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Sample records for ammonium perchlorates

  1. Comparative DFT study of crystalline ammonium perchlorate and ammonium dinitramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weihua; Wei, Tao; Zhu, Wei; Xiao, Heming

    2008-05-22

    The electronic structure, vibrational properties, absorption spectra, and thermodynamic properties of crystalline ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium dinitramide (ADN) have been comparatively studied using density functional theory in the local density approximation. The results shows that the p states for the two solids play a very important role in their chemical reaction. From the low frequency to high frequency region, ADN has more motion modes for the vibrational frequencies than AP. The absorption spectra of AP and ADN display a few, strong bands in the fundamental absorption region. The thermodynamic properties show that ADN is easier to decompose than AP as the temperature increases. PMID:18396853

  2. Thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate during gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess radiation damage effects in propellants, pyrotechnics, and similar materials, thermal decomposition measurements were made on ammonium perchlorate powders and crystals during gamma-ray irradiation. Gas evolution studies were made on single crystals and powders of ammonium perchlorate, both at room temperature and at 2270C. The results are discussed. (U.S.)

  3. Perchlorate Exposure and Thyroid Function in Ammonium Perchlorate Workers in Yicheng, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of low level dust on the thyroid function of workers chronically exposed to ammonium perchlorate (AP is uncertain and controversial. The aim of this study was to examine whether workers in China with long-term (>3 years occupational exposure to low levels of AP dust had affected thyroid homeostasis. Mean occupational exposures to AP dust ranged from 0.43 to 1.17 mg/m3. Geometric means of post-shift urinary perchlorate levels were 20.5 µg/L for those exposed and 12.8 µg/L for the controls. No significant differences were found for thyroid function parameters of FT3, FT4, or log TSH or for TPO prevalence or thyroglobulin levels. Additionally, no differences in findings were observed for complete blood count (CBC, serum biochemical profile, or pulmonary function test. Median urinary iodine levels of 172 and 184 µg/L showed that the workers had sufficient iodine intake. This study found no effect on thyroid function from long term, low-level documented exposure to ammonium perchlorate. It is the first study to report both thyroid status parameters and urinary perchlorate, a biomarker of internal perchlorate exposure, in occupationally exposed workers in China.

  4. CRYSTALLIZATION KINETICS OF AMMONIUM PERCHLORATE IN AN AGITATED VESSEL

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    Nahidh Kaseer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available 31Overall crystal growth kinetics for ammonium perchlorate in laboratory scale batch  agitated vessel crystallizer have been determined from batch experiments performed in an integral mode. The effects of temperature between 30-60ºC, seed size 0.07, 0.120 and 0.275 mm and stirrer speed 160, 340, and 480 rpm, on the kinetics of crystal growth were investigated. Two different methods, viz. polynomial fitting and initial derivative were used to predict the kinetics expression. In general both methods gave comparable results for growth kinetics estimation. The order of growth process is not more than two. The activation energy for crystal growth of ammonium perchlorate was determined and found  to be equal to 5.8 kJ/ mole.            Finally, the influence of the affecting parameters on the crystal growth rate gives general expression that had an obvious dependence of the growth rate on each variables of concern (temperature, seed size, and stirrer speed .The general overall growth rate expression had shown that super saturation is the most significant variable. While the positive dependence of the stirrer speed demonstrates the importance of the diffusional step in the growth rate model. Moreover, the positive dependence of the seed size demonstrate the importance of the surface integration  step in the growth rate model. All the studied variables tend to suggest that the growth rate characteristics  of ammonium perchlorate from aqueous solution commenced in a batch crystallizer are diffusion kinetic controlled process.

  5. CRYSTALLIZATION KINETICS OF AMMONIUM PERCHLORATE IN AN AGITATED VESSEL

    OpenAIRE

    Nahidh Kaseer; Rafi' J. Yaqub; Ahmed Khalid

    2013-01-01

    31Overall crystal growth kinetics for ammonium perchlorate in laboratory scale batch  agitated vessel crystallizer have been determined from batch experiments performed in an integral mode. The effects of temperature between 30-60ºC, seed size 0.07, 0.120 and 0.275 mm and stirrer speed 160, 340, and 480 rpm, on the kinetics of crystal growth were investigated. Two different methods, viz. polynomial fitting and initial derivative were used to predict the kinetics expression. In general both me...

  6. Prediction of Particle Size of Ammonium Perchlorate during Pulverisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Jain

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium perchlorate has been pulverised by an impact mill (air classifier mill to studythe influence of different operating parameters, viz., effect of mill speed, classifier speed, feedrate, and damper opening (suction rate on the particle size. Further based on the differentgrinding parameters, an empirical equation has been developed and used for the prediction ofparticle size. The experimental results indicate that the values are very close to the predictedones. In addition, particle size distribution has also been studied by applying different modelequations and it has been found that Rosin-Rammler model is the most suitable model for thisoperation.

  7. Stoichiometric analysis of ammonium nitrate and ammonium perchlorate with nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedhar, S.; Rao, S. Venugopal; Kiran, P. Prem; Tewari, Surya P.; Kumar, G. Manoj

    2010-04-01

    We present our results on the stoichiometric analysis of ammonium nitrate (AN) and ammonium Perchlorate (AP) studied using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with nanosecond pulses. The LIBS spectra collected for AP and AN, without any gating and using a high resolution spectrometer, exhibited characteristic lines corresponding to O, N, H, C, and K. The Oxygen line at 777.38 nm and three Nitrogen lines (N1, N2, N3) at 742.54 nm, 744.64 nm, 747.12 nm were used for evaluating the Oxygen/Nitrogen ratios. The intensities were calculated using area under the peaks and normalized to their respective transition probabilities and statistical weights. The O/N1 ratios estimated from the LIBS spectra were ~4.94 and ~5.11 for AP and O/N3 ratios were ~1.64 and ~1.47 for AN obtained from two independent measurements. The intensity ratios show good agreement with the actual stoichiometric ratios - four for AP and one for AN.

  8. High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

    2010-04-21

    High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's kPSI). Previous studies on similar AP based materials demonstrate that low pressure (e.g. P < 10 MPa or 1500 PSI) burn rates can be quite different than the elevated pressure deflagration rate measurements (see References and HPP results discussed herein), hence elevated pressure measurements are necessary in order understand the deflagration behavior under relevant conditions. Previous work on explosives have shown that at 100's of MPa some explosives will transition from a laminar burn mechanism to a convective burn mechanism in a process termed deconsolidative burning. The resulting burn rates that are orders-of-magnitude faster than the laminar burn rates. Materials that transition to the deconsolidative-convective burn mechanism at elevated pressures have been shown to be considerably more violent in confined heating experiments (i.e. cook-off scenarios). The mechanisms of propellant and explosive deflagration are extremely complex and include both chemical, and mechanical processes, hence predicting the behavior and rate of a novel material or formulation is difficult if not impossible. In this work, the AP/HTPB based material, TAL-1503 (B-2049), was burned in a constant volume apparatus in argon up to 300 MPa (ca. 44 kPSI). The burn rate and pressure were measured in-situ and used to calculate a pressure dependent burn rate. In general, the material appears to burn in a laminar fashion at these elevated pressures. The experiment was reproduced multiple times and the burn rate law using the best data is B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} where B is the burn

  9. Radiation decomposition of ammonium perchlorate in the presence of composite rocket propellant ingredients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolysed ammonium perchlorate (AP) oxidises aqueous iodide ions more when it is irradiated in combination with either aluminium, hydroxy terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), copper chromite or iron oxide. The influence is large in the case of AP + HTPB and AP + Copper chromite. (author)

  10. Experimental investigation on the heterogeneous kinetic process of the low thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longuet, Baptiste [Laboratoire Energetique Explosions et Structures Universite d' Orleans (Germany); Gillard, Philippe [Laboratoire Energetic Explosions et Structures, Universite d' Orleans, Bourges (France)

    2009-02-15

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate has been extensively studied in the past. Nevertheless, the various results published illustrate, on the one hand, significant differences regarding the influence of different parameters on the decomposition and on the other hand, a lack of useful quantitative laws to predict the thermal behaviour of this crystal under a range of conditions (temperature, duration of exposure, presence of confinement). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of nano magnesium oxide catalyzed ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrhenius kinetic parameters of ammonium perchlorate (AP) catalyzed with nano-sized magnesium oxide (MgO) has been determined in this work. Nano particles of MgO with an average size of approximately 20 to 30 nm have been used to catalyze the AP. The particles were characterized using Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques before mixing with AP. Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA) shows that MgO nanoparticles have a strong catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. The addition of MgO nano particles reduces the two stage decomposition of ammonium perchlorate to a single stage. Arrhenius kinetic parameters of pure and the catalyzed AP have been calculated using non isothermal kinetic approach based on Kissinger method. The comparison of the thermal behavior and kinetic parameters of pure and catalyzed AP has also been carried out to elucidate the reaction mechanism. The results show that the activation energy of the catalyzed AP has increased from 138.1 kJ/mole to 159.1kJ/mole. The rate of reaction, however, has increased in the catalyzed AP showing that it has become more reactive by the addition of MgO nano particles. The enthalpy of activation has increased by 16 percent in the catalyzed AP. (author)

  12. Nano-Ammonium Perchlorate: Preparation, Characterization, and Evaluation in Composite Propellant Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, A.; Mehilal; Jain, S.; Jain, M. K.; Bhattacharya, B.

    2013-07-01

    Nanomaterials are finding applications in explosives and propellant formulations due to their large surface area and high surface energy. This high surface energy is responsible for the low activation energy and increase in burning rate of the composition. Therefore, a successful attempt has been made to prepare nano-ammonium perchlorate using a nonaqueous method by dissolving ammonium perchlorate (AP) in methanol followed by adding the dissolved AP to the hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), homogenization, and vacuum distillation of the solvent. The nano-AP thus formed was characterized using a NANOPHOX particle size analyzer (Sympatec, Germany), transmission electron microscopy (FEI, Hillsboro, OR), X-ray diffraction (PANalytical B.V., The Netherlands) and scanning electron microscopy (Ikon Analytical Equipment Pvt. Ltd., Mumbai, India) for particle size, purity, and morphology, respectively. The thermal behavior of nano-AP was also studied using differential thermal analysis-thermo gravimetric analysis (DTA-TGA). The data indicated that the particle size of the prepared AP was in the range of 21-52 nm and the thermal decomposition temperature was lower than that of coarse AP. Characterized nano-AP was subsequently used in composite propellant formulation up to 5% with 86% solid loading and studied for different properties. The results showed a 14% increase in burning rate in comparison to standard propellant composition with desired mechanical properties.

  13. Effect of Triethanolamine and Benzaldehyde on the Storage Stability of Polystyrene- Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant

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    K. Kishore

    1986-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of triethanolamine and benzaldehyde on the stability of polystyrene has been studied by dynamic thermogravimetry (TG. Slower decomposition of polymer in the presence of these compounds indicates their inhibiting ability on the oxidation of the polymer. The burning rate measurements of polystyrene (PS/ammonium perchlorate (AP propellants at ambient temperature and pressure shows an increase with the storage time. The percentage change in the burning rate of the propellants containing aldehyde and amine is less during the ageing which indicates the increased stability of the propellants. The safe-life time of the propellants for the ballistic stability has been calculated from the activation energy for the ageing process using an Arrhenius type equation. The safe-life of the propellants containing triethanolamine and benzaldehyde is more than the neat propellant.

  14. A Consideration for Design of Ammonium Perchlorate/Hydroxyl Terminated Polybutadiene Composite Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohga, Makoto

    Specific impulse and burning rate characteristics are the important properties for the propellant design. Because of the requirements for the preparation of ammonium perchlorate (AP)/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) composite propellant, there is an upper limit content, φ of AP contained propellant. Specific impulse and burning rate increase with increasing the AP content. The specific impulse, Ispφ and the burning rate, rφ of the propellant prepared at φ, rφ are the highest values of the propellant prepared with AP used as an oxidizer. It is necessary for the propellant design to estimate φ, Ispφ and rφ. The φ, Ispφ and rφ are closely associated with the specific surface area, Swp measured by air-permeability method. Therefore, these values are estimated with Swp. A process for the design of AP/HTPB composite propellant would be proposed in this study.

  15. Size and Shape of Ammonium Perchlorate and their Influence on Properties of Composite Propellant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Jain

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of the composite propellant compositions contain solid loading up to 86 per cent. The main solid ingredients of composite propellant are ammonium perchlorate (AP and aluminium powder. Therefore, it is a must to characterise these to improve processibility and quality of composite propellant. Effect of particle size on propellants slurry viscosity and ballistic parameters are well documented, however, the effect of oxidizer particle shape is not reported. In the present study, different methods for size and shape characterisation are discussed and effect of size and shape of AP on composite propellant properties are studied. The data indicate that as size of AP decreases, propellant slurry viscosity increases and burn rate increases. The particles having higher shape factor provides less endof mix (EOM viscosity of propellant slurry and burn rate. Further, effect of size of ground AP on shape is also investigated. From the data thus obtained, it is inferred that as size of ground AP decreases, shape factor decreases, and particles become more irregular in shape.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(3, pp.294-299, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1523

  16. Shock wave response of ammonium perchlorate single crystals to 6 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plane shock wave experiments were carried out on ammonium perchlorate single crystals compressed along [210] and [001] orientations to peak stresses ranging from 1.2 to 6.2 GPa. Quartz gauge and velocity interferometer techniques were used to measure the elastic and plastic shock wave velocities, and stress and particle velocity histories in the shocked samples. The measured Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) was 0.48±0.09 GPa. Above the HEL and up to about 6 GPa, the data show a clear two-wave structure, indicating an elastic-plastic response. Time-dependent elastic precursor decay and plastic wave ramping are discernable and orientation dependent in the low stress data. However, the orientation dependence of the peak state response is small. Hence, data for both orientations were summarized into a single isotropic, elastic-plastic-stress relaxation model. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the numerical simulations using this model and the measured wave profiles. At a shock stress of about 6 GPa and for the time duration and crystal orientations examined, we did not observe any features that may be identified as a sustained chemical reaction or a phase transformation. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  17. Microscopic observations of X-ray and gamma-ray induced decomposition of ammonium perchlorate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herley, P. J.; Levy, P. W.

    1972-01-01

    The X-ray and gamma-ray induced decomposition of ammonium perchlorate was studied by optical, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. This material is a commonly used oxidizer in solid propellents which could be employed in deep-space probes, and where they will be subjected to a variety of radiations for as long as ten years. In some respects the radiation-induced damage closely resembles the effects produced by thermal decomposition, but in other respects the results differ markedly. Similar radiation and thermal effects include the following: (1) irregular or ill-defined circular etch pits are formed in both cases; (2) approximately the same size pits are produced; (3) the pit density is similar; (4) the c face is considerably more reactive than the m face; and (5) most importantly, many of the etch pits are aligned in crystallographic directions which are the same for thermal or radiolytic decomposition. Thus, dislocations play an important role in the radiolytic decomposition process.

  18. Effect of Surface Microstructure on the Temperature sensitivity of Burning Rate of Ammonium Perchlorate

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    K. Kishore

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering Vielle's law and the new thermodynamic model which the authors have developed recently the true dependence of temperature sensitivity of burning rate of ammonium perchlorate (AP on pressure is resolved and experimentally verified for bellet burning. The value of decreases with pressure steeply in regime I' (below 20 atm, but gently in regime I (above 20 atm. The value of powder AP has been determined and it is observed that (powder > (pellet, which clearly suggests that of is innuenced by the surface temperature sensitive parameter and hence by the surface/subsurface microstructure. In powder burning, the buoyant lifting of the particles into the gas phase occurs, Which constitutes the so-called 'free board region' (FER extending just above the true surface. Consequent to the decomposition of AP particles in FER, the condensed phase heat release gets curtailed and (powder becomes larger. A general relationship for in terms of density and surface temperature is suggested, which is applicable to both pellet and powder AP.

  19. Preignition reactions of AP-HTPB propellants studied by IR spectrometry. [Ammonium Perchlorate-Hydroxyl Terminated PolyButadiene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, R. J.; Baer, A. D.; Ryan, N. W.

    1977-01-01

    IR absorption spectrometry was used to follow the disappearance of NH and CH bonds during the pyrolysis of a polymer film containing 30 weight percent ammonium perchlorate (AP). The remaining 70 weight percent consisted of a mixture of 92.5 weight percent hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and 7.5 weight percent isophrone diisocyanate (IPDI). The results indicate that polymer decomposition is induced by products of AP decomposition, and that about 2.5 CH bonds disappear for each NH bond that disappears. The diffusion process occurring in the later stages of the reaction is analyzed in an attempt to account for the unexpectedly low activation energy.

  20. On the adhesion between hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene fuel-binder and ammonium perchlorate. Performance of bonding agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, K.; Iwama, A.; Fukuda, T.

    1985-12-01

    A simple method to evaluate the adhesive force between solid oxidizer and polymeric fuel-binder is presented. As an illustration, hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) sticks including several different bonding agents are bonded on ammonium perchlorate (AP) single crystals, and stress-strain history unitl rupture occurs is obtained by applying uniaxial tensile stress perpendicularly to the adhesion surface. Further, whether each bonding agent reacts with AP or not was analysed with pursuing infrared absorption spectra. The hypothesis that the interfacial adhesive force arises from hydrogen bonding force is proposed.

  1. A novel hydrolysis method to synthesize chromium hydroxide nanoparticles and its catalytic effect in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of Cr(OH)3 nanoparticles in Cr3+–F− aqueous solution. ► The F− ion tailors coagulated materials, Cr(OH)3 nanoparticles are obtained. ► Adding nanosized Cr(OH)3, AP thermal decomposition temperature decreases to 200 °C. ► The nanosized Cr(OH)3 catalyzes NH3 oxidation, accelerating AP thermal decomposition. - Abstract: A procedure for the preparation of spherical Cr(OH)3 nanoparticles was developed based on the aging of chromium nitrate aqueous solutions in the presence of sodium fluoride, urea, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy, the morphological characteristics of Cr(OH)3 were controlled by altering the molar ratio of fluoride ion to chromium ion, as well as the initial pH and chromium ion concentration. The prepared nanosized Cr(OH)3 decreased the temperature required to decompose ammonium perchlorate from 450 °C to about 250 °C as the catalyst. The possible catalytic mechanism of the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate was also discussed.

  2. Effects of addition of surfactants on viscosity of uncured ammonium perchlorate(A/P)/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) propellant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, M.; Hagihara, Y. [National Defense Academy, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-08-31

    In production of ammonium perchlorate (AP)/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) propellants, it is preferable that the uncured propellant has a low viscosity during the mixing and forming processes. In this study, effects of surfacant on viscosity of the uncured propellant are studied for a total of 11 types of surfacants. It is found that sodium lauryl sulfate decreases viscosity of the AP/HTPB mixture more efficiently than any other surfacants tested. Apparent viscosity decreases by 30%, and its optimum dosage will be 0.005wt% based on the mixture to sufficiently decrease viscosity of the mixture. Viscosity of the mixture can be also decreased by improving wettability between AP and HTPB prepolymer. Sodium lauryl sulfate also shows an effect of delaying the potlife, i.e., time extending from addition of a curing agent to a thermosetting resin until it is cured to be unserviceable. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Synthesis of chrysalis-like CuO nanocrystals and their catalytic activity in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jun Wang; Shanshan He; Zhanshuang Li; Xiaoyan Jing; Milin Zhang; Zhaohua Jiang

    2009-11-01

    Chrysalis-like morphologies of CuO have been synthesized in large-quantity via a simple chemical deposition method without the use of any complex instruments and reagents. CuO nanocrystals showed a different morphology at three different temperatures, 25, 60 and 100°C. The particle size, morphology and crystal structure of the samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectra. The catalytic effect of CuO nanoparticles on the decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was investigated by STA 409 PC thermal analyzer at a heating rate of 10°C min-1 from 35 to 500°C. Compared with the thermal decomposition of pure AP, the addition of CuO nanoparticles decreased the decomposition temperature of AP by about 85°C.

  4. Synthesis of CNTs/CuO and its catalytic performance on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Cui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Copper oxide (CuO nanoparticles were successfully deposited on carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs surface via complex-precipitation method, the nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET. The catalytic performance of CNTs/CuO on ammonium perchlorate (AP decomposition was analyzed by differential thermal analyzer (DTA, the DTA results showed its excellent catalytic effect on AP decomposition, as 8 wt.% CNTs/CuO was added in AP, the second exothermic peak temperature decreased by 158 °C. Such composite may be a promising candidate for catalyzing the AP thermal decomposition.

  5. Limited overshooting of NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions in ammonium perchlorate; Ograniczene przeskoki jonow NH{sub 4}{sup +} w nadchloranie amonowym

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birczynski, A.; Lalowicz, Z.T. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Ingman, L.P.; Punkkinen, M.; Ylinen, E.E. [Wihuri Physical Lab., Turku Univ., Turku (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    The interpretation of NMR spectra for polycrystalline sample of ammonium perchlorate in helium temperature assumes the tunneling of NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Such interpretation does not agree with experimental data. The hypothesis of additional motion (fast rotation around one of C3 axis) has been checked and discussed on the base of NMR spectra of NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} monocrystal for the temperature range 2.1-25 K. 9 refs, 1 fig.

  6. Specific interactions of functionalised gold surfaces with ammonium perchlorate or starch; towards a chemical cartography of their mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, D.; Mercader, C.; Quere, S.; Hairault, L.; Méthivier, C.; Pradier, C. M.

    2012-10-01

    By functionalising gold samples, planar wafers or AFM tips, with an acid- or an amino acid-terminated thiols, mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and homocystein (H-Cyst) respectively, we were able to differentiate the interactions with ammonium perchlorate (AP) and starch (S), two components of a nanocomposition mixture. To do so, the interaction between gold functionalized surfaces and the two targeted compounds have been characterized and quantified by several complementary techniques. Polarisation modulation-infrared spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), providing chemical analyses of gold surfaces after contacting S or AP, proved that both compounds were retained on MUA or H-Cyst-modified surfaces, but to various extents. Quartz crystal microbalance on-line measurements enabled to monitor the kinetics of interaction and showed distinct differences in the behaviour of MUA and H-Cyst-surfaces towards the two compounds. Having observed that only H-Cyst-modified surfaces enables to get a contrast on the chemical force microscopy (CFM) images, this new result could be well explained by examining the data obtained by combining the above-mentioned surface characterisation techniques.

  7. Specific interactions of functionalised gold surfaces with ammonium perchlorate or starch; towards a chemical cartography of their mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercier, D. [CNRS, UMR CNRS 7609, Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface, Paris (France); Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - UPMC Paris VI, Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Laboratoire de recherche conventionne CEA/UPMC n Degree-Sign 1, Paris (France); Mercader, C.; Quere, S.; Hairault, L. [CEA, DAM, Le Ripault, F-37260 Monts (France); Laboratoire de recherche conventionne CEA/UPMC n Degree-Sign 1, Paris (France); Methivier, C. [CNRS, UMR CNRS 7609, Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface, Paris (France); Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - UPMC Paris VI, Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Laboratoire de recherche conventionne CEA/UPMC n Degree-Sign 1, Paris (France); Pradier, C.M., E-mail: claire-Marie.pradier@upmc.fr [CNRS, UMR CNRS 7609, Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface, Paris (France); Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - UPMC Paris VI, Laboratoire de Reactivite de Surface, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Laboratoire de recherche conventionne CEA/UPMC n Degree-Sign 1, Paris (France)

    2012-10-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurements of interactions by Quartz Crystal Microbalance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AFM and CFM measurements, tip functionalisation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface nano-imaging. - Abstract: By functionalising gold samples, planar wafers or AFM tips, with an acid- or an amino acid-terminated thiols, mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and homocystein (H-Cyst) respectively, we were able to differentiate the interactions with ammonium perchlorate (AP) and starch (S), two components of a nanocomposition mixture. To do so, the interaction between gold functionalized surfaces and the two targeted compounds have been characterized and quantified by several complementary techniques. Polarisation modulation-infrared spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), providing chemical analyses of gold surfaces after contacting S or AP, proved that both compounds were retained on MUA or H-Cyst-modified surfaces, but to various extents. Quartz crystal microbalance on-line measurements enabled to monitor the kinetics of interaction and showed distinct differences in the behaviour of MUA and H-Cyst-surfaces towards the two compounds. Having observed that only H-Cyst-modified surfaces enables to get a contrast on the chemical force microscopy (CFM) images, this new result could be well explained by examining the data obtained by combining the above-mentioned surface characterisation techniques.

  8. Synthesis of porous sheet-like Co3O4 microstructure by precipitation method and its potential applications in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porous sheet-like cobalt oxide (Co3O4) were successfully synthesized by precipitation method combined with calcination of cobalt hydroxide precursors. The structure, morphology and porosity properties of the products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nitrogen adsorption–desorption measurement. The as-prepared sheet-like microstructures were approximately 2–3 μm in average diameter, and the morphology of the cobalt hydroxide precursors was retained after the calcination process. However, it appeared a large number of uniform pores in the sheets after calcination. In order to calculate the potential catalytic activity, the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) has been analyzed, in which cobalt oxide played a role of an additive and the porous sheet-like Co3O4 microstructures exhibited high catalytic performance and considerable decrease in the thermal decomposition temperature of AP. Moreover, a formation mechanism for the sheet-like microstructures has been discussed. - Graphical abstract: Porous sheet-like Co3O4 were synthesized by facile precipitation method combined with calcination of β-Co(OH)2 precursors. Thermogravimetric–differential scanning calorimetric analysis indicates potential catalytic activity in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. Highlights: ► Synthesis of sheet-like β-Co(OH)2 precursors by precipitation method. ► Porous sheet-like Co3O4 were obtained by calcining β-Co(OH)2 precursors. ► The possible formation mechanism of porous sheet-like Co3O4 has been discussed. ► Porous sheet-like Co3O4 decrease the thermal decomposition temperature of ammonium perchlorate.

  9. Preparation of CoFe2O4 Nano crystallites by Solvo thermal Process and Its Catalytic Activity on the Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanometer cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) was synthesized by polyol-medium solvo thermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). Further, the catalytic activity and kinetic parameters of CoFe2O4 nano crystallites on the thermal decomposition behavior of ammonium perchlorate (AP) have been investigated by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry analysis (TG-DSC). The results imply that the catalytic performance of CoFe2O4 nano crystallites is significant and the decrease in the activation energy and the increase in the rate constant for AP further confirm the enhancement in catalytic activity of CoFe2O4 nano crystallites. A mechanism based on an proton transfer process has also been proposed for AP in the presence of CoFe2O4 nano crystallites.

  10. Hydrothermal preparation of Fe2O3/graphene nanocomposite and its enhanced catalytic activity on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fe2O3/graphene nanocomposite was prepared by a facile hydrothermal method, during which graphene oxides (GOs) were reduced to graphene with hydrazine and Fe2O3 nanoparticles were simultaneously anchored on graphene sheets. The morphology of the obtained Fe2O3/graphene nanocomposite was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was revealed by TEM images that Fe2O3 nanoparticles grew well on the surfaces of graphene. As much as I know, this new nanocomposite has not been investigated as a catalyst on the thermal decomposition of AP yet. In this work, the catalytic performance of the synthesized material on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was investigated creatively by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results of DSC indicated that graphene obviously improved the catalytic activity of Fe2O3 on the thermal decomposition of AP due to its high specific area.

  11. Sol–gel method to prepare graphene/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} aerogel and its catalytic application for the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Yuanfei; Li, Xiaoyu; Li, Guoping; Luo, Yunjun, E-mail: yjluo@bit.edu.cn [Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2015-10-15

    Graphene/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Gr/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) aerogel was synthesized by a simple sol–gel method and supercritical carbon dioxide drying technique. In this study, the morphology and structure were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen sorption tests. The catalytic performance of the as-synthesized Gr/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} aerogel on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was investigated by thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimeter. The experimental results showed that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with particle sizes in the nanometer range was anchored on the Gr sheets and Gr/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} aerogel exhibits promising catalytic effects for the thermal decomposition of AP. The decomposition temperature of AP was obviously decreased and the total heat release increased as well.

  12. Green synthesis of Co3O4 nanoparticles and their applications in thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate and dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Co3O4 NPs were synthesized from the leaves extract of plant Calotropis gigantea. • Green synthesis of Co3O4 NPs is a cost effective and eco-friendly route. • Faster thermal decomposition of AP occurred in presence of the green synthesized Co3O4 NPs. • A high burning rate of CSP was observed. • Green synthesized Co3O4 NPs displays the good electrocatalytic activity to reduction of I3− to I− ions. - Abstract: In this paper, we report on the green synthesis of cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4 NPs) using leaves extract of plant Calotropis gigantea and characterize by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The green synthesized Co3O4 NPs showed excellent catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and burning rate of composite solid propellants (CSPs). Kinetics of slow and rapid thermal decomposition has been investigated by isoconversional and ignition delay methods, respectively. Moreover, the electrocatalytic performance of green synthesized Co3O4 NPs in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) has also been evaluated. The cyclic voltametry measurement shows good electrocatalytic activity of Co3O4 NPs toward the reduction of I3− to I− ions

  13. Preparation of Coaxial-Line and Hollow Mn2O3 Nanofibers by Single-Nozzle Electrospinning and Their Catalytic Performances for Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiyuan; Yang, Jie; Cao, Weiguo; Guo, Xiangke; Guo, Xuefeng; Ding, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    Coaxial-line and hollow Mn2O3 nanofibers have been synthesized by a simple single-nozzle electrospinning method without using a complicated coaxial jet head, combined with final calcination. The crystal structure and morphology of the Mn2O3 nanofibers were investigated by using the X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the electrospinning distance has important influence on the morphology and structure of the obtained Mn2O3 nanofibers, which changes from hollow fibers for short electrospinning distance to coaxial-line structure for long electrospinning distance after calcination in the air. The formation mechanisms of different structured Mn2O3 fibers are discussed in detail. This facile and effective method is easy to scale up and may be versatile for constructing coaxial-line and hollow fibers of other metal oxides. The catalytic activity of the obtained Mn2O3 nanofibers on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results show that the hollow Mn2O3 nanofibers have good catalytic activity to promote the thermal decomposition of AP. PMID:26716314

  14. Experimental study on processability of ammonium perchlorate/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene composite propellant (I). Influences of operating temperature on viscosity of uncured propellant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, M.; Hagihara, Y. [National Defense Academy, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP)/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) composite propellant was adopted in this study, because AP/HTPB composite propellant is the most widely used one at present. In order to design the formulation of AP/HTPB composite propellant, it is necessary to spread the range of a specific impulse of AP/HTPB composite propellant widely, especially towards a high specific impulse region. Specific impulse of AP/HTPB composite propellant increases with an increasing AP content and when the AP content is about 90wt% the maximum specific impulse can be realized theoretically. Because an upper limit of AP content in propellant exists technically for the size distribution of AP used, the upper limit of specific impulse must be so. In order to increase the upper limit of specific impulse, it is necessary to increase the upper limit of AP content. In this study, the relationships between the viscosity of HTPB with a curing agent or uncured propellant and the curing time were investigated at temperatures from 313K to 353K, and was made to find out the optimum operating temperature for mixing and casting of uncured propellant experimentally. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Green synthesis of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and their applications in thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate and dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, J.K. [Department of Chemistry, Deen Dayal Upadhyay Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur (India); Srivastava, Pratibha, E-mail: author.pratibhas1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Deen Dayal Upadhyay Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur (India); Singh, Gurdip [Department of Chemistry, Deen Dayal Upadhyay Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur (India); Akhtar, M. Shaheer [New & Renewable Energy Material Development Center (NewREC), Chonbuk National University, Jeonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Ameen, S. [Energy Materials & Surface Science Laboratory, Solar Energy Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were synthesized from the leaves extract of plant Calotropis gigantea. • Green synthesis of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs is a cost effective and eco-friendly route. • Faster thermal decomposition of AP occurred in presence of the green synthesized Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. • A high burning rate of CSP was observed. • Green synthesized Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs displays the good electrocatalytic activity to reduction of I{sub 3}{sup −} to I{sup −} ions. - Abstract: In this paper, we report on the green synthesis of cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs) using leaves extract of plant Calotropis gigantea and characterize by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The green synthesized Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs showed excellent catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and burning rate of composite solid propellants (CSPs). Kinetics of slow and rapid thermal decomposition has been investigated by isoconversional and ignition delay methods, respectively. Moreover, the electrocatalytic performance of green synthesized Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) has also been evaluated. The cyclic voltametry measurement shows good electrocatalytic activity of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs toward the reduction of I{sub 3}{sup −} to I{sup −} ions.

  16. Environmental biotechnology and microbiology of (per)chlorate reducing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehboob, F.; Schraa, G.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Perchlorates are the salts derived from perchloric acid (HClO4). They occur both naturally and through manufacturing. They have been used as a medicine for more than 50 years to treat thyroid gland disorders and are used extensively within the pyrotechnics industry, and ammonium perchlorate is also

  17. Study on mechanism of thyroid cytotoxicity of ammonium perchlorate%过氯酸铵对甲状腺细胞毒作用机制的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘琴; 丁淼鸿; 张娆; 陈红霞; 周星星; 徐慧芳; 陈卉; 彭开良

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨过氯酸铵(AP)对甲状腺细胞的毒作用机制.方法 将甲状腺体外细胞培养到一定阶段,分别给予AP浓度为0、5、10、20、40、60 mmol/L的培养液进行细胞染毒,收集培养的细胞和上清液做以下指标测定.用噻唑蓝比色法(MTT法)测定细胞增殖,用流式细胞技术检测法测定细胞凋亡,用酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)测定甲状腺球蛋白(Tg)浓度,用比色法测定乳酸脱氢酶(LDH)、超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、丙二醛(MDA)等指标.结果 60 mmol/L AP染毒组细胞12、24、48、72 h时,存活率分别为74.93%、42.26%、2.66%和0.99%,40 mmol/L AP染毒组细胞24、48、72 h时,细胞存活率分别为73.15%、30.91%和3.03%,与对照组(100%)比较,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.01).各染毒组细胞总凋亡率均较对照组明显增加,20、40、60 mmol/L剂量组细胞早期凋亡率分别为15.70%、15.84%和16.96%,较对照组(9.54%)明显增加(P<0.05或P<0.01);60 mmol/L剂量组细胞晚期凋亡率为16.54%,较对照组(6.11%)明显增加,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.01).40 mmol/L染毒组细胞LDH活力为0.70 U/ml,较对照组(0.55 U/ml)明显升高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);5mmol/L染毒组细胞MDA含量为1.08 mmol/L,较对照组(2.36 mmol/L)降低,差异亦有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 AP作用于甲状腺细胞,可明显改变细胞形态,降低细胞存活率,这可能与AP抑制甲状腺细胞增殖,诱导甲状腺细胞凋亡,破坏甲状腺细胞膜完整性有关.AP对甲状腺细胞氧化损伤并不明显.%Objective To investigate the mechanism of thyroid cytotoxicity mechanism of ammonium perchlorate (AP).Methods Thyroid cells were cultured in vitro to a certain stage and then exposed to AP (0,5,10,20,40,and 60 mmol/L) in culture solution; the cultured cells and supernatant were collected.Cell viability was measured by MTT assay; cell apoptosis was determined by flow

  18. Effects of various lron oxides on burning rate of ammonium perchlorate/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene composite propellants. Part 1. AP/HTPB kei composite suishin'yaku no nensho sokudo ni oyobosu kakushu sankatetsu no koka. (1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagihara, Y.; Ichikawa, T.; Suzuki, M.; Koga, M. (The National Defense Academy, Yokosuka (Japan))

    1991-12-31

    Effect of iron oxide catalysts on burning rate of ammonium perchlorate(AP)/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadine(HTPB) composite propellants with AP 80 % and HTPB 20 % by weight was studied combining 7 various particle sizes of iron oxide measured with scanning electron microscope within the pressure range of 0.4 MPa - 8 MPa. Burning rate has increased with the decrease of particle diameter and this decrement is in the order with the diameter 0.36{mu}m, 0.30{mu}m, 0.26{mu}m, 0.20{mu}m, 0.16{mu}m, 0.14{mu}m. Smaller the particle size the larger is the surface area and this results in the increase in the contact surface area. As a result it has been concluded that with the decrease of average diameter the burning rate is increased. Pressure exponent without catalyst is 0.46 and with catalyst it is 0.45-0.49. This has meant that catalyst does not effect pressure exponent. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Modification of the in vitro hydra assay developmental toxicity screen for evaluation of airborne toxicants: Assessment of ammonium perchlorate and vapor expos. Final report, 15 December 1995-30 September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, R.E.

    1996-12-01

    When the Combat Exclusion Law was repealed, military women`s duties were expanded to include duties that formally were exclusively performed by men. These military women are occupationally exposed to chemicals, including airborne toxicants, for which no developmental or reproductive toxicity testing has been performed. The reproductive toxicity of these chemical compounds needs serious consideration so that military women can continue to perform their mission responsibilities and remain healthy. An in vitro developmental toxicity screen was performed to determine the developmental hazard index (A/D ratio) for ammonium perchlorate (AP), tricresyl phosphate vapor phase lubricant (TCP), and diethyleneglycol monomethylether (DGME) using the hydra assay. The screen employed exposing both adult Hydra attenuate and `artificial embryos` composed of disassociated hydra cells to these military compounds to investigate potential developmental toxicity. AID ratios of 1.71, <0.055, and 1.75, obtained for AP, TCP, and DGME, respectively, would indicate that these military compounds should not be considered primary developmental toxins in the context of this assay.

  20. Interaction between perchlorate and iodine in the metamorphosis of Hyla versicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparling, D.W.; Harvey, G.; Nzengung, V.

    2003-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a water-soluble, inorganic anion that is often combined with ammonium, potassium or other cations for use in industry and agriculture. Ammonium perchlorate, for example, is a potent oxidizer and is used in various military applications including rocket fuel. It has also been found in an historically widely used fertilizer, Chilean nitrate and in other fertilizers. It has been found in ground and surface waters of over 30 states and is considered a human health risk. Because of its similar atomic radius and volume, perchlorate competes with iodide for thyroid uptake and storage and thereby inhibits production of thyroid hormones. Amphibians may be particularly affected by perchlorate because they rely on the thyroid for metamorphosis. This study exposed early larval Hyla versicolor to concentrations of perchlorate ranging from 2.2 to 50 ppm to determine the effects of perchlorate on a native amphibian. In addition, three controls, 0 perchlorate, 0 perchlorate with 0.10 ppm iodide (C + I) and 50 ppm perchlorate + 0.10 ppm iodide (50 + I) were tested. Mortality (metamorphosis. The estimated EC50 for total inhibition of metamorphosis at 70 days of treatment was 3.63 ppm. There was no evidence of inhibition of development with the 50 + I, C + I, or controls, indicating that the presence of small concentrations of iodide could counter the effects of perchlorate. When tadpoles that had been inhibited by perchlorate were subsequently treated with iodide, development through prometamorphosis progressed but mortality was very high.

  1. Perchlorate in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinelango, P. Kalyani [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States); Tian Kang [Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Dasgupta, Purnendu K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1061 (United States)]. E-mail: Sandyd@ttu.edu

    2006-05-10

    There has been no reliable published data on the presence of perchlorate in seawater. Seaweeds are among the most important plant life in the ocean and are good sources of iodine and have been widely used as food and nutritional supplement. Perchlorate is known to inhibit the transport of iodide by the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), present e.g., in the thyroid and mammary glands. With perchlorate being increasingly detected in drinking water, milk and various other foods, increasing the iodide intake through inexpensive natural supplements may be an attractive solution for maintaining iodine assimilation. We report here measurable concentrations of perchlorate in several samples of seawater (detectable in about half the samples analyzed). We also report the iodide and perchlorate concentrations of 11 different species of seaweed and the corresponding bioconcentration factors (BCF) for perchlorate and iodide, relative to the seawater from which they were harvested. All seaweed samples came from the same region, off the coast of Northeastern Maine. Concentrations of iodide and perchlorate in four seawater samples collected from the region near harvest time were 30 {+-} 11 and 0.16 {+-} 0.084 {mu}g l{sup -1}, respectively. Concentrations of both iodide and perchlorate varied over a wide range for different seaweed species; iodide ranging from 16 to 3134 mg kg{sup -1} and perchlorate from 0.077 to 3.2 mg kg{sup -1}. The Laminaria species had the highest iodide concentration; Laminaria digitata is the seaweed species most commonly used in the kelp tablets sold in health food stores. Our sample of L. digitata contained 3134 {+-} 15 mg iodide/kg dry weight. The BCF varied widely for different species, with Laminaria species concentrating iodide preferentially over perchlorate. The iodide BCF (BCF{sub i}) to perchlorate BCF (BCF{sub p}) quotient ranged from 0.66 to 53; L. digitata and L. saccarina having a BCF{sub i}/BCF{sub p} value of 45 and 53, respectively, far

  2. Bioremediation Potential of Perchlorate Contaminated Deep Vadose Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, H.; Ronen, Z.; Weisbrod, N.; Dahan, O.; Nativ, R.

    2007-12-01

    Widespread perchlorate contamination was found in the vadose zone near a plant that manufactures ammonium perchlorate above the coastal aquifer of Israel in Ramat Hasharon. As part of the plant's operations, untreated industrial wastewater was disposed of for over 30 years in unlined wastewater ponds and nearby washes, causing contamination of the unsaturated zone (up to 2200 mg kg-1 sediment at a depth of 20 m) and the groundwater below it (up to 300 mg L-1). In this study, we examined the potential for microbial metabolism of perchlorate reduction in the contaminated deep vadose zone profile by native microbial communities. Microbial reduction of perchlorate was found in three of the four sediment samples taken from different depths. The sediments taken from 1 m (shallowest) and 35 m (deepest- close to the water table) showed the fastest degradation rates, while the sediment taken from 15 m showed the slowest rate. No perchlorate reduction was observed in the sediment taken from 20 m, where perchlorate concentrations were highest. These results were correlated to the viable microorganism counts in the profile. In experiments in which the effect of nitrate was examined, the lag time for perchlorate degradation was found to be inversely correlated to the initial nitrate concentration, while the perchlorate-reduction rates were faster in treatments with higher initial nitrate concentrations. We found no perchlorate degradation as long as nitrate was present in the system: perchlorate reduction was initiated only after all of the nitrate had been reduced. Nitrate-reduction rates were correlated to the initial nitrate concentrations and no lag period was observed. Nitrite was temporarily accumulated during nitrate reduction and was totally reduced, like nitrate, after 4 days. Count of viable microbial communities as well as PCR analysis of the chlorite dismutase gene in the native microbial population exposed to high concentrations of perchlorate (10,000-20,000 mg L-1

  3. Breastfed infants metabolize perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelor, C Phillip; Kirk, Andrea B; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Kroll, Martina; Campbell, Catrina A; Choudhary, Pankaj K

    2012-05-01

    Bifidobacteria are the dominant intestinal bacteria in breastfed infants. It is known that they can reduce nitrate. Although no direct experiments have been conducted until now, inferred pathways for Bifidobacterium bifidum include perchlorate reduction via perchlorate reductase. We show that when commercially available strains of bifidobacteria are cultured in milk, spiked with perchlorate, perchlorate is consumed. We studied 13 breastfed infant-mother pairs who provided 43 milk samples and 39 infant urine samples, and 5 formula-fed infant-mother pairs who provided 21 formula samples and 21 infant urine samples. Using iodine as a conservative tracer, we determined the average urinary iodine (UI) to milk iodine (MI) concentration ratio to be 2.87 for the breastfed infants. For the same samples, the corresponding perchlorate concentration ratio was 1.37 (difference significant, p perchlorate is lost. For the formula fed infant group the same ratios were 1.20 and 1.58; the difference was not significant (p = 0.68). However, the small number of subjects in the latter group makes it more difficult to conclude definitively whether perchlorate reduction does or does not occur. PMID:22497505

  4. Simultaneous removal of perchlorate and energetic compounds in munitions wastewater by zero-valent iron and perchlorate-respiring bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Se Chang; Hubbard, Brian; Cha, Daniel K; Kim, Byung J

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's insensitive melt-pour explosive, PAX-21 in addition to RDX and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The objective of this study is to develop an innovative treatment process to remove both perchlorate and energetic compounds simultaneously from PAX-21 production wastewater. It was hypothesized that the pretreatment of PAX-21 wastewater with zero-valent iron (ZVI) would convert energetic compounds to products that are more amenable for biological oxidation and that these products serve as electron donors for perchlorate-reducing bacteria. Results of batch ZVI reduction experiments showed that DNAN was completely reduced to 2,4-diaminoanisole and RDX was completely reduced to formaldehyde. Anaerobic batch biodegradation experiments showed that perchlorate (30 mg L(-1)) in ZVI-treated PAX-21 wastewater was decreased to an undetectable level after 5 days. Batch biodegradation experiments also confirmed that formaldehyde in ZVI-treated wastewater was the primary electron donor for perchlorate-respiring bacteria. The integrated iron-anaerobic bioreactor system was effective in completely removing energetic compounds and perchlorate from the PAX-21 wastewater without adding an exogenous electron donor. This study demonstrated that ZVI pretreatment not only removed energetic compounds, but also transformed energetic compounds to products that can serve as the source of electrons for perchlorate-respiring bacteria. PMID:24410688

  5. Bioelectrical Perchlorate Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrash, C.; Achenbach, L. A.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Several bioreactor designs are currently available for the ex-situ biological attenuation of perchlorate- contaminated waters and recently, some of these reactor designs were conditionally approved by the California Department of Health Services for application in the treatment of perchlorate contaminated drinking water. However, all of these systems are dependent on the continual addition of a chemical electron donor to sustain microbial activity and are always subject to biofouling and downstream water quality issues. In addition, residual labile electron donor in the reactor effluent can stimulate microbial growth in water distribution systems and contribute to the formation of potentially toxic trihalomethanes during disinfection by chlorination. As part of our ongoing studies into microbial perchlorate reduction we investigated the ability of dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) to metabolize perchlorate using a negatively charged electrode (cathode) in the working chamber of a bioelectrical reactor (BER) as the primary electron donor. In this instance the DPRB use the electrons on the electrode surface either directly or indirectly in the form of electrolytically produced H2 as a source of reducing equivalents for nitrate and perchlorate reduction. As part of this investigation our fed-batch studies showed that DPRB could use electrons from a graphite cathode poised at -500mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) for the reduction of perchlorate and nitrate. We isolated a novel organism, Dechlorospirillum strain VDY, from the cathode surface after 70 days operation which readily reduced 100 mg.L-1 perchlorate in a mediatorless batch bioelectrical reactor (BER) in 6 days. Continuous up-flow BERs (UFBERs) seeded with active cultures of strain VDY continuously treated waters containing 100 mg.L-1 perchlorate with almost 100% efficiency throughout their operation achieving a non-optimized volumetric loading of 60 mg.L-1 reactor volume.day-1. The same UFBERs also treated

  6. Effects of various iron oxides on burning rate of ammonium perchlorate/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene composite propellants. (II). ; Effect of grinding. AP/HTPB kei suishin prime yaku no nensho sokudo ni oyobosu kakushu sankatetsu no koka. 2. ; Funsai no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, Y.; Ichikawa, T.; Suzuki, M.; Koga, M. (The National Defance Academy, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1992-06-30

    The previous report has explained that in ammonium perchlorate/hydroxyl -terminated polybutadiene composite propellants the smaller the average iron oxide grain size, the greater the combustion rate increasing effect. To investigate effects of micronization more precisely, this paper investigated a method to reduce the grain size, in which iron oxides are ground using a ball mill and explosive shock treatments, to study the effects on the combustion rate of iron oxides thus proud and treated. Preliminary experiments determined the optimal grinding conditions and the optical explosion shock conditions for either process, and X-ray diffraction analyses were carried out on iron oxide powders before and after the treatments. As a result of the grinding and treating experiments, it was found out that the smaller the iron oxide grain size, the greater the combustion rate increasing effect. In addition, if iron ozide powder with nearly uniform diameter is used, the iron oxide treated with the explosion shock showed greater effect of increasing the combustion rate than the one ground using a ball mill. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Se Chang; Cha, Daniel K; Kim, Byung J; Oh, Seok-Young

    2011-08-30

    US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21 wastewater was rapidly decreased to an undetectable level in 2 days. This result demonstrated that iron treatment not only removed energetic compounds but also eliminated the toxic constituents that inhibited the subsequent microbial process. PMID:21700387

  8. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Se Chang; Cha, Daniel K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Kim, Byung J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Champaign, IL 61826-9005 (United States); Oh, Seok-Young, E-mail: quartzoh@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} Ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. {yields} DNAN is identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. {yields} Iron treatment not only removes energetic compounds but also eliminates the toxic constituents that inhibit the subsequent microbial process. - Abstract: US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21

  9. Detoxification of PAX-21 ammunitions wastewater by zero-valent iron for microbial reduction of perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. → DNAN is identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. → Iron treatment not only removes energetic compounds but also eliminates the toxic constituents that inhibit the subsequent microbial process. - Abstract: US Army and the Department of Defense (DoD) facilities generate perchlorate (ClO4-) from munitions manufacturing and demilitarization processes. Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's new main charge melt-pour energetic, PAX-21. In addition to ammonium perchlorate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN) are the major constituents of PAX-21. In order to evaluate microbial perchlorate reduction as a practical option for the treatment of perchlorate in PAX-21 wastewater, we conducted biodegradation experiments using glucose as the primary sources of electrons and carbon. Batch experiments showed that negligible perchlorate was removed in microbial reactors containing PAX-21 wastewater while control bottles containing seed bacteria and glucose rapidly and completely removed perchlorate. These results suggested that the constituents in PAX-21 wastewater may be toxic to perchlorate reducing bacteria. A series of batch toxicity test was conducted to identify the toxic constituents in PAX-21 and DNAN was identified as the primary toxicant responsible for inhibiting the activity of perchlorate reducing bacteria. It was hypothesized that pretreatment of PAX-21 by zero-valent iron granules will transform toxic constituents in PAX-21 wastewater to non-toxic products. We observed complete reduction of DNAN to 2,4-diaminoanisole (DAAN) and RDX to formaldehyde in abiotic iron reduction study. After a 3-day acclimation period, perchlorate in iron-treated PAX-21 wastewater was rapidly decreased to

  10. Isotopic mapping of groundwater perchlorate plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, Neil C; Hoaglund, John R; Marroquin, Roy J; Beloso, Abelardo D; Heraty, Linnea J; Bortz, Sarah E; Patterson, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of stable isotope ratios of chlorine and oxygen in perchlorate can, in some cases, be used for mapping and source identification of groundwater perchlorate plumes. This is demonstrated here for large, intersecting perchlorate plumes in groundwater from a region having extensive groundwater perchlorate contamination and a large population dependent on groundwater resources. The region contains both synthetic perchlorate derived from rocket fuel manufacturing and testing activities and agricultural perchlorate derived predominantly from imported Chilean (Atacama) nitrate fertilizer, along with a likely component of indigenous natural background perchlorate from local wet and dry atmospheric deposition. Most samples within each plume reflect either a predominantly synthetic or a predominantly agricultural perchlorate source and there is apparently a minor contribution from the indigenous natural background perchlorate. The existence of isotopically distinct perchlorate plumes in this area is consistent with other lines of evidence, including groundwater levels and flow paths as well as the historical land use and areal distribution of potential perchlorate sources. PMID:21352209

  11. 纳米SiO2负载的过渡金属硼化物对AP热分解的催化作用%Catalytic Activity of Nano-silica Supported Transition-metal Borides on the Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李茸; 刘祥萱; 王煊军

    2012-01-01

    采用化学还原法制备纳米NiB/SiO2、CoB/SiO2、MoB/SiO2催化剂,通过热重-差热分析(TG-DTA)研究了其对AP热分解过程的催化作用.结果表明,负载过渡金属硼化物催化剂对AP分解的催化活性顺序为:CoB/SiO2>NiB/SiO2> MoB/SiO2;加入质量分数5%的CoB/SiO2使AP高温热分解峰温度降低166.2℃;SiO2载体将CoB晶型转化推迟了 110℃左右,改善了催化剂的热稳定性.%The nano-silica supported transition metal catalysts NiB/SiO2 , CoB/SiO2 , MoB/SiO2 were prepared by chemical reduction method. Their catalytic activity on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was studied by TG-DTA. Results show that catalytic activity of nano-silica supported transition metal borides for the thermal decomposition of AP decreases in the order: CoB/SiO2 > NiB/SiO2 >MoB/SiO2. The CoB/SiO2 (mass ration of 5%) catalyst makes the high-temperature thermal decomposition temperature of AP decrease by 166. 2℃. The SiO2 carrier makes the crystal transformation temperature delay about 110℃, revealling the improvement of thermal stability of the catalyst.

  12. 超临界水氧化工艺降低高氯酸铵废水中氨氮浓度的试验%Experiment of Reduction of Ammonia-Nitrogen Concentration in Wastewater Containing Ammonium Perchlorate (AP)by Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO)Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄婷; 楚华; 王国娟

    2014-01-01

    通过建立超临界水氧化试验装置,采用超临界技术对固体推进剂生产废水进行处理,研究了含高氯酸铵废水NH3N去除率与氧气流量、废水流量、反应釜温度和压力的关系。结果表明最佳的超临界水氧化条件:温度为390~410℃、压力为22MPa、控制氧气流量为0.6~1.0L/min、废水流量为2L/h,NH3N去除率可达99%,处理后NH3N浓度低于3mg/L,达到了国家排放标准。%The supercritical water oxidation device and the supercritical technology was used to treat solid propellant production wastewater. The relationship among oxygen flow,waste water flow,temperature,pressure of reactor and the removal efficiency of NH3 N in ammonium perchlorate wastewater was investigated. The results show that the optimal conditions of the supercritical water oxidation are as follows:temperature is 390~410℃,pressure is 22 MPa,oxygen flow is 0. 6~1. 0 L/min and wastewater flow is 2 L/h. Under such condition,removal efficiency of NH3 N can reach 99%,NH3 N concentration of treated waste water is less than 3 mg/L, which meet national standards.

  13. 2-(Benzenesulfonamidopyridinium perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Li

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C11H11N2O2S+·ClO4−, the dihedral angle between the benzene and pyridinium rings is 87.33 (10°. An intramolecular N—H...O interaction, with an S=O-bonded O atom as receptor, occurs in the cation. In the crystal structure, ion pairs occur, being linked by strong N—H...O hydrogen bonds. The perchlorate anion plays a further role in the molecular packing by accepting several weak C—H...O interactions.

  14. Preparation of graphite-like carbon nitride and its catalytic performance for thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate%类石墨型氮化碳的制备及其对AP热分解催化性能研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谈玲华; 杭祖圣; 寇波; 徐建华; 郏永强; 王善斌

    2015-01-01

    The g-C3 N4 was synthesized melamine used as precursor via semi-closed method.The structure and morphology of g-C3 N4 were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction(XRD),transmission electron microsco-py(SEM)and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FT-IR).The catalysis of g-C3 N4 on thermal decomposi-tion of ammonium perchlorate(AP)was investigated bythermal gravimetric analysis (TG)and differential ther-mal analysis (DTA).The results show that the g-C3 N4 has layered structure.The g-C3 N4 make the two decom-position peaks of AP combine and the high-temperature decomposition peak value of AP decrease by 73.8 ℃, which exhibits good catalytic performance.The g-C3 N4 has excellent conductive properties and can accelerate the electron transfer in the process of oxidation-reduction cycle to make the decomposition of AP at a much lower temperature.%以三聚氰胺为前驱体、半封闭法制备出类石墨型氮化碳(g-C3 N4),采用 X 射线衍射(XRD)、扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、傅里叶红外光谱(FT-IR)对其结构和形貌进行表征,利用热失重(TG )、差热分析(DTA)研究g-C3 N4对高氯酸铵(AP)热分解的影响.结果表明,制备出的 g-C3 N4为层状结构. g-C3 N4对AP有较强的催化效果,可使 AP 的高低温分解峰合并,高温分解温度下降73.8℃.g-C3 N4优异的导电性能,在氧化还原循环中能加速电子转移,使 AP 在更低的温度下分解.

  15. Branched polymeric media: Perchlorate-selective resins from hyperbranched polyethyleneimine

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Dennis P.

    2012-10-02

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) is a persistent contaminant found in drinking groundwater sources in the United States. Ion exchange (IX) with selective and disposable resins based on cross-linked styrene divinylbenzene (STY-DVB) beads is currently the most commonly utilized process for removing low concentrations of ClO4 - (10-100 ppb) from contaminated drinking water sources. However, due to the low exchange capacity of perchlorate-selective STY-DVB resins (∼0.5-0.8 eq/L), the overall cost becomes prohibitive when treating groundwater with higher concentration of ClO4 - (e.g., 100-1000 ppb). In this article, we describe a new perchlorate-selective resin with high exchange capacity. This new resin was prepared by alkylation of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) beads obtained from an inverse suspension polymerization process. Batch and column studies show that our new PEI resin with mixed hexyl/ethyl quaternary ammonium chloride exchange sites can selectively extract trace amounts of ClO4 - from a makeup groundwater (to below detection limit) in the presence of competing ions. In addition, this resin has a strong-base exchange capacity of 1.4 eq/L, which is 1.75-2.33 times larger than those of commercial perchlorate-selective STY-DVB resins. The overall results of our studies suggest that branched PEI beads provide versatile and promising building blocks for the preparation of perchlorate-selective resins with high exchange capacity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  17. Hydrothermal oxidation of organic wastes using reclaimed ammonium nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proesmans, P.I.; Luan, L.; Buelow, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Ammonium nitrate is being studied as an alternative for ammonium perchlorate as an oxidizing agent in Department of Defense 1.1 and 1.3 rocket propellants. Use of ammonium nitrate would eliminate the HCl produced by ammonium perchlorate upon thermal decomposition. To stabilize the ammonium nitrate, which suffers from phase instability, potassium dinitramide (KDN) is added. This increased use of ammonium nitrate will ultimately create a need for environmentally responsible processes to reuse ammonium nitrate extracted from demilitarized rocket motors. Ammonium Nitrate was investigated as an oxidizing agent for methanol, acetic acid and phenol. High removal of organic, ammonia and nitrate was achieved at stoichiometric concentrations. The oxidation of ammonia by nitrate was much faster than the oxidation of either methanol or acetic acid. Phenol, however, was in strong competition with ammonia for the oxidizer (nitrate). Nitrogen products included N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2{sup {minus}}} as well as toxic NO and trace amounts of NO{sub 2}. Carbon products were CO{sub 2}, HCO{sub 3{sup {minus}}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, and CO.

  18. Peptide biomarkers as evidence of perchlorate biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Reema; Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2011-02-01

    Perchlorate is a known health hazard for humans, fish, and other species. Therefore, it is important to assess the response of an ecosystem exposed to perchlorate contamination. The data reported here show that a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach for the detection of perchlorate-reducing enzymes can be used to measure the ability of microorganisms to degrade perchlorate, including determining the current perchlorate degradation status. Signature peptides derived from chlorite dismutase (CD) and perchlorate reductase can be used as biomarkers of perchlorate presence and biodegradation. Four peptides each derived from CD and perchlorate reductase subunit A (PcrA) and seven peptides derived from perchlorate reductase subunit B (PcrB) were identified as signature biomarkers for perchlorate degradation, as these sequences are conserved in the majority of the pure and mixed perchlorate-degrading microbial cultures examined. However, chlorite dismutase signature biomarker peptides from Dechloromonas agitata CKB were found to be different from those in other cultures used and should also be included with selected CD biomarkers. The combination of these peptides derived from the two enzymes represents a promising perchlorate presence/biodegradation biomarker system. The biomarker peptides were detected at perchlorate concentrations as low as 0.1 mM and at different time points both in pure cultures and within perchlorate-reducing environmental enrichment consortia. The peptide biomarkers were also detected in the simultaneous presence of perchlorate and an alternate electron acceptor, nitrate. We believe that this technique can be useful for monitoring bioremediation processes for other anthropogenic environmental contaminants with known metabolic pathways. PMID:21115710

  19. Synthesis of 2,2-Diferrocenylpropane-based Tetrazole and Its Catalysis Performance for Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate%双核茂铁四氮唑的合成及对高氯酸铵热分解的催化作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖文向; 豆雅洁; 王静; 谢莉莉; 林芬; 袁耀锋

    2012-01-01

    moderate yield, and then compound 1 was transformed into 2,2-diferrocenylpropane carbaldehyde oxime(2) . Dehydration of the oxime gave 2,2-diferrocenylpropane nitrile(3). Finally, compound 4 was obtained via click reaction( [2+3] cycloaddi-tion) between compound 3 and sodium azide. Structures of the target compounds were characterized by H NMR,FTIR and mass spectrum. Electrochemical properties of the target compounds were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. Relationship between electrochemical behavior of multi-component redox and structure was discussed. Thermal decomposition characteristics of ammonium perchlorate (AP) with 5% (mass fraction) of compound 3 or 4 were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry ( TG) analysis. The results showed that the final exothermic peak temperature of AP was reduced by about 100 ℃ and compounds 3 and 4 had good combustion catalytic characteristics on AP.

  20. Organic carbon biostimulates rapid rhizodegradation of perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yifru, Dawit D; Nzengung, Valentine A

    2008-12-01

    Previous hydroponics and field studies identified phytodegradation and rhizodegradation as the two main mechanisms by which plants metabolize perchlorate. Plant uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate is a slower and undesired process that poses ecological risks resulting from phytoaccumulation of some fraction of the perchlorate. Meanwhile, rhizodegradation is a more rapid and favored process involving perchlorate-degrading bacteria utilizing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a carbon and energy (electron) source to rapidly degrade perchlorate to innocuous chloride. In the present study, rhizodegradation of perchlorate by willow trees (Salix nigra) was biostimulated using electron sources obtained from natural and artificial carbon sources. In bioreactors provided with carbon sources as 500 mg/L DOC, 25 to 40 mg/L of initial perchlorate concentrations were removed to below the ion chromatography method detection limit of 2 microg/L in approximately 9 d. For planted controls provided with no electron donors, the time required for the complete removal of the same doses of perchlorate was up to 70 d. Enhancement of rhizodegradation by organic carbon reduced the phytoaccumulated fraction of perchlorate by an order of magnitude from approximately 430 to 20 mg/kg. The implication of the present study is that the high fraction uptake and phytoaccumulation of perchlorate in agricultural products and the recycling of perchlorate into the ecosystem can be significantly curtailed by supplying electron donors derived from organic carbon sources to the root zone of plants. PMID:18593217

  1. Perchlorate Removal in groundwater by perchlorate reductases from the perchlorate respiring bacterium, perc1ace

    OpenAIRE

    Frankenberger, William

    2003-01-01

    [Note: See PDF for correct symbols.] Perchlorate (ClO4-) is an important energetic component of solid rocket fuel. The major source of ClO4- pollution is the military, space program and supporting industries. ClO4- is recalcitrant in the environment and is potentially toxic. The California Department of Health Services adopted an action level of 4 ppb for perchlorate in potable water. Microorganisms that reduce ClO4- to chloride and molecular oxygen have been isolated. For designing an effici...

  2. PERCHLORATE PHYTOREMEDIATION USING HARDWOOD TREES AND VASCULAR PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and soils at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate iswater soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of...

  3. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE BY TOBACCO PLANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in the plant tissues. The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of tobacco plants in phytoremediation, a technology that employs plants to degrade,...

  4. New synthetic method and properties of ammonium dinitramide; Ammonium dinitramide no shingoseiho to sono butsuri kagakuteki tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, H.; Onda, T.; Shiino, K. [Hosoya Kako Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Technology and Development Center; Miyazaki, S.; Matsuura, S. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan). Research and Development center

    1996-08-31

    Though, ammonium nitrate (AN) has been thought as solid propellant oxidizer, at present, ammonium perchlorate (AP) is mainly used because of the existence of crystal transition point, the improvement of propellant performance on AN and so forth. Ammonium dinitramide (ADN) can be used as an excellent oxidizer for high performance solid propellants, because it has much available oxygen. Furthermore, this propellant is smokeless, since ADN has no halogen resulting in generation of smoke on burning. ADN can be obtained by a new synthetic method which uses urea as starting substance and acquires nitrourea as intermediate product. According to this method, the yield is about 15% based on the amount of nitrourea. The hygroscopicity of this ADN is slightly higher than that of ammonium nitrate. Therefore, it is recommended to handle this substance at 50% of relative humidity or below. 13 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Peptide Biomarkers as Evidence of Perchlorate Biodegradation▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, Reema; Crawford, Ronald L.; Paszczynski, Andrzej J.

    2010-01-01

    Perchlorate is a known health hazard for humans, fish, and other species. Therefore, it is important to assess the response of an ecosystem exposed to perchlorate contamination. The data reported here show that a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach for the detection of perchlorate-reducing enzymes can be used to measure the ability of microorganisms to degrade perchlorate, including determining the current perchlorate degradation status. Signature peptides derive...

  6. Perchlorate reduction by microbes inhabiting oil reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebensteiner, Martin; Stams, Alfons; Lomans, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Microbial perchlorate and chlorate reduction is a unique type of anaerobic respiration as during reduction of (per)chlorate chlorite is formed, which is then split into chloride and molecular oxygen. In recent years it was demonstrated that (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria may employ oxygenase-dependent pathways for the degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings suggested that (per)chlorate may be used as oxygen-releasing compound in anoxic environments that contain hydrocarbons, such as polluted soil sites and oil reservoirs. We started to study perchlorate reduction by microbes possibly inhabiting oil reservoirs. One of the organisms studied was Archaeoglobus fulgidus. This extremely thermophilic archaeon is known as a major contributor to souring in hot oil reservoirs. A. fulgidus turned out to be able to use perchlorate as terminal electron acceptor for growth with lactate (Liebensteiner et al 2013). Genome based physiological experiments indicated that A. fulgidus possesses a novel perchlorate reduction pathway. Perchlorate is first reduced to chlorite, but chlorite is not split into chloride and molecular oxygen as occurs in bacteria. Rather, chlorite reacts chemically with sulfide, forming oxidized sulfur compounds, which are reduced to sulfide in the electron transport chain by the archaeon. The dependence of perchlorate reduction on sulfur compounds could be shown. The implications of our findings as novel strategy for microbiological enhanced oil recovery and for souring mitigation are discussed. Liebensteiner MG, Pinkse MWH, Schaap PJ, Stams AJM and Lomans BP (2013) Archaeal (per)chlorate reduction at high temperature, a matter of abiotic-biotic reactions. Science 340: 85-87

  7. A Colorimetric Bioassay for Perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinnickel, M. L.; Smith, S.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Recognition of perchlorate (ClO4-) as a widespread contaminant across the United States and its potential adverse affects towards human health has motivated the EPA to place ClO4- on its contaminant candidate list for drinking water supplies. While a federal MCL has not yet been set, a recommended public health goal of 1 ppb (μg.L-1) was established by the US EPA in 2002. To date, methods of detection require use of sensitive ion chromatographic equipment that are expensive, time consuming, and require highly trained personnel for use. Our studies are focused on the development of a highly sensitive, simple, and robust colorimetric bioassay based on the primary enzyme involved in microbial ClO4- reduction, the perchlorate reductase (Pcr). A previously published assay used reduced methyl viologen (MV, the dye is reduced with sodium hydrosulfite) as an electron donor to demonstrate Pcr activity. The assay directly correlates the amount of MV oxidized with the amount of ClO4- reduced by assuming a transfer of four electrons. To test this assumption, we compared actual concentrations of MV oxidized to ClO4- reduced in this assay. ClO4- concentrations were determined using a Dionex ICS-500 ion chromatography system, while MV concentrations were determined using a standard curve generated at 578 nm. Comparisons between the two revealed that twelve molecules of MV were oxidized for each molecule of ClO4- reduced. The oxidation of these additional eight MV molecules is explained by the interaction of the dye with chlorite (the product of the Pcr reaction) and other contaminants that could be present in the enzyme prep. This unsettling result indicated this assay would be problematic for the detection of ClO4- in soil, which has many chemicals that could react with MV. To improve upon this assay, we have tried to reduce ClO4- using less reactive dyes and reductants. The reductants ascorbic acid, NADH, and dithiothreitol drive Pcr catalyzed ClO4- reduction, however, they

  8. The Microbiology of Perchlorate in the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    In the last decade perchlorate has been identified as an important groundwater component that poses potential health threat. Although primarily sourced anthropogenically, many recent studies have identified significant natural pools throughout the US and the natural mechanisms of its synthesis remain a mystery. As such, the true perchlorate concentrations naturally present in the environment are still unknown making its regulation problematic. Because of its solubility and non-reactivity the fate and transport of perchlorate in the environment is primarily a function of microbial activity. In the last seven years more than forty specialized perchlorate respiring organisms have been identified and characterized. These dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) are metabolically diverse and environmental populations tend to be dominated by two primary genotypes, the Dechloromonas and the Azospira species. As such, the majority of our understanding of this metabolism is based on these organisms. These organisms are readily found in soil and sedimentary environments and often associate with the rhizosphere. Recent research has demonstrated an accumulation of these organisms along plant roots suggesting their catabolism of root exudates and molecular studies has demonstrated their existence as endophytic infections of the stem and leaves of actively growing Brachypodium grass plants although their exact role under these conditions is unknown. These microorganisms are generally not nutritionally fastidious and vitamin supplementation is unnecessary for growth although molybdenum is a required trace element for perchlorate reduction. The Dechloromonas and Azospira species generally grow optimally at pH values near neutrality in freshwater environments. Even so, recent field studies have shown that related deep-branching members of these genera often predominate in sites of adverse pH or salinity with some species being capable of growth and perchlorate respiration

  9. Silver(I) imidazole perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of silver(I) imidazole perchlorate reveals the presence of a planar (Ag+)6 cluster, in which three radiating pairs of Ag+ ions 3.051(1) A apart are disposed on the corners of an equilateral triangle, the inner Ag+ ions being 3.493(1) A apart. Each silver ion carries two linearly co-ordinated imidazole ligands, the whole unit has 32 (D3) symmetry. Exposure to 60Co γ-rays at 77 K results in electron addition to a group of three equivalent silver atoms. The 109Ag, 107Ag, and 14N hyperfine coupling constants show that the total 5s character of the unpaired electron is only ca. 0.55, and delocalisation onto six equivalent nitrogen ligands accounts for ca. 0.25. Low g values suggest that the remaining spin density is in 5p orbitals on silver. There is no indication of delocalisation onto the remaining three Ag+ ions in the cluster. Possible reasons for this selectivity are discussed. The electron-loss centre appears to be a normal Ag2+ complex. It is suggested that marked distortion results in the hole being trapped on one silver rather than being delocalised. (author)

  10. Perchlorate in The Great Lakes: Isotopic Composition and Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Poghosyan, Armen; Sturchio, Neil C.; Morrison, Candice G.; Beloso, Abelardo D., Jr.; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M.; Jackson, W. Andrew; Hatzinger, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Perchlorate is a persistent and mobile contaminant in the environment with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen (δ^(18)O, Δ^(17)O) and chlorine (δ^(37)Cl) along with the abundance of the radioactive isotope ^(36)Cl were used to trace perchlorate sources and behavior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. These lakes were selected for study as a likely repository of recent atmospheric perchlorate deposition. Perchlorate concentrations in the Great Lakes range from 0....

  11. Identification, Characterization, and Classification of Genes Encoding Perchlorate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, Kelly S.; Shang, Ching; Chakraborty, Romy; Belchik, Sara M.; Coates, John D.; Achenbach, Laurie A.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of perchlorate to chlorite, the first enzymatic step in the bacterial reduction of perchlorate, is catalyzed by perchlorate reductase. The genes encoding perchlorate reductase (pcrABCD) in two Dechloromonas species were characterized. Sequence analysis of the pcrAB gene products revealed similarity to α- and β-subunits of microbial nitrate reductase, selenate reductase, dimethyl sulfide dehydrogenase, ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, and chlorate reductase, all of which are type II m...

  12. Quantitative Detection of Perchlorate-Reducing Bacteria by Real-Time PCR Targeting the Perchlorate Reductase Gene▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Hamilton, Nicholas S.; Stewart, Valley; Scow, Kate M.; Hristova, Krassimira R.

    2008-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR assay targeting the pcrA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of perchlorate reductase, detected pcrA genes from perchlorate-reducing bacteria in three different genera and from soil microbial communities. Partial pcrA sequences indicated differences in the composition of perchlorate-reducing bacterial communities following exposure to different electron donors.

  13. Quantitative detection of perchlorate-reducing bacteria by real-time PCR targeting the perchlorate reductase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Hamilton, Nicholas S; Stewart, Valley; Scow, Kate M; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2008-03-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR assay targeting the pcrA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of perchlorate reductase, detected pcrA genes from perchlorate-reducing bacteria in three different genera and from soil microbial communities. Partial pcrA sequences indicated differences in the composition of perchlorate-reducing bacterial communities following exposure to different electron donors. PMID:18245250

  14. Perchlorate levels in soil and waters from the Atacama Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, R; Palma, P; Parker, D; Molina, M; Godoy, F A; Escudey, M

    2014-02-01

    Perchlorate is an anion that originates as a contaminant in ground and surface waters. The presence of perchlorate in soil and water samples from northern Chile (Atacama Desert) was investigated by ion chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry. Results indicated that perchlorate was found in five of seven soils (cultivated and uncultivated) ranging from 290 ± 1 to 2,565 ± 2 μg/kg. The greatest concentration of perchlorate was detected in Humberstone soil (2,565 ± 2 μg/kg) associated with nitrate deposits. Perchlorate levels in Chilean soils are greater than those reported for uncultivated soils in the United States. Perchlorate was also found in superficial running water ranging from 744 ± 0.01 to 1,480 ± 0.02 μg/L. Perchlorate water concentration is 30-60 times greater than levels established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (24.5 μg/L) for drinking. PMID:24165784

  15. Atmospheric origins of perchlorate on Mars and in the Atacama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catling, D. C.; Claire, M. W.; Zahnle, K. J.; Quinn, R. C.; Clark, B. C.; Hecht, M. H.; Kounaves, S.

    2010-01-01

    Isotopic studies indicate that natural perchlorate is produced on Earth in arid environments by the oxidation of chlorine species through pathways involving ozone or its photochemical products. With this analogy, we propose that the arid environment on Mars may have given rise to perchlorate through the action of atmospheric oxidants. A variety of hypothetical pathways can be proposed including photochemical reactions, electrostatic discharge, and gas-solid reactions. Because perchlorate-rich deposits in the Atacama desert are closest in abundance to perchlorate measured at NASA's Phoenix Lander site, we made a preliminary study of the means to produce Atacama perchlorate to help shed light on the origin of Martian perchlorate. We investigated gas phase pathways using a 1-D photochemical model. We found that perchlorate can be produced in sufficient quantities to explain the abundance of perchlorate in the Atacama from a proposed gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. The feasibility of gas phase production for the Atacama provides justification for future investigations of gas phase photochemistry as a possible source for Martian perchlorate.

  16. Plant-mediated transformation of perchlorate into chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nzengung, V.A.; Wang, C. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Geology; Harvey, G. [AEM, Wright Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

    1999-05-01

    The decontamination of perchlorate-contaminated water by woody plants was investigated in sand and hydroponic bioreactors. Willow trees were found to be the most favorable woody plants with phraetophytic characteristics in comparative screen tests with eastern cottonwoods and Eucalyptus cineria. Willows decontaminated aqueous solutions dosed with 10--100 mg/.L of perchlorate to below the method detection limit of 2 {micro}g/L. Two phytoprocesses were identified as important in the remediation of perchlorate-contaminated water: (1) uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate in the tree branches and leaves and (2) rhizodegradation. Exposure of rooted willow trees to perchlorate-dosed media stimulated rhizodegradation. Homogeneous degradation studies using media from the root zone of dosed willow trees confirmed that rhizosphere-associated microorganisms mediated the degradation of perchlorate to chloride. Experiments conducted with varying ranges of nitrate concentrations clearly indicated that high nitrate concentrations interfered with rhizodegradation of perchlorate. This study provides evidence that the efficacy of phytoremediation of perchlorate-contaminated environments may depend on the concentration of competing terminal electron acceptors, such as nitrate, and the nitrogen source of the nutrient solution., Since perchlorate does not volatilize from water readily, a perchlorate remediation scheme may involve an intensively cultivated plantation of trees with phraetophytic characteristics and irrigation with the contaminated water.

  17. Elevated ammonium levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Novak, Ivana; MacAulay, Nanna

    2012-01-01

    Increased ammonium (NH(4)(+)/NH(3)) in the brain is a significant factor in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy, which involves altered glutamatergic neurotransmission. In glial cell cultures and brain slices, glutamate uptake either decreases or increases following acute ammonium expos...

  18. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS: DEVELOPMENT OF A PLANT KINETIC MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in plant tissues. This research determined the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. Three hydroponics growth studies were completed u...

  19. Different Strategies for Biological Remediation of Perchlorate Contaminated Groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has gained attention recently due to its interference with thyroid gland function. In infants and unborn children, inadequate thyroid hormone production can cause mental retardation and thyroid tumors. Since new perchlorate standards will be proposed in 2013, and if a stricter standard is imposed, cost effective technologies will be in high demand. The overall objective of this research was to evaluate two perchlorate bioremediation strategies using indigenous soil bact...

  20. Perchlorate and nitrate in leafy vegetables of North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, C A; Crump, K S; Krieger, R I; Khandaker, N R; Gibbs, J P

    2005-12-15

    In previous studies trace levels of perchlorate were found in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) irrigated with Colorado River water, which is contaminated with low levels of perchlorate from aerospace and defense related industries. In this paper, we report the results of a survey conducted across North America to evaluate the occurrence of perchlorate in leafy vegetables produced outside the lower Colorado River region, and evaluate the relative iodide uptake inhibition potential to perchlorate and nitrate in these leafy vegetables. Conventionally and organically produced lettuce and other leafy vegetable samples were collected from production fields and farmers' markets in the central and coastal valleys of California, New Mexico, Colorado, Michigan, Ohio, New York, Quebec, and New Jersey. Results show that 16% of the conventionally produced samples and 32% of the organically produced samples had quantifiable levels of perchlorate using ion chromatography. Estimated perchlorate exposure from organically produced leafy vegetables was approximately 2 times that of conventional produce, but generally less than 10% of the reference dose recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. Furthermore, the iodide uptake inhibition potential of perchlorate was less than 1% of that of the nitrate present. These data are consistent with those of other reported perchlorate survey work with lettuce, bottled water, breast milk, dairy milk, and human urine, and suggest a wide national presence of perchlorate. PMID:16475313

  1. Atmospheric Production of Perchlorate on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claire, M.; Catling, D. C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    Natural production and preservation of perchlorate on Earth occurs only in arid environments. Isotopic evidence suggests a strong role for atmospheric oxidation of chlorine species via pathways including ozone or its photochemical derivatives. As the Martian atmosphere is both oxidizing and drier than the driest places on Earth, we propose an atmospheric origin for the Martian perchlorates measured by NASA's Phoenix Lander. A variety of hypothetical formation pathways can be proposed including atmospheric photochemical reactions, electrostatic discharge, and gas-solid reactions. Here, we investigate gas phase formation pathways using a 1-D photochemical model (Catling et al. 2009, accepted by JGR). Because perchlorate-rich deposits in the Atacama desert are closest in abundance to perchlorate measured at NASA's Phoenix Lander site, we start with a study of the means to produce Atacama perchlorate. We found that perchlorate can be produced in sufficient quantities to explain the abundance of perchlorate in the Atacama from a proposed gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. These results are sensitive to estimated reaction rates for ClO3 species. The feasibility of gas phase production for the Atacama provides justification for further investigations of gas phase photochemistry as a possible source for Martian perchlorate. In addition to the Atacama results, we will present a preliminary study incorporating chlorine chemistry into an existing Martian photochemical model (Zahnle et al. JGR 2008).

  2. Interaction of perchlorate and trichloroethene bioreductions in mixed anaerobic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li-Lian; Yang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhao-Xin; Yi, Yang-Yi; Tang, Youneng; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-11-15

    This work evaluated the interaction of perchlorate and trichloroethene (TCE), two common co-contaminants in groundwater, during bioreduction in serum bottles containing synthetic mineral salts media and microbial consortia. TCE at concentrations up to 0.3mM did not significantly affect perchlorate reduction; however, perchlorate concentrations higher than 0.1mM made the reduction of TCE significantly slower. Perchlorate primarily inhibited the reduction of vinyl chloride (VC, a daughter product of TCE) to ethene. Mechanistic analysis showed that the inhibition was mainly because perchlorate reduction is thermodynamically more favorable than reduction of TCE and its daughter products and not because of toxicity due to accumulation of dissolved oxygen produced during perchlorate reduction. As the initial perchlorate concentration increased from 0 to 600mg/L in a set of serum bottles, the relative abundance of Rhodocyclaceae (a putatively perchlorate-reducing genus) increased from 6.3 to 80.6%, while the relative abundance of Dehalococcoides, the only known genus that is able to reduce TCE all the way to ethene, significantly decreased. Similarly, the relative abundance of Proteobacteria (a phylum to which most known perchlorate-reducing bacteria belong) increased from 22% to almost 80%. PMID:27449607

  3. Perchlorate in the Great Lakes: isotopic composition and origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Armen; Sturchio, Neil C; Morrison, Candice G; Beloso, Abelardo D; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M; Jackson, W Andrew; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2014-10-01

    Perchlorate is a persistent and mobile contaminant in the environment with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen (δ(18)O, Δ(17)O) and chlorine (δ(37)Cl) along with the abundance of the radioactive isotope (36)Cl were used to trace perchlorate sources and behavior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. These lakes were selected for study as a likely repository of recent atmospheric perchlorate deposition. Perchlorate concentrations in the Great Lakes range from 0.05 to 0.13 μg per liter. δ(37)Cl values of perchlorate from the Great Lakes range from +3.0‰ (Lake Ontario) to +4.0‰ (Lake Superior), whereas δ(18)O values range from -4.1‰ (Lake Superior) to +4.0‰ (Lake Erie). Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ(17)O values (+1.6‰ to +2.7‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7‰) and the other four lakes (∼+1.7‰). The stable isotopic results indicate that perchlorate in the Great Lakes is dominantly of natural origin, having isotopic composition resembling that measured for indigenous perchlorate from preindustrial groundwaters of the western USA. The (36)Cl/Cl ratio of perchlorate varies widely from 7.4 × 10(-12) (Lake Ontario) to 6.7 × 10(-11) (Lake Superior). These (36)ClO4(-) abundances are consistent with an atmospheric origin of perchlorate in the Great Lakes. The relatively high (36)ClO4(-) abundances in the larger lakes (Lakes Superior and Michigan) could be explained by the presence of (36)Cl-enriched perchlorate deposited during the period of elevated atmospheric (36)Cl activity following thermonuclear bomb tests in the Pacific Ocean. PMID:25171443

  4. High ozone increases soil perchlorate but does not affect foliar perchlorate content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3) is implicated in the natural source inventory of perchlorate (ClO4-), a hydrophilic salt that migrates to ground water and interferes with uptake of iodide in mammals, including humans. Tropospheric O3 is elevated in many areas. We previously showed (Grantz et al., 2013; Environmental Pol...

  5. PERCHLORATE IDENTIFICATION IN FERTILIZERS AND ACCUMULATION IN LETTUCE SEEDLINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate has contaminated groundwater, drinking water and soils at several locations in the U.S. The primary source of contamination at sites that have been investigated to date seems to be from industrial and military operations that use Perchlorate as an oxidizing agent. How...

  6. Experimental chlorine stable isotope fractionation of perchlorate respiring bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ader, M.; Coleman, M.; Coates, J.; Chaudhuri, S.

    2006-12-01

    Perchlorate natural occurrences on earth are very limited and seem restricted to extremely arid environments such as nitrate deposits of the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, where perchlorate contents can reach 0.1 to 1%. Anthropogenically sourced perchlorate however is extensively used as a major component of explosives and rocket fuels. Careless disposal of these highly soluble and very stable perchlorates locally led to the contamination of drinking water, now recognised as posing a significant health threat. Recent studies have demonstrated that some microorganisms are able to completely reduce perchlorate to innocuous chloride, and offer a great potential for the bioremediation of contaminated waters. Provided that the isotopic fractionation associated with this reduction is significant, the measurement of the chloride isotopic composition of contaminated water is a powerful tool for monitoring the progress of in-situ remediation. We report here, the characterisation of the isotopic fractionation associated with perchlorate reduction performed by Dechlorosoma suillum strain PS during 3 culture experiments performed in a batch fermentor (anoxic, 37°°C, pH =7). The basal medium contained acetate as the electron donor and perchlorate as the electron acceptor. When possible, chloride salts were replaced by sulphate salts so as to lower the initial chloride content. The paired chlorine isotopic compositions of chloride and perchlorate in solutions sampled throughout the experiment were measured using the method described in Ader et al. 2001. The fractionation between chloride and perchlorate was calculated independently for each sample, using on the one hand the chloride content and isotopic composition and on the other hand the perchlorate content and isotopic composition. The results show that the fractionation is constant within error throughout the experiment for the 3 experiments with a weighted mean of -14.94±0.14‰. This value is much lower than the

  7. Electron donors and co-contaminants affect microbial community composition and activity in perchlorate degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiangyu; Xie, Yuxuan; Wang, Jinfeng; Wang, Jing; Liu, Fei

    2015-04-01

    Although microbial reduction of perchlorate (ClO4(-)) is a promising and effective method, our knowledge on the changes in microbial communities during ClO4(-) degradation is limited, especially when different electron donors are supplied and/or other contaminants are present. Here, we examined the effects of acetate and hydrogen as electron donors and nitrate and ammonium as co-contaminants on ClO4(-) degradation by anaerobic microcosms using six treatments. The process of degradation was divided into the lag stage (SI) and the accelerated stage (SII). Quantitative PCR was used to quantify four genes: pcrA (encoding perchlorate reductase), cld (encoding chlorite dismutase), nirS (encoding copper and cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase), and 16S rRNA. While the degradation of ClO4(-) with acetate, nitrate, and ammonia system (PNA) was the fastest with the highest abundance of the four genes, it was the slowest in the autotrophic system (HYP). The pcrA gene accumulated in SI and played a key role in initiating the accelerated degradation of ClO4(-) when its abundance reached a peak. Degradation in SII was primarily maintained by the cld gene. Acetate inhibited the growth of perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), but its effect was weakened by nitrate (NO3(-)), which promoted the growth of PRB in SI, and therefore, accelerated the ClO4(-) degradation rate. In addition, ammonia (NH4(+)), as nitrogen sources, accelerated the growth of PRB. The bacterial communities' structure and diversity were significantly affected by electron donors and co-contaminants. Under heterotrophic conditions, both ammonia and nitrate promoted Azospira as the most dominant genera, a fact that might significantly influence the rate of ClO4(-) natural attenuation by degradation. PMID:25382499

  8. Proteomic detection of proteins involved in perchlorate and chlorate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Reema; Deobald, Lee A; Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2009-09-01

    Mass spectrometry and a time-course cell lysis method were used to study proteins involved in perchlorate and chlorate metabolism in pure bacterial cultures and environmental samples. The bacterial cultures used included Dechlorosoma sp. KJ, Dechloromonas hortensis, Pseudomonas chloritidismutans ASK-1, and Pseudomonas stutzeri. The environmental samples included an anaerobic sludge enrichment culture from a sewage treatment plant, a sample of a biomass-covered activated carbon matrix from a bioreactor used for treating perchlorate-contaminated drinking water, and a waste water effluent sample from a paper mill. The approach focused on detection of perchlorate (and chlorate) reductase and chlorite dismutase proteins, which are the two central enzymes in the perchlorate (or chlorate) reduction pathways. In addition, acetate-metabolizing enzymes in pure bacterial samples and housekeeping proteins from perchlorate (or chlorate)-reducing microorganisms in environmental samples were also identified. PMID:19199051

  9. Thermal decomposition of beryllium perchlorate tetrahydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal decomposition of Be(ClO4)2x4H2O was studied by the differential flow technique in the helium stream. The kinetics was followed by an exchange reaction of the perchloric acid appearing by the decomposition with potassium carbonate. The rate of CO2 liberation in this process was recorded by a heat conductivity detector. The exchange reaction yielding CO2 is quantitative, it is not the limiting one and it does not distort the kinetics of the process of perchlorate decomposition. The solid products of decomposition were studied by infrared and NMR spectroscopy, roentgenography, thermography and chemical analysis. A mechanism suggested for the decomposition involves intermediate formation of hydroxyperchlorate: Be(ClO4)2x4H2O → Be(OH)ClO4+HClO4+3H2O; Be(OH)ClO4 → BeO+HClO4. Decomposition is accompained by melting of the sample. The mechanism of decomposition is hydrolytic. At room temperature the hydroxyperchlorate is a thick syrup-like compound crystallizing after long storing

  10. AP的安全制备%Safe Preparations of Fine Ammonium Perchlorate Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Makoto Kohga

    2006-01-01

    Fine AP particles are required to manufacture the AP-based composite propellants with a wide burning rate range for various applications,especially high burning rate propellants. However,it is difficult to prepare a fine AP safely. Some safe methods for preparing the fine AP particles are reported such as the spray-dry method and freeze-dry method. It is shown that the crystal habit modified AP particle is an effective oxidizer to enhance the burning rate.

  11. Leading Edge Flame Detachment: Effect on Burning Rate of Ammonium Perchlorate Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, E. W.; Chakravarthy, S. R.; Sambamurthi, J. K.; Sigman, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    Inner details of the transition from premixed to diffusion controlled burning are examined by considering the transition at the individual particle flamelet level. These considerations lead to prediction of observable singular burning rate behavior of bimodal AP formulations. Burning rate measurements verify the predictions, supporting the view that particle flamelets become detached and retreat to more remote premixed locations at definite (particles size dependent) pressures, revealed by the burning rate tests.

  12. Perchlorates as Powerful Catalysts in Many Important Organic Transformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Bartoli; L. Sambri; M. Locatelli

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction For long times, metallic perchlorates have been considered dangerous compounds[1] in that they function as explosives and as incontrollable oxidizers. Therefore, the fear of the great hazard connected with their manufacture and uses had prevented an extensive use both in research laboratories and in industrial processes[2].However, recently it has been cleared that this bad reputation is due to the mistaken association of metallic perchlorates with the oxidizing potential of perchloric acid and the pyrotechnic performances of NH4ClO4.

  13. Effects of Perchlorate on Organic Molecules under Simulated Mars Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, B. L.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) was discovered in the northern polar region of Mars by the Mars Phoenix Lander in 2008 and has also been recently detected by the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater [1,2]. Perchlorate has also been shown to be formed under current Mars conditions via the oxidation of mineral chlorides, further supporting the theory that perchlorate is present globally on Mars [3]. The discovery of perchlorate on Mars has raised important questions about the effects of perchlorate on the survival and detection of organic molecules. Although it has been shown that pyrolysis in the presence of perchlorate results in the alteration or destruction of organic molecules [4], few studies have been conducted on the potential effects of perchlorate on organic molecules under martian surface conditions. Although perchlorate is typically inert under Mars-typical temperatures [5], perchlorate does absorb high energy UV radiation, and has been shown to decompose to form reactive oxychlorine species such as chlorite (ClO2-) when exposed to martian conditions including UV or ionizing radiation [6,7]. Here we investigate the effects of perchlorate on the organic molecules tryptophan, benzoic acid and mellitic acid in order to determine how perchlorate may alter these compounds under Mars conditions. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV flux found on Mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of SiO2 and each organic, as well as varying concentrations of perchlorate salts, and exposed in the MSC. Subsequent to exposure in the MSC samples are leached and the leachate analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS to determine the degree of degradation of the original organic and the identity of any potential decomposition products formed by oxidation or chlorination. References: [1] Kounaves et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol. 115, p. E00E10, 2010 [2] Glavin et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol

  14. Adamantane-1-ammonium acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise J. C. de Vries

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C10H18N+·C2H3O2−, the ammonium H atoms of the cation are linked to three acetate anions via N—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a chain structure extending along the b axis.

  15. Influence of the ammonium salt anion on the synergistic solvent extraction of lanthanides with mixtures of thenoyltrifluoroacetone and tridecylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synergistic solvent extraction of Pr, Gd and Yb with mixtures of thenoyltrifluoroacetone (HTTA) and primary ammonium salt (tridecylammonium chloride or perchlorate, TDAH(Cl, ClO4)) in C6H6 has been studied. The composition of the extracted species have been determined as Ln(TTA)3TDAHA(A- = Cl- or ClO4-). The values of the equilibrium constant KT,S have been calculated. The influence of the ammonium salt anion on the extraction process has been discussed. The separation factors of the pairs Gd/Pr and Yb/Gd have been determined

  16. The NAS Perchlorate Review: Adverse Effects?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Richard B.; Corley, Richard; Cowan, Linda; Utiger, Robert D.

    2005-11-01

    To the editor: Drs. Ginsberg and Rice argue that the reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg per day recommended by the National Academies’ Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion is not adequately protective. As members of the committee, we disagree. Ginsberg and Rice base their conclusion on three points. The first involves the designation of the point of departure as a NOEL (no-observed-effect level) versus a LOAEL (lowest-observed-adverse- effect level). The committee chose as its point of departure a dose of perchlorate (0.007 mg/kg per day) that when given for 14 days to 7 normal subjects did not cause a significant decrease in the group mean thyroid iodide uptake (Greer et al. 2002). Accordingly, the committee considered it a NOEL. Ginsberg and Rice focus on the fact that only 7 subjects were given that dose, and they 1seem to say that attention should be paid only to the results in those subjects in whom there was a 1fall in thyroid iodide uptake, and that the results in those in whom there was no fall or an increase should be ignored. They consider the dose to be a LOAEL because of the fall in uptake in those few subjects. It is important to note that a statistically significant decrease of, for example, 5% or even 10%, would not be biologically important and, more important, would not be sustained. For example, in another study (Braverman et al. 2004), administration of 0.04 mg/kg per day to normal subjects for 6 months had no effect on thyroid iodide uptake when measured at 3 and 6 months, and no effect on serum thyroid hormone or thyrotropin concentrations measured monthly (inspection of Figure 5A in the paper by Greer et al. suggests that this dose would inhibit thyroid iodide uptake by about 25% if measured at 2 weeks). The second issue involves database uncertainty. In clinical studies, perchlorate has been administered prospectively to 68 normal subjects for 2 weeks to 6 months. In one study (Brabant et al. 1992

  17. Behavioral response of dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria to different electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yvonne; Gustavson, Ruth L; Ali, Nadia; Weber, Karrie A; Westphal, Lacey L; Coates, John D

    2009-10-01

    The response behavior of three dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria to different electron acceptors (nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate) was investigated with two different assays. The observed response was species-specific, dependent on the prior growth conditions, and was inhibited by oxygen. We observed attraction toward nitrate when Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB and Azospira suillum strain PS were grown with nitrate. When D. aromatica and Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB were grown with perchlorate, both responded to nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate. When A. suillum was grown with perchlorate, the organism responded to chlorate and perchlorate but not nitrate. A gene replacement mutant in the perchlorate reductase subunit (pcrA) of D. aromatica resulted in a loss of the attraction response toward perchlorate but had no impact on the nitrate response. Washed-cell suspension studies revealed that the perchlorate grown cells of D. aromatica reduced both perchlorate and nitrate, while A. suillum cells reduced perchlorate only. Based on these observations, energy taxis was proposed as the underlying mechanism for the responses to (per)chlorate by D. aromatica. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first investigation of the response behavior of perchlorate-reducing bacteria to environmental stimuli. It clearly demonstrates attraction toward chlorine oxyanions and the unique ability of these organisms to distinguish structurally analogous compounds, nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate and respond accordingly. PMID:19533120

  18. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  19. Determination of Perchlorate in Bottled Water from Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Iannece

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Perchlorate is regarded as an emerging persistent inorganic contaminant. It is widely known that perchlorate is an endocrine disruptor as it competitively inhibits iodide transport in the thyroid gland. As drinking water is the major source of human exposure to perchlorate, its occurrence in commercially available bottled waters purchased in different regions of Italy was investigated. Perchlorate was measured using the rapid, sensitive, and selective LC-ESI-MS/MS (liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry method by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM of the transition 98.8→82.8, which corresponds to the loss of one oxygen atom in the perchlorate ion (ClO4−→ClO3−. The chlorine isotope ratio (35Cl/37Cl was used as a confirmation tool. The limit of quantification (LOQ for this method was 5 ng/L, and the recovery ranged from 94% to 108%. Perchlorate was detected in 44 of the 62 drinking waters tested, with concentrations ranging from <5 to 75 ng/L. These values are similar in magnitude to those reported in drinking water from the USA and do not pose an immediate health concern.

  20. Chemolithotrophic perchlorate reduction linked to the oxidation of elemental sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiumin; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Salazar, Margarita; Bentley, Harold; Bentley, Richard

    2007-04-15

    Perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) contamination of ground and surface water has been recently recognized as a widespread environmental problem. Biological methods offer promising perspectives of perchlorate remediation. Facultative anaerobic bacteria couple the oxidation of organic and inorganic electron-donating substrates to the reduction of perchlorate as a terminal electron acceptor, converting it completely to the benign end-product, chloride. Insoluble inorganic substrates are of interest for low maintenance bioreactor or permeable reactive barrier systems because they can provide a long-term supply of electron donor without generating organic residuals. The main objective of this research was to investigate the feasibility of utilizing elemental sulfur (S(0)) as an insoluble electron donor for the biological reduction of perchlorate. A chemolithotrophic enrichment culture derived from aerobic activated sludge was obtained which effectively coupled the oxidation of elemental sulfur to sulfate with the reduction of perchlorate to chloride and gained energy from the process for cell growth. The enrichment culture grew at a rate of 0.41 or 0.81 1/d in the absence and presence of added organic carbon for cell growth, respectively. The enrichment culture was also shown to carry out sulfur disproportionation to a limited extent as evidenced by the formation of sulfide and sulfate in the absence of added electron acceptor. When nitrate and perchlorate were added together, the two electron acceptors were removed simultaneously after an initial partial decrease in the nitrate concentration. PMID:17009322

  1. Oxidation of some disubstituted anisole derivatives with ceric perchlorate in perchloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of concentration of particular reagents on the kinetics of Ce(IV) reduction by 2,6-dimethyl and 3,5-dimethyl-anisole as well as 2-methoxy-5-methyl- and 4-methoxy-2-methyl-aniline in perchloric acid solution was investigated, establishing the stoichiometry of these processes. Some intermediate products - macromolecular, derivatives of p-benzoquinone and 4,4'-diphenoquinone - were separated and identified. The effects of substituents and the conditions of performed oxidation processes on the kind and yields of the resultant products were considered. (author). 22 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  2. Perchlorate in The Great Lakes: Distribution, Isotopic Composition and Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, A.; Sturchio, N. C.; Jackson, W. A.; Guan, Y.; Eiler, J. M.; Hatzinger, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrations, stable chlorine and oxygen isotopic compositions, and 36Cl abundances of perchlorate were investigated in the five Laurentian Great Lakes. Samples were collected during monitoring cruises in 2007 and 2008 of the U.S. EPA's RV Lake Guardian and in 2010 at the water supply intake of Marquette, MI on the southern shore of Lake Superior. Concentrations of perchlorate were measured by IC/MS/MS at 24 locations, including one or two depth profiles in each lake. Mean concentrations (μg/L) are: Superior, 0.06 × 0.01; Michigan, 0.10 × 0.01; Huron, 0.11 × 0.01; Erie, 0.08 × 0.01, and Ontario, 0.09 × 0.01. Concentration vs. depth is nearly constant in each lake, indicating well-mixed conditions. Perchlorate was extracted from near-surface water by passing 15,000 to 80,000 L of water through 1-L cartridges containing Purolite A530E bifunctional anion-exchange resin. In the laboratory, perchlorate was eluted from the resin, purified, and precipitated as a >99% pure crystalline phase. Milligram amounts were recovered from each lake. Chlorine and oxygen isotopic analyses were performed at Caltech using the Cameca 7f-GEO SIMS instrument, following validation of the SIMS method with analyses of USGS-37 and USGS-38 isotopic reference materials. Results indicate a relatively narrow range in δ37Cl values (+2.9 to +3.9 ‰) and a wider range in δ18O values (-4.0 to +4.1 ‰), with a general geographic trend of increasing δ18O from west to east. Oxygen-17 was measured at UIC using dual-inlet IRMS of O2 produced by decomposition of KClO4. Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ17O values (+1.6 ‰ to +2.7 ‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7 ‰) and the other four lakes (~ +1.7 ‰). The isotopic data indicate that perchlorate is dominantly of natural origin, having stable isotopic compositions resembling those of perchlorate from pre-industrial groundwaters in the western USA. The 36Cl

  3. Perchlorate, iodine supplements, iodized salt and breast milk iodine content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to determine if increasing maternal iodine intake through single dose tablets will decrease breast milk concentrations of the iodine-uptake inhibitor, perchlorate, through competitive inhibition. We also sought to determine if the timing of supplementation influences the fraction of iodine excreted in milk versus urine and to compare the effectiveness of iodized salt as a means of providing iodine to breastfed infants. Thirteen women who did not use supplements, seven of whom used iodized salt and six of whom used non-iodized salt, submitted four milk samples and a 24-h urine collection daily for three days. Women repeated the sampling protocol for three more days during which ∼ 150 μg of iodine were taken in the evening and again for three days with morning supplementation. Samples were analyzed using isotope-dilution inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for iodine and isotope-dilution ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for perchlorate. No statistically significant differences were observed in milk iodine or perchlorate concentrations during the two treatment periods. Estimated perchlorate intake was above the U.S. National Academy of Sciences suggested reference dose for most infants. Single daily dose iodine supplementation was not effective in decreasing milk perchlorate concentrations. Users of iodized salt had significantly higher iodine levels in milk than non-users. Iodized salt may be a more effective means of iodine supplementation than tablets. - Highlights: ► Estimated infant exposures to perchlorate were, on a μg/kg basis, ∼ 5 × higher than those of mothers. ► Daily supplements are less effective than iodized salt in providing iodine to lactating women. ► Low iodine and high perchlorate in milk may place infants at risk of iodine deficiency.

  4. Perchlorate, iodine supplements, iodized salt and breast milk iodine content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Andrea B. [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Texas Health Sciences Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States); Kroll, Martina; Dyke, Jason V.; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Dias, Rukshan A.; Dasgupta, Purnendu K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 700 Planetarium Place, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    This study was undertaken to determine if increasing maternal iodine intake through single dose tablets will decrease breast milk concentrations of the iodine-uptake inhibitor, perchlorate, through competitive inhibition. We also sought to determine if the timing of supplementation influences the fraction of iodine excreted in milk versus urine and to compare the effectiveness of iodized salt as a means of providing iodine to breastfed infants. Thirteen women who did not use supplements, seven of whom used iodized salt and six of whom used non-iodized salt, submitted four milk samples and a 24-h urine collection daily for three days. Women repeated the sampling protocol for three more days during which {approx} 150 {mu}g of iodine were taken in the evening and again for three days with morning supplementation. Samples were analyzed using isotope-dilution inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for iodine and isotope-dilution ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for perchlorate. No statistically significant differences were observed in milk iodine or perchlorate concentrations during the two treatment periods. Estimated perchlorate intake was above the U.S. National Academy of Sciences suggested reference dose for most infants. Single daily dose iodine supplementation was not effective in decreasing milk perchlorate concentrations. Users of iodized salt had significantly higher iodine levels in milk than non-users. Iodized salt may be a more effective means of iodine supplementation than tablets. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated infant exposures to perchlorate were, on a {mu}g/kg basis, {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign higher than those of mothers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Daily supplements are less effective than iodized salt in providing iodine to lactating women. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low iodine and high perchlorate in milk may place infants at risk of iodine deficiency.

  5. Developmental exposure to perchlorate alters synaptic transmission in hippocampus of the adult rat: in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate, a contaminant found in food and water supplies throughout the USA, blocks iodine uptake into the thyroid gland to reduce circulating levels of thyroid hormone. Neurological function accompanying developmental exposure to perchlorate was evaluated in the present study...

  6. Chlorine isotopic composition of perchlorate in human urine as a means of distinguishing among exposure sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Armen; Morel-Espinosa, Maria; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C; Ferreccio, Catterina; Steinmaus, Craig M; Sturchio, Neil C

    2016-05-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4(-)) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant with high human exposure potential. Natural perchlorate forms in the atmosphere from where it deposits onto the surface of Earth, whereas synthetic perchlorate is manufactured as an oxidant for industrial, aerospace, and military applications. Perchlorate exposure can potentially cause adverse health effects in humans by interfering with the production of thyroid hormones through competitively blocking iodide uptake. To control and reduce perchlorate exposure, the contributions of different sources of perchlorate exposure need to be quantified. Thus, we demonstrate a novel approach for determining the contribution of different perchlorate exposure sources by quantifying stable and radioactive chlorine isotopes of perchlorate extracted from composite urine samples from two distinct populations: one in Atlanta, USA and one in Taltal, Chile (Atacama region). Urinary perchlorate from the Atlanta region resembles indigenous natural perchlorate from the western USA (δ(37)Cl=+4.1±1.0‰; (36)Cl/Cl=1 811 (±136) × 10(-15)), and urinary perchlorate from the Taltal, Chile region is similar to natural perchlorate in nitrate salt deposits from the Atacama Desert of northern Chile (δ(37)Cl=-11.0±1.0‰; (36)Cl/Cl=254 (±40) × 10(-15)). Neither urinary perchlorate resembled the isotopic pattern found in synthetic perchlorate. These results indicate that natural perchlorate of regional provenance is the dominant exposure source for the two sample populations, and that chlorine isotope ratios provide a robust tool for elucidating perchlorate exposure pathways. PMID:25805252

  7. Aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residuals: A novel sorbent for perchlorate removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate contamination of aquifers and drinking-water supplies has led to stringent regulations in several states to reduce perchlorate concentrations in water at acceptable levels for human consumption. Several perchlorate treatment technologies exist, but there is significant cost associated with their use, and the majority of them are unable to degrade perchlorate to innocuous chloride. We propose the use of a novel sorbent for perchlorate, i.e. an aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residual (Al-WTR), which is a by-product of the drinking-water treatment process. Perchlorate sorption isotherms (23 ± 1 oC) showed that the greatest amount (65%) of perchlorate removed by the Al-WTR was observed with the lowest initial perchlorate load (10 mg L-1) after only 2 h of contact time. Increasing the contact time to 24 h, perchlorate removal increased from 65 to 76%. A significant correlation was observed between the amounts of perchlorate removed with evolved chloride in solution, suggesting degradation of perchlorate to chloride. - Drinking-water treatment residuals are a low-cost sorbent for perchlorate

  8. Ammonium diphosphitoindate(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Hamchaoui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, NH4[In(HPO32], is built up from InIII cations (site symmetry 3m. adopting an octahedral environment and two different phosphite anions (each with site symmetry 3m. exhibiting a triangular–pyramidal geometry. Each InO6 octahedron shares its six apices with hydrogen phosphite groups. Reciprocally, each HPO3 group shares all its O atoms with three different metal cations, leading to [In(HPO32]− layers which propagate in the ab plane. The ammonium cation likewise has site symmetry 3m.. In the structure, the cations are located between the [In(HPO32]− layers of the host framework. The sheets are held together by hydrogen bonds formed between the NH4+ cations and the O atoms of the framework.

  9. Ammonium generation during SRAT cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the IDMS noble-metal demonstration runs ammonium nitrate deposition was found in the vessel vent system of the feed preparation area. In the bench-scale experiments of studying the hydrogen generation during the sludge treatment cycle, ammonium ion production was also monitored. It was found that: During a simulation of the DWPF Cold Chemical Runs SRAT cycle no detectable amount of ammonium ions was generated when treating a non-noble-metal containing sludge simulant according to the nitric acid flowsheet. Ammonium ions were generated during the SRAT-SME cycle when treating the noble-metal containing sludge with either formic acid or nitric acid/late-washing PHA. This is due to the reaction between formic acid and nitrate catalyzed by the noble metals in the sludge simulant. Ammonium ion production closely followed the hydrogen evolution from the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. This report summarizes the results of the production of ammonia during the SRAT cycle

  10. Waterproofing Materials for Ammonium Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Damse

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the possibility of overcoming the problem of hygroscopicity of ammonium nitrate by coating the particles with selected waterproofing materials. Gravimetric analysis ofthe samples of ammonium nitrate coated with eight different waterproofing materials, vis-a-vis, uncoated ammonium nitrate, were conducted at different relative humidity and exposuretime. The results indicate that mineral jelly is the promising waterproofing material for ammonium nitrate among the materials tested, viz, calcium stearate, dioctyl phthalate, kaoline, diethylphthalate, dinitrotoluene, shelac varnish, and beeswax. Attempts were made to confirm the waterproofing ability of mineral jelly to ammonium nitrate using differential thermal analysisand x-ray diffraction patterns as an experimental tool. Suitability of mineral jelly as an additive for the gun propellant was also assessed on the basis of theoretical calculations using THERMprogram.

  11. Competitive microbial reduction of perchlorate and nitrate with a cathode directly serving as the electron donor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial reduction of perchlorate with an electrode as the electron donor represents an emerging technology for remediation of perchlorate contamination; it is important to know how perchlorate reduction behaves when nitrate, a co-contaminant of perchlorate is present. We reported that electrons derived from the electrode can be directly transferred to the bacteria with perchlorate or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. The presence of nitrate, even at the 0.07 mM level, can slow reduction of perchlorate (0.70 mM) as a poised potential of -0.50 V (vs. SCE) was applied to the inoculated cathode. Increasing the concentration of nitrate resulted in a noticeable inhibitory effect on perchlorate reduction. When the nitrate concentration was 2.10 mM, reduction of 0.70 mM perchlorate was totally inhibited. Bacterial community analyses based on 16S rDNA gene analysis with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed that most of the bacteria newly enriched on the nitrate and/or perchlorate biocathodes were the known electrochemically active denitrifiers, which possibly prefer to reduce nitrate over perchlorate. These results show that nitrate is a more favorable electron acceptor than perchlorate in the bioelectrochemical system where the cathode directly serves as the electron donor

  12. Thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate—A TGA–FTIR–MS study: Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • TGA–FTIR–MS study of ammonium perchlorate. • Decomposition was divided into low, intermediate, and high temperature regimes. • N2O and NO2 were the major species at low and high temperature regimes, respectively. • N2O, NO2, HNO3, and HCl were quantified to aid kinetic evaluation. • NO was not detected as a major product at any stage. - Abstract: The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate has been studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), coupled with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and electron ionization (EI) mass spectrometry (MS) of the evolved gases. The thermal decomposition could be demarcated into three distinct regimes, the low temperature decomposition (LTD) regime and the high temperature decomposition (HTD) regime, with an intermediate regime between the two, named as the intermediate temperature decomposition (ITD) regime. Using FTIR spectroscopy, N2O was detected as the primary species during the LTD regime, followed by HCl, NO2, and HNO3, in lesser quantities. On the contrary, NO2 was found to be the principal species, followed by almost equal concentrations of HCl, N2O, and HNO3 in the HTD regime. Other important species, such as H2O, Cl2, O2, etc., although observed by MS, were not quantified. NO could not be identified in appreciable quantities in any of the regimes. Based on the species detected during the present work, and previous research, a reaction scheme has been proposed for AP decomposition in the LTD and the HTD regimes

  13. Effect of nitrate, acetate and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing microbial communities and their activity in vadose soil

    OpenAIRE

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Yang, Kun; Dennis E. Rolston; Hristova, Krassimira R.; Scow, Kate M.

    2011-01-01

    Effect of nitrate, acetate and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) was examined by conducting microcosm tests using vadose soil collected from a perchlorate-contaminated site. The rate of perchlorate reduction was enhanced by hydrogen amendment and inhibited by acetate amendment, compared to unamendment. Nitrate was reduced before perchlorate in all amendments. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, nitrate delayed perchlorate reduction, suggesting the PRB preferentially ...

  14. Sample processing method for the determination of perchlorate in milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, many different water sources and foods have been reported to contain perchlorate. Studies indicate that significant levels of perchlorate are present in both human and dairy milk. The determination of perchlorate in milk is particularly important due to its potential health impact on infants and children. As for many other biological samples, sample preparation is more time consuming than the analysis itself. The concurrent presence of large amounts of fats, proteins, carbohydrates, etc., demands some initial cleanup; otherwise the separation column lifetime and the limit of detection are both greatly compromised. Reported milk processing methods require the addition of chemicals such as ethanol, acetic acid or acetonitrile. Reagent addition is undesirable in trace analysis. We report here an essentially reagent-free sample preparation method for the determination of perchlorate in milk. Milk samples are spiked with isotopically labeled perchlorate and centrifuged to remove lipids. The resulting liquid is placed in a disposable centrifugal ultrafilter device with a molecular weight cutoff of 10 kDa, and centrifuged. Approximately 5-10 ml of clear liquid, ready for analysis, is obtained from a 20 ml milk sample. Both bovine and human milk samples have been successfully processed and analyzed by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry (IC-MS). Standard addition experiments show good recoveries. The repeatability of the analytical result for the same sample in multiple sample cleanup runs ranged from 3 to 6% R.S.D. This processing technique has also been successfully applied for the determination of iodide and thiocyanate in milk

  15. Perchlorate exposure in lactating women in an urban community in New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate is most widely known as a solid oxidant for missile and rocket propulsion systems although it is also present as a trace contaminant in some fertilizers. It has been detected in drinking water, fruits, and vegetables throughout New Jersey and most of the United States. At sufficiently high doses, perchlorate interferes with the uptake of iodine into the thyroid and may interfere with the development of the skeletal system and the central nervous system of infants. Therefore, it is important to quantify perchlorate in breast milk to understand potential perchlorate exposure in infants. In this study we measured perchlorate in breast milk, urine, and drinking water collected from 106 lactating mothers from Central New Jersey. Each subject was asked to provide three sets of samples over a 3-month period. The average ± SD perchlorate level in drinking water, breast milk, and urine was 0.168 ± 0.132 ng/mL (n = 253), 6.80 ± 8.76 ng/mL (n = 276), and 3.19 ± 3.64 ng/mL (3.51 ± 6.79 μg/g creatinine) (n = 273), respectively. Urinary perchlorate levels were lower than reference range values for women of reproductive age (5.16 ± 11.33 μg/g creatinine, p = 0.03), likely because of perchlorate secretion in breast milk. Drinking water perchlorate levels were ≤ 1.05 ng/mL and were not positively correlated with either breast milk or urine perchlorate levels. These findings together suggest that drinking water was not the most important perchlorate exposure source for these women. Creatinine-adjusted urine perchlorate levels were strongly correlated with breast milk perchlorate levels (r = 0.626, p = < 0.0005). Breast milk perchlorate levels in this study are consistent with widespread perchlorate exposure in lactating women and thus infants. This suggests that breast milk may be a source of exposure to perchlorate in infants. - Research Highlights: → The general population, including infants, is exposed to perchlorate. → Breast milk is a significant

  16. Inhibition of perchlorate reduction by nitrate in a fixed biofilm reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate and nitrate were reduced simultaneously in fixed biofilm reactors. Reduction of 1000 μg L-1 perchlorate decreased slightly with the addition of 10-16 mg L-1 NO3-N when excess acetate was supplied while denitrification was complete. When influent acetate was reduced by 50% to well below the stoichiometric requirement, perchlorate reduction decreased by 70% while denitrification decreased by only 20%, suggesting that competition for electrons by nitrate was a factor in inhibition. Reduction of nitrate was favored over perchlorate, even though reactor biofilm had been enriched under perchlorate-reducing conditions for 10 months. When excess acetate was restored, perchlorate and nitrate returned to initial levels. The average most probable numbers of perchlorate- and nitrate-reducing bacteria during excess substrate operation were not significantly different and ranged between 2.0 x 105 and 7.9 x 105 cells cm-2 media surface area. The effect of nitrate on chloride generation by suspensions of perchlorate-reducing populations was studied using a chloride ion probe. The rate of reduction of 2 mM perchlorate decreased by 30% in the presence of 2 mM nitrate when excess acetate was added. When acetate was limited, perchlorate reduction decreased by 70% in the presence of equi-molar nitrate

  17. Detection of Perchlorate Anion on Functionalized Silver Colloids Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tio, J.; Wang, W.; Gu, B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate anion interferes with the uptake of iodide by the human thyroid gland and consequently disrupts the regulation of metabolism. Chronic exposure to high levels of perchlorate may lead to the formation of thyroid gland tumors. Although the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not set a maximum contaminant level (MCL) for perchlorate, a draft drinking water range of 4-18 ppb based on 2 liter daily consumption of water has been established. The current EPA approved method for detecting perchlorate uses ion chromatography which has a detection limit of ~1ppb and involves lengthy analytical time in the laboratory. A unique combination of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect and the bifunctional anion exchange resin’s high selectivity may provide an alternative way to detect perchlorate at such low concentrations and with high specificity. SERS, which uses laser excitation of adsorbed perchlorate anions on silver nanoparticles, has been shown to detect perchlorate anions at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. Normal micro-Raman analysis of perchlorate sorbed onto the resin beads has detected an even lower concentration of 10 ppb. In an effort to integrate these two effects, silver nanoparticles were coated with N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride, a functional group similar to that found on the resin bead, and subsequently inserted into different perchlorate concentration environments. This method has resulted in perchlorate detection down to ~10 ppb and a more consistent detection of perchlorate anion at ~50 ppb than that of earlier methods. As suggested by the direct insertion of functionalized silver colloids into perchlorate samples, this technique may potentially allow for the development of a probe using on-site Raman spectrometry to detect significantly low concentrations of perchlorate in situ rather than in the laboratory.

  18. Sensitivity and adaptability of methanogens to perchlorates: Implications for life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Goodhart, Timothy H.; Harpool, Joshua D.; Hearnsberger, Christopher E.; McCracken, Graham L.; McSpadden, Stanley W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander discovered perchlorate at its landing site, and in 2012, the Curiosity rover confirmed the presence of perchlorate on Mars. The research reported here was designed to determine if certain methanogens could grow in the presence of three different perchlorate salt solutions. The methanogens tested were Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanococcus maripaludis. Media were prepared containing 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2%, 5% and 10% wt/vol magnesium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate, or calcium perchlorate. Organisms were inoculated into their respective media followed by incubation at each organism's growth temperature. Methane production, commonly used to measure methanogen growth, was measured by gas chromatography of headspace gas samples. Methane concentrations varied with species and perchlorate salt tested. However, all four methanogens produced substantial levels of methane in the presence of up to 1.0% perchlorate, but not higher. The standard procedure for growing methanogens typically includes sodium sulfide, a reducing agent, to reduce residual molecular oxygen. However, the sodium sulfide may have been reducing the perchlorate, thus allowing for growth of the methanogens. To investigate this possibility, experiments were conducted where stainless steel nails were used instead of sodium sulfide as the reducing agent. Prior to the addition of perchlorate and inoculation, the nails were removed from the liquid medium. Just as in the prior experiments, the methanogens produced methane at comparable levels to those seen with sodium sulfide as the reductant, indicating that sodium sulfide did not reduce the perchlorate to any significant extent. Additionally, cells metabolizing in 1% perchlorate were transferred to 2%, cells metabolizing in 2% were transferred to 5%, and finally cells metabolizing in 5% were transferred to 10%. All four species produced methane at 2% and 5%, but not 10

  19. Relative source contributions for perchlorate exposures in a lactating human cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Andrea B. [University of North Texas Health Sciences Center (United States); Dyke, Jason V. [University of Texas at Arlington (United States); Ohira, Shin-Ichi [Kumamoto University (Japan); Dasgupta, Purnendu K., E-mail: Dasgupta@uta.edu [University of Texas at Arlington (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Perchlorate is an iodine-uptake inhibitor and common contaminant of food and drinking water. Understanding the amount of perchlorate exposure occurring through non-water sources is essential for accurate estimates of human exposure levels, and establishment of drinking water limits for this pervasive contaminant. The study objective was to determine the amount of perchlorate intake derived from diet rather than water. Subjects provided drinking water samples, detailed fluid-intake records, 24 h urine collections and four milk samples for nine days. Samples were analyzed for perchlorate by isotope dilution ion chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Amounts of perchlorate derived from drinking water and dietary sources were calculated for each individual. Water of local origin was found to contribute a minor fraction of perchlorate intake. Estimated fraction intake from drinking water ranged from 0 to 36%. The mean and median dose of perchlorate derived from non-water sources by lactating women was 0.18 μg/kg/day (range: 0.06 to 0.36 μg/kg/day.) Lactating women consumed more fluid (mean 2.424 L/day) than has been assumed in recent risk assessments for perchlorate. The data reported here indicate that lactating women may be exposed to perchlorate through dietary sources at markedly higher levels than estimated previously. Exposures to perchlorate from non-water sources may be higher than recent estimates, including those used to develop drinking water standards. - Highlights: ► Residence in an area with perchlorate-contaminated water may be a poor predictor of exposure. ► Exposures to perchlorate from food are likely underestimated. ► The relative contributions for human perchlorate exposures should be weighted more heavily towards non-water sources.

  20. Relative source contributions for perchlorate exposures in a lactating human cohort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate is an iodine-uptake inhibitor and common contaminant of food and drinking water. Understanding the amount of perchlorate exposure occurring through non-water sources is essential for accurate estimates of human exposure levels, and establishment of drinking water limits for this pervasive contaminant. The study objective was to determine the amount of perchlorate intake derived from diet rather than water. Subjects provided drinking water samples, detailed fluid-intake records, 24 h urine collections and four milk samples for nine days. Samples were analyzed for perchlorate by isotope dilution ion chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Amounts of perchlorate derived from drinking water and dietary sources were calculated for each individual. Water of local origin was found to contribute a minor fraction of perchlorate intake. Estimated fraction intake from drinking water ranged from 0 to 36%. The mean and median dose of perchlorate derived from non-water sources by lactating women was 0.18 μg/kg/day (range: 0.06 to 0.36 μg/kg/day.) Lactating women consumed more fluid (mean 2.424 L/day) than has been assumed in recent risk assessments for perchlorate. The data reported here indicate that lactating women may be exposed to perchlorate through dietary sources at markedly higher levels than estimated previously. Exposures to perchlorate from non-water sources may be higher than recent estimates, including those used to develop drinking water standards. - Highlights: ► Residence in an area with perchlorate-contaminated water may be a poor predictor of exposure. ► Exposures to perchlorate from food are likely underestimated. ► The relative contributions for human perchlorate exposures should be weighted more heavily towards non-water sources

  1. Isotopic tracing of perchlorate sources in groundwater from Pomona, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Isotopic analysis of groundwater perchlorate can provide source identification. • Citrus cultivation in Pomona, CA caused perchlorate contamination of groundwater. • Hydrologic modeling and mass balance support interpretation of perchlorate source. - Abstract: The groundwater of Pomona, California, is contaminated with perchlorate (ClO4-). This water is treated to reduce the ClO4- concentration to less than 6 μg L−1 for compliance with California Department of Public Health drinking water regulations. A study of the isotopic composition of oxygen and chlorine in ClO4- has been conducted to determine the source of the contamination. Isotopic compositions were measured for ClO4- samples extracted from 14 wells, yielding ranges of δ18O values from −10.8‰ to −8.0‰, Δ17O values from +4.6‰ to +7.5‰, and δ37Cl values from −12.8‰ to −8.9‰. Evaluation of mixing proportions using published isotopic data for three ClO4- end-members (synthetic, Atacama, and indigenous natural ClO4-) indicates that contamination is dominantly (85–89%) Atacama ClO4- derived from past use of imported Chilean nitrate fertilizer in citrus cultivation. This interpretation is consistent with (1) aerial photography archives showing extensive citrus fields surrounding Pomona in the early- to mid-20th century, (2) mass-balance estimates for ClO4-, and (3) numerical hydrologic models yielding travel-times for ClO4- from fields to wells that are in the range of 15 to >100 years. The hydrologic models predict that ClO4- contamination of Pomona groundwater will persist for decades into the future

  2. 4-(2-Azaniumylethylpiperazin-1-ium bis(perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Reisi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C6H17N32+·2ClO4−, the piperazine ring adopts a chair conformation with the ethylammonium fragment occupying an equatorial position. In the crystal, the dications and perchlorate anions are linked through N—H...O hydrogen bonding and weak C—H...O hydrogen bonding into a three-dimensional supramolecular network.

  3. Genetic Factors That Might Lead to Different Responses in Individuals Exposed to Perchlorate

    OpenAIRE

    Scinicariello, Franco; Murray, H. Edward; Smith, Lester; Wilbur, Sharon; Fowler, Bruce A.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in groundwater in many parts of the United States, and recent detection in vegetable and dairy food products indicates that contamination by perchlorate is more widespread than previously thought. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium iodide symporter, the thyroid cell–surface protein responsible for transporting iodide from the plasma into the thyroid. An estimated 4.3% of the U.S. population is subclinically hypothyroid, and 6.9% of pregnant wome...

  4. Purification and Characterization of (Per)Chlorate Reductase from the Chlorate-Respiring Strain GR-1

    OpenAIRE

    Kengen, Servé W. M.; Rikken, Geoffrey B.; Hagen, Wilfred R.; van Ginkel, Cees G.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    1999-01-01

    Strain GR-1 is one of several recently isolated bacterial species that are able to respire by using chlorate or perchlorate as the terminal electron acceptor. The organism performs a complete reduction of chlorate or perchlorate to chloride and oxygen, with the intermediate formation of chlorite. This study describes the purification and characterization of the key enzyme of the reductive pathway, the chlorate and perchlorate reductase. A single enzyme was found to catalyze both the chlorate-...

  5. Transposon and Deletion Mutagenesis of Genes Involved in Perchlorate Reduction in Azospira suillum PS

    OpenAIRE

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Clark, Iain C.; Liao, Annette; Coates, John D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although much work on the biochemistry of the key enzymes of bacterial perchlorate reduction, chlorite dismutase, and perchlorate reductase has been published, understanding of the molecular mechanisms of this metabolism has been somewhat hampered by the lack of a clear model system amenable to genetic manipulation. Using transposon mutagenesis and clean deletions, genes important for perchlorate reduction in Azospira suillum PS have been identified both inside and outside the previo...

  6. Extraction of scandium ions by 1-alkyl-3-methyl-2-pyrazoline-5-ones from perchlorate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of acid and interphase distribution of 1-alkyl-3-methyl-2-pyrazoline-5-ones in the system water-chloroform-perchloric acid are studied. Reagents capable to extract scandium cations from subacid solutions in the presence of perchlorate ions. 1-Alkyl-3-methyl-2-pyrazoline-5-ones stratifies aqueous solutions of perchloric acid into two liquid phase. Scandium ions are concentrated in the lower phase having small volume

  7. Uranyl ion behaviour in perchloric media and its extraction by TBP CCl/sub 4/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahia, A. (Centre de Developpement des Materiaux, Commissariat aux Energies Nouvelles, Alger (Algeria)); Benali-Baitich, O. (Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), Institut de Chimie, Alger (Algeria))

    The behaviour of uranyl ion in aqueous solution of perchloric acid (O < Cub(HC104) < 13 mol.1/sup -1/) shows that for an acidity higher than 9 mol.1/sup -1/, there is formation of a monoperchlorato complex. The extraction of uranly perchlorate from aqueous perchloric solutions by TBP diluted CC1/sub 4/ as a function of uranium and perchloric acid concentrations enabled us on one hand, to concluded that UO/sub 2//sup + +/ is solvated by 2 TBP molecules, and on the other hand, to determine the composition of the coextracted HC1O/sub 4/ solvated species.

  8. Perchlorate in fish from a contaminated site in east-central Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate, a known thyroid endocrine disruptor, contaminates surface waters near military instillations where solid fuel rocket motors are manufactured or assembled. To assess potential perchlorate exposure to fish and the human population which may feed on them, fish were collected around the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant in McLennan County, TX, and analyzed for the presence of the perchlorate anion. The sampling sites included Lake Waco and Belton Lake, and several streams and rivers within their watersheds. The general tendency was that perchlorate was only found in a few species sampled, and perchlorate was not detected in every individual within these species. When detected in the fish, perchlorate tissue concentrations were greater than that in the water. This may be due to highly variable perchlorate concentrations in the water coupled with individual-level variation in elimination from the body, or to routes of exposure other than water. - In perchlorate-contaminated lakes and streams, perchlorate is detected infrequently in fish heads, fillets, and whole bodies, but may be detected more often depending on species and seasonal trends, and always at concentrations higher in the fish than in the water

  9. Containerized Wetland Bioreactor Evaluated for Perchlorate and Nitrate Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibley, V R; Krauter, P W

    2004-12-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) designed and constructed an innovative containerized wetlands (bioreactor) system that began operation in November 2000 to biologically degrade perchlorate and nitrate under relatively low-flow conditions at a remote location at Site 300 known as Building 854. Since initial start-up, the system has processed over 3,463,000 liters of ground water and treated over 38 grams of perchlorate and 148 kilograms of nitrate. Site 300 is operated by the University of California as a high-explosives and materials testing facility supporting nuclear weapons research. The 11-square mile site located in northern California was added to the NPL in 1990 primarily due to the presence of elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water. At the urging of the regulatory agencies, perchlorate was looked for and detected in the ground water in 1999. VOCs, nitrate and perchlorate were released into the soil and ground water in the Building 854 area as the result of accidental leaks during stability testing of weapons or from waste discharge practices that are no longer permitted at Site 300. Design of the wetland bioreactors was based on earlier studies showing that indigenous chlorate-respiring bacteria could effectively degrade perchlorate into nontoxic concentrations of chlorate, chlorite, oxygen, and chloride. Studies also showed that the addition of organic carbon would enhance microbial denitrification. Early onsite testing showed acetic acid to be a more effective carbon source than dried leaf matter, dried algae, or milk replacement starter; a nutrient and carbon source used in a Department of Defense phytoremediation demonstration. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Using solar energy, ground water is pumped into granular

  10. Influence of the ammonium salt anion on the synergistic solvent extraction of lanthanides with mixtures of thenoyltrifluoroacetone and tridecylamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukov, I.L.; Jordanov, V.M. [Univ. of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Sofia (Bulgaria). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry

    1998-08-01

    The synergistic solvent extraction of Pr, Gd and Yb with mixtures of thenoyltrifluoroacetone (HTTA) and primary ammonium salt (tridecylammonium chloride or perchlorate, TDAH(Cl, ClO{sub 4})) in C{sub 6}H{sub 6} has been studied. The composition of the extracted species have been determined as Ln(TTA){sub 3}TDAHA(A{sup {minus}} = Cl{sup {minus}} or ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}). The values of the equilibrium constant K{sub T,S} have been calculated. The influence of the ammonium salt anion on the extraction process has been discussed. The separation factors of the pairs Gd/Pr and Yb/Gd have been determined.

  11. Perchlorate in the Hydrologic Cycle - An Overview of Sources and Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonestrom, D. A.; Jackson, W.; Mayer, K.; Orris, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) in water and food is of concern due to deleterious health affects associated with hypothyroidism. The presence of widespread perchlorate in 0-to-28 ka-old pristine ground water of the Middle Rio Grande Basin (Plummer et al., 2006, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es051739h), in ground water >1 mile from agricultural activities in the Southern High Plains (Rajagapolan et al., 2006, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es052155i), and in unsaturated zones throughout the arid and semiarid southwestern United States (Rao et al., 2007, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es062853i) clearly indicates that perchlorate is a non-exotic component of the hydrologic cycle, at least in dry environments. The natural system has been greatly perturbed in places by human activities. Most anthropogenic inputs are associated with the manufacture and use of explosives and rocket fuel, providing concentrated sources of excess perchlorate to the hydrologic cycle. Perchlorate-containing fertilizers and irrigation provide dispersed sources within and down-gradient from agricultural areas. Natural sources include photochemically mediated reactions involving ozone at the land surface and in the lower atmosphere. A growing body of work indicates that a small, but persistent, meteoric source acting over thousands of years can explain observed accumulations of unsaturated-zone perchlorate in arid regions. In addition to meteoric sources, oxyanions produced during volcanogenic processes can include appreciable amounts of natural perchlorate. Terrestrial plants take up perchlorate in soil water, with some species of xerophytic succulents concentrating the anion to high levels. Similarly, perchlorate in marine plants indicates that perchlorate is part of marine biochemical cycles. Perchlorate-bearing marine sediments of late Tertiary age suggest that perchlorate has been part of global geochemical cycles for millions of years and, furthermore, can be preserved in the subsurface despite the nearly ubiquitous presence of

  12. Physiological and Genetic Description of Dissimilatory Perchlorate Reduction by the Novel Marine Bacterium Arcobacter sp. Strain CAB

    OpenAIRE

    Carlström, Charlotte I.; Wang, Ouwei; Melnyk, Ryan A.; Bauer, Stefan; Lee, Joyce; Engelbrektson, Anna; Coates, John D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacterium (DPRB), Arcobacter sp. strain CAB, was isolated from a marina in Berkeley, CA. Phylogenetically, this halophile was most closely related to Arcobacter defluvii strain SW30-2 and Arcobacter ellisii. With acetate as the electron donor, strain CAB completely reduced perchlorate (ClO4 −) or chlorate (ClO3 −) [collectively designated (per)chlorate] to innocuous chloride (Cl−), likely using the perchlorate reductase (Pcr) and chlorite di...

  13. Bifunctional lanthanum phosphate substrates as novel adsorbents and biocatalyst supports for perchlorate removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankar, Sasidharan [Materials Science and Technology Division (India); Prajeesh, Gangadharan Puthiya Veetil; Anupama, Vijaya Nadaraja [Process Engineering and Environmental Technology Division, CSIR – National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Industrial Estate P.O., Thiruvananthapuram 695019 (India); Krishnakumar, Bhaskaran [Process Engineering and Environmental Technology Division, CSIR – National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Industrial Estate P.O., Thiruvananthapuram 695019 (India); Academy of Scientific and Industrial Research (AcSIR) (India); Hareesh, Padinhattayil [Materials Science and Technology Division (India); Nair, Balagopal N. [R and D Centre, Noritake Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan); Warrier, Krishna Gopakumar [Materials Science and Technology Division (India); Academy of Scientific and Industrial Research (AcSIR) (India); Hareesh, Unnikrishnan Nair Saraswathy, E-mail: hareesh@niist.res.in [Materials Science and Technology Division (India); Academy of Scientific and Industrial Research (AcSIR) (India)

    2014-06-30

    Graphical abstract: Porous lanthanum phosphate substrates, obtained by an environmentally benign thermal gelation process, performed the role of dual functional sorbent facilitating perchlorate adsorption and bioremediation through the growth of perchlorate reducing microbial colonies. - Highlights: • Lanthanum phosphate monoliths as efficient perchlorate adsorbents. • And also as substrates for biofilm (perchlorate reducing bacteria) growth. • Environmentally benign thermal gelation process for substrate fabrication. • 98% adsorption efficiency for perchlorate concentrations up to 100 μg/L. • The regenerated monoliths show nearly 100% reusability. - Abstract: Porous lanthanum phosphate substrates, obtained by an environmentally benign colloidal forming process employing methyl cellulose, are reported here as excellent adsorbents of perchlorate with >98% efficiency and with 100% reusability. Additionally, the effectiveness of such substrates as biocatalyst supports that facilitate biofilm formation of perchlorate reducing microbes (Serratia marcescens NIIST 5) is also demonstrated for the first time. The adsorption of perchlorate ions is attributed to the pore structure of lanthanum phosphate substrate and the microbial attachment is primarily ascribed to its intrinsic hydrophobic property. Lanthanum phosphate thus emerges as a dual functional material that possesses an integrated adsorption/bioremediation property for the effective removal of ClO{sub 4}{sup −} which is an increasingly important environmental contaminant.

  14. Identification of a Perchlorate Reduction Genomic Island with Novel Regulatory and Metabolic Genes ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Engelbrektson, Anna; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Byrne-Bailey, Kathy; Coates, John D.

    2011-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the genomes of four dissimilatory (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria has revealed a genomic island associated with perchlorate reduction. In addition to the characterized metabolic genes for perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, the island contains multiple conserved uncharacterized genes possibly involved in electron transport and regulation.

  15. Identification of a perchlorate reduction genomic island with novel regulatory and metabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Ryan A; Engelbrektson, Anna; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Byrne-Bailey, Kathy; Coates, John D

    2011-10-01

    A comparative analysis of the genomes of four dissimilatory (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria has revealed a genomic island associated with perchlorate reduction. In addition to the characterized metabolic genes for perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, the island contains multiple conserved uncharacterized genes possibly involved in electron transport and regulation. PMID:21856823

  16. Bifunctional lanthanum phosphate substrates as novel adsorbents and biocatalyst supports for perchlorate removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Porous lanthanum phosphate substrates, obtained by an environmentally benign thermal gelation process, performed the role of dual functional sorbent facilitating perchlorate adsorption and bioremediation through the growth of perchlorate reducing microbial colonies. - Highlights: • Lanthanum phosphate monoliths as efficient perchlorate adsorbents. • And also as substrates for biofilm (perchlorate reducing bacteria) growth. • Environmentally benign thermal gelation process for substrate fabrication. • 98% adsorption efficiency for perchlorate concentrations up to 100 μg/L. • The regenerated monoliths show nearly 100% reusability. - Abstract: Porous lanthanum phosphate substrates, obtained by an environmentally benign colloidal forming process employing methyl cellulose, are reported here as excellent adsorbents of perchlorate with >98% efficiency and with 100% reusability. Additionally, the effectiveness of such substrates as biocatalyst supports that facilitate biofilm formation of perchlorate reducing microbes (Serratia marcescens NIIST 5) is also demonstrated for the first time. The adsorption of perchlorate ions is attributed to the pore structure of lanthanum phosphate substrate and the microbial attachment is primarily ascribed to its intrinsic hydrophobic property. Lanthanum phosphate thus emerges as a dual functional material that possesses an integrated adsorption/bioremediation property for the effective removal of ClO4− which is an increasingly important environmental contaminant

  17. Terbium nitrate luminescence quenching by eosin in he presence of lithium perchlorate in sulfolane solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quenching of terbium nitrate luminescence by anionic dye, eosin, in the presence of lithium perchlorate in sulfolane solutions was studied. Temperature dependence of terbium nitrate luminescence in sulfolane solutions in the presence of perchlorate anions were considered. The values of energy required for water molecular substitution in Tb3+ ion coordination sphere for solvent molecule in electrolyte solution were ascertained

  18. Archaeal (Per)Chlorate Reduction at High Temperature: An Interplay of Biotic and Abiotic Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebensteiner, M.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Schaap, P.J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lomans, B.P.

    2013-01-01

    Perchlorate and chlorate anions [(per)chlorate] exist in the environment from natural and anthropogenic sources, where they can serve as electron acceptors for bacteria. We performed growth experiments combined with genomic and proteomic analyses of the hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus that s

  19. Monitoring of perchlorate in diverse foods and its estimated dietary exposure for Korea populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Woo; Oh, Sung-Hee; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2012-12-01

    The perchlorate concentrations in various Korean food samples were monitored, and 663 samples belonging to 39 kinds of food were analyzed. The analysis results revealed that dairy products contain the highest average concentration of 6.34 μg/kg and high detection frequency of over 85%. Fruit and vegetables showed the next highest perchlorate concentration with an average of 6.17 μg/kg. Especially, with its average concentration of 39.9 μg/kg, spinach showed the highest perchlorate level among all target food samples studied. Tomato was followed by spinach, which showed a high perchlorate average concentration of 19.8 μg/kg, and over 7 μg/kg was detected in ham and sausage (avg. 7.31 μg/kg) and in instant noodles (avg. 7.58 μg/kg). Less than 2 μg/kg was detected in fishes, meats and beverages. The exposure dose of perchlorate in Korean by food intake was calculated on the basis of the analyzed perchlorate levels in this study. The daily perchlorate dose to which Korean adults are exposed is 0.04 μg/kg bw/day, which is lower than the RfD (0.7 μg/kg bw/day) value suggested by US NAS. This result indicates that Korean people's current exposure to perchlorate from domestic food consumption is evaluated as safe. PMID:23116718

  20. Photodimerization and photooxygenation of 9-vinylcarbazole catalyzed by titanium dioxide and magnesium perchlorate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hajime; Maeda; Mio; Yamamoto; Hideyuki; Nakagawa; Kazuhiko; Mizuno

    2010-01-01

    Photoreaction of 9-vinylcarbazole in acetonitrile in the presence of titanium dioxide and a catalytic amount of magnesium perchlorate gave 3,6-di(9-carbazolyl)-1,2-dioxane as a photooxygenated product via photodimerization of 9-vinylcarbazole.The photoreaction proceeds via an electron transfer mechanism,where magnesium perchlorate accelerated formation of the photo-oxygenated product.

  1. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  2. 77 FR 50613 - Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Carbonate and Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Bicarbonate; Exemption From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Carbonate and Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Bicarbonate... Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Carbonate and Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Bicarbonate, jointly referred to as.... Background and Statutory Findings In the Federal Register of December 8, 2011 (76 FR 76674) (FRL-...

  3. (Dicyanamido)[tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine]zinc(II) perchlorate

    OpenAIRE

    Shi Guo Zhang; Hong Yan Zhao; Hong Li

    2008-01-01

    In the title complex, [Zn(C2N3)(C18H18N4)]ClO4, the ZnII ion has a slightly distorted trigonal–bipyramidal ZnN5 coordination geometry. The crystal structure is stabilized by weak intermolecular C—H...O and C—H...N hydrogen bonds. In addition, there are relatively close contacts between the O atoms of the perchlorate anion and symmetry-related pyridine rings [O...Cg = 3.179 (3) and 3.236 (3) Å, where Cg is the centroid of a pyridine ring], and between t...

  4. Specific heat and thermodynamic properties of the cesium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cesium perchlorate specific heat has been measured in a vacuum adiabatic microcalorimeter in the 10-365 K range. On the basis of the data obtained the thermodynamic functions are calculated. Csub(p)sup(0) (298.15 K) = 110.4+-0.2 J/Kxmol; S0 (298.15 K)=175.9+-0.5 J/Kxmol; H0 (298.15 K) - H0(0)=22280+-50 J/mol; - [G0 (289.15 K) - H0(0)]/T = 101.2+-0.2 J/Kxmol

  5. Characterization of Perchlorate in a New Frozen Human Urine Standard Reference Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lee L.; Jarrett, Jeffery M.; Davis, W. Clay; Kilpatrick, Eric L.; Oflaz, Rabia; Turk, Gregory C.; Leber, Dennis D.; Valentin, Liza; Morel-Espinosa, Maria; Blount, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate, an inorganic anion, has recently been recognized as an environmental contaminant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Urine is the preferred matrix for assessment of human exposure to perchlorate. Although the measurement technique for perchlorate in urine was developed in 2005, the calibration and quality assurance aspects of the metrology infrastructure for perchlorate are still lacking in that there is no certified reference material (CRM) traceable to the International System of Units (SI). To meet the quality assurance needs in biomonitoring measurements of perchlorate and the related anions that affect thyroid health, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3668 Mercury, Perchlorate, and Iodide in Frozen Human Urine. SRM 3668 consists of perchlorate, nitrate, thiocyanate, iodine, and mercury in urine at two levels that represent the 50th and 95th percentiles, respectively, of the concentrations (with some adjustments) in the U.S. population. It is the first CRM being certified for perchlorate. Measurements leading to the certification of perchlorate were made collaboratively at NIST and CDC using three methods based on liquid or ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS or IC-MS/MS). Potential sources of bias were analyzed and results were compared for the three methods. Perchlorate in SRM 3668 Level I urine was certified to be 2.70 μg L−1 ± 0.21 μg L−1, and for SRM 3668 Level II urine, the certified value is 13.47 μg L−1 ± 0.96 μg L−1. PMID:22850897

  6. Specific adsorption of perchlorate anions on Pt{hkl} single crystal electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Gary A; Brew, Ashley; Hunter, Katherine; Sharman, Jonathan; Wright, Edward

    2014-07-21

    The voltammetry of Pt{111}, Pt{100}, Pt{110} and Pt{311} single crystal electrodes as a function of perchloric acid concentration (0.05-2.00 M) has been studied in order to test the assertion made in recent reports by Watanabe et al. that perchlorate anions specifically adsorb on polycrystalline platinum. Such an assertion would have significant ramifications for our understanding of electrocatalytic processes at platinum surfaces since perchlorate anions at low pH have classically been assumed not to specifically adsorb. For Pt{111}, it is found that OHad and electrochemical oxide states are both perturbed significantly as perchloric acid concentration is increased. We suggest that this is due to specific adsorption of perchlorate anions competing with OHad for adsorption sites. The hydrogen underpotential deposition (H UPD) region of Pt{111} however remains unchanged although evidence for perchlorate anion decomposition to chloride on Pt{111} is reported. In contrast, for Pt{100} no variation in the onset of electrochemical oxide formation is found nor any shift in the potential of the OHad state which normally results from the action of specifically adsorbing anions. This suggests that perchlorate anions are non-specifically adsorbed on this plane although strong changes in all H UPD states are observed as perchloric acid concentration is increased. This manifests itself as a redistribution of charge from the H UPD state situated at more positive potential to the one at more negative potential. For Pt{110} and Pt{311}, marginal changes in the onset of electrochemical oxide formation are recorded, associated with specific adsorption of perchlorate. Specific adsorption of perchlorate anions on Pt{111} is deleterious to electrocatalytic activity in relation to the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as measured using a rotating disc electrode (RDE) in a hanging meniscus configuration. This study supports previous work suggesting that a large component of the ORR

  7. Ammonium assmilation in spruce ectomycorrhizas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assimilation of labelled NH4+ into amino acids has been followed in ectomycorrhizal roots of spruce. Over an 18 h period of NH4+ feeding, Gln, Glu and Ala became the most abundant amino acids. Gln was also the most highly labelled amino acid during the experiment, followed by Glu and Ala. This result indicates that Gln synthesis is an important ammonium utilization reaction in spruce mycorrhizas. Addition of MSX to NH4+ fed mycorrhizas caused an inhibition of Gln accumulation with a corresponding increase in Glu, Ala and Asn levels. The supply of MSX induced a sharp diminution of 15N enrichment in both amino and amido groups of glutamine. In contrast, the 15N incorporation into Glu and derivatives (Ala and Asp) remained very high. This study demonstrates that the fungal glutamate dehydrogenase is quite operative in spruce ectomycorrhizas since it is able to sustain ammonium assimilation when glutamine synthetase is inhibited

  8. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  9. Palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidation of L-tryptophan by hexacyanoferrate(III) in perchloric acid medium: a kinetic and mechanistic approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ahmed Fawzy

    2016-02-01

    The catalytic effect of palladium(II) on the oxidation of L-tryptophan by potassium hexacyanoferrate( III) has been investigated spectrophotometrically in aqueous perchloric acid medium. A first order dependence in [hexacyanoferrate(III)] and fractional-first order dependences in both [L-tryptophan] and [palladium(II)] were obtained. The reaction exhibits fractional-second order kinetics with respect to [H+]. Reaction rate increased with increase in ionic strength and dielectric constant of the medium. The effect of temperature on the reaction rate has also been studied and activation parameters have been evaluated and discussed. Initial addition of the reaction product, hexacyanoferrate(II), does not affect the rate significantly. A plausible mechanistic scheme explaining all the observed kinetic results has been proposed. The final oxidation products are identified as indole-3-acetaldehyde, ammonium ion and carbon dioxide. The rate law associated with the reaction mechanism is derived.

  10. Ion Chromatographic Determination of low level Perchlorate in Natural Waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a persistent contaminant of drinking-, surface-, and ground-water, and of soils. Possible contributions of ClO4- contamination are the military, the space program, and supporting industries and fertilizers. Perchlorate has long been known to have a negative effect on the thyroid gland. It has been added to the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Contaminant candidate List (CCL) in 1998, so that ClO4 can be regulated at a concentration safe to humans. This paper describes the determination of trace level ClO4- in various matrices utilizing ion chromatographic method. The method utilizes a Dionex IonPac AS11 column with suppressed conductivity detection, 1500ul sample loop, and a 100 mN NaOH eluent at a flow rate of 1.0ml/min. These parameters allow a method detection limit (MDL) of 0.277ug/1 and a short retention time of 8 minutes. A quality control, proficiency testing samples from the EPA and a number of environmental samples from New York State (ground water) and California (ground and surface waters) were analyzed by this technique. Concentrations measured were in the range of 1.9-217 ug/1. No evidence of ClO4- was found in various commonly used fertilizers. (author)

  11. Extraction of scandium by benzoylantipyrine from chloride-perchlorate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution of scandium complexes in case of extraction by benzoyl-4-antipyrine (BANT) in chloroform from aqueous chloride-perchlorate solutions, depending on extraction, perchlorate-ion and salting out agents concentration, was studied. It has been ascertained that scandium distribution factor is nearly 50 at NaClO4 and BANT concentrations equal to 2 and 0.1 mol/l respectively. Introduction of salting out agents (NaCl, CaCl2) and HCl at a constant content of NaClO4 (0.5 mol/l) increases noticeably scandium extraction. For 0.1 mol/l BANT solution in chloroform the extraction capacity in terms of scandium makes up 1.26 g/l. The optimal conditions for the element extraction have been found, the composition of the complex extracted has been ascertained (Sc:BANT:ClO4- = 1:3:3) and extraction mechanism has been suggested. Influence of interfering elements on scandium distribution factor was studied

  12. The relationship between perchlorate in drinking water and cord blood thyroid hormones: First experience from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Javidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the controversial information regarding the effects of perchlorate on thyroid function of high risk population as neonates, and given the high prevalence rate of thyroid disorders specially congenital hypothyroidism in our region, this study aims to investigate for the first time in Iran, the relationship between drinking groundwater perchlorate and cord blood thyroid hormones level in an industrial region. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, drinking groundwater perchlorate level of rural areas of Zarinshahr, Isfahan was measured. Simultaneously, cord blood level of thyroid hormones of neonates born in the studied region was measured. Thyroid function test of neonates in regions with low and high perchlorate level were compared. Results: In this study, 25 tap water samples were obtained for perchlorate measurement. Level of cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, T4 and T3 of 25 neonates were measured. Mean (standard deviation of perchlorate, TSH, T4 and T3 was 3.59 (5.10 μg/l, 7.81 (4.14 mIU/m, 6.06 (0.85 mg/dl, and 63.46 (17.53 mg/dl, respectively. Mean levels of thyroid function tests were not different in low ( 0.05. Conclusions: Perchlorate did not appear to be related to thyroid function of neonates in the studied industrial region. It seems that iodine status of the regions, as well as other environmental contaminants and genetic background, could impact on its relation with thyroid function of neonates.

  13. A bioassay for the detection of perchlorate in the ppb range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinnickel, Mark; Smith, Stephen C; Koo, Jonathan; O'Connor, Susan M; Coates, John D

    2011-04-01

    A bioassay for the determination of ppb (μg·L(-1)) concentrations of perchlorate has been developed and is described herein. The assay uses the enzyme perchlorate reductase (PR) from the perchlorate-reducing organism Dechloromonas agitata in purified and partially purified forms to detect perchlorate. The redox active dye phenazine methosulfate (PMS) is shown to efficiently shuttle electrons to PR from NADH. Perchlorate can be determined indirectly by monitoring NADH oxidization by PR. To lower the detection limit, we have shown that perchlorate can be concentrated on a solid-phase extraction (SPE) column that is pretreated with the cation decyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). Perchlorate is eluted from these columns with a solution of 2 M NaCl and 200 mM morpholine propane sulfonic acid (MOPS, pH 12.5). By washing these columns with 15 mL of 2.5 mM DTAB and 15% acetone, contaminating ions, such as chlorate and nitrate, are removed without affecting the bioassay. Because of the effect of complex matrices on the SPE columns, the method of standard additions is used to analyze tap water and groundwater samples. The efficacy of the developed bioassay was demonstrated by analyzing samples from 2-17000 ppb in deionized lab water, tap water, and contaminated groundwater. PMID:21384912

  14. Microbial community analysis of perchlorate-reducing cultures growing on zero-valent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic microbial mixed cultures demonstrated its ability to completely remove perchlorate in the presence of zero-valent iron. In order to understand the major microbial reaction in the iron-supported culture, community analysis comprising of microbial fatty acids and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) techniques was performed for perchlorate reducing cultures. Analysis of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) and subsequent principal component analysis (PCA) showed clear distinctions not only between iron-supported perchlorate reducing culture and seed bacteria, but also among perchlorate-reducing cultures receiving different electron donors. The DGGE pattern targeting the chlorite dismutase (cld) gene showed that iron-supported perchlorate reducing culture is similar to hydrogen-fed cultures as compared to acetate-fed culture. The phylogenetic tree suggested that the dominant microbial reaction may be a combination of the autotrophic and heterotrophic reduction of perchlorate. Both molecular and chemotaxonomic experimental results support further understanding in the function of zero-valent iron as an adequate electron source for enhancing the microbial perchlorate reduction in natural and engineered systems.

  15. Genetic factors that might lead to different responses in individuals exposed to perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scinicariello, Franco; Murray, H Edward; Smith, Lester; Wilbur, Sharon; Fowler, Bruce A

    2005-11-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in groundwater in many parts of the United States, and recent detection in vegetable and dairy food products indicates that contamination by perchlorate is more widespread than previously thought. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium iodide symporter, the thyroid cell-surface protein responsible for transporting iodide from the plasma into the thyroid. An estimated 4.3% of the U.S. population is subclinically hypothyroid, and 6.9% of pregnant women may have low iodine intake. Congenital hypothyroidism affects 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 4,000 infants, and 15% of these cases have been attributed to genetic defects. Our objective in this review is to identify genetic biomarkers that would help define subpopulations sensitive to environmental perchlorate exposure. We review the literature to identify genetic defects involved in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, particularly defects in iodide transport from circulation into the thyroid cell, defects in iodide transport from the thyroid cell to the follicular lumen (Pendred syndrome), and defects of iodide organification. Furthermore, we summarize relevant studies of perchlorate in humans. Because of perchlorate inhibition of iodide uptake, it is biologically plausible that chronic ingestion of perchlorate through contaminated sources may cause some degree of iodine discharge in populations that are genetically susceptible to defects in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, thus deteriorating their conditions. We conclude that future studies linking human disease and environmental perchlorate exposure should consider the genetic makeup of the participants, actual perchlorate exposure levels, and individual iodine intake/excretion levels. PMID:16263499

  16. Perchlorate Exposure Reduces Primordial Germ Cell Number in Female Threespine Stickleback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ann M.; Earp, Nathanial C.; Redmond, Mandy E.; Postlethwait, John H.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Perchlorate is a common aquatic contaminant that has long been known to affect thyroid function in vertebrates, including humans. More recently perchlorate has been shown to affect primordial sexual differentiation in the aquatic model fishes zebrafish and threespine stickleback, but the mechanism has been unclear. Stickleback exposed to perchlorate from fertilization have increased androgen levels in the embryo and disrupted reproductive morphologies as adults, suggesting that perchlorate could disrupt the earliest stages of primordial sexual differentiation when primordial germ cells (PGCs) begin to form the gonad. Female stickleback have three to four times the number of PGCs as males during the first weeks of development. We hypothesized that perchlorate exposure affects primordial sexual differentiation by reducing the number of germ cells in the gonad during an important window of stickleback sex determination at 14–18 days post fertilization (dpf). We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the number of PGCs at 16 dpf in control and 100 mg/L perchlorate-treated male and female stickleback. Perchlorate exposure from the time of fertilization resulted in significantly reduced PGC number only in genotypic females, suggesting that the masculinizing effects of perchlorate observed in adult stickleback may result from early changes to the number of PGCs at a time critical for sex determination. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of a connection between an endocrine disruptor and reduction in PGC number prior to the first meiosis during sex determination. These findings suggest that a mode of action of perchlorate on adult reproductive phenotypes in vertebrates, including humans, such as altered fecundity and sex reversal or intersex gonads, may stem from early changes to germ cell development. PMID:27383240

  17. Perchlorate Exposure Reduces Primordial Germ Cell Number in Female Threespine Stickleback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M Petersen

    Full Text Available Perchlorate is a common aquatic contaminant that has long been known to affect thyroid function in vertebrates, including humans. More recently perchlorate has been shown to affect primordial sexual differentiation in the aquatic model fishes zebrafish and threespine stickleback, but the mechanism has been unclear. Stickleback exposed to perchlorate from fertilization have increased androgen levels in the embryo and disrupted reproductive morphologies as adults, suggesting that perchlorate could disrupt the earliest stages of primordial sexual differentiation when primordial germ cells (PGCs begin to form the gonad. Female stickleback have three to four times the number of PGCs as males during the first weeks of development. We hypothesized that perchlorate exposure affects primordial sexual differentiation by reducing the number of germ cells in the gonad during an important window of stickleback sex determination at 14-18 days post fertilization (dpf. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the number of PGCs at 16 dpf in control and 100 mg/L perchlorate-treated male and female stickleback. Perchlorate exposure from the time of fertilization resulted in significantly reduced PGC number only in genotypic females, suggesting that the masculinizing effects of perchlorate observed in adult stickleback may result from early changes to the number of PGCs at a time critical for sex determination. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of a connection between an endocrine disruptor and reduction in PGC number prior to the first meiosis during sex determination. These findings suggest that a mode of action of perchlorate on adult reproductive phenotypes in vertebrates, including humans, such as altered fecundity and sex reversal or intersex gonads, may stem from early changes to germ cell development.

  18. Tailored Architectures of Ammonium Ionenes

    OpenAIRE

    Tamami, Mana

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a variety of ammonium ionenes from water-soluble coatings to high-performance elastomers are discussed. Water-soluble random copolymer ionenes were synthesized using the Menshutkin reaction from 1,12-dibromododecane, N,N,Nâ ²,Nâ ²-tetramethyl-1,6-hexanediamine, and 1,12-bis(N,N-dimethylamino)dodecane. The absolute molecular weights were determined for the first time using a multiangle laser light scattering detector in aqueous size exclusion chromatograph...

  19. Ammonium assmilation in spruce ectomycorrhizas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalot, M.; Brun, A.; Botton, B. (Univ. of nancy, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)); Stewart, G. (University College, London (England))

    1990-05-01

    Assimilation of labelled NH{sub 4}{sup +} into amino acids has been followed in ectomycorrhizal roots of spruce. Over an 18 h period of NH{sub 4}{sup +} feeding, Gln, Glu and Ala became the most abundant amino acids. Gln was also the most highly labelled amino acid during the experiment, followed by Glu and Ala. This result indicates that Gln synthesis is an important ammonium utilization reaction in spruce mycorrhizas. Addition of MSX to NH{sub 4}{sup +} fed mycorrhizas caused an inhibition of Gln accumulation with a corresponding increase in Glu, Ala and Asn levels. The supply of MSX induced a sharp diminution of {sup 15}N enrichment in both amino and amido groups of glutamine. In contrast, the {sup 15}N incorporation into Glu and derivatives (Ala and Asp) remained very high. This study demonstrates that the fungal glutamate dehydrogenase is quite operative in spruce ectomycorrhizas since it is able to sustain ammonium assimilation when glutamine synthetase is inhibited.

  20. Synthesis of Chitosan Quaternary Ammonium Salts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A series of N-alkyl or N-aryl chitosan quaternary ammonium salts were prepared via Schiffs base intermediates. Quaternization of N-substituted chitosan derivatives was carried out using methyl iodide to produce water-soluble cationic chitosan quaternary ammonium salt. The products were characterized by IR, 1HNMR and elemental analysis. The degree of substitution of chitosan quaternary ammonium salt was calculated by elemental analysis.

  1. Effect of nitrate, acetate, and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing microbial communities and their activity in vadose soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Yang, Kun; Rolston, Dennis E; Hristova, Krassimira R; Scow, Kate M

    2011-05-01

    The effect of nitrate, acetate, and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) was examined by conducting microcosm tests using vadose soil collected from a perchlorate-contaminated site. The rate of perchlorate reduction was enhanced by hydrogen amendment and inhibited by acetate amendment, compared with unamendment. Nitrate was reduced before perchlorate in all amendments. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, nitrate delayed perchlorate reduction, suggesting that the PRB preferentially use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In contrast, nitrate eliminated the inhibitory effect of acetate amendment on perchlorate reduction and increased the rate and the extent, possibly because the preceding nitrate reduction/denitrification decreased the acetate concentration that was inhibitory to the native PRB. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, perchlorate reductase gene (pcrA) copies, representing PRB densities, increased with either perchlorate or nitrate reduction, suggesting that either perchlorate or nitrate stimulates the growth of the PRB. In contrast, in acetate-amended soil pcrA increased only when perchlorate was depleted: a large portion of the PRB may have not utilized nitrate in this amendment. Nitrate addition did not alter the distribution of the dominant pcrA clones in hydrogen-amended soil, likely because of the functional redundancy of PRB as nitrate-reducers/denitrifiers, whereas acetate selected different pcrA clones from those with hydrogen amendment. PMID:21284679

  2. A rapid and simple method for the separation of TBP-dodecane by perchloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic solvents, including TBP etc., are widely used as an extractant, and treated and disposed by storage, incineration, and absorption into absorbent after they were used. Any of those methods does not aim at recycling of solvents, treating concurrently the extractant and the diluent without separating them. In this paper, a test is reported on the TBP-dodecane separation by perchloric acid for a separation test of the diluent from the extractant as a first step toward recycling. Basically this separation method is already reported by P. Mark et al. as a method for the analysis of TBP, but it requires a large amount of perchloric acid. With a further detailed study of the perchloric acid effects on the TBP-dodecane separation, it was made clear that the separation is possible by adding a fixed amount of TBP contacted with perchloric acid to the TBP-dodecane solvent. In this paper, its outline is presented. (author)

  3. ANALYSIS OF HYDROPONIC FERTILIZER MATRIXES FOR PERCHLORATE: COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven retail hydroponic nitrate fertilizer products, two liquid and five solid, were comparatively analyzed for the perchlorate anion (ClO4-) by ion chromatography (IC) with suppressed conductivity detection, complexation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (cESI-MS), norma...

  4. Radioiodine tracers as useful tools in studies of thyrotoxic effects of exogenous bromide and perchlorate ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the use of 125I and 131I radionuclides, we followed the effects of exogenous bromide and perchlorate ions on the metabolism of iodine and of thyroid hormone in the rat. The presumed thyrotoxic effects of bromide and perchlorate have been confirmed and quantified. Correct assay conditions for the radiometric determination of the enzyme activity of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) have been established. The use of the adapted radiometric assay revealed a divergent influence of bromide and perchlorate ions on the TPO activity in the rat thyroids. Excessive bromide exerted a biphasic effect, depending on the extent of bromide intake in the animals. In contrast, in all the rats that were administered with high amounts of perchlorate were found elevated TPO activities. (author)

  5. On the stability of perchlorate ions against reductive attacks in electrochemical systems and in the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GYŐZŐ G. LÁNG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The problems related to the electrochemical/electrocatalytic stability of perchlorate ions are reviewed in the light of recent experimental results. The electrocatalytic, catalytic, and electrochemical reduction processes are presented and the links between them are outlined. Some possible mechanisms of the complicated reduction processes are discussed. Various methods for the detection of reduction process are presented, e.g. voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and radiotracer methods. Environmental aspects and some methods for perchlorate removal and wastewater treatment are briefly summarized.

  6. The perchlorate discharge test with 123I for the diagnosis of the Pendred syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method for the diagnosis of the Pendred Syndrome in children by the Perchlorate discharge test using 123I is described. The older child, who has the Pendred Syndrome and the obligatory hearing deficit, frequently has neither a goitre nor hypothyroidism, but other investigations (bone growth, scars and function tests) can also show changes. However a more certain diagnosis of this disorder in children is possible by the perchlorate discharge test using 123I. (orig.)

  7. Behavioral response of dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria to different electron acceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yvonne; Gustavson, Ruth L.; Ali, Nadia; Weber, Karrie A.; Westphal, Lacey L.; Coates, John D.

    2009-01-01

    The response behavior of three dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria to different electron acceptors (nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate) was investigated with two different assays. The observed response was species-specific, dependent on the prior growth conditions, and was inhibited by oxygen. We observed attraction toward nitrate when Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB and Azospira suillum strain PS were grown with nitrate. When D. aromatica and Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB were ...

  8. Perchlorate in dust fall and indoor dust in Malta: An effect of fireworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Alfred J; Chircop, Cynthia; Micallef, Tamara; Pace, Colette

    2015-07-15

    We report on the presence of perchlorate in the settleable dust of Malta, a small central Mediterranean island. Both dust fall collected directly as it precipitated from atmosphere over a period of one month and deposited indoor dust from domestic residences were studied. Perchlorate was determined by ion chromatography of water extracts of the collected dusts. Dust fall was collected from 43 towns during 2011 to 2013 and indoor dust was sampled from homes in the same localities. Perchlorate was detected in 108 of 153 samples of dust fall (71%) and in 28 of 37 indoor dust samples (76%). Detectable perchlorate in dust fall ranged from 0.52μgg(-1) to 561μgg(-1) with a median value of 6.2μgg(-1); in indoor dust, levels were from 0.79μgg(-1) to 53μgg(-1) with a median value of 7.8μgg(-1), the highest recorded anywhere to date. Statistical analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in perchlorate content of indoor dust and dust fall. Perchlorate levels in dust fall escalate during the summer in response to numerous religious feasts celebrated with fireworks and perchlorate persists at low μgg(-1) concentrations for several months beyond the summer festive period. In Malta, perchlorate derives exclusively from KClO4, imported for fireworks manufacture. Its residue in dust presents an exposure risk to the population, especially via ingestion by hand to mouth transfer. Our results suggest that wherever intensive burning of fireworks takes place, the environmental impact may be much longer lived than realised, mainly due to re-suspension and deposition of contaminated settled dust in the urban environment. PMID:25828411

  9. Thermal decomposition characteristics of ammonium dinitramide. Part 1; Anmoniumu jinitoramido no netsubunkai tokusei. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takishita, Y.; Teramoto, Y. [Japan Defence Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-28

    At present, the mainstream of the oxidizer of solid propellant used in defense and space exploitation is ammonium perchlorate (AP), while a large amount of hydrogen chloride is generated by AP-based propellant due to chlorine existing in AP molecules. Ammonium dinitramide (ADN) is paid attention recently as a new none-chlorine energetic oxidizer. ADN, with the specific driving force equal to that of AP, is expected as a propellant-oxidizer to meet simultaneously the demands for the improvement of concealment and the prevention of environmental pollution while the high specific driving force is maintained. In this study, thermal decomposition characteristics of ADN is investigated by thermal analysis and mass spectroscopy. The activation energies calculated based on velocity theory are 105kj/mole, 117kj/mole and 151kj/mole respectively at the initial temperature sought from thermal gravity (TG) curve, the peak temperature of decompositing calorification in differential thermal analysis curve, and the temperature from which weight loss is 50% in TG curve. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Microbial redox processes in deep subsurface environments and the potential application of (perchlorate in oil reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G Liebensteiner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of microorganisms to thrive under oxygen-free conditions in subsurface environments relies on the enzymatic reduction of oxidized elements, such as sulfate, ferric iron or CO2, coupled to the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. A broad phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms from subsurface environments has been described using isolation-based and advanced molecular ecological techniques. The physiological groups reviewed here comprise iron-, manganese- and nitrate-reducing microorganisms. In the context of recent findings also the potential of chlorate and perchlorate [jointly termed (perchlorate] reduction in oil reservoirs will be discussed. Special attention is given to elevated temperatures that are predominant in the deep subsurface. Microbial reduction of (perchlorate is a thermodynamically favorable redox process, also at high temperature. However, knowledge about (perchlorate reduction at elevated temperatures is still scarce and restricted to members of the Firmicutes and the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus. By analyzing the diversity and phylogenetic distribution of functional genes in (metagenome databases and combining this knowledge with extrapolations to earlier-made physiological observations we speculate on the potential of (perchlorate reduction in the subsurface and more precisely oil fields. In addition, the application of (perchlorate for bioremediation, souring control and microbial enhanced oil recovery are addressed.

  11. Preliminary analyses for perchlorate in selected natural materials and their derivative products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orris, G.J.; Harvey, G.J.; Tsui, D.T.; Eldrige, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    Increasing concern about sources of perchlorate contamination in ground and surface waters has led to interest in identifying potential sources of natural perchlorate and products derived from these natural sources. To date, most perchlorate found in ground and surface waters has been attributed to its major uses as an oxidizer in solid propellants for rockets, in fireworks and other explosives, and a variety of other uses of man-made perchlorate salts. However, perchlorate found in the soils, surface water, and ground water of some locations cannot be linked to an anthropogenic source. This paper contains preliminary data on the detection and non-detection of perchlorate in a variety of natural materials and their products, including some fertilizer materials. These data were previously presented at two conferences; once in poster session and once orally (Harvey and others, 1999; Orris and others, 2000). Although the results presented here are included in a journal article awaiting publication, the lack of public information on this topic has led to repeated requests for the data used as the basis for our presentations in 1999 and 2000.

  12. A screened hybrid density functional study on energetic complexes: Cobalt, nickel and copper carbohydrazide perchlorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The molecular geometry, electronic structure, infrared spectra, and heats of reaction and formation of cobalt and nickel tris(carbohydrazide) perchlorates as well as copper bis(carbohydrazide) perchlorate are investigated using the HSE screened hybrid density functional. The metal-ligand interaction, thermal stability, and red-shift of the amino stretching vibrations of these complexes are also discussed. Moreover, it is found there is a relationship between the energy gap and impact sensitivity. - Abstract: The molecular geometry, electronic structure, infrared spectra and thermochemical properties of cobalt and nickel tris(carbohydrazide) perchlorates (CoCP and NiCP) as well as copper bis(carbohydrazide) perchlorate (CuCP) were investigated using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) screened hybrid density functional. The results show that both perchlorate ions coordinate with the copper atom, and the interactions between copper and perchlorate are ionic, whereas all the metal-carbohydrazide interactions are covalent. Due to the delocalization from the σN-H bond orbital to the n*M antibond orbital, the amino stretching vibrations of these complexes show considerable red-shift compared with those of free carbohydrazide ligand. The calculated heats of reaction and formation indicate that the formations of these complexes are exothermic, and the order of their thermal stability is NiCP > CoCP > CuCP. These agree well with the experimental results. Finally, we find that there is a relationship between the energy gap and impact sensitivity.

  13. Mechanistic Studies on the Radiolytic Decomposition of Perchlorates on the Martian Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew M.; Abplanalp, Matthew J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-04-01

    Perchlorates—inorganic compounds carrying the perchlorate ion ({{ClO}}4{}-)—were discovered at the north polar landing site of the Phoenix spacecraft and at the southern equatorial landing site of the Curiosity Rover within the Martian soil at levels of 0.4-0.6 wt%. This study explores in laboratory experiments the temperature-dependent decomposition mechanisms of hydrated perchlorates—namely magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate (Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O)—and provides yields of the oxygen-bearing species formed in these processes at Mars-relevant surface temperatures from 165 to 310 K in the presence of galactic cosmic-ray particles (GCRs). Our experiments reveal that the response of the perchlorates to the energetic electrons is dictated by the destruction of the perchlorate ion ({{ClO}}4{}-) and the inherent formation of chlorates ({{ClO}}3{}-) plus atomic oxygen (O). Isotopic substitution experiments reveal that the oxygen is released solely from the perchlorate ion and not from the water of hydration (H2O). As the mass spectrometer detects only molecular oxygen (O2) and no atomic oxygen (O), atomic oxygen recombines to molecular oxygen within the perchlorates, with the overall yield of molecular oxygen increasing as the temperature drops from 260 to 160 K. Absolute destruction rates and formation yields of oxygen are provided for the planetary modeling community.

  14. High-nitrogen-based pyrotechnics: perchlorate-free red- and green-light illuminants based on 5-aminotetrazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Moretti, Jared D

    2013-09-16

    Prototype testing of perchlorate-free hand-held signal illuminants for the US Army's M126 A1 red-star and M195 green-star parachute illuminants are described. Although previous perchlorate-free variants for these items have been developed based on high-nitrogen compounds that are not readily available, the new formulations consist of anhydrous 5-aminotetrazole as the suitable perchlorate replacement. Compared to the perchlorate-containing control, the disclosed illuminants exhibited excellent stabilities toward various ignition stimuli and had excellent pyrotechnic performance. The illuminants are important from both military and civil fireworks perspectives, as the perchlorate-free nature of the illuminants adequately address environmental concerns associated with perchlorate-containing red- and green-light-emitting illuminants. PMID:23950104

  15. Thermal analysis studies of ammonium uranyl carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis of the ammonium uranyl carbonate powder were performed with heat balance in the following atmosphers: Air, Ar and Ar-8%H2. The thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis curves of the ammonium uranyl carbonate powder obtained from different source were reported and discussed

  16. Evolution of Electrogenic Ammonium Transporters (AMTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Tami R; Ward, John M

    2016-01-01

    The ammonium transporter gene family consists of three main clades, AMT, MEP, and Rh. The evolutionary history of the AMT/MEP/Rh gene family is characterized by multiple horizontal gene transfer events, gene family expansion and contraction, and gene loss; thus the gene tree for this family of transporters is unlike the organismal tree. The genomes of angiosperms contain genes for both electrogenic and electroneutral ammonium transporters, but it is not clear how far back in the land plant lineage electrogenic ammonium transporters occur. Here, we place Marchantia polymorpha ammonium transporters in the AMT/MEP/Rh phylogeny and we show that AMTs from the liverwort M. polymorpha are electrogenic. This information suggests that electrogenic ammonium transport evolved at least as early as the divergence of bryophytes in the land plant lineage. PMID:27066024

  17. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (per)chlorate treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Anna eEngelbrektson; Christopher eHubbard; Lauren eTom; Aaron eBOUSSINA; Yong Tae eJin; Hayden eWong; Yvette Marisa Piceno; Hans Karl Carlson; Mark eConrad; Andersen, Gary L.; Coates, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (per)chlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 m...

  18. High-performing red-light-emitting pyrotechnic illuminants through the use of perchlorate-free materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Jared D; Sabatini, Jesse J; Poret, Jay C

    2014-07-01

    The development of perchlorate-free M662 40 mm illuminating pyrotechnic compositions is described. On the bases of cost, performance, and sensitivity, potassium periodate was determined to be most effective potassium perchlorate replacement in the compositions tested. The optimal periodate-based composition exceeded the performance of the perchlorate-containing control, exhibited low sensitivity values to impact, friction, and electrostatic discharge, and had high thermal onset temperatures. PMID:24939042

  19. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  20. Perchlorate in the San Antonio Segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlquist, L.; Rajagapolan, S.; Jackson, W. A.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in drinking-water supplies and can have adverse health effects on humans by disrupting thyroid function. Perchlorate and other constituents were analyzed from ground-water samples that were collected in 2004-06 from 99 wells completed in the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The fractured karstic carbonate Edwards aquifer, declared a sole-source aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, supplies nearly one-half million acre-feet per year for drinking water and other uses. Wells were located in a variety of land-use settings that included rangeland, agriculture, and urban; well types included domestic, public, and observation. Perchlorate was detected in 98 percent of the samples, and concentrations ranged from less than 0.05 to 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). Five samples contained concentrations greater than 1 μg/L and were from wells in the urban northern San Antonio area. The results from three samples that contained perchlorate at concentrations greater than 2 μg/L are anomalous. Chloride concentration ranged from 5.6 to 69 milligrams per liter, typical for freshwater in the Edwards aquifer. No significant (r2 greater than 0.7) correlations were observed when perchlorate concentrations were correlated with depth to water, total depth of well, or concentrations of bicarbonate, nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, bromide, chloride, fluoride, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, strontium, and dissolved solids. Tritium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.9 tritium units in 31 of the 99 samples and indicate at least some fraction of modern water (post-atmospheric nuclear tests). No correlation between apparent tritium age and perchlorate concentration was observed, a possible indication that anthropogenic influences are not affecting observed perchlorate concentrations. The molar ratio of chloride to perchlorate ranged from 17,000 to 320

  1. Study of microbial perchlorate reduction: Considering of multiple pH, electron acceptors and donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xing [Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Recycling (Shandong), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Gao, Baoyu, E-mail: bygao@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Recycling (Shandong), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jin, Bo [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005,Australia (Australia); Zhen, Hu [Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Recycling (Shandong), School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang, Xiaoyi [CSIRO Land and Water, Gate 5, Waite Road, Urrbrae, SA 5064 (Australia); Dai, Ming [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide SA 5005,Australia (Australia)

    2015-03-21

    Graphical abstract: Schemes of perchlorate reduction in ClO{sub 4}{sup −}/ClO{sub 3}{sup −}–NO{sub 3}{sup −} e{sup −}acceptor systems. - Highlights: • We created a multiple electron acceptor/donor system for ClO{sub 4}{sup −} reduction. • Nitrate reduction was inhibited when using perchlorate-grown Azospira sp. KJ. • Reduction proceeded as an order of ClO{sub 3}{sup −}, ClO{sub 4}{sup −}and NO{sub 3}{sup −}. • Oxidation of acetate was inhibited by succinate in acetate–succinate series. - Abstract: Bioremediation of perchlorate-cotaminated water by a heterotrophic perchlorate reducing bacterium creates a multiple electron acceptor-donor system. We experimentally determined the perchlorate reduction by Azospira sp. KJ at multiple pH, electron acceptors and donors systems; this was the aim of this study. Perchlorate reduction was drastically inhibited at the pH 6.0, and the maximum reduction of perchlorate by Azospira sp. KJ was observed at pH value of 8.0. Perchlorate reduction was retarded in ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–ClO{sub 3}{sup −}, ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–ClO{sub 3}{sup −}–NO{sub 3}{sup −},and ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–NO{sub 3}{sup −} acceptor systems, while being completely inhibited by the additional O{sub 2} in the ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–O{sub 2} acceptor system. The reduction proceeded as an order of ClO{sub 3}{sup −}, ClO{sub 4}{sup −}, and NO{sub 3}{sup −} in the ClO{sub 4}{sup −}–ClO{sub 3}{sup −}–NO{sub 3}{sup −} system. K{sub S,}v{sub max}, and q{sub max} obtained at different e{sup −} acceptor and donor conditions are calculated as 140.5–190.6 mg/L, 8.7–13.2 mg-perchlorate/L-h, and 0.094–0.16 mg-perchlorate/mg-DW-h, respectively.

  2. Study of microbial perchlorate reduction: Considering of multiple pH, electron acceptors and donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Schemes of perchlorate reduction in ClO4−/ClO3−–NO3− e−acceptor systems. - Highlights: • We created a multiple electron acceptor/donor system for ClO4− reduction. • Nitrate reduction was inhibited when using perchlorate-grown Azospira sp. KJ. • Reduction proceeded as an order of ClO3−, ClO4−and NO3−. • Oxidation of acetate was inhibited by succinate in acetate–succinate series. - Abstract: Bioremediation of perchlorate-cotaminated water by a heterotrophic perchlorate reducing bacterium creates a multiple electron acceptor-donor system. We experimentally determined the perchlorate reduction by Azospira sp. KJ at multiple pH, electron acceptors and donors systems; this was the aim of this study. Perchlorate reduction was drastically inhibited at the pH 6.0, and the maximum reduction of perchlorate by Azospira sp. KJ was observed at pH value of 8.0. Perchlorate reduction was retarded in ClO4−–ClO3−, ClO4−–ClO3−–NO3−,and ClO4−–NO3− acceptor systems, while being completely inhibited by the additional O2 in the ClO4−–O2 acceptor system. The reduction proceeded as an order of ClO3−, ClO4−, and NO3− in the ClO4−–ClO3−–NO3− system. KS,vmax, and qmax obtained at different e− acceptor and donor conditions are calculated as 140.5–190.6 mg/L, 8.7–13.2 mg-perchlorate/L-h, and 0.094–0.16 mg-perchlorate/mg-DW-h, respectively

  3. Particle size distribution and perchlorate levels in settled dust from urban roads, parks, and roofs in Chengdu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwen; Shen, Yang; Pi, Lu; Hu, Wenli; Chen, Mengqin; Luo, Yan; Li, Zhi; Su, Shijun; Ding, Sanglan; Gan, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    A total of 27 settled dust samples were collected from urban roads, parks, and roofs in Chengdu, China to investigate particle size distribution and perchlorate levels in different size fractions. Briefly, fine particle size fractions (intake is safe to both children and adults in Chengdu, China. However, due to perchlorate mainly existing in fine particles, there is a potential for perchlorate to transfer into surface water and the atmosphere by runoff and wind erosion or traffic emission, and this could act as an important perchlorate pollution source for the indoor environment, and merits further study. PMID:26608047

  4. Americium(3) solvent extraction by oxides of dialkyl(diaryl)[dialkylcarbamoylmethyl]phosphines (CMPO) from perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of americium(3) from perchloric acid solutions by CMPO was investigated. It is shown that americium(3) is much more effectively extracted from perchloric acid solutions, than from nitric acid ones, and increase in americium distribution coefficient depends considerably on reagent nature. As a consequence, anomalous aryl effect increases significantly in perchloric acid solutions. The value of anomalous aryl effect depends directly on stoichiometry of extracted complexes in nitric acid and perchloric acid media. Conditions for extractional concentration of americium up to the 100-fold one with small reagent consumption were suggested

  5. The nucleation kinetics of ammonium metavanadate precipitated by ammonium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guangchao; Sun, Zhaohui; Xian, Yong; Jing, Han; Chen, Haijun; Yin, Danfeng

    2016-05-01

    The nucleation kinetics of ammonium metavanadate (NH4VO3) was investigated under conditions of the simulated process for precipitation of NH4VO3 from the vanadium-containing solution. Induction periods for the nucleation of NH4VO3 were experimentally determined as a function of supersaturation at temperatures from 30 to 45 °C. Using the classical nucleation theory, the interfacial tension between NH4VO3 and supersaturated solution, the nucleation rate and critical radius of nucleus for the homogeneous nucleation of NH4VO3 were estimated. With temperature increasing, the calculated interfacial tension gradually decreased from 29.78 mJ/m2 at 30 °C to 23.66 mJ/m2 at 45 °C. The nucleation rate was found to proportionally increase but the critical radius of nucleus exponentially decreased, with increase in supersaturation ratio at a constant temperature. The activation energy for NH4VO3 nucleation was obtained from the relationship between temperature and induction period, ranging from 79.17 kJ/mol at S=25 to 115.50 kJ/mol at S=15. FT-IR and Raman spectrum indicated that the crystals obtained in the precipitation process were NH4VO3.

  6. Soil Flushing Through a Thick Vadose Zone: Perchlorate Removal Documented at Edwards AFB, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battey, T. F.; Shepard, A. J.; Tait, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    There are currently few viable alternatives for perchlorate remediation in the vadose zone, particularly for the relatively thick vadose zones that are typical in the arid southwest where many perchlorate sites occur. Perchlorate in the vadose zone occurs in the form of highly soluble salts that may represent a risk to human or ecological receptors, and may also represent a threat to the underlying groundwater. A soil flushing treatability study was conducted at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert of southern California at a site with a 129-foot thick vadose zone consisting primarily of clayey sand. This study utilized an infiltration gallery in conjunction with extraction, treatment, and re-injection of groundwater at the site, which contained perchlorate-contaminated soil and groundwater. The study objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of the infiltration gallery to 1) introduce treated groundwater back into the aquifer and 2) wash the perchlorate from the vadose zone soils to the aquifer. The infiltration gallery consisted of slotted PVC pipes within a highly permeable engineered bed of washed gravel. The initial water introduced into the gallery was amended with potassium bromide tracer. A downhole neutron probe was used to track the movement of the wetting front downward and outward from the gallery. Successive neutron measurements in vertical access tubes revealed that the introduced water reached the 125-foot bottom of the access tubes 14 weeks after the water was introduced into the gallery. The bromide tracer was detected in groundwater immediately below the gallery approximately 1 week later. The infiltration gallery was able to sustain an average flow rate of 2.3 gallons per minute. Prior to infiltration, the perchlorate concentration in groundwater below the gallery was 4,500 µg/L. Approximately 18 weeks after the start of infiltration, a perchlorate spike of 72,400 µg/L was detected below the gallery. The increase in perchlorate

  7. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (perchlorate treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eEngelbrektson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (perchlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 mM treatment after an initial inhibition period. In contrast, no effluent sulfide was observed with (perchlorate (10 mM. Microbial community analyses indicated temporal community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Nitrate addition stimulated Xanthomonadaceae and Rhizobiaceae growth, supporting their role in nitrate metabolism. (Perchlorate showed distinct effects on microbial community structure compared with nitrate and resulted in a general suppression of the community relative to the untreated control combined with a significant decrease in sulfate reducing species abundance indicating specific toxicity. Furthermore, chlorate stimulated Pseudomonadaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, members of which are known chlorate respirers, suggesting that chlorate may also control sulfidogenesis by biocompetitive exclusion of sulfate-reduction. Perchlorate addition stimulated Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfomonadaceae, which contain sulfide oxidizing and elemental sulfur-reducing species respectively, suggesting that effluent sulfide concentrations may be controlled through sulfur redox cycling in addition to toxicity and biocompetitive exclusion. Sulfur isotope analyses further support sulfur cycling in the columns, even when sulfide is not detected. This study indicates that (perchlorate show great promise as inhibitors of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms and respiratory processes are involved.

  8. Structure, phase transitions and molecular motions in 4-aminopyridinium perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czupinski, O.; Bator, G.; Ciunik, Z.; Jakubas, R.; Medycki, W.; Swiergiel, J.

    2002-09-01

    The crystal structure of the 4-aminopyridinium perchlorate (4-apyH)ClO4 has been determined at 100 K by means of x-ray diffraction as monoclinic, with space group P 21, with Z = 8. The crystal undergoes two structural phase transitions: one of first-order type, reversible, at 241/243 K (on cooling/heating respectively) and one of weakly first-order type, irreversible, at 277 K (on heating). The crystal dynamics is discussed on the basis of the temperature dependence of the 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance second moment (M2) and spin-lattice relaxation time T1. Both phase transitions are interpreted in terms of the changes in the motional state of (4-apyH)+ cations and ClO4- anions. The dielectric dispersion studies disclose a relaxation process over the high-temperature phase (above 241 K) in the audio-frequency region. The dielectric results are described by a Cole-Cole equation. The title crystal reveals pyroelectric properties below 241 K. The ferroelastic domain structure of (4-apyH)ClO4 is observed over the whole temperature range studied.

  9. Structure, phase transitions and molecular motions in 4-aminopyridinium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of the 4-aminopyridinium perchlorate (4-apyH)ClO4 has been determined at 100 K by means of x-ray diffraction as monoclinic, with space group P 21, with Z=8. The crystal undergoes two structural phase transitions: one of first-order type, reversible, at 241/243 K (on cooling/heating respectively) and one of weakly first-order type, irreversible, at 277 K (on heating). The crystal dynamics is discussed on the basis of the temperature dependence of the 1H nuclear magnetic resonance second moment (M2) and spin-lattice relaxation time T1. Both phase transitions are interpreted in terms of the changes in the motional state of (4-apyH)+ cations and ClO4- anions. The dielectric dispersion studies disclose a relaxation process over the high-temperature phase (above 241 K) in the audio-frequency region. The dielectric results are described by a Cole-Cole equation. The title crystal reveals pyroelectric properties below 241 K. The ferroelastic domain structure of (4-apyH)ClO4 is observed over the whole temperature range studied. (author)

  10. Structure, phase transitions and molecular motions in 4-aminopyridinium perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czupinski, O.; Bator, G.; Ciunik, Z.; Jakubas, R. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland); Medycki, W.; Swiergiel, J. [Institute of Molecular Physics, PAS, Poznan (Poland)

    2002-09-16

    The crystal structure of the 4-aminopyridinium perchlorate (4-apyH)ClO{sub 4} has been determined at 100 K by means of x-ray diffraction as monoclinic, with space group P 2{sub 1}, with Z=8. The crystal undergoes two structural phase transitions: one of first-order type, reversible, at 241/243 K (on cooling/heating respectively) and one of weakly first-order type, irreversible, at 277 K (on heating). The crystal dynamics is discussed on the basis of the temperature dependence of the {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance second moment (M{sub 2}) and spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1}. Both phase transitions are interpreted in terms of the changes in the motional state of (4-apyH){sup +} cations and ClO{sub 4}- anions. The dielectric dispersion studies disclose a relaxation process over the high-temperature phase (above 241 K) in the audio-frequency region. The dielectric results are described by a Cole-Cole equation. The title crystal reveals pyroelectric properties below 241 K. The ferroelastic domain structure of (4-apyH)ClO{sub 4} is observed over the whole temperature range studied. (author)

  11. Iodine-deficient vegetarians: a hypothetical perchlorate-susceptible population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl; Dourson, Michael; Borak, Jonathan

    2005-06-01

    Recent risk assessments of environmental perchlorate have been subject to much debate. A particular concern is whether appropriate susceptible sub-populations have been identified. Iodine-deficient pregnant women, especially vegetarians, have been proposed as such a potential susceptible sub-population, but there is no evidence of iodine deficiency in the US population and the adequacy of iodine nutrition has not been studied in US vegetarians. To understand the possibility that US vegetarians might be iodine deficient, we reviewed the prevalence, demography, and lifestyle characteristics of US vegetarians as well as the world literature on iodine nutrition in vegetarians. Our findings indicate that strict vegetarians and vegans, who comprise probably less than 0.1% of the US population, have higher education, higher incomes, and healthier lifestyles than the general population. Field studies indicate that vegetarian diets need not lead to iodine deficiency and vegans may suffer excess iodine intake. It is remains uncertain whether there are iodine-deficient vegans or pregnant women in the US. Of more general concern is whether the 10-fold default uncertainty factor is needed for intraspecies (i.e., within human) variability to protect such hypothetical susceptible sub-populations. PMID:15896441

  12. Chlorine-36 abundance in natural and synthetic perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, M [NON LANL; Sturchio, Neil C [UNIV OF ILLIONOIS; Caffee, M [PURDUE UNIV; Belosa, A D [UNIV OF ILLINOIS; Heraty, Jr., L J [UNIV OF ILLINOIS; Bohike, J K [RESTON, VA; Hatzinger, P B [SHAW ENIVIORNMENTAL C0.; Jackson, W A [TEXAS TECH; Gu, B [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) is ubiquitous in the environment. It occurs naturally as a product of atmospheric photochemical reactions, and is synthesized for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -}; nitrate produced from these soils has been exported worldwide since the mid-1800's for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} into the environment has complicated attempts to understand the geochemical cycle of ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} samples from the southwestern United States have relatively high {sup 36}Cl abundances ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 3,100 x 10{sup -15} to 28,800 x 10{sup -15}), compared with samples of synthetic ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.0 x 10{sup -15} to 40 x 10{sup -15}) and Atacama Desert ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.9 x 10{sup -15} to 590 x 10{sup -15}) ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. These data give a lower limit for the initial {sup 36}Cl abundance of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and provide temporal and other constraints on its geochemical cycle.

  13. Hydrogen oxidation on gold electrode in perchloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sustersic, M.G.; Almeida, N.V.; Von Mengershausen, A.E. [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico Sociales, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, 25 de Mayo N 384, 5730 Villa Mercedes, San Luis (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The aim of this research is to study the interface gold/perchloric acid solution in presence of hydrogen. The reactive is generated by H{sup +} ion reduction and by saturating the electrolyte with the gaseous H{sub 2}. No evidence of H{sub 2} dissociative adsorption is found. In special conditions, a strongly adsorbed layer is formed from the atoms diffusing from inside of the metal. The mass transport occurs in three ways: the diffusion of H atoms inwards, the diffusion of H atoms back to the surface and the dissolved H{sub 2} diffusion from the bulk electrolyte to the surface. When dissolved H{sub 2} reacts, the reaction is kinetically controlled when the H{sub 2} partial pressure is high, and it is diffusionally controlled when the reactive partial pressure is low. Above 0.7 V, (measured vs. RHE), the (100) plane surface reconstruction lifts, and the rate determining step is the H diffusion towards inside of the metal, and the current suddenly falls. The Hydrogen redox reaction on gold shows reversibility with respect to the potential when the reactives are the H diffusing outwards of the metal and the H{sup +} ion present in the electrolyte. However, the absolute current values of oxidation and reduction are different because the reactive sources are different. (author)

  14. Widespread occurrence of (per)chlorate in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Davila, Alfonso F.; Sears, Derek W. G.; Coates, John D.; McKay, Christopher P.; Brundrett, Maeghan; Estrada, Nubia; Böhlke, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) and chlorate (ClO3-) are ubiquitous on Earth and ClO4- has also been found on Mars. These species can play important roles in geochemical processes such as oxidation of organic matter and as biological electron acceptors, and are also indicators of important photochemical reactions involving oxyanions; on Mars they could be relevant for human habitability both in terms of in situ resource utilization and potential human health effects. For the first time, we extracted, detected and quantified ClO4- and ClO3- in extraterrestrial, non-planetary samples: regolith and rock samples from the Moon, and two chondrite meteorites (Murchison and Fayetteville). Lunar samples were collected by astronauts during the Apollo program, and meteorite samples were recovered immediately after their fall. This fact, together with the heterogeneous distribution of ClO4- and ClO3- within some of the samples, and their relative abundance with respect to other soluble species (e.g., NO3-) are consistent with an extraterrestrial origin of the oxychlorine species. Our results, combined with the previously reported widespread occurrence on Earth and Mars, indicate that ClO4- and ClO3- could be present throughout the Solar System.

  15. Microbial Community Structure during Nitrate and Perchlorate Reduction in Ion-exchange Brine Using the Hydrogen-based membrane Biofilm Reactor (MBIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detoxification of perchlorate by microbial communities under denitrifying conditions has been recently reported, although the identity of the mixed populations involved in perchlorate reduction is not well understood. In order to address this, the bacterial diversity of membrane ...

  16. NOVEL ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN URINARY PERCHLORATE AND POTENTIALLY RELEVANT EFFECTS ON RISK FACTORS FOR HEART DISEASE BASED ON NHANES 2001-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental pollutant, and is a thyroid hormone disruptor. A previous population study based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002 database showed that urinary perchlorate concentrations were associated with signi...

  17. Adaptive evolution of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 for developing resistance to perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta-Kolte, M. G.; Youngblut, M.; Redford, S.; Gregoire, P.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its toxic, explosive, and corrosive nature, inadvertent biological H2S production by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) poses significant health and industrial operational risks. Anthropogenic sources are dominated by the oil industry where H2S in reservoir gases and fluids has an associated annual cost estimated at $90 billion globally. Our previous studies have identified perchlorate (ClO4-) as a selective and potent inhibitor of SRM in pure culture and complex microbial ecosystems. However, constant addition of inhibitors like perchlorate to natural ecosystems may result in a new adaptive selective pressure on SRM populations. With this in mind we investigated the ability of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, a model oil reservoir SRM, to adapt to perchlorate and develop a resistance. Serial transfers of three parallel cultures with increasing concentrations of perchlorate up to 100 mM were generated and compared to wild-type strains that were transferred for same number of generations in absence of perchlorate. Genome sequencing revealed that all three adapted strains had single non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the same gene, Dde_2265, the sulfate adenylytransferase (ATP sulfurylase (ATPS)) (EC 2.7.7.4). ATPS catalyzes the first committed step in sulfate reduction and is essential in all SRM. IC50s against growth for these evolved strains demonstrated a three-fold increased resistance to perchlorate compared to wild-type controls. These evolved strains also had 5x higher transcriptional abundance of Dde_2265 compared to the wild-type strain. Biochemical characterization of the purified ATPS enzyme from both wild-type and the evolved strain showed that the mutant ATPS from the evolved strain was resistant to perchlorate inhibition of ATP turnover with a KI for perchlorate that was 3x greater relative to the wild-type ATPS. These results demonstrate that a single-base pair mutation in ATPS can have a significant impact on developing

  18. Effects of lanthanum nitrate on growth and chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics of Alternanthera philoxeroides under perchlorate stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢寅峰; 蔡贤雷; 刘伟龙; 陶功胜; 陈倩; 张强

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effects of exogenous lanthanum (La) on Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart.) Griseb under perchlorate stress, changes in the growth and physiological parameters were investigated in solution culture experiments under controlled condi-tions. Different concentrations of La (NO3)3 were used in our study. It was shown that 0.1 and 0.5 mg/L La3+alleviated the inhibition effect of perchlorate on A. philoxeroides, including relative growth yield, dry weight of different organs, leaf area and root activity. And La3+prevented decline in the relative chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters including Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm',ΦPSI and ETR induced by perchlorate stress. Moreover, 0.5 mg/L La3+showed an optimal mitigative effect, while excess La3+(5.0 mg/L) led to synergistic effect on stress. Correlation analysis revealed a significant positive relationship between growth indexes and the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, root activity and relative chlorophyll content (p<0.05). The results suggested that appropriate concentration of La3+could effectively alleviate growth inhibition and injury of A. philoxeroides caused by perchlorate stress, and the mitigative effect of La3+might be achieved by improving root activity, maintaining chlorophyll content and promoting photochemical efficiency of photosystem II of A. philoxeroides under perchlorate stress.

  19. Perchlorate and Nitrate Remediation Efficiency and Microbial Diversity in a Containerized Wetland Bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jr., B D; Dibley, V; Pinkart, H; Legler, T

    2004-06-09

    We have developed a method to remove perchlorate (14 to 27 {micro}g/L) and nitrate (48 mg/L) from contaminated groundwater using a wetland bioreactor. The bioreactor has operated continuously in a remote field location for more than two years with a stable ecosystem of indigenous organisms. This study assesses the bioreactor for long-term perchlorate and nitrate remediation by evaluating influent and effluent groundwater for reduction-oxidation conditions and nitrate and perchlorate concentrations. Total community DNA was extracted and purified from 10-g sediment samples retrieved from vertical coring of the bioreactor during winter. Analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of short, 16S rDNA, polymerase-chain-reaction products was used to identify dominant microorganisms. Bacteria genera identified were closely affiliated with bacteria widely distributed in soils, mud layers, and fresh water. Of the 17 dominant bands sequenced, most were gram negative and capable of aerobic or anaerobic respiration with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Halomonas, and Nitrospira). Several identified genera (Rhizobium, Acinetobactor, and Xanthomonas) are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen into a combined form (ammonia) usable by host plants. Isolates were identified from the Proteobacteria class, known for the ability to reduce perchlorate. Initial bacterial assessments of sediments confirm the prevalence of facultative anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing perchlorate and nitrate in situ.

  20. Assessment of perchlorate-reducing bacteria in a highly polluted river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigliotta, Giovanni; Motta, Oriana; Guarino, Francesco; Iannece, Patrizia; Proto, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    A 1-year monitoring experiment of the Sarno River basin was conducted during 2008 to evaluate the overall quality of the water over time and to compare the results with those obtained previously. The physico-chemical and microbiological characteristics of the water course had not changed appreciably with respect to previous determinations, thus emphasizing the major contribution of untreated urban wastewater to the overall pollution of the river. Moreover, attention was paid to the perchlorate ion, one of the so-called emerging contaminants, which is widespread in natural environments and is known to have adverse effects on the human thyroid gland. Over the entire monitoring program, we did not find appreciable levels of perchlorate, although the particular environmental condition could support its development. Thus, a dedicated study was designed to assess the presence of bacteria that can reasonably reduce perchlorate levels. By enrichment and molecular procedures, we identified α- and β-Proteobacteria strains, classified by 16S rDNA sequences as Dechlorospirillum sp. and Dechlorosoma sp., respectively. Further physiologic characterization and the presence of the alpha subunit gene (pcrA) of the perchlorate reductase in both strains confirmed the presence in the river of viable and active perchlorate dissimilatory bacteria. PMID:20843743

  1. Surface modification of silver nanofilms for improved perchlorate detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jumin; Han, Mei-Juan; Li, Jinwei; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2012-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), as one of the most sensitive spectroscopic analysis methods, has been investigated extensively for the detection of environmental contaminants in recent years. In this work, we reported the new development of robust SERS substrates for rapid and sensitive sensing of aqueous perchlorate, a widespread environmental contaminant. The fabrication of the substrates consisted of two simple steps: (a) formation of Ag nanofilms on Cu and surface-roughened Cu foils (Ag/Cu and Ag/rCu nanofilms) using a controllable and inexpensive one-step electroless plating process, and (b) surface modification of the Ag nanofilms with cysteamine (Cys) self-assembly monolayer (SAM) (Cys-Ag/Cu and Cys-Ag/rCu substrates). Due to the strong affinity of -NH(3)(+) groups of the Cys molecules for perchlorate ions, the rapid SERS detection of perchlorate has been realized with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 5 μg L(-1) (ppb) for aqueous samples without need for drying. Various calibration curves with good linear relationships were obtained, indicating the quantification potential of SERS analysis of perchlorate using these new substrates. It was found that the neutral pH yielded the maximum SERS signals, and 85% of original sensitivity was remained in 5 days of storage time in the air, indicating the substrates are fairly stable. Within 10 regeneration-reuse cycles, the SERS signals of perchlorate kept in the range of 85-105% of the original value, verifying its reusability. PMID:22494687

  2. Electrochemically and bioelectrochemically induced ammonium recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildemyn, Sylvia; Luther, Amanda K; Andersen, Stephen J; Desloover, Joachim; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-01-01

    Streams such as urine and manure can contain high levels of ammonium, which could be recovered for reuse in agriculture or chemistry. The extraction of ammonium from an ammonium-rich stream is demonstrated using an electrochemical and a bioelectrochemical system. Both systems are controlled by a potentiostat to either fix the current (for the electrochemical cell) or fix the potential of the working electrode (for the bioelectrochemical cell). In the bioelectrochemical cell, electroactive bacteria catalyze the anodic reaction, whereas in the electrochemical cell the potentiostat applies a higher voltage to produce a current. The current and consequent restoration of the charge balance across the cell allow the transport of cations, such as ammonium, across a cation exchange membrane from the anolyte to the catholyte. The high pH of the catholyte leads to formation of ammonia, which can be stripped from the medium and captured in an acid solution, thus enabling the recovery of a valuable nutrient. The flux of ammonium across the membrane is characterized at different anolyte ammonium concentrations and currents for both the abiotic and biotic reactor systems. Both systems are compared based on current and removal efficiencies for ammonium, as well as the energy input required to drive ammonium transfer across the cation exchange membrane. Finally, a comparative analysis considering key aspects such as reliability, electrode cost, and rate is made. This video article and protocol provide the necessary information to conduct electrochemical and bioelectrochemical ammonia recovery experiments. The reactor setup for the two cases is explained, as well as the reactor operation. We elaborate on data analysis for both reactor types and on the advantages and disadvantages of bioelectrochemical and electrochemical systems. PMID:25651406

  3. Activation energies involved in isothermal dehydration and decomposition of gamma-irradiated magnesium perchlorate (Paper No. RE-23)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-irradiation enhances the acceleratory rate of dehydration as well as decomposition of magnesium perchlorate. Activation energies computed using Arrhenius treatment decreased with rise in radiation dose prior to its thermal dehydration and decomposition. The reduction in the activation energies may be attributed to the strain and stress produced in voids of the samples of magnesium perchlorate due to irradiation. (author)

  4. Martian Chlorine Chemistry: A Study of Perchlorate on the Martian Surface, Evidence of an Ongoing Formation Mechanism and Implications of a Complex Chlorine Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Brandi L.

    2015-10-01

    The research presented herein addresses the detection of perchlorate on Mars, evidence of perchlorate in Mars meteorite EETA 79001, determination of the perchlorate parent salts at the Phoenix landing site, and the ongoing formation of perchlorate from chloride minerals as well as from other oxychlorine species. The detection of perchlorate in three samples by the Phoenix Wet Chemistry Laboratory and the implication of these results are discussed. The further detection of perchlorate in Mars meteorite EETA 79001 by ion chromatography and the determination of the parent salts of the perchlorate detected at the Phoenix landing site by electrochemical analyses and ion chromatography are detailed and the implications of the identity of the parent salts are discussed. The possible formation pathways for martian perchlorate are then explored and a possible mechanism for ongoing perchlorate formation on the martian surface is detailed. Perchlorate is shown to be formed upon exposure of chloride minerals, as well as of chlorite and chlorate salts, to current Mars relevant conditions including temperature, pressure, ultraviolet radiation and atmospheric composition. The implications of this ongoing perchlorate formation for the survival and detection of organics, the oxidizing nature of the soil, formation of liquid brines and recurring slope lineae are discussed. Further preliminary experiments have been conducted to investigate the effects of perchlorate formation on the survival and degradation of organic compounds.

  5. A simplified method for obtaining high-purity perchlorate from groundwater for isotope analyses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    vonKiparski, G; Hillegonds, D

    2011-04-04

    Investigations into the occurrence and origin of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) found in groundwater from across North America have been sparse until recent years, and there is mounting evidence that natural formation mechanisms are important. New opportunities for identifying groundwater perchlorate and its origin have arisen with the utilization of improved detection methods and sampling techniques. Additionally, application of the forensic potential of isotopic measurements has begun to elucidate sources, potential formation mechanisms and natural attenuation processes. Procedures developed appear to be amenable to enable high precision stable isotopic analyses, as well as lower precision AMS analyses of {sup 36}Cl. Immediate work is in analyzing perchlorate isotope standards and developing full analytical accuracy and uncertainty expectations. Field samples have also been collected, and will be analyzed when final qa/qc samples are deemed acceptable.

  6. The effect of various reaction parameters on bioremediation of perchlorate-contaminated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioremediation was employed to treat perchlorate-contaminated water. All enrichments and growth of mixed cultures were performed in anaerobic acetate medium. Enrichment cultures were started with activated sludge obtained from a local wastewater treatment plant where it predominantly treats domestic wastewater. Several parameters affecting perchlorate removal were examined through batch experiments, these include the amount of domesticated sludge, the acetate concentration, pH, the C/N ratio and the reaction temperature. The results indicated that acetate was an effective carbon source and electron donor. Under the selected conditions, namely 1.0 g domesticated sludge, an acetate concentration of 1.2 g l-1, pH 8.0, a C/N ratio of 20 at 40 deg, C, 50 mg l-1 perchlorate could be rapidly reduced to non-detectable levels within 24 h

  7. Dracorhodin perchlorate induces the apoptosis of glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Luo, Junjie; Meng, Linghu; Pan, Taifeng; Zhao, Binjie; Tang, Zhen-Gang; Dai, Yongjian

    2016-04-01

    Dracorhodin perchlorate (Dp), a synthetic analogue of the antimicrobial anthocyanin red pigment, has recently been shown to induce apoptotic cell death in various types of cancer cells. Yet, the inhibitory effect of Dp on human glioma cells remains uninvestigated. Therefore, in the present study, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry were used to detect cell viability and cell cycle progression in glioma U87MG and T98G cells, respectively. Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double staining and JC-1 staining were separately applied to determine cellular apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential damage in the cells. The expression levels of associated proteins involved in cell cycle progression and apoptosis were measured by western blotting. The activities of caspase‑9/-3 were determined by Caspase-Glo-9/3 assay. The results indicated that Dp treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and blocked cell cycle progression at the G1/S phase in the U87MG and T98G cells via the upregulation of p53 and p21 protein expression, and simultaneous downregulation of Cdc25A, Cdc2 and P-Cdc2 protein expression. Additionally, Dp treatment led to the loss of cellular mitochondrial membrane potential, and the release of cytochrome c, and strongly induced the occurence of apoptosis. Increased expression levels of Bim and Bax protein and the downregulated expression of Bcl-2 protein were observed. Caspase-9/-3 were activated and their activities were elevated after Dp treatment. These findings indicate that Dp inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioma cells, and is a possible candidate for glioma treatment. PMID:26846469

  8. Microbial perchlorate reduction with elemental sulfur and other inorganic electron donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiumin; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A; Byrnes, David J; Bentley, Harold; Bentley, Richard

    2008-03-01

    ClO(4)(-) has recently been recognized as a widespread contaminant of surface and ground water. This research investigated chemolithotrophic perchlorate reduction by bacteria in soils and sludges utilizing inorganic electron-donating substrates such as hydrogen, elemental iron, and elemental sulfur. The bioassays were performed in anaerobic serum bottles with various inocula from anaerobic or aerobic environments. All the tested sludge inocula were capable of reducing perchlorate with H2 as electron donor. Aerobic activated sludge was evaluated further and it supported perchlorate reduction with Fe(0) and S(0) additions under anaerobic conditions. Heat-killed sludge did not convert ClO(4)(-), confirming the reactions were biologically catalyzed. ClO(4)(-) (3mM) was almost completely removed by the first sampling time on d 8 with H2 (> or = 0.37mMd(-1)), after 22d with S(0) (0.18mM d(-1)) and 84% removed after 37d with Fe(0) additions (0.085mMd(-1)). Perchlorate-reduction occurred at a much faster rate (1.12mMd(-1)), when using an enrichment culture developed from the activated sludge with S(0) as an electron donor. The enrichment culture also utilized S(2-) and S(2)O(3)(2-) as electron-donating substrates to support ClO(4)(-) reduction. The mixed cultures also catalyzed the disproportionation of S(0) to S(2-) and SO(4)(2-). Evidence is presented demonstrating that S(0) was directly utilized by microorganisms to support perchlorate-reduction. In all the experiments, ClO(4)(-) was stoichiometrically converted to chloride. The study demonstrates that microorganisms present in wastewater sludges can readily use a variety of inorganic compounds to support perchlorate reduction. PMID:17988714

  9. Effects of larval-juvenile treatment with perchlorate and co-treatment with thyroxine on zebrafish sex ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhi, S.; Torres, L.; Patino, R.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of larval-juvenile exposure to perchlorate, a thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitor, on the establishment of gonadal sex ratios in zebrafish. Zebrafish were exposed to untreated water or water containing perchlorate at 100 or 250 ppm for a period of 30 days starting at 3 days postfertilization (dpf). Recovery treatments consisted of a combination of perchlorate and exogenous thyroxine (T4; 10 nM). Thyroid histology was assessed at the end of the treatment period (33 dpf), and gonadal histology and sex ratios were determined in fish that were allowed an additional 10-day period of growth in untreated water. As expected, exposure to perchlorate caused changes in thyroid histology consistent with hypothyroidism and these effects were reversed by co-treatment with exogenous T4. Perchlorate did not affect fish survival but co-treatment with T4 induced higher mortality. However, relative to the corresponding perchlorate concentration, co-treatment with T4 caused increased mortality only at a perchlorate concentration of 100 ppm. Perchlorate alone or in the presence of T4 suppressed body length at 43 dpf relative to control values. Perchlorate exposure skewed the sex ratio toward female in a concentration-dependent manner, and co-treatment with T4 not only blocked the feminizing effect of perchlorate but also overcompensated by skewing the sex ratio towards male. Moreover, co-treatment with T4 advanced the onset of spermatogenesis in males. There was no clear association between sex ratios and larval survival or growth. We conclude that endogenous thyroid hormone plays a role in the establishment of gonadal sex phenotype during early development in zebrafish. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A low cost igniter utilizing an SCB and titanium sub-hydride potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickes, R. W., Jr.; Grubelich, M. C.; Hartman, J. K.; McCampbell, C. B.; Churchill, J. K.

    1994-01-01

    A conventional NSI (NASA Standard Initiator) normally employs a hot-wire ignition element to ignite ZPP (zirconium potassium perchlorate). With minor modifications to the interior of a header similar to an NSI device to accommodate an SCB (semiconductor bridge), a low cost initiator was obtained. In addition, the ZPP was replaced with THKP (titanium sub-hydride potassium perchlorate) to obtain increased overall gas production and reduced static-charge sensitivity. This paper reports on the all-fire and no-fire levels obtained and on a dual mix device that uses THKP as the igniter mix and a thermite as the output mix.

  11. Linking methane oxidation with perchlorate reduction: a microbial base for possible Martian life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. G.; Carlstrom, C.; Baesman, S. M.; Coates, J. D.; Oremland, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    Recent observations of methane (CH4) and perchlorate (ClO4-) within the atmosphere and surface of Mars, respectively, provide impetus for establishing a metabolic linkage between these compounds whereby CH4 acts as an electron donor and perchlorate acts as an electron acceptor. Direct linkage through anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) has not been observed. However, indirect syntrophic oxygenase-dependent oxidation of CH4 with an aerobic methane oxidizer is feasible. The pathway for anaerobic dissimilatory perchlorate reduction includes 3 steps. The first 2 are sequential reductions of (1) perchlorate to chlorate and (2) chlorate to chlorite, mediated by perchlorate reductase. The third step is disproportionation of chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen, mediated by chlorite dismutase. Utilization of thusly derived oxygen by hydrocarbon-degrading organisms in anoxic environments was first demonstrated by Coates et. al. (1998)1, however the link to aerobic methane oxidation was not examined at that time. Here, we systematically explore the potential for several species of aerobic methanotrophs to couple with chlorite during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. In one experiment, 0.5 kPa CH4 was completely removed in one day from the headspace of combined cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB and Methylococcus capsulatus in the presence of 5 mM chlorite. Oxidation of labeled 14CH4 to 14CO2 under similar conditions was later confirmed. Another experiment demonstrated complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 over several days by Methylobacter albus strain BG8 with strain CKB in the presence of 5 mM chlorite. Finally, we observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing natural soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and strain CKB and in the presence of 10 mM chlorite. This soil, collected from a pristine lake shoreline, demonstrated endogenous methane, perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite uptake. Other soil and

  12. Natural Nitrogen—15 Abundance of Ammonium Nitrogen and Fixed Ammonium in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHISHU-LIAN; XINGGUANG-XI; 等

    1992-01-01

    The present article deals with the natural nitrogen-15 abundance of ammonium nitrogen and fixed ammonium in different soils.Variations in the natural 15N abundance of ammonium nitrogen mineralized in soils under anaerobic incubation condition were related to soil pH.The δ 15N of mineralizable N in acid soils was lower but that in neutral and calcareous soils was higher compared with the δ 15N of total N in the soils.A variation tendence was also found in the δ 15N of amino-acid N in the hydrolysates of soils.The natural 15N abundance of fixed ammonium was higher than that of total N in most surface soils and other soil horizons,indicating that the increase of δ 15N in the soil borizons beneath subsurface horizon of some forest soils and acid paddy soils was related to the higher δ 15N value of fixed ammonium in the soil.

  13. Benchmark binding energies of ammonium and alkyl-ammonium ions interacting with water. Are ammonium-water hydrogen bonds strong?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Valérie; Masella, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Alkyl-ammonium ion/water interactions are investigated using high level quantum computations, yielding thermodynamics data in good agreement with gas-phase experiments. Alkylation and hydration lead to weaken the NHsbnd O hydrogen bonds. Upon complete hydration by four water molecules, their main features are close to those of the OHsbnd O bond in the isolated water dimer. Energy decomposition analyses indicate that hydration of alkyl-ammonium ions are mainly due to electrostatic/polarization effects, as for hard monoatomic cations, but with a larger effect of dispersion.

  14. Reduction in Ammonium Ions in Sludge Liquor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Šlajūtė

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Liquor rejected from the centrifugation of the digested sludge can contain the concentrations of ammonium ions up to 1750 mg/L. These loads are usually returned to the intake of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP without additional treatment and can have a negative impact on biological wastewater and/or sludge treatment processes, e.g. phosphorus and nitrogen removal. This article deals with the use of naturally obtained sorbent, zeolite, in batch and column test procedure for removing ammonium from the rejected liquor. This research study was carried out using different sizes of zeolite particles: 0.8–1.6 mm and 1.6–2.5 mm. The highest efficiency of ammonium removal (up to 98 % was achieved by applying the zeolite particles of 0.8–1.6 mm.Article in Lithuanian

  15. Reproductive toxicity screen of ammonium dinitramide administered in the drinking water of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkead, E R; Wolfe, R E; Flemming, C D; Leahy, H F; Caldwell, D J; Miller, C R; Marit, G B

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Defense is currently considering replacing ammonium perchlorate with ammonium dinitramide (ADN), a class 1.1 explosive oxidizer to be used in solid rocket propellant mixtures and explosives. This study was intended to evaluate the potential of ADN to produce alterations in paternal fertility, maternal pregnancy and lactation, and growth and development of offspring. Male and female rats received drinking water containing 0.0, 0.2, 1.0, or 2.0 g ADN/liter throughout the study. Mating occurred following 14 days of treatment. All dams, one-half the males, and representative pups were maintained for a total of 90 days of treatment. No mortality occurred in parental animals during the study. Treatment with ADN resulted in no adverse effects on mating; 92-100% of the animals mated. No treatment-related effects were seen in parental animals clinically or histopathologically. Adverse treatment-related effects were noted in maternal and paternal fertility indices, gestational indices, and live birth indices in both the mid- and high-dose groups. Litter sizes in the mid- and high-dose groups were significantly smaller than those of the low-dose and control groups. Mean pup weights showed no statistically significant differences between ADN-treated pups and controls. Gross and histopathological examination of the animals failed to identify the cause for the decrease in litter production in the mid- and high-dose dams. This study indicates that ADN is a reproductive toxicant. The no-observable-effect level (NOEL) is 29 mg/kg/day, the median dose of the low level female rats. PMID:8748424

  16. A steady-state biofilm model for simultaneous reduction of nitrate and perchlorate, part 1: model development and numerical solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Youneng; Zhao, Heping; Marcus, Andrew K; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2012-02-01

    A multispecies biofilm model is developed for simultaneous reduction of nitrate and perchlorate in the H(2)-based membrane biofilm reactor. The one-dimension model includes dual-substrate Monod kinetics for a steady-state biofilm with five solid and five dissolved components. The solid components are autotrophic denitrifying bacteria, autotrophic perchlorate-reducing bacteria, heterotrophic bacteria, inert biomass, and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The dissolved components are nitrate, perchlorate, hydrogen (H(2)), substrate-utilization-associated products, and biomass-associated products (BAP). The model explicitly considers four mechanisms involved in how three important operating conditions (H(2) pressure, nitrate loading, and perchlorate loading) affect nitrate and perchlorate removals: (1) competition for H(2), (2) promotion of PRB growth due to having two electron acceptors (nitrate and perchlorate), (3) competition between nitrate and perchlorate reduction for the same resources in the PRB: electrons and possibly reductase enzymes, and (4) competition for space in the biofilm. Two other special features are having H(2) delivered from the membrane substratum and solving directly for steady state using a novel three-step approach: finite-difference for approximating partial differential and/or integral equations, Newton-Raphson for solving nonlinear equations, and an iterative scheme to obtain the steady-state biofilm thickness. An example result illustrates the model's features. PMID:22191376

  17. A STUDY ON THE ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN YOUNG HEAD LETTUCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overall objective of this study was to demonstrate in a greenhouse study the potential for incorporation of perchlorate from aqueous solutions of 10, 50, 100, 500, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000 ppb into an agricultural food crop (lettuce; Lactuca sativa), which is typically grown ...

  18. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage.

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2010-08-03

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5-0.8 microm in diameter, and 2-8 microm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37 degrees C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H(2)/CO(2) to acetate, usually as the only product. Succinate was decarboxylated to propionate. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, and CO(2). The G+C content of the DNA was 42.6 mol%. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain An4 was most closely related to Sporomusa ovata (98% similarity). The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell-free extracts.

  19. ISSUES IN MANAGING THE RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) contamination of ground and surface waters has placed drinking water supplies at risk in communities throughout the US, especially in the West. Several major assessment studies of that risk in terms of health and environmental impact are ...

  20. Trace determination of perchlorate using electromembrane extraction and capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kiplagat, I.K.; Doan, T.K.O.; Kubáň, Pavel; Boček, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 21 (2011), s. 3008-3015. ISSN 0173-0835 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/10/1219 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : electromembrane extraction * perchlorate * capillary electrophoresis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2011

  1. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; Mehboob, Farrakh; van Gelder, Antonie H; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Stams, Alfons J M

    2010-09-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5-0.8 microm in diameter, and 2-8 microm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37 degrees C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H(2)/CO(2) to acetate, usually as the only product. Succinate was decarboxylated to propionate. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, and CO(2). The G+C content of the DNA was 42.6 mol%. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain An4 was most closely related to Sporomusa ovata (98% similarity). The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell-free extracts. PMID:20680263

  2. Periodate salts as pyrotechnic oxidizers: development of barium- and perchlorate-free incendiary formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Jared D; Sabatini, Jesse J; Chen, Gary

    2012-07-01

    In a flash: pyrotechnic incendiary formulations with good stabilities toward various ignition stimuli have been developed without the need for barium or perchlorate oxidizers. KIO(4) and NaIO(4) were introduced as pyrotechnic oxidizers and exhibited excellent pyrotechnic performance. The periodate salts may garner widespread use in military and civilian fireworks because of their low hygroscopicities and high chemical reactivities. PMID:22639415

  3. Developmental exposure to perchlorate alters synaptic transmission in hippocampus of the adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Food Quality Protection Act and Safe Drinking Water Act mandate the EPA to identify potential health risks associated with chemicals that act on the endocrine system. Perchlorate, a contaminant found in food and water supplies throughout the USA, blocks iodine uptake into the...

  4. Double-Polymer-Modified Pencil Lead for Stripping Voltammetry of Perchlorate in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadyar, Anahita; Kim, Yushin; Ward, Michelle M.; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    The inexpensive and disposable electrode based on a double-polymer-modified pencil lead is proposed for upper-division undergraduate instrumental laboratories to enable the highly sensitive detection of perchlorate. Students fabricate and utilize their own electrodes in the 3-4 h laboratory session to learn important concepts and methods of…

  5. DISTRIBUTION OF PERCHLORATE IN SAMPLES OF SODIUM NITRATE (CHILE SALTPETER) FERTILIZER DERIVED FROM NATURAL CALICHE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two lots of sodium nitrate fertilizer derived from Chilean caliche were analyzed to determine the distribution of perchlorate throughout the material. Although our samples represent a limited amount, we found that distribution was essentially homogeneous in any 100-g portion. Whe...

  6. Radioiodine tracers as useful tools in studies of thyrotoxic effects of exogenous bromide and perchlorate ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 2 (2012), s. 405-408. ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : bromide * perchlorate * radioiodine tracer * thyroid hormone Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.467, year: 2012

  7. Preparation and Analysis of Solid Solutions in the Potassium Perchlorate-Permanganate System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Garrett K.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment, designed for and tested in an advanced inorganic laboratory methods course for college seniors and graduate students, that prepares and analyzes several samples in the nearly ideal potassium perchlorate-permanganate solid solution series. The results are accounted for by a theoretical treatment based upon aqueous…

  8. 高氯酸诺氟沙星铜(Ⅱ)%Norfloxacin Coppe(Ⅱ) Perchlorate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢永荣; 叶琼; 熊仁根

    2004-01-01

    The hydrothermal treatment of Cu(ClO4)2·6H2O and Norfloxacin (H-Norf) afforded [Cu(H-Noff)2(ClO4)2] (1) in which center Cu has a square planar geometry while perchlorate just acts as charge balance anions. CCDC:140821.

  9. Occupational Exposure in Ammonium Phosphate Fertilizer Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational exposures and activity concentrations have been assessed in two industrial plants producing mono-ammonium phosphate and di-ammonium phosphate fertilizers, located in south-western Spain. The annual effective doses received by the workers are below 1 mSv/a, with the contribution from external exposure being similar to that from internal exposure. The dose contribution from inhalation of dust has been estimated to be about 0.12 mSv/a, while the 222Rn concentrations inside the plants are of no concern. Consequently, no additional radiation protection measures need to be taken to protect the workers in these facilities. (author)

  10. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2009-07-16

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 {+-} 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly.

  11. Systematics of Natural Perchlorate in Precipitation, Soils, and Plants at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Jackson, W. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Taylor, E. M.

    2007-12-01

    Naturally occurring perchlorate is known to be associated with nitrate deposits of the hyperarid Atacama Desert in Chile, and recent large-scale sampling has identified a substantial reservoir (up to 1 kg/ha) of natural perchlorate in diverse unsaturated zones of the arid and semiarid Southwestern United States (Rao et al., 2007, ES&T, DOI: 10.1021/es062853i). The objective of the Amargosa Desert work is to develop a better understanding of the deposition, accumulation, and biological cycling of perchlorate in arid environments. Occurrence of perchlorate was evaluated by sampling shallow soil profiles up to 3 m in depth at four different locations and at two different time periods, and by sampling dominant plant species growing near the subsurface profiles. Deposition of perchlorate was evaluated by analyzing both bulk deposition (precipitation plus dry fall, collected under oil) collected on site and wet deposition samples collected by the National Atmospheric Deposition program at a nearby site. Soil samples and atmospheric-deposition samples were tested for both perchlorate (ClO4- ) and major anions. Perchlorate concentrations (0.2-20 µg/kg) were variable with depth in soil profiles and generally correlated most highly with chloride (Cl-) and nitrate (NO3-), although the intensity of these relations differed among profiles. Plant concentrations were generally above 1 mg/kg, suggesting ClO4- accumulation. Concentrations of ClO4- were generally much greater in total deposition than wet deposition samples, indicating a substantial dryfall component of meteoric deposition. This presentation will present the mass distribution and variability of perchlorate in bulk deposition, soils, and plants. Reasons for observed relations between subsurface concentrations of perchlorate and other anions will be explored.

  12. Fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate and nitrate during in situ biodegradation in a sandy aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzinger, P.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Heraty, L.J.; Borden, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental context. Perchlorate (ClO4-) and nitrate (NO3-) are common co-contaminants in groundwater, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Each of these compounds is biodegradable, so in situ enhanced bioremediation is one alternative for treating them in groundwater. Because bacteria typically fractionate isotopes during biodegradation, stable isotope analysis is increasingly used to distinguish this process from transport or mixing-related decreases in contaminant concentrations. However, for this technique to be useful in the field to monitor bioremediation progress, isotope fractionation must be quantified under relevant environmental conditions. In the present study, we quantify the apparent in situ fractionation effects for stable isotopes in ClO4- (Cl and O) and NO3- (N and O) resulting from biodegradation in an aquifer. Abstract. An in situ experiment was performed in a shallow alluvial aquifer in Maryland to quantify the fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate (Cl and O) and nitrate (N and O) during biodegradation. An emulsified soybean oil substrate that was previously injected into this aquifer provided the electron donor necessary for biological perchlorate reduction and denitrification. During the field experiment, groundwater extracted from an upgradient well was pumped into an injection well located within the in situ oil barrier, and then groundwater samples were withdrawn for the next 30 h. After correction for dilution (using Br- as a conservative tracer of the injectate), perchlorate concentrations decreased by 78% and nitrate concentrations decreased by 82% during the initial 8.6 h after the injection. The observed ratio of fractionation effects of O and Cl isotopes in perchlorate (18O/37Cl) was 2.6, which is similar to that observed in the laboratory using pure cultures (2.5). Denitrification by indigenous bacteria fractionated O and N isotopes in nitrate at a ratio of ???0.8 (18O/15N), which is within the range of values

  13. Detonation characteristics of ammonium nitrate products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, R.J.A.; Hengel, E.I.V. van den; Steen, A.C. van der

    2006-01-01

    The detonation properties of ammonium nitrate (AN) products depend on many factors and are therefore, despite the large amount of information on this topic, difficult to assess. In order to further improve the understanding of the safety properties of AN, the European Fertilizer Manufacturers Associ

  14. 76 FR 46907 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... common example is when fertilizer-grade ammonium nitrate is mixed with fuel oil and creates an explosive... Requirements 1. Mixture Requirement 2. Threshold Weight and Individual Products Exemptions 3. Explosives... Federal Bureau of Investigation FR Federal Register HMR Hazardous Materials Regulations HMT...

  15. Montmorillonite modification by quaternary ammonium epoxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duchek, P.; Špírková, Milena; Šabata, Stanislav

    Kochi: India n Society of Nanoscience And Nanotechnology, 2010. s. 1. [Nanotech India 2010. 19.11.2010-21.11.2010, Kochi] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX08240901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : montmorillonite * quaternary ammonium epoxide * intercalation Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  16. 21 CFR 184.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 19, which is incorporated... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium bicarbonate. 184.1135 Section 184.1135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 20, which is incorporated by reference. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium hydroxide. 184.1139 Section 184.1139 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), pp. 22-23, which is incorporated by... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium sulfate. 184.1143 Section 184.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 19, which is incorporated by reference. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  20. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction linked to aerobic methane oxidation via chlorite dismutase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars is controversial yet the evidence has aroused scientific interest, as CH4 could be a harbinger of extant or extinct microbial life. There are various oxidized compounds present on the surface of Mars that could serve as electron acceptors for the anaerobic oxidation of CH4, including perchlorate (ClO4-). We examined the role of perchlorate, chlorate (ClO3-) and chlorite (ClO2-) as oxidants linked to CH4 oxidation. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction begins with reduction of ClO4- to ClO2- and ends with dismutation of chlorite to yield chloride (Cl-) and molecular oxygen (O2). We explored the potential for aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria to couple with oxygen derived from chlorite dismutation during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the N2-flushed headspace above cell suspensions of methanotrophs (Methylobacter albus strain BG8) and perchlorate reducing bacteria (Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB) in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. Similar rates of CH4 consumption were observed for these mixed cultures whether they were co-mingled or segregated under a common headspace, indicating that direct contact of cells was not required for methane consumption to occur. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing dried soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and D. agitata CKB and in the presence of 10 mM ClO2-. This soil (seasonally exposed sediment) collected from the shoreline of a freshwater lake (Searsville Lake, CA) demonstrated endogenous CH4 uptake as well as perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite reduction/dismutation. However, these experiments required physical separation of soil from the aqueous bacterial culture to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the

  1. 40 CFR 721.4095 - Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... trialkylamine halides. 721.4095 Section 721.4095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4095 Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides. (a... generically as quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides (PMNs...

  2. Physiological and genetic description of dissimilatory perchlorate reduction by the novel marine bacterium Arcobacter sp. strain CAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlström, Charlotte I; Wang, Ouwei; Melnyk, Ryan A; Bauer, Stefan; Lee, Joyce; Engelbrektson, Anna; Coates, John D

    2013-01-01

    A novel dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacterium (DPRB), Arcobacter sp. strain CAB, was isolated from a marina in Berkeley, CA. Phylogenetically, this halophile was most closely related to Arcobacter defluvii strain SW30-2 and Arcobacter ellisii. With acetate as the electron donor, strain CAB completely reduced perchlorate (ClO4(-)) or chlorate (ClO3(-)) [collectively designated (per)chlorate] to innocuous chloride (Cl(-)), likely using the perchlorate reductase (Pcr) and chlorite dismutase (Cld) enzymes. When grown with perchlorate, optimum growth was observed at 25 to 30°C, pH 7, and 3% NaCl. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) preparations were dominated by free-swimming straight rods with 1 to 2 polar flagella per cell. Strain CAB utilized a variety of organic acids, fructose, and hydrogen as electron donors coupled to (per)chlorate reduction. Further, under anoxic growth conditions strain CAB utilized the biogenic oxygen produced as a result of chlorite dismutation to oxidize catechol via the meta-cleavage pathway of aerobic catechol degradation and the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme. In addition to (per)chlorate, oxygen and nitrate were alternatively used as electron acceptors. The 3.48-Mb draft genome encoded a distinct perchlorate reduction island (PRI) containing several transposases. The genome lacks the pcrC gene, which was previously thought to be essential for (per)chlorate reduction, and appears to use an unrelated Arcobacter c-type cytochrome to perform the same function. IMPORTANCE The study of dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria (DPRB) has largely focused on freshwater, mesophilic, neutral-pH environments. This study identifies a novel marine DPRB in the genus Arcobacter that represents the first description of a DPRB associated with the Campylobacteraceae. Strain CAB is currently the only epsilonproteobacterial DPRB in pure culture. The genome of strain CAB lacks the pcrC gene found in all

  3. Determination of perchlorate in drinking water by ion chromatography using macrocycle-based concentration and separation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, John D; Simpson, David; Jensen, Bryce D; Gardner, Joseph S; Peterson, Quinn P

    2006-06-16

    Macrocycle-based ion chromatography provides a convenient, reliable method for the determination of perchlorate ion, which is currently of great interest to the environmental community. This study shows that effective perchlorate determinations can be made using standard conductimetric detection by combining an 18-crown-6-based mobile phase with an underivatized reversed-phase mobile phase ion chromatography (MPIC) column. One unique feature of this method is the flexibility in column capacity that is achieved through simple variations in eluent concentrations of 18-crown-6 and KOH, facilitating the separation of target analyte anions such as perchlorate. Using a standard anion exchange column as concentrator makes possible the determination of perchlorate as low as 0.2 ug/L in low ionic strength matrices. Determination of perchlorate at the sub-ug/L level in pure water and in spiked local city hard water samples with high background ion concentrations can be achieved this way. However, like other IC techniques, this method is challenged to achieve analyses at the ug/L level in the demanding high ionic strength matrix described by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (1,000 mg/L chloride, sulfate and carbonate). We approached this challenge by use of the Cryptand C1 concentrator column, provided by Dionex Corporation, to effectively preconcentrate perchlorate while reducing background ion concentrations in the high ionic strength matrix. The retention characteristics of the concentrator column were studied in order to maximize its effectiveness for perchlorate determinations. The method makes possible the determination of perchlorate at the 5 ug/L level in the highest ionic strength matrix described by the EPA. PMID:16516902

  4. Perchlorate content of plant foliage reflects a wide range of species-dependent accumulation but not ozone-induced biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate (ClO4−) interferes with uptake of iodide in humans. Emission inventories do not explain observed distributions. Ozone (O3) is implicated in the natural origin of ClO4−, and has increased since pre-industrial times. O3 produces ClO4−in vitro from Cl−, and plant tissues contain Cl− and redox reactions. We hypothesize that O3 exposure may induce plant synthesis of ClO4−. We exposed contrasting crop species to environmentally relevant O3 concentrations. In the absence of O3 exposure, species exhibited a large range of ClO4− accumulation but there was no relationship between leaf ClO4− and O3, whether expressed as exposure or cumulative flux (dose). Older, senescing leaves accumulated more ClO4− than younger leaves. O3 exposed vegetation is not a source of environmental ClO4−. There was evidence of enhanced ClO4− content in the soil surface at the highest O3 exposure, which could be a significant contributor to environmental ClO4−. -- Highlights: • Exposure to ozone in crop species does not induce accumulation nor biosynthesis of perchlorate. • Older leaves accumulate more perchlorate than younger leaves. • Soil surface may accumulate perchlorate following exposure to ozone. • Species differ greatly in accumulation of perchlorate from the rhizosphere, independent of ozone. • Ozone exposed vegetation is not a candidate source of environmental perchlorate. -- Exposure of crop species to ozone did not lead to biosynthesis or greater accumulation of foliar perchlorate. Older leaves accumulated more perchlorate than younger leaves

  5. Oxygen and chlorine isotopic fractionation during perchlorate biodegradation: Laboratory results and implications for forensics and natural attenuation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Böhlke, J.K.; Beloso, A.D., Jr.; Streger, S.H.; Heraty, L.J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant having both anthropogenic and natural sources. Stable isotope ratios of O and Cl in a given sample of perchlorate may be used to distinguish its source(s). Isotopic ratios may also be useful for identifying the extent of biodegradation of perchlorate, which is critical for assessing natural attenuation of this contaminant in groundwater. For this approach to be useful, however, the kinetic isotopic fractionations of O and Cl during perchlorate biodegradation must first be determined as a function of environmental variables such as temperature and bacterial species. A laboratory study was performed in which the O and Cl isotope ratios of perchlorate were monitored as a function of degradation by two separate bacterial strains (Azospira suillum JPLRND and Dechlorospirillum sp. FBR2) at both 10??C and 22??C with acetate as the electron donor. Perchlorate was completely reduced by both strains within 280 h at 22??C and 615 h at 10??C. Measured values of isotopic fractionation factors were ??18O = -36.6 to -29.0??? and ??37Cl = -14.5 to -11.5???, and these showed no apparent systematic variation with either temperature or bacterial strain. An experiment using 18O-enriched water (??18O = +198???) gave results indistinguishable from those observed in the isotopically normal water (??18O = -8.1???) used in the other experiments, indicating negligible isotope exchange between perchlorate and water during biodegradation. The fractionation factor ratio ??18O/??37Cl was nearly invariant in all experiments at 2.50 ?? 0.04. These data indicate that isotope ratio analysis will be useful for documenting perchlorate biodegradation in soils and groundwater. The establishment of a microbial fractionation factor ratio (??18O/??37Cl) also has significant implications for forensic studies. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  6. 40 CFR 721.10099 - Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10099 Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (generic). (a) Chemical... as dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (1:1) (PMN P-03-715) is subject to reporting under...

  7. A Reservoir of Natural Perchlorate in Unsaturated Zones of Arid and Semi-Arid Regions, Southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. A.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Anderson, T. A.; Orris, G. J.; Rajagapolan, S.; Sandvig, R. M.; Scanlon, B. R.; Walvoord, M. A.; Jackson, W.

    2006-12-01

    Natural perchlorate (ClO4-) is generally present in unsaturated zones of steppe-to-desert regions of the arid and semi-arid southwestern United States. The perchlorate is associated with atmospherically deposited chloride that has accumulated throughout the Holocene. To assess this natural reservoir, we analyzed unsaturated-zone profiles from ten sites across Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah for perchlorate and other anions. The sampled sites represent a wide range of precipitation (0.1 0.5 m yr-1), dominant vegetation, soil type, underlying geology, and include five distinct ecological regions: Chihuahuan, Mojave, and southern Great Basin deserts; Arizona-New Mexico semi-desert; and Texas High Plains dry steppe. Concentrations of perchlorate correlated closely with chloride and bromide. The perchlorate reservoir (up to 1 kg ha-1) is sufficiently large to impact groundwater when natural recharge during pluvial periods or induced recharge after conversion to agriculture flushes accumulated salts from the unsaturated zone. This little explored source can explain perchlorate in milk and other agricultural products far from anthropogenic contamination, and should be considered when evaluating overall exposure risk.

  8. Activity inhibition and its mitigation in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells: The role of phosphoric acid, ammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate, and polyvinylidene difluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst-Olesen, Kaspar; Nesselberger, Markus; Perchthaler, Markus; Hacker, Viktor; Arenz, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    In the presented work we systematically study the influence of phosphoric acid, ammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate (ATFMS), and polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of carbon supported, Pt based catalysts. The influence of phosphoric acid is investigated in a mixed solution of perchloric acid with small amounts of phosphoric acid added. Thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) measurements show that such a mixed electrolyte is advantageous as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is inhibited without influencing the oxygen solubility in the electrolyte. In contrast to previous reports it is seen when investigating additives that ATFMS acts as a catalyst poison; whereas the results provide evidence of a better performance in case of the PVDF incorporated catalysts as compared to reference samples without PVDF. The technological relevance of the PVDF improvements and its stability over prolonged time was validated by membrane electrode assembly (MEA) tests.

  9. Quaternary ammonium compounds – New occupational hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Lipińska-Ojrzanowska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs, quats belong to organic ionic chemical agents which display unique properties of both surfactants and disinfectants. Their wide distribution in the work environment and also in private households brings about new occupational hazards. This paper reviews reports about the health effects of QACs. QACs could play a role of sensitizers and irritants to the skin and mucous membranes. It is suspected that particular QACs can display an immunologic crossreactivity between each other and with other chemical compounds containing ammonium ion, such as muscle relaxants widely used in anesthesia. They may promote the development of airway allergy, however, the background mechanisms are still unclear and need to be further investigated. Until now, a few cases of occupational asthma induced by QACs have been described and their involvement in contact dermatitis has been documented. The possibility of anaphylaxis due to QACs cannot be excluded as well. Med Pr 2014;65(5:675–682

  10. Detonation Properties of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wätterstam, A.; Östmark, H.; Helte, A.; Karlsson, S.

    1999-06-01

    Ammonium Dinitramide, ADN, has a potential as an oxidizer for underwater high explosives. Pure ADN has a large reaction-zone length and shows a strong non-ideal behaviour. The work presented here is an extension of previous work.(Sensitivity and Performance Characterization of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN). Presented at 11th International Detonation Symposium, Snowmass, CO, 1998.) Experiments for determining the detonation velocity as a function of inverse charge radius and density, reaction-zone length and curvature, and the detonation pressure are presented. Measurements of pressure indicates that no, or weak von-Neumann spike exists, suggesting an immediate chemical decomposition. Experimental data are compared with predicted using thermochemical codes and ZND-theory.

  11. Secondary transformation mechanism of paramagnetic centers in irradiated alkali metal perchlorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EPR method has been used to study thermal transformations of paramagnetic centres (PC) in X-ray irradiated potassium, rubidium and cesium perchlorates. Experimental data make it possible to suppose that diffusion coefficient of O- ion a rather high and this ion is freely diffused already at 262 K. Colliding with [MeClO4]+ centres it is transformed in a molecule of oxygen. Another part of O- is transformed in stable ozonide-ion at 300 K. About room temperature hole centres dissociate with formation of ClO2 radical. It is supposed that part of electron and hole centres is not stabilized but at 77 K it is transformed in stable radiolysis products. This process most effective proceeds in dislocations and on the surface of microcrystals. The suggested model of thermal transformations of primary PC in irradiated perchlorates of alkali metals explains formation of all the finite ion and paramagnetic radiolysis products

  12. Kinetics of oxidation of uranium(IV) by permanganate ion in aqueous perchlorate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of oxidation of uranium(IV) by permanganate ion in 1.0 mol dm-3 perchloric acid solution has been investigated using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. The reaction was found to be second order overall and first order in the concentrations of both reactants. The catalytic effect of the perchlorates of Hg2+, Cu2+, and Fe3+ on the reaction rate has been investigated. The activation parameters were evaluated and found to be ΔS not= 30.52 ± 1.22 kJ-1 mol-1, ΔH not= 62.89 ± 1.87 kJ mol-1, and ΔG not=53.79 ± 1.44 kJ mol-1. A tentative mechanism consistent with the kinetics is discussed. (author)

  13. Laboratory investigation of perchlorate deliquescence at the surface of Mars with a Raman scattering lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakakos, George; Whiteway, James A.

    2015-10-01

    A sample of magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate was subjected to the water vapor pressure and temperatures found at the landing site of the Phoenix Mars mission. Laser Raman scattering was applied to detect the onset of deliquescence and provide a relative estimate of the quantity of water taken up and subsequently released by the sample. As the temperature of the sample decreased at the same rate as measured on Mars during the evening, significant uptake of water from the atmosphere was observed to occur prior to the frost point temperature being reached. As the temperature was lowered further, the relative humidity over ice increased to 100% and frost formed on the surface surrounding the perchlorate sample. Freezing of the brine film was observed at the eutectic temperature of -67°C, and thawing occurred at a temperature of -62°C.

  14. trans-Tetraaquabis[bis(pyridin-3-ylmethanone-κN]manganese(II bis(perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [Mn(C11H8N2O2(H2O4](ClO42, the Mn2+ ion is located on an inversion center with the slightly distorted N2O4 octahedral coordination sphere comprising N-atom donors from two monodentate trans-related bis(pyridin-3-ylmethanone ligands and four water ligands. The two perchlorate anions are linked to the mononuclear complex molecule through water O—H...O hydrogen bonds while inter-complex water O—H...N(pyridine interactions form an infinite chain structure extending along the b axis. The perchlorate anions also function as inter-unit links through water O—H...O hydrogen bonds which, together with water O—H...O(carbonyl interactions, give a three-dimensional framework structure.

  15. Thermal behavior of aluminum powder and potassium perchlorate mixtures by DTA and TG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the thermal decomposition characteristics of micron sized aluminum powder + potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic systems were studied with thermal analytical techniques. The results show that the reactivity of aluminum powder in air increases as the particle size decreases. Pure aluminum with 5 μm particle size has a fusion temperature about 647 deg. C, but this temperature for 18 μm powder is 660 deg. C. Pure potassium perchlorate has an endothermic peak at 300 deg. C corresponding to a rhombic-cubic transition, a fusion temperature around 590 deg. C and decomposes at 592 deg. C. DTA curves for Al5/KClO4 (30:70) mixture show a maximum peak temperature for thermal decomposition at 400 deg. C. Increasing the particle size of aluminum powder increases the ignition temperature of the mixture. The oxidation temperature increased by enhance in the aluminum content of the mixture

  16. Thermal behavior of aluminum powder and potassium perchlorate mixtures by DTA and TG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmortazavi, S.M. [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, P.O. Box 16765-3454, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: pourmortazavi@yahoo.com; Fathollahi, M. [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, P.O. Box 16765-3454, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hajimirsadeghi, S.S. [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, P.O. Box 16765-3454, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, S.G. [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, P.O. Box 16765-3454, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-04-01

    In this work the thermal decomposition characteristics of micron sized aluminum powder + potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic systems were studied with thermal analytical techniques. The results show that the reactivity of aluminum powder in air increases as the particle size decreases. Pure aluminum with 5 {mu}m particle size has a fusion temperature about 647 deg. C, but this temperature for 18 {mu}m powder is 660 deg. C. Pure potassium perchlorate has an endothermic peak at 300 deg. C corresponding to a rhombic-cubic transition, a fusion temperature around 590 deg. C and decomposes at 592 deg. C. DTA curves for Al{sub 5}/KClO{sub 4} (30:70) mixture show a maximum peak temperature for thermal decomposition at 400 deg. C. Increasing the particle size of aluminum powder increases the ignition temperature of the mixture. The oxidation temperature increased by enhance in the aluminum content of the mixture.

  17. Radiation-chemical behaviour of Rh(3) in perchloric and nitric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodium(3) behaviour in solutions of concentrated (> 1 mol/l) nitric and perchloric acids under 60Co gamma radiation with dose rate of 3.5 Gy/s has been studied. It is shown that in case of nitrate solution irradiation by doses up to 2x104 Gy, rhodium(3) concentration does not change. Rhodium(3) proved to be stable in perchlorate solutions in case of irradiation by doses up to 3x104 Gy; however, in the presence of organic acids and alcohols its reduction to methane occurred. Kinetic characteristics of rhodium(3) reduction by ethyl alcohol by the doses up to 4x104 Gy have been ascertained, reduction mechanism being considered. 6 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  18. Proton dynamics investigation for dimethyl ammonium cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton dynamics in dimethyl ammonium cation has been investigated by means of NMR and spin echo methods in polycrystalline salts [NH2(CH3)2]+Bi2J9- and [NH2(CH3)2]+SbJ9-. Spin-lattice relaxation time as well as second moment of NMR line have been measured for influence study of crystal structure changes on proton dynamics

  19. Development of technology for ammonium nitrate dissociation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonia and ammonium carbonate are frequently used as reagents in fuel production and processing of liquid radioactive wastes. In particular, liquid radioactive wastes that contain ammonium nitrate are generated during operations of metal precipitation. In closed vessels at elevated temperature, for example in evaporators or deposits in tubing, ammonium nitrate may explode due to generation of gaseous nitrogen oxides [2]. In this connection, steps have to be taken to rule out conditions that result in explosion. To do that, ammonium nitrate should be removed even prior to the initial stage of its formation. This report gives results of development of a method of dissociating ammonium nitrate

  20. DETECTION OF THE AMMONIUM ION IN SPACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B. [Deparment of Astrophysics, CAB, INTA-CSIC, Crta Torrejon-Ajalvir Km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Fuente, A. [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Apdo. 112, E-28803 Alcala de Henares (Spain); Domenech, J. L.; Cueto, M.; Carrasco, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Marcelino, N. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Roueff, E. [Luth, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8102, Place J. Janssen F-92190 Meudon (France); Gerin, M. [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8112 and Ecole Normale Superieure, 61 Avenue de lObservatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Pearson, J., E-mail: jcernicharo@cab.inta-csic.es [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MC 168-314, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We report on the detection of a narrow feature at 262816.73 MHz toward Orion and the cold prestellar core B1-bS which we attribute to the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} line of the deuterated ammonium ion, NH{sub 3}D{sup +}. The observations were performed with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope. The carrier has to be a light molecular species as it is the only feature detected over 3.6 GHz of bandwidth. The hyperfine structure is not resolved, indicating a very low value for the electric quadrupolar coupling constant of nitrogen which is expected for NH{sub 3}D{sup +} as the electric field over the N nucleus is practically zero. Moreover, the feature is right at the predicted frequency for the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} transition of the ammonium ion, 262817 {+-} 6 MHz (3{sigma}), using rotational constants derived from new infrared data obtained in our laboratory in Madrid. The estimated column density is (1.1 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}. Assuming a deuterium enhancement similar to that of NH{sub 2}D, we derive N(NH{sub 4}{sup +}) {approx_equal} 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, i.e., an abundance for ammonium of a few 10{sup -11}.

  1. Electric conductivity of gel-polymeric electrolytes with Ca, Mg and Zn perchlorate salts

    OpenAIRE

    NIKOLA CVJETICANIN; SLAVKO MENTUS

    1999-01-01

    The gel-polymeric electrolytes were prepared with calcium, magnesium and zinc perchlorates dissolved in propylene carbonate together with poly (acrylo nitrile) or poly(methyl methacrylate) as a solution immobilizing polymers. The electric conductivity of these electrolytes was examined in the dependence of temperature and solvent content, at a constant salt-to-polymer concentration ratio. The electrolyte compositions were outlined having the conductivity close to 10-3 S cm-1. It was demonstra...

  2. Non-aqueous titrimetric assay of gabapentin in capsules using perchloric acid as titrant

    OpenAIRE

    Sameer A. M. Abdulrahman; KANAKAPURA BASAVAIAH

    2011-01-01

    Two simple, rapid, accurate and inexpensive methods using visual and potentiometric titrimetric techniques are described for the determination of gabapentin (GBP) in bulk drug as well as in capsules. The methods are based on the neutralization reaction of the primary amino group of GBP with acetous perchloric acid as titrant in anhydrous acetic acid medium. The end point was detected either visually using crystal violet as indicator or potentiometrically using a modified glass electrode SCE e...

  3. Electrochromic iridium oxide films: Compatibility with propionic acid, potassium hydroxide, and lithium perchlorate in propylene carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Rui-Tao; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G.

    2013-01-01

    Porous thin films of It oxide were prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering onto unheated substrates. The crystallite size was similar to 5 nm, and a small amount of unoxidized Ir was present. The electrochromic performance was studied by optical transmittance measurements and cyclic voltammetry applied to films in aqueous and non-aqueous electrolytes, specifically being 1 M propionic acid, 1 M potassium hydroxide (KOH), and 1 M lithium perchlorate in propylene carbonate (Li-PC). Cyclic v...

  4. Disproportionation of plutonium IV in concentrated solutions of plutonium in perchloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work was carried out to study the dependence of the PuIV disproportionation reaction in perchloric acid solution on the plutonium concentration up to 20 g/l. Solutions of such high plutonium concentration have not previously been studied. It was found that the bimolecular rate constant and the equilibrium constant of the disproportionation reaction were not appreciably different from their values at lower concentrations. (author)

  5. Radiometric quantification of thyrotoxic and goitrogenic effects of exogenous bromide and perchlorate ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Stanislav

    Bratislava: Slovenská technická univerzita, 2012, s. 152-156. ISBN 978-80-227-3722-7. [Priemyselná toxikológia 2012 /32./. Svit, Vysoké Tatry (SK), 20.06.2012-22.06.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : bromide * perchlorate * radiometric assay * thyroid peroxidase Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  6. The use of chlorate, nitrate, and perchlorate to promote crude oil mineralization in salt marsh sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundrett, Maeghan; Horita, Juske; Anderson, Todd; Pardue, John; Reible, Danny; Jackson, W Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Due to the high volume of crude oil released by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the salt marshes along the gulf coast were contaminated with crude oil. Biodegradation of crude oil in salt marshes is primarily limited by oxygen availability due to the high organic carbon content of the soil, high flux rate of S(2-), and saturated conditions. Chlorate, nitrate, and perchlorate were evaluated for use as electron acceptors in comparison to oxygen by comparing oil transformation and mineralization in mesocosms consisting of oiled salt marsh sediment from an area impacted by the BP Horizon oil spill. Mineralization rates were determined by measuring CO2 production and δ (13)C of the produced CO2 and compared to transformation evaluated by measuring the alkane/hopane ratios over a 4-month period. Total alkane/hopane ratios decreased (~55-70 %) for all treatments in the following relative order: aerated ≈ chlorate > nitrate > perchlorate. Total CO2 produced was similar between treatments ranging from 550-700 mg CO2-C. The δ (13)C-CO2 values generally ranged between the indigenous carbon and oil values (-17 and -27‰, respectively). Oil mineralization was greatest for the aerated treatments and least for the perchlorate amended. Our results indicate that chlorate has a similar potential as oxygen to support oil mineralization in contaminated salt marshes, but nitrate and perchlorate were less effective. The use of chlorate as a means to promote oil mineralization in situ may be a promising means to remediate contaminated salt marshes while preventing unwanted secondary impacts related to nutrient management as in the case of nitrate amendments. PMID:25854211

  7. The Investigation of Perchlorate/Iron Phase Mixtures as A Possible Source of Oxygen Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Heil, E.; Morris, R. V.; Archer, P. D.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H.; Freissinet C.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Mahaffy, P.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Paz-Zorzano, Maria; Stern, J. C.; McKay, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover detected O2 and HCl gas releases from the Rocknest (RN) eolian bedform and the John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) drill hole materials in Gale Crater. Chlorinated hydrocarbons have also been detected by the SAM quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GCMS). These detections along with the detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) suggesting perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 and chlorine species. Laboratory thermal analysis of individual per-chlorates has yet to provide an unequivocal temperature match to the SAM O2 and HCl release data. These detections along with the detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory suggested perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 and chlorine species. Laboratory thermal analysis of pure perchlorates has yet to provide an unequivocal temperature match to the SAM O2 and HCl release data. Analog laboratory analysis of iron mineralogy detected in Gale materials that was physically mixed with Ca- and Mg-perchlorate has been shown to catalyze lower O2 release temperatures and approach some SAM O2 release data. Instead of physical mixtures used in previous work, the work presented here utilized perchlorate solutions added to Fe phases. This technique allowed for perchlorate to come in closer contact with the Fe-phase and may more closely mimic Mars conditions where humidity can increase enough to cause deliquescence of the highly hygroscopic perchlorate phases. The objective of this work is to: 1) Utilize a laboratory SAM analog instrument to evaluate the O2 release temperatures from Mg- and Ca-perchlorates solutions applied to Fephases detetected in Gale Crate; and 2) Determine if perchlorate solutions can provide improved matches with the SAM O2 temperature release profiles.

  8. Evaluation of the natural attenuation potential of a complex pollution plume (chlorate, perchlorate, 1,2dichloroethane and vinyl chloride) by autochthonous microbial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Harris-Hellal, Jennifer; Joulian, Catherine; Hube, Daniel; Coulon, Stéphanie; Guérin, Valérie; Garrido, Françis

    2013-01-01

    Artificially synthetized chloride-based-oxyanions such as perchlorate (ClO4-) and chlorate (ClO3-), are used in a vast number of applications such as military and aerospace industry; they are also used as herbicides and in pyrotechnic applications. Due to their very high solubility, perchlorate and chlorate are readily transported in water systems and can thus end up in drinking water. Ingestion of perchlorate may affect iodine uptake by the human thyroid and thus thyroidal hormone production...

  9. Perchlorate induced low temperature carbonate decomposition in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R.

    2012-07-01

    Simulated Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) analyses have shown that a CO2 release detected between 400°C and 680°C by the Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument may have been caused by a reaction between calcium carbonate and hydrated magnesium perchlorate. In our experiments a CO2 release beginning at 385 ± 12°C was attributed to calcite reacting with water vapor and HCl gas from the dehydration and thermal decomposition of Mg-perchlorate. The release of CO2 is consistent with the TEGA detection of CO2 released between 400 and 680°C, with the amount of CO2 increasing linearly with added perchlorate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments confirmed CaCl2 formation from the reaction between calcite and HCl. These results have important implications for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. Heating soils may cause inorganic release of CO2; therefore, detection of organic fragments, not CO2 alone, should be used as definitive evidence for organics in Martian soils.

  10. Temporal and spatial variation of perchlorate in streambed sediments: results from in-situ dialysis samplers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fate of perchlorate (ClO4-) in streambed sediments is becoming a concern due to the increasing number of groundwater and surface water contamination sites in the United States. Dialysis samplers were deployed at three sites over a period of 1 year to determine the vertical distribution of ClO4-in sediment pore water. Results indicated that the spatial and temporal ClO4-penetration into sediments could be affected by numerous factors, such as temperature, microbial degradation, ClO4-surface water concentration, and sediment physico-geological properties. In general, maximum ClO4-penetration into sediments at the studied sites was 30 cm below the sediment-water surface. The vertical sequential depletion of electron acceptors in sediments suggested that microbial reduction was responsible for ClO4-depletion in stream sediments. Biodegradation of ClO4-occurred over a seasonally variable active depth zone of 1-10 cm. Results implied that there was a rapid natural attenuation potential of perchlorate in saturated near-surface sediments. -Perchlorate may be rapidly attenuated in saturated near-surface sediments

  11. Widespread occurrence of perchlorate in water, foodstuffs and human urine collected from Kuwait and its contribution to human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomirah, Husam F; Al-Zenki, Sameer F; Alaswad, Marivi C; Alruwaih, Noor A; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2016-06-01

    Perchlorate is a thyroid hormone-disrupting compound and is reported to occur widely in the environment. Little is known on human exposure to perchlorate in Kuwait. In this study, 218 water samples, 618 commonly consumed foodstuffs and 532 urine samples collected from Kuwait were analysed to assess the exposure of the Kuwaiti population to perchlorate. For the estimation of daily intake of perchlorate, food consumption rates were obtained from the National Nutrition Survey in the State of Kuwait (NNSSK). The results showed that leafy vegetables accounted for a major share of perchlorate exposure among the Kuwaiti population at 0.062 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (36.2%), followed by fruits at 0.026 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (15.3%) and non-leafy vegetables at 0.017 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (10.1%). The urinary perchlorate geometric mean (GM) concentrations ranged from 8.51 to 17.1 µg l(-)(1) for the five age groups, which were higher than those reported in other countries. The estimated urinary perchlorate exposure for the Kuwaiti general population was 0.42 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1), which was higher than that reported for the United States. The dietary intake of perchlorate for the Kuwaiti population ranged from 0.14 to 0.67 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) for the five age groups, with a mean total daily intake of 0.17 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) for the general population. The highest estimated dietary mean daily intake of perchlorate (0.67 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1)) was found for children at 3-5 years. The estimated dietary perchlorate exposure in Kuwait is higher than the recommended mean reference dose (RfD) but lower than that of provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI) set by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). PMID:27248576

  12. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (per)chlorate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrektson, Anna; Hubbard, Christopher G; Tom, Lauren M; Boussina, Aaron; Jin, Yong T; Wong, Hayden; Piceno, Yvette M; Carlson, Hans K; Conrad, Mark E; Anderson, Gary; Coates, John D

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (per)chlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 mM) treatment after an initial inhibition period. In contrast, no effluent sulfide was observed with (per)chlorate (10 mM). Microbial community analyses indicated temporal community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Nitrate addition stimulated Xanthomonadaceae and Rhizobiaceae growth, supporting their role in nitrate metabolism. (Per)chlorate showed distinct effects on microbial community structure compared with nitrate and resulted in a general suppression of the community relative to the untreated control combined with a significant decrease in sulfate reducing species abundance indicating specific toxicity. Furthermore, chlorate stimulated Pseudomonadaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, members of which are known chlorate respirers, suggesting that chlorate may also control sulfidogenesis by biocompetitive exclusion of sulfate-reduction. Perchlorate addition stimulated Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfomonadaceae, which contain sulfide oxidizing and elemental sulfur-reducing species respectively, suggesting that effluent sulfide concentrations may be controlled through sulfur redox cycling in addition to toxicity and biocompetitive exclusion. Sulfur isotope analyses further support sulfur cycling in the columns, even when sulfide is not detected. This study indicates that (per)chlorate show great promise as inhibitors of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms and respiratory processes are involved. PMID:25071731

  13. Review:Anaerobic ammonium oxidation for treatment of ammonium-rich wastewaters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei ZHANG; Ping ZHENG; Chongojian TANG; Ren-cun JIN

    2008-01-01

    The concept of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) is presently of great interest.The functional bacteria belonging to the Planctomycete phylum and their metabolism are investigated by microbiologists.Meanwhile,the ANAMMOX is equally valuable in treatment of ammonium-rich wastewaters.Related processes including partial nitritation-ANAMMOX and completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) have been developed,and lab-scale experiments proved that both processes were quite feasible in engineering with appropriate control.Successful full-scale practice in the Netherlands will ac-celerate application of the process in future.This review introduces the microbiology and more focuses on application of the ANAMMOX process.

  14. Review: Mechanisms of ammonium toxicity and the quest for tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Raquel; Ariz, Idoia; Cruz, Cristina; Moran, Jose Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Ammonium sensitivity of plants is a worldwide problem, constraining crop production. Prolonged application of ammonium as the sole nitrogen source may result in physiological and morphological disorders that lead to decreased plant growth and toxicity. The main causes of ammonium toxicity/tolerance described until now include high ammonium assimilation by plants and/or low sensitivity to external pH acidification. The various ammonium transport-related components, especially the non-electrogenic influx of NH3 (related to the depletion of (15)N) and the electrogenic influx of NH4(+), may contribute to ammonium accumulation, and therefore to NH3 toxicity. However, this accumulation may be influenced by increasing K(+) concentration in the root medium. Recently, new insights have been provided by "omics" studies, leading to a suggested involvement of GDP mannose-pyrophosphorylase in the response pathways of NH4(+) stress. In this review, we highlight the cross-talk signaling between nitrate, auxins and NO, and the importance of the connection of the plants' urea cycle to metabolism of polyamines. Overall, the tolerance and amelioration of ammonium toxicity are outlined to improve the yield of ammonium-grown plants. This review identifies future directions of research, focusing on the putative importance of aquaporins in ammonium influx, and on genes involved in ammonium sensitivity and tolerance. PMID:27181951

  15. Rapid measurement of perchlorate in polar ice cores down to sub-ng L(-1) levels without pre-concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kari; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Brandis, Derek; Cox, Thomas; Splett, Scott

    2015-10-01

    An ion chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (IC-ESI-MS/MS) method has been developed for rapid and accurate measurement of perchlorate in polar snow and ice core samples in which perchlorate concentrations are expected to be as low as 0.1 ng L(-1). Separation of perchlorate from major inorganic species in snow is achieved with an ion chromatography system interfaced to an AB SCIEX triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection and lower limit of quantification without pre-concentration have been determined to be 0.1 and 0.3 ng L(-1), respectively, with a linear dynamic range of 0.3-10.0 ng L(-1) in routine measurement. These represent improvements over previously reported methods using similar analytical techniques. The improved method allows fast, accurate, and reproducible perchlorate quantification down to the sub-ng L(-1) level and will facilitate perchlorate measurement in the study of natural perchlorate production with polar ice cores in which perchlorate concentrations are anticipated to vary in the low and sub-ng L(-1) range. Initial measurements of perchlorate in ice core samples from central Greenland show that typical perchlorate concentrations in snow dated prior to the Industrial Revolution are about 0.8 ng L(-1), while perchlorate concentrations are significantly higher in recent (post-1980) snow, suggesting that anthropogenic sources are a significant contributor to perchlorate in the current environment. PMID:26297465

  16. (Per)chlorate reduction by the thermophilic bacterium Moorella perchloratireducens sp. nov., isolated from underground gas storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; van Gelder, Ton; Weelink, Sander A; Stams, Alfons J M

    2008-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterium, strain An10, was isolated from underground gas storage with methanol as a substrate and perchlorate as an electron acceptor. Cells were gram-positive straight rods, 0.4 to 0.6 mum in diameter and 2 to 8 mum in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. Spores were terminal with a bulged sporangium. The temperature range for growth was 40 to 70 degrees C, with an optimum at 55 to 60 degrees C. The pH optimum was around 7. The salinity range for growth was between 0 and 40 g NaCl liter(-1) with an optimum at 10 g liter(-1). Strain An10 was able to grow on CO, methanol, pyruvate, glucose, fructose, cellobiose, mannose, xylose, and pectin. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, thiosulfate, neutralized Fe(III) complexes, and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. The G+C content of the DNA was 57.6 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA analysis, strain An10 was most closely related to Moorella thermoacetica and Moorella thermoautotrophica. The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell extracts. Strain An10 is the first thermophilic and gram-positive bacterium with the ability to use (per)chlorate as a terminal electron acceptor. PMID:17981952

  17. [Achievement of Sulfate-Reducing Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Reactor Started with Nitrate-Reducting Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-chuan; Yuan, Lin-jiang; Zhou, Guo-biao; Li, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The transformation of nitrite-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation to sulfate-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an UASB was performed and the changes in microbial community were studied. The result showed that the sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation process was successfully accomplished after 177 days' operation. The removal rate of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were up to 58. 9% and 15. 7%, the removing load of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were 74. 3 mg.(L.d)-1 and 77. 5 mg.(L.d)-1 while concentration of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate of influent were 130 mg.(L.d)-1 and 500 mg.(L.d)-1, respectively. The lost nitrogen and sulphur was around 2 in molar ratio. The pH value of the effluent was lower than that of the influent. Instead of Candidatus brocadia in nitrite reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation granular sludge, Bacillus benzoevorans became the dominant species in sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation sludge. The dominant bacterium in the two kinds of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process is different. Our results imply that the two anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes are carried out by different kind of bacterium. PMID:26717697

  18. Quaternary Ammonium Polyethyleneimine: Antibacterial Activity Ira

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine- (QA-PEI-) based nanoparticles were synthesized using two synthetic methods, reductive amination and N-alkylation. According to the first method, QA-PEI nanoparticles were synthesized by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde followed by reductive amination with octanal and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. The second method is based on crosslinking with dialkyl halide followed by N-alkylation with octyl halide and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. QA-PEI nanoparticles completely inhibited bacterial growth (>106 bacteria), including both Gram-positive, that is, Staphylococcus aureus at 80 μ/mL, and Gram-negative, that is, Escherichia coli at 320 μ/mL. Activity analysis revealed that the degree of alkylation and N-methylation of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl alkylated QA-PEI alkylated at 1 : 1 mole ratio (primary amine of PEI monomer units/alkylating agent). Also, cytotoxicity studies on MAT-LyLu and MBT cell lines were performed with QA-PEI nanoparticles. These findings confirm previous reports that poly cations bearing quaternary ammonium moieties inhibit bacterial growth in vitro and have a potential use as additives in medical devices which need antibacterial properties.

  19. Light and variable 37Cl/35Cl ratios in rocks from Gale Crater, Mars: Possible signature of perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, K. A.; Martin, P.; Archer, P. D.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Fairén, A. G.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malespin, C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Sutter, B.

    2016-03-01

    Cl isotope ratios measured on HCl thermally evolved from as-yet-unknown phases in sedimentary rocks and sand in Gale Crater provide unexpected insights to the Martian surficial Cl cycle. The seven samples yield δ37Cl values ranging from - 1 ± 25 ‰ to - 51 ± 5 ‰. Five analyses from two samples of the Sheepbed mudstone (Yellowknife Bay study area) are analytically indistinguishable with a mean δ37Cl of - 11 ± 7 ‰ (1 σ). In contrast, four mudstones/sandstones from the Kimberley and Pahrump study areas also yielded indistinguishable ratios, but with a mean δ37Cl of - 43 ± 6 ‰. The Rocknest sand deposit gave a highly uncertain δ37Cl value of - 7 ± 44 ‰. These light and highly variable δ37Cl values are unique among known solar system materials. Two endmember models are offered to account for these observations, and in both, perchlorate, with its extreme ability to fractionate Cl isotopes, is critical. In the first model, SAM is detecting HCl from an oxychlorine compound (e.g., perchlorate) produced from volcanic gas emissions by atmospheric chemical reactions. Similar reactions in Earth's atmosphere may be responsible for the isotopically lightest known Cl outside of this study, in perchlorate from the Atacama Desert. Some of the Gale Crater δ37Cl values are more negative than those in Atacama perchlorate, but because reaction mechanisms and associated fractionation factors are unknown, it is impossible to assess whether this difference is prohibitive. If the negative δ37Cl signal is produced in this fashion, the isotopic variability among samples could arise either from variations in the relative size of the reactant chloride and product perchlorate reservoirs, or from variations in the fraction of perchlorate reduced back to chloride after deposition. Such reduction strongly enriches 37Cl in the residual perchlorate. Perchlorate reduction alone offers an alternative endmember model that can explain the observed data if SAM measured HCl derived

  20. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Shcherbakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2T M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth’s subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars.

  1. Development of Biosensors for Real Time Analysis of Perchlorate in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Frankenberger, William T.; Okeke, Benedict C.; Cheng, Quan Jason

    2006-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) contamination of ground water is a widespread problem in the U.S., which can adversely affect human health and wildlife. Current methods for detecting and quantifying ClO4 - in water are time consuming, expensive, and subject to error due to complex procedures and various interferences. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop a method that can accurately detect and measure low concentrations of ClO4 - in the field. This study reports the construction of a ClO4 -- reducta...

  2. Bis(1,10-phenanthroline)lithium perchlorate: crystal structure and dissociation of complex in acetone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composition of solid phase formed in acetone at concentration ratios of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and LiClO4 near 2:1 is established. Molecular structure of bis(1,10-phenanthroline)lithium perchlorate is determined by X-ray structural analysis: space group Pnna, a=7.191(2), b=39.929(9), c=14.494(3) A, Z=8, Dx=1.490 g/cm3. Data of IR spectroscopy in acetone denotes dissociation of the Li(phen)2ClO4 complex for the 1:1 composition complex and molecule phen in the solution equilibrium with the solid phase

  3. Lanthanide perchlorate complexes of quinoline-1-oxide and isoquinoline-2-oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Kalyanasundaram, R; Navaneetham, NS; Soundararajan, S.

    1985-01-01

    Complexes of lanthanide perchlorates with quinoline-1-oxide and isoquinoline-2-oxide have been isolated for the first time characterised by analysis, conductance and IR, NMR and electronic spectoral studies. The complexes of quinoline-1-oxide have the composition $Ln(QNO)_8$$(ClO_4)_3$ where Ln = La, Pr or Nd and $Ln(QNO)_7$ where Ln = Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb. The isoquinoline-2-oxide complexes analyse for the formula $Ln(IsoQNO)_7(ClO_4)_3$ where Ln = La-Yb.

  4. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5–0.8 μm in diameter, and 2–8 μm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37°C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H2/CO2 to acetate, usually as the only product. ...

  5. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, M.; Mehboob, F.; Gelder, van, M.; Rijpstra, I.; Sinninghe-Damsté, J.S.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5-0.8 microm in diameter, and 2-8 microm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37 degrees C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H(2)/CO(2) to acetate, usually a...

  6. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, M.; Mehboob, F.; van Gelder, T; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; J. S. Sinninghe Damsté; Stams, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5–0.8 μm in diameter, and 2–8 μm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37°C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H2/CO2 to acetate, usually as the only product. ...

  7. 2-(2-Hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-1H-benzimidazol-3-ium perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Chen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the title molecular salt, C14H13N2O2+·ClO4−, the ring systems in the cation are almost coplanar [dihedral angle = 5.53 (13°]. Intramolecular N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds generate S(6 and S(5 rings, respectively. In the crystal, the two H atoms involved in the intramolecular hydrogen bonds also participate in intermolecular links to acceptor O atoms of the perchlorate anions. A simple intermolecular N—H...O bond also occurs. Together, these form a double-chain structure along [101].

  8. Combined effects of perchlorate, thiocyanate, and iodine on thyroid function in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinmaus, Craig, E-mail: craigs@berkeley.edu [Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1515 Clay St. 16th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Miller, Mark D., E-mail: ucsfpehsumiller@gmail.com [Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1515 Clay St. 16th Floor, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Cushing, Lara, E-mail: lara.cushing@berkeley.edu [Energy and Resources Group, 310 Barrows Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 93720-3050 (United States); Blount, Benjamin C., E-mail: bkb3@cdc.gov [Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, NE, Mail Stop F47, Atlanta, GA (United States); Smith, Allan H., E-mail: ahsmith@berkeley.edu [Arsenic Health Effects Research Group, 1950 Addison St., Suite 204, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94704 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Perchlorate, thiocyanate, and low iodine intake can all decrease iodide intake into the thyroid gland. This can reduce thyroid hormone production since iodide is a key component of thyroid hormone. Previous research has suggested that each of these factors alone may decrease thyroid hormone levels, but effect sizes are small. We hypothesized that people who have all three factors at the same time have substantially lower thyroid hormone levels than people who do not, and the effect of this combined exposure is substantially larger than the effects seen in analyses focused on only one factor at a time. Using data from the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, subjects were categorized into exposure groups based on their urinary perchlorate, iodine, and thiocyanate concentrations, and mean serum thyroxine concentrations were compared between groups. Subjects with high perchlorate (n=1939) had thyroxine concentrations that were 5.0% lower (mean difference=0.40 μg/dl, 95% confidence interval=0.14–0.65) than subjects with low perchlorate (n=2084). The individual effects of iodine and thiocyanate were even smaller. Subjects with high perchlorate, high thiocyanate, and low iodine combined (n=62) had thyroxine concentrations 12.9% lower (mean difference=1.07 μg/dl, 95% confidence interval=0.55–1.59) than subjects with low perchlorate, low thiocyanate, and adequate iodine (n=376). Potential confounders had little impact on results. Overall, these results suggest that concomitant exposure to perchlorate, thiocyanate, and low iodine markedly reduces thyroxine production. This highlights the potential importance of examining the combined effects of multiple agents when evaluating the toxicity of thyroid-disrupting agents. -- Highlights: ► Recent data suggest that essentially everyone in the US is exposed to perchlorate. ► Perchlorate exposure may be associated with lower thyroid hormone levels. ► Some groups may be more susceptible to

  9. Combined effects of perchlorate, thiocyanate, and iodine on thyroid function in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorate, thiocyanate, and low iodine intake can all decrease iodide intake into the thyroid gland. This can reduce thyroid hormone production since iodide is a key component of thyroid hormone. Previous research has suggested that each of these factors alone may decrease thyroid hormone levels, but effect sizes are small. We hypothesized that people who have all three factors at the same time have substantially lower thyroid hormone levels than people who do not, and the effect of this combined exposure is substantially larger than the effects seen in analyses focused on only one factor at a time. Using data from the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, subjects were categorized into exposure groups based on their urinary perchlorate, iodine, and thiocyanate concentrations, and mean serum thyroxine concentrations were compared between groups. Subjects with high perchlorate (n=1939) had thyroxine concentrations that were 5.0% lower (mean difference=0.40 μg/dl, 95% confidence interval=0.14–0.65) than subjects with low perchlorate (n=2084). The individual effects of iodine and thiocyanate were even smaller. Subjects with high perchlorate, high thiocyanate, and low iodine combined (n=62) had thyroxine concentrations 12.9% lower (mean difference=1.07 μg/dl, 95% confidence interval=0.55–1.59) than subjects with low perchlorate, low thiocyanate, and adequate iodine (n=376). Potential confounders had little impact on results. Overall, these results suggest that concomitant exposure to perchlorate, thiocyanate, and low iodine markedly reduces thyroxine production. This highlights the potential importance of examining the combined effects of multiple agents when evaluating the toxicity of thyroid-disrupting agents. -- Highlights: ► Recent data suggest that essentially everyone in the US is exposed to perchlorate. ► Perchlorate exposure may be associated with lower thyroid hormone levels. ► Some groups may be more susceptible to

  10. Hydration Structure of the Quaternary Ammonium Cations

    KAUST Repository

    Babiaczyk, Wojtek Iwo

    2010-11-25

    Two indicators of the hydropathicity of small solutes are introduced and tested by molecular dynamics simulations. These indicators are defined as probabilities of the orientation of water molecules\\' dipoles and hydrogen bond vectors, conditional on a generalized distance from the solute suitable for arbitrarily shaped molecules. Using conditional probabilities, it is possible to distinguish features of the distributions in close proximity of the solute. These regions contain the most significant information on the hydration structure but cannot be adequately represented by using, as is usually done, joint distance-angle probability densities. Our calculations show that using our indicators a relative hydropathicity scale for the interesting test set of the quaternary ammonium cations can be roughly determined. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  11. Studies on inorganic exchangers - ammonium phosphomolybdate (AMP) and ammonium phosphotungstate (APW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separation of fission product cesium from other accompanying fission products by use of inorganic ion exchangers, namely, ammonium phosphomolybdate (AMP) and ammonium phosphotungstate (APW) has been investigated. The gross fission product solution is passed through a column of AMP or APW conditioned with HNO3 of appropriate molarity say 2M. The column is thoroughly washed with HNO3 till no activity is left in it . Cesium is eluted by 3M NH4NO3 at 40 deg C. The eluate is converted into cesium chloride by wet decomposition method. The radioactive cesium obtained by this procedure is found to be of high purity and free from any other active contaminants. (M.G.B.)

  12. Surge ammonium uptake in macroalgae from a coral atoll

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, V.; Wafar, M.V.M.

    (Phaeophyta)) from Kavaratti atoll (Lakshadweep, India). Addition of ammonium (up to 20 mmol L-1) led to pronounced uptake within 4–6 min, with the amount of ammonium taken up during surge phase (<4 min) accounting for from about half to 10 times that taken up...

  13. Racer (Ammonium Nonanoate) weed control evaluation for onions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racer has been labeled as a herbicide for food use and is currently under consideration as an organic herbicide for organically grown food crops. The main component (40%) of Racer is ammonium nonanoate (ammonium pelargonate), which occurs in nature and primarily formed from biodegradation of higher...

  14. How to make a living from anaerobic ammonium oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kartal, B.; De Almeida, N.M.; Maalcke, W.J.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Keltjens, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria primarily grow by the oxidation of ammonium coupled to nitrite reduction, using CO2 as the sole carbon source. Although they were neglected for a long time, anammox bacteria are encountered in an enormous species (micro)diversity in virtually any anoxi

  15. Extraction-spectrophotometric determination of niobium with 1,2,4,6-tetraphenylpyridinium perchlorate and thiocyanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1,2,4,6-Tetraphenylpyridinium (TPP+) as the acetate or perchlorate was used as a counter ion in the spectrophotometric determination of Nb(V) by extraction into toluene of the anionic Nb(V) -thiocyanate complex from 4 to 6 M hydrochloric acid. The molar absorptivity of the ion-association complex, whose composition was shown to be NbOCl(SCN)3-.TPP+, was 2.82 x 104 l mol-1cm-1 at 395 nm. Beer's law was obeyed over the range 0.1 to 2.5 μg ml-1 of Nb(V). The method was applied to the determination of niobium in standard steels and ores with good precision and accuracy. 1-(4'-Nitrophenyl)-2,4,6-triphenylpyridinium (nitro-TPP+) perchlorate was also synthesised and used in the spectrophotometric determination of Nb(V), but did not show advantages over TPP+. The fluorescence of TPP+ and Nb(V)-SCN--TPP+ solutions in toluene also disappeared when nitro-TPP+ was used, owing to the paramagnetic effect of the NO2 group. (author)

  16. Interfacial behavior of perchlorate versus chloride ions in saturated aqueous salt solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosal, S; Kuo, I W; Baer, M D; Bluhm, H

    2009-04-14

    In recent years combination of theoretical and experimental work have presented a novel view of the aqueous interface wherein hard and/or multiply charged ions are excluded from the interface, but large polarizable anions show interfacial enhancement relative to the bulk. The observed trend in the propensity of anions to adsorb at the air/water interface appears to be reverse of the Hofmeister series for anions. This study focuses on experimental and theoretical examination of the partitioning behavior of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) and chloride (Cl{sup -}) ions at the air/water interface. We have used ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique to directly probe the interfacial concentrations of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and Cl{sup -} ions in sodium perchlorate and sodium chloride solutions, respectively. Experimental observations are compared with first principles molecular dynamics simulations. Both experimental and simulation results show enhancement of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} ion at the interface, compared with the absence of such enhancement in the case of Cl{sup -} ion. These observations are in agreement with the expected trend in the interfacial propensity of anions based on the Hofmeister series.

  17. 123Iodine scintigraphy and perchlorate discharge test in the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Thirty eight children suffering from congenital primary permanent hypothyroidism were studied to determine the diagnostic impact of 123I scintigraphy in comparison to laboratory findings and ultrasonography. Methods: In all patients 123I scintigraphy was performed after intravenous administration of 3,7 MBq 123I. If accumulation of the radiotracer in thyroid tissue occured a perchlorate discharge test was performed subsequently. Results: Scintigraphy revealed athyrosis in 7 children. In 9 children a lingual thyroid was observed. Deficiency in iodine organification was diagnosed by a significant discharge of 123I in 15 patients. In four of these children the diagnosis of Pendred's syndrome could be established. Ectopic thyroid tissue could be demonstrated only by scintigraphy where clinical examination and sonography failed in the diagnosis in all cases. Hypoplasia of the thyroid gland as it was diagnosed in 2 cases by ultrasonography appeared to be unlikely because of normal 123I uptake was seen in these patients. In 2 patients with scintigraphic proven athyrosis an orthotopic gland had been falsely considered by ultrasound. In 44% of our patients the final diagnosis could only be established if 123I scintigraphy and perchlorate discharge test were performed. Conclusion: This findings suggest that scintigraphy is indispensible in the correct diagnostic work up of congenital hypothyroidism. (orig.)

  18. Sol-gel preparation of a di-ureasil electrolyte doped with lithium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) synthesized by the sol-gel process and designated as di-ureasils have been prepared through the incorporation of lithium perchlorate, LiClO4, into the d-U(2000) organic-inorganic hybrid network. Electrolytes with lithium salt compositions of n (where n indicates the number of oxyethylene units per Li+ ion) between ∞ and 0.5 were characterized by conductivity measurements, cyclic voltammetry at a gold microelectrode, thermal analysis and Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopy. The conductivity results obtained suggest that this system offers a quite significant improvement over previously characterized analogues doped with lithium triflate [S.C. Nunes, V. de Zea Bermudez, D. Ostrovskii, M.M. Silva, S. Barros, M.J. Smith, R.A. Sa Ferreira, L.D. Carlos, J. Rocha, E. Morales, J. Electrochem. Soc. 152 (2) (2005), A429]. 'Free' perchlorate ions, detected in all the samples examined, are identified as the main charge carriers in the sample that yields the highest room temperature conductivity (n = 20). In the di-ureasils with n ≤ 10 ionic association is favoured and the ionic conductivity drops

  19. Reversible, Selective Trapping of Perchlorate from Water in Record Capacity by a Cationic Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinas, Ian R; Silva, Rachel C; Oliver, Scott R J

    2016-02-16

    We report the capture of ppm-level aqueous perchlorate in record capacity and kinetics via the complete anion exchange of a cationic metal-organic framework. Ambient conditions were used for both the synthesis of silver 4,4'-bipyridine nitrate (SBN) and the exchange, forming silver 4,4'-bipyridine perchlorate (SBP). The exchange was complete within 90 min, and the capacity was 354 mg/g, representing 99% removal. These values are greater than current anion exchangers such as the resins Amberlite IRA-400 (249 mg/g), Purolite A530E (104 mg/g), and layered double hydroxides (28 mg/g). Moreover, unlike resins and layered double hydroxides, SBN is fully reusable and displays 96% regeneration to SBN in nitrate solution, with new crystal formation allowing the indefinite cycling for perchlorate. We show seven cycles as proof of concept. Perchlorate contamination of water represents a serious health threat because it is a thyroid endocrine disruptor. This noncomplexing anionic pollutant is significantly mobile and environmentally persistent. Removal of other anionic pollutants from water such as chromate, pertechnetate, or arsenate may be possible by this methodology. PMID:26765213

  20. Anomalous aryl strengthening of americium and europium complexes during extraction by alkylenediphosphine dioxides from perchloric acid media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of americium and europium from perchlorate environments by solutions of three types of methylenediphosphine dioxides, namely (C6H5)P(O)(CH2)sub(n)(O)P(C6H5)2, (C6H5)2P(O)CH2(O)P(C8H17)2 and (C8H17)2P(O)(CH2)sub(n)(O)P(C8H17)2 has been studied (n is 1 or 2 ) The diluents used have been dichlorethane and chloroform. In perchlorate environments the distribuiton coefficients of americium and europium have proved to be by about 3 orders of magnitude higher than in nitric acid environments, i.e. in perchlorate media the complexes are far more stable. Separation coefficients of americium and REE in perchloric acid soutions are much higher than in nitrate environments. The average value of Am/Eu separation coeffecient at 1-5 M acidity was about 6 (with dichlorethane as diluent) or about 7 (with chloroform as diluent). The complexes essentially exist as trisolvated. Americium complexes display anomalous stability increase upon being diluted: by about 2 orders of magnitude with dichlorethane and by up to 3 orders of magnitude with chloroform used as diluent

  1. Electrodialysis of Pu-contaminated ammonium nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonium nitrate is the major component of Pu-contaminated liquid waste generated at the Pu-fuel facilities, and its safe decomposition was experimented by the method of electrodialysis. The process consists of two steps. The one is the electrodialysis of ammonium nitrate to ammonium nitrite in aqueous solution, and the other is the thermal decomposition of the ammonium nitrite to water and nitrogen gas also in aqueous solution. A thermal decomposition column and a heat exchanger were used for the continuous decomposition experiments. The membrane was a cation exchange membrane, the anolyte was 0.1 - 0.5 mol nitric acid, the catholyte was 10 - 50 weight % ammonium nitrate, and the current density was 10 - 50 amp/dm2. The experimental results of the pH and temperature effects on the current efficiency show that electrodialysis is preferable in alkaline region and at lower temperature. It is important to control such minor reactions as ammonium hydroxide byproduction as little as possible. The minor reaction of nitrogen gas generation greatly reduces the current efficiency of ammonium nitrite production. The best current efficiency achieved in the experiments was 85% by selecting the best operating conditions. In order to achieve high current efficiency in electrodialysis, the selection of electrolyzer composition, anode, cation exchange membrane, etc. is indispensable. It is generally preferable to choose the metal which has high hydrogen overvoltage to achieve high current efficiency by controlling hydrogen gas generation. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Correlation of anaerobic ammonium oxidation and denitrification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of the nitrous organic wastewater treated was studied in seven anaerobic sequencing batch reactors(ASBRs)(0 #-6 #) which had been run under stable anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox). By means of monitoring and data analysis of COD, NH4+-N, NO2--N, NO3--N and pH, and of microbial test, the results revealed that the optimal Anammox performance was achieved from 2# reactor in which COD/NH4+-N was 1.65, Anammox bacteria and denitrification bacteria could coexist, and Anammox reaction and denitrification reaction could occur simultaneously in the reactors. The ratio of NH4+-N consumed: NO2--N consumed: NO3--N produced was 1:1.38:0.19 in 0# reactor which was not added glucose in the wastewater. When different ratio of COD and NH4+-N was fed for the reactors, the ratio of NO2--N consumed: NH4+-N consumed was in the range of 1.51-2.29 and the ratio of NO3-N produced: NH4+-N consumed in the range of 0-0.05.

  3. Modelling an Ammonium Transporter with SCLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Troina

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Stochastic Calculus of Looping Sequences (SCLS is a recently proposed modelling language for the representation and simulation of biological systems behaviour. It has been designed with the aim of combining the simplicity of notation of rewrite systems with the advantage of compositionality. It also allows a rather simple and accurate description of biological membranes and their interactions with the environment.In this work we apply SCLS to model a newly discovered ammonium transporter. This transporter is believed to play a fundamental role for plant mineral acquisition, which takes place in the arbuscular mycorrhiza, the most wide-spread plant-fungus symbiosis on earth. Due to its potential application in agriculture this kind of symbiosis is one of the main focuses of the BioBITs project. In our experiments the passage of NH3 / NH4+ from the fungus to the plant has been dissected in known and hypothetical mechanisms; with the model so far we have been able to simulate the behaviour of the system under different conditions. Our simulations confirmed some of the latest experimental results about the LjAMT2;2 transporter. The initial simulation results of the modelling of the symbiosis process are promising and indicate new directions for biological investigations.

  4. 15N-ammonium test in clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By use of the 15N-ammonium test the liver function is investigated under influence of hormonal contraceptives in women and in liver diseases in children. With the described noninvasive nonradioactive isotope test the ammonia detoxification capability and the urea synthesis capacity of the liver is determined by measuring of the 15N excretion in ammonia and urea in urine after oral administering of 15N-ammonium chloride. The 15N-ammonium test shows a significant influence of the hormonal contraceptives on the liver function and gives diagnostic evidence for liver diseases in children. (author)

  5. Effect of Ammonium Nitrate on Nanoparticle Size Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyana C. Pingali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate was added to the spraying solution as a foaming agent to reduce the particle size of nanoparticles synthesized in the spray-pyrolysis process. Ammonium nitrate was effective in breaking the aerosol droplet size and generating nanoparticles that were of approximately one order-of-magnitude (from 200 to 20 nm smaller diameter than those created in the absence of ammonium nitrate in the feed solution. This technique makes it possible to control the particle diameter of metallic nanoparticles below 20 nm.

  6. Potentiometric Electronic Tongue to Resolve Mixtures of Sulfide and Perchlorate Anions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivy Wilson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the use of an array of potentiometric sensors and an artificial neural network response model to determine perchlorate and sulfide ions in polluted waters, by what is known as an electronic tongue. Sensors used have been all-solid-state PVC membrane selective electrodes, where their ionophores were different metal-phtalocyanine complexes with specific and anion generic responses. The study case illustrates the potential use of electronic tongues in the quantification of mixtures when interfering effects need to be counterbalanced: relative errors in determination of individual ions can be decreased typically from 25% to less than 5%, if compared to the use of a single proposed ion-selective electrode.

  7. Structure and properties of 2-cyanopyridinium perchlorate [2-CNPyH][ClO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czupinski, O.; Wojtas, M.; Zaleski, J.; Jakubas, R.; Medycki, W.

    2006-03-01

    The crystal structure of 2-cyanopyridinium perchlorate, [2-CNPyH][ClO4], has been determined at 100 (phase II) and 293 K (phase I). It is monoclinic P 21 at 100 K and orthorhombic P 212121 at 293 K. The dynamic properties of the crystal were studied by differential scanning calorimetry, dilatometry, pyroelectric, dielectric, proton (1H NMR), chlorine (35Cl NMR) magnetic resonance spectroscopies and the infrared method. The crystal undergoes a structural phase transition (\\mathrm {I\\rightarrow II} ) at 170 K characterized by a complex mechanism involving both 'order-disorder' and 'displacive' contributions. It reveals pyroelectric properties below 170 K. The dielectric relaxation existing over phase I is due to the motion of the cyano group, whereas the dynamics of the [ClO4]- anions is reflected in the significant dielectric increment around the \\mathrm {I\\rightarrow II} phase transition.

  8. Structure and properties of 2-cyanopyridinium perchlorate [2-CNPyH][ClO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of 2-cyanopyridinium perchlorate, [2-CNPyH][ClO4], has been determined at 100 (phase II) and 293 K (phase I). It is monoclinic P 21 at 100 K and orthorhombic P 212121 at 293 K. The dynamic properties of the crystal were studied by differential scanning calorimetry, dilatometry, pyroelectric, dielectric, proton (1H NMR), chlorine (35Cl NMR) magnetic resonance spectroscopies and the infrared method. The crystal undergoes a structural phase transition (I →II) at 170K characterized by a complex mechanism involving both 'order-disorder' and 'displacive' contributions. It reveals pyroelectric properties below 170K. The dielectric relaxation existing over phase I is due to the motion of the cyano group, whereas the dynamics of the [ClO4]- anions is reflected in the significant dielectric increment around the I →II phase transition

  9. Degradation study of trichloroethylene and perchloric ethylene using high energy electron beam generated in industrial accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pollution of potable water with chlorinated hydrocarbons, mainly trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloric ethylene (PCE), is seriously increasing the problem of contamination of water, specially in highly industrialized areas. Recent studies show that depuration by ionizing radiation has been considered a possible alternative to the control of water pollution, wherein the process by ionizing radiation converts TCE and PCE into approximately 100% carbon dioxide ions. Water samples containing TCE e PCE were submitted to radiation in the pilot plant installed in the industrial electron accelerator at IPEN from Radiation Dynamics, Dynamitron II, of 1,5 MeV - 25 m A, with doses varying from 2 kGy to 8 kGy, being its parameters analyzed before and after irradiation TCE and PCE concentrations were determined by the gas chromatography method by liquid-liquid extraction using a gas chromatograph, model CG 90, with an electron capture detector. (author). 5 refs, 4 figs

  10. Thyroid scintigraphy and perchlorate discharge test in the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative thyroid scanning using low doses of technetium-99m sodium pertechnetate was performed on 147 infants (55 males and 92 females) with congenital hypothyroidism detected through the national neonatal screening programme. Thirty-two (21.8%) were athyrotic, while 62 (42.2%) had an ectopic thyroid and 53 (36%) had a eutopic gland with increased 99mTc uptake (mean 17%; range, 5%-38%). The perchlorate discharge test (PDT) was performed in nine of the infants with ectopic glands and 15 with eutopic glands; the findings were consistent with an organification defect in 22 cases (seven ectopic and 15 eutopic). Thyroid scintigraphy and PDT can add useful aetiological, genetic and prognostic information in the clinical evaluation of infants with congenital hypothyroidism detected by neonatal screening. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. Promethium-147 extraction with 1,1-diantipyrylalkanes from perchlorate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conditions for quantitative extraction of indicator amounts of promethium-147 from perchlorate solutions with 1,1-diantipyrylalkanes are found. The composition of oxtracted complexes is identified. Extraction concentration constants are calculated. The dependence between the extraction capacity and reagent structure is established. Promethium-147 is used as a radioactive label when studying La3+, Ce3+, Pr3+, Nd3+, Sm3+, Lu3+ extraction. The concentration constants of r.e.e. extraction with diantipyrylmethane are 3.1x1010; 3.5x1010; 3.5x1010; 3.8x1010; 4.0x1010; 6.2x1010, respectively, when μ=0.2

  12. Non-aqueous titrimetric assay of gabapentin in capsules using perchloric acid as titrant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAMEER A.M. ABDULRAHMAN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Two simple, rapid, accurate and inexpensive methods using visual and potentiometric titrimetric techniques are described for the determination of gabapentin (GBP in bulk drug as well as in capsules. The methods are based on the neutralization reaction of the primary amino group of GBP with acetous perchloric acid as titrant in anhydrous acetic acid medium. The end point was detected either visually using crystal violet as indicator or potentiometrically using a modified glass electrode SCE electrode system. Both methods are applicable over the range 1.0-16.0 mg of GBP and the titration reaction follows a 1:1 stoichiometry. The methods were successfully applied to the determination of GBP in capsules. The validity of the proposed methods was further ascertained by parallel determination by a reference method and by recovery studies via standard-addition technique.

  13. Thyroid scintigraphy and perchlorate discharge test in the diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Desouki, M. [Dept. of Medicine, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Jurayyan, N. [Dept. of Paediatrics, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Nuaim, A. [Div. of Endocrinology, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Herbish, A. [Dept. of Paediatrics, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Abo-Bakr, A. [Dept. of Paediatrics, King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Mazrou, Y. [Ministry of Health, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Swailem, A. [Ministry of Health, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-09-01

    Quantitative thyroid scanning using low doses of technetium-99m sodium pertechnetate was performed on 147 infants (55 males and 92 females) with congenital hypothyroidism detected through the national neonatal screening programme. Thirty-two (21.8%) were athyrotic, while 62 (42.2%) had an ectopic thyroid and 53 (36%) had a eutopic gland with increased {sup 99m}Tc uptake (mean 17%; range, 5%-38%). The perchlorate discharge test (PDT) was performed in nine of the infants with ectopic glands and 15 with eutopic glands; the findings were consistent with an organification defect in 22 cases (seven ectopic and 15 eutopic). Thyroid scintigraphy and PDT can add useful aetiological, genetic and prognostic information in the clinical evaluation of infants with congenital hypothyroidism detected by neonatal screening. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Effect of Microwave Heating on the Leaching of Lateritic Nickel Ore in Perchloric Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the leaching conditions of Sivrihisar (Adatepe) limonite type lateritic ore in acidic medium were investigated. Leaching experiments were carried out using conventional and microwave-assisted method. The effects of stirring speed, leaching temperature, perchloric acid concentration, solid/liquid ratio and particle size on conventional leaching were determined. Microwave-assisted leaching was carried out by using the optimum results of the conventional leaching. The pre-heating process was applied on different microwave powers (0, 90, 180, 360 and 600 W) and pre-processing time (0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15 and 20 min). These experimental results demonstrated that acid leaching was a convenient method for Ni extraction from lateritic ore. The higher dissolution and the higher Ni recoveries in the microwave-assisted leaching process were obtained in less leach time. (author)

  15. Hydration of some trivalent metal ions extracted as perchlorates with trioctylphosphine oxide in hexane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorates of Sc3+, Y3+, La3+, and Eu3+ have each been extracted from 0.1 mol x dem-3 aqueous solution of μ=1 with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in hexane. The hydration number of the extracted salts has been determined by Karl Fischer titration. Sc3+, Y3+, and Eu3+ are extracted as the tetra- and hexa-solvates of TOPO but the assumption of octa-solvate on addition to the tetra-solvate explains the extraction data of La3+ well. The hydration number of tetra-solvates is 2(Sc3+ and Eu3+), 3(Y3+) and probably 4 for La3+ ion. That of hexa-and octa-solvates is 4-5. (author)

  16. Hydration and Solvation of Metal Perchlorates Extracted with Trioctylphosphine Oxide in Hexane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perchlorates of Sc3+, Y3+, La3+, and Eu3+ have each been extracted from 0.1 mol dm-3 aqueous solution of μ=1 with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in hexane. The hydration number of the extracted salts has been determined by Karl Fischer titration. Sc3+, Y3+, and Eu3+ are extracted as the tetra- and hexa-solvates of TOPO but the assumption of octa-solvate on addition to the tetra-solvate explains the extraction data of La3+ well. The hydration number of tetra-solvates is 2 (Sc3+ and Eu3+), 3 (Y3+) and probably 4 for La3+ ion. That of hexa-and octa- solvates is 4-5. (author). 1 tabs

  17. Extraction of lanthanide and scandium perchlorates by podands bearing diphenylphosphorylacetamide terminal groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interphase distribution of La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu,Y and Sc perchlorate trace amounts between HClO4 aqueous solutions and phosphorus-containing podands with two end groups Ph2P(O)CH2C(O)NH- connected by di- and triethylene glycol chain in dichlorethane has been studied. Stoichiometry of extracted complexes is determined, effect of HClO4 concentration in aqueous phase and nature of organic solvent on the efficiency of metal ion transitions in organic phase are treated. Studied compounds reveal higher extraction ability regarding to metal ions in HClO4 solutions as compared with the same ability of (dibutylcarbamoylmethyl)diphenylphosphine oxide. Possibility for the using macroporous polymer sorbents impregnated by studied podands for the separation and concentration of rare earth(III) and Sc(III) ions from aqueous solutions containing ClO4- anions has been demonstrated

  18. Large Angular Jump Mechanism Observed for Hydrogen Bond Exchange in Aqueous Perchlorate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Minbiao; /SLAC, PULSE /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Odelius3, Michael; /Stockholm U.; Gaffney1, K.J.; /aff SLAC, PULSE

    2010-06-11

    The mechanism for hydrogen bond (H-bond) switching in solution has remained subject to debate despite extensive experimental and theoretical studies. We have applied polarization-selective multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy to investigate the H-bond exchange mechanism in aqueous NaClO{sub 4} solution. The results show that a water molecule shifts its donated H-bonds between water and perchlorate acceptors by means of large, prompt angular rotation. Using a jump-exchange kinetic model, we extract an average jump angle of 49 {+-} 4{sup o}, in qualitative agreement with the jump angle observed in molecular dynamics simulations of the same aqueous NaClO{sub 4} solution.

  19. Complexes of rare-earth perchlorates with ditbutyl amides of di, tri and tetraglycolic acids

    OpenAIRE

    Premlatha, C; Soundararajan, S

    1981-01-01

    New complexes of lanthanide perchlorates with di-t-butyl amides of di, tri and tetraglycolic acids have been synthesised. The complexes have the general formula Ln(DiGA)3(ClO4)3; Ln(TriGA)2 (ClO4)3 and Ln(TetGA)2 (C1O4)3, where Ln = La-Yb and Y and DiGA = N,N′, di-t-butyl diglycolamide, TriGA N,N′, di-t-butyl triglycolamide and TetGA = N,N′ di-t-butyl tetraglycolamide, respectively. The complexes have been characterized by analysis, electrolytic conductance, infrared,1H and13C nuclear magneti...

  20. Ammonium removal by modified zeolite from municipal wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ya-ping; GAO Ting-yao; JIANG Shang-ying; CAO Da-wen

    2004-01-01

    Ammonium removal by modified zeolite, H-form and Na-form zeolite, were examined by batch-type methods. The adsorption of ammonium on modified zeolite was exothermic process. The saturation adsorption capacity of ammonium on H-form and Na-form zeolite were 21.23 and 41.15 mg/g, respectively. After ten times adsorption- desorption-readsorption cycles the standard deviations of H-form and Na-form zeolite were 6.34% and 6.59%. The zeolite adsorption process has proved cost effective and practical in reducing ammonium by H-form and Na-form zeolite in municipal wastewater from concentration 27.68 mg/L to 2.80 mg/L and 5.91 mg/L.

  1. Fixed Ammonium Content and Maximum Capacity of Ammonium Fixation in Major Types of Tillage Soils in Hunan Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yang-zhu; HUANG Shun-hong; WAN Da-juan; HUANG Yun-xiang; ZHOU Wei-jun; ZOU Ying-bin

    2007-01-01

    In order to understand the status of fixed ammonium, fixed ammonium content, maximum capacity of ammonium fixation, and their influencing factors in major types of tillage soils of Hunan Province, China, were studied with sampling on fields, and laboratory incubation and determination. The main results are summarized as follows: (1) Content of fixed ammonium in the tested soils varies greatly with soil use pattern and the nature of parent material. For the paddy soils, it ranges from 135.4 ± 57.4 to 412.8±32.4 mg kg-1, with 304.7±96.7 mg kg-1 in average; while it ranges from 59.4 to 435.7 mg kg-1, with 230.1 ± 89.2 mg kg1 in average for the upland soils. The soils developed from limnic material and slate had higher fixed ammonium content than the soils developed from granite. The percentage of fixed ammonium to total N in the upland soils is always higher than that in the paddy soils. It ranges from 6.1 ± 3.6% to 16.6 ±4.6%, with 14.0% ± 5.1% in average for the paddy soils and it amounted to 5.8 ±2.0% to 40.1 ± 17.8%, with 23.5 ± 14.2% in average for upland soils. (2) The maximum capacity of ammonium fixation has the same trend with the fixed ammonium content in the tested soils. For all the tested soils, the percentage of recently fixed ammonium to maximum capacity of ammonium fixation is always bellow 20% and it may be due to the fact that the soils have high fertility and high saturation of ammonium-fixing site. (3) The clay content and clay composition in the tested soils are the two important factors influe ncing their fixed ammonium content and maximum capacity of ammonium fixation. The results showed that hydrous mica is the main 2:1 type clay mineral in <0.02 mm clay of the paddy soils, and its content in 0.02-0.002 mm clay is much higher than that in < 0.002 mm clay of the soils. The statistical analysis showed that both the fixed ammonium content and the maximum capacity of ammonium fixation of the paddy soils were positively correlated with

  2. Effect of Perchlorates on Electron Radiolysis of Glycine with Application to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góbi, Sándor; Abplanalp, Matthew J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-05-01

    This work explores the radiolytic decomposition of glycine (H2NCH2COOH) under simulated Martian conditions in the presence of perchlorates ({{{ClO}}4}-), which are abundant oxidizers on the surface of Mars, by energetic electrons at 10, 160, 210, and 260 K, mimicking the radiation exposure of the Martian regolith in the first 5-10 cm depths over about 250 million years. Our experiments present quantitative evidence that the rate constants of the glycine decomposition in the presence of magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate (Mg(ClO4)2 · 6H2O) were a factor of about two higher than that of the pure glycine, suggesting that energetic oxygen atoms (O) released from the {{{ClO}}4}- have a significant effect on the decomposition rates and accelerate them by providing a unique oxidizing environment in the radiolyzed samples. Hence, two decay mechanisms exist: radiolysis by the electrons and oxidation by the O atoms. Within the Mars-relevant temperature range covering 160-260 K, the destruction rates are nearly temperature invariant with rates varying as little as 5%. Further, the formation rates of carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO) are both accelerated in the presence of {{{ClO}}4}- by a factor of three to five, supporting our conclusion of an active oxygen-initiated chemistry. In addition, the degradation rates are significantly higher than the formation rates of CO2 and CO. This suggests that, besides the decarboxylation, alternative degradation pathways such as a polymerization of glycine must exist. Finally, besides CO2 and CO, three alternative products were identified tentatively: methylamine (CH3NH2), methane (CH4), and ammonia (NH3).

  3. Subsurface ammonium maxima in northern Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Satyanarayana, D.; Sahu, S.D.; Panigrahy, P.K.; Sarma, V.V.; Suguna, C.

    Environmental Research 31 (1991) 123-136 Subsurface Ammonium Maxima in Northern Bay of Bengal D. Satyanarayana, S. D. Sahu, P. K. Panigrahy School of Chemistry, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam 530 003, India V. V. Sarma & C. Suguna National Institute.... Inorganic phosphate was determined by the method of Murphy & Riley (1962), nitrite by the method of Bendschneider & Robinson (1952) and nitrate by the method of Morris & Riley (1963) as modified by Grasshoff (1964). Ammonium was determined by indophenol...

  4. METHOD 332.0: DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH SUPPRESSED CONDUCTIVITY AND ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This method is applicable to the identification and quantitation of perchlorate in raw and finished drinking waters. The approach used is ion chromatography with suppressed conductivity and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (IC-ESI/MS)

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and bioactivity of rosin quaternary ammonium salt derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Two series of rosin quaternary ammonium salts (QAS were synthesized using the same path. The structure of the target products was characterized by HPLC, MS, IR, and 1HNMR, and the bioactivity was determined by filter paper method using Trametes versicolor (white-rot fungus and Gloeophyllum trabeum (brown-rot fungus, which are two kinds of general wood decay fungi in nature. The results showed that all compounds tested had a satisfactory anti-fungal effect at the molarity of 0.025 mmol/mL. Hereinto, acrylpimaric Gemini QAS had better bioactivity than dehydrogenated or tetrahydrogenated rosin QAS against Trametes versicolor. To this fungus, quaternary ammonium groups, which wraps up the membrane of microorganism and disrupts the balance in cell membrane, plays the leading role for its bioactivity. To Gloeophyllum trabeum, the inhibition activity of acrylpimaric QAS and dehydrogenated rosin QAS are almost at the same level and larger than tetrahydrogenated rosin QAS, so we conclude that both quaternary ammonium group and aromatic group play important roles. Compared with dodecyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (1227, which is a commercially available quaternary ammonium salt type fungicide, acrylpimaric acid quaternary ammonium salts have approximate bioactivity against Gloeophyllum trabeum. In conclusion, rosin derivatives with functional groups would do well in wood preservative applications.

  6. Removal of ammonium from municipal landfill leachate using natural zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhihong; Wang, Jiawen; Sun, Lingyu; Zhang, Daobin; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Ammonium ion-exchange performance of the natural zeolite was investigated in both batch and column studies. The effects of zeolite dosage, contact time, stirring speed and pH on ammonium removal were investigated in batch experiments. The result showed that ammonium removal efficiency increased with an increase in zeolite dosage from 25 to 150 g/L, and an increase in stirring speed from 200 to 250 r/min. But further increase in zeolite dosage and stirring speed would result in an unpronounced increase of ammonium removal. The optimal pH for the removal of ammonium was found as 7.1. In the column studies, the effect of flow rate was investigated, and the total ammonium removal percentage during 180 min operation time decreased with the flow rate though the ion-exchange capacity varied to a very small extent with the flow rate ranging from 4 to 9 mL/min. The spent zeolite was regenerated by sodium chloride solution and the ammonia removal capacity of zeolite changed little or even increased after three regeneration cycles. PMID:26510611

  7. Mutagenicity of quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A series of quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties, with configuration D-galacto, D-gluco and D-manno, was synthesized and characterized. → The quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties revealed potent mutagenic activities, as assessed by using the Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence mutagenicity test. → The N-[2-(D-glycopyranosyloxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaminium salts were of the highest activity in the mutagenicity assay. → We suggest that quaternary ammonium salts may be more hazardous than previously supposed. - Abstract: Quaternary ammonium salts are widely used in industrial, agricultural, healthcare and domestic applications. They are believed to be safe compounds, with little or no health hazard to humans. However, in this report, we demonstrate that a series of newly synthesized quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties reveal potent mutagenic activities, as assessed by using the Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence mutagenicity test. D-Gluco- and D-galacto-derivatives were found to have a higher mutagenic potential than D-manno-derivatives. Among the former groups of compounds, the N-[2-(D-glycopyranosyloxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaminium salts were of the highest activity in the mutagenicity assay. These results suggest that the safety of quaternary ammonium salts may be lower than previously supposed, indicating a need for testing such compounds for their mutagenicity.

  8. Mutagenicity of quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmochowska, Barbara [Department of Carbohydrate Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Piosik, Jacek; Woziwodzka, Anna [Intercollegiate Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Gdansk and Medical University of Gdansk, Kladki 24, 80-822 Gdansk (Poland); Sikora, Karol; Wisniewski, Andrzej [Department of Carbohydrate Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Wegrzyn, Grzegorz, E-mail: wegrzyn@biotech.univ.gda.pl [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Gdansk, Kladki 24, 80-822 Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} A series of quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties, with configuration D-galacto, D-gluco and D-manno, was synthesized and characterized. {yields} The quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties revealed potent mutagenic activities, as assessed by using the Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence mutagenicity test. {yields} The N-[2-(D-glycopyranosyloxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaminium salts were of the highest activity in the mutagenicity assay. {yields} We suggest that quaternary ammonium salts may be more hazardous than previously supposed. - Abstract: Quaternary ammonium salts are widely used in industrial, agricultural, healthcare and domestic applications. They are believed to be safe compounds, with little or no health hazard to humans. However, in this report, we demonstrate that a series of newly synthesized quaternary ammonium salts containing carbohydrate moieties reveal potent mutagenic activities, as assessed by using the Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence mutagenicity test. D-Gluco- and D-galacto-derivatives were found to have a higher mutagenic potential than D-manno-derivatives. Among the former groups of compounds, the N-[2-(D-glycopyranosyloxy)ethyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaminium salts were of the highest activity in the mutagenicity assay. These results suggest that the safety of quaternary ammonium salts may be lower than previously supposed, indicating a need for testing such compounds for their mutagenicity.

  9. Thermal Diffusivity and Specific Heat Measurements of Titanium Potassium Perchlorate Titanium Subhydride Potassium Perchlorate 9013 Glass 7052 Glass SB-14 Glass and C-4000 Muscovite Mica Using the Flash Technique.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Paul Elliott; Cooper, Marcia A.

    2015-02-01

    The flash technique was used to measure the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of titanium potassium perchlorate (TKP) ignition powder (33wt% Ti - 67wt% KP) with Ventron sup- plied titanium particles, TKP ignition powder (33wt% Ti - 67wt% KP) with ATK supplied titanium particles, TKP output powder (41wt% Ti - 59wt% KP), and titanium subhydride potassium perchlorate (THKP) (33wt% TiH 1.65 - 67wt% KP) at 25 o C. The influence of density and temperature on the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of TKP with Ventron supplied titanium particles was also investigated. Lastly, the thermal diffusivity and specific heats of 9013 glass, 7052 glass, SB-14 glass, and C-4000 Muscovite mica are presented as a function of temperature up to 300 o C.

  10. Mechanism and kinetics for ammonium dinitramide (ADN) sublimation: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, R S; Chen, Hui-Lung; Lin, M C

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism for sublimation of NH(4)N(NO(2))(2) (ADN) has been investigated quantum-mechanically with generalized gradient approximation plane-wave density functional theory calculations; the solid surface is represented by a slab model and the periodic boundary conditions are applied. The calculated lattice constants for the bulk ADN, which were found to consist of NH(4)(+)[ON(O)NNO(2)](-) units, instead of NH(4)(+)[N(NO(2))(2)](-), agree quite well with experimental values. Results show that three steps are involved in the sublimation/decomposition of ADN. The first step is the relaxation of the surface layer with 1.6 kcal/mol energy per NH(4)ON(O)NNO(2) unit; the second step is the sublimation of the surface layer to form a molecular [NH(3)]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex with a 29.4 kcal/mol sublimation energy, consistent with the experimental observation of Korobeinichev et al. (10) The last step is the dissociation of the [H(3)N]-[HON(O)NNO(2)] complex to give NH(3) and HON(O)NNO(2) with the dissociation energy of 13.9 kcal/mol. Direct formation of NO(2) (g) from solid ADN costs a much higher energy, 58.3 kcal/mol. Our calculated total sublimation enthalpy for ADN(s) → NH(3)(g) + HON(O)NNO(2)) (g), 44.9 kcal/mol via three steps, is in good agreement with the value, 42.1 kcal/mol predicted for the one-step sublimation process in this work and the value 44.0 kcal/mol computed by Politzer et al. (11) using experimental thermochemical data. The sublimation rate constant for the rate-controlling step 2 can be represented as k(sub) = 2.18 × 10(12) exp (-30.5 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1), which agrees well with available experimental data within the temperature range studied. The high pressure limit decomposition rate constant for the molecular complex H(3)N···HON(O)NNO(2) can be expressed by k(dec) = 3.18 × 10(13) exp (-15.09 kcal/mol/RT) s(-1). In addition, water molecules were found to increase the sublimation enthalpy of ADN, contrary to that found in the ammonium

  11. Acute and chronic activity of perchlorate and hexavalent chromium contamination on the survival and development of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of water contamination with perchlorate and hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] on the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus were assessed. The chronic (10-day) LC5s values for perchlorate and chromium were 74 ± 8.0 mg/L and 0.41 ± 0.15 mg/L, respectively. Relative Growth Index, a measure of growth and mortality rates in a population, was significantly reduced within 5 days for levels of perchlorate as low as 25 mg/L and for levels of chromium as low as 0.16 mg/L. Neither compound altered wing length of surviving adults. In combination, contaminants were synergistic, causing 14% more mortality than predicted. Acute (24-h) LC5 values for perchlorate and Cr (VI) were 17,000 ± 3200 and 38 ± 1.3 mg/L, respectively. Effects on mosquito larvae in contaminated environments are likely to be observed for Cr (VI) but not for perchlorate, which generally does not occur at levels as high as those shown here to affect larval mosquitoes. - While pollution with hexavalent chromium may adversely affect Culex quinquefasciatus larvae, levels of perchlorate currently in the environment will not impact these insects

  12. Acute and chronic activity of perchlorate and hexavalent chromium contamination on the survival and development of Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, Mary A. [Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)]. E-mail: mary.sorensen@email.ucr.edu; Jensen, Peter D. [Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Walton, William E. [Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Trumble, John T. [Department of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Effects of water contamination with perchlorate and hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)] on the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus were assessed. The chronic (10-day) LC{sub 5}s values for perchlorate and chromium were 74 {+-} 8.0 mg/L and 0.41 {+-} 0.15 mg/L, respectively. Relative Growth Index, a measure of growth and mortality rates in a population, was significantly reduced within 5 days for levels of perchlorate as low as 25 mg/L and for levels of chromium as low as 0.16 mg/L. Neither compound altered wing length of surviving adults. In combination, contaminants were synergistic, causing 14% more mortality than predicted. Acute (24-h) LC{sub 5} values for perchlorate and Cr (VI) were 17,000 {+-} 3200 and 38 {+-} 1.3 mg/L, respectively. Effects on mosquito larvae in contaminated environments are likely to be observed for Cr (VI) but not for perchlorate, which generally does not occur at levels as high as those shown here to affect larval mosquitoes. - While pollution with hexavalent chromium may adversely affect Culex quinquefasciatus larvae, levels of perchlorate currently in the environment will not impact these insects.

  13. Methods to Stabilize and Destabilize Ammonium Borohydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Thomas K.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Bowden, Mark E.; Besenbacher, Fleming; Jensen, Torben R.; Autrey, Thomas

    2013-01-21

    Ammonium borohydride, NH4BH4, has a high hydrogen content of ρm = 24.5 wt% H2 and releases 18 wt% H2 below T = 160 °C. However, the half-life of bulk NH4BH4 at ambient temperatures, ~6 h, is insufficient for practical applications. The decomposition of NH4BH4 (ABH2) was studied at variable hydrogen and argon back pressures to investigate possible pressure mediated stabilization effects. The hydrogen release rate from solid ABH2 at ambient temperatures is reduced by ~16 % upon increasing the hydrogen back pressure from 5 to 54 bar. Similar results were obtained using argon pressure and the observed stabilization may be explained by a positive volume of activation in the transition state leading to hydrogen release. Nanoconfinement in mesoporous silica, MCM-41, was investigated as alternative means to stabilize NH4BH4. However, other factors appear to significantly destabilize NH4BH4 and it rapidly decomposes at ambient temperatures into [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] (DADB) in accordance with the bulk reaction scheme. The hydrogen desorption kinetics from nanoconfined [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] is moderately enhanced as evidenced by a reduction in the DSC decomposition peak temperature of ΔT = -13 °C as compared to the bulk material. Finally, we note a surprising result, storage of DADB at temperature < -30 °C transformed, reversibly, the [(NH3)2BH2][BH4] into a new low temperature polymorph as revealed by both XRD and solid state MAS 11B MAS NMR. TA & AK are thankful for support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. A portion of the research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle.

  14. Effects of Temperature and Drying and Wetting Alternation on Ammonium Fixation in Manured Loessial Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANXIAOLIN; LILING; 等

    1996-01-01

    Effects of temperature and drying and wetting alternation (DWA) on ammonium fixation in manured loessial soil were studied by means of Batch Equilibrium with varying concentration solutions of ammonium chloride.ammonium fixation time,and soil clay contents.The purpose of the research was to find out the pattern of ammonium fixation affected by the varying factors.The results showed a remarkable variation in ammonium fixation.Fixed ammonium increased with temperature and treatments of DWA.The ammonium fixation in manured loessial soil was characterized by the effect of temperature and DWA.

  15. Early metabolic effects and mechanism of ammonium transport in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were performed to define the effects and mechanism of NH+4 transport in yeast. The following results were obtained. Glucose was a better facilitator than ethanol-H2O2 for ammonium transport; low concentrations of uncouplers or respiratory inhibitors could inhibit the transport with ethanol as the substrate. With glucose, respiratory inhibitors showed only small inhibitory effects, and only high concentrations of azide or trifluoromethoxy carbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone could inhibit ammonium transport. Ammonium in the free state could be concentrated approximately 200-fold by the cells. Also, the addition of ammonium produced stimulation of both respiration and fermentation; an increased rate of H+ extrusion and an alkalinization of the interior of the cell; a decrease of the membrane potential, as monitored by fluorescent cyanine; an immediate decrease of the levels of ATP and an increase of ADP, which may account for the stimulation of both fermentation and respiration; and an increase of the levels of inorganic phosphate. Ammonium was found to inhibit 86Rb+ transport much less than K+. Also, while K+ produced a competitive type of inhibition, that produced by NH4+ was of the noncompetitive type. From the distribution ratio of ammonium and the pH gradient, an electrochemical potential gradient of around -180 mV was calculated. The results indicate that ammonium is transported in yeast by a mechanism similar to that of monovalent alkaline cations, driven by a membrane potential. The immediate metabolic effects of this cation seem to be due to an increased [H+]ATPase, to which its transport is coupled. However, the carriers seem to be different. The transport system studied in this work was that of low affinity

  16. Ammonium inhibition of nitrogenase activity in Herbaspirillum seropedicae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, H.; Burris, R.H. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

    1989-06-01

    The effect of oxygen, ammonium ion, and amino acids on nitrogenase activity in the root-associated N{sub 2}-fixing bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae was investigated in comparison with Azospirillum spp. and Rhodospirillum rubrum. H. seropedicae is microaerophilic, and its optimal dissolved oxygen level is from 0.04 to 0.2 kPa for dinitrogen fixation but higher when it is supplied with fixed nitrogen. No nitrogenase activity was detected when the dissolved O{sub 2} level corresponded to 4.0 kPa. Ammonium, a product of the nitrogenase reaction, reversible inhibited nitrogenase activity when added to derepressed cell cultures. However, the inhibition of nitrogenase activity was only partial even with concentrations of ammonium chloride as high as 20 mM. Amides such as glutamine and asparagine partially inhibited nitrogenase activity, but glutamate did not. Nitrogenase in crude extracts prepared from ammonium-inhibited cells showed activity as high as in extracts from N{sub 2}-fixing cells. The pattern of the dinitrogenase and the dinitrogenase reductase revealed by the immunoblotting technique did not change upon ammonium chloride treatment of cells in vivo. No homologous sequences were detected with the draT-draG probe from Azospirillum lipoferum. There is no clear evidence that ADP-ribosylation of the dinitrogenase reductase is involved in the ammonium inhibition of H. seropedicae. The uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone decreased the intracellular ATP concentration and inhibited the nitrogenase activity of whole cells. The ATP pool was significantly disturbed when cultures were treated with ammonium in vivo.

  17. Poly[[tetrakis(μ2-pyrazine N,N′-dioxide-κ2O:O′erbium(III] tris(perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Buchner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The title three-dimensional coordination network, {[Er(C4H4N2O24](ClO43}n, is isostructural to that of other lanthanides. The Er+3 cation lies on a fourfold roto-inversion axis. It is coordinated in a distorted square-antiprismatic fashion by eight O atoms from bridging pyrazine N,N′-dioxide ligands. There are two unique pyrazine N,N′-dioxide ligands. One ring is located around an inversion center, and there is a a twofold rotation axis at the center of the other ring. There are also two unique perchlorate anions. One is centered on a twofold rotation axis and the other on a fourfold roto-inversion axis. The perchlorate anions are located in channels that run perpendicular to (001 and (110 and interact with the coordination network through C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  18. Bis(μ-bis{[4-(2-pyridylpyrimidin-2-yl]sulfanyl}methanedisilver(I bis(perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Bin Zhu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the macrocyclic centrosymmetric dinuclear complex, [Ag2(C19H14N6S22](ClO42, the AgI atom, bis{[4-(2-pyridylpyrimidin-2-yl]sulfanyl}methane (2-bppt ligand and perchlorate anion each lie on a twofold rotation axis. The 2-bppt ligand chelates two four-coordinated AgI atoms through its two bipyridine-like arms. The O atoms of the perchlorate anion are disordered each over two positions of equal occupancy. Adjacent complex molecules are linked by π–π interactions between the pyridine and pyrimidine rings [centroid–centroid distance = 3.663 (8 Å].

  19. Poly[[tetrakis(μ2-pyrazine N,N′-dioxide-κ2O:O′holmium(III] tris(perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Buchner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The title three-dimensional coordination network, {[Ho(C4H4N2O24](ClO43}n, is isostructural to that of other lanthanides. The Ho+3 cation lies on a fourfold roto-inversion axis. It is coordinated in a distorted square anti-prismatic fashion by eight O atoms from bridging pyrazine N,N′-dioxide ligands. There are two unique pyrazine N,N′-dioxide ligands. One ring is located around an inversion center, and there is a a twofold rotation axis at the center of the other ring. There are also two unique perchlorate anions. One is centered on a twofold rotation axis and the other on a fourfold roto-inversion axis. The perchlorate anions are located in channels that run perpendicular to (001 (110 and interact with the coordination network through C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  20. Reactions between cerium(IV) and methyl-6-x-derivatives of aniline in perchloric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation of 2,6-dimethyl-, 2-isopropyl-6-methyl, 2-chloro-6-methyl-and 2-methyl-6-nitro aniline with cerium(IV) in perchloric acid solutions has been examined. It has been found that the concentration of hydrogen ions and the basicity of nitrogen atom in the amine group decide about the resultant intermediate products. Some of these products can be practically prepared using cerium(IV) as an oxidizing agent. (author). 16 refs, 1 tab

  1. X-ray, vibrational spectra and quantum chemical studies on a new semiorganic crystal: 4-Chloroanilinium perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, R.; Athimoolam, S.; Gunasekaran, M.; Anitha, K.

    2014-11-01

    A new semi-organic material 4-chloroanilinium perchlorate was synthesized and grown as a single crystal by slow evaporation solution growth technique. A good X-ray quality single crystal was selected from the grown crops and used for the single crystal diffraction studies. The asymmetric part of the unit cell contains a 4-chloroanilinium cation and a perchlorate anion. The protonation on the N site of the chloroaniline is confirmed from the CN bond distance and the deprotonation on perchloric acid is confirmed from ClO bond geometry. The molecular aggregations are stabilized through intricate three dimensional hydrogen bonding network formed by the classical NH⋯O hydrogen bonds. It form two infinite chains running along the b-axis of the unit cell which are cross-linked through another NH⋯O bond leading to alternate ring R44(12) motifs. These ring and chain motifs lead to alternate hydrophilic and hydrophobic layers along c-axis of the unit cell. The presence of different functional groups and the nature of their vibrations were identified in experimental vibrational studies through Infra-Red and Raman measurements in the range of 4000-400 cm-1. The optimized molecular structure, vibrational mode, computed spectra, molecular properties and NBO analysis of the 4-chloroanilinium perchlorate were found out by quantum chemical calculations with HF and DFT/B3LYP methods invoking 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets. Computed geometrical parameters and harmonic frequencies of fundamental, combination and overtone transitions were found in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The electronic properties such as HOMO and LUMO energies were carried out.

  2. Evaluation of the Protective Effects of Emilia sonchifolia Linn. (DC.) on Perchlorate-Induced Oxidative Damage

    OpenAIRE

    D. Gayathri Devi; Y. Lija; T.R. Cibin; Biju, P.G.; V. Gayathri Devi; Annie Abraham

    2006-01-01

    Emilia sonchifolia Linn. (DC.) is a traditionally used medicinal plant seen in most tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. Various parts of the plant are used for the treatment of diseases like asthma, intermittent fevers, breast cancer, ophthalmia, nyctalopia etc. We have isolated the flavonoid fraction from E. sonchifolia (whole plant). Female albino rats were fed with 0.2% sodium perchlorate to induce oxidative stress. The flavonoid fraction of the plant was fed along with sodium perc...

  3. 2,5-Bis[2-({bis[3-(dimethylazaniumylpropyl]azaniumyl}methylphenyl]-1,3,4-oxadiazole hexakis(perchlorate sesquihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieri Fusi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the title hydrated salt, C36H66N8O6+·6ClO4−·1.5H2O, the asymmetric unit consists of a hexaprotonated [H6L]6+ cation, five perchlorate anions in general positions, two on twofold rotation axes (one of which is disordered, and two water molecules of crystallization in general positions, one of them disordered around a twofold crystallographic axis. In the [H6L]6+ cation, two strong intramolecular N—H...N hydrogen bonds occur, involving the N atoms of the oxadiazole ring as acceptors and the closest NH+ groups of each dipropylenetriamine unit. In the crystal, the [H6L]6+ cations form channels along the a-axis direction, in which the perchlorate counter-ions and the water molecules are lodged. The crystal packing features a network of N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the NH+ groups of the [H6L]6+ cation, the perchlorate anions and the water molecules.

  4. Microbial respiration with chlorine oxyanions: diversity and physiological and biochemical properties of chlorate- and perchlorate-reducing microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebensteiner, Martin G; Oosterkamp, Margreet J; Stams, Alfons J M

    2016-02-01

    Chlorine oxyanions are valuable electron acceptors for microorganisms. Recent findings have shed light on the natural formation of chlorine oxyanions in the environment. These suggest a permanent introduction of respective compounds on Earth, long before their anthropogenic manufacture. Microorganisms that are able to grow by the reduction of chlorate and perchlorate are affiliated with phylogenetically diverse lineages, spanning from the Proteobacteria to the Firmicutes and archaeal microorganisms. Microbial reduction of chlorine oxyanions can be found in diverse environments and different environmental conditions (temperature, salinities, pH). It commonly involves the enzymes perchlorate reductase (Pcr) or chlorate reductase (Clr) and chlorite dismutase (Cld). Horizontal gene transfer seems to play an important role for the acquisition of functional genes. Novel and efficient Clds were isolated from microorganisms incapable of growing on chlorine oxyanions. Archaea seem to use a periplasmic Nar-type reductase (pNar) for perchlorate reduction and lack a functional Cld. Chlorite is possibly eliminated by alternative (abiotic) reactions. This was already demonstrated for Archaeoglobus fulgidus, which uses reduced sulfur compounds to detoxify chlorite. A broad biochemical diversity of the trait, its environmental dispersal, and the occurrence of relevant enzymes in diverse lineages may indicate early adaptations of life toward chlorine oxyanions on Earth. PMID:26104311

  5. Modeling of alkyl quaternary ammonium cations intercalated into montmorillonite lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The modification of montmorillonites by three surfactants increases the basal spacing. ► The model proposed show a bilayer conformation for the surfactant ODTMA. ► The DODMA and TOMA surfactants adopt a paraffin type arrangement. ► Behavior of surfactants in interlayer space was confirmed by TGA and ATR analysis. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to study the conformation of the quaternary ammonium cations viz., octadecyl trimethyl ammonium (ODTMA), dioctadecyl dimethyl ammonium (DMDOA) and trioctadecyl methyl ammonium (TOMA) intercalated within montmorillonite. The modified montmorillonite was characterized by X-ray diffraction in small angle (SAXS), thermal analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy of attenuated total reflection (ATR). The modification of organophilic montmorillonites by the three surfactants ODTMA, DMDOA and TOMA increases the basal spacing from their respective intercalated distances of 1.9 nm, 2.6 nm and 3.4 nm respectively. The increase in the spacing due to the basic organic modification was confirmed by the results of thermal analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy (ATR), and also supported by theoretical calculations of longitudinal and transversal chain sizes of these alkyl quaternary ammonium cations

  6. Removal of toxic ions (chromate, arsenate, and perchlorate) using reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, and ultrafiltration membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Jaekyung

    2009-09-01

    Rejection characteristics of chromate, arsenate, and perchlorate were examined for one reverse osmosis (RO, LFC-1), two nanofiltration (NF, ESNA, and MX07), and one ultrafiltration (UF and GM) membranes that are commercially available. A bench-scale cross-flow flat-sheet filtration system was employed to determine the toxic ion rejection and the membrane flux. Both model and natural waters were used to prepare chromate, arsenate, and perchlorate solutions (approximately 100 μg L-1 for each anion) in mixtures in the presence of other salts (KCl, K2SO4, and CaCl2); and at varying pH conditions (4, 6, 8, and 10) and solution conductivities (30, 60, and 115 mS m-1). The rejection of target ions by the membranes increases with increasing solution pH due to the increasingly negative membrane charge with synthetic model waters. Cr(VI), As(V), and ClO4 - rejection follows the order LFC-1 (>90%) > MX07 (25-95%) ≅ ESNA (30-90%) > GM (3-47%) at all pH conditions. In contrast, the rejection of target ions by the membranes decreases with increasing solution conductivity due to the decreasingly negative membrane charge. Cr(VI), As(V), and ClO4 - rejection follows the order CaCl2 < KCl ≅ K2SO4 at constant pH and conductivity conditions for the NF and UF membranes tested. For natural waters the LFC-1 RO membrane with a small pore size (0.34 nm) had a significantly greater rejection for those target anions (>90%) excluding NO3 - (71-74%) than the ESNA NF membrane (11-56%) with a relatively large pore size (0.44 nm), indicating that size exclusion is at least partially responsible for the rejection. The ratio of solute radius (ri,s) to effective membrane pore radius (rp) was employed to compare ion rejection. For all of the ions, the rejection is higher than 70% when the ri,s/rp ratio is greater than 0.4 for the LFC-1 membrane, while for di-valent ions (CrO4 2 -, SO4 2 -, and HAsSO4 2 -) the rejection (38-56%) is fairly proportional to the ri,s/rp ratio (0.32-0.62) for the ESNA

  7. Perchlorate production by ozone oxidation of chloride in aqueous and dry systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overwhelming evidence now exists that perchlorate is produced through natural processes and can be ubiquitously found at environmentally relevant concentrations in arid and semi-arid locations. A number of potential production mechanisms have been hypothesized and ClO4- production by ozone oxidation of surface bound Cl- was demonstrated. However, no information concerning the impact of concentration, final reaction products distribution, impact of reaction phase, or oxidation of important oxychlorine intermediates has been reported. Using IC-MS-MS analysis and replicate oxidation experiments, we show that exposing aqueous solutions or Cl- coated sand or glass surfaces to O3 (0.96%) generated ClO4- with molar yields of 0.007 and 0.01% for aqueous Cl- solutions and 0.025 and 0.42% for Cl- coated sand and glass, respectively. Aqueous solutions of Cl- produced less ClO4- than Cl- coated sand or glass as well as a higher ratio of ClO3- to ClO4-. Reduction of the initial Cl- mass resulted in substantially higher molar yields of ClO4- and ClO3-. In addition, alkaline absorbers that captured gaseous products contained substantial quantities of Cl-, ClO3-, and ClO4-. Solutions of possible oxychlorine intermediates (OCl- and ClO3-) exposed to O3 produced only scant amounts of ClO4- while a ClO2- solution exposed to O3 produced substantial molar yields of ClO4- (4% molar yield). Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy energy-dispersive X-ray analysis demonstrated a significant loss of Cl- and an increase in oxygen on the Cl- coated silica sand exposed to O3. While the experimental conditions are not reflective of natural conditions this work clearly demonstrates the relative potential of Cl- precursors in perchlorate production and the likely importance of dry aerosol oxidation over solution phase reactions. It also suggests that ClO2- may be a key intermediate while ClO3- and OCl- are unlikely to play a significant role

  8. Anomalous aryl strengthening of complexes at americium and europium extraction with alkylenediphospine dioxide from perchloric media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studied was the extraction of americium(3) and europium(3) from perchlorate solutions(0.001 M) with dioxides of alkylenediphosphines of three types: aryl Ph2P(O)CH2(O)PPh2(briefly 4P), and Ph2P(O)(CH2)2(O)PPh2, mixed Ph2P(O)CH2(O)P(C8H17)2 (or 2Ph2Oct) and alkyl (C8H17)2P(O)CH2(O)P(C8H17)2 (or 4 Oct). Trisolvates of MeS3x(ClO4)3 are predominantly formed but americium disolvates are also present upon dilution with dichloroethane. For 4Ph,2Ph2Oct and 4 Oct the concentration is, respectively, 1015, 2x1014, and 1013; for disolvates by 4 orders of magnitude lower which is, nevertheless, by 2 orders of magnitude higher than for nitric acid solutions. The separation coefficient of β Am/Eu for 4Ph attains 6-8. As in the case of nitrate solutions, an anomalous aryl strengthening of the complexes is observed: an increase in the distribution coefficients and extraction constants in the series of 4 Oct - 2Ph 2 Oct - 4Ph, in spite of the introduction of electronegative aryl substituents into the dioxide molecule, which reduce electron density on oxygen atoms and basicity of dioxides. In contrast to nitric acid solutions, observed is a nonlinear effect of a change in basicity on extraction properties upon dilution with dichloroethane (dioxide of 2Ph2 Oct does not occupy an intermediate position but is close to 4Ph). Upon dilution with chloroform the dependence is linear and anomalous effect rises due to a different nature of interactions of dioxides with chloroform. When the bridge increases up to ethylene, an anomalous strengthening of the complexes disappears. However, the distribution coefficients upon extraction with alkyl dioxide are considerably lower, which can be explained by a stronger extraction of perchloric acid

  9. Thermodynamics of the complexation of ciprofloxacin with calcium and magnesium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The thermodynamics of the reactions of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with Ca(ClO4)2 and Mg(ClO4)2 were investigated by conductometric titration. → The reactions of CIP with each ion produce two ionic complexes with the formulas M(CIP)2+ and M(CIP)22+. → The change in enthalpy and entropy were negative which indicate that the complexation is driven by the enthalpy change. - Abstract: The thermodynamics of the reactions of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2) and magnesium perchlorate (Mg(ClO4)2) have been investigated in water-methanol solvent using conductometric titration. The reactions of CIP with each ion produce two ionic complexes with the general formulas M(CIP)2+ and M(CIP)22+. The stability constants K1 and K2 at 25 oC for the complexes formed from the reaction with Ca(ClO4)2 were 8.84 x 104 and 3.62 x 104, respectively. For the reaction with Mg(ClO4)2K1 and K2 were 1.72 x 105 and 2.50 x 103, respectively. The enthalpy (ΔH1, ΔH2, ΔH12) and entropy (ΔS1, ΔS2, ΔS12) of complexation reactions were determined from the temperature dependence of the complexation constants. The reactions of CIP with both ions are accompanied by a decrease in entropy (ΔS12 = -468.12 and -478.89 J/K mol for complexation with Ca(ClO4)2 and Mg(ClO4)2, respectively) and enthalpy (ΔH12 = -193.09 and -192.01 kJ/mol for complexation with Ca(ClO4)2 and Mg(ClO4)2, respectively), which indicate that the reactions are driven by the enthalpy change.

  10. Thermodynamics of the complexation of ciprofloxacin with calcium and magnesium perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Mustafa, Jamil, E-mail: malkawi@just.edu.jo [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid (Jordan); Taha, Ziyad A. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 3030, Irbid (Jordan)

    2011-07-10

    Highlights: {yields} The thermodynamics of the reactions of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Mg(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} were investigated by conductometric titration. {yields} The reactions of CIP with each ion produce two ionic complexes with the formulas M(CIP){sup 2+} and M(CIP){sub 2}{sup 2+}. {yields} The change in enthalpy and entropy were negative which indicate that the complexation is driven by the enthalpy change. - Abstract: The thermodynamics of the reactions of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}) and magnesium perchlorate (Mg(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}) have been investigated in water-methanol solvent using conductometric titration. The reactions of CIP with each ion produce two ionic complexes with the general formulas M(CIP){sup 2+} and M(CIP){sub 2}{sup 2+}. The stability constants K{sub 1} and K{sub 2} at 25 {sup o}C for the complexes formed from the reaction with Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} were 8.84 x 10{sup 4} and 3.62 x 10{sup 4}, respectively. For the reaction with Mg(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}K{sub 1} and K{sub 2} were 1.72 x 10{sup 5} and 2.50 x 10{sup 3}, respectively. The enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub 1}, {Delta}H{sub 2}, {Delta}H{sub 12}) and entropy ({Delta}S{sub 1}, {Delta}S{sub 2}, {Delta}S{sub 12}) of complexation reactions were determined from the temperature dependence of the complexation constants. The reactions of CIP with both ions are accompanied by a decrease in entropy ({Delta}S{sub 12} = -468.12 and -478.89 J/K mol for complexation with Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Mg(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}, respectively) and enthalpy ({Delta}H{sub 12} = -193.09 and -192.01 kJ/mol for complexation with Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Mg(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}, respectively), which indicate that the reactions are driven by the enthalpy change.

  11. Process for producing ammonium molybdate from molybdenum trioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for producing ammonium molybdate from molybdenum trioxide having iron as an impurity is described comprising: (a) digesting the molybdenum trioxide with ammonia in a sealed vessel which is equipped with one or more stirrers at a temperature of from about 500C. to about 600C., at a pressure of from about 0.5 psig to about 15 psig, with the amount of ammonia being equal to from about 1.01 to about 1.8 times the stoichiometric amount needed to form normal ammonium molybdate, to form an ammonium molybdate solution containing essentially all of the starting molybdenum and a digestion residue containing essentially all of the iron; and (b) separating the solution from the residue

  12. Ammonium as a sustainable proton shuttle in bioelectrochemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf; Law, Yingyu; Cheng, Ka Yu

    2011-10-01

    This work examines a pH control method using ammonium (NH(4)(+)) as a sustainable proton shuttle in a CEM-equipped BES. Current generation was sustained by adding NH(3) or ammonium hydroxide (NH(4)OH) to the anolyte, controlling its pH at 7. Ammonium ion migration maintained the catholyte pH at approximately 9.25. Such NH(4)(+)/NH(3) migration accounted for 90±10% of the ionic flux in the BES. Reintroducing the volatilized NH(3) from the cathode into the anolyte maintained a suitable anolyte pH for sustained microbial-driven current generation. Hence, NH(4)(+)/NH(3) acted as a proton shuttle that is not consumed in the process. PMID:21865037

  13. Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Mother-Liquid Radiochemical Production - 13089

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the work is to develop a basic technology of decomposition of ammonium nitrate stock solutions produced in radiochemical enterprises engaged in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel and fabrication of fresh fuel. It was necessary to work out how to conduct a one-step thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, select and test the catalysts for this process and to prepare proposals for recycling condensation. Necessary accessories were added to a laboratory equipment installation decomposition of ammonium nitrate. It is tested several types of reducing agents and two types of catalyst to neutralize the nitrogen oxides. It is conducted testing of modes of the process to produce condensation, suitable for use in the conversion of a new technological scheme of production. It is studied the structure of the catalysts before and after their use in a laboratory setting. It is tested the selected catalyst in the optimal range for 48 hours of continuous operation. (authors)

  14. Performance of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammo-nium oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; ZHENG Ping; HE YuHui; JIN RenCun

    2009-01-01

    The performance of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation was studied. The results showed that both SO42- and NH4+ were chemically stable under anaerobic conditions. They did not react with each other in the absence of biological catalyst (sludge). The anaerobic digested sludge cultivated in an anaerobic reactor for three years took on the ability of oxidizing ammonium with sulfate anaero-bically. The average reduction of sulfate and ammonium was 71.67 mg.L-1 and 56.82 mg.L-1 at high concentrations.The reaction between SO42- and NH4+ was difficult, though feasible, due to its low standard Gibbs free energy change. The experiment demonstrated that high substrate concentrations and low oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) may be favourable for the biological reaction.

  15. Performance of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The performance of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation was studied.The results showed that both SO42-and NH4+ were chemically stable under anaerobic conditions.They did not react with each other in the absence of biological catalyst(sludge).The anaerobic digested sludge cultivated in an anaerobic reactor for three years took on the ability of oxidizing ammonium with sulfate anaero-bically.The average reduction of sulfate and ammonium was 71.67 mg.L-1 and 56.82 mg.L-1 at high concentrations.The reaction between SO42-and NH4+ was difficult,though feasible,due to its low standard Gibbs free energy change.The experiment demonstrated that high substrate concentrations and low oxidation-reduction potential(ORP) may be favourable for the biological reaction.

  16. Enrichment culture of marine anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Yong-jie

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the enrichment of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria in the marine environment using sediment samples obtained from the East China Sea and discusses the nitrogen removal efficiency of marine anammox bioreactor. Enrichment of anammox bacteria with simultaneous removal of nitrite and ammonium ions was observed in the Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor under a total nitrogen loading rate of 0.37kg-N m-3day-1. In this study, The nitrogen removal efficiency was up to 80% and the molar-reaction ratio of ammonium, nitrite and nitrate was 1.0:1.22:0.22 which was a little different from a previously reported ratio of 1.0:1.32:0.26 in a freshwater system.

  17. Immunological detection of small organic molecules in the presence of perchlorates: relevance to the life marker chip and life detection on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Catherine S; Sims, Mark R; Cullen, David C

    2011-11-01

    The proposed ExoMars mission, due to launch in 2018, aims to look for evidence of extant and extinct life in martian rocks and regolith. Previous attempts to detect organic molecules of biological or abiotic origin on Mars have been unsuccessful, which may be attributable to destruction of these molecules by perchlorate salts during pyrolysis sample extraction techniques. Organic molecules can also be extracted and measured with solvent-based systems. The ExoMars payload includes the Life Marker Chip (LMC) instrument, capable of detecting biomarker molecules of extant and extinct Earth-like life in liquid extracts of martian samples with an antibody microarray assay. The aim of the work reported here was to investigate whether the presence of perchlorate salts, at levels similar to those at the NASA Phoenix landing site, would compromise the LMC extraction and detection method. To test this, we implemented an LMC-representative sample extraction process with an LMC-representative antibody assay and used these to extract and analyze a model sample that consisted of a Mars analog sample matrix (JSC Mars-1) spiked with a representative organic molecular target (pyrene, an example of abiotic meteoritic infall targets) in the presence of perchlorate salts. We found no significant change in immunoassay function when using pyrene standards with added perchlorate salts. When model samples spiked with perchlorate salts were subjected to an LMC-representative liquid extraction, immunoassays functioned in a liquid extract and detected extracted pyrene. For the same model sample matrix without perchlorate salts, we observed anomalous assay signals that coincided with yellow coloration of the extracts. This unexpected observation is being studied further. This initial study indicates that the presence of perchlorate salts, at levels similar to those detected at the NASA Phoenix landing site, is unlikely to prevent the LMC from extracting and detecting organic molecules from

  18. Multi-fractal property of perchlorate reductase gene sequences and DNA photonics application to UV fluorescence detection on Mars-like surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremberger, George, Jr.; Cheung, Eric; Gadura, N.; Holden, Todd; Subramaniam, Raji; Sullivan, Regina; Schneider, Pat; Flamholz, Alex; Lieberman, David H.; Cheung, Tak D.

    2009-08-01

    The discovery of perchlorate on Mars raises the possibility of the existence of perchlorate reduction microbes on that planet. The perchlorate reductase gene sequence fractal dimensions of two Dechloromonas species were compared with five other sequences in the microbial dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase family. A nucleotide sequence can be expressed as a numerical sequence where each nucleotide is assigned its proton number. The resulting numerical sequence can be investigated for its fractal dimension in terms of evolution and chemical properties for comparative studies. Analysis of the fractal dimensions for the DMSO reductase family supports phylogenetic analyses that show that the perchlorate reductase gene sequences are members of the same family. A sub-family with roughly the same nucleotide length emerges having the property that the gene fractal dimension is negatively correlated with the Shannon di-nucleotide entropy (R2 ~ 0.95, N =5). The gene sequence fractal dimension is found to be positively correlated with the neighbor joining distances reported in a published protein phylogeny tree (R2~ 0.92, N = 5). The multi-fractal property associated with these genes shows that perchlorate reductase has lower dimensionality as compared to the relatively higher dimensionality DNA-break repair genes Rec-A and Rad-A observed in the Dechloromonas aromatica and Deinococcus radiodurans genomes. The studied perchlorate gene sequences show a higher Shannon di-nucleotide entropy (~3.97 bits) relative to Dechloromonas aromatica DNA repair sequences (~3.87 bits Rec-A, ~3.92 bits Rad-A), suggesting that there are fewer constraints on nucleotide variety in the perchorlate sequences . These observations thus allow for the existence of perchlorate reducing microbes on Mars now or in the past. Timeresolved UV fluorescence study near the emission bands of nucleotide sequences could be used for bio-detection on Mars-like surfaces and the results may further constrain the

  19. Aerosol isotopic ammonium signatures over the remote Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. T.; Jickells, T. D.; Baker, A. R.; Marca, A.; Johnson, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    We report aerosol ammonium 15N signatures for samples collected from research cruises on the South Atlantic and Caribbean using a new high sensitivity method. We confirm a pattern of isotopic signals from generally light (δ15N -5 to -10‰), for aerosols with very low (ocean, to generally heavier values (δ15N +5 to +10‰), for aerosols collected in temperate and tropical latitudes and with higher ammonium concentrations (>2  nmol m-3). We discuss whether this reflects a mixing of aerosols from two end-members (polluted continental and remote marine emissions), or isotopic fractionation during aerosol transport.

  20. Chemical treatment of ammonium fluoride solution in uranium reconversion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical procedure is described for the treatment of the filtrate, produced from the transformation of uranium hexafluoride (U F6) into ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC). This filtrate is an intermediate product in the U F6 to uranium dioxide (U O2) reconversion process. The described procedure recovers uranium as ammonium peroxide fluoro uranate (APOFU) by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2), and as later step, its calcium fluoride (CaF2) co-precipitation. The recovered uranium is recycled to the AUC production plant. (author)

  1. Ammonium 1-ammonioethane-1,1-diylbis(hydrogenphosphonate dihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Pekhnyo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, NH4+·C2H8NO6P2−·2H2O, was obtained by the reaction between 1-aminoethane-1,1-diyldiphosphonic acid and ammonium hydroxide (1:1 in an aqueous solution. The asymmetric unit contains one anion with two H atoms transferred from the phosphonic acid groups to the amino group of the anion and to an ammonia molecule, giving an ammonium cation. The structure displays N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonding, which creates a three-dimensional network.

  2. Tripropyl­ammonium trithio­cyanurate

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yunxia

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound (systematic name: tripropyl­azanium 2,4,6-tris­ulfanyl­idene­cyclo­hexan-1-ide), (C3H7)3HN+·C3H2N3S3 −, one H atom of trithio­cyanuric acid is accepted by tripropyl­amine to form the ammonium ion. Coplanar trithio­cyanurate and tripropyl­ammonium ions [dihedral angle = 82.33 (8)°] form the salt, which is stabilised by various N—H⋯S and N—H⋯N contacts.

  3. Tripropyl­ammonium trithio­cyanurate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunxia

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound (systematic name: tripropyl­azanium 2,4,6-tris­ulfanyl­idene­cyclo­hexan-1-ide), (C3H7)3HN+·C3H2N3S3 −, one H atom of trithio­cyanuric acid is accepted by tripropyl­amine to form the ammonium ion. Coplanar trithio­cyanurate and tripropyl­ammonium ions [dihedral angle = 82.33 (8)°] form the salt, which is stabilised by various N—H⋯S and N—H⋯N contacts. PMID:21588990

  4. Recovery of uranium values from ammonium diuranate filtrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the conversion of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) to UO2 or U metal powder, ammonium diuranate filtrate (ADUF) is generated by precipitation of uranyl fluoride solution (UO2F2) with ammonium hydroxide solution (NH4OH). This filtrate contains uranium in the range of 150-200 mg/l and fluoride ions in the range of 10-15 g/l. Uranium is present in the filtrate in hexavalent state as mixed fluoride complex particularly, UO2F2.3NH4F, which is quite soluble in aqueous medium and leads to loss of precious uranium in the effluent stream and also poses disposal issues

  5. Structure and properties of 2-cyanopyridinium perchlorate [2-CNPyH][ClO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czupinski, O [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, Joliot-Curie 14, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Wojtas, M [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, Joliot-Curie 14, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Zaleski, J [Institute of Chemistry, University of Opole, Oleska 48, 45-951 Opole (Poland); Jakubas, R [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, Joliot-Curie 14, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Medycki, W [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Science, Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznan (Poland)

    2006-03-29

    The crystal structure of 2-cyanopyridinium perchlorate, [2-CNPyH][ClO{sub 4}], has been determined at 100 (phase II) and 293 K (phase I). It is monoclinic P 2{sub 1} at 100 K and orthorhombic P 2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} at 293 K. The dynamic properties of the crystal were studied by differential scanning calorimetry, dilatometry, pyroelectric, dielectric, proton ({sup 1}H NMR), chlorine ({sup 35}Cl NMR) magnetic resonance spectroscopies and the infrared method. The crystal undergoes a structural phase transition (I {yields}II) at 170K characterized by a complex mechanism involving both 'order-disorder' and 'displacive' contributions. It reveals pyroelectric properties below 170K. The dielectric relaxation existing over phase I is due to the motion of the cyano group, whereas the dynamics of the [ClO{sub 4}]{sup -} anions is reflected in the significant dielectric increment around the I {yields}II phase transition.

  6. Spectroscopic and structural studies of di-ureasils doped with lithium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di-urea cross-linked POE/siloxane hybrid ormolytes (di-ureasils) doped with a wide concentration range of lithium perchlorate trihydrate (LiClO4.3H2O) (200 ≥ n ≥ 0.5, where n expresses the salt content in terms of the number of ether oxygen atoms per Li+ ion) have been analysed by Fourier transform infrared and Raman (FT-IR and FT-Raman, respectively) spectroscopies and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results obtained lead us to conclude that the xerogels with n ≥ 5 are totally amorphous. At n ≤ 1 free salt is observed. 'Free' ClO4- ions appear to be the main charge carriers at the conductivity maximum located within the 25 ≤ n ≤ 8 composition range of this family of ormolytes. At n = 15 ClO4- ions coordinated in mono/tridentate (C3v symmetry) and bidentate (C2v symmetry) configurations were detected. In salt-rich samples with n + ions bond to the urea carbonyl oxygen atoms over the entire range of salt concentration studied

  7. Ion Conduction and Polymer Dynamics of Poly(2-vinylpyridine) - Lithium Perchlorate Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atorngitjawat, Pornpen; Runt, James

    2008-03-01

    Ion conduction and polymer dynamics of single phase mixtures of poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VPy) with 0.1 to 10 mol% lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) were investigated using broadband dielectric spectroscopy. Interpretation of the relaxation behavior was assisted by findings from wide-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, and other techniques. Five dielectric relaxations were observed: a local β process in the glassy state, a segmental relaxation, a slow segmental process, an ion-mode relaxation, and electrode polarization. The local P2VPy relaxation was strongly suppressed with increasing LiClO4 content arising from the formation of transient crosslinks, which lead to a subsequent decrease in the number of free pyridine groups, and/or a reduction in the local free volume in the presence of LiClO4. Ion conduction at low LiClO4 concentrations (diffusion of anions through the matrix, which is strongly coupled with the segmental relaxation. At relatively high LiClO4 concentration (10 mol%), partial decoupling between ion motion and the segmental relaxation was observed, leading to increased conductivity.

  8. Poly[[μ2-acetato-aquadi-μ3-isonicotinato-holmium(IIIsilver(I] perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Feng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the title three-dimensional heterometallic complex, {[AgHo(C6H4NO22(C2H3O2(H2O]ClO4}n, the HoIII ion is eight-coordinated by four O atoms from four different isonicotinate ligands, three O atoms from two different acetate ligands and one O atom of a water molecule. The two-coordinate AgI ion is bonded to two N atoms from two different isonicotinate anions. These metal coordination units are connected by bridging isonicotinate and acetate ligands, generating a three-dimensional network. The coordinated water molecules link the carboxylate group of the acetate ligand and the nitrate ligand by O—H...O hydrogen bonding. The crystal structure is further stabilized by hydrogen bonds. The perchlorate ion is disordered over two sites with site-occupancy factors 0.539 (12 and 0.461 (12, while the methyl group of the acetate ligand is disordered over two sites with site-occupancy factors 0.51 (4 and 0.49 (4.

  9. Fate of N from Green Manures and Ammonium Sulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHISHU-LIAN; WENQI-XIAO; 等

    1991-01-01

    By means of 15N tracer technique the fate of N in ammonium sulfate,milk vetch,sesbania and azolla,and the availability of their residual N were studied in a microplot experiment.Results showed that a) at the end of the first crop of early rice,both plant recovery and loss of N from ammonium sulfate were the highest whereas those from azolla were the lowest with those from milk vetch and sesbania in between;the sequence was reversed in terms of recovery of N in soil;the net residual N from ammonium sulfate was very low,about 1/7-1/4 of that from green manures,indicating that chemical N fertilizer contributes little to the soil N reserve;b) plant recovery of the residual N was low and it did not always decrease with time;the total plant recovery (from the second to the fifth crops) of the residual N from various test fertilizers was only 8-11% of the total N originally applied;c) the plant recovery of the residual N from ammonium sulfate was the highest,followed by those from milk vetch and sesbania,and that from azolla was the lowest,no matter in which cropping season (from the second to the fifth);N availability ratio showed the same trend,indicating that chemical N fertilizer helps renovate soil organic N,maintain and increase availability of soil N.

  10. Increase of water resistance of ammonium nitrate explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkhair Mansurov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Developed a method of kapsulating of ammonium nitrate with liquid paraffin increase finding explosives in water for 60 minutes. Placing explosives in the plastic shell, the explosive was, as in standing or running water during the day. When conducting field tests failures were absent.

  11. Growth features of ammonium hydrogen -tartrate single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Sajeevkumar; R Raveendran; B S Remadevi; Alexander Varghese Vaidyan

    2004-08-01

    Ammonium hydrogen -tartrate (-AHT) single crystals were grown in silica gel. The growth features of these crystals with variation of parameters like specific gravity of the gel, gel pH, acid concentrations, concentration of the feed solution and gel age were studied in detail.

  12. Aqueous Media Oxidation of Alcohols with Ammonium Persulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IMANZADEH, Gholam Hassan; ZAMANLOO, Mohammad R.; MANSOORI, Yaghoob; KHODAYARI, Ali

    2007-01-01

    Oxidation of series of various primary and secondary alcohols to corresponding carbonyl compounds with ammonium persulfate in aqueous media was described. No over oxidation of primary alcohols to carboxylic acids and secondary alcohols to esters was observed. Under such conditions benzoin was converted to benzoic acid.

  13. Characterization of ammonium polyuranate powders from a continuous precipitator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonium polyuranate powders produced in a continuous, well-mixed precipitator were characterized by means of electron microscopy. The powders were qualitatively analyzed with the scanning electron microscope and the elementary crystallites were quantivatively analyzed with the transmission electron microscope. The results were fit to a kinetic theory of continuous precipitation. A phase analysis was also preformed by x-ray powder diffraction

  14. New synthetic method and properties of ammonium dinitramide (ADN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, H.; Onda, T.; Shi Ino, K.; Kiname, S.I. [Technical Center, Hosoya Kako, Osawa (Japan); Miyazaki, S.; Suzuki, S. [Research et Development Center, Nissan Motor Co, Saitama (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Ammonium dinitramide (ADN) is one of the energetic materials, its hazard, however, has never been presented yet. In this paper, new synthetic method of ADN and its properties are contained. It has been found out that ADN has little hazard and is a safe energetic compound. (authors) 4 refs.

  15. Ammonium dinitramide (ADN)-Prilling, coating, and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Thomas; Pontius, Heike; Aniol, Jasmin; Birke, Christoph; Leisinger, Karlfred; Reinhard, Werner [Fraunhofer-Institut Chemische Technologie ICT, Pfinztal (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Ammonium dinitramide (ADN) is the promising oxidizer, which is expected to be applied, e.g., in solid rocket propellants. The manufacturing of spherical ADN particles (the so-called ADN-Prills) with useful morphology and reproducible quality is realized by means of the emulsion crystallization process. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Treating leachate mixture with anaerobic ammonium oxidation technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-guo; ZHOU Shao-qi

    2006-01-01

    Large amounts of ammonium and a low content of biodegradable chemical oxygen demand(COD) are contained in leachate from aged landfills, together with the effluent containing high concentration of nitric nitrogen after biochemical treatment.Treatment effect of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process on the mixture of the leachate and its biochemical effluent was investigated. The results show that the average removal efficiencies of ammonium, nitric nitrogen and total nitrogen are 87.51%,74.95% and 79.59%, respectively, corresponding to the average ratio of removed nitric nitrogen to ammonium, i.e. 1.14 during the steady phase of anammox activity. The mean removal efficiency of COD is only 24.01% during the experimental period. The demand of total phosphorous for the anammox process is unobvious. Especially, the alkalinity and pH value of the effluent are close to those of the influent during the steady phase of anammox activity. In addition, it is demonstrated that the status of the anammox bioreactor can be indicated by the alkalinity and pH value during the course of the experiment. The anammox bioreactor has shown potential for nitrogen removal in the leachate mixture. However, COD and total phosphorous in the leachate mixture need further treatment for removal efficiencies of COD and total phosphorous are not good in the anammox bioreactor.

  17. Characterization of ammonium polyuranate powders from a continuous precipitator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oolman, T.

    1979-01-01

    Ammonium polyuranate powders produced in a continuous, well-mixed precipitator were characterized by means of electron microscopy. The powders were qualitatively analyzed with the scanning electron microscope and the elementary crystallites were quantivatively analyzed with the transmission electron microscope. The results were fit to a kinetic theory of continuous precipitation. A phase analysis was also preformed by x-ray powder diffraction.

  18. Ammonium transformation in a nitrogen-rich tidal freshwater marsh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribsholt, B.; Andersson, M.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Brion, N.; De Brabandere, Loreto; Dehairs, F.; Meire, P.; Middelburg, J.J.; Struyf, E.; Tramper, A.; Van Damme, S.

    2006-01-01

    The fate and transport of watershed-derived ammonium in a tidal freshwater marsh fringing the nutrient rich Scheldt River, Belgium, was quantified in a whole ecosystem 15N labeling experiment. In late summer (September) we added 15N-NH4+ to the flood water entering a 3477 m2 tidal freshwater mars...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1141a - Ammonium phosphate, monobasic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... phosphoric acid at a pH below 5.8. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium phosphate, monobasic. 184.1141a Section 184.1141a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1141b - Ammonium phosphate, dibasic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... acid at a pH above 5.8. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium phosphate, dibasic. 184.1141b Section 184.1141b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  1. Salmonella enterica Strains with Reduced Susceptibility to Quarternary Ammonium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Salmonella spp. are responsible for 76 million illnesses per year in the U.S. Quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) are commonly used antimicrobial agents. Reduced susceptibility to these compounds by a broad spectrum of organisms is a concern. Methods: Salmonella enterica strains with r...

  2. Structure, hydrogen bonding and thermal expansion of ammonium carbonate monohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, A Dominic; Wood, Ian G; Alfè, Dario; Hernández, Eduardo R; Gutmann, Matthias J; Sparkes, Hazel A

    2014-12-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of ammonium carbonate monohydrate, (NH4)2CO3·H2O, using Laue single-crystal diffraction methods with pulsed neutron radiation. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group Pnma (Z = 4), with unit-cell dimensions a = 12.047 (3), b = 4.453 (1), c = 11.023 (3) Å and V = 591.3 (3) Å(3) [ρcalc = 1281.8 (7) kg m(-3)] at 10 K. The single-crystal data collected at 10 and 100 K are complemented by X-ray powder diffraction data measured from 245 to 273 K, Raman spectra measured from 80 to 263 K and an athermal zero-pressure calculation of the electronic structure and phonon spectrum carried out using density functional theory (DFT). We find no evidence of a phase transition between 10 and 273 K; above 273 K, however, the title compound transforms first to ammonium sesquicarbonate monohydrate and subsequently to ammonium bicarbonate. The crystallographic and spectroscopic data and the calculations reveal a quite strongly hydrogen-bonded structure (EHB ≃ 30-40 kJ mol(-1)), on the basis of H...O bond lengths and the topology of the electron density at the bond critical points, in which there is no free rotation of the ammonium cation at any temperature. The barrier to free rotation of the ammonium ions is estimated from the observed librational frequency to be ∼ 36 kJ mol(-1). The c-axis exhibits negative thermal expansion, but the thermal expansion behaviour of the a and b axes is ormal. PMID:25449618

  3. Antibacterial activity of reactive quaternary ammonium compounds in solution and in nonleachable coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gozzelino, G.; Romero Tobar, D.E.; Chaitiemwong, N.; Hazeleger, W.C.; Beumer, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Antibacterial polymers suitable for coating applications without leaching of the biocidal component have been obtained by UV copolymerization of acrylic resins with acrylic monomers containing quaternary ammonium moieties. Suitable reactive biocides, based on quaternary ammonium monomers (QAMs), end

  4. Structural characterization, phase transition and dielectric properties of 4-cyanopyridynium perchlorate monohydrate: [(4-CNC 5H 4NH)][ClO 4]·H 2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czupiński, O.; Wojtaś, M.; Pietraszko, A.; Jakubas, R.

    2007-01-01

    Crystal structure of 4-cyanopyridynium perchlorate monohydrate ([(4-CNC 5H 4NH)][ClO 4]·H 2O) has been determined at 293 and 240 K as orthorhombic space group, Pnma and monoclinic space group, P2 1/ c, respectively, by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction. At room temperature the perchlorate anion reveals significant disorder, which is realized by the splitting of two oxygen atoms into four sites. DSC, dilatometric and dielectric spectroscopy techniques show that the crystal undergoes phase transition at 286/288 K (on cooling/heating scans). [(4-CNC 5H 4NH)][ClO 4]·H 2O appears to be an insulator with relatively high activation energy of the order of 100 kJ/mol. The phase transition in the title crystal is believed to be related to the dynamics of the perchlorate anion.

  5. Shock sensitivity of the explosive 2-(5-Cyanotetrazolato) Pentaamine Cobalt(III) Perchlorate (CP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inorganic explosive, 2-(5-Cyanotetrazolato) Pentaamine Cobalt(III) Perchlorate, more commonly designated CP, is used in a number of hot-wire initiated deflagration-to-detonation detonators. Analyses of the safety aspects of these detonators are dependent upon utilizing shock initiation sensitivity data on this explosive where sensitivity is defined as the amplitude (P) and duration (tau) of the shock stimulus which produces a 50% probability of initiation. In this work the shock sensitivity of CP powder pressed to 1.50 Mg/m3 bulk density was determined using flyer plate impact techniques which provided pulse durations of 0.17 μs and 0.23 μs and pulse amplitudes of 0.8 to 2.3 GPa. Impact tests were conducted in air and vacuum, and with flyers of different area. It was necessary to develop a new test technique to generate flyer velocities to bracket the threshold of initiation for this study. This was done by electrically exploding a metal foil against a lucite shock-moderator from which a plastic flyer lifted off at a controlled velocity. The energy source was a large capacitor bank and provided flyer velocities repeatable within 7% and with a planarity of 30 ns or less. The pressure thresholds for detonation of CP were found to be 1.75 GPa and 1.40 GPa, for pulse durations of 0.17 μs and 0.23 μs respectively. There was no discernible difference in response between samples tested in air or vacuum, or with flyers of different area, within experimental error

  6. Widespread presence of naturally occurring perchlorate in high plains of Texas and New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Anderson, T.A.; Fahlquist, L.; Rainwater, K.A.; Ridley, M.; Jackson, W.A.

    2006-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) occurrence in groundwater has previously been linked to industrial releases and the historic use of Chilean nitrate fertilizers. However, recently a number of occurrences have been identified for which there is no obvious anthropogenic source. Groundwater from an area of 155 000 km2 in 56 counties in northwest Texas and eastern New Mexico is impacted by the presence of ClO4-. Concentrations were generally low (<4 ppb), although some areas are impacted by concentrations up to 200 ppb. ClO4- distribution is not related to well type (public water system, domestic, agricultural, or water-table monitoring) or aquifer (Ogallala, Edward Trinity High Plains, Edwards Trinity Plateau, Seymour, or Cenozoic). Results from vertically nested wells strongly indicate a surface source. The source of ClO4- appears to most likely be atmospheric deposition. Evidence supporting this hypothesis primarily relates to the presence of ClO 4- in tritium-free older water, the lack of relation between land use and concentration distribution, the inability of potential anthropogenic sources to account for the estimated mass of ClO4-, and the positive relationship between conserved anions (e.g., IO3-, Cl-, SO4-2) and ClO4-. The ClO4- distribution appears to be mainly related to evaporative concentration and unsaturated transport. This process has led to higher ClO4- and other ion concentrations in groundwater where the water table is relatively shallow, and in areas with lower saturated thickness. Irrigation may have accelerated this process in some areas by increasing the transport of accumulated salts and by increasing the number of evaporative cycles. Results from this study highlight the potential for ClO4- to impact groundwater in arid and semiarid areas through long-term atmospheric deposition. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  7. Solution-reaction Calorimetric Study of Coordination Compounds of Rare Earth Perchlorates with Alanine and Imidazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO, Yan-Ru(赵艳茹); HOU, An-Xin(侯安新); DONG, Jia-Xin(董家新); ZHAO, Shun-Sheng(赵顺省); LIU, Yi(刘义); QU, Song-Sheng(屈松生)

    2004-01-01

    Two coordination compounds of rare earth perchlorates with alanine and imidazole, [RE(Ala)n(Im)(H2O)](ClO4)3(s) (RE=La, n=3; RE=Nd, n=2), have been prepared and characterized. The standard molar enthalpies of reaction for the following two reactions, LaCL·7H2O(s)+3Ala(s)+Im(s)+3NaClO4(s)=[La(Ala).(Im)(H2O)]-(ClO4)3(s)+3NaCl(s)+6H2O(I)(1)and NdCl3·6H2O(s)+2Ala(s)+2Ala(s)+Im(s)+3NaClO4(s)=[Nd(Ala)2(Im)(H2O)]-(ClO4)3(s)+3NaCl(s)+5H2O(l) (2), were determined by solution-reaction calorimetry, at T=298.15 K, as 36.168 ±0.642kJ·mol-1 and 48.590±0.934kJ·mol-1 respectively. From the results and other auxiliary quantities, the standard molar enthalpies of formation of [La(Ala)3(Im)(H2O)](ClO4)3(s) and [Nd(Ala)2(Im)(H2O)] (ClO4)3(s) were derived,△fH(-)m{[La(Ala).(Im)(H2O)](ClO4)3,s}=(-2984.8±1.0)kJ·mol-1 and △fH(-)m{[Nd(Ala).(Im)(H2O)]-(ClO4)3,s}=(-2387.8±0.8)kJ·mol-1, respectively.

  8. Investigation of electric discharge treatment of water for ammonium nitrogen removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of water purification from ammonium nitrogen using pulsed electric discharge in water-air mixtures was investigated. The model solution of chlorous ammonium was used in experiments. The concentration of ions ammonium was about 300 mg/l. Achieved reduction of ammonium concentration was about 35%. In this paper the mechanism of this process is discussed. The ways to increasing efficiency of this method are proposed

  9. 4,4,5,5-Tetramethyl-2-(4-pyridinio-2-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Jiang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, C12H17N3O2+·ClO4−, consists of 4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-2-(4-pyridinioimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide radical cations and perchlorate anions. Both the cation and the Cl atom of the anion are located on the same twofold rotation axis, and the crystal structure shows the average structure for the radical cation. The five-membered ring assumes a half-chair conformation. The cation links with the anion via N—H...O hydrogen bonding.

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of glycine by iron(III)-1,10-phenanthroline complex in perchloric acid medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T V N Partha Sarathi; A Kalyan Kumar; K Krishna Kishore; P Vani

    2005-07-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of glycine by iron(III)-1,10-phenanthroline complex has been studied in perchloric acid medium. The reaction is first order with respect to iron(III) and glycine. An increase in (phenanthroline) increases the rate, while increase in [H+] decreases the rate. Hence it can be inferred that the reactive species of the substrate is the zwitterionic form and that of the oxidant is [Fe(phen)2(H2O)2]3+. The proposed mechanism leads to the rate law as elucidated.

  11. Eu(III) extraction by bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid and 8-hydroxyquinoline in dodecane from perchlorate medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Europium(III) was extracted by bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) and 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) in dodecane from aqueous perchlorate media of constant ionic strength (0.1M; H+, NaClO4). Slope analysis of the data indicate that three molecules of HDEHP or HQ are attached to Eu3+. Extraction constants were obtained at different temperatures. The data were used to calculate the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) for the extraction process in the two systems. When using mixtures of crown ethers with HDEHP no synergism was observed. (author) 18 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  12. Thermodynamics of Eu(III) extraction by Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid or 8-hydroxyquinoline in dodecane from perchlorate medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Europium (III) was extracted by bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) and 8-hydroxyquinoline (Hq) at different temperatures in dodecane, from perchlorate aqueous media of constant ionic strength (0.1 M ; H+, NaCl O4). Slope analysis of the data indicated that three molecules of HDEHP or Hq are attached to Eu3+. The extraction constants were evaluated at different temperatures. The data obtained were used to calculate the thermodynamic parameters (Δ G,Δ H and Δ S ) for the two systems. Some trials to use mixtures of crown ethers with the reagents investigated but no synergism was observed. 8 fig.,3 tab

  13. (Per)chlorate reduction by the thermophilic bacterium Moorella perchloratireducens sp. nov., isolated from underground gas storage

    OpenAIRE

    Balk, M.; Gelder, van, M.; Weelink, S.A.B.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterium, strain An10, was isolated from underground gas storage with methanol as a substrate and perchlorate as an electron acceptor. Cells were gram-positive straight rods, 0.4 to 0.6 µm in diameter and 2 to 8 µm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. Spores were terminal with a bulged sporangium. The temperature range for growth was 40 to 70°C, with an optimum at 55 to 60°C. The pH optimum was around 7. The salinity range for growth was between 0 and 40 g NaCl lite...

  14. (Per)chlorate Reduction by the Thermophilic Bacterium Moorella perchloratireducens sp. nov., Isolated from Underground Gas Storage▿

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterium, strain An10, was isolated from underground gas storage with methanol as a substrate and perchlorate as an electron acceptor. Cells were gram-positive straight rods, 0.4 to 0.6 μm in diameter and 2 to 8 μm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. Spores were terminal with a bulged sporangium. The temperature range for growth was 40 to 70°C, with an optimum at 55 to 60°C. The pH optimum was around 7. The salinity range for growth was between 0 and 40 g NaCl lite...

  15. Analysis of perchlorate in foods and beverages by ion chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (IC-ESI-MS/MS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new IC-ESI-MS/MS method, with simple sample preparation procedure, has been developed for quantification and confirmation of perchlorate (ClO4-) anions in water, fresh and canned food, wine and beer samples at low part-per-trillion (ng l-1) levels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time an analytical method is used for determination of perchlorate in wine and beer samples. The IC-ESI-MS/MS instrumentation consisted of an ICS-2500 ion chromatography (IC) system coupled to either an API 2000TM or an API 3200TM mass spectrometer. The IC-ESI-MS/MS system was optimized to monitor two pairs of precursor and fragment ion transitions, i.e., multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). All samples had oxygen-18 isotope labeled perchlorate internal standard (ISTD) added prior to extraction. Chlorine isotope ratio (35Cl/37Cl) was used as a confirmation tool. The transition of 35Cl16O4- (m/z 98.9) into 35Cl16O3- (m/z 82.9) was monitored for quantifying the main analyte; the transition of 37Cl16O4- (m/z 100.9) into 37Cl16O3- (m/z 84.9) was monitored for examining a proper isotopic abundance ratio of 35Cl/37Cl; and the transition of 35Cl18O4- (m/z 107.0) into 35Cl18O3- (m/z 89.0) was monitored for quantifying the internal standard. The minimum detection limit (MDL) for this method in de-ionized water is 5 ng l-1 (ppt) using the API 2000TM mass spectrometer and 0.5 ng l-1 using the API 3200TM mass spectrometer. Over 350 food and beverage samples were analyzed mostly in triplicate. Except for four, all samples were found to contain measurable amounts of perchlorate. The levels found ranged from 5 ng l-1 to 463.5 ± 6.36 μg kg-1 using MRM 98.9 → 82.9 and 100 μl injection

  16. cis-Aquabis(2,2′-bipyridine-κ2N,N′fluoridochromium(III bis(perchlorate dihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Birk

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The title mixed aqua–fluoride complex, [CrF(C10H8N22(H2O](ClO42·2H2O, has been synthesized by aquation of the corresponding difluoride complex using lanthanide(III ions as F− acceptors. The complex crystallizes with a CrIII ion at the center of a distorted octahedral coordination polyhedron with a cis arrangement of ligands. The crystal packing shows a hydrogen-bonding pattern involving water molecules, the coordinated F atom and the perchlorate anions

  17. 40 CFR 721.10100 - Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (2:1) (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (2... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10100 Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (2:1) (generic). (a) Chemical... as dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (2:1) (PMN P-03-716) is subject to reporting under...

  18. High-nitrogen-based pyrotechnics: longer- and brighter-burning, perchlorate-free, red-light illuminants for military and civilian applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Nagori, Amita V; Chen, Gary; Chu, Phillip; Damavarapu, Reddy; Klapötke, Thomas M

    2012-01-01

    The full-up prototype testing of perchlorate-free, hand-held, signal illuminants for the US Army's M126A1 red star parachute hand-held signal is described. Compared to the perchlorate-containing control, the disclosed illuminants yielded excellent stabilities toward various ignition stimuli while offering superior pyrotechnic performance. Militarily, the illuminants provided further evidence that development of smaller hand-held signal items in an environmentally conscious way is a realistic and obtainable goal. The results are also important from the perspective of civilian fireworks, as the development of brighter, longer-burning, and environmentally compatible red-light-emitting pyrotechnics is now possible. PMID:22161957

  19. A Hydrogen Ion-Selective Poly(Vinyl Chloride) Membrane Electrode Based on Calix[4]arene as a Perchlorate Ion-Selective Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    CANEL, Esin; ERDEN, Sevcan; ÖZEL, Ayça DEMİREL; MEMON, Sahahabuddin

    2008-01-01

    A hydrogen ion-selective electrode was prepared using 5,11,17,23-tetra-tert-butyl-25,26,27,28-tetracyanometoxy-calix[4]arene and the possibility of its use as a perchlorate ion-selective electrode was investigated using its characteristic of becoming perchlorate sensitive in acidic regions. The electrode of the optimum characteristic had a composition of 1% ionophore, 66% o-NPOE, and 33% PVC. This electrode exhibited a linear response over the range 1.0 \\times 10-1-1.0 \\times 10-5 M o...

  20. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in the East China Sea sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Song

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Benthic nitrogen transformation pathways were investigated in the sediment of the East China Sea in June of 2010 using the 15N isotope pairing technique. Slurry incubations indicated that denitrification, anammox and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA as well as nitrate release by nitrate storing organisms occurred in the East China Sea sediments. These four processes did not exist independently, the nitrate release therefore diluted the 15N labeling fraction of NO3−, a part of the 15NH4+ derived from DNRA also formed 30N2 via anammox. Therefore current methods of rate calculations led to over and underestimations of anammox and denitrification respectively. Following the procedure outlined in Thampdrup and Dalsgaard (2002, denitrification rates were slightly underestimated by on average 6% without regard to the effect of nitrate release, while this underestimation could be counteracted by the presence of DNRA. On the contrary, anammox rates calculated from 15NO3− experiment were significantly overestimated by 42% without considering nitrate release. In our study this overestimation could only be compensated 14% by taking DNRA into consideration. In a parallel experiment amended with 15NH4+ + 14NO3−, anammox rates were not significantly influenced by DNRA due to the high background of 15NH4+ addition. Excluding measurements in which bioirrigation was present, integrated denitrification rates decreased from 10 to 4 mmol N m−2 d−1 with water depth, while integrated anammox rates increased from 1.5 to 4.0 mmol N m−2 d−1. Consequently, the relative contribution of anammox to the total N-loss increased from 13% at the shallowest site near the Changjiang estuary to 50% at the deepest site on the outer shelf. This study represents the first time in which anammox has been demonstrated to play a significant role in benthic nitrogen cycling in the East China Sea sediment, especially on the outer shelf. N

  1. Sources et marché du sulfate d'ammonium Sources of and Market for Ammonium Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loussouarn C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Engrais azoté le plus utilisé dans le monde jusqu'en 1970, le sulfate d'ammonium ne représente plus aujourd'hui que 4 % de la fertilisation azotée. Avec une teneur en azote de 21 % seulement, il a été peu à peu remplacé comme engrais universel par des produits plus concentrés, notamment l'urée et le nitrate d'ammonium. Obtenu pour plus de 40 % comme sous-produit dans la synthèse de monomères comme le caprolactame, l'acrylonitrile ou le méthacrylate de méthyle, et pour près de 10 % dans le traitement des gaz de cokerie, sa production dépend largement des développements du marché des fibres synthétiques, et, dans une moindre mesure, de la sidérurgie et de la métallurgie. Dans les pays développés, où la production est essentiellement fatale, le volume du marché est et sera plus fonction de la disponibilité du sulfate d'ammonium que de la demande ou de facteurs de marché; sa consommation ne résidera plus que dans des applications spécifiques pour lesquelles il sera bien adapté. Par contre, l'intérêt croissant pour compenser le déficit en soufre de certains sols, et les qualités agronomiques propres du sulfate d'ammonium laissent entrevoir la possibilité d'un essor de son utilisation dans certaines régions en voie de développernent. Ammonium sulfate was the most worldwide nitrogenous fertilizer used up to 1970. Today, it makes up only 4% of nitrogenous fertilization. With a nitrogen content of only 21%, it has gradually been replaced as a universal fertilizer by more concentrated products, particularly urea and ammonium nitrate. More than 40% of the ammonium sulfate is obtained as a by-product from the synthesis of monomers such as caprolactam, acrylonitrile or methyl methacrylate, and nearly 10% from coking gas processing. Its production depends extensively on the development of the market for synthetic fibers and, to a lesser extent, on the steel and metallurgical industries. In the industrialized countries

  2. Preparation of nanodispersed titania using stabilized ammonium nitrate melts

    KAUST Repository

    Raciulete, Monica

    2010-10-01

    An expedite one-step approach using simple precursors has been proposed to obtain metallic oxide compounds and exemplified by preparation of highly dispersed TiO2. The technique consists in heating to 400500 °C of molten ammonium nitrate stabilized with an organic nitrogen-containing compound (urea, melamine, ammonium oxalate) and containing dissolved metal salt precursor (TiOCl2). The crystallites of the resulting TiO2 demonstrated variable size and shape as a function of stabilizer used. Their activity in photocatalytic oxidation of formic acid also depends on the nature of the stabilizer. The catalysts as-prepared showed high photocatalytic performance, superior to that of the Degussa P25 reference. Nitrogen containing stabilizers play a double role of increasing the process safety and modifying the properties of the solid products. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation in a bioreactor treating slaughterhouse wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Reginatto

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium oxidation was thought to be an exclusively aerobic process; however, as recently described in the literature, it is also possible under anaerobic conditions and this process was named ANAMMOX. This work describes the operation of a system consisting of a denitrifying reactor coupled to a nitrifying reactor used for removal of nitrogen from slaughterhouse wastewater. During operation of the denitrifying reactor an average nitrogen ammonium removal rate of 50 mg/Ld was observed. This biomass was used to seed a second reactor, operated in repeated fed batch mode, fed with synthetic medium specific to the growth of bacteria responsible for the ANAMMOX process. The nitrogen loading rate varied between 33 and 67 mgN/Ld and average nitrogen removal was 95% and 40%, respectively. Results of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH confirmed the presence of anammox-like microorganisms in the enriched biomass.

  4. Kinetic study of uranium residue dissolution in ammonium carbonate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the kinetics of the dissolution of a uranium residue in ammonium carbonate media. The residue is generated in the production of medical isotopes. The effects of parameters, such as varying peroxide and carbonate concentrations, dissolution time as well as temperature on the extraction rate have been separately studied. Results indicate complete dissolution of the residue at 60 deg C, after 30 min, in ammonium carbonate solution enriched with hydrogen peroxide. The yield and rate of uranium extraction were found to increase as a function of both temperature, in the range of 25-60 deg C, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The extraction process was governed by chemical reaction as the activation energy was found to be 45.5 kJ/mol. The order of reaction with respect to uranium concentration was found to be approximately first order. (author)

  5. Tripolyphosphates of potassium-cadmium and ammonium-cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation of barely soluble compounds during interaction of ammonium and potassium tripolyphosphates with cadmium nitrate in aqueous solutions (0.1-2.0 mol% concentration, the temperature 20 deg C), is investigated. KCd2P3O10x7H2O, NH4Cd2P3O10x7H2O crystallohydrates and Cd5(P3O10)2xhH2O (x=10-13) X-ray amorphous salt, that are dissolved in potassium and ammonium tripolyphosphate solution with formation of Cd2+:P3O105-=1:1 and 1:2 complexes, are separated. In K5P3O10-Cd(NO3)2-H2O system Cd2+:P3O105-=1:1 complex is crystallized in a mixture with varied composition amorphous phase

  6. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity of lamotrigine and its ammonium derivatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yong Qian; Peng-Cheng Lv; Lei Shi; Rui-Qin Fang; Zhong-Cheng Song; Hai-Liang Zhu

    2009-07-01

    Antiepileptic drug lamotrigine and its thirteen ammonium salt complexes (4a-4m) were synthesized and characterized by IR, elemental analysis, 1H-NMR, and MS spectral methods. Many of the ammonium salts (4a-4m) were first reported. Furthermore, the crystal structure of compound 3 was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. All these complexes were tested in vitro for their antibacterial activity (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae). The results indicated that most of the complexes showed good antibacterial activity against Gram-positive (B. subtilis, S. aureus and S. faecalis), but showed mild, even inactive against Gram-negative bacterial strains.

  7. Precipitation mechanism of ammonium uranate and relative process selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes hydrolytic mechanism of uranyl ion, composition and structure of formed ammonium uranates. Investigations show that uranyl hydrolytic complexes as a main form of dinuclear complexes in solution with further hydrolyze to form sub-stable uranyl hydroxide with the oxonium oxygen bond which can react with cation NH4+, existing in solution, by substituting the hydroxyl bridge hydrogens to form ammonium uranates. Virgin thin grain is small and can easily polymerize into a porous particle by absorption of plate to plate, and the later may aggregate into a second aggregation. Transform of F- system into NO3- system, or use of two-steps precipitation, strictly controlled pH value, in order to quicken speed of formation of the virgin grain, an ADU-derived special UO2 powder can be obtained

  8. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of Ammonium-Based Rotaxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Thibeault

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The number of synthetic methods enabling the preparation of ammonium-based rotaxanes has increased very rapidly in the past ten years. The challenge in the synthesis of rotaxanes results from the rather weak interactions between the ammonium-containing rod and the crown ether macrocycle in the pseudorotaxane structure that rely mostly on O•H hydrogen bonds. Indeed, no strong base or polar solvent that could break up H-bonding can be used during the formation of rotaxanes because the two components will separate as two distinct entities. Moreover, most of the reactions have to be performed at room temperature to favor the formation of pseudorotaxane in solution. These non-trivial prerequisites have been taken into account to develop efficient reaction conditions for the preparation of rotaxanes and those are described in detail along this review.

  9. Pilot scale for preparation of ammonium uranyl carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedure adopted for obtaining Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC) from uranium hexafluoride (UF sub(6)) or aqueous solutions of uranylnitrate (UO sub(2)(NO sub(3)) sub(2)) is described in the present work. This procedure involves the precipitation of AUC in a chemical reactor by the addition of gaseous UF sub(6) or solutions of uranylnitrate to NH sub(3) and CO sub(2) gases in a solution containing ammonium bicarbonate, where pH and temperature are controlled. Details regarding the characterization and quality control methods in the preparation of AUC are presented along with their physical and chemical properties. Some informations about effluents generated during the process are presented too. An attempt is made to correlate the parameters involved in the precipitation process of AUC and their characteristics. (author)

  10. Proton- and ammonium- sensing by histaminergic neurons controlling wakefulness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvgenij eYanovsky

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Orexinergic and histaminergic neurons in the posterior hypothalamus are involved in the control of arousal. Extracellular levels of acid /CO2 are fundamental physicochemical signals controlling wakefulness and breathing. Acidification excites orexinergic neurons like the chemosensory neurons in the brain stem. Hypercapnia induces c-Fos expression, a marker for increased neuronal activity, in the rat histaminergic tuberomamillary nucleus (TMN, but the mechanisms of this excitation are unknown. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs are gated by protons and also by ammonium. Recordings in rat brain slices revealed now that acidification within the physiological range (pH from 7.3 to 7.0 as well as ammonium chloride (5mM excite histaminergic neurons. We detected variable combinations of 4 known types of ASICs in single TMN neurons, along with the pharmacological properties of pH-induced current. At pH 7.0 however, activation of ASICs in TMN neurons was negligible. Block of type I metabotropic glutamate receptors abolished proton- but not ammonium- induced excitation. Mouse TMN neurons were identified within a novel HDC-Cre transgenic reporter mouse line. In contrast to the rat these lacked pH 7.0-induced excitation and showed only a minimal response to the mGluR I agonist DHPG (0.5µM. Ammonium-induced excitation was similar in mouse and rat. Thus glutamate, which is released by glial cells and orexinergic axons amplifies CO2/acid-induced arousal through the recruitment of the histaminergic system in rat but not in mouse. These results are relevant for the understanding of neuronal mechanisms controlling H+/CO2-induced arousal in hepatic encephalopathy and obstructive sleep apnoea. The new HDC-Cre mouse model will be a useful tool for studying the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the histaminergic system.

  11. Intercalation of quaternary ammonium epoxide into montmorillonite structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duchek, P.; Špírková, Milena; Šabata, Stanislav

    Beijing : Chinese Vacuum Society, 2010. s. 109. [International Vacuum Congress /18./, International Conference on Nanoscience and Technology, International Conference on Solid Surfaces /14./, Vacuum and Surface Sciences Conference of Asia and Australia. 23.08.2010-27.08.2010, Beijing] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX08240901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : montmorillonite * quaternary ammonium epoxide * intercalation Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  12. Recovering germanium from coal ash by chlorination with ammonium chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new process of enriching germanium from coal ash was developed. The process involves in mixing the coal ash and ammonium chloride and then roasting the mixture to produce germanium chloride that is then absorbed by dilute hydrochloric acid and hydrolyzed to germanium oxide. The germanium recovery reached to 80.2% at the optimum condition: mass ratio of NH4Cl/coal ash is 0.15, roasting temperature 400℃ and roasting time 90 min.

  13. Ammonium photo-production by heterocytous cyanobacteria: potentials and constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizeau, Dominique; Bui, Lan Anh; Dupré, Catherine; Legrand, Jack

    2016-08-01

    Over the last decades, production of microalgae and cyanobacteria has been developed for several applications, including novel foods, cosmetic ingredients and more recently biofuel. The sustainability of these promising developments can be hindered by some constraints, such as water and nutrient footprints. This review surveys data on N2-fixing cyanobacteria for biomass production and ways to induce and improve the excretion of ammonium within cultures under aerobic conditions. The nitrogenase complex is oxygen sensitive. Nevertheless, nitrogen fixation occurs under oxic conditions due to cyanobacteria-specific characteristics. For instance, in some cyanobacteria, the vegetative cell differentiation in heterocyts provides a well-adapted anaerobic microenvironment for nitrogenase protection. Therefore, cell cultures of oxygenic cyanobacteria have been grown in laboratory and pilot photobioreactors (Dasgupta et al., 2010; Fontes et al., 1987; Moreno et al., 2003; Nayak & Das, 2013). Biomass production under diazotrophic conditions has been shown to be controlled by environmental factors such as light intensity, temperature, aeration rate, and inorganic carbon concentration, also, more specifically, by the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the culture medium. Currently, there is little information regarding the production of extracellular ammonium by heterocytous cyanobacteria. This review compares the available data on maximum ammonium concentrations and analyses the specific rate production in cultures grown as free or immobilized filamentous cyanobacteria. Extracellular production of ammonium could be coupled, as suggested by recent research on non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria, to that of other high value metabolites. There is little information available regarding the possibility for using diazotrophic cyanobacteria as cellular factories may be in regard of the constraints due to nitrogen fixation. PMID:25613641

  14. Ammonium Uptake by Phytoplankton Regulates Nitrification in the Sunlit Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Jason M.; Chavez, Francisco P.; Francis, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrification, the microbial oxidation of ammonium to nitrate, is a central part of the nitrogen cycle. In the ocean's surface layer, the process alters the distribution of inorganic nitrogen species available to phytoplankton and produces nitrous oxide. A widely held idea among oceanographers is that nitrification is inhibited by light in the ocean. However, recent evidence that the primary organisms involved in nitrification, the ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), are present and active throu...

  15. Hibiscus sabdariffa Affects Ammonium Chloride-Induced Hyperammonemic Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Subramanian, P.; M. Mohamed Essa

    2007-01-01

    Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS) is an edible medicinal plant, indigenous to India, China and Thailand and is used in Ayurveda and traditional medicine. Alcoholic extract of HS leaves (HSEt) was studied for its anti-hyperammonemic and antioxidant effects in brain tissues of ammonium chloride-induced hyperammonemic rats. Oral administration of HSEt (250 mg kg−1 body weight) significantly normalizes the levels of ammonia, urea, uric acid, creatinine and non-protein nitrogen in the blood. HSEt significa...

  16. Nanomodified vermiculite NMV - a new material for recycling ammonium nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama, Miradije; Laiho, Taina; Eklund, Olav; Lehto, Kirsi; Shebanov, Alex; Smått, Jan-Henrik

    2016-04-01

    Vermiculites ((Mg,Fe,Al)3(Al,Si)4O10(OH)24H2O) are naturally occurring minerals from hydromica group with a high cation exchange capacity and large surface area. Since vermiculite is a hydrated mineral, its structure can be changed with heat. In this study vermiculite samples were heated in an oven until the interlayer distance of them diminished from 14 Å to 11.7 Å. This method for improving vermiculites intake of ammonium ions by heating, is an invention made at the University of Turku. Nanomodified vermiculite (NMV) is able to absorb up to 4.7 wt% of ammonium. NMV can be used as an efficient filter and immobilizer of ammonium in different environments. NMV has been efficiently tested on waste water from a biogas plant, human urine, combustion experiments, industrial chimneys, excrements from farms etc. Ammonium doped vermiculite (ADV) is further developed for fertilizer use. Performed experiments have testified the usability of ADV as a fertilizer. At first step the NMV was processed with the reject water from a biogas plant, were it absorbed NH4+ into the lattice. At second, the ADV was used as nutrient source for garden plants. Geraniums and begonias were used as test plants of the work. Plant growth rate was evaluated based on plant weight. Results showed that significant increase of the growth of geraniums and of begonias were observed when comparing to those cultivations where plants have got normal fertilization. Moreover, ADV has been tested as a fertilizer in greenhouse experiments with spruces and pines. After five months, the weight of the plants that had grown in a substrate containing ADV was 10 times the weight of plants growing in the reference substrate.

  17. Alicyclic ammonium ionic liquids as lithium battery electrolytes A review

    OpenAIRE

    Puga, A.V.

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquids are reasonable alternatives to electrolytes used in energy storage devices, such as lithium batteries, both lithium-ion and lithium-metal, given the safety advantages they provide. This is due to the favourable properties they often possess, mainly non­flammability and non­volatility. Candidates with alicyclic ammonium cations exhibit high electrochemical stabilities, especially towards lithium, a unique feature which enables the fabrication of reversible lithium-metal batteries...

  18. Potassium-strontium amd ammonium-strontium tripolyphosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of low-soluble compounds during interaction of potassium and ammonium tripolyphosphates and strontium nitrate in aqueous solutions (0.1-1.0 mol.% concentration, 20 deg C temperature) is investigated. Crystal hydrates KSr2P3O10x7H2O, NH4Sr2P3O10x5H2O and amorphous salt Sr5(P3O10)2xXH2O (X=10-12) are extracted

  19. Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria: Unique Microorganisms with Exceptional Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Niftrik, L.A.M.P. van; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria defy many microbiological concepts and share numerous properties with both eukaryotes and archaea. Among their most intriguing characteristics are their compartmentalized cell plan and archaeon-like cell wall. Here we review our current knowledge about anammox cell biology. The anammox cell is divided into three separate compartments by bilayer membranes. The anammox cell consists of (from outside to inside) the cell wall, paryphoplasm,...

  20. Synthesis and characterization of ammonium phosphate fertilizers with boron

    OpenAIRE

    ANGELA MAGDA; RODICA PODE; CORNELIA MUNTEAN; MIHAI MEDELEANU; ALEXANDRU POPA

    2010-01-01

    The concentration of boron, an essential micronutrient for plants, presents a narrow range between deficiency and toxicity. In order to provide the boron requirement for plants, and to avoid toxicity problems, boron compounds are mixed with basic fertilizers. Sodium borate pentahydrate was used as a boron source. Ammonium orthophosphates fertilizers with boron were prepared by neutralizing phosphoric acid with ammonia and addition of variable amounts of sodium tetraborate pentahydrate to the ...

  1. Separation and Recovery of Tetramethyl Ammonium Hydroxide with Zeolitic Adsorbents

    OpenAIRE

    S. Nishihama; Takatori, K.; K. Yoshizuka

    2010-01-01

    Separation and recovery of tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) has been investigated, employing several zeolites as adsorbents. Zeolite X, prepared by using TMAH as a structure directing agent, possesses highest adsorption ability among the adsorbents investigated in the present work, which corresponds to the specific surface area and pore volume of the zeolite. The adsorption amount of TMAH with the zeolitic adsorbents increases with increase in pH value in the aqueous solution, indicating...

  2. Nitrogen loss by anaerobic oxidation of ammonium in rice rhizosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Nie, San'an; Li, Hu; Yang, Xiaoru; Zhang, Zhaoji; Weng, Bosen; Huang, Fuyi; Zhu, Gui-Bing; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of ammonium (anammox) is recognized as an important process for nitrogen (N) cycling, yet its role in agricultural ecosystems, which are intensively fertilized, remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the presence, activity, functional gene abundance and role of anammox bacteria in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere paddy soils using catalyzed reporter deposition–fluorescence in situ hybridization, isotope-tracing technique, quantitative PCR assay and 16S rRNA gene cl...

  3. Development of antibacterial quaternary ammonium silane coatings on polyurethane catheters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zanini, S.; Polissi, A.; Maccagni, E.A.; Dell'Orto, E.C.; Liberatore, Chiara; Riccardi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 451, Aug (2015), 78-84. ISSN 0021-9797 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0143 Grant ostatní: OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : plasma-induced graft-polymerization * acrylic acid * ATR/FTIR * AFM * quaternary ammonium silane * Escherichia coli Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.368, year: 2014

  4. ITP determination of potassium and ammonium in fertilizers and silage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Michaela; Křivánková, Ludmila; Skalická, I.; Bartoš, M.; Vytřas, K.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 67, Suppl. (2008), S63-S68. ISSN 0009-5893. [Advances in Chromatography and Electrophoresis 2007 and Chiranal 2007. Olomouc, 24.06.2007-27.06.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/2106; GA AV ČR IAA400310703 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : capillary electrophoresis * ammonium * potassium Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.312, year: 2008

  5. Study of stripping cristallization processus of AUC with ammonium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is concerned with direct crystallization of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) from a uranium loaded organic phase (30% TBP in kerosene), with ammonium carbonate (NH4)2CO3. The effects of operating conditions ((NH4)2CO3 concentration, flow-ratio, residence time, temperature) on the physical properties of AUC crystals (particle size distribution, specific surface, density...) are reported. All products were identified (both by chemical analysis, X-Ray diffraction) as being ammonium uranyl carbonate crystals (AUC). The results show that a high phase ratio and (NH4)2CO3 concentration favor the formation of fine AUC grains and aggregates. This is due mainly to the high concentration of NH+4 in the system which leads to a high solution supersaturation and consequently to a rapid formation rate of crystal (germination). The reverse phenomenon is observed at low phase ratio and (NH4)2CO3 concentration, where germination and crystal growth are slow and the product is mainly monocrystal. In the intermediate range, a mixture of polycrystal and aggregates is obtained. Residence and temperature are also shown to have an effect on the processes (the effect of time being more important than temperature). In the course of this study a bench-scale stripper-crystallizer was developped and operated successfully. (author). tables, graphs

  6. Extraction Factor Of Pure Ammonium Paratungstate From Tungsten Scraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Typical oxidation process of tungsten scraps was modified by the rotary kiln with oxygen burner to increase the oxidation rate of tungsten scraps. Also to accelerate the solubility of solid oxidized products, the hydrothermal reflux method was adapted. By heating tungsten scraps in rotary kiln with oxygen burner at around 900° for 2hrs, the scraps was oxidized completely. Then oxidized products (WO3 and CoWO4 was fully dissolved in the solution of NaOH by hydrothermal reflux method at 150° for 2hrs. The dissolution rate of oxidized products was increased with increasing the reaction temperature and concentration of NaOH. And then CaWO4 and H2WO4 could be generated from the aqueous sodium tungstate solution. Ammonium paratungstate (APT also could be produced from tungstic acid using by aqueous ammonium solution. The morphologies (cubic and plate types of APT was controlled by the stirring process of purified solution of ammonium paratungstate.

  7. Ammonium and potassium effect on nitrate assimilation in cucumber seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Buczek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ammonium present in the induction medium toghether with nitrate on the activity of nitrate reductase (NR, nitrite reductase (NiR, glutamic acid dehydrogenase (GDH and absorption and accumulation of NO3- in cucumber seedlings were investigated. Maximum NR and NiR activity in the cotyledons was observed when seedlings were supplied with KNO3 as the sole source of nitrogen. When plants were supplied with NH4NO3 the presence of NH4+ in the induction medium repressed by about 50 per cent the activity of both reductases in the cotyledons. Addition of K+ to this medium abolished completely the inhibitory effect of NH4+. The effect of K+ cannot be replaced by that Na+ ions. On the other hand, ammonium has no effect on the level of NR activity in roots, while NiR was almost completely repressed. Under the experimental conditions ammonium, in the presence of nitrates, decreased the activity of GDH, but this diminution did not occur when the plants were supplied with K+ simultaneously. It has found that NH4+ ions reduced NO3- absorption but at the same time, the ratio of NO3- absorbed to that reduced was increased more than twice. The presumable mechanism of these phenomena is discussed.

  8. Increasing wheat production while decreasing nitrogen losses from ammonium bicarbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of a 4-year field experiment were i) to investigate the effects of rate and timing of application of ammonium bicarbonate on N-uptake efficiency by irrigated winter wheat, ii) to determine the fate of fertilizer N in wheat followed by maize, and iii) to study nitrate dynamics in the soil after N-fertilizer application to evaluate groundwater pollution by leaching. Nitrogen-application rates significantly affected wheat grain yields and straw dry matter. Grain yields were higher with 150 than with 225 kg N ha-1, whereas the highest fractional recoveries of N from ammonium bicarbonate occurred with 75 kg N ha-1 (38.5% in 1994-95 and 33.5% in 1996-97). On the basis of grain yield, N recovery and soil-N balance, ammonium bicarbonate at 150 kg N ha-1, was the optimum rate, when applied basally and as a top dressing to wheat. Subsequent yields of maize stover and grain were affected by N applied to the wheat, suggesting that fertilizer recommendations, in terms of rate and timing, should be made on the basis of effects on the cropping rotation as a whole. Water-holding capacity of the soil was poor, therefore large applications of N are likely to cause nitrate pollution of ground water. (author)

  9. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation. PMID:27088325

  10. Study of the ion-channel behavior on glassy carbon electrode supported bilayer lipid membranes stimulated by perchlorate anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhiquan; Shi, Jun; Huang, Weimin, E-mail: huangwm@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a kind of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) layer membranes was supported on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). We studied the ion channel behavior of the supported bilayer lipid membrane by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SCEM) in tris(2,2′-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) solution. Perchlorate anion was used as a presence of stimulus and ruthenium(II) complex cations as the probing ions for the measurement of SECM, the lipid membrane channel was opened and exhibited the behavior of distinct SECM positive feedback curve. The channel was in a closed state in the absence of perchlorate anions while reflected the behavior of SECM negative feedback curve. The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected and it was dependant on the potential of SECM. - Highlights: • The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected. • Dynamic investigations of ion-channel behavior of supported bilayer lipid membranes by scanning electrochemical microscopy • A novel way to explore the interaction between molecules and supported bilayer lipid membranes.

  11. Study of the ion-channel behavior on glassy carbon electrode supported bilayer lipid membranes stimulated by perchlorate anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a kind of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) layer membranes was supported on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). We studied the ion channel behavior of the supported bilayer lipid membrane by scanning electrochemical microscopy (SCEM) in tris(2,2′-bipyridine) ruthenium(II) solution. Perchlorate anion was used as a presence of stimulus and ruthenium(II) complex cations as the probing ions for the measurement of SECM, the lipid membrane channel was opened and exhibited the behavior of distinct SECM positive feedback curve. The channel was in a closed state in the absence of perchlorate anions while reflected the behavior of SECM negative feedback curve. The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected and it was dependant on the potential of SECM. - Highlights: • The rates of electron transfer reaction in the lipid membranes surface were detected. • Dynamic investigations of ion-channel behavior of supported bilayer lipid membranes by scanning electrochemical microscopy • A novel way to explore the interaction between molecules and supported bilayer lipid membranes

  12. The Comparison of Ammonium or Nitrate-Grown Lettuce and Spinach in a Hydroponic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. R. Roosta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Most plant species are sensitive to high ammonium concentrations. In this experiment the sensitivity of lettuce and spinach to ammonium was investigated. In a factorial experiment with framework of a completely randomized design with two factors, nitrogen form (ammonium and nitrate and plant species (lettuce and spinach, and three replications seeds were germinated in a mixture of perlite, sand and clay in soil-maid pots. After two weeks, the seedlings at two true-leaf stage were then transferred to buckets containing 4 L of aerated nutrient solution. The four plants were growing together. The treatments were ammonium and nitrate at 5 mM. In comparison to nitrate, ammonium reduced the growth of both species. Concentration of K, Mg, and Na decreased with ammonium in both species. The reduction of K and Mg concentrations in ammonium-fed plants may have a role in ammonium toxicity. Ammonium nutrition of both species caused an increase in P at roots and shoots. Higher P content at ammonium-fed lettuce and spinach plants may be due to creation of cations and anions balance in plants. Chlorophyll a and b were higher in ammonium-fed than nitrate-fed plants.

  13. Concurrence of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation and Organotrophic Denitrification in Presence of p-Cresol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Blanco, G; Cervantes, F J; Beristain-Cardoso, R; Gómez, J

    2015-08-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the capacity of anaerobic granular sludge for oxidizing ammonium and p-cresol with nitrate as terminal electron acceptor. Kinetics for the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium and p-cresol is described in this paper. The phenolic compound was very efficiently consumed, achieving 65 % of mineralization. Ammonium and nitrate were also consumed at 83 and 92 %, respectively, being the main product N2. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation was promoted owing to accumulation of nitrite, and it allowed the synergy of anaerobic ammonium oxidation and organotrophic denitrification for the simultaneous removal of ammonium, nitrate, and p-cresol. A carbonaceous intermediate partially identified was transiently accumulated, and it transitorily truncated the respiratory process of denitrification. These experimental results might be considered for defining strategies in order to remove nitrate, ammonium, and phenolic compounds from wastewaters. PMID:26062920

  14. Selective Anion Exchange Resins for the Removal of Perchlorate [(CIO{sub 4}{sup -})] from Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, B.

    1999-05-20

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate a novel bifunctional anion exchange resin for the cost-effective, in situ treatment of groundwater contaminated with perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}). Both laboratory and field studies were performed to determine the selectivity and capacity of the bifunctional synthetic resins to sorb ClO{sub 4}{sup -} from simulated or actual contaminated groundwater. A number of synthetic bifunctional resins, including two commercial versions made by Purolite International and three commercially available, mono-functional resins, were tested. Initial laboratory batch and column breakthrough studies determined the best synthetic resins and the optimal conditions for the field experiment. Laboratory results indicated that the bifunctional synthetic resins, D-3696 and RO-02-119 were highly selective toward ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and performed {approx}5 times better than the best commercial nitrate resin (Purolite{reg_sign} A-520E) and more than an order of magnitude better than some nonselective commercial resins (e.g. Amberlite{reg_sign} IRA-900). The bifunctional resins were particularly effective in removing trace quantities of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} in groundwater to below the detection limit ({approx} 3 {micro}g/L). A field trial demonstrated that the bifunctional resin (D-3696) was able to treat {approx} 110,000 bed volumes of groundwater before a 10% breakthrough of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} occurred under the column flow-through conditions (running at {approx} 2 bed volumes per minute). On the other hand, the Purolite{reg_sign} A-520E resin was able to treat {approx} 23,000 bed volumes of groundwater under the same experimental conditions. No pretreatment was needed to remove either dissolved organic matter or other competing anions (such as SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} or NO{sub 3}{sup -}) in the groundwater, and the treatment process did not alter the water quality by removing or adding secondary by-products because of the high selectivity of the

  15. Soil, plant, and terrain effects on natural perchlorate distribution in a desert landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraski, Brian J.; Jackson, W.A.; Welborn, Toby L.; Böhlke, John Karl; Sevanthi, Ritesh; Stonestrom, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4−) is a contaminant that occurs naturally throughout the world, but little is known about its distribution and interactions in terrestrial ecosystems. The objectives of this Amargosa Desert, Nevada study were to determine (i) the local-scale distribution of shallow-soil (0–30 cm) ClO4− with respect to shrub proximity (far and near) in three geomorphic settings (shoulder slope, footslope, and valley floor); (ii) the importance of soil, plant, and terrain variables on the hillslope-distribution of shallow-soil and creosote bush [Larrea tridentata (Sessé & Moc. ex DC.) Coville] ClO4−; and (iii) atmospheric (wet plus dry, including dust) deposition of ClO4− in relation to soil and plant reservoirs and cycling. Soil ClO4− ranged from 0.3 to 5.0 μg kg−1. Within settings, valley floor ClO4− was 17× less near shrubs due in part to enhanced leaching, whereas shoulder and footslope values were ∼2× greater near shrubs. Hillslope regression models (soil, R2 = 0.42; leaf, R2 = 0.74) identified topographic and soil effects on ClO4− deposition, transport, and cycling. Selective plant uptake, bioaccumulation, and soil enrichment were evidenced by leaf ClO4− concentrations and Cl−/ClO4− molar ratios that were ∼8000× greater and 40× less, respectively, than soil values. Atmospheric deposition ClO4− flux was 343 mg ha−1 yr−1, ∼10× that for published southwestern wet-deposition fluxes. Creosote bush canopy ClO4− (1310 mg ha−1) was identified as a previously unrecognized but important and active reservoir. Nitrate δ18O analyses of atmospheric deposition and soil supported the leaf-cycled–ClO4− input hypothesis. This study provides basic data on ClO4− distribution and cycling that are pertinent to the assessment of environmental impacts in desert ecosystems and broadly transferable to anthropogenically contaminated systems.

  16. Experimental evidence for supercooled brines, viscous liquids, and low temperature perchlorate glasses on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, J.; Catling, D. C.; Light, B.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of liquid water on the cold and dry surface of Mars is possible where concentrated salt solutions lower the freezing point of water. The eutectic temperature is the maximum equilibrium freezing point depression possible for a given salt solution, which ranges from near 0°C for carbonates and sulfates, to as low as -75°C for perchlorates. Although eutectic temperatures suggest a lower temperature limit for liquid water on Mars, salt solutions will typically supercool below their eutectic before crystallization occurs. We report on results investigating the magnitude of supercooling and its variation with salt composition and concentration for pure salt solutions and saturated soil solutions of MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, NaClO4, Mg(ClO4)2, and Ca(ClO4)2. We measured supercooling by monitoring solution temperatures during slow cooling and warming experiments. Our results indicate that supercooling is pervasive. Slowly cooled MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions typically supercool 5-15°C below their eutectic temperature before crystallizing. The addition of soil to these salt solutions has a variable effect on supercooling. Relative to the pure salt solutions, supercooling decreases in MgSO4 soil solutions, increases in MgCl2 soil solutions, and is similar in NaCl and NaClO4 soil solutions. Supercooling in MgSO4, MgCl2, NaCl, and NaClO4 solutions could marginally extend the duration of liquid water during relatively warm daytime temperatures in the Martian summer. Remarkably, we found that Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions never crystallize during slow cooling, but remain in a supercooled, liquid state until forming an amorphous glass near -120°C. Even if soil is added to the solutions, which will induce crystallization in most salt solutions, a glass still forms during cooling. The large supercooling effect in Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 solutions has the potential to prevent water from freezing over diurnal and possibly annual cycles on Mars. Glasses are

  17. Use of starch and potato peel waste for perchlorate bioreduction in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, Benedict C; Frankenberger, William T

    2005-07-15

    The cost of carbon substrates for microbial reduction of perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) is central to the success and competitiveness of a sustainable bioremediation strategy for ClO(4)(-). This study explored the potential application of starch in combination with an amylolytic bacterial consortia and potato peel waste for ClO(4)(-) bioreduction. We obtained a potent amylolytic bacterial consortium that consisted of a Citrobacter sp. S4, Streptomyces sp. S2, Flavobacterium sp. S6, Pseudoxanthomonas sp. S5, Streptomyces sp. S7, and an Aeromonas sp. S8 identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. ClO(4)(-) concentration substantially decreased in purified starch medium inoculated with the amylolytic bacterial consortium and Dechlorosoma sp. perclace. Potato peel waste supported ClO(4)(-) reduction by perclace with the rate of ClO(4)(-) reduction being dependent on the amount of potato peels. Over 90% ClO(4)(-) removal was achieved in 4 days in a single time point experiment with 2% (w/v) potato peels waste. ClO(4)(-) reduction in a non-sterile 0.5% potato peel media inoculated with perclace occurred with an initial concentration of 10.14+/-0.04 mg L(-1) to 2.87+/-0.4 mg L(-1) (71.7% reduction) within 5 days. ClO(4)(-) was not detected in the cultures in 6 days. In a non-sterile 0.5% potato media without perclace, ClO(4)(-) depletion occurred slowly from an initial value of 9.99+/-0.15 mg L(-1) to 6.33+/-0.43 mg L(-1) (36.63% reduction) in 5 days. Thereafter, ClO(4)(-) was rapidly degraded achieving 77.1% reduction in 7 days and not detected in 9 days. No susbstantial reduction of ClO(4)(-) was observed in the sterile potato peel media without perclace in 7 days. Redox potential of the potato peel cultures was favorable for ClO(4)(-) reduction, decreasing to as low as -294 mV in 24 h. Sugar levels remained very low in cultures effectively reducing ClO(4)(-) and was substantially higher in sterilized controls. Our results indicate that potato peel waste in combination with amylolytic

  18. Perchlorate in pleistocene and holocene groundwater in North-Central New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, L.N.; Böhlke, J.K.; Doughten, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Groundwater from remote parts of the Middle Rio Grande Basin in north-central New Mexico has perchlorate (ClO4-) concentrations of 0.12-1.8 ??g/L Because the water samples are mostly preanthropogenic in age (0-28 000 years) and there are no industrial sources in the study area, a natural source of the ClO4- is likely. Most of the samples have Br-, Cl-, and SO42- concentrations that are similar to those of modern bulk atmospheric deposition with evapotranspiration (ET) factors of about 7-40. Most of the ET values for Pleistocene recharge were nearly twice that for Holocene recharge. The NO3-/Cl- and ClO4-/Cl- ratios are more variable than those of Br -/Cl- or SO42-/Cl-. Samples thought to have recharged under the most arid conditions in the Holocene have relatively high NO3-/Cl- ratios and low ??15N values (+1 per mil (???)) similar to those of modern bulk atmospheric N deposition. The ??18O values of the NO 3- (-4 to 0 ???) indicate that atmospheric N0 3- was not transmitted directly to the groundwater but may have been cycled in the soils before infiltrating. Samples with nearly atmospheric NO3-/Cl- ratios have relatively high ClO4- concentrations (1.0-1.8 ??g/L) with a nearly constant ClO4-/Cl- mole ratio of (1.4 ?? 0.1) ?? 10-4, which would be consistent with an average ClO 4- concentration of 0.093 ?? 0.005 ??g/L in bulk atmospheric deposition during the late Holocene in north-central NM. Samples thought to have recharged underwetter conditions have higher ??15N values (+3 to +8 ???), lower N03-/Cl- ratios, and lower ClO4-/Cl- ratios than the ones most likely to preserve an atmospheric signal. Processes in the soils that may have depleted atmospherically derived NO3- also may have depleted ClO4- to varying degrees prior to recharge. If these interpretations are correct, then ClO4- concentrations of atmospheric origin as high as 4 ??g/L are possible in preanthropogenic groundwater in parts of the Southwest where ET approaches a factor of 40. Higher ClO4

  19. Inhibition of the Sodium-Iodide Symporter by Perchlorate: An Evaluation of Lifestage Sensitivity Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA originally released this document in draft form as supporting material for the Preliminary Regulatory Determination on Perchlorate (FR Notice) in October 2008. The document has since been revised in response to comments from independent external peer review. A copy of the PBP...

  20. INHIBITION OF THE SODIUM-IODIDE SYMPORTER BY PERCHLORATE: AN EVALUATION OF LIFESTAGE SENSITIVITY USING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODELING (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA first released this document in draft form as supporting material for the Preliminary Regulatory Determination on Perchlorate (FR Notice) in October 2008. The document has since been revised. The final report is available in response to comments from independent external pee...

  1. Comparison of Pumped and Diffusion Sampling Methods to Monitor Concentrations of Perchlorate and Explosive Compounds in Ground Water, Camp Edwards, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2004-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Denis R.; Vroblesky, Don A.

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory and field tests were conducted at Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation on Cape Cod to examine the utility of passive diffusion sampling for long-term monitoring of concentrations of perchlorate and explosive compounds in ground water. The diffusion samplers were constructed of 1-inch-diameter rigid, porous polyethylene tubing. The results of laboratory tests in which diffusion samplers were submerged in containers filled with ground water containing perchlorate, RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine), and HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) indicate that concentrations inside the diffusion samplers equilibrated with concentrations in the containers within the 19-day-long test period. Field tests of the diffusion samplers were conducted in 15 wells constructed of 2- or 2.5-inch-diameter polyvinyl chloride pipe with 10-foot-long slotted screens. Concentrations of perchlorate, RDX, and HMX in the diffusion samplers placed in the wells for 42 to 52 days were compared to concentrations in samples collected by low-flow pumped sampling from 53 days before to 109 days after retrieval of the diffusion samples. The results of the field tests indicate generally good agreement between the pumped and diffusion samples for concentrations of perchlorate, RDX, and HMX. The concentration differences indicate no systematic bias related to contaminant type or concentration levels.

  2. Start-up of simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfate from an anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process in an anaerobic up-flow bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory testing of simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfate (SRAS) was studied from an anammox process in an anaerobic bioreactor filled with granular activated carbon. Two different phases of experiment were investigated to start up the SRAS process, and final batch tests were performed to analyze the SRAS process. The experiment included an anammox process and an SRAS process. During the anammox process, the highest removal efficiency of ammonium and nitrite was up to 97 and 98%, respectively. After 160 days in the stationary phase of anammox process, the ratio of ammonium to nitrite consumption was approximately 1:1.15, which is much higher than 1:1.32 in the traditional anammox process. The extra electron acceptor, such as sulfate, was thought to react with ammonium by bacteria. Synthetic wastewater containing ammonium chlorine and sodium sulfate was used as the feed for the bioreactor in the second phase of experiment. During the SRAS process, the influent concentrations of ammonium and sulfate were controlled to be 50-60 and 210-240 mg L-1 respectively. After start-up and acclimatization of this process for 60 days, the average effluent concentrations of ammonium and sulfate were 30 and 160 mg L-1, respectively. The simultaneous ammonium and sulfate removal was detected in the reactor. In order to further validate the biochemical interaction between ammonium and sulfate, batch tests was carried out. Abiotic tests were carried out to demonstrate that the pure chemical action between ammonium and sulfate without microorganism was not possible. Biotic assays with different ammonium and sulfate concentrations were further investigated that high concentrations of ammonium and sulfate could promote simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfate. And elemental sulfur and nitrogen gas as the products measured in the SRAS process helped to demonstrate the occurrence of new interaction between nitrogen and sulfur. The new process of SRAS in the inorganic

  3. Influence of heterogeneous ammonium availability on bacterial community structure and the expression of nitrogen fixation and ammonium transporter genes during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouser, P.J.; N' Guessan, A.L.; Elifantz, H.; Holmes, D.E.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2009-04-01

    The impact of ammonium availability on microbial community structure and the physiological status and activity of Geobacter species during in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater was evaluated. Ammonium concentrations varied by as much as two orders of magnitude (<4 to 400 {micro}M) across the study site. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that ammonium influenced the composition of the microbial community prior to acetate addition with Rhodoferax species predominating over Geobacter species at the site with the highest ammonium, and Dechloromonas species dominating at sites with lowest ammonium. However, once acetate was added, and dissimilatory metal reduction was stimulated, Geobacter species became the predominant organisms at all locations. Rates of U(VI) reduction appeared to be more related to the concentration of acetate that was delivered to each location rather than the amount of ammonium available in the groundwater. In situ mRNA transcript abundance of the nitrogen fixation gene, nifD, and the ammonium importer gene, amtB, in Geobacter species indicated that ammonium was the primary source of nitrogen during in situ uranium reduction, and that the abundance of amtB transcripts was inversely correlated to ammonium levels across all sites examined. These results suggest that nifD and amtB expression by subsurface Geobacter species are closely regulated in response to ammonium availability to ensure an adequate supply of nitrogen while conserving cell resources. Thus, quantifying nifD and amtB expression appears to be a useful approach for monitoring the nitrogen-related physiological status of Geobacter species in subsurface environments during bioremediation. This study also emphasizes the need for more detailed analysis of geochemical/physiological interactions at the field scale, in order to adequately model subsurface microbial processes.

  4. Theoretical Study of Energetic Complexes (Ⅲ): Bis-(5-nitro-2Htetrazolato-N2)tetraammine Cobalt(Ⅲ) Perchlorate (BNCP) and Its Transition Metal (Ni/Fe/Cu/Zn) Perchlorate Analogues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚静; 张建国; 张同来; 黄辉胜; 张绍文; 舒远杰

    2012-01-01

    The geometric conformation and electronic structure of bis-(5-nitro-2H-tetrazolato-N2)tetraammine cobalt(Ⅲ) perchlorate and its Ni/Fe/Cu/Zn analogues are studied under the TPSS (Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria) levels of density functional theory in order to throw light on the relationship between their energy gaps and impact sensitivity While the perchlorate ions are coordinated with the copper cation, which is different from the other four compounds NBO (Natural bond orbital) analyses indicated that the metal-ligand interaction in the Co complex is covalent, while the others are ionic. The analysis of the electrostatic potential demonstrated that the O atoms from the nitro-tetrazole ring and perchlorate were primarily negative, while the other atoms were positive. The study was also conducted to gain a better understanding of the correlation of the energy gap and impact sensitivity.

  5. Regeneration of clinoptilolite zeolite used for the ammonium removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of zeolites has been increased in the last years with different applications and with a great boom in the environmental area, but a little had been make about the regeneration of such zeolites. The presence of nitrogen-ammonia in water may cause serious pollution problems since it results to be toxic for fishes and other aquatic life forms, also it provokes the algae growing. The natural clinoptilolite contains interchangeable ions such as the sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), magnesium (Mg2+) and calcium (Ca2+) in different proportions depending on the mineral origin When the zeolite is upgraded to its sodium form, the cation exchange capacity and the preference by the nitrogen-ammonia are increased, allowing the reversible process of sorption. In this work it was proposed the regeneration to its sodium form about the ammonia clinoptilolite zeolite. The natural mineral was characterized using the methods such as: X-ray diffraction, Infrared spectroscopy, Thermal gravimetric analysis and surface area. The results show that the ammonium sorption was between 95% and 98.7% such an ambient temperature as a flow back. the zeolite was regenerated approximately from 60% in the first cycle up to 97% in the last cycle at flow back temperature and of 59.2% up to 96.9% at ambient temperature, it was not presented any significant effect which could be attributed to the temperature. During the exchange process, the cations present in the natural zeolite were exchanged with the ammonium ions, this process was not completed due to that retained ammonium quantity was major that of the desorpted ions, what shows that in addition of ion exchange, another type of sorption process exists. (Author)

  6. The Properties of Ammonium Dinitramine (ADN): Part 2: Melt Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahma, A.; Edvinsson, H.; Östmark, H.

    2010-04-01

    A melt casting technique for ammonium dinitramine (ADN) and ADN/aluminum was developed. ADN proved relatively easy to cast, when 1% of magnesium oxide was used as a stabilizer and crystallization kernels. Densities of ADN/MgO 99/1 were 92 to 97% of theoretical mean density (TMD) and those of ADN/Al/MgO 64/35/1 were between 95 and 99% of TMD. Sedimentation of Al in the melt was prevented and the particle wetting was ensured by selecting a suitable particle size for Al. No gelling agents or other additives were used. The casting process and factors influencing it are discussed.

  7. Aluminum-silicates flotation with quaternary ammonium salts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王毓华; 胡岳华; 陈湘清

    2003-01-01

    The zeta potential measurements show that the flotation separation of diaspore from kaolinite, illite and pyrophyllite could be achieved in the range of pH 46.5 with cationic collectors. A special quaternary ammonium salts(DTAL) shows better selectivity than that the dodecyl amine(DDA) does for the flotation of three silicates. The closed-circuit flotation results show that the reverse flotation de-silicate can be achieved with DTAL as collector, a new inorganic reagent(SFL) as depressant and MIBC as frother to obtain a bauxite concentrate m(Al2O3)/m(SiO2)>10, Al2O3 recovery>86%).

  8. Further laboratory and theoretical investigations of ammonium dinitramide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulis, A.J.; Snelson, A. [IIT Research Institut, Chicago (United States); Heberlein, C.; Patel, D.L. [U.S. Army Cecom RD et E Center, NVESD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogen and deuterated ammonium dinitramide have been vaporized under high vacuum and the IR matrix isolation spectra of the decomposition products obtained. Tentative vibration assignments have been made for HN(NO{sub 2}){sub 2} and DN(NO{sub 2}){sub 2} assuming a symmetrical non-planar structure in which the H or D is bonded to the central nitrogen atom. Other structures are also possible. Ab initio calculations have been made for the various structural isomers of hydrogen dinitramide. Vibration frequencies calculated for the hydrogenated and deuterated species are compared with the experimental values with the object of identifying the molecules` structure. (authors) 3 refs.

  9. Surface energy and crystallization phenomena of ammonium dinitramide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teipel, Ulrich; Heintz, Thomas [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Chemische Technologie (ICT), PO Box 1240, D-76318 Pfinztal (Germany)

    2005-12-01

    Ammonium dinitramide (ADN) was characterized during recrystallization from the melt. The surface tension of molten ADN at 97 C was measured to be 89 mN/m. The wetting angles between molten ADN and different solid surfaces (polytetrafluoroethylene, glass, steel, and aluminum) were determined. The wettability depends on the surface tension of molten ADN, the free surface energy of the solid surfaces and the interfacial tension between the solid and liquid. Observations of the recrystallization behavior of molten ADN showed that nucleation does not occur, even at super cooling rates of 70 K. Crystallization can be initiated by the application of seed crystals. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Ammonium diamminesilver(I bis(5-chloro-2-hydroxybenzenesulfonate trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Peng Deng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of silver nitrate with 5-chloro-2-hydroxybenzenesulfonic acid in the presence of ammonia yielded the title salt, (NH4[Ag(NH32](C6H4ClO4S2·3H2O. The AgI ion shows linear coordination [N—Ag—N = 175.2 (1 °]. The ammonium and diamminesilver cations, the benzenesulfonate anion and the lattice water molecules interact through an intricate network of N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds to form a three-dimensional network.

  11. Molecular recognition of organic ammonium ions in solution using synthetic receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Späth

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium ions are ubiquitous in chemistry and molecular biology. Considerable efforts have been undertaken to develop synthetic receptors for their selective molecular recognition. The type of host compounds for organic ammonium ion binding span a wide range from crown ethers to calixarenes to metal complexes. Typical intermolecular interactions are hydrogen bonds, electrostatic and cation–π interactions, hydrophobic interactions or reversible covalent bond formation. In this review we discuss the different classes of synthetic receptors for organic ammonium ion recognition and illustrate the scope and limitations of each class with selected examples from the recent literature. The molecular recognition of ammonium ions in amino acids is included and the enantioselective binding of chiral ammonium ions by synthetic receptors is also covered. In our conclusion we compare the strengths and weaknesses of the different types of ammonium ion receptors which may help to select the best approach for specific applications.

  12. Optimized geometry, vibration (IR and Raman spectra and nonlinear optical activity of p-nitroanilinium perchlorate molecule: A theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Ömer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular modeling of p-nitroanilinium perchlorate molecule was carried out by using B3LYP and HSEH1PBE levels of density functional theory (DFT. The IR and Raman spectra were simulated and the assignments of vibrational modes were performed on the basis of relative contribution of various internal co-ordinates. NBO analysis was performed to demonstrate charge transfer, conjugative interactions and the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions within PNAPC. Obtained large dipole moment values showed that PNAPC is a highly polarizable complex, and the charge transfer occurs within PNAPC. Hydrogen bonding and charge transfer interactions were also displayed by small HOMO-LUMO gap and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP surface. The strong evidences that the material can be used as an efficient nonlinear optical (NLO material of PNAPC were demonstrated by considerable polarizability and hyperpolarizability values obtained at DFT levels.

  13. Synthesis of N-(3-(Dimethylamino)-2-(4-Ethoxyphenyl) Alllidene)-N-Methylmethanaminium Perchlorate by Willgerodt-Kindler Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Wei-min; WANG Xing-yong; YANG Hai-tao; SHI Gui-zhen; LI Feng

    2006-01-01

    Liquid crystals containing phenylpyrimidine units are the fascination condensed state of soft matter with unique electrical, optical and mechanical properties. In this paper, a novel and efficient route was reported for the synthesis of N-(3-(dimethylamino)-2-(4-ethoxyphenyl)allylidene)-N-methylmethanaminium perchlorate by the WillgerodtKindler reaction, which can be further applied to prepare liquid crystals containing phenylpyrimidine units. The product was confirmed by 1HNMR, MS, FT-IR and elemental analysis. The experimental conditions of the Willgerodt-Kindler reaction were also studied and the results show that the yield ofp-ethoxyphenyl-acetic acid increased remarkably with a reaction time up to 60 min, then decreased due to carbonization. On the other hand, the yield was also influenced by microwave power. It increased from 20.6 % to 78.8 % with a rise in the microwave power from 250 W to 450 W, but the product was carbonized at 640 W.

  14. Optimized pyroelectric properties of 0-3 composites of PZT particles in polyurethane doped with lithium perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploss, Bernd; Krause, Markus

    2007-12-01

    A substantial improvement in the performance of pyroelectric 0-3 composites of ceramic particles in a polymer matrix has been achieved by doping the polymer matrix material. Readily prepared and polarized films with various volume fractions of lead zirconate-titanate (PZT) particles in polyurethane have been doped in a solution of lithium perchlorate in acetone to increase the conductivity. With an appropriate conductivity, the dielectric permittivities of the ceramic particles and the polymer matrix become matched, resulting in an improvement of the pyroelectric coefficient from about 6 microC/(m(2)K) to about 50 microC/(m(2)K). The experimental results are explained by theoretical predictions. PMID:18276541

  15. Spectrophotometric determination of microamounts of thorium with thorin in the presence of cetylpyridinium chloride as surfactant in perchloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and more sensitive spectrophotometric method is developed for determination of thorium using thorin as a chromogenic reagent in the presence of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) in perchloric acid. The reaction was instantaneous and complex was found stable for 168 h. A significant bathochromic shift was noted in the presence of CPC. The determination range was enhanced from 25 to 30 μg mL-1 with molar absorptivity of 2.95 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1 at 25 ± 5 deg C. Sandell's sensitivity was calculated to be 6.8 ng cm-2 at 581 nm. Relative standard deviation was reduced from 4.25 to 2.5. The interference of Ni2+, Mn2+, Sn4+, phosphate, EDTA, sulphate and tartrate has been reduced significantly in the presence of surfactant. The validity of the proposed method was tested by determining thorium in Certified Reference Materials. (author)

  16. Thermal, optical, mechanical and electrical properties of a novel NLO active L-phenylalanine L-phenylalaninium perchlorate single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystals of L-phenylalanine L-phenylalaninium perchlorate (LPAPCl), a semiorganic nonlinear (NLO) material have been successfully grown up to a size of 14 mmx5 mmx3 mm. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals are determined by single crystal XRD. The UV-Vis-NIR spectrum of LPAPCl show less optical absorption in the entire visible region. Nonlinear optical study reveals that the SHG efficiency of LPAPCl is nearly 1.4 times that of KDP. The laser damage density is found to be 7.4 GW/cm2. The crystals are subjected to microhardness studies and the variation of the microhardness with the applied load is studied. The response of dielectric constant in the frequency region of 50 Hz to 5 MHz has been investigated. AC and DC conductivity and photoconductivity experiments are also carried out and the results are discussed.

  17. Solution enthalpy of lithium perchlorate in diethyl ether, acetone, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide and effects of cycloaddition reactions acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integral solution enthalpies of lithium perchlorate in diethyl ether, acetonitrile, acetone and DMSO at 298,2 K are determined calorimetrically; they are equal to -6.2, -9.1, -15.9 and -18.0 kcal/mol correspondingly. For diethyl ether dependence of integral solution enthalpy on salt concentration within the range from 3 x 10-3 up to 5,6 mol/l is determined. Reducing exoeffect of salt dissolution in the ether from -6 up to -5 kcal/mol in the range of small concentrations (3 x 10-3 - 3 x 10-2 mol/l), the constancy of the effect in the 5 x 10-2 - 1.3 mol/l range and following smooth reducing exoeffect up to -3.2 kcal/mol at salt concentration 5.6 mol/l is pointed out

  18. Novel perchlorate and phosphate salts of vinpocetine: Characterization, relative solid-state stability evaluation and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu-heng; Ge, Shu-wang; Wang, Wei; Zheng, Qiang; Zuo, Yun-wei; Zhong, Chang-jiang; Sun, Bai-wang

    2016-02-01

    Salt formation is a very common and effective method of improving a drug's physicochemical properties such as hygroscopicity and physical stability at different humidity conditions. Aqueous solubility is another important parameter that can be improved by salt formation; however this strategy has not yet been evaluated for the important alkaloid drug, Vinpocetine. A poorly water-soluble basic drug (water solubility value≈ 5 μg/ml and pKa value of 7.31), vinpocetine was converted into two novel salts in this work, with perchloric acid and phosphoric acid in a 1: 1 M ratio. However, an unexpected phase transformation occurred in one of the salts after the stability test, which is a major concern in studies on dosage form. The conversion of the salt to free base could be related to the temperature-humidity profile of the type II salt (formed by vinpocetine and phosphoric acid). When the temperature was more than 70 °C under high humidity conditions of more than 80%, the phase transformation occurred immediately. To gain further understanding of this phenomenon, single crystals of the two novel salts were prepared and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, Powder-XRD, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Constituents of the crystalline phase were also investigated in terms of Hirshfeld surface. The structures were found to be stabilized by H⋯H, C-H⋯O, O-H⋯N and C-H⋯π intermolecular interactions. Our stability studies showed that both these two novel salts could improve the stability of vinpocetine, however the type I salt (formed by vinpocetine and perchloric acid) offers more advantages. This finding will provide valuable information for vinpocetine dosage form development.

  19. Evidence for Perchlorates and the Origin of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons Detected by SAM at the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Freissinet, Caroline; Miller, Kristen E.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Brunner, Anna E.; Buch, Arnaud; Sutter, Brad; Archer, P. Douglas, Jr.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cabane, Michel; Coll, Patrice; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coscia, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Franz, Heather B.; Grotzinger, John P.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Martin, Mildred G.; McKay, Christopher; Ming, Douglas W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Pavlov, Alexander; Steele, Andrew; Summons, Roger E.; Szopa, Cyril; Teinturier, Samuel; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    A single scoop of the Rocknest aeolian deposit was sieved (less than 150 micrometers), and four separate sample portions, each with a mass of approximately 50 mg, were delivered to individual cups inside the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument by the Mars Science Laboratory rover's sample acquisition system. The samples were analyzed separately by the SAM pyrolysis evolved gas and gas chromatograph mass spectrometer analysis modes. Several chlorinated hydrocarbons including chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, a chloromethylpropene, and chlorobenzene were identified by SAM above background levels with abundances of approximately 0.01 to 2.3 nmol. The evolution of the chloromethanes observed during pyrolysis is coincident with the increase in O2 released from the Rocknest sample and the decomposition of a product of N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA), a chemical whose vapors were released from a derivatization cup inside SAM. The best candidate for the oxychlorine compounds in Rocknest is a hydrated calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2·nH2O), based on the temperature release of O2 that correlates with the release of the chlorinated hydrocarbons measured by SAM, although other chlorine-bearing phases are being considered. Laboratory analog experiments suggest that the reaction of Martian chlorine from perchlorate decomposition with terrestrial organic carbon from MTBSTFA during pyrolysis can explain the presence of three chloromethanes and a chloromethylpropene detected by SAM. Chlorobenzene may be attributed to reactions of Martian chlorine released during pyrolysis with terrestrial benzene or toluene derived from 2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide (Tenax) on the SAM hydrocarbon trap. At this time we do not have definitive evidence to support a nonterrestrial carbon source for these chlorinated hydrocarbons, nor do we exclude the possibility that future SAM analyses will reveal the presence of organic compounds native to the

  20. Shock Initiation and Equation of State of Ammonium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, David; Sheffield, Steve; Dattelbaum, Dana; Chellappa, Raja; Velisavljevic, Nenad

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is a widely used fertilizer and mining explosive commonly found in ammonium nitrate-fuel oil. Neat AN is a non-ideal explosive with measured detonation velocities approaching 4 km/s. Previously, we reported a thermodynamically-complete equation of state for AN based on its maximum density, and showed that near-full density AN did not initiate when subjected to shock input conditions up to 22 GPa. In this work, we extend these initial results, by presenting new Hugoniot data for intermediate density neat AN obtained from gas gun-driven plate impact experiments. AN at densities from 1.8 to 1.5 g/cm3 were impacted into LiF windows using a two-stage light gas gun. Dual VISARs were used to measure the interfacial particle velocity wave profile as a function of time following impact. The new Hugoniot data, in addition to updates to thermodynamic parameters derived from structural analysis and vibrational spectroscopy measurements in high pressure diamond anvil cell experiments, are used to refine the unreacted EOS for AN. Furthermore, shock initiation of neat AN was observed as the initial porosity increased (density decreased). Insights into the relationship(s) between initial density and shock initiation sensitivity are also presented, from evidence of shock initiation in the particle velocity profiles obtained for the lower density AN samples.

  1. Ammonium nitrate as an oxidizer in solid composite propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manelis, G. B.; Lempert, D. B.

    2009-09-01

    Despite the fact that ammonium nitrate (AN) has the highest hydrogen content and fairly high oxygen balance (compared to other oxidizers), its extremely low formation enthalpy and relatively low density makes it one of the worst power oxidizers in solid composite propellants (SCP). Nevertheless, AN has certain advantages - the combustion of the compositions containing AN is virtually safe, its combustion products are ecologically clean, it is very accessible and cheap, and also very thermostable (far more stable than ammonium dinitramide (ADN)). Besides, its low density stops being a disadvantage if the propellant has to be used in deep space and therefore, must be carried there with other rocket carriers. The low cost of AN may also become a serious advantage in the AN application even in lower stages of multistage space launchers as well as in one-stage space launchers with low mass fraction of the propellant. The main specific features relevant to the creation of AN-based SCPs with the optimal energetic characteristics are discussed. The use of metals and their hydrides and proper fuel-binders as well as the recent successes in phase stabilization of AN are described.

  2. Steroidal Ammonium Compounds as New Neuromuscular Blocking Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Zhigang; Hu, Hao; Tang, Jiazhi; Liu, Zhiying; Yang, Yue; Qiu, Guofu; Xiao, Yuling; Liu, Peng; Hu, Xianming; Zhou, Xiaoju; Hong, Xuechuan

    2016-05-01

    Neuromuscular blocking agents are widely used as an anesthesia auxiliary in surgery, which induce relaxation of skeletal muscles by blocking signal transmission at the neuromuscular junction. Many neuromuscular blocking agents s were developed over the past decades, but none of them fully meets the needs of the clinic by various reasons. In this study, a series of quaternary ammonium steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents were synthesized and evaluated on isolated mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragms for their bioactivities. The initial separation of mono- and bis-quaternary ammonium compounds turned out to be very challenging on regular silica gel chromatography. Therefore, a facile purification method, in which the silica gel was pretreated with methanolic sodium bromide solution, was finally achieved. Compounds 3g (0.36 μm) and 4g (0.37 μm) exhibited excellent neuromuscular blocking activities, which were about sixfold to sevenfold higher in potency than that of rocuronium (2.50 μm). In addition, other bis-quaternized compounds also showed good potencies close to that of rocuronium. Furthermore, the preliminary structure-activity relationship of this series was also elucidated. Benzyl group was found to be a promising quaternary group in this series. PMID:26684806

  3. Development of electrochemical denitrification from waste water containing ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors developed processes to dentrify waste water containing ammonium nitrate discharged from the nuclear fuel manufacturing works and to recover nitric acid and ammonia. For denitrification they applied the operating method and the conditions of operation to make 0.4mM or less from NH4NO3 waste water of 1.5 M by 3 stages of electrodialysis cells. To recover nitric acid and ammonium water, they separated HNO3 solution of 6 M and NH4OH solution with one unit of electrolysis cell, then absorbed NH3 gas from NH4OH solution with water and applied the condition of operation to recover 8 M NH4OH solution. The authors demonstrated that treatment and recovery can be carried out stably with actual waste water with a system through the combination of previously mentioned electrodialysis cells, electrolysis cells and an ammonia gas absorber. At present they are planning a plant where NH4NO3 waste water of 4,500 mol can be treated per day

  4. Influence of Ammonium Salts and Cane Molasses on Growth of Alcaligenes eutrophus and Production of Polyhydroxybutyrate

    OpenAIRE

    Beaulieu, M.; Beaulieu, Y.; Melinard, J.; Pandian, S.; GOULET, J.

    1995-01-01

    The production of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) by Alcaligenes eutrophus DSM 545 was studied in a synthetic medium with 3% glucose at pH 7.0 supplemented with several ammonium substrates and cane molasses. Growth was measured by dry cell weight, and the PHB content was measured by gas chromatography. The effects of ammonium sources such as sulfate, nitrate, phosphate, and chloride salts and those of different ammonium sulfate concentrations were evaluated. The best growth and PHB production were ...

  5. Effects of Calcium Lignosulfonate and Silicic Acid on Ammonium Nitrate Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ozan Gezerman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate salts are the most commonly used nitrogenous fertilizers in industry. However, storage of ammonium nitrate is problematic, since its initial properties can decline because of environmental factors, leading to large economic losses. In this study, in order to prevent the caking and degradation of ammonium nitrate, an alternative composition with additional calcium lignosulfonate and silicic acid was studied. The resulting fertilizer was analyzed by screening analysis, ion chromatography, and electron microscopy methods.

  6. Ammonium removal from municipal wastewater with application of ion exchange and partial nitritation/Anammox process

    OpenAIRE

    Malovanyy, Andriy

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen removal from municipal wastewater with application of Anammox process offers cost reduction, especially if it is combined with maximal use of organic content of wastewater for biogas production. In this study a new technology is proposed, which is based on ammonium concentration from municipal wastewater by ion exchange followed by biological removal of ammonium from the concentrated stream by partial nitritation/Anammox process. In experiments on ammonium concentration four the most...

  7. Influence of different ammonium, lactate and glutamine concentrations on CCO cell growth

    OpenAIRE

    Slivac, Igor; Blajić, Višnja; Radošević, Kristina; Kniewald, Zlatko; Gaurina Srček, Višnja

    2010-01-01

    In this study the effects of ammonium and lactate on a culture of channel catfish ovary (CCO) cells were examined. We also made investigation on the influence of glutamine, since our previous research revealed that this amino acid stimulated CCO cell growth more than glucose in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of ammonium in cell culture included the considerable decrease in cell growth rate with eventual growth arrest as well as the retardation of glucose consumption. At ammonium...

  8. Purification of uranium from fission products by ammonium uranyl carbonate precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of the oxalate filtrate generated in plutonium reconversion laboratory involves recovery of plutonium by uranous oxalate carrier precipitation and uranium by ammonium diuranate precipitation. The ammonium di-uranate precipitate generally carries most of the fission products which are high energy gamma emitters. Purification of uranium from the fission products has been investigated employing ammonium carbonate which dissolves the slurry and re-precipitates uranium as ammonium uranyl carbonate. Fission product decontamination factor has been evaluated, which indicate the possibility of 99.6% recovery and purification of uranium from fission products. This method simplifies the purification process with less man-rem exposure and high quality end product. (author)

  9. Interaction between Ammonium Toxicity and Green Tide Development Over Seagrass Meadows: A Laboratory Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marin, Francisco Moreno; Vergara, Juan J.; Pérez-Llorens, J. Lucas; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Brun, Fernando G.

    Eutrophication affects seagrasses negatively by increasing light attenuation through stimulation of biomass of fast-growing, bloom-forming algae and because high concentrations of ammonium in the water can be toxic to higher plants. We hypothesized nevertheless, that moderate amounts of nitrophilic...... by high ammonium availability although Ulva sp. lowered the availability of light. Benthic microalgae, which increased in biomass during the experiment, seemed to play a similar role as Ulva sp.–they contributed to remove ammonium from the water, and thus, aided to keep the ammonium concentrations...

  10. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by anammox bacteria in the Black Sea RID B-8834-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, MMM; Sliekers, AO; Lavik, G.; Schmid, M.; Jørgensen, BB; Kuenen, JG; Damste, JSS; Strous, M.; Jetten, MSM

    2003-01-01

    ). Here we provide evidence for bacteria that anaerobically oxidize ammonium with nitrite to N(2) in the world's largest anoxic basin, the Black Sea. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences shows that these bacteria are related to members of the order Planctomycetales performing the...... anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process in ammonium-removing bioreactors(3). Nutrient profiles, fluorescently labelled RNA probes, (15)N tracer experiments and the distribution of specific 'ladderane' membrane lipids(4) indicate that ammonium diffusing upwards from the anoxic deep water is consumed...

  11. Studies on Biquaternary Ammonium Salt Algaecide for Removing Red Tide Algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洁生; 张珩; 杨维东; 高洁; 柯琼

    2004-01-01

    The paper deals with the removal and control of red tide algae, Phaeoecystis globosa and Alexandrium tamarense by biquaternary ammonium salt algaecide. The results show that the efficient concentration of biquaternary ammonium salt to control the two algaes in 96 h is 0.8 mg · L-1 and 0.4 mg · L-1, respectively. It is found that biquaternary ammonium salt has high efficiency and longer duration of action in the removal and control of algae.Biquaternary ammonium salt might be an excellent algaecide to control HAB.

  12. Reduced blood flow increases the in vivo ammonium ion concentration in the RIF-1 tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Previous studies from our laboratory have suggested that pooling of ammonium in tumor tissues may be caused by its inefficient removal due to the poor vasculature commonly found in tumors. The purpose of these experiments was to validate the relationship between tumor ammonium ion concentration and tumor blood flow, and to determine whether large concentrations of ammonium ion detected by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are either produced within the tumor or simply imported into the tumor through the blood stream. Methods and Materials: To test this hypothesis, we reduced blood flow in subcutaneously grown Radiation Induced Fibrosarcoma-1 (RIF-1) tumors, either by creating partial ischemia with a bolus injection of hydralazine or by occlusion with surgical sutures. 14N and 31P NMR spectroscopy were used to detect the presence of ammonium, and to assess the bioenergetic status of the tumors, respectively. Results: A correlation between ammonium ion concentration and (PCr(Pi)) ratio was established for untreated tumors. An increase in the in vivo tumor ammonium ion concentration was observed for every tumor that experienced a reduction in blood flow caused by either hydralazine injection or suture ligation. Changes in ammonium ion concentration paralleled changes in the bioenergetics of hydralazine-treated tumors. Conclusion: Our results support the hypothesis that a reduction in tumor blood flow is responsible for the accumulation of ammonium in tumors, and that detected ammonium originated from within the tumor

  13. The perchlorate discharge test with {sup 123}I for the diagnosis of the Pendred syndrome in children; Der Depletionstest mit {sup 123}Iod zur Diagnose des Pendred-Syndroms bei Kindern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, K.; Fischer, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    The method for the diagnosis of the Pendred Syndrome in children by the Perchlorate discharge test using {sup 123}I is described. The older child, who has the Pendred Syndrome and the obligatory hearing deficit, frequently has neither a goitre nor hypothyroidism, but other investigations (bone growth, scars and function tests) can also show changes. However a more certain diagnosis of this disorder in children is possible by the perchlorate discharge test using {sup 123}I. (orig.)

  14. Ammonium sulphate on maize crops under no tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Anita Gonçalves da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work were to evaluate the management of N and S (as ammonium sulphate fertilization under no-tillage system on the components of maize productivity and on N and S accumulation in the crop, as well as to evaluate the minimum value of the Nitrogen Sufficiency Index (NSI 0.95 as an indicator for side dressing requirements. The experiment had a completely randomized block design with six treatments and four replications carried out in Red Latosol dystrophic soil (Hapludox, in Campo Mourão, Paraná State, where the following treatments in summer growth maize were applied: T1- 120 kg ha-1 N in seeding; T2- 120 kg ha-1 N in side dressing; T3- 40 kg ha-1 N in seeding and 80 kg ha-1 N in side dressing; T4- 30 kg ha-1 N in seeding and 90 kg ha-1 N in side dressing, monitored by a chlorophyll meter using the Nitrogen Sufficiency Index (NSI; T5- 120 kg ha-1 N anticipated in wheat seeding; T6- without nitrogen fertilization. NSI was determined by the relationship between the leaf chlorophyll index (ICF average of T4 plants and that one in the plot fertilized with 120 kg ha-1 N at the maize seed sowing (T1. During two years, ammonium sulphate was applied to the maize crop after wheat under no tillage system. In the first year, with adequate rainfall, the maize yield was similar to the one in which the complete ammonium sulphate dose application was done in maize seeding and side dressing. The anticipated fertilization to wheat seed sowing resulted in maize yield without difference from the parceled form. In the second year, with irregular rainfall, all treatments with N were similar and they increased maize yield compared to that without N fertilization. NSI of 0.95 was not efficient to evaluate maize N requirements in side dressing, and resulted in lower maize yield. N was accumulated mainly in the grains unlike S that accumulated in the plant shoots; both were highly correlated to maize productivity.

  15. Assessment of the potential for ammonium nitrate formation and reaction in Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two principal scenarios by which ammonium nitrate may be formed were considered: (a) precipitation of ammonium nitrate in the waste, and (b) ammonium nitrate formation via the gas phase reaction of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide. The first of these can be dismissed because ammonium ions, which are necessary for ammonium nitrate precipitation, can exist only in negligibly small concentrations in strongly alkaline solutions. Gas phase reactions between ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor in the gas phase represent the most likely means by which ammonium nitrate aerosols could be formed in Tank 241-SY-101. Predicted ammonium nitrate formation rates are largely controlled by the concentration of nitrogen dioxide. This gas has not been detected among those gases vented from the wastes using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. While detection limits for nitrogen dioxide have not been established experimentally, the maximum concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the gas phase in Tank 241-SY-101 was estimated at 0.1 ppm based on calculations using the HITRAN data base and on FTIR spectra of gases vented from the wastes. At 50 C and with 100 ppm ammonia also present, less than one gram of ammonium nitrate per year is estimated to be formed in the tank. To date, ammonium nitrate has not been detected on HEPA filters in the ventilation system, so any quantity that has been formed in the tank must be quite small, in good agreement with rate calculations. The potential for runaway exothermic reactions involving ammonium nitrate in Tank 241-SY-101 is minimal. Dilution by non-reacting waste components, particularly water, would prevent hazardous exothermic reactions from occurring within the waste slurry, even if ammonium nitrate were present. 41 refs

  16. Single stage biological nitrogen removal by nitritation and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in biofilm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmer, C; Tromm, C; Hippen, A; Rosenwinkel, K H; Seyfried, C F; Kunst, S

    2001-01-01

    In full scale wastewater treatment plants with at times considerable deficits in the nitrogen balances, it could hitherto not be sufficiently explained which reactions are the cause of the nitrogen losses and which micro-organisms participate in the process. The single stage conversion of ammonium into gaseous end-products--which is henceforth referred to as deammonification--occurs particularly frequently in biofilm systems. In the meantime, one has succeeded to establish the deammonification processes in a continuous flow moving-bed pilot plant. In batch tests with the biofilm covered carriers, it was possible for the first time to examine the nitrogen conversion at the intact biofilm. Depending on the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, two autotrophic nitrogen converting reactions in the biofilm could be proven: one nitritation process under aerobic conditions and one anaerobic ammonium oxidation. With the anaerobic ammonium oxidation, ammonium as electron donor was converted with nitrite as electron acceptor. The end-product of this reaction was N2. Ammonium and nitrite did react in a stoichiometrical ratio of 1:1.37, a ratio which has in the very same dimension been described for the ANAMMOX-process (1:1.31 +/- 0.06). Via the oxygen concentration in the surrounding medium, it was possible to control the ratio of nitritation and anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the nitrogen conversion of the biofilm. Both processes were evenly balanced at a DO concentration of 0.7 mg/l, so that it was possible to achieve a direct, almost complete elimination of ammonium without addition of nitrite. One part of the provided ammonium did participate in the nitritation, the other in the anaerobic ammonium oxidation. Through the aerobic ammonium oxidation into nitrite within the outer oxygen supplied layers of the biofilm, the reaction partner was produced for the anaerobic ammonium oxidation within the inner layers of the biofilm. PMID:11379106

  17. Effects of various iron hydroxides on burning rate of ammonium phercholate/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene composite propellants. AP/HTPB kei suishin'yaku no nensho sokudo ni oyobosu kakushu suisanka dai 2 tetsu no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, M.; Suzuki, M.; Hagihara, Y. (The National Defense Academy, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1992-12-25

    Researches are being moved forward on combustion catalysts for ammonium perchlorate/hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (AP/HTPB) composite propellants. The previous paper has reported that various iron oxide catalysts with the larger the specific surface area exhibit larger effect of increasing combustion rates. This paper investigates subsequently ferric hydroxides with still smaller specific surface area than iron oxides for their effects of increasing combustion rates when used as a catalyst. As a result, it was found that ferric hydroxide with the larger the specific surface area shows larger effects of increasing combustion rates as in iron oxides. Compared with iron oxide with the largest specific surface area of 22.8 m[sup 2]/g among the iron oxides used in the previous report, ferric hydroxide used in this experiment with more than four times as much specific surface area of 87 to 104 m[sup 2]/g showed larger effects. It was thought that specific surface areas govern the catalytic effect and accelerate thermal decomposition in solid phase. 6 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Growth and characterization of ammonium acid phthalate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, A.; Ramasamy, P.

    2013-04-01

    Ammonium acid phthalate (AAP) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The unit cell parameters were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and it belongs to orthorhombic system with the space group of Pcab. The high resolution X-ray diffraction studies revealed the crystalline perfection of the grown crystal. The various functional groups of AAP were identified by FT-IR and Raman spectral analyses. Thermal stability of the grown crystals was studied by TGA/DTA. The optical properties of the grown crystals were analyzed by UV-Vis-NIR and photoluminescence spectral studies. The mechanical property of the grown crystal was studied by Vickers microhardness measurement. The growth features of AAP were analyzed by chemical etching.

  19. Studies on a Cationically Modified Quaternary Ammonium Salt of Lignin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ai-li; JIANG Wen-ju

    2007-01-01

    A new quaternary ammonium salt monomer was synthesized and a quaternary amination of lignin( noted as QL),with the monomer was carried out by grafting copolymerization. The products were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy(FTIR). The experimental results indicate that the yield of the monomer was 99.06%, and the conversion of the monomer and the grafting yield of QL were 93.69% and 185.78%, respectively. The feasibility of QL as the fiocculant to be applied in color removal of five artificial dyes, eriochrome black T( dye A), gongo red( dye B), direct fast black G (dye C), cuprofix blue green B (dye D), and acid black ATT (dye E) was examined.Results show that QL exhibits the favorable flocculation performance and high stability.

  20. Computational Modeling of Degradation of Substituted Benzyltrimethyl Ammonium: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, H.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2014-09-01

    The degradation of cations on the alkaline exchange membranes is the major challenge for alkaline membrane fuel cells. In this paper, we investigated the degradation barriers by density functional theory for substituted benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA+) cations, which is one of the most commonly used cations for alkaline exchange membranes. We found that substituted cations with electron-releasing substituent groups at meta-position of the benzyl ring could result in improved degradation barriers. However, after investigating more than thirty substituted BTMA+ cations with ten different substituent groups, the largest improvement of degradation barriers is only 1.6 kcal/mol. This implies that the lifetime of alkaline membrane fuel cells could increase from a few months to a few years by using substituted BTMA+ cations, an encouraging but still limited improvement for real-world applications.

  1. Review of Options for Ammonia/Ammonium Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-06

    This report is a review of literature supporting practical ammonia/ammonium destruction processes. Melter research supporting Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass production has shown that significant amounts of ammonia will be in the melter offgas condensate. Further work with secondary waste forms indicates the potential need to remove the ammonia, perhaps by an oxidative process. This review finds likely practical chemical methods to oxidize ammonia in aqueous solution at moderate temperatures and atmospheric pressure, using easily obtained reagents. Leading candidates include nitrite oxidation to produce nitrogen gas, various peroxide oxidative processes, and air stripping. This work reviews many other processes and provides reasoning to not consider those processes further for this application.

  2. Hibiscus sabdariffa Affects Ammonium Chloride-Induced Hyperammonemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohamed Essa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hibiscus sabdariffa (HS is an edible medicinal plant, indigenous to India, China and Thailand and is used in Ayurveda and traditional medicine. Alcoholic extract of HS leaves (HSEt was studied for its anti-hyperammonemic and antioxidant effects in brain tissues of ammonium chloride-induced hyperammonemic rats. Oral administration of HSEt (250 mg kg−1 body weight significantly normalizes the levels of ammonia, urea, uric acid, creatinine and non-protein nitrogen in the blood. HSEt significantly reduced brain levels of lipid peroxidation products such as thiobarbituric acid and reactive substances (TBARS and hydroperoxides (HP. However, the administered extract significantly increased the levels of antioxidants such as catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx and reduced glutathione (GSH in brain tissues of hyperammonemic rats. This investigation demonstrates significant anti-hyperammonemic and antioxidant activity of HS.

  3. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel); Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry (Israel); Domb, Abraham J., E-mail: avid@ekmd.huji.ac.i [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine (Israel)

    2010-02-15

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  4. Adsorption of anionic dyes on ammonium-functionalized MCM-41

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations were conducted in a batch reactor system to study the adsorption behavior of four anionic dyes (Methyl orange (MO), Orange IV (OIV), Reactive brilliant red X-3B (X-3B), and Acid fuchsine (AF)) on ammonium-functionalized MCM-41 (NH3+-MCM-41) from aqueous medium by varying the parameters such as contact time, initial dye concentration, pH and competitive anions. Dye adsorption was broadly independent of initial dye concentration. The intraparticle diffusion model was the best in describing the adsorption kinetics for the four anionic dyes on NH3+-MCM-41. The adsorption data for the four dyes were well fitted with the Langmuir model. The electrostatic interaction was considered to be the main mechanism for the dye adsorption. Finally, it was observed that the anion of soft acid inhibited the adsorption capacity significantly

  5. Spectrophotometric determination of boron in ammonium diuranate and interference studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes determination of boron in ammonium diuranate by spectrophotometry employing curcumin as a complexing agent after extraction of boron with 2-ethyl hexane 1,3 diol. Two diluents namely ethyl alcohol (EtOH) and N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) were investigated for the preparation of final solution. It was observed that the blank is less with DMF presumably due to higher extent of deprotonation of uncomplexed curcumin. The detection limits of method for 25 and 10 ml dilution are 20 ng and 10 ng respectively. Interference studies for several cation and anion species like Al, Cr, Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn, Mo, F, W, NO, and different amount of 10% EHD in CHCl3 are also discussed. (author)

  6. A facile synthesis of ω-aminoalkyl ammonium hydrogen phosphates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Bo Kong; Xiao Yong Zhou; Yang Yang; Xing Yi Xie

    2012-01-01

    A series of ω-aminoalkyl ammonium hydrogen phosphates were synthesized through a simple and efficient three-step method.The starting materials,ω-aminoalkyl alcohols (AC-n,with carbon number n =3,4,5,6),were amino-protected with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (Fmoc-Cl),followed by phosphorylation with POCl3 and deprotection in piperidine/DMF The structures of each intermediate and final product were confirmed by 1H NMR,FTIR and mass spectrum.The yield of each step was about 77-92%,with a total yield higher than 56%.This new method was superior in low-cost raw materials,mild reaction temperatures (0-25 ℃) and easy purification methods.

  7. Crystal structure of tris-(hydroxyl-ammonium) orthophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinemann, Malte; Jess, Inke; Boeckmann, Jan; Näther, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The crystal structure of the title salt, ([H3NOH](+))3·[PO4](3-), consists of discrete hydroxyl-ammonium cations and ortho-phos-phate anions. The atoms of the cation occupy general positions, whereas the anion is located on a threefold rotation axis that runs through the phospho-rus atom and one of the phosphate O atoms. In the crystal structure, cations and anions are linked by inter-molecular O-H⋯O and N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds into a three-dimensional network. Altogether, one very strong O-H⋯O, two N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds of medium strength and two weaker bifurcated N-H⋯O inter-actions are observed. PMID:26594525

  8. Ammonium derivatives of chromenones and quinolinones as lead antimicrobial agents

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shilpi Gupta; Seema Singh; Abha Kathuria; Manish Kumar; Sweta Sharma; Ram Kumar; Virinder S Parmar; Bharat Singh; Anjali Gupta; Erik Van Der Eycken; Gainda L Sharma; Sunil K Sharma

    2012-03-01

    A series of novel ammonium derivatives were synthesized and examined for their antimicrobial efficacy. Comparison of antimicrobial spectrum revealed that compounds 9, 11, 16 and 23 had strong potential against pathogens in vitro. Cytotoxicity results showed compound 9 to be least toxic, it is non-toxic to A549 and U87 cells in MTT assay and exhibits marginal toxicity (15-20%) to human erythrocytes at a concentration of 1000 g/ml as compared to 100% lysis of cells by 31.25 g/ml of the standard drug amphotericin B. This compound has MIC values in the range of 1.95-31.25 g/disc in DDA against different pathogens and may considered to be an important lead antimicrobial molecule for further exploration.

  9. Oxidation of alginate and pectate biopolymers by cerium(IV) in perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions: A comparative kinetic and mechanistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Ahmed

    2016-03-15

    The kinetics of oxidation of alginate (Alg) and pectate (Pec) carbohydrate biopolymers was studied by spectrophotometry in aqueous perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions at fixed ionic strengths and temperature. In both acids, the reactions showed a first order dependence on [Ce(IV)], whereas the orders with respect to biopolymer concentrations are less than unity. In perchloric acid, the reactions exhibited less than unit orders with respect to [H(+)] whereas those proceeded in sulfuric acid showed negative fractional-first order dependences on [H(+)]. The effect of ionic strength and dielectric constant was studied. Probable mechanistic schemes for oxidation reactions were proposed. In both acids, the final oxidation products were characterized as mono-keto derivatives of both biopolymers. The activation parameters with respect to the slow step of the mechanisms were computed and discussed. The rate laws were derived and the reaction constants involved in the different steps of the mechanisms were calculated. PMID:26794772

  10. Control of Sulfidogenesis Through Bio-oxidation of H2S Coupled to (per)chlorate Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregoire, Patrick [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Engelbrektson, Anna [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Hubbard, Christopher G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Metlagel, Zoltan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Csencsits, Roseann [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Auer, Manfred [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Conrad, Mark E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Thieme, Jurgen [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Northrup, Paul [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Coates, John D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-04-04

    Here, we investigate H2S attenuation by dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria (DPRB). All DPRB tested oxidized H2S coupled to (per)chlorate reduction without sustaining growth. H2S was preferentially utilized over organic electron donors resulting in an enriched (34S)-elemental sulfur product. Electron microscopy revealed elemental sulfur production in the cytoplasm and on the cell surface of the DPRB Azospira suillum. We also propose a novel hybrid enzymatic-abiotic mechanism for H2S oxidation similar to that recently proposed for nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The results of this study have implications for the control of biosouring and biocorrosion in a range of industrial environments.

  11. Tetracalcium phosphate composite containing quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate with antibacterial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lei; Weir, Michael D.; Limkangwalmongkol, Penwadee; Hack, Gary D.; Xu, Hockin H. K.; Chen, Qianming; Zhou, Xuedong

    2012-01-01

    Tooth caries is a carbohydrate-modified bacterial infectious disease, and recurrent caries is a frequent reason for restoration failure. The objective of this study was to develop a novel antibacterial composite using tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) fillers and bis(2-methacryloyloxy-ethyl) dimethyl-ammonium bromide, which is a quaternary ammonium dimethacrylate (QADM). QADM was synthesized using 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and 2-bromoethyl methacrylate and incorporated into a resin. The resin was filled with 40% TTCP and 30% glass particles. The following QADM mass fractions in the composite were tested: 0%, 6%, 12%, and 18%. Streptococcus mutans biofilms were formed on the composites and the colony-forming units (CFUs), metabolic activity, and lactic acid production were measured. The TTCP-QADM composite had flexural strength and elastic modulus similar to those of two commercial composites (p > 0.1). Increasing the QADM content in TTCP composite greatly decreased the bacteria growth and biofilm matrix production. There were significantly more dead bacteria with increasing QADM content. TTCP composite containing 18% QADM had biofilm CFU, metabolic activity, and acid production about half of those without QADM. Inversely linear relationships were established between QADM mass fraction and S. mutans biofilm CFU, metabolic activity, and acid production, with correlation coefficients R2 ≥ 0.98. In conclusion, TTCP-QADM composites were developed and the effect of QADM mass fraction on the antibacterial properties of the composite was determined for the first time. The novel TTCP-QADM composites possessing a strong antibacterial capability, together with calcium phosphate ion release and good mechanical properties, are promising for dental restorations to reduce biofilm growth and recurrent caries. PMID:22190356

  12. Use of ASP for Removal of Fluorine and Ammonium Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purified zeolites from Bayah, Lampung dan Tasik have been modified into microporous alumino-silico phosphate (ASP) which could be used as anion and cation exchangers. ASP has been prepared by mixing purified zeolites and ammonium dihydrogen phosphate in weight ratios of 1 :1, 1 :5 and 5:1. The materials have been characterized by XRF, XRD and TG. The ion-exchange experiments have been performed by batch method for various concentrations of 0.01, 0.04, 0.08, 0.2 and O,4 NF and NH4 ion. Column experiment has been performed for: 500 ppm of ion F ( 0,026 N) and 100 ppm (0.0055 N) of ion NH4 concentrations respectively, fed into 1 cm diameter column containing 3 g pure ion exchangers. From batch experiment the fluorine sorption increases following the increase the concentration and F could be adsorbed up to about 1.09 -9.17 eq/kg for in the range of concentration 0.01 - 0.08 N. For higher fluorine concentration, the fluorine sorption tends to fluctuate. The ammonium sorption experiments obtain similar results for purified zeolites and ASP. The ion could be absorbed up to about 1.09 - 14.24 eq/kg. In column experiment, 1 g ASP could absorb fluorine up to about 278,48 - 334,19 BV ( 900-1300 ml) at 50% BT, and absorb NH4 about 219.64 - 297.17 BV (850 -1150 ml) separately. These result shows that the ASP might be a potential material to be used for removal of ion F and NH4 from the waste generayed in the fuel element fabrication

  13. PCDD/Fs' suppression by sulfur-amine/ammonium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jian-Ying; Li, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Tong; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Buekens, Alfons; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2015-03-01

    Three distinct -S and -NH2 or NH4(+) containing compounds, including ammonium thiosulfate, aminosulfonic acid and thiourea, were studied as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) inhibitors. All these three -S and -N containing compounds tested show strong suppression of PCDD/Fs formation, especially for thiourea which has not been studied before. With a (S+N)/Cl molar ratio of only 0.47, thiourea could inhibit 97.3% of PCDD/Fs and even 99.8% of I-TEQ. At an unusually high de novo test temperature (650 °C), the PCDD/Fs' formation was still very low but also the inhibition capacity of thiourea was weak, with an efficiency of 59% for PCDD/Fs when with a (S+N)/Cl molar ratio of 1.40. The results also revealed that the inhibition capability of the combined -S/-NH2 or -S/NH4(+) suppressant was strongly influenced by both the nature of the functional group of nitrogen and the value of the molar ratio (S+N)/Cl. The amine functional group -NH2 tends to be more efficient than ammonium NH4(+) and within a certain range a higher (S+N)/Cl value leads to a higher inhibition efficiency. Moreover, the emission of gases was continuously monitored: the Gasmet results revealed that SO2, HCN and NH3 were the most important decomposition products of thiourea. Thiourea is non-toxic, environment-friendly and can be sprayed into the post-combustion zone in form of powder or aqueous solution. The cost of thiourea at least can be partially compensated by its high inhibition efficiency. Therefore, the application of thiourea in a full-scale incinerator system is promising and encouraging. PMID:25481352

  14. Leaching kinetics of malachite in ammonium carbonate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudenne, Paul D.; Olson, Ferron A.

    1983-03-01

    Leaching of malachite was conducted with ammonium carbonate as lixiviant and with temperature, lixiviant concentration, and particle size as variables. Two stages of reaction were found. In Stage I, the initial dissolution of malachite proceeds rapidly, but after about 10 pct reaction the rate is reduced by surface blockage due to the presence of a needle-structured intermediate, presumably Cu(OH)2. Subsequently, malachite and the intermediate dissolve concurrently. In Stage II, after 90 pct reaction, essentially all of the malachite has dissolved and only the intermediate remains. It dissolves in Stage II. The activation energy is 64 kJ/mole (15.3 kcal/mole) for Stage I and 75 kJ/mole (18 kcal/mole) for Stage II. The rate of reaction in Stage I is proportional to the reciprocal of particle size and is 0.8 order with respect to the concentration of ammonium carbonate. The structures of leaching residues were studied using a scanning electron microscope. The kinetic data (activation energy and entropy), particle size and concentration dependence, residue morphology, and general leaching behavior evident from microscopic monitoring during leaching were used to develop the geometric equation for leaching in Stage I. The equation, based on a heterogeneous reaction with geometric rate control, is: 1 - (1 - α 1/3 = K01/r0/[(NH4)2C03]0.8 exp(-64,000/RT)t. It was deduced that initial steps in reaction were: (1) release of Cu2+ from malachite; (2) initial complexing with ammonia to form Cu(NH3)2+; and (3) subsequent complexing to produce Cu(NH3){4/2+} which is stable in solution at pH 8.8, the buffered pH of reaction. Stage II appears to be a similar reaction except that the reaction obeys cylindrical geometry instead of spherical geometry as in Stage I.

  15. Photo-Fenton-like degradation of azo dye methyl orange using synthetic ammonium and hydronium jarosite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhihui [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Liang, Jianru [Department of Environmental Engineering, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Zhou, Lixiang, E-mail: lxzhou@njau.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2013-01-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydronium and ammonium jarosite could catalyze the oxidation of methyl orange in photo-Fenton-like process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxidation process is essentially heterogeneous, not homogeneous. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydronium jarosite has stronger reactivity than ammonium jarosite. - Abstract: Ammonium and hydronium jarosite were prepared by hydrothermal method with urea as the homogeneous precipitant. X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectrum, UV-vis spectra and fourier transform infrared spectrum were used to characterize the resulting products. The photodegradation efficiency of the prepared ammonium and hydronium jarosite was studied in a photo-Fenton-like process using methyl orange (MO) as target pollutant. The photocatalytic degradation of MO over synthetic ammonium and hydronium jarosite under various conditions, such as catalysts loading, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and initial pH, has been investigated. Results show that ammonium and hydronium jarosite have satisfactory photocatalysis effect in degradation of MO azo dye, and that the reactivity of hydronium jarosite toward the mineralization of MO was higher than that of ammonium jarosite. The novel ammonium and hydronium jarosite catalysts would be important for industrial applications due to their high photoactivity, little iron leaching and low cost.

  16. Ammonium across a Selective Polymer Inclusion Membrane : Characterization, Transport, and Selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casadella, Anna; Schaetzle, Olivier; Loos, Katja

    2016-01-01

    The recovery of ammonium from urine requires distinguishing and excluding sodium and potassium. A polymer inclusion membrane selective for ammonium is developed using an ionophore based on pyrazole substituted benzene. The interactions of the components are studied, as well as their effect on transp

  17. Temperature effects in the absorption spectra and exciton luminescence in ammonium halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warm-up behavior of the first maximum exciton absorption bands in ammonium halides is explored. Under phase transition occurs offset of bands, bound both with changing a parameter of lattice, and efficient mass of exciton. Warm-up dependency of quantum leaving a luminescence of self-trapped excitons in ammonium halides is measured. (author)

  18. Effects of Ammonium and Nitrite on Growth and Competitive Fitness of Cultivated Methanotrophic Bacteria▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nyerges, Györgyi; Han, Suk-Kyun; Stein, Lisa Y.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of nitrite and ammonium on cultivated methanotrophic bacteria were investigated. Methylomicrobium album ATCC 33003 outcompeted Methylocystis sp. strain ATCC 49242 in cultures with high nitrite levels, whereas cultures with high ammonium levels allowed Methylocystis sp. to compete more easily. M. album pure cultures and cocultures consumed nitrite and produced nitrous oxide, suggesting a connection between denitrification and nitrite tolerance.

  19. Alkali metal and ammonium chlorides in water and heavy water (binary systems)

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen-Adad, R

    1991-01-01

    This volume surveys the data available in the literature for solid-fluid solubility equilibria plus selected solid-liquid-vapour equilibria, for binary systems containing alkali and ammonium chlorides in water or heavy water. Solubilities covered are lithium chloride, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, rubidium chloride, caesium chloride and ammonium chloride in water and heavy water.

  20. Nitrogen removal by autotrophic ammonium oxidizing bacteria enrichment under anaerobic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsak (Lek Noophan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Sludge from an anoxic tank at the centralized wastewater treatment plant, Nong Khaem, Bangkok, Thailand, was inoculatedin an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR. The optimal compositions and operating conditions of the stock of autotrophic ammonium oxidizing bacteria medium were determined. The process of oxidizing ammonium with bacteria under anaerobic conditions is often referred to as the Anammox process (NO2- to N2 gas, using NH4+ as the electron donor and NO2- as the electron acceptor. The startup period for the anammox culture took more than three months. With ammoniumand nitrite concentration ratios of 1:1.38 and 1:1.6, the nitrogen conversion rate zero order. Fluorescent in situ hybridization(FISH was used to identify specific autotrophic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomonas spp., Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans, and Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis. Results from this work demonstrated a shift in the species of ammonium oxidizing bacteria from Nitrosomonas spp. to Candidati Brocadia anammoxidans and Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, with increased ammonium concentrations from 3 mM to 15 mM. Under NH4+:NO2- ratios of 1:1.38 and 1:1.6 the ammoniumoxidizing bacteria were able to remove both ammonium and nitrite simultaneously. The specific nitrogen removal rate of theanammox bacteria (Candidati Brocadia anammoxidans and Kuenenia stuttgartiensis was significantly higher than that of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomonas spp.. Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (Candidati Brocadia anammoxidans and Kuenenia stuttgartiensis are strict anaerobes.