxins. Regulatory agencies are aware of the risks and have taken or are considering appropriate regulatory actions for most alkaloids. These vary from setting limits for the presence of a compound in feed, foods and beverages, trying to define safe upper limits, advising on a strategy aiming at restrictions in use, informing the public to be cautious or taking specific plant varieties from the market. For some alkaloids known to be present in the modern food chain, e.g., piperine, nicotine, theobromine, theophylline and tropane alkaloids risks coming from the human food chain are considered to be low if not negligible. Remarkably, for many alkaloids that are known constituents of the modern food chain and of possible concern, tolerable daily intake values have so far not been defined. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Knowledge synthesis of benefits and adverse effects of measles vaccination: the Lasbela balance sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson Neil

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In preparation for a cluster-randomized controlled trial of a community intervention to increase the demand for measles vaccination in Lasbela district of Pakistan, a balance sheet summarized published evidence on benefits and possible adverse effects of measles vaccination. Methods The balance sheet listed: 1 major health conditions associated with measles; 2 the risk among the unvaccinated who contract measles; 3 the risk among the vaccinated; 4 the risk difference between vaccinated and unvaccinated; and 5 the likely net gain from vaccination for each condition. Results Two models revealed very different projections of net gain from measles vaccine. A Lasbela-specific combination of low period prevalence of measles among the unvaccinated, medium vaccination coverage and low vaccine efficacy rate, as revealed by the baseline survey, resulted in less-than-expected gains attributable to vaccination. Modelled on estimates where the vaccine had greater efficacy, the gains from vaccination would be more substantial. Conclusion Specific local conditions probably explain the low rates among the unvaccinated while the high vaccine failure rate is likely due to weaknesses in the vaccination delivery system. Community perception of these realities may have had some role in household decisions about whether to vaccinate, although the major discouraging factor was inadequate access. The balance sheet may be useful as a communication tool in other circumstances, applied to up-to-date local evidence.

  7. Long-term therapy in COPD: any evidence of adverse effect on bone?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnulf Langhammer

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Arnulf Langhammer1, Siri Forsmo2, Unni Syversen3,41HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU, Verdal, Norway; 2Department of Public Health and General Practice, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; 3Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, NTNU, Trondheim, Norway; 4Department of Endocrinology, St. Olav’s University Hospital, Trondheim, NorwayAbstract: Patients with COPD have high risk for osteoporosis and fractures. Hip and vertebral fractures might impair mobility, and vertebral fractures further reduce lung function. This review discusses the evidence of bone loss due to medical treatment opposed to disease severity and risk factors for COPD, and therapeutic options for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in these patients. A review of the English-language literature was conducted using the MEDLINE database until June 2009. Currently used bronchodilators probably lack adverse effect on bone. Oral corticosteroids (OCS increase bone resorption and decrease bone formation in a dose response relationship, but the fracture risk is increased more than reflected by bone densitometry. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS have been associated with both increased bone loss and fracture risk. This might be a result of confounding by disease severity, but high doses of ICS have similar effects as equipotent doses of OCS. The life-style factors should be modified, use of regular OCS avoided and use of ICS restricted to those with evidenced effect and probably kept at moderate doses. The health care should actively reveal risk factors, include bone densitometry in fracture risk evaluation, and give adequate prevention and treatment for osteoporosis.Keywords: COPD, corticosteroids, bronchodilators, bone mineral density, osteoporosis, fractures

  8. PERTINENT DRY NEEDLING CONSIDERATIONS FOR MINIMIZING ADVERSE EFFECTS – PART ONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, Rob J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Dry needling is an evidence-based treatment technique that is accepted and used by physical therapists in the United States. This treatment approach focuses on releasing or inactivating muscular trigger points to decrease pain, reduce muscle tension, and assist patients with an accelerated return to active rehabilitation. Issue While commonly used, the technique has some patient risk and value of the treatment should be based on benefit compared to the potential risk. Adverse effects (AEs) with dry needling can be mild or severe, with overall incidence rates varying from zero to rates of approximately 10 percent. While mild AEs are the rule, any procedure that involves a needle insertion has the potential for an AE, with select regions and the underlying anatomy increasing the risk. Known significant AEs from small diameter needle insertion include pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, hematoma, infection, central nervous system injury, and other complications. Purpose/Objective Underlying anatomy across individuals has variability, requiring an in-depth knowledge of anatomy prior to any needle placement. This commentary is an overview of pertinent anatomy in the region of the thorax, with a ‘part two’ that addresses the abdomen, pelvis, back, vasovagal response, informed consent and other pertinent issues. The purpose of the commentary is to minimize the risk of a dry needling AE. Conclusions/Implications Dry needling is an effective adjunct treatment procedure that is within the recognized scope of physical therapy practice. Physical therapy education and training provides practitioners with the anatomy, basic sciences, and clinical foundation to use this intervention safely and effectively. A safe and evidenced-based implementation of the procedure is based on a thorough understanding of the underlying anatomy and the potential risks, with risks coordinated with patients via informed consent. Levels of Evidence Level 5 PMID:27525188

  9. Dose-dependent adverse effects of salinomycin on male reproductive organs and fertility in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olajumoke Omolara Ojo

    steroidogenesis. Spermatogenesis was however observed in testis 28 days after Salinomycin withdrawal. The results indicate reversible dose-dependent adverse effects of Salinomycin on male reproductive system of mice.

  10. Curcumin Inhibits The Adverse Effects of Sodium Arsenite in Mouse Epididymal Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momeni Hamid Reza

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of curcumin on epididy- mal sperm parameters in adult male Navel Medical Research Institute (NMRI mice ex- posed to sodium arsenite. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we divided the animals into four groups: control, sodium arsenite (5 mg/kg, curcumin (100 mg/kg and curcumin+sodium arsenite. Exposures were performed by intraperitoneal injections for a 5-week period. After the exposure period, we recorded the animals’ body and left testes weights. The left caudal epididymis was used to count the sperm number and analyze motility, viability, morphological abnormalities, acrosome reaction, DNA integrity, and histone-protamine replacement in the spermatozoa. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by the Tukey’s test was used to assess the statistical significance of the data with SPSS 16.0. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results Mice exposed to sodium arsenite showed a significant decrease in the num- ber, motility, viability, normal sperm morphology and acrosome integrity of spermato- zoa compared to the control group. In the curcumin+sodium arsenite group, curcumin significantly reversed these adverse effects to the point where they approximated the control. In addition, the application of curcumin alone had no significant difference in these parameters compared to the control and curcumin+sodium arsenite groups. However, we observed no significant differences in the body and the testis weight as well as the DNA integrity and histone-protamine replacement in the spermatozoa of the four groups. Conclusion Curcumin compensated for the toxic effects of sodium arsenite on a number of sperm parameters in adult mice.

  11. Adverse effects of salivary contamination for adhesives in restorative dentistry. A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Pooja; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2017-06-01

    To review and critically analyze the literature concerning the influence of salivary contamination on the bond quality of adhesives used in restorative materials by comparing and contrasting the different adhesive materials. A detailed search on PUBMED, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar and Web of Science was carried out to identify publications on salivary contamination and dental adhesive materials, from 1990-2017 (March) which resulted in a total of 6,202 web-identified publications. After screening titles/abstracts and de-duplicating, 54 publications were selected that matched the requirements for this review. The condition for selection was English literature concerning the effect of salivary contamination on the adhesives used in restorative dentistry. The obtained articles were systematically evaluated. Salivary contamination of adhesives during restorative procedures statistically (64.6%) showed an adverse effect on adhesives, occurring either at one or many stages of restoration. Methodological dissimilarities impeded the direct comparison of the selected studies. Nevertheless, the 2-step etch and rinse adhesives were relatively less vulnerable to salivary contamination than the others. 65% of the evaluated studies for decontamination achieved improved bonding when the contaminated surface was subjected to some kind of decontamination procedure. However, the duration and other specificities were not standard in all the evaluations and need further research to assess the course of action. It is necessary to do long term studies to evaluate the effectiveness of contaminated adhesive over time. Salivary contamination is a potential cause for poor bond quality of adhesive systems during restorative procedures and to provide a successful treatment, proper care must be taken to ensure the operating area is free from contamination. Understanding the properties of the materials and its constituents as well as considering measures to manage the potential

  12. Manganese rescues adverse effects on lifespan and development in Podospora anserina challenged by excess hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Carolin; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2015-03-01

    For biological systems, balancing cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is of great importance because ROS are both, essential for cellular signaling and dangerous in causing molecular damage. Cellular ROS abundance is controlled by a delicate network of molecular pathways. Within this network, superoxide dismutases (SODs) are active in disproportion of the superoxide anion leading to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. The fungal aging model Podospora anserina encodes at least three SODs. One of these is the mitochondrial PaSOD3 isoform containing manganese as a cofactor. Previous work resulted in the selection of strains in which PaSod3 is strongly overexpressed. These strains display impairments in growth and lifespan. A computational model suggests a series of events to occur in Sod3 overexpressing strains leading to adverse effects due to elevated hydrogen peroxide levels. In an attempt to validate this model and to obtain more detailed information about the cellular responses involved in ROS balancing, we further investigated the PaSod3 overexpressing strains. Here we show that hydrogen peroxide levels are indeed strongly increased in the mutant strain. Surprisingly, this phenotype can be rescued by the addition of manganese to the growth medium. Strikingly, while we obtained no evidence for an antioxidant effect of manganese, we found that the metal is required for induction of components of the ROS scavenging network and lowers the hydrogen peroxide level of the mutant. A similar effect of manganese on lifespan reversion was obtained in wild-type strains challenged with exogenous hydrogen peroxide. It appears that manganese is limited under high hydrogen peroxide and suggests that a manganese-dependent activity leads to the induction of ROS scavenging components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Adverse health effects in children of women exposed in utero to diethylstilbestrol (DES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournaire, Michel; Epelboin, Sylvie; Devouche, Emmanuel; Viot, Géraldine; Le Bidois, Jérôme; Cabau, Anne; Dunbavand, Annabel; Levadou, Anne

    2016-09-01

    Exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) in utero is associated with adverse health effects, including genital anomalies in women and men, and cancers in women. Animal studies showed birth defects and tumors in the offspring of DES exposed mice, revealing transgenerational transmission of DES effects. In humans, birth defects, such as hypospadias were observed in children of prenatally exposed women. The aim of this research was to further assess the health effects in children of prenatally exposed women. In a retrospective cohort study, the reports of women exposed to DES in utero on their 4409 children were compared with those of unexposed women on their 6203 children. Comparisons used odd ratios (OR) between children of exposed and unexposed women and standardized incidence rate (SIR) with the general population. These cohorts were recruited on a voluntary basis to answer questionnaires. There was a global increase of defects in children born to exposed women when compared with those born to unexposed (OR 2.29, 95% CI: 1.80-2.79, P<0.001) and with the general population (SIR 2.39, 95% CI: 2.11-2.68). Increased defects were observed in male genital tract, esophagus, lip or palate, musculoskeletal and circulatory systems. For female genital tract anomalies, there was no significant increase. However, this cohort being relatively young, further follow-up is needed. An increase of cerebral palsy was revealed. The incidence of cancers was not increased, in particular for breast, uterus and ovary. Our results confirmed a transgenerational transmission of defects in male genital tract. With caution due to possible bias associated with this method, our data suggest an increase of defects for esophagus, lip or palate, musculoskeletal and circulatory system in children of exposed women. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk of Adverse Health and Performance Effects of Celestial Dust Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert R.; Meyers, Valerie E.

    2015-01-01

    silica (Permissible Exposure Limit [PEL] 0.05 mg/m3) but more toxic than the nuisance dust titanium dioxide (TiO2 [PEL 5.0 mg/m3]). A PEL for episodic exposure to airborne lunar dust during a six-month stay on the lunar surface was established, in consultation with an independent, extramural panel of expert pulmonary toxicologists, at 0.3 mg/m3. The PEL provided for lunar dust is limited to the conditions and exposure specified therefore additional research remains to be accomplished with lunar dust to further address the issues of activation, address other areas of more unique lunar geology (Glotch et al., 2010; Greenhagen et al., 2010), examine potential toxicological effects of inhaled or ingested dust upon other organ systems, such cardiovascular, nervous systems, and examine effects of acute exposure to massive doses of dust such as may occur during off-nominal situations. Work to support the establishment of PELs for Martian dust and dusts of asteroids remains to be accomplished. The literature that describes health effects of exposure to toxic terrestrial dusts provides substantial basis for concern that prolonged exposure to respirable celestial dust could be detrimental to human health. Celestial bodies where a substantial portion of the dust is in the respirable range or where the dusts have large reactive surface areas or contain transition metals or volatile organics, represent greater risks of adverse effects from exposure to the dust. It is possible that in addition to adverse effects to the respiratory system, inhalation and ingestion of celestial dusts could pose risks to other systems

  15. Effect of taurine on attenuating chemotherapy-induced adverse effects in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Islambulchilar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion our results indicated that taurine supplementation could be a protection against chemotherapy-induced toxicities probably by its antioxidant capacity. Present study showed effectiveness of taurineon the chemotherapy-related toxicities and some of the complications during the maintenance period of treatment following coadministration in young adults with ALL.

  16. PERTINENT DRY NEEDLING CONSIDERATIONS FOR MINIMIZING ADVERSE EFFECTS – PART TWO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, Rob J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dry needling (DN) is an evidence based treatment technique that is accepted and used by physical therapists in the United States. This clinical commentary is the second in a two-part series outlining some of the pertinent anatomy and other issues that are needed for optimal utilization of this treatment modality. Part one was an overview of the thorax with a summary of reported adverse effects (AEs) and the underlying anatomy that could be used to minimize patient risk. As is the case with any intervention, the technique of dry needling has some inherent patient risk. The incidence of AEs with this procedure is typically low, ranging from zero to approximately 10 percent. Knowledge of the underlying anatomy can be a key factor associated with decreasing the likelihood of an AE. Purpose/Objective The second part of this clinical commentary goes beyond the thorax, to explore the anatomy associated with dry needling the abdomen, pelvis, and back. In the abdomen, pelvis and back, dry needling can penetrate the peritoneal cavity or adjacent organs, resulting in AEs. A physiological reaction that is an AE secondary to a needle insertion, pain or fear, is an autonomic vasovagal response. Additionally, suggestions for dealing with the fearful patient, the obese patient, universal precautions, and other clinical considerations, are discussed. The purpose of parts one and part two of this clinical commentary is to minimize the risk of a dry needling AE. Conclusions/Implications Dry needling is an effective adjunctive treatment procedure that is within the recognized scope of practice of the physical therapist. An evidence-based implementation of the procedure must be based on a thorough understanding of the underlying anatomy and the potential risks, with risks communicated to patients via informed consent. Level of Evidence Level 5 PMID:27757293

  17. [Prevention and Treatment of Common Acute Adverse Effects With Antipsychotic Use in Adults With Schizophrenia Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas Borrero, Álvaro Enrique; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; Vélez Traslaviña, Ángela; Castro Díaz, Sergio Mario; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; García Valencia, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    To determine the most adequate strategies for the prevention and treatment of the acute adverse effects of the use of antipsychotics. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. A systematic literature search was carried out. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. The non-pharmacological interventions such as nutritional counseling by a nutritionist, exercise and psychotherapy are effective in preventing weight gain with the use of antipsychotics. (Kg Weight reduction in DM of -3.05 (-4.16, -1.94)). The antipsychotic change from olanzapine to aripiprazole showed weight loss and decreased BMI (decreased weight in KG DM -3.21 (-9.03, -2.61). The use of beta blockers was ineffective in reducing akathisia induced by antipsychotic; using as outcome the 50% reduction of symptoms of akathisia comparing beta-blockers with placebo RR was 1.4 (0.59, 1.83). It is recommended to make psychotherapeutic accompaniment and nutrition management of overweight for patients with weight gain. If these alternatives are ineffective is suggested to change the antipsychotic or consider starting metformin. For the management of drug-induced akathisia it is recommended to decrease the dose of the drug and the addition of lorazepam. It is recommended using 5mg biperiden IM or trihexyphenidyl 5mg orally in case of secondary acute dystonia and for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced parkinsonism to decrease the dose of antipsychotic or consider using 2 - 4mg/day of biperiden or diphenhydramine 50mg once daily. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Genomic correlates of glatiramer acetate adverse cardiovascular effects lead to a novel locus mediating coronary risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Brænne

    Full Text Available Glatiramer acetate is used therapeutically in multiple sclerosis but also known for adverse effects including elevated coronary artery disease (CAD risk. The mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular side effects of the medication are unclear. Here, we made use of the chromosomal variation in the genes that are known to be affected by glatiramer treatment. Focusing on genes and gene products reported by drug-gene interaction database to interact with glatiramer acetate we explored a large meta-analysis on CAD genome-wide association studies aiming firstly, to investigate whether variants in these genes also affect cardiovascular risk and secondly, to identify new CAD risk genes. We traced association signals in a 200-kb region around genomic positions of genes interacting with glatiramer in up to 60 801 CAD cases and 123 504 controls. We validated the identified association in additional 21 934 CAD cases and 76 087 controls. We identified three new CAD risk alleles within the TGFB1 region on chromosome 19 that independently affect CAD risk. The lead SNP rs12459996 was genome-wide significantly associated with CAD in the extended meta-analysis (odds ratio 1.09, p = 1.58×10-12. The other two SNPs at the locus were not in linkage disequilibrium with the lead SNP and by a conditional analysis showed p-values of 4.05 × 10-10 and 2.21 × 10-6. Thus, studying genes reported to interact with glatiramer acetate we identified genetic variants that concordantly with the drug increase the risk of CAD. Of these, TGFB1 displayed signal for association. Indeed, the gene has been associated with CAD previously in both in vivo and in vitro studies. Here we establish genome-wide significant association with CAD in large human samples.

  19. A multiparameter investigation into adverse effects of aflatoxin on Oreochromis niloticus health status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy E. Mahfouz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin is a common contaminant of foods, particularly in the staple diets of many developing countries. To evaluate adverse effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 toxicity on health status in the Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus, fish were fed diet contaminated with either 20 or 100 ppb AFB1 for 6 or 12 weeks. Growth indices, survival rate and hepatosomatic index (HSI were assessed. Blood samples were collected for hematological profiles (e.g. RBCs and WBC count, Hb content. Liver enzyme activity; aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP, were evaluated and toxin residues in the liver and musculature were detected. Liver histopathological investigations were carried out, whereas antioxidant glutathione peroxidase (GPx and glutathione S-transferase (GST gene expression were determined in this tissue by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Furthermore, to test the fish immune status, challenge against Aeromonas hydrophila was conducted. Results indicated that 100 ppb AFB1 negatively impacted O. niloticus weight gain, feed efficiency, hematological profiles, HSI as well as liver histopathology, while increase in AST, ALT, ALP liver enzymes activity was evidenced. Further, the expression of liver GPx and GST down-regulated and AFB1 residues were always detected in the liver and only in the musculature in fish fed 100 ppb AFB1 for 12 weeks. The ability of fish to withstand A. hydrophila infection was remarkably lowered. Overall, the results herein demonstrate the toxic effects of AFB1 in O. niloticus. The observed alterations in fish status, especially in the liver coincide well with the expected oxidative stress resulting from the AFB1 toxicity.

  20. Adverse effects of plant food supplements and botanical preparations: a systematic review with critical evaluation of causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Ceschi, Alessandro; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Lüde, Saskia; De Souza Nascimento, Elizabeth; Dos Santos, Ariana; Colombo, Francesca; Frigerio, Gianfranco; Nørby, Karin; Plumb, Jenny; Finglas, Paul; Restani, Patrizia

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this review was to collect available data on the following: (i) adverse effects observed in humans from the intake of plant food supplements or botanical preparations; (ii) the misidentification of poisonous plants; and (iii) interactions between plant food supplements/botanicals and conventional drugs or nutrients. PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase were searched from database inception to June 2014, using the terms 'adverse effect/s', 'poisoning/s', 'plant food supplement/s', 'misidentification/s' and 'interaction/s' in combination with the relevant plant name. All papers were critically evaluated according to the World Health Organization Guidelines for causality assessment. Data were obtained for 66 plants that are common ingredients of plant food supplements; of the 492 papers selected, 402 (81.7%) dealt with adverse effects directly associated with the botanical and 89 (18.1%) concerned interactions with conventional drugs. Only one case was associated with misidentification. Adverse effects were reported for 39 of the 66 botanical substances searched. Of the total references, 86.6% were associated with 14 plants, including Glycine max/soybean (19.3%), Glycyrrhiza glabra/liquorice (12.2%), Camellia sinensis/green tea ( 8.7%) and Ginkgo biloba/gingko (8.5%). Considering the length of time examined and the number of plants included in the review, it is remarkable that: (i) the adverse effects due to botanical ingredients were relatively infrequent, if assessed for causality; and (ii) the number of severe clinical reactions was very limited, but some fatal cases have been described. Data presented in this review were assessed for quality in order to make the results maximally useful for clinicians in identifying or excluding deleterious effects of botanicals. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Milan PM1 induces adverse effects on mice lungs and cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Francesca; Sancini, Giulio; Longhin, Eleonora; Mantecca, Paride; Camatini, Marina; Palestini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested a link between inhaled particulate matter (PM) exposure and increased mortality and morbidity associated with cardiorespiratory diseases. Since the response to PM1 has not yet been deeply investigated, its impact on mice lungs and cardiovascular system is here examined. A repeated exposure to Milan PM1 was performed on BALB/c mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf) and the lung parenchyma were screened for markers of inflammation (cell counts, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α); macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2); heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1); nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells p50 subunit (NFκB-p50); inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS); endothelial-selectin (E-selectin)), cytotoxicity (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH); alkaline phosphatase (ALP); heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70); caspase-8-p18), and a putative pro-carcinogenic marker (cytochrome 1B1 (Cyp1B1)). Heart tissue was tested for HO-1, caspase-8-p18, NFκB-p50, iNOS, E-selectin, and myeloperoxidase (MPO); plasma was screened for markers of platelet activation and clot formation (soluble platelet-selectin (sP-selectin); fibrinogen; plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1)). PM1 triggers inflammation and cytotoxicity in lungs. A similar cytotoxic effect was observed on heart tissues, while plasma analyses suggest blood-endothelium interface activation. These data highlight the importance of lung inflammation in mediating adverse cardiovascular events following increase in ambient PM1 levels, providing evidences of a positive correlation between PM1 exposure and cardiovascular morbidity.

  2. Milan PM1 Induces Adverse Effects on Mice Lungs and Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Farina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested a link between inhaled particulate matter (PM exposure and increased mortality and morbidity associated with cardiorespiratory diseases. Since the response to PM1 has not yet been deeply investigated, its impact on mice lungs and cardiovascular system is here examined. A repeated exposure to Milan PM1 was performed on BALB/c mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf and the lung parenchyma were screened for markers of inflammation (cell counts, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2; heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells p50 subunit (NFκB-p50; inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS; endothelial-selectin (E-selectin, cytotoxicity (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; alkaline phosphatase (ALP; heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70; caspase-8-p18, and a putative pro-carcinogenic marker (cytochrome 1B1 (Cyp1B1. Heart tissue was tested for HO-1, caspase-8-p18, NFκB-p50, iNOS, E-selectin, and myeloperoxidase (MPO; plasma was screened for markers of platelet activation and clot formation (soluble platelet-selectin (sP-selectin; fibrinogen; plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1. PM1 triggers inflammation and cytotoxicity in lungs. A similar cytotoxic effect was observed on heart tissues, while plasma analyses suggest blood-endothelium interface activation. These data highlight the importance of lung inflammation in mediating adverse cardiovascular events following increase in ambient PM1 levels, providing evidences of a positive correlation between PM1 exposure and cardiovascular morbidity.

  3. Chemical composition modulates the adverse effects of particles on the mucociliary epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiani Carvalho-Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:We compared the adverse effects of two types of real ambient particles; i.e., total suspended particles from an electrostatic precipitator of a steel mill and fine air particles from an urban ambient particulate matter of 2.5 µm, on mucociliary clearance.METHOD:Mucociliary function was quantified by mucociliary transport, ciliary beating frequency and the amount of acid and neutral mucous in epithelial cells through morphometry of frog palate preparations. The palates were immersed in one of the following solutions: total suspended particles (0.1 mg/mL, particulate matter 2.5 µm 0.1 mg/mL (PM0.1 or 3.0 mg/mL (PM3.0 and amphibian Ringer’s solution (control. Particle chemical compositions were determined by X-ray fluorescence and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.RESULTS:Exposure to total suspended particles and PM3.0 decreased mucociliary transport. Ciliary beating frequency was diminished by total suspended particles at all times during exposure, while particulate matter of 2.5 µm did not elicit changes. Particulate matter of 2.5 µm reduced epithelial mucous and epithelium thickness, while total suspended particles behaved similarly to the control group. Total suspended particles exhibited a predominance of Fe and no organic compounds, while the particulate matter 2.5 µm contained predominant amounts of S, Fe, Si and, to a lesser extent, Cu, Ni, V, Zn and organic compounds.CONCLUSION:Our results showed that different compositions of particles induced different airway epithelial responses, emphasizing that knowledge of their individual characteristics may help to establish policies aimed at controlling air pollution.

  4. Genetic predisposition for high stress reactivity amplifies effects of early-life adversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlwrick, Silja; Rechenberg, Alexandra; Matthes, Mariana; Burgstaller, Jessica; Schwarzbauer, Thomas; Chen, Alon; Touma, Chadi

    2016-08-01

    A dysregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and the experience of early-life adversity are both well-established risk factors for the development of affective disorders, such as major depression. However, little is known about the interaction of these two factors in shaping endophenotypes of the disease. Here, we studied the gene-environment interaction of a genetic predisposition for HPA axis dysregulation with early-life stress (ELS), assessing the short-, as well as the long-lasting consequences on emotional behavior, neuroendocrine functions and gene expression profiles. Three mouse lines, selectively bred for either high (HR), intermediate (IR), or low (LR) HPA axis reactivity, were exposed to one week of ELS using the limited nesting and bedding material paradigm. Measurements collected during or shortly after the ELS period showed that, regardless of genetic background, ELS exposure led to impaired weight gain and altered the animals' coping behavior under stressful conditions. However, only HR mice additionally showed significant changes in neuroendocrine stress responsiveness at a young age. Accordingly, adult HR mice also showed lasting consequences of ELS, including hyperactive stress-coping, HPA axis hyperreactivity, and gene expression changes in the Crh system, as well as downregulation of Fkbp5 in relevant brain regions. We suggest that the genetic predisposition for high stress reactivity interacts with ELS exposure by disturbing the suppression of corticosterone release during a critical period of brain development, thus exerting lasting programming effects on the HPA axis, presumably via epigenetic mechanisms. In concert, these changes lead to the emergence of important endophenotypes associated with affective disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Family and personal protective factors moderate the effects of adversity and negative disposition on smoking among Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpawong, Thalida Em; Sun, Ping; Chang, Megan Chia-Chen; Gallaher, Peggy; Pang, Zengchang; Guo, Qian; Johnson, C Anderson; Unger, Jennifer

    2010-07-01

    Tobacco use among Chinese adolescents is increasing at approximately 80,000 new smokers per day. Assessing the causes for initiating tobacco use in China will be important in developing effective interventions and policies to stem rising prevalence rates. This study tested predictors of Resilience Theory in a sample of 602 Chinese adolescents. Results revealed that prior adversity, measured through school and family-related events, was significantly associated with increased smoking in females. Family factors (i.e., family cohesion, family adaptability, parental monitoring) and one personal factor (i.e., academic score) were associated with lower odds for smoking due to prior adversity and negative disposition.

  6. Effects of Childhood Adversity on Bullying and Cruelty to Animals in the United States: Findings from a National Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Michael G.; Fu, Qiang; Beaver, Kevin M.; DeLisi, Matt; Perron, Brian E.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined effects of type of and cumulative burden of childhood adversities on bullying and cruelty to animals in the United States. Data were derived from Waves I and II of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Structured psychiatric interviews were…

  7. (Un)Healthy in the city : Adverse health effects of traffic-related noise and air pollution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlema, Wilma

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the adverse health effects of urbanity, traffic-related noise and air pollution. We used harmonized data from multiple European cohort studies: LifeLines, HUNT, FINRISK, EPIC-Oxford and KORA. Based on our studies, we concluded that the living environment may be associated with

  8. Adverse effects on sexual development in rat offspring after low dose exposure to a mixture of endocrine disrupting pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hass, Ulla; Boberg, Julie; Christiansen, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated whether a mixture of low doses of five environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting pesticides, epoxiconazole, mancozeb, prochloraz, tebuconazole and procymidone, would cause adverse developmental toxicity effects in rats. In rat dams, a significant increase...... and cumulative intake, because of the potentially serious impact of mixed exposure on development and reproduction in humans....

  9. Stress moderates the effect of childhood trauma and adversity on recent drinking in treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eames, Sarah F; Businelle, Michael S; Suris, Alina; Walker, Robrina; Rao, Uma; North, Carol S; Xiao, Hong; Adinoff, Bryon

    2014-06-01

    This study sought to clarify the relationship between childhood trauma and adversity with later alcohol consumption and the moderating effects of adult psychosocial stress. Seventy-seven recently abstinent alcohol-dependent men attending residential treatment programs were assessed. Childhood trauma/adversity was assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), drinks per drinking day (DDD) with the Timeline Follow Back, and chronic psychosocial stress with the UCLA Stress Interview. Drinking and stress were retrospectively assessed for 6 months prior to the present treatment episode. Direct associations between childhood trauma/adversity and alcohol consumption and the moderating effects of recent psychosocial stress were assessed. All measures were considered as continuous variables. Pretreatment drinking severity (DDD) was associated with CTQ Total score (p = .009) and the Emotional Abuse (p effects of CTQ Total score on drinking severity (p = .04). Whereas higher CTQ scores were significantly associated with a greater amount of pretreatment drinking in participants with high UCLA stress scores (p = .01), CTQ scores were not associated with the amount of drinking in those with low UCLA stress scores (p = .63). Childhood trauma predicts drinking severity in alcohol-dependent men, and this effect is stronger in participants with ongoing stress in adult life. These findings suggest that early childhood trauma/adversity may sensitize stress-response systems. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Toward a Case Definition of Adverse Health Effects in the Environs of Industrial Wind Turbines: Facilitating a Clinical Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtry, Robert Y.

    2011-01-01

    Internationally, there are reports of adverse health effects (AHE) in the environs of industrial wind turbines (IWT). There was multidisciplinary confirmation of the key characteristics of the AHE at the first international symposium on AHE/IWT. The symptoms being reported are consistent internationally and are characterized by crossover findings…

  11. Adverse Effects of Cholinesterase Inhibitors in Dementia, According to the Pharmacovigilance Databases of the United-States and Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault B Ali

    Full Text Available This survey analyzes two national pharmacovigilance databases in order to determine the major adverse reactions observed with the use of cholinesterase inhibitors in dementia. We conducted a statistical analysis of the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS and the Canada Vigilance Adverse Reaction Database (CVARD concerning the side effects of cholinesterase inhibitors. The statistics calculated for each adverse event were the frequency and the reporting odds ratios (ROR. A total of 9877 and 2247 reports were extracted from the FAERS and CVARD databases, respectively. A disproportionately higher frequency of reports of death as an adverse event for rivastigmine, compared to the other acetylcholinesterase inhibiting drugs, was observed in both the FAERS (ROR = 3.42; CI95% = 2.94-3.98; P<0.0001 and CVARD (ROR = 3.67; CI95% = 1.92-7.00; P = 0.001 databases. While cholinesterase inhibitors remain to be an important therapeutic tool against Alzheimer's disease, the disproportionate prevalence of fatal outcomes with rivastigmine compared with alternatives should be taken into consideration.

  12. Photoprotective Effect of the Plant Collaea argentina against Adverse Effects Induced by Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Mamone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a treatment modality for tumours and other accessible lesions based on the combination of light and a photosensitizer (PS accumulated in the target tissue. The main disadvantage of PDT is PS retention after treatment during long time periods that conduces to cutaneous damage. It is believed that singlet oxygen is responsible for that skin photosensitization. The aim of this work was to evaluate the photoprotective activity of the methanolic extract of the Argentinian plant Collaea argentina against PDT under several treatments and employing different PSs. C. argentina exhibited photoprotective activity against aminolevulinic acid- (ALA- PDT in the LM2 murine adenocarcinoma cell line. The photoprotection was dependant on the extract concentration and the incubation time, being detectable from 40 μg/mL onwards and at least after 3 h exposure of the cells. C. argentina extract protects these mammalian tumor cells against PDT effects, and it interferes with the oxygen singlet production from PSs during PDT treatment. We propose that it will be a promising agent to protect cells against PDT-induced skin sensitivity.

  13. Low concentrations of metal mixture exposures have adverse effects on selected biomarkers of Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yologlu, Ertan, E-mail: ertanyologlu82@gmail.com [Adiyaman University, Faculty of Education, Department of Science Education, 02040 Adiyaman (Turkey); Ozmen, Murat [Inonu University, Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, Faculty of Arts & Science, 44280 Malatya (Turkey)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Selected metal mixtures were evaluated for toxicity of safety limit concentrations. • Xenopus laevis tadpoles were used as model test organism. • Combinations of LC{sub 50} and LC{sub 50}/2 caused 100% lethality for some metals. • Metals did not change metallothionein levels in low concentrations. • Selected enzyme activities showed induction after low concentration exposures. - Abstract: Polluted ecosystems may contain mixtures of metals, such that the combinations of metals, even in low concentrations, may cause adverse effects. In the present study, we focused on toxic effects of mixtures of selected metals, the LC{sub 50} values, and also their safety limit in aquatic systems imposed by the European legislation using a model organism. Xenopus laevis tadpoles were used as test organisms. They were exposed to metals or their combinations due to 96-h LC{sub 50} values. Glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), carboxylesterase (CaE), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) levels were evaluated. Metallothionein concentrations were also determined. The LC{sub 50}s for Cd, Pb, and Cu were calculated as 5.81 mg AI/L, 123.05 mg AI/L, and 0.85 mg AI/L, respectively. Low lethality ratios were observed with unary exposure of each metal in lower concentrations. Double or triple combinations of LC{sub 50} and LC{sub 50}/2 concentrations caused 100% lethality with Cd + Cu and Pb + Cd + Cu mixtures, while the Pb + Cu mixture also caused high lethal ratios. The selected enzyme activities were significantly affected by metals or mixtures, and dose-related effects were determined. The metallothionein levels generally increased as related to concentration in unary metals and mixtures. Acceptable limit values of unary metals and mixtures did not significantly change metallothionein levels. The results suggest that oxidative stress-related mechanisms are involved in the toxicity induced by selected

  14. Effectiveness of intranasal sodium hyaluronate in mitigating adverse effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mantia, Ignazio; Andaloro, Claudio

    2017-11-19

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in moderate-to-severe cases of obstructive sleep apnea can cause nasal discomfort and other undesirable problems. The aim of our study was to test the effects of sodium hyaluronate on nasal problems that patients experienced in their daily lives, sleepiness, nasal resistance to airflow, nasal mucociliary clearance, changes in inflammatory markers, and compliance to CPAP in three groups of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on CPAP therapy. A total of 102 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] of ≥10/hour) were randomized into three treatment groups: (1) hyaluronate plus CPAP, (2) saline solution plus CPAP, and (3) CPAP-only groups. Outcome measures were the extent of improvement in the Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniRQLQ) mean scores, sleepiness, nasal resistance to airflow, nasal mucociliary clearance, changes in inflammatory markers, and compliance to CPAP. Significant improvement in each outcome measure was determined by comparing scores at baseline and after 4 weeks for each treatment group. Significant improvement in the MiniRQLQ overall mean score was observed both in the hyaluronate plus CPAP (p CPAP groups (p CPAP group had better improvement compared with the saline solution plus CPAP group (0.24 versus 0.12, respectively). An increase in nasal inflammatory markers and saccharin transit test score was observed in all three groups, although it was statistically lower in the hyaluronate plus CPAP group (all p CPAP therapy, but future studies over a longer period of time after treatment should be performed to corroborate our findings.

  15. Local adverse effects associated with the use of inhaled corticosteroids in patients with moderate or severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charleston Ribeiro Pinto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe and characterize local adverse effects (in the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx associated with the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs in patients with moderate or severe asthma. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving a convenience sample of 200 asthma patients followed in the Department of Pharmaceutical Care of the Bahia State Asthma and Allergic Rhinitis Control Program Referral Center, located in the city of Salvador, Brazil. The patients were ≥ 18 years of age and had been using ICSs regularly for at least 6 months. Local adverse effects (irritation, pain, dry throat, throat clearing, hoarseness, reduced vocal intensity, loss of voice, sensation of thirst, cough during ICS use, altered sense of taste, and presence of oral candidiasis were assessed using a 30-day recall questionnaire. RESULTS: Of the 200 patients studied, 159 (79.5% were women. The mean age was 50.7 ± 14.4 years. In this sample, 55 patients (27.5% were using high doses of ICS, with a median treatment duration of 38 months. Regarding the symptoms, 163 patients (81.5% reported at least one adverse effect, and 131 (65.5% had a daily perception of at least one symptom. Vocal and pharyngeal symptoms were identified in 57 (28.5% and 154 (77.0% of the patients, respectively. The most commonly reported adverse effects were dry throat, throat clearing, sensation of thirst, and hoarseness. CONCLUSIONS: Self-reported adverse effects related to ICS use were common among the asthma patients evaluated here.

  16. Suppression of Adverse Effects of GIC Using Controlled Variable Grounding Resistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhussein, A.; Ali, M. H.

    2016-12-01

    Geomagnetically induced current (GIC) has a harmful impact on power systems, with a large footprint. Mitigation strategies for the GIC are required to protect the integrity of the power system. To date, the adverse effects of GIC are being mitigated by either operational procedures or grounding fixed capacitors (GFCs). The operational procedures are uncertain, reduce systems' reliability, and increase energy losses. On the other hand, GFCs, incur voltage spikes, increase the transformer cost substantially, and require protection circuitry. This study investigates new possible approaches to cope with GIC, by using a controlled variable grounding resistor (CVGR), without interfering with the system's normal operation. In addition, the new techniques help suppress unsymmetrical faults in the power network. The controllability of the grounding resistor is applied using three different techniques: (1) a Parallel switch that is controlled by PI regulated duty cycle, (2) a Parallel switch that is triggered by a preset values in a look-up-table (LUT), and (3) a Mechanical resistor varied by a Fuzzy logic controller (FLC). The experimental results were obtained and validated using the MATLAB/SIMULINK software. A hypothetical power system that consists of a generator, a 765kv, 500 km long transmission lines connecting between a step-up, Δ-Yn, transformer, and a step-down, Yn-Δ, transformer, is considered. The performance of the CVGR is compared with that of the GFC under the cases of GIC event and unsymmetrical faults. From the simulation results, the following points are concluded: The CVGR effectively suppresses the GIC flowing in the system. Consequently, it protects the transformers from saturation and the rest of the system from collapsing. The CVGR also reduces the voltage and power swings associated with unsymmetrical faults and blocks the zero sequence current flowing through the neutral of the transformer. The performance of the CVGR surpasses that of the GFC in

  17. Brain Regions Related to Impulsivity Mediate the Effects of Early Adversity on Antisocial Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Scott; Chaarani, Bader; Kan, Kees-Jan; Spechler, Philip A; Orr, Catherine; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Cattrell, Anna; Conrod, Patricia J; Desrivières, Sylvane; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Paillère Martinot, Marie-Laure; Artiges, Eric; Nees, Frauke; Papadopoulos-Orfanos, Dimitri; Poustka, Luise; Smolka, Michael N; Jurk, Sarah; Walter, Henrik; Whelan, Robert; Schumann, Gunter; Althoff, Robert R; Garavan, Hugh

    2017-08-15

    Individual differences in impulsivity and early adversity are known to be strong predictors of adolescent antisocial behavior. However, the neurobiological bases of impulsivity and their relation to antisocial behavior and adversity are poorly understood. Impulsivity was estimated with a temporal discounting task. Voxel-based morphometry was used to determine the brain structural correlates of temporal discounting in a large cohort (n = 1830) of 14- to 15-year-old children. Mediation analysis was then used to determine whether the volumes of brain regions associated with temporal discounting mediate the relation between adverse life events (e.g., family conflict, serious accidents) and antisocial behaviors (e.g., precocious sexual activity, bullying, illicit substance use). Greater temporal discounting (more impulsivity) was associated with 1) lower volume in frontomedial cortex and bilateral insula and 2) greater volume in a subcortical region encompassing the ventral striatum, hypothalamus and anterior thalamus. The volume ratio between these cortical and subcortical regions was found to partially mediate the relation between adverse life events and antisocial behavior. Temporal discounting is related to regions of the brain involved in reward processing and interoception. The results support a developmental imbalance model of impulsivity and are consistent with the idea that negative environmental factors can alter the developing brain in ways that promote antisocial behavior. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Note On : The adverse effects of polygamy on the rights of women: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A variety of researches conducted in diverse contexts of Ethiopia found that polygamy type of family relationship hinders the realization of the rights of women in many respects. This research inquires whether the polygamous life style practiced in Gedeo and Sidama Zones adversely affects the rights of women in the same ...

  19. Wind action and its adverse effects on operations of South African harbours

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goliger, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available /unloading processes and occasionally damage to infrastructure, vessels and cargo or even loss of life or limb. This paper provides an overview of critical aspects of adverse wind actions, the importance of wind data capturing and processing. The relevance of wind...

  20. Effect of APOE ε4 allele on survival and fertility in an adverse environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Exel, Eric; Koopman, Jacob J. E.; Bodegom, David van

    2017-01-01

    disadvantage in this rural Ghanaian population. Moreover, APOE-ε4 promotes fertility in highly infectious environments. Our findings suggest that APOE-ε4 may be considered as evolutionarily adaptive. Its adverse associations in affluent modern populations with later onset diseases of aging further characterize...

  1. Comparing the Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Citalopram with Nortriptylinee in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hedayat Nazari

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Nazari H1, Saki M2, Sohrabi P3, Tarrahi MJ4, Movahedi M5, Badrizadeh A6, Baqeri Kh7 1. Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 2. Instructor, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 3. General Practitioner, Neurology and Psychoiatry Hospital, Khorramabad 4. Instructor, Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 5. Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 6. B.Sc of Nursing, Staff Member of Research and Technology Office, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 7. B.Sc of Nursing, Psychology hospital Abstract Background: Major depressive disorder (MDD is one of the most common mental disorders all over the world. An effective treatment preserves an acceptable level of function in the affected patients. Different drugs are used in the treatment of MDD, and each of them has specific therapeutic and adverse effects. Recently, SSRI drugs are used in the treatment of this disorder, and yet there is not enough study about them. Thus, we decided to compare the effectiveness and adverse effects of Nortriptyline with that of Citalopram in MDD. Materials and methods: In this double-blinded clinical trial, 80 MMD (DSM-IV-TR patients, who that not any other mental, substance and organic disorders were selected. Samples were randomly assigned into two groups which were treated with Nortriptyline or Citalopram. Efficacy and adverse effects were evaluated at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after the treatment. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Efficacy was similar in two groups, and no significant differences between the two groups were observed in the mean scores. The comparison of adverse effects between the two groups showed a significant difference in the hypersomnia, dry mouth, anorexia and nausea

  2. Examining the effect of adverse geological conditions on jamming of a single shielded TBM in Uluabat tunnel using numerical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohola Hasanpour

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe shield jamming events have been reported during excavation of Uluabat tunnel through adverse geological conditions, which resulted in several stoppages at advancing a single shielded tunnel boring machine (TBM. To study the jamming mechanism, three-dimensional (3D simulation of the machine and surrounding ground was implemented using the finite difference code FLAC3D. Numerical analyses were performed for three sections along the tunnel with a higher risk for entrapment due to the combination of overburden and geological conditions. The computational results including longitudinal displacement contours and ground pressure profiles around the shield allow a better understanding of ground behavior within the excavation. Furthermore, they allow realistically assessing the impact of adverse geological conditions on shield jamming. The calculated thrust forces, which are required to move the machine forward, are in good agreement with field observations and measurements. It also proves that the numerical analysis can effectively be used for evaluating the effect of adverse geological environment on TBM entrapments and can be applied to prediction of loads on the shield and pre-estimating of the required thrust force during excavation through adverse ground conditions.

  3. The relation between family adversity and social anxiety among adolescents in Taiwan: effects of family function and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Yang, Pinchen; Wu, Yu-Yu; Cheng, Chung-Ping

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between three indicators of family adversity (domestic violence, family substance use, and broken parental marriage) and the severity of social anxiety among adolescents in Taiwan, as well as the mediating effects of perceived family function and self-esteem on that relationship, using structural equation modeling (SEM). A total of 5607 adolescents completed the social anxiety subscale of the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children; the Family APGAR Index; the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale; and a questionnaire for domestic violence, family substance use, and broken parental marriage. The relation between family adversity and social anxiety, as well as the mediating effects of family function and self-esteem, was examined using SEM. SEM analysis revealed that all three indicators of family adversity reduced the level of family function, that decreased family function compromised the level of self-esteem, and that a low level of self-esteem further increased the severity of social anxiety. The results indicated that, along with intervening to change family adversity, evaluating and improving adolescents' self-esteem and family function are also important clinical issues when helping adolescents reduce their social anxiety.

  4. Adverse effects of brain irradiation correlated with MR and CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constine, L.S.; Konski, A.; Ekholm, S.; McDonald, S.; Rubin, P.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-one patients treated for primary malignancies of the brain at the University of Rochester Cancer Center since 1970 were assessed for adverse effects of irradiation clinically, and by computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. At diagnosis, patients ranged in age from 1-65 years (median 19 years) and the most common tumor (in 30) was astrocytoma. Radiation doses ranged from 45 to 81.3 Gy (median 56.8 Gy). White matter changes visible on MR were graded on a scale of 1-4, with grades 1-2 known to occur in some normal patients. Areas of increased signal intensity not associated with the tumor or surgery were visible in all patients (gr 1 = 37%, gr 2 = 32%, gr 3 = 17%, gr 4 = 15%) whereas only 35% had regions of abnormality (hypodensity) on CT. Sulci enlargement and ventricular abnormalities (asymmetry or dilatation) were present in approximately 50% of patients by each technique. Higher grade MR lesions were associated with radiation to large volumes and high doses. For the 36 patients treated with 1.5-2.0 Gy daily fractions, the mean radiation dose by grade was as follows: gr 1 = 55.1 Gy, gr 2 = 58.8 Gy, gr 3 = 60.0 Gy, gr 4 = 63.5 Gy. All 5 patients treated on a hyperfractionated schedule had gr 1-2 changes despite receiving greater than 70 Gy. Fifty percent of patients treated to the whole brain (+/- boost) had gr 3-4 changes, compared with 14% treated with local fields (peak dose regions similar in both groups). Among the children (less than or equal to 13 years), 20% had gr 3-4 changes compared with 56% of adults (excluding hyperfractionated patients). This finding may be due entirely or in part to the lower radiation doses used for children (mean 54.4 Gy vs. 63.7 Gy in adults). Clinical abnormalities attributable to irradiation included an impairment in mental functioning in 7 adults, and learning disabilities in 5 children

  5. Adverse health effects of lead exposure on children and exploration to internal lead indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q.; Zhao, H.H. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Chen, J.W.; Gu, K.D.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Zhu, Y.X.; Zhou, Y.K. [Minitry of Environmental Protection Key Lab of Environment, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ye, L.X., E-mail: yelx2004@163.com [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2009-11-15

    Our research on adverse effects of lead exposures on physical and neurobehavioral health of children aged 6-12 years in 4 villages, labeled as K, M, L, and X, in rural China, was reported in this article. Lead in blood (PbB), urine (PbU), hairs (PbH), and nails (PbN) were measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Abbreviated Symptom Questionnaire of Conner's instruments and Revised Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices were applied to evaluate childhood attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders (ADHD) and intelligences. Geometric means (SD) of PbB, PbU, PbH and PbN concentrations were 71.2 {mu}g/L (1.56), 11.7 {mu}g/g (1.75), 12.5 {mu}g/g (2.82), and 25.3 {mu}g/g (2.79), respectively. 54 (17.0%) children had PbB levels of {>=} 100 {mu}g/L. Boys, the 6-10 years old, and living in village K were 2.11, 2.48, and 9.16 times, respectively, more likely to be poisoned by lead than girls, aged 11-12 years, and residing in X. 18 (5.7%) and 37 (11.7%) subjects had ADHD and mental retardations, respectively. Inverse relationships between intelligences and natural log transformed PbU and PbH levels were observed with respective odds ratios (95%CI) of 1.79 (1.00-3.22) and 1.46 (1.06-2.03) or 1.28 (1.04-1.58) and 1.73 (1.18-2.52) by binary or ordinal logistic regression modeling. ADHD prevalence was different by gender and age of subjects. PbU, PbH, and PbN related to PbB positively with respective correlation coefficients of 0.530, 0.477, and 0.181. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the three measurements reveled areas under curves (AUCs) being 0.829, 0.758, and 0.687, respectively. In conclusion, children had moderate levels of lead exposures in this rural area. Intelligence declines were associated with internal lead levels among children. ROC analysis suggests PbU an internal lead indicator close to PbB.

  6. Adverse health effects of lead exposure on children and exploration to internal lead indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Q.; Zhao, H.H.; Chen, J.W.; Gu, K.D.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Zhu, Y.X.; Zhou, Y.K.; Ye, L.X.

    2009-01-01

    Our research on adverse effects of lead exposures on physical and neurobehavioral health of children aged 6-12 years in 4 villages, labeled as K, M, L, and X, in rural China, was reported in this article. Lead in blood (PbB), urine (PbU), hairs (PbH), and nails (PbN) were measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Abbreviated Symptom Questionnaire of Conner's instruments and Revised Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices were applied to evaluate childhood attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders (ADHD) and intelligences. Geometric means (SD) of PbB, PbU, PbH and PbN concentrations were 71.2 μg/L (1.56), 11.7 μg/g (1.75), 12.5 μg/g (2.82), and 25.3 μg/g (2.79), respectively. 54 (17.0%) children had PbB levels of ≥ 100 μg/L. Boys, the 6-10 years old, and living in village K were 2.11, 2.48, and 9.16 times, respectively, more likely to be poisoned by lead than girls, aged 11-12 years, and residing in X. 18 (5.7%) and 37 (11.7%) subjects had ADHD and mental retardations, respectively. Inverse relationships between intelligences and natural log transformed PbU and PbH levels were observed with respective odds ratios (95%CI) of 1.79 (1.00-3.22) and 1.46 (1.06-2.03) or 1.28 (1.04-1.58) and 1.73 (1.18-2.52) by binary or ordinal logistic regression modeling. ADHD prevalence was different by gender and age of subjects. PbU, PbH, and PbN related to PbB positively with respective correlation coefficients of 0.530, 0.477, and 0.181. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the three measurements reveled areas under curves (AUCs) being 0.829, 0.758, and 0.687, respectively. In conclusion, children had moderate levels of lead exposures in this rural area. Intelligence declines were associated with internal lead levels among children. ROC analysis suggests PbU an internal lead indicator close to PbB.

  7. Important sources and chemical species of ambient fine particles related to adverse health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, J.

    2017-12-01

    contributor to PM2.5, leading to adverse human health effects.

  8. Energy drinks consumption pattern, perceived benefits and associated adverse effects amongst students of University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsunni, Ahmed A; Badar, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    There are safety concerns about energy drinks alongside marketing claims of physiological and behavioural benefits. There is no scientific data about usage of energy drinks in Saudi Arabia. This study determined consumption patterns of energy drinks as well as perceived benefits and side effects amongst students at a Saudi university. This study was carried out in students of University of Dammam from October to December 2010. A questionnaire about energy drink use, reasons for use, benefits and side effects experienced was distributed amongst the university students. Frequencies of responses and differences between male and female students were analysed. A total of 412 students (282 males and 130 females) responded, out of whom 54.60% males and 26.15% female students were energy drink users. Mean age at first use was significantly (pcompany of friends, to keep awake, for more energy and for better performance in driving, sports or exams. Amongst many the commonest (p<0.05) benefit reported was ability to stay awake longer. The students reported a number of adverse effects. Increased urination and insomnia were the commonest in males and females respectively. Only 36.70% males and 14.28% females never experienced an adverse effect. A significant proportion of students at university of Dammam use energy drinks, they have reported a number of effects (perceived as benefits) along with a variety of adverse effects.

  9. Alternatives to Mineral Oil Adjuvants in Vaccines Against Aeromonas salmonicida subs. salmonicida in Rainbow Trout Offer Reductions in Adverse Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Christensen, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to reduce the frequency and severity of adverse reactions seen from the use of mineral oil adjuvants in salmonid fish, the effects of two alternative adjuvants were assessed, focusing on the induction of adverse effects as well as protection. Using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss...... changes, as well as protection against experimental infection with A. salmonicida. While adverse effects were not eliminated, reductions in microscopic and macroscopic adverse effects, in particular, were seen for both the nucleotide- and liposome-based vaccine formulations. Furthermore, the induced...

  10. Brazilian clinical trial of uniform multidrug therapy for leprosy patients: the correlation between clinical disease types and adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitor de Sá Gonçalves

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to verify the correlation between leprosy types and the adverse effects of treatment drugs. This quantitative, prospective, nested study was developed at the Dona Libânia Dermatology Centre in Fortaleza, Brazil. Data were collected from November 2007-November 2008. During this period, 818 leprosy patients were diagnosed and began treatment. Forty patients with tuberculoid leprosy (TT were selected. Twenty patients followed a standard therapy of dapsone and rifampicin and 20 were administered dapsone, rifampicin and clofazimine (U-MDT. Twenty patients with borderline lepromatous (BL and lepromatous leprosy (LL were also selected and treated with U-MDT. All of the subjects received six doses. With the exception of haemolytic anaemia, there was a low incidence of adverse effects in all the groups. We did not observe any differences in the incidence of haemolytic anaemia or other side effects across groups of patients with TT, BL or LL treated with U-MDT.

  11. Immune-related adverse effects of cancer immunotherapy- Implications for rheumatology

    OpenAIRE

    Cappelli, Laura C.; Shah, Ami A.; Bingham, Clifton O.

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) are being increasingly studied and used as therapy for a growing number of malignancies. ICIs work by blocking inhibitory pathways of T-cell activation, leading to an immune response directed against tumors. Such nonspecific immunologic activation can lead to immune-related adverse events (IRAE). Some IRAE including inflammatory arthritis, sicca syndrome, myositis and vasculitis are of special interest to rheumatologists. As use of ICIs increases, recogniti...

  12. Interventions to reduce acute and late adverse gastrointestinal effects of pelvic radiotherapy for primary pelvic cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Theresa A; Green, John T; Beresford, Mark; Wedlake, Linda; Burden, Sorrel; Davidson, Susan E; Lal, Simon; Henson, Caroline C; Andreyev, H Jervoise N

    2018-01-23

    An increasing number of people survive cancer but a significant proportion have gastrointestinal side effects as a result of radiotherapy (RT), which impairs their quality of life (QoL). To determine which prophylactic interventions reduce the incidence, severity or both of adverse gastrointestinal effects among adults receiving radiotherapy to treat primary pelvic cancers. We conducted searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Embase in September 2016 and updated them on 2 November 2017. We also searched clinical trial registries. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions to prevent adverse gastrointestinal effects of pelvic radiotherapy among adults receiving radiotherapy to treat primary pelvic cancers, including radiotherapy techniques, other aspects of radiotherapy delivery, pharmacological interventions and non-pharmacological interventions. Studies needed a sample size of 20 or more participants and needed to evaluate gastrointestinal toxicity outcomes. We excluded studies that evaluated dosimetric parameters only. We also excluded trials of interventions to treat acute gastrointestinal symptoms, trials of altered fractionation and dose escalation schedules, and trials of pre- versus postoperative radiotherapy regimens, to restrict the vast scope of the review. We used standard Cochrane methodology. We used the random-effects statistical model for all meta-analyses, and the GRADE system to rate the certainty of the evidence. We included 92 RCTs involving more than 10,000 men and women undergoing pelvic radiotherapy. Trials involved 44 different interventions, including radiotherapy techniques (11 trials, 4 interventions/comparisons), other aspects of radiotherapy delivery (14 trials, 10 interventions), pharmacological interventions (38 trials, 16 interventions), and non-pharmacological interventions (29 trials, 13 interventions). Most studies (79/92) had design limitations. Thirteen studies had a low risk of bias, 50 studies had an unclear

  13. Adverse effects of a single dose of gentamicin in adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Rachel S; Harding, Jan; Molloy, Rob; Land, Lucy; Longcroft-Neal, Kate; Moore, David; Ross, Jonathan D C

    2018-02-01

    To systematically review the frequency and type of adverse events associated with a single dose of intravenous or intramuscular gentamicin in adults, for any indication, in studies where a comparator was available. A review protocol was developed and registered (PROSPERO: CRD42013003229). Studies were eligible for review if they: recruited participants aged ≥16 years; used gentamicin intramuscularly or intravenously as a single one-off dose; compared gentamicin to another medication or placebo; and monitored adverse events. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, trial registries, conference proceedings and other relevant databases were searched up to November 2016. Risk of bias was assessed on all included studies. In total, 15 522 records were identified. After removal of duplicates, screening of title/abstracts for relevance and independent selection of full texts by two reviewers, 36 studies were included. Across all the included studies, 24 107 participants received a single one-off dose of gentamicin (doses ranged from 1 mg kg -1 to 480 mg per dose). Acute kidney injury was described in 2520 participants receiving gentamicin. The large majority of cases were reversible. There were no cases of ototoxicity reported in patients receiving gentamicin. A meta-analysis was not performed due to study heterogeneity. A significant number of patients saw a transient rise in creatinine after a single dose of gentamicin at doses up to 480 mg. Persistent renal impairment and other adverse events were relatively rare. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. The adverse effects of interferon-free regimens in 149 816 chronic hepatitis C treated Egyptian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, D; El Saeed, K; Elakel, W; El Baz, T; Omar, A; Yosry, A; Elsayed, M H; Said, M; El Raziky, M; Anees, M; Doss, W; El Shazly, Y; Wedemeyer, H; Esmat, G

    2018-03-05

    Interferon-free regimens are associated with high sustained virological response; however, associated adverse effects have yet to be fully reported. To evaluate the adverse effects associated with the different direct-acting antiviral drug (DAA) regimens in Egyptian patients. This multicenter retrospective study included all adverse effects during and after treatment with DAA regimens of 149 816 chronic hepatitis C treated Egyptian patients. Patients received sofosbuvir (SOF)/ribavirin (RBV) (n = 21 835), SOF/simeprevir (n = 24 215) SOF/daclatasvir (DCV) (n = 58 477), SOF/DCV/RBV (n = 45 188) and paritaprevir/ombitasvir/ritonavir/RBV (n = 101). The duration of treatment varied between 12 and 24 weeks. All changes in the treatment regimens, discontinuation, mortality, and serious side effects were reported. Adverse effects developed in 2475 (1.7%) (mean age [54 ± 9], male gender [53%]) patients. Serious side effects developed in 68% of these patients, and SOF/RBV was the most common causing regimen (73%, P < 0.001). Anaemia and hyperbilirubinemia were the most common side effects (731/149816, 0.5% and 463/149816, 0.3%, respectively) and SOF/RBV (588/21835, 3% and 353/21835, 1.6%, respectively) showed the highest incidence in the treated patients. Hepatocellular carcinoma and mortality were reported in 0.02% and 0.06% of all treated patients, respectively. Patients with liver cirrhosis showed higher incidence of serious side effects (Log rank P = 0.045) and mortality (Log rank P = 0.025) than patients without liver cirrhosis. Male gender (P = 0.012), lower haemoglobin (P < 0.001), platelets (P < 0.001) and albumin (P = 0.001), higher bilirubin (P = 0.002) and cirrhosis (P < 0.001) were factors associated with serious side effects development. Adverse effects associated with DAAs are few, anaemia being the most common. SOF/RBV regimen showed the highest rate of side effects while SOF/DCV showed the least. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons

  15. Pituitary size alteration and adverse effects of radiation therapy performed in 9 dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Harumi; Mori, Akihiro; Lee, Peter; Sugihara, Shiho; Oda, Hitomi; Sako, Toshinori

    2018-01-10

    The purpose of this study was to determine the therapeutic and/or adverse effects of radiation therapy (RT) against pituitary tumors in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism, as monitored by frequent post-RT detailed MRI examinations, clinical signs, and changes in hormone concentrations. Nine dogs with an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary mass diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) underwent RT for 4weeks (total of 48Gy in 4-Gy fractions). Pituitary height/brain area (P/B) value, clinical signs, basal plasma ACTH concentrations, serum cortisol concentrations (pre- and post-ACTH stimulation test) and adverse effects of RT were evaluated before and post-RT. The P/B value was significantly lower in all nine dogs post-RT. One dog lacking any neurological signs demonstrated no change in clinical signs pre and post-RT. Out of 8 dogs which exhibited neurological signs pre-RT, half of them demonstrated complete resolution of their signs, whereas the other half showed transient resolution. In all animals with recurrence of neurological signs, pituitary tumor regrowth was not observed; however, MRI revealed moderate to severe pituitary hemorrhage. Late adverse effect (bilateral otitis media) was observed in three of nine dogs post-RT. RT did not induce any significant changes in the dogs' basal plasma ACTH concentration and pre- and post-ACTH serum cortisol concentrations. In conclusion, RT is effective to reduce pituitary size and the mass effect, but does not appear to affect blood hormone concentrations, necessitating additional medical treatment against hypercortisolism. Periodic MRI imaging post-RT enables early detection of adverse effects of RT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Factors associated with anti-tuberculosis medication adverse effects: a case-control study in Lima, Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocfa Chung-Delgado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-term exposure to anti-tuberculosis medication increases risk of adverse drug reactions and toxicity. The objective of this investigation was to determine factors associated with anti-tuberculosis adverse drug reactions in Lima, Peru, with special emphasis on MDR-TB medication, HIV infection, diabetes, age and tobacco use. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: A case-control study was performed using information from Peruvian TB Programme. A case was defined as having reported an anti-TB adverse drug reaction during 2005-2010 with appropriate notification on clinical records. Controls were defined as not having reported a side effect, receiving anti-TB therapy during the same time that the case had appeared. Crude, and age- and sex-adjusted models were calculated using odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI. A multivariable model was created to look for independent factors associated with side effect from anti-TB therapy. A total of 720 patients (144 cases and 576 controls were analyzed. In our multivariable model, age, especially those over 40 years (OR = 3.93; 95%CI: 1.65-9.35, overweight/obesity (OR = 2.13; 95%CI: 1.17-3.89, anemia (OR = 2.10; IC95%: 1.13-3.92, MDR-TB medication (OR = 11.1; 95%CI: 6.29-19.6, and smoking (OR = 2.00; 95%CI: 1.03-3.87 were independently associated with adverse drug reactions. CONCLUSIONS: Old age, anemia, MDR-TB medication, overweight/obesity status, and smoking history are independent risk factors associated with anti-tuberculosis adverse drug reactions. Patients with these risk factors should be monitored during the anti-TB therapy. A comprehensive clinical history and additional medical exams, including hematocrit and HIV-ELISA, might be useful to identify these patients.

  17. Effect of pregnane X receptor polymorphisms on tacrolimus blood concentrations and the resulting adverse reactions in kidney transplantation recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z P; Zhao, M; Qu, Q S; Miao, S Z

    2016-09-16

    We investigated the effect of pregnane X receptor (PXR) polymorphisms on tacrolimus (FK506) blood trough concentrations and the associated adverse reactions in kidney transplantation recipients (KTRs). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to detect the genotypes of single nucleotide polymorphism loci in 336 KTRs. The PXR six-base deletion mutation was classified using specific allele PCR, and the FK506 blood trough concentration in the KTRs was measured by chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay. There were significant differences in adverse reactions resulting from FK506 in age, weight, body mass index (BMI) and treatment course (P adverse reactions induced by hyperglycemia. The KTRs' PXR rs3842689, rs6785049, and rs1523127 mutation frequencies were 26.07, 11.79, and 16.07%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the mutation frequency of each locus between the control group and the adverse reaction groups. Therefore, rs3842689, 7635G>A (rs6785049), and 24381C>A (rs1523127) PXR polymorphisms have no obvious impact on FK506; furthermore, the PXR rs3842689 wild-type homozygous WW genotype is a risk factor of FK506 and results in gastrointestinal reactions.

  18. PARENTAL CHILDHOOD ADVERSITY, DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS, AND PARENTING QUALITY: EFFECTS ON TODDLER SELF-REGULATION IN CHILD WELFARE SERVICES INVOLVED FAMILIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieker, Susan J; Oxford, Monica L; Fleming, Charles B; Lohr, Mary Jane

    2018-01-01

    Parents who are involved with child welfare services (CWSI) often have a history of childhood adversity and depressive symptoms. Both affect parenting quality, which in turn influences child adaptive functioning. We tested a model of the relations between parental depression and child regulatory outcomes first proposed by K. Lyons-Ruth, R. Wolfe, A. Lyubchik, and R. Steingard (2002). We hypothesized that both parental depression and parenting quality mediate the effects of parental early adversity on offspring regulatory outcomes. Participants were 123 CWSI parents and their toddlers assessed three times over a period of 6 months. At Time 1, parents reported on their childhood adversity and current depressive symptoms. At Time 2, parents' sensitivity to their child's distress and nondistress cues was rated from a videotaped teaching task. At Time 3, observers rated children's emotional regulation, orientation/engagement, and secure base behavior. The results of a path model partly supported the hypotheses. Parent childhood adversity was associated with current depressive symptoms, which in turn related to parent sensitivity to child distress, but not nondistress. Sensitivity to distress also predicted secure base behavior. Depression directly predicted orientation/engagement, also predicted by sensitivity to nondistress. Sensitivity to distress predicted emotion regulation and orientation/engagement. Results are discussed in terms of intervention approaches for CWSI families. © 2017 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  19. Reporting and understanding the safety and adverse effect profile of mobile apps for psychosocial interventions: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Farooq; Gire, Nadeem; Xiang, Shuo; Yang, Megan; Syed, Yumeen; Shokraneh, Farhad; Adams, Clive; Farooq, Saeed

    2016-06-22

    Recent years have seen a rapidly increasing trend towards the delivery of health technology through mobile devices. Smartphones and tablet devices are thus becoming increasingly popular for accessing information and a wide range of services, including health care services. Modern mobile apps can be used for a variety of reasons, ranging from education for the patients and assistance to clinicians to delivery of interventions. Mobile phone apps have also been established to benefit patients in a scope of interventions across numerous medical specialties and treatment modalities. Medical apps have their advantages and disadvantages. It is important that clinicians have access to knowledge to make decisions regarding the use of medical apps on the basis of risk-benefit ratio. Mobile apps that deliver psycho social interventions offer unique challenges and opportunities. A number of reviews have highlighted the potential use of such apps. There is a need to describe, report and study their side effects too. The adverse effects associated with these apps can broadly be divided into: (1) those resulting from the security and safety concerns; (2) those arising from the use of a particular psycho social intervention; and (3) those due to the interaction with digital technology. There is a need to refine and reconsider the safety and adverse effects in this area. The safety profile of a mobile PSI app should describe its safety profile in: (1) privacy and security; (2) adverse effects of psychotherapy; and (3) adverse effects unique to the use of apps and the internet. This is, however, a very new area and further research and reporting is required to inform clinical decision making.

  20. Sex-specific and strain-dependent effects of early life adversity on behavioral and epigenetic outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija eKundakovic

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Early life adversity can have a significant long-term impact with implications for the emergence of psychopathology. Disruption to mother-infant interactions is a form of early life adversity that may, in particular, have profound programming effects on the developing brain. However, despite converging evidence from human and animal studies, the precise mechanistic pathways underlying adversity-associated neurobehavioral changes has yet to be elucidated. One approach to the study of mechanism is exploration of epigenetic changes associated with early life experience. In the current study, we examined the effects of postnatal maternal separation in mice and assessed the behavioral, brain gene expression, and epigenetic effects of this manipulation in offspring. Importantly, we included two different mouse strains (B6 and Balb/c and both male and female offspring to determine strain- and/or sex-associated differential response to maternal separation. We found both strain-specific and sex-dependent effects of maternal separation in early adolescent offspring on measures on open-field exploration, sucrose preference, and social behavior. Analyses of cortical and hippocampal mRNA levels of the glucocorticoid receptor (Nr3c1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf genes revealed decreased hippocampal Bdnf expression in maternally-separated B6 females and increased cortical Bdnf expression in maternally separated male and female Balb/c offspring. Analyses of Nr3c1and Bdnf (IV and IX CpG methylation indicated increased hippocampal Nr3c1 methylation in maternally separated B6 males and increased hippocampal Bdnf IX methylation in male and female maternally separated Balb/c mice. Overall, though effect sizes were modest, these findings suggest a complex interaction between early life adversity, genetic background, and sex in the determination of neurobehavioral and epigenetic outcomes that may account for differential vulnerability to later life

  1. Evaluation of granulocytes reposition and appearance of the adverse effects produced by the stimulating factors of granulocytic colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracia Solera Camarasa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the most frequent adverse effects produced by colony stimulating factors available at the University Hospital San Juan de Alicante (filgrastim and pegfilgrastim. Materials and methods: Observational, retrospective study, developed at the Pharmaceutical Care Unit for External Patients (UFPE of the Hospital Universitario de San Juan de Alicante, between February 8 and 26, 2016 (inclusive. Variables collected: Sex, age, diagnosis, chemotherapy scheme, start date chemotherapy treatment, stimulating factor and prescribed dose, cycles received, start date treatment with stimulant factor and adverse effects. Results: Of the 15 patients treated with colony stimulating factor only the 13.3% were being treated with lower doses than the ones according to their weight. In 100% the medication was correctly prescribed. The main chemotherapy regimen where primary prophylaxis was used was AC for breast cancer. The main side effects were musculoskeletal pain, asthenia / fatigue, and gastrointestinal disorders such as constipation and diarrhea. Conclusions: Preventive use with granulocytic colony stimulating factor has been shown to reduce the risk and duration of neutropenia. The adverse effects obtained are within the normal range for the use of said medicament.

  2. Biomarkers of effect in endocrine disruption: how to link a functional assay to an adverse outcome pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lorenzetti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of in vitro testing strategies may achieve a cost-effective generation of comprehensive datasets on a large number of chemicals, according to the requirements of the European Regulation REACH. Much emphasis is placed on in vitro methods based on subcellular mechanisms (e.g., nuclear receptor interaction, but it is necessary to define the predictive value of molecular or biochemical changes within an adverse outcome pathway (AOP. AOP pivots on the description of the flow from a molecular initiating event through a cascade of intermediate events needed to produce a specific adverse effect at organism level: downstream responses at cell level are, therefore, essential to define an AOP. Several in vitro assays are based on human cell lines representative of endocrine-targeted tissues (e.g., prostate and on functional biomarkers of clinical relevance (e.g., PSA secretion in human prostate epithelial cells. We discuss the implementation of such functional biomarkers in the AOP context.

  3. Effects of feeding wheat naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on blood biochemistry and the effectiveness of dietary lignin treatment to alleviate mycotoxin adverse effects in broiler chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Klapáčová Katarína; Faixová Zita; Grešáková L'uba; Faix Š.; Miklósová Lucia; Leng L'.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of feeding wheat naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on some biochemical parameters and the efficacy of lignin to alleviate adverse effects of fusariotoxins in broiler chickens. Eighty, 1-d-old ROSS 308 broiler chicks of both sexes were used in the experiment. All birds received the control diet for two weeks and then they were fed experimental diets for two more weeks. The 4 diets included the fo...

  4. The adverse effects of bureaucracy for the hotel industry in China : the investment behaviors changed by different ownerships

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Wang; Zeng, Le; Zhang, Luxin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/aim The aim is to examine the distribution of hotel ownerships and star-rated levels in different regions. This thesis depends on the analysis of the examination to find out if the change of investment behaviors can decrease or avoid the adverse effects of bureaucracy in the Chinese hotel industry. Design/methodology/approach Data has been collected through the third-party electronic distribution channel. The analysis includes a description of the samples and statistical tests. Findin...

  5. Association of CYP2C19 polymorphisms and lansoprazole-associated respiratory adverse effects in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, John J; Lang, Jason E; Mougey, Edward B; Blake, Kathryn B; Gong, Yan; Holbrook, Janet T; Wise, Robert A; Teague, W G

    2013-09-01

    To determine whether cytochrome P450 (CYP)2C19 haplotype associates with lansoprazole-associated adverse event frequency. Respiratory adverse events from a clinical trial of lansoprazole in children with asthma were analyzed for associations with extensive or poor metabolizer (PM) phenotype based on CYP2C19 haplotypes. Carriers of CYP2C19*2, *3, *8, or *9 alleles were PMs; carriers of 2 wild-type alleles were extensive metabolizers (EMs). Plasma concentrations of lansoprazole were determined in PM and EM phenotypes. The frequency of upper respiratory infection among PMs (n = 45) was higher than that among EMs (n = 91), which in turn was higher than that in placebo subjects (n = 135; P = .0039). The frequency of sore throat (ST) was similarly distributed among EMs and PMs (P = .0015). The OR (95% CI) for upper respiratory infections in PMs was 2.46 (1.02-5.96) (P = .046); for EMs, the OR (95% CI) was 1.55 (0.86-2.79). The OR (95% CI) for ST in EMs and PMs was 2.94 (1.23-7.05, P = .016) vs 1.97 (1.09-3.55, P = .024), respectively. Mean ± SD plasma concentrations of lansoprazole were higher in PMs than in EMs: 207 ± 179 ng/mL vs 132 ± 141 ng/mL (P = .04). Lansoprazole-associated upper respiratory infections and ST in children are related in part to CYP2C19 haplotype. Our data suggest that lansoprazole-associated adverse events in children may be mitigated by adjusting the conventional dose in PMs. Additional studies are required to replicate our findings. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of maternal near miss on adverse infant nutritional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Dulce M; Moura, Erly C; Santos, Leonor P; Leal, Maria C; Cecatti, Jose G

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the association between self-reported maternal near miss and adverse nutritional status in children under one year of age. This study is a secondary analysis of a study in which women who took their children under one year of age to the national vaccine campaign were interviewed. The self-reported condition of maternal near miss used the criteria of Intensive Care Unit admission; eclampsia; blood transfusion and hysterectomy; and their potential associations with any type of nutritional disorder in children, including deficits in weight-for-age, deficits in height-for-age, obesity and breastfeeding. The rates of near miss for the country, regions and states were initially estimated. The relative risks of infant adverse nutritional status according to near miss and maternal/childbirth characteristics were estimated with their 95% CIs using bivariate and multiple analyses. The overall prevalence of near miss was 2.9% and was slightly higher for the Legal Amazon than for other regions. No significant associations were found with nutritional disorders in children. Only a 12% decrease in overall maternal breastfeeding was associated with near miss. Living in the countryside and child over 6 months of age increased the risk of altered nutritional status by approximately 15%, while female child gender decreased this risk by 30%. Maternal near miss was not associated with an increased risk of any alteration in infant nutritional status. There was no association between maternal near miss and altered nutritional status in children up to one year of age. The risk of infant adverse nutritional status was greater in women living in the countryside, for children over 6 months of age and for male gender.

  7. The effect of maternal near miss on adverse infant nutritional outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulce M. Zanardi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the association between self-reported maternal near miss and adverse nutritional status in children under one year of age. METHODS: This study is a secondary analysis of a study in which women who took their children under one year of age to the national vaccine campaign were interviewed. The self-reported condition of maternal near miss used the criteria of Intensive Care Unit admission; eclampsia; blood transfusion and hysterectomy; and their potential associations with any type of nutritional disorder in children, including deficits in weight-for-age, deficits in height-for-age, obesity and breastfeeding. The rates of near miss for the country, regions and states were initially estimated. The relative risks of infant adverse nutritional status according to near miss and maternal/childbirth characteristics were estimated with their 95% CIs using bivariate and multiple analyses. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of near miss was 2.9% and was slightly higher for the Legal Amazon than for other regions. No significant associations were found with nutritional disorders in children. Only a 12% decrease in overall maternal breastfeeding was associated with near miss. Living in the countryside and child over 6 months of age increased the risk of altered nutritional status by approximately 15%, while female child gender decreased this risk by 30%. Maternal near miss was not associated with an increased risk of any alteration in infant nutritional status. CONCLUSIONS: There was no association between maternal near miss and altered nutritional status in children up to one year of age. The risk of infant adverse nutritional status was greater in women living in the countryside, for children over 6 months of age and for male gender.

  8. Focal treatment of spasticity using botulinum toxin A in cerebral palsy cases of GMFCS level V: evaluation of adverse effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Tedesco

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To report on the experience of injections of botulinum toxin A (BTA in a series of patients with cerebral palsy of Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS level V.Methods:This was a retrospective case series study on 33 patients with cerebral palsy of GMFCS level V who received 89 sessions of BTA application (of which 84 were Botox® and five were other presentations, in which the basic aim was to look for adverse effects.Results:The mean number of application sessions per patient was three, and the mean age at the time of each injection was 4 + 6 years (range: 1.6–13 years. The muscles that most frequently received injections were the gastrocnemius, hamstrings, hip adductors, biceps brachii and finger flexors. The mean total dose was 193 U and the mean dose per weight was 12.5 U/kg. Only one patient received anesthesia for the injections and no sedation was used in any case. No local or systemic adverse effects were observed within the minimum follow-up of one month.Conclusion:The absence of adverse effects in our series was probably related to the use of low doses and absence of sedation or anesthesia. According to our data, BTA can be safely used for patients with cerebral palsy of GMFCS level V, using low doses and preferably without sedation or anesthesia.

  9. Toxic elements in the stream sediments of an urbanized basin, Eastern China: urbanization greatly elevates their adverse biological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pengbao; Yin, Aijing; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Huan; Fan, Manman; Gao, Chao

    2017-04-01

    The concentration of toxic elements (Hg, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni and As) was measured in the sediments of the Qinhuai River in Eastern China along a rural to urban gradient. Multiple approaches were undertaken to evaluate the degree of enrichment and adverse biological effects of these elements. The results showed that the concentration of Hg, Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb increased exponentially from the agricultural headwater to the urbanized downstream, which reflects a severe anthropogenic influence. In addition, area-specific references, such as the local soil background (LSB) and upper continental crust (UCC) derived from the Yangtze craton, were more applicable for evaluating the enrichment of toxic elements in the Qinhuai River than was global UCC. In addition, Cd and Hg had the highest enrichment factor values (EF, with averages of 9.18 and 7.14, respectively); Zn, Pb and Cu had moderate EFs (averages from 1.52 to 2.40), while the average EFs of Ni, Cr and As were approximately equal to 1. Based on consensus-based sediment quality guidelines (SQGs), the contamination characteristics of all of the samples studied were associated with low to moderate priority of adverse biological effects (ABEs) in the rural upstream area, while it was associated with a high to moderate priority of ABEs in the urban sections of the Qinhuai River. Our results suggest that the adverse biological effects of elevated levels of toxic elements were strongly related to the degree of anthropogenic pollution.

  10. Adverse Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extracts and the Major Components in the Stems of Impatiens balsamina L. on Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Fang Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Impatiens balsamina L. (Balsaminaceae, an annual herb found throughout China, has been extensively used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. However, our knowledge regarding the adverse effects of I. balsamina in vivo is very limited. In this present study, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans model was employed to fully assess the adverse effects of hydroalcoholic (EtOH 55% extracts of I. balsamina stems (HAEIBS in vivo. After exposure to 10 mg/mL HAEIBS, the major organism-level endpoints of C. elegans of percent survival, frequency of head thrash and body bends, and reproduction had decreased by 24%, 30%, and 25%, respectively. The lifespan of C. elegans was also greatly reduced after HAEIBS exposure compared to the controls. The active compounds in HAEIBS were separated using high speed countercurrent chromatograph (HSCCC and characterized by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. Two compounds, lawsone and 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (MNQ, and their adverse effects were then more thoroughly detailed in this study. It was found that lawsone is the major toxin in HAEIBS with a higher toxicity than MNQ in terms of negative impact on C. elegans mortality, locomotion, reproduction, and lifespan. Our data also suggests that the C. elegans model may be useful for assessing the possible toxicity of other Chinese medicines, plant extracts, and/or compounds.

  11. The effect of lifetime cumulative adversity on change and chronicity in depressive symptoms and quality of life in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrira, Amit

    2012-12-01

    Lifetime cumulative adversity (LCA) has a detrimental effect on mental health. However, it is less clear whether it also increases the risk for mental health deterioration across time, and whether it is related to a continuous impairment in mental health among older adults. The current study aimed to examine whether LCA is related to deterioration and to continuous vulnerability in depressive symptoms and quality of life. Nine thousand one hundred fifty four older adults (mean age = 63 at Wave 1) who participated in the first three waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) reported exposure to negative life events, depressive symptoms, and quality of life. Respondents with more LCA were at greater risk of high level of depressive symptoms and low level of quality of life. Those with more adversity were at greater risk of reporting an increase in depressive symptoms and a decrease in quality of life between waves. LCA was also related to continuous high level of depressive symptoms and low level of quality of life. The effect of LCA was stronger for depressive symptoms than for quality of life. LCA is associated with decline, as well as with continuous impairment, in major markers of mental health at the second half of life. The overall modest effects imply that resilience to LCA is widespread among older adults. Still, prevention and intervention programs should target old people with cumulative adversity, as they are in risk for deterioration and chronic vulnerability in important components of mental health.

  12. Hydrocortisone as an intervention for dexamethasone-induced adverse effects in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of a double-blind, randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.T. Warris (Lidewij); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); F.K. Aarsen (Femke); S. Pluijm (Saskia); M. Bierings (Marc); Van Bos, C.D. (Cor Den); C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); Thygesen, H.H. (Helene H.); W.J.E. Tissing (Wim); M.A. Veening (Margreet A.); R. Pieters (Rob); E.L.T. van den Akker (Erica)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose Dexamethasone is a key component in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but can induce serious adverse effects. Recent studies have led to the hypothesis that neuropsychological adverse effects may be a result of cortisol depletion of the cerebral

  13. WindVOiCe, a Self-Reporting Survey: Adverse Health Effects, Industrial Wind Turbines, and the Need for Vigilance Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Carmen M. E.; Gillis, Lorrie; Kouwen, Nicholas; Aramini, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Industrial wind turbines have been operating in many parts of the globe. Anecdotal reports of perceived adverse health effects relating to industrial wind turbines have been published in the media and on the Internet. Based on these reports, indications were that some residents perceived they were experiencing adverse health effects. The purpose…

  14. Beyond PM2.5: The role of ultrafine particles on adverse health effects of air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Hu, Bin; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jianxun; Yang, Guosheng; Xu, Diandou; Chen, Chunying

    2016-12-01

    Air pollution constitutes the major threat to human health, whereas their adverse impacts and underlying mechanisms of different particular matters are not clearly defined. Ultrafine particles (UFPs) are high related to the anthropogenic emission sources, i.e. combustion engines and power plants. Their composition, source, typical characters, oxidative effects, potential exposure routes and health risks were thoroughly reviewed. UFPs play a major role in adverse impacts on human health and require further investigations in future toxicological research of air pollution. Unlike PM2.5, UFPs may have much more impacts on human health considering loads of evidences emerging from particulate matters and nanotoxicology research fields. The knowledge of nanotoxicology contributes to the understanding of toxicity mechanisms of airborne UFPs in air pollution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Air Pollution, edited by Wenjun Ding, Andrew J. Ghio and Weidong Wu. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Adverse effects produced by different drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease: A mixed treatment comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-Dong; Bi, Zhen-Yun; Liu, Jing-Feng; Si, Wei-Jun; Shi, Qian-Qian; Xue, Li-Peng; Bai, Jing

    2017-10-01

    This mixed treatment comparison is used to compare the adverse effects of eleven different drugs used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD). The drugs that we compare include the following: ropinirole, rasagiline, rotigotine, entacapone, apomorphine, pramipexole, sumanirole, bromocriptine, piribedil, pergolide, and levodopa. PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library were searched from the inception to December 2015. Our analysis combines the evidences of direct comparison and indirect comparison between various literatures. We evaluated the merging odds ratios (OR) value and surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) of each of the drugs and used this as a mode of comparison. Twenty-four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included in this study. Our results demonstrated that the incidence of adverse reactions of ropinirole, rotigotine, entacapone, and sumanirole were obviously higher in terms of nausea compared to the placebo. Ropinirole produced the highest incidence rates of dyskinesia side effects, whereas pramipexole was significantly higher in terms of patients' hallucination. In addition, the SUCRA values of all the drugs showed that the incidence of adverse reaction of pergolide was relatively high (nausea: 83.5%; hallucination: 79.8%); for dyskinesia and somnolence, the incidence of ropinirole was higher (dyskinesia: 80.5%; somnolence: 69.4%); the incidence of adverse reaction of piribedil was higher on PD in terms of dizziness (67.0%); and the incidence of bromocriptine was relatively high in terms of constipation (62.3%). This mixed treatment comparison showed that the drugs ropinirole, bromocriptine, and piribedil produced the highest incidence rates of nausea, dyskinesia, hallucination, dizziness, constipation, and somnolence symptoms. Thus, we conclude that as these three drugs produced the most frequent symptoms, they are not recommended for the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Adverse Effect of the 2-1-1 Regimen for Rabies PEP in Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu Qing; Tao, Xiao Yan; Yu, Peng Cheng; Jin, Chun Qiu; Yu, Hong Jie; Chen, Mei Shun; Zhu, Wu Yang

    2017-05-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) has proved to be the most important measure for rabies prevention and control. There is little information regarding adverse reactions to the Essen and 2-1-1 regimens in preschool children (aged 0-6). We reexamined the outcomes of 1,109 preschool children who were vaccinated using SPEEDA under the Essen regimen between January 2011 and December 2012 and 1,267 preschool children under the 2-1-1 regimen between January 2013 and December 2014. We find that, in preschool children, the febrile reaction after the first 2-dose injection in the 2-1-1 regimen was significantly higher than that induced by the first 1-dose in the Essen procedure. Thus, we recommend that the Essen regimen should still be used for rabies PEP in preschool children. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  17. [New devices of fecal diversion and collection: adverse effects described in the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez López, M I

    2014-01-01

    Among products for the management and control of faeces in patients with fecal incontinence, there are new devices that allow the diversion and collection of fecal matter. This study has aimed to know the complications related to these new devices described in the literature. A search was made in the main bibliographic databases, obtaining publications on the new devices. The relevant documents were selected, these being those that described complications. After these were described. A total of 13 relevant documents were recovered. There were 45 adverse events 36 patients. Those having the greatest incidence were rectal bleeding (10 patients) and abdominal distension (6 patients). In order to provide the best patient care, it is essential to know the possible complications in order to be able to prevent them. The cares given these patients need to be reevaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  18. A Review of Adverse Effects of Road Traffic Noise on Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devi; Kumari, Neeraj; Sharma, Pooja

    Noise pollution due to road traffic is a potential threat to human health. Since it is a global hazard, the rapid urbanization and exponential traffic growth have aggravated the problem. Population residing along the busy traffic lanes is continuously exposed to the sound levels which are above the permissible limits. This constant exposure to noise pollution is a cause of concern as it leads to several adverse impacts on human health. Traffic noise causes irritation and annoyance, sleep disturbances, cardiovascular disease, risk of stroke, diabetes, hypertension and loss of hearing. It results in decreased work performance. The present review highlights the serious health hazards of road traffic noise (RTN) which needs to be curbed. Preventive measures of noise pollution can help in combating noise-induced health hazards and increased work performance.

  19. Disclosure and adverse effects of complementary and alternative medicine used by hospitalized patients in the North East of England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello N

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence, disclosure and adverse effects of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use in hospitalised patients, and to explore the associations between patients’ perceived side-effects and relevant factors. Methods: Patients who were admitted to a district general hospital and met the eligibility criteria were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Their medications and pertinent details were verified from the medical notes. All quantitative and qualitative data were collated and analysed. A chi-squared test was performed to test the associations of the perceived CAM side-effects with the significance level determined at α=0.05. Results: A total of 240 in-patients completed the study. They were mostly white British (98.8%. The prevalence of CAM use within two years was 74.6% and one month 37.9%. Only 19 of 91 patients (20.9% using CAM within one month disclosed their current CAM applications. Nearly half of patients (45.8% who used CAM within two years experienced various CAM side-effects that tended to resolve after discontinuation. Slightly more than half (57.6% perceived CAM side-effects and their perceptions were significantly associated with gender (P=0.048 and consideration for future CAM use (P=0.033. Potential interactions between herbal remedies/dietary supplements and prescribed drugs, such as garlic with lisinopril or aspirin, were assessed in 82 patients (45.8%. Conclusion: Most in-patients used CAM and experienced some adverse effects. The disclosure of CAM use and its adverse outcomes should be encouraged by healthcare professionals.

  20. Effects of alcohol-induced working memory decline on alcohol consumption and adverse consequences of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, William V; Day, Anne M; Metrik, Jane; Leventhal, Adam M; Kahler, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol use appears to decrease executive function acutely in a dose-dependent manner, and lower baseline executive function appears to contribute to problematic alcohol use. However, no studies, to our knowledge, have examined the relationship between individual differences in working memory (a subcomponent of executive function) after alcohol consumption and drinking behaviors and consequences. The current study assessed the relationship between drinking behavior, alcohol-related consequences, and alcohol-induced changes in working memory (as assessed by Trail Making Test-B). Participants recruited from the community (n = 41), 57.3 % male, mean age 39.2, took part in a three-session, within-subjects, repeated-measures design. Participants were administered a placebo, 0.4 g/kg, or 0.8 g/kg dose of alcohol. Working memory, past 30-day alcohol consumption, and consequences of alcohol use were measured at baseline; working memory was measured again after each beverage administration. Poorer working memory after alcohol administration (controlling for baseline working memory) was significantly associated with a greater number of drinks consumed per drinking day. Additionally, we observed a significant indirect relationship between the degree of alcohol-induced working memory decline and adverse consequences of alcohol use, which was mediated through greater average drinks per drinking day. It is possible that greater individual susceptibility to alcohol-induced working memory decline may limit one's ability to moderate alcohol consumption as evidenced by greater drinks per drinking day and that this results in more adverse consequences of alcohol use.

  1. Melatonin for Atypical Antipsychotic-Induced Metabolic Adverse Effects: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kamath

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to determine the effect of melatonin administration on atypical antipsychotic-induced metabolic adverse effects in patients with psychiatric disorders. A systematic search was performed in PUBMED, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Web of Science, and EBSCOhost electronic databases. Randomized controlled trials studying the effect of melatonin on antipsychotic-induced metabolic adverse effects were identified and subjected to meta-analysis. Four studies were included in the meta-analysis, including 57 patients on melatonin and 61 patients on placebo. Melatonin produced a significant decrease in the diastolic blood pressure compared with placebo (mean difference = −4.44 [95% CI, −7.00 to −1.88]; p=0.0007; I2 = 13%, but not the systolic blood pressure (mean difference = −4.23 [95% CI, −8.11 to −0.36]; p=0.03; I2 = 0%. Although a decrease in the body mass index was seen in the melatonin group, the difference was not significant in the random-effects analysis model. To conclude, in patients on atypical antipsychotics, melatonin at a dose of up to 5 mg/day for a treatment duration of up to 12 weeks attenuated the rise in diastolic blood pressure compared with placebo but had no significant effects on other metabolic parameters.

  2. Melatonin for Atypical Antipsychotic-Induced Metabolic Adverse Effects: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Ashwin; Rather, Zahoor Ahmad

    2018-01-01

    The objective of our study was to determine the effect of melatonin administration on atypical antipsychotic-induced metabolic adverse effects in patients with psychiatric disorders. A systematic search was performed in PUBMED, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Web of Science, and EBSCOhost electronic databases. Randomized controlled trials studying the effect of melatonin on antipsychotic-induced metabolic adverse effects were identified and subjected to meta-analysis. Four studies were included in the meta-analysis, including 57 patients on melatonin and 61 patients on placebo. Melatonin produced a significant decrease in the diastolic blood pressure compared with placebo (mean difference = -4.44 [95% CI, -7.00 to -1.88]; p = 0.0007; I 2 = 13%), but not the systolic blood pressure (mean difference = -4.23 [95% CI, -8.11 to -0.36]; p = 0.03; I 2 = 0%). Although a decrease in the body mass index was seen in the melatonin group, the difference was not significant in the random-effects analysis model. To conclude, in patients on atypical antipsychotics, melatonin at a dose of up to 5 mg/day for a treatment duration of up to 12 weeks attenuated the rise in diastolic blood pressure compared with placebo but had no significant effects on other metabolic parameters.

  3. Meta-Analysis of the Adverse Effects of Long-Term Azithromycin Use in Patients with Chronic Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Ding-Hui; Chen, Lu-Lu; Zhao, Qi; Yu, Yan-Zhe; Ding, Jing-Jing; Miao, Li-Yun; Xiao, Yong-Long; Zhang, De-Ping; Guo, Yu-Biao; Xie, Can-Mao

    2014-01-01

    The adverse effects of azithromycin on the treatment of patients with chronic lung diseases (CLD) were evaluated in the present study. MEDLINE and other databases were searched for relevant articles published until August 2013. Randomized controlled trials that enrolled patients with chronic lung diseases who received long-term azithromycin treatment were selected, and data on microbiological studies and azithromycin-related adverse events were abstracted from articles and analyzed. Six studies were included in the meta-analysis. The risk of bacterial resistance in patients receiving long-term azithromycin treatment was increased 2.7-fold (risk ratio [RR], 2.69 [95% confidence interval {95% CI}, 1.249, 5.211]) compared with the risk in patients receiving placebo treatment. On the other hand, the risk of bacterial colonization decreased in patients receiving azithromycin treatment (RR, 0.551 [95% CI, 0.460, 0.658]). Patients receiving long-term azithromycin therapy were at risk of increased impairment of hearing (RR, 1.168 [95% CI, 1.030, 1.325]). This analysis provides evidence supporting the idea that bacterial resistance can develop with long-term azithromycin treatment. Besides the increasingly recognized anti-inflammatory role of azithromycin used in treating chronic lung diseases, we should be aware of the potential for adverse events with its long-term use. PMID:24189261

  4. Behavioral and physiologic adverse effects in adolescent and young adult emergency department patients reporting use of energy drinks and caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Deidrya A E; Cotter, Bradford V; Merchant, Roland C; Babu, Kavita M; Baird, Janette R; Nirenberg, Ted; Linakis, James G

    2013-08-01

    This pilot study assessed the prevalence of physiologic and behavioral adverse effects among adolescent (13-17 years) and adult (18-25 years) emergency department patients who reported energy drink and/or caffeinated-only beverage use within the 30 days prior to emergency department presentation. It was hypothesized that energy drink users would report more adverse effects than those who used only traditional caffeinated beverages such as coffee, tea, or soft drinks. This cross-sectional pilot study was conducted in two urban emergency departments, one adult and one pediatric. Eligible patients were enrolled during a 6-week period between June and August 2010. Participants completed a tablet computer-based, self-administered, anonymous questionnaire about their past 30-day energy drink and/or caffeinated-only beverage use, substance use, and experience of 10 physiologic and 10 behavioral symptoms. Multivariable logistic regression and negative binomial regression models, adjusted for age, gender, and substance use, were created to compare the occurrence of each adverse effect between energy drink and caffeinated-only beverage users. Odds ratios (ORs) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated. Of those enrolled, 53.3% reported consuming energy drinks, 39.1% caffeinated-only beverages, and 7.6% no energy drinks or caffeinated-only beverages within the past 30 days. In multivariable logistic regression models, energy drink users were more likely than caffeinated-only beverage users to report having "gotten into trouble at home, school, or work" in the past 30 days (OR: 3.12 [1.24-7.88]). In the negative binomial regression multivariable models, more behavioral effects were reported among drug users (IRR: 1.50 [1.18-1.93]), and more physiologic effects were reported among tobacco users (IRR: 1.42 [1.13-1.80]) and females (IRR: 1.48 [1.21-1.80]), but not among energy drink users. Energy drink users and substance users are more likely to report specific physiologic

  5. Comparative study of adverse effects of Olanzapine and Risperidone on blood suger, lipid and other side effects in psychotic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mitra safa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Safa M1, Mohammadi MR2, Saki M3, Delfan B4, Tarrahi MJ5, Rouhandeh M6 1. Assistant Professor, Department of psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 2. GP, Khorramabad, Iran 3. Instructor, Department of Nursing, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 4. Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 5. Instructor, Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran 6. BSc in Nursing, Khorramabad, Iran Abstract Background: Chronic mental disorders are among the problems in psychiatrics. Atypical anti psychotic drugs are new effective medications to treat these disorders. Unfortunately these drugs lead to side effects such as increase in blood glocuse, weight gain and edema. This study aims to investigate adverse effects of Olanzapine and Rispridone on lipid level and blood glocuse and other complications in patients with psychotic disorders. Materials and methods: This clinical trial-double blinded study, patients with psychotic disorders were randomly categorized into two groups. Group one treated with Olanzapine and other with Rispridone. All the subjects were initially assessed for blood sugar and lipids, and in the case of normal, they were randomly assigned to two groups in a double- blinded method to be treated with Olanzapine or Risperidone. Blood sugar and lipids tests were performed for all subjects at the 1st week and 3 months after initiation of therapy. Other complications were assessed too, then the data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The results of the study indicated that the levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and blood suger rose significantly at the 1st week and third month after beginning the treatment. Increase of cholesterol and triglyceride in the Olanzapine and Risperidone

  6. Adverse effects of extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) for acute respiratory failure: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zulian; Duarte, Rui V; Bayliss, Sue; Bramley, George; Cummins, Carole

    2016-06-07

    The extracorporeal membrane carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) system is primarily designed for the purpose of removing CO2 from the body for patients with potentially reversible severe acute hypercapnic respiratory failure or being considered for lung transplantation. Systematic reviews have focused on the effectiveness of ECCO2R. To the author's best knowledge, this is the first systematic review to focus on the adverse effects of this procedure. We will conduct a systematic review of procedure-related adverse effects of ECCO2R systems. A high sensitivity search strategy will be employed in Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and product regulatory databases and ongoing trial registers to identify citations. Reference lists of relevant studies and grey literature will also be searched. Screening of the results will be performed by two reviewers independently using pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Clinical trials and observational studies will be included. Data will be extracted using a purposefully developed extraction form. Appropriateness for statistical pooling of the results will be determined and carried out if heterogeneity is low to moderate. The GRADE framework will be employed to grade the overall quality of the evidence. In the UK, the current access to the use of ECCO2R is possible only with special arrangements for clinical governance, consent and for audit or research. Current evidence on ECCO2R suggests that there are a number of well-recognised complications which vary greatly across studies. This systematic review will consolidate the existing knowledge on adverse effects resulting from the use of ECCO2R. PROSPERO CRD42015023503 .

  7. Comparative effectiveness and adverse effects of interferon alpha-2b plus ribavirin therapy in hepatitis 'C' for 26 weeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C is major emerging challenge for pathologists and treating physicians all over the world. Already 10 million Pakistani population has become anti-HCV positive. It is not only affecting hepatobiliary system but with passage of time research is revealing that Hepatitis C is going to involve almost every organ of the body. With timely diagnosis and treatment, millions of patients can be saved from morbidity and mortality. The nation has to sacrifice initial economic allocations to avoid later millions of mortalities and greater economic losses on affected patients and to support their families. The objective of this study was to evaluate effectiveness of combine therapy of Hepatitis C in local population of Pakistan. This case series study was done at CMH Okara, Kohat, Abbottabad, and PAF Hospital, Shorkot from August 2000 to August 2009. All 1,000 patients from 10 to 60 years of age, confirmed anti-HCV Positive by ELISA and PCR Positive for HCV RNA, were subjected to Interferon alpha-2b and Ribavirin therapy for similar period of time. Response and adverse affects were observed by clinical examination, blood complete picture including platelet count and ALT fortnightly. PCR for HCV RNA and ultrasound abdomen (hepatobiliary system) was done quarterly during treatment and 6 monthly for 2 years after treatment to review the sustained response and relapse. Over all cure rate after 2 years was 855 (85.5%) excluding the 50 (5%) of initial resistant to one year treatment and 95 (9.5%) re-treated relapse cases. One hundred and forty-five (14.5%) patients were found to be resistant to treatment. Hepatitis C must be treated timely after proper diagnosis. Interferon and Ribavirin combination have shown high 'cure' rate in Hepatitis C. In spite of high cure rate of 85.5% with timely and proper treatment, low socio-economic status is a major problem for poor individuals to get treatment. Preventive aspect must be strictly followed and implemented. (author)

  8. Reduction of inappropriate prescriptions and adverse effects to medications in hospitalized elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fajreldines

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Together, potentially inappropriate prescribing of medications (PIP and appropriate prescribing omission (APO constitute a problem that requires multiple interventions to reduce its size and the occurrence of adverse drug events (ADE. This study aims to assess PIP, APO, ADE before and after the intervention of a clinical pharmacist over medical prescriptions for elderly hospitalized patients. In a before-after study, a total of 16 542 prescriptions for 1262 patients were analyzed applying the criteria defined in both STOPP- START (screening tool of older people's prescriptions and screening tool to alert to right treatment. The intervention consisted in lectures and publications on STOPP-START criteria made available to all the areas of the hospital and suggestions made by the clinical pharmacist to the physician on each individual prescription. Before intervention, PIM was 48.9% on admission and 46.1% at discharge, while after the intervention it was 47.4% on admission and 16.7% at discharge. APO was 10% on admission and 7.6% at discharge, while after intervention it was 12.2% on admission and 7.9% at discharge. ADE were 50.9% before and 34.4% after intervention. The frequency of return to emergency was 12.2% and 4.7% before and after intervention. PIM, EAM, conciliation error, clinically serious drug interaction, and delirium were reduced to statistically significant levels. In line with various international studies, the intervention showed to attain positive results.

  9. Adverse effects of herbal or dietary supplements in G6PD deficiency: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Lai, Nai Ming; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Chong, David Weng Kwai

    2017-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common genetic disorder, affecting nearly 400 million individuals worldwide. Whilst it is known that a number of drugs, foods and chemicals can trigger haemolysis in G6PD deficient individuals, the association between herbal and dietary supplements and haemolysis is less clear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between herbal or dietary supplements and adverse events in G6PD deficient individuals. We searched 14 electronic databases from their inception until November 2015 for articles describing the use of herbal or dietary supplements in G6PD deficient individuals. Additional publications were identified from manually searching textbooks, conference abstracts and the grey literature. All study designs were included as long as they contained clinical information. These gathered findings were summarized narratively. Thirty-two publications met inclusion criteria. These reported on 10 herbal and dietary supplements. Overall evidence linking haemolysis to a herbal/dietary supplement was only found for henna. No evidence of harm was observed for vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, Gingko biloba and α-lipoic acid. The review showed that there was insufficient evidence to contravene the use of most herbal or dietary products at therapeutic doses in G6PD deficient subjects. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Effects of early life adversity and sex on dominance in European starlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Tom; Oliver, Caitlin Jade; Andrews, Clare; Bateson, Melissa; Nettle, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Dominance in socially foraging animals may be related to sex and to variation in individual quality. Individual quality may in turn reflect conditions during early development. We studied dominance in a cohort of adult European starlings, Sturnus vulgaris , that had been subject to experimental manipulations of food supply and begging effort when they were nestlings. We measured dominance in two different contexts, contests over a food resource and relative position on a sloping perch, over the course of 3 weeks. Dominance in food contests was extremely stable over the 3 weeks and relative perch position somewhat stable. Males were dominant over females in contests over food and perched in higher positions. These sex differences were not explained by males' greater size or body weight. Food dominance and perch position were uncorrelated. Neither early life food supply nor early life begging effort affected food dominance; nor did an alternative measure of developmental stress, developmental telomere attrition. Birds that had been made to beg more as nestlings perched in higher positions than those that had begged less. Our results did not support the hypothesis that early life adversity leads to lower adult dominance rank in the context of feeding, and we suggest that relative perch position may have measured individual preference rather than competitive ability.

  11. The management of acute adverse effects of breast cancer treatment in general practice: a video-vignette study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwa, Moyez; Long, Anne; Shaw, Tim; Pagey, Georgina; Halkett, Georgia; Pillai, Vinita; Meng, Xingqiong

    2014-09-03

    There has been a focus recently on the use of the Internet and email to deliver education interventions to general practitioners (GPs). The treatment of breast cancer may include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and/or hormone treatment. These treatments may have acute adverse effects. GPs need more information on the diagnosis and management of specific adverse effects encountered immediately after cancer treatment. The goal was to evaluate an Internet-based educational program developed for GPs to advise patients with acute adverse effects following breast cancer treatment. During phase 1, participants viewed 6 video vignettes of actor-patients reporting 1 of 6 acute symptoms following surgery and chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy treatment. GPs indicated their diagnosis and proposed management through an online survey program. They received feedback about each scenario in the form of a specialist clinic letter, as if the patient had been seen at a specialist clinic after they had attended the GP. This letter incorporated extracts from local guidelines on the management of the symptoms presented. This feedback was sent to the GPs electronically on the same survey platform. In phase 2, all GPs were invited to manage similar cases as phase 1. Their proposed management was compared to the guidelines. McNemar test was used to compare data from phases 1 and 2, and logistic regression was used to explore the GP characteristics that were associated with inappropriate case management. A total of 50 GPs participated. Participants were younger and more likely to be female than other GPs in Australia. For 5 of 6 vignettes in phase 1, management was consistent with expert opinion in the minority of cases (6%-46%). Participant demographic characteristics had a variable effect on different management decisions in phase 1. The variables modeled explained 15%-28% of the differences observed. Diagnosis and management improved significantly in phase 2, especially for diarrhea

  12. Systematic review of the potential adverse effects of caffeine consumption in healthy adults, pregnant women, adolescents, and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikoff, Daniele; Welsh, Brian T; Henderson, Rayetta; Brorby, Gregory P; Britt, Janice; Myers, Esther; Goldberger, Jeffrey; Lieberman, Harris R; O'Brien, Charles; Peck, Jennifer; Tenenbein, Milton; Weaver, Connie; Harvey, Seneca; Urban, Jonathan; Doepker, Candace

    2017-11-01

    To date, one of the most heavily cited assessments of caffeine safety in the peer-reviewed literature is that issued by Health Canada (Nawrot et al., 2003). Since then, >10,000 papers have been published related to caffeine, including hundreds of reviews on specific human health effects; however, to date, none have compared the wide range of topics evaluated by Nawrot et al. (2003). Thus, as an update to this foundational publication, we conducted a systematic review of data on potential adverse effects of caffeine published from 2001 to June 2015. Subject matter experts and research team participants developed five PECO (population, exposure, comparator, and outcome) questions to address five types of outcomes (acute toxicity, cardiovascular toxicity, bone and calcium effects, behavior, and development and reproduction) in four healthy populations (adults, pregnant women, adolescents, and children) relative to caffeine intake doses determined not to be associated with adverse effects by Health Canada (comparators: 400 mg/day for adults [10 g for lethality], 300 mg/day for pregnant women, and 2.5 mg/kg/day for children and adolescents). The a priori search strategy identified >5000 articles that were screened, with 381 meeting inclusion/exclusion criteria for the five outcomes (pharmacokinetics was addressed contextually, adding 46 more studies). Data were extracted by the research team and rated for risk of bias and indirectness (internal and external validity). Selected no- and low-effect intakes were assessed relative to the population-specific comparator. Conclusions were drawn for the body of evidence for each outcome, as well as endpoints within an outcome, using a weight of evidence approach. When the total body of evidence was evaluated and when study quality, consistency, level of adversity, and magnitude of response were considered, the evidence generally supports that consumption of up to 400 mg caffeine/day in healthy adults is not associated

  13. Energy drink consumption in Europe: A review of the risks, adverse health effects and policy options to respond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Joaquim Breda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the worldwide consumption of energy drinks increasing in recent years, concerns have been raised both in the scientific community and among the general public about the health effects of these products. Recent studies provide data on consumption patterns in Europe however more research is needed to determine the potential for adverse health effects related to the increasing consumption of energy drinks, particularly among young people. A review of the literature was conducted to identify published articles that examined the health risks, consequences and policies related to energy drink consumption. The health risks associated with energy drink consumption are primarily related to their caffeine content, but more research is needed that evaluates the long term effects of consuming common energy drink ingredients. The evidence indicating adverse health effects due to the consumption of energy drinks with alcohol is growing. The risks of heavy consumption of energy drinks among young people have largely gone unaddressed and are poised to become a significant public health problem in the future.

  14. Energy Drink Consumption in Europe: A Review of the Risks, Adverse Health Effects, and Policy Options to Respond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, João Joaquim; Whiting, Stephen Hugh; Encarnação, Ricardo; Norberg, Stina; Jones, Rebecca; Reinap, Marge; Jewell, Jo

    2014-01-01

    With the worldwide consumption of energy drinks increasing in recent years, concerns have been raised both in the scientific community and among the general public about the health effects of these products. Recent studies provide data on consumption patterns in Europe; however, more research is needed to determine the potential for adverse health effects related to the increasing consumption of energy drinks, particularly among young people. A review of the literature was conducted to identify published articles that examined the health risks, consequences, and policies related to energy drink consumption. The health risks associated with energy drink consumption are primarily related to their caffeine content, but more research is needed that evaluates the long-term effects of consuming common energy drink ingredients. The evidence indicating adverse health effects due to the consumption of energy drinks with alcohol is growing. The risks of heavy consumption of energy drinks among young people have largely gone unaddressed and are poised to become a significant public health problem in the future. PMID:25360435

  15. Adverse events associated with incretin-based drugs in Japanese spontaneous reports: a mixed effects logistic regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daichi Narushima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spontaneous Reporting Systems (SRSs are passive systems composed of reports of suspected Adverse Drug Events (ADEs, and are used for Pharmacovigilance (PhV, namely, drug safety surveillance. Exploration of analytical methodologies to enhance SRS-based discovery will contribute to more effective PhV. In this study, we proposed a statistical modeling approach for SRS data to address heterogeneity by a reporting time point. Furthermore, we applied this approach to analyze ADEs of incretin-based drugs such as DPP-4 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists, which are widely used to treat type 2 diabetes. Methods: SRS data were obtained from the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER database. Reported adverse events were classified according to the MedDRA High Level Terms (HLTs. A mixed effects logistic regression model was used to analyze the occurrence of each HLT. The model treated DPP-4 inhibitors, GLP-1 receptor agonists, hypoglycemic drugs, concomitant suspected drugs, age, and sex as fixed effects, while the quarterly period of reporting was treated as a random effect. Before application of the model, Fisher’s exact tests were performed for all drug-HLT combinations. Mixed effects logistic regressions were performed for the HLTs that were found to be associated with incretin-based drugs. Statistical significance was determined by a two-sided p-value <0.01 or a 99% two-sided confidence interval. Finally, the models with and without the random effect were compared based on Akaike’s Information Criteria (AIC, in which a model with a smaller AIC was considered satisfactory. Results: The analysis included 187,181 cases reported from January 2010 to March 2015. It showed that 33 HLTs, including pancreatic, gastrointestinal, and cholecystic events, were significantly associated with DPP-4 inhibitors or GLP-1 receptor agonists. In the AIC comparison, half of the HLTs reported with incretin-based drugs favored the random effect

  16. Language development of internationally adopted children: Adverse early experiences outweigh the age of acquisition effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhlin, Natalia; Hein, Sascha; Doyle, Niamh; Hart, Lesley; Macomber, Donna; Ruchkin, Vladislav; Tan, Mei; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2015-01-01

    We compared English language and cognitive skills between internationally adopted children (IA; mean age at adoption=2.24, SD=1.8) and their non-adopted peers from the US reared in biological families (BF) at two time points. We also examined the relationships between outcome measures and age at initial institutionalization, length of institutionalization, and age at adoption. On measures of general language, early literacy, and non-verbal IQ, the IA group performed significantly below their age-peers reared in biological families at both time points, but the group differences disappeared on receptive vocabulary and kindergarten concept knowledge at the second time point. Furthermore, the majority of children reached normative age expectations between 1 and 2 years post-adoption on all standardized measures. Although the age at adoption, age of institutionalization, length of institutionalization, and time in the adoptive family all demonstrated significant correlations with one or more outcome measures, the negative relationship between length of institutionalization and child outcomes remained most robust after controlling for the other variables. Results point to much flexibility and resilience in children's capacity for language acquisition as well as the potential primacy of length of institutionalization in explaining individual variation in IA children's outcomes. (1) Readers will be able to understand the importance of pre-adoption environment on language and early literacy development in internationally adopted children. (2) Readers will be able to compare the strength of the association between the length of institutionalization and language outcomes with the strength of the association between the latter and the age at adoption. (3) Readers will be able to understand that internationally adopted children are able to reach age expectations on expressive and receptive language measures despite adverse early experiences and a replacement of their first

  17. Adverse effects of female obesity and interaction with race on reproductive potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    Across the reproductive spectrum, obesity is associated with greater risks for adverse health outcomes, including higher rates of infertility, subfertility, early pregnancy loss, fetal deaths and stillbirths, congenital anomalies, and pregnancy complications. The excess reproductive morbidity associated with obesity may increase with longer duration, making the current trends among children and young adults particularly critical in terms of their future reproductive potential. Obese women have a lower chance of pregnancy following in vitro fertilization (IVF), require higher dosages of gonadotropins, and have reduced rates of implantation, clinical intrauterine gestation, and live birth rates and increased rates of pregnancy loss, as well as greater risks for prematurity and preeclampsia even when stratified by plurality. Racial and ethnic differences by overweight and obesity in IVF outcomes have been reported. Compared with normal-weight women, failure to achieve a clinical intrauterine gestation is significantly more likely among obese women overall, normal-weight and obese Asian women, normal-weight Hispanic women, and overweight and obese Black women. Among women who do conceive, compared with normal-weight women, failure to achieve a live birth is significantly more likely among overweight and obese women overall, and among overweight and obese Asian women, overweight and obese Hispanic women, and normal-weight and obese Black women. Although weight loss should theoretically be the first line of therapy for obese women, other lifestyle factors, such as regular physical exercise, elimination of tobacco use and alcohol consumption, and stress management, may be of more immediate benefit in achieving conception. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An acidosis-sparing ketogenic (ASK) diet to improve efficacy and reduce adverse effects in the treatment of refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Alan W C; Walcutt, Isabel A; Sander, Josemir W

    2017-09-01

    Diets that increase production of ketone bodies to provide alternative fuel for the brain are evolving from the classic ketogenic diet for epilepsy devised nearly a century ago. The classic ketogenic diet and its more recent variants all appear to have similar efficacy with approximately 50% of users showing a greater than 50% seizure reduction. They all require significant medical and dietetic support, and there are tolerability issues. A review suggests that low-grade chronic metabolic acidosis associated with ketosis is likely to be an important contributor to the short term and long term adverse effects of ketogenic diets. Recent studies, particularly with the characterization of the acid sensing ion channels, suggest that chronic metabolic acidosis may increase the propensity for seizures. It is also known that low-grade chronic metabolic acidosis has a broad range of negative health effects and an increased risk of early mortality in the general population. The modified ketogenic dietary treatment we propose is formulated to limit acidosis by measures that include monitoring protein intake and maximizing consumption of alkaline mineral-rich, low carbohydrate green vegetables. We hypothesize that this acidosis-sparing ketogenic diet is expected to be associated with less adverse effects and improved efficacy. A case history of life-long intractable epilepsy shows this diet to be a successful long-term strategy but, clearly, clinical studies are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Control of adverse effects of explosive blasting in mines by using shock tube (non-electric) initiation systems and its future challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, P.D. [Maharashtra Explosives Ltd., Nagpur (India)

    2000-04-01

    Every kind of blasting in mines produces some adverse effects on environment, such as ground vibration, noise, fly rock etc. Presently, for restricting these adverse effects, use of shock tube (non-electric) initiation systems are gaining momentum. There are some inherent shortcomings of this initiation system regarding chances of misfires. This paper discusses the various adverse effects of blasting, advantages of shock tube initiation system and the shortcomings of shock tube initiation system regarding chances of misfire and how misfire arises out of failure of shock tube initiation system is different and more dangerous than the misfire occurring due to failure of conventional system (with detonating fuse and cord relays). 1 tab.

  20. CYP2D6 polymorphisms may predict occurrence of adverse effects to tamoxifen: a preliminary retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wickramage I

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ishani Wickramage,1 Kamani Hemamala Tennekoon,1 Merenchi Arachchige Yasantha Ariyaratne,2 Asanka Sudeshini Hewage,1 Tharmini Sundralingam,1 1Institute of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IBMBB, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka; 2National Cancer Institute, Maharagama, Sri Lanka Introduction and aims: Tamoxifen is an adjuvant drug effective in treating hormone ­receptor – positive breast cancer. However, 30%–50% of patients relapse and many develop adverse effects, such as hot flashes and fatty liver. Allelic variations altering the activity of cytochrome P450-2D6 enzyme affect response to tamoxifen by modulating metabolism of tamoxifen into its pharmacologically active metabolite endoxifen. Although association between CYP2D6 polymorphisms and recurrence of breast cancer in patients on tamoxifen had been reported, little evidence exists on association between these polymorphisms and adverse effects to tamoxifen. This study explored the association between CYP2D6 polymorphisms and tamoxifen effects, hitherto not studied in Sri Lanka. Methods: A retrospective preliminary study was carried out on 24 breast cancer patients on tamoxifen for minimally 3 months attending National Cancer Institute, Maharagama, Sri Lanka. They were not on CYP2D6-inhibiting drugs, chemotherapy or other endocrine therapy, and had no conditions that could occur as adverse effects to tamoxifen before starting the therapy. Their blood samples were collected, DNA was extracted and genotyped using SNaPshot Multiplex sequencing based single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP assay. Results: SNP/allele frequencies detected: 1846G>A (confirmatory of *4 null allele=8.3%; 2549delA (confirmatory of *3 null allele=50%; 100C>T (suggestive of *10 reduced functional allele, in addition to other alleles=0%; combination of 2988G>A, -1584C and 2850C>T (strongly suggestive of *41 or other reduced functional allele=4.8%. Occurrence of heterozygous 2988G>A SNP with

  1. Assessment of individual radiosensitivity in human lymphocytes of cancer patients and its correlation with adverse side effects to radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Di Giorgio, M; Busto, E; Mairal, L; Menendez, P; Roth, B; Sardi, M; Taja, M R; Vallerga, M B

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: Individual radiosensitivity is an inherent characteristic, associated with an increased reaction to ionizing radiation on the human body. Biological endpoints such as clonogenic survival, chromosome aberration formation and repair capacity of radiation-induced damage have been applied to evaluate individual radiosensitivity in vitro. 5%-7% of cancer patients develop adverse side effects to radiation therapy in normal tissues within the treatment field, which are referred as 'clinical radiation reactions' and include acute effects, late effects and cancer induction. It has been hypothesized that the occurrence and severity of these reactions are mainly influenced by genetic susceptibility to radiation. Additionally, the nature of the genetic disorders associated with hypersensitivity to radiotherapy suggests that DNA repair mechanisms are involved. Consequently, the characterization of DNA repair in lymphocytes through cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (MN) and alkaline single-cell micro...

  2. [Adverse effects of the herd immunity or when childhood vaccination becomes deleterious for the epidemiology of infectious diseases in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Pierre-Olivier

    2011-03-01

    The irremediable ageing of the world population, the aged-related increasing in the prevalence of infectious diseases the fear of any influenza pandemic rife have recently led the European Union Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS) et the International Association of Geriatric and Gerontology European Regions (IAGG-ER) of establishing vaccine recommendations dedicated to individuals aged of 60 years or above and promoting a life-course vaccination programme. This approach is mainly motivated by the herd immunity-associated effect on the epidemiology of infectious diseases observed within the adult and old adult population. This review (1) after a presentation of the concept and its demonstrated beneficial effects; (2) will detail that herd immunity acts with adverse effects on the epidemiology of the infectious diseases in the adult and aged individual population; (3) in order to demonstrate that maintaining a vaccine pressure in every age groups is imperative.

  3. The adverse effects of domestic violence on psychosocial well-being

    OpenAIRE

    Siltala, Heli

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of domestic violence on psychosocial well-being.Comparisons were made between the effects of psychological, physical and sexual abuse. Possible gender differences in the prevalence and effects of domestic violence were also taken into account. The data used in this study was collected from the staff of the Central Finland Health Care District in 2010. A total of 1 952 people participated in the study. The dependent variables included in...

  4. Severe unexpected adverse effects after permanent eye makeup and their management by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldman A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Alberto Goldman,1 Uwe Wollina2 1Clinica Goldman, Porto Alegre RS, Brazil; 2Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany Abstract: Permanent makeup is a cosmetic tattoo that is used to enhance one’s appearance, and which has become more popular among middle-aged and elderly women. A couple of benefits seem to be associated with permanent tattoos in the elderly: saving time (wake up with makeup; poor eyesight (difficult to apply makeup; and saving money. On the other hand, cosmetic tattoos bear the same risks as other tattoo procedures. We report on fading and unintended hyperpigmentation after tattooing on eyebrows and eyelids, and discuss the scientific and anatomical background behind the possible cause. Dermatochalasis may be a possible risk factor for excessive unwanted discolorations. Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser is an appropriate and safe therapeutic tool that can manage such adverse effects. Consumer protection warrants better information and education of the risks of cosmetic tattoos – in particular, for elderly women. Keywords: permanent makeup, cosmetic tattoos, adverse effects, dermatochalasis, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

  5. Cigarette smoking is associated with dose-dependent adverse effects on paraoxonase activity and fibrinogen in young women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Gajalakshmi; Araujo, Jesus A.; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Yin, Fen

    2014-01-01

    Context Smoking is associated with increased fibrinogen and decreased paraoxonase (PON) activity, markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, in patients with coronary artery disease. Objective We tested the hypothesis that the adverse effect of smoking on these biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress would be detectable in otherwise healthy young female habitual smokers. Materials and methods Thirty-eight young women participated in the study (n = 20 habitual smokers, n = 18 non-smokers). Fibrinogen, PON-1 activity and HDL oxidant index (HOI) were measured. Results Mean values of fibrinogen, PON-1 activity and log HOI were not different between the groups. Importantly, however, decreased PON-1 activity (r s = −0.51, p = 0.03) and increased fibrinogen (rs = 0.49, p = 0.04) were significantly correlated with increasing number of cigarettes smoked per day in habitual smokers. Discussion and conclusion Cigarette smoking is associated with a dose-dependent adverse effect on PON-1 activity and fibrinogen in young women, which may have implications for future cardiovascular risk. PMID:25472476

  6. Management of arthropod pathogen vectors in North America: Minimizing adverse effects on pollinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Howard; Bargar, Timothy A.; Hladik, Michelle L.; Lubelczyk, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Tick and mosquito management is important to public health protection. At the same time, growing concerns about declines of pollinator species raise the question of whether vector control practices might affect pollinator populations. We report the results of a task force of the North American Pollinator Protection Campaign (NAPPC) that examined potential effects of vector management practices on pollinators, and how these programs could be adjusted to minimize negative effects on pollinating species. The main types of vector control practices that might affect pollinators are landscape manipulation, biocontrol, and pesticide applications. Some current practices already minimize effects of vector control on pollinators (e.g., short-lived pesticides and application-targeting technologies). Nontarget effects can be further diminished by taking pollinator protection into account in the planning stages of vector management programs. Effects of vector control on pollinator species often depend on specific local conditions (e.g., proximity of locations with abundant vectors to concentrations of floral resources), so planning is most effective when it includes collaborations of local vector management professionals with local experts on pollinators. Interventions can then be designed to avoid pollinators (e.g., targeting applications to avoid blooming times and pollinator nesting habitats), while still optimizing public health protection. Research on efficient targeting of interventions, and on effects on pollinators of emerging technologies, will help mitigate potential deleterious effects on pollinators in future management programs. In particular, models that can predict effects of integrated pest management on vector-borne pathogen transmission, along with effects on pollinator populations, would be useful for collaborative decision-making.

  7. Refill adherence and self-reported adverse drug reactions and sub-therapeutic effects: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedna, Khedidja; Hägg, Staffan; Andersson Sundell, Karolina; Petzold, Max; Hakkarainen, Katja M

    2013-12-01

    To assess refill adherence to dispensed oral long-term medications among the adult population and to investigate whether the percentages of self-reported adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and sub-therapeutic effects (STEs) differed for medications with adequate refill adherence, oversupply, and undersupply. Survey responses on self-reported ADRs and STEs were linked to the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register in a cross-sectional population-based study. Refill adherence to antihypertensive, lipid-lowering, and oral anti-diabetic medications was measured using the continuous measure of medication acquisition (CMA). The percentages of self-reported ADRs and STEs were compared between medications with adequate refill adherence (CMA 0.8-1.2), oversupply (CMA > 1.2), and undersupply (CMA diabetic medications. Overall, 65.7% of the medications had adequate refill adherence, 21.9% oversupply, and 12.4% undersupply. The percentages of self-reported ADRs and STEs were respectively 2.6%, 2.7%, and 2.1% (p > 0.5) for ADRs and 1.1%, 1.6%, and 1.5% (p > 0.5) for STEs. Adequate refill adherence was found in two thirds of the medication therapies. ADRs and STEs were unexpectedly equally commonly reported for medications with adequate refill adherence, oversupply, and undersupply. These results suggest that a better understanding of patients' refill behaviors and their perceived medication adverse outcomes is needed and should be considered in improving medication management. The impact of individual and healthcare factors that may influence the association between refill adherence and reported medication adverse outcomes should be investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Characteristics and management of immune-related adverse effects associated with ipilimumab, a new immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrews S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie Andrews,1 Rita Holden21H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, 2St Luke's Hospital and Health Network Cancer Center, Easton, PA, USAAbstract: When diagnosed in its early stages, melanoma is highly treatable and associated with good long-term outcomes; however, the prognosis is much poorer for patients diagnosed with advanced or metastatic melanoma. For decades, available treatments were effective in only a few patients and associated with significant safety concerns. Ipilimumab is a novel immunotherapy which has proved to be an exciting breakthrough in the treatment of melanoma. It is the first drug approved for the treatment of melanoma by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA which has shown a survival benefit in a randomized Phase III clinical trial. The objective of this review is to provide information on the administration, treatment responses, and expected outcomes of treatment of metastatic melanoma with the new immunotherapeutic agent, ipilimumab, a drug with a unique mechanism of action that differentiates it from current treatments. Guidelines for the management of immune-related adverse events associated with ipilimumab therapy are also presented. These stress vigilance, prompt intervention, and the use of corticosteroids as appropriate. Various ipilimumab-associated immune-related adverse events, both common (enterocolitis, dermatitis and less frequent (hepatitis, hypophysitis, are illustrated in case studies. Nurses are uniquely positioned to provide patient and caregiver education on how this new therapy differs from traditional cytotoxic agents, to recognize the signs and symptoms of immune-related adverse events, and to report them immediately, and finally, to be aware of the patterns of response that are commonly observed in patients receiving ipilimumab therapy.Keywords: melanoma, ipilimumab, immunotherapy, case studies

  9. Guanfacine Attenuates Adverse Effects of Dronabinol (THC) on Working Memory in Adolescent-Onset Heavy Cannabis Users: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, David S; Holst, Manuela; Rodgman, Christopher; Haile, Colin N; Keller, Jake; Hussain, Mariyah Z; Kosten, Thomas R; Newton, Thomas F; Verrico, Christopher D

    2018-01-01

    The cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) agonist Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, adversely effects working memory performance in humans. The α2A-adrenoceptor (AR) agonist guanfacine improves working memory performance in humans. The authors aimed to determine the effects of short-term (6 days) treatment with guanfacine on adverse cognitive effects produced by THC. Employing a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design, the cognitive, subjective, and cardiovascular effects produced by oral THC (20 mg) administration were determined twice in the same cannabis users: once after treatment with placebo and once after treatment with guanfacine (3 mg/day). Compared with performance at baseline, THC negatively affected accuracy on spatial working memory trials while participants were maintained on placebo (p=0.012) but not guanfacine (p=0.497); compared with placebo, accuracy was significantly (p=0.003, Cohen's d=-0.640) improved while individuals were treated with guanfacine. Similarly, compared with baseline, THC increased omission errors on an attentional task while participants were maintained on placebo (p=0.017) but not on guanfacine (p=0.709); compared with placebo, there were significantly (p=0.034, Cohen's d=0.838) fewer omissions while individuals were maintained on guanfacine. Although THC increased visual analog scores of subjective effects and heart rate, these increases were similar during treatment with placebo and guanfacine. THC did not significantly affect performance of a recognition memory task or blood pressure while individuals were maintained on either treatment. Although preliminary, these results suggest that guanfacine warrants further testing as a potential treatment for cannabis-induced cognitive deficits.

  10. Adverse effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid on rat cerebellar granule cell cultures were attenuated by amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, B; Ferri, A; Brusco, A; Rassetto, M; Lopez, L M; Evangelista de Duffard, A M; Duffard, R

    2011-05-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), a worldwide-used herbicide, has been shown to produce a wide range of adverse effects in the health--from embryotoxicity and teratogenicity to neurotoxicity--of animals and humans. In this study, neuronal morphology and biochemical events in rat cerebellar granule cell (CGC) cultures have been analyzed to define some of the possible mechanisms involved in 2,4-D-induced cell death. For that purpose, amphetamine (AMPH) that has been shown to accelerate the recovery of several functions in animals with brain injury has been used as a pharmacologycal tool and was also investigated as a possible protecting agent. Addition of 2,4-D to CGC cultures produced a drastic decrease in cell viability, in association with an increased incidence of necrosis and apoptosis, and an increased level of reactive oxygen species, a decrease in glutathione content, and an abnormal activity of some enzymes with respect to the control group. The adverse effects of 2,4-D were partly attenuated in presence of AMPH. Some deleterious effects on several ultrastructural features of the cells, as well as the enhanced incidence of apoptosis, were partially preserved in AMPH-protected cultures as compared with those which were exposed to 2,4-D alone. The collected evidences (1) confirms the previously observed, deleterious effects of 2.4D on the same or a similar model; (2) suggests that the 2,4-D-induced apoptosis could have been mediated by or associated to an oxidative imbalance in the affected cells, and (3) shows some evidence of a protective effect of AMPH on 2,4-D-induced cell death, which could have been exerted through a reduction in the oxidative stress.

  11. Medical marijuana patient counseling points for health care professionals based on trends in the medical uses, efficacy, and adverse effects of cannabis-based pharmaceutical drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Jayesh R; Forrest, Benjamin D; Freeman, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a review of the medical uses, efficacy, and adverse effects of the three approved cannabis-based medications and ingested marijuana. A literature review was conducted utilizing key search terms: dronabinol, nabilone, nabiximols, cannabis, marijuana, smoke, efficacy, toxicity, cancer, multiple sclerosis, nausea, vomiting, appetite, pain, glaucoma, and side effects. Abstracts of the included literature were reviewed, analyzed, and organized to identify the strength of evidence in medical use, efficacy, and adverse effects of the approved cannabis-based medications and medical marijuana. A total of 68 abstracts were included for review. Dronabinol's (Marinol) most common medical uses include weight gain, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), and neuropathic pain. Nabiximol's (Sativex) most common medical uses include spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuropathic pain. Nabilone's (Cesamet) most common medical uses include CINV and neuropathic pain. Smoked marijuana's most common medical uses include neuropathic pain and glaucoma. Orally ingested marijuana's most common medical uses include improving sleep, reducing neuropathic pain, and seizure control in MS. In general, all of these agents share similar medical uses. The reported adverse effects of the three cannabis-based medications and marijuana show a major trend in central nervous system (CNS)-related adverse effects along with cardiovascular and respiratory related adverse effects. Marijuana shares similar medical uses with the approved cannabis-based medications dronabinol (Marinol), nabiximols (Sativex), and nabilone (Cesamet), but the efficacy of marijuana for these medical uses has not been fully determined due to limited and conflicting literature. Medical marijuana also has similar adverse effects as the FDA-approved cannabis-based medications mainly consisting of CNS related adverse effects but also including cardiovascular and respiratory

  12. Fish oil and olive oil supplements attenuate the adverse cardiovascular effects of concentrated ambient air pollution particles exposure in healthy middle-aged adult human volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to ambient levels of air pollution increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Advanced age is among the factors associated with susceptibility to the adverse effects of air pollution. Dietary fatty acid supplementation has been shown to decrease cardiovascular ris...

  13. The effect of an adverse psychological environment on salivary cortisol levels in the elderly differs by 5-HTTLPR genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Ancelin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: An adverse psychological environment (e.g. stressful events or depression has been shown to influence basal cortisol levels and cortisol response to stress. This differs depending on the adverse stimuli, but also varies across individuals and may be influenced by genetic predisposition. An insertion/deletion polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR is a strong candidate in this regard. Objective: To investigate how stressful life events and depression are associated with diurnal cortisol levels in community-dwelling elderly and determine whether this varies according to genetic variability in the 5-HTTLPR. Methods: This population-based study included 334 subjects aged 65 and older (mean (SD = 76.5 (6.3. Diurnal cortisol was measured on two separate days, under quiet (basal and stressful conditions. The number of recent major stressful events experienced during the past year was assessed from a 12-item validated questionnaire as an index of cumulative recent stressful events. Lifetime trauma was evaluated using the validated Watson's PTSD inventory, which evaluates the most severe traumatic or frightening experience according to DSM criteria. Depression was defined as having a Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI diagnosis of current major depressive disorder or high levels of depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale ≥16. 5-HTTLPR genotyping was performed on blood samples. Results: Exposure to stressful life events was associated with lower basal evening cortisol levels overall, and in the participants with the 5-HTTLPR L allele but not the SS genotype. The greatest effects (over 50% decrease, p < 0.001 were observed for the LL participants having experienced multiple recent stressful events or severe lifetime traumas. Participants with the L allele also had higher evening cortisol stress response. Conversely, depression tended to be associated with a 42

  14. High ammonium availability amplifies the adverse effect of low salinity on eelgrass Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villazán, Beatriz; Salo, Tiina Elina; Brun, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change intensifies the frequency and intensity of rainfall events, which increases the discharge of freshwater and nutrients to coastal areas. This may lower salinity and increase nutrient availability and, thus, affect estuarine eelgrass populations. We studied the interactive effect...... of increasing NH4+ levels and low salinity on estuarine eelgrass Zostera marina, grown in microcosm at various combinations of NH4+ enrichment (0, 10 and 25 µM) and salinity (5, 12.5 and 20). Increasing NH4+ had a positive effect on eelgrass performance as long as salinity was kept at ambient level (20). N...... enrichment was followed by an increase in pigments, photosynthesis and various growth variables and a decrease in stored carbon concentrations (sucrose and starch). Low salinity had an overall negative effect on plant fitness; pigment concentration, photosynthesis and growth were reduced while mortality...

  15. [Disorders of lipid and glucose metabolism. Long-term adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landauer, N; Goebel, F D

    2002-04-09

    In addition to readily controllable short-term side effects, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) also has long-term side effects: lipodystrophy syndrome, hyperlipoproteinemia, insulin resistance, elevated glucose tolerance sometimes leading to diabetes mellitus and lactic acidosis. The pathogenesis remains uncertain although various hypotheses have been advanced. A number of approaches for the treatment of lipodystrophy are available, the effects of which, however, have not been confirmed by study results. Hyperlipoproteinemia probably means an increased cardiovascular risk, but a final pronouncement on this is not yet possible. Fibrates and statins are currently applied for treatment, but interactions with HAART medicaments have to be considered. HAART-induced diabetes mellitus presents clinically as type 2 diabetes, and is treated accordingly.

  16. Adverse effects of non-hormonal pharmacological interventions in breast cancer survivors, suffering from hot flashes: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stub, Trine; Hervik, Jill Brook

    2016-01-01

    Published version. Source at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10549-016-4002-x Purpose: To access frequency and severity of adverse effects (AE) of non-hormonal drugs (NHD) for hot flashes in breast cancer survivors compared to controls and analyze adverse-effect risk by reviewing published randomized trials. Methods: Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO and PubMed databases were searched. Trials were included where participants were ...

  17. Adverse Effects of Influenza Vaccination among Healthcare Staff in Shiraz in 2014, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Hashemi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Influenza vaccination is one of the most important ways to prevent influenza acquisition in healthcare staff. This study was conducted to determine the cumulative incidence rate of side effects associated with influenza vaccination among healthcare staff in some of the hospitals in Shiraz. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on the staff of a number of hospitals in Shiraz who received influenza vaccine in 1392. Instrument in this study was a researcher-developed questionnaire about common side effects that was collected up to 10 days after the vaccination. Incidence of side effects was reported with 95% confidence interval. The data were analyzed by chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and univariate logistic regression. Results: From the 450 vaccinated staff, 424 (94.23% completed the questionnaire. 53.8% of vaccine recipients were female and 46.2% male. The mean age of the participants was 34.94 years.  Up to 10 days after vaccination, cumulative incidence rate of side effects following vaccination was obtained 21.7% for common cold-like symptoms, 71.2% for muscle pain, 16.5% for pain where the shot was given, 15.3% for fever, 14.4% for runny nose, 12.3% for severe headache, 9% for severe coughing, 0.9% for diarrhea, and 1.7% for abdominal pain (1.7%. No severe side effects such as acute allergic reactions and Guillain-Barré syndrome were reported. Conclusion: The reported incidence rate of side effects in this study, high risk of acquiring disease among health care staff, and their role in controlling influenza epidemics represent the necessity of influenza vaccination in this occupational population.

  18. Adverse health effects of experiencing food insecurity among Greenlandic school children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niclasen, B.; Petzold, M.; Schnohr, C. W.

    2013-01-01

    Background. In vulnerable populations, food security in children has been found to be associated with negative health effects. Still, little is known about whether the negative health effects can be retrieved in children at the population level. Objective. To examine food insecurity reported...... in Grade 5 through 10. The participation rate in the participating schools was 65%. Food insecurity was measured as going to bed or to school hungry because there was no food at home. Results. Boys, the youngest children (11-12 year-olds), and children from low affluence homes were at increased risk...

  19. Dyskinesia as a new adverse effect of hormonal treatment in West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhudyan, Biayna G; Dimova, Petia S; Capuano, Alessandro; Vigevano, Federico

    2014-03-01

    West syndrome is an age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy. Despite potential side effects, hormonal therapy remains the main treatment for West syndrome. Here, we report on 10 patients receiving steroid treatment who presented with unusual, mostly hyperkinetic, movements. Facial grimacing, repetitive mouth opening, adduction and abduction of upper and lower extremities, and periodical strabismus in different combinations were observed in all patients, independent of formulation, dose, duration, and efficacy of treatment. Symptoms disappeared in sleep and reappeared immediately on arousal. Dyskinesias stopped gradually after a month of discontinuation of treatment. Repeated EEGs did not show corresponding epileptiform activity. We conclude that these abnormal movements can be attributed to side effects of hormonal treatment.

  20. A Cross-Cultural Longitudinal Examination of the Effect of Cumulative Adversity on the Mental and Physical Health of Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palgi, Yuval; Shrira, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Self-oriented adversity refers to traumatic events that primarily inflict the self, whereas other-oriented adversity refers to events that affect the self by primarily targeting others. The present study aimed to examine whether cultural background moderates the effects of self-oriented and other-oriented adversity on mental and physical health of older adults. Using longitudinal data from the Israeli component of the Survey of Health and Retirement, we focused on 370 Jews and 239 Arabs who reported their exposure to various adversities across the lifespan, and completed questionnaires regarding mental and physical health. Results showed that the effect of self-oriented adversity on health did not differ among Jews and Arabs. However, other-oriented adversity showed a stronger effect on Arabs’ mental and physical health than on Jews’ health. Our findings suggest that the accumulation of adverse events that affect the self by primarily targeting others may have a stronger impact in collectivist cultures than in individualist cultures. PMID:25961862

  1. Dose-Effect Relationships for Adverse Events After Cranial Radiation Therapy in Long-term Childhood Cancer Survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, Irma W.E.M. van; Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C.; Pal, Helena J.H. van der; Heinen, Richard C.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Oldenburger, Foppe; Os, Rob M. van; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Schouten–van Meeteren, Antoinette Y.N.; Caron, Huib N.; Koning, Caro C.E.; Kremer, Leontien C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of clinical adverse events (AEs) and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors treated with cranial radiation therapy (CRT), with the aim of assessing dose-effect relationships. Methods and Materials: The retrospective study cohort consisted of 1362 Dutch childhood cancer survivors, of whom 285 were treated with CRT delivered as brain irradiation (BI), as part of craniospinal irradiation (CSI), and as total body irradiation (TBI). Individual CRT doses were converted into the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD 2 ). Survivors had received their diagnoses between 1966 and 1996 and survived at least 5 years after diagnosis. A complete inventory of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 3.0 AEs was available from our hospital-based late-effect follow-up program. We used multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses to examine the EQD 2 in relation to the prevalence and severity of AEs, correcting for sex, age at diagnosis, follow-up time, and the treatment-related risk factors surgery and chemotherapy. Results: There was a high prevalence of AEs in the CRT group; over 80% of survivors had more than 1 AE, and almost half had at least 5 AEs, both representing significant increases in number of AEs compared with survivors not treated with CRT. Additionally, the proportion of severe, life-threatening, or disabling AEs was significantly higher in the CRT group. The most frequent AEs were alopecia and cognitive, endocrine, metabolic, and neurologic events. Using the EQD 2 , we found significant dose-effect relationships for these and other AEs. Conclusion: Our results confirm that CRT increases the prevalence and severity of AEs in childhood cancer survivors. Furthermore, analyzing dose-effect relationships with the cumulative EQD 2 instead of total physical dose connects the knowledge from radiation therapy and radiobiology with the clinical experience

  2. Dose-Effect Relationships for Adverse Events After Cranial Radiation Therapy in Long-term Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijk, Irma W.E.M. van, E-mail: i.w.vandijk@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pal, Helena J.H. van der [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children' s Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heinen, Richard C. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children' s Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leeuwen, Flora E. van [Department of Epidemiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oldenburger, Foppe; Os, Rob M. van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ronckers, Cécile M. [Dutch Childhood Oncology Group, Long-term Effects after Childhood Cancer, The Hague (Netherlands); Schouten–van Meeteren, Antoinette Y.N. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children' s Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Caron, Huib N. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children' s Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Koning, Caro C.E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kremer, Leontien C.M. [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Oncology, Emma Children' s Hospital/Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of clinical adverse events (AEs) and treatment-related risk factors in childhood cancer survivors treated with cranial radiation therapy (CRT), with the aim of assessing dose-effect relationships. Methods and Materials: The retrospective study cohort consisted of 1362 Dutch childhood cancer survivors, of whom 285 were treated with CRT delivered as brain irradiation (BI), as part of craniospinal irradiation (CSI), and as total body irradiation (TBI). Individual CRT doses were converted into the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}). Survivors had received their diagnoses between 1966 and 1996 and survived at least 5 years after diagnosis. A complete inventory of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade 3.0 AEs was available from our hospital-based late-effect follow-up program. We used multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses to examine the EQD{sub 2} in relation to the prevalence and severity of AEs, correcting for sex, age at diagnosis, follow-up time, and the treatment-related risk factors surgery and chemotherapy. Results: There was a high prevalence of AEs in the CRT group; over 80% of survivors had more than 1 AE, and almost half had at least 5 AEs, both representing significant increases in number of AEs compared with survivors not treated with CRT. Additionally, the proportion of severe, life-threatening, or disabling AEs was significantly higher in the CRT group. The most frequent AEs were alopecia and cognitive, endocrine, metabolic, and neurologic events. Using the EQD{sub 2}, we found significant dose-effect relationships for these and other AEs. Conclusion: Our results confirm that CRT increases the prevalence and severity of AEs in childhood cancer survivors. Furthermore, analyzing dose-effect relationships with the cumulative EQD{sub 2} instead of total physical dose connects the knowledge from radiation therapy and radiobiology with the clinical experience.

  3. Patterns of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use, Perceived Benefits, and Adverse Effects among Adult Users in Enugu Urban, Southeast Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ijeoma Okoronkwo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is now on the increase. Evidence from studies carried out globally has established that CAM use is very common and varies among populations. This study investigated patterns of CAM use, perceived benefits, and associated harm with CAM use among adults. A cross-sectional study was conducted in three local government areas of Enugu urban, Southeast Nigeria. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from all consenting adult participants aged between 18 and 65 years. Of the 732 participants interviewed, 62.8% were females while 37.2% were males. Majority (84.7% of the participants had used CAM at one time or another. The most commonly used CAM product was the biological products, followed by spiritual therapy. The major route of administration for CAM products was oral and about 40% of the participants combined CAM with conventional medicine. Majority (78.6% of CAM users benefited from CAM products after using them while a few complained of adverse reactions. As CAM is gaining widespread acceptance and use, there is need for clinical trial on the benefits and adverse effects associated with the use of CAM to facilitate proof of efficacy and safety of the products.

  4. Effect of controlled adverse chamber environment exposure on tear functions in silicon hydrogel and hydrogel soft contact lens wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takashi; Matsumoto, Yukihiro; Ibrahim, Osama M A; Wakamatsu, Tais Hitomi; Uchino, Miki; Fukagawa, Kazumi; Ogawa, Junko; Dogru, Murat; Negishi, Kazuno; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2011-11-11

    To prospectively evaluate the effect of controlled adverse chamber environment (CACE) exposure on tear function, including tear osmolarity, in subjects wearing narafilcon A versus those wearing etafilcon A soft contact lens (SCL). Thirty-one healthy subjects with no history of contact lens wear (13 women, 18 men; average age, 30.5 ± 6.5 years) were randomly divided into age- and sex-matched groups (15 subjects wearing narafilcon A SCL; 16 subjects wearing etafilcon A SCL) and entered a CACE for 20 minutes. All subjects underwent tear osmolarity, tear evaporation rate, strip meniscometry, tear film breakup time, fluorescein vital staining, and functional visual acuity measurement before and after exposure to the controlled adverse chamber. The mean blink rate increased with significant deteriorations in the mean symptom VAS scores, mean tear osmolarity, tear evaporation rate, strip meniscometry score, and tear stability with CACE exposure along with a decrease in visual maintenance ratio in functional visual acuity testing in etafilcon A wearers. The mean symptom VAS scores, mean tear evaporation rate, tear stability, blink rates, and visual maintenance ratios did not change significantly in narafilcon A wearers after CACE exposure. This study suggested marked tear instability, higher tear osmolarity, and increased tear evaporation with marked dry eye and visual symptomatology in nonadapted hydrogel SCL wearers, suggesting that silicone hydrogel SCLs may be suitable for persons who live and work in cool, low-humidity, and windy environments, as tested in this study.

  5. [Effect of endotracheal intubation and laryngeal mask airway on perioperative respiratory adverse events in children with upper airway infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hua-jun; Fang, Xiang-ming

    2013-12-03

    To investigate the effect of endotracheal intubation (TT) or the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) on the incidence of perioperative respiratory adverse events in children with upper respiratory tract infection undergo general anesthesia. From November, 2006 to October, 2012 in the Zhuji People's Hospital, 76 children with upper respiratory tract infection approved by hospital ethic committee were randomly divided into 2 groups:group I (n = 36), children were applied with endotracheal intubation during general anesthesia (TT group), while groupII (n = 40), laryngeal mask airway were used (LMA group).Intraoperative mean arterial pressure (MAP), hear rate (HR), pulse oximetry (SPO2), and end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (P ETCO2) were recorded during the surgery. The incidence of adverse events such as hypoxemia, fidgety, sore throat, and laryngospasm were evaluated in resuscitation room.We also assessed the pre- and postoperative symptoms of respiratory tract infection. There was no significant difference in upper respiratory tract infection symptoms between two groups, and the children in both groups have good tolerance to TT or LMA.However, the hemodynamics status in LMA group were more stable than those in TT group after the LMA insertion or removing (P children with upper respiratory tract infection undergo general anesthesia.

  6. Investigation of landslide potential parameters on Zonguldak-Ereğli Highway and adverse effects of landslides in the region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Eray

    2014-04-01

    Landslides are natural phenomena in the same class of natural disasters as earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, erosion, and volcanic eruptions that adversely affect human lives and property. Owing to their widespread occurrence, landslides are easily visible and able to be partially understood by people witnessing them. Nevertheless, to comprehend the detail of their formation and determine their potential, it is necessary to undertake geodetic, geological, and geophysical measurements in regions prone to landslides. By analyzing these measurements, it is possible to better ascertain those regions predisposed to landslides and thus provide the means to prevent loss of life and property. The city of Zonguldak, situated in the Western Black Sea region of Turkey, has a high occurrence of landslides owing to its harsh topography with rugged and steep slopes and rainfall in almost every season. Furthermore, the diurnal temperature ranging up to 10 °C in all seasons, especially in winter, plays a crucial role in rock disintegration in this region. Other factors damage ground composition and trigger landslides, such as underground mining operations, road construction that collapses rocky hills using explosives, and excavation works in steep terrain for building construction. This study gives a detailed account of the causes and adverse effects of landslides and their parameters through examples of landslide occurrences in the region, together with the results and analyses of two periods of geodetic measurements conducted on the Zonguldak-Ereğli Highway in Ilıksu district.

  7. Long-term adverse effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation on dental development in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pas-van Voskuilen, I. G. M.; Veerkamp, J. S. J.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.; Bresters, D.; van Wijk, A. J.; Barasch, A.; McNeal, S.; Gortzak, R. A. Th

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess late effects of cytotoxic therapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) on dental development in survivors of childhood cancer. Forty children who underwent allogeneic HCT for a variety of hematological malignancies were evaluated at a minimum of

  8. Long-term adverse effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation on dental development in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pas-Voskuilen, I.G.M.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Bresters, D.; van Wijk, A.J.; Barasch, A.; McNeal, S.; Gortzak, R.A.T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess late effects of cytotoxic therapy with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) on dental development in survivors of childhood cancer. Materials and methods: Forty children who underwent allogeneic HCT for a variety of hematological malignancies

  9. Scaling the sublethal effects of methylmercury to yellow perchs population dynamics using adverse outcome pathway framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study sought to evaluate the effects of environmentally relevant dietary MeHg exposures on adult female yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) reproduction. Yellow perch were used in the study for their socioeconomic and ecological importance within the Great Lakes basin, a...

  10. Mercury, phthalates, and ionizing radiations in neonatal intensive care controls. Adverse effects and preventive measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarlenga, Mercedes; Somaruga, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Studies realized by important institutions in the world have demonstrated that the load of illnesses associated with environmental and occupational conditions are affected by the current generation, especially to the most vulnerable populations as are the newborn babies. In the present work, the effects of the mercury, the phthalates and the ionizing radiations on the neonates health are described [es

  11. Machine learning-based prediction of adverse drug effects: An example of seizure-inducing compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxuan Gao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Various biological factors have been implicated in convulsive seizures, involving side effects of drugs. For the preclinical safety assessment of drug development, it is difficult to predict seizure-inducing side effects. Here, we introduced a machine learning-based in vitro system designed to detect seizure-inducing side effects. We recorded local field potentials from the CA1 alveus in acute mouse neocortico-hippocampal slices, while 14 drugs were bath-perfused at 5 different concentrations each. For each experimental condition, we collected seizure-like neuronal activity and merged their waveforms as one graphic image, which was further converted into a feature vector using Caffe, an open framework for deep learning. In the space of the first two principal components, the support vector machine completely separated the vectors (i.e., doses of individual drugs that induced seizure-like events and identified diphenhydramine, enoxacin, strychnine and theophylline as “seizure-inducing” drugs, which indeed were reported to induce seizures in clinical situations. Thus, this artificial intelligence-based classification may provide a new platform to detect the seizure-inducing side effects of preclinical drugs.

  12. Identifying and managing adverse environmental health effects: 5. Persistent organic pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelsohn, Alan; Gibson, Brian L.; Sanborn, Margaret D.; Weir, Erica

    2002-01-01

    CONCERN AND AWARENESS IS GROWING about the health effects of exposures to environmental contaminants, including those found in food. Most primary care physicians lack knowledge and training in the clinical recognition and management of the health effects of environmental exposures. We have found that the use of a simple history-taking tool — the CH2OPD2 mnemonic (Community, Home, Hobbies, Occupation, Personal habits, Diet and Drugs) — can help physicians identify patients at risk of such health effects. We present an illustrative case of a mother who is concerned about eating fish and wild game because her 7-year-old son has been found to have learning difficulties and she is planning another pregnancy. Potential exposures to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and mercury are considered. The neurodevelopmental effects of POPs on the fetus are reviewed. We provide advice to limit a patient's exposure to these contaminants and discuss the relevance of these exposures to the learning difficulties of the 7-year-old child and to the planning of future pregnancies. PMID:12074124

  13. Combined use of SSRIs and NSAIDs increases the risk of gastrointestinal adverse effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, J.C.F.; van den Berg, P.B; Tobi, H; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje Theodora Wilhelmina

    Aims To investigate the relationship between the use of antidepressants with or without NSAIDs and the risk of gastrointestinal side-effects. Methods This was a population-based cohort study. Medication data of 180 000 patients from 16 pharmacies in The Netherlands were studied. The subjects were a

  14. Etonogestrel contraceptive implant (Implanon): analysis of patient compliance and adverse effects in the breastfeeding period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvan, Candan İltemir; Gözdemir, Elif; Kaygusuz, Ikbal; Kamalak, Zeynep; Turhan, Nilgün Öztürk

    2010-01-01

    To analyse the compliance of patients and side effects of Implanon® during breast feeding. Prospective study of 61 postpartum women who chose Implanon® for long term contraception between April 2007 and December 2009. Compliance, side effects and removals were recorded. Amenorrhoea, prolonged bleeding, frequent bleeding and infrequent bleeding were reported in 20 (32%), 13 (21%), 4 (6.5%) and 2 (3.2%) patients, respectively. Non-menstrual side effects experienced by participants included; weight gain reported by 10 patients (16%), anxiety by 6 (9.8%), breast tenderness by 4 (6.5%), headache by 4 (6.5%), pain at the insertion site by two (3.2%), hirstutism by two (3.2%), acne by 1 (1.6%), loss of libido by 1 (1.6%), weight gain and headache by two (3.2%), weight gain and anxiety by two (1.6%). The mean breastfeeding period was 16±7.4/months. During the follow up, Implanon® was removed from 24 patients (39%). If patients are well informed about its expected side effects before placement, Implanon® is well tolerated and i an acceptable choice for women who have recently experienced labor and are looking for long term reversible contraception.

  15. Marine snow increases the adverse effects of oil on benthic invertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenennaam, Van Justine S.; Rahsepar, Shokouh; Radović, Jagoš R.; Oldenburg, Thomas B.P.; Wonink, Jessica; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Foekema, Edwin M.

    2018-01-01

    After the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, a MOSSFA (Marine Oil Snow Sedimentation and Flocculent Accumulation) event took place, transporting an estimated 14% of total released oil to the sediment, and smothering parts of the benthic ecosystem. This microcosm study describes the effects of oiled

  16. Undiagnosed metabolic syndrome and other adverse effects among clozapine users of Xhosa descent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Faasen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clozapine use is known to be associated with significant side-effects, including prolongation of the QT-interval, agranulocytosis and metabolic syndrome. However, few data exist on the prevalence of clozapine side-effects in patients of Xhosa descent.  Objective. To gather data from Xhosa patients with schizophrenia to establish the prevalence of clozapine side-effects in this population.  Methods. Twenty-nine Xhosa patients with schizophrenia (as per the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR who had been receiving clozapine treatment for >1 year on an outpatient basis were selected for inclusion. All patients were participating in a genetics study in the Cape Metropolitan area. The participants were evaluated for the presence of side-effects (tests including an electrocardiogram, white blood cell count (WCC and fasting blood glucose.  Results. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 44.8% (95% confidence interval (CI 26.7 - 62.9 and of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus 13.8% (95% CI 1.24 - 26.34. There was a significant association between metabolic syndrome and body mass index (BMI (p440 ms. There was an association between the duration of clozapine treatment and QT-interval (with Bazett’s correction.   Conclusion. The high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus in this sample points to a need to monitor glucose levels and BMI on a regular basis. A larger study should be done to accurately quantify the differences in prevalence of side-effects between population groups.

  17. Silicon does not alleviate the adverse effects of drought stress in soybean plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Ruppenthal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Beneficial effects of silicon (Si in the plants growth under conditions of drought stress have been associated with to uptake and accumulation ability of element by different species. However, the effects of Si on soybean under water stress are still incipient and inconclusive. This study investigated the effect of Si application as a way to confer greater soybean tolerance to drought stress. The experiment was carried out in 20-L pots under greenhouse conditions. Treatments were arranged in a randomized block design in a 2 × 4 factorial: two water regimes (no stress or water stress and four Si rates (0, 50, 100 and 200 mg kg–1. Soybean plants were grown until beginning flowering (R1 growth stage with soil moisture content near at the field capacity, and then it started the differentiation of treatments under drought by the suspension of water supply. Changes in relative water content (RWC in leaf, electrolyte leakage from cells, peroxidase activity, plant nutrition and growth were measured after 7 days of drought stress and 3 days recovery. The RWC in soybean leaves decreased with Si rates in the soil. Silicon supply in soil with average content of this element, reduced dry matter production of soybean under well-irrigated conditions and caused no effect on dry matter under drought stress. The nitrogen uptake by soybean plants is reduced with the Si application under drought stress. The results indicated that the Si application stimulated the defense mechanisms of soybean plants, but was not sufficient to mitigate the negative effects of drought stress on the RWC and dry matter production.

  18. Vaccine Adverse Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... in the primary immunization series in infants Report Adverse Event Report a Vaccine Adverse Event Contact FDA ( ...

  19. High dose brain CT with ioxaglate and diatrizoate adverse reactions and effects on urine protein tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raininko, R.; Laivola, J.; Irjala, K.; Turku Univ. Central Hospital

    1988-01-01

    Sodium meglumine ioxaglate (320 or 306 mg I/ml) and meglumine diatrizoate (306 mg I/ml) in an intravenous dose of 2 ml/kg were compared in a randomized double-blind test on the brain CT of 209 patients. Side effects were noted in 56% of the ioxaglate group and 90% of the diatrizoate group. Diatrizoate caused a sensation of heat significantly more often and more intensely, but the frequencies of other side effects did not differ significantly. No severe reactions occurred. The quality of the CT scans was equal. Neither ioxaglate nor diatrizoate impaired renal function. False-positive strip tests and falsely elevated protein values measured by the biuretic method were found in particular in the ioxaglate group. The results of urine protein measurements and strip tests are misleading on the day of the examination with both ioxaglate and diatrizoate. (orig.)

  20. Listening in adverse conditions: Masking release and effects of hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersgaard, Claus Forup Corlin

    and HI listeners, to study the effects of hearing loss on the ability to decode speech, and to establish a framework for modeling speech intelligibility based on an auditory processing model. The first part of the thesis established the modeling framework and showed that, by using a model that captures...... if it is obtained from low-order resolved harmonics or from high-rate envelope fluctuations produced by interaction between unresolved harmonics. The final avenue of investigation focused on the effects of hearing loss on the ability to decode speech by measuring consonant confusions for both individual HI......Speech perception is a complex process involving the ability to detect the speech signal, separate it from interfering sounds and decode the transmitted speech information. In contrast to normalhearing (NH) listeners, hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often show a large reduction in the masking...

  1. Desalted duck egg white peptides promote calcium uptake by counteracting the adverse effects of phytic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tao; Liu, Weiwei; Shi, Wen; Ma, Zhili; He, Hui

    2017-03-15

    The structure of the desalted duck egg white peptides-calcium chelate was characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Characterization results showed structural folding and aggregation of amino acids or oligopeptides during the chelation process. Desalted duck egg white peptides enhanced the calcium uptake in the presence of oxalate, phosphate and zinc ions in Caco-2 monolayers. Animal model indicated that desalted duck egg white peptides effectively enhanced the mineral absorption and counteracted the deleterious effects of phytic acid. These findings suggested that desalted duck egg white peptides might promote calcium uptake in three pathways: 1) desalted duck egg white peptides bind with calcium to form soluble chelate and avoid precipitate; 2) the chelate is absorbed as small peptides by enterocyte; and 3) desalted duck egg white peptides regulate the proliferation and differentiation of enterocytes through the interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid 6 calcium channel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adverse effects of the renal accumulation of haem proteins. Novel therapeutic approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Melania Guerrero-Hue; Alfonso Rubio-Navarro; Ángel Sevillano; Claudia Yuste; Eduardo Gutiérrez; Alejandra Palomino-Antolín; Elena Román; Manuel Praga; Jesús Egido; Juan Antonio Moreno

    2018-01-01

    Haemoglobin and myoglobin are haem proteins that play a key role as they help transport oxygen around the body. However, because of their chemical structure, these molecules can exert harmful effects when they are released massively into the bloodstream, as reported in certain pathological conditions associated with rhabdomyolysis or intravascular haemolysis. Once in the plasma, these haem proteins can be filtered and can accumulate in the kidney, where they become cytotoxic, particularly for...

  3. [Fundamental and applied aspects of preventing the adverse effects of aviation noise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdan'ko, I M; Zinkin, V N; Soldatov, S K; Bogomolov, A V; Sheshegov, P M

    2014-01-01

    In the article, aviation noise is discussed as a harmful physical factor with ecological, hygienic, clinical and social implications. Noise contributes to development of general and occupational pathologies, chronic diseases, and reduction of professional longevity. The present-day knowledge of aviation noise sources and dynamics, and effects on environment, population, and aviation personnel is overviewed, as well as strategies to prevent noise consequences, muffling techniques being the key ones.

  4. Amelioration of sexual adverse effects in the early breast cancer patient

    OpenAIRE

    Melisko, Michelle E.; Goldman, Mindy; Rugo, Hope S.

    2010-01-01

    Background As the number of breast cancer survivors increases, the long term consequences of breast cancer treatment are gaining attention. Sexual dysfunction is a common complaint amongst breast cancer survivors, and there are few evidence based recommendations and even fewer well designed clinical trials to establish what treatments are safe or effective in this patient population. Design We conducted a PubMed search for articles published between 1995?2009 containing the terms breast cance...

  5. Adverse effects of lindane in a maize agro-ecosystem in Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukarhirwa, E.M.; Tinzaara, W.; Kiremire, B.T.

    1997-01-01

    The impact of lindane, at commercial rates of application, on invertebrate fauna, soil microbial activity, earthworm populations, crop damage and yields in a maize agro-ecosystem was studied and compared with unsprayed control plots of maize using a pitfall trap, D-Vac suction, litter bag, the earthworm formalin expulsion and crop assessment methods. The findings of the study generally portrayed lindane as having very few effects on the maize agro-ecosystem. (author). 5 refs, 9 tabs

  6. Identifying and managing adverse environmental health effects: 2. Outdoor air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelsohn, Alan; Stieb, David; Sanborn, Margaret D.; Weir, Erica

    2002-01-01

    AIR POLLUTION CONTRIBUTES TO PREVENTABLE ILLNESS AND DEATH. Subgroups of patients who appear to be more sensitive to the effects of air pollution include young children, the elderly and people with existing chronic cardiac and respiratory disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. It is unclear whether air pollution contributes to the development of asthma, but it does trigger asthma episodes. Physicians are in a position to identify patients at particular risk of health effects from air pollution exposure and to suggest timely and appropriate actions that these patients can take to protect themselves. A simple tool that uses the CH2OPD2 mnemonic (Community, Home, Hobbies, Occupation, Personal habits, Diet and Drugs) can help physicians take patients' environmental exposure histories to assess those who may be at risk. As public health advocates, physicians contribute to the primary prevention of illness and death related to air pollution in the population. In this article we review the origins of air pollutants, the pathophysiology of health effects, the burden of illness and the clinical implications of smog exposure using the illustrative case of an adolescent patient with asthma. PMID:12000251

  7. Contesting facts about wind farms in Australia and the legitimacy of adverse health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Shannon; Botterill, Linda Courtenay

    2017-02-01

    The development of wind energy in Australia has been subject to ongoing public debate and has been characterised by concerns over the health impacts of wind turbines. Using discursive psychology, we examine 'wind turbine syndrome' as a contested illness and analyse how people build and undermine divergent arguments about wind-farm health effects. This article explores two facets of the dispute. First, we consider how participants construct 'facts' about the health effects of wind farms. We examine rhetorical resources used to construct wind farms as harmful or benign. Second, we examine the local negotiation of the legitimacy of health complaints. In the research interviews examined, even though interviewees treat those who report experiencing symptoms from wind farms as having primary rights to narrate their own experience, this epistemic primacy does not extend to the ability to 'correctly' identify symptoms' cause. As a result, the legitimacy of health complaints is undermined. Wind turbine syndrome is an example of a contested illness that is politically controversial. We show how stake, interest and legitimacy are particularly relevant for participants' competing descriptions about the 'facts' of wind turbine health effects.

  8. Chemical characterization of sunscreens composition and its related potential adverse health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallad, Karim N

    2017-09-01

    Although the sun is very beneficial and essential for life, exposing ourselves too much to sunlight might lead to detrimental health effects such as skin cancer. Eight percent of the total different electromagnetic radiation that regularly irradiates the earth is classified as ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The ozone layer absorbs the most energetic UV rays; consequently, UV-A and UV-B reach the earth surface. UV-A rays heavily contribute to both premature skin aging and skin cancer, while UV-B rays cause sunburn. Hence, the use of sunscreen is strongly encouraged by many healthcare practitioners in order to minimize or possibly eradicate the harmful effects of UV rays on our skin, keeping in mind, that about 90% of all skin cancers are associated with exposure to the sun's harmful radiation. Unfortunately, inaccurate information is currently roaming the media and the Internet regarding the safety, toxicity, and acute side effects of the active ingredients currently used in sunscreens, therefore discouraging people from using sunscreens. In this review article, it is concluded based on the scientific published literature that the sunscreen ingredients are safe and there are no related potential hazardous health risks associated with their use. In addition, at present, sunscreens are very useful in preventing sunburn and probably skin cancer and photoaging and their regular use can have a positive and a significant impact on public health as means or instruments implemented to reduce exposure to UV radiation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effects of Vascular and Nonvascular Adverse Events and of Extended-Release Niacin With Laropiprant on Health and Healthcare Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Seamus; Haynes, Richard; Hopewell, Jemma C; Parish, Sarah; Gray, Alastair; Landray, Martin J; Collins, Rory; Armitage, Jane; Mihaylova, Borislava

    2016-07-01

    Extended-release niacin with laropiprant did not significantly reduce the risk of major vascular events and increased the risk of serious adverse events in Heart Protection Study 2-Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events (HPS2-THRIVE), but its net effects on health and healthcare costs are unknown. 25 673 participants aged 50 to 80 years with previous cardiovascular disease were randomized to 2 g of extended-release niacin with 40 mg of laropiprant daily versus matching placebo, in addition to effective statin-based low-density lipoprotein cholesterol-lowering treatment. The net effects of niacin-laropiprant on quality-adjusted life years and hospital care costs (2012 UK £; converted into US $ using purchasing power parity index) during 4 years in HPS2-THRIVE were evaluated using estimates of the impact of serious adverse events on health-related quality of life and hospital care costs. During the study, participants assigned niacin-laropiprant experienced marginally but not statistically significantly lower survival (0.012 fewer years [standard error (SE) 0.007]), fewer quality-adjusted life years (0.023 [SE 0.007] fewer using UK EQ-5D scores; 0.020 [SE 0.006] fewer using US EQ-5D scores) and accrued greater hospital costs (UK £101 [SE £37]; US $145 [SE $53]). Stroke, heart failure, musculoskeletal events, gastrointestinal events, and infections were associated with significant decreases in health-related quality of life in both the year of the event and in subsequent years. All serious vascular and nonvascular events were associated with substantial increases in hospital care costs. In HPS2-THRIVE, the addition of extended-release niacin-laropiprant to statin-based therapy reduced quality of life-adjusted survival and increased hospital costs. URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00461630. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Effects and adverse events after CXL for keratoconus are independent of age: a 1-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baenninger, P B; Bachmann, L M; Wienecke, L; Kaufmann, C; Thiel, M A

    2014-06-01

    To compare the effect, failure rate and the risks of corneal cross-linking (CXL) in keratoconus patients aged ≥35 years to patients phoropter-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and maximum keratometry values (Kmax) before and 12 months after CLX in patients aged ≥35 years (n=34, 38 eyes) to the cohort of patients below 35 years of age. Overall, CXL significantly improved BCVA from 0.487 logMAR (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.426-0.548) by -0.197 logMAR (95% CI -0.243 to -0.150; P<0.001) and reduced Kmax from 48.96 diopter (Dpt) by -1.33 Dpt (95% CI -1.85 to -0.81: P<0.001). Age ≥35 years had no effect on the changes of BCVA (-0.02 (95% CI -0.13 to 0.09); P=0.757) or Kmax (0.58 (95%CI -0.51 to 1.68); P=0.294) as compared with younger patients. In 54 patients (55 eyes, 38.5%) aged <35 years and in 18 patients (18 eyes, 47.4%) aged ≥35 years, BCVA increased by ≥2 Snellen lines. Failure (increase in Kmax ≥1 Dpt) was observed in 17 eyes (16.5%) of patients aged <35 years and in 3 eyes (7.9%) of patients aged ≥35 years during the 12-month follow-up period. Adverse outcomes (loss of ≥2 Snellen lines) occurred in 4 (3.9%) eyes of patients aged <35 years and 1 (2.6%) eye of a patient aged ≥35 years. Effects and adverse events of CXL treatment do not seem to differ between subjects younger or older than 35 years.

  11. [Effect of electroacupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6) on short-term adverse effects of drug-induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Yan; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Jiang; He, Zhi-Ping; Yan, Chen

    2007-02-01

    To search for a therapeutic method for alleviating the short-term adverse effect of drug-induced abortion. Ninety cases of early pregnancy were divided into 3 groups randomly. Control group were treated with medicine, electroacupuncture group I with electroacupuncture at both Hegu (LI 4) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6) simultaneously within 30-60 min after the medicine was given, and electroacupuncture group II with electroacupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6) successively within 30-60 min after the medicine was administrated. After treatment, the short-term adverse effect in the electroacupuncture groups was more significantly alleviated as compared with the control group (P effects of drug-induced abortion, and first electroacupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) followed by Sanyinjiao (SP 6) can more significantly alleviate abdominal pain.

  12. In vivo adverse effects of alpha-tocopherol on the semen quality of male bucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, A; Qureshi, M S; Khan, R U

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative stress has detrimental effects on semen quality during spermatogenesis and semen processing for artificial insemination. This work was conducted to study the effect of different levels of vitamin E on the semen traits, oxidative status and trace minerals in Beetal bucks. Thirty-six bucks of similar body weight and age (1 year) were randomly divided into four groups. One group was kept as control with no supplementation (group 1), and the others were supplemented with 200 (group 2), 400 (group 3) and 800 IU (group 4) vitamin E/animal/day for 2 months. At the end of the experiment, semen samples were collected and evaluated. Seminal plasma was separated to study the concentration of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and trace minerals (Zn, Cu, Mn and Fe). Group 3 showed significantly higher (p < 0.05) semen volume and per cent motility and lower dead sperm percentage compared to control group. Superoxide dismutase, GPx, Zn, Cu and Mn were higher in the same group. The level of AST decreased in group 3 without any change on the concentration of ALT. It is suggested that vitamin E at the rate of 400 IU/buck/day supported higher semen volume, per cent motility, per cent live spermatozoa, antioxidants (SOD, GPx) and trace mineral levels (Zn, Cu, Mn) in the seminal plasma. The increased supplementation from 0 to 400 showed a general increasing trend in improving semen quality. However, the dose of 800 IU/kg had no useful effect in further improving the semen quality. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Enduring effects of severe developmental adversity, including nutritional deprivation, on cortisol metabolism in aging Holocaust survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda, Rachel; Bierer, Linda M; Andrew, Ruth; Schmeidler, James; Seckl, Jonathan R

    2009-06-01

    In animal models, early life exposure to major environmental challenges such as malnutrition and stress results in persisting cardiometabolic, neuroendocrine and affective effects. While such effects have been associated with pathogenesis, the widespread occurrence of 'developmental programming' suggests it has adaptive function. Glucocorticoids may mediate 'programming' and their metabolism is known to be affected by early life events in rodents. To examine these relationships in humans, cortisol metabolism and cardiometabolic disease manifestations were examined in Holocaust survivors in relation to age at exposure and affective dysfunction, notably lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Fifty-one Holocaust survivors and 22 controls without Axis I disorder collected 24-h urine samples and were evaluated for psychiatric disorders and cardiometabolic diagnoses. Corticosteroids and their metabolites were assayed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS); cortisol was also measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Holocaust survivors showed reduced cortisol by RIA, and decreased levels of 5alpha-tetrahydrocortisol (5alpha-THF) and total glucocorticoid production by GC-MS. The latter was associated with lower cortisol metabolism by 5alpha-reductase and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11beta-HSD) type-2. The greatest decrements were associated with earliest age of Holocaust exposure and less severe PTSD symptomatology. Cardiometabolic manifestations were associated with decreased 11beta-HSD-2 activity. In controls, 5alpha-reductase was positively associated with trauma-related symptoms (i.e., to traumatic exposures unrelated to