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Sample records for aminobutyric acid

  1. Hydroxylated analogues of 5-aminovaleric acid as 4-aminobutyric acidB receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, U; Hedegaard, A; Herdeis, C

    1992-01-01

    The (R) and (S) forms of 5-amino-2-hydroxyvaleric acid (2-OH-DAVA) and 5-amino-4-hydroxyvaleric acid (4-OH-DAVA) were designed as structural hybrids of the 4-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) agonist (R)-(-)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [(R)-(-)-3-OH-GABA] and the GABAB antagonist 5-aminovaleric acid...

  2. Production of gaba (γ - aminobutyric acid by microorganisms: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Dhakal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB, which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods.

  3. Study on Processing Technology and Quality of Moringa oleifera leaves with y - Aminobutyric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain the high level of γ-aminobutyric acid Moringa oleifera leaves, Use 7% sodium glutamate solution to soak the fresh Moringa oleifera leaves, study effect of different treatment times and three different drying methods( hot air drying, vacuum freeze drying, shadow drying on the formation of y-aminobutyric acid and quality (total flavonoids, soluble sugar, amino acids, polyphenols, colorof dried Moringa oleifera leaves. The results indicated that shadow-dried Moringa oleifera leaves had the hightest retention of γ-aminobutyric acid, but its browning degree were not preferable, soluble sugar was damaged gravely, and its vulnerable to weather conditions. Vacuum freeze dried Moringa oleifera leaves had the hightest retention of flavonoids, polyphenols and amino acids. The y-aminobutyric acid content of Vacuum freeze dried and hot air dried Moringa oleifera leaves had no much difference. Hot air dried Moringa oleifera leaves browning degree were preferable, it’s had an moderate content of soluble sugar and amino acids, the short drying time is characteristics of this drying method.with the treatment time increased, the content of γ-aminobutyric acid and amino acids content first increased and then decreased. Flavonoids and polyphenols content first decreased and then increased. Soluble sugar content decreased. In summary, after soaking with 7% sodium glutamate solution for 10h, then dried by hot air drying(drying temperature of 60°C, was the most suitable way for industrial production of the high level of γ-aminobutyric acid Moringa oleifera leaves.

  4. EFFECT OF FOOD-MICROORGANISMS ON GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID PRODUCTION BY FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Hudec

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are nice targets in order to study γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA production that has been reported to be effective in order to reduce blood pressure in experimental animals and human beings. In this study, we aimed to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA production in aerobical and anaerobical conditions, using different sources of microorganisms. The highest selectivity of GABA from precursor L-monosodium glutamate (82.22% has been reported using of microorganisms from banana, and with addition of pyridoxal-5-phosphate (P-5-P. For augmentation of selectivity the application of the further stimulating factors of GABA biosynthesis is needed.

  5. Study on Process Parameters of Extraction of γ-aminobutyric Acid Instant Moringa oleifera Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiaokun, Fu; Suhui, Zhang; Neng, Liu; Jihua, Li; Shaodan, Peng; Changqing, Guo; Wei, Zhou

    2017-12-01

    To preliminary optimize the extraction of γ-aminobutyric acid instant tea powder from Moringa oleifera leaves,taking γ-aminobutyric acid Moringa oleifera leaves as raw material and pure water as extraction solvent and GABA content as the main evaluation index,the effects of extraction temperature, ratio of liquid to material and extraction time on biochemical components and sensory qualities of Moringa oleifera leaves extractor was studied by using one-factor-at-a-time experiment.The results showed shat the optimal extraction conditions for γ-aminobutyric acid instant tea powder were extraction temperature of 60 °C, material-to-water ration of 1:10 and extraction time of 40 min.

  6. The anticonvulsant gabapentin (neurontin) does not act through gamma-aminobutyric acid-B receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Mosbacher, Johannes; Elg, Susanne

    2002-01-01

    The actions of the anticonvulsant gabapentin [1-(aminomethyl)cyclohexaneacetic acid, Neurontin] have been somewhat enigmatic until recently, when it was claimed to be a gamma-aminobutyric acid-B (GABA(B)) receptor agonist acting exclusively at a heterodimeric complex containing the GABA(B(1a)) sp...

  7. Submerged fermentation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9 for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in central nervous system, and its application in drugs and functional foods has attracted great attention. To enhance production of y-aminobutyric acid, Lactobacillus rhamnosus YS9, a strain isolated from Chinese traditional fermented food pickled vegetable, was grown under submerged fermentation. Its cultivation conditions were investigated. When culture pH condition was adjusted to the optimal pH of glutamate decarboxylase activity, culture of Lb. rhamnosus YS9 in medium supplemented with 200 mM of monosodium glutamate and 200 µM of pyridoxal phosphate (PLP, produced 187 mM of GABA.

  8. Detection of the in vivo conversion of 2-pyrrolidinone to gamma-aminobutyric acid in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callery, P S; Stogniew, M; Geelhaar, L A

    1979-01-01

    Labeled gamma-aminobutyric acid was detected in mouse brain following intravenous injections of deuterium labeled 2-pyrrolidinone. [2H6]Pyrrolidinone was prepared by the reduction of [2H4]succinimide with lithium aluminum deuteride. Quantification was accomplished by a gas chromatography mass spectrometry assay method. gamma-Aminobutyric acid and internal standard, 5-aminovaleric acid, were converted to volatile derivatives by treatment with N,N-dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal. Quantitative estimates were derived from peak area measurements obtained from monitoring the parent ions of the gamma-aminobutyric acid and internal standard derivatives by repetitive scanning during the GC run. The conversion of pyrrolidinone to gamma-aminobutyric acid may provide a method for labeling central gamma-aminobutyric acid pools.

  9. The gamma-aminobutyric acid shunt contributes to closing the tricarboxylic acid cycle in Synechocystis sp PCC 6803

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, W; Brune, D; Vermaas, WFJ

    2014-07-16

    A traditional 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is missing in the cyanobacterial tricarboxylic acid cycle. To determine pathways that convert 2-oxoglutarate into succinate in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a series of mutant strains, Delta sll1981, Delta slr0370, Delta slr1022 and combinations thereof, deficient in 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase (Sll1981), succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Slr0370), and/or in gamma-aminobutyrate metabolism (Slr1022) were constructed. Like in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, N-acetylornithine aminotransferase, encoded by slr1022, was shown to also function as gamma-aminobutyrate aminotransferase, catalysing gamma-aminobutyrate conversion to succinic semialdehyde. As succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase converts succinic semialdehyde to succinate, an intact gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is present in Synechocystis. The Delta sll1981 strain, lacking 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase, exhibited a succinate level that was 60% of that in wild type. However, the succinate level in the Delta slr1022 and Delta slr0370 strains and the Delta sll1981/Delta slr1022 and Delta sll1981/Delta slr0370 double mutants was reduced to 20-40% of that in wild type, suggesting that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt has a larger impact on metabolite flux to succinate than the pathway via 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase. C-13-stable isotope analysis indicated that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt catalysed conversion of glutamate to succinate. Independent of the 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase bypass, the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is a major contributor to flux from 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate to succinate in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  10. Hydroxylated analogues of 5-aminovaleric acid as 4-aminobutyric acidB receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, U; Hedegaard, A; Herdeis, C

    1992-01-01

    The (R) and (S) forms of 5-amino-2-hydroxyvaleric acid (2-OH-DAVA) and 5-amino-4-hydroxyvaleric acid (4-OH-DAVA) were designed as structural hybrids of the 4-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) agonist (R)-(-)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [(R)-(-)-3-OH-GABA] and the GABAB antagonist 5-aminovaleric acid...... (DAVA). (S)-(-)-2-OH-DAVA and (R)-(-)-4-OH-DAVA showed a moderately potent affinity for GABAB receptor sites in rat brain and showed GABAB antagonist effects in a guinea pig ileum preparation. The respective enantiomers, (R)-(+)-2-OH-DAVA and (S)-(+)-4-OH-DAVA, were markedly weaker in both test systems......-DAVA can be superimposed. These conformations may reflect the shapes adopted by these conformationally flexible compounds during their interaction with GABAB receptors. The present studies emphasize the similar, but distinct, constraints imposed on agonists and antagonists for GABAB receptors....

  11. Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration is associated with physical disability in progressive multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanky, Bhavana S.; Muhlert, Nils; Tur, Carmen; Edden, Richard A. E.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.; Miller, David H.; Thompson, Alan J.; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is thought to be the major cause of ongoing, irreversible disability in progressive stages of multiple sclerosis. Gamma-aminobutyric acid is the principle inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aims of this study were to investigate if gamma-aminobutyric acid levels (i) are abnormal in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis compared with healthy controls; and (ii) correlate with physical and cognitive performance in this patient population. Thirty patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and 17 healthy control subjects underwent single-voxel MEGA-PRESS (MEscher-GArwood Point RESolved Spectroscopy) magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T, to quantify gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the prefrontal cortex, right hippocampus and left sensorimotor cortex. All subjects were assessed clinically and underwent a cognitive assessment. Multiple linear regression models were used to compare differences in gamma-aminobutyric acid concentrations between patients and controls adjusting for age, gender and tissue fractions within each spectroscopic voxel. Regression was used to examine the relationships between the cognitive function and physical disability scores specific for these regions with gamma-aminobuytric acid levels, adjusting for age, gender, and total N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamine-glutamate complex levels. When compared with controls, patients performed significantly worse on all motor and sensory tests, and were cognitively impaired in processing speed and verbal memory. Patients had significantly lower gamma-aminobutyric acid levels in the hippocampus (adjusted difference = −0.403 mM, 95% confidence intervals −0.792, −0.014, P = 0.043) and sensorimotor cortex (adjusted difference = −0.385 mM, 95% confidence intervals −0.667, −0.104, P = 0.009) compared with controls. In patients, reduced motor function in the right upper and lower limb was associated with lower gamma-aminobutyric acid

  12. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) oral rinse reduces capsaicin-induced burning mouth pain sensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Kelun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In burning mouth patients, analgesia after oral administration of clonazepam may result from modulation of peripheral γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. METHODS: The effect of oral administration of test solutions (water, 0.5 mol/L or 0.05 mol/L GABA, 1% lidocaine) was investigated...

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in β-aminobutyric acid enhanced Arabidopsis thaliana tolerance to simulated acid rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingwu; Jiang, Xinwu; Shi, Wuliang; Chen, Juan; Pei, Zhenming; Zheng, Hailei

    2011-05-01

    Acid rain is a worldwide environmental issue that has seriously destroyed forest ecosystems. As a highly effective and broad-spectrum plant resistance-inducing agent, β-aminobutyric acid could elevate the tolerance of Arabidopsis when subjected to simulated acid rain. Using comparative proteomic strategies, we analyzed 203 significantly varied proteins of which 175 proteins were identified responding to β-aminobutyric acid in the absence and presence of simulated acid rain. They could be divided into ten groups according to their biological functions. Among them, the majority was cell rescue, development and defense-related proteins, followed by transcription, protein synthesis, folding, modification and destination-associated proteins. Our conclusion is β-aminobutyric acid can lead to a large-scale primary metabolism change and simultaneously activate antioxidant system and salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid signaling pathways. In addition, β-aminobutyric acid can reinforce physical barriers to defend simulated acid rain stress. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. (QTLs) for γ- aminobutyric acid content in grain of barley

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... by glutamate decarboxylase, a calcium/calmodulin- dependent enzyme, and acts as a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (Krnjevic,. 1974; Mazzucotelli et al., 2006). Cold acclimation causes a significant increase in amino acid pools and induces the expression of the GABA-shunt ...

  15. Synthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid analogs based on carbohydrate scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ming; Meng, Xiang-Bao; Li, Zhong-Jun

    2010-06-16

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid analogs based on sugar scaffolds were prepared in six to nine steps starting from D-glucal and D-galactal. The key step in the synthesis is the Vilsmeier-Haack reaction that affords the corresponding 2-C-formyl glycal on treatment with DMF and POCl(3). Oxidation of the aldehyde and reduction of the 4-azido group provided the corresponding GABA analog. Acylamide and tetrazole analogs were also prepared as the bioisosteres of the carboxylic acid. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Highly Atom Economic Synthesis of d?2?Aminobutyric Acid through an In?Vitro Tri?enzymatic Catalytic System

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xi; Cui, Yunfeng; Cheng, Xinkuan; Feng, Jinhui; Wu, Qiaqing; Zhu, Dunming

    2017-01-01

    Abstract d?2?Aminobutyric acid is an unnatural amino acid serving as an important intermediate in pharmaceutical production. Developing a synthetic method that uses cheaper starting materials and produces less by?product is a pressing demand. A tri?enzymatic catalytic system, which is composed of l?threonine ammonia lyase (l?TAL), d?amino acid dehydrogenase (d?AADH), and formate dehydrogenase (FDH), has thus been developed for the synthesis of d?2?aminobutyric acid with high optical purity. I...

  17. Mass fragmentographic quantitation of glutamic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid in cerebellar nuclei and sympathetic ganglia of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilsson, L; Costa, E

    1976-04-07

    A method for the simultaneous quantitation of glutamic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in tissue by mass fragmentography has been developed. The amino and carboxylic groups of the two amino acids were in a convenient one-step reaction derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride and hexafluoroisopropanol. Deuterium-labeled glutamic acid and GABA and a homologue of GABA have been used as internal standards. The usefulness of the technique has been demonstrated by measurements in parts of rat cerebellum and in the superior cervical ganglion.

  18. Design and Mechanism of Tetrahydrothiophene-Based γ-Aminobutyric Acid Aminotransferase Inactivators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Hoang V. [Departments; Hawker, Dustin D. [Departments; Wu, Rui [Department; Doud, Emma [Departments; Widom, Julia [Departments; Sanishvili, Ruslan [X-ray; Liu, Dali [Department; Kelleher, Neil L. [Departments; Silverman, Richard B. [Departments

    2015-03-25

    Low levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), one of two major neurotransmitters that regulate brain neuronal activity, are associated with many neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinsons disease, Alzheimers disease, Huntingtons disease, and cocaine addiction. One of the main methods to raise the GABA level in human brain is to use small molecules that cross the bloodbrain barrier and inhibit the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT), the enzyme that degrades GABA. We have designed a series of conformationally restricted tetrahydrothiophene-based GABA analogues with a properly positioned leaving group that could facilitate a ring-opening mechanism, leading to inactivation of GABA-AT. One compound in the series is 8 times more efficient an inactivator of GABA-AT than vigabatrin, the only FDA-approved inactivator of GABA-AT. Our mechanistic studies show that the compound inactivates GABA-AT by a new mechanism. The metabolite resulting from inactivation does not covalently bind to amino acid residues of GABA-AT but stays in the active site via H-bonding interactions with Arg-192, a pi-pi interaction with Phe-189, and a weak nonbonded (SO)-O-...=C interaction with Glu-270, thereby inactivating the enzyme.

  19. Mass fragmentographic determination of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid in discrete amygdaloid nuclei of rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Matsumoto, T; Hirano, M; Kagoshima, H; Kuroki, T; Yao, H; Uchimura, H; Nakahara, T

    1987-06-01

    A mass fragmentographic method for the simultaneous quantification of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamic acid is described. In a convenient one-step reaction, the two amino acids were derivatized with pentafluoropropionic anhydride and pentafluoropropanol. The derivatization products were stable for several days. The technique has been applied to the assay of GABA and Glu in five amygdaloid nuclei of the rat brain. The GABA level was high in the central and medial nuclei, whereas the Glu level was high in the lateral and basal nuclei. The regional distribution of GABA was different from that of Glu within the amygdaloid nuclei.

  20. Optimizing soaking and germination conditions to improve gamma-aminobutyric acid content in japonica and indica germinated brown rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Xiang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, X.; Evers, J.B.; Werf, van der W.; Duan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Germinated brown rice is a well-known functional food due to its high content of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This study was designed to test the difference of producing GABA in two domesticated rice genotypes (indica and japonica rice), and the effects of adding exogenous glutamic acid or

  1. Application of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptor imaging for study of neuropsychiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Weiqi; Qiu Chun; Guan Yihui

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptors are heterogeneous polypeptide pentamers widely spread in the central nervous system on the neuron membrane. Different subunit combinations educe various neuro-inhibitory pharmacological effects such as sedative, hypnosis, anticonvulsion and anxiolysis. PET can be utilized to study the binding of the receptors in vivo. PET radioligands of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptors can be classified into 3 types: antagonists,agonists and reverse agonists, of which antagonist radiotracer 11 C-flumazenil is the most commonly applied in epilepsy, anxiety disorders, depression, vegetative state,addiction and other neuro-psychiatric disorders. (authors)

  2. Gamma-aminobutyric acid mediates nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco under flooding stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is a four-carbon non-protein amino acid conserved from bacteria to plants and vertebrates. Increasing evidence supports a regulatory role for GABA in plant development and the plant's response to environmental stress. The biosynthesis of nicotine, the main economically important metabolite in tobacco, is tightly regulated. GABA has not hitherto been reported to function in nicotine biosynthesis. Here we report that water flooding treatment (hypoxia markedly induced the accumulation of GABA and stimulated nicotine biosynthesis. Suppressing GABA accumulation by treatment with glutamate decarboxylase inhibitor impaired flooding-induced nicotine biosynthesis, while exogenous GABA application directly induced nicotine biosynthesis. Based on these results, we propose that GABA triggers nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco seedlings subjected to flooding. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanism of nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco plants exposed to environmental stress.

  3. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid on the Hering-Breuer inspiration-inhibiting reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, N P; Aleksandrov, V G; Ivanova, T G

    2010-02-01

    Acute experiments on rats were performed to study the effects of intraventricular microinjections of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the volume-time parameters of external respiration and the inspiration-inhibiting Hering-Breuer reflex. The state of this reflex before and after GABA administration was assessed in terms of the extent of changes in the duration and amplitude of inspiratory oscillations in intrathoracic pressure in response to end-expiratory occlusion of the trachea. Administration of 20 microM GABA into the lateral ventricles of the brain decreased the minute ventilation (due to reductions in the respiratory frequency and respiratory volume), weakened respiratory muscle contractions, and decreased the peak airflow rate on inspiration and expiration. The response to end-expiratory occlusion decreased significantly after administration of GABA, demonstrating the involvement of GABAergic mechanisms in mediating the inspiration-inhibiting Hering-Breuer reflex.

  4. Characterization of the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor system in human brain gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frattola, L.; Ferrarese, C.; Canal, N.; Gaini, S.M.; Galluso, R.; Piolti, R.; Trabucchi, M.

    1985-01-01

    The properties of [ 3 H]-gamma-aminobutyric acid [( 3 H]GABA) binding were studied in biopsied specimens from normal human brain and from 18 cases of human brain gliomas, made up of 6 astrocytomas, 6 glioblastomas, 3 oligodendrogliomas, and 3 medulloblastomas. In fresh membranes obtained from normal gray and white matter one population of Na+-dependent GABA receptors was observed, while in the frozen Triton X-100-treated membranes two distinct populations of Na+-independent binding sites were detected. Specific GABA binding sites in brain gliomas were shown only in frozen Triton X-100-treated membranes. As in normal tissue, these receptors are Na+-independent and bind [ 3 H]GABA with two distinct affinity components. The biochemical profiles of [ 3 H]GABA binding to membranes obtained from different tumors of glial origin are quite similar and cannot be related to the degree of malignancy of the neoplasia

  5. Cloning and characterization of a functional human ¿-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter, human GAT-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bolette; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Jensen, Anders A.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters act to terminate GABA neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. Intriguingly four distinct GABA transporters have been cloned from rat and mouse, whereas only three functional homologs of these transporters have been cloned from human....... The aim of this study therefore was to search for this fourth missing human transporter. Using a bioinformatics approach, we successfully identified and cloned the full-length cDNA of a so far uncharacterized human GABA transporter (GAT). The predicted protein displays high sequence similarity to rat GAT...... in human. Furthermore the availability of human GAT-2 enables the use of all human clones of the GABA transporters in drug development programs and functional characterization of novel inhibitors of GABA transport....

  6. Enrichment of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid in Bean Sprouts: Exploring Biosynthesis of Plant Metabolite Using Common Household Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanarata, Theerasak; Plianwong, Samarwadee; Opanasopit, Praneet; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait

    2018-01-01

    The enrichment of plant foods with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is currently an interesting issue in the field of nutraceuticals and can be used as an experiment for upper-division undergraduate students. Here, an interdisciplinary hands-on experiment to produce GABA-enriched mung bean sprouts using common household reagents is described. Based…

  7. Optimization of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 from Honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Tajabadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dominant strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from honey bees were evaluated for their γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-producing ability. Out of 24 strains, strain Taj-Apis362 showed the highest GABA-producing ability (1.76 mM in MRS broth containing 50 mM initial glutamic acid cultured for 60 h. Effects of fermentation parameters, including initial glutamic acid level, culture temperature, initial pH and incubation time on GABA production were investigated via a single parameter optimization strategy. The optimal fermentation condition for GABA production was modeled using response surface methodology (RSM. The results showed that the culture temperature was the most significant factor for GABA production. The optimum conditions for maximum GABA production by Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 were an initial glutamic acid concentration of 497.97 mM, culture temperature of 36 °C, initial pH of 5.31 and incubation time of 60 h, which produced 7.15 mM of GABA. The value is comparable with the predicted value of 7.21 mM.

  8. Novel fermented chickpea milk with enhanced level of ?-aminobutyric acid and neuroprotective effect on PC12 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wen; Wei, Mingming; Wu, Junjun; Rui, Xin; Dong, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, novel fermented chickpea milk with high γ -aminobutyric acid (GABA) content and potential neuroprotective activity was developed. Fermentation starter that can produce GABA was selected from 377 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional Chinese fermented foods. Among the screened strains, strain M-6 showed the highest GABA-producing capacity in De Man–Rogosa and Sharp (MRS) broth and chickpea milk. M-6 was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum based on Gram stai...

  9. Efficient increase of ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in tomato fruits by targeted mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Satoko; Arai, Chikako; Takayama, Mariko; Matsukura, Chiaki; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-proteinogenic amino acid that has hypotensive effects. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is among the most widely cultivated and consumed vegetables in the world and contains higher levels of GABA than other major crops. Increasing these levels can further enhance the blood pressure-lowering function of tomato fruit. Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is a key enzyme in GABA biosynthesis; it has a C-terminal autoinhibitory domain that regulates enzymatic function, and deleting this domain increases GAD activity. The tomato genome has five GAD genes (SlGAD1-5), of which two (SlGAD2 and SlGAD3) are expressed during tomato fruit development. To increase GABA content in tomato, we deleted the autoinhibitory domain of SlGAD2 and SlGAD3 using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas)9 technology. Introducing a stop codon immediately before the autoinhibitory domain increased GABA accumulation by 7 to 15 fold while having variable effects on plant and fruit size and yield. This is the first study describing the application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to increase GABA content in tomato fruits. Our findings provide a basis for the improvement of other types of crop by CRISPR/Cas9-based genetic modification.

  10. Enzymatic production of γ-aminobutyric acid in soybeans using high hydrostatic pressure and precursor feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Shigeaki; Katayama, Takumi; Watanabe, Takae; Nakajima, Kanako; Hayashi, Mayumi; Shigematsu, Toru; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    The effects were investigated of the glutamic acid (Glu) substrate concentration on the generation and kinetics of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in soybeans treated under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP; 200 MPa for 10 min at 25 °C). The conversion of Glu to GABA decreased with increasing initial Glu concentration in the soybeans. The crude glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) obtained from the HHP-treated soybeans showed substrate inhibition. The GABA production rate in the HHP-treated soybeans fitted the following substrate inhibition kinetic equation: v0=(VmaxS0)/(Km+S0+(S0)2/Ki). The Km value for the HHP-treated soybeans was significantly higher than that of the untreated soybeans. The Km values in this study show the affinity between Glu and GAD, and indicate that the HHP-treated soybeans had lower affinity between Glu and GAD than the untreated soybeans. GAD extracted from the HHP-treated soybeans showed a similar value to that in the HHP-treated soybeans. The intact biochemical system was so damaged in the HHP-treated soybeans that it showed substrate inhibition kinetics similar to that of the extracted GAD. The combination of HHP and precursor feeding proved to be a novel tool that can be used to increase the concentration of a target component.

  11. CHANGES IN SELECTIVITY OF GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID FORMATION EFFECTED BY FERMENTATION CONDITIONS AND MICROORGANISMS RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Kovalovská

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we observe the effect of fermentation conditions and resources of microorganisms for production of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. The content of produced GABA depends on various conditions such as the amount of precursor, an addition of salt, enzyme and the effect of pH. The highest selectivity of GABA (74.0 % from the precursor (L-monosodium glutamate has been determinate in the follow conditions: in the presence of pre-cultured microorganisms from Encián cheese in amount 1.66 % (w/v the source of microorganisms/volume of the fermentation mixture, after the addition of 0.028 % (w/v of CaCl2/volume of the fermentation mixture, 100 μM of pyridoxal-5-phosphate (P-5-P and the GABA precursor concentration in the fermentation mixture 2.6 mg ml-1 in an atmosphere of gas nitrogen. Pure cultures of lactic acid bacteria increased the selectivity of GABA by an average of 20 % compared with bacteria from the path of Encián.

  12. The effect of amino acid backbone length on molecular packing: crystalline tartrates of glycine, β-alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and DL-α-aminobutyric acid (AABA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losev, Evgeniy; Boldyreva, Elena

    2018-02-01

    We report a novel 1:1 cocrystal of β-alanine with DL-tartaric acid, C 3 H 7 NO 2 ·C 4 H 6 O 6 , (II), and three new molecular salts of DL-tartaric acid with β-alanine {3-azaniumylpropanoic acid-3-azaniumylpropanoate DL-tartaric acid-DL-tartrate, [H(C 3 H 7 NO 2 ) 2 ] + ·[H(C 4 H 5 O 6 ) 2 ] - , (III)}, γ-aminobutyric acid [3-carboxypropanaminium DL-tartrate, C 4 H 10 NO 2 + ·C 4 H 5 O 6 - , (IV)] and DL-α-aminobutyric acid {DL-2-azaniumylbutanoic acid-DL-2-azaniumylbutanoate DL-tartaric acid-DL-tartrate, [H(C 4 H 9 NO 2 ) 2 ] + ·[H(C 4 H 5 O 6 ) 2 ] - , (V)}. The crystal structures of binary crystals of DL-tartaric acid with glycine, (I), β-alanine, (II) and (III), GABA, (IV), and DL-AABA, (V), have similar molecular packing and crystallographic motifs. The shortest amino acid (i.e. glycine) forms a cocrystal, (I), with DL-tartaric acid, whereas the larger amino acids form molecular salts, viz. (IV) and (V). β-Alanine is the only amino acid capable of forming both a cocrystal [i.e. (II)] and a molecular salt [i.e. (III)] with DL-tartaric acid. The cocrystals of glycine and β-alanine with DL-tartaric acid, i.e. (I) and (II), respectively, contain chains of amino acid zwitterions, similar to the structure of pure glycine. In the structures of the molecular salts of amino acids, the amino acid cations form isolated dimers [of β-alanine in (III), GABA in (IV) and DL-AABA in (V)], which are linked by strong O-H...O hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the three crystal structures comprise different types of dimeric cations, i.e. (A...A) + in (III) and (V), and A + ...A + in (IV). Molecular salts (IV) and (V) are the first examples of molecular salts of GABA and DL-AABA that contain dimers of amino acid cations. The geometry of each investigated amino acid (except DL-AABA) correlates with the melting point of its mixed crystal.

  13. Growth, density functional theory (DFT) and spectral studies on L-2-aminobutyric acid -biologically active material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usha, C.; Santhakumari, R.; Meenakshi, R.; Jayasree, R.; Bhuvaneswari, M.

    2017-12-01

    Single crystal of L-2-aminobutyric acid (ABA) was grown from water by slow evaporation at room temperature. The crystalline nature of the grown crystal was confirmed using powder X-ray diffraction studies. The grown crystal was subjected to FT-IR, FT-Raman, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral analyses to confirm the presence of functional group and molecular structure respectively. Thermal properties were investigated by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. The range and percentage of optical transmission was ascertained by recording UV-vis-NIR spectrum. The electronic charge distribution and reactivity of the molecules within the crystal were studied by HOMO and LUMO analysis and the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) of the grown crystal was performed using the B3LYP method. The anti-bacterial activities of the crystal were performed by disk diffusion method against the standard bacteria E. coli. The crystal exhibits good anti-bacterial activity. Second harmonic generation efficiency of the powdered ABA crystal was tested using Nd:YAG laser and it is found to be ∼3.3 times that of potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate.

  14. Potentiation of gamma aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR by Ethanol: How are inhibitory receptors affected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eFörstera

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increase in the understanding of ethanol actions on the type A -aminobutyric acid chloride channel (GABAAR, a member of the pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs. However, the mechanism by which ethanol potentiates the complex is still not fully understood and a number of publications have shown contradictory results. Thus many questions still remain unresolved requiring further studies for a better comprehension of this effect. The present review concentrates on the involvement of GABAAR in the acute actions of ethanol and specifically focuses on the immediate, direct or indirect, synaptic and extra-synaptic modulatory effects. To elaborate on the immediate, direct modulation of GABAAR by acute ethanol exposure, electrophysiological studies investigating the importance of different subunits, and data from receptor mutants will be examined. We will also discuss the nature of the putative binding sites for ethanol based on structural data obtained from other members of the pLGICs family. Finally, we will briefly highlight the glycine gated chloride channel (GlyR, another member of the pLGIC family, as a suitable target for the development of new pharmacological tools.

  15. Accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid in soybean by hypoxia germination and freeze-thawing incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Runqiang; Feng, Li; Wang, Shufang; Yu, Nanjing; Gu, Zhenxin

    2016-04-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) can be synthesised by the GABA shunt and polyamine degradation pathway in plants under hypoxia stress and lower temperature. The hypoxia germination freeze-thawing incubation was used as a new technique for accumulating more GABA in soybean. Results showed that glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and diamine oxidase (DAO) activity as well as GABA content increased during germination within 24 h under hypoxia. However, the contents of dry matters and protein decreased. When the hypoxia-treated sprouts were frozen at -18 °C for 12 h and thawed at 25 °C for 6 h, GABA content increased drastically to 7.21-fold of the non-frozen sprouts. Subsequently, the freeze-thawing sprouts were ground into homogenates and incubated. GABA content was 14.20-fold of the only-soaked seeds when homogenates was incubated at 45 °C for 80 min within 400 µmol L(-1) pyridoxine (VB6) (pH 6.5). The hypoxia germination freeze-thawing incubation was an effective method for accumulating GABA in soybean. During incubation, DAO was more important for GABA formation in homogenate of germinated soybean compared with GAD. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Hydrogel Film-Immobilized Lactobacillus brevis RK03 for γ-Aminobutyric Acid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Huang Hsueh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogels of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate/polyethylene glycol diacrylate (HEMA/PEGDA have been extensively studied for their use in biomedical and pharmaceutical applications owing to their nontoxic and highly hydrophilic characteristics. Recently, cells immobilized by HEMA/PEGDA hydrogels have also been studied for enhanced production in fermentation. Hydrogel films of HEMA/PEGDA copolymer were generated by Ultraviolet (UV-initiated photopolymerization. The hydrogel films were used to immobilize viable Lactobacillus brevis RK03 cells for the bioconversion of monosodium glutamate (MSG to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. The mechanical properties and fermentation yields of the L. brevis RK03 cells immobilized on polyacrylate hydrogel films with different monomeric formulations were investigated. Fermentation was carried out in 75 mL de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS medium containing various concentrations of MSG. We found that HEMA (93%/PEGDA (3% hydrogels (sample H maximized GABA production. The conversion rate of MSG to GABA reached a maximum value of 98.4% after 240 h. Bioconversion activity gradually declined after 420 h to 83.8% after five cycles of semi-continuous fermentation. Our results suggest that HEMA (93%/PEGDA (3% hydrogels have great potential for use in GABA production via semi-continuous fermentation.

  17. An Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strain with Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Transaminase Activity Shows an Enhanced Genetic Transformation Ability in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Nonaka, Satoko; Someya, Tatsuhiko; Zhou, Sha; Takayama, Mariko; Nakamura, Kouji; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has the unique ability to mediate inter-kingdom DNA transfer, and for this reason, it has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. To increase the transformation frequency in plant genetic engineering, we focused on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is a negative factor in the Agrobacterium-plant interaction. Recent studies have shown contradictory results regarding the effects of GABA on vir gene expression, leading to the speculation that GABA inhibits T-DN...

  18. γ-Aminobutyric acid inhibits the proliferation and increases oxaliplatin sensitivity in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lihua; Du, Aiying; Xiong, Ying; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Yao; Tian, Zhaofeng; Yan, Hongli

    2016-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a natural non-protein amino acid, which broadly exists in many plant parts and is widely used as an ingredient in the food industry. In mammals, it is widely distributed in central nervous system and non-neural tissues. In addition to a primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, endogenous GABA content has been found to be elevated in neoplastic tissues in colon cancer. However, the effect of extraneous GABA on colon cancer has rarely been reported. In this study, we found the inhibitory effects of GABA on the proliferation of colon cancer cells (CCCs). The amino acid also suppressed metastasis of SW480 and SW620 cells. To further study the correlated mechanism, we analyzed the changes in cell cycle distribution and found that GABA suppressed cell cycle progression through G2/M or G1/S phase. Furthermore, RNA sequencing analysis revealed GABA-induced changes in the mRNA expression of 30 genes, including EGR1, MAPK4, NR4A1, Fos, and FosB, in all the three types of CCC. Importantly, GABA enhanced the anti-tumor efficacy of oxaliplatin (OXA) in subcutaneous xenograft tumor model in nude mice. The data suggest that GABA inhibits colon cancer cell proliferation perhaps by attenuating EGR1-NR4A1 axis, EGR1-Fos axis, and by disrupting MEK-EGR1 signaling pathway. This work reveals the pharmacological value of GABA derived from food and suggests that exogenous GABA might play an auxiliary role in polychemotherapy of colon cancer.

  19. Metabolome analysis of milk fermented by γ-aminobutyric acid-producing Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagi, Tatsuro; Kobayashi, Miho; Nomura, Masaru

    2016-02-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the most important functional components in fermented foods because of its physiological functions, such as neurotransmission and antihypertensive activities. However, little is known about components other than GABA in GABA-rich fermented foods. A metabolomic approach offers an opportunity to discover bioactive and flavor components in fermented food. To find specific components in milk fermented with GABA-producing Lactococcus lactis 01-7, we compared the components found in GABA-rich fermented milk with those found in control milk fermented without GABA production using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A principal component analysis score plot showed a clear differentiation between the control milk fermented with L. lactis 01-1, which does not produce GABA, and GABA-rich milk fermented with a combination of L. lactis strains 01-1 and 01-7. As expected, the amount of GABA in GABA-rich fermented milk was much higher (1,216-fold) than that of the control milk. Interestingly, the amount of Orn was also much higher (27-fold) than that of the control milk. Peptide analysis showed that levels of 6 putative angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptides were also higher in the GABA-rich fermented milk. Furthermore, ACE-inhibitory activity of GABA-rich fermented milk tended to be higher than that of the control milk. These results indicate that the GABA-producing strain 01-7 provides fermented milk with other functional components in addition to GABA. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type B (GABAB) Receptor Internalization Is Regulated by the R2 Subunit*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Saad; Wilkins, Megan E.; Dehghani-Tafti, Ebrahim; Thomas, Philip; Baddeley, Stuart M.; Smart, Trevor G.

    2011-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) receptors are important for slow synaptic inhibition in the CNS. The efficacy of inhibition is directly related to the stability of cell surface receptors. For GABAB receptors, heterodimerization between R1 and R2 subunits is critical for cell surface expression and signaling, but how this determines the rate and extent of receptor internalization is unknown. Here, we insert a high affinity α-bungarotoxin binding site into the N terminus of the R2 subunit and reveal its dominant role in regulating the internalization of GABAB receptors in live cells. To simultaneously study R1a and R2 trafficking, a new α-bungarotoxin binding site-labeling technique was used, allowing α-bungarotoxin conjugated to different fluorophores to selectively label R1a and R2 subunits. This approach demonstrated that R1a and R2 are internalized as dimers. In heterologous expression systems and neurons, the rates and extents of internalization for R1aR2 heteromers and R2 homomers are similar, suggesting a regulatory role for R2 in determining cell surface receptor stability. The fast internalization rate of R1a, which has been engineered to exit the endoplasmic reticulum, was slowed to that of R2 by truncating the R1a C-terminal tail or by removing a dileucine motif in its coiled-coil domain. Slowing the rate of internalization by co-assembly with R2 represents a novel role for GPCR heterodimerization whereby R2 subunits, via their C terminus coiled-coil domain, mask a dileucine motif on R1a subunits to determine the surface stability of the GABAB receptor. PMID:21724853

  1. MS transport assays for γ-aminobutyric acid transporters--an efficient alternative for radiometric assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Sebastian; Höfner, Georg; Wanner, Klaus T

    2014-08-05

    Transport assays for neurotransmitters based on radiolabeled substrates are widely spread and often indispensable in basic research and the drug development process, although the use of radioisotopes is inherently coupled to issues concerning radioactive waste and safety precautions. To overcome these disadvantages, we developed mass spectrometry (MS)-based transport assays for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). These "MS Transport Assays" provide all capabilities of [(3)H]GABA transport assays and therefore represent the first substitute for the latter. The performance of our approach is demonstrated for GAT1, the most important GABA transporter (GAT) subtype. As GABA is endogenously present in COS-7 cells employed as hGAT1 expression system, ((2)H6)GABA was used as a substrate to differentiate transported from endogenous GABA. To record transported ((2)H6)GABA, a highly sensitive, short, robust, and reliable HILIC-ESI-MS/MS quantification method using ((2)H2)GABA as an internal standard was developed and validated according to the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) guidelines. Based on this LC-MS quantification, a setup to characterize hGAT1 mediated ((2)H6)GABA transport in a 96-well format was established, that enables automated processing and avoids any sample preparation. The K(m) value for ((2)H6)GABA determined for hGAT1 is in excellent agreement with results obtained from [(3)H]GABA uptake assays. In addition, the established assay format enables efficient determination of the inhibitory potency of GAT1 inhibitors, is capable of identifying those inhibitors transported as substrates, and furthermore allows characterization of efflux. The approach described here combines the strengths of LC-MS/MS with the high efficiency of transport assays based on radiolabeled substrates and is applicable to all GABA transporter subtypes.

  2. β-aminobutyric acid mediated drought stress alleviation in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Arun K; Bhardwaj, Pardeep K; Ghosh, Supriya; Roy, Sankhajit; Saha, Suman; Sherpa, Ang R; Saha, Samir K; Hossain, Zahed

    2016-02-01

    The present study highlights the role of β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) in alleviating drought stress effects in maize (Zea mays L.). Chemical priming was imposed by pretreating 1-week-old plants with 600 μM BABA prior to applying drought stress. Specific activities of key antioxidant enzymes and metabolites (ascorbate and glutathione) levels of ascorbate-glutathione cycle were studied to unravel the priming-induced modulation of plant defense system. Furthermore, changes in endogenous ABA and JA concentrations as well as mRNA expressions of key genes involved in their respective biosynthesis pathways were monitored in BABA-primed (BABA+) and non-primed (BABA-) leaves of drought-challenged plants to better understand the mechanistic insights into the BABA-induced hormonal regulation of plant response to water-deficit stress. Accelerated stomatal closure, high relative water content, and less membrane damage were observed in BABA-primed leaves under water-deficit condition. Elevated APX and SOD activity in non-primed leaves found to be insufficient to scavenge all H2O2 and O2 (·-) resulting in oxidative burst as evident after histochemical staining with NBT and DAB. A higher proline accumulation in non-primed leaves also does not give much protection against drought stress. Increased GR activity supported with the enhanced mRNA and protein expressions might help the BABA-primed plants to maintain a high GSH pool essential for sustaining balanced redox status to counter drought-induced oxidative stress damages. Hormonal analysis suggests that in maize, BABA-potentiated drought tolerance is primarily mediated through JA-dependent pathway by the activation of antioxidant defense systems while ABA biosynthesis pathway also plays an important role in fine-tuning of drought stress response.

  3. Conformational preferences of γ-aminobutyric acid in the gas phase and in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Il Keun; Kang, Young Kee

    2012-09-01

    The conformational study of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been carried out at the M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory in the gas phase and the SMD M06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory in water. In the gas phase, the folded conformation gG1 with gauche- and gauche+ conformations for the Cβsbnd Cα and Cγsbnd Cβ bonds, respectively, is found to be lowest in energy and enthalpy, which can be ascribed to the favored hyperconjugative n → π* interaction between the lone electron pair of the amine nitrogen atom and the Cdbnd O bond of the carboxylic group and the favored antiparallel dipole-dipole interaction between the Nsbnd H bond and the Cdbnd O bond. In addition, the intramolecular hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic group and the amine Nsbnd H group have contributed to stabilize some low-energy conformers. However, the most preferred conformation is found to be tG1 and more stable by 0.4 kcal/mol in ΔG than the conformer gG1, in which the favored entropic term due to the conformational flexibility and the other favored n → σ*, σ → σ*, and π → σ* interactions seem to play a role. The conformational preferences of the neutral GABA calculated by ΔG's are reasonably consistent with the populations deduced from FT microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets combined with laser ablation. In water, the two folded conformers Gg and gG of the zwitterionic GABA are dominantly populated, each of which has the population of 47%, and the hydrogen bond between the ammonium Nsbnd H group and the lone electron pair of the Csbnd O- group seems to be crucial in stabilizing these conformers. Our calculated result that the folded conformers preferentially exist in water is consistent with the 1H NMR experiments in D2O.

  4. High γ-aminobutyric acid production from lactic acid bacteria: Emphasis on Lactobacillus brevis as a functional dairy starter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinglong; Shah, Nagendra P

    2017-11-22

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA-rich foods have shown anti-hypertensive and anti-depressant activities as the major functions in humans and animals. Hence, high GABA-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) could be used as functional starters for manufacturing novel fermented dairy foods. Glutamic acid decarboxylases (GADs) from LAB are highly conserved at the species level based on the phylogenetic tree of GADs from LAB. Moreover, two functionally distinct GADs and one intact gad operon were observed in all the completely sequenced Lactobacillus brevis strains suggesting its common capability to synthesize GABA. Difficulties and strategies for the manufacture of GABA-rich fermented dairy foods have been discussed and proposed, respectively. In addition, a genetic survey on the sequenced LAB strains demonstrated the absence of cell envelope proteinases in the majority of LAB including Lb. brevis, which diminishes their cell viabilities in milk environments due to their non-proteolytic nature. Thus, several strategies have been proposed to overcome the non-proteolytic nature of Lb. brevis in order to produce GABA-rich dairy foods.

  5. The benzodiazepine diazepam potentiates responses of α1β2γ2 γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors activated by either γ-aminobutyric acid or allosteric agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Eaton, Megan M.; Steinbach, Joe Henry; Akk, Gustav

    2013-01-01

    Background The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor is target for several anesthetics, anticonvulsants, anxiolytics and sedatives. Neurosteroids, barbiturates and etomidate both potentiate responses to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and allosterically activate the receptor. We examined the ability of a benzodiazepine, diazepam, to potentiate responses to allosteric agonists. Methods The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, and studied using whole-cell and single-channel patch clamp. The receptors were activated by the orthosteric agonist GABA, and allosteric agonists pentobarbital, etomidate and alfaxalone. Results Diazepam is equally potent at enhancing responses to orthosteric and allosteric agonists. Diazepam EC50s were 25±4, 26±6, 33±6, and 26±3 nM for receptors activated by GABA, pentobarbital, etomidate, and alfaxalone, respectively (mean±S.D., 5–6 cells at each condition). Mutations to the benzodiazepine-binding site (α1(H101C), γ2(R144C), γ2(R197C)) reduced or removed potentiation for all agonists, and an inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine site reduced responses to all agonists. Single-channel data elicited by GABA demonstrate that in the presence of 1 μM diazepam the prevalence of the longest open-time component is increased from 13±7 (mean±S.D., n=5 patches) to 27±8 % (n=3 patches) and the rate of channel closing is decreased from 129±28 s−1 to 47±6 s−1 (mean±S.D.) Conclusions We conclude that benzodiazepines do not act by enhancing affinity of the orthosteric site for GABA but rather by increasing channel gating efficacy. The results also demonstrate the presence of significant interactions between allosteric activators and potentiators, raising a possibility of effects on dosage requirements or changes in side effects. PMID:23407108

  6. Determination of l-glutamic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid in mouse brain tissue utilizing GC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farthing, Christine A; Farthing, Don E; Gress, Ronald E; Sweet, Douglas H

    2017-11-15

    A rapid and selective method for the quantitation of neurotransmitters, l-Glutamic acid (GA) and γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), was developed and validated using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The novel method utilized a rapid online hot GC inlet gas phase sample derivatization and fast GC low thermal mass technology. The method calibration was linear from 0.5 to 100μg/mL, with limits of detections of 100ng/mL and 250ng/mL for GA and GABA, respectively. The method was used to investigate the effects of deletion of organic anion transporter 1 (Oat1) or Oat3 on murine CNS levels of GA and GABA at 3 and 18 mo of age, as compared to age matched wild-type (WT) animals. Whole brain concentrations of GA were comparable between WT, Oat1 -/- , and Oat3 -/- 18 mo at both 3 and 18 mo of age. Similarly, whole brain concentrations of GABA were not significantly altered in either knockout mouse strain at 3 or 18 mo of age, as compared to WT. These results indicate that the developed GC-MS/MS method provides sufficient sensitivity and selectivity for the quantitation of these neurotransmitters in mouse brain tissue. Furthermore, these results suggest that loss of Oat1 or Oat3 function in isolation does not result in significant alterations in brain tissue levels of GA or GABA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Spectroscopic investigation on structure and pH dependent Cocrystal formation between gamma-aminobutyric acid and benzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Xue, Jiadan; Cai, Qiang; Zhang, Qi

    2018-02-01

    Vibrational spectroscopic methods, including terahertz absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopy, were utilized for the characterization and analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), benzoic acid (BA), and the corresponding GABA-BA cocrystal formation under various pH values of aqueous solution. Vibrational spectroscopic results demonstrated that the solvent GABA-BA cocrystal, similar as grinding counterpart, possessed unique characteristic features compared with that of starting parent compounds. The change of vibrational modes for GABA-BA cocrystal comparing with starting components indicates there is strong inter-molecular interaction between GABA and BA molecules during its cocrystallization process. Formation of GABA-BA cocrystal under slow solvent evaporation is impacted by the pH value of aqueous solution. Vibrational spectra indicate that the GABA-BA cocrystal could be stably formed with the solvent condition of 2.00 ≤ pH ≤ 7.00. In contrast, such cocrystallization did not occur and the cocrystal would dissociate into its parent components when the pH value of solvent is lower than 2.00. This study provides experimental benchmark to discriminate and identify the structure of cocrystal and also pH-dependent cocrystallization effect with vibrational spectroscopic techniques in solid-state pharmaceutical fields.

  8. Biodiversity and γ-aminobutyric acid production by lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional alpine raw cow's milk cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciosi, Elena; Carafa, Ilaria; Nardin, Tiziana; Schiavon, Silvia; Poznanski, Elisa; Cavazza, Agostino; Larcher, Roberto; Tuohy, Kieran M

    2015-01-01

    "Nostrano-cheeses" are traditional alpine cheeses made from raw cow's milk in Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy. This study identified lactic acid bacteria (LAB) developing during maturation of "Nostrano-cheeses" and evaluated their potential to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an immunologically active compound and neurotransmitter. Cheese samples were collected on six cheese-making days, in three dairy factories located in different areas of Trentino and at different stages of cheese ripening (24 h, 15 days, and 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8 months). A total of 1,059 LAB isolates were screened using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR) and differentiated into 583 clusters. LAB strains from dominant clusters (n = 97) were genetically identified to species level by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. LAB species most frequently isolated were Lactobacillus paracasei, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The 97 dominant clusters were also characterized for their ability in producing GABA by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). About 71% of the dominant bacteria clusters evolving during cheeses ripening were able to produce GABA. Most GABA producers were Lactobacillus paracasei but other GABA producing species included Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. No Enterococcus faecalis or Sc. macedonicus isolates produced GABA. The isolate producing the highest amount of GABA (80.0±2.7 mg/kg) was a Sc. thermophilus.

  9. Lactic Acid Bacterial Starter Culture with Antioxidant and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Biosynthetic Activities Isolated from Flatfish-Sikhae Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yeong Geol; Yu, Hyun-Hee; Chang, Young-Hyo; Hwang, Han-Joon

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to select a lactic acid bacterial strain as a starter culture for flatfish-Sikhae fermentation and to evaluate its suitability for application in a food system. Four strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from commercial flatfish-Sikhae were identified and selected as starter culture candidates through investigation of growth rates, salt tolerance, food safety, and functional properties such as antioxidative and antimicrobial activities. The fermentation properties of the starter candidates were also examined in food systems prepared with these strains (candidate batch) in comparison with a spontaneous fermentation process without starter culture (control batch) at 15°C. The results showed that the candidate YG331 batch had better fermentation properties such as viable cell count, pH, and acidity than the other experimental batches, including the control batch. The results are expressed according to selection criteria based on a preliminary sensory evaluation and physiochemical investigation. Also, only a small amount of histamine was detected with the candidate YG331 batch. The radical scavenging activity of the candidate batches was better compared with the control batch, and especially candidate YG331 batch showed the best radical scavenging activity. Also, we isolated another starter candidate (identified as Lactobacillus brevis PM03) with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing activity from commercial flatfish-Sikhae products. The sensory scores of the candidate YG331 batch were better than those of the other experimental batches in terms of flavor, color, and overall acceptance. In this study, we established selection criteria for the lactic acid bacterial starter for the flatfish-Sikhae production and finally selected candidate YG331 as the most suitable starter.

  10. The structure and diffusion behaviour of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in neutral aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo, M.M.; Esteso, M.A.; Barros, M.F.; Verissimo, L.M.P.; Romero, C.M.; Suarez, A.F.; Ramos, M.L.; Valente, A.J.M.; Burrows, H.D.; Ribeiro, A.C.F.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Diffusion coefficients and densities of binary aqueous solutions of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). • Dependence on both shape and size of GABA on its diffusion. • Interactions intramolecular and the solute-water interactions in these systems. - Abstract: GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is a non-protein amino acid with important physiological properties, and with considerable relevance to the food and pharmaceutical industries. Particular interest has focused on its role as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian cerebral cortex. In this paper, we report density and mutual diffusion coefficients of GABA in non-buffered aqueous solutions (0.001–0.100) mol·dm −3 at 298.15 K. Under these conditions, 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy and pH measurements show that it is present predominantly as a monomeric zwitterionic species. Diffusion coefficients have been computed assuming that this behaves as the binary system GABA/water. From density and intermolecular diffusion coefficients measurements, the molar volume, hydrodynamic radii, R h , diffusion coefficients at infinitesimal concentration, D 0 , activity coefficients and the thermodynamic factors, F T , have been estimated. Within experimental error, the hydrodynamic volume calculated from this is identical to the molar volume obtained from density measurements. From the NMR spectra and literature data, it is suggested that this amino acid diffuses in aqueous solution as a curved, coil-like hydrated zwitterionic entity.

  11. Inhibition of microbial growth and enrichment of gamma-aminobutyric acid during germination of brown rice by electrolyzed oxidizing water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhan-Hui; Zhang, Yan; Li, Li-Te; Curtis, Rempel B; Kong, Xiao-Lin; Fulcher, R Gary; Zhang, Gong; Cao, Wei

    2010-03-01

    Electrolyzed oxidizing water (EOW) has been regarded as a potential environmentally friendly broad spectrum microbial decontaminant. EOW with a pH of 3.0 and oxidation reduction potential of 1,079.0 mV were generated by the electrolysis of a dilute NaCl solution (20 mM) in an electrochemical cell. The effects of EOW, 1% NaClO solution, and alkaline electrolyzed water on controlling microbial growth, germination ratio, and enrichment of gamma-aminobutyric acid in germinated brown rice (GBR) were evaluated in this study. Results show that EOW was the most effective at inhibiting microbial growth during germination. Rinsing the rice grains with EOW at 12-h intervals resulted in aerobic plate count reductions of 4.82 log CFU/g, while soaking resulted in bacterial count reductions of 5.38 log CFU/g after 72 h of germination. Moreover, EOW significantly enriched gamma-aminobutyric acid content in GBR (P < 0.05); content was increased 1.6 times in grain rinsed with EOW and 1.8 times in grain soaked in EOW. The findings indicate that EOW is a feasible disinfectant for industrial GBR production.

  12. Ca2+ and aminoguanidine on γ-aminobutyric acid accumulation in germinating soybean under hypoxia–NaCl stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runqiang Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, a nonproteinous amino acid with some benefits on human health, is synthesized by GABA-shunt and the polyamine degradation pathway in plants. The regulation of Ca2+ and aminoguanidine on GABA accumulation in germinating soybean (Glycine max L. under hypoxia-NaCl stress was investigated in this study. Exogenous Ca2+ increased GABA content significantly by enhancing glutamate decarboxylase gene expression and its activity. Addition of ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid into the culture solution reduced GABA content greatly due to the inhibition of glutamate decarboxylase activity. Aminoguanidine reduced over 85% of diamine oxidase activity, and 33.28% and 36.35% of GABA content in cotyledon and embryo, respectively. Under hypoxia–NaCl stress, the polyamine degradation pathway contributed 31.61–39.43% of the GABA formation in germinating soybean.

  13. Effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis and intracellular transport on the gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced functional differentiation of cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Meier, E

    1990-01-01

    The effect of inhibitors of protein synthesis (actinomycin D, cycloheximide), proteases (leupeptin), and intracellular transport (colchicine, monensin) on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist [4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP)]-induced changes in morphological differenti......The effect of inhibitors of protein synthesis (actinomycin D, cycloheximide), proteases (leupeptin), and intracellular transport (colchicine, monensin) on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist [4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP)]-induced changes in morphological...

  14. Effects of glutamate decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter on the bioconversion of GABA in engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Kim, Tae Wan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-05-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-essential amino acid and a precursor of pyrrolidone, a monomer of nylon 4. GABA can be biosynthesized through the decarboxylation of L: -glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase. In this study, the effects of glutamate decarboxylase (gadA, gadB), glutamate/GABA antiporter (gadC) and GABA aminotransferase (gabT) on GABA production were investigated in Escherichia coli. Glutamate decarboxylase was overexpressed alone or with the glutamate/GABA antiporter to enhance GABA synthesis. GABA aminotransferase, which redirects GABA into the TCA cycle, was knock-out mutated. When gadB and gadC were co-overexpressed in the gabT mutant strain, a final GABA concentration of 5.46 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l of monosodium glutamate (MSG), which corresponded to a GABA yield of 89.5%.

  15. Induced resistance in tomato fruit by γ-aminobutyric acid for the control of alternaria rot caused by Alternaria alternata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiali; Sun, Cui; Zhang, Yangyang; Fu, Da; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ting

    2017-04-15

    The study investigated the effect of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the control of alternaria rot in tomato fruit and the possible mechanism involved. Our results showed exogenous GABA could stimulate remarkable resistance to the alternaria rot, while it had no direct antifungal activity against Alternaria alternata. Moreover, the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase, along with the expression of these corresponding genes, were significantly induced in the GABA treatment. The obtained data suggested GABA induced resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen A. alternata, at least in part by activating antioxidant enzymes, restricting the levels of cell death caused by reactive oxygen species. Meanwhile, the key enzyme genes of GABA shunt, GABA transaminase and succinic-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, were found up-regulated in the GABA treatment. The activation of the GABA shunt might play a vital role in the resistance mechanism underpinning GABA-induced plant immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Conformational basis for the Li(+)-induced leak current in the rat gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacAulay, Nanna; Zeuthen, Thomas; Gether, Ulrik

    2002-01-01

    The rat gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter-1 (GAT-1) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and the substrate-independent Li(+)-induced leak current was examined using two-electrode voltage clamp. The leak current was not affected by the addition of GABA and was not due to H(+) permeation. The Li......(+)-bound conformation of the protein displayed a lower passive water permeability than that of the Na(+)- and choline (Ch(+))-bound conformations and the leak current did not saturate with increasing amounts of Li(+) in the test solution. The mechanism that gives rise to the leak current did not support active water...... millimolar concentrations of Na(+) (the apparent affinity constant, K'(0.5) = 3 mM). In addition, it was found that the GABA transport current was sustained at correspondingly low Na(+) concentrations if Li(+) was present instead of choline. This is consistent with a model in which Li(+) can bind...

  17. Cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate in posttraumatic stress disorder and their relationships to self-reported sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerhoff, Dieter J; Mon, Anderson; Metzler, Thomas; Neylan, Thomas C

    2014-05-01

    To test if posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with low brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels and if reduced GABA is mediated by poor sleep quality. Laboratory study using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) and behavioral testing. VA Medical Center Research Service, Psychiatry and Radiology. Twenty-seven patients with PTSD (PTSD+) and 18 trauma-exposed controls without PTSD (PTSD-), recruited from United States Army reservists, Army National Guard, and mental health clinics. None. 1H MRS at 4 Tesla yielded spectra from three cortical brain regions. In parieto-occipital and temporal cortices, PTSD+ had lower GABA concentrations than PTSD-. As expected, PTSD+ had higher depressive and anxiety symptom scores and a higher Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) score. Higher ISI correlated with lower GABA and higher glutamate levels in parieto-occipital cortex and tended to correlate with lower GABA in the anterior cingulate. The relationship between parieto-occipital GABA and PTSD diagnosis was fully mediated through insomnia severity. Lower N-acetylaspartate and glutamate concentrations in the anterior cingulate cortex correlated with higher arousal scores, whereas depressive and anxiety symptoms did generally not influence metabolite concentrations. Low brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is consistent with most findings in panic and social anxiety disorders. Low GABA associated with poor sleep quality is consistent with the hyperarousal theory of both primary insomnia and PTSD. Our data demonstrate that poor sleep quality mediates low parieto-occipital GABA in PTSD. The findings have implications for PTSD treatment approaches.

  18. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in the developing rhesus monkey brain: subcellular studies of taurine, cysteinesulfinic acid decarboxylase, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, D K; Sturman, J A; Gaull, G E

    1981-09-01

    Taurine, cysteinesulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD), glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) were measured in subcellular fractions prepared from occipital lobe of fetal and neonatal rhesus monkeys. In addition, the distribution of [35S]taurine in subcellular fractions was determined after administration to the fetus via the mother, to the neonate via administration to the mother prior to birth, and directly to the neonate at various times after birth. CSAD, glutamate, GABA, and GAD all were found to be low or unmeasurable in early fetal life and to increase during late fetal and early neonatal life to reach values found in the mother. Taurine was present in large amounts in early fetal life and decreased slowly during neonatal life, arriving at amounts found in the mother not until after 150 days of age. Significant amounts of taurine, CSAD, GABA, and GAD were associated with nerve ending components with some indication that the proportion of brain taurine found in these organelles increases during development. All subcellular pools of taurine were rapidly labeled by exogenously administered [35S]taurine. The subcellular distribution of all the components measured was compatible with the neurotransmitter or putative neurotransmitter functions of glutamate, GABA, and taurine. The large amount of these three amino acids exceeds that required for such function. The excess of glutamate and GABA may be used as a source of energy. The function of the excess of taurine is still not clear, although circumstantial evidence favors an important role in the development and maturation of the CNS.

  19. Dynamic changes in gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate decarboxylase activity in oats (Avena nuda L.) during steeping and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian Guo; Hu, Qing Ping; Duan, Jiang Lian; Tian, Cheng Rui

    2010-09-08

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and provides beneficial effects for human and other animals health. To accumulate GABA, samples from two different naked oat cultivars, Baiyan II and Bayou I, were steeped and germinated in an incubator. The content of GABA and glutamic acid as well as the activity of the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) in oats during steeping and germination were investigated with an amino acid automatic analyzer. Compared with raw groats, an increase in GABA content of oat groats during steeping and germination was continuously observed for two oat cultivars. The activity of GAD increased greatly at the end of steeping and the second stage of germination for Baiyan II and Bayou I, respectively. Glutamic acid content of treated oat groats was significantly lower than that in raw groats until the later period of germination. GABA was correlated (p<0.01) significantly and positively with the glutamic acid rather than GAD activity in the current study. The results indicates that steeping and germination process under highly controlled conditions can effectively accumulate the GABA in oat groats for Baiyan II and Bayou I, which would greatly facilitate production of nutraceuticals or food ingredients that enable consumers to gain greater access to the health benefits of oats. However, more assays need to be further performed with more oat cultivars.

  20. Determination of glutamic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid in Ringer's solution without desalination at the femtomole level by gas chromatography chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, K; Shindo, N; Mineki, R; Ohta, K

    1981-04-01

    For the quantification of glutamic acid in Ringer's solution, pentafluoropropionic methyl ester was the most sensitive derivative. The detectable concentration was 0.01 microM glutamic acid in Ringer's solution; the amount of the preparation was 1 pmol and the injection into a gas chromatograph mass spectrometer was 10 fmol. For the quantification of gamma-aminobutyric acid in Ringer's solution, the trifluoroacetal-hexafluoropropionyl ester was quantification of gamma-aminobutyric acid in Ringer's solution, the trifluoroacetal-hexafluoropropionyl ester was detectable at a concentration of 0.01 microM. Ringer's salts facilitated acylation in the order heptafluorobutyric anhydride greater than pentafluoropropionic anhydride greater than trifluoroacetic anhydride. The effect depended on esterification of carboxy groups in the order methyl ester greater than hexafluoropropionyl ester greater than butyl ester. Sodium carbonate, sodium acetate and sodium citrate also facilitated acylation with pentafluoroproionic anhydride, while sodium phosphate inhibited the acylation and sodium sulfate inhibited it slightly. The pentafluoropropionic methyl ester of glutamic acid was stable for up to 10 days, when it was dissolved in acetone and stored at -18 degrees C.

  1. Enhancing gamma-aminobutyric acid content in germinated brown rice by repeated treatment of soaking and incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitinunsomboon, Somboon; Keeratipibul, Suwimon; Boonsiriwit, Athip

    2013-02-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), commonly produced by germination of brown rice grain, is a free amino acid which could help relieving or preventing non-communicable diseases in human. Several research works have been conducted on GABA production from germinated brown rice. However, the yielded GABA (10.1-69.2 mg/100 g germinated brown rice) was comparatively low; thus the amount was insufficient to be used as active ingredients in functional foods. The objective of this study was to explore alternative methods in order to gain higher yield of GABA. A new process of repeated soaking (in tap water at 35 °C, 3 h) and incubation (at 37 °C, 21 h) during germination was developed. The amount of GABA produced was highest at 116.88 ± 9.24 mg/100 g germinated brown rice (dry basis). However, an unpleasant odour was generated by some microorganisms during long germination. Lactic acid was applied at soaking step to overcome this problem; whereby 0.5% lactic acid solution (vol./vol.) could effectively control the microorganisms without impairing GABA producing ability and sensory qualities.

  2. Characterization of a Potential Probiotic Lactobacillus brevis RK03 and Efficient Production of γ-Aminobutyric Acid in Batch Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Kuo, Jen-Min; Liu, Si-Jia

    2018-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fish and evaluated for their γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing abilities. Out of thirty-two isolates, Lactobacillus brevis RK03 showed the highest GABA production ability. The effects of various fermentation parameters including initial glutamic acid level, culture temperature, initial pH, and incubation time on GABA production were investigated via a singleparameter optimization strategy. For industrial large-scale production, a low-cost GABA producing medium (GM) broth was developed for fermentation with L. brevis RK03. We found that an optimized GM broth recipe of 1% glucose; 2.5% yeast extract; 2 ppm each of CaCO3, MnSO4, and Tween 80; and 10 μM pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) resulted in a maximum GABA yield of 62,523 mg/L after 88 h following the addition of 650 mM monosodium glutamate (MSG), for a conversion rate of 93.28%. Our data provide a practical approach for the highly efficient and economic production of GABA. In addition, L. brevis RK03 is highly resistant to gastric acid and bovine bile salt. Thus, the discovery of Lactobacillus strains with the ability to synthesize GABA may offer new opportunities in the design of improved health-promoting functional foods. PMID:29300336

  3. Characterization of a Potential Probiotic Lactobacillus brevis RK03 and Efficient Production of γ-Aminobutyric Acid in Batch Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hui Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fish and evaluated for their γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-producing abilities. Out of thirty-two isolates, Lactobacillus brevis RK03 showed the highest GABA production ability. The effects of various fermentation parameters including initial glutamic acid level, culture temperature, initial pH, and incubation time on GABA production were investigated via a singleparameter optimization strategy. For industrial large-scale production, a low-cost GABA producing medium (GM broth was developed for fermentation with L. brevis RK03. We found that an optimized GM broth recipe of 1% glucose; 2.5% yeast extract; 2 ppm each of CaCO3, MnSO4, and Tween 80; and 10 μM pyridoxal phosphate (PLP resulted in a maximum GABA yield of 62,523 mg/L after 88 h following the addition of 650 mM monosodium glutamate (MSG, for a conversion rate of 93.28%. Our data provide a practical approach for the highly efficient and economic production of GABA. In addition, L. brevis RK03 is highly resistant to gastric acid and bovine bile salt. Thus, the discovery of Lactobacillus strains with the ability to synthesize GABA may offer new opportunities in the design of improved health-promoting functional foods.

  4. Buffer-free production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using an engineered glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Taek Jin; Ho, Ngoc Anh Thu; Pack, Seung Pil

    2013-08-15

    Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) converts glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) through decarboxylation using proton as a co-substrate. Since GAD is active only at acidic conditions even though pH increases as the reaction proceeds, the conventional practice of using this enzyme involved the use of relatively high concentration of buffers, which might complicate the downstream purification steps. Here we show by simulation and experiments that the free acid substrate, glutamic acid, rather than its monosodium salt can act as a substrate and buffer at the same time. This yielded the buffer- and salt-free synthesis of GABA conveniently in a batch mode. Furthermore, we engineered GAD to hyper active ones by extending or reducing the length of the enzyme by just one residue at its C-terminus. Through the buffer-free reaction with engineered GAD, we could synthesize 1M GABA in 3h, which can be translated into a space-time yield of 34.3g/L/h. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Studies on high γ-aminobutyric acid-producing monascus purpureus which breeding with heavy ion beam radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jing; Chen Jihong; Li Wenjian; Wang Shuyang; Ma Shuang; Yang Weicheng

    2010-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) is a kind of nonprotein amino acid, which is reported to antihypertension, tranquilization, improve liver function, prevent obesity and avoid senile dementia, etc., and is an important effective component in health products. In this study, Monascus Purpureus spores were radiated with 96 MeV/u, LET=28.12 keV/μm 12C6+ ion beams. Doses were set as 20, 50 and 80 Gy, respectively. The experiments were run as follows: preparation of monospore suspension → irradiated with heavy ion beam → diluted and spread on dish → screening and stored in inclined plane → shaking culture → GABA extraction → GABA concentration determined by paper chromatography. One stable high productive strain HQ06 was obtained in this study. The content of GABA in HQ06 was 2.50±0.04 mg/ml, 3.7±1.7% higher than that in control (which was 2.41±0.03 mg/ml). Results showed that it is feasible for breeding high GABA producing strains with heavy ion beam radiation, and the heavy ion beam is a kind of effective mutation source. Further studies should be done for breeding much higher productive strains to satisfy the demands of industry. (authors)

  6. Differential mechanisms of action of the novel γ-aminobutyric acid receptor antagonist ectoparasiticides fluralaner (A1443) and fipronil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, Miho; Kobayashi, Masaki; Matsui, Hiroto; Nakahira, Kunimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Fluralaner (A1443) is an isoxazoline ectoparasiticide that is a novel antagonist of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (GABARs), with a potency comparable to that of fipronil, a phenylpyrazole ectoparasiticide. To clarify the biological effectiveness of fluralaner against fipronil-resistant pests, differences in the actions of fluralaner and fipronil on GABARs that possess resistance to dieldrin (rdl)-type mutations were evaluated. Fipronil had neither pest control nor GABAR-antagonistic activities against two-spotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae) that had two different rdl-type amino acids (A(301) → H and T(350) → A: Drosophila melanogaster GABAR numbering) and against small brown planthoppers (Laodelphax striatellus) that had a novel rdl-type (A(283) → N) mutation in GABARs. In contrast, fluralaner showed not only high pest control activities against these pests, but also excellent antagonistic activities for these rdl-type GABARs. The findings indicate that rdl-type fipronil-resistant pests do not show cross-resistance to fluralaner owing to the differential actions of fluralaner and fipronil on the GABAR. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Novel fermented chickpea milk with enhanced level of γ-aminobutyric acid and neuroprotective effect on PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Wei, Mingming; Wu, Junjun; Rui, Xin; Dong, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, novel fermented chickpea milk with high γ -aminobutyric acid (GABA) content and potential neuroprotective activity was developed. Fermentation starter that can produce GABA was selected from 377 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional Chinese fermented foods. Among the screened strains, strain M-6 showed the highest GABA-producing capacity in De Man-Rogosa and Sharp (MRS) broth and chickpea milk. M-6 was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum based on Gram staining, API carbohydrate fermentation pattern testing, and 16s rDNA sequencing. The complete gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase was cloned to confirm the presence of the gene in L. plantarum M-6. The fermentation condition was optimized by response surface methodology. Results demonstrated that L. plantarum M-6 produced the highest GABA content of 537.23 mg/L. The optimal condition included an inoculum concentration of 7%, presence of 0.2% (m/v) monosodium glutamate and 55 µ M pyridoxal-5-phosphate, incubation temperature of 39 °C and fermentation time of 48 h . GABA-enriched chickpea milk exerted protective effects on PC12 cells against MnCl2 -induced injury. GABA-enriched chickpea milk improved cell viability and markedly attenuated the release of lactate dehydrogenase compared with the impaired cells.

  8. Novel fermented chickpea milk with enhanced level of γ-aminobutyric acid and neuroprotective effect on PC12 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, novel fermented chickpea milk with high γ -aminobutyric acid (GABA content and potential neuroprotective activity was developed. Fermentation starter that can produce GABA was selected from 377 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional Chinese fermented foods. Among the screened strains, strain M-6 showed the highest GABA-producing capacity in De Man–Rogosa and Sharp (MRS broth and chickpea milk. M-6 was identified as Lactobacillus plantarum based on Gram staining, API carbohydrate fermentation pattern testing, and 16s rDNA sequencing. The complete gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase was cloned to confirm the presence of the gene in L. plantarum M-6. The fermentation condition was optimized by response surface methodology. Results demonstrated that L. plantarum M-6 produced the highest GABA content of 537.23 mg/L. The optimal condition included an inoculum concentration of 7%, presence of 0.2% (m/v monosodium glutamate and 55 µ M pyridoxal-5-phosphate, incubation temperature of 39 °C and fermentation time of 48 h . GABA-enriched chickpea milk exerted protective effects on PC12 cells against MnCl2 -induced injury. GABA-enriched chickpea milk improved cell viability and markedly attenuated the release of lactate dehydrogenase compared with the impaired cells.

  9. Methyl-inositol, γ-aminobutyric acid and other health benefit compounds in the aril of litchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zi-Chen; Yang, Zhuan-Ying; Li, Jian-Guo; Chen, Hou-Bin; Huang, Xu-Ming; Wang, Hui-Cong

    2016-11-01

    The available components in the flesh of litchi seem insufficient to interpret its wide and significant physiological effects. Some unusual compounds, including myo-inositol, inositol methyl derivatives and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were identified as main constituents in the flesh of litchi. Their concentrations varied among cultivars but remain relatively constant during development. Litchi flesh was shown to contain moderate myo-inositol (0.28-0.78 mg g(-1) FW), ascorbic acid (0.08-0.39 mg g(-1) FW) and phenolics (0.47-1.60 mg g(-1) FW), but abundant l-quebrachitol (1.6-6.4 mg g(-1) FW) and GABA (1.7-3.5 mg g(-1) FW). The concentration of GABA in the flesh of litchi was about 100 times higher than in other fruits. And l-quebrachitol is not a common component in fruits. The biological and physiological activities of inositols, inositol derivatives and GABA have been extensively documented. These compounds are probably important compositional characteristic contributing to the widely shown health benefits of litchi.

  10. The effect of fermented buckwheat on producing l-carnitine- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-enriched designer eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Namhyeon; Lee, Tae-Kyung; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hanh; An, Eun-Bae; Kim, Nahyun M; You, Young-Hyun; Park, Tae-Sub; Kim, Doman

    2017-07-01

    The potential of fermented buckwheat as a feed additive was studied to increase l-carnitine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in designer eggs. Buckwheat contains high levels of lysine, methionine and glutamate, which are precursors for the synthesis of l-carnitine and GABA. Rhizopus oligosporus was used for the fermentation of buckwheat to produce l-carnitine and GABA that exert positive effects such as enhanced metabolism, antioxidant activities, immunity and blood pressure control. A novel analytical method for simultaneously detecting l-carnitine and GABA was developed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and LC/MS/MS. The fermented buckwheat extract contained 4 and 34 times more l-carnitine and GABA respectively compared with normal buckwheat. Compared with the control, the fermented buckwheat extract-fed group showed enriched l-carnitine (13.6%) and GABA (8.4%) in the yolk, though only l-carnitine was significantly different (P superfood production and supplement industries. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. An Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strain with Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Transaminase Activity Shows an Enhanced Genetic Transformation Ability in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Satoko; Someya, Tatsuhiko; Zhou, Sha; Takayama, Mariko; Nakamura, Kouji; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has the unique ability to mediate inter-kingdom DNA transfer, and for this reason, it has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. To increase the transformation frequency in plant genetic engineering, we focused on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is a negative factor in the Agrobacterium-plant interaction. Recent studies have shown contradictory results regarding the effects of GABA on vir gene expression, leading to the speculation that GABA inhibits T-DNA transfer. In this study, we examined the effect of GABA on T-DNA transfer using a tomato line with a low GABA content. Compared with the control, the T-DNA transfer frequency was increased in the low-GABA tomato line, indicating that GABA inhibits T-DNA transfer. Therefore, we bred a new A. tumefaciens strain with GABA transaminase activity and the ability to degrade GABA. The A. tumefaciens strain exhibited increased T-DNA transfer in two tomato cultivars and Erianthus arundinacues and an increased frequency of stable transformation in tomato. PMID:28220841

  12. Extraction, purification and anti-fatigue activity of γ-aminobutyric acid from mulberry (Morus alba L.) leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hengwen; He, Xuanhui; Liu, Yan; Li, Jun; He, Qingyong; Zhang, Cuiying; Wei, Benjun; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Mulberry (Morus alba L.) is a tree species of Moraceae widely distributed in Southern China. In the present study, the white crystal of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was purified from mulberry leaves, and its bioactivity was also investigated. The main results were as follows: first, the crude GABA was extracted from mulberry leaves by using biochemical methods. Then, the crude was purified by chromatography over an S-8 macroporous resin, Sephadex G-10, and 732 cation exchange resin to yield a white crystal. Lavage administration and exposure of GABA to male NIH mice showed no adverse effects on their growth and development. In an endurance capacity test, the average loaded-swimming time of medium dose was 111.60% longer than the control (P < 0.01). Further investigations showed that relative to that of model control, the respective blood lactate (BL) concentrations of low- and medium-dose were 28.52% and 28.81% lower (P < 0.05), whereas the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were 36.83% and 40.54% lower (P < 0.05), and that of liver glycogen (LG) levels were 12.81% and 17.22% lower (P < 0.05). The results indicated that GABA has an advantage over taurine of anti-fatigue effect. These findings were indicative of the anti-fatigue activity of GABA.

  13. Identification of rare noncoding sequence variants in gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor, alpha 4 subunit in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Anthony J; Van Booven, Derek; Cuccaro, Michael L; Haines, Jonathan L; Gilbert, John R; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A

    2018-01-01

    Alterations of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling system has been strongly linked to the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Genetic associations of common variants in GABA receptor subunits, in particular GABRA4 on chromosome 4p12, with ASD have been replicated by several studies. Moreover, molecular investigations have identified altered transcriptional and translational levels of this gene and protein in brains of ASD individuals. Since the genotyped common variants are likely not the functional variants contributing to the molecular consequences or underlying ASD phenotype, this study aims to examine rare sequence variants in GABRA4, including those outside the protein coding regions of the gene. We comprehensively re-sequenced the entire protein coding and noncoding portions of the gene and putative regulatory sequences in 82 ASD individuals and 55 developmentally typical pediatric controls, all homozygous for the most significant previously associated ASD risk allele (G/G at rs1912960). We identified only a single common, coding variant, and no association of any single marker or set of variants with ASD. Functional annotation of noncoding variants identified several rare variants in putative regulatory sites. Finally, a rare variant unique to ASD cases, in an evolutionary conserved site of the 3'UTR, shows a trend toward decreasing gene expression. Hence, GABRA4 rare variants in noncoding DNA may be variants of modest physiological effects in ASD etiology.

  14. Uncertainty assessment of gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration of different brain regions in individual and group using residual bootstrap analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng; Liao, Congyu; Chen, Song; Ding, Qiuping; Zhu, Darong; Liu, Hui; Yan, Xu; Zhong, Jianhui

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work is to quantify individual and regional differences in the relative concentration of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in human brain with in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectral editing Mescher-Garwood point resolved spectroscopy (MEGA-PRESS) sequence and GABA analysis toolkit (Gannet) were used to detect and quantify GABA in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and occipital cortex (OCC) of healthy volunteers. Residual bootstrap, a model-based statistical analysis technique, was applied to resample the fitting residuals of GABA from the Gaussian fitting model (referred to as GABA + thereafter) in both individual and group data of ACC and OCC. The inter-subject coefficient of variation (CV) of GABA + in OCC (20.66 %) and ACC (12.55 %) with residual bootstrap was lower than that of a standard Gaussian model analysis (21.58 % and 16.73 % for OCC and ACC, respectively). The intra-subject uncertainty and CV of OCC were lower than that of ACC in both analyses. The residual bootstrap analysis thus provides a more robust uncertainty estimation of individual and group GABA + detection in different brain regions, which may be useful in our understanding of GABA biochemistry in brain and its use for the diagnosis of related neuropsychiatric diseases.

  15. Analysis of subcomponents of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor macromolecular complex in mammalian central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    Since the presence of endogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may affect benzodiazepine binding to tissue sections in autoradiographic studies, a protocol designed to check for this influence has been investigated. [ 3 H]Flunitrazepam (1 nM) was used to label benzodiazepine receptors for autoradiographic localization. Bicuculline was added to the incubation medium of an additional set of tissue sections to antagonize any potential effect of endogenous GABA. Binding in these sections was compared to that occurring in another set in which excess GABA was added to create further GABA enhancement. Binding was also compared to adjacent sections which were treated similarly but also preincubated in distilled-deionized water to burst the cells by osmotic shock and eliminate endogenous GABA, thereby preventing any effect on benzodiazepine binding. The results indicated that endogenous GABA is indeed present in the slide-mounted tissue sections and is affecting benzodiazepine receptor binding differentially in various regions of the brain depending on the density of GABAergic innervation. Scatchard analysis of saturation data demonstrated that the alteration in BZ binding due to GABA was a result of a change in the affinity rather than number of receptors present

  16. An Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strain with Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Transaminase Activity Shows an Enhanced Genetic Transformation Ability in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Satoko; Someya, Tatsuhiko; Zhou, Sha; Takayama, Mariko; Nakamura, Kouji; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2017-02-21

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has the unique ability to mediate inter-kingdom DNA transfer, and for this reason, it has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. To increase the transformation frequency in plant genetic engineering, we focused on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is a negative factor in the Agrobacterium-plant interaction. Recent studies have shown contradictory results regarding the effects of GABA on vir gene expression, leading to the speculation that GABA inhibits T-DNA transfer. In this study, we examined the effect of GABA on T-DNA transfer using a tomato line with a low GABA content. Compared with the control, the T-DNA transfer frequency was increased in the low-GABA tomato line, indicating that GABA inhibits T-DNA transfer. Therefore, we bred a new A. tumefaciens strain with GABA transaminase activity and the ability to degrade GABA. The A. tumefaciens strain exhibited increased T-DNA transfer in two tomato cultivars and Erianthus arundinacues and an increased frequency of stable transformation in tomato.

  17. [Effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid-rich germinated brown rice on indexes of life-style related diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hiroyuki; Uno, Yoshihiro; Umemoto, Takao; Sugiyama, Chiyo; Matsumoto, Masami; Wada, Yuji; Ishizuka, Tatsuo

    2004-03-01

    We examined the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid-rich germinated brown rice (germinated brown rice) on principal indexes of life-style related diseases in 67 volunteers aged 71 +/- 8. They were divided into two groups; germinated brown rice group, which had an equal amount of the germinated brown rice to polished rice for 11 to 13 months, and control group, which had polished rice alone for the same period. Differences of indexes before and after the examination between the two groups were compared. Significant increases in body fat ratio, hemoglobin A1c and mean red cell volume and a significant decrease in mean red cell hemoglobin concentration were observed in the germinated brown rice group. However, there was no difference of changes in body mass index, blood pressure, serum lipid, hepatic and renal functions, bone metabolic markers, bone density, depression score, red blood cell counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance between the two groups. These findings suggested that germinated brown rice might not improve glucose metabolism.

  18. Decreased Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) and Gamma Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) in Individuals with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Anthony J; Pietsch, Stefanie C

    2013-01-01

    There is support for the role of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the etiology of mood disorders. Recent research has shown that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) modulates GABAergic inhibition and seizure susceptibility. This study was designed to determine and correlate plasma levels of HGF and GABA as well as symptom severity in individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Plasma from 15 individuals with OCD (9 males, 6 females;, mean age 38.7 years) and 17 neurotypical controls (10 males, 7 females; mean age 35.2 years) was assessed for HGF, GABA, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) concentration using enzyme-linked immunosorbest assays ELISAs. Symptom severity was assessed in these OCD individuals and compared with HGF and GABA concentrations. In this preliminary study, individuals with OCD had significantly decreased HGF levels, decreased plasma levels of GABA and decreased uPA. We found that both uPA and uPAR levels correlate with HGF. Both low uPA and low uPAR levels correlate with high symptom severity in individuals with OCD. Low GABA levels in OCD individuals also correlate with high symptom severity. These results demonstrate a preliminary association between HGF, GABA, uPA levels, and OCD and suggest that plasma GABA and uPA levels are related to symptom severity in individuals with OCD.

  19. Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Increases the Production of Short-Chain Fatty Acids and Decreases pH Values in Mouse Colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Min; Chen, Hai-Hong; Nie, Shao-Ping; Yin, Jun-Yi; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2017-04-20

    Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) could regulate physiological functions in the gastrointestinal tract. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of GABA on colon health in mice. The female Kunming mice were given GABA at doses of 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg/d for 14 days. Afterwards, the short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) concentrations, pH values, colon index, colon length and weight of colonic and cecal contents were determined to evaluate the effects of GABA on colon health. The results showed that intake of GABA could increase the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate and total SCFAs in colonic and cecal contents, as well as the weight of colonic and cecal contents. The colon index and length of the 40 mg/kg/d GABA-treated group were significantly higher than those of the control group ( p colonic and cecal contents was also observed. These results suggest that GABA may improve colon health.

  20. Modulation of cardiopulmonary depressor reflex in nucleus ambiguus by electroacupuncture: roles of opioids and γ-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Li, Peng; Li, Min; Longhurst, John C

    2012-04-01

    Stimulation of cardiopulmonary receptors with phenylbiguanide (PBG) elicits depressor cardiovascular reflex responses, including decreases in blood pressure and heart rate mediated in part by the brain stem parasympathetic cardiac neurons in the nucleus ambiguus (NAmb). The present study examined NAmb neurotransmitter mechanisms underlying the influence of electroacupuncture (EA) on the PBG-induced hypotension and bradycardia. We hypothesized that somatic stimulation during EA modulates PBG responses through opioid and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) modulation in the NAmb. Anesthetized and ventilated cats were studied during repeated stimulation with PBG or cardiac vagal afferents while low-frequency EA (2 Hz) was applied at P5-6 acupoints overlying the median nerve for 30 min and NAmb neuronal activity, heart rate, and blood pressure were recorded. Microinjection of kainic acid into the NAmb attenuated the PBG-induced bradycardia from -60 ± 11 to -36 ± 11 beats/min. Likewise, EA reduced the PBG-induced depressor and bradycardia reflex by 52 and 61%, respectively. Cardiac vagal afferent evoked preganglionic cellular activity in the NAmb was reduced by EA for about 60 min. Blockade of opioid or GABA(A) receptors using naloxone and gabazine reversed the EA-related modulation of the evoked cardiac vagal activity by 73 and 53%, respectively. Similarly, naloxone and gabazine reversed EA modulation of the negative chronotropic responses from -11 ± 5 to -23 ± 6 and -13 ± 4 to -24 ± 3 beats/min, respectively. Thus EA at P5-6 decreases PBG evoked hypotension and bradycardia as well as the NAmb PBG-sensitive preganglionic cardiac vagal outflow through opioid and GABA neurotransmitter systems.

  1. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and related molecules in the sea fan Eunicella cavolini (Cnidaria: Octocorallia): a biochemical and immunohistochemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girosi, Laura; Ferrando, Sara; Beltrame, Francesco; Ciarcia, Gaetano; Diaspro, Alberto; Fato, Marco; Magnone, Mirko; Raiteri, Luca; Ramoino, Paola; Tagliafierro, Grazia

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study has been the biochemical demonstration of the presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the Mediterranean sea fan Eunicella cavolini by means of high-performance liquid chromatography, and the description of the distribution pattern of GABA and its related molecules, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) and one of the GABA receptors (GABA(B) R) by immunohistochemical methods. The interrelationships of GABA, GAD and GABA receptor immunoreactivity have been established by using double-immunohistochemical methods and confocal microscopy. The immunodetection of monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies has revealed GABA immunoreactivity throughout the polyp tissue, both in neuronal and non-neuronal elements. GAD immunoreactivity has been mostly localized in the neuronal compartment, contacting epithelial and muscular elements. GABA(B) R immunoreactivity appears particularly intense in the nematocytes and in the oocyte envelope; its presence in GAD-immunoreactive neurons in the tentacles suggests an autocrine type of regulation. Western blot analysis has confirmed that a GABA(B) R, with a molecular weight of 142 kDa, similar to that of rat brain, is present in E. cavolini polyp tissue. The identification of the sites of the synthesis, vesicular transport, storage and reception of GABA strongly suggests the presence of an almost complete set of GABA-related molecules for the functioning of the GABAergic system in this simple nervous system. The distribution of these different immunoreactivities has allowed us to hypothesize GABA involvement in nematocyst discharge, in body wall and enteric muscular contraction, in neuronal integration and in male gametocyte differentiation.

  2. On-line near-infrared spectroscopy optimizing and monitoring biotransformation process of γ-aminobutyric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyu Ding

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS with its fast and nondestructive advantages can be qualified for the real-time quantitative analysis. This paper demonstrates that NIRS combined with partial least squares (PLS regression can be used as a rapid analytical method to simultaneously quantify l-glutamic acid (l-Glu and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA in a biotransformation process and to guide the optimization of production conditions when the merits of NIRS are combined with response surface methodology. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC reference analysis was performed by the o-phthaldialdehyde pre-column derivatization. NIRS measurements of two batches of 141 samples were firstly analyzed by PLS with several spectral pre-processing methods. Compared with those of the HPLC reference analysis, the resulting determination coefficients (R2, root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP and residual predictive deviation (RPD of the external validation for the l-Glu concentration were 99.5%, 1.62 g/L, and 11.3, respectively. For the GABA concentration, R2, RMSEP, and RPD were 99.8%, 4.00 g/L, and 16.4, respectively. This NIRS model was then used to optimize the biotransformation process through a Box-Behnken experimental design. Under the optimal conditions without pH adjustment, 200 g/L l-Glu could be catalyzed by 7148 U/L glutamate decarboxylase (GAD to GABA, reaching 99% conversion at the fifth hour. NIRS analysis provided timely information on the conversion from l-Glu to GABA. The results suggest that the NIRS model can not only be used for the routine profiling of enzymatic conversion, providing a simple and effective method of monitoring the biotransformation process of GABA, but also be considered to be an optimal tool to guide the optimization of production conditions.

  3. Gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor genes and nicotine dependence: evidence for association from a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Arpana; Pergadia, Michele L; Saccone, Scott F; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Saccone, Nancy L; Neuman, Rosalind J; Breslau, Naomi; Johnson, Eric; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Montgomery, Grant W; Heath, Andrew C; Martin, Nicholas G; Goate, Alison M; Rice, John P; Bierut, Laura J; Madden, Pamela A F

    2008-06-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor A (GABRA) gene clusters on chromosomes 4 and 5 have been examined previously for their association with alcohol and drug dependence phenotypes. Compelling evidence suggests that GABRA2 is associated with alcohol and drug dependence. However, no study has investigated whether genes in the GABA(A) gene clusters are associated with nicotine dependence, an important phenotype with a high correlation to persistent smoking, the single most preventable cause of mortality world-wide. Using data on 1050 nicotine-dependent cases and 879 non-dependent smoking controls, we used logistic regression to examine the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 13 genes in the GABA(A) receptor system as well as GABBR2 (a GABA(B) gene). We found evidence for association between four SNPs in GABRA4, two SNPs in GABRA2 and one SNP in GABRE with nicotine dependence. These included a synonymous polymorphism in GABRA2 (rs279858), lying in a highly conserved region, which has been shown previously to be associated with alcohol and drug dependence. A non-synonymous polymorphism (rs16859834/rs2229940) in GABRA4, also highly conserved, was associated at P-value of 0.03. Significant haplotypes associated with nicotine dependence were found for GABRA2. No evidence for epistatic interactions were noted. Our study did not find evidence for an association between GABBR2 gene and nicotine dependence. Given the potential role of compounds that enhance GABAergic neurotransmission in smoking cessation research, these findings have enormous potential for informing the wider field of addiction research.

  4. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Application Improved Early Growth, Net Photosynthesis, and Associated Physio-Biochemical Events in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu; Liu, Jianhua; Ashraf, Umair; Li, Gaoke; Li, Yuliang; Lu, Wenjia; Gao, Lei; Han, Fuguang; Hu, Jianguang

    2016-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an endogenous signaling molecule and involved in growth regulations and plant development, however, a little information is available on the consequences of exogenous GABA application on growth, development, and associated physio-biochemical processes in maize. The present study examined the GABA-induced regulations in early growth, net photosynthetic rate, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and enzymatic activities in three maize cultivars, i.e., Yuecainuo 6, Zhengtian 68, and Yuecainuo 2. Two levels of GABA, i.e., 0 mg L(-1) and 50 mg L(-1), in solution form, with total application volume of 100 ml per pot containing 15 maize seedlings were exogenously applied. Results revealed that exogenous GABA application improved seedling growth in terms of seedling length and biomass accumulation in all maize cultivars at both 3 and 7 days after treatment (DAT). It also promoted net photosynthesis and variably affected gas exchange attributes, i.e., stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (Tr), as well as leaves SPAD value. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation [in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA)] under GABA treated maize seedlings were also remained variable; however, osmolyte accumulation (protein and proline) and activities of anti-oxidants enzymes, i.e., super-oxide dismutase and peroxidase were also affected differently at both 3 and 7 DAT in all maize cultivars. Furthermore, enzymes involved in nitrogen metabolism, e.g., nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase were improved. These results suggest the involvement of GABA in various physio-metablical mechanisms which might lead to improvement in morphological growth of maize. In future, research is still needed at molecular and genetic levels to unravel the involvement of GABA-mediated regulations in growth and its associated physio-biochemical mechanisms.

  5. γ-Aminobutyric acid addition alleviates ammonium toxicity by limiting ammonium accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoling; Zhu, Changhua; Yang, Na; Gan, Lijun; Xia, Kai

    2016-12-01

    Excessive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer has increased ammonium (NH 4 + ) accumulation in many paddy soils to levels that reduce rice vegetative biomass and yield. Based on studies of NH 4 + toxicity in rice (Oryza sativa, Nanjing 44) seedlings cultured in agar medium, we found that NH 4 + concentrations above 0.75 mM inhibited the growth of rice and caused NH 4 + accumulation in both shoots and roots. Use of excessive NH 4 + also induced rhizosphere acidification and inhibited the absorption of K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn in rice seedlings. Under excessive NH 4 + conditions, exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) treatment limited NH 4 + accumulation in rice seedlings, reduced NH 4 + toxicity symptoms and promoted plant growth. GABA addition also reduced rhizosphere acidification and alleviated the inhibition of Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn absorption caused by excessive NH 4 + . Furthermore, we found that the activity of glutamine synthetase/NADH-glutamate synthase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2/NADH-GOGAT; EC1.4.1.14) in root increased gradually as the NH 4 + concentration increased. However, when the concentration of NH 4 + is more than 3 mM, GABA treatment inhibited NH 4 + -induced increases in GS/NADH-GOGAT activity. The inhibition of ammonium assimilation may restore the elongation of seminal rice roots repressed by high NH 4 + . These results suggest that mitigation of ammonium accumulation and assimilation is essential for GABA-dependent alleviation of ammonium toxicity in rice seedlings. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  6. Fabrication of chitosan-gold nanoshells for γ-aminobutyric acid detection as a surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ik Joong; Lim, Jae Wook [Dept. of Chemical and BioEngineering, Gachon University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) principle-based brain-probing optical fiber was produced to analyze changes in the concentration of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The procedure was carried out within the GABA administration concentration range of 5–30 mM for the patients who should take cranial medicines for GABA components of less than a normal range. The optical fiber, of which the surface had been reformed, was prepared by treatment with chitosan-gold nanoshell particles, which were synthesized by using an ionic interaction. The treated fiber was subsequently combined with GABA, for the purpose of analyzing its GABA concentration. The calibration curve of the SERS sensitivity (counts) as determined by the concentration levels of GABA adsorbed onto the chitosan-gold nanoshell without attachment to the optical fiber was as follows: y = 0.2x{sup 2} − 0.6743x + 419.8 ( R{sup 2}  = 0.9874), while the corresponding calibration curve of the SERS sensitivity (counts) with attachment to optical fiber was as follows: y = 7.4057x{sup 2} + 93.68x + 1851.4 ( R{sup 2}  = 0.9472). Based on the aforementioned two sets of data, it was confirmed that the analysis of GABA using optical fiber had a higher level of sensitivity compared to its analysis in the absence of optical fiber.

  7. Altered behavioral responses to gamma-aminobutyric acid pharmacological agents in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Ting; Chang, Ya-Gin; Chang, Ching-Pang; Siew, Jian-Jing; Chen, Hui-Mei; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Chern, Yijuang

    2017-11-01

    Disruptions in gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acid signaling are believed to be involved in Huntington's disease pathogenesis, but the regulation of GABAergic signaling remains elusive. Here we evaluated GABAergic signaling by examining the function of GABAergic drugs in Huntington's disease and the expression of GABAergic molecules using mouse models and human brain tissues from Huntington's disease. We treated wild-type and R6/2 mice (a transgenic Huntington's disease mouse model) acutely with vehicle, diazepam, or gaboxadol (drugs that selectively target synaptic or extrasynaptic GABA A receptors) and monitored their locomotor activity. The expression levels of GABA A receptors and a major neuron-specific chloride extruder (potassium-chloride cotransporter-2) were analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunocytochemistry. The R6/2 mice were less sensitive to the sedative effects of both drugs, suggesting reduced function of GABA A receptors. Consistently, the expression levels of α1/α2 and δ subunits were lower in the cortex and striatum of R6/2 mice. Similar results were also found in 2 other mouse models of Huntington's disease and in Huntington's disease patients. Moreover, the interaction and expression levels of potassium-chloride cotransporter-2 and its activator (brain-type creatine kinase) were decreased in Huntington's disease neurons. These findings collectively suggest impaired chloride homeostasis, which further dampens GABA A receptor-mediated inhibitory signaling in Huntington's disease brains. The dysregulated GABAergic responses and altered expression levels of GABA A receptors and potassium-chloride cotransporter-2 in Huntington's disease mice appear to be authentic and may contribute to the clinical manifestations of Huntington's disease patients. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in1H MRS volumes composed heterogeneously of grey and white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Mark; Singh, Krish D; Brealy, Jennifer A; Linden, David E J; Evans, C John

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration using localised MRS suffers from partial volume effects related to differences in the intrinsic concentration of GABA in grey (GM) and white (WM) matter. These differences can be represented as a ratio between intrinsic GABA in GM and WM: r M . Individual differences in GM tissue volume can therefore potentially drive apparent concentration differences. Here, a quantification method that corrects for these effects is formulated and empirically validated. Quantification using tissue water as an internal concentration reference has been described previously. Partial volume effects attributed to r M can be accounted for by incorporating into this established method an additional multiplicative correction factor based on measured or literature values of r M weighted by the proportion of GM and WM within tissue-segmented MRS volumes. Simulations were performed to test the sensitivity of this correction using different assumptions of r M taken from previous studies. The tissue correction method was then validated by applying it to an independent dataset of in vivo GABA measurements using an empirically measured value of r M . It was shown that incorrect assumptions of r M can lead to overcorrection and inflation of GABA concentration measurements quantified in volumes composed predominantly of WM. For the independent dataset, GABA concentration was linearly related to GM tissue volume when only the water signal was corrected for partial volume effects. Performing a full correction that additionally accounts for partial volume effects ascribed to r M successfully removed this dependence. With an appropriate assumption of the ratio of intrinsic GABA concentration in GM and WM, GABA measurements can be corrected for partial volume effects, potentially leading to a reduction in between-participant variance, increased power in statistical tests and better discriminability of true effects. Copyright © 2016 John

  9. Chronic noise stress-induced alterations of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid and their metabolism in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Amajad Iqbal; Oommen, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress induces neurochemical changes that include neurotransmitter imbalance in the brain. Noise is an environmental factor inducing stress. Chronic noise stress affects monoamine neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system. The effect on other excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is not known. The aim was to study the role of chronic noise stress on the glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic systems of the brain. Female Wistar rats (155 ± 5 g) were unintentionally exposed to noise due to construction (75-95 db, 3-4 hours/day, 5 days a week for 7-8 weeks) in the vicinity of the animal care facility. Glutamate/GABA levels and their metabolic enzymes were evaluated in different rat brain regions (cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum) and compared with age and gender matched nonexposed rats. Chronic noise stress decreased glutamate levels and glutaminase activity 27% and 33% in the cortex, 15% and 24% in the cerebellum. Glutamate levels increased 10% in the hippocampus, 28% in striatum and glutaminase activity 15% in striatum. Glutamine synthetase activity increased significantly in all brain regions studied, that is, cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum (P Noise stress-increased GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity 20% and 45% in the cortex, 13% and 28% in the hippocampus respectively. GABA levels and glutamate alpha decarboxylase activity decreased 15% and 14%, respectively in the striatum. GABA transaminase activity was significantly reduced in the cortex (55%), hippocampus (17%), and cerebellum (33%). Chronic noise stress differentially affected glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter systems in the rat brain, which may alter glutamate and GABA neurotransmission.

  10. Dairy Streptococcus thermophilus improves cell viability of Lactobacillus brevis NPS-QW-145 and its γ-aminobutyric acid biosynthesis ability in milk

    OpenAIRE

    Qinglong Wu; Yee-Song Law; Nagendra P. Shah

    2015-01-01

    Most high ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producers are Lactobacillus brevis of plant origin, which may be not able to ferment milk well due to its poor proteolytic nature as evidenced by the absence of genes encoding extracellular proteinases in its genome. In the present study, two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes, gadA and gadB, were found in high GABA-producing L. brevis NPS-QW-145. Co-culturing of this organism with conventional dairy starters was carried out to manufacture GABA-rich f...

  11. Efficient bioconversion of L-glutamate to γ-aminobutyric acid by Lactobacillus brevis resting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiufeng; Chang, Chuanyou; Ma, Shenxi; Cheng, Yibing; Zhang, Jun; Gao, Qiang

    2017-05-01

    This work investigated the efficient bioconversion process of L-glutamate to GABA by Lactobacillus brevis TCCC 13007 resting cells. The optimal bioconversion system was composed of 50 g/L 48 h cultivated wet resting cells, 0.1 mM pyridoxal phosphate in glutamate-containing 0.6 M citrate buffer (pH 4.5) and performed at 45 °C and 180 rpm. By 10 h bioconversion at the ratio of 80 g/L L-glutamic acid to 240 g/L monosodium glutamate, the final titer of GABA reached 201.18 g/L at the molar bioconversion ratio of 99.4 %. This process presents a potential for industrial and commercial applications and also offers a promising feasibility of continuous GABA production coupled with fermentation. Besides, the built kinetics model revealed that the optimum operating conditions were 45 °C and pH 4.5, and the bioconversion kinetics at low ranges of substrate concentration (0 < S < 80 g/L) was assumed to follow the classical Michaelis-Menten equation.

  12. The protective effect of γ-aminobutyric acid on the development of immune function in chickens under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J; Chen, Z

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the development of immune function in chicks under heat stress (HS). One-day-old male Wenchang chicks were randomly divided into control (CK), HS and GABA+HS groups. The GABA+HS group was fed with 0.2 ml GABA solution (50 mg/kg) daily by oral gavage. The HS and GABA+HS groups were placed in 40 ± 0.5 °C environment for 2 h heat treatment from 13:00 each day. Blood samples were routinely taken at 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 days respectively, and the contents of T and B lymphocyte subsets in the blood and tissue were analysed by flow cytometry after FITC/PE double staining; the plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-2, immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IgG and IgM were determined using ELISA. The thymus and the bursa of fabricius were also collected to analyse for organ index and observe for the changes in tissue microstructure. In addition, the chicks received primary and secondary immunizations with attenuated Newcastle disease (ND) vaccine (LaSota strain) at 7 and 28 days respectively; conventional hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay was performed to monitor the titre changes in plasma antibody against ND virus in the birds. Our results indicated that the indices of both thymus and bursa of fabricius, the intactness of tissue structure and development, the plasma levels of IL-2, IgA, IgG and IgM, the titres of ND antibody, and the levels of B and T lymphocyte subsets in HS group were all significantly lower than those in CK group (p < 0.05). However, all above indices were significantly improved in GABA+HS group compared with those in HS group (p < 0.05). These results demonstrated that while HS seriously affected the development of immune function in Wenchang chicks, GABA effectively alleviated the damages of HS to the development of immune function in chicks. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Social and neural determinants of aggressive behavior: pharmacotherapeutic targets at serotonin, dopamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miczek, Klaus A; Fish, Eric W; De Bold, Joseph F; De Almeida, Rosa M M

    2002-10-01

    Aggressive outbursts that result in harm and injury present a major problem for the public health and criminal justice systems, but there are no adequate treatment options. Obstacles at the level of social policy, institutional regulation, and scientific strategy in developing animal models continue to impede the development of specific anti-aggressive agents for emergency and long-term treatments. To be more relevant to the clinical situation, preclinical aggression research has begun to focus on the neurobiological determinants of escalated aggressive behavior that exceeds species-typical patterns. It is the goal of this review to examine novel pharmacological and molecular tools that target the neural mechanisms for different kinds of aggressive behavior more selectively than previously possible and to outline potential pharmacotherapeutic options. (1) The preclinical focus on the behavioral characteristics and determinants of intense aggression promises to be most relevant to the clinical distinction between the proposed impulsive-reactive-hostile-affective subtypes of human aggression and the controlled-proactive-instrumental-predatory subtypes of aggression. The neural circuits for many types of human and animal aggression critically involve serotonin, dopamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and specific receptor subtypes. (2) The dynamic changes in frontal cortical serotonin that are triggered by engaging in aggressive behavior imply that serotonergic drug effects are largely determined by the functional state of the receptors at the time of drug treatment. Of the numerous 5-HT receptors currently identified, the 5-HT(1B) receptors offer a promising target for reducing impulsive aggressive behavior, particularly if the action can be limited to sites in the central nervous system. (3) Aggressive confrontations are salient stressors, both for the aggressor as well as the victim of aggression, that are accompanied by activation of the mesocorticolimbic but

  14. [Construction of a recombinant Escherichia coli BL21/ pET-28a-lpgad and the optimization of transformation conditions for the efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lingzhi; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming

    2012-01-01

    In order to enhance gamma-aminobutyric acid production from L-glutamate efficiently, we amplified the key enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) encoding gene lpgad from the strain Lactobacillus plantarum GB 01-21 which was obtained by way of multi-mutagenesis and overexpressed it in E. coli BL21. Then we purified GAD by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and characterized the enzyme to optimize the conditions of the whole-cell transformation. The results showed that the recombinant E. coli BL21 (pET-28a-lpgad) produced 8.53 U/mg GAD, which was increased by 3.24 fold compared with the GAD activity in L. plantarum. The optimum pH and temperature of the enzyme were pH 4.8 and 37 degrees C, respectively. At the same time, we found that Ca2+ and Mg2+ could increase the activity significantly. Based on this, we investigated gamma-aminobutyric acid transformation in 5 L fermentor under the optimum transformation conditions. Accordingly, the yield of gamma-aminobutyric acid was 204.5 g/L at 24 h when the 600 g L-glutamate was added and the mole conversion rate had reached 97.92%. The production of gamma-aminobutyric acid was improved by 42.5% compared with that under the unoptimized transformation conditions. This paved a way for the gamma-aminobutyric acid construction of the industrial applications.

  15. Biodiversity and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Production by Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Traditional Alpine Raw Cow’s Milk Cheeses

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    Elena Franciosi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available “Nostrano-cheeses” are traditional alpine cheeses made from raw cow’s milk in Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy. This study identified lactic acid bacteria (LAB developing during maturation of “Nostrano-cheeses” and evaluated their potential to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, an immunologically active compound and neurotransmitter. Cheese samples were collected on six cheese-making days, in three dairy factories located in different areas of Trentino and at different stages of cheese ripening (24 h, 15 days, and 1, 2, 3, 6, and 8 months. A total of 1,059 LAB isolates were screened using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR and differentiated into 583 clusters. LAB strains from dominant clusters (n=97 were genetically identified to species level by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. LAB species most frequently isolated were Lactobacillus paracasei, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. The 97 dominant clusters were also characterized for their ability in producing GABA by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. About 71% of the dominant bacteria clusters evolving during cheeses ripening were able to produce GABA. Most GABA producers were Lactobacillus paracasei but other GABA producing species included Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. No Enterococcus faecalis or Sc. macedonicus isolates produced GABA. The isolate producing the highest amount of GABA (80.0±2.7 mg/kg was a Sc. thermophilus.

  16. The gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB receptor agonist baclofen inhibits morphine sensitization by decreasing the dopamine level in rat nucleus accumbens

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    Fu Zhenyu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeated morphine exposure can induce behavioral sensitization. There are evidences have shown that central gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA system is involved in morphine dependence. However, the effect of a GABAB receptor agonist baclofen on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in rats is unclear. Methods We used morphine-induced behavioral sensitization model in rat to investigate the effects of baclofen on behavioral sensitization. Moreover, dopamine release in the shell of the nucleus accumbens was evaluated using microdialysis assay in vivo. Results The present study demonstrated that morphine challenge (3 mg/kg, s.c. obviously enhanced the locomotor activity following 4-day consecutive morphine administration and 3-day withdrawal period, which indicated the expression of morphine sensitization. In addition, chronic treatment with baclofen (2.5, 5 mg/kg significantly inhibited the development of morphine sensitization. It was also found that morphine challenge 3 days after repeated morphine administration produced a significant increase of extracellular dopamine release in nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, chronic treatment with baclofen decreased the dopamine release induced by morphine challenge. Conclusions Our results indicated that gamma-aminobutyric acid system plays an important role in the morphine sensitization in rat and suggested that behavioral sensitization is a promising model to study the mechanism underlying drug abuse.

  17. Effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis and intracellular transport on the gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced functional differentiation of cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Meier, E

    1990-01-01

    an intracellular and a plasma membrane localization of the receptors. In all experiments cultures treated with THIP alone served as controls. The inhibitors of protein synthesis totally abolished the ability of THIP to induce low-affinity GABA receptors. In contrast, the inhibitors of intracellular transport......The effect of inhibitors of protein synthesis (actinomycin D, cycloheximide), proteases (leupeptin), and intracellular transport (colchicine, monensin) on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist [4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP)]-induced changes in morphological...... as well as the protease inhibitor did not affect this parameter. However, studies of effects of GABA on transmitter release from monensin-treated cultures showed that transmitter release could not be inhibited by GABA in these cells in spite of the presence of low-affinity GABA receptors in the membrane...

  18. Serotonin Transporter (5-HTT) and gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Subunit beta3 (GABRB3) Gene Polymorphisms are not Associated with Autism in the IMGSA Families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maestrini, E.; Lai, C.; Marlow, A.

    1999-01-01

    on the collection of families grom the International Molecular Genetic Study of Autism (IMGSA) Consortium, using the transmission disequilibrium test. Two polymorphisms in the 5-HTT gene (a functional insertion-deletion polymorphism in the promoter and a variable nubmer tandem repeat in the second intron) were...... examined in 90 families comprising 174 affected individuals. Furthermore, seven microsatellite markers spanning the 15q11-q13 region were studied in 94 families with 182 affected individuals. No significant evidence of association or linkage was found at any of the markers tested, indicating that the 5-HTT......Previous studies have suggested that the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene and the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit beta3 (GABRB3) gene, or other genes in the 15q11-q13 region, are possibly involved in susceptibility to autism. To test this hypothesis we performed an association study...

  19. The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide lotilaner (Credelio™: a non-competitive antagonist specific to invertebrates γ-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channels (GABACls

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    Lucien Rufener

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The isoxazolines are a novel class of parasiticides that are potent inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-gated chloride channels (GABACls and, to a lesser extent, of inhibitory glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls. Lotilaner (Credelio™, a novel representative of this chemical class, is currently evaluated for its excellent ectoparasiticide properties. Methods In this study, we investigated the molecular mode of action and pharmacology of lotilaner. We report the successful gene identification, cDNA cloning and functional expression in Xenopus oocytes of Drosohpila melanogaster (wild type and dieldrin/fipronil-resistant forms, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (an ectoparasite copepod crustacean of salmon, Rhipicephalus microplus and Canis lupus familiaris GABACls. Automated Xenopus oocyte two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology was used to assess GABACls functionality and to compare ion channel inhibition by lotilaner with that of established insecticides addressing GABACls as targets. Results In these assays, we demonstrated that lotilaner is a potent non-competitive antagonist of insects (fly GABACls. No cross-resistance with dieldrin or fipronil resistance mutations was detected, suggesting that lotilaner might bind to a site at least partly different from the one bound by known GABACl blockers. Using co-application experiments, we observed that lotilaner antagonism differs significantly from the classical open channel blocker fipronil. We finally confirmed for the first time that isoxazoline compounds are not only powerful antagonists of GABACls of acari (ticks but also of crustaceans (sea lice, while no activity on a dog GABAA receptor was observed up to a concentration of 10 μM. Conclusions Together, these results demonstrate that lotilaner is a non-competitive antagonist specific to invertebrate’s γ-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channels (GABACls. They contribute to our understanding of the mode of

  20. The sedative but not the memory-blocking properties of ethanol are modulated by α5-subunit-containing γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Loren J; Zurek, Agnieszka A; Bonin, Robert P; Oh, Gabriel H T; Kim, John H; Mount, Howard T J; Orser, Beverley A

    2011-03-01

    The precise mechanisms underlying the memory-blocking properties of ethanol are unknown, in part because ethanol targets a wide array of neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. The aim of this study was to determine whether the memory loss caused by ethanol is mediated, in part, by α5 subunit-containing γ-aminobutyric acid subtype A receptors. These receptors have been implicated in learning and memory processes and are targets for a variety of neurodepressive drugs. Also, since these receptors generate a tonic inhibitory current in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, we examined whether concentrations of ethanol that block memory in vivo increased the tonic current using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in hippocampal neurons. Null mutant mice lacking the α5 subunit (Gabra5-/-) and wild-type mice were equally impaired in contextual fear conditioning by moderate (1mg/kg) and high (1.5mg/kg) doses of ethanol. The higher dose of ethanol also reduced auditory delay fear conditioning to the same extent in the two genotypes. Interestingly, wild-type mice were more sensitive than Gabra5-/- mice to the sedative effects of low (0.5mg/kg) and moderate (1mg/kg) doses of ethanol in the open-field task. Concentrations of ethanol that impaired memory performance in vivo did not increase the amplitude of the tonic current. Together, the results suggest that the α5-subunit containing γ-aminobutyric acid subtype A receptors are not direct targets for positive modulation by ethanol nor do they contribute to ethanol-induced memory loss. In contrast, these receptors may contribute to the sedative properties of ethanol. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhancement of gama-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and other health-related metabolites in germinated red rice (Oryza sativa L.) by ultrasonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Junzhou; Ulanov, Alexander V; Dong, Mengyi; Yang, Tewu; Nemzer, Boris V; Xiong, Shanbai; Zhao, Siming; Feng, Hao

    2018-01-01

    Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) that has a red (reddish brown) bran layer in de-hulled rice is known to contain rich biofunctional components. Germination is an effective technique to improve the nutritional quality, digestibility, and flavor of de-hulled rice. Ultrasonication, a form of physical stimulation, has been documented as a novel approach to improve the nutritional quality of plant-based food. This study was undertaken to test the use of ultrasound to enhance the nutritional value of red rice. Ultrasonication (5min, 16W/L) was applied to rice during soaking or after 66h germination. Changes of metabolites (amino acids, sugars, and organic acids) in red rice treated by ultrasonication were determined using a GC/MS plant primary metabolomics analysis platform. Differential expressed metabolites were identified through multivariate statistical analysis. Results showed that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and riboflavin (vitamin B 2 ) in red rice significantly increased after germination for 72h, and then experienced a further increase after treatment by ultrasound at different stages during germination. The metabolomics analysis showed that some plant metabolites, i.e. GABA, O-phosphoethanolamine, and glucose-6-phosphate were significantly increased after the ultrasonic treatment (VIP>1.5) in comparison with the untreated germinated rice. The findings of this study showed that controlled germination with ultrasonic stress is an effective method to enhance GABA and other health-promoted components in de-hulled rice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synergistic antipruritic effects of gamma aminobutyric acid A and B agonists in a mouse model of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevikbas, Ferda; Braz, Joao M; Wang, Xidao; Solorzano, Carlos; Sulk, Mathias; Buhl, Timo; Steinhoff, Martin; Basbaum, Allan I

    2017-08-01

    Despite recent insights into the pathophysiology of acute and chronic itch, chronic itch remains an often intractable condition. Among major contributors to chronic itch is dysfunction of spinal cord gamma aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) inhibitory controls. We sought to test the hypothesis that selective GABA agonists as well as cell transplant-derived GABA are antipruritic against acute itch and in a transgenic mouse model of atopic dermatitis produced by overexpression of the T H 2 cell-associated cytokine, IL-31 (IL-31Tg mice). We injected wild-type and IL-31Tg mice with combinations of GABA-A (muscimol) or GABA-B (baclofen) receptor agonists 15 to 20 minutes prior to injection of various pruritogens (histamine, chloroquine, or endothelin-1) and recorded spontaneous scratching before and after drug administration. We also tested the antipruritic properties of intraspinal transplantation of precursors of GABAergic interneurons in the IL-31Tg mice. Systemic muscimol or baclofen are antipruritic against both histamine-dependent and -independent pruritogens, but the therapeutic window using either ligand alone was very small. In contrast, combined subthreshold doses of baclofen and muscimol produced a significant synergistic antipruritic effect, with no sedation. Finally, transplant-mediated long-term enhancement of GABAergic signaling not only reduced spontaneous scratching in the IL-31Tg mice but also dramatically resolved the associated skin lesions. Although additional research is clearly needed, existing approved GABA agonists should be considered in the management of chronic itch, notably atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Delta Subunit-Containing Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid A Receptor Disinhibits Lateral Amygdala and Facilitates Fear Expression in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Peng; He, Qing-Hai; Pan, Han-Qing; Xu, Xiao-Bin; Chen, Wen-Bing; He, Ye; Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Ying, Xiao-Ping; Han, Ren-Wen; Li, Bao-Ming; Gao, Tian-Ming; Pan, Bing-Xing

    2017-06-15

    Maintaining gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) inhibition in the amygdala within a physiological range is critical for the appropriate expression of emotions such as fear and anxiety. The synaptic GABA type A receptor (GABA A R) is generally known to mediate the primary component of amygdala inhibition and prevent inappropriate expression of fear. However, little is known about the contribution of the extrasynaptic GABA A R to amygdala inhibition and fear. By using mice expressing green fluorescent protein in interneurons (INs) and lacking the δ subunit-containing GABA A R (GABA A (δ)R), which is exclusively situated in the extrasynaptic membrane, we systematically investigated the role of GABA A (δ)R in regulating inhibition in the lateral amygdala (LA) and fear learning using the combined approaches of immunohistochemistry, electrophysiology, and behavior. In sharp contrast to the established role of synaptic GABA A R in mediating LA inhibition, we found that either pharmacological or physiological recruitment of GABA A (δ)R resulted in the weakening of GABAergic transmission onto projection neurons in LA while leaving the glutamatergic transmission unaltered, suggesting disinhibition by GABA A (δ)R. The disinhibition arose from IN-specific expression of GABA A (δ)R with its activation decreasing the input resistance of local INs and suppressing their activation. Genetic deletion of GABA A (δ)R attenuated its role in suppressing LA INs and disinhibiting LA. Importantly, the GABA A (δ)R facilitated long-term potentiation in sensory afferents to LA and permitted the expression of learned fear. Our findings suggest that GABA A (δ)R serves as a brake rather than a mediator of GABAergic inhibition in LA. The disinhibition by GABA A (δ)R may help to prevent excessive suppression of amygdala activity and thus ensure the expression of emotion. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dairy Streptococcus thermophilus improves cell viability of Lactobacillus brevis NPS-QW-145 and its γ-aminobutyric acid biosynthesis ability in milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinglong; Law, Yee-Song; Shah, Nagendra P.

    2015-01-01

    Most high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producers are Lactobacillus brevis of plant origin, which may be not able to ferment milk well due to its poor proteolytic nature as evidenced by the absence of genes encoding extracellular proteinases in its genome. In the present study, two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes, gadA and gadB, were found in high GABA-producing L. brevis NPS-QW-145. Co-culturing of this organism with conventional dairy starters was carried out to manufacture GABA-rich fermented milk. It was observed that all the selected strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, but not Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, improved the viability of L. brevis NPS-QW-145 in milk. Only certain strains of S. thermophilus improved the gadA mRNA level in L. brevis NPS-QW-145, thus enhanced GABA biosynthesis by the latter. These results suggest that certain S. thermophilus strains are highly recommended to co-culture with high GABA producer for manufacturing GABA-rich fermented milk. PMID:26245488

  5. Dairy Streptococcus thermophilus improves cell viability of Lactobacillus brevis NPS-QW-145 and its γ-aminobutyric acid biosynthesis ability in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinglong; Law, Yee-Song; Shah, Nagendra P

    2015-08-06

    Most high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producers are Lactobacillus brevis of plant origin, which may be not able to ferment milk well due to its poor proteolytic nature as evidenced by the absence of genes encoding extracellular proteinases in its genome. In the present study, two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes, gadA and gadB, were found in high GABA-producing L. brevis NPS-QW-145. Co-culturing of this organism with conventional dairy starters was carried out to manufacture GABA-rich fermented milk. It was observed that all the selected strains of Streptococcus thermophilus, but not Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, improved the viability of L. brevis NPS-QW-145 in milk. Only certain strains of S. thermophilus improved the gadA mRNA level in L. brevis NPS-QW-145, thus enhanced GABA biosynthesis by the latter. These results suggest that certain S. thermophilus strains are highly recommended to co-culture with high GABA producer for manufacturing GABA-rich fermented milk.

  6. A fluorescence-coupled assay for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA reveals metabolic stress-induced modulation of GABA content in neuroendocrine cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Ippolito

    Full Text Available Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1, was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies.

  7. Sequence analysis of diamine oxidase gene from fava bean and its expression related to γ-aminobutyric acid accumulation in seeds germinating under hypoxia-NaCl stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Runqiang; Yin, Yongqi; Guo, Liping; Han, Yongbin; Gu, Zhenxin

    2014-06-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is synthesized via the polyamine degradation pathway in plants, with diamine oxidase (DAO) being the key enzyme. In this study the cDNA of DAO in fava bean was cloned and its expression in seeds germinating under hypoxia-NaCl stress was investigated. Fava bean DAO cDNA is 2199 bp long and contains 2025 bp of open reading frame that encodes 675 amino acid peptides with a calculated molecular weight of 76.31 kDa and a pI of 5.41. Hypoxia and hypoxia-NaCl stress enhanced DAO activity and resulted in GABA accumulation in germinating fava bean. However, DAO gene expression was down-regulated under hypoxia compared with non-stress condition, while its expression in the cotyledon and shoot was up-regulated under hypoxia-NaCl. In addition, DAO expression could be promoted to enhance GABA accumulation after increasing the stress intensity using NaCl. DAO gene expression was significantly inhibited by aminoguanidine treatment under hypoxia but increased under hypoxia-NaCl. Under hypoxia, GABA accumulation due to NaCl was mainly concentrated in the cotyledon. The GABA content increase under hypoxia did not result from DAO gene expression, but DAO existing in seeds was activated under hypoxia. DAO gene expression was up-regulated to enhance GABA accumulation after increasing the stress intensity. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Use of sourdough fermentation and pseudo-cereals and leguminous flours for the making of a functional bread enriched of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, Rossana; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Gobbetti, Marco

    2010-02-28

    Lactobacillus plantarum C48 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis PU1, previously selected for the biosynthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), were used for sourdough fermentation of cereal, pseudo-cereal and leguminous flours. Chickpea, amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat were the flours most suitable to be enriched of GABA. The parameters of sourdough fermentation were optimized. Addition of 0.1mM pyridoxal phosphate, dough yield of 160, inoculum of 5 x 10(7)CFU/g of starter bacteria and fermentation for 24h at 30 degrees C were found to be the optimal conditions. A blend of buckwheat, amaranth, chickpea and quinoa flours (ratio 1:1:5.3:1) was selected and fermented with baker's yeast (non-conventional flour bread, NCB) or with Lb. plantarum C48 sourdough (non-conventional flour sourdough bread, NCSB) and compared to baker's yeast started wheat flour bread (WFB). NCSB had the highest concentration of free amino acids and GABA (ca. 4467 and 504 mg/kg, respectively). The concentration of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of NCSB bread was the highest, as well as the rate of in vitro starch hydrolysis was the lowest. Texture analysis showed that sourdough fermentation enhances several characteristics of NCSB with respect to NCB, thus approaching the features of WFB. Sensory analysis showed that sourdough fermentation allowed to get good palatability and overall taste appreciation. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A functional assay to measure postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acidB responses in cultured spinal cord neurons: Heterologous regulation of the same K+ channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamatchi, G.L.; Ticku, M.K. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The stimulation of postsynaptic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors leads to slow inhibitory postsynaptic potentials due to the influx of K(+)-ions. This was studied biochemically, in vitro in mammalian cultured spinal cord neurons by using 86Rb as a substitute for K+. (-)-Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, produced a concentration-dependent increase in the 86Rb-influx. This effect was stereospecific and blocked by GABAB receptor antagonists like CGP 35 348 (3-aminopropyl-diethoxymethyl-phosphonic acid) and phaclofen. Apart from the GABAB receptors, both adenosine via adenosine1 receptors and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) via 5-HT1 alpha agonists also increased the 86Rb-influx. These agonists failed to show any additivity between them when they were combined in their maximal concentration. In addition, their effect was antagonized specifically by their respective antagonists without influencing the others. These findings suggest the presence of GABAB, adenosine1 and 5-HT1 alpha receptors in the cultured spinal cord neurons, which exhibit a heterologous regulation of the same K(+)-channel. The effect of these agonists were antagonized by phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, an activator of protein kinase C, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. This suggests that these agonists by acting on their own receptors converge on the same K(+)-channel through the Gi/Go proteins. In summary, we have developed a biochemical functional assay for studying and characterizing GABAB synaptic pharmacology in vitro, using spinal cord neurons.

  10. Efficient gamma-aminobutyric acid bioconversion by employing synthetic complex between glutamate decarboxylase and glutamate/GABA antiporter in engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Ko, Ji-seun; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a precursor of one of the most promising heat-resistant biopolymers, Nylon-4, and can be produced by the decarboxylation of monosodium glutamate (MSG). In this study, a synthetic protein complex was applied to improve the GABA conversion in engineered Escherichia coli. Complexes were constructed by assembling a single protein-protein interaction domain SH3 to the glutamate decarboxylase (GadA and GadB) and attaching a cognate peptide ligand to the glutamate/GABA antiporter (GadC) at the N-terminus, C-terminus, and the 233rd amino acid residue. When GadA and GadC were co-overexpressed via the C-terminus complex, a GABA concentration of 5.65 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l MSG, which corresponds to a GABA yield of 93 %. A significant increase of the GABA productivity was also observed where the GABA productivity increased 2.5-fold in the early culture period due to the introduction of the synthetic protein complex. The GABA pathway efficiency and GABA productivity were enhanced by the introduction of the complex between Gad and glutamate/GABA antiporter.

  11. Effects of controlled germination on selected physicochemical and functional properties of whole-wheat flour and enhanced γ-aminobutyric acid accumulation by ultrasonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Junzhou; Hou, Gary G; Nemzer, Boris V; Xiong, Shanbai; Dubat, Arnaud; Feng, Hao

    2018-03-15

    Using hard red spring (HRS), hard white (HW), and soft white (SW) wheat, this study examined how germination time affected the functionality of whole-wheat flour (WWF) and enhancement of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content through ultrasonication. The falling number values significantly decreased and the glucose content increased by 227-357% after 15h of controlled germination. The setback value of WWF paste decreased from 654 to 6cP (HW), 690 to 9cP (SW), and 698 to 7cP (HRS), respectively, showing significant decreases of starch retrogradation in an aqueous system. The gluten quality and dough mixing performance of WWF after 5-15h of controlled germination was enhanced since gluten is less weakened during the dough heating stage of Mixolab testing. After a 72h germination, the GABA content increased by 339% of the non-sprouting counterpart. Furthermore, the GABA content in the ultrasound-treated SW sample was 30.7% higher than that without ultrasound treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Restless legs syndrome and central nervous system gamma-aminobutyric acid: preliminary associations with periodic limb movements in sleep and restless leg syndrome symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelman, John W; Schoerning, Laura; Platt, Sam; Jensen, J Eric

    2014-10-01

    Previous research has demonstrated abnormalities in glutamate and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) in the thalamus in individuals with restless legs syndrome (RLS) compared with healthy matched controls. However, levels of these transmitters in other RLS-related brain areas and levels of the most common inhibitory neurotransmitter, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), have not been assessed. This study examined GABA, glutamate, and NAA levels in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), thalamus and cerebellum with the use of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) at 4 tesla (4 T) and Megapress difference-editing in 18 subjects with RLS and a matched control group without RLS. Actigraphy was performed on the nights before scans to assess periodic limb movements of sleep (PLMS). Levels of GABA, glutamate, and NAA were no different between RLS and control subjects in any of the three voxels of interest. However, GABA levels were positively correlated with both PLM indices and RLS severity in the thalamus and negatively with both of these measures in the cerebellum in RLS subjects. In addition, NAA levels were higher in the ACC in RLS than in controls. Our preliminary data suggest that known cerebellar-thalamic interactions may modulate the intensity of RLS sensory and motor symptoms. In addition, anterior cingulate cortex may be associated with the affective components of the painful symptoms in this disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hypergravity exposure decreases gamma-aminobutyric acid immunoreactivity in axon terminals contacting pyramidal cells in the rat somatosensory cortex: a quantitative immunocytochemical image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, F.; Wu, L. C.; Fox, R. A.; Daunton, N. G.; Corcoran, M. L.; Polyakov, I.

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of gamma-aminobutyric acid immunoreactivity (GABA-IR) in the hindlimb representation of the rat somatosensory cortex after 14 days of exposure to hypergravity (hyper-G) was conducted by using computer-assisted image processing. The area of GABA-IR axosomatic terminals apposed to pyramidal cells of cortical layer V was reduced in rats exposed to hyper-G compared with control rats, which were exposed either to rotation alone or to vivarium conditions. Based on previous immunocytochemical and behavioral studies, we suggest that this reduction is due to changes in sensory feedback information from muscle receptors. Consequently, priorities for muscle recruitment are altered at the cortical level, and a new pattern of muscle activity is thus generated. It is proposed that the reduction observed in GABA-IR of the terminal area around pyramidal neurons is the immunocytochemical expression of changes in the activity of GABAergic cells that participate in reprogramming motor outputs to achieve effective movement control in response to alterations in the afferent information.

  14. Further evidence for involvement of the dorsal hippocampus serotonergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic pathways in the expression of contextual fear conditioning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almada, Rafael C; Albrechet-Souza, Lucas; Brandão, Marcus L

    2013-12-01

    Intra-dorsal hippocampus (DH) injections of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), a serotonin-1A (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-1A) receptor agonist, were previously shown to inhibit the expression of contextual fear when administered six hours after conditioning. However, further understanding of the consolidation and expression of aversive memories requires investigations of these and other mechanisms at distinct time points and the regions of the brain to which they are transferred. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of DH serotonergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic mechanisms in the expression of contextual fear 24 h after conditioning, reflected by fear-potentiated startle (FPS) and freezing behavior. The recruitment of the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in these processes was also evaluated by measuring Fos protein immunoreactivity. Although intra-DH injections of 8-OH-DPAT did not produce behavioral changes, muscimol reduced both FPS and the freezing response. Fos protein immunoreactivity revealed that contextual fear promoted wide activation of the mPFC, which was significantly reduced after intra-DH infusions of muscimol. The present findings, together with previous data, indicate that in contrast to 5-HT, which appears to play a role during the early phases of contextual aversive memory consolidation, longer-lasting GABA-mediated mechanisms are recruited during the expression of contextual fear memories.

  15. Alternate cadmium exposure differentially affects the content of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex of male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquifino, A.I. [Dept. de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular III, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Seara, R.; Fernandez-Rey, E.; Lafuente, A. [Lab. de Toxicologia, Universidad de Vigo, Orense (Spain)

    2001-05-01

    This work examines changes of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine contents in the hypothalamus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the rat after an alternate schedule of cadmium administration. Age-associated changes were also evaluated, of those before puberty and after adult age. In control rats GABA content decreased with age in the median eminence and in anterior, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and the striatum. Taurine content showed similar results with the exception of mediobasal hypothalamus and striatum, where no changes were detected. In pubertal rats treated with cadmium from 30 to 60 days of life, GABA content significantly decreased in all brain regions except in the striatum. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90 of life, GABA content was significantly changed in prefrontal cortex only compared with the age matched controls. Taurine content showed similar results in pubertal rats, with the exception of the median eminence and the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither of which showed a change. However, when cadmium was administered to rats from day 60 to 90 of life, taurine content only changed in prefrontal cortex compared with the age matched controls. These results suggest that cadmium differentially affects GABA and taurine contents within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex as a function of age. (orig.)

  16. Alternate cadmium exposure differentially affects the content of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex of male rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esquifino, A.I.; Seara, R.; Fernandez-Rey, E.; Lafuente, A.

    2001-01-01

    This work examines changes of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine contents in the hypothalamus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the rat after an alternate schedule of cadmium administration. Age-associated changes were also evaluated, of those before puberty and after adult age. In control rats GABA content decreased with age in the median eminence and in anterior, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex and the striatum. Taurine content showed similar results with the exception of mediobasal hypothalamus and striatum, where no changes were detected. In pubertal rats treated with cadmium from 30 to 60 days of life, GABA content significantly decreased in all brain regions except in the striatum. When cadmium was administered from day 60 to 90 of life, GABA content was significantly changed in prefrontal cortex only compared with the age matched controls. Taurine content showed similar results in pubertal rats, with the exception of the median eminence and the mediobasal hypothalamus, neither of which showed a change. However, when cadmium was administered to rats from day 60 to 90 of life, taurine content only changed in prefrontal cortex compared with the age matched controls. These results suggest that cadmium differentially affects GABA and taurine contents within the hypothalamus, median eminence, striatum and prefrontal cortex as a function of age. (orig.)

  17. Effects of single and combined administration of fermented barley extract and gamma-aminobutyric acid on the development of atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokazono, Hideki; Omori, Toshiro; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effects single and combined administration of fermented barley extract P (FBEP), prepared from barley-shochu distillery by-products, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the development of atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice. Single administration of FBEP and GABA dose-dependently reduced the development of AD-like skin lesions in mice. GABA reduced the development of AD-like skin lesions by suppressing serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and splenocyte interleukin (IL)-4 production, while FBEP reduced skin lesions without affecting the IgE or cytokine production. However, in mice with induced AD-like skin lesions, combined administration of FBEP and GABA decreased serum IgE levels and splenic cell IL-4 production, and increased splenic cell interferon-gamma production. These results suggest that combined administration of FBEP and GABA alleviated AD-like skin lesions in the NC/Nga mice by adjusting the Th1/Th2 balance to a Th1-predominant immune response.

  18. Psychological stress-reducing effect of chocolate enriched with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in humans: assessment of stress using heart rate variability and salivary chromogranin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, H; Takishima, T; Kometani, T; Yokogoshi, H

    2009-01-01

    We studied the psychological stress-reducing effect of chocolate enriched with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), on stress induced by an arithmetic task using changes of heart rate variability (HRV) and salivary chromogranin A (CgA). Subjects ingested 10 g chocolate enriched with 28 mg GABA (GABA chocolate); 15 min after the ingestion, subjects were assigned an arithmetic task for 15 min. After the task, an electrocardiogram was recorded and saliva samples were collected. HRV was determined from the electrocardiogram, and the activity of the autonomic nervous system was estimated through HRV. The CgA concentration of all saliva samples, an index for acute psychological stress, was measured. From HRV, those taking GABA chocolate made a quick recovery to the normal state from the stressful state. The CgA value after the task in those taking GABA chocolate did not increased in comparison with that before ingestion. From these results, GABA chocolate was considered to have a psychological stress-reducing effect.

  19. Time-course study and effects of drying method on concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid, flavonoids, anthocyanin, and 2''-hydroxynicotianamine in leaves of buckwheats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tatsuro; Watanabe, Masami; Iki, Makiko; Aoyagi, Yasuo; Kim, Sun-Ju; Mukasa, Yuji; Yokota, Satoshi; Takigawa, Shigenobu; Hashimoto, Naoto; Noda, Takahiro; Yamauchi, Hiroaki; Matsuura-Endo, Chie

    2009-01-14

    Concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), rutin, minor flavonoids (such as orientin), anthocyanin, and 2''-hydroxynicotianamine (2HN) were quantified in the leaves of common and tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench and Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn., respectively), at 14, 28, and 42 days after sowing (DAS). GABA and rutin concentrations peaked at 42 DAS, whereas anthocyain, 2HN, and minor flavonoid concentrations declined with the age of the plants. However, at 42 DAS, anthocyanin concentrations in the leaves of tartary buckwheat Hokkai T10 leaves were at least 10-fold greater than in the other buckwheats tested. In addition, the effects on target compound concentrations and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity of three different drying methods (20 h at 40 degrees C, 7 h at 70 degrees C, or lyophilization) were investigated. In general, the drying method had no significant effect on the parameters tested. These results indicate that, in terms of GABA, rutin, and anthocyanin concentrations, leaf powder from 42 day old Hokkai T10 has the potential to be a useful food ingredient, such as Ao-jiru juice.

  20. Effects of Traumatic Stress Induced in the Juvenile Period on the Expression of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Receptor Type A Subunits in Adult Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Yan Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have found that early traumatic experience significantly increases the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA deficits were proposed to be implicated in development of PTSD, but the alterations of GABA receptor A (GABAAR subunits induced by early traumatic stress have not been fully elucidated. Furthermore, previous studies suggested that exercise could be more effective than medications in reducing severity of anxiety and depression but the mechanism is unclear. This study used inescapable foot-shock to induce PTSD in juvenile rats and examined their emotional changes using open-field test and elevated plus maze, memory changes using Morris water maze, and the expression of GABAAR subunits (γ2, α2, and α5 in subregions of the brain in the adulthood using western blotting and immunohistochemistry. We aimed to observe the role of GABAAR subunits changes induced by juvenile trauma in the pathogenesis of subsequent PTSD in adulthood. In addition, we investigated the protective effects of exercise for 6 weeks and benzodiazepine (clonazepam for 2 weeks. This study found that juvenile traumatic stress induced chronic anxiety and spatial memory loss and reduced expression of GABAAR subunits in the adult rat brains. Furthermore, exercise led to significant improvement as compared to short-term BZ treatment.

  1. A case of relapsing encephalitis positive for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor antibody associated with Type B3 thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Takaya; Kinoshita, Makoto; Shimazu, Kohki; Fushimi, Hiroaki; Omori, Kenichi; Hazama, Takanori

    2016-11-29

    A 87-year-old female presented with subacute progression of cognitive decline. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images of brain MRI showed multifocal high-intensity lesions. Thoracic CT image revealed the presence of thymoma, and serum autoantibody screening showed positivity for anti-gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor antibody. Histopathological analysis confirmed type B3 thymoma after thymectomy. The patient received both plasmapheresis and intravenous methylprednisolone therapy, and showed remarkable amelioration of clinical symptoms and MRI abnormal high intensity. However, after 2 month from the clinical recovery, the patient showed recurrence of brain lesions and intravenous methylprednisolone monotherapy was performed. Continuation of oral steroid therapy was required to maintain the quienscent state of inflammation within the central nervous system. Anti-GABA A receptor antibody is a recently discovered novel autoantibody associated with autoimmue encephalitis. Due to the limited number of literature reported, clinical course and therapeutic response of GABA A receptor antibody encephalitis remains elusive. Here we reported a rare case of GABA A receptor antibody encephalitis with type B3 thymoma. Clinical, radiological and therapeutic courses described in our report highlight the importance of immunotherapy for treatment of the disease.

  2. Enhancing Contents of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) and Other Micronutrients in Dehulled Rice during Germination under Normoxic and Hypoxic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Junzhou; Yang, Tewu; Feng, Hao; Dong, Mengyi; Slavin, Margaret; Xiong, Shanbai; Zhao, Siming

    2016-02-10

    Biofortification of staple grains with high contents of essential micronutrients is an important strategy to overcome micronutrient malnutrition. However, few attempts have targeted at γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a functional nutrient for aging populations. In this study, two rice cultivars, Heinuo and Xianhui 207, were used to investigate changes in GABA and other nutritional compounds of dehulled rice after germination under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Forty-one metabolites were identified in both cultivars treated by normoxic germination, whereas the germinated dehulled rice of Heinuo and Xianhui 207 under hypoxic treatment had 43 and 41 metabolites identified, respectively. GABA increased in dehulled rice after germination, especially under hypoxia. Meanwhile, a number of other health-beneficial and/or flavor-related compounds such as lysine and d-mannose increased after the hypoxic treatment. The accumulation of GABA exhibited genotype-specific modes in both normoxic and hypoxic treatments. With regard to GABA production, Xianhui 207 was more responsive to the germination process than Heinuo, whereas Heinuo was more responsive to hypoxia than Xianhui 207. This study provides a promising approach to biofortify dehulled rice with increased GABA and other nutrients through metabolomic-based regulation.

  3. Changes of tocopherols, tocotrienols, γ-oryzanol, and γ-aminobutyric acid levels in the germinated brown rice of pigmented and nonpigmented cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Lean-Teik; Huang, Shao-Hua; Chen, Yen-Ting; Su, Chun-Han

    2013-12-26

    This study examined the changes of tocopherols (Toc), tocotrienols (T3), γ-oryzanol (GO), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contents in germinated brown rice (GBR) of pigmented and nonpigmented cultivars under different germination conditions. Results showed that the Toc and T3 contents in GBR were significantly different between treatments in both rice cultivars. The pigmented GBR possessed higher total vitamin E, total Toc, total T3, and GO contents than the nonpigmented GBR; however, its level of GABA was lower. The order of the three highest vitamin E homologues in pigmented and nonpigmented GBR was γ-T3 > γ-Toc > α-Toc and α-Toc > γ-T3 > α-T3, respectively; β-Toc, β-T3, δ-Toc, and δ-T3 were present in only small amounts (≤1.0 mg/kg) in GBR of both cultivars. Although both cultivars showed an increase in GABA contents with increasing germination time, the GABA content in nonpigmented GBR was higher.

  4. The effect of D,L-β-aminobutyric acid on the growth and development of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. tulipae (Apt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Jarecka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of D,L-β-aminobutyric acid (BABA on the growth and development of the root system and the development of fusariosis on tulip bulbs cv. Apeldoorn infected by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. tulipae (F.ox.t. 218 was studied. The length and fresh weight of roots, the development of fusariosis on bulbs and the linear growth of mycelium of F.ox.t. 218 on PDA medium were measured. Preventively used BABA at a concentration of 100, 250 and 300 µg·cm-3 for soaking uncooled and cooled tulip bulbs greatly inhibited the development of fusariosis on the root system; the length and fresh weight of roots were similar to those of the bulbs not inoculated with F.ox.t. 218. At a concentration of 100 µg·cm-3;, BABA used for soaking bulbs limited the development of fusariosis on scales in about 50% and the concentration of 200 µg·cm-3 totally inhibited the disease symptoms induced by F.ox.t. 218. At a concentration of 100 - 1000 µg·cm-3, BABA did not inhibit the mycelium growth of F.ox.t. 17 and F.xo.t. 218 on PDA medium. This study suggests that BABA protects tulip roots and bulb scales against F. oxysporum f. sp. tulipae by inducing resistance in these organs and has no direct influence on the pathogen.

  5. Improved fermentative production of gamma-aminobutyric acid via the putrescine route: Systems metabolic engineering for production from glucose, amino sugars, and xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, João M P; Nguyen, Anh Q D; Pérez-García, Fernando; Kind, Stefanie; Wendisch, Volker F

    2017-04-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid widespread in Nature. Among the various uses of GABA, its lactam form 2-pyrrolidone can be chemically converted to the biodegradable plastic polyamide-4. In metabolism, GABA can be synthesized either by decarboxylation of l-glutamate or by a pathway that starts with the transamination of putrescine. Fermentative production of GABA from glucose by recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum has been described via both routes. Putrescine-based GABA production was characterized by accumulation of by-products such as N-acetyl-putrescine. Their formation was abolished by deletion of the spermi(di)ne N-acetyl-transferase gene snaA. To improve provision of l-glutamate as precursor 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity was reduced by changing the translational start codon of the chromosomal gene for 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase subunit E1o to the less preferred TTG and by maintaining the inhibitory protein OdhI in its inhibitory form by changing amino acid residue 15 from threonine to alanine. Putrescine-based GABA production by the strains described here led to GABA titers up to 63.2 g L -1 in fed-batch cultivation at maximum volumetric productivities up to 1.34 g L -1  h -1 , the highest volumetric productivity for fermentative GABA production reported to date. Moreover, GABA production from the carbon sources xylose, glucosamine, and N-acetyl-glucosamine that do not have competing uses in the food or feed industries was established. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 862-873. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Altered γ-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission in major depressive disorder: a critical review of the supporting evidence and the influence of serotonergic antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehrson, Alan L; Sanchez, Connie

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggesting that central nervous system γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations are reduced in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) has been present since at least 1980, and this idea has recently gained support from more recent magnetic resonance spectroscopy data. These observations have led to the assumption that MDD's underlying etiology is tied to an overall reduction in GABA-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission. In this paper, we review the mechanisms that govern GABA and glutamate concentrations in the brain, and provide a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the clinical data supporting reduced GABA neurotransmission in MDD. This review includes an evaluation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy data, as well as data on the expression and function of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase, GABA neuron-specific cell markers, such as parvalbumin, calretinin and calbindin, and the GABAA and GABAB receptors in clinical MDD populations. We explore a potential role for glial pathology in MDD-related reductions in GABA concentrations, and evidence of a connection between neurosteroids, GABA neurotransmission, and hormone-related mood disorders. Additionally, we investigate the effects of GABAergic pharmacological agents on mood, and demonstrate that these compounds have complex effects that do not universally support the idea that reduced GABA neurotransmission is at the root of MDD. Finally, we discuss the connections between serotonergic and GABAergic neurotransmission, and show that two serotonin-focused antidepressants - the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine and the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine - modulate GABA neurotransmission in opposing ways, despite both being effective MDD treatments. Altogether, this review demonstrates that there are large gaps in our understanding of the relationship between GABA physiology and MDD, which must be remedied with more data from well-controlled empirical

  7. Carrier-mediated ¿-aminobutyric acid transport across the basolateral membrane of human intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Carstensen, Mette; Brodin, Birger

    2012-01-01

    and the anticancer prodrug d-aminolevulinic acid across the apical membrane of small intestinal enterocytes. Little is however known about the basolateral transport of these substances. We investigated basolateral transport of GABA in mature Caco-2 cell monolayers using isotope studies. Here we report that, at least...

  8. Gene knockout of the alpha6 subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor: lack of effect on responses to ethanol, pentobarbital, and general anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homanics, G E; Ferguson, C; Quinlan, J J; Daggett, J; Snyder, K; Lagenaur, C; Mi, Z P; Wang, X H; Grayson, D R; Firestone, L L

    1997-04-01

    The alpha6 subunit of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)-R) has been implicated in mediating the intoxicating effects of ethanol and the motor ataxic effects of general anesthetics. To test this hypothesis, we used gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to create mice lacking a functional alpha6 gene. Homozygous mice are viable and fertile and have grossly normal cerebellar cytoarchitecture. Northern blot and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated that the targeting event disrupted production of functional alpha6 mRNA. Autoradiography of histological sections of adult brains demonstrated that diazepam-insensitive binding of [3H]Ro15-4513 to the cerebellar granule cell layer of wild-type mice was completely absent in homozygous mice. Cerebellar GABA(A)-R density was unchanged in the mutant mice; however, the apparent affinity for muscimol was markedly reduced. Sleep time response to injection of ethanol after pretreatment with vehicle or Ro15-4513 did not differ between genotypes. Sleep time response to injection of pentobarbital and loss of righting reflex and response to tail clamp stimulus in mice anesthetized with volatile anesthetics also did not differ between genotypes. Thus, the alpha6 subunit of the GABA(A)-R is not required for normal development, viability, and fertility and does not seem to be a critical or unique component of the neuronal pathway mediating the hypnotic effect of ethanol and its antagonism by Ro15-4513 in mice. Similarly, the alpha6 subunit does not seem to be involved in the behavioral responses to general anesthetics or pentobarbital.

  9. Effect of γ-Aminobutyric Acid-producing Lactobacillus Strain on Laying Performance, Egg Quality and Serum Enzyme Activity in Hy-Line Brown Hens under Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y Z; Cheng, J L; Ren, M; Yin, L; Piao, X S

    2015-07-01

    Heat-stress remains a costly issue for animal production, especially for poultry as they lack sweat glands, and alleviating heat-stress is necessary for ensuring animal production in hot environment. A high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producer Lactobacillus strain was used to investigate the effect of dietary GABA-producer on laying performance and egg quality in heat-stressed Hy-line brown hens. Hy-Line brown hens (n = 1,164) at 280 days of age were randomly divided into 4 groups based on the amount of freeze-dried GABA-producer added to the basal diet as follows: i) 0 mg/kg, ii) 25 mg/kg, iii) 50 mg/kg, and iv) 100 mg/kg. All hens were subjected to heat-stress treatment through maintaining the temperature and the relative humidity at 28.83±3.85°C and 37% to 53.9%, respectively. During the experiment, laying rate, egg weight and feed intake of hens were recorded daily. At the 30th and 60th day after the start of the experiment, biochemical parameters, enzyme activity and immune activity in serum were measured. Egg production, average egg weight, average daily feed intake, feed conversion ratio and percentage of speckled egg, soft shell egg and misshaped egg were significantly improved (phens fed GABA-producing strain supplemented diet was significantly higher (phens fed the basal diet, whereas cholesterol level was decreased. Compared with the basal diet, GABA-producer strain supplementation increased serum level of glutathione peroxidase (p = 0.009) and superoxide dismutase. In conclusion, GABA-producer played an important role in alleviating heat-stress, the isolated GABA-producer strain might be a potential natural and safe probiotic to use to improve laying performance and egg quality in heat-stressed hens.

  10. Neurotoxins from Snake Venoms and α-Conotoxin ImI Inhibit Functionally Active Ionotropic γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Denis S.; Shelukhina, Irina V.; Son, Lina V.; Ojomoko, Lucy O.; Kryukova, Elena V.; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N.; Zhmak, Maxim N.; Dolgikh, Dmitry A.; Ivanov, Igor A.; Kasheverov, Igor E.; Starkov, Vladislav G.; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Sieghart, Werner; Tsetlin, Victor I.; Utkin, Yuri N.

    2015-01-01

    Ionotropic receptors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAAR) regulate neuronal inhibition and are targeted by benzodiazepines and general anesthetics. We show that a fluorescent derivative of α-cobratoxin (α-Ctx), belonging to the family of three-finger toxins from snake venoms, specifically stained the α1β3γ2 receptor; and at 10 μm α-Ctx completely blocked GABA-induced currents in this receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes (IC50 = 236 nm) and less potently inhibited α1β2γ2 ≈ α2β2γ2 > α5β2γ2 > α2β3γ2 and α1β3δ GABAARs. The α1β3γ2 receptor was also inhibited by some other three-finger toxins, long α-neurotoxin Ls III and nonconventional toxin WTX. α-Conotoxin ImI displayed inhibitory activity as well. Electrophysiology experiments showed mixed competitive and noncompetitive α-Ctx action. Fluorescent α-Ctx, however, could be displaced by muscimol indicating that most of the α-Ctx-binding sites overlap with the orthosteric sites at the β/α subunit interface. Modeling and molecular dynamic studies indicated that α-Ctx or α-bungarotoxin seem to interact with GABAAR in a way similar to their interaction with the acetylcholine-binding protein or the ligand-binding domain of nicotinic receptors. This was supported by mutagenesis studies and experiments with α-conotoxin ImI and a chimeric Naja oxiana α-neurotoxin indicating that the major role in α-Ctx binding to GABAAR is played by the tip of its central loop II accommodating under loop C of the receptors. PMID:26221036

  11. Neurotoxins from snake venoms and α-conotoxin ImI inhibit functionally active ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Denis S; Shelukhina, Irina V; Son, Lina V; Ojomoko, Lucy O; Kryukova, Elena V; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Zhmak, Maxim N; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Ivanov, Igor A; Kasheverov, Igor E; Starkov, Vladislav G; Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Sieghart, Werner; Tsetlin, Victor I; Utkin, Yuri N

    2015-09-11

    Ionotropic receptors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAAR) regulate neuronal inhibition and are targeted by benzodiazepines and general anesthetics. We show that a fluorescent derivative of α-cobratoxin (α-Ctx), belonging to the family of three-finger toxins from snake venoms, specifically stained the α1β3γ2 receptor; and at 10 μm α-Ctx completely blocked GABA-induced currents in this receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes (IC50 = 236 nm) and less potently inhibited α1β2γ2 ≈ α2β2γ2 > α5β2γ2 > α2β3γ2 and α1β3δ GABAARs. The α1β3γ2 receptor was also inhibited by some other three-finger toxins, long α-neurotoxin Ls III and nonconventional toxin WTX. α-Conotoxin ImI displayed inhibitory activity as well. Electrophysiology experiments showed mixed competitive and noncompetitive α-Ctx action. Fluorescent α-Ctx, however, could be displaced by muscimol indicating that most of the α-Ctx-binding sites overlap with the orthosteric sites at the β/α subunit interface. Modeling and molecular dynamic studies indicated that α-Ctx or α-bungarotoxin seem to interact with GABAAR in a way similar to their interaction with the acetylcholine-binding protein or the ligand-binding domain of nicotinic receptors. This was supported by mutagenesis studies and experiments with α-conotoxin ImI and a chimeric Naja oxiana α-neurotoxin indicating that the major role in α-Ctx binding to GABAAR is played by the tip of its central loop II accommodating under loop C of the receptors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Enhanced Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid by Optimizing Culture Conditions of Lactobacillus brevis HYE1 Isolated from Kimchi, a Korean Fermented Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hee Seon; Cha, In-Tae; Roh, Seong Woon; Shin, Hae-Hun; Seo, Myung-Ji

    2017-03-28

    This study evaluated the effects of culture conditions, including carbon and nitrogen sources, L-monosodium glutamate (MSG), and initial pH, on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production by Lactobacillus brevis HYE1 isolated from kimchi, a Korean traditional fermented food. L. brevis HYE1 was screened by the production analysis of GABA and genetic analysis of the glutamate decarboxylase gene, resulting in 14.64 mM GABA after 48 h of cultivation in MRS medium containing 1% (w/v) MSG. In order to increase GABA production by L. brevis HYE1, the effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on GABA production were preliminarily investigated via one-factor-at-a-time optimization strategy. As the results, 2% maltose and 3% tryptone were determined to produce 17.93 mM GABA in modified MRS medium with 1% (w/v) MSG. In addition, the optimal MSG concentration and initial pH were determined to be 1% and 5.0, respectively, resulting in production of 18.97 mM GABA. Thereafter, response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to determine the optimal conditions of the above four factors. The results indicate that pH was the most significant factor for GABA production. The optimal culture conditions for maximum GABA production were also determined to be 2.14% (w/v) maltose, 4.01% (w/v) tryptone, 2.38% (w/v) MSG, and an initial pH of 4.74. In these conditions, GABA production by L. brevis HYE1 was predicted to be 21.44 mM using the RSM model. The experiment was performed under these optimized conditions, resulting in GABA production of 18.76 mM. These results show that the predicted and experimental values of GABA production are in good agreement.

  13. The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide fluralaner: selective inhibition of arthropod γ-aminobutyric acid- and L-glutamate-gated chloride channels and insecticidal/acaricidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassel, Michael; Wolf, Christian; Noack, Sandra; Williams, Heike; Ilg, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Isoxazolines are a novel class of parasiticides that are potent inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels (GABACls) and L-glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls). In this study, the effects of the isoxazoline drug fluralaner on insect and acarid GABACl (RDL) and GluCl and its parasiticidal potency were investigated. We report the identification and cDNA cloning of Rhipicephalus (R.) microplus RDL and GluCl genes, and their functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The generation of six clonal HEK293 cell lines expressing Rhipicephalus microplus RDL and GluCl, Ctenocephalides felis RDL-A285 and RDL-S285, as well as Drosophila melanogaster RDLCl-A302 and RDL-S302, combined with the development of a membrane potential fluorescence dye assay allowed the comparison of ion channel inhibition by fluralaner with that of established insecticides addressing RDL and GluCl as targets. In these assays fluralaner was several orders of magnitude more potent than picrotoxinin and dieldrin, and performed 5-236 fold better than fipronil on the arthropod RDLs, while a rat GABACl remained unaffected. Comparative studies showed that R. microplus RDL is 52-fold more sensitive than R. microplus GluCl to fluralaner inhibition, confirming that the GABA-gated chloride channel is the primary target of this new parasiticide. In agreement with the superior RDL on-target activity, fluralaner outperformed dieldrin and fipronil in insecticidal screens on cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis), yellow fever mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti) and sheep blowfly larvae (Lucilia cuprina), as well as in acaricidal screens on cattle tick (R. microplus) adult females, brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) adult females and Ornithodoros moubata nymphs. These findings highlight the potential of fluralaner as a novel ectoparasiticide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Deficits in the activity of presynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptors contribute to altered neuronal excitability in fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji-Yong; Chadchankar, Jayashree; Vien, Thuy N; Mighdoll, Michelle I; Hyde, Thomas M; Mather, Robert J; Deeb, Tarek Z; Pangalos, Menelas N; Brandon, Nicholas J; Dunlop, John; Moss, Stephen J

    2017-04-21

    The behavioral and anatomical deficits seen in fragile X syndrome (FXS) are widely believed to result from imbalances in the relative strengths of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Although modified neuronal excitability is thought to be of significance, the contribution that alterations in GABAergic inhibition play in the pathophysiology of FXS are ill defined. Slow sustained neuronal inhibition is mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA B ) receptors, which are heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors constructed from R1a and R2 or R1b and R2 subunits. Via the activation of G i/o , they limit cAMP accumulation, diminish neurotransmitter release, and induce neuronal hyperpolarization. Here we reveal that selective deficits in R1a subunit expression are seen in Fmr1 knock-out mice (KO) mice, a widely used animal model of FXS, but the levels of the respective mRNAs were unaffected. Similar trends of R1a expression were seen in a subset of FXS patients. GABA B receptors (GABA B Rs) exert powerful pre- and postsynaptic inhibitory effects on neurotransmission. R1a-containing GABA B Rs are believed to mediate presynaptic inhibition in principal neurons. In accordance with this result, deficits in the ability of GABA B Rs to suppress glutamate release were seen in Fmr1-KO mice. In contrast, the ability of GABA B Rs to suppress GABA release and induce postsynaptic hyperpolarization was unaffected. Significantly, this deficit contributes to the pathophysiology of FXS as the GABA B R agonist ( R )-baclofen rescued the imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission evident in Fmr1-KO mice. Collectively, our results provided evidence that selective deficits in the activity of presynaptic GABA B Rs contribute to the pathophysiology of FXS. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Induction of Direct or Priming Resistance against Botrytis cinerea in Strawberries by β-Aminobutyric Acid and Their Effects on Sucrose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaituo; Liao, Yunxia; Xiong, Qi; Kan, Jianquan; Cao, Shifeng; Zheng, Yonghua

    2016-07-27

    The specific forms of disease resistance induced by β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) and their impacts on sucrose metabolism of postharvest strawberries were determined in the present research. Treatment with 10-500 mmol L(-1) BABA inhibited the Botrytis cinerea infection, possibly directly by suppressing the fungus growth and indirectly by triggering disease resistance. Moreover, BABA-induced resistance against B. cinerea infection in strawberries was associated with either one of two mechanisms, depending upon the concentration used: BABA at concentrations higher than 100 mmol L(-1) directly induced the defense response, including a H2O2 burst, modulation of the expression of PR genes, including FaPR1, FaChi3, Faβglu, and FaPAL, and increased activities of chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase, and PAL, whereas BABA at 10 mmol L(-1) activated a priming response because the BABA-treated fruits exhibited an increased capacity to express molecular defense only when the fruits were inoculated with B. cinerea. Activation of the priming defense appeared almost as effective against B. cinerea as inducing direct defense. However, the primed strawberries maintained higher activities of SS synthesis and SPS and SPP enzymes) and lower level of SS cleavage during the incubation; these activities contributed to higher sucrose, fructose, and glucose contents, sweetness index, and sensory scores compared to fruits exhibiting the direct defense. Thus, it is plausible that the priming defense, which can be activated by BABA at relatively low concentrations, represents an optimal strategy for combining the advantages of enhanced disease protection and soluble sugar accumulation.

  16. Modulation of the release of norepinephrine by gamma-aminobutyric acid and morphine in the frontal cerebral cortex of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peoples, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Agents that enhance gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA, neurotransmission modulate certain effects of opioids, such as analgesia. Opioid analgesia is mediated in part by norepinephrine in the forebrain. In this study, the interactions between morphine and GABAergic agents on release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine from rat frontal cerebral cortical slices were examined. GABA, 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}-10{sup {minus}3} M, enhanced potassium stimulated ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine release and reversed the inhibitory effect of morphine in a noncompetitive manner. GABA did not enhance release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine stimulated by the calcium ionophore A23187. The effect of GABA was reduced by the GABA{sub A} receptor antagonists bicuculline methiodide or picrotoxin, and by the selective inhibitor of GABA uptake SKF 89976A, but was blocked completely only when bicuculline methiodide and SKF 89976A were used in combination. The GABA{sub A} agonist muscimol, 10{sup {minus}4} M, mimicked the effect of GABA, but the GABA{sub B} agonist ({plus minus})baclofen, 10{sup {minus}4} M, did not affect the release of ({sup 3}H) norepinephrine in the absence or the presence of morphine. Thus GABA appears to produce this effect by stimulating GABA uptake and GABA{sub A}, but not GABA{sub B}, receptors. In contrast to the results that would be predicted for an event involving GABA{sub A} receptors, however, the effect of GABA did not desensitize, and benzodiazepine agonists did not enhance the effect of GABA at any concentration tested between 10{sup {minus}8} and 10{sup {minus}4} M. Thus these receptors may constitute a subclass of GABA{sub A} receptors. These results support a role of GABA uptake and GABA{sub A} receptors in enhancing the release of norepinephrine and modulating its inhibition by opioids in the frontal cortex of the rat.

  17. A New Probiotic Cheddar Cheese with High ACE-Inhibitory Activity and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Content Produced with Koumiss-Derived Lactobacillus casei Zhang

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    Hai Kuan Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cheddar cheese has been manufactured with Lactobacillus casei Zhang as the dairy starter adjunct. L. casei Zhang had previously been isolated from koumiss collected from Xilin Guole in Inner Mongolia and characterized in detail with regard to their probiotic potential. The addition of L. casei Zhang to Cheddar cheese had no adverse effects on sensory criteria. The cheese made with 0.1, 1 and 2 % of the probiotic strain L. casei Zhang adjuncts contained high levels of the Lactobacillus after 6 months of ripening with final counts of 9.6·10^7, 7.7·10^7 and 1.02·10^8 CFU/g, respectively. In the ripe control cheese, without the addition of probiotic strain L. casei Zhang, the number of Lactobacillus reached 5.7·107 CFU/g. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR (ERIC-PCR analysis was used to distinguish the added L. casei Zhang from the natural flora of the cheese and to determine whether L. casei Zhang grew in the cheese. ACE-inhibitory activity and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA concentrations in the cheese were measured. Compared with control cheese, experimental cheese with 0.1, 1 and 2 % of probiotic strain L. casei Zhang revealed some increase in ACE-inhibitory activity and GABA mass fraction. In the present study, the production of both ACE-inhibitory activity and GABA in the probiotic cheese with the L. casei Zhang adjunct isolated from koumiss has been found for the first time. The results suggest that cheese with the probiotic strain L. casei Zhang showed good potential for application in the management of hypertension.

  18. Dual orexin receptor antagonists show distinct effects on locomotor performance, ethanol interaction and sleep architecture relative to gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor modulators

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    Andres D. Ramirez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs are a potential treatment for insomnia that function by blocking both the orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors. The objective of the current study was to further confirm the impact of therapeutic mechanisms targeting insomnia on locomotor coordination and ethanol interaction using DORAs and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA-A receptor modulators of distinct chemical structure and pharmacologic properties in the context of sleep-promoting potential. The current study compared rat motor co-ordination after administration of DORAs, DORA-12 and almorexant, and GABA-A receptor modulators, zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam, alone or each in combination with ethanol. Motor performance was assessed by measuring time spent walking on a rotarod apparatus. Zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam (0.3–30 mg/kg administered orally [PO] impaired rotarod performance in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, all three GABA-A receptor modulators potentiated ethanol- (0.25–1.25 g/kg induced impairment on the rotarod. By contrast, neither DORA-12 (10–100 mg/kg, PO nor almorexant (30–300 mg/kg, PO impaired motor performance alone or in combination with ethanol. In addition, distinct differences in sleep architecture were observed between ethanol, GABA-A receptor modulators (zolpidem, eszopiclone and diazepam and DORA-12 in electroencephalogram studies in rats. These findings provide further evidence that orexin receptor antagonists have an improved motor side-effect profile compared with currently available sleep-promoting agents based on preclinical data and strengthen the rationale for further evaluation of these agents in clinical development.

  19. Nicotine stimulates pancreatic cancer xenografts by systemic increase in stress neurotransmitters and suppression of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Plummer, Howard K; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2009-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality in Western countries. We have shown previously that four representative human PDAC cell lines were regulated by beta-adrenoreceptors via cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent signaling. In the current study, we have tested the hypothesis that nicotine stimulates the growth of PDAC xenografts in nude mice by increasing the systemic levels of the stress neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline, which are the physiological agonists for beta-adrenoreceptors and that inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) of the adenylyl cyclase-dependent pathway downstream of adrenoreceptors blocks this effect. The size of xenografts from PDAC cell line Panc-1 was determined 30 days after inoculation of the cancer cells. Stress neurotransmitters in serum as well as cAMP in the cellular fraction of blood and in tumor tissue were assessed by immunoassays. Levels of GABA, its synthesizing enzymes GAD65 and GAD67 and beta-adrenergic signaling proteins in the tumor tissue were determined by western blotting. Nicotine significantly increased the systemic levels of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cAMP while increasing xenograft size and protein levels of cAMP, cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the tumor tissue. Nicotine additionally reduced the protein levels of both GAD isozymes and GABA in tumor tissue. Treatment with GABA abolished these responses to nicotine and blocked the development of xenografts in mice not exposed to nicotine. These findings suggest that the development and progression of PDAC is subject to significant modulation by stimulatory stress neurotransmitters and inhibitory GABA and that treatment with GABA may be useful for marker-guided cancer intervention of PDAC.

  20. Increased Cortical Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Precedes Incomplete Extinction of Conditioned Fear and Increased Hippocampal Excitatory Tone in a Mouse Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Brandy L; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Charlton, Jennifer L; Kohler, Robert J; Galloway, Matthew P; Perrine, Shane A; Conti, Alana C

    2016-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) contributes to development of affective disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Psychiatric symptoms typically emerge in a tardive fashion post-TBI, with negative effects on recovery. Patients with PTSD, as well as rodent models of PTSD, demonstrate structural and functional changes in brain regions mediating fear learning, including prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala (AMYG), and hippocampus (HC). These changes may reflect loss of top-down control by which PFC normally exhibits inhibitory influence over AMYG reactivity to fearful stimuli, with HC contribution. Considering the susceptibility of these regions to injury, we examined fear conditioning (FC) in the delayed post-injury period, using a mouse model of mTBI. Mice with mTBI displayed enhanced acquisition and delayed extinction of FC. Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ex vivo, we examined PFC, AMYG, and HC levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate as surrogate measures of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission, respectively. Eight days post-injury, GABA was increased in PFC, with no significant changes in AMYG. In animals receiving FC and mTBI, glutamate trended toward an increase and the GABA/glutamate ratio decreased in ventral HC at 25 days post-injury, whereas GABA decreased and GABA/glutamate decreased in dorsal HC. These neurochemical changes are consistent with early TBI-induced PFC hypoactivation facilitating the fear learning circuit and exacerbating behavioral fear responses. The latent emergence of overall increased excitatory tone in the HC, despite distinct plasticity in dorsal and ventral HC fields, may be associated with disordered memory function, manifested as incomplete extinction and enhanced FC recall.

  1. Tomato Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes SlGAD2 and SlGAD3 Play Key Roles in Regulating γ-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Mariko; Koike, Satoshi; Kusano, Miyako; Matsukura, Chiaki; Saito, Kazuki; Ariizumi, Tohru; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) can accumulate relatively high levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during fruit development. However, the molecular mechanism underlying GABA accumulation and its physiological function in tomato fruits remain elusive. We previously identified three tomato genes (SlGAD1, SlGAD2 and SlGAD3) encoding glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), likely the key enzyme for GABA biosynthesis in tomato fruits. In this study, we generated transgenic tomato plants in which each SlGAD was suppressed and those in which all three SlGADs were simultaneously suppressed. A significant decrease in GABA levels, i.e. 50-81% compared with wild-type (WT) levels, was observed in mature green (MG) fruits of the SlGAD2-suppressed lines, while a more drastic reduction (up to <10% of WT levels) was observed in the SlGAD3- and triple SlGAD-suppressed lines. These findings suggest that both SlGAD2 and SlGAD3 expression are crucial for GABA biosynthesis in tomato fruits. The importance of SlGAD3 expression was also confirmed by generating transgenic tomato plants that over-expressed SlGAD3. The MG and red fruits of the over-expressing transgenic lines contained higher levels of GABA (2.7- to 5.2-fold) than those of the WT. We also determined that strong down-regulation of the SlGADs had little effect on overall plant growth, fruit development or primary fruit metabolism under normal growth conditions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Effect of γ-aminobutyric acid and nattokinase-enriched fermented beans on the blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive and normotensive Wistar–Kyoto rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanintra Suwanmanon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have evaluated the changes in arterial blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR caused by the short-term intake of Bacillus subtilis B060-fermented beans with significant γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA and nattokinase activity. After being weaned, 7-week-old male SHR and 7-week-old male Wistar–Kyoto (WKY rats were randomized into seven groups. Until the 8th week of life, the rats in each group were given one of the following: Group 1, high dose of GABA and nattokinase in the SHR (SHD; Group 2, medium dose of GABA and nattokinase in the SHR (SMD; Group 3, low dose of GABA and nattokinase in the SHR (SLD; Group 4, negative control in the SHR (SD; Group 5, positive control in the SHR (SM; Group 6, high dose of GABA and nattokinase in the WKY (WHD; and Group 7, negative control in the WKY (WD. Distilled water served as the negative control, and captopril (50 mg/kg, a known ACE inhibitor, served as the positive control. Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure values were measured weekly from the 8th week to the 16th week of life using the tail-cuff method. A definite decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure values could be observed in the rats treated with captopril and in the rats that received GABA and nattokinase. The greatest antihypertensive effect was observed when the pharmacological treatment was administered. The effect of the daily intake of fermented beans containing GABA and nattokinase may be helpful in controlling blood pressure levels in hypertensive model animals. The fermentation of beans with B. subtilis B060 may therefore constitute a successful strategy for producing a functional food with antihypertensive activity.

  3. Short-term memory impairment after isoflurane in mice is prevented by the α5 γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor inverse agonist L-655,708.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Bechara J; Maclean, Ashley J B; Kanisek, Marijana; Zurek, Agnieszka A; Martin, Loren J; Roder, John C; Orser, Beverley A

    2010-11-01

    Memory blockade is an essential component of the anesthetic state. However, postanesthesia memory deficits represent an undesirable and poorly understood adverse effect. Inhibitory α5 subunit-containing γ-aminobutyric acid subtype A receptors (α5GABAA) are known to play a critical role in memory processes and are highly sensitive to positive modulation by anesthetics. We postulated that inhibiting the activity of α5GABAA receptors during isoflurane anesthesia would prevent memory deficits in the early postanesthesia period. Mice were pretreated with L-655,708, an α5GABAA receptor-selective inverse agonist, or vehicle. They were then exposed to isoflurane for 1 h (1.3%, or 1 minimum alveolar concentration, or air-oxygen control). Then, either 1 or 24 h later, mice were conditioned in fear-associated contextual and cued learning paradigms. In addition, the effect of L-655,708 on the immobilizing dose of isoflurane was studied. Motor coordination, sedation, anxiety, and the concentration of isoflurane in the brain at 5 min, 1 h, and 24 h after isoflurane were also examined. Motor and sensory function recovered within minutes after termination of isoflurane administration. In contrast, a robust deficit in contextual fear memory persisted for at least 24 h. The α5GABAA receptor inverse agonist, L-655,708, completely prevented memory deficits without changing the immobilizing dose of isoflurane. Trace concentrations of isoflurane were measured in the brain 24 h after treatment. Memory deficits occurred long after the sedative, analgesic, and anxiolytic effects of isoflurane subsided. L-655,708 prevented memory deficit, suggesting that an isoflurane interaction at α5GABAA receptors contributes to memory impairment during the early postanesthesia period.

  4. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and pentobarbital induce different conformational rearrangements in the GABA A receptor alpha1 and beta2 pre-M1 regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Jose; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2008-05-30

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) triggers conformational movements in the alpha(1) and beta(2) pre-M1 regions that are associated with channel gating. At high concentrations, the barbiturate pentobarbital opens GABA(A)R channels with similar conductances as GABA, suggesting that their open state structures are alike. Little, however, is known about the structural rearrangements induced by barbiturates. Here, we examined whether pentobarbital activation triggers movements in the GABA(A)R pre-M1 regions. Alpha(1)beta(2) GABA(A)Rs containing cysteine substitutions in the pre-M1 alpha(1) (K219C, K221C) and beta(2) (K213C, K215C) subunits were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and analyzed using two-electrode voltage clamp. The cysteine substitutions had little to no effect on GABA and pentobarbital EC(50) values. Tethering chemically diverse thiol-reactive methanethiosulfonate reagents onto alpha(1)K219C and alpha(1)K221C affected GABA- and pentobarbital-activated currents differently, suggesting that the pre-M1 structural elements important for GABA and pentobarbital current activation are distinct. Moreover, pentobarbital altered the rates of cysteine modification by methanethiosulfonate reagents differently than GABA. For alpha(1)K221Cbeta(2) receptors, pentobarbital decreased the rate of cysteine modification whereas GABA had no effect. For alpha(1)beta(2)K215C receptors, pentobarbital had no effect whereas GABA increased the modification rate. The competitive GABA antagonist SR-95531 and a low, non-activating concentration of pentobarbital did not alter their modification rates, suggesting that the GABA- and pentobarbital-mediated changes in rates reflect gating movements. Overall, the data indicate that the pre-M1 region is involved in both GABA- and pentobarbital-mediated gating transitions. Pentobarbital, however, triggers different movements in this region than GABA, suggesting their activation mechanisms differ.

  5. Proteomic analysis of elicitation of downy mildew disease resistance in pearl millet by seed priming with β-aminobutyric acid and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anup, Chandra Pal; Melvin, Prasad; Shilpa, Nataraj; Gandhi, Mayuri Nalin; Jadhav, Manali; Ali, Hussain; Kini, Kukkundoor Ramachandra

    2015-04-29

    Downy mildew is one of the severe diseases of pearl millet, globally affecting its commercial production. Priming of seeds of a susceptible cultivar of pearl millet with β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) and Pseudomonas fluorescens has reduced the downy mildew disease incidence level under field studies. In the current study, proteomic approach was used to elucidate the poorly studied resistance mechanism in these elicitor primed pearl millet seeds in response to Sclerospora graminicola infection. 2DE-MS/MS based proteomic approach revealed that majority of the 63 differentially accumulated (p≤0.05) proteins associated with energy and metabolism followed by stress and defense category. Multivariate statistics disclosed that infection caused by the pathogen rather than elicitor treatment had a major influence on the dynamics of protein abundance. Mechanism of priming mediated by BABA and P. fluorescens were different from each other as evident by the protein abundance profile of hierarchical clustering analysis. Over-representation of proteins pertaining to glucose metabolism suggests that seed priming ensures plant protection against disease without compromising its normal growth and development. In addition the study forms a basis for future investigation by functional analysis of these differentially accumulated proteins to further unravel the resistance mechanism of elicitor primed plant against the S. graminicola. The study is based on the comparative proteomic analysis between BABA and P. fluorescens mediated resistance in pearl millet, in response to downy mildew causing biotroph - S. graminicola. To our knowledge, this article is the first to report on seedling proteome of pearl millet whose genome is not yet sequenced. In addition, the study also provides clue for the plausible antagonistic cross-talk that might exist between jasmonic acid signaling and salicylic acid signaling in SAR and ISR mediated resistance by BABA and P. fluorescens against the downy

  6. Activating glutamate decarboxylase activity by removing the autoinhibitory domain leads to hyper γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation in tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Mariko; Matsukura, Chiaki; Ariizumi, Tohru; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The C-terminal extension region of SlGAD3 is likely involved in autoinhibition, and removing this domain increases GABA levels in tomato fruits. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a ubiquitous non-protein amino acid with several health-promoting benefits. In many plants including tomato, GABA is synthesized via decarboxylation of glutamate in a reaction catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), which generally contains a C-terminal autoinhibitory domain. We previously generated transgenic tomato plants in which tomato GAD3 (SlGAD3) was expressed using the 35S promoter/NOS terminator expression cassette (35S-SlGAD3-NOS), yielding a four- to fivefold increase in GABA levels in red-ripe fruits compared to the control. In this study, to further increase GABA accumulation in tomato fruits, we expressed SlGAD3 with (SlGAD3 OX ) or without (SlGAD3ΔC OX ) a putative autoinhibitory domain in tomato using the fruit ripening-specific E8 promoter and the Arabidopsis heat shock protein 18.2 (HSP) terminator. Although the GABA levels in SlGAD3 OX fruits were equivalent to those in 35S-SlGAD3-NOS fruits, GABA levels in SlGAD3ΔC OX fruits increased by 11- to 18-fold compared to control plants, indicating that removing the autoinhibitory domain increases GABA biosynthesis activity. Furthermore, the increased GABA levels were accompanied by a drastic reduction in glutamate and aspartate levels, indicating that enhanced GABA biosynthesis affects amino acid metabolism in ripe-fruits. Moreover, SlGAD3ΔC OX fruits exhibited an orange-ripe phenotype, which was associated with reduced levels of both carotenoid and mRNA transcripts of ethylene-responsive carotenogenic genes, suggesting that over activation of GAD influences ethylene sensitivity. Our strategy utilizing the E8 promoter and HSP terminator expression cassette, together with SlGAD3 C-terminal deletion, would facilitate the production of tomato fruits with increased GABA levels.

  7. Contribution of the activated catalase to oxidative stress resistance and γ-aminobutyric acid production in Lactobacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Changjiang; Hu, Sheng; Huang, Jun; Luo, Maiqi; Lu, Tao; Mei, Lehe; Yao, Shanjing

    2016-12-05

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are generally sensitive to H 2 O 2 , a compound which can paradoxically produce themselves and lead to the growth arrest and cell death. To counteract the potentially toxic effects of this compound, the gene katE encoding a heme-dependent catalase (CAT) belonging to the family of monofunctional CATs was cloned from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC1306. The enhanced homologous CAT expression was achieved using the NICE system. L. brevis cells with overexpressed CAT showed 685-fold and 823-fold higher survival when exposed to 30mmol/L of H 2 O 2 and long-term aerated stress (after 72h), respectively, than that of the wild type cells. Furtherly, the effects of activated CAT on GABA production in L. brevis were investigated. A GABA production level of 66.4g/L was achieved using two-step biotransformation that successively employed the growing and resting cells derived from engineering L. brevis CAT. These results demonstrated clearly that overexpression of the KatE gene in L. brevis led to a marked increased survival in oxidizing environment, and shed light on a novel feasible approach to enhance the GABA production level by improving the antioxidative properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rescue of Deficient Amygdala Tonic γ-Aminobutyric Acidergic Currents in the Fmr−/y Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome by a Novel γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A Receptor-Positive Allosteric Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Brandon S.; Martinez-Botella, Gabriel; Loya, Carlos M.; Salituro, Francesco G.; Robichaud, Albert J.; Huntsman, Molly M.; Ackley, Mike A.; Doherty, James J.; Corbin, Joshua G.

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory transmission are emerging as a common component of many nervous system disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Tonic γ-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission provided by peri- and extrasynaptic GABA type A (GABAA) receptors powerfully controls neuronal excitability and plasticity and, therefore, provides a rational therapeutic target for normalizing hyperexcitable networks across a variety of disorders, including ASDs. Our previous studies revealed tonic GABAergic deficits in principal excitatory neurons in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in the Fmr1−/y knockout (KO) mouse model fragile X syndrome. To correct amygdala deficits in tonic GABAergic neurotransmission in Fmr1−/y KO mice, we developed a novel positive allosteric modulator of GABAA receptors, SGE-872, based on endogenously active neurosteroids. This study shows that SGE-872 is nearly as potent and twice as efficacious for positively modulating GABAA receptors as its parent molecule, allopregnanolone. Furthermore, at submicromolar concentrations (≤1 µM), SGE-872 is selective for tonic, extrasynaptic α4β3δ-containing GABAA receptors over typical synaptic α1β2γ2 receptors. We further find that SGE-872 strikingly rescues the tonic GABAergic transmission deficit in principal excitatory neurons in the Fmr1−/y KO BLA, a structure heavily implicated in the neuropathology of ASDs. Therefore, the potent and selective action of SGE-872 on tonic GABAA receptors containing α4 subunits may represent a novel and highly useful therapeutic avenue for ASDs and related disorders involving hyperexcitability of neuronal networks. PMID:26308557

  9. Effect of Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction on striatal glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid levels detected using microdialysis in a rat model of Tourette syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wen Zhang,1,* Li Wei,2,* Wenjing Yu,1 Xia Cui,1 Xiaofang Liu,2 Qian Wang,1 Sumei Wang2 1Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, 2Department of Pediatrics, Dongfang Hospital, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction (JPZDD is a dedicated treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS. The balance of neurotransmitters in the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical network is crucial to the occurrence of TS and related to its severity. This study evaluated the effect of JPZDD on glutamate (Glu and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA and their receptors in a TS rat model.Materials and methods: Rats were divided into four groups (n=12 each. TS was induced in three of the groups by injecting them with 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile for 7 consecutive days. Two model groups were treated with tiapride (Tia or JPZDD, while the control and the remaining model group were gavaged with saline. Behavior was assessed by stereotypic score and autonomic activity. Striatal Glu and GABA contents were detected using microdialysis. Expressions of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR were observed using Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results: Tia and JPZDD groups had decreased stereotypy compared with model rats; however, the JPZDD group showed a larger decrease in stereotypy than the Tia group at a 4-week time point. In a spontaneous activity test, the total distance of the JPZDD and Tia groups was significantly decreased compared with the model group. The Glu levels of the model group were higher than the control group and decreased with Tia or JPZDD treatment. The GABA level was higher in the model group than the control group. Expressions of GABAAR protein in the model group were higher than in the control group. Treatment with Tia or JPZDD reduced the expression of GABAAR protein. In the case of the m

  10. Altered γ-aminobutyric acid neurotransmission in major depressive disorder: a critical review of the supporting evidence and the influence of serotonergic antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pehrson AL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alan L Pehrson, Connie Sanchez External Sourcing and Scientific Excellence, Lundbeck Research USA, Paramus, NJ, USA Abstract: Evidence suggesting that central nervous system γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA concentrations are reduced in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD has been present since at least 1980, and this idea has recently gained support from more recent magnetic resonance spectroscopy data. These observations have led to the assumption that MDD’s underlying etiology is tied to an overall reduction in GABA-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission. In this paper, we review the mechanisms that govern GABA and glutamate concentrations in the brain, and provide a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the clinical data supporting reduced GABA neurotransmission in MDD. This review includes an evaluation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy data, as well as data on the expression and function of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase, GABA neuron-specific cell markers, such as parvalbumin, calretinin and calbindin, and the GABAA and GABAB receptors in clinical MDD populations. We explore a potential role for glial pathology in MDD-related reductions in GABA concentrations, and evidence of a connection between neurosteroids, GABA neurotransmission, and hormone-related mood disorders. Additionally, we investigate the effects of GABAergic pharmacological agents on mood, and demonstrate that these compounds have complex effects that do not universally support the idea that reduced GABA neurotransmission is at the root of MDD. Finally, we discuss the connections between serotonergic and GABAergic neurotransmission, and show that two serotonin-focused antidepressants – the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine and the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine – modulate GABA neurotransmission in opposing ways, despite both being effective MDD treatments. Altogether, this review demonstrates that there are large

  11. Genetic manipulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt in rice: overexpression of truncated glutamate decarboxylase (GAD2) and knockdown of γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) lead to sustained and high levels of GABA accumulation in rice kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimajiri, Yasuka; Oonishi, Takayuki; Ozaki, Kae; Kainou, Kumiko; Akama, Kazuhito

    2013-06-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid commonly present in all organisms. Because cellular levels of GABA in plants are mainly regulated by synthesis (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD) and catabolism (GABA-transaminase, GABA-T), we attempted seed-specific manipulation of the GABA shunt to achieve stable GABA accumulation in rice. A truncated GAD2 sequence, one of five GAD genes, controlled by the glutelin (GluB-1) or rice embryo globulin promoters (REG) and GABA-T-based trigger sequences in RNA interference (RNAi) cassettes controlled by one of these promoters as well, was introduced into rice (cv. Koshihikari) to establish stable transgenic lines under herbicide selection using pyriminobac. T₁ and T₂ generations of rice lines displayed high GABA concentrations (2-100 mg/100 g grain). In analyses of two selected lines from the T₃ generation, there was a strong correlation between GABA level and the expression of truncated GAD2, whereas the inhibitory effect of GABA-T expression was relatively weak. In these two lines both with two T-DNA copies, their starch, amylose, and protein levels were slightly lower than non-transformed cv. Koshihikari. Free amino acid analysis of mature kernels of these lines demonstrated elevated levels of GABA (75-350 mg/100 g polished rice) and also high levels of several amino acids, such as Ala, Ser, and Val. Because these lines of seeds could sustain their GABA content after harvest (up to 6 months), the strategy in this study could lead to the accumulation GABA and for these to be sustained in the edible parts. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effect of γ-Aminobutyric Acid-producing Strain on Laying Performance, Egg Quality and Serum Enzyme Activity in Hy-Line Brown Hens under Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Z. Zhu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat-stress remains a costly issue for animal production, especially for poultry as they lack sweat glands, and alleviating heat-stress is necessary for ensuring animal production in hot environment. A high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-producer Lactobacillus strain was used to investigate the effect of dietary GABA-producer on laying performance and egg quality in heat-stressed Hy-line brown hens. Hy-Line brown hens (n = 1,164 at 280 days of age were randomly divided into 4 groups based on the amount of freeze-dried GABA-producer added to the basal diet as follows: i 0 mg/kg, ii 25 mg/kg, iii 50 mg/kg, and iv 100 mg/kg. All hens were subjected to heat-stress treatment through maintaining the temperature and the relative humidity at 28.83±3.85°C and 37% to 53.9%, respectively. During the experiment, laying rate, egg weight and feed intake of hens were recorded daily. At the 30th and 60th day after the start of the experiment, biochemical parameters, enzyme activity and immune activity in serum were measured. Egg production, average egg weight, average daily feed intake, feed conversion ratio and percentage of speckled egg, soft shell egg and misshaped egg were significantly improved (p<0.05 by the increasing supplementation of the dietary GABA-producer. Shape index, eggshell thickness, strength and weight were increased linearly with increasing GABA-producer supplementation. The level of calcium, phosphorus, glucose, total protein and albumin in serum of the hens fed GABA-producing strain supplemented diet was significantly higher (p<0.05 than that of the hens fed the basal diet, whereas cholesterol level was decreased. Compared with the basal diet, GABA-producer strain supplementation increased serum level of glutathione peroxidase (p = 0.009 and superoxide dismutase. In conclusion, GABA-producer played an important role in alleviating heat-stress, the isolated GABA-producer strain might be a potential natural and safe probiotic to use to

  13. Circuit- and Diagnosis-Specific DNA Methylation Changes at γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Related Genes in Postmortem Human Hippocampus in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, W Brad; Subburaju, Sivan; Benes, Francine M

    2015-06-01

    Dysfunction related to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic neurotransmission in the pathophysiology of major psychosis has been well established by the work of multiple groups across several decades, including the widely replicated downregulation of GAD1. Prior gene expression and network analyses within the human hippocampus implicate a broader network of genes, termed the GAD1 regulatory network, in regulation of GAD1 expression. Several genes within this GAD1 regulatory network show diagnosis- and sector-specific expression changes within the circuitry of the hippocampus, influencing abnormal GAD1 expression in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. To investigate the hypothesis that aberrant DNA methylation contributes to circuit- and diagnosis-specific abnormal expression of GAD1 regulatory network genes in psychotic illness. This epigenetic association study targeting GAD1 regulatory network genes was conducted between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2014. Postmortem human hippocampus tissue samples were obtained from 8 patients with schizophrenia, 8 patients with bipolar disorder, and 8 healthy control participants matched for age, sex, postmortem interval, and other potential confounds from the Harvard Brain Tissue Resource Center, McLean Hospital, Belmont, Massachusetts. We extracted DNA from laser-microdissected stratum oriens tissue of cornu ammonis 2/3 (CA2/3) and CA1 postmortem human hippocampus, bisulfite modified it, and assessed it with the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (Illumina, Inc). The subset of CpG loci associated with GAD1 regulatory network genes was analyzed in R version 3.1.0 software (R Foundation) using the minfi package. Findings were validated using bisulfite pyrosequencing. Methylation levels at 1308 GAD1 regulatory network-associated CpG loci were assessed both as individual sites to identify differentially methylated positions and by sharing information among colocalized probes to identify differentially methylated regions. A total of

  14. Discovery of α-Substituted Imidazole-4-acetic Acid Analogues as a Novel Class of ρ1 γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A Receptor Antagonists with Effect on Retinal Vascular Tone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krall, Jacob; Brygger, Benjamin M.; Sigurðardóttir, Sara B.

    2016-01-01

    The ρ-containing γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAA Rs) play an important role in controlling visual signaling. Therefore, ligands that selectively target these GABAA Rs are of interest. In this study, we demonstrate that the partial GABAA R agonist imidazole-4-acetic acid (IAA) is able...... to penetrate the blood-brain barrier in vivo; we prepared a series of α- and N-alkylated, as well as bicyclic analogues of IAA to explore the structure-activity relationship of this scaffold focusing on the acetic acid side chain of IAA. The compounds were prepared via IAA from l-histidine by an efficient...... minimal-step synthesis, and their pharmacological properties were characterized at native rat GABAA Rs in a [(3) H]muscimol binding assay and at recombinant human α1 β2 γ2S and ρ1  GABAA Rs using the FLIPR™ membrane potential assay. The (+)-α-methyl- and α-cyclopropyl-substituted IAA analogues ((+)-6...

  15. Sodium P-Aminosalicylic Acid Improved Manganese-Induced Learning and Memory Dysfunction via Restoring the Ultrastructural Alterations and γ-Aminobutyric Acid Metabolism Imbalance in the Basal Ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Chao-Yan; Luo, Yi-Ni; He, Sheng-Nan; Deng, Xiang-Fa; Luo, Hai-Lan; Yuan, Zong-Xiang; Meng, Hao-Yang; Mo, Yu-Huan; Li, Shao-Jun; Jiang, Yue-Ming

    2017-03-01

    Excessive intake of manganese (Mn) may cause neurotoxicity. Sodium para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS-Na) has been used successfully in the treatment of Mn-induced neurotoxicity. The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is related with learning and memory abilities. However, the mechanism of PAS-Na on improving Mn-induced behavioral deficits is unclear. The current study was aimed to investigate the effects of PAS-Na on Mn-induced behavioral deficits and the involvement of ultrastructural alterations and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism in the basal ganglia of rats. Sprague-Dawley rats received daily intraperitoneally injections of 15 mg/kg MnCl 2 .4H 2 O, 5d/week for 4 weeks, followed by a daily back subcutaneously (sc.) dose of PAS-Na (100 and 200 mg/kg), 5 days/week for another 3 or 6 weeks. Mn exposure for 4 weeks and then ceased Mn exposure for 3 or 6 weeks impaired spatial learning and memory abilities, and these effects were long-lasting. Moreover, Mn exposure caused ultrastructural alterations in the basal ganglia expressed as swollen neuronal with increasing the electron density in the protrusions structure and fuzzed the interval of neuropil, together with swollen, focal hyperplasia, and hypertrophy of astrocytes. Additionally, the results also indicated that Mn exposure increased Glu/GABA values as by feedback loops controlling GAT-1, GABA A mRNA and GABA A protein expression through decreasing GABA transporter 1(GAT-1) and GABA A receptor (GABA A ) mRNA expression, and increasing GABA A protein expression in the basal ganglia. But Mn exposure had no effects on GAT-1 protein expression. PAS-Na treatment for 3 or 6 weeks effectively restored the above-mentioned adverse effects induced by Mn. In conclusion, these findings suggest the involvement of GABA metabolism and ultrastructural alterations of basal ganglia in PAS-Na's protective effects on the spatial learning and memory abilities.

  16. Development and Validation of a HPTLC Method for Simultaneous Estimation of L-Glutamic Acid and γ-Aminobutyric Acid in Mice Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancheti, J S; Shaikh, M F; Khatwani, P F; Kulkarni, Savita R; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2013-11-01

    A new robust, simple and economic high performance thin layer chromatographic method was developed for simultaneous estimation of L-glutamic acid and γ-amino butyric acid in brain homogenate. The high performance thin layer chromatographic separation of these amino acid was achieved using n-butanol:glacial acetic acid:water (22:3:5 v/v/v) as mobile phase and ninhydrin as a derivatising agent. Quantitation of the method was achieved by densitometric method at 550 nm over the concentration range of 10-100 ng/spot. This method showed good separation of amino acids in the brain homogenate with Rf value of L-glutamic acid and γ-amino butyric acid as 21.67±0.58 and 33.67±0.58, respectively. The limit of detection and limit of quantification for L-glutamic acid was found to be 10 and 20 ng and for γ-amino butyric acid it was 4 and 10 ng, respectively. The method was also validated in terms of accuracy, precision and repeatability. The developed method was found to be precise and accurate with good reproducibility and shows promising applicability for studying pathological status of disease and therapeutic significance of drug treatment.

  17. Mechanism of Inactivation of γ-Aminobutyric Acid Aminotransferase by (1 S ,3 S )-3-Amino-4-difluoromethylene-1-cyclopentanoic Acid (CPP-115)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyunbeom [Department; Doud, Emma H. [Department; Department; Wu, Rui [Department; Sanishvili, Ruslan [X-ray; Juncosa, Jose I. [Department; Liu, Dali [Department; Kelleher, Neil L. [Department; Department; Silverman, Richard B. [Department; Department

    2015-02-10

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that degrades GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in mammalian cells. When the concentration of GABA falls below a threshold level, convulsions can occur. Inhibition of GABA-AT raises GABA levels in the brain, which can terminate seizures as well as have potential therapeutic applications in treating other neurological disorders, including drug addiction. Among the analogues that we previously developed, (1S,3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylene-1-cyclopentanoic acid (CPP-115) showed 187 times greater potency than that of vigabatrin, a known inactivator of GABA-AT and approved drug (Sabril) for the treatment of infantile spasms and refractory adult epilepsy. Recently, CPP-115 was shown to have no adverse effects in a Phase I clinical trial. Here we report a novel inactivation mechanism for CPP-115, a mechanism-based inactivator that undergoes GABA-AT-catalyzed hydrolysis of the difluoromethylene group to a carboxylic acid with concomitant loss of two fluoride ions and coenzyme conversion to pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP). The partition ratio for CPP-115 with GABA-AT is about 2000, releasing cyclopentanone-2,4-dicarboxylate (22) and two other precursors of this compound (20 and 21). Time-dependent inactivation occurs by a conformational change induced by the formation of the aldimine of 4-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid and PMP (20), which disrupts an electrostatic interaction between Glu270 and Arg445 to form an electrostatic interaction between Arg445 and the newly formed carboxylate produced by hydrolysis of the difluoromethylene group in CPP-115, resulting in a noncovalent, tightly bound complex. This represents a novel mechanism for inactivation of GABA-AT and a new approach for the design of mechanism-based inactivators in general.

  18. 7T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Glutamate, and Glutamine Reveals Altered Concentrations in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakkar, Katharine N; Rösler, Lara; Wijnen, Jannie P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia predicts dysfunction in both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission. We addressed this hypothesis by measuring GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate...... concentrations in vivo in patients with schizophrenia using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T, which allows separation of metabolites that would otherwise overlap at lower field strengths. In addition, we investigated whether altered levels of GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus......, and 24 healthy nonrelatives. Glutamate, glutamine, and GABA were measured cortically and subcortically in bilateral basal ganglia and occipital cortex. RESULTS: Patients with schizophrenia had reduced cortical GABA compared with healthy relatives and the combined sample of healthy relatives and healthy...

  19. Reduced γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Glutamate+Glutamine Levels in Drug-Naïve Patients with First-Episode Schizophrenia but Not in Those at Ultrahigh Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, glutamate (Glu levels, and an imbalance between GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmissions have been involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, it remains unclear how these abnormalities impact the onset and course of psychosis. In the present study, 21 drug-naïve subjects at ultrahigh risk for psychosis (UHR, 16 drug-naïve patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FES, and 23 healthy controls (HC were enrolled. In vivo GABA and glutamate+glutamine (Glx levels in the medial prefrontal cortex were measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Medial prefrontal GABA and Glx levels in FES patients were significantly lower than those in HC and UHR, respectively. GABA and Glx levels in UHR were comparable with those in HC. In each group, there was a positive correlation between GABA and Glx levels. Reduced medial prefrontal GABA and Glx levels thus may play an important role in the early stages of schizophrenia.

  20. Phenotypic consequences of deletion of the {gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, or {beta}{sub 3} subunit of the type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culia, C.T.; Stubbs, L.J.; Montgomery, C.S.; Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-03-29

    Three genes (Gabrg3, Gabra5, and Gabrb3) encoding the {gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {beta}{sub 3} subunits of the type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor, respectively, are known to map near the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7. This region shares homology with a segment of human chromosome 15 that is implicated in Angelman syndrome, an inherited neurobehavioral disorder. By mapping Gabrg3-Gabra5-Gabrb3-telomere. Like Gabrb3, neither the Gabra5 nor Gabrg3 gene is functionally imprinted in adult mouse brain. Mice deleted for all three subunits die at birth with a cleft palate, although there are rare survivors ({approximately} 5%) that do not have a cleft palate but do exhibit a neurological abnormality characterized by tremor, jerky gait, and runtiness. The authors have previously suggested that deficiency of the {beta}{sub 3} subunit may be responsible for the clefting defect. Most notably, however, in this report they describe mice carrying two overlapping, complementing p deletions that fail to express the {gamma}{sub 3} transcript, as well as mice from another line that express neither the {gamma}{sub 3} nor {alpha}{sub 5} transcripts. Surprisingly, mice from both of these lines are phenotypically normal and do not exhibit any of the neurological symptoms characteristic of the rare survivors that are deleted for all three ({gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {beta}{sub 3}) subunits. These mice therefore provide a whole-organism type A {gamma}-aminobutyric-acid receptor background that is devoid of any receptor subtypes that normally contain the {gamma}{sub 3} and/or {alpha}{sub 5} subunits. The absence of an overt neurological phenotype in mice lacking the {gamma}{sub 3} and/or {alpha}{sub 5} subunits also suggests that mutations in these genes are unlikely to provide useful animal models for Angelman syndrome in humans.

  1. Perinatal exposure to germinated brown rice and its gamma amino-butyric acid-rich extract prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in first generation rat offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadiza Altine Adamu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence suggests perinatal environments influence the risk of developing insulin resistance. Objective: The present study was aimed at determining the effects of intrauterine exposure to germinated brown rice (GBR and GBR-derived gamma (γ aminobutyric acid (GABA extract on epigenetically mediated high fat diet–induced insulin resistance. Design: Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed high-fat diet (HFD, HFD+GBR, or HFD+GABA throughout pregnancy until 4 weeks postdelivery. The pups were weighed weekly and maintained on normal pellet until 8 weeks postdelivery. After sacrifice, biochemical markers of obesity and insulin resistance including oral glucose tolerance test, adiponectin, leptin, and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4 were measured. Hepatic gene expression changes and the global methylation and histone acetylation levels were also evaluated. Results: Detailed analyses revealed that mothers given GBR and GABA extract, and their offspring had increased adiponectin levels and reduced insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, leptin, oxidative stress, and RBP4 levels, while their hepatic mRNA levels of GLUT2 and IPF1 were increased. Furthermore, GBR and GABA extract lowered global DNA methylation levels and modulated H3 and H4 acetylation levels. Conclusions: These results showed that intrauterine exposure to GBR-influenced metabolic outcomes in offspring of rats with underlying epigenetic changes and transcriptional implications that led to improved glucose homeostasis.

  2. Insect γ-aminobutyric acid receptors and isoxazoline insecticides: toxicological profiles relative to the binding sites of [³H]fluralaner, [³H]-4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate, and [³H]avermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunqing; Casida, John E

    2014-02-05

    Isoxazoline insecticides, such as fluralaner (formerly A1443), are noncompetitive γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABA-R) antagonists with selective toxicity for insects versus mammals. The isoxazoline target in house fly ( Musca domestica ) brain has subnanomolar affinity for [³H]fluralaner and a unique pattern of sensitivity to isoxazolines and avermectin B(1a) (AVE) but not to fipronil and α-endosulfan. Inhibitor specificity profiles for 15 isoxazolines examined with Musca GABA-R and [³H]fluralaner, [³H]-4'-ethynyl-4-n-propylbicycloorthobenzoate ([³H]EBOB), and [³H]AVE binding follow the same structure-activity trends although without high correlation. The 3 most potent of the 15 isoxazolines tested in Musca [³H]fluralaner, [³H]EBOB, and [³H]AVE binding assays and in honeybee (Apis mellifera) brain [³H]fluralaner assays are generally those most toxic to Musca and four agricultural pests. Fluralaner does not inhibit [³H]EBOB binding to the human GABA-R recombinant β₃ homopentamer, which is highly sensitive to all of the commercial GABAergic insecticides. The unique isoxazoline binding site may resurrect the GABA-R as a major insecticide target.

  3. High-resolution mapping of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster on chromosome 15q11-q13, and localization of breakpoints in two Angelman syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnett, D.; Wagstaff, J.; Woolf, E. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Glatt, K. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)); Kirkness, E.J. (National Inst. of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States))Lalande, M. (Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States) Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Boston, MA (United States))

    1993-06-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptors are a family of ligand-gated chloride channels constituting the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the nervous system. In order to determine the genomic organization of the GABA[sub A] receptor [beta]3 subunit gene (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 subunit gene (GABRA5) in chromosome 15q11-q13, the authors have constructed a high-resolution physical map using the combined techniques of field-inversion gel electrophoresis and phage genomic library screening. This map, which covers nearly 1.0 Mb, shows that GABRB3 and GABRA5 are separated by less than 100 kb and are arranged in a head-to-head configuration. GABRB3 encompasses approximately 250 kb, while GABRA5 is contained within 70 kb. This difference in size is due in large part to an intron of 150 kb within GABRB3. The authors have also identified seven putative CpG islands within a 600-kb interval. Chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints -- in one Angelman syndrome (AS) patient with an unbalanced translocation and in another patient with a submicroscopic deletion -- are located within the large GABRB3 intron. These findings will facilitate chromosomal walking strategies for cloning the regions disrupted by the DNA rearrangements in these AS patients and will be valuable for mapping new genes to the AS chromosomal region. 64 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The human [gamma]-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit [beta]3 and [alpha]5 gene cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13 is rich in highly polymorphic (CA)[sub n] repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatt, K.; Lalande, M. (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA (United States)); Sinnett, D. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA[sub A]) receptor [beta]33 (GABRB3) and [alpha]5 (GABRA5) subunit genes have been localized to the Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome region of chromosome 15q11-q13. GABRB3, which encompasses 250 kb, is located 100 kb proximal of GABRA5, with the two genes arranged in head-to-head transcriptional orientation. In screening 135 kb of cloned DNA within a 260-kb interval extending from within GABRB3 to the 5[prime] end of GABRA5, 10 new (CA), repeats have been identified. Five of these have been analyzed in detail and found to be highly polymorphic, with the polymorphism information content (PIC) ranging from 0.7 to 0.85 and with heterozygosities of 67 to 94%. In the clones from GABRB3/GABRA5 region, therefore, the frequency of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 is 1 per 27 kb. Previous estimates of the density of (CA)[sub n] with PICs [ge] 0.7 in the human genome have been approximately 10-fold lower. The GABRB3/GABRA5 region appears, therefore, to be enriched for highly informative (CA)[sub n]. This set of closely spaced, short tandem repeat polymorphisms will be useful in the molecular analyses of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and in high-resolution studies of genetic recombination within this region. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Antagonistic properties of a natural product-Bicuculline with the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor: studied through electrostatic potential mapping, electronic and vibrational spectra using ab initio and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Jain, Sudha; Asthana, B P

    2011-12-15

    (+)-Bicuculline (hereinafter referred to as bicuculline), a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid is of current interest as an antagonist of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Its inhibitor properties have been studied through molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) mapping of this molecule and GABA receptor. The hot site on the potential surface of bicuculline, which is also isosteric with GABA receptor, has been used to interpret the inhibitor property. A systematic quantum chemical study of the possible conformations, their relative stabilities, FT-Raman, FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopic analysis of bicuculline has been reported. The optimized geometries, wavenumber and intensity of the vibrational bands of all the conformers of bicuculline have been calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP functional and 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Mulliken atomic charges, HOMO-LUMO gap ΔE, ionization potential, dipole moments and total energy have also been obtained for the optimized geometries of both the molecules. TD-DFT method is used to calculate the electronic absorption parameters in gas phase as well as in solvent environment using integral equation formalism-polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM) employing 6-31G basis set and the results thus obtained are compared with the UV absorption spectra. The combination of experimental and calculated results provides an insight into the structural and vibrational spectroscopic properties of bicuculline. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationship of nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid and total antioxidants in peripheral blood with insomnia after stroke: study protocol for a prospective non-randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA have been shown to regulate sleep. The nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, GABA and total antioxidants may relate to insomnia in stroke patients. In this prospective single-center non-randomized controlled clinical trial performed in the China Rehabilitation Research Center, we analyzed the relationship of nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, GABA and total antioxidants with insomnia after stroke. Patients during rehabilitation of stroke were recruited and assigned to the insomnia group or non-insomnia group. Simultaneously, persons without stroke or insomnia served as normal controls. Each group contained 25 cases. The primary outcome was nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, GABA and total antioxidants in peripheral blood. The secondary outcomes were Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Insomnia Severity Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (Chinese version, and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. The relationship of nocturnal concentrations of melatonin, GABA and total antioxidants with insomnia after stroke was analyzed and showed that they were lower in the insomnia group than in the non-insomnia group. The severity of stroke was higher in the insomnia group than in the non-insomnia group. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the nocturnal concentrations of melatonin and GABA were associated with insomnia after stroke. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT03202121.

  7. Perinatal exposure to germinated brown rice and its gamma amino-butyric acid-rich extract prevents high fat diet-induced insulin resistance in first generation rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamu, Hadiza Altine; Imam, Mustapha Umar; Ooi, Der-Jiun; Esa, Norhaizan Mohd; Rosli, Rozita; Ismail, Maznah

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests perinatal environments influence the risk of developing insulin resistance. The present study was aimed at determining the effects of intrauterine exposure to germinated brown rice (GBR) and GBR-derived gamma (γ) aminobutyric acid (GABA) extract on epigenetically mediated high fat diet-induced insulin resistance. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were fed high-fat diet (HFD), HFD+GBR, or HFD+GABA throughout pregnancy until 4 weeks postdelivery. The pups were weighed weekly and maintained on normal pellet until 8 weeks postdelivery. After sacrifice, biochemical markers of obesity and insulin resistance including oral glucose tolerance test, adiponectin, leptin, and retinol binding protein-4 (RBP4) were measured. Hepatic gene expression changes and the global methylation and histone acetylation levels were also evaluated. Detailed analyses revealed that mothers given GBR and GABA extract, and their offspring had increased adiponectin levels and reduced insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, leptin, oxidative stress, and RBP4 levels, while their hepatic mRNA levels of GLUT2 and IPF1 were increased. Furthermore, GBR and GABA extract lowered global DNA methylation levels and modulated H3 and H4 acetylation levels. These results showed that intrauterine exposure to GBR-influenced metabolic outcomes in offspring of rats with underlying epigenetic changes and transcriptional implications that led to improved glucose homeostasis.

  8. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  9. Brain γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) detection in vivo with the J-editing (1) H MRS technique: a comprehensive methodological evaluation of sensitivity enhancement, macromolecule contamination and test-retest reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shungu, Dikoma C; Mao, Xiangling; Gonzales, Robyn; Soones, Tacara N; Dyke, Jonathan P; van der Veen, Jan Willem; Kegeles, Lawrence S

    2016-07-01

    Abnormalities in brain γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been implicated in various neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. However, in vivo GABA detection by (1) H MRS presents significant challenges arising from the low brain concentration, overlap by much stronger resonances and contamination by mobile macromolecule (MM) signals. This study addresses these impediments to reliable brain GABA detection with the J-editing difference technique on a 3-T MR system in healthy human subjects by: (i) assessing the sensitivity gains attainable with an eight-channel phased-array head coil; (ii) determining the magnitude and anatomic variation of the contamination of GABA by MM; and (iii) estimating the test-retest reliability of the measurement of GABA with this method. Sensitivity gains and test-retest reliability were examined in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), whereas MM levels were compared across three cortical regions: DLPFC, the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the occipital cortex (OCC). A three-fold higher GABA detection sensitivity was attained with the eight-channel head coil compared with the standard single-channel head coil in DLPFC. Despite significant anatomical variation in GABA + MM and MM across the three brain regions (p test-retest reliability of GABA measurement, expressed as either the ratio to voxel tissue water (W) or to total creatine, was found to be very high for both the single-channel coil and the eight-channel phased-array coil. For the eight-channel coil, for example, Pearson's correlation coefficient of test vs. retest for GABA/W was 0.98 (R(2)  = 0.96, p = 0.0007), the percentage coefficient of variation (CV) was 1.25% and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.98. Similar reliability was also found for the co-edited resonance of combined glutamate and glutamine (Glx) for both coils. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Effects of NaCl Replacement with Gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the Quality Characteristics and Sensorial Properties of Model Meat Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Byeongsoo; Lee, Jung Gyu; Cho, Hyung-Yong; Min, Sang-Gi; Choi, Mi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of γ-aminobutylic acid (GABA) on the quality and sensorial properties of both the GABA/NaCl complex and model meat products. GABA/NaCl complex was prepared by spray-drying, and the surface dimensions, morphology, rheology, and saltiness were characterized. For model meat products, pork patties were prepared by replacing NaCl with GABA. For characteristics of the complex, increasing GABA concentration increased the surface dimensions of the complex. However, GABA did not affect the rheological properties of solutions containing the complex. The addition of 2% GABA exhibited significantly higher saltiness than the control (no GABA treatment). In the case of pork patties, sensory testing indicated that the addition of GABA decreased the saltiness intensity. Both the intensity of juiciness and tenderness of patties containing GABA also scored lower than the control, based on the NaCl reduction. These results were consistent with the quality characteristics (cooking loss and texture profile analysis). Nevertheless, overall acceptability of the pork patties showed that up to 1.5%, patties containing GABA did not significantly differ from the control. Consequently, the results indicated that GABA has a potential application in meat products, but also manifested a deterioration of quality by the NaCl reduction, which warrants further exploration.

  11. Effect of Yi-nao-jie-yu decoction on γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor in the hippocampus and serum inflammatory factors in a rat model of poststroke anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wen Zhang,1 Ruizhen Zhao,1 Xiaoli Li,1 Xia Cui,1 Zijun Zhao,1 Yingqiu Mao,2 Fengzhi Wu,3 Qisheng Tang1 1Department of Encephalopathy, The Third Affiliated Hospital, 2Center of Scientific Research, 3Center of Journals, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Chaoyang District, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: The Yi-nao-jie-yu decoction (YNJYD is a herbal preparation widely used in the clinics of traditional Chinese medicine and has been recently used as an important new therapeutic agent in poststroke anxiety (PSA. The neuroendocrine–immune system plays an important role in PSA mechanisms, although the modulating effects of YNJYD remain unknown. This study investigated the potential effects of YNJYD on the neuroendocrine–immune system in a rat model of PSA.Materials and methods: The PSA model was induced by injecting collagenase (type VII into the right globus pallidus, accompanied by empty water bottle stimulation for 2 weeks. The sham group and the PSA model group were gavaged with saline, while the treatment groups received buspirone (BuSpar or YNJYD. Behavior was evaluated with the open field test and elevated plus maze once a week. Pathological changes were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL-6, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, IL-1α, and cortisol were detected by radioimmunoassay. Expression of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR α2 subunit was examined by Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results: YNJYD-treated rats exhibited significantly better recovery than BuSpar-treated rats at 21 days and 28 days in the open field test and elevated plus maze. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed neural repair in the hippocampus in the treatment groups. Serum levels of IL-1α in the YNJYD group were significantly less than those in the model group and the Bu

  12. Effect of Functional Bread Rich in Potassium, γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Blood Pressure, Glucose Metabolism and Endothelial Function: A Double-blind Randomized Crossover Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Tomás, Nerea; Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Quilez, Joan; Merino, Jordi; Ferré, Raimon; Díaz-López, Andrés; Bulló, Mònica; Hernández-Alonso, Pablo; Palau-Galindo, Antoni; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    Because it has been suggested that food rich in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) peptides have beneficial effects on blood pressure (BP) and other cardiovascular risk factors, we tested the effects of low-sodium bread, but rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides on 24-hour BP, glucose metabolism, and endothelial function.A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial was conducted in 30 patients with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension, comparing three 4-week nutritional interventions separated by 2-week washout periods. Patients were randomly assigned to consume 120 g/day of 1 of the 3 types of bread for each nutritional intervention: conventional wheat bread (CB), low-sodium wheat bread enriched in potassium (LSB), and low-sodium wheat bread rich in potassium, GABA, and ACEI peptides (LSB + G). For each period, 24-hour BP measurements, in vivo endothelial function, and biochemical samples were obtained.After LSB + G consumption, 24-hour ambulatory BP underwent a nonsignificant greater reduction than after the consumption of CB and LSB (0.26 mm Hg in systolic BP and -0.63 mm Hg in diastolic BP for CB; -0.71 mm Hg in systolic BP and -1.08 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB; and -0.75 mm Hg in systolic BP and -2.12 mm Hg in diastolic BP for LSB + G, respectively). Diastolic BP at rest decreased significantly during the LSB + G intervention, although there were no significant differences in changes between interventions. There were no significant differences between interventions in terms of changes in in vivo endothelial function, glucose metabolism, and peripheral inflammatory parameters.Compared with the consumption of CB or LSB, no greater beneficial effects on 24-hour BP, endothelial function, or glucose metabolism were demonstrated after the consumption of LSB + G in a population with pre or mild-to-moderate hypertension. Further studies are warranted to clarify the effect of GABA on BP

  13. DNA methylation at the neonatal state and at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association with the estrogen receptor 1, gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor 1, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in female adolescent patients with OCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Becker Nissen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents.The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome.Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2 and COMT.The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072 in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1 (cg10939667, the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG (cg16650906, and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF (cg14080521 in blood samples at the time of diagnosis.Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and

  14. DNA Methylation at the Neonatal State and at the Time of Diagnosis: Preliminary Support for an Association with the Estrogen Receptor 1, Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid B Receptor 1, and Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Female Adolescent Patients with OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Judith Becker; Hansen, Christine Søholm; Starnawska, Anna; Mattheisen, Manuel; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hollegaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder. Non-genetic factors and their interaction with genes have attracted increasing attention. Epigenetics is regarded an important interface between environmental signals and activation/repression of genomic responses. Epigenetic mechanisms have not previously been examined in OCD in children and adolescents. The aim of the present study was to examine the DNA methylation profile of selected genes in blood spots from neonates later diagnosed with OCD and in the same children/adolescents at the time of diagnosis compared with age- and sex-matched controls. Furthermore, we wanted to characterize the association of the differential methylation profiles with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome. Dried and new blood spot samples were obtained from 21 female children/adolescents with verified OCD and 12 female controls. The differential methylation was analyzed using a linear model and the correlation with the severity of OCD and treatment outcome was analyzed using the Pearson correlation. We evaluated selected Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip probes within and up to 100,000 bp up- and downstream of 14 genes previously associated with OCD (SLC1A1, SLC25A12, GABBR1, GAD1, DLGAP1, MOG, BDNF, OLIG2, NTRK2 and 3, ESR1, SL6A4, TPH2, and COMT). The study found no significantly differential methylation. However, preliminary support for a difference was found for the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) B receptor 1 (cg10234998, cg17099072) in blood samples at birth and for the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) (cg10939667), the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) (cg16650906), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (cg14080521) in blood samples at the time of diagnosis. Preliminary support for an association was observed between the methylation profiles of GABBR1 and MOG and baseline severity, treatment effect, and responder status; and between the methylation profile of ESR1 and baseline

  15. Substrate-Na{sup +} complex formation: Coupling mechanism for {gamma}-aminobutyrate symporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallo, Anna; Simon, Agnes [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Bencsura, Akos [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of Structural Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Heja, Laszlo [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Kardos, Julianna, E-mail: jkardos@chemres.hu [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary)

    2009-07-24

    Crystal structures of transmembrane transport proteins belonging to the important families of neurotransmitter-sodium symporters reveal how they transport neurotransmitters across membranes. Substrate-induced structural conformations of gated neurotransmitter-sodium symporters have been in the focus of research, however, a key question concerning the mechanism of Na{sup +} ion coupling remained unanswered. Homology models of human glial transporter subtypes of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid were built. In accordance with selectivity data for subtype 2 vs. 3, docking and molecular dynamics calculations suggest similar orthosteric substrate (inhibitor) conformations and binding crevices but distinguishable allosteric Zn{sup 2+} ion binding motifs. Considering the occluded conformational states of glial human {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transporter subtypes, we found major semi-extended and minor ring-like conformations of zwitterionic {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion. The existence of the minor ring-like conformation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion may be attributed to the strengthening of the intramolecular H-bond by the electrostatic effect of Na{sup +} ion. Coupling substrate uptake into cells with the thermodynamically favorable Na{sup +} ion movement through substrate-Na{sup +} ion complex formation may be a mechanistic principle featuring transmembrane neurotransmitter-sodium symporter proteins.

  16. [Scanning electron microscope study of dentin treated with sodium N-monochloro-DL2-aminobutyrate (NMAB)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Bahillo, J; Segade, L A; Gándara Rey, J; Macedo de Carvalho Capelas, M

    1989-02-01

    This paper report a scanning electron microscope study of the dentinal surface after treatment with sodium N-monochloro-DL2-aminobutyrate (NMAB). The carious cavity shows a rugous and irregular surface. There are detaching plates of the dentin dissolved by the NMAB. At high magnification the compact dentin and the detaching plates show a acid-etched surface.

  17. Gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid levels in the auditory pathway of rats with chronic tinnitus: A direct determination using high resolution point-resolved proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Brozoski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Damage to the auditory system following high-level sound exposure reduces afferent input. Homeostatic mechanisms appear to compensate for the loss. Overcompensation may produce the sensation of sound without an objective physical correlate, i.e., tinnitus. Several potential compensatory neural processes have been identified, such as increased spontaneous activity. The cellular mechanisms enabling such compensatory processes may involve down-regulation of inhibitory neurotransmission mediated by γ-amino butyric acid (GABA, and/or up-regulation of excitatory neurotransmission, mediated by glutamic acid (Glu. Because central processing systems are integrated and well regulated, compensatory changes in one system may produce reactive changes in others. Some or all may be relevant to tinnitus. To examine the roles of GABA and Glu in tinnitus, high-resolution point resolved proton magnetic-resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS was used to quantify their levels in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN, inferior colliculus (IC, medial geniculate body( (MGB, and primary auditory cortex (A1 of rats. Chronic tinnitus was produced by a single high-level unilateral exposure to noise, and was measured using a psychophysical procedure sensitive to tinnitus. Decreased GABA levels were evident only in the MGB, with the greatest decrease, relative to unexposed controls, obtained in the contralateral MGB. Small GABA increases may have been present bilaterally in A1 and in the contralateral DCN. Although Glu levels showed considerable variation, Glu was moderately and bilaterally elevated both in the DCN and in A1. In the MGB Glu was increased ipsilaterally but decreased contralaterally. These bidirectional and region-specific alterations in GABA and Glu may reflect large-scale changes in inhibitory and excitatory equilibrium accompanying chronic tinnitus. The present results also suggest that targeting both neurotransmitter systems may be optimal in developing more effective

  18. Response surface modeling for y-aminobutyric acid production by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plackett-Burman design (PBD) was applied to seek for the crucial parameters that affect the production of GABA. In addition, central composite design (CCD) was used to optimize each crucial variable. As a result, the maximum GABA production predicted by the CCD was 937.61 mg/kg using 60 g sterilized rice and 0.5% ...

  19. The four human ¿-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Trine; Christiansen, Bolette; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    , we perform the first elaborate pharmacological characterization of all four human GAT subtypes. We conduct the experiments in parallel in a [3H]GABA uptake assay using 14 standard GAT substrates and inhibitors. This setup enables direct comparison of the absolute values of inhibitory activities...... at the four human GATs....

  20. Quantitative Autoradiography on [(35)S]TBPS Binding Sites of Gamma- Aminobutyric Acid(A) Receptors in Discrete Brain Regions of High- Alcohol-Drinking and Low-Alcohol- Drinking Rats Selectively Bred forHigh- and Low-Alcohol Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, B.H.; Kunkler, P.E.; Lumeng, L.

    1997-01-01

    It has been documented that ethanol can potentiate brain gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic function, and there is a close link between the GABA(A) receptor complex and effects of ethanol, including reinforcement of alcohol which is a fundamental element of alcohol preference. However, it is unknown in what discrete brain regions GABA(A) receptors might be associated with alcohol preference. In the present study, [(35)S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ([(35)S]TBPS) was used to localize GABA(A) receptors in high-alcohol-drinking (HAD) rats and low-alcohol-drinking (LAD) rats which were selectively bred for high and low alcohol preference, respectively. Initial qualitative observations indicated that [(35)S]TBPS binding sites were abundant in many brain areas including the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus and amygdala of HAD and LAD rats. Furthermore, the quantitative autoradiographic analysis revealed fewer [(35)S]TBPS binding sites of GABA(A) receptors in the amygdaloid complex, central medial thalamic nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus and anterior hypothalamic nucleus of HAD rats than LAD rats. Collectively, this study has indicated that HAD rats selectively bred for high alcohol preference possess lower [(35)S]TBPS binding in the brain. Since lower TBPS binding has been proposed to reflect enhanced GABAergic function, as evidenced in rats with seizure or under alcohol withdrawal, the results from the present study suggest that HAD rats might have an enhanced GABAergic function. It is thus likely that enhanced GABAergic function in the brain might be related to high alcohol preference which is characteristic in HAD rats. In addition, the present result showing no difference of [(35)S]TBPS binding in the nucleus accumbens is also in agreement with a notion that [(35)S]TBPS binding may represent only a small spectrum of the GABA(A) receptor complex which is constituted of a sophisticated subunit combination whose functional compositions are still unknown. In

  1. Syntheses of {gamma}-aminobutyric-1-{sup 14}C and of {alpha}-aminoadipic-6-{sup 14}C acid from methoxy-3 chloropropyl-magnesium and marked carbon dioxide; Syntheses de l'acide {gamma}-aminobutyrique{sup 14}C-1 et de l'acide {alpha}-aminoadipique {sup 14}C-6 a partir de methoxy-3 chloropropylmagnesium et d'anhydride carbonique marque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phung Nhu Liem [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Departement des radioelements, Service des molecules marquees

    1967-04-01

    Carbonation of {gamma}-methoxypropyl-magnesium chloride by CO{sub 2} gives {gamma}-methoxy-butyric carboxylic-{sup 14}C acid with a yield of about 95 per cent. When the latter is treated successively with anhydrous HBr and with diazomethane, methyl carboxylic {gamma}-bromobutyrate-{sup 14}C is formed. This in turn gives {gamma}-amino-butyric carboxylic-{sup 14}C acid with an overall yield of 66 per cent with respect to Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3}, when it is condensed with potassium phthalimide and hydrolyzed by acid. By reacting methyl-{gamma}-bromobutyrate-{sup 14}C with the sodium derivative of ethyl cyanacetamido-acetate in ethanol, followed by an acid hydrolysis, {alpha}-aminoadipic-6-{sup 14}C acid is obtained with an overall yield of 46 per cent with respect to Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3}. (author) [French] La carbonatation du chlorure de {gamma}-methoxypropylmagnesium par {sup 14}CO{sub 2} donne l'acide {gamma}-methoxybutyrique carboxyle {sup 14}C avec un rendement d'environ 95 pour cent. Ce dernier traite successivement par HBr anhydre et par le diazomethane conduit au {gamma}-bromobutyrate de methyle carboxyle {sup 14}C. Celui-ci condense avec le phtalimide de potassium suivi d'une hydrolyse acide fournit l'acide {gamma}-aminobutyrique carboxyle {sup 14}C avec un rendement global de 66 pour cent par rapport a Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3}. L'action du {gamma}-bromobutyrate de methyle {sup 14}C sur le derive sode du cyanacetamidoacetate d'ethyle dans l'ethanol suivie d'hydrolyse acide donne l'acide {alpha}-aminoadipique {sup 14}C-6 avec un rendement global de 46 pour cent par rapport a Ba{sup 14}CO{sub 3}. (auteur)

  2. Severe Intellectual Disability and Enhanced Gamma-Aminobutyric Acidergic Synaptogenesis in a Novel Model of Rare RASopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papale, Alessandro; d'Isa, Raffaele; Menna, Elisabetta; Cerovic, Milica; Solari, Nicola; Hardingham, Neil; Cambiaghi, Marco; Cursi, Marco; Barbacid, Mariano; Leocani, Letizia; Fasano, Stefania; Matteoli, Michela; Brambilla, Riccardo

    2017-02-01

    Dysregulation of Ras-extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) signaling gives rise to RASopathies, a class of neurodevelopmental syndromes associated with intellectual disability. Recently, much attention has been directed at models bearing mild forms of RASopathies whose behavioral impairments can be attenuated by inhibiting the Ras-ERK cascade in the adult. Little is known about the brain mechanisms in severe forms of these disorders. We performed an extensive characterization of a new brain-specific model of severe forms of RASopathies, the KRAS 12V mutant mouse. The KRAS 12V mutation results in a severe form of intellectual disability, which parallels mental deficits found in patients bearing mutations in this gene. KRAS 12V mice show a severe impairment of both short- and long-term memory in a number of behavioral tasks. At the cellular level, an upregulation of ERK signaling during early phases of postnatal development, but not in the adult state, results in a selective enhancement of synaptogenesis in gamma-aminobutyric acidergic interneurons. The enhancement of ERK activity in interneurons at this critical postnatal time leads to a permanent increase in the inhibitory tone throughout the brain, manifesting in reduced synaptic transmission and long-term plasticity in the hippocampus. In the adult, the behavioral and electrophysiological phenotypes in KRAS 12V mice can be temporarily reverted by inhibiting gamma-aminobutyric acid signaling but not by a Ras-ERK blockade. Importantly, the synaptogenesis phenotype can be rescued by a treatment at the developmental stage with Ras-ERK inhibitors. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism underlying inhibitory synaptogenesis and provide new insights in understanding mental dysfunctions associated to RASopathies. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A gene duplication led to specialized gamma-aminobutyrate and beta-alanine aminotransferase in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm; Andersen, Birgit; Dobritzsch, D.

    2007-01-01

    In humans, beta-alanine (BAL) and the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) are transaminated by a single aminotransferase enzyme. Apparently, yeast originally also had a single enzyme, but the corresponding gene was duplicated in the Saccharomyces kluyveri lineage. SkUGA1 encodes a homologue...

  4. Role of sialic acid in synaptosomal transport of amino acid transmitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaleska, M.M.; Erecinska, M.

    1987-01-01

    Active, high-affinity, sodium-dependent uptake of [ 14 C]-aminobutyric acid and of the acidic amino acid D-[ 3 H]-aspartate was inhibited by pretreatment of synaptosomes with neuraminidase from Vibrio cholerae. Inhibition was of a noncompetitive type and was related to the amount of sialic acid released. The maximum accumulation ratios of both amino acids (intracellular [amino acid]/extracellular [amino acid]) remained largely unaltered. Treatment with neuraminidase affected neither the synaptosomal energy levels nor the concentration of internal potassium. It is suggested that the γ-aminobutyric acid and acidic amino acid transporters are glycosylated and that sialic acid is involved in the operation of the carrier proteins directly and not through modification of driving forces responsible for amino acid uptake

  5. Synthesis and accumulation of free amino acids during somatic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In ZE, glutamine and asparagine appeared to be fundamental to the process of induction of zygotic embryos. On the other hand, the induction of somatic embryos that appeared require glutamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamic acid. The results suggest the involvement of amino acids in the ontogenesis of ...

  6. Modulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system by Passiflora incarnata L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Kurt; Rose, Thorsten; Fiebich, Bernd; Kammler, Thomas; Hoffmann, Christine; Weiss, Gabriele

    2011-06-01

    Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloraceae) is important in herbal medicine for treating anxiety or nervousness, Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), symptoms of opiate withdrawal, insomnia, neuralgia, convulsion, spasmodic asthma, ADHD, palpitations, cardiac rhythm abnormalities, hypertension, sexual dysfunction and menopause. However, the mechanism of action is still under discussion. Despite gaps in our understanding of neurophysiological processes, it is increasingly being recognized that dysfunction of the GABA system is implicated in many neuropsychiatric conditions, including anxiety and depressive disorders. Therefore, the in vitro effects of a dry extract of Passiflora incarnata (sole active ingredient in Pascoflair® 425 mg) on the GABA system were investigated. The extract inhibited [(3) H]-GABA uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes but had no effect on GABA release and GABA transaminase activity. Passiflora incarnata inhibited concentration dependently the binding of [(3) H]- SR95531 to GABA(A) -receptors and of [(3) H]-CGP 54626 to GABA(B) -receptors. Using the [(35) S]-GTPγS binding assay Passiflora could be classified as an antagonist of the GABA(B) receptor. In contrast, the ethanol- and the benzodiazepine-site of the GABA(A) -receptor were not affected by this extract. In conclusion, the first evidence was shown that numerous pharmacological effects of Passiflora incarnata are mediated via modulation of the GABA system including affinity to GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors, and effects on GABA uptake. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Ammonia modifies enteric neuromuscular transmission through glial γ-aminobutyric acid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, David E; Watson, Ralph E; Robson, Simon C; Gulbransen, Brian D

    2017-12-01

    Impaired gut motility may contribute, at least in part, to the development of systemic hyperammonemia and systemic neurological disorders in inherited metabolic disorders, or in severe liver and renal disease. It is not known whether enteric neurotransmission regulates intestinal luminal and hence systemic ammonia levels by induced changes in motility. Here, we propose and test the hypothesis that ammonia acts through specific enteric circuits to influence gut motility. We tested our hypothesis by recording the effects of ammonia on neuromuscular transmission in tissue samples from mice, pigs, and humans and investigated specific mechanisms using novel mutant mice, selective drugs, cellular imaging, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Exogenous ammonia increased neurogenic contractions and decreased neurogenic relaxations in segments of mouse, pig, and human intestine. Enteric glial cells responded to ammonia with intracellular Ca 2+ responses. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase and the deletion of glial connexin-43 channels in hGFAP :: Cre ER T2+/- /connexin43 f/f mice potentiated the effects of ammonia on neuromuscular transmission. The effects of ammonia on neuromuscular transmission were blocked by GABA A receptor antagonists, and ammonia drove substantive GABA release as did the selective pharmacological activation of enteric glia in GFAP::hM3Dq transgenic mice. We propose a novel mechanism whereby local ammonia is operational through GABAergic glial signaling to influence enteric neuromuscular circuits that regulate intestinal motility. Therapeutic manipulation of these mechanisms may benefit a number of neurological, hepatic, and renal disorders manifesting hyperammonemia. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We propose that local circuits in the enteric nervous system sense and regulate intestinal ammonia. We show that ammonia modifies enteric neuromuscular transmission to increase motility in human, pig, and mouse intestine model systems. The mechanisms underlying the effects of ammonia on enteric neurotransmission include GABAergic pathways that are regulated by enteric glial cells. Our new data suggest that myenteric glial cells sense local ammonia and directly modify neurotransmission by releasing GABA. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. (Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Nicoletti, G. (Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia)); Holan, G. (CSIRO, Melbourne (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  9. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on synaptogenesis and synaptic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Elster, L

    1998-01-01

    ; that is, GABA acts as a trophic signal. Accordingly, activating preexisting GABA receptors, a trophic GABA signal enhances the growth rate of neuronal processes, facilitates synapse formation, and promotes synthesis of specific proteins. Transcription and de novo synthesis are initiated by the GABA signal......, this ability to target the induced GABAA receptors is probably coupled to the maturation of neurons and not to the action of GABA per se. The induced GABAA receptors apparently mediate a pronounced inhibition of neurotransmitter release, whereas other subtypes of GABAA receptors may be modulatory rather than...

  10. Elucidating Conformational Changes in the {gamma}-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Loo, Donald D F; Hansen, Søren Skovstrup

    2009-01-01

    The GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1) has three current-generating modes: GABA-coupled current, Li(+)-induced leak current, and Na(+)-dependent transient currents. We earlier hypothesized that Li(+) is able to substitute for the first Na(+) in the transport cycle and thereby induce a distinct conformation...... in GAT-1 and that the onset of the Li(+)-induced leak current at membrane potentials more negative than -50 mV was due to a voltage-dependent conformational change of the Li(+)-bound transporter. In this study, we set out to verify this hypothesis and seek insight into the structural dynamics underlying......-dependent fluorescence data obtained in sodium buffer and the associated conformational changes were distinct from those associated with the Li(+)-induced leak current. The inhibitor potency of SKF89976A of the Li(+)- versus Na(+)-bound transporter confirmed the cationic dependence of the conformational occupancy. Our...

  11. Comparison of Nootropic and Neuroprotective Features of Aryl-Substituted Analogs of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyurenkov, I N; Borodkina, L E; Bagmetova, V V; Berestovitskaya, V M; Vasil'eva, O S

    2016-02-01

    GABA analogs containing phenyl (phenibut) or para-chlorophenyl (baclofen) substituents demonstrated nootropic activity in a dose of 20 mg/kg: they improved passive avoidance conditioning, decelerated its natural extinction, and exerted antiamnestic effect on the models of amnesia provoked by scopolamine or electroshock. Tolyl-containing GABA analog (tolibut, 20 mg/kg) exhibited antiamnestic activity only on the model of electroshock-induced amnesia. Baclofen and, to a lesser extent, tolibut alleviated seizures provoked by electroshock, i.e. both agents exerted anticonvulsant effect. All examined GABA aryl derivatives demonstrated neuroprotective properties on the maximum electroshock model: they shortened the duration of coma and shortened the period of spontaneous motor activity recovery. In addition, these agents decreased the severity of passive avoidance amnesia and behavioral deficit in the open field test in rats exposed to electroshock. The greatest neuroprotective properties were exhibited by phenyl-containing GABA analog phenibut.

  12. Does gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA influence the development of chronic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridges S Louis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have demonstrated a role for spinal p38 MAP kinase (MAPK in the development of chronic inflammation and peripheral arthritis and a role for GABA in the inhibition of p38 MAPK mediated effects. Integrating these data suggests that GABA may play a role in downregulating mechanisms that lead to the production of proinflammatory agents such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and matrix metalloproteinase 3 – agents implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Genetic studies have also associated RA with members of the p38 MAPK pathway. Hypothesis We propose a hypothesis for an inefficient GABA signaling system that results in unchecked proinflammatory cytokine production via the p38 MAPK pathway. This model also supports the need for increasing research in the integration of immunology and neuroscience.

  13. Study on flavour volatiles of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) green tea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was shown by the sensory evaluation that the color of the soup and the extracted leaves of GABA tea were similar to that of the oolong tea, and the smell was similar to the aroma of cooked sweet red dates mixed with some of sour. In GABA tea, the contents of 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methyl phenol, methyl myristate, ...

  14. Allosteric ligands and their binding sites define γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) mediate rapid inhibitory transmission in the brain. GABA(A)Rs are ligand-gated chloride ion channel proteins and exist in about a dozen or more heteropentameric subtypes exhibiting variable age and brain regional localization and thus participation in differing brain functions and diseases. GABA(A)Rs are also subject to modulation by several chemotypes of allosteric ligands that help define structure and function, including subtype definition. The channel blocker picrotoxin identified a noncompetitive channel blocker site in GABA(A)Rs. This ligand site is located in the transmembrane channel pore, whereas the GABA agonist site is in the extracellular domain at subunit interfaces, a site useful for low energy coupled conformational changes of the functional channel domain. Two classes of pharmacologically important allosteric modulatory ligand binding sites reside in the extracellular domain at modified agonist sites at other subunit interfaces: the benzodiazepine site and the high-affinity, relevant to intoxication, ethanol site. The benzodiazepine site is specific for certain GABA(A)R subtypes, mainly synaptic, while the ethanol site is found at a modified benzodiazepine site on different, extrasynaptic, subtypes. In the transmembrane domain are allosteric modulatory ligand sites for diverse chemotypes of general anesthetics: the volatile and intravenous agents, barbiturates, etomidate, propofol, long-chain alcohols, and neurosteroids. The last are endogenous positive allosteric modulators. X-ray crystal structures of prokaryotic and invertebrate pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, and the mammalian GABA(A)R protein, allow homology modeling of GABA(A)R subtypes with the various ligand sites located to suggest the structure and function of these proteins and their pharmacological modulation. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Accumulation in Giant Embryo Rice Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guo-Chao; Xie, Mi-Xue; Wang, Ying-Cun; Li, Jian-Yue

    2017-06-21

    To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying GABA accumulation in giant embryo rice seeds, we analyzed the expression levels of GABA metabolism genes and contents of GABA and GABA metabolic intermediates in developing grains and germinated brown rice of giant embryo rice 'Shangshida No. 5' and normal embryo rice 'Chao2-10' respectively. In developing grains, the higher GABA contents in 'Shangshida No. 5' were accompanied with upregulation of gene transcripts and intermediate contents in the polyamine pathway and downregulation of GABA catabolic gene transcripts, as compared with those in 'Chao2-10'. In germinated brown rice, the higher GABA contents in 'Shangshida No. 5' were parallel with upregulation of OsGAD and polyamine pathway gene transcripts and Glu and polyamine pathway intermediate contents and downregulation of GABA catabolic gene transcripts. These results are the first to indicate that polyamine pathway and GABA catabolic genes play a crucial role in GABA accumulation in giant embryo rice seeds.

  16. The γ-Aminobutyrate Permease GabP Serves as the Third Proline Transporter of Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaprasis, Adrienne; Hoffmann, Tamara; Stannek, Lorena; Gunka, Katrin; Commichau, Fabian M.

    2014-01-01

    PutP and OpuE serve as proline transporters when this imino acid is used by Bacillus subtilis as a nutrient or as an osmostress protectant, respectively. The simultaneous inactivation of the PutP and OpuE systems still allows the utilization of proline as a nutrient. This growth phenotype pointed to the presence of a third proline transport system in B. subtilis. We took advantage of the sensitivity of a putP opuE double mutant to the toxic proline analog 3,4-dehydro-dl-proline (DHP) to identify this additional proline uptake system. DHP-resistant mutants were selected and found to be defective in the use of proline as a nutrient. Whole-genome resequencing of one of these strains provided the lead that the inactivation of the γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) transporter GabP was responsible for these phenotypes. DNA sequencing of the gabP gene in 14 additionally analyzed DHP-resistant strains confirmed this finding. Consistently, each of the DHP-resistant mutants was defective not only in the use of proline as a nutrient but also in the use of GABA as a nitrogen source. The same phenotype resulted from the targeted deletion of the gabP gene in a putP opuE mutant strain. Hence, the GabP carrier not only serves as an uptake system for GABA but also functions as the third proline transporter of B. subtilis. Uptake studies with radiolabeled GABA and proline confirmed this conclusion and provided information on the kinetic parameters of the GabP carrier for both of these substrates. PMID:24142252

  17. Effects of Aqueous Extract of Saffron on Gamma-Amino Butyric Acid Content in Rat Hypothalami

    OpenAIRE

    Nikpour Moghaddam; Qujeq; Rastegari Efahani

    2016-01-01

    Background Preliminary studies revealed that 4-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a key and major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Evidence from many animal studies and even some clinical studies indicate that GABA is responsible for regulating behavior and also plays an important role in brain functions. Previous studies presented Glutamic acid decarboxylase as a catalyst for the conversion of glutamic acid to GABA. Objectives ...

  18. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of 6-aminonicotinic acid analogues as novel γ-aminobutyric acidA receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jette Gellert; Sørensen, Troels Ersted; Damgaard, Maria

    2014-01-01

    interaction field calculations and docking studies in a α1β2γ2 GABAA receptor homology model, and were confirmed by affinities of substituted analogues of 3. The tight steric requirements observed for the remarkably few GABAAR agonists reported to date is challenged by our findings. New openings for agonist...

  19. Targeted enhancement of glutamate-to-γ-aminobutyrate conversion in Arabidopsis seeds affects carbon-nitrogen balance and storage reserves in a development-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fait, Aaron; Nesi, Adriano Nunes; Angelovici, Ruthie; Lehmann, Martin; Pham, Phuong Anh; Song, Luhua; Haslam, Richard P; Napier, Johnathan A; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2011-11-01

    In seeds, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) operates at the metabolic nexus between carbon and nitrogen metabolism by catalyzing the unidirectional decarboxylation of glutamate to form γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To elucidate the regulatory role of GAD in seed development, we generated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transgenic plants expressing a truncated GAD from Petunia hybrida missing the carboxyl-terminal regulatory Ca(2+)-calmodulin-binding domain under the transcriptional regulation of the seed maturation-specific phaseolin promoter. Dry seeds of the transgenic plants accumulated considerable amounts of GABA, and during desiccation the content of several amino acids increased, although not glutamate or proline. Dry transgenic seeds had higher protein content than wild-type seeds but lower amounts of the intermediates of glycolysis, glycerol and malate. The total fatty acid content of the transgenic seeds was 50% lower than in the wild type, while acyl-coenzyme A accumulated in the transgenic seeds. Labeling experiments revealed altered levels of respiration in the transgenic seeds, and fractionation studies indicated reduced incorporation of label in the sugar and lipid fractions extracted from transgenic seeds. Comparative transcript profiling of the dry seeds supported the metabolic data. Cellular processes up-regulated at the transcript level included the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid elongation, the shikimate pathway, tryptophan metabolism, nitrogen-carbon remobilization, and programmed cell death. Genes involved in the regulation of germination were similarly up-regulated. Taken together, these results indicate that the GAD-mediated conversion of glutamate to GABA during seed development plays an important role in balancing carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in storage reserve accumulation.

  20. Hypothesis/review: contribution of putrescine to 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) production in response to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelp, Barry J; Bozzo, Gale G; Trobacher, Christopher P; Zarei, Adel; Deyman, Kristen L; Brikis, Carolyne J

    2012-09-01

    4-Aminobutyrate (GABA) accumulates in various plant parts, including bulky fruits such as apples, in response to abiotic stress. It is generally believed that the GABA is derived from glutamate, although a contribution from polyamines is possible. Putrescine, but not spermidine and spermine, generally accumulates in response to the genetic manipulation of polyamine biosynthetic enzymes and abiotic stress. However, the GABA levels in stressed plants are influenced by processes other than putrescine availability. It is hypothesized that the catabolism of putrescine to GABA is regulated by a combination of gene-dependent and -independent processes. The expression of several putative diamine oxidase genes is weak, but highly stress-inducible in certain tissues of Arabidopsis. In contrast, candidate genes that encode 4-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase are highly constitutive, but not stress inducible. Changes in O(2) availability and cellular redox balance due to stress may directly influence the activities of diamine oxidase and 4-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase, thereby restricting GABA formation. Apple fruit is known to accumulate GABA under controlled atmosphere storage and therefore could serve as a model system for investigating the relative contribution of putrescine and glutamate to GABA production. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A putrescine-inducible pathway comprising PuuE-YneI in which gamma-aminobutyrate is degraded into succinate in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Shin; Kato, Kenji; Asada, Kei; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2010-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) is metabolized to succinic semialdehyde by GABA aminotransferase (GABA-AT), and the succinic semialdehyde is subsequently oxidized to succinate by succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH). In Escherichia coli, there are duplicate GABA-ATs (GabT and PuuE) and duplicate SSADHs (GabD and YneI). While GabT and GabD have been well studied previously, the characterization and expression analysis of PuuE and YneI are yet to be investigated. By analyzing the amino acid profiles in cells of DeltapuuE and/or DeltagabT mutants, this study demonstrated that PuuE plays an important role in GABA metabolism in E. coli cells. The similarity of the amino acid sequences of PuuE and GabT is 67.4%, and it was biochemically demonstrated that the catalytic center of GabT is conserved as an amino acid residue important for the enzymatic activity in PuuE as Lys-247. However, the regulation of expression of PuuE is significantly different from that of GabT. PuuE is induced by the addition of putrescine to the medium and is repressed by succinate and low aeration conditions; in contrast, GabT is almost constitutive. Similarly, YneI is induced by putrescine, while GabD is not. For E. coli, PuuE is important for utilization of putrescine as a sole nitrogen source and both PuuE and YneI are important for utilization of putrescine as a sole carbon source. The results demonstrate that the PuuE-YneI pathway was a putrescine-inducible GABA degradation pathway for utilizing putrescine as a nutrient source.

  2. A Putrescine-Inducible Pathway Comprising PuuE-YneI in Which γ-Aminobutyrate Is Degraded into Succinate in Escherichia coli K-12▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Shin; Kato, Kenji; Asada, Kei; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2010-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyrate (GABA) is metabolized to succinic semialdehyde by GABA aminotransferase (GABA-AT), and the succinic semialdehyde is subsequently oxidized to succinate by succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH). In Escherichia coli, there are duplicate GABA-ATs (GabT and PuuE) and duplicate SSADHs (GabD and YneI). While GabT and GabD have been well studied previously, the characterization and expression analysis of PuuE and YneI are yet to be investigated. By analyzing the amino acid profiles in cells of ΔpuuE and/or ΔgabT mutants, this study demonstrated that PuuE plays an important role in GABA metabolism in E. coli cells. The similarity of the amino acid sequences of PuuE and GabT is 67.4%, and it was biochemically demonstrated that the catalytic center of GabT is conserved as an amino acid residue important for the enzymatic activity in PuuE as Lys-247. However, the regulation of expression of PuuE is significantly different from that of GabT. PuuE is induced by the addition of putrescine to the medium and is repressed by succinate and low aeration conditions; in contrast, GabT is almost constitutive. Similarly, YneI is induced by putrescine, while GabD is not. For E. coli, PuuE is important for utilization of putrescine as a sole nitrogen source and both PuuE and YneI are important for utilization of putrescine as a sole carbon source. The results demonstrate that the PuuE-YneI pathway was a putrescine-inducible GABA degradation pathway for utilizing putrescine as a nutrient source. PMID:20639325

  3. Prefrontal gamma-aminobutyric Acid type a receptor insertion controls cue-induced relapse to nicotine seeking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbers, B.R.; van Mourik, Y.; Schetters, D.; Smit, A.B.; de Vries, T.J.; Spijker, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current smoking cessation therapies offer limited success, as relapse rates remain high. Nicotine, which is the major component of tobacco smoke, is thought to be primarily responsible for the addictive properties of tobacco. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms

  4. Putative Neurotransmitters in ’Aplysia’: Distribution of Gamma- Aminobutyric Acid, Aspartate and Glutamate in Ganglia and Single Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-01

    junction. In preliminary electrophysiological investigations, they found that while aspartate is much less effective than glutamate at depolarizing the...been described in other inver- 21 7 tebrate nervous systems. Lewis and Evans note the presence of large amounts of taurine in

  5. Post-endocytotic Deubiquitination and Degradation of the MetabotropicAminobutyric Acid Receptor by the Ubiquitin-specific Protease 14

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lahaie, N.; Králíková, Michaela; Prezeau, L.; Blahoš, Jaroslav; Bouvier, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 13 (2016), s. 7156-7170 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/12/2408 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) * biosensor * deubiquitylation * G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) * GABA receptor * protein degradation * receptor endocytosis * ubiquitination Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2016

  6. RP-HPLC method for simultaneous estimation of vigabatrin, gamma-aminobutyric acid and taurine in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Police, Anitha; Shankar, Vijay Kumar; Narasimha Murthy, S

    2018-02-15

    Vigabatrin is used as first line drug in treatment of infantile spasms for its potential benefit overweighing risk of causing permanent peripheral visual field defects and retinal damage. Chronic administration of vigabatrin in rats has demonstrated these ocular events are result of GABA accumulation and depletion of taurine levels in retinal tissues. In vigabatrin clinical studies taurine plasma level is considered as biomarker for studying structure and function of retina. The analytical method is essential to monitor taurine levels along with vigabatrin and GABA. A RP-HPLC method has been developed and validated for simultaneous estimation of vigabatrin, GABA and taurine using surrogate matrix. Analytes were extracted from human plasma, rat plasma, retina and brain by simple protein precipitation method and derivatized by naphthalene 2, 3‑dicarboxaldehyde to produce stable fluorescent active isoindole derivatives. The chromatographic analysis was performed on Zorbax Eclipse AAA column using gradient elution profile and eluent was monitored using fluorescence detector. A linear plot of calibration curve was observed in concentration range of 64.6 to 6458, 51.5 to 5150 and 62.5 to 6258 ng/mL for vigabatrin, GABA and taurine, respectively with r 2  ≥ 0.997 for all analytes. The method was successfully applied for estimating levels of vigabatrin and its modulator effect on GABA and taurine levels in rat plasma, brain and retinal tissue. This RP-HPLC method can be applied in clinical and preclinical studies to explore the effect of taurine deficiency and to investigate novel approaches for alleviating vigabatrin induced ocular toxicity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Comparative proteomic analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid responses in hypoxia-treated and untreated melon roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Longquan; Wu, Xiaolei; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Kaizhi; Pan, Yinghong; Li, Jingrui; Gao, Hongbo

    2015-08-01

    Hypoxia is one of the main environmental stresses that accounts for decreasing crop yield. To further investigate the mechanisms whereby exogenous GABA alleviates hypoxia injury to melon seedlings, a comparative proteomic analysis was performed using roots subjected to normal aeration and hypoxia conditions with or without GABA (5mM). The results indicated that protein spots on gels after hypoxia and hypoxia+GABA treatment were significantly changed. Three "matched sets" were analyzed from four treatments, and 13 protein spots with large significant differences in expression were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Exogenous GABA treatment enhanced the expression of protein in cytosolic phosphoglycerate kinase 1, exaA2 gene product, dnaJ and myb-like DNA-binding domain-containing proteins, as well as elongation factor-1 alpha and hypothetical proteins in hypoxia-induced roots. However, the hypoxia+GABA treated roots had a significantly lower expression of proteins including malate dehydrogenase, nucleoside diphosphate kinase, disease resistance-like protein, disulfide isomerase, actin, ferrodoxin NADP oxidoreductase, glutathione transferase, netting associated peroxidase. This paper describes the effect of GABA on melon plants under hypoxia-induced stress using proteomics, and supports the alleviating function of GABA in melon plants grown under hypoxic conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of gamma-aminobutyric acid in early neuronal development: studies with an embryonic neuroectodermal stem cell clone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelitai, M.; Anděrová, Miroslava; Markó, K.; Kékesi, K.; Koncz, P.; Syková, Eva; Madarász, E.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 76, - (2004), s. 801-811 ISSN 0360-4012 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/1528; GA ČR GA305/03/1172; GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : neuronal development * calcium response Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.727, year: 2004

  9. Gephyrin-mediated γ-aminobutyric acid type A and glycine receptor clustering relies on a common binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Hans-Michael; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Tretter, Verena

    2011-01-01

    confirmed the receptor-gephyrin interaction to be a mutually exclusive process. Selected gephyrin point mutants that critically weaken complex formation with GlyR β also abolished the GABA(A)R α1 and α3 interactions. Additionally, we identified a common binding motif with two conserved aromatic residues...

  10. beta-aminobutyric acid protects Brassica napus plants from infection by Leptosphaeria maculans. Resistance induction or a direct antifungal effect?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šašek, Vladimír; Nováková, Miroslava; Dobrev, Petre; Valentová, O.; Burketová, Lenka

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 1 (2012), s. 279-289 ISSN 0929-1873 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/08/1581; GA MZe QH72117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Antimicrobial * BTH * Gene expression Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection Impact factor: 1.610, year: 2012

  11. Conformational basis for the Li(+)-induced leak current in the rat gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacAulay, Nanna; Zeuthen, Thomas; Gether, Ulrik

    2002-01-01

    (+)-bound conformation of the protein displayed a lower passive water permeability than that of the Na(+)- and choline (Ch(+))-bound conformations and the leak current did not saturate with increasing amounts of Li(+) in the test solution. The mechanism that gives rise to the leak current did not support active water...

  12. α-Thujone (the active component of absinthe): γ-Aminobutyric acid type A receptor modulation and metabolic detoxification

    OpenAIRE

    Höld, Karin M.; Sirisoma, Nilantha S.; Ikeda, Tomoko; Narahashi, Toshio; Casida, John E.

    2000-01-01

    α-Thujone is the toxic agent in absinthe, a liqueur popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries that has adverse health effects. It is also the active ingredient of wormwood oil and some other herbal medicines and is reported to have antinociceptive, insecticidal, and anthelmintic activity. This study elucidates the mechanism of α-thujone neurotoxicity and identifies its major metabolites and their role in the poisoning process. Four observations establish that α-thujone is a modulator of th...

  13. Mu Opioid Receptors in Gamma-Aminobutyric Acidergic Forebrain Neurons Moderate Motivation for Heroin and Palatable Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbogne, Pauline; Gardon, Olivier; Martín-García, Elena; Keyworth, Helen L; Matsui, Aya; Mechling, Anna E; Bienert, Thomas; Nasseef, Taufiq; Robé, Anne; Moquin, Luc; Darcq, Emmanuel; Ben Hamida, Sami; Robledo, Patricia; Matifas, Audrey; Befort, Katia; Gavériaux-Ruff, Claire; Harsan, Laura-Adela; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Hennig, Jurgen; Gratton, Alain; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis; Alvarez, Veronica A; Maldonado, Rafael; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2017-05-01

    Mu opioid receptors (MORs) are central to pain control, drug reward, and addictive behaviors, but underlying circuit mechanisms have been poorly explored by genetic approaches. Here we investigate the contribution of MORs expressed in gamma-aminobutyric acidergic forebrain neurons to major biological effects of opiates, and also challenge the canonical disinhibition model of opiate reward. We used Dlx5/6-mediated recombination to create conditional Oprm1 mice in gamma-aminobutyric acidergic forebrain neurons. We characterized the genetic deletion by histology, electrophysiology, and microdialysis; probed neuronal activation by c-Fos immunohistochemistry and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging; and investigated main behavioral responses to opiates, including motivation to obtain heroin and palatable food. Mutant mice showed MOR transcript deletion mainly in the striatum. In the ventral tegmental area, local MOR activity was intact, and reduced activity was only observed at the level of striatonigral afferents. Heroin-induced neuronal activation was modified at both sites, and whole-brain functional networks were altered in live animals. Morphine analgesia was not altered, and neither was physical dependence to chronic morphine. In contrast, locomotor effects of heroin were abolished, and heroin-induced catalepsy was increased. Place preference to heroin was not modified, but remarkably, motivation to obtain heroin and palatable food was enhanced in operant self-administration procedures. Our study reveals dissociable MOR functions across mesocorticolimbic networks. Thus, beyond a well-established role in reward processing, operating at the level of local ventral tegmental area neurons, MORs also moderate motivation for appetitive stimuli within forebrain circuits that drive motivated behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency: Decrease in 4-OH-butyric acid levels with low doses of vigabatrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escalera, G.I.; Ferrer, I.; Marina, L.C.; Sala, P.R.; Salomons, G.S.; Jakobs, C.; Perez-Cerda, C.

    2010-01-01

    Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency (gamma-hydroxybutyric aciduria) is a rare neurometabolic disease caused by a deficiency in gamma-aminobutyric degradation, resulting in an increase in gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in biological fluids. The clinical spectrum is heterogeneous, including a

  15. Novel high-affinity and selective biaromatic 4-substituted ¿-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) analogues as GHB ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, Signe; Wellendorph, Petrine; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and has been proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. GHB is used in the treatment of narcolepsy and is a drug of abuse. GHB binds to both GABA(B) receptors and specific high-affinity GHB sites...

  16. Targeted Enhancement of Glutamate-to-γ-Aminobutyrate Conversion in Arabidopsis Seeds Affects Carbon-Nitrogen Balance and Storage Reserves in a Development-Dependent Manner1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fait, Aaron; Nesi, Adriano Nunes; Angelovici, Ruthie; Lehmann, Martin; Pham, Phuong Anh; Song, Luhua; Haslam, Richard P.; Napier, Johnathan A.; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2011-01-01

    In seeds, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) operates at the metabolic nexus between carbon and nitrogen metabolism by catalyzing the unidirectional decarboxylation of glutamate to form γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). To elucidate the regulatory role of GAD in seed development, we generated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transgenic plants expressing a truncated GAD from Petunia hybrida missing the carboxyl-terminal regulatory Ca2+-calmodulin-binding domain under the transcriptional regulation of the seed maturation-specific phaseolin promoter. Dry seeds of the transgenic plants accumulated considerable amounts of GABA, and during desiccation the content of several amino acids increased, although not glutamate or proline. Dry transgenic seeds had higher protein content than wild-type seeds but lower amounts of the intermediates of glycolysis, glycerol and malate. The total fatty acid content of the transgenic seeds was 50% lower than in the wild type, while acyl-coenzyme A accumulated in the transgenic seeds. Labeling experiments revealed altered levels of respiration in the transgenic seeds, and fractionation studies indicated reduced incorporation of label in the sugar and lipid fractions extracted from transgenic seeds. Comparative transcript profiling of the dry seeds supported the metabolic data. Cellular processes up-regulated at the transcript level included the tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty acid elongation, the shikimate pathway, tryptophan metabolism, nitrogen-carbon remobilization, and programmed cell death. Genes involved in the regulation of germination were similarly up-regulated. Taken together, these results indicate that the GAD-mediated conversion of glutamate to GABA during seed development plays an important role in balancing carbon and nitrogen metabolism and in storage reserve accumulation. PMID:21921115

  17. The Intracellular Loops of the GB2 Subunit Are Crucial for G-Protein Coupling of the Heteromeric Gamma-Aminobutyrate B Receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havlíčková, Michaela; Prezeau, L.; Duthey, B.; Bettler, B.; Pin, J. P.; Blahoš, Jaroslav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 2 (2002), s. 343-350 ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/00/0654; GA MZd NL6114; GA MZd NF6704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5008914 Keywords : GABA * Gamma-aminobutyrate * GPCR Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 5.480, year: 2002

  18. Nonproteinogenic D-amino acids at millimolar concentrations are a toxin for anaerobic microorganisms relevant to early Earth and other anoxic planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Sophie L; Cockell, Charles S

    2015-03-01

    The delivery of extraterrestrial organics to early Earth provided a potentially important source of carbon and energy for microbial life. Optically active organic compounds of extraterrestrial origin exist in racemic form, yet life on Earth has almost exclusively selected for L- over D-enantiomers of amino acids. Although D-enantiomers of proteinogenic amino acids are known to inhibit aerobic microorganisms, the role of concentrated nonproteinogenic meteoritic D-amino acids on anaerobic metabolisms relevant to early Earth and other anoxic planets such as Mars is unknown. Here, we test the inhibitory effect of D-enantiomers of two nonproteinogenic amino acids common to carbonaceous chondrites, norvaline and α-aminobutyric acid, on microbial iron reduction. Three pure strains (Geobacter bemidjiensis, Geobacter metallireducens, Geopsychrobacter electrodiphilus) and an iron-reducing enrichment culture were grown in the presence of 10 mM D-enantiomers of both amino acids. Further tests were conducted to assess the inhibitory effect of these D-amino acids at 1 and 0.1 mM. The presence of 10 mM D-norvaline and D-α-aminobutyric acid inhibited microbial iron reduction by all pure strains and the enrichment. G. bemidjiensis was not inhibited by either amino acid at 0.1 mM, but D-α-aminobutyric acid still inhibited at 1 mM. Calculations using published meteorite accumulation rates to the martian surface indicate D-α-aminobutyric acid may have reached inhibitory concentrations in little over 1000 years during peak infall. These data show that, on a young anoxic planet, the use of one enantiomer over another may render the nonbiological enantiomer an environmental toxin. Processes that generate racemic amino acids in the environment, such as meteoritic infall or impact synthesis, would have been toxic processes and could have been a selection pressure for the evolution of early racemases.

  19. (1S, 3S)-3-amino-4-difluoromethylenyl-1-cyclopentanoic acid (CPP-115), a potent gamma-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase inactivator for the treatment of cocaine addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Yue; Gerasimov, Madina R; Kvist, Trine

    2012-01-01

    Vigabatrin, a GABA aminotransferase (GABA-AT) inactivator, is used to treat infantile spasms and refractory complex partial seizures and is in clinical trials to treat addiction. We evaluated a novel GABA-AT inactivator (CPP-115) and observed that it does not exhibit other GABAergic or off...... at 1/300-1/600th the dose of vigabatrin. It also blocks expression of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference at a dose 1/300th that of vigabatrin. Electroretinographic (ERG) responses in rats treated with CPP-115, at doses 20-40 times higher than those needed to treat addiction in rats, exhibited...... reductions in ERG responses, which were less than the reductions observed in rats treated with vigabatrin at the same dose needed to treat addiction in rats. In conclusion, CPP-115 can be administered at significantly lower doses than vigabatrin, which suggests a potential new treatment for addiction...

  20. Transfer of Asymmetry between Proteinogenic Amino Acids under Harsh Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Vives, Thomas; Snytnikov, Valeriy N.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2017-09-01

    The heating above 400 °C of serine, cysteine, selenocysteine and threonine leads to a complete decomposition of the amino acids and to the formation in low yields of alanine for the three formers and of 2-aminobutyric acid for the latter. At higher temperature, this amino acid is observed only when sublimable α-alkyl-α-amino acids are present, and with an enantiomeric excess dependent on several parameters. Enantiopure or enantioenriched Ser, Cys, Sel or Thr is not able to transmit its enantiomeric excess to the amino acid formed during its decomposition. The presence during the sublimation-decomposition of enantioenriched valine or isoleucine leads to the enantioenrichment of all sublimable amino acids independently of the presence of many decomposition products coming from the unstable derivative. All these studies give information on a potentially prebiotic key-reaction of abiotic transformations between α-amino acids and their evolution to homochirality.

  1. Solid state radiolysis of non-proteinaceous amino acids in vacuum. Astrochemical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco Cataldo; Giancarlo Angelini; Yaser Hafez; Susana Iglesias-Groth

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of the amino acids present in Murchison meteorite and in other carbonaceous chondrites has revealed the presence of 66 different amino acids. Only eight of these 66 amino acids are proteinaceous amino acids used by the present terrestrial biochemistry in protein synthesis, the other 58 amino acids are somewhat 'rare' or unusual or even 'unknown' for the current terrestrial biochemistry. For this reason in the present work a series of 'uncommon' non-proteinaceous amino acids, namely, l-2-aminobutyric acid, R(-)-2-aminobutyric acid, 2-aminoisobutyric acid (or α-aminoisobutyric acid), l-norleucine, l-norvaline, l-β-leucine, l-β-homoalanine, l-β-homoglutamic acid, S(-)-α-methylvaline and dl-3-aminoisobutyric acid were radiolyzed in vacuum at 3.2 MGy a dose equivalent to that emitted in 1.05 x 10 9 years from the radionuclide decay in the bulk of asteroids or comets. The residual amount of each amino acid under study remained after radiolysis was determined by differential scanning calorimetry in comparison to pristine samples. For optically active amino acids, the residual amount of each amino acid remained after radiolysis was also determined by optical rotatory dispersion spectroscopy and by polarimetry. With these analytical techniques it was possible to measure also the degree of radioracemization undergone by each amino acid after radiolysis. It was found that the non-proteinaceous amino acids in general do not show a higher radiation and radioracemization resistance in comparison to the common 20 proteinaceous amino acids studied previously. The unique exception is represented by ?-aminoisobutyric acid which shows an extraordinary resistance to radiolysis since 96.6 % is recovered unchanged after 3.2 MGy. Curiously α-aminoisobutyric acid is the most abundant amino acid found in carbonaceous chondrites. In Murchison meteorite α-aminoisobutyric acid represents more than 20 % of the total 66 amino acids found in this meteorite. (author)

  2. Impact of 1-methylcyclopropene and controlled atmosphere storage on polyamine and 4-aminobutyrate levels in ‘Empire’ apple fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen L Deyman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP delays ethylene-meditated ripening of apple (Malus domestica Borkh. fruit during controlled atmosphere storage. Here, we tested the hypothesis that 1-MCP and controlled atmosphere storage enhances the levels of polyamines (PAs and 4-aminobutyrate (GABA in apple fruit. A 46-week experiment was conducted with ‘Empire’ apple using a split-plot design with four treatment replicates and 3 oC, 2.5 kPa O2, and 0.03 or 2.5 kPa CO2 with or without 1 μL L-1 1-MCP. Total PA levels were not elevated by the 1-MCP treatment. Examination of the individual PAs revealed that: (i total putrescine levels tended to be lower with 1-MCP regardless of the CO2 level, and while this was mostly at the expense of free putrescine, large transient increases in soluble conjugated putrescine were also evident; (ii total spermidine levels tended to be lower with 1-MCP, particularly at 2.5 kPa CO2, and this was mostly at the expense of soluble conjugated spermidine; (iii total spermine levels at 2.5 kPa CO2 tended to be lower with 1-MCP, and this was mostly at the expense of both soluble and insoluble conjugated spermine; and (iv total spermidine and spermine levels at 0.03 kPa were relatively unaffected, compared to 2.5 kPa CO2, but transient increases in free spermidine and spermine were evident. These findings might be due to changes in the conversion of putrescine into higher PAs and the interconversion of free and conjugated forms in apple fruit, rather than altered S-adenosylmethionine availability. Regardless of 1-MCP and CO2 treatments, the availability of glutamate showed a transient peak initially, probably due to protein degradation, and this was followed by a steady decline over the remainder of the storage period which coincided with linear accumulation of GABA. This pattern has been attributed to the stimulation of glutamate decarboxylase activity and inhibition of GABA catabolism, rather than a contribution of PAs to GABA

  3. Gas Phase Structure of Amino Acids: La-Mb Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, I. Pena S.; Sanz, M. E.; Vaquero, V.; Cabezas, C.; Perez, C.; Blanco, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2009-06-01

    Recent improvements in our laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectrometer such as using Laval-type nozzles and picoseconds Nd:YAG lasers (30 to 150 ps) have allowed a major step forward in the capabilities of this experimental technique as demonstrated by the last results in serine cysteine and threonine^a for which seven, six and seven conformers have been respectively identified. Taking advantage of these improvements we have investigated the natural amino acids metionine, aspartic and glutamic acids and the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the aim of identify and characterize their lower energy conformers. Searches in the rotational spectra have lead to the identification of seven conformers of metionine, six and five of aspartic and glutamic acids, respectively, and seven for the γ-aminobutyric. These conformers have been unambiguously identified by their spectroscopic constants. In particular the ^{14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, that depend heavily on the orientation of the amino group with respect to the principal inertial axes of the molecule, prove to be a unique tool to distinguish unambigously between conformations with similar rotational constants. For the γ-aminobutyric acid two of the seven observed structures are stablized by an intramolecular interaction n-π*. Two new conformers of proline have been identified together with the two previously observed. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys., 2009, 11, 617. D. B. Atkinson, M. A. Smith, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 1995, 66, 4434 S. Blanco, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA2007, 104, 20183. M. E. Sanz, S. Blanco, J. C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.,2008, 120, 6312. A. Lesarri, S. Mata, E. J. Cocinero, S. Blanco, J.C. López, J. L. Alonso, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. , 2002, 41, 4673

  4. Glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in transgenic mouse septum: an anti-GFP immunofluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verimli, Ural; Sehirli, Umit S

    2016-09-01

    The septum is a basal forebrain region located between the lateral ventricles in rodents. It consists of lateral and medial divisions. Medial septal projections regulate hippocampal theta rhythm whereas lateral septal projections are involved in processes such as affective functions, memory formation, and behavioral responses. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons of the septal region possess the 65 and 67 isoforms of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. Although data on the glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in the septal region generally appears to indicate glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 dominance, different studies have given inconsistent results in this regard. The aim of this study was therefore to obtain information on the distributions of both of these glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms in the septal region in transgenic mice. Two animal groups of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice were utilized in the experiment. Brain sections from the region were taken for anti-green fluorescent protein immunohistochemistry in order to obtain estimated quantitative data on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons. Following the immunohistochemical procedures, the mean numbers of labeled cells in the lateral and medial septal nuclei were obtained for the two isoform groups. Statistical analysis yielded significant results which indicated that the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase predominates in both lateral and medial septal nuclei (unpaired two-tailed t-test p glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65 in the septal region in glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

  5. Quantitative analysis of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in the mouse model of obsessive compulsive disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Schaper, Helge Ascan

    2010-01-01

    Within this study a new genetic mouse model of obsessive compulsive disorder was further established. For this purpose 3 groups of mice were examined, which had been bidirectionally selected regarding thermoregulatory nest-building behavior before. One group emerged with increased nest-building behavior HA, another group with reduced nest-building behavior LA as well as a control group CA, which shows average values concerning nest-building behavior. Particularly the increased nest-building b...

  6. Interaction of carvacrol with the Ascaris suum nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors, potential mechanism of antinematodal action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trailović, Saša M; Marjanović, Djordje S; Nedeljković Trailović, Jelena; Robertson, Alan P; Martin, Richard J

    2015-08-01

    Essential plant oils (or their active principles) are safe to use and a potentially attractive alternative to current antiparasitic drugs. In the present study, we tested the effects of carvacrol on the isolated tissues of Ascaris suum and investigated potential interactions with other antiparasitic drugs. We used somatic muscle flaps for contraction assays, as well as for electrophysiological investigations. Carvacrol 300 μM highly significantly inhibited contractions caused by 1, 3, 10, 30, and 100 μM of ACh (p = 0.0023, p = 0.0002, p = 0.0002, p acetylcholine was 8.87 μM (log EC50 = 0.95 ± 0.26), while R max was 2.53 ± 0.24 g. The EC50 of acetylcholine in the presence of 300 μM of carvacrol was 27.71 μM (log EC50 = 1.44 ± 0.28) and the R max decreased to 1.63 ± 0.32 g. Furthermore, carvacrol highly significant potentiates inhibitory effect of GABA and piperazine on the contractions induced by ACh. However, carvacrol (100 and 300 μM), did not produce any changes in the membrane potential or conductance of the A. suum muscle cell. While, 300 μM of carvacrol showed a significant inhibitory effect on ACh-induced depolarization response. The mean control depolarization was 13.58 ± 0.66 mV and decreased in presence of carvacrol to 4.50 ± 1.02 mV (p < 0.0001). Mean control Δg was 0.168 ± 0.017 μS, while in the presence of 300 μM of carvacrol, Δg significantly decreased to 0.060 ± 0.018 ΔS (p = 0.0017). The inhibitory effect on contractions may be the explanation of the antinematodal potential of carvacrol. Moreover, inhibition of depolarizations caused by ACh and reduction of conductance changes directly points to an interaction with the nAChR in A. suum.

  7. 5-(Piperidin-4-yl)-3-Hydroxypyrazole: A Novel Scaffold for Probing the Orthosteric γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A Receptor Binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krall, Jacob; Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    A series of bioisosteric N1- and N2-substituted 5-(piperidin-4-yl)-3-hydroxypyrazole analogues of the partial GABAAR agonists 4-PIOL and 4-PHP have been designed, synthesized, and characterized pharmacologically. The unsubstituted 3-hydroxypyrazole analogue of 4-PIOL (2 a; IC50∼300 μM) is a weak...... indicate that the N1-substituted analogues of 4-PIOL and 4-PHP, 2 a–k, and previously reported 3-substituted 4-PHP analogues share a common binding mode to the orthosteric binding site in the receptor. Interestingly, the core scaffold of the N2-substituted analogues of 4-PIOL and 4-PHP, 3 b...

  8. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mediated transmembrane chloride flux with membrane vesicles from rat brain measured by quench flow technique: kinetic homogeneity of ion flux and receptor desensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, D.J.; Subbarao, K.

    1987-01-01

    Transmembrane chloride flux mediated by the GABA/sub A/ receptor and the desensitization of the receptor were followed using quench flow technique with 36 Cl - and a membrane preparation from rat cerebral cortex. Measurements in short times allowed these two processes to be resolved. In general the ion-flux activity was desensitized in two phases. A fast phase took place in circa 200 ms (100 μM GABA) followed by a slower phase in several seconds. A minority of the membrane preparations did not display the fast phase. It is desirable to be able to separate these two phases of desensitization to facilitate analysis of the responses of the receptor. A short preincubation with GABA removed the fast phase from a subsequent measurement. In the absence of the fast phase the whole ion-flux equilibrium was seen as a single phase. The measurements presented covering a time range of 0.01 seconds to 10 seconds show a single phase of ion flux which can be described by a first order ion influx process and a single first order desensitization process with a halt time of circa 1 s (100 μM GABA). The results imply a single population of vesicles containing a single population of GABA receptor (remaining active) with a single phase of desensitization. An understanding of this homogeneity, and how to ensure it, gives a basis for quantitatively testing the effects of drugs on these responses. Ion flux measurements with quench flow technique are a suitable tool for investigation of the mechanism of action of neurotransmitter receptors from brain. 37 references, 3 figures

  9. Ex vivo binding of t-( sup 35 S) butylbicyclophosphorothionate: A biochemical tool to study the pharmacology of ethanol at the gamma-aminobutyric acid-coupled chloride channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanna, E.; Concas, A.; Serra, M.; Santoro, G.; Biggio, G. (Univ. of Cagliari (Italy))

    1991-03-01

    The effects of acute administration of ethanol on t-(35S)Butylbiclophosphorothionate (35S-TBPS) binding measured ex vivo in unwashed membrane preparations of rat cerebral cortex were investigated. Ethanol, given i.g., decreased in a dose-related (0.5-4 g/kg) and time-dependent manner the binding of 35S-TBPS. This effect was similar to that induced by the administration of diazepam (0.5-4 mg/kg i.p.). Scatchard plot analysis of this radioligand binding revealed that ethanol, differently from diazepam, decreased the apparent affinity of 35S-TBPS recognition sites whereas it failed to change the density of these binding sites. The effect of ethanol on 35S-TBPS binding could not be reversed by the previous administration to rats of the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (ethyl-8-fluoro-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H- imidazo (1,5a) (1,4) benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate). Vice versa, the benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, Ro 15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H- imidazo (1,5a) (4,4) benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate) (8 mg/kg i.p.), prevented completely ethanol-induced decrease of 35S-TBPS binding. The ability of Ro 15-4513 to prevent the action of ethanol was shared by the anxiogenic and proconvulsant beta-carboline derivatives, FG 7142 (N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide) (12.5 mg/kg i.p.) and ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (0.6 mg/kg i.v.), which, per se, enhanced this parameter. Moreover, ethanol (0.5-4 g/kg) was able to reverse the increase of 35S-TBPS binding elicited by the s.c. injection of isoniazid (350 mg/kg) and to clearly attenuate the severity of tonic-clonic seizures produced by this inhibitor of the GABAergic transmission.

  10. Deletion of the γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter 2 (GAT2 and SLC6A13) Gene in Mice Leads to Changes in Liver and Brain Taurine Contents*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yun; Holmseth, Silvia; Guo, Caiying; Hassel, Bjørnar; Höfner, Georg; Huitfeldt, Henrik S.; Wanner, Klaus T.; Danbolt, Niels C.

    2012-01-01

    The GABA transporters (GAT1, GAT2, GAT3, and BGT1) have mostly been discussed in relation to their potential roles in controlling the action of transmitter GABA in the nervous system. We have generated the first mice lacking the GAT2 (slc6a13) gene. Deletion of GAT2 (both mRNA and protein) neither affected growth, fertility, nor life span under nonchallenging rearing conditions. Immunocytochemistry showed that the GAT2 protein was predominantly expressed in the plasma membranes of periportal hepatocytes and in the basolateral membranes of proximal tubules in the renal cortex. This was validated by processing tissue from wild-type and knockout mice in parallel. Deletion of GAT2 reduced liver taurine levels by 50%, without affecting the expression of the taurine transporter TAUT. These results suggest an important role for GAT2 in taurine uptake from portal blood into liver. In support of this notion, GAT2-transfected HEK293 cells transported [3H]taurine. Furthermore, most of the uptake of [3H]GABA by cultured rat hepatocytes was due to GAT2, and this uptake was inhibited by taurine. GAT2 was not detected in brain parenchyma proper, excluding a role in GABA inactivation. It was, however, expressed in the leptomeninges and in a subpopulation of brain blood vessels. Deletion of GAT2 increased brain taurine levels by 20%, suggesting a taurine-exporting role for GAT2 in the brain. PMID:22896705

  11. Polyamine biosynthesis and degradation are modulated by exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid in root-zone hypoxia-stressed melon roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyan; Fan, Longquan; Gao, Hongbo; Wu, Xiaolei; Li, Jingrui; Lv, Guiyun; Gong, Binbin

    2014-09-01

    We detected physiological change and gene expression related to PA metabolism in melon roots under controlled and hypoxic conditions with or without 5 mM GABA. Roots with hypoxia treatment showed a significant increase in glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity and endogenous GABA concentration. Concurrently, PA biosynthesis and degradation accelerated with higher gene expression and enzymes activity. However, endogenous GABA concentrations showed a large and rapid increase in Hypoxia + GABA treated roots. This led to a marked increase in Glu concentration by feedback inhibition of GAD activity. Hypoxia + GABA treatment enhanced arginine (Arg), ornithine (Orn) and methionine (Met) levels, promoting enzyme gene expression levels and arginine decarboxylase (ADC), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) activities in roots. Hypoxia + GABA treatment significantly increased concentrations of free putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) from day two to eight, promoting the PA conversion to soluble conjugated and insoluble bound forms. However, PA degradation was significantly inhibited in hypoxia + GABA treated roots by significantly decreasing gene expression and activity of diamine oxidase (DAO) and polyamine oxidase (PAO). However, exogenous GABA showed a reduced effect in control compared with hypoxic conditions. Our data suggest that alleviating effect of exogenous GABA to hypoxia is closely associated with physiological regulation of PA metabolism. We propose a potential negative feedback mechanism of higher endogenous GABA levels from combined effects of hypoxia and exogenous GABA, which alleviate the hypoxia damage by accelerating PA biosynthesis and conversion as well as preventing PA degradation in melon plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential interactions of 5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol analogues with insect γ-aminobutyric acid receptors leading to functional selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Genyan; Frølund, Bente; Ozoe, Fumiyo

    2015-01-01

    value of 31.3 μM. Homology models and docking simulations revealed that a cation-π interaction between an analogue and an Arg residue in loop C or E of the orthosteric site is a key component of antagonism. This specific phenomenon was lacking in the interactions between 2a and the orthosteric site...

  13. Residues in the extracellular loop 4 are critical for maintaining the conformational equilibrium of the gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacAulay, Nanna; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    affinity, a decrease in apparent Na+ affinity, a profound shift in the Q/Vm relationship to more negative potentials, and a decreased Li+-induced leak current. The data are consistent with a shift in the conformational equilibrium of the mutant transporters, with M345H stabilized in an outward......-facing conformation and T349H in an inward-facing conformation. These data suggest that the extracellular end of transmembrane domain 7 not only undergoes conformational changes critical for the translocation process but also plays a role in regulating the conformational equilibrium between inward- and outward...

  14. Bioconversion Using Lactic Acid Bacteria: Ginsenosides, GABA, and Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2017-05-28

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are used as fermentation starters in vegetable and dairy products and influence the pH and flavors of foods. For many centuries, LAB have been used to manufacture fermented foods; therefore, they are generally regarded as safe. LAB produce various substances, such as lactic acid, β-glucosidase, and β-galactosidase, making them useful as fermentation starters. Existing functional substances have been assessed as fermentation substrates for better component bioavailability or other functions. Representative materials that were bioconverted using LAB have been reported and include minor ginsenosides, γ-aminobutyric acid, equol, aglycones, bioactive isoflavones, genistein, and daidzein, among others. Fermentation mainly involves polyphenol and polysaccharide substrates and is conducted using bacterial strains such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Bifidobacterium sp. In this review, we summarize recent studies of bioconversion using LAB and discuss future directions for this field.

  15. Determination of primary amino acids in wines by high performance liquid magneto-chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrado, E; Rodriguez, J A; Castrillejo, Y

    2009-05-15

    Eight amino acids (ethanolamine, glycine, alanine, beta-aminobutyric acid, leucine, methionine, histidine and asparagine) were identified and quantified in Spanish wines by high performance liquid magneto-chromatography (HPLMC) with UV-V spectrophotometry. For this method, the amino acids are first complexed with mono(1,10-phenanthroline)-Cu(II) to confer them paramagnetic properties, and then separated by application of a low magnetic field intensity (5.5 mT) to the stationary phase contained in the chromatographic column. Principal components analysis of the results obtained grouped together the wine samples according to their denomination of origin: "Ribera del Duero", "Rueda" or "Rioja" (Spain). Through cluster analysis, a series of correlations was also observed among certain amino acids, and between these groupings and the type of wine. These clusters were found to reflect the role played by the amino acids as primary or secondary nutrients for the bacteria involved in alcoholic and malolactic fermentation.

  16. Methanol extract of Nigella sativa seed induces changes in the levels of neurotransmitter amino acids in male rat brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naggar, Tarek; Carretero, María Emilia; Arce, Carmen; Gómez-Serranillos, María Pilar

    2017-12-01

    Nigella sativa L. (Ranunculaceae) (NS) has been used for medicinal and culinary purposes. Different parts of the plant are used to treat many disorders. This study investigates the effects of NS methanol extract on brain neurotransmitter amino acid levels. We measured the changes in aspartate, glutamate, glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid in five brain regions of male Wistar rats after methanol extract treatment. Animals were injected intraperitoneally with saline solution (controls) or NS methanol extract (equivalent of 2.5 g/kg body weight) and sacrificed 1 h later or after administering 1 daily dose for 8 days. The neurotransmitters were measured in the hypothalamus, cortex, striatum, hippocampus and thalamus by HPLC. Results showed significant changes in amino acids compared to basal values. Glutamate increased significantly (16-36%) in the regions analyzed except the striatum. Aspartate in the hypothalamus (50 and 76%) and glycine in hippocampus (32 and 25%), thalamus (66 and 29%) and striatum (75 and 48%) also increased with the two treatment intervals. γ-Aminobutyric acid significantly increased in the hippocampus (38 and 32%) and thalamus (22 and 40%) but decreased in the cortex and hypothalamus although in striatum only after eight days of treatment (24%). Our results suggest that injected methanol extract modifies amino acid levels in the rat brain regions. These results could be of interest since some neurodegenerative diseases are related to amino acid level imbalances in the central nervous system, suggesting the prospect for therapeutic use of NS against these disorders.

  17. Free amino acids in botanicals and botanical preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carratù, B; Boniglia, C; Giammarioli, S; Mosca, M; Sanzini, E

    2008-06-01

    Numerous studies were carried out about aminoacidic composition of vegetable proteins, but information about the free amino acid pool and the role of these substances is very incomplete. The aim of this paper was to contribute to the scarce knowledge concerning the composition of free amino acids in botanicals and botanical preparations widely used as food, in dietary supplements, and in pharmaceutical products. This work studied the composition of free amino acids, identified the major components of 19 species of plants, and evaluated the influence of different types of extraction on the amino acid profile. Amino acids were determined using an automatic precolumn derivatization with fluorenylmethyl-chloroformate and reversed-phase liquid chromatography with fluorescence and ultraviolet detection. The amounts of total free amino acids varied widely between plants, from approximately 12 g in 100 g of Echinacea pallida extract to less than 60 mg in the same amount of Coleus forskohlii, Garcinia cambogia, and Glycine max. In 13 plants arginine, asparagine, glutamine, proline, and gamma-aminobutyric acid were the free amino acids found in preponderant quantities. The levels of free amino acids above the quantification limit in 36 assayed samples of botanicals, extracts, and supplements are shown.

  18. Enzymatic preparation of α- and β-deuterated or tritiated amino acids with l-methionine γ-lyase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaki, N.; Sawada, S.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, K.

    1982-01-01

    L-Methionine γ-lyase catalyzes the exchange of α- and β-hydrogens of L-methionine and S-methyl-L-cysteine with deuterium or tritium of solvents. The rate of α-hydrogen exchange with deuterium was about 40 times faster than that of the elimination reactions. The deuterium and tritium were exchanged also with the α- and β-hydrogens of the straight-chain amino acids which do not undergo the elimination: L-alanine, L-α-aminobutyrate, L-norvaline, and L-norleucine. No exchange occurs for the D-isomers, acidic L-amino acids, basic L-amino acids, and branched-chain L-amino acids, although α-hydrogen of glycine, L-trypotophan, and L-phenylalanine is exchanged slowly. These enzymatic hydrogen-exchange reactions facilitate specific labeling of the L-amino acids with deuterium and tritium

  19. Molecular basis for amino acid sensing by family C G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Family C of human G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is constituted by eight metabotropic glutamate receptors, two gamma-aminobutyric acid type B (GABA(B1-2)) subunits forming the heterodimeric GABA(B) receptor, the calcium-sensing receptor, three taste1 receptors (T1R1-3), a promiscuous L-alpha;-amino......-2) and T1R2-3 receptor, all receptors are either activated or positively modulated by amino acids. In this review, we outline mutational, biophysical and structural studies which have elucidated the interaction of the amino acids with the Venus flytrap domains, molecular mechanisms of receptor selectivity...... acid receptor G-protein-coupled receptor family C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) and seven orphan receptors. Aside from the orphan receptors, the family C GPCRs are dimeric receptors characterized by a large extracellular Venus flytrap domain which bind the endogenous agonists. Except from the GABA(B1...

  20. A radiometric microassay for glutamic acid decarboxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maderdrut, J.L.; North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill

    1979-01-01

    A simple method for purifying L-[ 3 H] glutamic acid and incubation conditions suitable for estimating L-glutamic acid decarboxylase activity are described. Routine and recycled cation-exchange procedure for separating γ-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamate are outlined and compared. Recycling increases the sensitivity of the cation-exchange method by 6-7 fold. L-Glutamate decarboxylase activity can be measured reliably in samples of embryonic neural tissue having wet-weights of approximately 1 μg. The cation-exchange method is compared with the anion-exchange and CO 2 -trapping methods. L-Glutamate decarboxylase activity has been detected in the lumbar spinal cord of the chick embryo at Day 21/4 (stage 14) using the cation-exchange method. This is 5-6 days earlier than L-glutamate decarboxylase activity has been detected in embryonic neural tissue by previous investigators. L-Glutamate decarboxylase is present in the lumbar spinal cord at least as early as the birth of the first lumbar spinal cord neurons and at least 1-2 days before the initiation of synaptogenesis. (author)

  1. Plasma amino acid profiling in major depressive disorder treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hye-In; Chun, Mi-Ryung; Yang, Jeong-Soo; Lim, Shinn-Won; Kim, Min-Ji; Kim, Seon-Woo; Myung, Woo-Jae; Kim, Doh-Kwan; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2015-05-01

    Amino acids are important body metabolites and seem to be helpful for understanding pathogenesis and predicting therapeutic response in major depressive disorder (MDD). We performed amino acid profiling to discover potential biomarkers in major depressive patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Amino acid profiling using aTRAQ™ kits for Amino Acid Analysis in Physiological Fluids on a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) system was performed on 158 specimens at baseline and at 6 weeks after the initiation of SSRI treatment for 68 patients with MDD and from 22 healthy controls. Baseline alpha-aminobutyric acid (ABA) discriminated the patients according to the therapeutic response. Plasma glutamic acid concentration and glutamine/glutamic acid ratio were different between before and after SSRI treatment only in the response group. Comparing patients with MDD with healthy controls, alterations of ten amino acids, including alanine, beta-alanine, beta-aminoisobutyric acid, cystathionine, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, homocystine, methionine, O-phospho-L-serine, and sarcosine, were observed in MDD. Metabolism of amino acids, including ABA and glutamic acid, has the potential to contribute to understandings of pathogenesis and predictions of therapeutic response in MDD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Early continuous white noise exposure alters l-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor subunit glutamate receptor 2 and gamma-aminobutyric acid type a receptor subunit beta3 protein expression in rat auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinghong; Yu, Liping; Zhang, Jiping; Cai, Rui; Sun, Xinde

    2010-02-15

    Auditory experience during the postnatal critical period is essential for the normal maturation of auditory function. Previous studies have shown that rearing infant rat pups under conditions of continuous moderate-level noise delayed the emergence of adult-like topographic representational order and the refinement of response selectivity in the primary auditory cortex (A1) beyond normal developmental benchmarks and indefinitely blocked the closure of a brief, critical-period window. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of these physiological changes after noise rearing, we studied expression of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 and GABA(A) receptor subunit beta3 in the auditory cortex after noise rearing. Our results show that continuous moderate-level noise rearing during the early stages of development decreases the expression levels of GluR2 and GABA(A)beta3. Furthermore, noise rearing also induced a significant decrease in the level of GABA(A) receptors relative to AMPA receptors. However, in adult rats, noise rearing did not have significant effects on GluR2 and GABA(A)beta3 expression or the ratio between the two units. These changes could have a role in the cellular mechanisms involved in the delayed maturation of auditory receptive field structure and topographic organization of A1 after noise rearing. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Application of radioamino acid analyzer to the study of the metabolism of glutamic acid analogs in tea trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Satoshi; Hoshina, Tsuguo.

    1983-01-01

    The metabolic pattern of glutamic acid in tea trees was examined using a radioamino acid analyzer. The radioactivity of 1- 14 C ethylamine absorbed through the roots of the seedlings of the variety Yabukita, was incorporated only into theanine in both roots and shoots. When 1- 14 C ethylamine was directly absorbed into the 3 topmost leaves, a low radioactivity was detected only in theanine. Ethylamine was metabolized into theanine in both roots and leaves, but the enzymatic activity in the roots was 12.5 - 20.5 times as high as that of the leaves. When 14 C methylamine was given through the roots, the radioactivity was specifically incorporated into γ-glutamylmethylamide in both roots and shoots. The metabolism of U- 14 C glutamic acid, U- 14 C alanine and 1- 14 C alanine given through the roots showed that alanine entered mainly the glutamic acid skeleton of theanine. Furthermore, the metabolism of alanine to theanine was slower than its incorporation into glutamic acid and aminobutyric acid. The possibility was suggested that some compounds other than alanine could also be the precursors of the ethylamino group of theanine. (Kaihara, S.)

  4. Analysis of amino acid neurotransmitters from rat and mouse spinal cords by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şanlı, Nurullah; Tague, Sarah E; Lunte, Craig

    2015-03-25

    A RP-LC-FL detection method has been developed to identify and quantitate four amino acid neurotransmitters including glutamic acid, glycine, taurine and γ-aminobutyric acid in rat and mouse spinal cord tissue. 3-(4-carboxybenzoyl)-2-quinolinecarboxaldehyde (CBQCA) was employed for the derivatization of these neurotransmitters prior to RP-LC-FL analysis. Different parameters which influenced separation and derivatization were optimized. Under optimum conditions, linearity was achieved within the concentration ranges of 0.50-50.00 μM for all analytes with correlation coefficients from 0.9912 to 0.9997. The LODs ranged from 0.03 μM to 0.06 μM. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of amino acid neurotransmitters in biological samples such as rat and mouse spinal cord with satisfactory recoveries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Allosteric modulation of retinal GABA receptors by ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Cecilia I.; Vickers, Evan; Moraga Cid, Gustavo; Aguayo, Luis G.; von Gersdorff, Henrique; Calvo, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA and GABAC) belong to the cys-loop receptor family of ligand-gated ion channels. GABAC receptors are highly expressed in the retina, mainly localized at the axon terminals of bipolar cells. Ascorbic acid, an endogenous redox agent, modulates the function of diverse proteins, and basal levels of ascorbic acid in the retina are very high. However, the effect of ascorbic acid on retinal GABA receptors has not been studied. Here we show that the function of GABAC and GABAA receptors is regulated by ascorbic acid. Patch-clamp recordings from bipolar cell terminals in goldfish retinal slices revealed that GABAC receptor-mediated currents activated by tonic background levels of extracellular GABA, and GABAC currents elicited by local GABA puffs, are both significantly enhanced by ascorbic acid. In addition, a significant rundown of GABA-puff evoked currents was observed in the absence of ascorbic acid. GABA-evoked Cl- currents mediated by homomeric ρ1 GABAC receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes were also potentiated by ascorbic acid in a concentration-dependent, stereospecific, reversible, and voltage-independent manner. Studies involving the chemical modification of sulfhydryl groups showed that the two cys-loop cysteines and histidine 141, all located in the ρ1 subunit extracellular domain, each play a key role in the modulation of GABAC receptors by ascorbic acid. Additionally, we show that retinal GABAA IPSCs and heterologously expressed GABAA receptor currents are similarly augmented by ascorbic acid. Our results suggest that ascorbic acid may act as an endogenous agent capable of potentiating GABAergic neurotransmission in the CNS. PMID:21715633

  6. Rosmarinic Acid Potentiates Pentobarbital-Induced Sleep Behaviors and Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) Sleep through the Activation of GABAA-ergic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Yeong Ok; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that RA, one of major constituents of Perilla frutescens which has been used as a traditional folk remedy for sedation in oriental countries, shows the anxiolytic-like and sedative effects. This study was performed to know whether RA may enhance pentobarbital-induced sleep through ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A-ergic systems in rodents. RA (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the locomotor activity in mice. RA decreased sleep latency and increased the total sleep time in pent...

  7. Role of taurine on acid secretion in the rat stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Jau-Der

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taurine has chemical structure similar to an inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. Previous studies on GABA in the stomach suggest GABAergic neuron is involved in acid secretion, but the effects of taurine are poor understood. Methods The effects of taurine on acid secretion, signal transduction, and localization of taurinergic neurons were determined in the rat stomach using everted whole stomach, RIA kit and immunohistochemical methods. Results We used antibodies against taurine-synthesizing enzyme, cysteine sulfuric acid decarboxylase (CSAD, and taurine. CSAD- and taurine-positive cells were found in the muscle and mucosal layers. Distributions of CSAD- and taurine-positive cells in both mucosal and muscle layers were heterogeneous in the stomach. Taurine at 10-9~10-4 M induced acid secretion, and the maximum secretion was at 10-5 M, 1.6-fold higher than the spontaneous secretion. Taurine-induced acid secretion was completely inhibited by bicuculline and atropine but not by cimetidine, proglumide, or strychnine. Atropine and tetrodotoxin (TTX completely inhibited the acid secretion induced by low concentrations of taurine and partially inhibited induced by high concentrations. Verapamil, a calcium blocker agent, inhibited acid output elicited by taurine. We assumed all Ca2+ channels involved in the response to these secretagogues were equally affected by verapamil. Intracellular cAMP (adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphat in the stomach significantly increased with taurine treatment in a dose-dependent manner. High correlation (r=0.859, p Conclusions Our results demonstrated for the first time in taurine-induced acid secretion due to increase intracellular calcium may act through the A type of GABA receptors, which are mainly located on cholinergic neurons though cAMP pathway and partially on nonneuronal cells in the rat stomach.

  8. Role of taurine on acid secretion in the rat stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Taurine has chemical structure similar to an inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Previous studies on GABA in the stomach suggest GABAergic neuron is involved in acid secretion, but the effects of taurine are poor understood. Methods The effects of taurine on acid secretion, signal transduction, and localization of taurinergic neurons were determined in the rat stomach using everted whole stomach, RIA kit and immunohistochemical methods. Results We used antibodies against taurine-synthesizing enzyme, cysteine sulfuric acid decarboxylase (CSAD), and taurine. CSAD- and taurine-positive cells were found in the muscle and mucosal layers. Distributions of CSAD- and taurine-positive cells in both mucosal and muscle layers were heterogeneous in the stomach. Taurine at 10-9~10-4 M induced acid secretion, and the maximum secretion was at 10-5 M, 1.6-fold higher than the spontaneous secretion. Taurine-induced acid secretion was completely inhibited by bicuculline and atropine but not by cimetidine, proglumide, or strychnine. Atropine and tetrodotoxin (TTX) completely inhibited the acid secretion induced by low concentrations of taurine and partially inhibited induced by high concentrations. Verapamil, a calcium blocker agent, inhibited acid output elicited by taurine. We assumed all Ca2+ channels involved in the response to these secretagogues were equally affected by verapamil. Intracellular cAMP (adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphat) in the stomach significantly increased with taurine treatment in a dose-dependent manner. High correlation (r=0.859, p taurine concentrations with cAMP was observed. Conclusions Our results demonstrated for the first time in taurine-induced acid secretion due to increase intracellular calcium may act through the A type of GABA receptors, which are mainly located on cholinergic neurons though cAMP pathway and partially on nonneuronal cells in the rat stomach. PMID:21294907

  9. Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  10. Physiological and metabolic effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid for mitigating salinity stress in creeping bentgrass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin Yang

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to determine whether foliar application of a chlorophyll precursor, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA, could mitigate salinity stress damages in perennial grass species by regulating photosynthetic activities, ion content, antioxidant metabolism, or metabolite accumulation. A salinity-sensitive perennial grass species, creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera, was irrigated daily with 200 mM NaCl for 28 d, which were foliar sprayed with water or ALA (0.5 mg L-1 weekly during the experiment in growth chamber. Foliar application of ALA was effective in mitigating physiological damage resulting from salinity stress, as manifested by increased turf quality, shoot growth rate, leaf relative water content, chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate. Foliar application of ALA also alleviated membrane damages, as shown by lower membrane electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation, which was associated with increases in the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Leaf content of Na+ was reduced and the ratio of K+/Na+ was increased with ALA application under salinity stress. The positive effects of ALA for salinity tolerance were also associated with the accumulation of organic acids (α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, and malic acid, amino acids (alanine, 5-oxoproline, aspartic acid, and γ -aminobutyric acid, and sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose, lyxose, allose, xylose, sucrose, and maltose. ALA-mitigation of physiological damages by salinity could be due to suppression of Na+ accumulation and enhanced physiological and metabolic activities related to photosynthesis, respiration, osmotic regulation, and antioxidant defense.

  11. Glucose and amino acid metabolism in rat brain during sustained hypoglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Tyce, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of glucose in brains during sustained hypoglycemia was studied. [U- 14 C]Glucose (20 microCi) was injected into control rats, and into rats at 2.5 hr after a bolus injection of 2 units of insulin followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2 units/100 g rat/hr. This regimen of insulin injection was found to result in steady-state plasma glucose levels between 2.5 and 3.5 mumol per ml. In the brains of control rats carbon was transferred rapidly from glucose to glutamate, glutamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid and aspartate and this carbon was retained in the amino acids for at least 60 min. In the brains of hypoglycemic rats, the conversion of carbon from glucose to amino acids was increased in the first 15 min after injection. After 15 min, the specific activity of the amino acids decreased in insulin-treated rats but not in the controls. The concentrations of alanine, glutamate, and gamma-amino-butyric acid decreased, and the concentration of aspartate increased, in the brains of the hypoglycemic rats. The concentration of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, a cofactor in many of the reactions whereby these amino acids are formed from tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, was less in the insulin-treated rats than in the controls. These data provide evidence that glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, and GABA can serve as energy sources in brain during insulin-induced hypoglycemia

  12. Perturbations in amino acids and metabolic pathways in osteoarthritis patients determined by targeted metabolomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Han, Su; Liu, Xuefeng; Wang, Kunpeng; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Chundong; Zhang, Xi

    2018-05-15

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative synovial joint disease affecting people worldwide. However, the exact pathogenesis of OA remains unclear. Metabolomics analysis was performed to obtain insight into possible pathogenic mechanisms and diagnostic biomarkers of OA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPLC-TQ-MS), followed by multivariate statistical analysis, was used to determine the serum amino acid profiles of 32 OA patients and 35 healthy controls. Variable importance for project values and Student's t-test were used to determine the metabolic abnormalities in OA. Another 30 OA patients were used as independent samples to validate the alterations in amino acids. MetaboAnalyst was used to identify the key amino acid pathways and construct metabolic networks describing their relationships. A total of 25 amino acids and four biogenic amines were detected by UPLC-TQ-MS. Differences in amino acid profiles were found between the healthy controls and OA patients. Alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid and 4-hydroxy-l-proline were important biomarkers distinguishing OA patients from healthy controls. The metabolic pathways with the most significant effects were involved in metabolism of alanine, aspartate, glutamate, arginine and proline. The results of this study improve understanding of the amino acid metabolic abnormalities and pathogenic mechanisms of OA at the molecular level. The metabolic perturbations may be important for the diagnosis and prevention of OA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced Synthesis of Alkyl Amino Acids in Miller's 1958 H2S Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Eric T.; Cleaves, H. James; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, James P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Lazcano, Antonio; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Stanley Miller's 1958 H2S-containing experiment, which included a simulated prebiotic atmosphere of methane (CH4), ammonia (NH3), carbon dioxide (CO2), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) produced several alkyl amino acids, including the alpha-, beta-, and gamma-isomers of aminobutyric acid (ABA) in greater relative yields than had previously been reported from his spark discharge experiments. In the presence of H2S, aspariic and glutamic acids could yield alkyl amino acids via the formation of thioimide intermediates. Radical chemistry initiated by passing H2S through a spark discharge could have also enhanced alkyl amino acid synthesis by generating alkyl radicals that can help form the aldehyde and ketone precursors to these amino acids. We propose mechanisms that may have influenced the synthesis of certain amino acids in localized environments rich in H2S and lightning discharges, similar to conditions near volcanic systems on the early Earth, thus contributing to the prebiotic chemical inventory of the primordial Earth.

  14. Increased ophthalmic acid production is supported by amino acid catabolism under fasting conditions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Sho; Lee, Jaeyong; Takao, Toshifumi; Fujii, Junichi

    2017-09-23

    Glutathione (GSH) plays pivotal roles in antioxidation and detoxification. The transsulfuration pathway, in conjunction with methionine metabolism, produces equimolar amounts of cysteine (Cys) and 2-oxobutyric acid (2OB). The resulting 2OB is then converted into 2-aminobutyric acid (2AB) by a transaminase and is utilized as a substitute for Cys by the GSH-synthesizing machinery to produce ophthalmic acid (OPT). By establishing a method for simultaneously measuring Cys, GSH, and OPT by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found that fasting causes an elevation in OPT levels in the liver and blood plasma, even though the levels of Cys and GSH are decreased. Autophagy was activated, but the levels of GSH/OPT-synthesizing enzymes remained unchanged. After 6 h of fasting, the mice were given 1% 2AB and/or 5% glucose in the drinking water for an additional 24 h and the above metabolites analyzed. 2AB administration caused an increase in OPT levels, and, when glucose was co-administered with 2AB, the levels of OPT were elevated further but GSH levels were decreased somewhat. These results suggest that, while Cys is utilized for glyconeogenesis under fasting conditions, reaching levels that were insufficient for the synthesis of GSH, 2OB was preferentially converted to 2AB via amino acid catabolism and was utilized as a building block for OPT. Thus the consumption of Cys and the parallel elevation of 2AB under fasting conditions appeared to force γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase to form γ-glutamyl-2AB, despite the fact that the enzyme has a higher Km value for 2AB than Cys. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Patterns of free amino acids in German convenience food products: marked mismatch between label information and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanussen, M; Gonder, U; Jakobs, C; Stegemann, D; Hoffmann, G

    2010-01-01

    Free amino acids affect food palatability. As information on amino acids in frequently purchased pre-packaged food is virtually absent, we analyzed free amino acid patterns of 17 frequently purchased ready-to-serve convenience food products, and compared them with the information obtained from the respective food labels. Quantitative amino acid analysis was performed using ion-exchange chromatography. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations were verified using a stable isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. The patterns of free amino acids were compared with information obtained from food labels. An obvious mismatch between free amino acid patterns and food label information was detected. Even on considering that tomatoes and cereal proteins are naturally rich in glutamate, the concentrations of free glutamate outranged the natural concentration of this amino acid in several products, and strongly suggested artificial enrichment. Free glutamate was found to be elevated even in dishes that explicitly state 'no glutamate added'. Arginine was markedly elevated in lentils. Free cysteine was generally low, possibly reflecting thermal destruction of this amino acid during food processing. The meat and brain-specific dipeptide carnosine (CARN) was present in most meat-containing products. Some products did not contain detectable amounts of CARN in spite of meat content being claimed on the food labels. We detected GABA at concentrations that contribute significantly to the taste sensation. This investigation highlights a marked mismatch between food label information and food composition.

  16. An exceptional series of phase transitions in hydrophobic amino acids with linear side chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Henrik Görbitz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The solid-state phase transitions and intermediate structures of S-2-aminobutanoic acid (l-2-aminobutyric acid, S-2-aminopentanoic acid (l-norvaline, S-2-aminohexanoic acid (l-norleucine and l-methionine between 100 and 470 K, identified by differential scanning calorimetry, have been characterized in a comprehensive single-crystal X-ray diffraction investigation. Unlike other enantiomeric amino acids investigated until now, this group featuring linear side chains displays up to five distinct phases. The multiple transitions between them involve a number of different processes: alteration of the hydrogen-bond pattern, to our knowledge the first example of this observed for an amino acid, sliding of molecular bilayers, seen previously only for racemates and quasiracemates, concerted side-chain rearrangements and abrupt as well as gradual modifications of the side-chain disorder. Ordering of l-norleucine upon cooling even proceeds via an incommensurately modulated structure. l-Methionine has previously been described as being fully ordered at room temperature. An accurate refinement now reveals extensive disorder for both molecules in the asymmetric unit, while two previously unknown phases occur above room temperature.

  17. Correlations between plasma levels of amino acids and nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing; Xu, Qinrong; Xia, Qiang; Yuan, Yongsheng; Zhang, Li; Sun, Hongbin; Shan, Han; Zhang, Kezhong

    2015-03-01

    Converging evidence suggests that changes in plasma levels of amino acids are involved in Parkinson's disease (PD), but their roles in nonmotor symptoms (NMS) of PD remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlations between plasma amino acids and NMS of PD. Plasma levels of aspartate (Asp), glutamate (Glu), glycine (Gly) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were measured in 92 PD patients and 60 healthy controls. Four NMS, including depression, pain, sleep disturbances and autonomic dysfunction were assessed in enrolled subjects using the Hamilton Depression Scale, the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Scale for Outcomes in Parkinson's disease for Autonomic Symptoms, respectively. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate the correlations between plasma levels of amino acids and NMS. PD patients exhibited significantly higher scores of NMS scales and lower plasma levels of amino acids compared to healthy controls. Within the PD group, plasma levels of Asp and Glu were negatively associated with the severity of depression and sleep disturbances. Moreover, decreased plasma level of GABA was correlated with more severe symptoms of sleep disturbances. After controlling for gender, disease duration, severity of motor symptoms and anti-parkinsonian medications, Glu but not Asp remained significantly associated with depression, along with Asp, GABA but not Glu remained negatively associated with sleep disturbances. The altered plasma levels of amino acids may be implicated in the pathogenesis of NMS of PD.

  18. Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  19. Obeticholic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  20. Aminocaproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  1. Ethacrynic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  2. Mefenamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  3. Amino Acids Content in Mangosteen Fruit as Affected by Tree Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Setiawan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Kita meneliti perbedaan kandungan dan komposisi asam amino pada buah manggis yang dipanen dari pohon yang berbeda umur dari kebun Manggis di Bogor pada tahun 2012. Pohon manggis dengan umur yang berbeda (muda, sekitar 20 tahun; sedang, sekitar umur 35 tahun; dan tua, sekitar 50 tahundipilih untuk diambil buahnya. Buah dari tiap pohon dipanen pada kondisi masak hijau spot kuning-merah. Pada buah dari semua umur pohon, asam amino yang dominan adalah γ-aminobutyric acid dan alanine. Total kandungan asam amino tertinggi terdapat pada buah yang dipetik dari pohon umur muda dari pada  buah yang dipetik dari pohon umur sedang dan tuaKata kunci: asam amino, GABA, kandungan, manggis

  4. In vitro anti-inflammatory properties of fermented pepino (Solanum muricatum) milk by γ-aminobutyric acid-producing Lactobacillus brevis and an in vivo animal model for evaluating its effects on hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Vincent Hung-Shu; Chiu, Tsai-Hsin; Fu, Szu-Chieh

    2016-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to determine the in vitro anti-inflammatory and in vivo antihypertensive effects of fermented pepino (Solanum muricatum) milk by Lactobacillus brevis with the goal of developing functional healthy products. The inflammatory factors of fermented pepino milk with L. brevis were assessed in RAW 264.7 macrophages, including nitric oxide (NO) production. Inflammatory factor genes of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were also assayed by a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results showed that fermented PE inhibited NO production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells with 150 mg mL(-1) fermented PE completely blocking LPS-induced NO production. The mRNA expressions of COX-1, COX-2, and iNOS were attenuated by treatment with higher concentrations of fermented PE (150 mg/ml). Cells treated with fermented pepino extract (PE) (100 ng mL(-1)) exhibited strikingly decreased LPS-induced expression of TNF-α mRNA. During the feeding trial, rats treated with 10% fermented pepino milk (100 µg 2.5 mL(-1)) and 100% fermented pepino milk (1000 µg 2.5 mL(-1)) exhibited significant decreases in the systolic blood pressure. Our results showed that fermented pepino milk has wide potential applications for development as a health food. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor regulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation in rat hippocampus in high doses of Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE)-induced impairment of spatial memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Gang; Zhang Wenbin; Zhang Yun; Chen Yaoming; Liu Mingchao; Yao Ting; Yang Yanxia; Zhao Fang; Li Jingxia; Huang Chuanshu; Luo Wenjing; Chen Jingyuan

    2009-01-01

    Experimental and occupational exposure to Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) has been reported to induce neurotoxicological and neurobehavioral effects, such as headache, nausea, dizziness, and disorientation, etc. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in MTBE-induced neurotoxicity are still not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of MTBE on spatial memory and the expression and function of GABA A receptor in the hippocampus. Our results demonstrated that intraventricular injection of MTBE impaired the performance of the rats in a Morris water maze task, and significantly increased the expression of GABA A receptor α1 subunit in the hippocampus. The phosphorylation of ERK1/2 decreased after the MTBE injection. Furthermore, the decreased ability of learning and the reduction of phosphorylated ERK1/2 level of the MTBE-treated rats was partly reversed by bicuculline injected 30 min before the training. These results suggested that MTBE exposure could result in impaired spatial memory. GABA A receptor may play an important role in the MTBE-induced impairment of learning and memory by regulating the phosphorylation of ERK in the hippocampus.

  6. The effect of heart-and kidney-Benefiting Chinese Herbal Medicine on the function of cholinergic M-and Gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA) receptor in brain tissues of analogue dementia rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Qizhong; Gong Bin; Fang Jun

    1993-01-01

    3 H-QNB and 3 H-GABA were used as radioactive ligand for M-and GABA receptors respectively. M-and GABA receptors were assayed by radioligand binding assay (RBA) in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of analogue dementia rats. It was found that R t of M receptor was decreased in cerebral cortex and hippocampus and R t of GABA receptor was decreased in cerebellum of analogue dementia rats. The dissociation constant (K D ) of M-receptor was decreased significantly in cerebral cortex and K D value of (GABA) receptor was decreased in cerebellum of analogue dementia rats. The decreased R t of M-and GABA receptor in brain tissue of analogue dementia rats was raised by Heart- and Kidney-Benefiting Chinese Herbs as well as hydergin

  7. Acid Evolution of Escherichia coli K-12 Eliminates Amino Acid Decarboxylases and Reregulates Catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Amanda; Penix, Stephanie R; Basting, Preston J; Griffith, Jessie M; Creamer, Kaitlin E; Camperchioli, Dominic; Clark, Michelle W; Gonzales, Alexandra S; Chávez Erazo, Jorge Sebastian; George, Nadja S; Bhagwat, Arvind A; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2017-06-15

    Acid-adapted strains of Escherichia coli K-12 W3110 were obtained by serial culture in medium buffered at pH 4.6 (M. M. Harden, A. He, K. Creamer, M. W. Clark, I. Hamdallah, K. A. Martinez, R. L. Kresslein, S. P. Bush, and J. L. Slonczewski, Appl Environ Microbiol 81:1932-1941, 2015, https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.03494-14). Revised genomic analysis of these strains revealed insertion sequence (IS)-driven insertions and deletions that knocked out regulators CadC (acid induction of lysine decarboxylase), GadX (acid induction of glutamate decarboxylase), and FNR (anaerobic regulator). Each acid-evolved strain showed loss of one or more amino acid decarboxylase systems, which normally help neutralize external acid (pH 5 to 6) and increase survival in extreme acid (pH 2). Strains from populations B11, H9, and F11 had an IS 5 insertion or IS-mediated deletion in cadC , while population B11 had a point mutation affecting the arginine activator adiY The cadC and adiY mutants failed to neutralize acid in the presence of exogenous lysine or arginine. In strain B11-1, reversion of an rpoC (RNA polymerase) mutation partly restored arginine-dependent neutralization. All eight strains showed deletion or downregulation of the Gad acid fitness island. Strains with the Gad deletion lost the ability to produce GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) and failed to survive extreme acid. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) of strain B11-1 showed upregulated genes for catabolism of diverse substrates but downregulated acid stress genes (the biofilm regulator ariR , yhiM , and Gad). Other strains showed downregulation of H 2 consumption mediated by hydrogenases ( hya and hyb ) which release acid. Strains F9-2 and F9-3 had a deletion of fnr and showed downregulation of FNR-dependent genes ( dmsABC , frdABCD , hybABO , nikABCDE , and nrfAC ). Overall, strains that had evolved in buffered acid showed loss or downregulation of systems that neutralize unbuffered acid and showed altered regulation of

  8. Rhizobium leguminosarum has a second general amino acid permease with unusually broad substrate specificity and high similarity to branched-chain amino acid transporters (Bra/LIV) of the ABC family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosie, A H F; Allaway, D; Galloway, C S; Dunsby, H A; Poole, P S

    2002-08-01

    Amino acid uptake by Rhizobium leguminosarum is dominated by two ABC transporters, the general amino acid permease (Aap) and the branched-chain amino acid permease (Bra(Rl)). Characterization of the solute specificity of Bra(Rl) shows it to be the second general amino acid permease of R. leguminosarum. Although Bra(Rl) has high sequence identity to members of the family of hydrophobic amino acid transporters (HAAT), it transports a broad range of solutes, including acidic and basic polar amino acids (L-glutamate, L-arginine, and L-histidine), in addition to neutral amino acids (L-alanine and L-leucine). While amino and carboxyl groups are required for transport, solutes do not have to be alpha-amino acids. Consistent with this, Bra(Rl) is the first ABC transporter to be shown to transport gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). All previously identified bacterial GABA transporters are secondary carriers of the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) superfamily. Also, transport by Bra(Rl) does not appear to be stereospecific as D amino acids cause significant inhibition of uptake of L-glutamate and L-leucine. Unlike all other solutes tested, L-alanine uptake is not dependent on solute binding protein BraC(Rl). Therefore, a second, unidentified solute binding protein may interact with the BraDEFG(Rl) membrane complex during L-alanine uptake. Overall, the data indicate that Bra(Rl) is a general amino acid permease of the HAAT family. Furthermore, Bra(Rl) has the broadest solute specificity of any characterized bacterial amino acid transporter.

  9. Amino acid synthesis in photosynthesizing spinach cells: effects of ammonia on pool sizes and rates of labeling from 14CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, P.O.; Cornwell, K.L.; Gee, S.L.; Bassham, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Isolated cells from leaves of Spinacia oleracea have been maintained in a state capable of high rates of photosynthetic CO 2 fixation for more than 60 hours. The incorporation of 14 CO 2 under saturating CO 2 conditions into carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and amino acids, and the effect of ammonia on this incorporation have been studied. Total incorporation, specific radioactivity, and pool size have been determined as a function of time for most of the protein amino acids and for γ-aminobutyric acid. The measurements of specific radio-activities and of the approaches to 14 C saturation of some amino acids indicate the presence and relative sizes of metabolically active and passive pools of these amino acids. Added ammonia decreased carbon fixation into carbohydrates and increased fixation into carboxylic acids and amino acids. The results indicate that added ammonia stimulates the reactions mediated by pyruvate kinase and phosphenoenolpyruvate carboxylase, as seen with other plant systems. The data on the effects of added ammonia on total labeling, pool sizes, and specific radioactivities of several amino acids provides a number of indications about the intracellular sites of principal synthesis from carbon skeletons of these amino acids and the selective nature of effects of increased intracellular ammonia concentration on-such synthesis

  10. Ibotenic acid and thioibotenic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we have determined and compared the pharmacological profiles of ibotenic acid and its isothiazole analogue thioibotenic acid at native rat ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors and at recombinant rat metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors expressed in mammalian cell lines....... Thioibotenic acid has a distinct pharmacological profile at group III mGlu receptors compared with the closely structurally related ibotenic acid; the former is a potent (low microm) agonist, whereas the latter is inactive. By comparing the conformational energy profiles of ibotenic and thioibotenic acid...... with the conformations preferred by the ligands upon docking to mGlu1 and models of the other mGlu subtypes, we propose that unlike other subtypes, group III mGlu receptor binding sites require a ligand conformation at an energy level which is prohibitively expensive for ibotenic acid, but not for thioibotenic acid...

  11. Properties of Kimchi Fermented with GABA-Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria as a Starter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Wook; Shim, Jae Min; Yao, Zhuang; Kim, Jeong A; Kim, Jeong Hwan

    2018-02-13

    Kimchi was prepared with a starter, Lactobacillus zymae GU240 producing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and one precursor of GABA (glutamic acid, glutamic acid mono sodium salt (MSG), or kelp extract). L. zymae GU240, an isolate from kimchi, can grow at 7% NaCl and low temperature. Five different kimchi samples were fermented for 20 weeks at -1°C. Kimchi with starter alone could not produce GABA. GABA content was highest in kimchi with co-inoculation of starter and MSG (1%, w/w). Kimchi co-inoculated with a starter and kelp extract powder (3%, w/w) had the second highest GABA content. Addition of glutamic acid powder (1%, w/w) caused a reduction in the pH level of kimchi and growth inhibition of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and yeasts. Kimchi samples with MSG or kelp extract showed improvement of sensory evaluation scores. The results demonstrate the possibility to produce kimchi with improved functionality and taste by using L. zymae GU240 as a starter along with a suitable precursor such as MSG or kelp extract.

  12. The selective conversion of glutamic acid in amino acid mixtures using glutamate decarboxylase--a means of separating amino acids for synthesizing biobased chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yinglai; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids (AAs) derived from hydrolysis of protein rest streams are interesting feedstocks for the chemical industry due to their functionality. However, separation of AAs is required before they can be used for further applications. Electrodialysis may be applied to separate AAs, but its efficiency is limited when separating AAs with similar isoelectric points. To aid the separation, specific conversion of an AA to a useful product with different charge behavior to the remaining compounds is desired. Here the separation of L-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-glutamic acid (Glu) was studied. L-Glutamate α-decarboxylase (GAD, Type I, EC 4.1.1.15) was applied to specifically convert Glu into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA has a different charge behavior from Asp therefore allowing a potential separation by electrodialysis. Competitive inhibition and reduced operational stability caused by Asp could be eliminated by maintaining a sufficiently high concentration of Glu. Immobilization of GAD does not reduce the enzyme's initial activity. However, the operational stability was slightly reduced. An initial study on the reaction operating in a continuous mode was performed using a column reactor packed with immobilized GAD. As the reaction mixture was only passed once through the reactor, the conversion of Glu was lower than expected. To complete the conversion of Glu, the stream containing Asp and unreacted Glu might be recirculated back to the reactor after GABA has been removed. Overall, the reaction by GAD is specific to Glu and can be applied to aid the electrodialysis separation of Asp and Glu. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  13. Okadaic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H; Severinsen, Mai C K

    2014-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a polyether fatty acid produced by marine dinoflagellates and the causative agent of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. The effect of OA on apical endocytosis in the small intestine was studied in organ cultured porcine mucosal explants. Within 0.5-1 h of culture, the toxin caused...... in acidic organelles, implying a different toxic mechanism of action. We propose that rapid induction of LBs, an indicator of phospholipidosis, should be included in the future toxicity profile of OA....

  14. Participation of GABAA Chloride Channels in the Anxiolytic-Like Effects of a Fatty Acid Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Rodríguez-Landa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human amniotic fluid and a mixture of eight fatty acids (FAT-M identified in this maternal fluid (C12:0, lauric acid, 0.9 μg%; C14:0, myristic acid, 6.9 μg%; C16:0, palmitic acid, 35.3 μg%; C16:1, palmitoleic acid, 16.4 μg%; C18:0, stearic acid, 8.5 μg%; C18:1cis, oleic acid, 18.4 μg%; C18:1trans, elaidic acid, 3.5 μg%; C18:2, linoleic acid, 10.1 μg% produce anxiolytic-like effects that are comparable to diazepam in Wistar rats, suggesting the involvement of γ-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA receptors, a possibility not yet explored. Wistar rats were subjected to the defensive burying test, elevated plus maze, and open field test. In different groups, three GABAA receptor antagonists were administered 30 min before FAT-M administration, including the competitive GABA binding antagonist bicuculline (1 mg/kg, GABAA benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (5 mg/kg, and noncompetitive GABAA chloride channel antagonist picrotoxin (1 mg/kg. The FAT-M exerted anxiolytic-like effects in the defensive burying test and elevated plus maze, without affecting locomotor activity in the open field test. The GABAA antagonists alone did not produce significant changes in the behavioral tests. Picrotoxin but not bicuculline or flumazenil blocked the anxiolytic-like effect of the FAT-M. Based on the specific blocking action of picrotoxin on the effects of the FAT-M, we conclude that the FAT-M exerted its anxiolytic-like effects through GABAA receptor chloride channels.

  15. Neuroprotective Effect of Uncaria rhynchophylla in Kainic Acid-Induced Epileptic Seizures by Modulating Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Sprouting, Neuron Survival, Astrocyte Proliferation, and S100B Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsiang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncaria rhynchophylla (UR, which is a traditional Chinese medicine, has anticonvulsive effect in our previous studies, and the cellular mechanisms behind this are still little known. Because of this, we wanted to determine the importance of the role of UR on kainic acid- (KA- induced epilepsy. Oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate the onset of epileptic seizure in animal tests. Hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting dramatically decreased, while neuronal survival increased with UR treatment in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 areas. Furthermore, oral UR for 6 weeks significantly attenuated the overexpression of astrocyte proliferation and S100B proteins but not γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA receptors. These results indicate that oral UR for 6 weeks can successfully attenuate mossy fiber sprouting, astrocyte proliferation, and S100B protein overexpression and increase neuronal survival in KA-induced epileptic rat hippocampus

  16. Primordial Synthesis of Amines and Amino Acids in a 1958 Miller H2S-Rich Spark Discharge Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Eric T.; Cleaves, Henderson J.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Callahan, Michael; Aubrey, Andrew; Lazcano, Antonio; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Archived samples from a previously unreported 1958 Stanley Miller electric discharge experiment containing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were recently discovered and analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We report here the detection and quantification of primary amine-containing compounds in the original sample residues, which were produced via spark discharge using a gaseous mixture of H2S, CH4, NH3, and CO2. A total of 23 amino acids and 4 amines, including 7 organosulfur compounds, were detected in these samples. The major amino acids with chiral centers are racemic within the accuracy of the measurements, indicating that they are not contaminants introduced during sample storage. This experiment marks the first synthesis of sulfur amino acids from spark discharge experiments designed to imitate primordia! environments. The relative yield of some amino acids, in particular the isomers of aminobutyric acid, are the highest ever found in a spark discharge experiment. The simulated primordial conditions used by Miller may serve as a model for early volcanic plume chemistry and provide insight to the possible roles such plumes may have played in abiotic organic synthesis. Additionally, the overall abundances of the synthesized amino acids in the presence of H2S are very similar to the abundances found in some carbonaceous meteorites, suggesting that H2S may have played an important role in prebiotic reactions in early solar system environments.

  17. Stable isotope dilution HILIC-MS/MS method for accurate quantification of glutamic acid, glutamine, pyroglutamic acid, GABA and theanine in mouse brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Unno, Keiko; Min, Jun Zhe; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed the stable isotope dilution hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique for the accurate, reasonable and simultaneous quantification of glutamic acid (Glu), glutamine (Gln), pyroglutamic acid (pGlu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and theanine in mouse brain tissues. The quantification of these analytes was accomplished using stable isotope internal standards and the HILIC separating mode to fully correct the intramolecular cyclization during the electrospray ionization. It was shown that linear calibrations were available with high coefficients of correlation (r(2)  > 0.999, range from 10 pmol/mL to 50 mol/mL). For application of the theanine intake, the determination of Glu, Gln, pGlu, GABA and theanine in the hippocampus and central cortex tissues was performed based on our developed method. In the region of the hippocampus, the concentration levels of Glu and pGlu were significantly reduced during reality-based theanine intake. Conversely, the concentration level of GABA increased. This result showed that transited theanine has an effect on the metabolic balance of Glu analogs in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Aristolochic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often used as herbal medicines or in other botanical products in the United States and abroad. Aristolochic ... individuals with kidney or renal disease who consumed botanical products containing aristolochic acids. Animal Studies The findings ...

  19. Zoledronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Robert; Burkinshaw, Roger; Winter, Matthew; Neville-Webbe, Helen; Lester, Jim; Woodward, Emma; Brown, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Both bone metastases and fragility fractures due to bone loss result in considerable morbidity affecting quality of life and independence as well as placing complex demands on healthcare resources. Zoledronic acid is a widely used intravenous bisphosphonate that reduces this skeletal morbidity in both benign and malignant conditions. The incidence, clinical importance and prevention strategies to minimize side effects associated with the use of zoledronic acid are discussed with a particular focus on use in oncology where intensive monthly scheduling is required. This potentially increases the risk for adverse events over the 6-12 monthly administration used to treat benign bone diseases. A detailed understanding of the generally favorable safety profile of zoledronic acid, but particularly the potential for renal dysfunction and osteonecrosis of the jaw. When compared to many other therapies, especially in the cancer setting, the severity of adverse events related to zoledronic acid is generally mild and, with the exception of the acute phase response causing transient fever, myalgia and bone pain, side effects are infrequent. Thus, the benefits of treatment with zoledronic acid within its licensed indications almost always outweigh the risks.

  20. Metabolic regulation of trisporic acid on Blakeslea trispora revealed by a GC-MS-based metabolomic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Sun

    Full Text Available The zygomycete Blakeslea trispora is used commercially as natural source of â-carotene. Trisporic acid (TA is secreted from the mycelium of B. trispora during mating between heterothallic strains and is considered as a mediator of the regulation of mating processes and an enhancer of carotene biosynthesis. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and multivariate analysis were employed to investigate TA-associated intracellular biochemical changes in B. trispora. By principal component analysis, the differential metabolites discriminating the control groups from the TA-treated groups were found, which were also confirmed by the subsequent hierarchical cluster analysis. The results indicate that TA is a global regulator and its main effects at the metabolic level are reflected on the content changes in several fatty acids, carbohydrates, and amino acids. The carbon metabolism and fatty acids synthesis are sensitive to TA addition. Glycerol, glutamine, and ã-aminobutyrate might play important roles in the regulation of TA. Complemented by two-dimensional electrophoresis, the results indicate that the actions of TA at the metabolic level involve multiple metabolic processes, such as glycolysis and the bypass of the classical tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results reveal that the metabolomics strategy is a powerful tool to gain insight into the mechanism of a microorganism's cellular response to signal inducers at the metabolic level.

  1. Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.; Dietrich, W.E.; Sposito, Garrison

    1997-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  2. Lipoic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Tetikcok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipoic acid, which is defined as a miralce antioxidan, is used by many departments. Eventhough clinical using data are very limited , it is used in treatment of diabetic neuropathy, physical therapy and rehabilitation clinic, dermatology clinic, geriatric clinics. It has usage area for cosmetic purposes. Although there are reports there are the direction of the effectiveness in these areas, the works done are not enough. Today lipoic acid , used in many areas ,is evaluated as universal antioxidant [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(3.000: 206-209

  3. Use of Selected Lactic Acid Bacteria and Quinoa Flour for Manufacturing Novel Yogurt-Like Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lorusso

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating the suitability of quinoa for making yogurt-like beverages. After the selection of the adequate technological parameters, the fermentation was carried out by using different lactic acid bacteria strains: a probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus SP1, an exopolysaccharides (EPS-producing (Weissella confusa DSM 20194, and one isolated from quinoa (Lactobacillus plantarum T6B10. During the 20 h of fermentation, W. confusa caused the highest viscosity increase. All the strains had improved concentration of free amino acids and γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA, polyphenols availability, antioxidant activity (up to 54%, and protein digestibility. The nutritional index (NI was the highest when L. rhamnosus SP1 was used. The starch hydrolysis index in vitro ranged from 52 to 60. During storage at 4 °C, viscosity and water holding capacity decreased with the exception of the beverage fermented with W. confusa, while all the nutritional characteristics remained stable or slightly increased. Sensory analyses showed that beverages had good textural and organoleptic profiles. Besides the well-known positive properties of the raw matrix, fermentation allowed the obtainment of beverages with different features. Due to the nutritional and functional characteristics conferred to the quinoa beverages, the use of the probiotic and EPS-producing strains showed adequate potential for the industrial application.

  4. Decreased amino acids in various brain areas of patients with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, D K; Lloyd, K G; Kelley, W N; Fox, I

    1982-08-01

    In an effort to further understand the pathogenesis of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, an X-linked recessive disease of purine metabolism associated with a deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase, we have analyzed the amino acids in autopsy brain material obtained from five patients and six controls. The amino acids glycine and glutamine serve as substrates for the synthesis of purines in man. Amino acids were measured in the occipital cortex, limbic cortical area, cerebellar cortex, hippocampus and putamen. In general the amino acids were usually lower in concentration in brain material from affected individuals. Most dramatically decreased were threonine, serine, valine, isoleucine, lysine and arginine. Only glutamine and urea were higher than controls. Glutamate, gamma-aminobutyrate and cystathionine were essentially unaffected. The data reported here do not support a role for increased glycine in the pathogenesis of this disease as implied by findings previously reported in cultured cell lines (Skaper and Seegmiller 1976, 1977). The current findings suggest that individuals with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome have a generally lower concentration of free amino acids in brain. This decrease may be involved in the etiology of the disease or the decrease may be a result of the generally malnourished state of these individuals. These results imply that affected patients have a limited supply of amino acid precursors available for the synthesis of either proteins or neurotransmitters that the brain requires for normal function. Thus, the low amino acid pools could be an important factor in the brain dysfunction observed in patients with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

  5. Alteration of tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism in rat brain slices by halothane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.C.; Brunner, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    Metabolism of [2- 14 C] pyruvate, [1- 14 C] acetate and [5- 14 C] citrate in rat cerebral cortex slices was studied in the presence of halothane. Metabolites assayed include acetylcholine (ACh), citrate, glutamate, glutamineγ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and aspartate. The trichloroacetic acid soluble extract, the trichloracetic acid insoluble precipitate and its lipid extract were also studied. In control experiments, pyruvate preferentially labelled ACh, citrate, glutamate, GABA and aspartate. Acetate labelled ACh, but to a lesser extent than pyruvate. Acetate also labelled lipids and glutamine. Citrate labelled lipids but not ACh and served as a preferential precursor for glutamine. These data support a three-compartment model for cerebral tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism. Halothane caused increases in GABA and aspartate contents and a decrease in ACh content. It has no effect on the contents of citrate, glutamate and glutamine. Halothane preferentially inhibited the metabolic transfer of radioactivity from pyruvate into almost all metabolites, an effect probably not related to pyruvate permeability. This is interpreted as halothane depression of the large metabolic compartment which includes the nerve endings. Halothane increased the metabolic transfer of radioactivity from acetate into lipids but did not alter such a transfer into the trichloroacetic acid extract. Halothane increased the metabolic transfer of radioactivity from citrate into the trichloroacetic acid precipitate, lipids and especially glutamine. Transfer of citrate radioactivity into GABA was somewhat decreased. The differential effects of halothane on acetate and citrate utilization suggest that the small metabolic compartment should be subdivided. Therefore, at least three metabolic compartments are demonstrated. Halothane did not interfere with the dicarboxylic acid portion of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. (author)

  6. Salicylhydroxamic acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to as topological indices, can be used for establishing QSAR of interest in pharmacology. A number of successful QSAR studies were made 4 based on Wms by means of which we can determine the ways in which the structural features of SHA and SHA derivatives influence the course of nucleic acid synthesis in a tumour ...

  7. Good and bad protons: genetic aspects of acidity stress responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavrukov, Yuri; Hirai, Yoshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Physiological aspects of acidity stress in plants (synonymous with H(+) rhizotoxicity or low-pH stress) have long been a focus of research, in particular with respect to acidic soils where aluminium and H(+) rhizotoxicities often co-occur. However, toxic H(+) and Al(3+) elicit different response mechanisms in plants, and it is important to consider their effects separately. The primary aim of this review was to provide the current state of knowledge regarding the genetics of the specific reactions to low-pH stress in growing plants. A comparison of the results gleaned from quantitative trait loci analysis and global transcriptome profiling of plants in response to high proton concentrations revealed a two-stage genetic response: (i) in the short-term, proton pump H(+)-ATPases present the first barrier in root cells, allocating an excess of H(+) into either the apoplast or vacuole; the ensuing defence signaling system involves auxin, salicylic acid, and methyl jasmonate, which subsequently initiate expression of STOP and DREB transcription factors as well as chaperone ROF; (2) the long-term response includes other genes, such as alternative oxidase and type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, which act to detoxify dangerous reactive oxygen species in mitochondria, and help plants better manage the stress. A range of transporter genes including those for nitrate (NTR1), malate (ALMT1), and heavy metals are often up-regulated by H(+) rhizotoxicity. Expansins, cell-wall-related genes, the γ-aminobutyric acid shunt and biochemical pH-stat genes also reflect changes in cell metabolism and biochemistry in acidic conditions. However, the genetics underlying the acidity stress response of plants is complicated and only fragmentally understood. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Decreased labeling of amino acids by inhibition of the utilization of [3H, 14C]glucose via the hexosemonophosphate shunt in rat brain in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaitonde, M.K.; James, M.D.; Evans, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of rats with 6-aminonicotinamide showed a small but significant decrease in the labeling of amino acids in the brain after injection of [ 3 H]acetate. The results of these experiments also gave evidence of the presence of [ 3 H]glucose and [ 3 H]acetate, and an increase in [ 3 H]glucose content in the brain of 6-aminonicotinamide treated rats. To apportion the contribution of [ 3 H]glucose formed by gluconeogenesis from [ 3 H]acetate to the labeling of amino acids a method was formulated based on the measurement of radioactivity of amino acids, lactate and free sugars in brain after injection of [6- 3 H]glucose or [1- 3 H]glucose relative to that after co-injection of [U- 14 C]glucose or [2- 14 C]glucose. These findings indicated that a significant decrease in the labeling of amino acids from [U-14C]glucose reported previously and again confirmed using [1- 3 H], [6- 3 H], [2- 14 C] or [U- 14 C]glucose in the present investigation was not due to the inhibition of the activities of enzymes of the citric acid cycle. These results support the postulated role of the hexosemonophosphate shunt for the utilization of glucose in providing neurotransmitter amino acids glutamate and gamma-aminobutyrate

  9. Levulinic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hachuła

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound (systematic name: 4-oxopentanoic acid, C5H8O3, is close to planar (r.m.s. deviation = 0.0762 Å. In the crystal, the molecules interact via O—H...O hydrogen bonds in which the hydroxy O atoms act as donors and the ketone O atoms in adjacent molecules as acceptors, forming C(7 chains along [20-1].

  10. Preparation and properties of BSA-loaded microspheres based on multi-(amino acid) copolymer for protein delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingtao; Lv, Guoyu; Zhang, Jue; Tang, Songchao; Yan, Yonggang; Wu, Zhaoying; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie

    2014-01-01

    A multi-(amino acid) copolymer (MAC) based on ω-aminocaproic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, L-alanine, L-lysine, L-glutamate, and hydroxyproline was synthetized, and MAC microspheres encapsulating bovine serum albumin (BSA) were prepared by a double-emulsion solvent extraction method. The experimental results show that various preparation parameters including surfactant ratio of Tween 80 to Span 80, surfactant concentration, benzyl alcohol in the external water phase, and polymer concentration had obvious effects on the particle size, morphology, and encapsulation efficiency of the BSA-loaded microspheres. The sizes of BSA-loaded microspheres ranged from 60.2 μm to 79.7 μm, showing different degrees of porous structure. The encapsulation efficiency of BSA-loaded microspheres also ranged from 38.8% to 50.8%. BSA release from microspheres showed the classic biphasic profile, which was governed by diffusion and polymer erosion. The initial burst release of BSA from microspheres at the first week followed by constant slow release for the next 7 weeks were observed. BSA-loaded microspheres could degrade gradually in phosphate buffered saline buffer with pH value maintained at around 7.1 during 8 weeks incubation, suggesting that microsphere degradation did not cause a dramatic pH drop in phosphate buffered saline buffer because no acidic degradation products were released from the microspheres. Therefore, the MAC microspheres might have great potential as carriers for protein delivery. PMID:24855351

  11. p-Coumaric acid activates the GABA-A receptor in vitro and is orally anxiolytic in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepens, Arjan; Bisson, Jean-Francois; Skinner, Margot

    2014-02-01

    The increasing prevalence and social burden of subclinical anxiety in the western world represents a significant psychosocial and financial cost. Consumers are favouring a more natural and nonpharmacological approach for alleviating the effects of everyday stress and anxiety. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor is the primary mediator of central inhibitory neurotransmission, and GABA-receptor agonists are well known to convey anxiolytic effects. Using an in vitro screening approach to identify naturally occurring phytochemical GABA agonists, we discovered the plant secondary metabolite p-coumaric acid to have significant GABAergic activity, an effect that could be blocked by co-administration of the specific GABA-receptor antagonist, picrotoxin. Oral administration of p-coumaric acid to rodents induced a significant anxiolytic effect in vivo as measured using the elevated plus paradigm, in line with the effects of oral diazepam. Given that p-coumaric acid is reasonably well absorbed following oral consumption in man and is relatively nontoxic, it may be suitable for the formulation of a safe and effective anxiolytic functional food. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Dietary supplementation with cholesterol and docosahexaenoic acid affects concentrations of amino acids in tissues of young pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Kim, Sung Woo; Li, Xilong; Datta, Sujay; Pond, Wilson G.

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are important nutrients for neural development of infants. However, little is known about the effect of cholesterol or DHA on concentrations of amino acids (AA) in neonatal tissues. This study was conducted with the piglet (an established model for studying human infant nutrition) to test the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with the lipids may modulate AA availability in tissues. Sixteen newborn pigs were nursed by sows for 24 h and then assigned to one of four treatment groups, representing supplementation with 0.0% (control), 0.2% cholesterol, 0.2% DHA, or cholesterol plus DHA to the basal milk-formula. All piglets were euthanized at 49 days of age. In brain, cholesterol supplementation reduced (P < 0.05) concentrations of glutamate, serine, glutamine, threonine, β-alanine, alanine, methionine, isoleucine, leucine, and γ-aminobutyrate but increased (P < 0.05) concentrations of glycine and lysine, whereas DHA supplementation similarly affected (P < 0.05) concentrations of the same AA (except for isoleucine and lysine) and taurine. In addition, concentrations of most AA in liver, muscle and plasma were substantially altered by dietary supplementation of cholesterol and DHA in a tissue-dependent manner. Further, DHA reduced concentrations of carnosine in skeletal muscle, as well as ammonia in both plasma and brain. The results reveal that cholesterol and DHA can regulate AA metabolism and availability in various tissues of piglets. These novel findings have important implications for designing the next generation of infant formula to optimize neonatal growth and development. PMID:18972185

  13. Maleopimaric acid acetic acid solvate

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Meng; Zhou, Yong-hong; Guo, Xiao-xin; Hu, Li-hong

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, C24H32O5·C2H4O2, is a derivative of abietic acid. The two fused and unbridged cyclohexane rings have chair conformations and the anhydride ring is planar. Of the other three six-membered rings, two have boat conformations and one has a twist-boat conformation. The crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular O—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  14. Chromohalobacter is a Causing Agent for the Production of Organic Acids and Putrescine during Fermentation of Ganjang, a Korean Traditional Soy Sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji Young; Chun, Byung Hee; Jeon, Che Ok

    2015-12-01

    Ganjang, a Korean traditional fermented soy sauce, is prepared by soaking doenjang-meju (fermented soybeans) in approximately 20% (w/v) solar salt solution. The metabolites and bacterial communities during ganjang fermentation were simultaneously investigated to gain a better understanding of the roles of the microbial population. The bacterial community analysis based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that initially, the genus Cobetia was predominant (0 to 10 d), followed by Bacillus (5 to 74 d), and eventually, Chromohalobacter became predominant until the end of the fermentation process (74 to 374 d). Metabolite analysis using (1)H-NMR showed that carbon compounds, such as fructose, galactose, glucose, and glycerol, probably released from doenjang-meju, increased rapidly during the early fermentation period (0 to 42 d). After removal of doenjang-meju from the ganjang solution (42 d), the initial carbon compounds remained nearly constant without the increase of fermentation products. At this point, Bacillus species, which probably originated from doenjang-meju, were predominant, suggesting that Bacillus is not mainly responsible for ganjang fermentation. Fermentation products including acetate, lactate, α-aminobutyrate, γ-aminobutyrate, and putrescine increased quickly with the rapid decrease of the initial carbon compounds, while Chromohalobacter, probably derived from the solar salts, was predominant. Multivariate redundancy analysis indicated that the Chromohalobacter population was closely correlated with the production of the organic acids and putrescine during the ganjang fermentation. These results may suggest that Chromohalobacter is a causing agent responsible for the production of organic acids and putrescine during ganjang fermentation and that the solar salts, not doenjang-meju, is an important microbial source for ganjang fermentation. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. Rhizobial strains exert a major effect on the amino acid composition of alfalfa nodules under NaCl stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Annick; Bipfubusa, Marie; Dhont, Catherine; Chalifour, François-P; Drouin, Pascal; Beauchamp, Chantal J

    2016-11-01

    Specific amino acids have protective functions in plants under stress conditions. This study assessed the effects of rhizobial strains on the amino acid composition in alfalfa under salt stress. Two alfalfa cultivars (Medicago sativa L. cv Apica and salt-tolerant cv Halo) in association with two Sinorhizobium meliloti strains with contrasting growth under salt stress (strain A2 and salt-tolerant strain Rm1521) were exposed to different levels of NaCl (0, 20, 40, 80 or 160 mM NaCl) under controlled conditions. We compared root and shoot biomasses, as well as root:shoot ratio for each association under these conditions as indicators of the salt tolerance of the symbiosis. Amino acid concentrations were analyzed in nodules, leaves and roots. The total concentration of free amino acids in nodules was mostly rhizobial-strain dependent while in leaves and roots it was mostly responsive to salt stress. For both cultivars, total and individual concentrations of amino acids including asparagine, proline, glutamine, aspartate, glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), histidine and ornithine were higher in Rm1521 nodules than in A2 nodules. Conversely, lysine and methionine were more abundant in A2 nodules than in Rm1521 nodules. Proline, glutamine, arginine, GABA and histidine substantially accumulated in salt-stressed nodules, suggesting an enhanced production of amino acids associated with osmoregulation, N storage or energy metabolism to counteract salt stress. Combining the salt-tolerant strain Rm1521 and the salt-tolerant cultivar Halo enhanced the root:shoot ratios and amino acid concentrations involved in plant protection which could be in part responsible for the enhancement of salt tolerance in alfalfa. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Biodiversity and technological-functional potential of lactic acid bacteria isolated from spontaneously fermented quinoa sourdoughs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Rodríguez, L; Vera Pingitore, E; Rollan, G; Cocconcelli, P S; Fontana, C; Saavedra, L; Vignolo, G; Hebert, E M

    2016-05-01

    To analyse lactic acid bacteria (LAB) diversity and technological-functional and safety properties of strains present during spontaneous fermented quinoa sourdoughs. Fermentation was performed by daily backslopping at 30°C for 10 days. Autochthonous LAB microbiota was monitored by a biphasic approach combining random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR and rRNA gene sequencing with PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. Identification and intraspecies differentiation allowed to group isolates within nine LAB species belonging to four genera. A succession of LAB species occurred during 10-days backslopping; Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus brevis were detected as dominant species in the consortium. The characterization of 15 representative LAB strains was performed based on the acidifying capacity, starch and protein hydrolysis, γ-aminobutyric acid and exopolysaccharides production, antimicrobial activity and antibiotic resistance. Strains characterization led to the selection of Lact. plantarum CRL1905 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides CRL1907 as candidates to be assayed as functional starter culture for the gluten-free (GF) quinoa fermented products. Results on native LAB microbiota present during quinoa sourdough fermentation will allow the selection of strains with appropriate technological properties to be used as a novel functional starter culture for GF-fermented products. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. 2-Furoylmethyl amino acids as indicators of Maillard reaction during the elaboration of black garlic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Ríos, Karina L; Vázquez-Barrios, M Estela; Gaytán-Martínez, Marcela; Olano, Agustín; Montilla, Antonia; Villamiel, Mar

    2018-02-01

    This study reports the formation of 2-furomethyl-amino acids (2-FM-AA) as indicators of Maillard reaction (MR) in black garlic elaboration, followed by the determination of furosine by ion-pair RP-HPLC-UV. The method was assessed for accuracy, repeatability and detection and quantitation limits indicating its adequacy. Traditional procedure of black garlic obtainment and the inclusion of convective drying (CDP) and ohmic heating (OHP) were assayed. For comparison purposes, three commercial black garlic samples were used. Together with furosine (2-FM-lysine), 2-furoylmethyl-γ-aminobutyric acid and 2-FM-arginine were detected. Levels of furosine were higher in CDP (46.6-110.1mg/100g protein) than in OHP (13.7-42.0mg/100g protein) samples, probably due to the most severe processing conditions used in the former. These results highlight the suitability of 2-FM-AA as chemical indicators to monitor the process of black garlic elaboration in order to obtain high quality products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth / For Parents / Folic Acid and ... conception and during early pregnancy . What Is Folic Acid? Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  19. Discrimination of some European vinegars with protected denomination of origin as a function of their amino acid and biogenic amine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnici, Fabio; Durán-Guerrero, Enrique; Riponi, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Twenty-three amino acids and 11 amines were quantified in 37 premium quality European vinegars (traditional balsamic vinegar of Modena, balsamic vinegars of Modena and vinegars of Jerez) by an HPLC-DAD method after derivatisation with diethyl ethoxymethylenmalonate. Data were assessed in the light of the differences in technology and raw materials. The total amount of amino acids ranged from 136 mg kg(-1) to 1450 mg kg(-1) in traditional balsamic vinegar of Modena and balsamic vinegar of Modena, respectively. Jerez vinegars had a mean content from 351 mg kg(-1) to 921 mg kg(-1) . Proline, glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid were the main amino acids while isoleucine was only found in balsamic vinegar of Modena at a concentration of <1 mg kg(-1) . Traditional balsamic vinegar of Modena had the lowest amount of biogenic amines. However, for all the vinegars, their concentration did not raise health issues. Based on the entire dataset, samples were successfully segregated and classified by means of principal component and cluster analysis. The amino acid and amine content in vinegars is influenced by the production process and raw materials. They may potentially contribute in characterising the European premium quality vinegars also for authentication or anti-fraud purposes. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Dehydroabietic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ping Rao

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The title compound [systematic name: (1R,4aS,10aR-7-isopropyl-1,4a-dimethyl-1,2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octahydrophenanthrene-1-carboxylic acid], C20H28O2, has been isolated from disproportionated rosin which is obtained by isomerizing gum rosin with a Pd-C catalyst.. Two crystallographically independent molecules exist in the asymmetric unit. In each molecule, there are three six-membered rings, which adopt planar, half-chair and chair conformations. The two cyclohexane rings form a trans ring junction with the two methyl groups in axial positions. The crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  1. Autism as a disorder of deficiency of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and altered metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2013-10-01

    Autism has a strong genetic and environmental basis in which inflammatory markers and factors concerned with synapse formation, nerve transmission, and information processing such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) and their products and neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid, and catecholamines and cytokines are altered. Antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and trace elements are needed for the normal metabolism of neurotrophic factors, eicosanoids, and neurotransmitters, supporting reports of their alterations in autism. But, the exact relationship among these factors and their interaction with genes and proteins concerned with brain development and growth is not clear. It is suggested that maternal infections and inflammation and adverse events during intrauterine growth of the fetus could lead to alterations in the gene expression profile and proteomics that results in dysfunction of the neuronal function and neurotransmitters, alteration(s) in the metabolism of PUFAs and their metabolites resulting in excess production of proinflammatory eicosanoids and cytokines and a deficiency of anti-inflammatory cytokines and bioactive lipids that ultimately results in the development of autism. Based on these evidences, it is proposed that selective delivery of BDNF and methods designed to augment the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids and PUFAs may prevent, arrest, or reverse the autism disease process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory amino acids at spinal level is associated with maintenance of persistent pain-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lai-Hong; Hou, Jun-Feng; Liu, Ming-Gang; Li, Meng-Meng; Cui, Xiu-Yu; Lu, Zhuo-Min; Zhang, Fu-Kang; An, Yang-Yuan; Shi, Lin; Chen, Jun

    2009-05-01

    Although the postsynaptic events responsible for development of pathological pain have been intensively studied, the relative contribution of presynaptic neurotransmitters to the whole process remains less elucidated. In the present investigation, we sought to measure temporal changes in spinal release of both excitatory amino acids (EAAs, glutamate and aspartate) and inhibitory amino acids (IAAs, glycine, ?-aminobutyric acid and taurine) in response to peripheral inflammatory pain state. The results showed that following peripheral chemical insult induced by subcutaneous bee venom (BV) injection, there was an initial, parallel increase in spinal release of both EAAs and IAAs, however, the balance between them was gradually disrupted when pain persisted longer, with EAAs remaining at higher level but IAAs at a level below the baseline. Moreover, the EAAs-IAAs imbalance at the spinal level was dependent upon the ongoing activity from the peripheral injury site. Intrathecal blockade of ionotropic (NMDA and non-NMDA) and metabotropic (mGluRI, II, III) glutamate receptors, respectively, resulted in a differential inhibition of BV-induced different types of pain (persistent nociception vs. hyperalgesia, or thermal vs. mechanical hyperalgesia), implicating that spinal antagonism of any specific glutamate receptor subtype fails to block all types of pain-related behaviors. This result provides a new line of evidence emphasizing an importance of restoration of EAAs-IAAs balance at the spinal level to prevent persistence or chronicity of pain.

  3. A tonoplast Glu/Asp/GABA exchanger that affects tomato fruit amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Christopher J; Thomas, Benjamin; Baxter, Charles J; Smith, J Andrew C; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2015-03-01

    Vacuolar accumulation of acidic metabolites is an important aspect of tomato fruit flavour and nutritional quality. The amino acids Asp and Glu accumulate to high concentrations during ripening, while γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) shows an approximately stoichiometric decline. Given that GABA can be catabolised to form Glu and subsequently Asp, and the requirement for the fruit to maintain osmotic homeostasis during ripening, we hypothesised the existence of a tonoplast transporter that exports GABA from the vacuole in exchange for import of either Asp or Glu. We show here that the tomato vacuolar membrane possesses such a transport property: transport of Glu across isolated tonoplast vesicle membranes was trans-stimulated in counterexchange mode by GABA, Glu and Asp. We identified SlCAT9 as a candidate protein for this exchanger using quantitative proteomics of a tonoplast-enriched membrane fraction. Transient expression of a SlCAT9-YFP fusion in tobacco confirmed a tonoplast localisation. The function of the protein was examined by overexpression of SlCAT9 in transgenic tomato plants. Tonoplast vesicles isolated from transgenic plants showed higher rates of Glu and GABA transport than wild-type (WT) only when assayed in counterexchange mode with Glu, Asp, or GABA. Moreover, there were substantial increases in the content of all three cognate amino acids in ripe fruit from the transgenic plants. We conclude that SlCAT9 is a tonoplast Glu/Asp/GABA exchanger that strongly influences the accumulation of these amino acids during fruit development. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Selection of Taste Markers Related to Lactic Acid Bacteria Microflora Metabolism for Chinese Traditional Paocai: A Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Zhang, Chuchu; Yang, Qin; Guo, Zhuang; Yang, Bo; Lu, Wenwei; Li, Dongyao; Tian, Fengwei; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-03-23

    Traditional paocai brine (PB) is continuously propagated by back-slopping and contains numerous lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains. Although PB is important for the quality of paocai (Chinese sauerkraut), the taste features, taste-related compounds of PB-paocai and the effects of LAB communities from PB on the taste compounds remain unclear. An electronic tongue was used to evaluate the taste features of 13 PB-paocai samples. Umami, saltiness, bitterness, sweetness, and aftertaste astringency were the main taste features of PB-paocai. A total of 14 compounds were identified as discriminant taste markers for PB-paocai via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based multimarker profiling. A LAB co-culture (Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus buchneri, and Pediococcus ethanoliduran) from PB could significantly increase glutamic acid (umami), sucrose (sweetness), glycine (sweetness), lactic acid (sourness), and γ-aminobutyric acid in PB-paocai, which would endow it with important flavor features. Such features could then facilitate starter screening and fermentation optimization to produce paocai-related foods with better nutritional and sensory qualities.

  5. Effects of aniracetam on extracellular levels of transmitter amino acids in the hippocampus of the conscious gerbils: an intracranial microdialysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Siming; Cai, Jingxia

    2003-03-27

    The effects of aniracetam on extracellular amino acid levels in the hippocampus of conscious gerbils, with or without transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion, were measured by microdialysis and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography. Increased extracellular levels of aspartate and glutamate that were observed in the hippocampus of conscious gerbils during transient global forebrain ischemia were reversed by aniracetam. In contrast, the level of extracellular gamma-aminobutyric acid was increased, while taurine was maintained at a higher level than other amino acids by administration of aniracetam (100 mg/kg, p.o.) 60 min before ischemia. Further, in contrast to ischemic animals, administration of aniracetam (100 mg/kg, p.o.) enhanced the release of glutamate and aspartate in the normal gerbil hippocampus. The results suggest that these effects might be due to a partial calcium agonist activity of aniracetam, and that the effects of aniracetam on amino acid levels might be a mechanism of protection against delayed neuronal death in the ischemic hippocampus, thereby improving memory dysfunction induced by ischemia/reperfusion.

  6. Simultaneous determination of amino acids and neurotransmitters in plasma samples from schizophrenic patients by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Diego Soares; Crevelin, Eduardo José; de Moraes, Luiz Alberto Beraldo; Cecilio Hallak, Jaime Eduardo; de Souza Crippa, José Alexandre; Costa Queiroz, Maria Eugênia

    2015-03-01

    A sensitive, reproducible, and rapid method was developed for the simultaneous determination of underivatized amino acids (aspartate, serine, glycine, alanine, methionine, leucine, tyrosine, and tryptophan) and neurotransmitters (glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid) in plasma samples using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry. The plasma concentrations of amino acids and neurotransmitters obtained from 35 schizophrenic patients in treatment with clozapine (27 patients) and olanzapine (eight patients) were compared with those obtained from 38 healthy volunteers to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. The chromatographic conditions separated ten target compounds within 3 min. This method presented linear ranges that varied from (lower limit of quantification: 9.7-13.3 nmol/mL) to (upper limit of quantification: 19.4-800 nmol/mL), intra- and interassay precision with coefficients of variation lower than 10%, and relative standard error values of the accuracy ranged from -2.1 to 9.9%. The proposed method appropriately determines amino acids and neurotransmitters in plasma from schizophrenic patients. Compared with the control group (healthy volunteers), the plasma levels of methionine in schizophrenic patients treated with olanzapine are statistically significantly higher. Moreover, schizophrenic patients treated with clozapine tend to have increased plasma levels of glutamate. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Pancreatic beta cells express two autoantigenic forms of glutamic acid decarboxylase, a 65-kDa hydrophilic form and a 64-kDa amphiphilic form which can be both membrane-bound and soluble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, S; Schierbeck, H; Aanstoot, H J

    1991-01-01

    The 64-kDa pancreatic beta-cell autoantigen, which is a target of autoantibodies associated with early as well as progressive stages of beta-cell destruction, resulting in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) in humans, has been identified as the gamma-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing enzyme glutamic...... analyzed in this study. GAD65 has a shorter half-life than the GAD64 forms, remains hydrophilic and soluble, and does not resolve into isomers. Comparative analysis of the brain and beta-cell forms of GAD show that GAD65 and GAD64 in pancreatic beta-cells correspond to the larger and smaller forms of GAD...... in brain, respectively. The expression of different forms and the flexibility in subcellular localization of the GAD autoantigen in beta-cells may have implications for both its function and autoantigenicity....

  8. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  9. Uric acid test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... for testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  10. Uric acid - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid ...

  11. Plasma amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  12. Facts about Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... of the baby’s brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  13. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003565.htm Methylmalonic acid blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid in the ...

  14. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Chiba (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  15. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 expression by a distinct population of mouse vestibular supporting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavazzani, Elisa; Tritto, Simona; Spaiardi, Paolo; Botta, Laura; Manca, Marco; Prigioni, Ivo; Masetto, Sergio; Russo, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The function of the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is to convert glutamate in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Glutamate decarboxylase exists as two major isoforms, termed GAD65 and GAD67, that are usually expressed in GABA-containing neurons in the central nervous system. GAD65 has been proposed to be associated with GABA exocytosis whereas GAD67 with GABA metabolism. In the present immunofluorescence study, we have investigated the presence of the two GAD isoforms in the semicircular canal cristae of wild type and GAD67-GFP knock-in mice. While no evidence for GAD65 expression was found, GAD67 was detected in a distinct population of peripherally-located supporting cells, but not in hair cells or in centrally-located supporting cells. GABA, on the other hand, was found in all supporting cells. The present result indicate that only a discrete population of supporting cells use GAD67 to synthesize GABA. This is the first report of a marker that allows to distinguish two populations of supporting cells in the vestibular epithelium. On the other hand, the lack of GABA and GAD enzymes in hair cells excludes its involvement in afferent transmission.

  16. Docosahexaenoic acid intake ameliorates ketamine-induced impairment of spatial cognition and learning ability in ICR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shucai; Dai, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhiwen; Hao, Wei; Chen, Hongxian

    2014-09-19

    Several studies have reported the ketamine-induced cognitive impairment. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation improves cognitive function in human infants and protects against learning impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we investigated the effect of DHA on ketamine-induced impairment of spatial cognition and learning ability in Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice. Morris water maze (MWM) was used to assess spatial learning and memory. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that intraperitoneal injection of ketamine (30mg/kg, twice per day) for 4 weeks led to the decline of spatial cognitive ability in mice, and 420mg/(kgd) DHA supplementation for 6 weeks improved ketamine-induced spatial cognitive impairment to a certain extent. The up-regulation of GABA levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex was related to the improvement in spatial learning. Our results suggested that DHA supplementation would be a promising intervention to improve ketamine-induced spatial memory and cognitive dysfunction, and this effect of DHA might be correlated with the up-regulation of GABA levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Glutamic acid ameliorates estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal-like symptoms in ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Hee-Yun; Yang, Woong Mo; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2015-09-01

    Some amino acids are considered alternative therapies for improving menopausal symptoms. Glutamic acid (GA), which is abundant in meats, fish, and protein-rich plant foods, is known to be a neurotransmitter or precursor of γ-aminobutyric acid. Although it is unclear if GA functions in menopausal symptoms, we hypothesized that GA would attenuate estrogen deficiency-induced menopausal symptoms. The objective to test our hypothesis was to examine an estrogenic effect of GA in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells, and ER-positive human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The results demonstrated that administration with GA to mice suppressed body weight gain and vaginal atrophy when compared with the OVX mice. A microcomputed tomographic analysis of the trabecular bone showed increases in bone mineral density, trabecular number, and connectivity density as well as a significant decrease in total porosity of the OVX mice treated with GA. In addition, GA increased serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and estrogen compared with the OVX mice. Furthermore, GA induced proliferation and increased ER-β messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, estrogen response element (ERE) activity, extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, and alkaline phosphatase activity in MG-63 cells. In MCF-7 cells, GA also increased proliferation, Ki-67 mRNA expression, ER-β mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Estrogen response element activity increased by GA was inhibited by an estrogen antagonist. Taken together, our data demonstrated that GA has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Polyamines Are Critical for the Induction of the Glutamate Decarboxylase-dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Manas K.; Tabor, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    As part of our studies on the biological functions of polyamines, we have used a mutant of Escherichia coli that lacks all the genes for polyamine biosynthesis for a global transcriptional analysis on the effect of added polyamines. The most striking early response to the polyamine addition is the increased expression of the genes for the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system (GDAR) that is important for the survival of the bacteria when passing through the acid environment of the stomach. Not only were the two genes for glutamate decarboxylases (gadA and gadB) and the gene for glutamate-γ-aminobutyrate antiporter (gadC) induced by the polyamine addition, but the various genes involved in the regulation of this system were also induced. We confirmed the importance of polyamines for the induction of the GDAR system by direct measurement of glutamate decarboxylase activity and acid survival. The effect of deletions of the regulatory genes on the GDAR system and the effects of overproduction of two of these genes were also studied. Strikingly, overproduction of the alternative σ factor rpoS and of the regulatory gene gadE resulted in very high levels of glutamate decarboxylase and almost complete protection against acid stress even in the absence of any polyamines. Thus, these data show that a major function of polyamines in E. coli is protection against acid stress by increasing the synthesis of glutamate decarboxylase, presumably by increasing the levels of the rpoS and gadE regulators. PMID:24097985

  19. Determination of amino acid neurotransmitters in rat hippocampi by HPLC-UV using NBD-F as a derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Wang, Rui; Jiang, Qingqing; Wang, Shue; Yao, Yao; Shao, Lihua

    2014-04-01

    A simple, rapid and accurate high-performance liquid chromatography method with ultraviolet-visible detection was developed for the determination of five amino acid neurotransmitters - aspartate, glutamic acid, glycine, taurine and γ-aminobutyric acid - in rat hippocampi with pre-column derivatization with 4-fluoro-7-nitrobenzofurazan. Several conditions which influenced derivatization and separation, such as pH, temperature, acetonitrile percentage mobile phase and flow rate, were optimized to obtain a suitable protocol for amino acids quantification in samples. The separation of the five neurotransmitter derivatives was performed on a C18 column using a mobile phase consisting of phosphate buffer (0.02 mol/L, pH 6.0)-acetonitrile (84:16, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min with the column temperature at 30°C. The detection wavelength was 472 nm. Without gradient elution, the five neurotransmitter derivatives were completely separated within 15 min. The linear relation was good in the range from 0.50 to 500 µmol/L, and the correlation coefficients were ≥0.999. Intra-day precision was between 1.8 and 3.2%, and inter-day precision was between 2.4 and 4.7%. The limits of detection (signal-to-noise ratio 3) were from 0.02 to 0.15 µmol/L. The established method was used to determine amino acid neurotransmitters in rat hippocampi with satisfactory recoveries varying from 94.9 to 105.2%. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Evaluation of the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of asiatic acid, a compound from Gotu kola or Centella asiatica, in the male Sprague Dawley rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceremuga, Tomás Eduardo; Valdivieso, Debra; Kenner, Catherine; Lucia, Amy; Lathrop, Keith; Stailey, Owen; Bailey, Heather; Criss, Jonathan; Linton, Jessica; Fried, Jordan; Taylor, Andrew; Padron, Gina; Johnson, Arthur Don

    2015-04-01

    Herbal medication use continues to rise and interactions with existing medications propose risks and may have significant effects and consequences on the administration of anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of asiatic acid and its potential modulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor. Fifty-five male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups: vehicle (DMSO), asiatic acid (AA), midazolam, or a combination of flumazenil + AA or midazolam + AA, and injected intraperitoneally 30 minutes prior to testing. The rats were tested on the Elevated Plus Maze (EPM) and the Forced Swim Test (FST). Data were analyzed using a two-tailed multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Significance was found regarding the ratio of open arm time, maximum speed, and time spent mobile in the AA group and the midazolam + AA group (P < .05). Flumazenil decreased the anxiolytic effects, suggesting that AA modulates the benzodiazepine site on the GABAA receptor. Further studies are recommended to determine the efficacy of prolonged treatment for anxiety and depression.

  1. 3,4,5-Trimethoxycinnamic acid (TMCA), one of the constituents of Polygalae Radix enhances pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors via GABAAergic systems in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Il; Han, Jin-Yi; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2013-10-01

    These experiments were performed to investigate whether 3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamic acid (TMCA), one of the constituents derived from Polygalae Radix, enhances pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors, and to alter sleep architecture through the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic systems in mice. TMCA decreased the locomotor activity. TMCA prolonged total sleep time, and reduced sleep latency induced by pentobarbital, similar to muscimol, a GABAA agonist. From the electrocencephalogram recording for 6 h after TMCA administration, the number of sleep/wake cycles were reduced by TMCA. TMCA also increased the total sleep time and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. In addition, TMCA increased Cl(-) influx in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells of mice. TMCA increased the activation of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the expressions of γ-subunit of GABAA receptors in the cerebellar granule cells. However, α- and β-subunits proteins of GABAA receptors were not increased. Therefore, TMCA would increase pentobarbital induced-sleep and NREM sleep in mice. These results indicate that TMCA may enhance sleep and alter sleep architecture through GABAAergic systyems.

  2. Enantiomeric excesses induced in amino acids by ultraviolet circularly polarized light irradiation of extraterrestrial ice analogs: A possible source of asymmetry for prebiotic chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modica, Paola; De Marcellus, Pierre; D'Hendecourt, Louis Le Sergeant; Meinert, Cornelia; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of meteoritic amino acids with enantiomeric excesses of the L-form (ee L ) has suggested that extraterrestrial organic materials may have contributed to prebiotic chemistry and directed the initial occurrence of the ee L that further led to homochirality of amino acids on Earth. A proposed mechanism for the origin of ee L in meteorites involves an asymmetric photochemistry of extraterrestrial ices by UV circularly polarized light (CPL). We have performed the asymmetric synthesis of amino acids on achiral extraterrestrial ice analogs by VUV CPL, investigating the chiral asymmetry transfer at two different evolutionary stages at which the analogs were irradiated (regular ices and/or organic residues) and at two different photon energies (6.6 and 10.2 eV). We identify 16 distinct amino acids and precisely measure the L-enantiomeric excesses using the enantioselective GC × GC-TOFMS technique in five of them: α-alanine, 2,3-diaminopropionic acid, 2-aminobutyric acid, valine, and norvaline, with values ranging from ee L = –0.20% ± 0.14% to ee L = –2.54% ± 0.28%. The sign of the induced ee L depends on the helicity and the energy of CPL, but not on the evolutionary stage of the samples, and is the same for all five considered amino acids. Our results support an astrophysical scenario in which the solar system was formed in a high-mass star-forming region where icy grains were irradiated during the protoplanetary phase by an external source of CPL of a given helicity and a dominant energy, inducing a stereo-specific photochemistry.

  3. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests.

  4. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  5. Neurotransmitters and neuronal apoptotic cell death of chronically aluminum intoxicated Nile catfish (Clarias gariepinus) in response to ascorbic acid supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Samah R; Hussein, Mohamed M A

    2015-12-01

    Few studies have been carried out to assess the neurotoxic effect of aluminum (Al) on the aquatic creatures. This study aims to evaluate the neurotoxic effects of long term Al exposure on the Nile catfish (Clarias gariepinus) and the potential ameliorative influence of ascorbic acid (ASA) over a 180 days exposure period. Forty eight Nile catfish were divided into four groups: control group, placed in clean water, ASA exposed group (5mg/l), AlCl3 received group (28.96 μg/l; 1/20 LC50), and group received AlCl3 concomitantly with ASA. Brain tissue was examined by using flow cytometry to monitor the apoptotic cell population, HPLC analysis for the quantitative estimation of brain monoamine neurotransmitters [serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE)]. The amino acid neurotransmitters [serum taurine, glycine, aspartate and glutamine and brain gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)] levels were assessed, plus changes in brain tissue structure using light microscopy. The concentration of Al in both brain tissue and serum was determined by using atomic absorption spectrophotometery. The Al content in serum and brain tissue were both elevated and Al exposure induced an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, a marked reduction of the monoamine and amino acids neurotransmitters levels and changes in tissue morphology. ASA supplementation partially abolished the effects of AL on the reduced neurotransmitter, the degree of apoptosis and restored the morphological changes to the brain. Overall, our results indicate that, ASA is a promising neuroprotective agent against for Al-induced neurotoxicity in the Nile catfish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultraviolet-B radiation modifies the quantitative and qualitative profile of flavonoids and amino acids in grape berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lüscher, J; Torres, N; Hilbert, G; Richard, T; Sánchez-Díaz, M; Delrot, S; Aguirreolea, J; Pascual, I; Gomès, E

    2014-06-01

    Grapevine cv. Tempranillo fruit-bearing cuttings were exposed to supplemental ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation under controlled conditions, in order to study its effect on grape traits, ripening, amino acids and flavonoid profile. The plants were exposed to two doses of UV-B biologically effective (5.98 and 9.66kJm(-2)d(-1)), applied either from fruit set to ripeness or from the onset of veraison to ripeness. A 0kJm(-2)d(-1) treatment was included as a control. UV-B did not significantly modify grape berry size, but increased the relative mass of berry skin. Time to reach ripeness was not affected by UV-B, which may explain the lack of changes in technological maturity. The concentration of must extractable anthocyanins, colour density and skin flavonols were enhanced by UV-B, especially in plants exposed from fruit set. The quantitative and qualitative profile of grape skin flavonols were modified by UV-B radiation. Monosubstituted flavonols relative abundance increased proportionally to the accumulated UV-B doses. Furthermore, trisubstituted forms, which where predominant in non-exposed berries, were less abundant as UV-B exposure increased. Although total free amino acid content remained unaffected by the treatments, the increased levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), as well as the decrease in threonine, isoleucine, methionine, serine and glycine, revealed a potential influence of UV-B on the GABA-mediated signalling and amino acid metabolism. UV-B had an overall positive impact on grape berry composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acid Deposition Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, A.E.K.

    2004-01-01

    Acid deposition, commonly known as acid rain, occurs when emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and other industrial processes undergo complex chemical reactions in the atmosphere and fall to the earth as wet deposition (rain, snow, cloud, fog) or dry deposition (dry particles, gas). Rain and snow are already naturally acidic, but are only considered problematic when less than a ph of 5.0 The main chemical precursors leading to acidic conditions are atmospheric concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). When these two compounds react with water, oxygen, and sunlight in the atmosphere, the result is sulfuric (H 2 SO 4 ) and nitric acids (HNO 3 ), the primary agents of acid deposition which mainly produced from the combustion of fossil fuel and from petroleum refinery. Airborne chemicals can travel long distances from their sources and can therefore affect ecosystems over broad regional scales and in locations far from the sources of emissions. According to the concern of petroleum ministry with the environment and occupational health, in this paper we will discussed the acid deposition phenomena through the following: Types of acidic deposition and its components in the atmosphere Natural and man-made sources of compounds causing the acidic deposition. Chemical reactions causing the acidic deposition phenomenon in the atmosphere. Factors affecting level of acidic deposition in the atmosphere. Impact of acid deposition. Procedures for acidic deposition control in petroleum industry

  8. Contribution of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus reuteri to acid resistance and persistence in sourdough fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Marcia S; Schlicht, Sabine; Gänzle, Michael G

    2011-08-30

    Acid stress impacts the persistence of lactobacilli in industrial sourdough fermentations, and in intestinal ecosystems. However, the contribution of glutamate to acid resistance in lactobacilli has not been demonstrated experimentally, and evidence for the contribution of acid resistance to the competitiveness of lactobacilli in sourdough is lacking. It was therefore the aim of this study to investigate the ecological role of glutamate decarboxylase in L. reuteri. A gene coding for a putative glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was identified in the genome of L. reuteri 100-23. Different from the organization of genetic loci coding for glutamate decarboxylase in other lactic acid bacteria, gadB was located adjacent to a putative glutaminase gene, gls3. An isogenic deletion mutant, L. reuteri ∆gadB, was generated by a double crossover method. L. reuteri 100-23 but not L. reuteri ∆gadB converted glutamate to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) in phosphate butter (pH 2.5). In sourdough, both strains converted glutamine to glutamate but only L. reuteri 100-23 accumulated GABA. Glutamate addition to phosphate buffer, pH 2.5, improved survival of L. reuteri 100-23 100-fold. However, survival of L. reuteri ∆gadB remained essentially unchanged. The disruption of gadB did not affect growth of L. reuteri in mMRS or in sourdough. However, the wild type strain L. reuteri 100-23 displaced L. reuteri ∆gadB after 5 cycles of fermentation in back-slopped sourdough fermentations. The conversion of glutamate to GABA by L. reuteri 100-23 contributes to acid resistance and to competitiveness in industrial sourdough fermentations. The organization of the gene cluster for glutamate conversion, and the availability of amino acids in cereals imply that glutamine rather than glutamate functions as the substrate for GABA formation. The exceptional coupling of glutamine deamidation to glutamate decarboxylation in L. reuteri likely reflects adaptation to cereal substrates.

  9. Contribution of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus reuteri to acid resistance and persistence in sourdough fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gänzle Michael G

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acid stress impacts the persistence of lactobacilli in industrial sourdough fermentations, and in intestinal ecosystems. However, the contribution of glutamate to acid resistance in lactobacilli has not been demonstrated experimentally, and evidence for the contribution of acid resistance to the competitiveness of lactobacilli in sourdough is lacking. It was therefore the aim of this study to investigate the ecological role of glutamate decarboxylase in L. reuteri. Results A gene coding for a putative glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was identified in the genome of L. reuteri 100-23. Different from the organization of genetic loci coding for glutamate decarboxylase in other lactic acid bacteria, gadB was located adjacent to a putative glutaminase gene, gls3. An isogenic deletion mutant, L. reuteri ∆gadB, was generated by a double crossover method. L. reuteri 100-23 but not L. reuteri ∆gadB converted glutamate to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA in phosphate butter (pH 2.5. In sourdough, both strains converted glutamine to glutamate but only L. reuteri 100-23 accumulated GABA. Glutamate addition to phosphate buffer, pH 2.5, improved survival of L. reuteri 100-23 100-fold. However, survival of L. reuteri ∆gadB remained essentially unchanged. The disruption of gadB did not affect growth of L. reuteri in mMRS or in sourdough. However, the wild type strain L. reuteri 100-23 displaced L. reuteri ∆gadB after 5 cycles of fermentation in back-slopped sourdough fermentations. Conclusions The conversion of glutamate to GABA by L. reuteri 100-23 contributes to acid resistance and to competitiveness in industrial sourdough fermentations. The organization of the gene cluster for glutamate conversion, and the availability of amino acids in cereals imply that glutamine rather than glutamate functions as the substrate for GABA formation. The exceptional coupling of glutamine deamidation to glutamate decarboxylation in L. reuteri likely

  10. Contribution of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus reuteri to acid resistance and persistence in sourdough fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Acid stress impacts the persistence of lactobacilli in industrial sourdough fermentations, and in intestinal ecosystems. However, the contribution of glutamate to acid resistance in lactobacilli has not been demonstrated experimentally, and evidence for the contribution of acid resistance to the competitiveness of lactobacilli in sourdough is lacking. It was therefore the aim of this study to investigate the ecological role of glutamate decarboxylase in L. reuteri. Results A gene coding for a putative glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was identified in the genome of L. reuteri 100-23. Different from the organization of genetic loci coding for glutamate decarboxylase in other lactic acid bacteria, gadB was located adjacent to a putative glutaminase gene, gls3. An isogenic deletion mutant, L. reuteri ∆gadB, was generated by a double crossover method. L. reuteri 100-23 but not L. reuteri ∆gadB converted glutamate to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) in phosphate butter (pH 2.5). In sourdough, both strains converted glutamine to glutamate but only L. reuteri 100-23 accumulated GABA. Glutamate addition to phosphate buffer, pH 2.5, improved survival of L. reuteri 100-23 100-fold. However, survival of L. reuteri ∆gadB remained essentially unchanged. The disruption of gadB did not affect growth of L. reuteri in mMRS or in sourdough. However, the wild type strain L. reuteri 100-23 displaced L. reuteri ∆gadB after 5 cycles of fermentation in back-slopped sourdough fermentations. Conclusions The conversion of glutamate to GABA by L. reuteri 100-23 contributes to acid resistance and to competitiveness in industrial sourdough fermentations. The organization of the gene cluster for glutamate conversion, and the availability of amino acids in cereals imply that glutamine rather than glutamate functions as the substrate for GABA formation. The exceptional coupling of glutamine deamidation to glutamate decarboxylation in L. reuteri likely reflects adaptation to cereal

  11. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acids are "building blocks" that join together to form proteins. If you have one of these disorders, your body may have trouble breaking down certain amino acids. Or there may be a problem getting the ...

  12. Uric acid - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acid in blood Images Blood test Uric acid crystals References Edwards NL. Crystal deposition diseases. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. ... M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn ...

  13. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  14. Pantothenic acid and biotin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/002410.htm Pantothenic acid and biotin To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pantothenic acid and biotin are types of B vitamins. They are water- ...

  15. Acid-fast stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  16. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  17. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminolevulinic acid is used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty ... skin cancer) of the face or scalp. Aminolevulinic acid is in a class of medications called photosensitizing ...

  18. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  19. Azelaic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azelaic acid gel and foam is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat the pimples and ...

  20. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  1. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  2. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Valproic Acid Monday, 01 January 2018 In every pregnancy, a ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to valproic acid may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  3. Lactic acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  4. Sulfuric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulfuric acid is a very strong chemical that is corrosive. Corrosive means it can cause severe burns and ... or mucous membranes. This article discusses poisoning from sulfuric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  5. Valproic acid prevents retinal degeneration in a murine model of normal tension glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Atsuko; Guo, Xiaoli; Noro, Takahiko; Harada, Chikako; Tanaka, Kohichi; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Harada, Takayuki

    2015-02-19

    Valproic acid (VPA) is widely used for treatment of epilepsy, mood disorders, migraines and neuropathic pain. It exerts its therapeutic benefits through modulation of multiple mechanisms including regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate neurotransmissions, activation of pro-survival protein kinases and inhibition of histone deacetylase. The evidence for neuroprotective properties associated with VPA is emerging. Herein, we investigated the therapeutic potential of VPA in a mouse model of normal tension glaucoma (NTG). Mice with glutamate/aspartate transporter gene deletion (GLAST KO mice) demonstrate progressive retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss and optic nerve degeneration without elevated intraocular pressure, and exhibit glaucomatous pathology including glutamate neurotoxicity and oxidative stress in the retina. VPA (300mg/kg) or vehicle (PBS) was administered via intraperitoneal injection in GLAST KO mice daily for 2 weeks from the age of 3 weeks, which coincides with the onset of glaucomatous retinal degeneration. Following completion of the treatment period, the vehicle-treated GLAST KO mouse retina showed significant RGC death. Meanwhile, VPA treatment prevented RGC death and thinning of the inner retinal layer in GLAST KO mice. In addition, in vivo electrophysiological analyses demonstrated that visual impairment observed in vehicle-treated GLAST KO mice was ameliorated with VPA treatment, clearly establishing that VPA beneficially affects both histological and functional aspects of the glaucomatous retina. We found that VPA reduces oxidative stress induced in the GLAST KO retina and stimulates the cell survival signalling pathway associated with extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK). This is the first study to report the neuroprotective effects of VPA in an animal model of NTG. Our findings raise intriguing possibilities that the widely prescribed drug VPA may be a novel candidate for treatment of glaucoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  6. Concentrations and nitrogen isotope compositions of free amino acids in Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) needles of different ages as indicators of atmospheric nitrogen pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Xiao, Huayun

    2017-09-01

    Free amino acid δ15N values and concentrations of current-year new (new), current-year mature (middle-age) and previous-year (old) Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) needles were determined for five sites with different distances from a highway in a forest in Guiyang (SW China). Needle free amino acid concentrations decreased with increasing distance from the highway, and only the free amino acid concentrations (total free amino acid, arginine, γ-aminobutyric acid, valine, alanine and proline) in the middle-aged needles demonstrated a strong correlation with distance from the highway, indicating that free amino acid concentrations in middle-aged needles may be a more suitable indicator of nitrogen (N) deposition compared to new and old needles. Needle free amino acid δ15N values were more positive near the highway compared to the more distant sites and increased with increasing needle age, indicating that N deposition in this site may be dominated by isotopically heavy NOx-N from traffic emissions. In sites beyond 400 m from the highway, the δ15N values of total free amino acids, histidine, glutamine, proline, alanine, aspartate, isoleucine, lysine, arginine and serine in each age of needle were noticeably negative compared to their respective δ15N values near the highway. This suggested that needle free amino acid δ15N values from these sites were more affected by 15N-depleted atmospheric NHx-N from soil emissions. This result was further supported by the similarity in the negative moss δ15N values at these sites to the δ15N values of soil-derived NHx-N. Needle free amino acid δ15N values therefore have the potential to provide information about atmospheric N sources. We conclude that needle free amino acid concentrations are sensitive indicators of N deposition and that the age-related free amino acid δ15N values in needles can efficiently reflect atmospheric N sources. This would probably promote the application of the combined plant tissue amino acid

  7. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  8. The Acid Rain Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  9. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  10. Stomach acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour (mEq/ ...

  11. Immunoglobulin and fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising 0.1-10 w/w % immunoglobulin (Ig), 4-14 w/w % saturated fatty acids, 4-14 w/w % mono-unsaturated fatty acids and 0-5 w/w % poly-unsaturated fatty acids, wherein the weight percentages are based on the content of dry matter in the composition...

  12. Amino acid analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  13. Molecular Interaction of Pinic Acid with Sulfuric Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, Jonas; Kurten, Theo; Bilde, Merete

    2014-01-01

    from the corresponding ΔG values. The first two additions of sulfuric acid to pinic acid are found to be favorable with ΔG values of -9.06 and -10.41 kcal/mol. Addition of a third sulfuric acid molecule is less favorable and leads to a structural rearrangement forming a bridged sulfuric acid-pinic acid...... without the further possibility for attachment of either sulfuric acid or pinic acid. This suggests that pinic acid cannot be a key species in the first steps in nucleation, but the favorable interactions between sulfuric acid and pinic acid imply that pinic acid can contribute to the subsequent growth...

  14. [Biosynthesis of adipic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li; Chen, Wujiu; Yuan, Fei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-10-01

    Adipic acid is a six-carbon dicarboxylic acid, mainly for the production of polymers such as nylon, chemical fiber and engineering plastics. Its annual demand is close to 3 million tons worldwide. Currently, the industrial production of adipic acid is based on the oxidation of aromatics from non-renewable petroleum resources by chemo-catalytic processes. It is heavily polluted and unsustainable, and the possible alternative method for adipic acid production should be developed. In the past years, with the development of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, green and clean biotechnological methods for adipic acid production attracted more attention. In this study, the research advances of adipic acid and its precursor production are reviewed, followed by addressing the perspective of the possible new pathways for adipic acid production.

  15. The role of apitoxin in alleviating propionic acid-induced neurobehavioral impairments in rat pups: The expression pattern of Reelin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghestani, Maha H; Selim, Manar E; Abd-Elhakim, Yasmina M; Said, Enas N; El-Hameed, Noura E Abd; Khalil, Samah R; El-Tawil, Osama S

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy of apitoxin (bee venom; BV) in ameliorating propionic acid (PPA) -induced neurobehavioral impacts was studied. Sixty rat pups were enrolled in a split litter design to six groups: a control group, a PPA-treated group, a BV-treated group, a BV/PPA protective group, a PPA/BV therapeutic group, and a BV/PPA/BV protective and therapeutic group. Exploratory, social, locomotor, and repetitive/stereotype-like activities were assessed and prosocial, empathy, and acquired behavior were evaluated. Levels of neurotransmitter including serotonin, dopamine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were determined and a quantitative analysis of Reelin gene expression was performed. PPA treatment induced several behavioral alterations, as reduced exploratory activity and social behaviors, increased repetitive/stereotypic behaviors, and hyperactivity. In addition, a marked decline of neurotransmitters and down-regulation of Reelin mRNA expression were observed. BV exhibited high efficiency in ameliorating the PPA-induced neurobehavioral alterations, particularly when applied both before and after PPA administration. Overall, the results implied that BV has merit as a candidate therapeutic treatment to alleviate PPA-induced neurobehavioral disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  17. Profiling of Amino Acids and Their Derivatives Biogenic Amines Before and After Antipsychotic Treatment in First-Episode Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa Leppik

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SCH is a heterogeneous disorder, deriving from a potential multitude of etiopathogenetic factors. During the past few years there has been an increasing interest in the role of circulating amino acids (AAs and biogenic amines (BAs in the pathophysiology of SCH. In the present study, we aimed to provide an insight into the potential role of alterations in levels of AAs and BAs as well as examine their more specific metabolic shifts in relation to early stage of SCH. We measured 21 AAs and 17 BAs in serum samples of patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP before and after 7-month antipsychotic treatment in comparison to control subjects (CSs. According to multivariate analysis, antipsychotic-naïve FEP patients had significantly higher levels of taurine and spermine, whereas values of proline (Pro, alpha-aminoadipic acid (alpha-AAA, kynurenine (Kyn, valine (Val, tyrosine (Tyr, citrulline (Citr, tryptophan (Trp, and histidine (His were diminished compared to CSs. Increased levels of taurine and spermine, as well as reduced levels of alpha-AAA and Kyn probably reflect the compromised function of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors in patients. The decreased levels of Pro (AA modulating the function of glutamate decarboxylase likely reflect the imbalanced function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA system in the brain of FEP patients. The alterations in ratio between Tyr and phenylalanine (Phe can be taken as a sign of compromised function of dopaminergic system. These metabolic shifts were reinstated by 7-month antipsychotic treatment. Serum metabolic profiles can be regarded as important indicators to investigate clinical course of SCH and treatment response.

  18. Amino Acid and Biogenic Amine Profile Deviations in an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test: A Comparison between Healthy and Hyperlipidaemia Individuals Based on Targeted Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia (HLP is characterized by a disturbance in lipid metabolism and is a primary risk factor for the development of insulin resistance (IR and a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. The aim of this work was to investigate the changes in postprandial amino acid and biogenic amine profiles provoked by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in HLP patients using targeted metabolomics. We used ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry to analyze the serum amino acid and biogenic amine profiles of 35 control and 35 HLP subjects during an OGTT. The amino acid and biogenic amine profiles from 30 HLP subjects were detected as independent samples to validate the changes in the metabolites. There were differences in the amino acid and biogenic amine profiles between the HLP individuals and the healthy controls at baseline and after the OGTT. The per cent changes of 13 metabolites from fasting to the 2 h samples during the OGTT in the HLP patients were significantly different from those of the healthy controls. The lipid parameters were associated with the changes in valine, isoleucine, creatine, creatinine, dimethylglycine, asparagine, serine, and tyrosine (all p < 0.05 during the OGTT in the HLP group. The postprandial changes in isoleucine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA during the OGTT were positively associated with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; all p < 0.05 in the HLP group. Elevated oxidative stress and disordered energy metabolism during OGTTs are important characteristics of metabolic perturbations in HLP. Our findings offer new insights into the complex physiological regulation of metabolism during the OGTT in HLP.

  19. Bile acid sequestrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Sonne, David P; Knop, Filip K

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized in the liver from cholesterol and have traditionally been recognized for their role in absorption of lipids and in cholesterol homeostasis. In recent years, however, bile acids have emerged as metabolic signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of lipid...... and glucose metabolism, and possibly energy homeostasis, through activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and TGR5. Bile acid sequestrants (BASs) constitute a class of drugs that bind bile acids in the intestine to form a nonabsorbable complex resulting in interruption...... of the enterohepatic circulation. This increases bile acid synthesis and consequently reduces serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Also, BASs improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Despite a growing understanding of the impact of BASs on glucose metabolism, the mechanisms behind their glucose...

  20. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  1. DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID HYBRIDS OF ACETIC ACID BACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ley, J.; Friedman, S.

    1964-01-01

    De Ley, J. (State University, Ghent, Belgium), and S. Friedman. Deoxyribonucleic acid hybrids of acetic acid bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 88:937–945. 1964.—Deuterated N15-labeled deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from Acetobacter aceti (mesoxydans 4) forms hybrids with ordinary DNA from other species of this genus (A. xylinum, A. pasteurianus, A. estunensis, and possibly A. xylinoides) when the guanine plus cytosine base composition does not vary by more than 1 to 2%. Beyond this limit (A. aceti Ch31 and A. muciparus 5) no hybrids are formed. The hybrids are apparently derived from an asymmetrical part of the compositional distribution. The results lend strength to the concept of a genetic species rather than to a division of a genus into sharply separated species, based on small phenotypic differences. Taxonomic implications are discussed. PMID:14219057

  2. Azetidinic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Bunch, Lennart; Chopin, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    A set of ten azetidinic amino acids, that can be envisioned as C-4 alkyl substituted analogues of trans-2-carboxyazetidine-3-acetic acid (t-CAA) and/or conformationally constrained analogues of (R)- or (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) have been synthesized in a diastereo- and enantiomerically pure form from...... of two diastereoisomers that were easily separated and converted in two steps into azetidinic amino acids. Azetidines 35-44 were characterized in binding studies on native ionotropic Glu receptors and in functional assays at cloned metabotropic receptors mGluR1, 2 and 4, representing group I, II and III...

  3. Recovery of organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  4. The acid rain primer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugent, O.

    2006-10-01

    Acid rain continues to be a major problem in North America, and particularly in eastern Canada. This report introduced the topic of acid rain and discussed its formation, measurement, sources, and geographic distribution. The major sources of sulphur dioxide in Canada are smelting metals, burning coal for electrical power generation, industrial emissions (e.g., pulp and paper, petroleum and aluminum industry), and oil and gas extraction and refining. In Canada, the largest source of nitrogen oxide is the burning of fossil fuels by the transportation sector. Problem areas for acid rain in Canada were identified. The effects of acid rain were examined on lakes and aquatic ecosystems, forests and soils, human-made structures and materials, human health, and on visibility. Acid rain policies and programs were then presented from a historical and current context. Ecosystem recovery from acid rain was discussed with reference to acid rain monitoring, atmospheric response to reductions in acid-causing emissions, and ecosystem recovery of lakes, forests, and aquatic ecosystems. Challenges affecting ecosystem recovery were also presented. These challenges include drought and dry weather, decrease of base cations in precipitation, release of sulphate previously stored in soil, mineralization and immobilization of sulphur/sulphates. Last, the report discussed what still needs to be done to improve the problem of acid rain as well as future concerns. These concerns include loss of base cations from forested watersheds and nitrogen deposition and saturation. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 17 figs

  5. Folic Acid Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Other Health Outcomes Folic Acid Fortification and Supplementation Neural Tube Defects Surveillance References Data and Statistics Research Birth Defects COUNT Articles & Key Findings Recommendations Links to ...

  6. Recovery of organic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verser, Dan W [Menlo Park, CA; Eggeman, Timothy J [Lakewood, CO

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  7. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  8. Effects of Aqueous Extract of Saffron on Gamma-Amino Butyric Acid Content in Rat Hypothalami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikpour Moghaddam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Preliminary studies revealed that 4-aminobutyric acid (GABA is a key and major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Evidence from many animal studies and even some clinical studies indicate that GABA is responsible for regulating behavior and also plays an important role in brain functions. Previous studies presented Glutamic acid decarboxylase as a catalyst for the conversion of glutamic acid to GABA. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of saffron on GABA content in the hypothalamus of rats. Materials and Methods Male rats weighing 190 - 210 g were used. They were maintained in a temperature-controlled room with a 12-hour light/dark illumination cycle. The rats were fed standard pellet feed and had access to water ad libitum. The animals were divided into three groups: The first group received a 250 µL intraperitoneal injection of 0.05 g/mL saffron (Group I. The second group received a 250 µL intraperitoneal injection of 0.1 g/mL saffron (Group II. The third group acted as the control and received only water (Group III. The time intervals chosen for this experiment were 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks following the administration of saffron. At least six animals were assigned to each experimental group. At each time interval, the animals were anaesthetized and brain tissue extracted, hypothalami separated and homogenized in PBS solution, rinsed with PBS, re-filtered, and centrifuged at 1200 g for 10 minutes. Results In this study, both doses of saffron (0.05 g/mL [Group I]; and 0.1 g/mL [Group II] caused significantly increased GABA content in each hypothalamus. GABA in Group I increased significantly compared to the control group (1.00 ± 0.05 [mean ± SD, n = 8] vs. 0.29 ± 0.05, mM. GABA in Group II also increased significantly compared to the control group (1.45 ± 0.07 [mean ± SD, n = 8] vs. 0.29 ± 0.05, mM. The effect of saffron on GABA was also dose dependent; the only exception occurring during the

  9. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Olthof, M.R.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Katan, M.B.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the absorption of chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in humans are lacking. We determined the absorption of chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in a cross-over study with 4 female and 3 male healthy ileo...

  10. Characterization of acid tars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Sunday A., E-mail: sunday.leonard@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Civil Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Stegemann, Julia A. [Department of Civil Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, Chadwick Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Roy, Amitava [J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Centre for Advance Microstructures and Devices (CAMD), 6980 Jefferson Highway, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 70806 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Acid tars from the processing of petroleum and petrochemicals using sulfuric acid were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) micro-analysis. Leaching of contaminants from the acid tars in 48 h batch tests with distilled water at a liquid-to-solid ratio 10:1 was also studied. GC/MS results show that the samples contained aliphatic hydrocarbons, cyclic hydrocarbons, up to 12 of the 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and numerous other organic groups, including organic acids (sulfonic acids, carboxylic acids and aromatic acids), phenyl, nitrile, amide, furans, thiophenes, pyrroles, and phthalates, many of which are toxic. Metals analysis shows that Pb was present in significant concentration. DSC results show different transition peaks in the studied samples, demonstrating their complexity and variability. FTIR analysis further confirmed the presence of the organic groups detected by GC/MS. The SEM/EDX micro-analysis results provided insight on the surface characteristics of the samples and show that contaminants distribution was heterogeneous. The results provide useful data on the composition, complexity, and variability of acid tars; information which hitherto have been scarce in public domain.

  11. Science of acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Tsuguo

    1992-01-01

    In this report, the mechanism of forming acid rain in the atmosphere and the process of its fall to ground, the mechanism of withering forests by acid substances, and the process of acidifying lakes and marshes are explained. Moreover, the monitoring networks for acid rain and the countermeasures are described. Acid rain is the pollution phenomena related to all environment, that is, atmosphere, hydrosphere, soilsphere, biosphere and so on, and it is a local environmental pollution problem, and at the same time, an international, global environmental pollution problem. In Japan, acid rain has fallen, but the acidification of lakes and marshes is not clear, and the damage to forests is on small scale. However in East Asia region, the release of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides is much, and the increase of the effects of acid rain is expected. It is necessary to devise the measures for preventing the damage due to acid rain. The global monitoring networks of World Meteorological Organization and United Nations Environment Program, and those in Europe, USA and Japan are described. The monitoring of acid rain in Japan is behind that in Europe and USA. (K.I.)

  12. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat- ... in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  13. Locked nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jan Stenvang; Sørensen, Mads D; Wengel, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA) is a class of nucleic acid analogs possessing very high affinity and excellent specificity toward complementary DNA and RNA, and LNA oligonucleotides have been applied as antisense molecules both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we briefly describe the basic...

  14. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  15. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  16. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Wesén, Clas; Sundin, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Chlorinated fatty acids have been found to be major contributors to organohalogen compounds in fish, bivalves, jellyfish, and lobster, and they have been indicated to contribute considerably to organohalogens in marine mammals. Brominated fatty acids have been found in marine sponges. Also, chlor...

  17. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  18. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  19. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  20. Acid dissociation characteristics of humic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochiyama, Osamu; Sakakibara, Tetsuro; Inoue, Yasushi

    1995-01-01

    Based on the results from potentiometric titrations carried out on polyacrylic acid and some commercially available humic acids, the equation for the proton dissociation of weak polymeric acids is proposed to be K app (H + )α/(1-α) = K 1/2 {(1-α)/α}((Na + )/(Na + ) s ), where α is the degree of dissociation, K 1/2 is the dissociation constant at α = 1/2, and the brackets with subscript s denote the concentration at the surface of the polymer. This equation has been derived on the assumptions: (i) Each polymer molecule is a polybasic acid (H N R N ) having different acidic sites with K values from K 1 to K N . (ii) Binding energies of protons on these sites are all equal. (iii) The ratios of the dissociation constants of H N-i R N i- and H N-j R N j- is expressed by K i /K j = {(N-i+1)/i}/{(N-j+1)/j} since the probabilities to release or bind a proton are proportional to the numbers of protons or numbers of available anionic sites on the polymer. (iv) The effective concentration of protons at the surface of the polymer ((H + ) s ) is related by (H + ) s /(H + ) = (Na + ) s /(Na + ), where (Na + ) s can be estimated by the relation, (Na + ) s = (Cl - ) s + (R - ) s (where (R - ) s Σi(H N-i R N i- )). This leads to (Na + ) s ≅ (Cl - ) s , which in turn leads to (Na + ) s ≅ (Na + ) at high ionic strength and (Na + ) s ≅ (R - ) s = C R α at low ionic strength. (author)

  1. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, Margreet R.; Hollman, Peter C H; Katan, Martijn B.

    2001-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid, an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid, is a major phenolic compound in coffee; daily intake in coffee drinkers is 0.5-1 g. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are antioxidants in vitro and might therefore contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, data on the

  2. Production of shikimic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, Uttam C

    2012-01-01

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate for the synthesis of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu®). Shikimic acid can be produced via chemical synthesis, microbial fermentation and extraction from certain plants. An alternative production route is via biotransformation of the more readily available quinic acid. Much of the current supply of shikimic acid is sourced from the seeds of Chinese star anise (Illicium verum). Supply from star anise seeds has experienced difficulties and is susceptible to vagaries of weather. Star anise tree takes around six-years from planting to bear fruit, but remains productive for long. Extraction and purification from seeds are expensive. Production via fermentation is increasing. Other production methods are too expensive, or insufficiently developed. In the future, production in recombinant microorganisms via fermentation may become established as the preferred route. Methods for producing shikimic acid are reviewed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 2-Methylaspartic acid monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray J. Butcher

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C5H9NO4·H2O, is an isomer of the α-amino acid glutamic acid that crystallizes from water in its zwitterionic form as a monohydrate. It is not one of the 20 proteinogenic α-amino acids that are used in living systems and differs from the natural amino acids in that it has an α-methyl group rather than an α-H atom. In the crystal, an O—H...O hydrogen bond is present between the acid and water molecules while extensive N—H...O and O—H...O hydrogen bonds link the components into a three-dimensional array.

  4. Acidity in rainfall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisue, G.T.; Kacoyannakis, J.

    1975-01-01

    The reported increasing acidity of rainfall raises many interesting ecological and chemical questions. In spite of extensive studies in Europe and North America there are, for example, great uncertainties in the relative contributions of strong and weak acids to the acid-base properties of rainwater. Unravelling this and similar problems may require even more rigorous sample collection and analytical procedures than previously employed. Careful analysis of titration curves permits inferences to be made regarding chemical composition, the possible response of rainwater to further inputs of acidic components to the atmosphere, and the behavior to be expected when rainwater interacts with the buffers present in biological materials and natural waters. Rainwater samples collected during several precipitation events at Argonne National Laboratory during October and November 1975 have been analyzed for pH, acid and base neutralizing properties, and the ions of ammonium, nitrate, chloride, sulfate, and calcium. The results are tabulated

  5. Control of sleep-to-wake transitions via fast amino acid and slow neuropeptide transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosqueiro, Thiago; Lecea, Luis de; Huerta, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC) modulates cortical, subcortical, cerebellar, brainstem and spinal cord circuits and it expresses receptors for neuromodulators that operate on a time scale of several seconds. Evidence from anatomical, electrophysiological and optogenetic experiments has shown that LC neurons receive input from a group of neurons called hypocretin neurons that release a neuropeptide called hypocretin. It is less well known how these two groups of neurons can be coregulated using GABAergic (GABA standing for gamma aminobutyric acid) neurons. As the time scale for GABA A inhibition is several orders of magnitude faster than that for the hypocretin neuropeptide effect, we investigate the limits of circuit activity regulation using a realistic model of neurons. Our investigation shows that GABA A inhibition is insufficient to control the activity levels of the LCs. Although slower forms of GABA A can in principle work, there is not much plausibility due to the low probability of the presence of slow GABA A and lack of robust stability at the maximum firing frequencies. The best possible control mechanism predicted by our modeling analysis is the presence of inhibitory neuropeptides, which exert effects on a similar time scale to the hypocretin/orexin. Although the nature of these inhibitory neuropeptides has not been identified yet, it provides the most efficient mechanism in the modeling analysis. Finally, we present a reduced mean-field model that perfectly captures the dynamics and the phenomena generated by this circuit. This investigation shows that brain communication involving multiple time scales can be better controlled by employing orthogonal mechanisms of neural transmission to decrease interference between cognitive processes and hypothalamic functions. (paper)

  6. Conjugated Fatty Acid Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Richa; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Sweet, Marie; Shanklin, John

    2012-01-01

    Conjugated linolenic acids (CLNs), 18:3 Δ9,11,13, lack the methylene groups found between the double bonds of linolenic acid (18:3 Δ9,12,15). CLNs are produced by conjugase enzymes that are homologs of the oleate desaturases FAD2. The goal of this study was to map the domain(s) within the Momordica charantia conjugase (FADX) responsible for CLN formation. To achieve this, a series of Momordica FADX-Arabidopsis FAD2 chimeras were expressed in the Arabidopsis fad3fae1 mutant, and the transformed seeds were analyzed for the accumulation of CLN. These experiments identified helix 2 and the first histidine box as a determinant of conjugase product partitioning into punicic acid (18:3 Δ9cis,11trans,13cis) or α-eleostearic acid (18:3 Δ9cis,11trans,13trans). This was confirmed by analysis of a FADX mutant containing six substitutions in which the sequence of helix 2 and first histidine box was converted to that of FAD2. Each of the six FAD2 substitutions was individually converted back to the FADX equivalent identifying residues 111 and 115, adjacent to the first histidine box, as key determinants of conjugase product partitioning. Additionally, expression of FADX G111V and FADX G111V/D115E resulted in an approximate doubling of eleostearic acid accumulation to 20.4% and 21.2%, respectively, compared with 9.9% upon expression of the native Momordica FADX. Like the Momordica conjugase, FADX G111V and FADX D115E produced predominantly α-eleostearic acid and little punicic acid, but the FADX G111V/D115E double mutant produced approximately equal amounts of α-eleostearic acid and its isomer, punicic acid, implicating an interactive effect of residues 111 and 115 in punicic acid formation. PMID:22451660

  7. Trans Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  8. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain. This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks. Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  9. Glycosyltransferase glycosylating flavokermesic acid and/or kermesic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I) : conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II) : conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid.......An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I) : conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II) : conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid....

  10. GLYCOSYLTRANSFERASE GLYCOSYLATING FLAVOKERMESIC ACID AND/OR KERMESIC ACID

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I): conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II): conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid.......An isolated glycosyltransferase (GT) polypeptide capable of: (I): conjugating glucose to flavokermesic acid (FK); and/or (II): conjugating glucose to kermesic acid (KA) and use of this GT to e.g. make Carminic acid....

  11. Fusidic acid in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöfer, Helmut; Simonsen, Lene

    1995-01-01

    Studies on the clinical efficacy of fusidic acid in skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), notably those due to Staphylococcus aureus, are reviewed. Oral fusidic acid (tablets dosed at 250 mg twice daily, or a suspension for paediatric use at 20 mg/kg/day given as two daily doses) has shown good...... excellent results in infected eczema by addressing both inflammation and infection. A new lipid-rich combination formulation provides an extra moisturizing effect. Development of resistance to fusidic acid has remained generally low or short-lived and can be minimized by restricting therapy to no more than...

  12. Homology modeling of ɣ-aminobutyrate- aminotransferase, a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-29

    Jun 29, 2011 ... of GABA-AT is not experimentally known, and we thus resorted to homology modelling to build a model based on x-ray crystal ... MUSCLE programs. The model was further checked for its correctness by predicting the .... is an important step for the prediction of protein's tertiary structure. Secondary structure ...

  13. octadecenoic acid in tomato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    octadecenoic acid which is proba- bly involved in plant defense responses is synthesized in tomato fruits and subjected to metabo- lism. Its catabolism or conversion was thus further characterized. The endogenous level of.

  14. Folic acid in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline. National Academies Press. Washington, DC, 1998. PMID: 23193625 ...

  15. Amino Acids and Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  16. Amino acid racemisation dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray-Wallace, C.V.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the time-dependent amino acid racemisation reaction as a method of age assessment was first reported by Hare and Abelson (1968). They noted that in specimens of the bivalve mollusc Mercenaria sp., greater concentrations of amino acids in the D-configuration with increasing fossil age. Hare and Abelson (1968) also reported negligible racemisation in a modern specimen of Mecanaria sp. On this basis they suggested that the extent of amino acid racemisation (epimerisation in the case of isoleucine) may be used to assess the age of materials within and beyond the range of radiocarbon dating. For the past thirty years amino acid racemisation has been extensively applied in Quaternary research as a method of relative and numeric dating, and a particularly large literature has emerged on the subject

  17. Hydrofluoric acid poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouth (intubation), and breathing machine (ventilator) Blood and urine tests Camera down the throat to see burns in the esophagus and the stomach (endoscopy) Fluids through a vein (IV) Magnesium and calcium solutions to neutralize the acid Medicines ...

  18. Acid Mine Drainage Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fripp, Jon

    2000-01-01

    .... Acid mine drainage (AMD) can have severe impacts to aquatic resources, can stunt terrestrial plant growth and harm wetlands, contaminate groundwater, raise water treatment costs, and damage concrete and metal structures...

  19. Methylmalonic Acid Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Iron-binding Capacity (TIBC, UIBC) Trichomonas Testing Triglycerides Troponin Tryptase Tumor Markers Uric Acid Urinalysis Urine ... very small amounts and is necessary for human metabolism and energy production. In one step of metabolism, ...

  20. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination.

  1. Fatty Acid Biosynthesis IX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carey, E. M.; Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max; Dils, R.

    1972-01-01

    # 1. I. [I-14C]Acetate was covalently bound to rabbit mammary gland fatty acid synthetase by enzymic transacylation from [I-14C]acetyl-CoA. Per mole of enzyme 2 moles of acetate were bound to thiol groups and up to I mole of acetate was bound to non-thiol groups. # 2. 2. The acetyl-fatty acid...... synthetase complex was isolated free from acetyl-CoA. It was rapidly hydrolysed at 30°C, but hydrolysis was greatly diminished at o°C and triacetic lactone synthesis occurred. In the presence of malonyl-CoA and NADPH, all the acetate bound to fatty acid synthetase was incorporated into long-chain fatty acids....... Hydrolysis of bound acetate and incorporation of bound acetate into fatty acids were inhibited to the same extent by guanidine hydrochloride. # 3. 3. Acetate was also covalently bound to fatty acid synthetase by chemical acetylation with [I-14C]acetic anhydride in the absence of CoASH. A total of 60 moles...

  2. [Acids in coffee. XI. The proportion of individual acids in the total titratable acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, U H; Maier, H G

    1985-07-01

    22 acids in ground roast coffees and instant coffees were determined by GLC of their silyl derivatives (after preseparation by gel electrophoresis) or isotachophoresis. The contribution to the total acidity (which was estimated by titration to pH 8 after cation exchange of the coffee solutions) was calculated for each individual acid. The mentioned acids contribute with 67% (roast coffee) and 72% (instant coffee) to the total acidity. In the first place citric acid (12.2% in roast coffee/10.7% in instant coffee), acetic acid (11.2%/8.8%) and the high molecular weight acids (8%/9%) contribute to the total acidity. Also to be mentioned are the shares of chlorogenic acids (9%/4.8%), formic acid (5.3%/4.6%), quinic acid (4.7%/5.9%), malic acid (3.9%/3%) and phosphoric acid (2.5%/5.2%). A notable difference in the contribution to total acidity between roast and instant coffee was found for phosphoric acid and pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid (0.7%/1.9%). It can be concluded that those two acids are formed or released from e.g. their esters in higher amounts than other acids during the production of instant coffee.

  3. Acidification and Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  4. Inhibitory effect of ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo; Wan, Wei; Wang, Jianlong [Laboratory of Environmental Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2008-12-15

    The inhibitory effect of added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production by mixed cultures was investigated in batch tests using glucose as substrate. The experimental results showed that, at 35 C and initial pH 7.0, during the fermentative hydrogen production, the substrate degradation efficiency, hydrogen production potential, hydrogen yield and hydrogen production rate all trended to decrease with increasing added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid concentration from 0 to 300 mmol/L. The inhibitory effect of added ethanol on fermentative hydrogen production was smaller than those of added acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid. The modified Han-Levenspiel model could describe the inhibitory effects of added ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid on fermentative hydrogen production rate in this study successfully. The modified Logistic model could describe the progress of cumulative hydrogen production. (author)

  5. Effects of germination and high hydrostatic pressure processing on mineral elements, amino acids and antioxidants in vitro bioaccessibility, as well as starch digestibility in brown rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qiang; Wang, Liping; Xu, Congcong; Mei, Jun; Li, Yunfei

    2017-01-01

    The effects of germination and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing on the in vitro bioaccessibility of mineral elements, amino acids (AAs), antioxidants and starch in brown rice (BR) were investigated. Germinated BR (GBR) was obtained by incubating at 37°C for 36h and then subjected to HHP treatments at 0.1, 100, 300 and 500MPa for 10min. The in vitro bioaccessibility of calcium and copper was increased by 12.59-52.17% and 2.87-23.06% after HHP, respectively, but bioaccessible iron was decreased. In addition, HHP significantly improved individual AAs, particularly indispensable AAs and gama-aminobutyric acid, as well as bioaccessible total antioxidant activities and starch resistance to enzymatic hydrolysis. However, germination greatly increased starch digestibility. Atomic force microscopy characterization suggested an obvious structural change in bran fraction at pressures above 300MPa. These results can help to understand the effects of germination and HHP technologies on nutrients bioaccessibility and develop appropriate processing conditions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Amino acids in the sedimentary humic and fulvic acids

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.

    Humic and fulvic acids isolated from a few sediment samples from Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal were analysed for total hydrolysable amino acids concentration and their composition. The amono acids content of fulvic acids was higher than in the humic...

  7. Synthesis and anticonvulsant activity of novel bicyclic acidic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conti, Paola; De Amici, Marco; Joppolo Di Ventimiglia, Samuele

    2003-01-01

    Bicyclic acidic amino acids (+/-)-6 and (+/-)-7, which are conformationally constrained homologues of glutamic acid, were prepared via a strategy based on a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The new amino acids were tested toward ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes; both of them...

  8. Differential gene expression in tomato fruit and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides during colonization of the RNAi-SlPH tomato line with reduced fruit acidity and higher pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barad, Shiri; Sela, Noa; Dubey, Amit K; Kumar, Dilip; Luria, Neta; Ment, Dana; Cohen, Shahar; Schaffer, Arthur A; Prusky, Dov

    2017-08-04

    The destructive phytopathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides causes anthracnose disease in fruit. During host colonization, it secretes ammonia, which modulates environmental pH and regulates gene expression, contributing to pathogenicity. However, the effect of host pH environment on pathogen colonization has never been evaluated. Development of an isogenic tomato line with reduced expression of the gene for acidity, SlPH (Solyc10g074790.1.1), enabled this analysis. Total RNA from C. gloeosporioides colonizing wild-type (WT) and RNAi-SlPH tomato lines was sequenced and gene-expression patterns were compared. C. gloeosporioides inoculation of the RNAi-SlPH line with pH 5.96 compared to the WT line with pH 4.2 showed 30% higher colonization and reduced ammonia accumulation. Large-scale comparative transcriptome analysis of the colonized RNAi-SlPH and WT lines revealed their different mechanisms of colonization-pattern activation: whereas the WT tomato upregulated 13-LOX (lipoxygenase), jasmonic acid and glutamate biosynthesis pathways, it downregulated processes related to chlorogenic acid biosynthesis II, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and hydroxycinnamic acid tyramine amide biosynthesis; the RNAi-SlPH line upregulated UDP-D-galacturonate biosynthesis I and free phenylpropanoid acid biosynthesis, but mainly downregulated pathways related to sugar metabolism, such as the glyoxylate cycle and L-arabinose degradation II. Comparison of C. gloeosporioides gene expression during colonization of the WT and RNAi-SlPH lines showed that the fungus upregulates ammonia and nitrogen transport and the gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolic process during colonization of the WT, while on the RNAi-SlPH tomato, it mainly upregulates the nitrate metabolic process. Modulation of tomato acidity and pH had significant phenotypic effects on C. gloeosporioides development. The fungus showed increased colonization on the neutral RNAi-SlPH fruit, and limited colonization on the WT acidic fruit

  9. Expression pattern of NMDA receptors reveals antiepileptic potential of apigenin 8-C-glucoside and chlorogenic acid in pilocarpine induced epileptic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseervatham, G Smilin Bell; Suryakala, U; Doulethunisha; Sundaram, S; Bose, P Chandra; Sivasudha, T

    2016-08-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of apigenin 8-C-glucoside (Vitexin) and chlorogenic acid on epileptic mice induced by pilocarpine and explored its possible mechanisms. Intraperitonial administration of pilocarpine (85mg/kg) induced seizure in mice was assessed by behavior observations, which is significantly (p>0.05) reduced by apigenin 8-C-glucoside (AP8CG) (10mg/kg) and chlorogenic acid (CA) (5mg/kg), similar to diazepam. Seizure was accompanied by an imbalance in the levels of Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate in the pilocarpine administered group. Moreover, convulsion along with reduced acetylcholinesterase, increased monoamine oxidase and oxidative stress was observed in epileptic mice brain. AP8CG and CA significantly restored back to normal levels even at lower doses. Further, increased lipid peroxidation and nitrite content was also significantly attenuated by AP8CG and CA. However, CA was found to be more effective when compared to AP8CG. In addition, the mRNA expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), mGluR1 and mGlu5 was significantly (P≤0.05) inhibited by AP8CG and CA in a lower dose. The mRNA expression of GRIK1 did not differ significantly in any of the group and showed a similar pattern of expression. Our result shows that AP8CG and CA selectively inhibit NMDAR, mGluR1 and mGlu5 expression. Modification in the provoked NMDAR calcium response coupled with neuronal death. Hence, these findings underline that the polyphenolics, AP8CG and CA have exerted antiepileptic and neuroprotective activity by suppressing glutamate receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevention of iron- and copper-mediated DNA damage by catecholamine and amino acid neurotransmitters, L-DOPA, and curcumin: metal binding as a general antioxidant mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Carla R; Angelé-Martínez, Carlos; Wilkes, Jenna A; Wang, Hsiao C; Battin, Erin E; Brumaghim, Julia L

    2012-06-07

    Concentrations of labile iron and copper are elevated in patients with neurological disorders, causing interest in metal-neurotransmitter interactions. Catecholamine (dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine) and amino acid (glycine, glutamate, and 4-aminobutyrate) neurotransmitters are antioxidants also known to bind metal ions. To investigate the role of metal binding as an antioxidant mechanism for these neurotransmitters, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), and curcumin, their abilities to prevent iron- and copper-mediated DNA damage were quantified, cyclic voltammetry was used to determine the relationship between their redox potentials and DNA damage prevention, and UV-vis studies were conducted to determine iron and copper binding as well as iron oxidation rates. In contrast to amino acid neurotransmitters, catecholamine neurotransmitters, L-DOPA, and curcumin prevent significant iron-mediated DNA damage (IC(50) values of 3.2 to 18 μM) and are electrochemically active. However, glycine and glutamate are more effective at preventing copper-mediated DNA damage (IC(50) values of 35 and 12.9 μM, respectively) than L-DOPA, the only catecholamine to prevent this damage (IC(50) = 73 μM). This metal-mediated DNA damage prevention is directly related to the metal-binding behaviour of these compounds. When bound to iron or copper, the catecholamines, amino acids, and curcumin significantly shift iron oxidation potentials and stabilize Fe(3+) over Fe(2+) and Cu(2+) over Cu(+), a factor that may prevent metal redox cycling in vivo. These results highlight the disparate antioxidant activities of neurotransmitters, drugs, and supplements and highlight the importance of considering metal binding when identifying antioxidants to treat and prevent neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Antiepileptic activity of total triterpenes isolated from Poria cocos is mediated by suppression of aspartic and glutamic acids in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanqiong; Yan, Hua; Jin, Ruirui; Lei, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Triterpenes from Poria cocos Wolf (Polyporaceae) have been used to treat various diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. However, the antiepileptic effects and mechanism are not fully understood. The objective of this study is to investigate the antiepileptic properties of total triterpenes (TTP) from the whole P. cocos. The ethanol extract TTP was identified by HPLC fingerprint analysis. Male ICR mice were gavaged (i.g.) with TTP (5, 20, 80 or 160 mg/kg) or reference drugs twice a day for 7 d. Antiepileptic activities of TTP were evaluated by maximal electroshock (MES)- and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in mice for 30 and 60 min, respectively. Locomotor activity and Rota-rod tests were performed for 60 min and 5 min, respectively. The levels of glutamic acid (Glu), aspartic acid (Asp), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine (Gly) in convulsive mice were estimated. The chronic epileptic model of Wistar rats was built to measure expressions of glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and GABA A in rat brain after TTP treatment. The LC 50 of TTP (i.g.) was above 6 g/kg. TTP (5-160 mg/kg) protected mice against MES- and PTZ-induced convulsions at 65.0% and 62.5%, respectively, but have no effect on rota-rod treadmill; TTP (20-160 mg/kg) significantly reduced the locomotor activities, shortened the onset of pentobarbital sodium-induced sleep; TTP decreased Glu and Asp levels in convulsive mice, but increased the GAD65 and GABA A expressions in chronic epileptic rats at doses usage. TTP extracted from P. cocos possessed potential antiepileptic properties and is a candidate for further antiepileptic drug development.

  12. [A case of immune-mediated encephalopathy showing refractory epilepsy and extensive brain MRI lesions associated with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayakawa, Yuko; Tateishi, Takahisa; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Doi, Hikaru; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2010-02-01

    We reported a patient with immune-mediated encephalopathy showing refractory epilepsy and multiple brain lesions on MRI. The patient had high titers of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody in sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A 36-year-old previously healthy woman was admitted to our hospital with onset of sudden generalized seizure that then persisted for one month. She had repeated epileptic attacks accompanied with loss of consciousness, and was refractory to valproic acid, zonisamide (200 mg/day) and phenobarbital (200 mg/day). Brain MRI showed multiple hyperintense lesions in predominantly bilateral frontal lobes, parietal lobes, occipital lobes and cingulate cortices. EEG showed epileptic activities (frequent sharp waves) in bilateral frontal regions. After admission, attacks disappeared through the administration of clonazepam (1.5 mg/day), though the patient remained slightly disoriented. As titers of anti-GAD antibody in sera and CSF were extremely high, we implemented plasma exchanges. After treatment, titers of anti-GAD antibody in sera and CSF decreased. The patient completely recovered to an alert state and the abnormal MRI lesions almost disappeared. Since GAD catalyzes production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), it is proposed that anti-GAD antibodies reduce synthesis of GABA or interferes with exocytosis of GABA in the nervous system. Anti-GAD antibodies are detected in some rare neurological disorders such as stiff-person syndrome. Recently, anti-GAD antibodies have been reported as implicated in cerebellar ataxia, palatal myoclonus, refractory epilepsy and limbic encephalitis. Epilepsy associated with the anti-GAD antibody is mostly pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy; with brain MRI showing no abnormality or only hippocampal sclerosis. It is very rare that brain MRI shows extensive abnormal lesions except in the hippocampus. This case suggests that anti-GAD antibodies could contribute to unexplained encephalopathy with

  13. Amino-acid contamination of aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolman, Y.; Miller, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    Considerable amino-acid contamination in commercially available analytical grade hydrochloric acid (37% HCl) was found. One bottle contained 8,300 nmol of amino-acids per liter. A bottle from another supplier contained 6,700 nmol per liter. The contaminants were mostly protein amino-acids and several unknowns. Data on the volatility of the amino-acids during HCl distillation were also obtained.

  14. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Ramsdell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.

  15. Biodegradation of Cyanuric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldick, Jerome

    1974-01-01

    Cyanuric acid biodegrades readily under a wide variety of natural conditions, and particularly well in systems of either low or zero dissolved-oxygen level, such as anaerobic activated sludge and sewage, soils, muds, and muddy streams and river waters, as well as ordinary aerated activated sludge systems with typically low (1 to 3 ppm) dissolved-oxygen levels. Degradation also proceeds in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Consequently, there are degradation pathways widely available for breaking down cyanuric acid discharged in domestic effluents. The overall degradation reaction is merely a hydrolysis; CO2 and ammonia are the initial hydrolytic breakdown products. Since no net oxidation occurs during this breakdown, biodegradation of cyanuric acid exerts no primary biological oxygen demand. However, eventual nitrification of the ammonia released will exert its usual biological oxygen demand. PMID:4451360

  16. Acid rain in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  17. Whither Acid Rain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Brimblecombe

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acid rain, the environmental cause célèbre of the 1980s seems to have vanished from popular conscience. By contrast, scientific research, despite funding difficulties, has continued to produce hundreds of research papers each year. Studies of acid rain taught much about precipitation chemistry, the behaviour of snow packs, long-range transport of pollutants and new issues in the biology of fish and forested ecosystems. There is now evidence of a shift away from research in precipitation and sulfur chemistry, but an impressive theoretical base remains as a legacy.

  18. 2-(Benzylcarbamoylnicotinic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Cao Mao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C14H12N2O3, the pyridine ring is twisted with respect to the phenyl ring and the carboxylic acid group at angles of 37.1 (5 and 8.1 (3°, respectively; the phenyl ring forms a dihedral angle of 41.4 (1° with the mean plane of the C—NH—C=O fragment. An intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond occurs between the carboxylic acid and carbonyl groups. In the crystal, N—H...O hydrogen bonds link molecules into a supramolecular chain running along the a-axis direction.

  19. Boric acid concentration monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kysela, J.; Mickal, V.; Racek, J.

    1978-01-01

    Boric acid concentration was measured by thermal neutron absorption in the study of the boric acid sorption and desorption curves on an anion exchange resin. Ra-Be 18.5 GBq and Am-Be 111 GBq sources and water as a moderator were used. The SNM 12 cylindrical corona detector with 10 B placed in the middle of the measuring cell was used for neutron flux measurement. The HP 9600 E computer system was used for measured data collection and evaluation. (Ha)

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids: new insights into the pharmacology and biology of docosahexaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, and eicosapentaenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Michael H

    2013-12-01

    Fish oil contains a complex mixture of omega-3 fatty acids, which are predominantly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Each of these omega-3 fatty acids has distinct biological effects that may have variable clinical effects. In addition, plasma levels of omega-3 fatty acids are affected not only by dietary intake, but also by the polymorphisms of coding genes fatty acid desaturase 1-3 for the desaturase enzymes that convert short-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The clinical significance of this new understanding regarding the complexity of omega-3 fatty acid biology is the purpose of this review. FADS polymorphisms that result in either lower levels of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids or higher levels of long-chain omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, are associated with dyslipidemia and other cardiovascular risk factors. EPA and DHA have differences in their effects on lipoprotein metabolism, in which EPA, with a more potent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha effect, decreases hepatic lipogenesis, whereas DHA not only enhances VLDL lipolysis, resulting in greater conversion to LDL, but also increases HDL cholesterol and larger, more buoyant LDL particles. Overall, these results emphasize that blood concentrations of individual long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, which reflect both dietary intake and metabolic influences, may have independent, but also complementary- biological effects and reinforce the need to potentially provide a complex mixture of omega-3 fatty acids to maximize cardiovascular risk reduction.

  1. Catalytic acetoxylation of lactic acid to 2-acetoxypropionic acid, en route to acrylic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerthuis, R.; Granollers, M.; Brown, D.R.; Salavagione, H.J.; Rothenberg, G.; Shiju, N.R.

    2015-01-01

    We present an alternative synthetic route to acrylic acid, starting from the platform chemical lactic acid and using heterogeneous catalysis. To improve selectivity, we designed an indirect dehydration reaction that proceeds via acetoxylation of lactic acid to 2-acetoxypropionic acid. This

  2. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  3. Usnic acid controls the acidity tolerance of lichens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauck, Markus; Juergens, Sascha-Rene

    2008-01-01

    The hypotheses were tested that, firstly, lichens producing the dibenzofuran usnic acid colonize substrates characterized by specific pH ranges, secondly, this preferred pH is in a range where soluble usnic acid and its corresponding anion occur in similar concentrations, and thirdly, usnic acid makes lichens vulnerable to acidity. Lichens with usnic acid prefer an ambient pH range between 3.5 and 5.5 with an optimum between 4.0 and 4.5. This optimum is close to the pK a1 value of usnic acid of 4.4. Below this optimum pH, dissolved SO 2 reduces the chlorophyll fluorescence yield more in lichens with than without their natural content of usnic acid. This suggests that usnic acid influences the acidity tolerance of lichens. The putative mechanism of the limited acidity tolerance of usnic acid-containing lichens is the acidification of the cytosol by molecules of protonated usnic acid shuttling protons through the plasma membrane at an apoplastic pH a1 . - Combined field and experimental data suggest that usnic acid makes lichens sensitive to acidity at pH <3.5

  4. Oxalic acid excretion after intravenous ascorbic acid administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Line; Mamer, Orval A.; Miller, Wilson H.; Levine, Mark; Assouline, Sarit; Melnychuk, David; Rousseau, Caroline; Hoffer, L. John

    2012-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is frequently administered intravenously by alternative health practitioners and, occasionally, by mainstream physicians. Intravenous administration can greatly increase the amount of ascorbic acid that reaches the circulation, potentially increasing the risk of oxalate crystallization in the urinary space. To investigate this possibility, we developed gas chromatography mass spectrometry methodology and sampling and storage procedures for oxalic acid analysis without interference from ascorbic acid and measured urinary oxalic acid excretion in people administered intravenous ascorbic acid in doses ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 g/kg body weight. In vitro oxidation of ascorbic acid to oxalic acid did not occur when urine samples were brought immediately to pH less than 2 and stored at –30°C within 6 hours. Even very high ascorbic acid concentrations did not interfere with the analysis when oxalic acid extraction was carried out at pH 1. As measured during and over the 6 hours after ascorbic acid infusions, urinary oxalic acid excretion increased with increasing doses, reaching approximately 80 mg at a dose of approximately 100 g. We conclude that, when studied using correct procedures for sample handling, storage, and analysis, less than 0.5% of a very large intravenous dose of ascorbic acid is recovered as urinary oxalic acid in people with normal renal function. PMID:19154961

  5. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, Mian Umer; Mahmud, Hisham Khaled Ben; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-01-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H 3 PO 4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid. (paper)

  6. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  7. Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Luc

    2003-06-24

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

  8. Acid Ceramidase in Melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Realini, Natalia; Palese, Francesca; Pizzirani, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Acid ceramidase (AC) is a lysosomal cysteine amidase that controls sphingolipid signaling by lowering the levels of ceramides and concomitantly increasing those of sphingosine and its bioactive metabolite, sphingosine 1-phosphate. In the present study, we evaluated the role of AC-regulated sphing...

  9. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  10. Salicylic Acid Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the package label for more information.Apply a small amount of the salicylic acid product to one or two small areas you want to treat for 3 days ... know that children and teenagers who have chicken pox or the flu should not use topical salicylic ...

  11. Multifunctional Cinnamic Acid Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Peperidou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Our research to discover potential new multitarget agents led to the synthesis of 10 novel derivatives of cinnamic acids and propranolol, atenolol, 1-adamantanol, naphth-1-ol, and (benzylamino ethan-1-ol. The synthesized molecules were evaluated as trypsin, lipoxygenase and lipid peroxidation inhibitors and for their cytotoxicity. Compound 2b derived from phenoxyphenyl cinnamic acid and propranolol showed the highest lipoxygenase (LOX inhibition (IC50 = 6 μΜ and antiproteolytic activity (IC50 = 0.425 μΜ. The conjugate 1a of simple cinnamic acid with propranolol showed the higher antiproteolytic activity (IC50 = 0.315 μΜ and good LOX inhibitory activity (IC50 = 66 μΜ. Compounds 3a and 3b, derived from methoxylated caffeic acid present a promising combination of in vitro inhibitory and antioxidative activities. The S isomer of 2b also presented an interesting multitarget biological profile in vitro. Molecular docking studies point to the fact that the theoretical results for LOX-inhibitor binding are identical to those from preliminary in vitro study.

  12. Koetjapic acid chloroform hemisolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. D. Nassar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C30H46O4·0.5CHCl3, consists of one koetjapic acid [systematic name: (3R,4aR,4bS,7S,8S,10bS,12aS-7-(2-carboxyethyl-3,4b,7,10b,12a-pentamethyl-8-(prop-1-en-2-yl-1,2,3,4,4a,4b,5,6,7,8,9,10,10b,11,12,12a-hexadecahydrochrysene-3-carboxylic acid] molecule and one half-molecule of chloroform solvent, which is disordered about a twofold rotation axis. The symmetry-independent component is further disordered over two sites, with occupancies of 0.30 and 0.20. The koetjapic acid contains a fused four-ring system, A/B/C/D. The A/B, B/C and C/D junctions adopt E/trans/cis configurations, respectively. The conformation of ring A is intermediate between envelope and half-chair and ring B adopts an envelope conformation whereas rings C and D adopt chair conformations. A weak intramolecular C—H...O hydrogen bond is observed. The koetjapic acid molecules are linked into dimers by two pairs of intermolecular O—H...O hydrogen bonds. The dimers are stacked along the c axis.

  13. Acid dip for dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.C.; McWhan, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Background signal in a PTFE based dosemeter caused by impurities in the PTFE and in the active component such as lithium fluoride is substantially reduced by treating the dosemeter with acid. The optimum treatment involves use of hydrofluoric acid at room temperature for approximately one minute, followed by thorough washing with methanol, and finally drying. This treatment is best applied after the original manufacture of the dosemeters. It may also be applied to existing dosemeters after they have been in use for some time. The treatment produces a permanent effect in reducing both the light induced signal and the non-light induced signal. The process may be applied to all types of dosemeter manufactured from PTFE or other plastics or resins which are able to resist brief exposure to acid. The treatment works particularly well with dosemeters based on PTFE and lithium fluoride. It is also applicable to dosemeters based on calcium sulphate, lithium borate and magnesium borate. Acids which may be used include hydrofluoric, hydrochloric, nitric, phosphoric and sulphuric. (author)

  14. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis Skovsgaard; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  15. Halogenated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Sundin, Peter; Wesén, Clas

    1997-01-01

    Halogenated fatty acids are the major contributors to organohalogen compounds in lipids of marine mammals, fish, and bivalves. For the initial characterization of these recently noticed compounds, a determination of the halogen concentration has usually been combined with some lipid isolation and...

  16. and amino acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    (L-Trp), were obtained from Sigma Chemical Company (USA). All the metal ions Cu(II),. Ni(II) and .... respective free amino acids show characteristic band positions, shifts and intensities, which can be correlated to ..... Financial support from the University Grants Commission, New Delhi to Prof P Rabindra. Reddy is gratefully ...

  17. [Acid hydrolysis of mandioca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, A J; Schneiderman, B; Baruffaldi, R; Nacco, R

    1975-01-01

    The influence of time of hydrolysis, pression of the process, ratio of mass of flour and volume and concentration of the acid solution was studied in the hydrolytic processes for Cassava flour. The aim was to obtain fermentable sugars, and the results were submitted to variance analysis.

  18. Hurnic acid protein complexation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, W. F.; Koopal, L. K.; Weng, L. P.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Norde, W.

    2008-01-01

    Interactions of purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) with lysozyme (LSZ) are investigated. In solution LSZ is moderately positively and PAHA negatively charged at the investigated pH values. The proton binding of PAHA and of LSZ is determined by potentiometric proton titrations at various KCl

  19. Nanoclusters of Cyanuric Acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen bonding; molecular clusters; cyanuric acid; self-assembly; symmetry. ... Chemical Laboratory, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Adyar, Chennai 600 020, India; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA; Indian Institute of Science Education and ...

  20. Prenatal exposure to valproic acid alters the development of excitability in the postnatal rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueta, Yukiko; Sekino, Yuko; Yoshida, Sachiko; Kanda, Yasunari; Ueno, Susumu

    2018-03-01

    Prenatal valproic acid (VPA) exposure is a well-known animal model of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that produces alterations in embryonic and adult neurogenesis as well as adolescent/adulthood neurobehavioral phenotypes. However, the effects of prenatal VPA exposure on neural network excitability, especially during the synaptogenic period around eye opening, are not fully understood. In this study, we orally administered VPA (300 mg/kg) to pregnant Wistar rats on gestation day 15 and subsequently performed field potential recording in the CA1 area of hippocampal slices obtained from control (saline-exposed) and VPA-exposed rat pups between postnatal day (PND) 13 and PND18. In control slices, we observed an abrupt enhancement of stimulation-dependent responses including population spike (PS) amplitudes and field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) slopes at PND16, which coincided with the average day of eye opening. In contrast, VPA-exposed pups exhibited delayed eye opening (PND17) and gradual rather than abrupt increases in PS amplitudes and fEPSP slopes over the duration of the synaptogenic period. We next investigated the involvement of ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) in PS generation using bicuculline methiodide (BMI), a GABA type A (GABA A ) receptor antagonist. In control slices, BMI enhanced PS amplitudes during PND14-15 (before eye opening) and had little effect thereafter during PND16-17; a subsequent regression model analysis of BMI ratios (the ratio of PS amplitudes in the presence and absence of BMI) indicated a possible developmental change between these periods. In contrast, almost identical regression models were obtained for BMI ratios during PND14-15 and PND16-17 in the VPA-exposed group, indicating the absence of a developmental change. Our results suggest that prenatal VPA exposure accelerates the development of hippocampal excitability before eye opening. Moreover, our experimental model can be used as a novel approach for the

  1. Effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid on erythropoiesis: A preclinical in vitro characterization for the treatment of congenital sideroblastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Okamoto, Koji; Niikuni, Ryoyu; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Ichinohasama, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    expressed in erythroid cells. Thus, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was added to K562 cells to competitively inhibit SLC36A1-mediated transport. GABA treatment significantly impeded the ALA-mediated increase in the number of hemoglobinized cells as well as the induction of HBG, HBA, and HMOX1. Finally, small-interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of ALAS2 in HiDEP cells considerably decreased the expression of HBA, HBG, and HMOX1, and these expression levels were rescued with ALA treatment. In summary, ALA appears to be transported into erythroid cells mainly by SLC36A1 and is utilized to generate heme. ALA may represent a novel therapeutic option for CSA treatment, particularly for cases harboring ALAS2 mutations

  2. The Glutaminase-Dependent System Confers Extreme Acid Resistance to New Species and Atypical Strains of Brucella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Freddi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutralophilic bacteria have developed specific mechanisms to cope with the acid stress encountered in environments such as soil, fermented foods, and host compartments. In Escherichia coli, the glutamate decarboxylase (Gad-dependent system is extremely efficient: it requires the concerted action of glutamate decarboxylase (GadA/GadB and of the glutamate (Glu/γ-aminobutyrate antiporter, GadC. Notably, this system is operative also in new strains/species of Brucella, among which Brucella microti, but not in the “classical” species, with the exception of marine mammals strains. Recently, the glutaminase-dependent system (named AR2_Q, relying on the deamination of glutamine (Gln into Glu and on GadC activity, was described in E. coli. In Brucella genomes, a putative glutaminase (glsA-coding gene is located downstream of the gadBC genes. We found that in B. microti these genes are expressed as a polycistronic transcript. Moreover, using a panel of Brucella genus-representative strains, we show that the AR2_Q system protects from extreme acid stress (pH ≤2.5, in the sole presence of Gln, only the Brucella species/strains predicted to have functional glsA and gadC. Indeed, mutagenesis approaches confirmed the involvement of glsA and gadC of B. microti in AR2_Q and that the acid-sensitive phenotype of B. abortus can be ascribed to a Ser248Leu substitution in GlsA, leading to loss of glutaminase activity. Furthermore, we found that the gene BMI_II339, of unknown function and downstream of the gadBC–glsA operon, positively affects Gad- and GlsA-dependent AR. Thus, we identified novel determinants that allow newly discovered and marine mammals Brucella strains to be better adapted to face hostile acidic environments. As for significance, this work may contribute to the understanding of the host preferences of Brucella species and opens the way to alternative diagnostic targets in epidemiological surveillance of brucellosis.

  3. Effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid on erythropoiesis: A preclinical in vitro characterization for the treatment of congenital sideroblastic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Tohru [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Department of Molecular Hematology/Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Okamoto, Koji; Niikuni, Ryoyu [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Takahashi, Kiwamu [SBI Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Ishizawa, Kenichi [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Clinical Research, Innovation and Education Center, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai (Japan); Ichinohasama, Ryo [Department of Hematopathology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Nakamura, Yukio [Cell Engineering Division, RIKEN BioResource Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru [SBI Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Harigae, Hideo, E-mail: harigae@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Department of Molecular Hematology/Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan)

    2014-11-07

    expressed in erythroid cells. Thus, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was added to K562 cells to competitively inhibit SLC36A1-mediated transport. GABA treatment significantly impeded the ALA-mediated increase in the number of hemoglobinized cells as well as the induction of HBG, HBA, and HMOX1. Finally, small-interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of ALAS2 in HiDEP cells considerably decreased the expression of HBA, HBG, and HMOX1, and these expression levels were rescued with ALA treatment. In summary, ALA appears to be transported into erythroid cells mainly by SLC36A1 and is utilized to generate heme. ALA may represent a novel therapeutic option for CSA treatment, particularly for cases harboring ALAS2 mutations.

  4. Thermal properties of some small peptides (N-acetyl-amino acid-N′-methylamides) with non-polar side groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badea, Elena; Della Gatta, Giuseppe; Pałecz, Bartłomiej

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • T fus and Δ fus H m of methylamides of N-acetyl substituted non-polar amino acids were measured. • T fus and Δ fus H m increased as a function of the molar mass of the alkyl side chains. • DL racemates showed T fus of about 40 °C lower than those of the corresponding pure L enantiomers. • Ideal solubility of solids at T = 298.15 K was estimated based on their T fus and Δ fus S m . - Abstract: Temperatures and molar enthalpies of fusion of a series of uncharged small peptides, namely the methylamides of N-acetyl substituted glycine, α-amino-butyric acid, alanine, valine, norvaline, leucine, isoleucine, norleucine, and proline, were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (d.s.c.), and molar entropies of fusion were derived. Both L- and DL-compunds were taken into account for the chiral molecules. No solid-to-solid transitions were detected from room temperature to fusion except for N-acetyl-N′-methyl alaninamide. Comparisons were made with the values for the N-acetyl amides of the corresponding amino acids previously reported. Both L enantiomers and DL racemates of α-aminobutyric acid, alanine, valine and isoleucine methylamides displayed temperatures of fusion sharply increasing as a function of molar mass, whereas much lower values, in countertendency with their molar mass increase, were found for proline and leucine methylamides. The racemic DL crystals showed temperatures of fusion of about 40 °C lower than those of the corresponding pure L enantiomers, except for proline and leucine derivatives. The enthalpies and entropies of fusion also varied as a function of molar mass following a similar trend with that of temperatures of fusion, except for alanine derivatives which showed lower values than expected. The values of ideal solubility of solids at T = 298.15 K were estimated based on their temperatures and molar entropies of fusion. Results were discussed with reference to the packing patterns based on hydrogen bonding and

  5. Kainic acid and 1'-hydroxykainic acid from Palmariales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, U P; Bird, C J; Shacklock, P F; Laycock, M V; Wright, J L

    1994-01-01

    The distribution of kainic acid among various red algae was investigated. Analysis of free amino acids from different populations of Palmaria palmata showed that some were unable to accumulate kainic acid to detectable concentrations, whereas in two dwarf mutants it was a major component of the free amino acid composition. The amino acid profiles were also examined for unknown amino acids in the search for possible intermediates in kainic acid biosynthesis. The only unknown amino acid present in P. palmata extracts was isolated and identified by NMR spectroscopy as 1'-hydroxykainic acid. This compound was found in all samples that contained kainic acid. To investigate the effect of growth conditions on kainic acid production different strains of P. palmata were grown at 5, 10, and 15 degrees C with or without added nitrate. No effect on production was observed, suggesting that the growth conditions in these experiments do not affect the level of gene expression in the pathway of kainic acid biosynthesis. Furthermore, changing the growth conditions did not induce synthesis of kainic acid in the non-producing strains of Palmariales.

  6. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  7. Progress in engineering acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-02-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used for the production of a variety of fermented foods, and are considered as probiotic due to their health-promoting effect. However, LAB encounter various environmental stresses both in industrial fermentation and application, among which acid stress is one of the most important survival challenges. Improving the acid stress resistance may contribute to the application and function of probiotic action to the host. Recently, the advent of genomics, functional genomics and high-throughput technologies have allowed for the understanding of acid tolerance mechanisms at a systems level, and many method to improve acid tolerance have been developed. This review describes the current progress in engineering acid stress resistance of LAB. Special emphasis is placed on engineering cellular microenvironment (engineering amino acid metabolism, introduction of exogenous biosynthetic capacity, and overproduction of stress response proteins) and maintaining cell membrane functionality. Moreover, strategies to improve acid tolerance and the related physiological mechanisms are also discussed.

  8. Adipic acid tolerance screening for potential adipic acid production hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Emma; Mapelli, Valeria; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2017-02-01

    Biobased processes for the production of adipic acid are of great interest to replace the current environmentally detrimental petrochemical production route. No efficient natural producer of adipic acid has yet been identified, but several approaches for pathway engineering have been established. Research has demonstrated that the microbial production of adipic acid is possible, but the yields and titres achieved so far are inadequate for commercialisation. A plausible explanation may be intolerance to adipic acid. Therefore, in this study, selected microorganisms, including yeasts, filamentous fungi and bacteria, typically used in microbial cell factories were considered to evaluate their tolerance to adipic acid. Screening of yeasts and bacteria for tolerance to adipic acid was performed in microtitre plates, and in agar plates for A. niger in the presence of adipic acid over a broad range of concentration (0-684 mM). As the different dissociation state(s) of adipic acid may influence cells differently, cultivations were performed with at least two pH values. Yeasts and A. niger were found to tolerate substantially higher concentrations of adipic acid than bacteria, and were less affected by the undissociated form of adipic acid than bacteria. The yeast exhibiting the highest tolerance to adipic acid was Candida viswanathii, showing a reduction in maximum specific growth rate of no more than 10-15% at the highest concentration of adipic acid tested and the tolerance was not dependent on the dissociation state of the adipic acid. Tolerance to adipic acid was found to be substantially higher among yeasts and A. niger than bacteria. The explanation of the differences in adipic acid tolerance between the microorganisms investigated are likely related to fundamental differences in their physiology and metabolism. Among the yeasts investigated, C. viswanathii showed the highest tolerance and could be a potential host for a future microbial cell factory for adipic acid.

  9. Boswellic acid inhibits expression of acid sphingomyelinase in intestinal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Rui-Dong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boswellic acid is a type of triterpenoids with antiinflammatory and antiproliferative properties. Sphingomyelin metabolism generates multiple lipid signals affecting cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Upregulation of acid sphingomyelinase (SMase has been found in several inflammation-related diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Methods The present study is to examine the effect of 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acids (AKBA, a potent boswellic acid, on acid SMase activity and expression in intestinal cells. Both transformed Caco-2 cells and non-transformed Int407 cells were incubated with AKBA. After incubation, the change of acid SMase activity was assayed biochemically, the enzyme protein was examined by Western blot, and acid SMase mRNA was quantified by qPCR. Results We found that AKBA decreased acid SMase activity in both intestinal cell lines in dose and time dependent manners without affecting the secretion of the enzyme to the cell culture medium. The effect of AKBA was more effective in the fetal bovine serum-free culture medium. Among different types of boswellic acid, AKBA was the most potent one. The inhibitory effect on acid SMase activity occurred only in the intact cells but not in cell-free extract in the test tubes. At low concentration, AKBA only decreased the acid SMase activity but not the quantity of the enzyme protein. However, at high concentration, AKBA decreased both the mass of acid SMase protein and the mRNA levels of acid SMase in the cells, as demonstrated by Western blot and qPCR, respectively. Under the concentrations decreasing acid SMase activity, AKBA significantly inhibited cell proliferation. Conclusion We identified a novel inhibitory effect of boswellic acids on acid SMase expression, which may have implications in human diseases and health.

  10. Selective hydrodeoxygenation of tartaric acid to succinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Jiayi [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation; Vasiliadou, Efterpi S. [Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Goulas, Konstantinos A. [Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Saha, Basudeb [Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Vlachos, Dionisios G. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; University of Delaware; Newark; USA; Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation

    2017-01-01

    A novel one-step process for the selective production of succinic acid from tartaric acid is developed. High succinic yield is achieved in an efficient catalytic system comprised of MoOx/BC, HBr and acetic acid under hydrogen atmosphere.

  11. Formic acid assisted hydrogenation of levulinic acid to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muppala Ashokraju

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... formic acid) as it is obtained through the hydrolysis of biomass that contains water. In this context, we have per- formed the hydrogenation of levulinic acid with formic acid in presence of water (LA: FA: H2O 1:5:1) and the results are displayed in Figure 7b. The results indicate better performance of the cat-.

  12. Acetic acid extraction from aqueous solutions using fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJmker, H.M.; Gramblicka, M.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van der Ham, Aloysius G.J.; Schuur, Boelo

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge for production of acetic acid via bio-based routes is cost-effective concentration and purification of the acetic acid from the aqueous solutions, for which liquid–liquid extraction is a possible method. A main challenge in extraction of acetic acid from dilute aqueous solutions is

  13. Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid and betulinic acid acetate isolated from Melaleuca cajuput on human myeloid leukemia (HL-60) cell line. ... The cytotoxic effect of betulinic acid (BA), isolated from Melaleuca cajuput a Malaysian plant and its four synthetic derivatives were tested for their cytotoxicity in various cell line or ...

  14. (Radioiodinated free fatty acids)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.

    1987-12-11

    The traveler participated in the Second International Workshop on Radioiodinated Free Fatty Acids in Amsterdam, The Netherlands where he presented an invited paper describing the pioneering work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving the design, development and testing of new radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids for evaluation of heart disease. He also chaired a technical session on the testing of new agents in various in vitro and in vivo systems. He also visited the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Nuclear Medicine in Bonn, West Germany, to review, discuss, plan and coordinate collaborative investigations with that institution. In addition, he visited the Cyclotron Research Center in Liege, Belgium, to discuss continuing collaborative studies with the Osmium-191/Iridium-191m radionuclide generator system, and to complete manuscripts and plan future studies.

  15. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  16. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  17. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  18. Electrochemistry of nucleic acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paleček, Emil; Bartošík, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 6 (2012), s. 3427-3481 ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055; GA MŠk(CZ) ME09038; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : nucleic acids electrochemistry * DNA biosensors * DNA damage Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 41.298, year: 2012

  19. Whence the acid raindrop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaton, T.H.E.

    1987-01-01

    Absorption of NO 2 can cause damage in animals and plants and, if present trends for NO x emissions continue, their by-product nitric acid may soon overtake sulphuric acid as the main acidifying agent of 'acid' rain. In response to this problem the feasibility of reducing NO x emissions from power stations is being studied. Although there can be no doubt that these expensive controls are desirable, their benefits are difficult to predict for two reasons: NO x is not only emitted by fuel combustion and the degree to which an industrialised country benefits from the implementation of NO x emission controls depends on how much its pollutant 'fall out' is immediately returned from the atmosphere, and how much is exported to neighbouring countries. The above factors involve questions regarding the source and reaction mechanisms for nitrogen compounds in the atmosphere. Because stable isotope ratio analysis has proved to be of value in providing answers to such questions in other environments, an investigation of the 15 N/ 14 N ratios of atmospheric gases (NO x , NH 3 ) and their solution products in rain (NO 3 , NH + 4 ) seemed to be justified

  20. Investigation of free amino acid, total phenolics, antioxidant activity and purine alkaloids to assess the health properties of non-Camellia tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Bi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To find novel functional beverages from folk teas, 33 species of frequently used non-Camellia tea (plants other than Camellia were collected and compared with Camellia tea (green tea, pu-erh tea and black tea for the first time. Data are reported here on the quantities of 20 free amino acids (FAAs and three purine alkaloids (measured by UHPLC, total polyphenols (measured by Folin-Ciocalteu assay, and antioxidant activity (DPPH. The total amounts of FAAs in non-Camellia tea (0.62–18.99 mg/g are generally less than that of Camellia tea (16.55–24.99 mg/g. However, for certain FAAs, the quantities were much higher in some non-Camellia teas, such as γ-aminobutyric acid in teas from Ampelopsis grossedentata, Isodon serra and Hibiscus sabdariffa. Interestingly, theanine was detected in tea from Potentilla fruticosa (1.16±0.81 mg/g. Furthermore, the content of polyphenols in teas from A. grossedentata, Acer tataricum subsp. ginnala are significantly higher than those from Camellia tea; teas from I. serra, Pistacia chinensis and A. tataricum subsp. ginnala have remarkable antioxidant activities similar to the activities from green tea (44.23 μg/mL. Purine alkaloids (caffeine, theobromine and theophylline were not detected in non-Camellia teas. The investigation suggest some non-Camellia teas may be great functional natural products with potential for prevention of chronic diseases and aging, by providing with abundant polyphenols, antioxidants and specific FAAs.

  1. Rosmarinic Acid Potentiates Pentobarbital-Induced Sleep Behaviors and Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) Sleep through the Activation of GABAA-ergic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yeong Ok; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2017-03-01

    It has been known that RA, one of major constituents of Perilla frutescens which has been used as a traditional folk remedy for sedation in oriental countries, shows the anxiolytic-like and sedative effects. This study was performed to know whether RA may enhance pentobarbital-induced sleep through γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A -ergic systems in rodents. RA (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/ kg, p.o.) reduced the locomotor activity in mice. RA decreased sleep latency and increased the total sleep time in pentobarbital (42 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced sleeping mice. RA also increased sleeping time and number of falling sleep mice after treatment with sub-hypnotic pentobarbital (28 mg/kg, i.p.). In electroencephalogram (EEG) recording, RA (2.0 mg/kg) not only decreased the counts of sleep/wake cycles and REM sleep, but also increased the total and NREM sleep in rats. The power density of NREM sleep showed the increase in δ-waves and the decrease in α-waves. On the other hand, RA (0.1, 1.0 and 10 μg/ml) increased intracellular Cl - influx in the primary cultured hypothalamic cells of rats. RA (p.o.) increased the protein expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase ( GAD 65/67 ) and GABA A receptors subunits except β1 subunit. In conclusion, RA augmented pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors through GABA A -ergic transmission. Thus, it is suggested that RA may be useful for the treatment of insomnia.

  2. Effect of GABA on oxidative stress in the skeletal muscles and plasma free amino acids in mice fed high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z X; Xia, S F; Qiao, Y; Shi, Y H; Le, G W

    2015-06-01

    Increased levels of plasma free amino acids (pFAAs) can disturb the blood glucose levels in patients with obesity, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome (MS) and are associated with enhanced protein oxidation. Oxidation of proteins, especially in the muscles, can promote protein degradation and elevate the levels of pFAAs. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a food additive, can reduce high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hyperglycaemia; however, the mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of GABA on protein oxidation and pFAAs changes. One hundred male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into five groups that were fed with control diet, HFD and HFD supplied with 0.2%, 0.12% and 0.06% GABA in drinking water for 20 weeks respectively. HFD feeding led to muscular oxidative stress, protein oxidation, pFAA disorders, hyperglycaemia and augmented plasma GABA levels. Treatment with GABA restored normally fasting blood glucose level and dose-dependently inhibited body weight gains, muscular oxidation and protein degradation. While medium and low doses of GABA mitigated HFD-induced pFAA disorders, the high dose of GABA deteriorated the pFAA disorders. Medium dose of GABA increased the levels of GABA, but high dose of GABA reduced the levels of plasma GABA and increased the activity of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase in the liver. Therefore, treatment with GABA mitigated HFD-induced hyperglycaemia probably by repairing HFD-induced muscular oxidative stress and pFAA disorders in mice. Our data also suggest that an optimal dose of GABA is crucial for the prevention of excess GABA-related decrease in the levels of pFAA and GABA as well as obesity. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Gamma Amino Butyric Acid Attenuates Liver and Kidney Damage Associated with Insulin Alteration in γ-Irradiated and Streptozotocin-Treated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saada, H.N.; Eltahawy, N.A.; Hammad, A.S.; Morcos, N.Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the inhibitory neurotransmitters that may have the ability to relive the intensity of stress. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the role of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) in modulating insulin disturbance associated with liver and kidney damage in γ-irradiated and streptozotocin-treated rats. Irradiation was performed by whole body exposure to 6 Gy from a Cs-137 source. Streptozotocin (STZ) was administered in a single intraperitoneal dose (60 mg/kg body weight). GABA (200 mg/Kg body weight/day) was administered daily via gavages during 3 weeks to γ-irradiated and STZ-treated-rats. The results obtained showed that γ-irradiation induced hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance (similar to type 2 Diabetes), while STZ-treatment produced hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency with no insulin resistance detected (similar to type 1 Diabetes). In both cases, significant increases of alanine amino transferase (ALT) and aspartate amino transferase (AST) activities, urea and creatinine levels were recorded in the serum. These changes were associated with oxidative damage to the liver and kidney tissues notified by significant decreases of superoxide dismutase (SOD ), catalase and glutathione peroxidase ( GSH-Px) activities in parallel to significant increases of malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced oxidation protein products ( AOPP) levels. The administration of GABA to irradiated as well as STZ-treated rats regulated insulin and glucose levels, minimized oxidative stress and reduced the severity of liver and kidney damage. It could be concluded that GABA could be a useful adjunct to reduce some metabolic complications associated with insulin deficiency and insulin resistance

  4. Selected biomarkers as predictive tools in testing efficacy of melatonin and coenzyme Q on propionic acid - induced neurotoxicity in rodent model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, Mashael; Al-Ayadhi, Laila; El-Ansary, Afaf

    2014-02-25

    Exposures to environmental toxins are now thought to contribute to the development of autism spectrum disorder. Propionic acid (PA) found as a metabolic product of gut bacteria has been reported to mimic/mediate the neurotoxic effects of autism. Results from animal studies may guide investigations on human populations toward identifying environmental contaminants that produce or drugs that protect from neurotoxicity. Forty-eight young male Western Albino rats were used in the present study. They were grouped into six equal groups 8 rats each. The first group received a neurotoxic dose of buffered PA (250 mg/Kg body weight/day for 3 consecutive days). The second group received only phosphate buffered saline (control group). The third and fourth groups were intoxicated with PA as described above followed by treatment with either coenzyme Q (4.5 mg/kg body weight) or melatonin (10 mg/kg body weight) for one week (therapeutically treated groups). The fifth and sixth groups were administered both compounds for one week prior to PA (protected groups). Heat shock protein70 (Hsp70), Gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA), serotonin, dopamine, oxytocin and interferon γ-inducible protein 16 together with Comet DNA assay were measured in brain tissues of the six studied groups. The obtained data showed that PA caused multiple signs of brain toxicity revealed in depletion of GABA, serotonin, and dopamine, are which important neurotransmitters that reflect brain function, interferon γ-inducible protein 16 and oxytocin. A high significant increase in tail length, tail DNA% damage and tail moment was reported indicating the genotoxic effect of PA. Administration of melatonin or coenzyme Q showed both protective and therapeutic effects on PA-treated rats demonstrated in a remarkable amelioration of most of the measured parameters. In conclusion, melatonin and coenzyme Q have potential protective and restorative effects against PA-induced brain injury, confirmed by improvement in

  5. Natural and Synthetic Variants of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Cyanobacteria: Introduction of the GABA Shunt into Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuyi; Qian, Xiao; Chang, Shannon; Dismukes, G C; Bryant, Donald A

    2016-01-01

    For nearly half a century, it was believed that cyanobacteria had an incomplete tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, because 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (2-OGDH) was missing. Recently, a bypass route via succinic semialdehyde (SSA), which utilizes 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase (OgdA) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SsaD) to convert 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) into succinate, was identified, thus completing the TCA cycle in most cyanobacteria. In addition to the recently characterized glyoxylate shunt that occurs in a few of cyanobacteria, the existence of a third variant of the TCA cycle connecting these metabolites, the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt, was considered to be ambiguous because the GABA aminotransferase is missing in many cyanobacteria. In this study we isolated and biochemically characterized the enzymes of the GABA shunt. We show that N -acetylornithine aminotransferase (ArgD) can function as a GABA aminotransferase and that, together with glutamate decarboxylase (GadA), it can complete a functional GABA shunt. To prove the connectivity between the OgdA/SsaD bypass and the GABA shunt, the gadA gene from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was heterologously expressed in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, which naturally lacks this enzyme. Metabolite profiling of seven Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 mutant strains related to these two routes to succinate were investigated and proved the functional connectivity. Metabolite profiling also indicated that, compared to the OgdA/SsaD shunt, the GABA shunt was less efficient in converting 2-OG to SSA in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. The metabolic profiling study of these two TCA cycle variants provides new insights into carbon metabolism as well as evolution of the TCA cycle in cyanobacteria.

  6. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: PROBIOTIC APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    NEENA GARG

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is a heterotrophic Gram-positive bacteria which under goes lactic acid fermentations and leads to production of lactic acid as an end product. LAB includes Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus which are grouped together in the family lactobacillaceae. LAB shows numerous antimicrobial activities due to production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds such as organic acids, bacteriocins, diacetyl, hydrogen peroxide and reutrin. LA...

  7. Levulinic acid in organic synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timokhin, Boris V; Baransky, V A; Eliseeva, G D

    1999-01-01

    Data concerning the methods of synthesis, chemical transformations and application of levulinic acid are analysed and generalised. The wide synthetic potential of levulinic acid, particularly as a key compound in the synthesis of various heterocyclic systems, saturated and unsaturated ketones and diketones, difficultly accessible acids and other compounds is demonstrated. The accessibility of levulinic acid from hexose-containing wood-processing and agricultural wastes is noted. The bibliography includes 260 references.

  8. Acids and bases solvent effects on acid-base strenght

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    Acids and bases are ubiquitous in chemistry. Our understanding of them, however, is dominated by their behaviour in water. Transfer to non-aqueous solvents leads to profound changes in acid-base strengths and to the rates and equilibria of many processes: for example, synthetic reactions involving acids, bases and nucleophiles; isolation of pharmaceutical actives through salt formation; formation of zwitter- ions in amino acids; and chromatographic separation of substrates. This book seeks to enhance our understanding of acids and bases by reviewing and analysing their behaviour in non-aqueous solvents. The behaviour is related where possible to that in water, but correlations and contrasts between solvents are also presented.

  9. Macrocyclic polyether complexes of amino acids and amino acid salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidzilya, V.A.; Oleksenko, LP.

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with the isolation of the complexes formed between various types of amino acid derivatives and macrocyclic polyethers, and the characterisation of their physical and chemical properties. The study shows that macrocyclic polyethers form 1:1 complexes with amino acids and amino acid derivatives, and that these complexes can be isolated in pure form. Amino acids can be bound to these complexes in their anionic forms, in switterionic forms, as well as in their protonated forms. These types of complexes may be useful for the transport of amino acids or their derivatives across both synthetic and natural membranes

  10. Sequential injection redox or acid-base titration for determination of ascorbic acid or acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenghor, Narong; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Vilen, Michael; Sara, Rolf; Christian, Gary D; Grudpan, Kate

    2002-12-06

    Two sequential injection titration systems with spectrophotometric detection have been developed. The first system for determination of ascorbic acid was based on redox reaction between ascorbic acid and permanganate in an acidic medium and lead to a decrease in color intensity of permanganate, monitored at 525 nm. A linear dependence of peak area obtained with ascorbic acid concentration up to 1200 mg l(-1) was achieved. The relative standard deviation for 11 replicate determinations of 400 mg l(-1) ascorbic acid was 2.9%. The second system, for acetic acid determination, was based on acid-base titration of acetic acid with sodium hydroxide using phenolphthalein as an indicator. The decrease in color intensity of the indicator was proportional to the acid content. A linear calibration graph in the range of 2-8% w v(-1) of acetic acid with a relative standard deviation of 4.8% (5.0% w v(-1) acetic acid, n=11) was obtained. Sample throughputs of 60 h(-1) were achieved for both systems. The systems were successfully applied for the assays of ascorbic acid in vitamin C tablets and acetic acid content in vinegars, respectively.

  11. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation...

  12. Pantothenic acid biosynthesis in zymomonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Luan; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Viitanen, Paul V.

    2014-07-01

    Zymomonas is unable to synthesize pantothenic acid and requires this essential vitamin in growth medium. Zymomonas strains transformed with an operon for expression of 2-dehydropantoate reductase and aspartate 1-decarboxylase were able to grow in medium lacking pantothenic acid. These strains may be used for ethanol production without pantothenic acid supplementation in seed culture and fermentation media.

  13. Fumaric acid production by fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roa Engel, C.A.; Straathof, A.J.J.; Zijlmans, T.W.; Van Gulik, W.M.; Van der Wielen, L.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The potential of fumaric acid as a raw material in the polymer industry and the increment of cost of petroleum-based fumaric acid raises interest in fermentation processes for production of this compound from renewable resources. Although the chemical process yields 112% w/w fumaric acid

  14. Waste acid detoxification and reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, T.M.; Stewart, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    Economically feasible processes that reduce the volume, quantity, and toxicity of metal-bearing waste acids by reclaiming, reusing, and recycling spent acids and metal salts are being developed and demonstrated. The acids used in the demonstrations are generated during metal-finishing operations used in nuclear fuel fabrication; HF-HNO 3 , HNO 3 , and HNO 3 -H 2 SO 4 wastes result from Zr etching, Cu stripping, and chemical milling of U. At discharge, wastes contain high concentrations of acid and one major metal impurity. The waste minimization process used to reclaim acid from these three streams incorporates three processes for acid regeneration and reclamation. Normally, HNO 3 remains in the bottoms when an aqueous acid solution is distilled; however, in the presence of H 2 SO 4 , HNO 3 will distill to the overhead stream. In this process, nitrates and fluorides present as free acid and metal salts can be reclaimed as acid for recycle to the metal-finishing processes. Uranium present in the chemical milling solution can be economically recovered from distillation bottoms and refined. Using acid distillation, the volume of chemical milling solution discharged as waste can be reduced by as much as 60% depending on the H 2 SO 4 concentration. A payback period of 2.2 years has been estimated for this process. The development and demonstration of precipitation and distillation processes for detoxification and reclamation of waste acid is supported by the US Department of Energy's Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP)

  15. Acidic aerosol in urban air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, M.; Yamaoka, S.; Miyazaki, T.; Oka, M.

    1982-01-01

    The distribution and chemical composition of acidic aerosol in Osaka City were investigated. Samples were collected at five sites in the city from June to September, 1979. Acidic aerosol was determined by the acid-base titration method, sulfate ion by barium chloride turbidimetry, nitrate ion by the xylenol method, and chloride ion by the mercury thiocyanate method. The concentration of acidic aerosol at five sites ranged from 7.7 micrograms per cubic meter to 10.0 micrograms per cubic meter, but mean concentrations in the residential area were slightly higher than those in the industrial area. When acidic aerosol concentrations were compared with concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, and chloride ions, a significant correlation was found between acidic aerosol and sulfate ion. The sum of the ion equivalents of the three types showed good correlation with the acidic aerosol equivalent during the whole period.

  16. Adsorption of humic acid on acid-activated Greek bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doulia, Danae; Leodopoulos, Ch; Gimouhopoulos, K; Rigas, F

    2009-12-15

    The adsorption of humic acid on bentonite from Milos Island (Greece) acid-treated with dilute H(2)SO(4) solutions over a concentration range between 0.25 and 13M has been studied. Bentonite activated with 3M sulfuric acid (AAS) showed a higher efficiency in removing humic acid from aqueous solutions and was selected for further investigation. The specific surface area of acid-activated bentonite was estimated using the methylene blue adsorption method. The morphology of untreated, activated, and HA-sorbed bentonite was studied under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The effects of contact time, adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dose, and temperature on the adsorption of humic acid onto bentonite activated with 3M H(2)SO(4) were studied using a batch adsorption technique. Acidic pH and high ionic strength proved to be favorable for the adsorption efficiency. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetic data and the rate constants were evaluated. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equations and the isotherm constants were determined. Thermodynamic parameters (DeltaH(o), DeltaS(o), and DeltaG(o)) of adsorption of humic acid onto acid-activated bentonite with 3M sulfuric acid were also evaluated.

  17. Cytenamide acetic acid solvate

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Andrea; Florence, Alastair J.; Fabianni, Francesca J. A.; Shankland, Kenneth; Bedford, Colin T.

    2008-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound (systematic name: 5H-dibenzo[a,d]cycloheptatriene-5-carboxamide ethanoic acid solvate), C16H13NO C2H4O2, the cytenamide and solvent molecules form a hydrogen-bonded R2 2(8) dimer motif, which is further connected to form a centrosymmetric double ring motif arrangement. The cycloheptene ring adopts a boat conformation and the dihedral angle between the leastsquares planes through the two aromatic rings is 54.7 (2) . peer...

  18. Crassulacean acid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas David Geydan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A review of Crassulacean acid metabolism is presented, characterized by showing the occurrence, activity and plasticity of these complex mechanism at the physiological, biochemical and molecular level, framed by the presence of the denominated four phases in CAM and its repercussion and expression due to different stresses in an ecological context. The basic enzymes, and metabolites necessary for the optional functioning of CAM are presented as well as their mode of action and cellular control. Finally, it is shown how environmental conditions and molecular signalling mediate the phenotypic plasticity.

  19. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for enhanced production of 5-aminovaleric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae Ho; Park, Seok Hyun; Oh, Young Hoon; Choi, Jae Woong; Lee, Moon Hee; Cho, Jae Sung; Jeong, Ki Jun; Joo, Jeong Chan; Yu, James; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-10-07

    5-Aminovaleric acid (5AVA) is an important five-carbon platform chemical that can be used for the synthesis of polymers and other chemicals of industrial interest. Enzymatic conversion of L-lysine to 5AVA has been achieved by employing lysine 2-monooxygenase encoded by the davB gene and 5-aminovaleramidase encoded by the davA gene. Additionally, a recombinant Escherichia coli strain expressing the davB and davA genes has been developed for bioconversion of L-lysine to 5AVA. To use glucose and xylose derived from lignocellulosic biomass as substrates, rather than L-lysine as a substrate, we previously examined direct fermentative production of 5AVA from glucose by metabolically engineered E. coli strains. However, the yield and productivity of 5AVA achieved by recombinant E. coli strains remain very low. Thus, Corynebacterium glutamicum, a highly efficient L-lysine producing microorganism, should be useful in the development of direct fermentative production of 5AVA using L-lysine as a precursor for 5AVA. Here, we report the development of metabolically engineered C. glutamicum strains for enhanced fermentative production of 5AVA from glucose. Various expression vectors containing different promoters and origins of replication were examined for optimal expression of Pseudomonas putida davB and davA genes encoding lysine 2-monooxygenase and delta-aminovaleramidase, respectively. Among them, expression of the C. glutamicum codon-optimized davA gene fused with His 6 -Tag at its N-Terminal and the davB gene as an operon under a strong synthetic H 36 promoter (plasmid p36davAB3) in C. glutamicum enabled the most efficient production of 5AVA. Flask culture and fed-batch culture of this strain produced 6.9 and 19.7 g/L (together with 11.9 g/L glutaric acid as major byproduct) of 5AVA, respectively. Homology modeling suggested that endogenous gamma-aminobutyrate aminotransferase encoded by the gabT gene might be responsible for the conversion of 5AVA to glutaric acid in

  20. New Acid Combination for a Successful Sandstone Acidizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, M. U.; Mahmud, H. K. B.; Rezaee, R.

    2017-05-01

    With the development of new enhanced oil recovery techniques, sandstone acidizing has been introduced and played a pivotal role in the petroleum industry. Different acid combinations have been applied, which react with the formation, dissolve the soluble particles; thus increase the production of hydrocarbons. To solve the problems which occurred using current preflush sandstone acidizing technology (hydrochloric acid); a new acid combination has been developed. Core flooding experiments on sandstone core samples with dimensions 1.5 in. × 3 in. were conducted at a flow rate of 2 cm3/min. A series of hydrochloric-acetic acid mixtures with different ratios were tested under 150°F temperature. The core flooding experiments performed are aimed to dissolve carbonate, sodium, potassium and calcium particles from the core samples. These experiments are followed by few important tests which include, porosity-permeability, pH value, Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) analysis and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR measurements). All the results are compared with the results of conventional hydrochloric acid technology. NMR and porosity analysis concluded that the new acid combination is more effective in creating fresh pore spaces and thus increasing the reservoir permeability. It can be seen from the pore distribution before and after the acidizing. Prior applying acid; the large size of pores appears most frequently in the pore distribution while with the applied acid, it was found that the small pore size is most the predominant of the pore distribution. These results are validated using ICP analysis which shows the effective removal of calcium and other positive ions from the core sample. This study concludes that the combination of acetic-hydrochloric acid can be a potential candidate for the preflush stage of sandstone acidizing at high temperature reservoirs.

  1. Simultaneous liquid-chromatographic quantitation of salicylic acid, salicyluric acid, and gentisic acid in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cham, B E; Bochner, F; Imhoff, D M; Johns, D; Rowland, M

    1980-01-01

    We have developed a specific and sensitive method for the determination of salicylic acid, salicyluric acid, and gentisic acid in urine. Any proteins present are precipitated with methyl cyanide. After centrifugation, an aliquot of the supernate is directly injected into an octadecyl silane reversed-phase chromatographic column, then eluted with a mixture of water, butanol, acetic acid, and sodium sulfate, and quantitated at 313 nm by ultraviolet detection according to peak-height ratios (with internal standard, o-methoxybenzoic acid) or peak heights (no internal standard). The method allows estimates within 25 min. Sensitivity was 0.2 mg/L for gentisic acid, and 0.5 mg/L for both salicyluric and salicylic acid (20-micro L injection volume); response was linear with concentration to at least 2.000 g/L for salicylic acid and metabolites. Analytical recovery of salicylic acid and metabolites from urine is complete. Intra-assay precision (coefficient of variation) is 5.52% at 7.5 mg/L for salicylic acid, 5.01% at 9.33 mg/L for salicyluric acid, and 3.07% at 7.96 mg/L for gentisic acid. Interassay precision is 7.32% at 7.51 mg/L for salicylic acid, 5.52% at 8.58 mg/L for salicyluric acid, and 3.97% at 8.32 mg/L for gentisic acid. We saw no significant interference in urine from patients being treated with various drugs other than aspirin.

  2. Vibrational structure of the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and arachidonic acid studied by infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Johannes; Noack, Kristina; Bartelmess, Juergen; Walter, Christian; Dörnenburg, Heike; Leipertz, Alfred

    2010-02-01

    The spectroscopic discrimination of the two structurally similar polyunsaturated C 20 fatty acids (PUFAs) 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (arachidonic acid) is shown. For this purpose their vibrational structures are studied by means of attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The fingerprint regions of the recorded spectra are found to be almost identical, while the C-H stretching mode regions around 3000 cm -1 show such significant differences as results of electronic and molecular structure alterations based on the different degree of saturation that both fatty acids can be clearly distinguished from each other.

  3. 2-arylureidobenzoic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valgeirsson, Jon; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan

    2003-01-01

    A series of 2-arylureidobenzoic acids (AUBAs) was prepared by a short and effective synthesis, and the pharmacological activity at glutamate receptors was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The compounds showed noncompetitive antagonistic activity at the kainate receptor subtype GluR5. The most potent...... on the benzoic acid moiety (ring A), whereas ring B tolerated a variety of substituents, but with a preference for lipophilic substituents. The most potent compounds had a 4-chloro substituent on ring A and 3-chlorobenzene (6b), 2-naphthalene (8h), or 2-indole (8k) as ring B and had IC(50) values of 1.3, 1.......2, and 1.2 microM, respectively, in a functional GluR5 assay. Compound 6c (IC(50) = 4.8 microM at GluR5) showed activity in the in vivo ATPA rigidity test, indicating that 6c has better pharmacokinetic properties than 8h, which was inactive in this test. The AUBAs are the first example of a series...

  4. Solid acid catalysis from fundamentals to applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Hideshi

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionTypes of solid acid catalystsAdvantages of solid acid catalysts Historical overviews of solid acid catalystsFuture outlookSolid Acids CatalysisDefinition of acid and base -Brnsted acid and Lewis acid-Acid sites on surfacesAcid strengthRole of acid sites in catalysisBifunctional catalysisPore size effect on catalysis -shape selectivity-Characterization of Solid Acid Catalysts Indicator methodTemperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ammoniaCalorimetry of adsorption of basic moleculesInfrare

  5. Maleic acid and succinic acid in fermented alcoholic beverages are the stimulants of gastric acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyssen, S; González-Calero, G; Schimiczek, M; Singer, M V

    1999-03-01

    Alcoholic beverages produced by fermentation (e.g., beer and wine) are powerful stimulants of gastric acid output and gastrin release in humans. The aim of this study was to separate and specify the gastric acid stimulatory ingredients in alcoholic beverages produced by fermentation. Yeast-fermented glucose was used as a simple model of fermented alcoholic beverages; it was stepwise separated by different methods of liquid chromatography, and each separated solution was tested in human volunteers for its stimulatory action on gastric acid output and gastrin release. Five substances were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography and were analyzed by mass spectrometry and 1H-13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At the end of the separation process of the five identified substances, only the two dicarboxylic acids, maleic acid and succinic acid, had a significant (P fermented glucose, respectively), but not on gastrin release. When given together, they increased gastric acid output by 100% of fermented glucose and by 95% of maximal acid output. We therefore conclude that maleic acid and succinic acid are the powerful stimulants of gastric acid output in fermented glucose and alcoholic beverages produced by fermentation, and that gastrin is not their mediator of action.

  6. Effect of baseline plasma fatty acids on eicosapentaenoic acid levels in individuals supplemented with alpha-linolenic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFilippis, Andrew P; Harper, Charles R; Cotsonis, George A; Jacobson, Terry A

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported a >50% increase in mean plasma eicosapentaenoic acid levels in a general medicine clinic population after supplementation with alpha-linolenic acid. In the current analysis, we evaluate the variability of changes in eicosapentaenoic acid levels among individuals supplemented with alpha-linolenic acid and evaluated the impact of baseline plasma fatty acids levels on changes in eicosapentaenoic acid levels in these individuals. Changes in eicosapentaenoic acid levels among individuals supplemented with alpha-linolenic acid ranged from a 55% decrease to a 967% increase. Baseline plasma fatty acids had no statistically significant effect on changes in eicosapentaenoic levels acid after alpha-linolenic acid supplementation. Changes in eicosapentaenoic acid levels varied considerably in a general internal medicine clinic population supplemented with alpha-linolenic acid. Factors that may impact changes in plasma eicosapentaenoic acid levels after alpha-linolenic acid supplementation warrant further study.

  7. Uric acid nephrolithiasis: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicerello, Elisa

    2018-04-01

    Uric acid nephrolithiasis appears to increase in prevalence. While a relationship between uric acid stones and low urinary pH has been for long known, additional association with various metabolic conditions and pathophysiological basis has recently been elucidated. Some conditions such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome disease, excessive dietary intake, and increased endogenous uric acid production and/or defect in ammoniagenesis are associated with low urinary pH. In addition, the phenomenon of global warming could result in an increase in areas with greater climate risk for uric acid stone formation. There are three therapeutic steps to be taken for management of uric acid stones: identification of urinary pH profiles, assessment of urinary volume status, and identification of disorders leading to excessive uric acid production. However, the most important factor for uric acid stone formation is acid urinary pH, which is a prerequisite for uric acid precipitation. This article reviews recent insights into the pathophysiology of uric acid stones and their management.

  8. Dissociation of weak acids during Gran plot free acidity titrations

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Steven E:; Cole, Jan M.

    2011-01-01

    A comparison of weak and free acid concentrations measured by base titration and hydrogen ionactivities determined by direct pH measurement is described for several of our data sets for raincollected above and below a forest canopy in the eastern United States. These data illustrate theinfluence of weak acid dissociation during titration and the possible effect of activity coefficientson calculated free acid concentrations.DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0889.1984.tb00240.x

  9. Electrolytic nature of aqueous sulfuric acid. 2. Acidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2012-09-27

    In part 1 of this study, I reported that the Debye-Hückel limiting law and the smaller-ion shell (SiS) model of strong electrolyte solutions fit nicely with the experimental mean ionic activity coefficient (γ(±)) of aqueous sulfuric acid as a function of concentration and of temperature when the acid is assumed to be a strong 1-3 electrolyte. Here, I report that the SiS-derived activity coefficient of H(+), γ(H(+)), of the 1-3 acid is comparable to that of aqueous HCl. This agrees with titration curves showing, as well-known, that sulfuric acid in water is parallel in strength to aqueous HCl. The calculated pH is in good accord with the Hammett acidity function, H(0), of aqueous sulfuric acid at low concentration, and differences between the two functions at high concentration are discussed and explained. This pH-H(0) relation is consistent with the literature showing that the H(0) of sulfuric acid (in the 1-9 M range) is similar to those of HCl and the other strong mineral monoprotic acids. The titration of aqueous sulfuric acid with NaOH does not agree with the known second dissociation constant of 0.010 23; rather, the constant is found to be ~0.32 and the acid behaves upon neutralization as a strong diprotic acid practically dissociating in one step. A plausible reaction pathway is offered to explain how the acid may transform, upon base neutralization, from a dissociated H(4)SO(5) (as 3H(+) and HSO(5)(3-)) to a dissociated H(2)SO(4) even though the equilibrium constant of the reaction H(+) + HSO(5)(3-) ↔ SO(4)(2-) + H(2)O, at 25 °C, is 10(-37) (part 1).

  10. Adipic acid tolerance screening for potential adipic acid production hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Emma; Mapelli, Valeria; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Biobased processes for the production of adipic acid are of great interest to replace the current environmentally detrimental petrochemical production route. No efficient natural producer of adipic acid has yet been identified, but several approaches for pathway engineering have been established. Research has demonstrated that the microbial production of adipic acid is possible, but the yields and titres achieved so far are inadequate for commercialisation. A plausible explanation ...

  11. Counter current extraction of phosphoric acid: Food grade acid production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlewit, H.; AlIbrahim, M.

    2009-01-01

    Extraction, scrubbing and stripping of phosphoric acid from the Syrian wet-phosphoric acid was carried out using Micro-pilot plant of mixer settler type of 8 l/h capacity. Tributyl phosphate (TBP)/di-isopropyl ether (DIPE) in kerosene was used as extractant. Extraction and stripping equilibrium curves were evaluated. The number of extraction and stripping stages to achieve the convenient and feasible yield was determined. Detailed flow sheet was suggested for the proposed continuous process. Data obtained include useful information for the design of phosphoric acid extraction plant. The produced phosphoric acid was characterized using different analytical techniques. (author)

  12. Phytanic acid metabolism in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Komen, Jasper; Ferdinandusse, Sacha

    2011-01-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a branched-chain fatty acid which cannot be beta-oxidized due to the presence of the first methyl group at the 3-position. Instead, phytanic acid undergoes alpha-oxidation to produce pristanic acid (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecanoic acid)

  13. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid as...

  14. Acid mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigham, Jerry M.; Cravotta, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) consists of metal-laden solutions produced by the oxidative dissolution of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air, moisture, and acidophilic microbes during the mining of coal and metal deposits. The pH of AMD is usually in the range of 2–6, but mine-impacted waters at circumneutral pH (5–8) are also common. Mine drainage usually contains elevated concentrations of sulfate, iron, aluminum, and other potentially toxic metals leached from rock that hydrolyze and coprecipitate to form rust-colored encrustations or sediments. When AMD is discharged into surface waters or groundwaters, degradation of water quality, injury to aquatic life, and corrosion or encrustation of engineered structures can occur for substantial distances. Prevention and remediation strategies should consider the biogeochemical complexity of the system, the longevity of AMD pollution, the predictive power of geochemical modeling, and the full range of available field technologies for problem mitigation.

  15. Synthesis of aminoaldonic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christel Thea

    With the aim of synthesising aminoaldonic acids, two 2-acetamido-2-deoxyaldonolactones with D-galacto (6) and D-arabino (11) configuration were prepared from acetylated sugar formazans in analogy with a known procedure. Empolying the same procedure to acetylated sugar phenylhydrazones gave mixtures......,4-lactone, respectively. A 2,3-aziridino-2,3-dideoxypentonamide 70 was also prepared from D-glucono-1,5-lactone. The lactones were converted into methyl 3,4-O-isopropylidene-2-O-sulfonyl esters 42, 50, 62 and 68, which upon treatment with concentrated aqueous ammonia yielded the aziridino compounds...... and 82, respectively. The aminolactone 84 was converted into the corresponding amino sugar 89.With the aim of synthesising substrates for the Pictet-Spengler reaction three 4-aldehydo acetamidodideoxytetronolactones 92, 97 and 103 were prepared by periodate cleavage of the corresponding hexonolactones...

  16. Uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Figueiredo, C. de

    1984-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from phosphoric liquor by two extraction process is studied. First, uranium is reduced to tetravalent condition and is extracted by dioctypyrophosphoric acid. The re-extraction is made by concentrated phosphoric acid with an oxidizing agent. The re-extract is submitted to the second process and uranium is extracted by di-ethylhexilphosphoric acid and trioctylphosphine oxide. (M.A.C.) [pt

  17. Acid digestion of organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capp, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    To overcome the high temperatures involved in straight incineration of organic waste and the difficulty of extracting actinides from the ash various research establishments throughout the world, including Winfrith and Harwell in the UK, have carried out studies on an alternative chemical combustion method known as acid digestion. The basis of the technique is to digest the waste in concentrated sulphuric acid containing a few percent of nitric acid at a temperature of about 250 0 C. Acid digestion residues consist mainly of non-refractory inorganic sulphates and oxides from which any actinide materials can easily be extracted. (author)

  18. Antibiofilm Properties of Acetic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Morten; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2014-01-01

    of the infected implant, tissue, or organ and thereby the biofilm. Acetic acid is known for its antimicrobial effect on bacteria in general, but has never been thoroughly tested for its efficacy against bacterial biofilms. In this article, we describe complete eradication of both Gram-positive and Gram......-negative biofilms using acetic acid both as a liquid and as a dry salt. In addition, we present our clinical experience of acetic acid treatment of chronic wounds. In conclusion, we here present the first comprehensive in vitro and in vivo testing of acetic acid against bacterial biofilms....

  19. ACETIC ACID AND A BUFFER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent.......The present invention relates to a composition comprising : a) 0.01-20% wt/wt acetic acid and b) a physiologically tolerable buffer capable of maintaining acetic acid at a pH in the range of 2-7; and use of such a composition as an antimicrobial agent....

  20. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ... the mechanism of amino acids metabolism. Amino acids find a number of applications in biochemical research, metabolism, microbiology, nutrition, pharmaceuticals and fortification of foods and feeds. Generally only the amino and carboxyl functional groups in RCH(NH2)COOH undergo chemical transformations while.