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Sample records for amino metabolism modifications

  1. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acids are "building blocks" that join together to form proteins. If you have one of these disorders, your body may have trouble breaking down certain amino acids. Or there may be a problem getting the ...

  2. Nonessential amino acid metabolism in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geck, Renee C; Toker, Alex

    2016-09-01

    Interest in studying cancer metabolism has risen in recent years, as it has become evident that the relationship between cancer and metabolic pathways could reveal novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Metabolic starvation therapy is particularly promising due to its low toxicity. Nonessential amino acids are promising metabolites for such therapy because they become essential in many tumor cells, including breast cancer cells. This review will focus on four nonessential amino acid metabolism pathways: glutamine-glutamate, serine-glycine, cysteine, and arginine-proline metabolism. Recent studies of these amino acids have revealed metabolic enzymes that have the potential to be effective as cancer therapy targets or biomarkers for response to metabolic starvation therapy. The review will also discuss features of nonessential amino acid metabolism that merit further investigation to determine their relevancy to breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-term Temozolomide Treatment Induces Marked Amino Metabolism Modifications and an Increase in TMZ Sensitivity in Hs683 Oligodendroglioma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Lamoral-Theys

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas account for more than 50% of all primary brain tumors. The worst prognosis is associated with gliomas of astrocytic origin, whereas gliomas with an oligodendroglial origin offer higher sensitivity to chemotherapy, especially when oligodendroglioma cells display 1p19q deletions. Temozolomide (TMZ provides therapeutic benefits and is commonly used with radiotherapy in highly malignant astrocytic tumors, including glioblastomas. The actual benefits of TMZ during long-term treatment in oligodendroglioma patients have not yet been clearly defined. In this study, we have investigated the effects of such a long-term TMZ treatment in the unique Hs683 oligodendroglioma model. We have observed increased TMZ sensitivity of Hs683 orthotopic tumors that were previously treated in vitro with months of progressive exposure to increasing TMZ concentrations before being xenografted into the brains of immunocompromised mice. Whole-genome and proteomic analyses have revealed that this increased TMZ sensitivity of Hs683 oligodendroglioma cells previously treated for long periods with TMZ can be explained, at least partly, by a TMZ-induced p38-dependant dormancy state, which in turn resulted in changes in amino acid metabolism balance, in growth delay, and in a decrease in Hs683 oligodendroglioma cell-invasive properties. Thus, long-term TMZ treatment seems beneficial in this Hs683 oligodendroglioma model, which revealed itself unable to develop resistance against TMZ.

  4. Cytokines: muscle protein and amino acid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    raises TNF-α and IL-6 to moderate levels, has only identified IL-6 as a potent cytokine, decreasing systemic amino acid levels and muscle protein metabolism. The marked decrease in circulatory and muscle amino acid concentrations was observed with a concomitant reduction in both the rates of muscle...... of IL-6 on the regulation of muscle protein metabolism but indirectly via IL-6 reducing amino acid availability. SUMMARY: Recent studies suggest that the best described cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 are unlikely to be the major direct mediators of muscle protein loss in inflammatory diseases. However...

  5. The gut microbiota modulates host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Shoaie, Saeed; Bergentall, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been proposed as an environmental factor that promotes the progression of metabolic diseases. Here, we investigated how the gut microbiota modulates the global metabolic differences in duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon, liver, and two white adipose tissue depots obtained from......, liver, and adipose tissues. We used these functional models to determine the global metabolic differences between CONV-R and GF mice. Based on gene expression data, we found that the gut microbiota affects the host amino acid (AA) metabolism, which leads to modifications in glutathione metabolism....... Our analyses revealed that the gut microbiota influences host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice....

  6. Branched Chain Amino Acids: Beyond Nutrition Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Cunxi; He, Ting; Zhang, Wenju; Zhang, Guolong; Ma, Xi

    2018-03-23

    Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), including leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile), and valine (Val), play critical roles in the regulation of energy homeostasis, nutrition metabolism, gut health, immunity and disease in humans and animals. As the most abundant of essential amino acids (EAAs), BCAAs are not only the substrates for synthesis of nitrogenous compounds, they also serve as signaling molecules regulating metabolism of glucose, lipid, and protein synthesis, intestinal health, and immunity via special signaling network, especially phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signal pathway. Current evidence supports BCAAs and their derivatives as the potential biomarkers of diseases such as insulin resistance (IR), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), cancer, and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). These diseases are closely associated with catabolism and balance of BCAAs. Hence, optimizing dietary BCAA levels should have a positive effect on the parameters associated with health and diseases. This review focuses on recent findings of BCAAs in metabolic pathways and regulation, and underlying the relationship of BCAAs to related disease processes.

  7. Dependence of the metabolic fecal amino acids on the amino acid content of the feed. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawielitzki, K.; Schadereit, R.; Voelker, T.; Reichel, K.

    1982-01-01

    In an experiment with 20 15 N-labelled growing rats the excretion of amino acids as well as of metabolic fecal amino acids were investigated after feeding of soybean oil meal as sole protein source. A low, yet statistically significant increase of the excretion of amino acids and metabolic fecal amino acids was ascertained in accordance with a growing quota of soybean oil meal in the ration. The true digestibility of amino acids ascertained according to conventional methods is above 90% and, under consideration of the increase of metabolic fecal amino acids, on the average increases by 3.5 digestibility units (1.4 to 6.2). (author)

  8. Metabolism of amino acid amides in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Croes, L.M.; Peeters, W.P.H.; Peters, P.J.H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of the natural amino acid L-valine, the unnatural amino acids D-valine, and D-, L-phenylglycine (D-, L-PG), and the unnatural amino acid amides D-, L-phenylglycine amide (D, L-PG-NH2) and L-valine amide (L-Val-NH2) was studied in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. The organism possessed

  9. Systems metabolic engineering strategies for the production of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Zhang, Quanwei; Xu, Qingyang; Zhang, Chenglin; Li, Yanjun; Fan, Xiaoguang; Xie, Xixian; Chen, Ning

    2017-06-01

    Systems metabolic engineering is a multidisciplinary area that integrates systems biology, synthetic biology and evolutionary engineering. It is an efficient approach for strain improvement and process optimization, and has been successfully applied in the microbial production of various chemicals including amino acids. In this review, systems metabolic engineering strategies including pathway-focused approaches, systems biology-based approaches, evolutionary approaches and their applications in two major amino acid producing microorganisms: Corynebacterium glutamicum and Escherichia coli, are summarized.

  10. Dependence of the metabolic fecal amino acids on the amino acid content of the feed. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawielitzki, K.; Schadereit, R.; Voelker, T.; Reichel, K.

    1981-01-01

    The amount of metabolic fecal amino acids (MFAA) in dependence on the amino acid intake was determined for graded maize rations in 15 N-labelled rats and the part of labelled endogenous amino acids in feces was calculated by the isotope dilution method. The excretion of amino acids and MFAA in feces are described as functions of the amino acid intake for 17 amino acids and calculated regressively. For all 17 amino acids investigated, there was a more or less steep increase of MFAA according to an increasing amino acid intake. In contrast to N-free feeding, the MFAA increase to the 2- to 4.5-fold value in feeding with pure maize (16.5% crude protein). The thesis of the constancy of the excretion of MFAA can consequently be no longer maintained. The true digestibility according to the conventional method is, on an average of all amino acids, 7.3 units below ascertained according to the 15 N method. The limiting amino acids lysine and threonine revealed the greatest difference. Tryptophane as first limiting amino acid could not be determined. The true digestibility of nearly all amino acids ascertained for maize by the isotope method is above 90%. (author)

  11. Metabolism of amino acids, dipeptides and tetrapeptides by Lactobacillus sakei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinz, Quirin; Schwab, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    The microbial degradation of proteins, peptides and amino acids generates volatiles involved in the typical flavor of dry fermented sausage. The ability of three Lactobacillus sakei strains to form aroma compounds was investigated. Whole resting cells were fermented in phosphate buffer with equimolar amounts of substrates consisting of dipeptides, tetrapeptides and free amino acids, respectively. Dipeptides disappeared quickly from the solutions whereas tetrapeptides were only partially degraded. In both approaches the concentration of free amino acids increased in the reaction mixture but did not reach the equimolar amount of the initial substrates. When free amino acids were fed to the bacteria their levels decreased only slightly. Although peptides were more rapidly degraded and/or transported into the cells, free amino acids produced higher amounts of volatiles. It is suggested, that after transport into the cell peptides are only partially hydrolyzed to their amino acids, while the rest is metabolized via alternative metabolic pathways. The three L. sakei strains differed to some extend in their ability to metabolize the substrates to volatile compounds. In a few cases this was due to the position of the amino acids within the peptides. Compared to other starter cultures used for the production of dry fermented sausages, the metabolic impact of the L. sakei strains on the formation of volatiles was very low. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Microbial Amino Acid Metabolism in Host Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Neis, Evelien P. J. G.; Dejong, Cornelis H. C.; Rensen, Sander S.

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions in gut microbiota composition and function are increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The functional output of the gut microbiota, including short-chain fatty acids and amino acids, are thought to be important modulators underlying the development of these disorders. Gut bacteria can alter the bioavailability of amino acids by utilization of several amino acids originating from both alimentary and endogenous protei...

  13. Treatment of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of amino acids. Babies with TYR I may need vitamin D, a vitamin that can help babies who ... Rickets is a condition in which too little vitamin D causes a child’s bones to be ... condition, he may need to take certain medicines. For example: Babies with ...

  14. Regulation of intestinal protein metabolism by amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Julien; Goichon, Alexis; Déchelotte, Pierre; Coëffier, Moïse

    2013-09-01

    Gut homeostasis plays a major role in health and may be regulated by quantitative and qualitative food intake. In the intestinal mucosa, an intense renewal of proteins occurs, at approximately 50% per day in humans. In some pathophysiological conditions, protein turnover is altered and may contribute to intestinal or systemic diseases. Amino acids are key effectors of gut protein turnover, both as constituents of proteins and as regulatory molecules limiting intestinal injury and maintaining intestinal functions. Many studies have focused on two amino acids: glutamine, known as the preferential substrate of rapidly dividing cells, and arginine, another conditionally essential amino acid. The effects of glutamine and arginine on protein synthesis appear to be model and condition dependent, as are the involved signaling pathways. The regulation of gut protein degradation by amino acids has been minimally documented until now. This review will examine recent data, helping to better understand how amino acids regulate intestinal protein metabolism, and will explore perspectives for future studies.

  15. Effects of Heterologous tRNA Modifications on the Production of Proteins Containing Noncanonical Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crnković, Ana; Vargas-Rodriguez, Oscar; Merkuryev, Anna; Söll, Dieter

    2018-02-02

    Synthesis of proteins with noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) enables the creation of protein-based biomaterials with diverse new chemical properties that may be attractive for material science. Current methods for large-scale production of ncAA-containing proteins, frequently carried out in Escherichia coli , involve the use of orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (o-aaRSs) and tRNAs (o-tRNAs). Although o-tRNAs are designed to be orthogonal to endogenous aaRSs, their orthogonality to the components of the E. coli metabolism remains largely unexplored. We systematically investigated how the E. coli tRNA modification machinery affects the efficiency and orthogonality of o-tRNA Sep used for production of proteins with the ncAA O- phosphoserine (Sep). The incorporation of Sep into a green fluorescent protein (GFP) in 42 E. coli strains carrying deletions of single tRNA modification genes identified several genes that affect the o-tRNA activity. Deletion of cysteine desulfurase ( iscS ) increased the yield of Sep-containing GFP more than eightfold, while overexpression of dimethylallyltransferase MiaA and pseudouridine synthase TruB improved the specificity of Sep incorporation. These results highlight the importance of tRNA modifications for the biosynthesis of proteins containing ncAAs, and provide a novel framework for optimization of o-tRNAs.

  16. Effects of Heterologous tRNA Modifications on the Production of Proteins Containing Noncanonical Amino Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Crnković

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of proteins with noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs enables the creation of protein-based biomaterials with diverse new chemical properties that may be attractive for material science. Current methods for large-scale production of ncAA-containing proteins, frequently carried out in Escherichia coli, involve the use of orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (o-aaRSs and tRNAs (o-tRNAs. Although o-tRNAs are designed to be orthogonal to endogenous aaRSs, their orthogonality to the components of the E. coli metabolism remains largely unexplored. We systematically investigated how the E. coli tRNA modification machinery affects the efficiency and orthogonality of o-tRNASep used for production of proteins with the ncAA O-phosphoserine (Sep. The incorporation of Sep into a green fluorescent protein (GFP in 42 E. coli strains carrying deletions of single tRNA modification genes identified several genes that affect the o-tRNA activity. Deletion of cysteine desulfurase (iscS increased the yield of Sep-containing GFP more than eightfold, while overexpression of dimethylallyltransferase MiaA and pseudouridine synthase TruB improved the specificity of Sep incorporation. These results highlight the importance of tRNA modifications for the biosynthesis of proteins containing ncAAs, and provide a novel framework for optimization of o-tRNAs.

  17. Increased resistance of peptides to serum proteases by modification of their amino groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galati, Rossella; Verdina, Alessandra; Falasca, Giuliana; Chersi, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    The ability of synthetic protein fragments to survive the degradative action of aminopeptidases and serum proteolytic enzymes can be remarkably enhanced by slight modifications at their N-terminal alpha-amino group. This can be achieved by addition of beta-alanine or amino acids of the D-configuration, amino acids which are seldom found in a living organism. These modifications do scarcely modify the chemical and physical properties of the peptides, and should be preferred, especially for in vivo tests, to drastic alterations of peptides as produced by dinitrophenylation or dansylation of the amino groups.

  18. KDM4C and ATF4 Cooperate in Transcriptional Control of Amino Acid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhu Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The histone lysine demethylase KDM4C is often overexpressed in cancers primarily through gene amplification. The molecular mechanisms of KDM4C action in tumorigenesis are not well defined. Here, we report that KDM4C transcriptionally activates amino acid biosynthesis and transport, leading to a significant increase in intracellular amino acid levels. Examination of the serine-glycine synthesis pathway reveals that KDM4C epigenetically activates the pathway genes under steady-state and serine deprivation conditions by removing the repressive histone modification H3 lysine 9 (H3K9 trimethylation. This action of KDM4C requires ATF4, a transcriptional master regulator of amino acid metabolism and stress responses. KDM4C activates ATF4 transcription and interacts with ATF4 to target serine pathway genes for transcriptional activation. We further present evidence for KDM4C in transcriptional coordination of amino acid metabolism and cell proliferation. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism linking KDM4C-mediated H3K9 demethylation and ATF4-mediated transactivation in reprogramming amino acid metabolism for cancer cell proliferation.

  19. Response of hepatic amino acid consumption to chronic metabolic acidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, L.; Blommaart, P. J.; Meijer, A. J.; Lamers, W. H.; Schoolwerth, A. C.

    1996-01-01

    In a previous paper, we showed that an inhibition of amino acid transport across the liver plasma membrane is responsible for the decrease in urea synthesis in acute metabolic acidosis. We have now studied the mechanism responsible for the decline in urea synthesis in chronic acidosis. Chronic

  20. Hepatocyte heterogeneity in the metabolism of amino acids and ammonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Häussinger, D.; Lamers, W. H.; Moorman, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    With respect to hepatocyte heterogeneity in ammonia and amino acid metabolism, two different patterns of sublobular gene expression are distinguished: 'gradient-type' and 'strict- or compartment-type' zonation. An example for strict-type zonation is the reciprocal distribution of carbamoylphosphate

  1. Evolution of amino acid metabolism inferred through cladistic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunchillos, Chomin; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2003-11-28

    Because free amino acids were most probably available in primitive abiotic environments, their metabolism is likely to have provided some of the very first metabolic pathways of life. What were the first enzymatic reactions to emerge? A cladistic analysis of metabolic pathways of the 16 aliphatic amino acids and 2 portions of the Krebs cycle was performed using four criteria of homology. The analysis is not based on sequence comparisons but, rather, on coding similarities in enzyme properties. The properties used are shared specific enzymatic activity, shared enzymatic function without substrate specificity, shared coenzymes, and shared functional family. The tree shows that the earliest pathways to emerge are not portions of the Krebs cycle but metabolisms of aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and glutamine. The views of Horowitz (Horowitz, N. H. (1945) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 31, 153-157) and Cordón (Cordón, F. (1990) Tratado Evolucionista de Biologia, Aguilar, Madrid, Spain), according to which the upstream reactions in the catabolic pathways and the downstream reactions in the anabolic pathways are the earliest in evolution, are globally corroborated; however, with some exceptions. These are due to later opportunistic connections of pathways (actually already suggested by these authors). Earliest enzymatic functions are mostly catabolic; they were deaminations, transaminations, and decarboxylations. From the consensus tree we extracted four time spans for amino acid metabolism development. For some amino acids catabolism and biosynthesis occurred at the same time (Asp, Glu, Lys, Leu, Ala, Val, Ile, Pro, Arg). For others ultimate reactions that use amino acids as a substrate or as a product are distinct in time, with catabolism preceding anabolism for Asn, Gln, and Cys and anabolism preceding catabolism for Ser, Met, and Thr. Cladistic analysis of the structure of biochemical pathways makes hypotheses in biochemical evolution explicit and parsimonious.

  2. Modification in amino acids of Dead Sea Scroll Parchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, H; Ajie, H

    1992-12-01

    Fragments of Dead Sea Scroll Parchments were extracted for collagen and subjected to amino acid analysis. In modern parchment samples, 90% or more of the protein could be extracted in hot aqueous solution as collagen. In the ancient specimens, 70% or less was extractable. The hot-solution insoluble material was analyzed for collagen. In the soluble extract, the quantity of tyrosine, histidine, and methionine was reduced. Dityrosine was detected. The need to extend such studies is discussed.

  3. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pat......-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation....

  4. Higher plant metabolism and energetics in hypogravity: Amino acid metabolism in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazelis, M.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory's investigation into the amino acid metabolism of dwarf marigolds exposed to an environment of simulated hypogravity is summarized. Using both in vivo, and/or in vitro studies, the following effects of hypogravitational stress have been shown: (1) increased proline incorporation into cell wall protein, (2) inhibition of amino acid decarboxylation, (3) decrease in glutamic acid decarboxylase activity; and (4) decrease in the relative amount of a number of soluble amino acids present in deproteinized extracts of marigold leaves. It is concluded from these data there are several rapid, major alterations in amino acid metabolism associated with hypogravitational stress in marigolds. The mechanism(s) and generality of these effects with regard to other species is still unknown.

  5. Covalent immobilization of glucose oxidase on amino MOFs via post-synthetic modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tudisco, C.G.; Zolubas, G.; Seoane de la Cuesta, B.; Zafarani, H.; Kazemzad Asiabi, M.; Gascon Sabate, J.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Rassaei, L.

    2016-01-01

    The post-synthetic modification (PSM) of two amino-MOFs with glucose oxidase is reported in this study. The multi-step approach preserved the MOFs' structure and allowed the production of enzyme-functionalized MOFs (MOFs@GOx), which retained the enzymatic activity and showed selective properties

  6. Reliable Metabolic Flux Estimation in Escherichia coli Central Carbon Metabolism Using Intracellular Free Amino Acids

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    Nobuyuki Okahashi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA is a tool of metabolic engineering for investigation of in vivo flux distribution. A direct 13C enrichment analysis of intracellular free amino acids (FAAs is expected to reduce time for labeling experiments of the MFA. Measurable FAAs should, however, vary among the MFA experiments since the pool sizes of intracellular free metabolites depend on cellular metabolic conditions. In this study, minimal 13C enrichment data of FAAs was investigated to perform the FAAs-based MFA. An examination of a continuous culture of Escherichia coli using 13C-labeled glucose showed that the time required to reach an isotopically steady state for FAAs is rather faster than that for conventional method using proteinogenic amino acids (PAAs. Considering 95% confidence intervals, it was found that the metabolic flux distribution estimated using FAAs has a similar reliability to that of the PAAs-based method. The comparative analysis identified glutamate, aspartate, alanine and phenylalanine as the common amino acids observed in E. coli under different culture conditions. The results of MFA also demonstrated that the 13C enrichment data of the four amino acids is required for a reliable analysis of the flux distribution.

  7. 'Trophic' and 'source' amino acids in trophic estimation: a likely metabolic explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, T C

    2017-06-01

    Amino acid nitrogen isotopic analysis is a relatively new method for estimating trophic position. It uses the isotopic difference between an individual's 'trophic' and 'source' amino acids to determine its trophic position. So far, there is no accepted explanation for the mechanism by which the isotopic signals in 'trophic' and 'source' amino acids arise. Yet without a metabolic understanding, the utility of nitrogen isotopic analyses as a method for probing trophic relations, at either bulk tissue or amino acid level, is limited. I draw on isotopic tracer studies of protein metabolism, together with a consideration of amino acid metabolic pathways, to suggest that the 'trophic'/'source' groupings have a fundamental metabolic origin, to do with the cycling of amino-nitrogen between amino acids. 'Trophic' amino acids are those whose amino-nitrogens are interchangeable, part of a metabolic amino-nitrogen pool, and 'source' amino acids are those whose amino-nitrogens are not interchangeable with the metabolic pool. Nitrogen isotopic values of 'trophic' amino acids will reflect an averaged isotopic signal of all such dietary amino acids, offset by the integrated effect of isotopic fractionation from nitrogen cycling, and modulated by metabolic and physiological effects. Isotopic values of 'source' amino acids will be more closely linked to those of equivalent dietary amino acids, but also modulated by metabolism and physiology. The complexity of nitrogen cycling suggests that a single identifiable value for 'trophic discrimination factors' is unlikely to exist. Greater consideration of physiology and metabolism should help in better understanding observed patterns in nitrogen isotopic values.

  8. Dynamics of human whole body amino acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, V.R.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of regulation of the nitrogen metabolism in humans under various nutritional and physiological states was examined using stable isotopes. In the simultaneous continuous infusion of 1- [ 13 ] - leucine and α- [ 15 N]- lysine, their fluxed decreased when individuals received lower protein intake. The rates of oxidation and incorporation into body proteins of leucine changed in parallel with the protein intake. Such effects of diet on whole body leucine kinetics were modified by the energy state and dietary energy level. The nitrogen balance was also improved by an excess level of dietary energy. When the intake of dietary protein was lowered below the maintenance level, the whole body flux and de novo synthesis of glycine were lowered, but alanine synthesis was clearly increased. The intravenous infusion of glucose at 4 mg/kg.min, which causes increase in excess blood sugar and plasma insulin, increased the alanine flux, but had no effect on the glycine flux. The rate of albumin synthesis, determined by giving 15 N-glycine orally every 3 hr, decreased with the lowered intake of dietary protein in young men, but not in elderly men. This explains why the serum albumin synthesis increases with the increase in the intake of dietary protein in young men, but not in elderly men. The rate of whole body protein synthesis in young men receiving the L-amino acid diets providing with the required intake of specific amino acid was much lower than that in the men receiving the diets providing with generous intake of specific amino acid. Thus the control mechanism to maintain the homeostasis of body nitrogen and amino acids is related in some unknown way to the nutritional requirement of the hosts. (Kaihara, S.)

  9. Proteins isolated from regenerating sciatic nerves of rats form aggregates following posttranslational amino acid modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingoglia, N.A.; Chakroborty, G.; Yu, M.; Luo, D.; Sturman, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Soluble proteins of regenerating sciatic nerves of rats can be posttranslationally, covalently modified by a variety of radioactive amino acids. The present study shows that once modified by a mixture of 15 amino acids, many of those proteins form aggregates that are unable to pass through a 0.45-micron filter and pellet following 20,000g centrifugation (suggesting a size of greater than 2 x 10(6) Da). Aggregation of proteins also occurs following modification by Arg or Lys alone, but does not occur following protein modification in nonregenerating nerves or in brain. Aggregates are not disrupted by treatment with 100 mM beta mercaptoethanol or by exposure to 1.0 M NaCl, but aggregates are solubilized by treatment with urea and by boiling in 1.5% SDS. Amino acid analysis of proteins modified by a mixture of [3H]amino acids shows a similar proportion of posttranslationally incorporated Ser, Pro, Val, Ala, Leu, Phe, Lys, and Arg in the soluble and pelletable fractions. Two-dimensional PAGE profiles of soluble and pelletable modified proteins show that the modified proteins in both fractions are in similar pI and molecular weight ranges, except that the soluble modified proteins include a high-molecular-weight component that is absent in the pelleted modified proteins. Kinetic studies show that while half-maximal levels of protein modification occur within 30 seconds of incubation, the appearance of the pelletable modified protein fraction is delayed significantly. These results indicate that amino acid modification of soluble proteins in regenerating sciatic nerves of rats results in physical changes in those proteins so that they form high-molecular-weight aggregates

  10. The effect of fractionated plasma separation and adsorption on cerebral amino acid metabolism and oxidative metabolism during acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Hauerberg, John; Frederiksen, Hans-Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Patients with acute liver failure have a disturbed amino acid metabolism and a compromised oxidative metabolism in the brain. A limited number of clinically neuroprotective interventions are available. This study aimed at assessing the effect of fractionated plasma separation and adsorption (FPSA......), an extracorporeal liver support system, on cerebral amino acids and lactate to pyruvate ratio....

  11. Modeling the role of covalent enzyme modification in Escherichia coli nitrogen metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidd, Philip B; Wingreen, Ned S

    2010-01-01

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) converts ammonium into the amino acid glutamine. GS is principally active when the cell is experiencing nitrogen limitation, and its activity is regulated by a bicyclic covalent modification cascade. The advantages of this bicyclic-cascade architecture are poorly understood. We analyze a simple model of the GS cascade in comparison to other regulatory schemes and conclude that the bicyclic cascade is suboptimal for maintaining metabolic homeostasis of the free glutamine pool. Instead, we argue that the lag inherent in the covalent modification of GS slows the response to an ammonium shock and thereby allows GS to transiently detoxify the cell, while maintaining homeostasis over longer times

  12. Metabolic Diet App Suite for inborn errors of amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Gloria; Ueda, Keiko; Houben, Roderick F A; Joa, Jeff; Giezen, Alette; Cheng, Barbara; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2016-03-01

    An increasing number of rare inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are amenable to targeted metabolic nutrition therapy. Daily adherence is important to attain metabolic control and prevent organ damage. This is challenging however, given the lack of information of disorder specific nutrient content of foods, the limited availability and cost of specialty products as well as difficulties in reliable calculation and tracking of dietary intake and targets. To develop apps for all inborn errors of amino acid metabolism for which the mainstay of treatment is a medical diet, and obtain patient and family feedback throughout the process to incorporate this into subsequent versions. The Metabolic Diet App Suite was created with input from health care professionals as a free, user-friendly, online tool for both mobile devices and desktop computers (http://www.metabolicdietapp.org) for 15 different IEMs. General information is provided for each IEM with links to useful online resources. Nutrient information is based on the MetabolicPro™, a North American food database compiled by the Genetic Metabolic Dietitians International (GMDI) Technology committee. After user registration, a personalized dashboard and management plan including specific nutrient goals are created. Each Diet App has a user-friendly interface and the functions include: nutrient intake counts, adding your own foods and homemade recipes and, managing a daily food diary. Patient and family feedback was overall positive and specific suggestions were used to further improve the App Suite. The Metabolic Diet App Suite aids individuals affected by IEMs to track and plan their meals. Future research should evaluate its impact on patient adherence, metabolic control, quality of life and health-related outcomes. The Suite will be updated and expanded to Apps for other categories of IEMs. Finally, this Suite is a support tool only, and does not replace medical/metabolic nutrition professional advice. Copyright

  13. Effects of amino silicone oil modification on properties of ramie fiber and ramie fiber/polypropylene composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Liping; Li, Wenjun; Chen, Dachuan; Zhou, Dianwu; Lu, Gang; Yuan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Ramie fiber (RF) changed to be hydrophobic after amino silicone oil modification. • Mechanical properties of RF/PP composites improved after fiber being modified. • N−H=O and O−H=N hydrogen bonds formed at the interface of modifier and fiber. • Amino silicone molecular interacts with cellulose in a preferred orientation. - Abstract: The effects of amino silicone oil modification on the properties of ramie fiber and ramie/polypropylene composites were investigated with experiments and molecular dynamics simulation. First, the effects of amino silicone oil treatments on the properties of ramie and ramie/polypropylene composites were investigated by experiments. The results indicated that the amino silicone oil modification can change the surface properties of ramie fiber from hydrophilic to hydrophobic and improve the mechanical properties of ramie/polypropylene composites. And then, the amino silicone oil modification mechanism at atomic and molecular levels was investigated by the molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation work elucidate that the surface modification mechanism can be described as: the amino silicone oil can interact with cellulose by the intermolecular forces, and the molecular chain of amino silicone oil tends to be an orientation that the hydrophobic alkyl groups project outward and the polar amino groups point to the surface of cellulose. Therefore, the surface of ramie fiber was covered with amino silicone oil, and the surface property of ramie fiber was changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. So the surface modification with amino silicone oil can improve the interfacial compatibility between ramie fiber and polymer

  14. Aldehyde stress-mediated novel modification of proteins: epimerization of the N-terminal amino acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Lee, Seon Hwa; Oe, Tomoyuki

    2013-12-16

    Various kinds of aldehyde-mediated chemical modifications of proteins have been identified as being exclusively covalent. We report a unique noncovalent modification: the aldehyde-mediated epimerization of the N-terminal amino acid. Epimerization of amino acids is thought to cause conformational changes that alter their biological activity. However, few mechanistic studies have been performed, because epimerization of an amino acid is a miniscule change in a whole protein. Furthermore, it does not produce a mass shift, making mass spectrometric analysis difficult. Here, we have demonstrated epimerization mediated by endogenous aldehydes. A model peptide, with an N-terminal l- or d-FMRFamide, was incubated with an endogenous or synthetic aldehyde [acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal, 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal, d-glucose (Glc), 4- or 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde] under physiological conditions. Each reaction mixture was analyzed by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection and/or electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Considerable epimerization occurred after incubation with some endogenous aldehydes (PLP, 40.6% after 1 day; Glc with copper ions, 6.5% after 7 days). Moreover, the epimerization also occurred in whole proteins (human serum albumin and PLP, 26.3% after 1 day). Tandem mass spectrometric studies, including deuterium labeling and sodium borohydride reduction, suggested that the epimerization results from initial Schiff base formation followed by tautomerization to ketimine that causes the chirality to be lost. This suggests that the epimerization of the N-terminal amino acid can also occur in vivo as a post-translational modification under a high level of aldehyde stress.

  15. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-06-09

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability.

  16. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  17. Subcritical Water Hydrolysis of Peptides: Amino Acid Side-Chain Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas; Bowra, Steve; Cooper, Helen J.

    2017-09-01

    Previously we have shown that subcritical water may be used as an alternative to enzymatic digestion in the proteolysis of proteins for bottom-up proteomics. Subcritical water hydrolysis of proteins was shown to result in protein sequence coverages greater than or equal to that obtained following digestion with trypsin; however, the percentage of peptide spectral matches for the samples treated with trypsin were consistently greater than for those treated with subcritical water. This observation suggests that in addition to cleavage of the peptide bond, subcritical water treatment results in other hydrolysis products, possibly due to modifications of amino acid side chains. Here, a model peptide comprising all common amino acid residues (VQSIKCADFLHYMENPTWGR) and two further model peptides (VCFQYMDRGDR and VQSIKADFLHYENPTWGR) were treated with subcritical water with the aim of probing any induced amino acid side-chain modifications. The hydrolysis products were analyzed by direct infusion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, either collision-induced dissociation or electron transfer dissociation, and liquid chromatography collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The results show preferential oxidation of cysteine to sulfinic and sulfonic acid, and oxidation of methionine. In the absence of cysteine and methionine, oxidation of tryptophan was observed. In addition, water loss from aspartic acid and C-terminal amidation were observed in harsher subcritical water conditions. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  18. Amino-functionalized surface modification of polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported polydimethylsiloxane membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Leiqing; Cheng, Jun, E-mail: juncheng@zju.edu.cn; Li, Yannan; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Amino group was introduced to improve surface polarity of PDMS membrane. • The water contact angle of PDMS membrane decreased after the modification. • The concentration of N atom on surface of PDMS membrane reached up to ∼6%. • The density of PDMS membrane decreased while the swelling degree increased. • CO{sub 2} permeability increased while selectivity decreased after the modification. - Abstract: This study aimed to improve surface polarity of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes and provide surface active sites which were easy to react with other chemicals. 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) containing an amino group was introduced into a PDMS membrane by crosslinking to prepare polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes with an amino-functionalized surface. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses proved the existence of APTES and its amino group in the PDMS membrane. The concentration of N atoms on the PDMS membrane surface reached ∼6% when the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer in the PDMS coating solution was increased to 4/3. The water contact angle decreased from ∼114° to ∼87.5°, indicating the improved surface polarization of the PDMS membrane. The density and swelling degree of the PDMS membrane decreased and increased, respectively, with increasing APTES content in PDMS. This phenomenon increased CO{sub 2} permeability and decreased CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} selectivity, CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity, and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity. When the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer was increased from 0 to 4/3, the CO{sub 2} permeation rate of the hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes initially decreased from ∼2370 GPU to ∼860 GPU and then increased to ∼2000 GPU due to the change in coating solution viscosity.

  19. Amino-functionalized surface modification of polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported polydimethylsiloxane membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Leiqing; Cheng, Jun; Li, Yannan; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Amino group was introduced to improve surface polarity of PDMS membrane. • The water contact angle of PDMS membrane decreased after the modification. • The concentration of N atom on surface of PDMS membrane reached up to ∼6%. • The density of PDMS membrane decreased while the swelling degree increased. • CO 2 permeability increased while selectivity decreased after the modification. - Abstract: This study aimed to improve surface polarity of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes and provide surface active sites which were easy to react with other chemicals. 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) containing an amino group was introduced into a PDMS membrane by crosslinking to prepare polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes with an amino-functionalized surface. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses proved the existence of APTES and its amino group in the PDMS membrane. The concentration of N atoms on the PDMS membrane surface reached ∼6% when the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer in the PDMS coating solution was increased to 4/3. The water contact angle decreased from ∼114° to ∼87.5°, indicating the improved surface polarization of the PDMS membrane. The density and swelling degree of the PDMS membrane decreased and increased, respectively, with increasing APTES content in PDMS. This phenomenon increased CO 2 permeability and decreased CO 2 /H 2 selectivity, CO 2 /CH 4 selectivity, and CO 2 /N 2 selectivity. When the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer was increased from 0 to 4/3, the CO 2 permeation rate of the hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes initially decreased from ∼2370 GPU to ∼860 GPU and then increased to ∼2000 GPU due to the change in coating solution viscosity.

  20. Nutritional epigenetics with a focus on amino acids: implications for the development and treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yun; Wu, Zhenlong; Dai, Zhaolai; Sun, Kaiji; Wang, Junjun; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings from human and animal studies indicate that maternal undernutrition or overnutrition affects covalent modifications of the fetal genome and its associated histones that can be carried forward to subsequent generations. An adverse outcome of maternal malnutrition is the development of metabolic syndrome, which is defined as a cluster of disorders including obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and insulin resistance. The transgenerational impacts of maternal nutrition are known as fetal programming, which is mediated by stable and heritable alterations of gene expression through covalent modifications of DNA and histones without changes in DNA sequences (namely, epigenetics). The underlying mechanisms include chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation (occurring at the 5'-position of cytosine residues within CpG dinucleotides), histone modifications (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and sumoylation) and expression and activity of small noncoding RNAs. The enzymes catalyzing these reactions include S-adenosylmethionine-dependent DNA and protein methyltransferases, DNA demethylases, histone acetylase (lysine acetyltransferase), general control nonderepressible 5 (GCN5)-related N-acetyltransferase (a superfamily of acetyltransferase) and histone deacetylase. Amino acids (e.g., glycine, histidine, methionine and serine) and vitamins (B6, B12 and folate) play key roles in provision of methyl donors for DNA and protein methylation. Therefore, these nutrients and related metabolic pathways are of interest in dietary treatment of metabolic syndrome. Intervention strategies include targeting epigenetically disturbed metabolic pathways through dietary supplementation with nutrients (particularly functional amino acids and vitamins) to regulate one-carbon-unit metabolism, antioxidative reactions and gene expression, as well as protein methylation and acetylation. These mechanism-based approaches may

  1. Nitrogen and amino acid metabolism in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, S.

    1981-01-01

    For the process of milk production, the dairy cow requires nutrients of which energy supplying nutrients and protein or amino acid supplying nutrients are the most important. Amino acid supplying nutrients have to be absorbed from the small intestine and the research reported in this thesis mainly

  2. Physiological and biochemical studies of bacterial amino acid amide metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, Hubertus Franciscus Maria

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids represent a class of versatile chiral building blocks for a whole range of fine chemicals, used in the pharmaceutical and agro-chemical industry. Considerable experience currently is available with a wide variety of chemo-enzymatic processes for the synthesis of amino acids, which is

  3. Study of Stationary Phase Metabolism Via Isotopomer Analysis of Amino Acids from an Isolated Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, AfshanS.; Tang, YinjieJ.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Martin, Hector Garcia; Gin, Jennifer; Benke, Peter; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-09-14

    Microbial production of many commercially important secondary metabolites occurs during stationary phase, and methods to measure metabolic flux during this growth phase would be valuable. Metabolic flux analysis is often based on isotopomer information from proteinogenic amino acids. As such, flux analysis primarily reflects the metabolism pertinent to the growth phase during which most proteins are synthesized. To investigate central metabolism and amino acids synthesis activity during stationary phase, addition of fully 13C-labeled glucose followed by induction of green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression during stationary phase was used. Our results indicate that Escherichia coli was able to produce new proteins (i.e., GFP) in the stationary phase, and the amino acids in GFP were mostly from degraded proteins synthesized during the exponential growth phase. Among amino acid biosynthetic pathways, only those for serine, alanine, glutamate/glutamine, and aspartate/asparagine had significant activity during the stationary phase.

  4. Regulation of amino-acid metabolism controls flux to lipid accumulation in Yarrowia lipolytica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Pomraning, Kyle R.; Baker, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    accumulation in Y. lipolytica does not involve transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism but is associated with regulation of amino-acid biosynthesis, resulting in redirection of carbon flux during nitrogen limitation from amino acids to lipids. Lipid accumulation in Y. lipolytica at nitrogen limitation...

  5. Microbial transglutaminase production by Streptoverticillium mobaraense: Analysis of amino acid metabolism using mass balances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Y.; Rinzema, A.; Bonarius, H.P.J.; Tramper, J.; Bol, J.

    1998-01-01

    Metabolic flows, especially those of amino acids, were determined and analyzed at different stages of a batch fermentation for microbial transglutaminase production by Streptoverticillium mobaraense. The method is mainly based on mass balances and measurements of amino acids and other metabolites.

  6. Weight loss is associated with plasma free amino acid alterations in subjects with metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tochikubo, O; Nakamura, H; Jinzu, H; Nagao, K; Yoshida, H; Kageyama, N; Miyano, H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is increasing worldwide, especially in Asian populations. Early detection and effective intervention are vital. Plasma free amino acid profile is a potential biomarker for the early detection for lifestyle-related diseases. However, little is known about whether the altered plasma free amino acid profiles in subjects with metabolic syndrome are related to the effectiveness of dietary and exercise interventions. Methods: Eighty-five Japanese sub...

  7. Perturbations in amino acids and metabolic pathways in osteoarthritis patients determined by targeted metabolomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Han, Su; Liu, Xuefeng; Wang, Kunpeng; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Chundong; Zhang, Xi

    2018-05-15

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative synovial joint disease affecting people worldwide. However, the exact pathogenesis of OA remains unclear. Metabolomics analysis was performed to obtain insight into possible pathogenic mechanisms and diagnostic biomarkers of OA. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPLC-TQ-MS), followed by multivariate statistical analysis, was used to determine the serum amino acid profiles of 32 OA patients and 35 healthy controls. Variable importance for project values and Student's t-test were used to determine the metabolic abnormalities in OA. Another 30 OA patients were used as independent samples to validate the alterations in amino acids. MetaboAnalyst was used to identify the key amino acid pathways and construct metabolic networks describing their relationships. A total of 25 amino acids and four biogenic amines were detected by UPLC-TQ-MS. Differences in amino acid profiles were found between the healthy controls and OA patients. Alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid and 4-hydroxy-l-proline were important biomarkers distinguishing OA patients from healthy controls. The metabolic pathways with the most significant effects were involved in metabolism of alanine, aspartate, glutamate, arginine and proline. The results of this study improve understanding of the amino acid metabolic abnormalities and pathogenic mechanisms of OA at the molecular level. The metabolic perturbations may be important for the diagnosis and prevention of OA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Coordinations between gene modules control the operation of plant amino acid metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galili Gad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Being sessile organisms, plants should adjust their metabolism to dynamic changes in their environment. Such adjustments need particular coordination in branched metabolic networks in which a given metabolite can be converted into multiple other metabolites via different enzymatic chains. In the present report, we developed a novel "Gene Coordination" bioinformatics approach and use it to elucidate adjustable transcriptional interactions of two branched amino acid metabolic networks in plants in response to environmental stresses, using publicly available microarray results. Results Using our "Gene Coordination" approach, we have identified in Arabidopsis plants two oppositely regulated groups of "highly coordinated" genes within the branched Asp-family network of Arabidopsis plants, which metabolizes the amino acids Lys, Met, Thr, Ile and Gly, as well as a single group of "highly coordinated" genes within the branched aromatic amino acid metabolic network, which metabolizes the amino acids Trp, Phe and Tyr. These genes possess highly coordinated adjustable negative and positive expression responses to various stress cues, which apparently regulate adjustable metabolic shifts between competing branches of these networks. We also provide evidence implying that these highly coordinated genes are central to impose intra- and inter-network interactions between the Asp-family and aromatic amino acid metabolic networks as well as differential system interactions with other growth promoting and stress-associated genome-wide genes. Conclusion Our novel Gene Coordination elucidates that branched amino acid metabolic networks in plants are regulated by specific groups of highly coordinated genes that possess adjustable intra-network, inter-network and genome-wide transcriptional interactions. We also hypothesize that such transcriptional interactions enable regulatory metabolic adjustments needed for adaptation to the stresses.

  9. Two food-borne heterocyclic amines: Metabolism and DNA adduct formation of amino-alpha-carbolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Hanne

    2005-01-01

    or proteins of animal or vegetable origin, furthermore they are found in many cooked foods, such as fish, meat, and chicken. The specific mutagenicity of the amino-a-carbolines are lower in the Ames Salmonella assay than other heterocyclic amines, but in rodent studies the carcinogenicity of the aminoa, alpha......-carbolines are comparable to other heterocyclic amines. The metabolic pathways of the amino-alpha-carbolines have been studied in vitro and in vivo, and the detoxified phase I and phase II metabolites characterized and quantified. The metabolic activation of the amino-a-carbolines and the formation of DNA-adducts have also...

  10. Carbohydrate metabolism during prolonged exercise and recovery: interactions between pyruvate dehydrogenase, fatty acids, and amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtzakis, Marina; Saltin, B.; Graham, T.

    2006-01-01

    During prolonged exercise, carbohydrate oxidation may result from decreased pyruvate production and increased fatty acid supply and ultimately lead to reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity. Pyruvate also interacts with the amino acids alanine, glutamine, and glutamate, whereby the decline...... amino acid taken up during exercise and recovery. Alanine and glutamine were also associated...... with pyruvate metabolism, and they comprised 68% of total amino-acid release during exercise and recovery. Thus reduced pyruvate production was primarily associated with reduced carbohydrate oxidation, whereas the greatest production of pyruvate was related to glutamate, glutamine, and alanine metabolism...

  11. Autophagy and amino acid metabolism in the brain: implications for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Eloy; Rodríguez-Navarro, José Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic pathway responsible for the maintenance of the tissue and organism homeostasis. Several amino acids regulate autophagic activity in different tissues, such as liver and muscle, but much less is known about this regulation in the brain. The lack of autophagy in neurons leads to a strong neurodegenerative phenotype and epileptic disorders. We summarize the current knowledge about the regulation of autophagy mediated by amino acids and how macroautophagy could serve as source of amino acids. We review the contribution of macroautophagy in the brain physiology and pathology emphasizing the relevancy of the proper control of amino acid levels such as glutamate and GABA in the brain due to its role as neurotransmitters and energy source. Furthermore, we discuss how malfunction in autophagy may result in pathological consequences, because many genetic epileptic disorders are related to signaling or metabolic pathways controlling both macroautophagy and amino acid metabolism in the brain.

  12. Defects in muscle branched-chain amino acid oxidation contribute to impaired lipid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Lerin

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Our data indicate that impaired muscle BCAA catabolism may contribute to the development of insulin resistance by perturbing both amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and suggest that targeting BCAA metabolism may hold promise for prevention or treatment of T2D.

  13. Metabolic Effects of Dietary Proteins, Amino Acids and The Other Amine Consisting Compounds on Cardiovascular System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Uğur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, first cause of deaths in the world, diet has a vital role. While nutrition programs for the cardiovascular health generally focus on lipids and carbohydrates, effects of proteins are not well concerned. Thus this review is written in order to examine effect of proteins, amino acids, and the other amine consisting compounds on cardiovascular system. Because of that animal or plant derived proteins have different protein composition in different foods such as dairy products, egg, meat, chicken, fish, pulse and grains, their effects on blood pressure and regulation of lipid profile are unlike. In parallel amino acids made up proteins have different effect on cardiovascular system. From this point, sulfur containing amino acids, branched chain amino acids, aromatic amino acids, arginine, ornithine, citrulline, glycine, and glutamine may affect cardiovascular system in different metabolic pathways. In this context, one carbon metabolism, synthesis of hormone, stimulation of signaling pathways and effects of intermediate and final products that formed as a result of amino acids metabolism is determined. Despite the protein and amino acids, some other amine consisting compounds in diet include trimethylamine N-oxide, heterocyclic aromatic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and products of Maillard reaction. These amine consisting compounds generally increase the risk for cardiovascular diseases by stimulating oxidative stress, inflammation, and formation of atherosclerotic plaque.

  14. The Amino Acid Metabolic and Carbohydrate Metabolic Pathway Play Important Roles during Salt-Stress Response in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Mao, Cuiyu; Shi, Zheng; Kou, Xiaohong

    2017-01-01

    Salt stress affects the plant quality, which affects the productivity of plants and the quality of water storage. In a recent study, we conducted the Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) analysis and RNA-Seq, bioinformatics study methods, and detection of the key genes with qRT-PCR. Our findings suggested that the optimum salt treatment conditions are 200 mM and 19d for the identification of salt tolerance in tomato. Based on the RNA-Seq, we found 17 amino acid metabolic and 17 carbohydrate metabolic pathways enriched in the biological metabolism during the response to salt stress in tomato. We found 7 amino acid metabolic and 6 carbohydrate metabolic pathways that were significantly enriched in the adaption to salt stress. Moreover, we screened 17 and 19 key genes in 7 amino acid metabolic and 6 carbohydrate metabolic pathways respectively. We chose some of the key genes for verifying by qRT-PCR. The results showed that the expression of these genes was the same as that of RNA-seq. We found that these significant pathways and vital genes occupy an important roles in a whole process of adaptation to salt stress. These results provide valuable information, improve the ability to resist pressure, and improve the quality of the plant.

  15. Amino Acid Uptake and Metabolism of Legionella pneumophila Hosted by Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunder, Eva; Gillmaier, Nadine; Kutzner, Erika; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Vroni; Lautner, Monika; Heuner, Klaus

    2014-07-25

    Legionella pneumophila survives and replicates within a Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) of amoebae and macrophages. Less is known about the carbon metabolism of the bacteria within the LCV. We have now analyzed the transfer and usage of amino acids from the natural host organism Acanthamoeba castellanii to Legionella pneumophila under in vivo (LCV) conditions. For this purpose, A. castellanii was 13C-labeled by incubation in buffer containing [U-(13)C(6)]glucose. Subsequently, these 13C-prelabeled amoebae were infected with L. pneumophila wild type or some mutants defective in putative key enzymes or regulators of carbon metabolism. 13C-Isotopologue compositions of amino acids from bacterial and amoebal proteins were then determined by mass spectrometry. In a comparative approach, the profiles documented the efficient uptake of Acanthamoeba amino acids into the LCV and further into L. pneumophila where they served as precursors for bacterial protein biosynthesis. More specifically, A. castellanii synthesized from exogenous [U-13C6]glucose unique isotopologue mixtures of several amino acids including Phe and Tyr, which were also observed in the same amino acids from LCV-grown L. pneumophila. Minor but significant differences were only detected in the isotopologue profiles of Ala, Asp, and Glu from the amoebal or bacterial protein fractions, respectively, indicating partial de novo synthesis of these amino acids by L. pneumophila. The similar isotopologue patterns in amino acids from L. pneumophila wild type and the mutants under study reflected the robustness of amino acid usage in the LCV of A. castellannii.

  16. Metabolic regulation of amino acid uptake in marine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchman, D.L.; Hodson, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    To determine the relationships among the processes of uptake, intracellular pool formation, and incorporation of amino acids into protein, the authors measured the uptake of dipeptides and free amino acids by bacterial assemblages in estuarine and coastal waters of the southeast US. The dipeptide phenylalanyl-phenylalanine (phe-phe) lowered V/sub max/ of phenylalanine uptake when the turnover rate of phenylalanine was relatively high. When the turnover rate was relatively low, phe-phe either had no effect or increased V/sub max/ of phenylalanine uptake. An analytical model was developed and tested to measure the turnover time of the intracellular pool of phenylalanine. The results suggested that the size of the intracellular pool is regulated, which precludes high assimilation rates of both phenylalanine and phe-phe. In waters with relatively low phenylalanine turnover rates, bacterial assemblages appear to have a greater capacity to assimilate phenylalanine and phe-phe simultaneously. Marine bacterial assemblages do not substantially increase the apparent respiration of amino acids when concentrations increase. The authors conclude that sustained increases in uptake rates and mineralization by marine bacterial assemblages in response to an increase in the concentrations of dissolved organic nitrogen is determined by the rate of protein synthesis

  17. Reprogramming of glucose, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism for cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoyong; Zhang, Huafeng

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is widely observed during cancer development to confer cancer cells the ability to survive and proliferate, even under the stressed, such as nutrient-limiting, conditions. It is famously known that cancer cells favor the "Warburg effect", i.e., the enhanced glycolysis or aerobic glycolysis, even when the ambient oxygen supply is sufficient. In addition, deregulated anabolism/catabolism of fatty acids and amino acids, especially glutamine, serine and glycine, have been identified to function as metabolic regulators in supporting cancer cell growth. Furthermore, extensive crosstalks are being revealed between the deregulated metabolic network and cancer cell signaling. These exciting advancements have inspired new strategies for treating various malignancies by targeting cancer metabolism. Here we review recent findings related to the regulation of glucose, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism, their crosstalk, and relevant cancer therapy strategy.

  18. Clostridium sticklandii, a specialist in amino acid degradation:revisiting its metabolism through its genome sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Fonknechten, Nuria; Chaussonnerie, Sébastien; Tricot, Sabine; Lajus, Aurélie; Andreesen, Jan R; Perchat, Nadia; Pelletier, Eric; Gouyvenoux, Michel; Barbe, Valérie; Salanoubat, Marcel; Le Paslier, Denis; Weissenbach, Jean; Cohen, Georges N; Kreimeyer, Annett

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Clostridium sticklandii belongs to a cluster of non-pathogenic proteolytic clostridia which utilize amino acids as carbon and energy sources. Isolated by T.C. Stadtman in 1954, it has been generally regarded as a "gold mine" for novel biochemical reactions and is used as a model organism for studying metabolic aspects such as the Stickland reaction, coenzyme-B12- and selenium-dependent reactions of amino acids. With the goal of revisiting its carbon, nitrogen, and energy m...

  19. Cerebral metabolism of ammonia and amino acids in patients with fulminant hepatic failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strauss, Gitte Irene; Knudsen, Karen Birgitte Moos; Kondrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: High circulating levels of ammonia have been suggested to be involved in the development of cerebral edema and herniation in fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). The aim of this study was to measure cerebral metabolism of ammonia and amino acids, with special emphasis on glutamine...... metabolism. METHODS: The study consisted of patients with FHF (n = 16) or cirrhosis (n = 5), and healthy subjects (n = 8). Cerebral blood flow was measured by the 133Xe washout technique. Blood samples for determination of ammonia and amino acids were drawn simultaneously from the radial artery...

  20. Engineering of aromatic amino acid metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuralhan, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a popular industrial microorganism. It has since long been used in bread, beer and wine making. More recently it is also being applied for heterologous protein production and as a target organism for metabolic engineering. The work presented in this thesis describes how

  1. Alteration of metabolomic markers of amino-acid metabolism in piglets with in-feed antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Chunlong; Yang, Yuxiang; Yu, Kaifan; Yu, Miao; Zhang, Chuanjian; Su, Yong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2017-04-01

    In-feed antibiotics have been used to promote growth in piglets, but its impact on metabolomics profiles associated with host metabolism is largely unknown. In this study, to test the hypothesis that antibiotic treatment may affect metabolite composition both in the gut and host biofluids, metabolomics profiles were analyzed in antibiotic-treated piglets. Piglets were fed a corn-soy basal diet with or without in-feed antibiotics from postnatal day 7 to day 42. The serum biochemical parameters, metabolomics profiles of the serum, urine, and jejunal digesta, and indicators of microbial metabolism (short-chain fatty acids and biogenic amines) were analyzed. Compared to the control group, antibiotics treatment did not have significant effects on serum biochemical parameters except that it increased (P Antibiotics treatment increased the relative concentrations of metabolites involved in amino-acid metabolism in the serum, while decreased the relative concentrations of most amino acids in the jejunal content. Antibiotics reduced urinary 2-ketoisocaproate and hippurate. Furthermore, antibiotics decreased (P Antibiotics significantly affected the concentrations of biogenic amines, which are derived from microbial amino-acid metabolism. The three major amines, putrescine, cadaverine, and spermidine, were all increased (P antibiotics-treated piglets. These results identified the phenomena that in-feed antibiotics may have significant impact on the metabolomic markers of amino-acid metabolism in piglets.

  2. Muscle protein degradation and amino acid metabolism during prolonged knee-extensor exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; Saltin, B; Wagenmakers, A J

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether prolonged one-leg knee-extensor exercise enhances net protein degradation in muscle with a normal or low glycogen content. Net amino acid production, as a measure of net protein degradation, was estimated from leg exchange and from changes...... acid production was also 10-fold higher during exercise compared with that at rest (difference not significant). The net production rates of threonine, glycine and tyrosine and of the sum of the non-metabolized amino acids were about 1.5-2.5-fold higher during exercise with the leg with a low glycogen...... in the concentrations of amino acids that are not metabolized in skeletal muscle. Experiments were performed at rest and during one-leg knee-extensor exercise in six subjects having one leg with a normal glycogen content and the other with a low glycogen content. Exercise was performed for 90 min at a workload of 60...

  3. Amino Acid Uptake and Metabolism of Legionella pneumophila Hosted by Acanthamoeba castellanii*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunder, Eva; Gillmaier, Nadine; Kutzner, Erika; Herrmann, Vroni; Lautner, Monika; Heuner, Klaus; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila survives and replicates within a Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) of amoebae and macrophages. Less is known about the carbon metabolism of the bacteria within the LCV. We have now analyzed the transfer and usage of amino acids from the natural host organism Acanthamoeba castellanii to Legionella pneumophila under in vivo (LCV) conditions. For this purpose, A. castellanii was 13C-labeled by incubation in buffer containing [U-13C6]glucose. Subsequently, these 13C-prelabeled amoebae were infected with L. pneumophila wild type or some mutants defective in putative key enzymes or regulators of carbon metabolism. 13C-Isotopologue compositions of amino acids from bacterial and amoebal proteins were then determined by mass spectrometry. In a comparative approach, the profiles documented the efficient uptake of Acanthamoeba amino acids into the LCV and further into L. pneumophila where they served as precursors for bacterial protein biosynthesis. More specifically, A. castellanii synthesized from exogenous [U-13C6]glucose unique isotopologue mixtures of several amino acids including Phe and Tyr, which were also observed in the same amino acids from LCV-grown L. pneumophila. Minor but significant differences were only detected in the isotopologue profiles of Ala, Asp, and Glu from the amoebal or bacterial protein fractions, respectively, indicating partial de novo synthesis of these amino acids by L. pneumophila. The similar isotopologue patterns in amino acids from L. pneumophila wild type and the mutants under study reflected the robustness of amino acid usage in the LCV of A. castellannii. PMID:24904060

  4. Enzymes involved in branched-chain amino acid metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeva-Andany, María M; López-Maside, Laura; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Sixto-Leal, Cristina

    2017-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine) are structurally related to branched-chain fatty acids. Leucine is 2-amino-4-methyl-pentanoic acid, isoleucine is 2-amino-3-methyl-pentanoic acid, and valine is 2-amino-3-methyl-butanoic acid. Similar to fatty acid oxidation, leucine and isoleucine produce acetyl-coA. Additionally, leucine generates acetoacetate and isoleucine yields propionyl-coA. Valine oxidation produces propionyl-coA, which is converted into methylmalonyl-coA and succinyl-coA. Branched-chain aminotransferase catalyzes the first reaction in the catabolic pathway of branched-chain amino acids, a reversible transamination that converts branched-chain amino acids into branched-chain ketoacids. Simultaneously, glutamate is converted in 2-ketoglutarate. The branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase complex catalyzes the irreversible oxidative decarboxylation of branched-chain ketoacids to produce branched-chain acyl-coA intermediates, which then follow separate catabolic pathways. Human tissue distribution and function of most of the enzymes involved in branched-chain amino acid catabolism is unknown. Congenital deficiencies of the enzymes involved in branched-chain amino acid metabolism are generally rare disorders. Some of them are associated with reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity and respiratory chain dysfunction that may contribute to their clinical phenotype. The biochemical phenotype is characterized by accumulation of the substrate to the deficient enzyme and its carnitine and/or glycine derivatives. It was established at the beginning of the twentieth century that the plasma level of the branched-chain amino acids is increased in conditions associated with insulin resistance such as obesity and diabetes mellitus. However, the potential clinical relevance of this elevation is uncertain.

  5. Emerging Perspectives on Essential Amino Acid Metabolism in Obesity and the Insulin-Resistant State12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sean H.

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of insulin action is most often considered in the context of impaired glucose homeostasis, with the defining feature of diabetes mellitus being elevated blood glucose concentration. Complications arising from the hyperglycemia accompanying frank diabetes are well known and epidemiological studies point to higher risk toward development of metabolic disease in persons with impaired glucose tolerance. Although the central role of proper blood sugar control in maintaining metabolic health is well established, recent developments have begun to shed light on associations between compromised insulin action [obesity, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)] and altered intermediary metabolism of fats and amino acids. For amino acids, changes in blood concentrations of select essential amino acids and their derivatives, in particular BCAA, sulfur amino acids, tyrosine, and phenylalanine, are apparent with obesity and insulin resistance, often before the onset of clinically diagnosed T2DM. This review provides an overview of these changes and places recent observations from metabolomics research into the context of historical reports in the areas of biochemistry and nutritional biology. Based on this synthesis, a model is proposed that links the FFA-rich environment of obesity/insulin resistance and T2DM with diminution of BCAA catabolic enzyme activity, changes in methionine oxidation and cysteine/cystine generation, and tissue redox balance (NADH/NAD+). PMID:22332087

  6. The Emerging Role of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Insulin Resistance and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Mee-Sup

    2016-07-01

    Insulin is required for maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Despite the importance of insulin sensitivity to metabolic health, the mechanisms that induce insulin resistance remain unclear. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) belong to the essential amino acids, which are both direct and indirect nutrient signals. Even though BCAAs have been reported to improve metabolic health, an increased BCAA plasma level is associated with a high risk of metabolic disorder and future insulin resistance, or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) by BCAAs has been suggested to cause insulin resistance. In addition, defective BCAA oxidative metabolism might occur in obesity, leading to a further accumulation of BCAAs and toxic intermediates. This review provides the current understanding of the mechanism of BCAA-induced mTORC1 activation, as well as the effect of mTOR activation on metabolic health in terms of insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the effects of impaired BCAA metabolism will be discussed in detail.

  7. The Emerging Role of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in Insulin Resistance and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mee-Sup Yoon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Insulin is required for maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Despite the importance of insulin sensitivity to metabolic health, the mechanisms that induce insulin resistance remain unclear. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs belong to the essential amino acids, which are both direct and indirect nutrient signals. Even though BCAAs have been reported to improve metabolic health, an increased BCAA plasma level is associated with a high risk of metabolic disorder and future insulin resistance, or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. The activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 by BCAAs has been suggested to cause insulin resistance. In addition, defective BCAA oxidative metabolism might occur in obesity, leading to a further accumulation of BCAAs and toxic intermediates. This review provides the current understanding of the mechanism of BCAA-induced mTORC1 activation, as well as the effect of mTOR activation on metabolic health in terms of insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the effects of impaired BCAA metabolism will be discussed in detail.

  8. Comparative metabolic profiling reveals the key role of amino acids metabolism in the rapamycin overproduction by Streptomyces hygroscopicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baohua; Liu, Jiao; Liu, Huanhuan; Huang, Di; Wen, Jianping

    2015-06-01

    Rapamycin is an important natural macrolide antibiotic with antifungal, immunosuppressive and anticancer activity produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus. In this study, a mutant strain obtained by ultraviolet mutagenesis displayed higher rapamycin production capacity compared to the wild-type S. hygroscopicus ATCC 29253. To gain insights into the mechanism of rapamycin overproduction, comparative metabolic profiling between the wild-type and mutant strain was performed. A total of 86 metabolites were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pattern recognition methods, including principal component analysis, partial least squares and partial least squares discriminant analysis, were employed to determine the key biomarkers. The results showed that 22 potential biomarkers were closely associated with the increase of rapamycin production and the tremendous metabolic difference was observed between the two strains. Furthermore, metabolic pathway analysis revealed that amino acids metabolism played an important role in the synthesis of rapamycin, especially lysine, valine, tryptophan, isoleucine, glutamate, arginine and ornithine. The inadequate supply of amino acids, or namely "nitrogen starvation" occurred in the mutant strain. Subsequently, the exogenous addition of amino acids into the fermentation medium of the mutant strain confirmed the above conclusion, and rapamycin production of the mutant strain increased to 426.7 mg/L after adding lysine, approximately 5.8-fold of that in the wild-type strain. Finally, the results of real-time PCR and enzyme activity assays demonstrated that dihydrodipicolinate synthase involved with lysine metabolism played vital role in the biosynthesis of rapamycin. These findings will provide a theoretical basis for further improving production of rapamycin.

  9. Lifestyle modification in the management of the metabolic syndrome: achievements and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Riccardo Dalle Grave1, Simona Calugi1, Elena Centis2, Rebecca Marzocchi2, Marwan El Ghoch1, Giulio Marchesini21Department of Eating & Weight Disorder, Villa Garda Hospital, Garda (VR, Italy; 2Unit of Metabolic Diseases & Clinical Dietetics, Alma Mater Studiorum – University of Bologna, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: Lifestyle modification based on behavior therapy is the most important and effective strategy to manage the metabolic syndrome. Modern lifestyle modification therapy combines specific recommendations on diet and exercise with behavioral and cognitive strategies. The intervention may be delivered face-to-face or in groups, or in groups combined with individual sessions. The main challenge of treatment is helping patients maintain healthy behavior changes in the long term. In the last few years, several strategies have been evaluated to improve the long-term effect of lifestyle modification. Promising results have been achieved by combining lifestyle modification with pharmacotherapy, using meals replacement, setting higher physical activity goals, and long-term care. The key role of cognitive processes in the success/failure of weight loss and maintenance suggests that new cognitive procedures and strategies should be included in the traditional lifestyle modification interventions, in order to help patients build a mind-set favoring long-term lifestyle changes. These new strategies raise optimistic expectations for an effective treatment of metabolic syndrome with lifestyle modifications, provided public health programs to change the environment where patients live support them.Keywords: metabolic syndrome, obesity, lifestyle modification, cognitive behavior therapy

  10. Amino Acids As Mediators of Metabolic Cross Talk between Host and Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wenkai; Rajendran, Ranjith; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Tan, Bie; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W.; Zhu, Guoqiang; Peng, Yuanyi; Huang, Xiaoshan; Deng, Jinping; Yin, Yulong

    2018-01-01

    The interaction between host and pathogen decidedly shapes the outcome of an infection, thus understanding this interaction is critical to the treatment of a pathogen-induced infection. Although research in this area of cell biology has yielded surprising findings regarding interactions between host and pathogen, understanding of the metabolic cross talk between host and pathogen is limited. At the site of infection, host and pathogen share similar or identical nutritional substrates and generate common metabolic products, thus metabolic cross talk between host and pathogen could profoundly affect the pathogenesis of an infection. In this review, we present results of a recent discovery of a metabolic interaction between host and pathogen from an amino acid (AA) metabolism-centric point of view. The host depends on AA metabolism to support defensive responses against pathogens, while the pathogens modulate AA metabolism for its own advantage. Some AA, such as arginine, asparagine, and tryptophan, are central points of competition between the host and pathogen. Thus, a better understanding of AA-mediated metabolic cross talk between host and pathogen will provide insight into fruitful therapeutic approaches to manipulate and prevent progression of an infection. PMID:29535717

  11. Nitrilase-Activatable Noncanonical Amino Acid Precursors for Cell-Selective Metabolic Labeling of Proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zefan; Zhu, Yuntao; Sun, Yuting; Qin, Ke; Liu, Weibing; Zhou, Wen; Chen, Xing

    2016-12-16

    Cell-selective protein metabolic labeling is of great interest for studying cell-cell communications and tissue homeostasis. We herein describe a nitrilase-activatable noncanonical amino acid tagging (NANCAT) strategy that exploits an exogenous nitrilase to enzymatically convert the nitrile-substituted precursors to their corresponding noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs), l-azidohomoalanine (Aha) or homopropargylglycine (Hpg), in living cells. Only cells expressing the nitrilase can generate Aha or Hpg in cellulo and metabolically incorporate them into the nascent proteins. Subsequent click-labeling of the azide- or alkyne-incorporated proteins with fluorescent probes or with affinity tags enables visualization and proteomic profiling of nascent proteomes, respectively. We have demonstrated that NANCAT can serve as a versatile strategy for cell-selective labeling of proteomes in both bacterial and mammalian cells.

  12. Urea application promotes amino acid metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in Azolla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiana Chen

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of urea on nitrogen metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in Azolla pinnata. Compared to controls, the application of urea to A. pinnata resulted in a 44% decrease in nitrogenase activity, no significant change in glutamine synthetase activity, 660% higher glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, 39% increase in free amino acid levels, 22% increase in malondialdehyde levels, 21% increase in Na+/K+- levels, 16% increase in Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase levels, and 11% decrease in superoxide dismutase activity. In terms of H2O2 detoxifying enzymes, peroxidase activity did not change and catalase activity increased by 64% in urea-treated A. pinnata. These findings suggest that urea application promotes amino acid metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in A. pinnata.

  13. Cerebral metabolism of ammonia and amino acids in patients with fulminant hepatic failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strauss, Gitte Irene; Knudsen, Karen Birgitte Moos; Kondrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: High circulating levels of ammonia have been suggested to be involved in the development of cerebral edema and herniation in fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). The aim of this study was to measure cerebral metabolism of ammonia and amino acids, with special emphasis on glutamine...... metabolism. METHODS: The study consisted of patients with FHF (n = 16) or cirrhosis (n = 5), and healthy subjects (n = 8). Cerebral blood flow was measured by the 133Xe washout technique. Blood samples for determination of ammonia and amino acids were drawn simultaneously from the radial artery...... and the internal jugular bulb. RESULTS: A net cerebral ammonia uptake was only found in patients with FHF (1.62 +/- 0.79 micromol x 100 g(-1) x min(-1)). The cerebral glutamine efflux was higher in patients with FHF than in the healthy subjects and cirrhotics, -6.11 +/- 5.19 vs. -1.93 +/- 1.17 and -1.50 +/- 0...

  14. Type 2 diabetes alters metabolic and transcriptional signatures of glucose and amino acid metabolism during exercise and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jakob S; Zhao, Xinjie; Irmler, Martin; Liu, Xinyu; Hoene, Miriam; Scheler, Mika; Li, Yanjie; Beckers, Johannes; Hrabĕ de Angelis, Martin; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Pedersen, Bente K; Lehmann, Rainer; Xu, Guowang; Plomgaard, Peter; Weigert, Cora

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic benefit of physical activity to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes is commonly accepted. However, the impact of the disease on the acute metabolic response is less clear. To this end, we investigated the effect of type 2 diabetes on exercise-induced plasma metabolite changes and the muscular transcriptional response using a complementary metabolomics/transcriptomics approach. We analysed 139 plasma metabolites and hormones at nine time points, and whole genome expression in skeletal muscle at three time points, during a 60 min bicycle ergometer exercise and a 180 min recovery phase in type 2 diabetic patients and healthy controls matched for age, percentage body fat and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2). Pathway analysis of differentially regulated genes upon exercise revealed upregulation of regulators of GLUT4 (SLC2A4RG, FLOT1, EXOC7, RAB13, RABGAP1 and CBLB), glycolysis (HK2, PFKFB1, PFKFB3, PFKM, FBP2 and LDHA) and insulin signal mediators in diabetic participants compared with controls. Notably, diabetic participants had normalised rates of lactate and insulin levels, and of glucose appearance and disappearance, after exercise. They also showed an exercise-induced compensatory regulation of genes involved in biosynthesis and metabolism of amino acids (PSPH, GATM, NOS1 and GLDC), which responded to differences in the amino acid profile (consistently lower plasma levels of glycine, cysteine and arginine). Markers of fat oxidation (acylcarnitines) and lipolysis (glycerol) did not indicate impaired metabolic flexibility during exercise in diabetic participants. Type 2 diabetic individuals showed specific exercise-regulated gene expression. These data provide novel insight into potential mechanisms to ameliorate the disturbed glucose and amino acid metabolism associated with type 2 diabetes.

  15. Control of amino acid transport coordinates metabolic reprogramming in T-cell malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzes, K M; Swamy, M; Hukelmann, J L; Emslie, E; Sinclair, L V; Cantrell, D A

    2017-12-01

    This study explores the regulation and importance of System L amino acid transport in a murine model of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) caused by deletion of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN). There has been a strong focus on glucose transport in leukemias but the present data show that primary T-ALL cells have increased transport of multiple nutrients. Specifically, increased leucine transport in T-ALL fuels mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity which then sustains expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α) and c-Myc; drivers of glucose metabolism in T cells. A key finding is that PTEN deletion and phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P 3 ) accumulation is insufficient to initiate leucine uptake, mTORC1 activity, HIF1α or c-Myc expression in T cells and hence cannot drive T-ALL metabolic reprogramming. Instead, a key regulator for leucine transport in T-ALL is identified as NOTCH. Mass spectrometry based proteomics identifies SLC7A5 as the predominant amino acid transporter in primary PTEN -/- T-ALL cells. Importantly, expression of SLC7A5 is critical for the malignant transformation induced by PTEN deletion. These data reveal the importance of regulated amino acid transport for T-cell malignancies, highlighting how a single amino acid transporter can have a key role.

  16. The positive association of branched-chain amino acids and metabolic dyslipidemia in Chinese Han population

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Panpan; Hu, Wen; Fu, Zhenzhen; Sun, Luning; Zhou, Ying; Gong, Yingyun; Yang, Tao; Zhou, Hongwen

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that serum branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are associated with the incident, progression and prognostic of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of BCAAs in metabolic dyslipidemia (raised triglycerides (TG) and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)) remains poorly understood. This study aims to investigate 1) the association of serum BCAAs with total cholesterol (TC), TG, HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and 2) the associati...

  17. SULPHUR-CONTAINING AMINO ACIDS METABOLISM IN EXPERIMENTAL HYPER- AND HYPOTHYROIDISM IN RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechiporuk, V; Zaichko, N; Korda, М; Melnyk, A; Koloshko, O

    2017-10-01

    Hyper- and hypothyroidism are some of the most common endocrinopathies that cause many metabolic disorders including amino acids metabolism. However, a specific molecular mechanism of thyroid hormones influence on sulphur-containing amino acids metabolism has not been established. The aim of our research was to investigate experimentally the influence of thyroid gland functional state on the main enzymatic systems of sulphur-containing amino acids metabolism in liver and kidneys, the content of homocysteine, cysteine and H2S in blood. The rats were administered with L-thyroxine and mercazolil to simulate the states of hyper- and hypothyroidism, which were confirmed by the content of fT3, fT4 and TSH in the blood. In liver and kidneys of the animals with hypothyroidism we observed the decrease in the activity of enzymes of remethylation cycle of S-adenosylmethioninsyntase, S-adenosylhomocysteinhyhdrolase, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase. Suppression of transsulfuration transformation of homocysteine to cysteine in hypothyroidism was mainly due to the inhibition of cystathionine synthase activity of cystathionine-β-synthase, wherein cystathionase activity of cystathionine-γ-lyase was not changed. In animals with hypothyroidism we also noticed the inhibition of cysteine desulfunation reactions: the activity of enzymes of cystathionine-β-synthase, cystathionine-γ-lyase and cysteine aminotransferase significantly decreased in liver and kidneys. Experimental hyperthyroidism was accompanied by increase in activity of remethylation cycle enzymes, increase in cystationine synthase activity of cystathionine-β-synthase in liver and activity of these enzymes in kidneys. The simulation of hyperthyroidism led to the decrease of homocysteine concentration, and of hypothyroidism - to the increase of homocysteine and cysteine concentrations and reduced H2S content in blood of the animals. Thus, the significant risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis

  18. Branched-chain amino acids in metabolic signalling and insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Christopher J.; Adams, Sean H.

    2014-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are important nutrient signals that have direct and indirect effects. Frequently, BCAAs have been reported to mediate antiobesity effects, especially in rodent models. However, circulating levels of BCAAs tend to be increased in individuals with obesity and are associated with worse metabolic health and future insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A hypothesized mechanism linking increased levels of BCAAs and T2DM involves leucine-mediated a...

  19. Essential amino acid metabolism in infected/non-infected, poor, Guatemalan children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazariegos, M.; De Vettorazzi, C.; Solomons, N.W.; Caballero, B.

    1994-01-01

    Traditional methods used to evaluate protein metabolism left unanswered some of the relevant questions in public health in developing countries, such as growth retardation in children. Particularly, in developing countries, infection (clinical and subclinical) and malnutrition are still relevant problems, and the most important scientific issues for the application of stable isotope tracer methods are related to the impact of infection, such as the oxidative disposal of essential amino acids in well-nourished and malnourished children. The objectives of the present proposal are: (1) To simplify, make less expensive, less time-consuming, and less invasive, methods in clinical research on amino acid metabolism using stable-isotope tracers in children; and (2) To assess the effects of infection (clinical or subclinical) on whole-body protein turnover in children with and without malnutrition. The objectives involve the engineering and assessment of a portable instrument to be used in evaluations of protein oxidation in the developing world. Methodological issues such as intra- and inter-subject variability, which are of great importance for the interpretation of amino acid metabolism and protein turnover, will also be considered. 18 refs, 2 figs

  20. Glucose and amino acid metabolism in rat brain during sustained hypoglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Tyce, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of glucose in brains during sustained hypoglycemia was studied. [U- 14 C]Glucose (20 microCi) was injected into control rats, and into rats at 2.5 hr after a bolus injection of 2 units of insulin followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2 units/100 g rat/hr. This regimen of insulin injection was found to result in steady-state plasma glucose levels between 2.5 and 3.5 mumol per ml. In the brains of control rats carbon was transferred rapidly from glucose to glutamate, glutamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid and aspartate and this carbon was retained in the amino acids for at least 60 min. In the brains of hypoglycemic rats, the conversion of carbon from glucose to amino acids was increased in the first 15 min after injection. After 15 min, the specific activity of the amino acids decreased in insulin-treated rats but not in the controls. The concentrations of alanine, glutamate, and gamma-amino-butyric acid decreased, and the concentration of aspartate increased, in the brains of the hypoglycemic rats. The concentration of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, a cofactor in many of the reactions whereby these amino acids are formed from tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, was less in the insulin-treated rats than in the controls. These data provide evidence that glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, and GABA can serve as energy sources in brain during insulin-induced hypoglycemia

  1. 1H NMR-Based Metabolic Profiling Reveals the Effects of Fluoxetine on Lipid and Amino Acid Metabolism in Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunjie Bai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, is a prescribed and effective antidepressant and generally used for the treatment of depression. Previous studies have revealed that the antidepressant mechanism of fluoxetine was related to astrocytes. However, the therapeutic mechanism underlying its mode of action in astrocytes remains largely unclear. In this study, primary astrocytes were exposed to 10 µM fluoxetine; 24 h post-treatment, a high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR-based metabolomic approach coupled with multivariate statistical analysis was used to characterize the metabolic variations of intracellular metabolites. The orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA score plots of the spectra demonstrated that the fluoxetine-treated astrocytes were significantly distinguished from the untreated controls. In total, 17 differential metabolites were identified to discriminate the two groups. These key metabolites were mainly involved in lipids, lipid metabolism-related molecules and amino acids. This is the first study to indicate that fluoxetine may exert antidepressant action by regulating the astrocyte’s lipid and amino acid metabolism. These findings should aid our understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying fluoxetine therapy.

  2. Combined metabolomic and correlation networks analyses reveal fumarase insufficiency altered amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Entai; Li, Xian; Liu, Zerong; Zhang, Fuchang; Tian, Zhongmin

    2018-04-01

    Fumarase catalyzes the interconversion of fumarate and l-malate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Fumarase insufficiencies were associated with increased levels of fumarate, decreased levels of malate and exacerbated salt-induced hypertension. To gain insights into the metabolism profiles induced by fumarase insufficiency and identify key regulatory metabolites, we applied a GC-MS based metabolomics platform coupled with a network approach to analyze fumarase insufficient human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and negative controls. A total of 24 altered metabolites involved in seven metabolic pathways were identified as significantly altered, and enriched for the biological module of amino acids metabolism. In addition, Pearson correlation network analysis revealed that fumaric acid, l-malic acid, l-aspartic acid, glycine and l-glutamic acid were hub metabolites according to Pagerank based on their three centrality indices. Alanine aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities increased significantly in fumarase deficiency HUVEC. These results confirmed that fumarase insufficiency altered amino acid metabolism. The combination of metabolomics and network methods would provide another perspective on expounding the molecular mechanism at metabolomics level. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Dietary modification of metabolic pathways via nuclear hormone receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiozzi, Gianella; Wong, Brian S; Ricketts, Marie-Louise

    2012-10-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs), as ligand-dependent transcription factors, have emerged as important mediators in the control of whole body metabolism. Because of the promiscuous nature of several members of this superfamily that have been found to bind ligand with lower affinity than the classical steroid NHRs, they consequently display a broader ligand selectivity. This promiscuous nature has facilitated various bioactive dietary components being able to act as agonist ligands for certain members of the NHR superfamily. By binding to these NHRs, bioactive dietary components are able to mediate changes in various metabolic pathways, including, glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride homeostasis among others. This review will provide a general overview of the nuclear hormone receptors that have been shown to be activated by dietary components. The physiological consequences of such receptor activation by these dietary components will then be discussed in more detail. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Characteristic metabolism of free amino acids in cetacean plasma: cluster analysis and comparison with mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Miyaji

    Full Text Available From an evolutionary perspective, the ancestors of cetaceans first lived in terrestrial environments prior to adapting to aquatic environments. Whereas anatomical and morphological adaptations to aquatic environments have been well studied, few studies have focused on physiological changes. We focused on plasma amino acid concentrations (aminograms since they show distinct patterns under various physiological conditions. Plasma and urine aminograms were obtained from bottlenose dolphins, pacific white-sided dolphins, Risso's dolphins, false-killer whales and C57BL/6J and ICR mice. Hierarchical cluster analyses were employed to uncover a multitude of amino acid relationships among different species, which can help us understand the complex interrelations comprising metabolic adaptations. The cetacean aminograms formed a cluster that was markedly distinguishable from the mouse cluster, indicating that cetaceans and terrestrial mammals have quite different metabolic machinery for amino acids. Levels of carnosine and 3-methylhistidine, both of which are antioxidants, were substantially higher in cetaceans. Urea was markedly elevated in cetaceans, whereas the level of urea cycle-related amino acids was lower. Because diving mammals must cope with high rates of reactive oxygen species generation due to alterations in apnea/reoxygenation and ischemia-reperfusion processes, high concentrations of antioxidative amino acids are advantageous. Moreover, shifting the set point of urea cycle may be an adaptation used for body water conservation in the hyperosmotic sea water environment, because urea functions as a major blood osmolyte. Furthermore, since dolphins are kept in many aquariums for observation, the evaluation of these aminograms may provide useful diagnostic indices for the assessment of cetacean health in artificial environments in the future.

  5. [Modifications in myocardial energy metabolism in diabetic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynberg, A

    2001-11-01

    The capacity of cardiac myocyte to regulate ATP production to face any change in energy demand is a major determinant of cardiac function. Because FA is the main heart fuel (although the most expensive one in oxygen, and prompt to induce deleterious effects), this process is based on a balanced fatty acid (FA) metabolism. Several pathological situations are associated with an accumulation of FA or derivatives, or with an excessive b-oxidation. The diabetic cardiomyocyte is characterised by an over consumption of FA. The control of the FA/glucose balance clearly appears as a new strategy for cytoprotection, particularly in diabetes and requires a reduced FA contribution to ATP production. Cardiac myocytes can control FA mitochondrial entry, but display weak ability to control FA uptake, thus the fate of non beta-oxidized FA appear as a new impairment for the cell. Both the trigger and the regulation of cardiac contraction result from membrane activity, and the other major FA function in the myocardium is their role in membrane homeostasis, through the phospholipid synthesis and remodeling pathways. Sudden death, hypercatecholaminemia, diabetes and heart failure have been associated with an altered PUFA content in cardiac membranes. Experimental data suggest that the 2 metabolic pathways involved in membrane homeostasis may represent therapeutic targets for cytoprotection. The drugs that increase cardiac phospholipid turnover (trimétazidine, ranolazine,...) display anti-ischemic non hemodynamic effect. This effect is based on a redirection of FA utilization towards phospholipid synthesis, which decrease their availability for energy production. A nutritional approach gave also promising results. Besides its anti-arrhythmic effect, the dietary docosahexaenoic acid is able to reduce FA energy consumption and hence oxygen demand. The cardiac metabolic pathways involving FA should be considered as a whole, precariously balanced. The diabetic heart being characterised by

  6. Carbon isotopic patterns of amino acids associated with various microbial metabolic pathways and physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P. L.; Hsiao, K. T.; Lin, L. H.

    2017-12-01

    Amino acids represent one of the most important categories of biomolecule. Their abundance and isotopic patterns have been broadly used to address issues related to biochemical processes and elemental cycling in natural environments. Previous studies have shown that various carbon assimilative pathways of microorganisms (e.g. autotrophy, heterotrophy and acetotrophy) could be distinguished by carbon isotopic patterns of amino acids. However, the taxonomic and catabolic coverage are limited in previous examination. This study aims to uncover the carbon isotopic patterns of amino acids for microorganisms remaining uncharacterized but bearing biogeochemical and ecological significance in anoxic environments. To fulfill the purpose, two anaerobic strains were isolated from riverine wetland and mud volcano in Taiwan. One strain is a sulfate reducing bacterium (related to Desulfovibrio marrakechensis), which is capable of utilizing either H2 or lactate, and the other is a methanogen (related to Methanolobus profundi), which grows solely with methyl-group compounds. Carbon isotope analyses of amino acids were performed on cells grown in exponential and stationary phase. The isotopic patterns were similar for all examined cultures, showing successive 13C depletion along synthetic pathways. No significant difference was observed for the methanogen and lactate-utilizing sulfate reducer harvested in exponential and stationary phases. In contrast, the H2-utilizing sulfate reducer harvested in stationary phase depleted and enriched 13C in aspartic acid and glycine, respectively when compared with that harvested in exponential phase. Such variations might infer the change of carbon flux during synthesis of these two amino acids in the reverse TCA cycle. In addition, the discriminant function analysis for all available data from culture studies further attests the capability of using carbon isotope patterns of amino acids in identifying microbial metabolisms.

  7. Transcriptome and Proteome Expression Analysis of the Metabolism of Amino Acids by the Fungus Aspergillus oryzae in Fermented Soy Sauce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids comprise the majority of the flavor compounds in soy sauce. A portion of these amino acids are formed from the biosynthesis and metabolism of the fungus Aspergillus oryzae; however, the metabolic pathways leading to the formation of these amino acids in A. oryzae remain largely unknown. We sequenced the transcriptomes of A. oryzae 100-8 and A. oryzae 3.042 under similar soy sauce fermentation conditions. 2D gel electrophoresis was also used to find some differences in protein expression. We found that many amino acid hydrolases (endopeptidases, aminopeptidases, and X-pro-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase were expressed at much higher levels (mostly greater than double in A. oryzae 100-8 than in A. oryzae 3.042. Our results indicated that glutamate dehydrogenase may activate the metabolism of amino acids. We also found that the expression levels of some genes changed simultaneously in the metabolic pathways of tyrosine and leucine and that these conserved genes may modulate the function of the metabolic pathway. Such variation in the metabolic pathways of amino acids is important as it can significantly alter the flavor of fermented soy sauce.

  8. Facile fouling resistant surface modification of microfiltration cellulose acetate membranes by using amino acid L-DOPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azari, Sara; Zou, Linda; Cornelissen, Emile; Mukai, Yasushito

    2013-01-01

    A major obstacle in the widespread application of microfiltration membranes in the wet separation processes such as wastewater treatment is the decline of permeates flux as a result of fouling. This study reports on the surface modification of cellulose acetate (CA) microfiltration membrane with amino acid L-3,4-dihydroxy-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) to improve fouling resistance of the membrane. The membrane surface was characterised using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), water contact angle and zeta potential measurement. Porosity measurement showed a slight decrease in membrane porosity due to coating. Static adsorption experiments revealed an improved resistance of the modified membranes towards the adhesion of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the model foulant. Dead end membrane filtration tests exhibited that the fouling resistance of the modified membranes was improved. However, the effect of the modification depended on the foulant solution concentration. It is concluded that L-DOPA modification is a convenient and non-destructive approach to enable low-BSA adhesion surface modification of CA microfiltration membranes. Nevertheless, the extent of fouling resistance improvement depends on the foulant concentration.

  9. L-theanine, unique amino acid of tea, and its metabolism, health effects, and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türközü, Duygu; Şanlier, Nevin

    2017-05-24

    Tea has been a very popular beverage around the world for centuries. The reason that it is delicious, enabling hydration, showing warming and relaxing effect can be mentioned why it is consumed so much in addition to its prominent health effects. Although the catechins and caffeine are the primary bioactive components that are related with the health effects of the tea, the health effects of theanine amino acid, which is a nonproteinic amino acid special to tea, has become prominent in recent years. It has been known that the theanine amino acid in tea has positive effects especially on relaxing, cognitive performance, emotional status, sleep quality, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, obesity, and common cold. The results of acute and chronic toxicity tests conducted on the safety of theanine express that L-theanine is reliable in general even if it is consumed too much with diet. However, it has not revealed a clear evidence-based result yet regarding theanine metabolism, health effects, and its safety. Within this frame, chemical structure of theanine, its biosynthesis, dietary sources, metabolism, health effects, and safety are discussed in present study.

  10. Clostridium sticklandii, a specialist in amino acid degradation:revisiting its metabolism through its genome sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelletier Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium sticklandii belongs to a cluster of non-pathogenic proteolytic clostridia which utilize amino acids as carbon and energy sources. Isolated by T.C. Stadtman in 1954, it has been generally regarded as a "gold mine" for novel biochemical reactions and is used as a model organism for studying metabolic aspects such as the Stickland reaction, coenzyme-B12- and selenium-dependent reactions of amino acids. With the goal of revisiting its carbon, nitrogen, and energy metabolism, and comparing studies with other clostridia, its genome has been sequenced and analyzed. Results C. sticklandii is one of the best biochemically studied proteolytic clostridial species. Useful additional information has been obtained from the sequencing and annotation of its genome, which is presented in this paper. Besides, experimental procedures reveal that C. sticklandii degrades amino acids in a preferential and sequential way. The organism prefers threonine, arginine, serine, cysteine, proline, and glycine, whereas glutamate, aspartate and alanine are excreted. Energy conservation is primarily obtained by substrate-level phosphorylation in fermentative pathways. The reactions catalyzed by different ferredoxin oxidoreductases and the exergonic NADH-dependent reduction of crotonyl-CoA point to a possible chemiosmotic energy conservation via the Rnf complex. C. sticklandii possesses both the F-type and V-type ATPases. The discovery of an as yet unrecognized selenoprotein in the D-proline reductase operon suggests a more detailed mechanism for NADH-dependent D-proline reduction. A rather unusual metabolic feature is the presence of genes for all the enzymes involved in two different CO2-fixation pathways: C. sticklandii harbours both the glycine synthase/glycine reductase and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathways. This unusual pathway combination has retrospectively been observed in only four other sequenced microorganisms. Conclusions Analysis of the C

  11. Clostridium sticklandii, a specialist in amino acid degradation:revisiting its metabolism through its genome sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonknechten, Nuria; Chaussonnerie, Sébastien; Tricot, Sabine; Lajus, Aurélie; Andreesen, Jan R; Perchat, Nadia; Pelletier, Eric; Gouyvenoux, Michel; Barbe, Valérie; Salanoubat, Marcel; Le Paslier, Denis; Weissenbach, Jean; Cohen, Georges N; Kreimeyer, Annett

    2010-10-11

    Clostridium sticklandii belongs to a cluster of non-pathogenic proteolytic clostridia which utilize amino acids as carbon and energy sources. Isolated by T.C. Stadtman in 1954, it has been generally regarded as a "gold mine" for novel biochemical reactions and is used as a model organism for studying metabolic aspects such as the Stickland reaction, coenzyme-B12- and selenium-dependent reactions of amino acids. With the goal of revisiting its carbon, nitrogen, and energy metabolism, and comparing studies with other clostridia, its genome has been sequenced and analyzed. C. sticklandii is one of the best biochemically studied proteolytic clostridial species. Useful additional information has been obtained from the sequencing and annotation of its genome, which is presented in this paper. Besides, experimental procedures reveal that C. sticklandii degrades amino acids in a preferential and sequential way. The organism prefers threonine, arginine, serine, cysteine, proline, and glycine, whereas glutamate, aspartate and alanine are excreted. Energy conservation is primarily obtained by substrate-level phosphorylation in fermentative pathways. The reactions catalyzed by different ferredoxin oxidoreductases and the exergonic NADH-dependent reduction of crotonyl-CoA point to a possible chemiosmotic energy conservation via the Rnf complex. C. sticklandii possesses both the F-type and V-type ATPases. The discovery of an as yet unrecognized selenoprotein in the D-proline reductase operon suggests a more detailed mechanism for NADH-dependent D-proline reduction. A rather unusual metabolic feature is the presence of genes for all the enzymes involved in two different CO2-fixation pathways: C. sticklandii harbours both the glycine synthase/glycine reductase and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathways. This unusual pathway combination has retrospectively been observed in only four other sequenced microorganisms. Analysis of the C. sticklandii genome and additional experimental procedures

  12. Amino acids : Chemistry, functionality and selected non-enzymatic post-translational modifications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, Rainer; Schlueter, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate goal of proteomics is determination of the exact chemical composition of protein species, including their complete amino acid sequence and the identification of each modified side chain, in every protein in a biological sample and their quantification. We are still far from achieving

  13. Function modification of SR-PSOX by point mutations of basic amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chunxia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerosis (AS is a common cardiovascular disease. Transformation of macrophages to form foam cells by internalizing modified low density-lipoprotein (LDL via scavenger receptor (SR is a key pathogenic process in the onset of AS. It has been demonstrated that SR-PSOX functions as either a scavenger receptor for uptake of atherogenic lipoproteins and bacteria or a membrane-anchored chemokine for adhesion of macrophages and T-cells to the endothelium. Therefore, SR-PSOX plays an important role in the development of AS. In this study the key basic amino acids in the chemokine domain of SR-PSOX have been identified for its functions. Results A cell model to study the functions of SR-PSOX was successfully established. Based on the cell model, a series of mutants of human SR-PSOX were constructed by replacing the single basic amino acid residue in the non-conservative region of the chemokine domain (arginine 62, arginine 78, histidine 80, arginine 82, histidine 85, lysine 105, lysine 119, histidine 123 with alanine (designated as R62A, R78A, H80A, R82A, H85A, K105A, K119A and H123A, respectively. Functional studies showed that the mutants with H80A, H85A, and K105A significantly increased the activities of oxLDL uptake and bacterial phagocytosis compared with the wild-type SR-PSOX. In addition, we have also found that mutagenesis of either of those amino acids strongly reduced the adhesive activity of SR-PSOX by using a highly non-overlapping set of basic amino acid residues. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that basic amino acid residues in the non-conservative region of the chemokine domain of SR-PSOX are critical for its functions. Mutation of H80, H85, and K105 is responsible for increasing SR-PSOX binding with oxLDL and bacteria. All the basic amino acids in this region are important in the cells adhesion via SR-PSOX. These findings suggest that mutagenesis of the basic amino acids in the chemokine domain of SR-PSOX may

  14. Water metabolism and modification of tritium excretion in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimasa, Y.; Akita, Y.

    1982-01-01

    1. The intake and excretion of tritium were studied in rats exposed to tritiated water vapor. The metabolism of tritium was also investigated in rats given single administrations of tritiated water and in rats given daily administrations (per os or i.p.). The results were essentially in accord with those reported previously. 2. Amounts of drinking water consumed and urine excreted by rats drinking water with 0.15% saccharin were 1.5 to 2 times higher than in rats drinking tap water. The tritium activity in various tissues of rats drinking water with 0.15% saccharin decreased to about half of that of rats drinking tap water. A similar tendency was observed also in rats drinking beer. The diuretic agent sodium acetazolamide also enhanced the urinary excretion of tritium. (author)

  15. Irreversible inactivation of snake venom l-amino acid oxidase by covalent modification during catalysis of l-propargylglycine☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Jyotirmoy; Bhattacharyya, Debasish

    2013-01-01

    Snake venom l-amino acid oxidase (SV-LAAO, a flavor-enzyme) has attracted considerable attention due to its multifunctional nature, which is manifest in diverse clinical and biological effects such as inhibition of platelet aggregation, induction of cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity against various cells. The majority of these effects are mediated by H2O2 generated during the catalytic conversion of l-amino acids. The substrate analog l-propargylglycine (LPG) irreversibly inhibited the enzyme from Crotalus adamanteus and Crotalus atrox in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Inactivation was irreversible which was significantly protected by the substrate l-phenylalanine. A Kitz–Wilson replot of the inhibition kinetics suggested formation of reversible enzyme–LPG complex, which occurred prior to modification and inactivation of the enzyme. UV–visible and fluorescence spectra of the enzyme and the cofactor strongly suggested formation of covalent adduct between LPG and an active site residue of the enzyme. A molecular modeling study revealed that the FAD-binding, substrate-binding and the helical domains are conserved in SV-LAAOs and both His223 and Arg322 are the important active site residues that are likely to get modified by LPG. Chymotrypsin digest of the LPG inactivated enzyme followed by RP-HPLC and MALDI mass analysis identified His223 as the site of modification. The findings reported here contribute towards complete inactivation of SV-LAAO as a part of snake envenomation management. PMID:23772385

  16. Protein oxidation: an overview of metabolism of sulphur containing amino acid, cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Saheem; Khan, Hamda; Shahab, Uzma; Rehman, Shahnawaz; Rafi, Zeeshan; Khan, Mohd Yasir; Ansari, Ahsanullah; Siddiqui, Zeba; Ashraf, Jalaluddin Mohammad; Abdullah, Saleh M S; Habib, Safia; Uddin, Moin

    2017-01-01

    The available data suggest that among cellular constituents, proteins are the major target for oxidation primarily because of their quantity and high rate of interactions with ROS. Proteins are susceptible to ROS modifications of amino acid side chains which alter protein structure. Among the amino acids, Cysteine (Cys) is more prone to oxidation by ROS because of its high nucleophilic property. The reactivity of Cys with ROS is due to the presence of thiol group. In the oxidised form, Cys forms disulfide bond, which are primary covalent cross-link found in proteins, and which stabilize the native conformation of a protein. Indirect evidence suggests that thiol modifications by ROS may be involved in neurodegenerative disorders, but the significance and precise extent of the contributions are poorly understood. Here, we review the role of oxidized Cys in different pathological consequences and its biochemistry may increase the research in the discovery of new therapies. The purpose of this review is to re-examine the role and biochemistry of oxidised Cys residues.

  17. Effects of Lysine deficiency and Lys-Lys dipeptide on cellular apoptosis and amino acids metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Li, Yuying; Han, Hui; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Lijian; Ren, Wenkai; Chen, Shuai; Wu, Fei; Fang, Rejun; Huang, Xingguo; Li, Chunyong; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Zhang, Yuzhe; Liu, Gang; Yao, Jiming; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2017-09-01

    Lysine (Lys) is a common limiting amino acids (AA) for humans and animals and plays an important role in cell proliferation and metabolism, while metabolism of Lys deficiency and its dipeptide is still obscure. Thus, this study mainly investigated the effects of Lys deficiency and Lys-Lys dipeptide on apoptosis and AA metabolism in vitro and in vivo models. Lys deficiency induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and upregulated Lys transporters in vitro and in vivo. SLC7A11, a cystine-glutamate antiporter, was markedly upregulated by Lys deficiency and then further mediated cystine uptake and glutamate release, which was negatively regulated by cystine and glutamate transporters. Meanwhile, Lys deprivation upregulated pept1 expression, which might improve Lys-Lys dipeptide absorption to compensate for the reduced Lys availability. Lys-Lys dipeptide alleviated Lys deficiency induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and influenced AA metabolism. Furthermore, the mammalian target of rapamycin signal might be involved in sensing cellular Lys starvation and Lys-Lys dipeptide. Altogether, these studies suggest that Lys deficiency impairs AA metabolism and causes apoptosis. Lys-Lys dipeptide serves as a Lys source and alleviates Lys deficiency induced cellular imbalance. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Branched-chain amino acid metabolism in rat muscle: abnormal regulation in acidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, R.C.; Hara, Y.; Kelly, R.A.; Block, K.P.; Buse, M.G.; Mitch, W.E.

    1987-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism is frequently abnormal in pathological conditions accompanied by chronic metabolic acidosis. To study how metabolic acidosis affects BCAA metabolism in muscle, rats were gavage fed a 14% protein diet with or without 4 mmol NH/sub 4/Cl x 100 g body wt/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/. Epitrochlearis muscles were incubated with L-(1-/sup 14/C)-valine and L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine, and rates of decarboxylation, net transamination, and incorporation into muscle protein were measured. Plasma and muscle BCAA levels were lower in acidotic rats. Rates of valine and leucine decarboxylation and net transamination were higher in muscles from acidotic rats; these differences were associated with a 79% increase in the total activity of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase and a 146% increase in the activated form of the enzyme. They conclude that acidosis affects the regulation of BCAA metabolism by enhancing flux through the transaminase and by directly stimulating oxidative catabolism through activation of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase.

  19. Amino acid metabolism during total parenteral nutrition in healthy volunteers: evaluation of a new amino acid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, M P; Hankard, R; Cynober, L

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the metabolism and the tolerance of a new amino acid (AA) solution administered under conditions mimicking cyclical parenteral nutrition (PN) in humans. Eight healthy volunteers received peripheral PN for 10 h providing 10.5 mg N x kg(-1) x h(-1) and 2.0 kcal x kg(-1) x h(-1) (glucose-to-lipids ratio: 70/30%). For adaptation, a non-protein energy intake was increased progressively for 90 min; thereafter, AA infusion was started and maintained at a constant rate for 10 h. Plasma and urine concentrations of all the AAs were measured before, during and after the PN. For each given AA, the relation between plasma variations at the steady-state and infusion rate, plasma clearance (Cl), renal clearance (Clr), re-absorption rate (Reab) and, retention rate (Reten) were determined. The nitrogen balance (DeltaN) was calculated during the PN period. The results are presented as means+/-sem. All plasma AA concentrations decreased during the starting period of non-protein energy intake. The plasma AA concentrations reached a steady-state within 3 h upon AA infusion, except for glycine and lysine (6 h). At the steady state, the plasma concentrations of the infused AAs were closely correlated to their infusion rate (y= -18.3+1.5x, r(2)=0.92). The plasma glutamine concentration was maintained during the PN, which indicates that the solution might stimulate the de novo synthesis of this AA. When the PN was stopped, plasma levels of the AAs decreased, most of them returning to their basal levels, or significantly below for lysine (Por= 99%, Reten >or=99% and for non-essential AAs: Cl or= 98% except glycine (95+/-1), aspartate (94+/-2) and histidine (94+/-1), Reten >or=97% except histidine (94+/-1), glycine (95+/-3). These results indicate that in healthy subjects, the amounts of AAs provided by the new solution were well balanced for an intravenous administration, and so were well utilized without excessive urinary excretion. The present study

  20. Amino-functionalized surface modification of polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported polydimethylsiloxane membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Leiqing; Cheng, Jun; Li, Yannan; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to improve surface polarity of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes and provide surface active sites which were easy to react with other chemicals. 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) containing an amino group was introduced into a PDMS membrane by crosslinking to prepare polyacrylonitrile hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes with an amino-functionalized surface. Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses proved the existence of APTES and its amino group in the PDMS membrane. The concentration of N atoms on the PDMS membrane surface reached ∼6% when the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer in the PDMS coating solution was increased to 4/3. The water contact angle decreased from ∼114° to ∼87.5°, indicating the improved surface polarization of the PDMS membrane. The density and swelling degree of the PDMS membrane decreased and increased, respectively, with increasing APTES content in PDMS. This phenomenon increased CO2 permeability and decreased CO2/H2 selectivity, CO2/CH4 selectivity, and CO2/N2 selectivity. When the mass ratio of APTES/PDMS oligomer was increased from 0 to 4/3, the CO2 permeation rate of the hollow fiber-supported PDMS membranes initially decreased from ∼2370 GPU to ∼860 GPU and then increased to ∼2000 GPU due to the change in coating solution viscosity.

  1. Bioactive compounds derived from the yeast metabolism of aromatic amino acids during alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Albert; Guillamon, Jose Manuel; Torija, Maria Jesus; Beltran, Gemma; Cerezo, Ana B; Troncoso, Ana M; Garcia-Parrilla, M Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Metabolites resulting from nitrogen metabolism in yeast are currently found in some fermented beverages such as wine and beer. Their study has recently attracted the attention of researchers. Some metabolites derived from aromatic amino acids are bioactive compounds that can behave as hormones or even mimic their role in humans and may also act as regulators in yeast. Although the metabolic pathways for their formation are well known, the physiological significance is still far from being understood. The understanding of this relevance will be a key element in managing the production of these compounds under controlled conditions, to offer fermented food with specific enrichment in these compounds or even to use the yeast as nutritional complements.

  2. Bioactive Compounds Derived from the Yeast Metabolism of Aromatic Amino Acids during Alcoholic Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Mas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolites resulting from nitrogen metabolism in yeast are currently found in some fermented beverages such as wine and beer. Their study has recently attracted the attention of researchers. Some metabolites derived from aromatic amino acids are bioactive compounds that can behave as hormones or even mimic their role in humans and may also act as regulators in yeast. Although the metabolic pathways for their formation are well known, the physiological significance is still far from being understood. The understanding of this relevance will be a key element in managing the production of these compounds under controlled conditions, to offer fermented food with specific enrichment in these compounds or even to use the yeast as nutritional complements.

  3. Proteomic Investigation of Protein Profile Changes and Amino Acid Residue Level Modification in Cooked Lamb Meat: The Effect of Boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2015-10-21

    Hydrothermal treatment (heating in water) is a common method of general food processing and preparation. For red-meat-based foods, boiling is common; however, how the molecular level effects of this treatment correlate to the overall food properties is not yet well-understood. The effects of differing boiling times on lamb meat and the resultant cooking water were here examined through proteomic evaluation. The longer boiling time was found to result in increased protein aggregation involving particularly proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as well as truncation in proteins such as in α-actinin-2. Heat-induced protein backbone cleavage was observed adjacent to aspartic acid and asparagine residues. Side-chain modifications of amino acid residues resulting from the heating, including oxidation of phenylalanine and formation of carboxyethyllysine, were characterized in the cooked samples. Actin and myoglobin bands from the cooked meat per se remained visible on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, even after significant cooking time. These proteins were also found to be the major source of observed heat-induced modifications. This study provides new insights into molecular-level modifications occurring in lamb meat proteins during boiling and a protein chemistry basis for better understanding the effect of this common treatment on the nutritional and functional properties of red-meat-based foods.

  4. Peripheral metabolism of PTH [parathyroid hormone]: Fate of biologically active amino terminus in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bringhurst, R.R.; Stern, A.M.; Yotts, M.; Mizrahi, N.; Segre, G.V.; Potts, J.T. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Clearance of intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) from blood is associated with rapid uptake by liver and kidney, limited proteolysis by tissue endopeptidases and, within minutes, appearance of circulating carboxyl-(COOH)-terminal PTH fragments. The fate of the corresponding amino(NH 2 )-terminal portion of the hormone during this peripheral metabolism is still unknown, however. To determine this, the authors have employed [ 35 S]bovine PTH (bPTH) labeled to high specific activity at NH 2 -terminal methionines, which permits direct monitoring of the fate of the PTH NH 2 -terminus during metabolism in vivo. The [ 35 S]PTH was administered by bolus or continuous intravenous infusion to anesthetized normal rats, to rats subjected to acute ablation of the liver, the kidneys, or both, and to rats receiving co-infusions of excess synthetic bPTH(1-34) NH 2 -terminal fragments. Analysis by high-resolution chromatographic techniques sensitive to 10 -13 M [ 35 S]PTH peptides in plasma yields no evidence that peripheral metabolism of PTH generates circulating NH 2 -terminal fragments, even when special measures are taken to block clearance of such putative fragments from blood. They find that the NH 2 -terminus of PTH is rapidly degraded in situ by the liver but that both liver and especially kidney nevertheless contain low levels of NH 2 -terminal PTH fragments that, although not released into the blood, are large enough to be potentially active. Thus the peripheral metabolism of PTH in normal animals does not normally lead to the formation of circulating amino terminal fragments of the hormone that might act independently of intact PTH on peripheral target tissues

  5. Branched-chain amino acids in metabolic signalling and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christopher J; Adams, Sean H

    2014-12-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are important nutrient signals that have direct and indirect effects. Frequently, BCAAs have been reported to mediate antiobesity effects, especially in rodent models. However, circulating levels of BCAAs tend to be increased in individuals with obesity and are associated with worse metabolic health and future insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A hypothesized mechanism linking increased levels of BCAAs and T2DM involves leucine-mediated activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which results in uncoupling of insulin signalling at an early stage. A BCAA dysmetabolism model proposes that the accumulation of mitotoxic metabolites (and not BCAAs per se) promotes β-cell mitochondrial dysfunction, stress signalling and apoptosis associated with T2DM. Alternatively, insulin resistance might promote aminoacidaemia by increasing the protein degradation that insulin normally suppresses, and/or by eliciting an impairment of efficient BCAA oxidative metabolism in some tissues. Whether and how impaired BCAA metabolism might occur in obesity is discussed in this Review. Research on the role of individual and model-dependent differences in BCAA metabolism is needed, as several genes (BCKDHA, PPM1K, IVD and KLF15) have been designated as candidate genes for obesity and/or T2DM in humans, and distinct phenotypes of tissue-specific branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase complex activity have been detected in animal models of obesity and T2DM.

  6. Essential amino-acid metabolism in infected/non-infected, poor, Guatemalan children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazariegos, M.; Solomons, N.W.; Vettorazzi, C.; Caballero, B.

    1996-01-01

    As mentioned above, it was our intention to develop and test a simplified version of the protocol to assess amino acid metabolism in children. With the combined efforts of a team of experts in the field, a generic protocol was developed as a mandate of the first CRP held at Boston in the fall of 1993. During the beginning of 1994, the final version of such a protocol was released to all the participants of the CRP meeting and arrangements were made in order to apply it and assess its usefulness in the field setting. Therefore, we have shifted our activities to apply, assess and adapt the generic protocol. We are now testing the protocol in the field to establish the variability parameters in both between and within individuals. After testing and refining the protocol, with the help of other groups in developed countries, by validation and/or comparative studies, we would be in a better position to recommend it as a tool to study amino acid metabolism in children in developing countries, whether to describe some specific profiles or to evaluate nutrition interventions. 1 fig., 3 tabs

  7. Branched-chain [corrected] amino acid metabolism: implications for establishing safe intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Susan M; Sweatt, Andrew J; Lanoue, Kathryn F

    2005-06-01

    There are several features of the metabolism of the indispensable BCAAs that set them apart from other indispensable amino acids. BCAA catabolism involves 2 initial enzymatic steps that are common to all 3 BCAAs; therefore, the dietary intake of an individual BCAA impacts on the catabolism of all 3. The first step is reversible transamination followed by irreversible oxidative decarboxylation of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid transamination products, the branched chain alpha-keto acids (BCKAs). The BCAA catabolic enzymes are distributed widely in body tissues and, with the exception of the nervous system, all reactions occur in the mitochondria of the cell. Transamination provides a mechanism for dispersing BCAA nitrogen according to the tissue's requirements for glutamate and other dispensable amino acids. The intracellular compartmentalization of the branched-chain aminotransferase isozymes (mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase, cytosolic branched-chain aminotransferase) impacts on intra- and interorgan exchange of BCAA metabolites, nitrogen cycling, and net nitrogen transfer. BCAAs play an important role in brain neurotransmitter synthesis. Moreover, a dysregulation of the BCAA catabolic pathways that leads to excess BCAAs and their derivatives (e.g., BCKAs) results in neural dysfunction. The relatively low activity of catabolic enzymes in primates relative to the rat may make the human more susceptible to excess BCAA intake. It is hypothesized that the symptoms of excess intake would mimic the neurological symptoms of hereditary diseases of BCAA metabolism.

  8. Oncogenic MYC Activates a Feedforward Regulatory Loop Promoting Essential Amino Acid Metabolism and Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ming; Jiang, Jue; Gao, Peng; Liu, Hudan; Qing, Guoliang

    2017-12-26

    Most tumor cells exhibit obligatory demands for essential amino acids (EAAs), but the regulatory mechanisms whereby tumor cells take up EAAs and EAAs promote malignant transformation remain to be determined. Here, we show that oncogenic MYC, solute carrier family (SLC) 7 member 5 (SLC7A5), and SLC43A1 constitute a feedforward activation loop to promote EAA transport and tumorigenesis. MYC selectively activates Slc7a5 and Slc43a1 transcription through direct binding to specific E box elements within both genes, enabling effective EAA import. Elevated EAAs, in turn, stimulate Myc mRNA translation, in part through attenuation of the GCN2-eIF2α-ATF4 amino acid stress response pathway, leading to MYC-dependent transcriptional amplification. SLC7A5/SLC43A1 depletion inhibits MYC expression, metabolic reprogramming, and tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These findings thus reveal a MYC-SLC7A5/SLC43A1 signaling circuit that underlies EAA metabolism, MYC deregulation, and tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1: Is It the Link between Sulfur Amino Acids and Lipid Metabolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Poloni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An association between sulfur amino acids (methionine, cysteine, homocysteine and taurine and lipid metabolism has been described in several experimental and population-based studies. Changes in the metabolism of these amino acids influence serum lipoprotein concentrations, although the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. However, recent evidence has suggested that the enzyme stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1 may be the link between these two metabolic pathways. SCD-1 is a key enzyme for the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids. Its main substrates C16:0 and C18:0 and products palmitoleic acid (C16:1 and oleic acid (C18:1 are the most abundant fatty acids in triglycerides, cholesterol esters and membrane phospholipids. A significant suppression of SCD-1 has been observed in several animal models with disrupted sulfur amino acid metabolism, and the activity of SCD-1 is also associated with the levels of these amino acids in humans. This enzyme also appears to be involved in the etiology of metabolic syndromes because its suppression results in decreased fat deposits (regardless of food intake, improved insulin sensitivity and higher basal energy expenditure. Interestingly, this anti-obesogenic phenotype has also been described in humans and animals with sulfur amino acid disorders, which is consistent with the hypothesis that SCD-1 activity is influenced by these amino acids, in particularly cysteine, which is a strong and independent predictor of SCD-1 activity and fat storage. In this narrative review, we discuss the evidence linking sulfur amino acids, SCD-1 and lipid metabolism.

  10. Metabolic profiling of plasma amino acids shows that histidine increases following the consumption of pork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samman S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Samir Samman,1 Ben Crossett,2 Miles Somers,1 Kirstine J Bell,1 Nicole T Lai,1,3 David R Sullivan,3 Peter Petocz4 1Discipline of Nutrition and Metabolism, 2Discipline of Proteomics and Biotechnology, School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4Department of Statistics, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Amino acid (AA status is determined by factors including nutrition, metabolic rate, and interactions between the metabolism of AA, carbohydrates, and lipids. Analysis of the plasma AA profile, together with markers of glucose and lipid metabolism, will shed light on metabolic regulation. The objectives of this study were to investigate the acute responses to the consumption of meals containing either pork (PM or chicken (CM, and to identify relationships between plasma AA and markers of glycemic and lipemic control. A secondary aim was to explore AA predictors of plasma zinc concentrations. Ten healthy adults participated in a postprandial study on two separate occasions. In a randomized cross-over design, participants consumed PM or CM. The concentrations of 21 AA, glucose, insulin, triglycerides, nonesterified fatty acids, and zinc were determined over 5 hours postprandially. The meal composition did not influence glucose, insulin, triglyceride, nonesterified fatty acid, or zinc concentrations. Plasma histidine was higher following the consumption of PM (P=0.014, with consistently higher changes observed after 60 minutes (P<0.001. Greater percentage increases were noted at limited time points for valine and leucine + isoleucine in those who consumed CM compared to PM. In linear regression, some AAs emerged as predictors of the metabolic responses, irrespective of the meal that was consumed. The present study demonstrates that a single meal of PM or CM produces a differential profile of AA in the

  11. Characterization of amino acid metabolism by cultured rat kidney cells: Study with 15N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissim, I.; States, B.; Yudkoff, M.; Segal, S.

    1987-01-01

    The present study evaluates the metabolism of glutamine and glutamate by normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. The major aim was to evaluate the effect of acute acidosis on the metabolism of amino acid and ammonia formation by cultured NRK cells. Experiments at either pH 7.0 or 7.4 were conducted with phosphate-buffered saline supplemented with either 1 mM [5- 15 N]glutamine, [2- 15 N]glutamine, or [ 15 N]glutamate. Incubation with either glutamine or glutamate as a precursor showed that production of ammonia and glucose was increased significantly at pH 7.0 vs 7.4. In experiments with [5- 15 N]glutamine, the authors found that ∼57 and 43% of ammonia N was derived from 5-N of glutamine at pH 7.4 and 7.0, respectively. Three major metabolic pathways of [2- 15 N]glutamine or [ 15 N]glutamate disposal were identified: (1) transamination reactions involving the pH-independent formation of [ 15 N] aspartate and [ 15 N]alanine; (2) the synthesis of [6- 15 NH 2 ]adenine nucleotide, a process more active at pH 7.4 vs. 7.0; and (3) glutamine synthesis from [ 15 N]glutamate, especially at pH 7.4. The data indicate that NRK cells in culture consume glutamine and glutamate and generate ammonia and various amino acids, depending on the H + concentration in the media. The studies suggest that these cell lines may provide a useful model for studying various aspects of the effect of pH on rat renal ammoniagenesis

  12. Fish oil and the pan-PPAR agonist tetradecylthioacetic acid affect the amino acid and carnitine metabolism in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørndal, Bodil; Brattelid, Trond; Strand, Elin; Vigerust, Natalya Filipchuk; Svingen, Gard Frodahl Tveitevåg; Svardal, Asbjørn; Nygård, Ottar; Berge, Rolf Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are important in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Recent studies have shown that PPARα-activation by WY 14,643 regulates the metabolism of amino acids. We investigated the effect of PPAR activation on plasma amino acid levels using two PPARα activators with different ligand binding properties, tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) and fish oil, where the pan-PPAR agonist TTA is a more potent ligand than omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. In addition, plasma L-carnitine esters were investigated to reflect cellular fatty acid catabolism. Male Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) were fed a high-fat (25% w/w) diet including TTA (0.375%, w/w), fish oil (10%, w/w) or a combination of both. The rats were fed for 50 weeks, and although TTA and fish oil had hypotriglyceridemic effects in these animals, only TTA lowered the body weight gain compared to high fat control animals. Distinct dietary effects of fish oil and TTA were observed on plasma amino acid composition. Administration of TTA led to increased plasma levels of the majority of amino acids, except arginine and lysine, which were reduced. Fish oil however, increased plasma levels of only a few amino acids, and the combination showed an intermediate or TTA-dominated effect. On the other hand, TTA and fish oil additively reduced plasma levels of the L-carnitine precursor γ-butyrobetaine, as well as the carnitine esters acetylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine, valeryl/isovalerylcarnitine, and octanoylcarnitine. These data suggest that while both fish oil and TTA affect lipid metabolism, strong PPARα activation is required to obtain effects on amino acid plasma levels. TTA and fish oil may influence amino acid metabolism through different metabolic mechanisms.

  13. Metabolomic Analyses of Leishmania Reveal Multiple Species Differences and Large Differences in Amino Acid Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth D Westrop

    Full Text Available Comparative genomic analyses of Leishmania species have revealed relatively minor heterogeneity amongst recognised housekeeping genes and yet the species cause distinct infections and pathogenesis in their mammalian hosts. To gain greater information on the biochemical variation between species, and insights into possible metabolic mechanisms underpinning visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, we have undertaken in this study a comparative analysis of the metabolomes of promastigotes of L. donovani, L. major and L. mexicana. The analysis revealed 64 metabolites with confirmed identity differing 3-fold or more between the cell extracts of species, with 161 putatively identified metabolites differing similarly. Analysis of the media from cultures revealed an at least 3-fold difference in use or excretion of 43 metabolites of confirmed identity and 87 putatively identified metabolites that differed to a similar extent. Strikingly large differences were detected in their extent of amino acid use and metabolism, especially for tryptophan, aspartate, arginine and proline. Major pathways of tryptophan and arginine catabolism were shown to be to indole-3-lactate and arginic acid, respectively, which were excreted. The data presented provide clear evidence on the value of global metabolomic analyses in detecting species-specific metabolic features, thus application of this technology should be a major contributor to gaining greater understanding of how pathogens are adapted to infecting their hosts.

  14. Impaired metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraibar, Martin; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2014-01-01

    lipids for energy production. Such changes reflect alterations in membrane composition and dysregulation of sphingolipids signaling during senescence. This study establishes a new concept connecting oxidative protein modifications with the altered cellular metabolism associated with the senescent...... is assured by resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. During senescence their replication and differentiation is compromised contributing to sarcopenia. In this study we have addressed the impact of oxidatively modified proteins in the impaired metabolism of senescent human satellite cells....... By using a targeted proteomics analysis we have found that proteins involved in protein quality control and glycolytic enzymes are the main targets of oxidation (carbonylation) and modification with advanced glycation/lipid peroxidation end products during replicative senescence of satellite cells...

  15. Effects of PREMIER lifestyle modifications on participants with and without the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Lillian F; Brown, Ann J; Ard, Jamy D; Loria, Catherine; Erlinger, Thomas P; Feldstein, Adrianne C; Lin, Pao-Hwa; Champagne, Catherine M; King, Abby C; McGuire, Heather L; Stevens, Victor J; Brantley, Phillip J; Harsha, David W; McBurnie, Mary Ann; Appel, Lawrence J; Svetkey, Laura P

    2007-10-01

    Lifestyle modification can reduce blood pressure and lower cardiovascular risk. Established recommendations include weight loss, sodium reduction, and increased physical activity. PREMIER studied the effects of lifestyle interventions based on established recommendations alone and with the addition of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern. This analysis aimed to assess the interventions' impact on cardiometabolic variables in participants with, compared with those without, metabolic syndrome. The primary outcome was 6-month change in systolic blood pressure. Participants with prehypertension or stage-1 hypertension were randomly assigned to an advice only control group, a 6-month intensive behavioral intervention group of established recommendations (EST), or an established recommendations plus DASH group (EST+DASH). Metabolic syndrome was defined per National Cholesterol and Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III. We used general linear models to test intervention effects on change in blood pressure, lipids, and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment), in subgroups defined by the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome. Of 796 participants, 399 had metabolic syndrome. Both EST and EST+DASH reduced the primary outcome variable, systolic blood pressure. Within the EST+DASH group, those with and without metabolic syndrome responded similarly (P=0.231). However, within EST, those with metabolic syndrome had a poorer response, with a decrease in systolic blood pressure of 8.4 mm Hg versus 12.0 mm Hg in those without metabolic syndrome (P=0.002). Thus, metabolic syndrome attenuated the systolic blood pressure reduction of EST, but this attenuation was overcome in EST+DASH. Finally, diastolic blood pressure, lipids, and homeostasis model assessment responded similarly to both interventions regardless of metabolic syndrome status. Our data suggest that strategies for lowering BP in individuals with metabolic syndrome may be

  16. Hyponatremic Chloride-depletion Metabolic Alkalosis Successfully Treated with High Cation-gap Amino Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryuge, Akihiro; Matsui, Katsuomi; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-01-01

    Chloride (Cl)-depletion alkalosis (CDA) develops due to the loss of Cl-rich body fluid, i.e., vomiting or diuretics use, and is typically treated with a chloride-rich solution such as normal saline (NS). Although NS is one of the most utilized Cl-rich solutions, high cation-gap amino acid (HCG-AA) predominantly comprises Cl and less sodium, making HCG-AA more efficient in correcting CDA. We herein report a case of CDA with chronic hyponatremia after frequent vomiting, which was successfully treated with HCG-AA without overcorrecting hyponatremia or causing hypervolemia. HCG-AA may be more beneficial than NS for treating hyponatremic or hypervolemic metabolic alkalosis.

  17. Hepatic SRC-1 Activity Orchestrates Transcriptional Circuitries of Amino Acid Pathways with Potential Relevance for Human Metabolic Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannour-Louet, Mounia; York, Brian; Tang, Ke; Stashi, Erin; Bouguerra, Hichem; Zhou, Suoling; Yu, Hui; Wong, Lee-Jun C.; Stevens, Robert D.; Xu, Jianming; Newgard, Christopher B.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances in amino acid metabolism are increasingly recognized as being associated with, and serving as prognostic markers for chronic human diseases, such as cancer or type 2 diabetes. In the current study, a quantitative metabolomics profiling strategy revealed global impairment in amino acid metabolism in mice deleted for the transcriptional coactivator steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1. Aberrations were hepatic in origin, because selective reexpression of SRC-1 in the liver of SRC-1 null mice largely restored amino acids concentrations to normal levels. Cistromic analysis of SRC-1 binding sites in hepatic tissues confirmed a prominent influence of this coregulator on transcriptional programs regulating amino acid metabolism. More specifically, SRC-1 markedly impacted tyrosine levels and was found to regulate the transcriptional activity of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme of tyrosine catabolism. Consequently, SRC-1 null mice displayed low TAT expression and presented with hypertyrosinemia and corneal alterations, 2 clinical features observed in the human syndrome of TAT deficiency. A heterozygous missense variant of SRC-1 (p.P1272S) that is known to alter its coactivation potential, was found in patients harboring idiopathic tyrosinemia-like disorders and may therefore represent one risk factor for their clinical symptoms. Hence, we reinforce the concept that SRC-1 is a central factor in the fine orchestration of multiple pathways of intermediary metabolism, suggesting it as a potential therapeutic target that may be exploitable in human metabolic diseases and cancer. PMID:25148457

  18. Restoration of metabolic health by decreased consumption of branched-chain amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Nicole E; Williams, Elizabeth M; Kasza, Ildiko; Konon, Elizabeth N; Schaid, Michael D; Schmidt, Brian A; Poudel, Chetan; Sherman, Dawn S; Yu, Deyang; Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I; Cottrell, Sara E; Geiger, Gabriella; Barnes, Macy E; Wisinski, Jaclyn A; Fenske, Rachel J; Matkowskyj, Kristina A; Kimple, Michelle E; Alexander, Caroline M; Merrins, Matthew J; Lamming, Dudley W

    2018-02-15

    We recently found that feeding healthy mice a diet with reduced levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which are associated with insulin resistance in both humans and rodents, modestly improves glucose tolerance and slows fat mass gain. In the present study, we show that a reduced BCAA diet promotes rapid fat mass loss without calorie restriction in obese mice. Selective reduction of dietary BCAAs also restores glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity to obese mice, even as they continue to consume a high-fat, high-sugar diet. A low BCAA diet transiently induces FGF21 (fibroblast growth factor 21) and increases energy expenditure. We suggest that dietary protein quality (i.e. the precise macronutrient composition of dietary protein) may impact the effectiveness of weight loss diets. Obesity and diabetes are increasing problems around the world, and although even moderate weight loss can improve metabolic health, reduced calorie diets are notoriously difficult to sustain. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; leucine, isoleucine and valine) are elevated in the blood of obese, insulin-resistant humans and rodents. We recently demonstrated that specifically reducing dietary levels of BCAAs has beneficial effects on the metabolic health of young, growing mice, improving glucose tolerance and modestly slowing fat mass gain. In the present study, we examine the hypothesis that reducing dietary BCAAs will promote weight loss, reduce adiposity, and improve blood glucose control in diet-induced obese mice with pre-existing metabolic syndrome. We find that specifically reducing dietary BCAAs rapidly reverses diet-induced obesity and improves glucoregulatory control in diet-induced obese mice. Most dramatically, mice eating an otherwise unhealthy high-calorie, high-sugar Western diet with reduced levels of BCAAs lost weight and fat mass rapidly until regaining a normal weight. Importantly, this normalization of weight was mediated not by caloric restriction or increased

  19. Topographical body fat distribution links to amino acid and lipid metabolism in healthy obese women [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois-Pierre J Martin

    Full Text Available Visceral adiposity is increasingly recognized as a key condition for the development of obesity related disorders, with the ratio between visceral adipose tissue (VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT reported as the best correlate of cardiometabolic risk. In this study, using a cohort of 40 obese females (age: 25-45 y, BMI: 28-40 kg/m(2 under healthy clinical conditions and monitored over a 2 weeks period we examined the relationships between different body composition parameters, estimates of visceral adiposity and blood/urine metabolic profiles. Metabonomics and lipidomics analysis of blood plasma and urine were employed in combination with in vivo quantitation of body composition and abdominal fat distribution using iDXA and computerized tomography. Of the various visceral fat estimates, VAT/SAT and VAT/total abdominal fat ratios exhibited significant associations with regio-specific body lean and fat composition. The integration of these visceral fat estimates with metabolic profiles of blood and urine described a distinct amino acid, diacyl and ether phospholipid phenotype in women with higher visceral fat. Metabolites important in predicting visceral fat adiposity as assessed by Random forest analysis highlighted 7 most robust markers, including tyrosine, glutamine, PC-O 44∶6, PC-O 44∶4, PC-O 42∶4, PC-O 40∶4, and PC-O 40∶3 lipid species. Unexpectedly, the visceral fat associated inflammatory profiles were shown to be highly influenced by inter-days and between-subject variations. Nevertheless, the visceral fat associated amino acid and lipid signature is proposed to be further validated for future patient stratification and cardiometabolic health diagnostics.

  20. Supramolecular packing and polymorph screening of N-isonicotinoyl arylketone hydrazones with phenol and amino modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hean, Duane; Michael, Joseph P.; Lemmerer, Andreas

    2018-04-01

    Thirteen structural variants based on the (E)-N‧-(1-arylethylidene)pyridohydrazide template were prepared, investigated and screened for possible polymorphic behaviour. Four variants showed from Differential Scanning Calorimetry Scans thermal events indicative of new solid-state phases. The thirteen variants included substituents R = sbnd OH or sbnd NH2 placed at ortho, meta and para positions on the phenyl ring; and shifting the pyridyl nitrogen between positions 4-, 3- and 2-. The crystal structures of twelve of the compounds were determined to explore their supramolecular structures. The outcomes of these modifications demonstrated that the pyridyl nitrogen at the 2- position is 'locked' by forming a hydrogen bond with the amide hydrogen; while placing the pyridyl nitrogen at positions 3- and 4- offers a greater opportunity for hydrogen bonding with neighbouring molecules. Such interactions include Osbnd H⋯N, Nsbnd H⋯N, Osbnd H⋯O, Nsbnd H⋯O, Nsbnd H⋯π, π⋯π stacking, as well as other weaker interactions such as Csbnd H⋯N, Csbnd H⋯O, Csbnd H⋯N(pyridyl). When OH or NH2 donors are placed in the ortho position, an intramolecular hydrogen bond is formed between the acceptor hydrazone nitrogen and the respective donor. The meta- and para-positioned donors form an unpredictable array of supramolecular structures by forming hydrogen-bonded chains with the pyridyl nitrogen and carbonyl acceptors respectively. In addition to the intramolecular and chain hydrogen bond formation demonstrated throughout the crystal structures under investigation, larger order hydrogen-bonded rings were also observed in some of the supramolecular aggregations. The extent of the hydrogen-bonded ring formations range from two to six molecular participants depending on the specific crystal structure.

  1. Sex Differences in Energy Metabolism Need to Be Considered with Lifestyle Modifications in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty N. Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Women have a higher proportion of body fat compared to men. However, women consume fewer kilojoules per kilogram lean mass and burn fat more preferentially during exercise compared with men. During gestation, women store even greater amounts of fat that cannot be solely attributed to increased energy intake. These observations suggest that the relationship between kilojoules consumed and kilojoules utilised is different in men and women. The reason for these sex differences in energy metabolism is not known; however, it may relate to sex steroids, differences in insulin resistance, or metabolic effects of other hormones such as leptin. When considering lifestyle modifications, sex differences in energy metabolism should be considered. Moreover, elucidating the regulatory role of hormones in energy homeostasis is important for understanding the pathogenesis of obesity and perhaps in the future may lead to ways to reduce body fat with less energy restriction.

  2. Insulin resistance is associated with altered amino acid metabolism and adipose tissue dysfunction in normoglycemic women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund, Petri; Zhang, Xiaobo; Pekkala, Satu; Autio, Reija; Kong, Lingjia; Yang, Yifan; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Alen, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated adiposity, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to identify early metabolic alterations associated with insulin resistance in normoglycemic women with varying degree of adiposity. One-hundred and ten young and middle-aged women were divided into low and high IR groups based on their median HOMA-IR (0.9 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 1.2). Body composition was assessed using DXA, skeletal muscle and liver fat by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, serum metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and adipose tissue and skeletal muscle gene expression by microarrays. High HOMA-IR subjects had higher serum branched-chain amino acid concentrations (BCAA) (p HOMA-IR subjects (p < 0.05 for all), but no differentially expressed genes in skeletal muscle were found. In conclusion, in normoglycemic women insulin resistance was associated with increased serum BCAA concentrations, down-regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism and increased expression of inflammation-related genes in the adipose tissue. PMID:27080554

  3. Effect of TiO2 modification with amino-based self-assembled monolayer on inverted organic solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozlu, Cem; Mutlu, Adem; Can, Mustafa; Havare, Ali Kemal; Demic, Serafettin; Icli, Sıddık

    2017-11-01

    The effects of surface modification of titanium dioxide (TiO2) on the performance of inverted type organic solar cells (i-OSCs) was investigated in this study. A series of benzoic acid derivatized self-assembled monolayer (SAM) molecules of 4‧-[(hexyloxy)phenyl]amino-3,5-biphenyl dicarboxylic acid (CT17) and 4‧-[1-naphthyl (phenyl)amino]biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid (CT19) were utilized to modify the interface between TiO2 buffer layer and poly-3 hexylthiophene (P3HT):[6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) active layer having the device structure of ITO/TiO2/SAM/P3HT:PC61BM/MoO3/Ag. The work function and surface wetting properties of TiO2 buffer layer served as electron transporting layer between ITO and PC61BM active layer were tuned by SAM method. The solar cell of the SAM modified devices exhibited better performance. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of i-OSCs devices with bare TiO2 electrodes enhanced from 2.00% to 2.21% and 2.43% with CT17 and CT19 treated TiO2 electrodes, respectively. The open circuit voltage (Voc) of the SAM treated TiO2 devices reached to 0.60 V and 0.61 V, respectively, while the Voc of untreated TiO2 was 0.57 V. The water contact angle of i-OSCs with CT17 and CT19 SAMs was also higher than the value of the unmodified TiO2 electrode. These results show that inserting a monolayer at the interface between organic and inorganic layers is an useful alternative method to improve the performance of i-OSCs.

  4. The Why and How of Amino Acid Analytics in Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Manig, F; Kuhne, K; von Neubeck, C; Schwarzenbolz, U; Yu, Z; Kessler, B; Pietzsch, J; Kunz-Schughart, LA

    2016-01-01

    Pathological alterations in cell functions are frequently accompanied by metabolic reprogramming including modifications in amino acid metabolism. Amino acid detection is thus integral to the diagnosis of many hereditary metabolic diseases. The development of malignant diseases as metabolic disorders comes along with a complex dysregulation of genetic and epigenetic factors affecting metabolic enzymes. Cancer cells might transiently or permanently become auxotrophic for non-essential or semi-...

  5. Enhanced productivity of gamma-amino butyric acid by cascade modifications of a whole-cell biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinwei; Ke, Chongrong; Zhu, Jiangming; Wang, Yan; Zeng, Wenchao; Huang, Jianzhong

    2018-04-01

    We previously developed a gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-producing strain of Escherichia coli, leading to production of 614.15 g/L GABA at 45 °C from L-glutamic acid (L-Glu) with a productivity of 40.94 g/L/h by three successive whole-cell conversion cycles. However, the increase in pH caused by the accumulation of GABA resulted in inactivation of the biocatalyst and consequently led to relatively lower productivity. In this study, by overcoming the major problem associated with the increase in pH during the production process, a more efficient biocatalyst was obtained through cascade modifications of the previously reported E. coli strain. First, we introduced four amino acid mutations to the codon-optimized GadB protein from Lactococcus lactis to shift its decarboxylation activity toward a neutral pH, resulting in 306.65 g/L of GABA with 99.14 mol% conversion yield and 69.8% increase in GABA productivity. Second, we promoted transportation of L-Glu and GABA by removing the genomic region encoding the C-plug of GadC (a glutamate/GABA antiporter) to allow its transport path to remain open at a neutral pH, which improved the GABA productivity by 16.8% with 99.3 mol% conversion of 3 M L-Glu. Third, we enhanced the expression of soluble GadB by introducing the GroESL molecular chaperones, leading to 20.2% improvement in GABA productivity, with 307.40 g/L of GABA and a 61.48 g/L/h productivity obtained in one cycle. Finally, we inhibited the degradation of GABA by inactivation of gadA and gadB from the E. coli genome, which resulted in almost no GABA degradation after 40 h. After the cascade system modifications, the engineered recombinant E. coli strain achieved a 44.04 g/L/h productivity with a 99.6 mol% conversion of 3 M L-Glu in a 5-L bioreactor, about twofold increase in productivity compared to the starting strain. This increase represents the highest GABA productivity by whole-cell bioconversion using L-Glu as a substrate in one cycle observed

  6. Amino acid and glucose metabolism in fed-batch CHO cell culture affects antibody production and glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Fed-batch Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture is the most commonly used process for IgG production in the biopharmaceutical industry. Amino acid and glucose consumption, cell growth, metabolism, antibody titer, and N-glycosylation patterns are always the major concerns during upstream process...

  7. Aging rather than stress strongly influences amino acid metabolisms in the brain and genital organs of female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaira, Momoko; Nagasawa, Mao; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ikeda, Hiromi; Minaminaka, Kimie; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2017-03-01

    Aging and stress affect quality of life, and proper nourishment is one of means of preventing this effect. Today, there is a focus on the amount of protein consumed by elderly people; however, changes in the amino acid metabolism of individuals have not been fully considered. In addition, the difference between average life span and healthy life years is larger in females than it is in males. To prolong the healthy life years of females, in the present study we evaluated the influence of stress and aging on metabolism and emotional behavior by comparing young and middle-aged female mice. After 28 consecutive days of immobilization stress, behavioral tests were conducted and tissue sampling was performed. The results showed that the body weight of middle-aged mice was severely lowered by stress, but emotional behaviors were hardly influenced by either aging or stress. Aging influenced changes in amino acid metabolism in the brain and increased various amino acid levels in the uterus and ovary. In conclusion, we found that aged mice were more susceptible to stress in terms of body-weight reduction, and that amino acid metabolisms in the brain and genital organs were largely influenced by aging rather than by stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Repletion of branched chain amino acids reverses mTORC1 signaling but not improved metabolism during dietary protein dilution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maida, Adriano; Chan, Jessica S K; Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dietary protein dilution (PD) has been associated with metabolic advantages such as improved glucose homeostasis and increased energy expenditure. This phenotype involves liver-induced release of FGF21 in response to amino acid insufficiency; however, it has remained unclear whether di...

  9. The positive association of branched-chain amino acids and metabolic dyslipidemia in Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Panpan; Hu, Wen; Fu, Zhenzhen; Sun, Luning; Zhou, Ying; Gong, Yingyun; Yang, Tao; Zhou, Hongwen

    2016-07-25

    It has been suggested that serum branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are associated with the incident, progression and prognostic of type 2 diabetes. However, the role of BCAAs in metabolic dyslipidemia (raised triglycerides (TG) and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C)) remains poorly understood. This study aims to investigate 1) the association of serum BCAAs with total cholesterol (TC), TG, HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and 2) the association between serum BCAAs levels and risk of metabolic dyslipidemia in a community population with different glucose homeostasis. Demographics data and blood samples were collected from 2251 Chinese subjects from the Huaian Diabetes Protective Program (HADPP) study. After exclusion for cardiovascular disease (CVD), serious hepatic or nephritic diseases and others, 1320 subjects remained for analysis (789 subjects with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) > 5.7, 521 with HbA1c ≤ 5.7). Serum BCAAs level was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS). The association of BCAAs with lipids or with the risk of metabolic dyslipidemia was analyzed. Elevated serum BCAAs (both total and individual BCAA) were positively associated with TG and inversely associated with HDL-C in the whole population. These correlations were still significant even after adjustment for confounding factors (r = 0.165, p dyslipidemia was 3.703 (2.261, 6.065) and 3.702 (1.877, 7.304), respectively (all p dyslipidemia. In addition, glucose homeostasis could play a certain role in BCAAs-related dyslipidemia.

  10. Effect of plant proteins and crystalline amino acid supplementation on postprandial plasma amino acid profiles and metabolic response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolland, Marine; Larsen, Bodil Katrine; Holm, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    .75 % of their body mass with a diet based on either (1) fish meal (FM), (2) pea protein concentrate (PPC), or (3) pea protein concentrate supplemented with histidine, lysine, methionine and threonine (PPC+) to mimic FM AA profile. The specific dynamic action and nitrogen quotient (NQ) were calculated for 48 h......The use of aquafeeds formulated with plant protein sources supplemented with crystalline amino acids (CAAs) is believed to influence amino acid (AA) uptake patterns and AA metabolic fate. Oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion rates were measured in rainbow trout (468.5 +/- A 86.5 g) force fed 0...... of the postprandial period. In parallel, plasma AA concentrations were measured in blood samples withdrawn from the caudal vein before and then 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 20, 32 and 48 h after feed administration. The unbalanced diet PPC had a significantly higher NQ compared to FM (0.29 +/- A 0.09 and 0.18 +/- A 0...

  11. Metabolism of γ-hydroxyl-[1-14C] butyrate by rat brain: relationship to the Krebs cycle and metabolic compartmentation of amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, J.D.; Roth, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Ninhydrin decarboxylation experiments were carried out on the labelled amino acids produced following intraventricular injection of either γ-hydroxy-[1- 14 C] butyric acid (GHB) or [1- 14 C] succinate. The loss of isotope (as 14 CO 2 ) was similar for both substances. The [1- 14 C] GHB metabolites lost 75% of the label and the [1- 14 C] succinate metabolites lost 68%. This observation gives support to the hypothesis that the rat brain has the enzymatic capacity to metabolize [1- 14 C] GHB to succinate and to amino acids that have the isotope in the carboxylic acid group adjacent to the α-amino group. These results also indicate that the label from [1- 14 C] GHB does not enter the Krebs cycle as acetate. The specific activity ratio of radio-labelled glutamine to glutamic acid was determined in order to evaluate which of the two major metabolic compartments prefentially metabolize GHB. It was found that for [1- 14 C] GHB the ratio was 4.20 +- 0.18 (S.E. for n = 7) and for [1- 14 C] succinate the ratio was 7.71 (average of two trials, 7.74 and 7.69). These results suggest that the compartment thought to be associated with glial cells and synaptosomal structures is largely responsible for the metabolism of GHB. Metabolism as it might relate to the neuropharmacological action of GHB is discussed. (author)

  12. Modification of nucleotide metabolism in relationship with differentiation and in response to irradiation in human tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Shuang

    1998-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the metabolism of nucleotides in human tumour cells. The first part addresses the modifications of nucleotide (more specifically purine) metabolism in relationship with human melanoma cell proliferation and differentiation. The second part addresses the modifications of this metabolism in response to an irradiation in human colon tumour cells. For each part, the author proposes a bibliographic synthesis, and a presentation of studied cells and of methods used to grow cells, and respectively to proliferate and differentiate them or to irradiate them, and then discusses the obtained results [fr

  13. When contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases invent their cognate amino acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Hervé; Becker, Hubert Dominique; Reinbolt, Joseph; Kern, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Faithful protein synthesis relies on a family of essential enzymes called aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, assembled in a piecewise fashion. Analysis of the completed archaeal genomes reveals that all archaea that possess asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) also display a second ORF encoding an AsnRS truncated from its anticodon binding-domain (AsnRS2). We show herein that Pyrococcus abyssi AsnRS2, in contrast to AsnRS, does not sustain asparaginyl-tRNAAsn synthesis but is instead capable of converting aspartic acid into asparagine. Functional analysis and complementation of an Escherichia coli asparagine auxotrophic strain show that AsnRS2 constitutes the archaeal homologue of the bacterial ammonia-dependent asparagine synthetase A (AS-A), therefore named archaeal asparagine synthetase A (AS-AR). Primary sequence- and 3D-based phylogeny shows that an archaeal AspRS ancestor originated AS-AR, which was subsequently transferred into bacteria by lateral gene transfer in which it underwent structural changes producing AS-A. This study provides evidence that a contemporary aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase can be recruited to sustain amino acid metabolism. PMID:12874385

  14. Abomasal amino acid infusion in postpartum dairy cows: Effect on whole-body, splanchnic, and mammary amino acid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mogens; Galindo, C; Ouellet, D R

    2015-01-01

    Nine Holstein cows with rumen cannulas and indwelling catheters in splanchnic blood vessels were used in a generalized randomized incomplete block design with repeated measures to study the effect of increased early postpartum AA supply on splanchnic and mammary AA metabolism. At calving, cows were...... blocked according to parity (second and third or greater) and allocated to 2 treatments: abomasal infusion of water (CTRL; n=4) or free AA with casein profile (AA-CN; n=5) in addition to a basal diet. The AA-CN infusion started with half of the maximal dose at the calving day (1 d in milk; DIM......, and Lys tended to be greater for AA-CN, and the net PDV recovery of these infused AA ranged from 69 to 73%, indicating increased PDV metabolism with AA-CN. The fractional hepatic removal of these AA did not differ from zero and was unaffected by the increased supply. Consequently, the splanchnic release...

  15. Plasma free amino acid profiles evaluate risk of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension in a large Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Natsu; Mahbub, M H; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Hase, Ryosuke; Ishimaru, Yasutaka; Sunagawa, Hiroshi; Amano, Hiroki; Kobayashi-Miura, Mikiko; Kanda, Hideyuki; Fujita, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Mai; Kikuchi, Shinya; Ikeda, Atsuko; Takasu, Mariko; Kageyama, Naoko; Nakamura, Mina; Tanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-04-07

    Recently, the association of plasma free amino acid (PFAA) profile and lifestyle-related diseases has been reported. However, few studies have been reported in large Asian populations, about the usefulness of PFAAs for evaluating disease risks. We examined the ability of PFAA profiles to evaluate lifestyle-related diseases in so far the largest Asian population. We examined plasma concentrations of 19 amino acids in 8589 Japanese subjects, and determined the association with variables associated with obesity, blood glucose, lipid, and blood pressure. We also evaluated the PFAA indexes that reflect visceral fat obesity and insulin resistance. The contribution of single PFAA level and relevant PFAA indexes was also examined in the risk assessment of lifestyle-related diseases. Of the 19 amino acids, branched-chain amino acids and aromatic amino acids showed association with obesity and lipid variables. The PFAA index related to visceral fat obesity showed relatively higher correlation with variables than that of any PFAA. In the evaluation of lifestyle-related disease risks, the odds ratios of the PFAA index related to visceral fat obesity or insulin resistance with the diseases were higher than most of those of individual amino acid levels even after adjusting for potential confounding factors. The association pattern of the indexes and PFAA with each lifestyle-related disease was distinct. We confirmed the usefulness of PFAA profiles and indexes as markers for evaluating the risks of lifestyle-related diseases, including diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, dyslipidemia, and hypertension in a large Asian population.

  16. Metabolic flux rearrangement in the amino acid metabolism reduces ammonia stress in the α1-antitrypsin producing human AGE1.HN cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priesnitz, Christian; Niklas, Jens; Rose, Thomas; Sandig, Volker; Heinzle, Elmar

    2012-03-01

    This study focused on metabolic changes in the neuronal human cell line AGE1.HN upon increased ammonia stress. Batch cultivations of α(1)-antitrypsin (A1AT) producing AGE1.HN cells were carried out in media with initial ammonia concentrations ranging from 0mM to 5mM. Growth, A1AT production, metabolite dynamics and finally metabolic fluxes calculated by metabolite balancing were compared. Growth and A1AT production decreased with increasing ammonia concentration. The maximum A1AT concentration decreased from 0.63g/l to 0.51g/l. Central energy metabolism remained relatively unaffected exhibiting only slightly increased glycolytic flux at high initial ammonia concentration in the medium. However, the amino acid metabolism was significantly changed. Fluxes through transaminases involved in amino acid degradation were reduced concurrently with a reduced uptake of amino acids. On the other hand fluxes through transaminases working in the direction of amino acid synthesis, i.e., alanine and phosphoserine, were increased leading to increased storage of excess nitrogen in extracellular alanine and serine. Glutamate dehydrogenase flux was reversed increasingly fixing free ammonia with increasing ammonia concentration. Urea production additionally observed was associated with arginine uptake by the cells and did not increase at high ammonia stress. It was therefore not used as nitrogen sink to remove excess ammonia. The results indicate that the AGE1.HN cell line can adapt to ammonia concentrations usually present during the cultivation process to a large extent by changing metabolism but with slightly reduced A1AT production and growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Seed and Foliar Application of Amino Acids Improve Variables of Nitrogen Metabolism and Productivity in Soybean Crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Walquíria F; Fagan, Evandro B; Soares, Luis H; Soares, Jérssica N; Reichardt, Klaus; Neto, Durval D

    2018-01-01

    The application of amino acids in crops has been a common practice in recent years, although most of the time they are associated with products based on algae extracts or on fermented animal or vegetable wastes. However, little is known about the isolated effect of amino acids on the development of crops. Therefore, the objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of the application of isolated amino acids on the in some steps of the soybean nitrogen metabolism and on productivity. Experiments were carried out in a greenhouse and in the field with the application of the amino acids glutamate (Glu), phenylalanine (Phe), cysteine (Cys) and glycine (Gly) and as a set (Glu+Phe+Cys+Gly), as seed treatment (ST), as foliar application (FA) and both (ST+FA), at the V 4 growth stage. Evaluations consisted of nitrate reductase and urease activities, nitrate, ureide, total amino acids and total nitrogen content in leaves, and productivity. The application of Glu to leaves, Cys as ST and a mixture of Glu+Cys+Phe+Gly as ST+FA in the greenhouse experiment increased the total amino acids content. In the field experiment all treatments increased the amino acid content in leaves. At the V 6 stage in the field experiment, all modes of Gly application, Glu as ST and FA, Cys and Phe as ST+FA and Glu+Cys+Phe+Gly as FA increased the nitrate content in leaves. In the greenhouse, application of Cys and Phe as ST increased the production of soybean plants by at least 21%. The isolated application of Cys, Phe, Gly, Glu and the set of these amino acids as ST increased the productivity of soybean plants in the field experiment by at least 22%.

  18. Incorporation of 3H-amino acids into proteins in a partially purified fraction of axoplasm: evidence for transfer RNA-mediated, post-translational protein modification in squid giant axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingoglia, N A; Giuditta, A; Zanakis, M F; Babigian, A; Tasaki, I; Chakraborty, G; Sturman, J A

    1983-12-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) has been demonstrated to be present in axons of both invertebrates and the higher vertebrates, but nothing is known of its role in the metabolism of the axon. The present experiments were performed to determine whether tRNA functions in axons as a participant in post-translational protein modification of endogenous proteins. RNA was extracted from the axoplasm of squid giant axons and incubated with a variety of 3H-amino acids, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (obtained from squid optic lobe), and an appropriate reaction mixture. All of the amino acids tested were bound to an RNA fraction, but this reaction did not occur when samples were incubated in the presence of ribonuclease or in the absence of axoplasmic RNA. When radioactive RNA was chromatographed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the radioactivity comigrated with known tRNA markers, suggesting the presence of 3H-aminoacylated tRNA. Aminoacylation of RNA could also be demonstrated by incubating fresh axoplasm with labeled amino acids and a reaction mixture, minus exogenous aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. These findings indicate the presence in axoplasm of a variety of species of aminoacyl-tRNAs as well as their corresponding synthetase enzymes. In the latter experiment no radioactivity was found associated with the protein fraction. This was also the finding when 3H-aminoacylated tRNA was either injected directly into the axon or incubated with extruded axoplasm. Thus, under the conditions described above, there is no evidence of transfer of amino acids from tRNA to proteins. In other experiments, axoplasm was pooled to a volume of 50 to 100 microliters, homogenized gently, and centrifuged at 150,000 X g for 1 hr. Some of the high speed supernatant was incubated with labeled amino acids and an appropriate reaction mixture, and the remainder was passed through an S-200 Sephacryl column before incubation with the same reaction mixture. There was no incorporation of amino acids into protein in

  19. Simultaneous analysis of amino acid and organic acid by NMR spectrometry, 2. Diagnostic aids for inborn error of metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koda, Naoya; Yamaguchi, Shuichi; Mori, Takeshi.

    1987-09-01

    Analysis of urine from patients with inborn error of metabolism were studied by /sup 1/H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Diseases studied were as follows; phenylketonuria, biotin responsive multiple carboxylase deficiency, non-ketotic hyperglycinemia, 3-ketothiolase deficiency, alkaptonuria, methylmalonic acidemia, isovaleric acidemia, glutaric aciduria, argininosuccinic aciduria and hyperornithinemia. In each disease, specific metabolites in urine were recognized by NMR spectrometry. This method is accomplished within 10 minutes with non-treated small volume of urine and will be successfully available for the screening andor diagnosis of inherited metabolic diseases of amino acid and organic acid.

  20. Effects of alkali stress on growth, free amino acids and carbohydrates metabolism in Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pingping; Fu, Jinmin; Hu, Longxing

    2012-10-01

    Soil alkalization is one of the most prominent adverse environmental factors limiting plant growth, while alkali stress affects amino acids and carbohydrates metabolism. The objective of this study was conducted to investigate the effects of alkali stress on growth, amino acids and carbohydrates metabolism in Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis). Seventy-day-old plants were subjected to four pH levels: 6.0 (control), 8.0 (low), 9.4 (moderate) and 10.3 (severe) for 7 days. Moderate to severe alkali stress (pH >9.4) caused a significant decline in turf quality and growth rate in Kentucky bluegrass. Soluble protein was unchanged in shoots, but decreased in roots as pH increased. The levels of amino acids was kept at the same level as control level at 4 days after treatment (DAT) in shoots, but greater at 7 DAT, when plants were subjected to severe (pH 10.3) alkali stress. The alkali stressed plants had a greater level of starch, water soluble carbohydrate and sucrose content, but lower level of fructose and glucose. Fructan and total non-structural carbohydrate (TNC) increased at 4 DAT and decreased at 7 DAT for alkali stressed plants. These results suggested that the decrease in fructose and glucose contributed to the growth reduction under alkali stress, while the increase in amino acids, sucrose and storage form of carbohydrate (fructan, starch) could be an adaptative mechanism in Kentucky bluegrass under alkali stress.

  1. Reproductive and metabolic state differences in olfactory responses to amino acids in a mouth brooding African cichlid fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonov, Alexandre A; Butler, Julie M; Field, Karen E; Caprio, John; Maruska, Karen P

    2017-08-15

    Olfaction mediates many crucial life-history behaviors such as prey detection, predator avoidance, migration and reproduction. Olfactory function can also be modulated by an animal's internal physiological and metabolic states. While this is relatively well studied in mammals, little is known about how internal state impacts olfaction in fishes, the largest and most diverse group of vertebrates. Here we apply electro-olfactograms (EOGs) in the African cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni to test the hypothesis that olfactory responses to food-related cues (i.e. l-amino acids; alanine and arginine) vary with metabolic, social and reproductive state. Dominant males (reproductively active, reduced feeding) had greater EOG magnitudes in response to amino acids at the same tested concentration than subordinate males (reproductively suppressed, greater feeding and growth rates). Mouth brooding females, which are in a period of starvation while they brood fry in their mouths, had greater EOG magnitudes in response to amino acids at the same tested concentration than both recovering and gravid females that are feeding. Discriminant function analysis on EOG magnitudes also grouped the male (subordinate) and female (recovering, gravid) phenotypes with higher food intake together and distinguished them from brooding females and dominant males. The slope of the initial negative phase of the EOG also showed intra-sexual differences in both sexes. Our results demonstrate that the relationship between olfaction and metabolic state observed in other taxa is conserved to fishes. For the first time, we provide evidence for intra-sexual plasticity in the olfactory response to amino acids that is influenced by fish reproductive, social and metabolic state. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Anesthesia with halothane and nitrous oxide alters protein and amino acid metabolism in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horber, F.F.; Krayer, S.; Rehder, K.; Haymond, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    General anesthesia in combination with surgery is known to result in negative nitrogen balance. To determine whether general anesthesia without concomitant surgery decreases whole body protein synthesis and/or increases whole body protein breakdown, two groups of dogs were studied: Group 1 (n = 6) in the conscious state and Group 2 (n = 8) during general anesthesia employing halothane (1.5 MAC) in 50% nitrous oxide and oxygen. Changes in protein metabolism were estimated by isotope dilution techniques employing simultaneous infusions of [4,53H]leucine and alpha-[1-14C]-ketoisocaproate (KIC). Total leucine carbon flux was unchanged or slightly increased in the anesthetized animals when compared to the conscious controls, indicating only a slight increase in the rate of proteolysis. However, leucine oxidation was increased (P less than 0.001) by more than 80% in the anesthetized animals when compared with their conscious controls, whereas whole body nonoxidative leucine disappearance, an indicator of whole body protein synthesis, was decreased. The ratio of leucine oxidation to the nonoxidative rate of leucine disappearance, which provides an index of the catabolism of at least one essential amino acid in the postabsorptive state, was more than twofold increased (P less than 0.001) in the anesthetized animals regardless of the tracer employed. These studies suggest that the administration of anesthesia alone, without concomitant surgery, is associated with a decreased rate of whole body protein synthesis and increased leucine oxidation, resulting in increased leucine and protein catabolism, which may be underlying or initiating some of the protein wasting known to occur in patients undergoing surgery

  3. Deuterium oxide as a tool for the study of amino acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, R.; Burton, J.; Varner, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    We have used deuterium oxide in nontoxic concentrations to study, in intact seedlings, the biosynthesis of amino acids. The extent and pattern of deuteration, as determined by a gas--liquid chromatograph--mass spectrometer system, permits conclusions about the biosynthesis of individual amino acids and also about their exposure to transaminases and other enzymes that might introduce deuterium into specific positions of the amino acid by exchange. This method could be used to study amino acid biogenesis in any organism that can tolerate 20 to 40 percent deuterium oxide for a period of a few hours to a few days

  4. High Glucose-Induced Cardiomyocyte Death May Be Linked to Unbalanced Branched-Chain Amino Acids and Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Lin, Qiuting; Chen, Jiuxia; Wei, Tingting; Li, Chen; Zhao, Liangcai; Gao, Hongchang; Zheng, Hong

    2018-04-01

    High glucose-induced cardiomyocyte death is a common symptom in advanced-stage diabetic patients, while its metabolic mechanism is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to explore metabolic changes in high glucose-induced cardiomyocytes and the heart of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by ¹H-NMR-based metabolomics. We found that high glucose can promote cardiomyocyte death both in vitro and in vivo studies. Metabolomic results show that several metabolites exhibited inconsistent variations in vitro and in vivo. However, we also identified a series of common metabolic changes, including increases in branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs: leucine, isoleucine and valine) as well as decreases in aspartate and creatine under high glucose condition. Moreover, a reduced energy metabolism could also be a common metabolic characteristic, as indicated by decreases in ATP in vitro as well as AMP, fumarate and succinate in vivo. Therefore, this study reveals that a decrease in energy metabolism and an increase in BCAAs metabolism could be implicated in high glucose-induced cardiomyocyte death.

  5. Amino acid availability regulates the effect of hyperinsulinemia on skin protein metabolism in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of amino acid supply and insulin infusion on skin protein kinetics (fractional synthesis rate (FSR), fractional breakdown rate (FBR), and net balance (NB)) in pigs were investigated. Four-month-old pigs were divided into four groups as follows: control, insulin (INS), amino acid (AA), an...

  6. Evaluating the role of epigenetic histone modifications in the metabolic memory of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Feng; Chen, Zhuo; Genuth, Saul; Paterson, Andrew; Zhang, Lingxiao; Wu, Xiwei; Li, Sierra Min; Cleary, Patricia; Riggs, Arthur; Harlan, David M; Lorenzi, Gayle; Kolterman, Orville; Sun, Wanjie; Lachin, John M; Natarajan, Rama

    2014-05-01

    We assessed whether epigenetic histone posttranslational modifications are associated with the prolonged beneficial effects (metabolic memory) of intensive versus conventional therapy during the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) on the progression of microvascular outcomes in the long-term Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation linked to promoter tiling arrays to profile H3 lysine-9 acetylation (H3K9Ac), H3 lysine-4 trimethylation (H3K4Me3), and H3K9Me2 in blood monocytes and lymphocytes obtained from 30 DCCT conventional treatment group subjects (case subjects: mean DCCT HbA1c level >9.1% [76 mmol/mol] and progression of retinopathy or nephropathy by EDIC year 10 of follow-up) versus 30 DCCT intensive treatment subjects (control subjects: mean DCCT HbA1c level 15 genes related to the nuclear factor-κB inflammatory pathway and were enriched in genes related to diabetes complications. These results suggest an association between HbA1c level and H3K9Ac, and a possible epigenetic explanation for metabolic memory in humans.

  7. Insight on the impacts of free amino acids and their metabolites on the immune system from a perspective of inborn errors of amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakula, Malgorzata M; Maier, Thorsten J; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Amino acids (AAs) support a broad range of functions in living organisms, including several that affect the immune system. The functions of the immune system are affected when free AAs are depleted or in excess because of external factors, such as starvation, or because of genetic factors, such as inborn errors of metabolism. Areas covered: In this review, we discuss the current insights into how free AAs affect immune responses. When possible, we make comparisons to known disease states resulting from inborn errors of metabolism, in which changed levels of AAs or AA metabolites provide insight into the impact of AAs on the human immune system in vivo. We also explore the literature describing how changes in AA levels might provide pharmaceutical targets for safe immunomodulatory treatment. Expert opinion: The impact of free AAs on the immune system is a neglected topic in most immunology textbooks. That neglect is undeserved, because free AAs have both direct and indirect effects on the immune system. Consistent choices of pre-clinical models and better strategies for creating formulations are required to gain clinical impact.

  8. Amino acid metabolism and whole-body protein turnover in lambs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of protein supplementation of a wheat straw diet on the metabolism of lysine, leucine, methionine and urea, and on whole-body protein turnover rate was investigated in lambs. The metabolism of lysine and leucine is reported elsewhere (Cronje et aI., 1992); in this paper methionine metabolism is discussed, and ...

  9. Proteomic analysis of amino acid metabolism differences between wild and cultivated Panax ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Sun

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: This study elucidates the differences in amino acids between wild and cultivated ginseng. These results will provide a reference for further studies on the medicinal functions of wild ginseng.

  10. Comparative Studies on Dyeability with Direct, Acid and Reactive Dyes after Chemical Modification of Jute with Mixed Amino Acids Obtained from Extract of Waste Soya Bean Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Nilendu Sekhar; Konar, Adwaita; Roy, Alok Nath; Samanta, Ashis Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Jute fabric was treated with mixed natural amino acids obtained from waste soya bean seed extract for chemical modification of jute for its cataionization and to enhance its dyeability with anionic dyes (like direct, reactive and acid dye) as well enabling soya modified jute for salt free dyeing with anionic reactive dyes maintaining its eco-friendliness. Colour interaction parameters including surface colour strength were assessed and compared for both bleached and soya-modified jute fabric for reactive dyeing and compared with direct and acid dye. Improvement in K/S value (surface colour strength) was observed for soya-modified jute even in absence of salt applied in dye bath for reactive dyes as well as for direct and acid dyes. In addition, reactive dye also shows good dyeability even in acid bath in salt free conditions. Colour fastness to wash was evaluated for bleached and soya-modified jute fabric after dyeing with direct, acid and reactive dyes are reported. Treatment of jute with soya-extracted mixed natural amino acids showed anchoring of some amino/aldemine groups on jute cellulosic polymer evidenced from Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) Spectroscopy. This amino or aldemine group incorporation in bleached jute causes its cationization and hence when dyed in acid bath for reactive dye (instead of conventional alkali bath) showed dye uptake for reactive dyes. Study of surface morphology by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of said soya-modified jute as compared to bleached jute was studied and reported.

  11. Mycobacterium Lysine ε-aminotransferase is a novel alarmone metabolism related persister gene via dysregulating the intracellular amino acid level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiangke; Li, Yunsong; Du, Qinglin; Huang, Qinqin; Guo, Siyao; Xu, Mengmeng; Lin, Yanping; Liu, Zhidong; Xie, Jianping

    2016-01-25

    Bacterial persisters, usually slow-growing, non-replicating cells highly tolerant to antibiotics, play a crucial role contributing to the recalcitrance of chronic infections and treatment failure. Understanding the molecular mechanism of persister cells formation and maintenance would obviously inspire the discovery of new antibiotics. The significant upregulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3290c, a highly conserved mycobacterial lysine ε-aminotransferase (LAT) during hypoxia persistent model, suggested a role of LAT in persistence. To test this, a lat deleted Mycobacterium smegmatis was constructed. The expression of transcriptional regulator leucine-responsive regulatory protein (LrpA) and the amino acids abundance in M. smegmatis lat deletion mutants were lowered. Thus, the persistence capacity of the deletion mutant was impaired upon norfloxacin exposure under nutrient starvation. In summary, our study firstly reported the involvement of mycobacterium LAT in persister formation, and possibly through altering the intracellular amino acid metabolism balance.

  12. The cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites as studied by 13C and 14C labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassel, B.

    1995-11-01

    The present investigations show the feasibility of analyzing the cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites by 13 C-and 14 C-labelling using labelled acetate and glucose as markers for glial and neuronal metabolism, respectively. Using [ 13 C[acetate, it was shown that glial cells export ∼60% of their TCA cycle intermediates, mostly as glutamine, and that this glutamine is used by neurons partly as an energy reserve, and partly it is converted directly to glutamate and GABA. Using [ 13 C[glucose, the glial process or pyruvate carboxylation was shown to compensate fully for the loss of glutamine. The mechanism of action of two neurotoxins, fluorocitrate and 3-nitropropionate was elucidated. The latter toxin was shown to inhibit the TCA cycle of GABAergic neurons selectively. Formation of pyruvate and lactate from glial TCA cycle intermediates was demonstrated in vivo. This pathway may be important for glial inactivation of transmitter glutamate and GABA. The results illustrate glianeuronal interactions, and they suggest the applicability of 13 CNMR spectroscopy to the detailed study of the cerebral metabolism of amino acids in the intact, unanesthetized human brain. 174 refs

  13. The cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites as studied by {sup 13}C and {sup 14}C labelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassel, B.

    1995-11-01

    The present investigations show the feasibility of analyzing the cerebral metabolism of amino acids and related metabolites by {sup 13}C-and {sup 14}C-labelling using labelled acetate and glucose as markers for glial and neuronal metabolism, respectively. Using [{sup 13}C]acetate, it was shown that glial cells export {approx}60% of their TCA cycle intermediates, mostly as glutamine, and that this glutamine is used by neurons partly as an energy reserve, and partly it is converted directly to glutamate and GABA. Using [{sup 13}C]glucose, the glial process or pyruvate carboxylation was shown to compensate fully for the loss of glutamine. The mechanism of action of two neurotoxins, fluorocitrate and 3-nitropropionate was elucidated. The latter toxin was shown to inhibit the TCA cycle of GABAergic neurons selectively. Formation of pyruvate and lactate from glial TCA cycle intermediates was demonstrated in vivo. This pathway may be important for glial inactivation of transmitter glutamate and GABA. The results illustrate glianeuronal interactions, and they suggest the applicability of {sup 13}CNMR spectroscopy to the detailed study of the cerebral metabolism of amino acids in the intact, unanesthetized human brain. 174 refs.

  14. Hormone regulation of rhizome development in tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) associated with proteomic changes controlling respiratory and amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiqing; Xu, Qian; Meyer, William A; Huang, Bingru

    2016-09-01

    Rhizomes are underground stems with meristematic tissues capable of generating shoots and roots. However, mechanisms controlling rhizome formation and growth are yet to be completely understood. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether rhizome development could be regulated by cytokinins (CKs) and gibberellic acids (GAs), and determine underlying mechanisms of regulation of rhizome formation and growth of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) by a CK or GA through proteomic and transcript analysis. A rhizomatous genotype of tall fescue ('BR') plants were treated with 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP, a synthetic cytokinin) or GA3 in hydroponic culture in growth chambers. Furthermore, comparative proteomic analysis of two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were performed to investigate proteins and associated metabolic pathways imparting increased rhizome number by BAP and rhizome elongation by GA3 KEY RESULTS: BAP stimulated rhizome formation while GA3 promoted rhizome elongation. Proteomic analysis identified 76 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) due to BAP treatment and 37 DEPs due to GA3 treatment. Cytokinin-related genes and cell division-related genes were upregulated in the rhizome node by BAP and gibberellin-related and cell growth-related genes in the rhizome by GA3 CONCLUSIONS: Most of the BAP- or GA-responsive DEPs were involved in respiratory metabolism and amino acid metabolism. Transcription analysis demonstrated that genes involved in hormone metabolism, signalling pathways, cell division and cell-wall loosening were upregulated by BAP or GA3 The CK and GA promoted rhizome formation and growth, respectively, by activating metabolic pathways that supply energy and amino acids to support cell division and expansion during rhizome initiation and elongation in tall fescue. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Metabolic Fate of Branched-Chain Amino Acids During Adipogenesis, in Adipocytes From Obese Mice and C2C12 Myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Alcalde, Isabela; Tenorio-Guzman, Miriam R; Tovar, Armando R; Salinas-Rubio, Daniela; Torre-Villalvazo, Ivan; Torres, Nimbe; Noriega, Lilia G

    2017-04-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism is regulated by the branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT2) and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDH). BCAT2 and BCKDH expression and activity are modified during adipogenesis and altered in adipose tissues of mice with genetic or diet-induced obesity. However, little is known about how these modifications and alterations affect the intracellular metabolic fate of BCAAs during adipogenesis, in adipocytes from mice fed a control or high-fat diet or in C2C12 myotubes. Here, we demonstrate that BCAAs are mainly incorporated into proteins during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. However, they are oxidized and incorporated into lipids during the late days of differentiation. Conversely, 92% and 97% of BCAA were oxidized, 1.6% and 6% were used for protein synthesis and 1.2% and 1.5% were incorporated into lipids in adipocytes from epididymal and subcutaneous adipose tissue, respectively. All three pathways were decreased in adipocytes from mice fed a high-fat diet. In C2C12 myotubes, leucine is mainly used for protein synthesis and palmitate is incorporated into lipids. Interestingly, leucine decreased both palmitate oxidation and its incorporation to lipids and proteins; and palmitate increased leucine oxidation and decreased its incorporation to lipids and proteins in a dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that BCAA metabolic fate differs between the early and late stages of adipocyte differentiation and in adipocytes from mice fed a control or high-fat diet; and that leucine affects the metabolic fate of palmitate and vice versa in C2C12 myotubes. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 808-818, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cationic Amino Acid Uptake Constitutes a Metabolic Regulation Mechanism and Occurs in the Flagellar Pocket of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier, León A.; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Montserrat, Javier; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosomatids' amino acid permeases are key proteins in parasite metabolism since they participate in the adaptation of parasites to different environments. Here, we report that TcAAP3, a member of a Trypanosoma cruzi multigene family of permeases, is a bona fide arginine transporter. Most higher eukaryotic cells incorporate cationic amino acids through a single transporter. In contrast, T. cruzi can recognize and transport cationic amino acids by mono-specific permeases since a 100-fold molar excess of lysine could not affect the arginine transport in parasites that over-express the arginine permease (TcAAP3 epimastigotes). In order to test if the permease activity regulates downstream processes of the arginine metabolism, the expression of the single T. cruzi enzyme that uses arginine as substrate, arginine kinase, was evaluated in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. In this parasite model, intracellular arginine concentration increases 4-folds and ATP level remains constant until cultures reach the stationary phase of growth, with decreases of about 6-folds in respect to the controls. Interestingly, Western Blot analysis demonstrated that arginine kinase is significantly down-regulated during the stationary phase of growth in TcAAP3 epimastigotes. This decrease could represent a compensatory mechanism for the increase in ATP consumption as a consequence of the displacement of the reaction equilibrium of arginine kinase, when the intracellular arginine concentration augments and the glucose from the medium is exhausted. Using immunofluorescence techniques we also determined that TcAAP3 and the specific lysine transporter TcAAP7 co-localize in a specialized region of the plasma membrane named flagellar pocket, staining a single locus close to the flagellar pocket collar. Taken together these data suggest that arginine transport is closely related to arginine metabolism and cell energy balance. The clinical relevance of studying trypanosomatids' permeases relies on the

  17. The Uptake and Metabolism of Amino Acids, and Their Unique Role in the Biology of Pathogenic Trypanosomatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Letícia; Nascimento, Janaina de Freitas; Damasceno, Flávia Silva; Bringaud, Frédéric; Michels, Paul A M; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2018-04-01

    Trypanosoma brucei , as well as Trypanosoma cruzi and more than 20 species of the genus Leishmania , form a group of flagellated protists that threaten human health. These organisms are transmitted by insects that, together with mammals, are their natural hosts. This implies that during their life cycles each of them faces environments with different physical, chemical, biochemical, and biological characteristics. In this work we review how amino acids are obtained from such environments, how they are metabolized, and how they and some of their intermediate metabolites are used as a survival toolbox to cope with the different conditions in which these parasites should establish the infections in the insects and mammalian hosts.

  18. Nontargeted LC–MS Metabolomics Approach for Metabolic Profiling of Plasma and Urine from Pigs Fed Branched Chain Amino Acids for Maximum Growth Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assadi Soumeh, Elham; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic response in plasma and urine of pigs when feeding an optimum level of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) for best growth performance is unknown. The objective of the current study was to identify the metabolic phenotype associated with the BCAAs intake level that could be linked to ...

  19. Further studies on the regulation of amino sugar metabolism in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, C. J.; Pasternak, C. A.

    1965-01-01

    1. Glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase [2-amino-2-deoxy-d-glucose 6-phosphate ketol-isomerase (deaminating), EC 5.3.1.10] of Bacillus subtilis has been partially purified. Its Km is 3·0mm. 2. Extracts of B. subtilis contain N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate deacetylase (Km 1·4mm), glucosamine 1-phosphate acetylase and amino sugar kinases (EC 2.7.1.8 and 2.7.1.9). 3. Glucosamine 6-phosphate synthetase (l-glutamine–d-fructose 6-phosphate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.16) is repressed by growth of B. subtilis in the presence of glucosamine, N-acetylglucosamine, N-propionylglucosamine or N-formylglucosamine. Glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase and N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate deacetylase are induced by N-acetylglucosamine. Amino sugar kinases are induced by glucose, glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. The synthesis of glucosamine 1-phosphate acetylase is unaffected by amino sugars. 4. Glucose in the growth medium prevents the induction of glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase and of N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate deacetylase caused by N-acetylglucosamine; glucose also alleviates the repression of glucosamine 6-phosphate synthetase caused by amino sugars. 5. Glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase increases in bacteria incubated beyond the exponential phase of growth. This increase is prevented by glucose. PMID:14343123

  20. Structure, function, and regulation of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism of bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Takeo

    2017-11-01

    Amino acids are essential components in all organisms because they are building blocks of proteins. They are also produced industrially and used for various purposes. For example, L-glutamate is used as the component of "umami" taste and lysine has been used as livestock feed. Recently, many kinds of amino acids have attracted attention as biological regulators and are used for a healthy life. Thus, to clarify the mechanism of how amino acids are biosynthesized and how they work as biological regulators will lead to further effective utilization of them. Here, I review the leucine-induced-allosteric activation of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from Thermus thermophilus and the relationship with the allosteric regulation of GDH from mammals. Next, I describe structural insights into the efficient production of L-glutamate by GDH from an excellent L-glutamate producer, Corynebacterium glutamicum. Finally, I review the structural biology of lysine biosynthesis of thermophilic bacterium and archaea.

  1. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in the whole body and mammary gland of the lactating Saanen goat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.J.; Knutson, R.J.; Louie, K.; Harris, P.M.; Davis, S.R.; Mackenzie, D.D.S.

    1999-01-01

    Five multiparous Saanen goats in late lactation were infused with 35 S-cysteine into the mammary gland via the external pudic artery. A further 2 goats were infused with 35 S-methionine via the same artery and later with 35 S-methionine into the jugular vein. Total uptake of cysteine from the arterial blood supply by the mammary gland was approximately 6% of the 35 S-cysteine flux past the gland, whereas uptake of methionine was 30-40%. Total mammary uptake of cysteine was also lower than that of methionine when expressed as a percentage of whole body utilisation (6.5 and 14%, respectively). The uptake from the blood did not account for output in the milk for either cysteine or methionine. Both amino acids were highly conserved by the gland as shown by little release of any degraded constitutive protein amino acids and no evidence of oxidation products of either cysteine or methionine being released into the blood. Comparison of 35 S activity in the milk from the infused and non-infused sides of the gland showed up to 10% trans-sulfuration of methionine to cysteine within the gland, none of which was exported in the venous drainage. Total ATP production by one side of the gland was 12.1 mol/day or 13 mmol/min.kg mammary tissue, of which 15% was required for gland protein synthesis. The experimental measurements from both the cysteine and methionine infusions were used to solve a model of gland amino acid uptake and partitioning. Modelling radioactivity of both amino acids in the blood, intracellular free pool, and milk protein suggested that a single intracellular pool cannot be the only source of amino acid for protein synthesis. The model also provides support for the hypothesis that a significant proportion of the uptake of at least some amino acids by the mammary gland is from intracellular hydrolysis of extracellularly derived peptides. Copyright (2001) CSIRO Australia

  2. High Temperature During Rice Grain Filling Enhances Aspartate Metabolism in Grains and Results in Accumulation of Aspartate-Family Amino Acids and Protein Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-gang LIANG

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Global warming causes the exacerbation of rice growing environment, which seriously affects rice growth and reproduction, and finally results in the decrease of rice yield and quality. We investigated the activities of aspartate metabolism enzymes in grains, and the contents of Aspartate-family amino acids and protein components to further understand the effects of high temperature (HT on rice nutritional quality during rice grain filling. Under HT, the average activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AAT and aspartokinase (AK in grains significantly increased, the amino acid contents of aspartate (Asp, lysine (Lys, threonine (Thr, methionine (Met and isoleucine (Ile and the protein contents of albumin, globulin, prolamin and glutelin also significantly increased. The results indicated that HT enhanced Asp metabolism during rice grain filling and the enhancement of Asp metabolism might play an important role in the increase of Asp-family amino acids and protein components in grains. In case of the partial appraisal of the change of Asp-family amino acids and protein components under HT, we introduced eight indicators (amino acid or protein content, ratio of amino acid or protein, amino acid or protein content per grain and amino acid or protein content per panicle to estimate the effects of HT. It is suggested that HT during rice grain filling was benefit for the accumulation of Asp-family amino acids and protein components. Combined with the improvement of Asp-family amino acid ratio in grains under HT, it is suggested that HT during grain filling may improve the rice nutritional quality. However, the yields of parts of Asp-family amino acids and protein components were decreased under HT during rice grain filling.

  3. The Nitrogen Moieties of Dietary Nonessential Amino Acids Are Distinctively Metabolized in the Gut and Distributed to the Circulation in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Kawamata, Yasuko; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Sakai, Ryosei

    2017-08-01

    Background: Although previous growth studies in rodents have indicated the importance of dietary nonessential amino acids (NEAAs) as nitrogen sources, individual NEAAs have different growth-promoting activities. This phenomenon might be attributable to differences in the nitrogen metabolism of individual NEAAs. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare nitrogen metabolism across dietary NEAAs with the use of their 15 N isotopologues. Methods: Male Fischer rats (8 wk old) were given 1.0 g amino acid-defined diets containing either 15 N-labeled glutamate, glutamine (amino or amide), aspartate, alanine, proline, glycine, or serine hourly for 5-6 h. Then, steady-state amino acid concentrations and their 15 N enrichments in the gut and in portal and arterial plasma were measured by an amino acid analyzer and LC tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. Results: The intestinal 15 N distribution and portal-arterial balance of 15 N metabolites indicated that most dietary glutamate nitrogen (>90% of dietary input) was incorporated into various amino acids, including alanine, proline, and citrulline, in the gut. Dietary aspartate nitrogen, alanine nitrogen, and amino nitrogen of glutamine were distributed similarly to other amino acids both in the gut and in the circulation. In contrast, incorporation of the nitrogen moieties of dietary proline, serine, and glycine into other amino acids was less than that of other NEAAs, although interconversion between serine and glycine was very active. Cluster analysis of 15 N enrichment data also indicated that dietary glutamate nitrogen, aspartate nitrogen, alanine nitrogen, and the amino nitrogen of glutamine were distributed similarly to intestinal and circulating amino acids. Further, the analysis revealed close relations between intestinal and arterial 15 N enrichment for each amino acid. The steady-state 15 N enrichment of arterial amino acids indicated that substantial amounts of circulating amino acid nitrogen are derived

  4. Effect of specific amino acids on hepatic lipid metabolism in fructose-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegatheesan, Prasanthi; Beutheu, Stéphanie; Ventura, Gabrielle; Sarfati, Gilles; Nubret, Esther; Kapel, Nathalie; Waligora-Dupriet, Anne-Judith; Bergheim, Ina; Cynober, Luc; De-Bandt, Jean-Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Fructose diets have been shown to induce insulin resistance and to alter liver metabolism and gut barrier function, ultimately leading to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Citrulline, Glutamine and Arginine may improve insulin sensitivity and have beneficial effects on gut trophicity. Our aim was to evaluate their effects on liver and gut functions in a rat model of fructose-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 58) received a 4-week fructose (60%) diet or standard chow with or without Citrulline (0.15 g/d) or an isomolar amount of Arginine or Glutamine. All diets were made isonitrogenous by addition of non-essential amino acids. At week 4, nutritional and metabolic status (plasma glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides and amino acids, net intestinal absorption) was determined; steatosis (hepatic triglycerides content, histological examination) and hepatic function (plasma aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin) were assessed; and gut barrier integrity (myeloperoxidase activity, portal endotoxemia, tight junction protein expression and localization) and intestinal and hepatic inflammation were evaluated. We also assessed diets effects on caecal microbiota. In these experimental isonitrogenous fructose diet conditions, fructose led to steatosis with dyslipidemia but without altering glucose homeostasis, liver function or gut permeability. Fructose significantly decreased Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus and tended to increase endotoxemia. Arginine and Glutamine supplements were ineffective but Citrulline supplementation prevented hypertriglyceridemia and attenuated liver fat accumulation. While nitrogen supply alone can attenuate fructose-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, Citrulline appears to act directly on hepatic lipid metabolism by partially preventing hypertriglyceridemia and steatosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition

  5. Metabolic and chemical regulation of tRNA modification associated with taurine deficiency and human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Kana; Suzuki, Takeo; Saito, Ayaka; Wei, Fan-Yan; Ikeuchi, Yoshiho; Numata, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Ryou; Yamane, Yoshihisa; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Goto, Takanobu; Kishita, Yoshihito; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Okazaki, Yasushi; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Sakaguchi, Yuriko

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Modified uridine containing taurine, 5-taurinomethyluridine (τm5U), is found at the anticodon first position of mitochondrial (mt-)transfer RNAs (tRNAs). Previously, we reported that τm5U is absent in mt-tRNAs with pathogenic mutations associated with mitochondrial diseases. However, biogenesis and physiological role of τm5U remained elusive. Here, we elucidated τm5U biogenesis by confirming that 5,10-methylene-tetrahydrofolate and taurine are metabolic substrates for τm5U formation catalyzed by MTO1 and GTPBP3. GTPBP3-knockout cells exhibited respiratory defects and reduced mitochondrial translation. Very little τm5U34 was detected in patient’s cells with the GTPBP3 mutation, demonstrating that lack of τm5U results in pathological consequences. Taurine starvation resulted in downregulation of τm5U frequency in cultured cells and animal tissues (cat liver and flatfish). Strikingly, 5-carboxymethylaminomethyluridine (cmnm5U), in which the taurine moiety of τm5U is replaced with glycine, was detected in mt-tRNAs from taurine-depleted cells. These results indicate that tRNA modifications are dynamically regulated via sensing of intracellular metabolites under physiological condition. PMID:29390138

  6. First Insights into the Genome of the Amino Acid-Metabolizing Bacterium Clostridium litorale DSM 5388

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlein, Anja; Alghaithi, Hamed S.; Chandran, Lenin; Chibani, Cynthia M.; Davydova, Elena; Dhamotharan, Karthikeyan; Ge, Wanwan; Gutierrez-Gutierrez, David A.; Jagirdar, Advait; Khonsari, Bahar; Nair, Kamal Prakash P. R.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium litorale is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped, and spore-forming bacterium, which is able to use amino acids such as glycine, sarcosine, proline, and betaine as single carbon and energy sources via Stickland reactions. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (3.41 Mb) and a circular plasmid (27 kb). PMID:25081264

  7. Training and muscle ammonia and amino acid metabolism in humans during prolonged exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, T E; Turcotte, L P; Kiens, Bente

    1995-01-01

    We studied the responses of NH3 and amino acids (AA) to prolonged exercise (3 h) in trained (Tr; n = 6) and untrained (Utr; n = 6) men. Each subject exercised the knee extensor muscles of one leg at 60% of maximum capacity. Thigh blood flow and femoral arteriovenous differences (0, 30, 60, 120, 1...

  8. Challenge models to study the effect of immune system activation on amino acid metabolism in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van de E.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Borne, van den J.J.G.C.; Peet-Schwering, van der C.M.C.; Beers, van H.; Jansman, A.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    In response to (non-)pathogenic challenges, the immune system of pigs can be activated. During immune system activation, there is a competition for amino acids (AA) between body protein deposition (growth) and immune function (Sandberg et al., 2007). As a consequence, feed intake and growth are

  9. Branched chain amino acid metabolism profiles in progressive human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lake, A.D.; Novák, Petr; Shipkova, P.; Aranibar, N.; Robertson, D.G.; Reily, M.D.; Lehman-McKeeman, L.D.; Vaillancourt, R.R.; Cherrington, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2015), s. 603-615 ISSN 0939-4451 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Branched chain amino acid * nonalcoholic fatty liver disease * nonalcoholic steatohepatitis * metabolomics and transcriptomics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.196, year: 2015

  10. [Effect of reduced oxygen concentrations and hydrogen sulfide on the amino acid metabolism and mesenchymal cells proliferation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, L N; Berezovskii, V A; Veselskii, S P

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of hydrogen sulfide donor (10(-12) mol/l NaHS--I group) alone and together with the reduced oxygen concentrations (5% O2--II group, 3% O2--III group, 24 h) on the biological processes of human stem cells culture. It was shown that the cells proliferation by the third day of cultivation in I, II and III group decreased 1,7; 2,8 and 4,2 times. On the 4th day of culture proliferation inhibited in I, II and III group by 29; 33 and 54% compared to the control. Thus, adverse effects NaHS enhanced by reducing the oxygen concentration. It was established that in all experimental versions rapidly absorbed from the culture medium amino acids: cysteine and cystine, serine and aspartic acid, valine and tryptophan, proline and hydroxyproline, which are involved in the synthesis of proteins, in particular collagen. In the culture medium increased the concentration of free amino acids of the three factions: arginine, histidine and taurine; glycine and methionine; alanine and glutamine. We believe that in the applied concentration of hydrogen sulfide donor in conditions of low oxygen in a gaseous medium incubation inhibits the proliferation and alters the amino acid metabolism of human cells line 4BL.

  11. Sargassum muticum and Jania rubens regulate amino acid metabolism to improve growth and alleviate salinity in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Latef, Arafat Abdel Hamed; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Saber, Hani; Alwaleed, Eman A; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2017-09-05

    The present study evaluates the potential of Sar gassum muticum (Sar) and Jan ia rubens (Jan) seaweeds for enhancing growth and mitigating soil-salinity in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). Under control conditions, Sar and Jan extracts improved chickpea growth which was attributed to their potential for increasing photosynthetic pigments, K + and amino acids, particularly proline, in comparison with water-sprayed control. Upon stress imposition, chickpea growth was reduced in NaCl concentration-dependent manner, and principal component analysis (PCA) revealed Na + accumulation and oxidative damage as major determinants of sensitivity at high salinity. Furthermore, amino acid quantification indicated activation/deactivation of overall metabolism in roots/shoots, as an adaptive strategy, for maintaining plant growth under salt stress. Sar and Jan extract supplementations provided stress amelioration, and PCA confirmed that improved growth parameters at high salinity were associated with enhanced activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase. Besides, four key amino acids, including serine, threonine, proline and aspartic acids, were identified from roots which maximally contribute to Sar- and Jan-mediated stress amelioration. Sar showed higher effectiveness than Jan under both control and salt stress conditions. Our findings highlight "bio-stimulant" properties of two seaweeds and provide mechanistic insight into their salt-ameliorating action which is relevant for both basic and applied research.

  12. Interactive effects of seawater acidification and elevated temperature on biomineralization and amino acid metabolism in the mussel Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-11-01

    Seawater acidification and warming resulting from anthropogenic production of carbon dioxide are increasing threats to marine ecosystems. Previous studies have documented the effects of either seawater acidification or warming on marine calcifiers; however, the combined effects of these stressors are poorly understood. In our study, we examined the interactive effects of elevated carbon dioxide partial pressure (P(CO2)) and temperature on biomineralization and amino acid content in an ecologically and economically important mussel, Mytilus edulis. Adult M. edulis were reared at different combinations of P(CO2) (pH 8.1 and 7.8) and temperature (19, 22 and 25°C) for 2 months. The results indicated that elevated P(CO2) significantly decreased the net calcification rate, the calcium content and the Ca/Mg ratio of the shells, induced the differential expression of biomineralization-related genes, modified shell ultrastructure and altered amino acid content, implying significant effects of seawater acidification on biomineralization and amino acid metabolism. Notably, elevated temperature enhanced the effects of seawater acidification on these parameters. The shell breaking force significantly decreased under elevated P(CO2), but the effect was not exacerbated by elevated temperature. The results suggest that the interactive effects of seawater acidification and elevated temperature on mussels are likely to have ecological and functional implications. This study is therefore helpful for better understanding the underlying effects of changing marine environments on mussels and other marine calcifiers. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Extending the working pH of nitrobenzene degradation using ultrasonic/heterogeneous Fenton to the alkaline range via amino acid modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElShafei, Gamal M S; Yehia, F Z; Dimitry, O I H; Badawi, A M; Eshaq, Gh

    2015-11-01

    Oxides of iron, α-Fe2O3 (I), and copper, CuO (II) prepared by usual precipitation method without surfactant were used at room temperature in the process of nitrobenzene (10mgL(-1)) degradation at different pH values with ultrasonic at 20kHz. The degradation was complete in 20 and 30min for (I) and (II), respectively in the pH range 2-7 using1.0gL(-1) of solids and 10mM of H2O2. A remarkable decrease in degradation efficiency was recorded on increasing the pH to values higher than the neutral range. This loss in efficiency was cancelled to a great extent through modifying the used oxides with amino acids. Arginine showed higher improving effect to (II) (1:1 weight ration) than glycine or glutamic acid. Modification of both oxides with increasing amounts of arginine increased the degradation efficiency of (I) in a more regular way than in case of (II). However, the extent of improvement due to amino acid modification was higher in case of (II) because of its originally low degradation efficiency in strongly alkaline media. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cereal grain, rachis and pulse seed amino acid δ15N values as indicators of plant nitrogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styring, Amy K; Fraser, Rebecca A; Bogaard, Amy; Evershed, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    Natural abundance δ(15)N values of plant tissue amino acids (AAs) reflect the cycling of N into and within plants, providing an opportunity to better understand environmental and anthropogenic effects on plant metabolism. In this study, the AA δ(15)N values of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) grains and rachis and broad bean (Vicia faba) and pea (Pisum sativum) seeds, grown at the experimental farm stations of Rothamsted, UK and Bad Lauchstädt, Germany, were determined by GC-C-IRMS. It was found that the δ(15)N values of cereal grain and rachis AAs could be largely attributed to metabolic pathways involved in their biosynthesis and catabolism. The relative (15)N-enrichment of phenylalanine can be attributed to its involvement in the phenylpropanoid pathway and glutamate has a δ(15)N value which is an average of the other AAs due to its central role in AA-N cycling. The relative AA δ(15)N values of broad bean and pea seeds were very different from one another, providing evidence for differences in the metabolic routing of AAs to the developing seeds in these leguminous plants. This study has shown that AA δ(15)N values relate to known AA biosynthetic pathways in plants and thus have the potential to aid understanding of how various external factors, such as source of assimilated N, influence metabolic cycling of N within plants. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of amino acid supplementations on metabolic and physiological parameters in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Marcelino; Herves, María Antonia; Giráldez, Inmaculada; Skar, Kristin; Mogren, Hanne; Mortensen, Atle; Puvanendran, Velmurugu

    2017-04-01

    The effects of tryptophan (Trp) and phenylalanine (Phe) diet supplementation on the stress and metabolism of the Atlantic cod have been studied. Fish were fed diet supplemented with Trp or Phe or control diet for 1 week. At the end of the feeding trial, fish were subjected to air exposure or heat shock. Following samples of blood, liver and muscle were taken from the fish and were analyzed for stress and metabolic indicators. After an air exposure, plasma cortisol levels in fish fed with Trp and Phe diets were lower compared to the fish fed the control diet. Diets containing both amino acids increased significantly the liver transaminase activities in juvenile cod. During thermal stress, high Trp contents had significant effects on fructose biphosphatase activity though Phe did not. Overall, activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, and phosphofructokinase increased significantly for both amino acid diets. For the thermal stress, fish had the highest values of those activities for the 3Trp diet. Trp content in the diet had significant effects on the transaminase activity in muscle during air stress compared to fish fed control and Phe diets. Muscle alanine transaminase activity for thermal stress in fish fed any diet was not significantly different from the control. Both Trp and Phe supplementations reduced the stress markers in the cod; hence, they could be used as additives for the stress attenuation. However, they also raised the activity of key enzymes in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, mainly the Trp diets.

  16. Multi-omics approach to study the growth efficiency and amino acid metabolism in Lactococcus lactis at various specific growth rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arike Liisa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactococcus lactis is recognised as a safe (GRAS microorganism and has hence gained interest in numerous biotechnological approaches. As it is fastidious for several amino acids, optimization of processes which involve this organism requires a thorough understanding of its metabolic regulations during multisubstrate growth. Results Using glucose limited continuous cultivations, specific growth rate dependent metabolism of L. lactis including utilization of amino acids was studied based on extracellular metabolome, global transcriptome and proteome analysis. A new growth medium was designed with reduced amino acid concentrations to increase precision of measurements of consumption of amino acids. Consumption patterns were calculated for all 20 amino acids and measured carbon balance showed good fit of the data at all growth rates studied. It was observed that metabolism of L. lactis became more efficient with rising specific growth rate in the range 0.10 - 0.60 h-1, indicated by 30% increase in biomass yield based on glucose consumption, 50% increase in efficiency of nitrogen use for biomass synthesis, and 40% reduction in energy spilling. The latter was realized by decrease in the overall product formation and higher efficiency of incorporation of amino acids into biomass. L. lactis global transcriptome and proteome profiles showed good correlation supporting the general idea of transcription level control of bacterial metabolism, but the data indicated that substrate transport systems together with lower part of glycolysis in L. lactis were presumably under allosteric control. Conclusions The current study demonstrates advantages of the usage of strictly controlled continuous cultivation methods combined with multi-omics approach for quantitative understanding of amino acid and energy metabolism of L. lactis which is a valuable new knowledge for development of balanced growth media, gene manipulations for desired product

  17. Uptake of Amino Acids and Their Metabolic Conversion into the Compatible Solute Proline Confers Osmoprotection to Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaprasis, Adrienne; Bleisteiner, Monika; Kerres, Anne; Hoffmann, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The data presented here reveal a new facet of the physiological adjustment processes through which Bacillus subtilis can derive osmostress protection. We found that the import of proteogenic (Glu, Gln, Asp, Asn, and Arg) and of nonproteogenic (Orn and Cit) amino acids and their metabolic conversion into proline enhances growth under otherwise osmotically unfavorable conditions. Osmoprotection by amino acids depends on the functioning of the ProJ-ProA-ProH enzymes, but different entry points into this biosynthetic route are used by different amino acids to finally yield the compatible solute proline. Glu, Gln, Asp, and Asn are used to replenish the cellular pool of glutamate, the precursor for proline production, whereas Arg, Orn, and Cit are converted into γ-glutamic semialdehyde/Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate, an intermediate in proline biosynthesis. The import of Glu, Gln, Asp, Asn, Arg, Orn, and Cit did not lead to a further increase in the size of the proline pool that is already present in osmotically stressed cells. Hence, our data suggest that osmoprotection of B. subtilis by this group of amino acids rests on the savings in biosynthetic building blocks and energy that would otherwise have to be devoted either to the synthesis of the proline precursor glutamate or of proline itself. Since glutamate is the direct biosynthetic precursor for proline, we studied its uptake and found that GltT, an Na+-coupled symporter, is the main uptake system for both glutamate and aspartate in B. subtilis. Collectively, our data show how effectively B. subtilis can exploit environmental resources to derive osmotic-stress protection through physiological means. PMID:25344233

  18. Highly viscous guar gum shifts dietary amino acids from metabolic use to fermentation substrate in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochus, Kristel; Janssens, Geert P J; Van de Velde, Hannelore; Verbrugghe, Adronie; Wuyts, Birgitte; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Hesta, Myriam

    2013-03-28

    The present study evaluated the potential of affecting amino acid metabolism through intestinal fermentation in domestic cats, using dietary guar gum as a model. Apparent protein digestibility, plasma fermentation metabolites, faecal fermentation end products and fermentation kinetics (exhaled breath hydrogen concentrations) were evaluated. Ten cats were randomly assigned to either guar gum- or cellulose-supplemented diets, that were fed in two periods of 5 weeks in a crossover design. No treatment effect was seen on fermentation kinetics. The apparent protein digestibility (P= 0.07) tended to be lower in guar gum-supplemented cats. As a consequence of impaired small-intestinal protein digestion and amino acid absorption, fermentation of these molecules in the large intestine was stimulated. Amino acid fermentation has been shown to produce high concentrations of acetic and butyric acids. Therefore, no treatment effect on faecal propionic acid or plasma propionylcarnitine was observed in the present study. The ratio of faecal butyric acid:total SCFA tended to be higher in guar gum-supplemented cats (P= 0.05). The majority of large-intestinal butyric acid is absorbed by colonocytes and metabolised to 3-hydroxy-butyrylcoenzyme A, which is then absorbed into the bloodstream. This metabolite was analysed in plasma as 3-hydroxy-butyrylcarnitine, which was higher (P= 0.02) in guar gum-supplemented cats. In all probability, the high viscosity of the guar gum supplement was responsible for the impaired protein digestion and amino acid absorption. Further research is warranted to investigate whether partially hydrolysed guar gum is useful to potentiate the desirable in vivo effects of this fibre supplement.

  19. Serum and adipose tissue amino acid homeostasis in the metabolically healthy obese.

    OpenAIRE

    Badoud Flavia; Lam Karen; DiBattista Alicia; Perreault Maude; Zulyniak Michael; Cattrysse Bradley; Stephenson Susan; Britz-McKibbin Philip; Mutch David

    2014-01-01

    A subgroup of obese individuals referred to as metabolically healthy obese (MHO) have preserved insulin sensitivity and a normal lipid profile despite being obese. The molecular basis for this improved cardiometabolic profile remains unclear. Our objective was to integrate metabolite and gene expression profiling to elucidate the molecular distinctions between MHO and metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO) phenotypes. A subset of individuals were selected from the Diabetes Risk Assessment study ...

  20. Emerging Perspectives on Essential Amino Acid Metabolism in Obesity and the Insulin-Resistant State12

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Sean H.

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of insulin action is most often considered in the context of impaired glucose homeostasis, with the defining feature of diabetes mellitus being elevated blood glucose concentration. Complications arising from the hyperglycemia accompanying frank diabetes are well known and epidemiological studies point to higher risk toward development of metabolic disease in persons with impaired glucose tolerance. Although the central role of proper blood sugar control in maintaining metabolic...

  1. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in the developing rhesus monkey brain: interrelationship of taurine and glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, D K; Sturman, J A; Gaull, G E

    1982-09-01

    The relationship of taurine to glutamate, and to other amino acids, has been examined in the occipital lobe of the developing rhesus monkey. During development taurine decreases in concentration (4.96 mumol/g in fetus to 1.52 mumol/g in adult) while glutamate increases (7.92 mumol/g in fetus to 11.26 mumol/g in adult). When the concentration of taurine is plotted against that of glutamate in fetal, neonatal and adult animals there is a significant correlation in the fetal (p less than 0.01) and adult (p less than 0.01) but not in the neonatal occipital lobe samples. This correlation in both fetal and adult brain is specific for these amino acids. Subcellular fractionation studies further indicate that this relationship may be of special importance in nerve endings.

  2. The role of interspecies hydrogen transfer on thermophilic protein and amino acid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oerlygsson, J.

    1994-09-01

    The dynamics of thermophilic protein (peptone) degradation to fatty acids was followed in small-scale, semi-continuous, steady state, thermophilic enrichment cultures under methanogenic conditions. Although only 4-9% of the carbon was recovered in methane, methanogenesis was crucial both for the complete hydrolysis of peptone and the degradation of the amino acids released. Under non-methanogenic conditions, the degradation of the branched-chain amino acids alanine, methionine and phenylalanine, all known to be deaminated oxidatively, was partly inhibited. The degradation under these conditions was probably due to the Stickland reaction. During the degradation of several different amino acids with these peptone enrichment cultures, large differences were found in both deamination rates and in amounts degraded between methanogenic and non-methanogenic conditions. Leucine, valine and alanine were completely degraded only under methanogenic conditions and at relatively low rates. Serine, threonine, cysteine and methionine were degraded under both methanogenic and non-methanogenic conditions. However, deamination rates were 1.3 to 2.2 times higher during methanogenesis. A Clostridium sp. strain P2, was isolated from one of the semi-continuously peptone-fed enrichment cultures. Like in mixed cultures, the degradation of the branched-chain amino acids by this isolate was dependent on hydrogen removal. During growth on glucose, fructose and mannose, strain P2 produced substantial amounts of L-alanine as a fermentation product. Pyruvate was the source of alanine, and the formation of the latter was strongly influenced by ammonium. The partial pressure of hydrogen was of less importance for the formation of alanine than was the concentration of ammonia. 101 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  3. Branched chain amino acid metabolism in the biosynthesis of Lycopersicon pennellii glucose esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, D.S.; Steffens, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Lycopersicon pennellii Corr. (D'Arcy) an insect-resistant, wild tomato possesses high densities of glandular trichomes which exude a mixture of 2,3,4-tri-O-acylated glucose esters that function as a physical impediment and feeding deterrent to small arthropod pests. The acyl moieties are branched C 4 and C 5 acids, and branched and straight chain C 10 , C 11 , and C 12 acids. The structure of the branched acyl constituents suggests that the branched chain amino acid biosynthetic pathway participates in their biosynthesis. [ 14 C]Valine and deuterated branched chain amino acids (and their oxo-acid derivatives) were incorporated into branched C 4 and C 5 acid groups of glucose esters by a process of transamination, oxidative decarboxylation and subsequent acylation. C 4 and C 5 branched acids were elongated by two carbon units to produce the branched C 10 -C 12 groups. Norvaline, norleucine, allylglycine, and methionine also were processed into acyl moieties and secreted from the trichomes as glucose esters. Changes in the acyl composition of the glucose esters following sulfonylurea herbicide administration support the participation of acetohydroxyacid synthetase and the other enzymes of branched amino acid biosynthesis in the production of glucose esters

  4. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Levels Are Related with Surrogates of Disturbed Lipid Metabolism among Older Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urho M Kujala

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims/hypothesis Existing studies suggest that decreased branched-chain amino acid (BCAA catabolism and thus elevated levels in blood are associated with metabolic disturbances. Based on such information we have developed a hypothesis how BCAA degradation mechanistically connects to tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, intramyocellular lipid storage and oxidation thus allowing more efficient mitochondrial energy production from lipids as well as providing better metabolic health. We analyzed whether data from aged Finnish men are in line with our mechanistic hypothesis linking BCAA catabolism and metabolic disturbances. Methods Older Finnish men enriched with individuals having been athletes in young adulthood (n=593; mean age 72.6 ± 5.9 years responded to questionnaires, participated in a clinical examination including assessment of body composition with bioimpedance and gave fasting blood samples for various analytes as well as participated in a 2 hour 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Metabolomics measurements from serum included BCAAs (isoleucine, leucine and valine.Results Out of the 593 participants 59 had previously known type 2 diabetes, further 67 had screen-detected type 2 diabetes, 127 IGT and 125 IFG while 214 had normal glucose regulation. There were group differences in all of the BCAA concentrations (p≤0.005 for all BCAAs, such that those with normal glucose tolerance had the lowest and those with diabetes mellitus had the highest BCAA concentrations. All BCAA levels correlated positively with body fat percentage (r=.29 - .34, p<.0001 for all. Expected associations with high BCAA concentrations and unfavorable metabolic profile indicators from metabolomics analysis were found. Except for glucose concentrations, the associations were stronger with isoleucine and leucine than with valine. Conclusions/interpretation The findings provided further support for our hypothesis by strengthening the idea that the efficiency of BCAA catabolism

  5. Glutamate availability is important in intramuscular amino acid metabolism and TCA cycle intermediates but does not affect peak oxidative metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourtzakis, M.; Graham, T.E.; Gonzalez-Alonso, J.

    2008-01-01

    declines in early exercise. To investigate the physiological relationship between glutamate, oxidative metabolism, and TCA cycle intermediates (i.e., fumarate, malate, 2-oxoglutarate), healthy subjects trained (T) the quadriceps of one thigh on the single-legged knee extensor ergometer (1 h/day at 70......% maximum workload for 5 days/wk), while their contralateral quadriceps remained untrained (UT). After 5 wk of training, peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) in the T thigh was greater than that in the UT thigh (P...peak in either trained or untrained muscle Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8...

  6. Amino acid and glucose metabolism in fed-batch CHO cell culture affects antibody production and glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian; Wagtberg Sen, Jette; Rasmussen, Søren Kofoed; Kontoravdi, Cleo; Weilguny, Dietmar; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-03-01

    Fed-batch Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture is the most commonly used process for IgG production in the biopharmaceutical industry. Amino acid and glucose consumption, cell growth, metabolism, antibody titer, and N-glycosylation patterns are always the major concerns during upstream process optimization, especially media optimization. Gaining knowledge on their interrelations could provide insight for obtaining higher immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer and better controlling glycosylation-related product quality. In this work, different fed-batch processes with two chemically defined proprietary media and feeds were studied using two IgG-producing cell lines. Our results indicate that the balance of glucose and amino acid concentration in the culture is important for cell growth, IgG titer and N-glycosylation. Accordingly, the ideal fate of glucose and amino acids in the culture could be mainly towards energy and recombinant product, respectively. Accumulation of by-products such as NH4(+) and lactate as a consequence of unbalanced nutrient supply to cell activities inhibits cell growth. The levels of Leu and Arg in the culture, which relate to cell growth and IgG productivity, need to be well controlled. Amino acids with the highest consumption rates correlate with the most abundant amino acids present in the produced IgG, and thus require sufficient availability during culture. Case-by-case analysis is necessary for understanding the effect of media and process optimization on glycosylation. We found that in certain cases the presence of Man5 glycan can be linked to limitation of UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis as a result of insufficient extracellular Gln. However, under different culture conditions, high Man5 levels can also result from low α-1,3-mannosyl-glycoprotein 2-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GnTI) and UDP-GlcNAc transporter activities, which may be attributed to high level of NH4+ in the cell culture. Furthermore, galactosylation of the mAb Fc glycans

  7. Amino acid metabolism and whole-body protein turnover in lambs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based diets: 1. Lysine and leucine metabolism 1. P.B. Cronje*. Irene Animal Production Institute, Private Bag X2, Irene, 1675 Republic of South Africa. J.V. Nolan and A.A. Leng. Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry and Nutrition, University ...

  8. Effect of abomasal glucose infusion on splanchnic amino acid metabolism in periparturient dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mogens; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2009-01-01

    Six Holstein cows fitted with ruminal cannulas and permanent indwelling catheters in the portal vein, hepatic vein, mesenteric vein, and an artery were used to study the effects of abomasal glucose infusion on splanchnic AA metabolism. The experimental design was a split plot, with cow as the whole...

  9. Amino acid metabolism and whole-body protein turnover in lambs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    but all estimates for the high-protein diet were significantly different (P < 0.06). The same trend was apparent in the case of whole-body protein synthesis, but leucine and methionine provided similar estimates for the high-protein diet. It was suggested that, although much stands to be gained from studies of the metabolism of ...

  10. Type 2 diabetes alters metabolic and transcriptional signatures of glucose and amino acid metabolism during exercise and recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob S; Zhao, Xinjie; Irmler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The therapeutic benefit of physical activity to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes is commonly accepted. However, the impact of the disease on the acute metabolic response is less clear. To this end, we investigated the effect of type 2 diabetes on exercise-induced plasma metabolite...... changes and the muscular transcriptional response using a complementary metabolomics/transcriptomics approach. METHODS: We analysed 139 plasma metabolites and hormones at nine time points, and whole genome expression in skeletal muscle at three time points, during a 60 min bicycle ergometer exercise...... and a 180 min recovery phase in type 2 diabetic patients and healthy controls matched for age, percentage body fat and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2). RESULTS: Pathway analysis of differentially regulated genes upon exercise revealed upregulation of regulators of GLUT4 (SLC2A4RG, FLOT1, EXOC7, RAB13...

  11. Metabolic changes in deafferented central neurons of an insect, Acheta domesticus. I. Effects upon amino acid uptake and incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M.R.; Edwards, J.S.

    1982-11-01

    Chronic cercal deafferentation of the terminal ganglion in developing crickets (Acheta domesticus), which is known to suppress normal development of giant interneuron dendritic arborizations is shown here to reduce (/sup 3/H)leucine uptake and incorporation into ganglion proteins. Short term deafferentation of adult crickets, in contrast, does not depress amino acid uptake and incorporation significantly. Following unilateral long term deafferentation of the terminal ganglion, a comparison was made of the (/sup 3/H)leucine incorporation into primary dendritic processes and somata of deafferented and normally innervated medial giant interneurons (MGIs) within the same ganglion by means of quantitative autoradiography. Grain densities within dendrites of deafferented MGIs were significantly lower than in paired control MGIs' grain densities within somata of deafferented MGIs also were reduced, although the effects of deafferentation were less pronounced in somata than in target dendrites. These results imply a specific influence of afferent innervation on protein metabolism during growth and development of target postsynaptic elements.

  12. Metabolic changes in deafferented central neurons of an insect, Acheta domesticus. I. Effects upon amino acid uptake and incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M R; Edwards, J S

    1982-11-01

    Chronic cercal deafferentation of the terminal ganglion in developing crickets (Acheta domesticus), which is known to suppress normal development of giant interneuron dendritic arborizations is shown here to reduce [3H]leucine uptake and incorporation into ganglion proteins. Short term deafferentation of adult crickets, in contrast, does not depress amino acid uptake and incorporation significantly. Following unilateral long term deafferentation of the terminal ganglion, a comparison was made of the [3H]leucine incorporation into primary dendritic processes and somata of deafferented and normally innervated medial giant interneurons (MGIs) within the same ganglion by means of quantitative autoradiography. Grain densities within dendrites of deafferented MGIs were significantly lower than in paired control MGIs' grain densities within somata of deafferented MGIs also were reduced, although the effects of deafferentation were less pronounced in somata than in target dendrites. These results imply a specific influence of afferent innervation on protein metabolism during growth and development of target postsynaptic elements.

  13. Effects of glucogenic and ketogenic feeding strategies on splanchnic glucose and amino acid metabolism in postpartum transition Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mogens; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2012-01-01

    assigned to 1 of 3 feeding strategies: a glucogenic diet (GLCG) based on sodium hydroxide treated wheat grain (56.5% of diet dry matter); a ketogenic diet (KETO) based on fodder beets (40.5% of diet dry matter); or an alfalfa-glucogenic strategy (ALF-GLCG) supplying 100% alfalfa (Medicago sativa L......Nine periparturient Holstein cows catheterized in major splanchnic vessels were used in a complete randomized design with repeated measurements to investigate effects of glucogenic and ketogenic feeding strategies on splanchnic metabolism of glucose and amino acids. At parturition, cows were.......) haylage at the day of parturition, followed by a 6-d linear shift to the GLCG diet. Samples were obtained 14 d before expected parturition as well as at 4, 15, and 29 d in milk (DIM). The net portal release of glucose was greatest with GLCG, reflecting the higher intake of ruminal escape starch with GLCG...

  14. Oligofructose and inulin modulate glucose and amino acid metabolism through propionate production in normal-weight and obese cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugghe, Adronie; Hesta, Myriam; Gommeren, Kris; Daminet, Sylvie; Wuyts, Birgitte; Buyse, Johan; Janssens, Geert P J

    2009-09-01

    The effect of dietary oligofructose and inulin supplementation on glucose metabolism in obese and non-obese cats was assessed. Two diets were tested in a crossover design; a control diet high in protein (46 % on DM basis), moderate in fat (15 %), low in carbohydrates (27 %), but no soluble fibres added; and a prebiotic diet, with 2.5 % of a mixture of oligofructose and inulin added to the control diet. Eight non-obese and eight obese cats were allotted to each of two diets in random order at intervals of 4 weeks. At the end of each testing period, intravenous glucose tolerance tests were performed. Area under the glucose curve (AUCgluc) was increased (P = 0.022) and the second insulin peak was delayed (P = 0.009) in obese compared to non-obese cats. Diets did not affect fasting plasma glucose concentrations, blood glucose response at each glucose time-point after glucose administration, AUCgluc, fasting serum insulin concentrations, area under the insulin curve, and height and appearance time of insulin response. Yet, analysis of acylcarnitines revealed higher propionylcarnitine concentrations (P = 0.03) when fed the prebiotic diet, suggesting colonic fermentation and propionate absorption. Prebiotic supplementation reduced methylmalonylcarnitine (P = 0.072) and aspartate aminotransferase concentrations (P = 0.025), both indicating reduced gluconeogenesis from amino acids. This trial evidenced impaired glucose tolerance and altered insulin response to glucose administration in obese compared to non-obese cats, regardless of dietary intervention; yet modulation of glucose metabolism by enhancing gluconeogenesis from propionate and inhibition of amino acid catabolism can be suggested.

  15. In Vivo Imaging of Branched Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    relative to the corresponding cell lines have been observed in tumor models of murine lymphoma and rat mammary adenocarcinoma.14 In addition, as...excitation. Twenty-four time points were acquired, with a sampling interval of 2.5 s, starting with the Pyr injection. The data were reconstructed ...Nelson SJ, Macdonald JM, Vigneron DB, Kurhanewicz J. Multi-channel metabolic imaging, with SENSE reconstruction , of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate in

  16. Changes in amino acid composition and nitrogen metabolizing enzymes in ripening fruits of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio; Palatnik; Heldt; Valle

    2000-10-16

    The free amino acid content of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruits from cultivars Platense, Vollendung and Cherry were determined during ripening. It was found that glutamate markedly increased in red fruits of the three cultivars under study. At this stage, the cv Cherry had the highest relative glutamate molar content (52%) of all the analyzed tomato fruit cultivars. Measurements of nitrogen-assimilating enzyme activities of these fruits showed a decrease in glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) during fruit ripening and a concomitant increase in NADH-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.1.3) and aspartate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1) activities. Western blot analysis of protein extracts revealed that while GS was principally present in green fruit extracts, GDH was almost exclusively observed in the extracts of red fruits. These results suggest a reciprocal pattern of induction between GS and GDH during tomato fruit ripening.

  17. Overcoming the Refractory Expression of Secreted Recombinant Proteins in Mammalian Cells through Modification of the Signal Peptide and Adjacent Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler-Gane, Gülin; Kidd, Sara; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Vaughan, Tristan J; Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Tigue, Natalie J

    2016-01-01

    The expression and subsequent purification of mammalian recombinant proteins is of critical importance to many areas of biological science. To maintain the appropriate tertiary structure and post-translational modifications of such proteins, transient mammalian expression systems are often adopted. The successful utilisation of these systems is, however, not always forthcoming and some recombinant proteins prove refractory to expression in mammalian hosts. In this study we focussed on the role of different N-terminal signal peptides and residues immediately downstream, in influencing the level of secreted recombinant protein obtained from suspension HEK293 cells. Using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as a model protein, we identified that the +1/+2 downstream residues flanking a heterologous signal peptide significantly affect secreted levels. By incorporating these findings we conducted a comparison of different signal peptide sequences and identified the most productive as secrecon, a computationally-designed sequence. Importantly, in the context of the secrecon signal peptide and SEAP, we also demonstrated a clear preference for specific amino acid residues at the +1 position (e.g. alanine), and a detrimental effect of others (cysteine, proline, tyrosine and glutamine). When proteins that naturally contain these "undesirable" residues at the +1 position were expressed with their native signal peptide, the heterologous secrecon signal peptide, or secrecon with an additional alanine at the +1 or +1 and +2 position, the level of expression differed significantly and in an unpredictable manner. For each protein, however, at least one of the panel of signal peptide/adjacent amino acid combinations enabled successful recombinant expression. In this study, we highlight the important interplay between a signal peptide and its adjacent amino acids in enabling protein expression, and we describe a strategy that could enable recombinant proteins that have so far

  18. Overcoming the Refractory Expression of Secreted Recombinant Proteins in Mammalian Cells through Modification of the Signal Peptide and Adjacent Amino Acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülin Güler-Gane

    Full Text Available The expression and subsequent purification of mammalian recombinant proteins is of critical importance to many areas of biological science. To maintain the appropriate tertiary structure and post-translational modifications of such proteins, transient mammalian expression systems are often adopted. The successful utilisation of these systems is, however, not always forthcoming and some recombinant proteins prove refractory to expression in mammalian hosts. In this study we focussed on the role of different N-terminal signal peptides and residues immediately downstream, in influencing the level of secreted recombinant protein obtained from suspension HEK293 cells. Using secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP as a model protein, we identified that the +1/+2 downstream residues flanking a heterologous signal peptide significantly affect secreted levels. By incorporating these findings we conducted a comparison of different signal peptide sequences and identified the most productive as secrecon, a computationally-designed sequence. Importantly, in the context of the secrecon signal peptide and SEAP, we also demonstrated a clear preference for specific amino acid residues at the +1 position (e.g. alanine, and a detrimental effect of others (cysteine, proline, tyrosine and glutamine. When proteins that naturally contain these "undesirable" residues at the +1 position were expressed with their native signal peptide, the heterologous secrecon signal peptide, or secrecon with an additional alanine at the +1 or +1 and +2 position, the level of expression differed significantly and in an unpredictable manner. For each protein, however, at least one of the panel of signal peptide/adjacent amino acid combinations enabled successful recombinant expression. In this study, we highlight the important interplay between a signal peptide and its adjacent amino acids in enabling protein expression, and we describe a strategy that could enable recombinant proteins that

  19. Branched-chain amino acids and ammonia metabolism in liver disease: therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The rationale for recommendation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; valine, leucine, and isoleucine) in treatment of liver failure is based on their unique pharmacologic properties, stimulatory effect on ammonia detoxification to glutamine (GLN), and decreased concentrations in liver cirrhosis. Multiple lines of evidence have shown that the main cause of the BCAA deficiency in liver cirrhosis is their consumption in skeletal muscle for synthesis of glutamate, which acts as a substrate for ammonia detoxification to GLN and that the BCAA administration to patients with liver failure may exert a number of positive effects that may be more pronounced in patients with marked depression of BCAA levels. On the other hand, due to the stimulatory effect of BCAA on GLN synthesis, BCAA supplementation may lead to enhanced ammonia production from GLN breakdown in the intestine and the kidneys and thus exert harmful effects on the development of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, to enhance therapeutic effectiveness of the BCAA in patients with liver injury, their detrimental effect on ammonia production, which is negligible in healthy people and/or patients with other disorders, should be avoided. In treatment of hepatic encephalopathy, simultaneous administration of the BCAA (to correct amino acid imbalance and promote ammonia detoxification to GLN) with α-ketoglutarate (to inhibit GLN breakdown to ammonia in enterocytes) and/or phenylbutyrate (to enhance GLN excretion by the kidneys) is suggested. Attention should be given to the type of liver injury, gastrointestinal bleeding, signs of inflammation, and the dose of BCAA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Effects of dietary habits modifications on selected metabolic parameters during weight loss in obese persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowska, Lucyna; Stefańska, Ewa; Jastrzebska, Marta; Adamska, Edyta; Wujek, Anita; Waszczeniuk, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a serious social problem, one of the most important health issues of the modern world, especially in industrialized countries. Due to the prevalence obesity is a social disease, chronic and also a risk factor for many diseases such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, gall stones or cancers. The aim of the study was to examine and evaluation whether the systematic one-year modifications of dietary habits affect the changes in body weight and some metabolic parameters in obese patients. 30 women and 30 men who declared intentions to decrease body weight were examined. The mean age of women was 48 +/- 12.5 years (range 31-72 years), men 51 +/- 13.2 years (range 23-70 years). The questionnaire survey concerning the subject matter was designed in the Department of Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition, Medical University of Bialystok. At the initial and final visit the frequency of some products consumption were assessed and concentrations of some biochemical parameters in the peripheral blood were measured. Women after one-year dietotherapy significantly reduced the incidence of eating: pasta, fruit and vegetable juices, potatoes, ripening cheese, sugar, meat, bacon and lard, butter and cream, and increased incidence of eating dark bread, groats, rice, vegetables and fruit, cottage cheese, fish and vegetable oils. Men significantly reduced the incidence of eating: pasta, potatoes, ripening cheese, sweet beverages, bacon and lard, margarine, and increased the incidence of eating dark bread, groats, rice, vegetables, cottage cheese and fish. After one year the average body weight decrease was 2.8 +/- 7.1 kg in women and 1.4 +/- 3.2 kg in men. The average reduction in waist circumference was 3.6 +/- 6.5 cm in women and 3.6 +/- 4,8 cm in men. HDL cholesterol levels increased significantly in women and not significantly in men. LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels decreased significantly in both groups. In women systolic blood

  1. Glutamate availability is important in intramuscular amino acid metabolism and TCA cycle intermediates but does not affect peak oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourtzakis, M; Graham, T E; González-Alonso, J; Saltin, B

    2008-08-01

    Muscle glutamate is central to reactions producing 2-oxoglutarate, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate that essentially expands the TCA cycle intermediate pool during exercise. Paradoxically, muscle glutamate drops approximately 40-80% with the onset of exercise and 2-oxoglutarate declines in early exercise. To investigate the physiological relationship between glutamate, oxidative metabolism, and TCA cycle intermediates (i.e., fumarate, malate, 2-oxoglutarate), healthy subjects trained (T) the quadriceps of one thigh on the single-legged knee extensor ergometer (1 h/day at 70% maximum workload for 5 days/wk), while their contralateral quadriceps remained untrained (UT). After 5 wk of training, peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) in the T thigh was greater than that in the UT thigh (PTCA cycle intermediates. In the UT thigh, peak exercise (vs. rest) induced an increase in fumarate (0.33+/-0.07 vs. 0.02+/-0.01 mmol/kg dry wt (dw), PTCA cycle, glutamate and TCA cycle intermediates do not directly affect VO2peak in either trained or untrained muscle.

  2. Genetic analysis of central carbon metabolism unveils an amino acid substitution that alters maize NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengyi Zhang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Central carbon metabolism (CCM is a fundamental component of life. The participating genes and enzymes are thought to be structurally and functionally conserved across and within species. Association mapping utilizes a rich history of mutation and recombination to achieve high resolution mapping. Therefore, applying association mapping in maize (Zea mays ssp. mays, the most diverse model crop species, to study the genetics of CCM is a particularly attractive system.We used a maize diversity panel to test the CCM functional conservation. We found heritable variation in enzyme activity for every enzyme tested. One of these enzymes was the NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, E.C. 1.1.1.41, in which we identified a novel amino-acid substitution in a phylogenetically conserved site. Using candidate gene association mapping, we identified that this non-synonymous polymorphism was associated with IDH activity variation. The proposed mechanism for the IDH activity variation includes additional components regulating protein level. With the comparison of sequences from maize and teosinte (Zea mays ssp. Parviglumis, the maize wild ancestor, we found that some CCM genes had also been targeted for selection during maize domestication.Our results demonstrate the efficacy of association mapping for dissecting natural variation in primary metabolic pathways. The considerable genetic diversity observed in maize CCM genes underlies heritable phenotypic variation in enzyme activities and can be useful to identify putative functional sites.

  3. Amino Acid Sensor Kinase Gcn2 Is Required for Conidiation, Secondary Metabolism, and Cell Wall Integrity in the Taxol-Producer Pestalotiopsis microspora

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    Dan Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The canonical Gcn2/Cpc1 kinase in fungi coordinates the expression of target genes in response to amino acid starvation. To investigate its possible role in secondary metabolism, we characterized a gcn2 homolog in the taxol-producing fungus Pestalotiopsis microspora. Deletion of the gene led to severe physiological defects under amino acid starvation, suggesting a conserved function of gcn2 in amino acid sensing. The mutant strain Δgcn2 displayed retardation in vegetative growth. It generated dramatically fewer conidia, suggesting a connection between amino acid metabolism and conidiation in this fungus. Importantly, disruption of the gene altered the production of secondary metabolites by HPLC profiling. For instance, under amino acid starvation, the deletion strain Δgcn2 barely produced secondary metabolites including the known natural product pestalotiollide B. Even more, we showed that gcn2 played critical roles in the tolerance to several stress conditions. Δgcn2 exhibited a hypersensitivity to Calcofluor white and Congo red, implying a role of Gcn2 in maintaining the integrity of the cell wall. This study suggests that Gcn2 kinase is an important global regulator in the growth and development of filamentous fungi and will provide knowledge for the manipulation of secondary metabolism in P. microspora.

  4. Metabolism-oriented amino acid requirement determination by means of the catabolic rates of 14C- and 15N-labelled lysine under maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, O.; Bergner, H.; Adam, K.

    1977-01-01

    Male Wistar rats (of 60 g live weight) allotted in 10 groups were fed diets with gradually increasing lysine levels ranging from 1.4 to 7.4 g lysine/16 g N. Feed intake was restricted so much that the experimental animals did not change their live weights during the last 3 days of the 8-day experimental period. On the 7the experimental day, 4 animals of each group were injected, i. p. 14 C-L-lysine, the 14 CO 2 -excretion being subsequently measured over a period of 2 hours. On the next day, 6 animals of each group were applied an i. p. injection of 15 N-L-lysine, the urine being collected over the following 24-hour period to measure the 15 N-frequency. Applying both labelling methods, an increased catabolisation of the amino acid was observed after the metabolically necessary lysine requirement had been covered. The methods are very sensitive and revealed, under the experimental conditions chosen, a lysine requirement coverage of about 3 g lysine/16 g N. The possibility of using also 15 N-labelled compounds in the metabolism-oriented amino acid requirement determination is likely to facilitate the transfer of the methodology to farm animals would thus allow to study the amino acid requirement of man. The metabolism-oriented amino acid requirement determination will likewise allow to estimate exact amino acid requirement data under conditions that cannot be rated on the basis of productive yields. (author)

  5. A 48-Hour Vegan Diet Challenge in Healthy Women and Men Induces a BRANCH-Chain Amino Acid Related, Health Associated, Metabolic Signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Colleen Fogarty; Vassallo, Irene; Di Cara, Alessandro; Milone, Cristiana; Comminetti, Ornella; Monnard, Irina; Godin, Jean-Philippe; Scherer, Max; Su, MingMing; Jia, Wei; Guiraud, Seu-Ping; Praplan, Fabienne; Guignard, Laurence; Ammon Zufferey, Corinne; Shevlyakova, Maya; Emami, Nashmil; Moco, Sofia; Beaumont, Maurice; Kaput, Jim; Martin, Francois-Pierre

    2018-02-01

    Research is limited on diet challenges to improve health. A short-term, vegan protein diet regimen nutritionally balanced in macronutrient composition compared to an omnivorous diet is hypothesized to improve metabolic measurements of blood sugar regulation, blood lipids, and amino acid metabolism. This randomized, cross-over, controlled vegan versus animal diet challenge is conducted on 21 (11 female,10 male) healthy participants. Fasting plasma is measured during a 3 d diet intervention for clinical biochemistry and metabonomics. Intervention diet plans meet individual caloric needs. Meals are provided and supervised. Diet compliance is monitored. The vegan diet lowers triglycerides, insulin and homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR), bile acids, elevated magnesium levels, and changed branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) metabolism (p vegan versus omnivorous diets. Plasma amino acid and magnesium concentrations positively correlate with dietary amino acids. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and dietary fiber inversely correlate with insulin, HOMA-IR, and triglycerides. Nutritional biochemistries, BCAAs, insulin, and HOMA-IR are impacted by sexual dimorphism. A health-promoting, BCAA-associated metabolic signature is produced from a short-term, healthy, controlled, vegan diet challenge when compared with a healthy, controlled, omnivorous diet. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Different environmental temperatures affect amino acid metabolism in the eurytherm teleost Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis Kaup, 1858) as indicated by changes in plasma metabolites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costas, B.; Aragao, C.; Ruiz-Jarabo, I.; Vargas-Chacoff, L.; Arjona, F.J.; Mancera, J.M.; Dinis, M.T.; Conceicao, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is a eurytherm teleost that under natural conditions can be exposed to annual water temperature fluctuations between 12 and 26 degrees C. This study assessed the effects of temperature on sole metabolic status, in particular in what concerns plasma free amino

  7. Modulation of amino acid metabolic signatures by supplemented isoenergetic diets differing in protein and cereal fiber content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattersley, John G; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Roden, Michael; Petzke, Klaus-Jürgen; Hoffmann, Daniela; Rudovich, Natalia N; Randeva, Harpal S; Vatish, Manu; Osterhoff, Martin; Goegebakan, Özlem; Hornemann, Silke; Nowotny, Peter; Machann, Jürgen; Hierholzer, Johannes; von Loeffelholz, Christian; Möhlig, Matthias; Arafat, Ayman M; Weickert, Martin O

    2014-12-01

    Amino-acid (AA) metabolic signatures differ in insulin-resistant (IR) obese vs normal-weight subjects, improve after weight loss, and seem to predict the risk of type 2 diabetes. It is unknown whether weight-maintaining dietary measures aimed at influencing IR alter AA signatures of high-risk subjects. In the randomized controlled Protein, Fiber and Metabolic Syndrome (ProFiMet) trial we investigated effects of four isoenergetic, moderately fat-reduced diets varying in protein and cereal-fiber contents on complete AA metabolic signatures in 76 group-matched overweight or obese high-risk subjects. We analyzed the relation of whole-body and hepatic IR with AA signatures, body fat composition and liver fat, after 0, 6, and 18 weeks of dietary intervention. Discrimination between diets was further enhanced by providing tailored dietary supplements for twice-daily consumption over 18 weeks in all groups. Baseline AA, including branched-chain signatures significantly related to IR, liver fat, and visceral fat mass. Isoenergetic variation of protein and cereal-fiber dietary contents, but not fat restriction, significantly influenced IR, whereas the relation of AA with IR changed with all diets. The tryptophan ratio was significantly suppressed in obese vs overweight participants, but increased after 6 weeks of high cereal-fiber intake to a nonobese phenotype. Modeling analyses revealed diet-induced alterations of complex AA profiles to relate to 70% and 62% of changes in whole-body and hepatic IR. We demonstrate that relatively short-term isoenergetic changes in the diet significantly alter the relation of AA signatures with IR, with possible implications on the determination and treatment of diabetes risk.

  8. The Janus Face of PAMAM Dendrimers Used to Potentially Cure Nonenzymatic Modifications of Biomacromolecules in Metabolic Disorders—A Critical Review of the Pros and Cons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary Watala

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus, which is characterised by high blood glucose levels and the burden of various macrovascular and microvascular complications, is a cause of much human suffering across the globe. While the use of exogenous insulin and other medications can control and sometimes prevent various diabetes-associated sequelae, numerous diabetic complications are still commonly encountered in diabetic patients. Therefore, there is a strong need for safe and effective antihyperglycaemic agents that provide an alternative or compounding option for the treatment of diabetes. In recent years, amino-terminated poly(amidoamine (PAMAM dendrimers (G2, G3 and G4 have attracted attention due to their protective value as anti-glycation and anti-carbonylation agents that can be used to limit the nonenzymatic modifications of biomacromolecules. The focus of this review is to present a detailed survey of our own data, as well as of the available literature regarding the toxicity, pharmacological properties and overall usefulness of PAMAM dendrimers. This presentation pays particular and primary attention to their therapeutic use in poorly controlled diabetes and its complications, but also in other conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, in which such nonenzymatic modifications may underlie the pathophysiological mechanisms. The impact of dendrimer administration on the overall survival of diabetic animals and on glycosylation, glycoxidation, the brain-blood barrier and cellular bioenergetics are demonstrated. Finally, we critically discuss the potential advantages and disadvantages accompanying the use of PAMAM dendrimers in the treatment of metabolic impairments that occur under conditions of chronic hyperglycaemia.

  9. Tyrosine modifications in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Maria B; Schöneich, Christian

    2012-12-01

    The understanding of physiological and pathological processes involving protein oxidation, particularly under conditions of aging and oxidative stress, can be aided by proteomic identification of proteins that accumulate oxidative post-translational modifications only if these detected modifications are connected to functional consequences. The modification of tyrosine (Tyr) residues can elicit significant changes in protein structure and function, which, in some cases, may contribute to biological aging and age-related pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, and cataracts. Studies characterizing proteins in which Tyr has been modified to 3-nitrotyrosine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, 3,3'-dityrosine and other cross-links, or 3-chlorotyrosine are reviewed, with an emphasis on structural and functional consequences. Distinguishing between inconsequential modifications and functionally significant ones requires careful biochemical and biophysical analysis of target proteins, as well as innovative methods for isolating the effects of the multiple modifications that often occur under oxidizing conditions. The labor-intensive task of isolating and characterizing individual modified proteins must continue, especially given the expanding list of known modifications. Emerging approaches, such as genetic and metabolic incorporation of unnatural amino acids, hold promise for additional focused studies of this kind.

  10. Reduction of Energetic Demands through Modification of Body Size and Routine Metabolic Rates in Extremophile Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, Courtney N; Greenway, Ryan; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Jeyasingh, Punidan D; Tobler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Variation in energy availability or maintenance costs in extreme environments can exert selection for efficient energy use, and reductions in organismal energy demand can be achieved in two ways: reducing body mass or metabolic suppression. Whether long-term exposure to extreme environmental conditions drives adaptive shifts in body mass or metabolic rates remains an open question. We studied body size variation and variation in routine metabolic rates in locally adapted populations of extremophile fish (Poecilia mexicana) living in toxic, hydrogen sulfide-rich springs and caves. We quantified size distributions and routine metabolic rates in wild-caught individuals from four habitat types. Compared with ancestral populations in nonsulfidic surface habitats, extremophile populations were characterized by significant reductions in body size. Despite elevated metabolic rates in cave fish, the body size reduction precipitated in significantly reduced energy demands in all extremophile populations. Laboratory experiments on common garden-raised fish indicated that elevated routine metabolic rates in cave fish likely have a genetic basis. The results of this study indicate that adaptation to extreme environments directly impacts energy metabolism, with fish living in cave and sulfide spring environments expending less energy overall during routine metabolism.

  11. Intermediate metabolism in association with the amino acid profile during the third trimester of normal pregnancy and diet-controlled gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Kalliopi I; Vlachos, George; Theodora, Marianna; Roubelaki, Maria; Angelidou, Konstantina; Antsaklis, Aris

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of fasting maternal plasma amino acids in normal pregnant women and compare them with those in gestational diabetes controlled by diet only. We also wished to delineate the alterations occurring in intermediate metabolic pathways in gestational diabetes. Forty-six (64.7%) pregnant women with uncomplicated pregnancy (NP group) and 25 (35.2%) women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM group) at 30-33 weeks of gestation participated in the study. Fasting maternal plasma carnitine (total, free, and acyl-carnitine), beta-hydroxybutyrate, free fatty acids, glycosylated hemoglobin, and 21 amino acids were assayed. Fasting carnitine esters exhibited lower levels in the GDM group (P = .03). Higher levels of fasting beta-hydroxybutyrate and free fatty acids (P diabetes, ketogenic amino acids and the branched-chain amino acid isoleucine are released at low rates from skeletal muscle and are mostly catabolized in the liver rather than in peripheral tissues. In contrast, in normal pregnancy proteinolysis is enhanced, and the ketogenic amino acids along with branched-chain amino acids are catabolized in both the liver and peripheral tissues. As a result, ketogenic amino acids are fully oxidized and gluconeogenesis becomes more efficient, whereas urea cycle operates at a higher rate.

  12. Whole-body nitrogen and tyrosine metabolism in surgical patients receiving branched-chain amino acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, S.P.; Bistrian, B.R.; Moldawer, L.L.; Blackburn, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Fifteen patients undergoing gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity received preoperatively a standard crystalline amino acid solution containing 15.6% branched-chain amino acids. During the first five postoperative days, the patients were randomized to receive one of three amino acid solutions of different branched-chain amino acid content. Whole-body amino acid appearance and oxidation were estimated using a continuous intravenous infusion of L-(U- 14 C)-tyrosine preoperatively and on the third postoperative day. This study suggests that an adequate nitrogen intake of a balanced amino acid mixture, as well as a solution enriched with branched-chain amino acids, maintains protein homeostasis and supports protein synthesis similarly in well-nourished patients following major abdominal surgery. A diet containing only branched-chain amino acids in isomolar ratios was as effective at maintaining protein retention and whole-body protein synthesis and albumin renewal postoperatively when compared with a standard amino acid formula

  13. [Effect of protein intervention on amino acid metabolism spectrum of Qi and Yin deficiency type 2 diabetic rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li-Na; Mao, Xin-Min; Ma, Xiao-Li; Li, Lin-Lin; Wang, Ye; Tao, Yi-Cun; Wang, Jing-Wei; Guo, Jia-Jia; Lan, Yi

    2016-11-01

    To study the effect of plant protein and animal protein on amino acid metabolism spectrum of Qi and Yin deficiency type 2 diabetic rats. 110 male SD rats were randomly divided into blank group (n=10), diabetic model group (n=20), disease-symptoms group (n=80). The rats of blank group received ordinary feeding, while other groups were fed with high sugar and fat diets. During the whole process of feeding, rats of disease-symptoms group were given with Qingpi-Fuzi (15.75 g•kg⁻¹) once a day through oral administration. Five weeks later, the rats were given with a low dose of STZ (40 mg•kg⁻¹) by intraperitoneal injection to establish experimental diabetic models. Then the models were randomly divided into disease-symptoms group 1 (Qi and Yin deficiency diabetic group, 15.75 g•kg⁻¹), disease-symptoms group 2 (plant protein group, 0.5 g•kg⁻¹), disease-symptoms group 3 (animal protein group, 0.5 g•kg⁻¹), disease-symptoms group 4 (berberine group, 0.1 g•kg⁻¹). The drugs were given for 4 weeks by gavage administration. After 4 weeks of protein intervention, the abdominal aortic blood was collected and serum was isolated to analyze its free amino acid by using AQC pre-column derivatization HPLC and fluorescence detector. Four weeks after the protein intervention, plant protein, animal protein and berberine had no obvious effect on body weight and blood sugar in type 2 diabetic rats. As compared with animal protein group, histidine and proline(PYin deficiency type 2 diabetic SD rats. Symbolic differential compounds could be found through metabonomics technology, providing experimental basis for early warning of type 2 diabetes and diagnosis of Qi and Yin deficiency syndrome. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  14. Plasma Amino Acid Abnormalities in Chronic Heart Failure. Mechanisms, Potential Risks and Targets in Human Myocardium Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Aquilani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to measure arterial amino acid levels in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF, and relate them to left ventricular function and disease severity. Amino acids (AAs play a crucial role for heart protein-energy metabolism. In heart failure, arterial AAs, which are the major determinant of AA uptake by the myocardium, are rarely measured. Forty-one subjects with clinically stable CHF (New York Heart Association (NYHA class II to IV were analyzed. After overnight fasting, blood samples from the radial artery were taken to measure AA concentrations. Calorie (KcalI, protein-, fat-, carbohydrate-intake, resting energy expenditure (REE, total daily energy expenditure (REE × 1.3, and cardiac right catheterization variables were all measured. Eight matched controls were compared for all measurements, with the exception of cardiac catheterization. Compared with controls, CHF patients had reduced arterial AA levels, of which both their number and reduced rates are related to Heart Failure (HF severity. Arterial aspartic acid correlated with stroke volume index (r = 0.6263; p < 0.0001 and cardiac index (r = 0.4243; p = 0.0028. The value of arterial aspartic acid (µmol/L multiplied by the cardiac index was associated with left ventricular ejection fraction (r = 0.3765; p = 0.0076. All NYHA groups had adequate protein intake (≥1.1 g/kg/day and inadequate calorie intake (KcalI < REE × 1.3 was found only in class IV patients. This study showed that CHF patients had reduced arterial AA levels directly related to clinical disease severity and left ventricular dysfunction.

  15. Metabolomic analysis of alterations in lipid oxidation, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism in dairy goats caused by exposure to Aflotoxin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianbo; Huang, Shuai; Fan, Caiyun; Zheng, Nan; Zhang, Yangdong; Li, Songli; Wang, Jiaqi

    2017-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the systemic and characteristic metabolites in the serum of dairy goats induced by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) exposure and to further understand the endogenous metabolic alterations induced by it. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomic approach was used to analyse the metabolic alterations in dairy goats that were induced by low doses of AFB1 (50 µg/kg DM). We found that AFB1 exposure caused significant elevations of glucose, citrate, acetate, acetoacetate, betaine, and glycine yet caused reductions of lactate, ketone bodies (acetate, β-hydroxybutyrate), amino acids (citrulline, leucine/isoleucine, valine, creatine) and cell membrane structures (choline, lipoprotein, N-acetyl glycoproteins) in the serum. These data indicated that AFB1 caused endogenous metabolic changes in various metabolic pathways, including cell membrane-associated metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycolysis, lipids, and amino acid metabolism. These findings provide both a comprehensive insight into the metabolic aspects of AFB1-induced adverse effects on dairy goats and a method for monitoring dairy animals exposed to low doses of AFB1.

  16. Effects of glucogenic and ketogenic feeding strategies on splanchnic glucose and amino acid metabolism in postpartum transition Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, M; Kristensen, N B

    2012-10-01

    Nine periparturient Holstein cows catheterized in major splanchnic vessels were used in a complete randomized design with repeated measurements to investigate effects of glucogenic and ketogenic feeding strategies on splanchnic metabolism of glucose and amino acids. At parturition, cows were assigned to 1 of 3 feeding strategies: a glucogenic diet (GLCG) based on sodium hydroxide treated wheat grain (56.5% of diet dry matter); a ketogenic diet (KETO) based on fodder beets (40.5% of diet dry matter); or an alfalfa-glucogenic strategy (ALF-GLCG) supplying 100% alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) haylage at the day of parturition, followed by a 6-d linear shift to the GLCG diet. Samples were obtained 14 d before expected parturition as well as at 4, 15, and 29 d in milk (DIM). The net portal release of glucose was greatest with GLCG, reflecting the higher intake of ruminal escape starch with GLCG, as compared with a lower starch intake with KETO. Postpartum, the portal recovery of feed starch was greater (28 ± 3%, mean ± SEM) with KETO as compared with GLCG (15 ± 4%). At 4 DIM, the net hepatic release of glucose was greatest with KETO and least with ALF-GLCG, whereafter it increased as lactation progressed with ALF-GLCG and GLCG, but not with KETO. The high alfalfa haylage allowance at 4 DIM with the ALF-GLCG treatment induced the lowest net release of nutrients from the splanchnic tissues at 4 DIM. The hepatic removal of lactate as percent of total influx (mean ± SEM) increased from 27 ± 3% prepartum to 56 ± 3% at 4 DIM. The hepatic removal of lactate as percent of net portal release increased from 144 ± 10% prepartum to 329 ± 17% at 4 DIM with ALF-GLCG and KETO as compared with 242 ± 20% in GLCG. No clear evidence for an amino acid sparing effect in splanchnic tissues from increasing small intestinal glucose absorption was observed. In conclusion, the glucogenic feeding strategy induced the highest glucogenic status among the tested feeding strategies due to

  17. 2,4-D and IAA Amino Acid Conjugates Show Distinct Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyer, Luděk; Vain, Thomas; Pařízková, Barbora; Oklestkova, Jana; Barbez, Elke; Kozubíková, Hana; Pospíšil, Tomáš; Wierzbicka, Roksana; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Fránek, Milan; Strnad, Miroslav; Robert, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    The herbicide 2,4-D exhibits an auxinic activity and therefore can be used as a synthetic and traceable analog to study auxin-related responses. Here we identified that not only exogenous 2,4-D but also its amide-linked metabolite 2,4-D-Glu displayed an inhibitory effect on plant growth via the TIR1/AFB auxin-mediated signaling pathway. To further investigate 2,4-D metabolite conversion, identity and activity, we have developed a novel purification procedure based on the combination of ion exchange and immuno-specific sorbents combined with a sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. In 2,4-D treated samples, 2,4-D-Glu and 2,4-D-Asp were detected at 100-fold lower concentrations compared to 2,4-D levels, showing that 2,4-D can be metabolized in the plant. Moreover, 2,4-D-Asp and 2,4-D-Glu were identified as reversible forms of 2,4-D homeostasis that can be converted to free 2,4-D. This work paves the way to new studies of auxin action in plant development. PMID:27434212

  18. Modifications of the metabolic pathways of lipid and triacylglycerol production in microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Luen; Ansari, William; Schoepp, Nathan G; Hannon, Michael J; Mayfield, Stephen P; Burkart, Michael D

    2011-11-02

    Microalgae have presented themselves as a strong candidate to replace diminishing oil reserves as a source of lipids for biofuels. Here we describe successful modifications of terrestrial plant lipid content which increase overall lipid production or shift the balance of lipid production towards lipid varieties more useful for biofuel production. Our discussion ranges from the biosynthetic pathways and rate limiting steps of triacylglycerol formation to enzymes required for the formation of triacylglycerol containing exotic lipids. Secondarily, we discuss techniques for genetic engineering and modification of various microalgae which can be combined with insights gained from research in higher plants to aid in the creation of production strains of microalgae.

  19. Potential use of carbon-11 labeled alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) as an in vivo tracer of amino acid uptake in differing metabolic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, P.S.; Starnes, H.F.; Brennan, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    AIB has been used as a model amino acid for the evaluation of alanine-preferring amino acid transport. Hormonal factors and starvation alter the tissue distribution of amino acids, particularly in liver and muscle. With positron emission tomography and labeling of biochemical tracers with C-11, (t1/2=20.4 min), it is now possible to study amino acid kinetics in vivo using external imaging. In order to investigate the utility of C-11 AIB as an in vivo tracer of altered tissue metabolism, C-14 AIB was studied in groups of rats with either streptozotocin-induced diabetes, insulin-induced hypoglycemia or starvation. The data suggest an increased amino acid uptake in liver in starvation, an increased uptake in muscle in response to insulin and associated hypoglycemia and decreased transport in muscle in starvation, as seen by other investigators. These results suggest that C-11 AIB may be useful as an in vivo monitor of metabolic changes in body tissues

  20. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jeremy G; Lincoln, James E; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  1. Expression of a bacterial bi-functional chorismate mutase/prephenate dehydratase modulates primary and secondary metabolism associated with aromatic amino acids in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzin, Vered; Malitsky, Sergey; Aharoni, Asaph; Galili, Gad

    2009-10-01

    Plants can synthesize the aromatic amino acid Phe via arogenate, but it is still not known whether they also use an alternative route for Phe biosynthesis via phenylpyruvate, like many micro-organisms. To examine this possibility, we expressed a bacterial bi-functional PheA (chorismate mutase/prephenate dehydratase) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana that converts chorismate via prephenate into phenylpyruvate. The PheA-expressing plants showed a large increase in the level of Phe, implying that they can convert phenylpyruvate into Phe. In addition, PheA expression rendered the plants more sensitive than wild-type plants to the Trp biosynthesis inhibitor 5-methyl-Trp, implying that Phe biosynthesis competes with Trp biosynthesis from their common precursor chorismate. Surprisingly, GC-MS, LC-MS and microarray analyses showed that this increase in Phe accumulation only had a very minor effect on the levels of other primary metabolites as well as on the transcriptome profile, implying little regulatory cross-interaction between the aromatic amino acid biosynthesis network and the bulk of the Arabidopsis transcriptome and primary metabolism. However, the levels of a number of secondary metabolites derived from all three aromatic amino acids (Phe, Trp and Tyr) were altered in the PheA plants, implying regulatory cross-interactions between the flux of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis from chorismate and their further metabolism into various secondary metabolites. Taken together, our results provide insights into the regulatory mechanisms of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis and their interaction with central primary metabolism, as well as the regulatory interface between primary and secondary metabolism.

  2. THE DISTURBANCE OF METABOLISM OF THE AMINO ACIDS AS A CAUSATIVE FOR THE MENTAL RETARDATION-PHENYLKETONURIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina IVANOVSKA

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available PKU is the rare single-gene disease belonging to disturbance of metabolism of the amino acids, which in its own basics halved the mutated gene, whose leaning at the 12-chromosome charge for the synthesis of phenylalanine hydroxylase, turning on phenylalanine into tyrosine. Enzyme block usually leads to the accumulation of a toxic substrate and/or the deficient synthesis of a product needed for normal body function. In PKU there is a toxic accumulation of phenylalanine behind the deficient enzyme, phenylalanine hydrоxylase. The symptoms are: lighten hare, blue eyes, lithe pigmented skin, convulsion, mental retardation, low level of adrenalin caused for the lack of tyrosine, the urine have a specific smell of rats or gab.Inheritance of disease become in autosomal recessive way which always become possibility to stay hidden in the family and to inherit from knee to knee without manifestation of its own phenotype.The only therapy that successfully avoids the causes of this disease is phenylalanine-restricted diet. Today we have some affords for improvement of gene therapy, which can help us for determination to these disease. The success of the therapy depends from timing of the right detection also diagnostics all trough equivalent therapy which can successfully interrupt the new forms of mental retardation and other symptoms.

  3. Seawater cultivation of freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 drastically alters amino acid composition and glycogen metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eIijima

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Water use assessment is important for bioproduction using cyanobacteria. For eco-friendly reasons, seawater should preferably be used for cyanobacteria cultivation instead of freshwater. In this study, we demonstrated that the freshwater unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 could be grown in a medium based on seawater. The Synechocystis wild-type strain grew well in an artificial seawater (ASW medium supplemented with nitrogen and phosphorus sources. The addition of HEPES buffer improved cell growth overall, although the growth in ASW medium was inferior to that in the synthetic BG-11 medium. The levels of proteins involved in sugar metabolism changed depending on the culture conditions. The biosynthesis of several amino acids including aspartate, glutamine, glycine, proline, ornithine, and lysine, was highly up-regulated by cultivation in ASW. Two types of natural seawater (NSW were also made available for the cultivation of Synechocystis cells, with supplementation of both nitrogen and phosphorus sources. These results revealed the potential use of seawater for the cultivation of freshwater cyanobacteria, which would help to reduce freshwater consumption during biorefinery using cyanobacteria.

  4. Amino acid-dependent activation of liver estrogen receptor alpha integrates metabolic and reproductive functions via IGF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Torre, Sara; Rando, Gianpaolo; Meda, Clara; Stell, Alessia; Chambon, Pierre; Krust, Andrée; Ibarra, Cristian; Magni, Paolo; Ciana, Paolo; Maggi, Adriana

    2011-02-02

    Throughout evolution, organisms have devised strategies to limit fertility in case of prolonged starvation. In mammals, the liver plays a central role in the orchestration of mechanisms allowing for the maintenance of energy homeostasis. We here demonstrate that dietary amino acids regulate the transcriptional activity of hepatic estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) through an mTOR-dependent mechanism. As a result of ERα activation, hepatic IGF-1 mRNA and blood IGF-1 are increased. Conversely, calorie restriction or selective ablation of ERα in the liver decrease blood IGF-1 to levels inadequate for the correct proliferation of the lumen epithelium in the uterus and the progression of the estrous cycle. We propose that the liver acts as critical mediator of energetic and reproductive functions responsible for the blockade of the estrous cycle in case of protein scarcity. Our findings may provide novel insights to understand the cause of selected forms of infertility and metabolic alterations in women after menopause. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of twenty standard amino acids on biochemical constituents, docosahexaenoic acid production and metabolic activity changes of Crypthecodinium cohnii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Waseem; Zan, Xinyi; Shamoon, Muhammad; Sharif, Hafiz Rizwan; Mukama, Omar; Tang, Xin; Song, Yuanda

    2017-08-01

    The influence of 20 standard amino acids was investigated on growth, lipid accumulation, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) production and cell biochemical composition of Crypthecodinium cohnii. C. cohnii efficiently utilize organic nitrogen (predominantly threonine and to a lesser extent tyrosine and serine) as compared to inorganic nitrogen (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 . However, No significant effect was observed on major biochemical composition of C. cohnii (lipids, carbohydrates and proteins) under N limitation or supplementation with different N-sources. Key lipogenic enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, ATP-citrate lyase, fatty acid synthase, malic enzyme, citrate synthase (CS), NAD + and NADP + dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase were shown to be vital in lipogenesis of C. cohnii. Our results indicated that the process of lipid accumulation in C. cohnii is growth-associated and does not depend upon the trigger of nitrogen depletion. This unusual behavior would suggest that the metabolism of the cells may not be entirely the same as in other lipid-accumulating microorganisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Yuanhuapine-induced intestinal and hepatotoxicity were correlated with disturbance of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrate metabolism and gut microflora function: A rat urine metabonomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanyan; Duan, Jin-Ao; Guo, Jianming; Shang, Erxin; Tang, Yuping; Qian, Yefei; Tao, Weiwei; Liu, Pei

    2016-07-15

    This research was designed to study metabonomic characteristics of the toxicity induced by yuanhuapine, a major bioactive diterpenoid in a well-known traditional Chinese medicine-Genkwa Flos. General observation, blood biochemistry and histopathological examination were used to reflect yuanhuapine-induced toxicity. Urine samples from rats in control and yuanhuapine treated rats were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). Pattern recognition methods including principal components analysis (PCA), partial least-squared discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), orthogonal partial least-squared discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) and computational system analysis were integrated to obtain comprehensive metabonomic profiling and pathways of the biological data sets. The results suggested that yuanhuapine could induce intestinal and liver damage. And 14 endogenous metabolites as biomarkers related to the amino acids metabolism, lipids metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and gut microflora were significantly changed in the urine of yuanhuapine treated rats, which were firstly constructed the metabolomic feature profiling and metabolite interaction network of yuanhuapine-induced injury using pattern recognition methods and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) approach. The present study showed that yuanhuapine-induced intestinal and hepatic toxicity were correlated with disturbance of amino acids metabolism, lipids metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and gut microflora. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficient production of d-amino acid oxidase in Escherichia coli by a trade-off between its expression and biomass using N-terminal modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Junxian; Yang, Taowei; Zhou, Junping; Xu, Meijuan; Zhang, Xian; Rao, Zhiming; Yang, Shangtian

    2017-11-01

    Native d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) that is expressed mostly as inclusion body and its toxicity for E. coli hamper efficient heterologous expression. In this study, the soluble expression of DAAO from Rhodosporidium toruloides (RtDAAO) was improved in E. coli through N-terminal modification, but the cell biomass was decreased. Then a trade-off between DAAO expression and biomass was achieved to obtain the highest volumetric activity of DAAO through regulated the number of N-terminus histidine residues. When variant 2 H 3 G was fused with three N-terminus histidine residues, the volumetric activity was increased by 3.1 times and the biomass was not significant change compared with the wild type. Finally, the N-terminus disordered region of RtDAAO (HSQK) was replaced with HHHG and the variant enzyme activity reached 80.7U/mL (with a 40 percent of inactive DAAO reduced) in a 7.5L fermenter in 24h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Studies on glucose, amino acid and protein metabolism in patients with liver cirrhosis in relation to plasma levels of human growth hormone (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, C

    1975-09-01

    Derangements in glucose, amino acid and protein metabolism in patients with liver cirrhosis were examined with special reference to plasma levels of human growth hormone (HGH). Changes in blood glucose, IRI (immunoreactive insulin), HGH, FFA (free fatty acid) and plasma free amino acid levels were determined in controls and patients following either oral glucose load, protein feeding or intravenous arginine infusion. 1) In patients with liver cirrhosis, incidence of glucose intolerance after glucose tolerance test (GTT) was high and IRI levels were elevated in the fasting state as well as after glucose, protein or arginine loads. 2) Fasting levels of blood HGH were significantly higher in liver cirrhosis than in controls. GTT revealed that blood HGH levels decreased slightly during the rising phase of blood glucose, and conversely, increased during the falling phase of glucose (180 minutes after the glucose load) both in controls and in patients. In cirrhotic patients, marked increases in HGH levels were observed both 120 minutes after the protein load and 60 minutes after the arginine infusion. 3) Fasting levels of serum FFA were significantly higher in liver cirrhosis than in controls. Both controls and patients, however, showed a similar pattern of change in FFA levels following GTT or protein ingestion, i.e. a minimum value 120 minutes after the load and a gradual increase thereafter. 4) Fasting levels of plasma free amino acids were significantly higher in cirrhotic patients than in controls. After the glucose load, however, slight decrease was noted in some amino acid levels. All the amino acid levels examined were elevated following protein ingestion, particularly in cirrhotic patients. 5) A positive correlation was demonstrated in cirrhotic patients between total plasma free amino acids and maximal HGH responses following protein ingestion. Similar significant correlations were observed between the maximal HGH response and the plasma level of several amino

  9. Lifestyle modifications supported by regional health nurses lowered insulin resistance, oxidative stress and central blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoichi; Miyazaki, Takashi; Sato, Makiko; Araki, Ryuichiro; Takahashi, Sachiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Shibazaki, Satomi

    2015-01-01

    This study was attempted to investigate whether lifestyle modifications supported by regional health nurses should improve cardio-metabolic factors--including adipocytokines, oxidative stress, and arterial stiffness--in subjects with metabolic syndrome. Thirty-six subjects with metabolic syndrome were enrolled, 28 of whom completed the 6-month lifestyle modifications (male:female=19:9). Blood and urine test results were examined in relation to metabolic factors before and after 6-month nutritional and physical activity modifications. In addition, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed and arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and radial augmentation index before and after them. Six-month lifestyle modifications significantly reduced body weight, homeostasis model assessment index, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). They significantly attenuated oxidative stress measured by the urinary 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine/creatinine ratio. They also lowered brachial and central systolic blood pressure. They tended to decrease waist circumferences and the levels of C-reactive protein. However they did not significantly change the levels of adipocytokines, including tumour necrosis factor, soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors, and interleukin 6, or arterial stiffness measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and radial augmentation index. Six-month lifestyle modifications supported by regional health nurses lowered body weight, insulin resistance, LDL-C, oxidative stress, and peripheral and central blood pressure in subjects with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbon nanotubes toxicology and effects on metabolism and immunological modification in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaretti, M; Mazzanti, G; Mastrangelo, S; Di Sotto, A; Bosco, S; Porta, N; Deriu, G; Bellucci, S; Balasubramanian, C; De Bellis, G; Micciulla, F; Tiberia, A; Cucina, A; Le Foche, F; Carru, G A; Masciangelo, R; Chiaretti, A M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research is focused on the biological effects of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on three different human cell types, laboratory animals in vivo, and immunological effects. Large numbers of researchers are directly involved in the handling of nanostructured materials such as MWCNTs and nanoparticles. It is important to assess the potential health risks related to their daily exposure to carbon nanotubes. The administration of sterilized nanosamples has been performed on laboratory animals, in both acute and chronic administration, and the pathological effects on the parenchymal tissues have been investigated. We studied the serum immunological modifications after intraperitoneal administration of the MWCNTs. We did not observe any antigenic reaction; the screening of ANA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin, C-ANCA and P-ANCA was negative. No quantitative modification of immunoglobulins was observed, hence no modification of humoral immunity was documented. We also studied the effects of MWCNTs on the proliferation of three different cell types. MCF-7 showed a significant inhibition of proliferation for all conditions studied, whereas hSMCs demonstrated a reduction of cell growth only for the highest MWCNTs concentrations after 72 h. Also, no growth modification was observed in the Caco-2 cell line. We observed that a low quantity of MWCNTs does not provoke any inflammatory reaction. However, for future medical applications, it is important to realize prosthesis based on MWCNTs, through studying the corresponding implantation effects. Moreover, it has to be emphasized that this investigation does not address, at the moment, the carcinogenicity of MWCNTs, which requires a detailed follow-up investigation on the specific topic. In view of the subsequent and more extensive use of MWCNTs, especially in applications where carbon nanotubes are injected into the human body for drug delivery, as a contrast agent carrying entities for MRI, or as the basic

  11. Carbon nanotubes toxicology and effects on metabolism and immunological modification in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaretti, M.; Mazzanti, G.; Bosco, S.; Bellucci, S.; Cucina, A.; LeFoche, F.; Carru, G. A.; Mastrangelo, S.; Di Sotto, A.; Masciangelo, R.; Chiaretti, A. M.; Balasubramanian, C.; DeBellis, G.; Micciulla, F.; Porta, N.; Deriu, G.; Tiberia, A.

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research is focused on the biological effects of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on three different human cell types, laboratory animals in vivo, and immunological effects. Large numbers of researchers are directly involved in the handling of nanostructured materials such as MWCNTs and nanoparticles. It is important to assess the potential health risks related to their daily exposure to carbon nanotubes. The administration of sterilized nanosamples has been performed on laboratory animals, in both acute and chronic administration, and the pathological effects on the parenchymal tissues have been investigated. We studied the serum immunological modifications after intraperitoneal administration of the MWCNTs. We did not observe any antigenic reaction; the screening of ANA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin, C-ANCA and P-ANCA was negative. No quantitative modification of immunoglobulins was observed, hence no modification of humoral immunity was documented. We also studied the effects of MWCNTs on the proliferation of three different cell types. MCF-7 showed a significant inhibition of proliferation for all conditions studied, whereas hSMCs demonstrated a reduction of cell growth only for the highest MWCNTs concentrations after 72 h. Also, no growth modification was observed in the Caco-2 cell line. We observed that a low quantity of MWCNTs does not provoke any inflammatory reaction. However, for future medical applications, it is important to realize prosthesis based on MWCNTs, through studying the corresponding implantation effects. Moreover, it has to be emphasized that this investigation does not address, at the moment, the carcinogenicity of MWCNTs, which requires a detailed follow-up investigation on the specific topic. In view of the subsequent and more extensive use of MWCNTs, especially in applications where carbon nanotubes are injected into the human body for drug delivery, as a contrast agent carrying entities for MRI, or as the basic

  12. Oxidative modifications of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase regulate metabolic reprogramming of stored red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Julie A; Wither, Matthew J; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Nemkov, Travis; Issaian, Aaron; Yoshida, Tatsuro; Dunham, Andrew J; Hill, Ryan C; Hansen, Kirk C; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-09-22

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays a key regulatory function in glucose oxidation by mediating fluxes through glycolysis or the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) in an oxidative stress-dependent fashion. Previous studies documented metabolic reprogramming in stored red blood cells (RBCs) and oxidation of GAPDH at functional residues upon exposure to pro-oxidants diamide and H2O2 Here we hypothesize that routine storage of erythrocyte concentrates promotes metabolic modulation of stored RBCs by targeting functional thiol residues of GAPDH. Progressive increases in PPP/glycolysis ratios were determined via metabolic flux analysis after spiking (13)C1,2,3-glucose in erythrocyte concentrates stored in Additive Solution-3 under blood bank conditions for up to 42 days. Proteomics analyses revealed a storage-dependent oxidation of GAPDH at functional Cys152, 156, 247, and His179. Activity loss by oxidation occurred with increasing storage duration and was progressively irreversible. Irreversibly oxidized GAPDH accumulated in stored erythrocyte membranes and supernatants through storage day 42. By combining state-of-the-art ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolic flux analysis with redox and switch-tag proteomics, we identify for the first time ex vivo functionally relevant reversible and irreversible (sulfinic acid; Cys to dehydroalanine) oxidations of GAPDH without exogenous supplementation of excess pro-oxidant compounds in clinically relevant blood products. Oxidative and metabolic lesions, exacerbated by storage under hyperoxic conditions, were ameliorated by hypoxic storage. Storage-dependent reversible oxidation of GAPDH represents a mechanistic adaptation in stored erythrocytes to promote PPP activation and generate reducing equivalents. Removal of irreversibly oxidized, functionally compromised GAPDH identifies enhanced vesiculation as a self-protective mechanism in ex vivo aging erythrocytes. © 2016 by The American

  13. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in the developing rhesus monkey brain: subcellular studies of the methylation cycle and cystathionine beta-synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, D K; Sturman, J A; Gaull, G E

    1981-03-01

    The subcellular distributions of the enzymes associated with the methylation and cystathionine-synthesizing portion of the sulfur amino acid metabolic pathway have been determined in the occipital lobe of the rhesus monkey. 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase and 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase activities are located mainly in the soluble compartment. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase activity is located primarily in mitochondria. Cystathionine beta-synthase is a soluble enzyme with a significant component occluded within the nerve endings. Glycine, serine, and cystathionine increase per gram of tissue during development. Glycine and serine are approximately 30% occluded within the nerve endings. These data are consistent with a localization of sulfur amino acid metabolism that supports a differential compartmentation of potential neurotransmitter function and methylation function in the primate.

  14. Amino acids regulate hepatic intermediary metabolism-related gene expression via mTORC1-dependent manner in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Wei Wei

    2015-01-01

    During my doctoral study, we used rainbow trout, a representative carnivorous fish and relevant diabetic model, to study the mechanisms underlying the regulation of hepatic intermediary metabolism by nutrients (amino acids (AAs) and glucose), and determine the potential involvement of insulin/Akt and mTORC1 signaling pathways in these regulations. Using acute administration of rapamycin, a pharmacological inhibitor of TOR, we first identified that mTORC1 activation promotes the expression of ...

  15. Effects of telephone-based motivational interviewing in lifestyle modification program on reducing metabolic risks in middle-aged and older women with metabolic syndrome: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Huei; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Heitkemper, Margaret McLean; Hung, Yi-Jen; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Tzeng, Wen-Chii; Chiang, Li-Chi

    2016-08-01

    Lifestyle modification is often difficult for middle-aged and older women living in the community who are at high risk of physical inactivity and metabolic syndrome. To examine the effects of telephone-based motivational interviewing in a 12-week lifestyle modification program on physical activity, MetS, metabolic risks (fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein, and central obesity), and the number of metabolic risks in community-living middle-aged and older women diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. A randomized controlled trial was conducted. Recruited were 328 middle-aged and older women from a community health center in Taiwan. Eligible women medically diagnosed with metabolic syndrome (n=115) were randomly assigned to one of three groups: The experimental group received an individualized telephone delivered lifestyle modification program that included motivational interviewing delivered by an experienced nurse. The brief group received a single brief lifestyle modification counseling session with a brochure. The usual care group received standard care. Physical activity was assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and metabolic risks were determined by serum markers and anthropometric measures at pre- and post-intervention. One hundred women completed the study and an intention-to-treat analysis was performed. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the intervention effects. Women in the experimental group increased physical activity from 1609 to 1892 MET-min/week (β=846, p=.01), reduced the percentage of diagnosed with metabolic syndrome to 81.6% (β=-0.17, p=.003), and decreased the number of metabolic risks from 4.0 to 3.6 (β=-0.50, pMotivational interviewing as a component of an individualized physical activity and lifestyle modification program has positive benefit in reducing metabolic risks in middle-aged and older women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evidence of endometrial amino acid metabolism and transport modulation by peri-ovulatory endocrine profiles driving uterine receptivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Moana Rodrigues; da Silva, Maressa Izabel Santos; Pugliesi, Guilherme; Van Hoeck, Veerle; Binelli, Mario

    2017-01-01

    In beef cattle, changes in the periovulatory endocrine milieu are associated with fertility and conceptus growth. A large preovulatory follicle (POF) and the resulting elevated concentrations of progesterone (P4) during diestrus positively affect pregnancy rates. Amino acids (AA) are important components of maternally derived secretions that are crucial for embryonic survival before implantation. The hypothesis is that the size of the POF and the concentration of P4 in early diestrus modulate the endometrial abundance of SLC transcripts related to AA transport and metabolism and subsequently impact luminal concentrations of AA. The follicle growth of Nelore cows was manipulated to produce two experimental groups: large POF and CL (LF-LCL group) and small POF and CL (SF-SCL group). On Day 4 (D4; Experiment 1) and Day 7 (D7; Experiment 2) after GnRH-induced ovulation (GnRH treatment = D0), the animals were slaughtered and uterine tissues and uterine washings were collected. qRT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression levels of AA transporters in D4 and D7 endometrial tissues. The concentrations of AA were quantified in D4 and D7 uterine washings by HPLC. Transcript results show that, on D4, SLC6A6, SLC7A4, SLC17A5, SLC38A1, SLC38A7 and SCLY and on D7 SLC1A4, SLC6A1, SLC6A14, SLC7A4, SLC7A7, SLC7A8, SLC17A5, SLC38A1, SLC38A7, SLC43A2 and DDO were more abundant in the endometria of cows from the LF-LCL group ( P  < 0.05). In addition, concentrations of AA in the uterine lumen were influenced by the endocrine profiles of the mother. In this context, D4 uterine washings revealed that greater concentrations of taurine, alanine and α-aminobutyric acid were present in SF-SCL ( P  < 0.05). In contrast, lower concentrations of valine and cystathionine were quantified on D7 uterine washings from SF-SCL cows ( P  < 0.05). The present study revealed an association between the abundance of transcripts related to AA transport and metabolism in the endometrium and

  17. Studies on the protein and amino acid metabolism of laying hens using 15N-labelled casein. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, G.

    1977-01-01

    Four colostomized Leghorn hens were fed, during 6 days, 15 N-labelled casein as sole protein source. Two animals were slaughtered 48 hours, the other two 144 hours after the last 15 N-application. The share of TCE-soluble N in total N averaged 16% for the body parts analysed, i.e. meat, bone, liver, kidneys, oviducts, residual viscera and other. The variation of the lysine, histidine and arginine levels in the body parts ranged from 3.6 to 7.9 g, 1.1 to 3.7 g and 6.4 to 7.4 g in 16.7 g hydrolysate N, respectively. Except for feathers, the analysed body parts contained an excess amount of heavy nitrogen. The degree of labelling was found to depend on the time of slaughtering after the tracer application. In the liver and in the oviduct being metabolically active organs, the 15 N-excess in the total N fraction decreased by 45% between the 2nd and the 6th days after 15 N-feeding, whilst in the meat it went down by 20%. The decline of the 15 N-concentration in the TCE-soluble N compounds was faster than in the total N-fraction. Out of the body samples analysed, the lysine of the liver having 0.26 atom% 15 N-excess was found to be more strongly labelled in hens 1 and 2. The amino acid arginine reached about the same level of labelling, the 15 N-frequency of histidine being the lowest. (author)

  18. Anti-ulcer effect and potential mechanism of licoflavone by regulating inflammation mediators and amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Shuai; Bao, Yong-Rui; Li, Tian-Jiao; Yang, Guan-Lin; Chang, Xin; Meng, Xian-Sheng

    2017-03-06

    Glycyrrhiza is the dry root and rhizome of the leguminous plant, Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., Glycyrrhiza inflata Bat. or Glycyrrhiza glabra L., which was firstly cited in Shennong's Herbal Classic in Han dynasty and was officially listed in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, has been widely used in China during the past millennia. Licoflavone is the major component of Glycyrrhiza with anti-ulcer activity. The present study is based on clarifying the anti-ulcer effect of licoflavone, aiming at elucidating the possible molecule mechanisms of its action for treating gastric ulcer rats induced by acetic acid. Rats were divided into 7 groups, and drugs were administered from on the day after the onset of gastric ulcer (day 3) until day 11 of the experiment once daily continuously. The plasma were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-TOF-MS), significant different metabolites were investigated to explain its therapeutic mechanism. Furthermore, quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was performed to detect the expression of RNA in stomach tissue for verifying the above results. Licoflavone can effectively cure the gastric ulcer, particularly the middle dose group. According to the statistical analysis of the plasma different metabolites from each groups and the expression of genes in tissues, sixteen significant different metabolites, including histamine, tryptophan, arachidonic acid, phingosine-1-phosphate etc., contributing to the treatment of gastric ulcer were discovered and identified. In RT-PCR analysis, the results of the expression of RNA were corresponded with what we discovered. Our study indicated licoflavone plays the role of treating gastric ulcer by regulating inflammation mediators and amino acid metabolism. We demonstrated that metabolomics technology combined with gene technology is a useful tool to search different metabolites and to dissect the potential

  19. Mitochondrial protein acetylation as a cell-intrinsic, evolutionary driver of fat storage: chemical and metabolic logic of acetyl-lysine modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanta, Sirisha; Grossmann, Ruth E; Brenner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Hormone systems evolved over 500 million years of animal natural history to motivate feeding behavior and convert excess calories to fat. These systems produced vertebrates, including humans, who are famine-resistant but sensitive to obesity in environments of persistent overnutrition. We looked for cell-intrinsic metabolic features, which might have been subject to an evolutionary drive favoring lipogenesis. Mitochondrial protein acetylation appears to be such a system. Because mitochondrial acetyl-coA is the central mediator of fuel oxidation and is saturable, this metabolite is postulated to be the fundamental indicator of energy excess, which imprints a memory of nutritional imbalances by covalent modification. Fungal and invertebrate mitochondria have highly acetylated mitochondrial proteomes without an apparent mitochondrially targeted protein lysine acetyltransferase. Thus, mitochondrial acetylation is hypothesized to have evolved as a nonenzymatic phenomenon. Because the pKa of a nonperturbed Lys is 10.4 and linkage of a carbonyl carbon to an ε amino group cannot be formed with a protonated Lys, we hypothesize that acetylation occurs on residues with depressed pKa values, accounting for the propensity of acetylation to hit active sites and suggesting that regulatory Lys residues may have been under selective pressure to avoid or attract acetylation throughout animal evolution. In addition, a shortage of mitochondrial oxaloacetate under ketotic conditions can explain why macronutrient insufficiency also produces mitochondrial hyperacetylation. Reduced mitochondrial activity during times of overnutrition and undernutrition would improve fitness by virtue of resource conservation. Micronutrient insufficiency is predicted to exacerbate mitochondrial hyperacetylation. Nicotinamide riboside and Sirt3 activity are predicted to relieve mitochondrial inhibition.

  20. The Zea mays mutants opaque-2 and opaque-7 disclose extensive changes in endosperm metabolism as revealed by protein, amino acid, and transcriptome-wide analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirona Raul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The changes in storage reserve accumulation during maize (Zea mays L. grain maturation are well established. However, the key molecular determinants controlling carbon flux to the grain and the partitioning of carbon to starch and protein are more elusive. The Opaque-2 (O2 gene, one of the best-characterized plant transcription factors, is a good example of the integration of carbohydrate, amino acid and storage protein metabolisms in maize endosperm development. Evidence also indicates that the Opaque-7 (O7 gene plays a role in affecting endosperm metabolism. The focus of this study was to assess the changes induced by the o2 and o7 mutations on maize endosperm metabolism by evaluating protein and amino acid composition and by transcriptome profiling, in order to investigate the functional interplay between these two genes in single and double mutants. Results We show that the overall amino acid composition of the mutants analyzed appeared similar. Each mutant had a high Lys and reduced Glx and Leu content with respect to wild type. Gene expression profiling, based on a unigene set composed of 7,250 ESTs, allowed us to identify a series of mutant-related down (17.1% and up-regulated (3.2% transcripts. Several differentially expressed ESTs homologous to genes encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, carbon metabolism (TCA cycle and glycolysis, in storage protein and starch metabolism, in gene transcription and translation processes, in signal transduction, and in protein, fatty acid, and lipid synthesis were identified. Our analyses demonstrate that the mutants investigated are pleiotropic and play a critical role in several endosperm-related metabolic processes. Pleiotropic effects were less evident in the o7 mutant, but severe in the o2 and o2o7 backgrounds, with large changes in gene expression patterns, affecting a broad range of kernel-expressed genes. Conclusion Although, by necessity, this paper is

  1. The Zea mays mutants opaque-2 and opaque-7 disclose extensive changes in endosperm metabolism as revealed by protein, amino acid, and transcriptome-wide analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartings, Hans; Lauria, Massimiliano; Lazzaroni, Nadia; Pirona, Raul; Motto, Mario

    2011-01-18

    The changes in storage reserve accumulation during maize (Zea mays L.) grain maturation are well established. However, the key molecular determinants controlling carbon flux to the grain and the partitioning of carbon to starch and protein are more elusive. The Opaque-2 (O2) gene, one of the best-characterized plant transcription factors, is a good example of the integration of carbohydrate, amino acid and storage protein metabolisms in maize endosperm development. Evidence also indicates that the Opaque-7 (O7) gene plays a role in affecting endosperm metabolism. The focus of this study was to assess the changes induced by the o2 and o7 mutations on maize endosperm metabolism by evaluating protein and amino acid composition and by transcriptome profiling, in order to investigate the functional interplay between these two genes in single and double mutants. We show that the overall amino acid composition of the mutants analyzed appeared similar. Each mutant had a high Lys and reduced Glx and Leu content with respect to wild type. Gene expression profiling, based on a unigene set composed of 7,250 ESTs, allowed us to identify a series of mutant-related down (17.1%) and up-regulated (3.2%) transcripts. Several differentially expressed ESTs homologous to genes encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, carbon metabolism (TCA cycle and glycolysis), in storage protein and starch metabolism, in gene transcription and translation processes, in signal transduction, and in protein, fatty acid, and lipid synthesis were identified. Our analyses demonstrate that the mutants investigated are pleiotropic and play a critical role in several endosperm-related metabolic processes. Pleiotropic effects were less evident in the o7 mutant, but severe in the o2 and o2o7 backgrounds, with large changes in gene expression patterns, affecting a broad range of kernel-expressed genes. Although, by necessity, this paper is descriptive and more work is required to define gene functions

  2. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can cause serious health problems and, sometimes, death. People with these kinds of disorders may need to limit or avoid certain foods because their bodies can’t process them properly. Illness or infection, eating the wrong kinds of foods, or going for a long ...

  3. SIZ1-Dependent Post-Translational Modification by SUMO Modulates Sugar Signaling and Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Pedro Humberto; Verde, Nuno; Lourenço, Tiago; Magalhães, Alexandre Papadopoulos; Tavares, Rui Manuel; Bejarano, Eduardo Rodríguez; Azevedo, Herlânder

    2015-12-01

    Post-translational modification mechanisms function as switches that mediate the balance between optimum growth and the response to environmental stimuli, by regulating the activity of key proteins. SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) attachment, or sumoylation, is a post-translational modification that is essential for the plant stress response, also modulating hormonal circuits to co-ordinate developmental processes. The Arabidopsis SUMO E3 ligase SAP and Miz 1 (SIZ1) is the major SUMO conjugation enhancer in response to stress, and is implicated in several aspects of plant development. Here we report that known SUMO targets are over-represented in multiple carbohydrate-related proteins, suggesting a functional link between sumoylation and sugar metabolism and signaling in plants. We subsequently observed that SUMO-conjugated proteins accumulate in response to high doses of sugar in a SIZ1-dependent manner, and that the null siz1 mutant displays increased expression of sucrose and starch catabolic genes and shows reduced starch levels. We demonstrated that SIZ1 controls germination time and post-germination growth via osmotic and sugar-dependent signaling, respectively. Glucose was specifically linked to SUMO-sugar interplay, with high levels inducing root growth inhibition and aberrant root hair morphology in siz1. The use of sugar analogs and sugar marker gene expression analysis allowed us to implicate SIZ1 in a signaling pathway dependent on glucose metabolism, probably involving modulation of SNF1-related kinase 1 (SnRK1) activity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Effects of simultaneous dietary fish oil ingestion and sulfur amino acid supplementation on the lipid metabolism in hepatoma-bearing rats with hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Masashi; Miura, Yutaka; Funabiki, Ryuhei; Yagasaki, Kazumi

    2010-01-01

    The effects of simultaneous dietary fish oil ingestion and sulfur amino acid (L-methionine and L-cystine) supplementation on serum lipid concentrations and various parameters related to the lipid metabolism were studied in Donryu rats subcutaneously implanted with an ascites hepatoma cell line, AH109A. A diet containing 10% fish oil was found to reduce serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, (very-low-density lipoprotein plus low-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol, phospholipid and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations in these animals, and dietary supplementation of 1.2% L-methionine and L-cystine also suppressed these serum lipid concentrations. Hepatic fatty acid synthesis and the availability of serum NEFA were decreased, and epididymal adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was elevated by dietary fish oil, while LPL activity in various tissues and hepatic fatty acid oxidation were increased by dietary sulfur amino acids, resulting in a reduction in the serum triglyceride concentration by dietary fish oil and sulfur amino acids, respectively. Dietary fish oil suppressed the hepatoma-induced increase in cholesterogenesis in the host liver, and dietary methionine and cystine enhanced bile acid excretion into feces, which were the causes of the hypocholesterolemic effect. In these serum lipid concentrations, there were significant effects of fish oil ingestion and sulfur amino acid supplementation, but no significant interaction between these two factors was seen. These results indicate that dietary fish oil and sulfur amino acid, L-methionine and L-cystine, have hypolipidemic effects in cancer-related hyperlipidemia, and that the effects of these two factors on the decrease in these serum lipid concentrations are additive; these two factors may affect the lipid metabolism via different pathways and mechanisms.

  5. Alterations in Aspergillus brasiliensis (niger) ATCC 9642 membranes associated to metabolism modifications during application of low-intensity electric current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Alvarez, Nancy; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Mariano; González, Ignacio

    2017-12-01

    The effects of electric current on membranes associated with metabolism modifications in Aspergillus brasiliensis (niger) ATCC 9642 were studied. A 450-mL electrochemical cell with titanium ruthenium-oxide coated electrodes and packed with 15g of perlite, as inert support, was inoculated with A. brasiliensis spores and incubated in a solid inert-substrate culture (12 d; 30°C). Then, 4.5days after starting the culture, a current of 0.42mAcm -2 was applied for 24h. The application of low-intensity electric current increased the molecular oxygen consumption rate in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, resulting in high concentrations of reactive oxygen species, promoting high lipoperoxidation levels, according to measured malondialdehyde, and consequent alterations in membrane permeability explained the high n-hexadecane (HXD) degradation rates observed here (4.7-fold higher than cultures without current). Finally, cell differentiation and spore production were strongly stimulated. The study contributes to the understanding of the effect of current on the cell membrane and its association with HXD metabolism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance: underlying causes and modification by exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christian K; Hevener, Andrea L; Barnard, R James

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a collection of cardiometabolic risk factors that includes obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Although there has been significant debate regarding the criteria and concept of the syndrome, this clustering of risk factors is unequivocally linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Regardless of the true definition, based on current population estimates, nearly 100 million have MS. It is often characterized by insulin resistance, which some have suggested is a major underpinning link between physical inactivity and MS. The purpose of this review is to: (i) provide an overview of the history, causes and clinical aspects of MS, (ii) review the molecular mechanisms of insulin action and the causes of insulin resistance, and (iii) discuss the epidemiological and intervention data on the effects of exercise on MS and insulin sensitivity.

  7. Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance: Underlying Causes and Modification by Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christian K.; Hevener, Andrea L.; Barnard, R. James

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a collection of cardiometabolic risk factors that includes obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Although there has been significant debate regarding the criteria and concept of the syndrome, this clustering of risk factors is unequivocally linked to an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Regardless of the true definition, based on current population estimates, nearly 100 million have MS. It is often characterized by insulin resistance, which some have suggested is a major underpinning link between physical inactivity and MS. The purpose of this review is to: (i) provide an overview of the history, causes and clinical aspects of MS, (ii) review the molecular mechanisms of insulin action and the causes of insulin resistance, and (iii) discuss the epidemiological and intervention data on the effects of exercise on MS and insulin sensitivity. PMID:23720280

  8. Single pyruvate intake induces blood alkalization and modification of resting metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olek, Robert A; Luszczyk, Marcin; Kujach, Sylwester; Ziemann, Ewa; Pieszko, Magdalena; Pischel, Ivo; Laskowski, Radoslaw

    2015-03-01

    Three separate studies were performed with the aim to 1) determine the effect of a single sodium pyruvate intake on the blood acid-base status in males and females; 2) compare the effect of sodium and calcium pyruvate salts and establish their role in the lipolysis rate; and 3) quantify the effect of single pyruvate intake on the resting energy metabolism. In all, 48 individuals completed three separate studies. In all the studies, participants consumed a single dose of pyruvate 0.1 g/kg 60 min before commencing the measurements. The whole blood pH, bicarbonate concentration, base excess or plasma glycerol, free fatty acids, glucose concentrations, or resting energy expenditure and calculated respiratory exchange ratio were determined. The analysis of variance for repeated measurements was performed to examine the interaction between treatment and time. The single dose of sodium pyruvate induced blood alkalization, which was more marked in the male than in the female participants. Following the ingestion of sodium or calcium pyruvate, the blood acid-base parameters were higher than in the placebo trial. Furthermore, 3-h postingestion glycerol was lower in both pyruvate trials than in placebo. Resting energy expenditure did not differ between the trials; however, carbohydrate oxidation was increased after sodium pyruvate ingestion. Pyruvate intake induced mild alkalization in a sex-dependent fashion. Moreover, it accelerated carbohydrate metabolism and delayed the rate of glycerol appearance in the blood, but had no effect on the resting energy expenditure. Furthermore, sodium salt seems to have had a greater effect on the blood buffering level than calcium salt. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nutritional value of protein hydrolysis products (oligopeptides and free amino acids) as a consequence of absorption and metabolism kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerat, A.

    1995-01-01

    When pigs were submitted to duodenal infusion of solutions containing a large percentage of small peptides (PEP) or free amino acids with the same pattern (AAL) amino acids appear in the portal blood more rapidly and more uniformly after infusion of PEP then after infusion of AAL, with the notable exception of methionine for which the opposite was true. These differences were lowered when a carbohydrate (maltose dextrin) was present in the solution, but nevertheless remained significant for the first hour after the infusion. The long-term (8-hour) uptake of free amino acids into the liver and the peripheral tissues differed in profile according to the nature of the duodenal infusion. Peripheral uptake was appreciably less well balanced after infusion of free amino acids (deficiency of threonine and phenylalanine) than after infusion of small peptides (deficiency of methionine). Accordingly, in the rat, under conditions of discontinuous enteral nutrition the mixture of small peptides was of greater nutritive value than the mixture of free amino acids. It thus appears that the absorption kinetics which results in important variations in the temporal distribution of free amino acids in the tissues may be at the origin of transitory imbalances in tissue amino acid uptake, and as a result of a lower nutritive value.

  10. Perturbations of Amino Acid Metabolism Associated with Glyphosate-Dependent Inhibition of Shikimic Acid Metabolism Affect Cellular Redox Homeostasis and Alter the Abundance of Proteins Involved in Photosynthesis and Photorespiration1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Driscoll, Simon P.; Bulman, Christopher A.; Ying, Liu; Emami, Kaveh; Treumann, Achim; Mauve, Caroline; Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway of the synthesis of amino acids such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. However, much uncertainty remains concerning precisely how glyphosate kills plants or affects cellular redox homeostasis and related processes in glyphosate-sensitive and glyphosate-resistant crop plants. To address this issue, we performed an integrated study of photosynthesis, leaf proteomes, amino acid profiles, and redox profiles in the glyphosate-sensitive soybean (Glycine max) genotype PAN809 and glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS). RRS leaves accumulated much more glyphosate than the sensitive line but showed relatively few changes in amino acid metabolism. Photosynthesis was unaffected by glyphosate in RRS leaves, but decreased abundance of photosynthesis/photorespiratory pathway proteins was observed together with oxidation of major redox pools. While treatment of a sensitive genotype with glyphosate rapidly inhibited photosynthesis and triggered the appearance of a nitrogen-rich amino acid profile, there was no evidence of oxidation of the redox pools. There was, however, an increase in starvation-associated and defense proteins. We conclude that glyphosate-dependent inhibition of soybean leaf metabolism leads to the induction of defense proteins without sustained oxidation. Conversely, the accumulation of high levels of glyphosate in RRS enhances cellular oxidation, possibly through mechanisms involving stimulation of the photorespiratory pathway. PMID:21757634

  11. Perturbations of amino acid metabolism associated with glyphosate-dependent inhibition of shikimic acid metabolism affect cellular redox homeostasis and alter the abundance of proteins involved in photosynthesis and photorespiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Driscoll, Simon P; Bulman, Christopher A; Ying, Liu; Emami, Kaveh; Treumann, Achim; Mauve, Caroline; Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H

    2011-09-01

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway of the synthesis of amino acids such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. However, much uncertainty remains concerning precisely how glyphosate kills plants or affects cellular redox homeostasis and related processes in glyphosate-sensitive and glyphosate-resistant crop plants. To address this issue, we performed an integrated study of photosynthesis, leaf proteomes, amino acid profiles, and redox profiles in the glyphosate-sensitive soybean (Glycine max) genotype PAN809 and glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS). RRS leaves accumulated much more glyphosate than the sensitive line but showed relatively few changes in amino acid metabolism. Photosynthesis was unaffected by glyphosate in RRS leaves, but decreased abundance of photosynthesis/photorespiratory pathway proteins was observed together with oxidation of major redox pools. While treatment of a sensitive genotype with glyphosate rapidly inhibited photosynthesis and triggered the appearance of a nitrogen-rich amino acid profile, there was no evidence of oxidation of the redox pools. There was, however, an increase in starvation-associated and defense proteins. We conclude that glyphosate-dependent inhibition of soybean leaf metabolism leads to the induction of defense proteins without sustained oxidation. Conversely, the accumulation of high levels of glyphosate in RRS enhances cellular oxidation, possibly through mechanisms involving stimulation of the photorespiratory pathway.

  12. Effects of glucose, propionic acid, and nonessential amino acids on glucose metabolism and milk yield in Holstein dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemosquet, S; Delamaire, E; Lapierre, H; Blum, J W; Peyraud, J L

    2009-07-01

    Whole-body glucose rate of appearance (Ra) responses and milk lactose secretion were compared in dairy cows receiving duodenal infusions of glucose (Glc), a mixture of 5 nonessential amino acids (NEAAm), or ruminal infusions of propionic acid (C3). Four mid-lactation Holstein cows, fitted with both duodenum and rumen cannulas, were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design with 14-d periods. Cows were fed a grass silage-based diet (Ctrl) that provided 88% of net energy of lactation and 122% of protein requirements. Concentrate was formulated with wheat (21.5%) and barley (20%) containing some starch. Isoenergetic infusions (5.15 Mcal/d of digestible energy) of Glc into the duodenum (7.7 mol/d), C3 into the rumen (14.1 mol/d), or NEAAm into the duodenum (in mol/d; Ala: 1.60; Asp: 0.60; Glu: 5.94; Gly: 1.22; Ser: 2.45) were given as a supplement to the Ctrl diet. During each period on d 13, [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose was infused into one jugular vein and blood samples were taken from the other jugular vein to measure glucose enrichment and determine Ra. Dry matter intake decreased slightly with the infusions (6%), but did not differ among them. Whole body glucose Ra averaged 502, 745, 600, and 576 mmol/h for Ctrl, Glc, C3, and NEAAm, respectively. It increased with the increase in energy supply (Ctrl vs. infusions) and differed according to the nutrients infused. The Ra response was higher with Glc and C3 than with NEAAm and higher with Glc than with C3. Plasma concentrations of insulin were not affected, but insulin-like growth factor 1 increased with infusions. Plasma glucagon increased with NEAAm, which could favor the increased Ra. Overall, milk lactose yield (137, 141, 142, and 130 mmol/h for Ctrl, Glc, C3, and NEAAm, respectively) was not modified by the infusions, but was lower with NEAAm compared with Glc and C3. Changes in lactose yield did not parallel the increase in Ra, and therefore the ratio of lactose yield to Ra decreased with the infusions and was lower in Glc

  13. Effects of Peptone Supplementation in Different Culture Media on Growth, Metabolic Pathway and Productivity of CHO DG44 Cells; a New Insight into Amino Acid Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davami, Fatemeh; Eghbalpour, Farnaz; Nematollahi, Leila; Barkhordari, Farzaneh; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    The optimization of bioprocess conditions towards improved growth profile and productivity yield is considered of great importance in biopharmaceutical manufacturing. Peptones as efficient sources of nutrients have been studied for their effect on media development; however, their role on metabolic pathway is not well understood. In the present study, the effect of different concentration of peptones on a recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line grown in three serum-free suspension cultures was determined. Six peptones of different origins and available amino acid profiles were investigated regarding their impact on cell growth, productivity, and metabolic pathways changes. In optimized feeding strategies, increases of 136% and 159% in volumetric productivity (for a low-nutrient culture media) and 55% (for a high-nutrient culture media) were achieved. Furthermore, particular sources of peptones with specific amino acid profile developed preferential results for each different culture medium. Two peptones, SoyA2SC and SoyE-110, were the only hydrolysates that showed production improvement in all three media. Casein Peptone plus Tryptone N1 and SoyA3SC showed different improved results based on their implemented concentration for each individual basal medium. The amino acid profile of peptones may provide clues to identify the most effective feeding strategies for recombinant CHO cells.

  14. Amino Acids Are an Ineffective Fertilizer for Dunaliella spp. Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphree, Colin A.; Dums, Jacob T.; Jain, Siddharth K.; Zhao, Chengsong; Young, Danielle Y.; Khoshnoodi, Nicole; Tikunov, Andrey; Macdonald, Jeffrey; Pilot, Guillaume; Sederoff, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Autotrophic microalgae are a promising bioproducts platform. However, the fundamental requirements these organisms have for nitrogen fertilizer severely limit the impact and scale of their cultivation. As an alternative to inorganic fertilizers, we investigated the possibility of using amino acids from deconstructed biomass as a nitrogen source in the genus Dunaliella. We found that only four amino acids (glutamine, histidine, cysteine, and tryptophan) rescue Dunaliella spp. growth in nitrogen depleted media, and that supplementation of these amino acids altered the metabolic profile of Dunaliella cells. Our investigations revealed that histidine is transported across the cell membrane, and that glutamine and cysteine are not transported. Rather, glutamine, cysteine, and tryptophan are degraded in solution by a set of oxidative chemical reactions, releasing ammonium that in turn supports growth. Utilization of biomass-derived amino acids is therefore not a suitable option unless additional amino acid nitrogen uptake is enabled through genetic modifications of these algae. PMID:28603530

  15. Effects of an eight-week supervised, structured lifestyle modification programme on anthropometric, metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in severely obese adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crowe, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Lifestyle modification is fundamental to obesity treatment, but few studies have described the effects of structured lifestyle programmes specifically in bariatric patients. We sought to describe changes in anthropometric and metabolic characteristics in a cohort of bariatric patients after participation in a nurse-led, structured lifestyle programme.

  16. Supplementation of branched-chain amino acids in protein-restricted diets modulates the expression levels of amino acid transporters and energy metabolism associated regulators in the adipose tissue of growing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghui Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA supplemented in protein-restricted diets on the growth performance and the expression profile of amino acid transporters and energy metabolism related regulators in the white adipose tissue (WAT of different regional depots including dorsal subcutaneous adipose (DSA and abdominal subcutaneous adipose (ASA. A total of 24 crossbred barrows (7.40 ± 0.70 kg were randomly divided into 4 groups and were fed the following isocaloric diets for 33 days: 1 a recommended adequate protein diet (AP, 20% CP, as a positive control; 2 a low protein diet (LP, 17% CP; 3 the LP diet supplemented with BCAA (LP + B, 17% CP to reach the same level of the AP diet group; 4 the LP diet supplemented with 2 times the amount of BCAA (LP + 2B, 17% CP. The daily gain and daily feed intake of the LP diet group were the lowest among all the treatments (P  0.05. Moreover, BCAA supplementation down-regulated the expression levels of amino acid transporters including L-type amino acid transporter 1 and sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 in DSA, but up-regulated the expression level of L-type amino acid transporter 4 in ASA (P < 0.05. Meanwhile, the energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase α was activated in the DSA of pigs fed LP diet and in the ASA of the pigs fed AP or LP + 2B diets (P < 0.05. The mRNA expression profile of the selected mitochondrial component and mitochondrial biogenesis associated regulators in DSA and ASA also responded differently to dietary BCAA supplementation. These results suggested that the growth performance of growing pigs fed protein restricted diets supplemented with BCAA could catch up to that of the pigs fed AP diets. The results also partly demonstrated that the regulation mechanisms of BCAA are different in the adipose tissues of different depots.

  17. Induction of resistance to gray mold with benzothiadiazole modifies amino acid profile and increases proanthocyanidins in grape: primary versus secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriti, Marcello; Rossoni, Mara; Borgo, Michele; Ferrara, Luigia; Faoro, Franco

    2005-11-16

    Field treatments of grapevine (cv. Merlot) with the plant activator benzothiadiazole (BTH, 0.3 mM) induced resistance against gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea. Both incidence and severity of the disease were reduced. The resistance was associated with an increase of total polyphenols in berry skins, in particular, the proanthocyanidin fraction, that increased up to 36%. The amino acid profile of leaves was also modified by treatments, particularly lysine, that augmented 4-fold. Other amino acids involved in resistance mechanisms to either biotic or abiotic stress increased as well. These results indicate that BTH treatments can be used to control gray mold, thereby limiting an excessive use of fungicides, and could be exploited to increase the content of micronutrients of high nutritional value, arising from both primary and secondary metabolisms.

  18. Effects of water turbulence on variations in cell ultrastructure and metabolism of amino acids in the submersed macrophyte, Elodea nuttallii (Planch.) H. St. John.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atapaththu, K S S; Miyagi, A; Atsuzawa, K; Kaneko, Y; Kawai-Yamada, M; Asaeda, T

    2015-09-01

    The interactions between macrophytes and water movement are not yet fully understood, and the causes responsible for the metabolic and ultrastructural variations in plant cells as a consequence of turbulence are largely unknown. In the present study, growth, metabolism and ultrastructural changes were evaluated in the aquatic macrophyte Elodea nuttallii, after exposure to turbulence for 30 days. The turbulence was generated with a vertically oscillating horizontal grid. The turbulence reduced plant growth, plasmolysed leaf cells and strengthened cell walls, and plants exposed to turbulence accumulated starch granules in stem chloroplasts. The size of the starch granules increased with the magnitude of the turbulence. Using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS), analysis of the metabolome found metabolite accumulation in response to the turbulence. Asparagine was the dominant amino acid that was concentrated in stressed plants, and organic acids such as citrate, ascorbate, oxalate and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) also accumulated in response to turbulence. These results indicate that turbulence caused severe stress that affected plant growth, cell ultrastructure and some metabolic functions of E. nuttallii. Our findings offer insights to explain the effects of water movement on the functions of aquatic plants. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  19. Effects of Different Dietary and Lifestyle Modification Therapies on Metabolic Syndrome in Prediabetic Arab Patients: A 12-Month Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan A. Alfawaz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This three-arm, randomized, controlled study aimed to determine the differences in the effects of general advice (GA on lifestyle change, intensive lifestyle modification programme (ILMP and GA + metformin (GA + Met in reducing the prevalence of full metabolic syndrome (MetS in subjects with prediabetes; 294 Saudis with prediabetes (fasting glucose 5.6–6.9 mmol/L were initially randomized, 263 completed 6 months and 237 completed 12 months. They were allocated into three groups: GA group which received a standard lifestyle change education; ILMP which followed a rigorous lifestyle modification support on diet and physical activity; and a GA + Met group. Anthropometric and biochemical estimations were measured. Full MetS (primary endpoint and its components (secondary endpoint were screened at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Full MetS in the ILMP group decreased by 26% (p < 0.001; in GA + Met group by 22.4% (p = 0.01 and in GA group by 8.2% (p = 0.28. The number of MetS components decreased significantly in the ILMP and GA + Met groups (mean change 0.81, p < 0.001 and 0.35, p = 0.05, respectively. Between-group comparison revealed a clinically significant decrease in MetS components in favor of the ILMP group (−0.58 (−0.88–0.28, p < 0.001. This study highlights the clinical potency of ILMP versus other diabetes prevention options in reducing MetS in Saudi adults with elevated fasting glucose.

  20. Metabolic Myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic myopathies are genetic disorders that impair intermediary metabolism in skeletal muscle. Impairments in glycolysis/glycogenolysis (glycogen-storage disease), fatty acid transport and oxidation (fatty acid oxidation defects), and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (mitochondrial myopathies) represent the majority of known defects. The purpose of this review is to develop a diagnostic and treatment algorithm for the metabolic myopathies. The metabolic myopathies can present in the neonatal and infant period as part of more systemic involvement with hypotonia, hypoglycemia, and encephalopathy; however, most cases present in childhood or in adulthood with exercise intolerance (often with rhabdomyolysis) and weakness. The glycogen-storage diseases present during brief bouts of high-intensity exercise, whereas fatty acid oxidation defects and mitochondrial myopathies present during a long-duration/low-intensity endurance-type activity or during fasting or another metabolically stressful event (eg, surgery, fever). The clinical examination is often normal between acute events, and evaluation involves exercise testing, blood testing (creatine kinase, acylcarnitine profile, lactate, amino acids), urine organic acids (ketones, dicarboxylic acids, 3-methylglutaconic acid), muscle biopsy (histology, ultrastructure, enzyme testing), MRI/spectroscopy, and targeted or untargeted genetic testing. Accurate and early identification of metabolic myopathies can lead to therapeutic interventions with lifestyle and nutritional modification, cofactor treatment, and rapid treatment of rhabdomyolysis.

  1. Influence of the 48867A>C (Asp358Ala) IL6R polymorphism on response to a lifestyle modification intervention in individuals with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, V R A; Bonatto, S L; Macagnan, F E; Feoli, A M P; Alho, C S; Santos, N D V; Schmitt, V M

    2013-02-28

    We evaluated the response of individuals with metabolic syndrome to lifestyle modification intervention and examined the influence of the 48867A>C (Asp358Ala) IL6R (rs2228145) polymorphism on this response. Participants were randomly divided into two groups: NI, nutritional intervention; NIE, nutritional intervention and exercise practice. Intervention lasted three months and participants completed a comprehensive evaluation and had blood collected for biochemical measurements. Eighty-two sedentary individuals with at least three criteria for metabolic syndrome were included. Comparing metabolic syndrome parameters before and after intervention, a reduction of waist circumference was observed, although significant only for AA and AC genotypes. Also, a decrease in triglyceride levels was observed (significant for AA genotype individuals; for the AC genotype, only in the NIE group). Significant reduction of fasting glucose level was observed in all AA genotype individuals; for the AC genotype, only in the NI group. Systolic blood pressure showed significant reduction in AA and AC genotype individuals. After three months of lifestyle modification intervention, improvement in some of the metabolic syndrome parameters was observed, some associated with the IL6R genotype. At enrollment, participants with genotypes AA and AC showed more severe conditions regarding metabolic syndrome inclusion criteria, supporting previous reports that the A allele is a genetic risk factor. These individuals, however, had a better response to intervention compared to individuals with the CC genotype, suggesting that nutritional control and exercise practice could prevent risks associated with metabolic syndrome more efficiently in individuals bearing the A allele.

  2. A Novel Synthetic Pathway Enables Microbial Production of Polyphenols Independent from the Endogenous Aromatic Amino Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallscheuer, Nicolai; Vogt, Michael; Marienhagen, Jan

    2017-03-17

    Numerous plant polyphenols have potential applications as pharmaceuticals or nutraceuticals. Stilbenes and flavonoids as most abundant polyphenols are synthesized from phenylpropanoids, which are exclusively derived from aromatic amino acids in nature. Several microorganisms were engineered for the synthesis of biotechnologically interesting plant polyphenols; however, low activity of heterologous ammonia lyases, linking endogenous microbial aromatic amino acid biosynthesis to phenylpropanoid synthesis, turned out to be the limiting step during microbial synthesis. We here developed an alternative strategy for polyphenol production from cheap benzoic acids by reversal of a β-oxidative phenylpropanoid degradation pathway avoiding any ammonia lyase activity. The synthetic pathway running in the non-natural direction is feasible with respect to thermodynamics and involved reaction mechanisms. Instantly, product titers of 5 mg/L resveratrol could be achieved in recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum strains indicating that phenylpropanoid synthesis from 4-hydroxybenzoic acid can in principle be implemented independently from aromatic amino acids and ammonia lyase activity.

  3. Branched-chain amino acids increase arterial blood ammonia in spite of enhanced intrinsic muscle ammonia metabolism in patients with cirrhosis and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Gitte; Keiding, Susanne; Munk, Ole Lajord

    2011-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are used in attempts to reduce blood ammonia in patients with cirrhosis and intermittent hepatic encephalopathy based on the hypothesis that BCAA stimulate muscle ammonia detoxification. We studied the effects of an oral dose of BCAA on the skeletal muscle...... the metabolism of blood-supplied ammonia and the A-V measurements were used to measure the total ammonia metabolism across the thigh muscle. After intake of BCAA, blood ammonia increased more than 30% in both groups of subjects (both P supplied ammonia (PET) was unaffected (P.......05). BCAA intake led to a massive glutamine release from the muscle (cirrhotic patients, P supplied ammonia in both the patients with cirrhosis and in the healthy...

  4. Early-onset and classical forms of type 2 diabetes show impaired expression of genes involved in muscle branched-chain amino acids metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Díaz-Ramos, Angels; Berdasco, María

    2017-01-01

    studies were also performed in tissues from ob/ob and db/db mice. We document that T2D, both early and late onset, are characterized by reduced muscle expression of genes involved in branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) metabolism. Weighted Co-expression Networks Analysis provided support to idea......The molecular mechanisms responsible for the pathophysiological traits of type 2 diabetes are incompletely understood. Here we have performed transcriptomic analysis in skeletal muscle, and plasma metabolomics from subjects with classical and early-onset forms of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Focused...... that the BCAA genes are relevant in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, and that mitochondrial BCAA management is impaired in skeletal muscle from T2D patients. In diabetic mice model we detected alterations in skeletal muscle proteins involved in BCAA metabolism but not in obese mice. Metabolomic analysis...

  5. 3-(3-amino-3-carboxypropyl)-5,6-Dihydrouridine is one of two novel post-transcriptional modifications in tRNALys(UUU) from Trypanosoma brucei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Jesper Schak; Español, Yaiza; Giessing, Anders M B

    2011-01-01

    . Furthermore, the tRNA has to be investigated with single-nucleotide resolution in order to ensure complete mapping of all modifications. In the present work, we characterized tRNA(Lys) (UUU) from Trypanosoma brucei, and provide a complete overview of its post-transcriptional modifications. The first step...

  6. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  7. Inter-Kingdom Modification of Metabolic Behavior: [GAR+] Prion Induction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mediated by Wine Ecosystem Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda F Bisson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has evolved to dominate grape juice fermentation. A suite of cellular properties, rapid nutrient depletion, production of inhibitory compounds and the metabolic narrowing of the niche, all enable a minor resident of the initial population to dramatically increase its relative biomass in the ecosystem. This dominance of the grape juice environment is fueled by a rapid launch of glycolysis and energy generation mediated by transport of hexoses and an efficient coupling of transport and catabolism. Fermentation occurs in the presence of molecular oxygen as the choice between respiratory or fermentative growth is regulated by the availability of sugar a phenomenon known as glucose or catabolite repression. Induction of the GAR+ prion alters the expression of the major hexose transporter active under these conditions, Hxt3, reducing glycolytic capacity. Bacteria present in the grape juice ecosystem were able to induce the GAR+ prion in wine strains of S. cerevisiae. This induction reduced fermentation capacity but did not block it entirely. However, dominance factors such as the rapid depletion of amino acids and other nitrogen sources from the environment were impeded enabling greater access to these substrates for the bacteria. Bacteria associated with arrested commercial wine fermentations were able to induce the prion state, and yeast cells isolated from arrested commercial fermentations were found to be GAR+ thus confirming the ecological relevance of prion induction. Subsequent analyses demonstrated that the presence of environmental acetic acid could lead to GAR+ induction in yeast strains under certain conditions. The induction of the prion enabled yeast growth on non-preferred substrates, oxidation and reduction products of glucose and fructose, present as a consequence of bacterial energy production. In native ecosystems prion induction never exceeded roughly 50-60% of the population of yeast cells

  8. Activation of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase by Sodium Dichloroacetate Shifts Metabolic Consumption from Amino Acids to Glucose in IPEC-J2 Cells and Intestinal Bacteria in Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Rui; Tang, Zhiru; Li, Yunxia; Li, Tiejun; Xu, Qingqing; Zhen, Jifu; Huang, Feiru; Yang, Jing; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Zhaoliang; Li, Mao; Sun, Jiajing; Zhang, Xiangxin; Chen, Jinchao; Wu, Liuting; Zhao, Shengjun; Qingyan, Jiang; Zhu, Weiyun; Yin, Yulong; Sun, Zhihong

    2018-04-18

    The extensive metabolism of amino acids (AA) as fuel is an important reason for the low use efficiency of protein in pigs. In this study, we investigated whether regulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)/pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha 1 (PDHA1) pathway affected AA consumption by porcine intestinal epithelial (IPEC-J2) cells and intestinal bacteria in pigs. The effects of knockdown of PDHA1 and PDK1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) on nutrient consumption by IPEC-J2 cells were evaluated. IPEC-J2 cells were then cultured with sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) to quantify AA and glucose consumption and nutrient oxidative metabolism. The results showed that knockdown of PDHA1 using siRNA decreased glucose consumption but increased total AA (TAA) and glutamate (Glu) consumption by IPEC-J2 cells ( P < 0.05). Opposite effects were observed using siRNA targeting PDK1 ( P < 0.05). Additionally, culturing IPEC-J2 cells in the presence of 5 mM DCA markedly increased the phosphorylation of PDHA1 and PDH phosphatase 1, but inhibited PDK1 phosphorylation ( P < 0.05). DCA treatment also reduced TAA and Glu consumption and increased glucose depletion ( P < 0.05). These results indicated that PDH was the regulatory target for shifting from AA metabolism to glucose metabolism and that culturing cells with DCA decreased the consumption of AAs by increasing the depletion of glucose through PDH activation.

  9. In Ovo Administration of Silver Nanoparticles and/or Amino Acids Influence Metabolism and Immune Gene Expression in Chicken Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrat K. Bhanja

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to their physicochemical and biological properties, silver nanoparticles (NanoAg have a wide range of applications. In the present study, their roles as a carrier of nutrients and an immunomodulator were tested in chicken embryos. Cysteine (Cys+NanoAg injected embryos had smaller livers but heavier breasts on the 19th day of embryogenesis. Cys injected embryos had lower oxygen consumption compared to threonine (Thr or NanoAg injected embryos. The energy expenditure in Thr+NanoAg, or NanoAg injected embryos was higher than Cys or Cys+NanoAg but was not different from uninjected control embryos. Relative expression of the hepatic insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I gene was higher in Cys or NanoAg injected embryos after lipopolysaccharide (LPS induction. The gene expression of hepatic tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6 did not differ among amino acids, NanoAg and uninjected controls in the non-LPS groups, but increased by many folds in the LPS treated NanoAg, Cys and Cys+NanoAg groups. In LPS treated spleens, TNF-α expression was also up-regulated by NanoAg, amino acids and their combinations, but interleukin-10 (IL-10 expression was down-regulated in Thr, Cys or Thr+NanoAg injected embryos. Toll like receptor-2 (TLR2 expression did not differ in NanoAg or amino acids injected embryos; however, toll like receptor-4 (TLR4 expression was higher in all treated embryos, except for Cys+NanoAg, than in uninjected control embryos. We concluded that NanoAg either alone or in combination with amino acids did not affect embryonic growth but improved immunocompetence, indicating that NanoAg and amino acid complexes can act as potential agents for the enhancement of innate and adaptive immunity in chicken.

  10. CypD(-/-) hearts have altered levels of proteins involved in Krebs cycle, branch chain amino acid degradation and pyruvate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menazza, Sara; Wong, Renee; Nguyen, Tiffany; Wang, Guanghui; Gucek, Marjan; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Cyclophilin D (CypD) is a mitochondrial chaperone that has been shown to regulate the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP). MPTP opening is a major determinant of mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiomyocyte death during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Mice lacking CypD have been widely used to study regulation of the MPTP, and it has been shown recently that genetic depletion of CypD correlates with elevated levels of mitochondrial Ca(2+). The present study aimed to characterize the metabolic changes in CypD(-/-) hearts. Initially, we used a proteomics approach to examine protein changes in CypD(-/-) mice. Using pathway analysis, we found that CypD(-/-) hearts have alterations in branched chain amino acid metabolism, pyruvate metabolism and the Krebs cycle. We tested whether these metabolic changes were due to inhibition of electron transfer from these metabolic pathways into the electron transport chain. As we found decreased levels of succinate dehydrogenase and electron transfer flavoprotein in the proteomics analysis, we examined whether activities of these enzymes might be altered. However, we found no alterations in their activities. The proteomics study also showed a 23% decrease in carnitine-palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), which prompted us to perform a metabolomics analysis. Consistent with the decrease in CPT1, we found a significant decrease in C4/Ci4, C5-OH/C3-DC, C12:1, C14:1, C16:1, and C20:3 acyl carnitines in hearts from CypD(-/-) mice. In summary, CypD(-/-) hearts exhibit changes in many metabolic pathways and caution should be used when interpreting results from these mice as due solely to inhibition of the MPTP. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Delayed Influence of Spinal Cord Injury on the Amino Acids of NO• Metabolism in Rat Cerebral Cortex Is Attenuated by Thiamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Boyko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe spinal cord injuries (SCIs result in chronic neuroinflammation in the brain, associated with the development of cognitive and behavioral impairments. Nitric oxide (NO• is a gaseous messenger involved in neuronal signaling and inflammation, contributing to nitrosative stress under dysregulated production of reactive nitrogen species. In this work, biochemical changes induced in the cerebral cortex of rats 8 weeks after SCI are assessed by quantification of the levels of amino acids participating in the NO• and glutathione metabolism. The contribution of the injury-induced neurodegeneration is revealed by comparison of the SCI- and laminectomy (LE-subjected animals. Effects of the operative interventions are assessed by comparison of the operated (LE/SCI and non-operated animals. Lower ratios of citrulline (Cit to arginine (Arg or Cit to ornithine and a more profound decrease in the ratio of lysine to glycine distinguish SCI animals from those after LE. The data suggest decreased NO• production from both Arg and homoarginine in the cortex 8 weeks after SCI. Both LE and SCI groups show a strong decrease in the level of cortex glutathione. The neurotropic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant actions of thiamine (vitamin B1 prompted us to study the thiamine effects on the SCI-induced changes in the NO• and glutathione metabolism. A thiamine injection (400 mg/kg intraperitoneally within 24 h after SCI abrogates the changes in the cerebral cortex amino acids related to NO•. Thiamine-induced normalization of the brain glutathione levels after LE and SCI may involve increased supply of glutamate for glutathione biosynthesis. Thus, thiamine protects from sequelae of SCI on NO•-related amino acids and glutathione in cerebral cortex.

  12. siRNA knock down of glutamate dehydrogenase in astrocytes affects glutamate metabolism leading to extensive accumulation of the neuroactive amino acids glutamate and aspartate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skytt, Dorte M; Klawonn, Anna M; Stridh, Malin H; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Patruss, Yasar; Quintana-Cabrera, Ruben; Bolaños, Juan P; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2012-09-01

    Glutamate is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and astrocytes are key players in sustaining glutamate homeostasis. Astrocytes take up the predominant part of glutamate after neurotransmission and metabolism of glutamate is necessary for a continuous efficient removal of glutamate from the synaptic area. Glutamate may either be amidated by glutamine synthetase or oxidatively metabolized in the mitochondria, the latter being at least to some extent initiated by oxidative deamination by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). To explore the particular importance of GDH for astrocyte metabolism we have knocked down GDH in cultured cortical astrocytes employing small interfering RNA (siRNA) achieving a reduction of the enzyme activity by approximately 44%. The astrocytes were incubated for 2h in medium containing either 1.0mM [(15)NH(4)(+)] or 100 μM [(15)N]glutamate. For those exposed to [(15)N]glutamate an additional 100 μM was added after 1h. Metabolic mapping was performed from isotope incorporation measured by mass spectrometry into relevant amino acids of cell extracts and media. The contents of the amino acids were measured by HPLC. The (15)N incorporation from [(15)NH(4)(+)] into glutamate, aspartate and alanine was decreased in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. However, the reduced GDH activity had no effect on the cellular contents of these amino acids. This supports existing in vivo and in vitro studies that GDH is predominantly working in the direction of oxidative deamination and not reductive amination. In contrast, when exposing the astrocytes to [(15)N]glutamate, the reduced GDH activity led to an increased (15)N incorporation into glutamate, aspartate and alanine and a large increase in the content of glutamate and aspartate. Surprisingly, this accumulation of glutamate and net-synthesis of aspartate were not reflected in any alterations in either the glutamine content or labeling, but a slight increase in mono labeling of

  13. Selenate mitigates arsenite toxicity in rice (Oryza sativa L.) by reducing arsenic uptake and ameliorates amino acid content and thiol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Dixit, Garima; Singh, Amit Pal; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Srivastava, Sudhakar; Mishra, Kumkum; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic element with the potential to cause health effects in humans. Besides rice is a source of both amino acids (AAs) and mineral nutrients, it is undesired source of As for billions of people consuming rice as the staple food. Selenium (Se) is an essential metalloid, which can regulate As toxicity by strengthening antioxidant potential. The present study was designed to investigate As(III) stress mitigating effect of Se(VI) in rice. The level of As, thiolic ligands and AAs was analyzed in rice seedlings after exposure to As(III)/Se(VI) alone and As(III)+Se(VI) treatments. Selenate supplementation (As(III) 25μM+Se(VI) 25μM) decreased total As accumulation in both root and shoot (179 & 144%) as compared to As(III) alone treatment. The As(III)+Se(VI) treatment also induced the levels of non-protein thiols (NPTs), glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PCs) as compared to As(III) alone treatment and also modulated the activity of enzymes of thiol metabolism. The content of amino acids (AAs) was significantly altered with Se(VI) supplementation. Importantly, essential amino acids (EAAs) were enhanced in As(III)+Se(VI) treatment as compared to As(III) alone treatment. In contrast, stress related non-essential amino acids (NEAAs) like GABA, Glu, Gly, Pro and Cys showed enhanced levels in As(III) alone treatment. In conclusion, rice supplemented with Se(VI) tolerated As toxicity with reduced As accumulation and increased the nutrition quality by increasing EAAs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Metabolism of Nonessential N15-Labeled Amino Acids and the Measurement of Human Whole-Body Protein Synthesis Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Dempsey, D. T.; Melnick, G.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15 labeled nonessential amino acids plus (15)NH4Cl were administered over a 10 h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted (Kendall coefficient of concordance W = 0.83, P is less than 0.01). Protein synthesis rates were calculated from the urinary ammonia plateau enrichment and the cumulative excretion of N-15. Glycine was one of the few amino acids that gave similar values by both methods.

  15. Metabolism of nonessential N-15-labeled amino acids and the measurement of human whole-body protein synthesis rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Settle, R. G.; Albina, J. A.; Melnick, G.; Dempsey, D. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight N-15-labeled nonessential amino acids plus (N-15)H4Cl were administered over a 10-h period to four healthy adult males using a primed-constant dosage regimen. The amount of N-15 excreted in the urine and the urinary ammonia, hippuric acid, and plasma alanine N-15 enrichments were measured. There was a high degree of consistency across subjects in the ordering of the nine compounds based on the fraction of N-15 excreted.

  16. Identification of Important Amino Acids in Gal2p for Improving the L-arabinose Transport and Metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqiang Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Efficient and cost-effective bioethanol production from lignocellulosic materials requires co-fermentation of the main hydrolyzed sugars, including glucose, xylose, and L-arabinose. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a glucose-fermenting yeast that is traditionally used for ethanol production. Fermentation of L-arabinose is also possible after metabolic engineering. Transport into the cell is the first and rate-limiting step for L-arabinose metabolism. The galactose permease, Gal2p, is a non-specific, endogenous monosaccharide transporter that has been shown to transport L-arabinose. However, Gal2p-mediated transport of L-arabinose occurs at a low efficiency. In this study, homologous modeling and L-arabinose docking were used to predict amino acids in Gal2p that are crucial for L-arabinose transport. Nine amino acid residues in Gal2p were identified and were the focus for site-directed mutagenesis. In the Gal2p transport-deficient chassis cells, the capacity for L-arabinose transport of the different Gal2p mutants was compared by testing growth rates using L-arabinose as the sole carbon source. Almost all the tested mutations affected L-arabinose transport capacity. Among them, F85 is a unique site. The F85S, F85G, F85C, and F85T point mutations significantly increased L-arabinose transport activities, while, the F85E and F85R mutations decreased L-arabinose transport activities compared to the Gal2p-expressing wild-type strain. These results verified F85 as a key residue in L-arabinose transport. The F85S mutation, having the most significant effect, elevated the exponential growth rate by 40%. The F85S mutation also improved xylose transport efficiency and weakened the glucose transport preference. Overall, enhancing the L-arabinose transport capacity further improved the L-arabinose metabolism of engineered S. cerevisiae.

  17. [The effects of a physical activity-behavior modification combined intervention(PABM-intervention) on metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese elementary school children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Young-Ran; An, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Young-A; Woo, Hae-Young

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of a physical activity-behavior modification combined intervention(PABM-intervention) on metabolic risk factors in overweight and obese elementary school children. Thirty-two participants (BMI>or=85 percentile or relative obesity>or=10) were allocated to the PABM-intervention group and behavior modification only intervention group. The PABM-intervention was composed of exercise intervention consisting of 50 minutes of physical activity(Hip-hop dance & gym-based exercises) twice a week and the behavior modification intervention consisted of 50 minutes of instruction for modifying lifestyle habits(diet & exercise) once a week. Effectiveness of intervention was based on waist circumference, BP, HDL-cholesterol, TG, and fasting glucose before and after the intervention. The proportion of subjects with 1, 2, 3 or more metabolic risk factors were 28.1, 43.8, and 15.6%, respectively. After the 8-week intervention, waist circumference, systolic BP, diastolic BP, and HDL-cholesterol changed significantly(p<.01) in the PABM group. This provides evidence that a PABM-intervention is effective in changing metabolic risk factors such as waist circumference, systolic BP, diastolic BP, and HDL-cholesterol in overweight and obese elementary school children.

  18. In vitro metabolism of two heterocyclic andnes, 2-amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (A alpha C) and 2-amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (MeA alpha C) in human and rat hepatic microsomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Hanne; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    2002-01-01

    2-Amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (AalphaC) and 2-amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (MeAalphaC) are two mutagenic and carcinogenic heterocyclic amines formed during ordinary cooking. In this study, we have investigated the in vitro metabolism of tritium-labelled AalphaC and MeAalphaC in hepatic ...

  19. The metabolic response in fish to mildly elevated water temperature relates to species-dependent muscular concentrations of imidazole compounds and free amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geda, Fikremariam; Declercq, Annelies M; Remø, Sofie C; Waagbø, Rune; Lourenço, Marta; Janssens, Geert P J

    2017-04-01

    Fish species show distinct differences in their muscular concentrations of imidazoles and free amino acids (FAA). This study was conducted to investigate whether metabolic response to mildly elevated water temperature (MEWT) relates to species-dependent muscular concentrations of imidazoles and FAA. Thirteen carp and 17 Nile tilapia, housed one per aquarium, were randomly assigned to either acclimation (25°C) or MEWT (30°C) for 14 days. Main muscular concentrations were histidine (HIS; P0.05), (NAH+HIS)/TAU ratio was markedly higher in carp versus tilapia, and decreased with MEWT only in carp (Pacids in carp metabolism (Pacids (NEFA) in carp (P=0.001), the latter shows that carp, being a fatter fish, more readily mobilises fat than tilapia at MEWT, which coincides with more intensive muscular mobilization of imidazoles. This study demonstrates that fish species differ in their metabolic response to MEWT, which is associated with species-dependent changes in muscle imidazole to taurine ratio. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic Diseases Downregulate the Majority of Histone Modification Enzymes, Making a Few Upregulated Enzymes Novel Therapeutic Targets--"Sand Out and Gold Stays".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ying; Chernaya, Valeria; Johnson, Candice; Yang, William Y; Cueto, Ramon; Sha, Xiaojin; Zhang, Yi; Qin, Xuebin; Sun, Jianxin; Choi, Eric T; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether the expression of histone modification enzymes is regulated in physiological and pathological conditions, we took an experimental database mining approach pioneered in our labs to determine a panoramic expression profile of 164 enzymes in 19 human and 17 murine tissues. We have made the following significant findings: (1) Histone enzymes are differentially expressed in cardiovascular, immune, and other tissues; (2) our new pyramid model showed that heart and T cells are among a few tissues in which histone acetylation/deacetylation, and histone methylation/demethylation are in the highest varieties; and (3) histone enzymes are more downregulated than upregulated in metabolic diseases and regulatory T cell (Treg) polarization/ differentiation, but not in tumors. These results have demonstrated a new working model of "Sand out and Gold stays," where more downregulation than upregulation of histone enzymes in metabolic diseases makes a few upregulated enzymes the potential novel therapeutic targets in metabolic diseases and Treg activity.

  1. Metabolic Diseases Downregulate the Majority of Histone Modification Enzymes, Making a Few Upregulated Enzymes Novel Therapeutic Targets – “Sand out and Gold Stays”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ying; Chernaya, Valeria; Johnson, Candice; Yang, William Y.; Cueto, Ramon; Sha, Xiaojin; Zhang, Yi; Qin, Xuebin; Sun, Jianxin; Choi, Eric T.; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether the expression of histone modification enzymes is regulated in physiological and pathological conditions, we took an experimental database mining approach pioneered in our labs to determine a panoramic expression profile of 164 enzymes in 19 human and 17 murine tissues. We have made the following significant findings: 1) Histone enzymes are differentially expressed in cardiovascular, immune and other tissues; 2) Our new pyramid model showed that heart and T cells are among a few tissues in which histone acetylation/deacetylation, histone methylation/demethylation are in the highest varieties; and 3) Histone enzymes are more downregulated than upregulated in metabolic diseases and Treg polarization/differentiation, but not in tumors. These results have demonstrated a new working model of “sand out and gold stays,” where more downregulation than upregulation of histone enzymes in metabolic diseases makes a few upregulated enzymes the potential novel therapeutic targets in metabolic diseases and Treg activity. PMID:26746407

  2. Application of stable isotope tracer methods to studies of amino acid, protein, and energy metabolism in malnourished populations of developing countries. Report of an IAEA consultants' meeting held in Vienna, Austria, 14-16 December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A Consultants' Meeting convened by the IAEA in December 1992, made recommendations on the organization of a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) using stable isotopic techniques for international comparative studies of amino acid, protein, and energy metabolism in chronically undernourished people. The CRP will use recent developments in stable isotope tracer techniques ( 13 C and 15 N) to assess the impact of infection in undernourished people on the kinetics of protein breakdown, protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism, and on the synthetic rates of selected plasma proteins. Studies will be conducted in developing countries, particularly in young children. The programme goals are to (i) elaborate methods and model protocols which can be implemented in developing countries to investigate the impact on protein metabolism of infection superimposed on chronic undernutrition; (ii) test they hypothesis that dietary requirements for protein and amino acids are related to the place of nutrition and are altered substantially when infection is superimposed on chronic undernutrition. When feasible, the primary focus on protein/amino acid metabolism will be extended to assessments of protein/energy interactions when H 2 18 O becomes more readily available and/or at research sites with indirect calorimetry equipment. The data generated should be appropriate as a basis for reevaluating amino acid/protein requirements in these populations. Refs

  3. Effects of dietary valine:lysine ratio on the performance, amino acid composition of tissues and mRNA expression of genes involved in branched-chain amino acid metabolism of weaned piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tong Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary standard ileal digestible (SID valine:lysine ratios on performance, intestinal morphology, amino acids of liver and muscle, plasma indices and mRNA expression of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA metabolism enzymes. Methods A total of 144 crossbred pigs (Duroc×Landrace×Large White weaned at 28±4 days of age (8.79±0.02 kg body weight were randomly allotted to 1 of 4 diets formulated to provide SID valine:lysine ratios of 50%, 60%, 70%, or 80%. Each diet was fed to 6 pens of pigs with 6 pigs per pen (3 gilts and 3 barrows for 28 days. Results Average daily gain increased quadratically (p<0.05, the villous height of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum increased linearly (p<0.05 as the SID valine:lysine ratio increased. The concentrations of plasma α-keto isovaleric and valine increased linearly (p<0.05, plasma aspartate, asparagine and cysteine decreased (p<0.05 as the SID valine:lysine ratio increased. An increase in SID lysine:valine levels increased mRNA expression levels of mitochondrial BCAA transaminase and branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase in the longissimus dorsi muscle (p<0.05. Conclusion Using a quadratic model, a SID valine:lysine ratio of 68% was shown to maximize the growth of weaned pigs which is slightly higher than the level recommended by the National Research Council [6].

  4. Adipose Tissue Dysfunction and Altered Systemic Amino Acid Metabolism Are Associated with Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, Sulin; Wiklund, Petri; Autio, Reija; Borra, Ronald; Ojanen, Xiaowei; Xu, Leiting; Törmäkangas, Timo; Alen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fatty liver is a major cause of obesity-related morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify early metabolic alterations associated with liver fat accumulation in 50- to 55-year-old men (n = 49) and women (n = 52) with and without NAFLD. METHODS: Hepatic fat content was

  5. Assessing SNP-SNP interactions among DNA repair, modification and metabolism related pathway genes in breast cancer susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Sapkota

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have identified low-penetrance common variants (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Although GWASs are primarily focused on single-locus effects, gene-gene interactions (i.e., epistasis are also assumed to contribute to the genetic risks for complex diseases including breast cancer. While it has been hypothesized that moderately ranked (P value based weak single-locus effects in GWASs could potentially harbor valuable information for evaluating epistasis, we lack systematic efforts to investigate SNPs showing consistent associations with weak statistical significance across independent discovery and replication stages. The objectives of this study were i to select SNPs showing single-locus effects with weak statistical significance for breast cancer in a GWAS and/or candidate-gene studies; ii to replicate these SNPs in an independent set of breast cancer cases and controls; and iii to explore their potential SNP-SNP interactions contributing to breast cancer susceptibility. A total of 17 SNPs related to DNA repair, modification and metabolism pathway genes were selected since these pathways offer a priori knowledge for potential epistatic interactions and an overall role in breast carcinogenesis. The study design included predominantly Caucasian women (2,795 cases and 4,505 controls from Alberta, Canada. We observed two two-way SNP-SNP interactions (APEX1-rs1130409 and RPAP1-rs2297381; MLH1-rs1799977 and MDM2-rs769412 in logistic regression that conferred elevated risks for breast cancer (P(interaction<7.3 × 10(-3. Logic regression identified an interaction involving four SNPs (MBD2-rs4041245, MLH1-rs1799977, MDM2-rs769412, BRCA2-rs1799943 (P(permutation = 2.4 × 10(-3. SNPs involved in SNP-SNP interactions also showed single-locus effects with weak statistical significance, while BRCA2-rs1799943 showed stronger statistical significance (P

  6. Modifications of Western-type diet regarding protein, fat and sucrose levels as modulators of steroid metabolism and activity in liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyńska, Agata; Herman, Andrzej P; Antushevich, Hanna; Bochenek, Joanna; Dziendzikowska, Katarzyna; Gajewska, Alina; Gromadzka-Ostrowska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the modification of the Western-type diet (high-fat, high-sucrose diet rich in saturated fatty acids) considering macronutrients content would influence hepatic metabolism and activity of steroids. For 3 weeks Wistar rat were fed the Western-type diet (21% fat, 35% sucrose, 19% protein, lard) and its modifications regarding dietary protein (10 and 19%), fat (5 and 21%) and sucrose (0 and 35%) levels. The steroid 5α-reductase type 1 (Srd5a1) and androgen receptor (Ar) gene expression as well as testosterone (T) conversion towards 5α-reduced derivatives in liver were positively correlated with body weight gain. The Western-type diets with decreased protein content regardless of the sucrose level exerted the most negative effect on the antioxidant system decreasing catalase (Cat), sodium dismutase (Sod1) and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx1) gene expression as well as Cat and Gpx activity and total antioxidant status, simultaneously intensifying lipid peroxidation. The impaired antioxidant system was accompanied by decreased level of hepatic T metabolism towards estrogens: 17β-estradiol (E2) and estriol, and increased estrogen receptor type 1 (Esr1) gene expression. Liver Esr1 mRNA level was differently correlated with T (positively) and E2 (negatively) plasma levels. Whereas the fat reduction in Western-type diet restored the plasma proportion between T and E2. In conclusion it could be stated that Western-type diet modification relating to protein, sucrose and fat content can influence hepatic steroid metabolism and activity; however the estrogens and androgens metabolism in liver would be connected with impairment of liver function or catabolic activity, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Serum aminotransferases in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are a signature of liver metabolic perturbations at the amino acid and Krebs cycle level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookoian, Silvia; Castaño, Gustavo O; Scian, Romina; Fernández Gianotti, Tomas; Dopazo, Hernán; Rohr, Cristian; Gaj, Graciela; San Martino, Julio; Sevic, Ina; Flichman, Diego; Pirola, Carlos J

    2016-02-01

    Extensive epidemiologic studies have shown that cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) are associated with serum concentrations of liver enzymes; however, fundamental characteristics of this relation are currently unknown. We aimed to explore the role of liver aminotransferases in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and MetS. Liver gene- and protein-expression changes of aminotransferases, including their corresponding isoforms, were evaluated in a case-control study of patients with NAFLD (n = 42), which was proven through a biopsy (control subjects: n = 10). We also carried out a serum targeted metabolite profiling to the glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and Krebs cycle (n = 48) and an exploration by the next-generation sequencing of aminotransferase genes (n = 96). An in vitro study to provide a biological explanation of changes in the transcriptional level and enzymatic activity of aminotransferases was included. Fatty liver was associated with a deregulated liver expression of aminotransferases, which was unrelated to the disease severity. Metabolite profiling showed that serum aminotransferase concentrations are a signature of liver metabolic perturbations, particularly at the amino acid metabolism and Krebs cycle level. A significant and positive association between systolic hypertension and liver expression levels of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase 2 (GOT2) messenger RNA (Spearman R = 0.42, P = 0.03) was observed. The rs6993 located in the 3' untranslated region of the GOT2 locus was significantly associated with features of the MetS, including arterial hypertension [P = 0.028; OR: 2.285 (95% CI: 1.024, 5.09); adjusted by NAFLD severity] and plasma lipid concentrations. In the context of an abnormal hepatic triglyceride accumulation, circulating aminotransferases rise as a consequence of the need for increased reactions of transamination to cope with the liver metabolic derangement that is associated with greater gluconeogenesis and

  8. Skin metabolism of aminophenols: Human keratinocytes as a suitable in vitro model to qualitatively predict the dermal transformation of 4-amino-2-hydroxytoluene in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, C.; Hewitt, N.J.; Kunze, G.; Wenker, M.; Hein, D.W.; Beck, H.; Skare, J.

    2009-01-01

    4-Amino-2-hydroxytolune (AHT) is an aromatic amine ingredient in oxidative hair colouring products. As skin contact occurs during hair dyeing, characterisation of dermal metabolism is important for the safety assessment of this chemical class. We have compared the metabolism of AHT in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT with that observed ex-vivo in human skin and in vivo (topical application versus oral (p.o.) and intravenous (i.v.) route). Three major metabolites of AHT were excreted, i.e. N-acetyl-AHT, AHT-sulfate and AHT-glucuronide. When 12.5 mg/kg AHT was applied topically, the relative amounts of each metabolite were altered such that N-acetyl-AHT product was the major metabolite (66% of the dose in comparison with 37% and 32% of the same applied dose after i.v. and p.o. administration, respectively). N-acetylated products were the only metabolites detected in HaCaT cells and ex-vivo whole human skin discs for AHT and p-aminophenol (PAP), an aromatic amine known to undergo N-acetylation in vivo. Since N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) is the responsible enzyme, kinetics of AHT was further compared to the standard NAT1 substrate p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) in the HaCaT model revealing similar values for K m and V max . In conclusion NAT1 dependent dermal N-acetylation of AHT represents a 'first-pass' metabolism effect in the skin prior to entering the systemic circulation. Since the HaCaT cell model represents a suitable in vitro assay for addressing the qualitative contribution of the skin to the metabolism of topically-applied aromatic amines it may contribute to a reduction in animal testing

  9. Exercise in ZDF rats does not attenuate weight gain, but prevents hyperglycemia concurrent with modulation of amino acid metabolism and AKT/mTOR activation in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Olasunkanmi A J; Bates, Holly E; Kiraly, Michael A; Vranic, Mladen; Riddell, Michael C; Marliss, Errol B

    2015-08-01

    Protein metabolism is altered in obesity, accompanied by elevated plasma amino acids (AA). Previously, we showed that exercise delayed progression to type 2 diabetes in obese ZDF rats with maintenance of β cell function and reduction in hyperglucocorticoidemia. We hypothesized that exercise would correct the abnormalities we found in circulating AA and other indices of skeletal muscle protein metabolism. Male obese prediabetic ZDF rats (7-10/group) were exercised (swimming) 1 h/day, 5 days/week from ages 6-19 weeks, and compared with age-matched obese sedentary and lean ZDF rats. Food intake and weight gain were unaffected. Protein metabolism was altered in obese rats as evidenced by increased plasma concentrations of essential AA, and increased muscle phosphorylation (ph) of Akt(ser473) (187%), mTOR(ser2448) (140%), eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) (111%), and decreased formation of 4E-BP1*eIF4E complex (75%, 0.01 ≤ p ≤ 0.05 for all measures) in obese relative to lean rats. Exercise attenuated the increase in plasma essential AA concentrations and muscle Akt and mTOR phosphorylation. Exercise did not modify phosphorylation of S6K1, S6, and 4E-BP1, nor the formation of 4E-BP1*eIF4E complex, mRNA levels of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin ligase MAFbx. Positive correlations were observed between ph-Akt and fed circulating branched-chain AA (r = 0.56, p = 0.008), postprandial glucose (r = 0.42, p = 0.04) and glucose AUC during an IPGTT (r = 0.44, p = 0.03). Swimming exercise-induced attenuation of hyperglycemia in ZDF rats is independent of changes in body weight and could result in part from modulation of muscle AKT activation acting via alterations of systemic AA metabolism.

  10. Metabolic rates of 15N-D- and 15N-L-phenylalanine in an amino acid mixture for parenteral feeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wutzke, K.; Heine, W.; Drescher, U.

    1982-01-01

    15 N investigations on the metabolism of L- and D-phenylalanine under conditions of parenteral feeding with the aminoacid solution Infesol in 6 infants revealed a retention rate of 83.4 +- 3.4 per cent for the L-form and of 36.6 +- 5.2 per cent for the D-form. When the D-isomer was raised from 1:3 to 1:1 in relation to the L-Form, 32.6 per cent of the infused D-phenylalanine were still retained. After continuous 24-hour infusion of the tracers, the maximum of 15 N excretion in the urine was reached between the 24th and the 30th hour. But little incorporation of 15 N-nitrogen was found in the serum and erythrocytes because of the relatively long half-life period of these proteins. Changes in the composition of commercial DL-amino acid mixtures will only be possible after determining the utilization rates of all essential and non-essential D-amino acids being used in such mixtures. (author)

  11. Dietary back-calculation using stable isotopes: can activities of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism be used to improve estimates of trophic shifts in fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaye-Siessegger, Julia; Focken, Ulfert; Abel, Hansjörg; Becker, Klaus

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was (1) to assess the effects of dietary protein content and feeding level on trophic shifts of C and N isotopes (Delta delta(13)C(tissue-diet) and Delta delta(15)N(tissue-diet)) and (2) to test whether the measurement of the activities of two enzymes involved in the metabolism of amino acids could improve the accuracy of estimation of the trophic shifts of C and N isotopes. For this, 36 Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were kept under controlled conditions for 8 weeks and fed at three different levels (2, 4 and 8 g kg(-0.8) d(-1)) with three diets differing in their protein content only (20, 29 and 39 %). For each fish, food to fish body trophic shifts of C and N isotopes were measured as well as the hepatic activities of aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). The feeding level affected the activities of ASAT and GDH as well as the trophic shifts of C and N isotopes significantly but the dietary protein content had no significant effect except on the specific activity of ASAT. Fish fed at the lowest level had significantly higher trophic shifts of C and N isotopes than fish fed at higher levels. The trophic shifts were significantly lower in fish with a high protein utilisation. Values of the 'goodness-of-fit' for linear regressions between enzyme activities and trophic shifts were low. Thus, activities of ASAT and GDH are not suitable for predicting estimates of trophic shifts in situations where the amount of food consumed or the dietary protein content is not known. In further studies, activities of enzymes involved in the metabolism of amino acids combined with measurements of the activities of other enzymes should be used to try and improve the accuracy of estimates of trophic shifts.

  12. Genetic Predisposition to an Impaired Metabolism of the Branched-Chain Amino Acids and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Mendelian Randomisation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotta, Luca A; Scott, Robert A; Sharp, Stephen J; Burgess, Stephen; Luan, Jian'an; Tillin, Therese; Schmidt, Amand F; Imamura, Fumiaki; Stewart, Isobel D; Perry, John R B; Marney, Luke; Koulman, Albert; Karoly, Edward D; Forouhi, Nita G; Sjögren, Rasmus J O; Näslund, Erik; Zierath, Juleen R; Krook, Anna; Savage, David B; Griffin, Julian L; Chaturvedi, Nishi; Hingorani, Aroon D; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy, Mark I; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Wareham, Nicholas J; Langenberg, Claudia

    2016-11-01

    Higher circulating levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; i.e., isoleucine, leucine, and valine) are strongly associated with higher type 2 diabetes risk, but it is not known whether this association is causal. We undertook large-scale human genetic analyses to address this question. Genome-wide studies of BCAA levels in 16,596 individuals revealed five genomic regions associated at genome-wide levels of significance (p genetically predicted difference of 1 SD in amino acid level was associated with an odds ratio for type 2 diabetes of 1.44 (95% CI 1.26-1.65, p = 9.5 × 10-8) for isoleucine, 1.85 (95% CI 1.41-2.42, p = 7.3 × 10-6) for leucine, and 1.54 (95% CI 1.28-1.84, p = 4.2 × 10-6) for valine. Estimates were highly consistent with those from prospective observational studies of the association between BCAA levels and incident type 2 diabetes in a meta-analysis of 1,992 cases and 4,319 non-cases. Metabolome-wide association analyses of BCAA-raising alleles revealed high specificity to the BCAA pathway and an accumulation of metabolites upstream of branched-chain alpha-ketoacid oxidation, consistent with reduced BCKD activity. Limitations of this study are that, while the association of genetic variants appeared highly specific, the possibility of pleiotropic associations cannot be entirely excluded. Similar to other complex phenotypes, genetic scores used in the study captured a limited proportion of the heritability in BCAA levels. Therefore, it is possible that only some of the mechanisms that increase BCAA levels or affect BCAA metabolism are implicated in type 2 diabetes. Evidence from this large-scale human genetic and metabolomic study is consistent with a causal role of BCAA metabolism in the aetiology of type 2 diabetes.

  13. Biofluid metabotyping of occupationally exposed subjects to air pollution demonstrates high oxidative stress and deregulated amino acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Surya Narayan; Das, Aleena; Meena, Ramovatar; Nanda, Ranjan Kumar; Rajamani, Paulraj

    2016-10-01

    Occupational exposure to air pollution induces oxidative stress and prolonged exposure increases susceptibility to cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in several working groups. Biofluid of these subjects may reflect perturbed metabolic phenotypes. In this study we carried out a comparative molecular profiling study using parallel biofluids collected from subjects (n = 85) belonging to auto rickshaw drivers (ARD), traffic cops (TC) and office workers (OW). Higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation markers in serum of ARD subjects were observed as compared to OW and TC. Uni and multivariate analyses of metabolites identified in urine by 1H NMR revealed 11 deregulated molecules in ARD subjects and involved in phenylalanine, histidine, arginine and proline metabolism. Despite contribution of confounding factors like exposure period, dietary factors including smoking and alcohol status, our results demonstrate existence of exposure specific metabotypes in biofluids of ARD, OW and TC groups. Monitoring serum oxidative stress and inflammation markers and urine metabolites by NMR may be useful to characterize perturbed metabolic phenotypes in populations exposed to urban traffic air pollution.

  14. Metabolic pathways leading from amino acids to vitamin B12 in Propionibacterium shermanii, and the sources of the seven methyl carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Katsumi; Kajiwara, Masahiro

    2007-10-01

    The metabolic pathways leading from l-[2-13C]aspartic acid, [2-13C]glycine and l-[methyl-13C]methionine to vitamin B12 were investigated, focusing on the biosynthetic pathways leading to the aminopropanol moiety of vitamin B12 and on the role of the Shemin pathway leading to delta-aminolevulinic acid (a biosynthetic intermediate of tetrapyrrole), by means of feeding experiments with Propionibacterium shermanii in combination with 13C-NMR spectroscopy. The 13C-methylene carbons of l-[2-(13)C]aspartic acid, which is transformed to [2-13C]glycine via l-[2-13C]threonine, and [2-13C]glycine added to the culture medium served mainly to enrich the seven methyl carbons of the corrin ring through C-methylation by S-adenosyl-l-[methyl-13C]methionine derived from catabolically generated l-[methyl-13C]methionine in the presence of tetrahydrofolic acid. The results indicate that the catabolism of these amino acids predominates over pathways leading to (2R)-1-amino-2-propanol or delta-aminolevulinic acid in P. shermanii. Feeding of l-[methyl-13C]methionine efficiently enriched all seven methyl carbons. In the cases of [2-13C]glycine and l-[methyl-13C]methionine, the 13C-enrichment ratio of the methyl carbon at C-25 (the site of the first C-methylation) was less than those of the other six methyl carbons, probably due to the influence of endogenous d-glucose in P. shermanii. The almost identical 13C-enrichment ratios of the other six methyl carbons indicated that these C-methylations during vitamin B12 biosynthesis were completed before the amino acids were completely consumed. However, in the case of l-[2-13C]aspartic acid, the 13C-enrichment ratios of five methyl carbons were low and similar, whereas the last two sites of C-methylation (C-53 and C-35) were not labeled, presumably because of complete consumption of the smaller amount of added label. The ratios of 13C-incorporation into the seven methyl carbons are influenced by the conditions of amino acid feeding experiments in

  15. Atomic evidence that modification of H-bonds established with amino acids critical for host-cell binding induces sterile immunity against malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Cifuentes, Gladys; Pirajan, Camilo; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Vanegas, Magnolia

    2010-01-01

    Based on the 3D X-ray crystallographic structures of relevant proteins of the malaria parasite involved in invasion to host cells and 3D NMR structures of High Activity Binding Peptides (HABPs) and their respective analogues, it was found that HABPs are rendered into highly immunogenic and sterile immunity inducers in the Aotus experimental model by modifying those amino acids that establish H-bonds with other HABPs or binding to host's cells. This finding adds striking and novel physicochemical principles, at the atomic level, for a logical and rational vaccine development methodology against infectious disease, among them malaria.

  16. Atomic evidence that modification of H-bonds established with amino acids critical for host-cell binding induces sterile immunity against malaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@mail.com [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Cifuentes, Gladys [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad del Rosario, Bogota (Colombia); Pirajan, Camilo; Moreno-Vranich, Armando [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Vanegas, Magnolia [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Universidad del Rosario, Bogota (Colombia)

    2010-04-09

    Based on the 3D X-ray crystallographic structures of relevant proteins of the malaria parasite involved in invasion to host cells and 3D NMR structures of High Activity Binding Peptides (HABPs) and their respective analogues, it was found that HABPs are rendered into highly immunogenic and sterile immunity inducers in the Aotus experimental model by modifying those amino acids that establish H-bonds with other HABPs or binding to host's cells. This finding adds striking and novel physicochemical principles, at the atomic level, for a logical and rational vaccine development methodology against infectious disease, among them malaria.

  17. The drought-tolerant Solanum pennellii regulates leaf water loss and induces genes involved in amino acid and ethylene/jasmonate metabolism under dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Isabel; Albaladejo, Irene; Meco, Victoriano; Morales, Belén; Sevilla, Angel; Bolarin, Maria C; Flores, Francisco B

    2018-02-12

    Breeding for drought-tolerant crops is a pressing issue due to the increasing frequency and duration of droughts caused by climate change. Although important sources of variation for drought tolerance exist in wild relatives, the mechanisms and the key genes controlling tolerance in tomato are little known. The aim of this study is to determine the drought response of the tomato wild relative Solanum pennellii (Sp) compared with the cultivated tomato Solanum lycopersicum (Sl). The paper investigates the physiological and molecular responses in leaves of Sp and Sl plants without stress and moderate drought stress. Significant physiological differences between species were found, with Sp leaves showing greater ability to avoid water loss and oxidative damage. Leaf transcriptomic analysis carried out when leaves did not as yet show visual dehydration symptoms revealed important constitutive expression differences between Sp and Sl species. Genes linked to different physiological and metabolic processes were induced by drought in Sp, especially those involved in N assimilation, GOGAT/GS cycle and GABA-shunt. Up-regulation in Sp of genes linked to JA/ET biosynthesis and signaling pathways was also observed. In sum, genes involved in the amino acid metabolism together with genes linked to ET/JA seem to be key actors in the drought tolerance of the wild tomato species.

  18. Aconitase post-translational modification as a key in linkage between Krebs cycle, iron homeostasis, redox signaling, and metabolism of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushchak, Oleh V; Piroddi, Marta; Galli, Francesco; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-01-01

    Aconitase, an enzyme possessing an iron-sulfur cluster that is sensitive to oxidation, is involved in the regulation of cellular metabolism. There are two isoenzymes of aconitase (Aco)--mitochondrial (mAco) and cytosolic (cAco) ones. The primary role of mAdco is believed to be to control cellular ATP production via regulation of intermediate flux in the Krebs cycle. The cytosolic Aco in its reduced form operates as an enzyme, whereas in the oxidized form it is involved in the control of iron homeostasis as iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a central role in regulation of Aco functions. Catalytic Aco activity is regulated by reversible oxidation of [4Fe-4S]²⁺ cluster and cysteine residues, so redox-dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) have gained increasing consideration as regards possible regulatory effects. These include modifications of cysteine residues by oxidation, nitrosylation and thiolation, as well as Tyr nitration and oxidation of Lys residues to carbonyls. Redox-independent PTMs such as phosphorylation and transamination also have been described. In the presence of a sustained ROS flux, redox-dependent PTMs may lead to enzyme damage and cell stress by impaired energy and iron metabolism. Aconitase has been identified as a protein that undergoes oxidative modification and inactivation in aging and certain oxidative stress-related disorders. Here we describe possible mechanisms of involvement of the two aconitase isoforms, cAco and mAco, in the control of cell metabolism and iron homeostasis, balancing the regulatory, and damaging effects of ROS.

  19. Embryonic protein undernutrition by albumen removal programs the hepatic amino acid and glucose metabolism during the perinatal period in an avian model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els Willems

    Full Text Available Different animal models have been used to study the effects of prenatal protein undernutrition and the mechanisms by which these occur. In mammals, the maternal diet is manipulated, exerting both direct nutritional and indirect hormonal effects. Chicken embryos develop independent from the hen in the egg. Therefore, in the chicken, the direct effects of protein deficiency by albumen removal early during incubation can be examined. Prenatal protein undernutrition was established in layer-type eggs by the partial replacement of albumen by saline at embryonic day 1 (albumen-deprived group, compared to a mock-treated sham and a non-treated control group. At hatch, survival of the albumen-deprived group was lower compared to the control and sham group due to increased early mortality by the manipulation. No treatment differences in yolk-free body weight or yolk weight could be detected. The water content of the yolk was reduced, whereas the water content of the carcass was increased in the albumen-deprived group, compared to the control group, indicating less uptake of nutrients from the yolk. At embryonic day 16, 20 and at hatch, plasma triiodothyronine (T3, corticosterone, lactate or glucose concentrations and hepatic glycogen content were not affected by treatment. At embryonic day 20, the plasma thyroxine (T4 concentrations of the albumen-deprived embryos was reduced compared to the control group, indicating a decreased metabolic rate. Screening for differential protein expression in the liver at hatch using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis revealed not only changed abundance of proteins important for amino acid metabolism, but also of enzymes related to energy and glucose metabolism. Interestingly, GLUT1, a glucose transporter, and PCK2 and FBP1, two out of three regulatory enzymes of the gluconeogenesis were dysregulated. No parallel differences in gene expressions causing the differences in protein abundance could be detected

  20. Intricate Effects of α-Amino and Lysine Modifications on Arginine Methylation of the N-Terminal Tail of Histone H4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Melody D; Zhang, Jing; He, Maomao; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zheng, Y George

    2017-07-18

    Chemical modifications of the DNA and nucleosomal histones tightly control the gene transcription program in eukaryotic cells. The "histone code" hypothesis proposes that the frequency, combination, and location of post-translational modifications (PTMs) of the core histones compose a complex network of epigenetic regulation. Currently, there are at least 23 different types and >450 histone PTMs that have been discovered, and the PTMs of lysine and arginine residues account for a crucial part of the histone code. Although significant progress has been achieved in recent years, the molecular basis for the histone code is far from being fully understood. In this study, we investigated how naturally occurring N-terminal acetylation and PTMs of histone H4 lysine-5 (H4K5) affect arginine-3 methylation catalyzed by both type I and type II PRMTs at the biochemical level. Our studies found that acylations of H4K5 resulted in decreased levels of arginine methylation by PRMT1, PRMT3, and PRMT8. In contrast, PRMT5 exhibits an increased rate of arginine methylation upon H4K5 acetylation, propionylation, and crotonylation, but not upon H4K5 methylation, butyrylation, or 2-hydroxyisobutyrylation. Methylation of H4K5 did not affect arginine methylation by PRMT1 or PRMT5. There was a small increase in the rate of arginine methylation by PRMT8. Strikingly, a marked increase in the rate of arginine methylation was observed for PRMT3. Finally, N-terminal acetylation reduced the rate of arginine methylation by PRMT3 but had little influence on PRMT1, -5, and -8 activity. These results together highlight the underlying mechanistic differences in substrate recognition among different PRMTs and pave the way for the elucidation of the complex interplay of histone modifications.

  1. Individual Amino Acid Supplementation Can Improve Energy Metabolism and Decrease ROS Production in Neuronal Cells Overexpressing Alpha-Synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delic, Vedad; Griffin, Jeddidiah W D; Zivkovic, Sandra; Zhang, Yumeng; Phan, Tam-Anh; Gong, Henry; Chaput, Dale; Reynes, Christian; Dinh, Vinh B; Cruz, Josean; Cvitkovic, Eni; Placides, Devon; Frederic, Ernide; Mirzaei, Hamed; Stevens, Stanley M; Jinwal, Umesh; Lee, Daniel C; Bradshaw, Patrick C

    2017-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by alpha-synuclein accumulation and loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the brain. Increased levels of alpha-synuclein have been shown to result in loss of mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I activity leading to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. WT alpha-synuclein was stably overexpressed in human BE(2)-M17 neuroblastoma cells resulting in increased levels of an alpha-synuclein multimer, but no increase in alpha-synuclein monomer levels. Oxygen consumption was decreased by alpha-synuclein overexpression, but ATP levels did not decrease and ROS levels did not increase. Treatment with ferrous sulfate, a ROS generator, resulted in decreased oxygen consumption in both control and alpha-synuclein overexpressing cells. However, this treatment only decreased ATP levels and increased ROS production in the cells overexpressing alpha-synuclein. Similarly, paraquat, another ROS generator, decreased ATP levels in the alpha-synuclein overexpressing cells, but not in the control cells, further demonstrating how alpha-synuclein sensitized the cells to oxidative insult. Proteomic analysis yielded molecular insights into the cellular adaptations to alpha-synuclein overexpression, such as the increased abundance of many mitochondrial proteins. Many amino acids and citric acid cycle intermediates and their ester forms were individually supplemented to the cells with L-serine, L-proline, L-aspartate, or L-glutamine decreasing ROS production in oxidatively stressed alpha-synuclein overexpressing cells, while diethyl oxaloacetate or L-valine supplementation increased ATP levels. These results suggest that dietary supplementation with individual metabolites could yield bioenergetic improvements in PD patients to delay loss of dopaminergic neurons.

  2. The why and how of amino acid analytics in cancer diagnostics and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manig, Friederike; Kuhne, Konstantin; von Neubeck, Cläre; Schwarzenbolz, Uwe; Yu, Zhanru; Kessler, Benedikt M; Pietzsch, Jens; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A

    2017-01-20

    Pathological alterations in cell functions are frequently accompanied by metabolic reprogramming including modifications in amino acid metabolism. Amino acid detection is thus integral to the diagnosis of many hereditary metabolic diseases. The development of malignant diseases as metabolic disorders comes along with a complex dysregulation of genetic and epigenetic factors affecting metabolic enzymes. Cancer cells might transiently or permanently become auxotrophic for non-essential or semi-essential amino acids such as asparagine or arginine. Also, transformed cells are often more susceptible to local shortage of essential amino acids such as methionine than normal tissues. This offers new points of attacking unique metabolic features in cancer cells. To better understand these processes, highly sensitive methods for amino acid detection and quantification are required. Our review summarizes the main methodologies for amino acid detection with a particular focus on applications in biomedicine and cancer, provides a historical overview of the methodological pre-requisites in amino acid analytics. We compare classical and modern approaches such as the combination of gas chromatography and liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS/LC-MS). The latter is increasingly applied in clinical routine. We therefore illustrate an LC-MS workflow for analyzing arginine and methionine as well as their precursors and analogs in biological material. Pitfalls during protocol development are discussed, but LC-MS emerges as a reliable and sensitive tool for the detection of amino acids in biological matrices. Quantification is challenging, but of particular interest in cancer research as targeting arginine and methionine turnover in cancer cells represent novel treatment strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Improved fermentative production of gamma-aminobutyric acid via the putrescine route: Systems metabolic engineering for production from glucose, amino sugars, and xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, João M P; Nguyen, Anh Q D; Pérez-García, Fernando; Kind, Stefanie; Wendisch, Volker F

    2017-04-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid widespread in Nature. Among the various uses of GABA, its lactam form 2-pyrrolidone can be chemically converted to the biodegradable plastic polyamide-4. In metabolism, GABA can be synthesized either by decarboxylation of l-glutamate or by a pathway that starts with the transamination of putrescine. Fermentative production of GABA from glucose by recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum has been described via both routes. Putrescine-based GABA production was characterized by accumulation of by-products such as N-acetyl-putrescine. Their formation was abolished by deletion of the spermi(di)ne N-acetyl-transferase gene snaA. To improve provision of l-glutamate as precursor 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity was reduced by changing the translational start codon of the chromosomal gene for 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase subunit E1o to the less preferred TTG and by maintaining the inhibitory protein OdhI in its inhibitory form by changing amino acid residue 15 from threonine to alanine. Putrescine-based GABA production by the strains described here led to GABA titers up to 63.2 g L -1 in fed-batch cultivation at maximum volumetric productivities up to 1.34 g L -1  h -1 , the highest volumetric productivity for fermentative GABA production reported to date. Moreover, GABA production from the carbon sources xylose, glucosamine, and N-acetyl-glucosamine that do not have competing uses in the food or feed industries was established. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 862-873. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Ozone impact on vegetation: phenolic metabolism modification and oxidative alteration of Rubisco in Phaseolus vulgaris L; Impact de l'ozone sur le vegetal: modification du metabolisme phenolique et alteration de la Rubisco chez Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanoun, M.

    2002-04-15

    In order to characterize and quantify, in semi-natural situation, the incidence of atmospheric pollution on some physiological and metabolic functions in plants, the aim of our work was to identify sub-cellular impact markers, in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), able to characterize a chronic and realistic ozone pollution climate. Two criteria were chosen: the foliar phenolic metabolism and the Rubisco, the key enzyme of photosynthesis. Using Open Top Chambers system, we demonstrated that, according to concentration, exposure kinetic and leaf type, ozone could induce amount variations of some constitutive soluble phenolic and the synthesis of new phenolic (iso-flavonoids). In some cases, these disturbances were observed jointly with foliar injuries and/or biomass reduction. Concurrently, this chronic and moderate ozone exposure could also induce carbonyl formation in amino acid residues constitutive of Rubisco small subunit (Rubisco-SSU) and a reduction in the amount of the native Rubisco. The amount of a constitutive kaempferol glucuronide and the ozone-induced oxidative alteration of Rubisco-SSU were selected and tested for the construction of dose-response relationships. Whatever the marker, the linear model was able to describe the relation. For the phenolic response, several exposure indexes were tested. According to their mode of calculation, these exposure forms emphasize more or less the contribution of high ozone concentrations. If, for Rubisco oxidation, the use of the exposure index AOT40 seems relevant, in the case of the phenolic marker, the choice of the right index is leaf type dependant. (author)

  5. Genetic Predisposition to an Impaired Metabolism of the Branched-Chain Amino Acids and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Mendelian Randomisation Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca A Lotta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Higher circulating levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; i.e., isoleucine, leucine, and valine are strongly associated with higher type 2 diabetes risk, but it is not known whether this association is causal. We undertook large-scale human genetic analyses to address this question.Genome-wide studies of BCAA levels in 16,596 individuals revealed five genomic regions associated at genome-wide levels of significance (p < 5 × 10-8. The strongest signal was 21 kb upstream of the PPM1K gene (beta in standard deviations [SDs] of leucine per allele = 0.08, p = 3.9 × 10-25, encoding an activator of the mitochondrial branched-chain alpha-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD responsible for the rate-limiting step in BCAA catabolism. In another analysis, in up to 47,877 cases of type 2 diabetes and 267,694 controls, a genetically predicted difference of 1 SD in amino acid level was associated with an odds ratio for type 2 diabetes of 1.44 (95% CI 1.26-1.65, p = 9.5 × 10-8 for isoleucine, 1.85 (95% CI 1.41-2.42, p = 7.3 × 10-6 for leucine, and 1.54 (95% CI 1.28-1.84, p = 4.2 × 10-6 for valine. Estimates were highly consistent with those from prospective observational studies of the association between BCAA levels and incident type 2 diabetes in a meta-analysis of 1,992 cases and 4,319 non-cases. Metabolome-wide association analyses of BCAA-raising alleles revealed high specificity to the BCAA pathway and an accumulation of metabolites upstream of branched-chain alpha-ketoacid oxidation, consistent with reduced BCKD activity. Limitations of this study are that, while the association of genetic variants appeared highly specific, the possibility of pleiotropic associations cannot be entirely excluded. Similar to other complex phenotypes, genetic scores used in the study captured a limited proportion of the heritability in BCAA levels. Therefore, it is possible that only some of the mechanisms that increase BCAA levels or affect BCAA metabolism are

  6. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Lifestyle Modification on Metabolic Control in Overweight Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Shin-Yu Lien

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to determine the effects of lifestyle modification programs on fasting plasma glucose (FPG levels in overweight children. We queried six relevant electronic databases and manually searched for studies published before December 2016. Overweight/obese children who underwent a lifestyle modification for more than 6 months were included. A total of 3923 children from eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs were included. Compared with the control group, the lifestyle modification group had significantly lower FPG levels by 1.3 mg/dL. The mean differences were significantly decreased for both secondary outcomes; BMI z-score decreased by 0.16 units and insulin levels decreased by 2.4 mU/L. The metaregression showed that the follow-up duration was associated with FPG levels and BMI and insulin levels and half year is a suitable follow-up duration for this population. This study showed that lifestyle modification programs may be effective in reducing the FPG levels of overweight/obese children. Further high-quality RCTs with longer follow-up periods are needed to evaluate the long-term effect of this complementary approach for diabetes mellitus prevention on overweight/obese children.

  7. DIABRISK - SL Prevention of cardio-metabolic disease with life style modification in young urban Sri Lankan's - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viberti Giancarlo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urban South-Asian's are predisposed to early onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cardiovascular disease (CVD. There is an urgent need for country specific primary prevention strategies to address the growing burden of cardio-metabolic disease in this population. The aim of this clinical trial is to evaluate whether intensive (3-monthly lifestyle modification advice is superior to a less-intensive (12 monthly; control group lifestyle modification advice on a primary composite cardio-metabolic end point in 'at risk' urban subjects aged between 5-40 years. Methods/Design This is an open randomised controlled parallel group clinical trial performed at a single centre in Colombo, Sri-Lanka. A cluster sampling strategy was used to select a large representative sample of subjects aged between 5-40 years at high risk of T2DM and CVD for the intervention study. We have screened 23,298 (males 47% females 53% healthy subjects for four risk factors: obesity, elevated waist circumference, family history of diabetes and physical inactivity, using a questionnaire and anthropometry. Those with two or more risk-factors were recruited to the intervention trial. We aim to recruit 4600 subjects for the intervention trial. The primary composite cardio-metabolic end point is; new onset T2DM, impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glycaemia, new onset hypertension and albuminuria, following 5 years of intervention. The effect of the intervention on pre-specified secondary endpoints will also be evaluated. The study will be conducted according to good clinical and ethical practice, data analysis and reporting guidelines. Discussion DIABRISK-SL is a large population based trial to evaluate the prevalence of diabetes, pre-diabetes and cardio-metabolic risk factors among young urban Sri-Lankans and the effect of a primary prevention strategy on cardio-metabolic disease end points. This work will enable country specific and regional cardio-metabolic

  8. Defects in the mitochondrial-tRNA modification enzymes MTO1 and GTPBP3 promote different metabolic reprogramming through a HIF-PPARγ-UCP2-AMPK axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutoual, Rachid; Meseguer, Salvador; Villarroya, Magda; Martín-Hernández, Elena; Errami, Mohammed; Martín, Miguel A; Casado, Marta; Armengod, M-Eugenia

    2018-01-18

    Human proteins MTO1 and GTPBP3 are thought to jointly catalyze the modification of the wobble uridine in mitochondrial tRNAs. Defects in each protein cause infantile hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with lactic acidosis. However, the underlying mechanisms are mostly unknown. Using fibroblasts from an MTO1 patient and MTO1 silenced cells, we found that the MTO1 deficiency is associated with a metabolic reprogramming mediated by inactivation of AMPK, down regulation of the uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) and transcription factor PPARγ, and activation of the hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). As a result, glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are uncoupled, while fatty acid metabolism is altered, leading to accumulation of lipid droplets in MTO1 fibroblasts. Unexpectedly, this response is different from that triggered by the GTPBP3 defect, as GTPBP3-depleted cells exhibit AMPK activation, increased levels of UCP2 and PPARγ, and inactivation of HIF-1. In addition, fatty acid oxidation and respiration are stimulated in these cells. Therefore, the HIF-PPARγ-UCP2-AMPK axis is operating differently in MTO1- and GTPBP3-defective cells, which strongly suggests that one of these proteins has an additional role, besides mitochondrial-tRNA modification. This work provides new and useful information on the molecular basis of the MTO1 and GTPBP3 defects and on putative targets for therapeutic intervention.

  9. Abomasal amino acid infusion in postpartum dairy cows: Effect on whole-body, splanchnic, and mammary glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, C; Larsen, M; Ouellet, D R; Maxin, G; Pellerin, D; Lapierre, H

    2015-11-01

    Nine Holstein cows fitted with rumen cannulas and indwelling catheters in splanchnic blood vessels were used to study the effects of supplementing AA on milk lactose secretion, whole-body rate of appearance (WB-Ra) of glucose, and tissue metabolism of glucose, lactate, glycerol, and β-OH-butyrate (BHBA) in postpartum dairy cows according to a generalized randomized incomplete block design with repeated measures in time. At calving, cows were blocked according to parity (second and third or greater) and were allocated to 2 treatments: abomasal infusion of water (n=4) or abomasal infusion of free AA with casein profile (AA-CN; n=5) in addition to the same basal diet. The AA-CN infusion started with half the maximal dose at 1 d in milk (DIM) and then steadily decreased from 791 to 226 g/d from DIM 2 to 29 to cover the estimated essential AA deficit. On DIM 5, 15, and 29, D[6,6-(2)H2]-glucose (23.7 mmol/h) was infused into a jugular vein for 5h, and 6 blood samples were taken from arterial, portal, hepatic, and mammary sources at 45-min intervals, starting 1h after the initiation of the D[6,6-(2)H2]glucose infusion. Trans-organ fluxes were calculated as veno-arterial differences times plasma flow (splanchnic: downstream dilution of deacetylated para-aminohippurate; mammary: Fick principle using Phe+Tyr). Energy-corrected milk and lactose yields increased on average with AA-CN by 6.4 kg/d and 353 g/d, respectively, with no DIM × treatment interaction. Despite increased AA supply and increased demand for lactose secretion with AA-CN, net hepatic release of glucose remained unchanged, but WB-Ra of glucose tended to increase with AA-CN. Portal true flux of glucose increased with AA-CN and represented, on average, 17% of WB-Ra. Splanchnic true flux of glucose was unaltered by treatments and was numerically equivalent to WB-Ra, averaging 729 and 741 mmol/h, respectively. Mammary glucose utilization increased with AA-CN infusion, averaging 78% of WB-Ra, and increased

  10. Modification of Bacterial Cellulose with Quaternary Ammonium Compounds Based on Fatty Acids and Amino Acids and the Effect on Antimicrobial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żywicka, Anna; Fijałkowski, Karol; Junka, Adam F; Grzesiak, Jakub; El Fray, Miroslawa

    2018-04-02

    In the present work, bacterial cellulose (BC) membranes have been modified with bioactive compounds based on long chain dimer of C18 linoleic acid, referred to as the dilinoleic acid (DLA) and tyrosine (Tyr), a natural amino acid capable of forming noncovalent cation-π interactions with positively charged ethylene diamine (EDA). This new compound, [EDA][DLA-Tyr], has been synthesized by simple coupling reaction, and its chemical structure was characterized by 1 H NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The antimicrobial activity of a new compound against S. aureus and S. epidermidis, two cocci associated with skin and wound infections, was assessed. The [EDA][DLA-Tyr] impregnated BC exhibited strong and long-term antimicrobial activity against both staphylococcal species. The results showed a 57-66% and 56-60% reduction in S. aureus and S. epidermidis viability, respectively, depending on [EDA][DLA-Tyr] concentration used. Importantly, [EDA][DLA-Tyr] molecules were released gradually from the BC pellicle, while a reference antibiotic, erythromycine (ER), did not show any antibacterial activity against S. aureus and S. epidermidis after 48 h of soaking in deionized water. Thus, a combination of [EDA][DLA-Tyr] and BC could be a promising new class of wound dressing displaying both biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity.

  11. Structure-activity relationship studies on a Trp dendrimer with dual activities against HIV and enterovirus A71. Modifications on the amino acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Gualda, Belén; Sun, Liang; Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Flores, Aida; Quesada, Ernesto; Balzarini, Jan; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Schols, Dominique; Neyts, Johan; Leyssen, Pieter; Mirabelli, Carmen; Camarasa, María-José; San-Félix, Ana

    2017-03-01

    We have recently described a new class of dendrimers with tryptophan (Trp) on the surface that show dual antiviral activities against HIV and EV71 enterovirus. The prototype compound of this family is a pentaerythritol derivative with 12 Trps on the periphery. Here we complete the structure-activity relationship studies of this family to identify key features that might be significant for the antiviral activity. With this aim, novel dendrimers containing different amino acids (aromatic and non-aromatic), tryptamine (a "decarboxylated" analogue of Trp) and N-methyl Trp on the periphery have been prepared. Dendrimer with N-Methyl Trp was the most active against HIV-1 and HIV-2 while dendrimer with tyrosine was endowed with the most potent antiviral activity against EV71. This tyrosine dendrimer proved to inhibit a large panel of EV71 clinical isolates (belonging to different clusters) in the low nanomolar/high picomolar range. In addition, a new synthetic procedure (convergent approach) has been developed for the synthesis of the prototype and some other dendrimers. This convergent approach proved more efficient (higher yields, easier purification) than the divergent approach previously reported. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Atherogenicity of amino acids in the lipid-laden macrophage model system in vitro and in atherosclerotic mice: a key role for triglyceride metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Oren; Grajeda-Iglesias, Claudia; Najjar, Mahmoud; Abu-Saleh, Niroz; Volkova, Nina; Dar, Dalit Esther; Hayek, Tony; Aviram, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Atherosclerosis-related research has focused mainly on the effects of lipids on macrophage foam cell formation and atherogenesis, whereas the role of amino acids (AAs) was understudied. The current study aimed to identify anti- or pro-atherogenic AA in the macrophage model system and to elucidate the underlying metabolic and molecular mechanisms. J774A.1 cultured macrophages were treated with increasing concentrations of each 1 of the 20 AAs. Macrophage atherogenicity was assessed in terms of cellular toxicity, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular cholesterol or triglyceride content. At nontoxic concentrations (up to 1 mM), modest effects on ROS generation or cholesterol content were noted, but six specific AAs significantly affected macrophage triglyceride content. Glycine, cysteine, alanine and leucine significantly decreased macrophage triglyceride content (by 24%-38%), through attenuated uptake of triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) by macrophages. In contrast, glutamate and glutamine caused a marked triglyceride accumulation in macrophages (by 107% and 129%, respectively), via a diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 (DGAT1)-dependent increase in triglyceride biosynthesis rate with a concurrent maturation of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1). Supplementation of apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE -/- ) mice with glycine for 40 days significantly decreased the triglyceride levels in serum and in peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) isolated from the mice (by 19%). In contrast, glutamine supplementation significantly increased MPM ROS generation and the accumulation of cholesterol and that of triglycerides (by 48%), via enhanced uptake of LDL and VLDL. Altogether, the present findings reveal some novel roles for specific AA in macrophage atherogenicity, mainly through modulation of cellular triglyceride metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of pre-meal drinks with protein and amino acids on glycemic and metabolic responses at a subsequent composite meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnerud, Ulrika J; Heinzle, Cornelia; Holst, Jens Juul

    2012-01-01

    Whey proteins have insulinogenic properties and the effect appears to originate from a specific postprandial plasma amino acid pattern. The insulinogenic effect can be mimicked by a specific mixture of the five amino acids iso, leu, lys, thr and val.......Whey proteins have insulinogenic properties and the effect appears to originate from a specific postprandial plasma amino acid pattern. The insulinogenic effect can be mimicked by a specific mixture of the five amino acids iso, leu, lys, thr and val....

  14. Mechanisms of metabonomic for a gateway drug: nicotine priming enhances behavioral response to cocaine with modification in energy metabolism and neurotransmitter level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Li

    Full Text Available Nicotine, one of the most commonly used drugs, has become a major concern because tobacco serves as a gateway drug and is linked to illicit drug abuse, such as cocaine and marijuana. However, previous studies mainly focused on certain genes or neurotransmitters which have already been known to participate in drug addiction, lacking endogenous metabolic profiling in a global view. To further explore the mechanism by which nicotine modifies the response to cocaine, we developed two conditioned place preference (CPP models in mice. In threshold dose model, mice were pretreated with nicotine, followed by cocaine treatment at the dose of 2 mg/kg, a threshold dose of cocaine to induce CPP in mice. In high-dose model, mice were only treated with 20 mg/kg cocaine, which induced a significant CPP. (1H nuclear magnetic resonance based on metabonomics was used to investigate metabolic profiles of the nucleus accumbens (NAc and striatum. We found that nicotine pretreatment dramatically increased CPP induced by 2 mg/kg cocaine, which was similar to 20 mg/kg cocaine-induced CPP. Interestingly, metabolic profiles showed considerable overlap between these two models. These overlapped metabolites mainly included neurotransmitters as well as the molecules participating in energy homeostasis and cellular metabolism. Our results show that the reinforcing effect of nicotine on behavioral response to cocaine may attribute to the modification of some specific metabolites in NAc and striatum, thus creating a favorable metabolic environment for enhancing conditioned rewarding effect of cocaine. Our findings provide an insight into the effect of cigarette smoking on cocaine dependence and the underlying mechanism.

  15. Mechanisms of Metabonomic for a Gateway Drug: Nicotine Priming Enhances Behavioral Response to Cocaine with Modification in Energy Metabolism and Neurotransmitter Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongyu; Bu, Qian; Chen, Bo; Shao, Xue; Hu, Zhengtao; Deng, Pengchi; Lv, Lei; Deng, Yi; Zhu, Ruiming; Li, Yan; Zhang, Baolai; Hou, Jing; Du, Changman; Zhao, Qian; Fu, Dengqi; Zhao, Yinglan; Cen, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine, one of the most commonly used drugs, has become a major concern because tobacco serves as a gateway drug and is linked to illicit drug abuse, such as cocaine and marijuana. However, previous studies mainly focused on certain genes or neurotransmitters which have already been known to participate in drug addiction, lacking endogenous metabolic profiling in a global view. To further explore the mechanism by which nicotine modifies the response to cocaine, we developed two conditioned place preference (CPP) models in mice. In threshold dose model, mice were pretreated with nicotine, followed by cocaine treatment at the dose of 2 mg/kg, a threshold dose of cocaine to induce CPP in mice. In high-dose model, mice were only treated with 20 mg/kg cocaine, which induced a significant CPP. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance based on metabonomics was used to investigate metabolic profiles of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and striatum. We found that nicotine pretreatment dramatically increased CPP induced by 2 mg/kg cocaine, which was similar to 20 mg/kg cocaine-induced CPP. Interestingly, metabolic profiles showed considerable overlap between these two models. These overlapped metabolites mainly included neurotransmitters as well as the molecules participating in energy homeostasis and cellular metabolism. Our results show that the reinforcing effect of nicotine on behavioral response to cocaine may attribute to the modification of some specific metabolites in NAc and striatum, thus creating a favorable metabolic environment for enhancing conditioned rewarding effect of cocaine. Our findings provide an insight into the effect of cigarette smoking on cocaine dependence and the underlying mechanism. PMID:24489831

  16. Effect of para halogen modification of S-3-(phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamides on metabolism and clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhyun; Coss, Christopher C; Dalton, James T

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand why para-halogen modifications of S-3-(4-halophenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethylphenyl) propionamide selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) had the opposite of expected effects on total clearance, in which electron-withdrawing groups generally protect benzene ring from hydroxylation. We determined the plasma protein binding of this series of halogen substituted SARMs and characterized the qualitative effects of B-ring halogen substitution on in vivo metabolism. In vivo metabolism of S-9, S-10, and S-11 were determined in rats using LC-MS(n) analysis. Intrinsic clearance was measured by in vitro metabolism using rat liver microsomes. Rat plasma protein binding was measured by equilibrium dialysis and drug concentrations after dialysis were analyzed by LC-MS. The major metabolic pathways of the halogen-substituted SARMs examined were very similar and included three major phase I pathways; (1) hydrolysis of the amide bond, (2) B-ring hydroxylation, and (3) A-ring nitro reduction to an aromatic amine. In plasma protein binding studies, S-1 (F, fu = 0.78 ± 0.17 %) showed the greatest unbound fraction, followed by S-9 (Cl, fu = 0.10 ± 0.04 %), S-10 (Br, fu = 0.03 ± 0.01 %), and S-11 (I, fu = 0.008 ± 0.001 %). The CLint values of S-1, S-9, S-10, and S-11 were 2.4, 2.5, 2.8, and 4.6 μL/min/mg, respectively. These findings suggest that as lipophilicity increased the free fraction was reduced thus compensating for metabolic liability and resulting in the apparent discrepancy between CLint and CL total of halogen-substituted SARMs series.

  17. 13C based proteinogenic amino acid (PAA) and metabolic flux ratio analysis of Lactococcus lactis reveals changes in pentose phosphate (PP) pathway in response to agitation and temperature related stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 is an important starter culture for dairy fermentation. During industrial fermentations, L. lactis is constantly exposed to stresses that affect the growth and performance of the bacterium. Although the response of L. lactis to several stresses has been described, the adaptation mechanisms at the level of in vivo fluxes have seldom been described. To gain insights into cellular metabolism, 13C metabolic flux analysis and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to measure the flux ratios of active pathways in the central metabolism of L. lactis when subjected to three conditions varying in temperature (30°C, 37°C) and agitation (with and without agitation at 150 rpm). Collectively, the concentrations of proteinogenic amino acids (PAAs) and free fatty acids (FAAs) were compared, and Pearson correlation analysis (r) was calculated to measure the pairwise relationship between PAAs. Branched chain and aromatic amino acids, threonine, serine, lysine and histidine were correlated strongly, suggesting changes in flux regulation in glycolysis, the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, malic enzyme and anaplerotic reaction catalysed by pyruvate carboxylase (pycA). Flux ratio analysis revealed that glucose was mainly converted by glycolysis, highlighting the stability of L. lactis’ central carbon metabolism despite different conditions. Higher flux ratios through oxaloacetate (OAA) from pyruvate (PYR) reaction in all conditions suggested the activation of pyruvate carboxylate (pycA) in L. lactis, in response to acid stress during exponential phase. Subsequently, more significant flux ratio differences were seen through the oxidative and non-oxidative pentose phosphate (PP) pathways, malic enzyme, and serine and C1 metabolism, suggesting NADPH requirements in response to environmental stimuli. These reactions could play an important role in optimization strategies for metabolic engineering in L. lactis. Overall, the

  18. 13C based proteinogenic amino acid (PAA and metabolic flux ratio analysis of Lactococcus lactis reveals changes in pentose phosphate (PP pathway in response to agitation and temperature related stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalrul Azlan Azizan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 is an important starter culture for dairy fermentation. During industrial fermentations, L. lactis is constantly exposed to stresses that affect the growth and performance of the bacterium. Although the response of L. lactis to several stresses has been described, the adaptation mechanisms at the level of in vivo fluxes have seldom been described. To gain insights into cellular metabolism, 13C metabolic flux analysis and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS were used to measure the flux ratios of active pathways in the central metabolism of L. lactis when subjected to three conditions varying in temperature (30°C, 37°C and agitation (with and without agitation at 150 rpm. Collectively, the concentrations of proteinogenic amino acids (PAAs and free fatty acids (FAAs were compared, and Pearson correlation analysis (r was calculated to measure the pairwise relationship between PAAs. Branched chain and aromatic amino acids, threonine, serine, lysine and histidine were correlated strongly, suggesting changes in flux regulation in glycolysis, the pentose phosphate (PP pathway, malic enzyme and anaplerotic reaction catalysed by pyruvate carboxylase (pycA. Flux ratio analysis revealed that glucose was mainly converted by glycolysis, highlighting the stability of L. lactis’ central carbon metabolism despite different conditions. Higher flux ratios through oxaloacetate (OAA from pyruvate (PYR reaction in all conditions suggested the activation of pyruvate carboxylate (pycA in L. lactis, in response to acid stress during exponential phase. Subsequently, more significant flux ratio differences were seen through the oxidative and non-oxidative pentose phosphate (PP pathways, malic enzyme, and serine and C1 metabolism, suggesting NADPH requirements in response to environmental stimuli. These reactions could play an important role in optimization strategies for metabolic engineering in L. lactis. Overall

  19. Robust Fluorine-Free Superhydrophobic Amino-Silicone Oil/SiO2 Modification of Electrospun Polyacrylonitrile Membranes for Waterproof-Breathable Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Junlu; Xu, Yue; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2017-05-03

    Superhydrophobic waterproof-breathable membranes have attracted considerable interest owing to their multifunctional applications in self-cleaning, anti-icing, anticorrosion, outdoor tents, and protective clothing. Despite the researches pertaning to the construction of superhydrophobic functional membranes by nanoparticle finishing have increased drastically, the disconnected particle component is easy to fall off from the membranes under deformation and wear conditions, which has restricted their wide use in practice. Here, robust superhydrophobic microporous membranes were prepared via a facile and environmentally friendly strategy by dip-coating amino-silicone oil (ASO) onto the electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) membranes, followed by SiO 2 nanoparticles (SiO 2 NPs) blade coating. Compared with hydrophilic PAN membranes, the modified membranes exhibited superhydrophobic surface with an advancing water contact angle up to 156°, after introducing ASO as low surface energy substance and SiO 2 NPs as filler to reduce the pore size and construct the multihierarchical rough structure. Varying the concentrations of ASO and SiO 2 NPs systematically, the PAN electrospun membranes modified with 1 wt % ASO and 0.1 wt % SiO 2 NPs were endowed with good water-resistance (74.3 kPa), relative low thermal conductivity (0.0028 W m -1 K -1 ), modest vapor permeability (11.4 kg m -2 d -1 ), and air permeability (20.5 mm s -1 ). Besides, the inorganic-organic hybrid coating of ASO/SiO 2 NPs could maintain its superhydrophobicity even after 40 abrasion cycles. The resulting membranes were found to resist variations on the pH scale from 0 to 12, and retained their water repellent properties when exposed to harsh acidic and alkali conditions. This facile fabrication of durable fluorine-free superhydrophobic membranes simultaneous with good waterproof-breathable performance provides the advantages for potential applications in self-cleaning materials and versatile protective

  20. Systematic structure modifications of imidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidine to reduce metabolism mediated by aldehyde oxidase (AO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Angelica; Kang, Ping; Ornelas, Martha; Kephart, Susan; Hu, Qiyue; Pairish, Mason; Jiang, Ying; Guo, Chuangxing

    2011-11-10

    N-{trans-3-[(5-Cyano-6-methylpyridin-2-yl)oxy]-2,2,4,4-tetramethylcyclobutyl}imidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidine-3-carboxamide (1) was recently identified as a full antagonist of the androgen receptor, demonstrating excellent in vivo tumor growth inhibition in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the imidazo[1,2-a]pyrimidine moiety is rapidly metabolized by aldehyde oxidase (AO). The present paper describes a number of medicinal chemistry strategies taken to avoid the AO-mediated oxidation of this particular system. Guided by an AO protein structure-based model, our investigation revealed the most probable site of AO oxidation and the observation that altering the heterocycle or blocking the reactive site are two of the more effective strategies for reducing AO metabolism. These strategies may be useful for other drug discovery programs.

  1. Abscisic acid (ABA) regulates grape bud dormancy, and dormancy release stimuli may act through modification of ABA metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chuanlin; Halaly, Tamar; Acheampong, Atiako Kwame; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Or, Etti

    2015-03-01

    In warm-winter regions, induction of dormancy release by hydrogen cyanamide (HC) is mandatory for commercial table grape production. Induction of respiratory stress by HC leads to dormancy release via an uncharacterized biochemical cascade that could reveal the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Previous studies proposed a central role for abscisic acid (ABA) in the repression of bud meristem activity, and suggested its removal as a critical step in the HC-induced cascade. In the current study, support for these assumptions was sought. The data show that ABA indeed inhibits dormancy release in grape (Vitis vinifera) buds and attenuates the advancing effect of HC. However, HC-dependent recovery was detected, and was affected by dormancy status. HC reduced VvXERICO and VvNCED transcript levels and induced levels of VvABA8'OH homologues. Regulation of these central players in ABA metabolism correlated with decreased ABA and increased ABA catabolite levels in HC-treated buds. Interestingly, an inhibitor of ethylene signalling attenuated these effects of HC on ABA metabolism. HC also modulated the expression of ABA signalling regulators, in a manner that supports a decreased ABA level and response. Taken together, the data support HC-induced removal of ABA-mediated repression via regulation of ABA metabolism and signalling. Expression profiling during the natural dormancy cycle revealed that at maximal dormancy, the HC-regulated VvNCED1 transcript level starts to drop. In parallel, levels of VvA8H-CYP707A4 transcript and ABA catabolites increase sharply. This may provide initial support for the involvement of ABA metabolism also in the execution of natural dormancy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  2. Self-management for obesity and cardio-metabolic fitness: Description and evaluation of the lifestyle modification program of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coates Alison M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sustainable lifestyle modification strategies are needed to address obesity and cardiovascular risk factors. Intensive, individualised programs have been successful, but are limited by time and resources. We have formulated a group-based lifestyle education program based upon national diet and physical activity (PA recommendations to manage obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors. This article describes the content and delivery of this program, with information on compliance and acceptability. Methods Overweight/obese adults (n = 153 with metabolic syndrome were recruited from the community and randomly allocated to intervention (INT or control (CON. Written copies of Australian national dietary and PA guidelines were provided to all participants. INT took part in a 16-week lifestyle program which provided a curriculum and practical strategies on 1 dietary and PA information based on national guidelines, 2 behavioural self-management tools, 3 food-label reading, supermarkets tour and cooking, 4 exercise sessions, and 5 peer-group support. Compliance was assessed using attendance records and weekly food/PA logs. Participants' motivations, perceived benefits and goals were assessed through facilitated discussion. Program acceptability feedback was collected through structured focus groups. Results Although completion of weekly food/PA records was poor, attendance at information/education sessions (77% overall and exercise participation (66% overall was high, and compared with CON, multiple markers of body composition and cardio-metabolic health improved in INT. Participants reported that the most useful program components included food-label reading, cooking sessions, and learning new and different physical exercises, including home-based options. Participants also reported finding self-management techniques helpful, namely problem solving and short-term goal setting. The use of a group setting and supportive 'peer' leaders

  3. Self-management for obesity and cardio-metabolic fitness: Description and evaluation of the lifestyle modification program of a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettman, Tahna L; Misan, Gary MH; Owen, Katherine; Warren, Kate; Coates, Alison M; Buckley, Jonathan D; Howe, Peter RC

    2008-01-01

    Background Sustainable lifestyle modification strategies are needed to address obesity and cardiovascular risk factors. Intensive, individualised programs have been successful, but are limited by time and resources. We have formulated a group-based lifestyle education program based upon national diet and physical activity (PA) recommendations to manage obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors. This article describes the content and delivery of this program, with information on compliance and acceptability. Methods Overweight/obese adults (n = 153) with metabolic syndrome were recruited from the community and randomly allocated to intervention (INT) or control (CON). Written copies of Australian national dietary and PA guidelines were provided to all participants. INT took part in a 16-week lifestyle program which provided a curriculum and practical strategies on 1) dietary and PA information based on national guidelines, 2) behavioural self-management tools, 3) food-label reading, supermarkets tour and cooking, 4) exercise sessions, and 5) peer-group support. Compliance was assessed using attendance records and weekly food/PA logs. Participants' motivations, perceived benefits and goals were assessed through facilitated discussion. Program acceptability feedback was collected through structured focus groups. Results Although completion of weekly food/PA records was poor, attendance at information/education sessions (77% overall) and exercise participation (66% overall) was high, and compared with CON, multiple markers of body composition and cardio-metabolic health improved in INT. Participants reported that the most useful program components included food-label reading, cooking sessions, and learning new and different physical exercises, including home-based options. Participants also reported finding self-management techniques helpful, namely problem solving and short-term goal setting. The use of a group setting and supportive 'peer' leaders were found to be

  4. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... functions: Anabolism (uh-NAB-uh-liz-um), or constructive metabolism, is all about building and storing. It ... in infants and young children. Hypothyroidism slows body processes and causes fatigue (tiredness), slow heart rate, excessive ...

  5. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... acid phenylalanine, needed for normal growth and protein production). Inborn errors of metabolism can sometimes lead to ...

  6. Dietary Modifications, Weight Loss, and Changes in Metabolic Markers Affect Global DNA Methylation in Hispanic, African American, and Afro-Caribbean Breast Cancer Survivors12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Cruzata, Lissette; Zhang, Wenfei; McDonald, Jasmine A; Tsai, Wei Yann; Valdovinos, Cristina; Falci, Laura; Wang, Qiao; Crew, Katherine D; Santella, Regina M; Hershman, Dawn L; Greenlee, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lower levels of global DNA methylation in tissue and blood have been associated with increased cancer risk. Conversely, cross-sectional analyses of healthier lifestyle patterns have been associated with higher levels of global DNA methylation. Objective: In this trial, we explored the associations between changes in lifestyle modifications (diet, weight loss), metabolic markers, and global epigenetic biomarkers in white blood cells. Methods: Study participants were Hispanic, African American, and Afro-Caribbean overweight and sedentary female breast cancer survivors (n = 24) who participated in a larger randomized, crossover, pilot study of a 6-mo weight loss intervention and who had available blood specimens. Anthropometric measures, a food-frequency questionnaire, and peripheral blood were collected at baseline, 6 mo, and 12 mo. Plasma samples were analyzed for metabolic markers (insulin, glucose). We measured DNA methylation of long interspersed nucleotide element 1 (LINE-1) and satellite 2 by pyrosequencing and MethyLight, respectively, and global DNA methylation by the luminometric methylation assay (LUMA). Results: DNA methylation of LINE-1 was statistically significantly elevated at 6 mo [75.5% vs. 78.5% (P DNA methylation (β = 0.19, P = 0.001) and LUMA DNA methylation levels (β = 0.24, P = 0.02), respectively. Similarly, 12-mo changes in dietary measures such as vegetable (β = 0.009, P = 0.048), protein (β = 0.04, P = 0.001), and total caloric (β = 0.05, P = 0.01) intake were positively associated with changes in LUMA DNA methylation, as was intake of fruit positively associated with changes in LINE-1 DNA methylation (β = 0.004, P = 0.02). Conclusions: Our hypothesis-generating results suggest that lifestyle modifications may be associated with changes in global DNA methylation detectable at 6 and 12 mo. These biomarkers may be useful intermediate biomarkers to use in future intervention trials. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials

  7. Methionine and Choline Supply during the Periparturient Period Alter Plasma Amino Acid and One-Carbon Metabolism Profiles to Various Extents: Potential Role in Hepatic Metabolism and Antioxidant Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to profile plasma amino acids (AA and derivatives of their metabolism during the periparturient period in response to supplemental rumen-protected methionine (MET or rumen-protected choline (CHOL. Forty cows were fed from −21 through 30 days around parturition in a 2 × 2 factorial design a diet containing MET or CHOL. MET supply led to greater circulating methionine and proportion of methionine in the essential AA pool, total AA, and total sulfur-containing compounds. Lysine in total AA also was greater in these cows, indicating a better overall AA profile. Sulfur-containing compounds (cystathionine, cystine, homocystine, and taurine were greater in MET-fed cows, indicating an enriched sulfur-containing compound pool due to enhanced transsulfuration activity. Circulating essential AA and total AA concentrations were greater in cows supplied MET due to greater lysine, arginine, tryptophan, threonine, proline, asparagine, alanine, and citrulline. In contrast, CHOL supply had no effect on essential AA or total AA, and only tryptophan and cystine were greater. Plasma 3-methylhistidine concentration was lower in response to CHOL supply, suggesting less tissue protein mobilization in these cows. Overall, the data revealed that enhanced periparturient supply of MET has positive effects on plasma AA profiles and overall antioxidant status.

  8. Rice protein improves adiposity, body weight and reduces lipids level in rats through modification of triglyceride metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate whether rice protein can possess a vital function in improving lipids level and adiposity, the effects of rice proteins extracted by alkaline (RP-A and α-amylase (RP-E on triglyceride metabolism were investigated in 7-week-old male Wistar rats fed cholesterol-enriched diets for 2 weeks, as compared with casein (CAS. Results Compared with CAS, plasma concentrations of glucose and lipids were significantly reduced by RP-feeding (P P P P P > 0.05. There was a significant positive correlation between protein digestibility and deposit fat (r = 0.8567, P P Conclusions The present study demonstrates that rice protein can modify triglyceride metabolism, leading to an improvement of body weight and adiposity. Results suggest that the triglyceride-lowering action as well as the potential of anti-adiposity induced by rice protein is attributed to upregulation of lipolysis and downregulation of lipogenesis, and the lower digestibility of rice protein may be the main modulator responsible for the lipid-lowering action.

  9. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver and Gallbladder Disorders Lung and Airway Disorders Men's Health Issues Mental Health Disorders Mouth and Dental Disorders Older People’s ... Liver and Gallbladder Disorders Lung and Airway Disorders Men's Health Issues Mental Health Disorders Mouth and Dental Disorders Older People’s ...

  10. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Concerts ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures 3D Models Images Infographics Audio Pronunciations The One-Page Manual of Health Quizzes ... Commentary ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures 3D Models Images Infographics Audio Pronunciations The One-Page Manual of Health Quizzes ...

  11. Amino acid metabolism of Astacus leptodactylus Esch.—III. Studies on the biosynthesis of α- and β-alanine from aspartate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marrewijk, W.J.A. van; Zandee, D.I.

    1975-01-01

    1. 1. Six hours after injection of 1- or 4-14C-aspartate into the crayfish Astacus leptodactylus almost all radioactivity incorporated was found in the amino acids. 2. 2. From both precursors only the amino acids α-alanine and glutamic acid were labelled. The biosynthesis of α-alanine from

  12. Carbon metabolism of peach fruit after harvest: changes in enzymes involved in organic acid and sugar level modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsani, Julia; Budde, Claudio O; Porrini, Lucía; Lauxmann, Martin A; Lombardo, Verónica A; Murray, Ricardo; Andreo, Carlos S; Drincovich, María F; Lara, María V

    2009-01-01

    Peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) is a climacteric fruit that ripens after harvest, prior to human consumption. Organic acids and soluble sugars contribute to the overall organoleptic quality of fresh peach; thus, the integrated study of the metabolic pathways controlling the levels of these compounds is of great relevance. Therefore, in this work, several metabolites and enzymes involved in carbon metabolism were analysed during the post-harvest ripening of peach fruit cv 'Dixiland'. Depending on the enzyme studied, activity, protein level by western blot, or transcript level by quantitative real time-PCR were analysed. Even though sorbitol did not accumulate at a high level in relation to sucrose at harvest, it was rapidly consumed once the fruit was separated from the tree. During the ripening process, sucrose degradation was accompanied by an increase of glucose and fructose. Specific transcripts encoding neutral invertases (NIs) were up-regulated or down-regulated, indicating differential functions for each putative NI isoform. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was markedly induced, and may participate as a glycolytic shunt, since the malate level did not increase during post-harvest ripening. The fermentative pathway was highly induced, with increases in both the acetaldehyde level and the enzymes involved in this process. In addition, proteins differentially expressed during the post-harvest ripening process were also analysed. Overall, the present study identified enzymes and pathways operating during the post-harvest ripening of peach fruit, which may contribute to further identification of varieties with altered levels of enzymes/metabolites or in the evaluation of post-harvest treatments to produce fruit of better organoleptic attributes.

  13. The influence of straw meal on the crude protein and amino acid metabolism and the digestibility of crude nutrients in broiler hens. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhn, K.; Zander, R.

    1987-01-01

    In two experiments with colostomized broiler hens the influence of a straw meal supplement on the apparent digestibility of the amino acids of the ration and the 15 N-labelled basic amino acids in wheat was studied. In experiment 1 the animals received 120 g mixed feed plus 0, 20, 30 and 40 g straw meal per animal and day. The digestibility of the amino acids decreased on average from 86% to 83%, 80% and 79% with the growing straw intake. In contrast to the control variant, 20 g straw meal intake resulted in a singificant decrease of digestibility for lysine, histidine, glycine, tyrosine, phenylanaline, cystine and methionine. 30 and 40 g straw meal reduced significantly the digestibility of all amino acids with the exception of arginine. The amino acid composition of the crude protein in feces changed only very slightly due to the straw supplement. In experiment 2 15 N-labelled wheat was a component of the ration. Of the 15 N-labelled amino acids lysine, histidine and arginine, 88, 90 and 95% were apparently digested. The adaptation of the animals to straw meal intake did not change the digestibility of the amino acids. (author)

  14. Dark CO/sub 2/ fixation and amino acid metabolism in symbiotic N/sub 2/-fixing systems. Labeling studies with /sup 14/C and /sup 13/N-labeled tracers. [Roots of soybean plants and alders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, G.T. III

    1982-01-01

    Amino acid metabolism was examined by monitoring the amino acids labeled with (/sup 14/C) incorporated during dark CO/sub 2/ fixation and with (/sup 13/N) incorporated from /sup 13/NH/sub 4/+, /sup 13/NO/sub 3/- or (/sup 13/N)N/sub 2/. Label from /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was directly incorporated in soybean roots and the N/sub 2/-fixing root nodules of soybeans and alders. The products of dark CO/sub 2/ fixation were primarily amino and organic acids. The distribution of label incorporated from /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ into amino acids depended on the plant species and the nitrigen source. The major labeled amino acids in roots and nodules of soybean plants dependent on N/sub 2/ were aspartate and glutamate; in alder nodules, citrulline; in roots of soybean plants treated with NO/sub 3/-, asparagine; and in roots of soybean plants treated with NH/sub 4/+, asparagine and glutamine. Asparagine was the major amino acid transported out of the soybean root system. Experiments indicated that asparagine was synthesized directly from aspartate. After exposure to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, the specific activity of glutamine was consistently higher than that of glutamate in soybean nodules and roots of plants treated with NO/sub 3/-. This was taken as evidence that there were two pools of glutamate, only one of which was associated with glutamine synthesis. Alder and soybean nodules and roots were incubated with /sup 13/N-labeled tracers. Those tissues incubated with /sup 13/NH/sub 4/+ had a higher ratio of (/sup 13/N)glutamine to (/sup 13/N)glutamate that similar tissues exposed to /sup 13/NO/sub 3/- or (/sup 13/N)N/sub 2/. An explanation for these results based on the relative rates of glutamine and glutamate synthesis is discussed.

  15. Starving/re-feeding processes induce metabolic modifications in thick-lipped grey mullet (Chelon labrosus, Risso 1827).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujante, I M; Martos-Sitcha, J A; Moyano, F J; Ruiz-Jarabo, I; Martínez-Rodríguez, G; Mancera, J M

    2015-02-01

    The effects of starvation and re-feeding on metabolites and tissue composition, GH/IGF-I axis, and digestive enzyme activities in juvenile thick-lipped grey mullet (Chelon labrosus) were evaluated. Fish were divided into three feeding groups (n=72, 82.00±4.09 g initial body mass). The control group was fed 1% of their body mass once a day throughout the experiment with commercial pellets. The other two groups were deprived of feed for 21 days (starved), or re-fed for 7 days after 14 days of food deprivation (re-fed). Full-length cDNAs from pituitary GH and hepatic IGF-I were cloned by screening a cDNA library or by PCR techniques. Furthermore, changes in their mRNA expressions were assessed by real time PCR in specimens maintained under the different feeding patterns. Results showed a negative growth in starved and re-feeding groups. Starvation induced a significant increase in plasma triglycerides as well as a decrease in liver glucose and glycogen. Re-feeding increased plasma glucose, lactate and protein, as well as liver glucose and glycogen. In addition, starvation significantly increased pituitary GH expression, while re-feeding down-regulated it. No significant changes were observed in hepatic IGF-I expression in any dietary treatment. Digestive enzyme activities were not significantly affected either by starvation or by re-feeding. The results of the present work suggest that juveniles of the thick-lipped grey mullet may easily adjust their metabolism under situations characterized by a short-term starvation and re-feeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamics of the amino acid and protein metabolism of laying hens after the application of 15N-labelled wheat protein. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhn, K.; Hennig, A.

    1989-01-01

    Over a period of 4 days 12 colostomized laying hens daily received 36 g coarse wheat meal containing 14.37 atom-% 15 N excess ( 15 N') together with a conventional ration. After the homogenisation of each oviduct N and 15 N' were determined. After the precipitation with TCA the 15 N' of the amino acids was analysed in both the precipitate and the supernatant. In addition, the free amino acids and the peptides were determined in the TCA soluble fraction. The atom-% 15 N' in the total N and in the non-basic amino acid N showed a parallel decrease; it diminshed from 1.75 atom-% 15 N' to 0.64. Of the three basic amino acids, lysine shows the lowest labelling at all four measuring points. The quotas of non-basic amino acid 14 N and 15 N' in the total 14 N and 15 N' of the oviduct are the same and amount to 53%. In contrast to this, the quota of the 14 N of the basic amino acids in the total 14 N of the oviduct only amounts to 21.6% and that of 15 N' only to 15.4%. The average atom-% 15 N' of the free amino acids 12 h after the last 15 N application is 1.54 and is considerably above that of the peptides with 1.15 atom-% 15 N'. 36 h after the last 15 N application the ascertained value of 1.25 is identical in both fractions. The labelling of the free amino acids decreases more quickly than that of the peptides the more time has passed after the last 15 N application. (author)

  17. Dynamics of the amino acid and protein metabolism of laying hens after the application of 15N-labelled wheat protein. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhn, K.

    1988-01-01

    In a 15 N labelling experiment 12 colostomized laying hens received 15 N-labelled wheat with 14.37 atom-% 15 N excess ( 15 N') over 4 days. 3 hens each were butchered after 12 h, 36 h, 60 h and 108 h after the last 15 N' application. The gastrointestinal tract was divided into 3 parts (esophagus with crop and gizzard as well as glandular stomach, small intestine, large intestine). These parts and the pancreas were hydrolyzed with 6 N HCl and the individual basic as well as the sum of acid and neutral amino acids were determined in the hydrolyzed fractions. In addition, the amino acids and peptides were determined in the TCA soluble N fraction. The atom-% 15 N' was determined in the individual amino acid and peptide fractions. The labelling of the basic amino acids in the individual tract segments was lower than in the acid and neutral amino acids. In comparison to the peptides, a higher atom-% 15 N' could be determined in the free amino acids. (author)

  18. Analysis of 26 amino acids in human plasma by HPLC using AQC as derivatizing agent and its application in metabolic laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Attri, Savita Verma; Behra, Bijaylaxmi; Bhisikar, Swapnil; Kumar, Praveen; Tageja, Minni; Sharda, Sheetal; Singhi, Pratibha; Singhi, Sunit

    2014-05-01

    The present study reports the simultaneous analysis of 26 physiological amino acids in plasma along with total cysteine and homocysteine by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) employing 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) as precolumn derivatizing reagent. Separations were carried out using Lichrospher 100 RP-18e (5 μm) 250 × 4.0 mm column connected to 100 CN 4.0 × 4.0 mm guard column on a quaternary HPLC system and run time was 53 min. Linearity of the peak areas for different concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 100 pmol/μL of individual amino acids was determined. A good linearity (R (2) > 0.998) was achieved in the standard mixture for each amino acid. Recovery of amino acids incorporated at the time of derivatization ranged from 95 to 106 %. Using this method we have established the normative data of amino acids in plasma, the profile being comparable to the range reported in literature and identified cases of classical homocystinuria, cobalamin defect/deficiency, non-ketotic hyperglycinemia, hyperprolinemia, ketotic hyperglycinemia, urea cycle defect and maple syrup urine disease.

  19. Kinetics of oxidation of acidic amino acids by sodium N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ... the mechanism of amino acids metabolism. Amino acids find a number of applications in biochemical research, metabolism, microbiology, nutrition, pharmaceuticals and fortification of foods and feeds. Generally only the amino and carboxyl functional groups in RCH(NH2)COOH undergo chemical transformations while.

  20. Radiolabeled amino acids : Basic aspects and clinical applications in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, PL; Vaalburg, W; Pruim, J; de Vries, EGE; Langen, KJ; Piers, DA

    As the applications of metabolic imaging are expanding, radiolabeled amino acids may gain increased clinical interest, This review first describes the basic aspects of amino acid metabolism, then continues with basic aspects of radiolabeled amino acids, and finally describes clinical applications,

  1. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics of oxidative stress: Identification of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) adducts of amino acids using lysozyme and bovine serum albumin as model proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslebagh, Roshanak; Pfeffer, Bruce A; Fliesler, Steven J; Darie, Costel C

    2016-10-01

    Modification of proteins by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a reactive by-product of ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation, on specific amino acid residues is considered a biomarker for oxidative stress, as occurs in many metabolic, hereditary, and age-related diseases. HNE modification of amino acids can occur either via Michael addition or by formation of Schiff-base adducts. These modifications typically occur on cysteine (Cys), histidine (His), and/or lysine (Lys) residues, resulting in an increase of 156 Da (Michael addition) or 138 Da (Schiff-base adducts), respectively, in the mass of the residue. Here, we employed biochemical and mass spectrometry (MS) approaches to determine the MS "signatures" of HNE-modified amino acids, using lysozyme and BSA as model proteins. Using direct infusion of unmodified and HNE-modified lysozyme into an electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer, we were able to detect up to seven HNE modifications per molecule of lysozyme. Using nanoLC-MS/MS, we found that, in addition to N-terminal amino acids, Cys, His, and Lys residues, HNE modification of arginine (Arg), threonine (Thr), tryptophan (Trp), and histidine (His) residues can also occur. These sensitive and specific methods can be applied to the study of oxidative stress to evaluate HNE modification of proteins in complex mixtures from cells and tissues under diseased versus normal conditions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Establishment of a yeast platform strain for production of p-coumaric acid through metabolic engineering of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Prado, Edith Angelica; Kildegaard, Kanchana Rueksomtawin; Li, Mingji

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic amino acids are precursors of numerous plant secondary metabolites with diverse biological functions. Many of these secondary metabolites are already being used as active pharmaceutical or nutraceutical ingredients, and there are numerous exploratory studies of other compounds...... with promising applications. p-Coumaric acid is derived from aromatic amino acids and, besides being a valuable chemical building block, it serves as precursor for biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites, such as polyphenols, flavonoids, and some polyketides. Here we developed a p-coumaric acid...... as another important flux-controlling step in the aromatic amino acid pathway by overexpressing enzymes from Escherichia coli, homologous to the pentafunctional enzyme Aro1p and to the bifunctional chorismate synthase-flavin reductase Aro2p. The highest titer of p-coumaric acid of 1.93±0.26 g L−1...

  3. Oncosecretomics coupled to bioenergetics identifies α-amino adipic acid, isoleucine and GABA as potential biomarkers of cancer: Differential expression of c-Myc, Oct1 and KLF4 coordinates metabolic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellance, Nadège; Pabst, Lisa; Allen, Genevara; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Nagrath, Deepak

    2012-11-01

    Bioenergetic profiling of tumors is a new challenge of cancer research and medicine as therapies are currently being developed. Meanwhile, methodological means must be proposed to gather information on tumor metabolism in order to adapt these potential therapies to the bioenergetic specificities of tumors. Studies performed on tumors and cancer cell lines have shown that cancer cells bioenergetics is highly variable. This profile changes with microenvironmental conditions (eg. substrate availability), the oncogenes activated (and the tumor suppressors inactivated) and the interaction with the stroma (i.e. reverse Warburg effect). Here, we assessed the power of metabolic footprinting (MFP) to unravel the bioenergetics and associated anabolic changes induced by three oncogenes, c-Myc, KLF4 and Oct1. The MFP approach provides a quantitative analysis of the metabolites secreted and consumed by cancer cells. We used ultra performance liquid chromatography for quantifying the amino acid uptake and secretion. To investigate the potential oncogene-mediated alterations in mitochondrial metabolism, we measured oxygen consumption rate and ATP production as well as the glucose uptake and lactate release. Our findings show that c-Myc deficiency initiates the Warburg effect along with a reduction of mitochondrial respiration. KLF4 deficiency also stimulated glycolysis, albeit without cellular respiration impairment. In contrast, Oct1 deficiency reduced glycolysis and enhanced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency. MFP revealed that c-Myc, KLF4 and Oct1 altered amino acid metabolism with specific patterns. We identified isoleucine, α-aminoadipic acid and GABA (γ-aminoisobutyric acid) as biomarkers related. Our findings establish the impact of Oct1, KLF4 and c-Myc on cancer bioenergetics and evidence a link between oncosecretomics and cellular bioenergetics profile. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Chemical Protein Modification through Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Smita B; Madder, Annemieke

    2016-04-01

    The modification of proteins with non-protein entities is important for a wealth of applications, and methods for chemically modifying proteins attract considerable attention. Generally, modification is desired at a single site to maintain homogeneity and to minimise loss of function. Though protein modification can be achieved by targeting some natural amino acid side chains, this often leads to ill-defined and randomly modified proteins. Amongst the natural amino acids, cysteine combines advantageous properties contributing to its suitability for site-selective modification, including a unique nucleophilicity, and a low natural abundance--both allowing chemo- and regioselectivity. Native cysteine residues can be targeted, or Cys can be introduced at a desired site in a protein by means of reliable genetic engineering techniques. This review on chemical protein modification through cysteine should appeal to those interested in modifying proteins for a range of applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Robust method for investigating nitrogen metabolism of 15N labeled amino acids using AccQ•Tag ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry: application to a parasitic plant-plant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Zachary; Cerveau, Delphine; Marnet, Nathalie; Bouchereau, Alain; Delavault, Philippe; Simier, Philippe; Pouvreau, Jean-Bernard

    2014-01-21

    An AccQ•Tag ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (AccQ•Tag-UPLC-PDA-ESI-MS) method is presented here for the fast, robust, and sensitive quantification of (15)N isotopologue enrichment of amino acids in biological samples, as for example in the special biotic interaction between the cultivated specie Brassica napus (rapeseed) and the parasitic weed Phelipanche ramosa (broomrape). This method was developed and validated using amino acid standard solutions containing (15)N amino acid isotopologues and/or biological unlabeled extracts. Apparatus optimization, limits of detection and quantification, quantification reproducibility, and calculation method of (15)N isotopologue enrichment are presented. Using this method, we could demonstrate that young parasite tubercles assimilate inorganic nitrogen as (15)N-ammonium when supplied directly through batch incubation but not when supplied by translocation from host root phloem, contrary to (15)N2-glutamine. (15)N2-glutamine mobility from host roots to parasite tubercles followed by its low metabolism in tubercles suggests that the host-derived glutamine acts as an important nitrogen containing storage compound in the young tubercle of Phelipanche ramosa.

  6. Co-ordinated research programme on application of stable isotope tracer methods to studies of amino acid, protein, and energy metabolism in malnourished populations of developing countries. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The use of isotopes has revolutionized the field of human nutrition research, but has been of greatest benefit to industrialized countries. The International Atomic Energy Agency is sponsoring programmes using isotopic and related technologies in human nutrition research to address issues that are of priority to developing countries. Scientists participating in the Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Amino Acid and Protein Metabolism in Malnourished Populations of Developing Countries'' are conducting research on the interaction between infection and amino acid metabolism, particularly the potential diversion of substrates from anabolic pathways to fight infection in marginally nourished children during periods of infections. This topic is of great importance to the nutritional status of children in developing countries, who frequently or chronically have infections and who, as a consequence, may have alterations in nutrient requirements. The CRP has developed and implemented a standardized protocol for measuring leucine oxidation during infection in 8 different countries. The CRP is expected to contribute important new knowledge about interactions between protein utilization, the stresses of unhygienic environments, and infections in marginally nourished people. This information is expected to be applicable to efforts to increase efficient utilization of limited food resources in developing countries. Another highlight of the CRP is that it represents an international team of nutrition scientists who together are building nutritional biology research capabilities in developing countries. Refs, figs, tabs

  7. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of riboflavin

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Zhenquan; Xu, Zhibo; Li, Yifan; Wang, Zhiwen; Chen, Tao; Zhao, Xueming

    2014-01-01

    Background Riboflavin (vitamin B2), the precursor of the flavin cofactors flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), is used commercially as an animal feed supplement and food colorant. E. coli is a robust host for various genetic manipulations and has been employed for efficient production of biofuels, polymers, amino acids, and bulk chemicals. Thus, the aim of this study was to understand the metabolic capacity of E. coli for the riboflavin production by modification...

  8. Dynamics of the amino acid and protein metabolism of laying hens after the application of 15N-labelled wheat protein. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhn, K.; Zander, R.

    1989-01-01

    Over a period of 4 days 12 colostomized laying hens daily received 36 g 15 N-labelled wheat with 15 N excess ( 15 N') of 14.37 atom-% together with a conventional feed mixture for laying hens. The labelling of the lysine N in the wheat was 13.58 atom-%, that of histidine N 14.38 and that of arginine 15 N' 13.63 atom-% 15 N'. Three hens each were butchered 12, 36, 60 and 108 h after the last 15 N' feeding. The first three hens did not receive any feed before being butchered. The following three hens each received the unlabelled feed ration for another 1, 2 or 4 days, resp., after the main period until they were butchered. The total of skeleton muscles, heart and stomach muscle (without inner skin) of each hen were combined into one sample, cut thinly, drenched with fluid nitrogen and pulverized. N, 15 N' and the basic and non-basic amino acids as well as their 15 N' were determined in the individual samples. In contrast to the organs, the proteins in the muscle tissue have a long half-life so that a slight decrease of atom-% 15 N' in the muscles could only be detected after 108 h. The 14 N and 15 N' quota of the non-basic amino acids in the total nitrogen of the muscles is 50 %. The 14 N quota of the basic amino acids is 30% and the 15 N' quota only 22.5% in the total muscle N. The heavy nitrogen of the free lysine in the TCA soluble N fraction is hardly detectable 36 h and 60 h after the last 15 N' supply and not at all after 108 h. In contrast to this, the other two free basic amino acids remain significantly higher labelled in dependence on the last butchering time. (author)

  9. Effect of amino acid supplementation on titer and glycosylation distribution in hybridoma cell cultures-Systems biology-based interpretation using genome-scale metabolic flux balance model and multivariate data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimonn, Thomas M; Park, Seo-Young; Agarabi, Cyrus D; Brorson, Kurt A; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2016-09-01

    Genome-scale flux balance analysis (FBA) is a powerful systems biology tool to characterize intracellular reaction fluxes during cell cultures. FBA estimates intracellular reaction rates by optimizing an objective function, subject to the constraints of a metabolic model and media uptake/excretion rates. A dynamic extension to FBA, dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA), can calculate intracellular reaction fluxes as they change during cell cultures. In a previous study by Read et al. (2013), a series of informed amino acid supplementation experiments were performed on twelve parallel murine hybridoma cell cultures, and this data was leveraged for further analysis (Read et al., Biotechnol Prog. 2013;29:745-753). In order to understand the effects of media changes on the model murine hybridoma cell line, a systems biology approach is applied in the current study. Dynamic flux balance analysis was performed using a genome-scale mouse metabolic model, and multivariate data analysis was used for interpretation. The calculated reaction fluxes were examined using partial least squares and partial least squares discriminant analysis. The results indicate media supplementation increases product yield because it raises nutrient levels extending the growth phase, and the increased cell density allows for greater culture performance. At the same time, the directed supplementation does not change the overall metabolism of the cells. This supports the conclusion that product quality, as measured by glycoform assays, remains unchanged because the metabolism remains in a similar state. Additionally, the DFBA shows that metabolic state varies more at the beginning of the culture but less by the middle of the growth phase, possibly due to stress on the cells during inoculation. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1163-1173, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  10. Yearly growth and metabolic changes in earthen pond-cultured meagre Argyrosomus regius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vargas-Chacoff

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic modifications associated with natural environmental conditions were assessed in the meagre Argyrosomus regius cultured in earthen ponds under natural photoperiod and temperature. Juvenile specimens (90-100 g initial weight were sampled (plasma, liver and muscle every two months for 18 months (between December 2004 and May 2006. Specimens showed seasonal variations in growth rate, with the highest values in spring and summer. Plasmatic, hepatic and muscular metabolite levels and hepatic and muscular metabolic enzymes also showed significant variations throughout the year. Enzymatic activity related to carbohydrate metabolism in the liver (HK, FBPase and G6PDH showed great modifications in summer, increasing glycogenogenic pathways, while amino acid metabolism (GDH and GOT activity was enhanced in spring and summer. However lipid-related (G3PDH activity metabolic enzymes did not show a clear seasonal pattern. In muscle, enzymatic activity related to amino acid, lipid and lactate metabolism (LDH-O activity, but not carbohydrate metabolism, showed seasonal changes in parallel with changes in growth rate. Thus A. regius specimens showed a trend to grow in summer months and mobilize their energy reserves in winter. Differences in the hepatic level were observed between the first and the second year of the study, suggesting the possible existence of metabolic changes related to specimen age or size. Our results indicate that growth and metabolic responses in A. regius are environmentally dependent and that this species is a very good candidate for diversification in aquaculture.

  11. Amino acid regulation of autophagosome formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are not only substrates for various metabolic pathways, but can also serve as signaling molecules controlling signal transduction pathways. One of these signaling pathways is mTOR-dependent and is activated by amino acids (leucine in particular) in synergy with insulin. Activation of

  12. Metabolic risks of neonates at birth following in utero exposure to HIV-ART: the amino acid profile of cord blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moutloatse, Gontse P.; Schoeman, Johannes C.; Lindeque, Zander; van Reenen, Mari; Hankemeier, Thomas; Bunders, Madeleine J.; Reinecke, Carolus J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Untargeted metabolomics of cord blood indicated that antiretroviral therapy to HIV-infected mothers (HIV-ART) did not compromise the exposed neonates with regard to the stress of neonatal hypoglycaemia at birth. However, identified biomarkers reflected stress in their energy metabolism,

  13. Chemical modification of L-glutamine to alpha-amino glutarimide on autoclaving facilitates Agrobacterium infection of host and non-host plants: A new use of a known compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Pralay

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accidental autoclaving of L-glutamine was found to facilitate the Agrobacterium infection of a non host plant like tea in an earlier study. In the present communication, we elucidate the structural changes in L-glutamine due to autoclaving and also confirm the role of heat transformed L-glutamine in Agrobacterium mediated genetic transformation of host/non host plants. Results When autoclaved at 121°C and 15 psi for 20 or 40 min, L-glutamine was structurally modified into 5-oxo proline and 3-amino glutarimide (α-amino glutarimide, respectively. Of the two autoclaved products, only α-amino glutarimide facilitated Agrobacterium infection of a number of resistant to susceptible plants. However, the compound did not have any vir gene inducing property. Conclusions We report a one pot autoclave process for the synthesis of 5-oxo proline and α-amino glutarimide from L-glutamine. Xenobiotic detoxifying property of α-amino glutarimide is also proposed.

  14. Role of Isovaleryl-CoA Dehydrogenase and Short Branched-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase in the Metabolism of Valproic Acid: Implications for the Branched-Chain Amino Acid Oxidation Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luís, Paula B. M.; Ruiter, Jos P. N.; IJlst, Lodewijk; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Duran, Marinus; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Vockley, Jerry; Wanders, Ronald J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Many biological systems including the oxidative catabolic pathway for branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are affected in vivo by valproate therapy. In this study, we investigated the potential effect of valproic acid (VPA) and some of its metabolites on the metabolism of BCAAs. In vitro studies were performed using isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD), isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IBD), and short branched-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SBCAD), enzymes involved in the degradation pathway of leucine, valine, and isoleucine. The enzymatic activities of the three purified human enzymes were measured using optimized high-performance liquid chromatography procedures, and the respective kinetic parameters were determined in the absence and presence of VPA and the corresponding CoA and dephosphoCoA conjugates. Valproyl-CoA and valproyl-dephosphoCoA inhibited IVD activity significantly by a purely competitive mechanism with Ki values of 74 ± 4 and 170 ± 12 μM, respectively. IBD activity was not affected by any of the tested VPA esters. However, valproyl-CoA did inhibit SBCAD activity by a purely competitive mechanism with a Ki of 249 ± 29 μM. In addition, valproyl-dephosphoCoA inhibited SBCAD activity via a distinct mechanism (Ki = 511 ± 96 μM) that appeared to be of the mixed type. Furthermore, we show that both SBCAD and IVD are active, using valproyl-CoA as a substrate. The catalytic efficiency of SBCAD turned out to be much higher than that of IVD, demonstrating that SBCAD is the most probable candidate for the first dehydrogenation step of VPA β-oxidation. Our data explain some of the effects of valproate on the branched-chain amino acid metabolism and shed new light on the biotransformation pathway of valproate. PMID:21430231

  15. Dissecting metabolic puzzles through isotope feeding: a novel amino acid in the biosynthetic pathway of the cruciferous phytoalexins rapalexin A and isocyalexin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedras, M Soledade C; Yaya, Estifanos E

    2013-02-21

    Understanding defence pathways of plants is crucial to develop disease-resistant agronomic crops, an important element of sustainable agriculture. For this reason, natural plant defenses such as phytoalexins, involved in protecting plants against microbial pathogens, have enormous biotechnological appeal. Crucifers are economically important plants, with worldwide impact as oilseeds, vegetables of great dietetic value and even nutraceuticals. Notably, the intermediates involved in the biosynthetic pathways of unique cruciferous phytoalexins such as rapalexin A and isocyalexin A remain unknown. Toward this end, using numerous perdeuterated compounds, we have established the potential precursors of these unique phytoalexins and propose for the first time their detailed biosynthetic pathway. This pathway involves a variety of intermediates and a novel amino acid as the central piece of this complex puzzle. This work has set the stage for the discovery of enzymes and genes of the biosynthetic pathway of cruciferous phytoalexins of unique scaffolds.

  16. Design, synthesis and biological studies of a library of NK1-Receptor Ligands Based on a 5-arylthiosubstituted 2-amino-4,6-diaryl-3-cyano-4H-pyran core: Switch from antagonist to agonist effect by chemical modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio, Rocío; Vengut-Climent, Empar; Mouillac, Bernard; Orcel, Hélène; López-Lázaro, Miguel; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Khiar, Noureddine; Fernández, Inmaculada

    2017-09-29

    A library of 5-arylthiosubstituted 2-amino-4,6-diaryl-3-cyano-4H-pyrans has been synthesized as a new family of non-peptide NK1 receptor ligands by a one-pot cascade process. Their biological effects via interaction with the NK1 receptor were experimentally determined as percentage of inhibition (for antagonists) and percentage of activation (for agonists), compared to the substance P (SP) effect, in IPone assay. A set of these amino compounds was found to inhibit the action of SP, and therefore can be considered as a new family of SP-antagonists. Interestingly, the acylation of the 2-amino position causes a switch from antagonist to agonist activity. The 5-phenylsulfonyl-2-amino derivative 17 showed the highest antagonist activity, while the 5-p-tolylsulfenyl-2-trifluoroacetamide derivative 20R showed the highest agonist effect. As expected, in the case of the 5-sulfinylderivatives, there was an enantiomeric discrimination in favor of one of the two enantiomers, specifically those with (S S ,R C ) configuration. The anticancer activity studies assessed by using human A-549 lung cancer cells and MRC-5 non-malignant lung fibroblasts, revealed a statistically significant selective cytotoxic effect of some of these 2-amino-4H-pyran derivatives toward the lung cancer cells. These studies demonstrated that the newly synthesized 4H-pyran derivatives can be used as a starting point for the synthesis of novel SP-antagonists with higher anticancer activity in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. 2-Oxoglutarate: linking TCA cycle function with amino acid, glucosinolate, flavonoid, alkaloid, and gibberellin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Wagner L; Martins, Auxiliadora O; Fernie, Alisdair R; Tohge, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) is used as an obligatory substrate in a range of oxidative reactions catalyzed by 2-OG-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes are widespread in nature being involved in several important biochemical processes. We have recently demonstrated that tomato plants in which the TCA cycle enzyme 2-OG dehydrogenase (2-ODD) was antisense inhibited were characterized by early senescence and modified fruit ripening associated with differences in the levels of bioactive gibberellin (GA). Accordingly, there is now compelling evidence that the TCA cycle plays an important role in modulating the rate of flux from 2-OG to amino acid metabolism. Here we discuss recent advances in the biochemistry and molecular biology of 2-OG metabolism occurring in different biological systems indicating the importance of 2-OG and 2-OG dependent dioxygenases not only in glucosinolate, flavonoid and alkaloid metabolism but also in GA and amino acid metabolism. We additionally summarize recent findings regarding the impact of modification of 2-OG metabolism on biosynthetic pathways involving 2-ODDs.

  18. 2-Oxoglutarate: linking TCA cycle function with amino acid, glucosinolate, flavonoid, alkaloid and gibberellin biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner L. Araújo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle intermediate 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG is used as an obligatory substrate in a range of oxidative reactions catalyzed by 2-OG-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes are widespread in nature being involved in several important biochemical processes. We have recently demonstrated that tomato plants in which the TCA cycle enzyme 2-OG dehydrogenase (2-ODD was antisense inhibited were characterized by early senescence and modified fruit ripening associated with differences in the levels of bioactive gibberellin (GA. Accordingly, there is now compelling evidence that the TCA cycle plays an important role in modulating the rate of flux from 2-OG to amino acid metabolism. Here we discuss recent advances in the biochemistry and molecular biology of 2-OG metabolism occurring in different biological systems indicating the importance of 2-OG and 2-OG dependent dioxygenases not only in glucosinolate, flavonoid and alkaloid metabolism but also in GA and amino acid metabolism. We additionally summarize recent findings regarding the impact of modification of 2-OG metabolism on biosynthetic pathways involving 2-ODDs.

  19. An enhanced in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) model for quantification of drug metabolism enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, A Kenneth; Fallon, Padraic G; Sharp, Sheila; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Huang, Jeffrey T-J

    2015-03-01

    Many of the enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism are maintained at a low basal level and are only synthesized in response to activation of upstream sensor/effector proteins. This induction can have implications in a variety of contexts, particularly during the study of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interaction profile of a candidate therapeutic compound. Previously, we combined in vivo SILAC material with a targeted high resolution single ion monitoring (tHR/SIM) LC-MS/MS approach for quantification of 197 peptide pairs, representing 51 drug metabolism enzymes (DME), in mouse liver. However, as important enzymes (for example, cytochromes P450 (Cyp) of the 1a and 2b subfamilies) are maintained at low or undetectable levels in the liver of unstimulated metabolically labeled mice, quantification of these proteins was unreliable. In the present study, we induced DME expression in labeled mice through synchronous ligand-mediated activation of multiple upstream nuclear receptors, thereby enhancing signals for proteins including Cyps 1a, 2a, 2b, 2c, and 3a. With this enhancement, 115 unique, lysine-containing, Cyp-derived peptides were detected in the liver of a single animal, as opposed to 56 in a pooled sample from three uninduced animals. A total of 386 peptide pairs were quantified by tHR/SIM, representing 68 Phase I, 30 Phase II, and eight control proteins. This method was employed to quantify changes in DME expression in the hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase null (HRN) mouse. We observed compensatory induction of several enzymes, including Cyps 2b10, 2c29, 2c37, 2c54, 2c55, 2e1, 3a11, and 3a13, carboxylesterase (Ces) 2a, and glutathione S-transferases (Gst) m2 and m3, along with down-regulation of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (Hsd) 11b1 and 17b6. Using DME-enhanced in vivo SILAC material with tHR/SIM, therefore, permits the robust analysis of multiple DME of importance to xenobiotic metabolism, with improved utility for the study of

  20. Grr1p is required for transcriptional induction of amino acid permease genes and proper transcriptional regulation of genes in carbon metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Regenberg, Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    dependent on Grr1p. Comparison of the grr1 Delta strain with the reference strain in the absence of citrulline revealed that GRR1 disruption leads to increased transcription of numerous genes. These encode enzymes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the pentose-phosphate pathway and both glucose and starch...... metabolism. Promoter analysis showed that many of the genes with increased transcription display Mig1p- and/or Msn2p/Msn4p-binding sites. Increased expression of glucose-repressed genes in the grr1 strain may be explained by the reduced expression of the hexose transporter genes HXT1, HXT2, HXT3 and HXT4...

  1. The influence of straw meal on the crude protein and amino acid metabolism and the digestibility of crude nutrients in broiler breeding hens. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zander, R.; Gruhn, K.; Hennig, A.

    1987-01-01

    The metabolization of the straw N and the influence of the straw on N excretion in urine were studied in 2 experiments with colostomized broiler hens and with 15 N-labelled wheat straw as well as 15 N-labelled wheat. In experiment 1 the test animals divided up into 4 groups received 0 g, 20 g, 30 g and 40 g straw meal per animal and day in addition to 120 g mixed feed. The daily 15 N excess ( 15 N') intake from the straw was 18.4 mg, 27.5 mg and 36.7 mg. The amount of 15 N' daily consumed with the labelled wheat in experiment 2 was 119.7 mg. 40 g straw meal resulted in a significantly increased amount of urine (p 15 N' of the labelled wheat was not influenced by the straw meal supplement. The productive 15 N' of the straw increased from 3.8 mg/animal and day (20 g straw) to 13.4 mg/animal and day (40 g straw). In contrast to 15 N wheat, straw as a 15 N source resulted in a lower labelling of uric acid N in comparison with urine N. It can be assumed that the changed metabolization of the straw N is influenced by microbial processes in the intestines. (author)

  2. Dietary glutamine supplementation effects on amino acid metabolism, intestinal nutrient absorption capacity and antioxidant response of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, F; Castro, C; Rufino-Palomares, E; Ordóñez-Grande, B; Gallardo, M A; Oliva-Teles, A; Peres, H

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate dietary glutamine supplementation effects on gilthead sea bream performance, intestinal nutrient absorption capacity, hepatic and intestinal glutamine metabolism and oxidative status. For that purpose gilthead sea bream juveniles (mean weight 13.0g) were fed four isolipidic (18% lipid) and isonitrogenous (43% protein) diets supplemented with 0, 0.5, 1 and 2% glutamine for 6weeks. Fish performance, body composition and intestinal nutrient absorption capacity were not affected by dietary glutamine levels. Hepatic and intestinal glutaminase (GlNase), glutamine synthetase (GSase), alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities were also unaffected by dietary glutamine supplementation. In the intestine GlNase activity was higher and GSase/GlNase ratio was two-fold lower than in the liver, suggesting a higher use of glutamine for energy production by the intestine than by the liver. The liver showed higher catalase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, while the intestine presented higher glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities and oxidised glutathione content, which seems to reveal a higher glutathione dependency of the intestinal antioxidant response. Total and reduced glutathione contents in liver and intestine and superoxide dismutase activity in the intestine were enhanced by dietary glutamine, though lipid peroxidation values were not affected. Overall, differences between liver and intestine glutamine metabolism and antioxidant response were identified and the potential of dietary glutamine supplementation to gilthead sea bream's antioxidant response was elucidated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamics of the amino acid and protein metabolism of laying hens after the application of 15N-labelled wheat protein. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruhn, K.; Zander, R.; Kirchner, E.

    1987-01-01

    12 colostomized laying hens which received 15 N-labelled wheat over 4 days were butchered 12 h, 36 h, and 108 h (3 animals each) after the last 15 N application. The intake of 15 N exess ( 15 N') from the wheat amounted to 540 mg 15 N' during the application period. The 15 N' in the blood plasma decreased after the last 15 N' application from 0.76 atom-% to 0.55 atom-% after 108 h, the labelling of the corpuscular components at the same measuring points increased from 0.28 to 0.50 atom-% 15 N'. 96.6% of the plasma 15 N' and 93,8% of that in the corpuscles is precipitable in trichloroacetic acid. The atom-% 15 N' of histidine in the total blood remained unchanged in dependence on the butchering time. The 15 N amount in lysine and arginine and that in the non-basic amino acids decreased inconsiderably in the period between 12 h and 108 h after the last 15 N' wheat feeding. (author)

  4. Selective posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Meng-Lin; Tian, Feng; Schultz, Peter

    2013-02-05

    The invention relates to posttranslational modification of phage-displayed polypeptides. These displayed polypeptides comprise at least one unnatural amino acid, e.g., an aryl-azide amino acid such as p-azido-L-phenylalanine, or an alkynyl-amino acid such as para-propargyloxyphenylalanine, which are incorporated into the phage-displayed fusion polypeptide at a selected position by using an in vivo orthogonal translation system comprising a suitable orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and a suitable orthogonal tRNA species. These unnatural amino acids advantageously provide targets for posttranslational modifications such as azide-alkyne [3+2]cycloaddition reactions and Staudinger modifications.

  5. Early-onset and classical forms of type 2 diabetes show impaired expression of genes involved in muscle branched-chain amino acids metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Díaz-Ramos, Angels; Berdasco, María

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the pathophysiological traits of type 2 diabetes are incompletely understood. Here we have performed transcriptomic analysis in skeletal muscle, and plasma metabolomics from subjects with classical and early-onset forms of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Focused...... that the BCAA genes are relevant in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, and that mitochondrial BCAA management is impaired in skeletal muscle from T2D patients. In diabetic mice model we detected alterations in skeletal muscle proteins involved in BCAA metabolism but not in obese mice. Metabolomic analysis...... revealed increased levels of branched-chain keto acids (BCKA), and BCAA in plasma of T2D patients, which may result from the disruption of muscle BCAA management. Our data support the view that inhibition of genes involved in BCAA handling in skeletal muscle takes place as part of the pathophysiology...

  6. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in the developing rhesus monkey brain: subcellular studies of taurine, cysteinesulfinic acid decarboxylase, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, D K; Sturman, J A; Gaull, G E

    1981-09-01

    Taurine, cysteinesulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD), glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) were measured in subcellular fractions prepared from occipital lobe of fetal and neonatal rhesus monkeys. In addition, the distribution of [35S]taurine in subcellular fractions was determined after administration to the fetus via the mother, to the neonate via administration to the mother prior to birth, and directly to the neonate at various times after birth. CSAD, glutamate, GABA, and GAD all were found to be low or unmeasurable in early fetal life and to increase during late fetal and early neonatal life to reach values found in the mother. Taurine was present in large amounts in early fetal life and decreased slowly during neonatal life, arriving at amounts found in the mother not until after 150 days of age. Significant amounts of taurine, CSAD, GABA, and GAD were associated with nerve ending components with some indication that the proportion of brain taurine found in these organelles increases during development. All subcellular pools of taurine were rapidly labeled by exogenously administered [35S]taurine. The subcellular distribution of all the components measured was compatible with the neurotransmitter or putative neurotransmitter functions of glutamate, GABA, and taurine. The large amount of these three amino acids exceeds that required for such function. The excess of glutamate and GABA may be used as a source of energy. The function of the excess of taurine is still not clear, although circumstantial evidence favors an important role in the development and maturation of the CNS.

  7. Effects of oral carbohydrate with amino acid solution on the metabolic status of patients in the preoperative period: a randomized, prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Kakuta, Nami; Kadota, Takako; Oyama, Takuro; Kume, Katsuyoshi; Hamaguchi, Eisuke; Niki, Noriko; Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-10-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery is increasingly desired nowadays, and preoperative nutrient intake may be beneficial for this purpose. In this study, we investigated whether the intake of preoperative carbohydrate with amino acid (ONS) solution can improve starvation status and lipid catabolism before the induction of anesthesia. This randomized, prospective clinical trial included 24 patients who were divided into two groups before surgery under general anesthesia: a control group, comprising patients who fasted after their last meal the day before surgery (permitted to drink only water), and an ONS group, comprising patients who consumed ONS solution 2 h before surgery. Biochemical markers, the respiratory quotient, and psychosomatic scores were assessed at the initiation of anesthesia. Compared with the control group, the ONS group showed significantly lower serum free fatty acid levels [control group: 828 (729, 1004) µEq/L, ONS group: 479 (408, 610) µEq/L, P = 0.0002, median (25th, 75th percentile)] and total ketone bodies [control group: 119 (68, 440) µmol/L, ONS group: 40 [27, 64] µmol/L, P = 0.037]. In addition, analysis using the Visual Analog Scale showed higher preoperative scores for anxiety, hunger, and thirst for the control group, with no differences in any other measure of subjective well-being between groups. The results of this study suggest that preoperative ONS intake improves lipid catabolism and starvation status before the induction of anesthesia. Furthermore, it can provide better preoperative mental health compared with complete fasting.

  8. Antiviral, metabolic, and pharmacokinetic properties of the isomeric dideoxynucleoside 4(S)-(6-amino-9H-purin-9-yl)tetrahydro-2(S)-furanmethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, V; St Clair, M H; Reardon, J E; Krasny, H C; Hazen, R J; Paff, M T; Boone, L R; Tisdale, M; Najera, I; Dornsife, R E

    1995-01-01

    4(S)-(6-Amino-9H-purin-9-yl)tetrahydro-2(S)-furanmethanol (IsoddA) is the most antivirally active member of a novel class of optically active isomeric dideoxynucleosides in which the base has been transposed from the natural 1' position to the 2' position and the absolute configuration is (S,S). IsoddA was active against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (strain IIIB), HIV-2 (strain ZY), and HIV-1 clinical isolates. Combinations of the compound with zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine), 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, or 5-fluoro-2'-deoxy-3'-thiacytidine showed synergistic inhibition of HIV. A moderate reduction of activity was observed with clinical isolates resistant to zidovudine. An IsoddA-resistant virus (eightfold-increased 50% inhibitory concentration) was selected in vitro by repeated passage of HIV-1 (HXB2) in the presence of increasing concentrations of IsoddA. The reverse transcriptase-coding region of the mutant virus contained a single base change resulting in a change at codon 184 from Met to Val. IsoddA was also active against hepatitis B virus (HBV) in vitro; however, it lacked substantial selective activity in an in vivo HBV model. IsoddA was inefficiently phosphorylated in CEM cells; however, the half-life of the triphosphate was 9.4 h, and IsoddATP was a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, with a Ki of 16 nM. The cytotoxicity 50% inhibitory concentrations of IsoddA were greater than 100 microM for CEM, MOLT-4, IM9, and the HepG2-derived HBV-infected 2.2.15 (subclone P5A) cell lines but were 12 and 11 microM for human granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and erythroid (BFU-E) progenitor cells, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8540705

  9. Isolevuglandins and mitochondrial enzymes in the retina: mass spectrometry detection of post-translational modification of sterol-metabolizing CYP27A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvet, Casey; Liao, Wei-Li; Heo, Gun-Young; Laird, James; Salomon, Robert G; Turko, Illarion V; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2011-06-10

    We report the first peptide mapping and sequencing of an in vivo isolevuglandin-modified protein. Mitochondrial cytochrome P450 27A1 (CYP27A1) is a ubiquitous multifunctional sterol C27-hydroxylase that eliminates cholesterol and likely 7-ketocholesterol from the retina and many other tissues. We investigated the post-translational modification of this protein with isolevuglandins, arachidonate oxidation products. Treatment of purified recombinant CYP27A1 with authentic iso[4]levuglandin E(2) (iso[4]LGE(2)) in vitro diminished enzyme activity in a time- and phospholipid-dependent manner. A multiple reaction monitoring protocol was then developed to identify the sites and extent of iso[4]LGE(2) adduction. CYP27A1 exhibited only three Lys residues, Lys(134), Lys(358), and Lys(476), that readily interact with iso[4]LGE(2) in vitro. Such selective modification enabled the generation of an internal standard, (15)N-labeled CYP27A1 modified with iso[4]LGE(2), for the subsequent analysis of a human retinal sample. Two multiple reaction monitoring transitions arising from the peptide AVLK(358)(-C(20)H(26)O(3))ETLR in the retinal sample were observed that co-eluted with the corresponding two (15)N transitions from the supplemented standard. These data demonstrate that modified CYP27A1 is present in the retina. We suggest that such protein modification impairs sterol elimination and likely has other pathological sequelae. We also propose that the post-translational modifications identified in CYP27A1 exemplify a general mechanism whereby oxidative stress and inflammation deleteriously affect protein function, contributing, for example, to cholesterol-rich lesions associated with age-related macular degeneration and cardiovascular disease. The proteomic protocols developed in this study are generally applicable to characterization of lipid-derived oxidative protein modifications occurring in vivo, including proteins bound to membranes.

  10. A 13-week low glycemic load diet and lifestyle modification program combining low glycemic load protein shakes and targeted nutraceuticals improved weight loss and cardio-metabolic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlberg, Clinton J; Ou, Joseph J; Babish, John G; Lamb, Joseph J; Eliason, Sarah; Brabazon, Holly; Gao, Wei; Kaadige, Mohan R; Tripp, Matthew L

    2017-12-01

    An open-label, randomized, exploratory study of 44 healthy overweight subjects with cardio-metabolic syndrome (CMS) risk factors was conducted to assess the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of a proprietary lifestyle modification program without (DIET) and with (PROG) targeted nutraceutical supplementation, including phytosterols, antioxidants, probiotics, fish oil, berberine, and soy, pea, and whey proteins over 13 weeks. Key metrics were recorded at baseline and weeks 9 and 13. For the DIET and PROG groups, compliance was 85% and 86%, respectively, with no adverse events related to the diet or supplements. Twelve subjects discontinued participation before week 9 for reasons unrelated to the study. PROG subjects experienced greater decreases (p < 0.05) than DIET in body mass, fat mass, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, TG, cholesterol / HDL ratio, TG/HDL ratio, apolipoprotein B / apolipoprotein A1 ratio, and hs-CRP. The Framingham 10-year cardiovascular disease risk score decreased by 40% (p < 0.01) in the PROG arm versus no change for the DIET arm. As a pilot study, it was not possible to state whether the observed effects were the result of nutraceutical supplementation alone or the result of additive or synergistic interactions among diet, lifestyle modifications, and nutraceutical supplementation. Moreover, individuals with CMS risk factors following a lifestyle modification program received additional health benefits from targeted nutraceutical supplementation.

  11. Plasma amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  12. Change of the level of adiponectin and metabolic indices in modification of life style of the patients suffering from abdominal obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Beresina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied nutritional habits, physical loads, anthropometric and metabolic perfromances, and revealed the changes required to increase the level of adiponectine under drug-free modalities of treatment of patients suffering from abdominal obesity. A 3-year randomized lifestyle intervention trial was performed in 153 patients with AO, age 30-53 yrs, 74 patients (group 1 performed individual hypocaloric diet balanced in fat intake, 79 patients (group 2 performed diet and individual aerobic exercise All patients received individual recommendations on changing their life style. Dynamics of anthropometric, metabolic parameters, physical capacity and adiponectin level were measured. Relation between low level of adiponectin and some metabolic disorders, and sedentary life were revealed. The rate of improving anthropometric parameters, physical capacity, and nutritionassociated with increasing adiponectin was established.

  13. Differential utilization of blood meal amino acids in mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Miesfeld, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Guoli Zhou, Roger MiesfeldDepartment of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USAAbstract: Amino acids in the mosquito blood meal have two forms, protein-bound and plasma-free amino acids. To determine if the metabolic fate and flux of these two forms of blood meal amino acids are distinct, we fed mosquitoes eight [14C]-labeled amino acids, seven of which are essential for mosquitoes (leucine, valine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, lysine, arginine, histidine), and one th...

  14. On the recovery of the DNA-synthesis after X-irradiation in the spleen of mice and its modification by the NAD-metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.

    1974-01-01

    The incorporation of tritium-labelled thymidine into the DNA of mice spleen cells after whole body irradiation with X-rays was measured in order to study the decrease of DNA synthesis is decreased for several hours after irradiation with low doses. Recovery effects become operative after six hours. The radiation effect on the NAD metabolism, known to be related to DNA synthesis, was also investigated. The rate of NAD synthesis is influenced via the extremely radiosensitive metabolic process in the nucleus. Conversely, inhibition of DNA synthesis by injection of NAD enhances the recovery of DNA synthesis after irradiaton. (G.G.)

  15. 'Red Ruby': an interactive web-based intervention for lifestyle modification on metabolic syndrome: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiry, Leila; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Najafi, Mahdi; Mohammad, Kazem; Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Montazeri, Ali

    2014-07-24

    Although effectiveness of web-based interventions on lifestyle changes are recognized, the potential of such programs on metabolic syndrome has not been explored. We describe the protocol of a randomized controlled trial that aims to determine the feasibility, acceptability, usability, and effectiveness of interactive technology on lifestyle intervention in a population with metabolic syndrome. This is a two-arm randomized controlled trial. The study includes 160 participants (n = 80 per arm) who will be recruited via online registration on the study website. The inclusion criteria are that they should have metabolic syndrome and have access to the Internet. All participants will receive information on dietary intake and physical activity through the study website. The intervention group will receive additional resources via the study website including interactive Healthy Heart Profile and calorie restricted diet tailored to the participants. The primary outcomes are feasibility, acceptability, usability, and the change in metabolic syndrome components. The secondary outcomes are comparing quality of life, physical activity and food intake among the study arms. The participants will be followed up to 6 months with data collection scheduled at baseline, 3 and 6 months. There is a need for developing and evaluating web-based interventions that target people with high risk for cardiovascular diseases. This study will therefore make an important contribution to this novel field of research and practice. IRCT201111198132N1.

  16. Changes in bacterial metabolism as a response to dissolved organic matter modification during protozoan grazing in coastal Cantabrian and Mediterranean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baña, Zuriñe; Ayo, Begoña; Marrasé, Cèlia; Gasol, Josep M; Iriberri, Juan

    2014-02-01

    We explored how marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) altered by bacterial growth and protozoan grazing modify the metabolism of Southeastern Cantabrian Sea (CS) and NW Mediterranean Sea (MS) coastal bacterial communities. Major metabolic features were measured in treatments with half of the natural water replaced by water with different DOM quality, characterized by fluorescent DOM analysis and collected from key times of the predator-prey curve. In both ecosystems, protozoan-altered DOM led to similar increases in bacterial carbon demand (238% and 213%) and decreases in bacterial growth efficiency (BGE: 56% for the CS and 46% for the MS). These low BGEs were caused by similar bacterial production but much higher bacterial respiration rates, which in turn were positively related to aminopeptidase activity. However, in the CS bacterial community dominated by Bacteroidetes (41%), the enhanced hydrolytic activity was produced at a lower metabolic cost than in the MS, dominated by SAR11 (47%), which suggests a better adaptation of Bacteroidetes to the DOM altered during protozoan grazing. These results highlight protozoan grazing as a relevant factor influencing BGE in coastal ecosystems, and relate bacterial community composition to the major metabolic processes that result after a change in the quality of marine DOM. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Roles of Vascular and Metabolic Components in Cognitive Dysfunction of Alzheimer disease: Short- and Long-term Modification by Non-genetic Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki eSato

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that a specific set of genetic and non-genetic risk factors contributes to the onset of Alzheimer disease (AD. Non-genetic risk factors include diabetes, hypertension in mid-life, and probably dyslipidemia in mid-life. This review focuses on the vascular and metabolic components of non-genetic risk factors. The mechanisms whereby non-genetic risk factors modify cognitive dysfunction are divided into four components, short- and long-term effects of vascular and metabolic factors. These consist of 1 compromised vascular reactivity, 2 vascular lesions, 3 hypo/hyperglycemia, and 4 exacerbated AD histopathological features, respectively. Vascular factors compromise cerebrovascular reactivity in response to neuronal activity and also cause irreversible vascular lesions. On the other hand, representative short-term effects of metabolic factors on cognitive dysfunction occur due to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Non-genetic risk factors also modify the pathological manifestations of AD in the long-term. Therefore, vascular and metabolic factors contribute to aggravation of cognitive dysfunction in AD through short-term and long-term effects. Beta-amyloid could be involved in both vascular and metabolic components. It might be beneficial to support treatment in AD patients by appropriate therapeutic management of non-genetic risk factors, considering the contributions of these four elements to the manifestation of cognitive dysfunction in individual patients, though all components are not always present. It should be clarified how these four components interact with each other. To answer this question, a clinical prospective study that follows up clinical features with respect to these four components: 1 functional MRI or SPECT for cerebrovascular reactivity, 2 MRI for ischemic lesions and atrophy, 3 clinical episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, 4 amyloid-PET and tau-PET for pathological features of AD, would be required.

  18. Transgenic manipulation of a single polyamine in poplar cells affects the accumulation of all amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridev Mohapatra; Rakesh Minocha; Stephanie Long; Subhash C. Minocha

    2010-01-01

    The polyamine metabolic pathway is intricately connected to metabolism of several amino acids. While ornithine and arginine are direct precursors of putrescine, they themselves are synthesized from glutamate in multiple steps involving several enzymes. Additionally, glutamate is an amino group donor for several other amino acids and acts as a substrate for biosynthesis...

  19. Modification of the liver fatty acids by Hibiscus sabdariffa Linnaeus (Malvaceae) infusion, its possible effect on vascular reactivity in a metabolic syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Torres, Israel; Zúñiga Muñoz, Alejandra; Beltrán-Rodríguez, Ulises; Díaz-Díaz, Eulises; Martínez-Memije, Raúl; Guarner Lans, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa Linnaeus (HSL)-fed infusion on the fatty acid (FA) profile in liver of metabolic syndrome (MS) rats and its possible effect on vascular reactivity. Body mass, intra-abdominal fat, triglycerides, insulin, blood pressure, saturated, monounsaturated FA, NEFAs, Δ(9)-, Δ(6)-desaturases and vasoconstriction were increased, while vasorelaxation, polyunsaturated FA, endothelial nitric oxide and [Formula: see text]/[Formula: see text] ratio decreased in MS versus Control, but HSL infusion modified it and increased Δ(5)-desaturase. The results suggest that the alteration in FA liver metabolism in the MS contributes to impaired vascular reactivity, but treatment with of HSL infusion can improve this condition.

  20. Amino acids attached to 2'-amino-LNA: Synthesis of DNA mixmer oligonucleotides with increased duplex stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Marie Willaing; Wengel, Jesper; Wamberg, Michael Chr.

    2010-01-01

    -LNA nucleosides derivatized with amino acids have been synthesized and incorporated into DNA oligonucleotides. Following oligonucleotide synthesis, peptides have been added using solid phase peptide coupling chem. Modification of oligonucleotides with pos. charged residues greatly improves thermal stability....

  1. Toward Sustainable Amino Acid Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Yoshihiro; Hara, Yoshihiko; Kojima, Hiroyuki

    Because the global amino acid production industry has been growing steadily and is expected to grow even more in the future, efficient production by fermentation is of great importance from economic and sustainability viewpoints. Many systems biology technologies, such as genome breeding, omics analysis, metabolic flux analysis, and metabolic simulation, have been employed for the improvement of amino acid-producing strains of bacteria. Synthetic biological approaches have recently been applied to strain development. It is also important to use sustainable carbon sources, such as glycerol or pyrolytic sugars from cellulosic biomass, instead of conventional carbon sources, such as glucose or sucrose, which can be used as food. Furthermore, reduction of sub-raw substrates has been shown to lead to reduction of environmental burdens and cost. Recently, a new fermentation system for glutamate production under acidic pH was developed to decrease the amount of one sub-raw material, ammonium, for maintenance of culture pH. At the same time, the utilization of fermentation coproducts, such as cells, ammonium sulfate, and fermentation broth, is a useful approach to decrease waste. In this chapter, further perspectives for future amino acid fermentation from one-carbon compounds are described.

  2. Impact of dietary modification of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on the hormonal and metabolic profile of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantalaki, Evangelia; Piperi, Christina; Livadas, Sarantis; Kollias, Anastasios; Adamopoulos, Christos; Koulouri, Aikaterini; Christakou, Charikleia; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the impact of dietary intervention on Advanced Glycation End products (AGEs) intake on the hormonal and metabolic profile in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). After baseline evaluation, 23 women with PCOS [mean ± SD, age: 23.4 ± 5.7 years; body mass index (BMI): 26 ± 5.7 kg/m2] underwent the following consecutive 2-month dietary regimens: a hypocaloric diet with ad-libitum AGEs content (Hypo), an isocaloric diet with high AGEs (HA) and an isocaloric diet with low AGEs (LA). Metabolic, hormonal and oxidative stress status was assessed and AGEs levels were determined in all subjects after the completion of each dietary intervention. Serum levels of AGEs, testosterone, oxidative stress, insulin and HOMA-IR index were significantly increased on the HA compared to the Hypo diet and subsequently decreased on the LA diet (compared to HA) (pPCOS. These novel findings support recommendations for a low AGEs dietary content along with lifestyle changes in women with PCOS.

  3. Toward a feline-optimized culture medium: impact of ions, carbohydrates, essential amino acids, vitamins, and serum on development and metabolism of in vitro fertilization-derived feline embryos relative to embryos grown in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Jason R; Bond, Jennifer B; Magarey, Genevieve M; Bateman, Helen L; Krisher, Rebecca L; Dunford, Susan A; Swanson, William F

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this study was to define the physiologic needs of domestic cat embryos to facilitate development of a feline-specific culture medium. In a series of factorial experiments, in vivo-matured oocytes (n = 2040) from gonadotropin-treated domestic cats were inseminated in vitro to generate embryos (n = 1464) for culture. In the initial study, concentrations of NaCl (100.0 vs. 120.0 mM), KCl (4.0 vs. 8.0 mM), KH(2)PO(4) (0.25 vs. 1.0 mM), and the ratio of CaCl(2) to MgSO(4)-7H(2)O (1.0:2.0 mM vs. 2.0:1.0 mM) in the medium were evaluated during Days 1-6 (Day 0: oocyte recovery and in vitro fertilization [IVF]) of culture. Subsequent experiments assessed the effects of varying concentrations of carbohydrate (glucose, 1.5, 3.0, or 6.0 mM; l-lactate, 3.0, 6.0, or 12.0 mM; and pyruvate, 0.1 or 1.0 mM) and essential amino acids (EAAs; 0, 0.5, or 1.0x) in the medium during Days 1-3 and Days 3-6 of culture. Inclusion of vitamins (0 vs. 1.0x) and fetal calf serum (FCS; 0 vs. 5% [v/v]) in the medium also was evaluated during Days 3-6. Development and metabolism of IVF embryos on Day 3 or Day 6 were compared to age-matched in vivo embryos recovered from naturally mated queens. A feline-optimized culture medium (FOCM) was formulated based on these results (100.0 mM NaCl, 8.0 mM KCl, 1.0 mM KH(2)PO(4), 2.0 mM CaCl(2), 1.0 mM MgSO(4), 1.5 mM glucose, 6.0 mM L-lactate, 0.1 mM pyruvate, and 0x EAAs with 25.0 mM NaHCO(3), 1.0 mM alanyl-glutamine, 0.1 mM taurine, and 1.0x nonessential amino acids) with 0.4% (w/v) BSA from Days 0-3 and 5% FCS from Days 3-6. Using this medium, ~70% of cleaved embryos developed into blastocysts with profiles of carbohydrate metabolism similar to in vivo embryos. Our results suggest that feline embryos have stage-specific responses to carbohydrates and are sensitive to EAAs but are still reliant on one or more unidentified components of FCS for optimal blastocyst development.

  4. In-frame amber stop codon replacement mutagenesis for the directed evolution of proteins containing non-canonical amino acids: identification of residues open to bio-orthogonal modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpino, James A J; Baldwin, Amy J; McGarrity, Adam R; Tippmann, Eric M; Jones, D Dafydd

    2015-01-01

    Expanded genetic code approaches are a powerful means to add new and useful chemistry to proteins at defined residues positions. One such use is the introduction of non-biological reactive chemical handles for site-specific biocompatible orthogonal conjugation of proteins. Due to our currently limited information on the impact of non-canonical amino acids (nAAs) on the protein structure-function relationship, rational protein engineering is a "hit and miss" approach to selecting suitable sites. Furthermore, dogma suggests surface exposed native residues should be the primary focus for introducing new conjugation chemistry. Here we describe a directed evolution approach to introduce and select for in-frame codon replacement to facilitate engineering proteins with nAAs. To demonstrate the approach, the commonly reprogrammed amber stop codon (TAG) was randomly introduced in-frame in two different proteins: the bionanotechnologically important cyt b(562) and therapeutic protein KGF. The target protein is linked at the gene level to sfGFP via a TEV protease site. In absence of a nAA, an in-frame TAG will terminate translation resulting in a non-fluorescent cell phenotype. In the presence of a nAA, TAG will encode for nAA incorporation so instilling a green fluorescence phenotype on E. coli. The presence of endogenously expressed TEV proteases separates in vivo target protein from its fusion to sfGFP if expressed as a soluble fusion product. Using this approach, we incorporated an azide reactive handle and identified residue positions amenable to conjugation with a fluorescence dye via strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). Interestingly, best positions for efficient conjugation via SPAAC were residues whose native side chain were buried through analysis of their determined 3D structures and thus may not have been chosen through rational protein engineering. Molecular modeling suggests these buried native residues could become partially exposed on

  5. In-frame amber stop codon replacement mutagenesis for the directed evolution of proteins containing non-canonical amino acids: identification of residues open to bio-orthogonal modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A J Arpino

    Full Text Available Expanded genetic code approaches are a powerful means to add new and useful chemistry to proteins at defined residues positions. One such use is the introduction of non-biological reactive chemical handles for site-specific biocompatible orthogonal conjugation of proteins. Due to our currently limited information on the impact of non-canonical amino acids (nAAs on the protein structure-function relationship, rational protein engineering is a "hit and miss" approach to selecting suitable sites. Furthermore, dogma suggests surface exposed native residues should be the primary focus for introducing new conjugation chemistry. Here we describe a directed evolution approach to introduce and select for in-frame codon replacement to facilitate engineering proteins with nAAs. To demonstrate the approach, the commonly reprogrammed amber stop codon (TAG was randomly introduced in-frame in two different proteins: the bionanotechnologically important cyt b(562 and therapeutic protein KGF. The target protein is linked at the gene level to sfGFP via a TEV protease site. In absence of a nAA, an in-frame TAG will terminate translation resulting in a non-fluorescent cell phenotype. In the presence of a nAA, TAG will encode for nAA incorporation so instilling a green fluorescence phenotype on E. coli. The presence of endogenously expressed TEV proteases separates in vivo target protein from its fusion to sfGFP if expressed as a soluble fusion product. Using this approach, we incorporated an azide reactive handle and identified residue positions amenable to conjugation with a fluorescence dye via strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC. Interestingly, best positions for efficient conjugation via SPAAC were residues whose native side chain were buried through analysis of their determined 3D structures and thus may not have been chosen through rational protein engineering. Molecular modeling suggests these buried native residues could become partially

  6. High-performance magnetic poly (arylene ether nitrile) nanocomposites: Co-modification of Fe3O4 via mussel inspired poly(dopamine) and amino functionalized silane KH550

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xinyi; Zhan, Yingqing; Long, Zhihang; Zeng, Guangyong; Ren, Yang; He, Yi

    2017-12-01

    To develop high-performance magnetic polymer composites, we reported a facial mussel-inspired way to functionalize Fe3O4 microspheres with dopamine (DA) and KH550, followed by compounding with poly (arylene ether nitrile) (PEN), to prepare functional nanocomposite films. Such mussel inspired co-modification of Fe3O4 was characterized and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Therefore, the outstanding properties of the functionalize Fe3O4/polymer composites were obtained. With the addition of 15 wt% functionalized Fe3O4, the saturation magnetization (Ms) and dielectric permittivity of the PEN composites were increased to 12.49 emu/g and 14.3 (250 Hz), respectively, while the low dielectric loss was maintained. In addition, even the high loading content of Fe3O4 was incorporated, the functional PEN composites still exhibited high mechanical properties and thermal stability, including the significant improvement in glass transition temperature, and the same level of the tensile strength compared with neat PEN. Our work revealed that magnetic and dielectric PEN composites materials along with high comprehensive properties may be potentially used in the electromagnetic fields.

  7. Intestinal amino acid metabolism in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.; Stoll, Barbara; Burrin, Douglas G.; Wattimena, Darcos; Schierbeek, Henk; Schaart, Maaike W.; Riedijk, Maaike A.; van der Lugt, Jasper

    2006-01-01

    The portal-drained viscera (stomach, intestine, pancreas and spleen) have a much higher rate of both energy expenditure and protein synthesis than can be estimated on the basis of their weight. A high utilization rate of dietary nutrients by the portal-drained viscera might result in a low systemic

  8. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  9. Functional Modification of Thioether Groups in Peptides, Polypeptides, and Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Timothy J

    2017-03-15

    Recent developments in the modification of methionine and other thioether-containing residues in peptides, polypeptides, and proteins are reviewed. Properties and potential applications of the resulting functionalized products are also discussed. While much of this work is focused on natural Met residues, modifications at other side-chain residues have also emerged as new thioether-containing amino acids have been incorporated into peptidic materials. Functional modification of thioether-containing amino acids has many advantages and is a complementary methodology to the widely utilized methods for modification at cysteine residues.

  10. Side Chain Cyclized Aromatic Amino Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van der Poorten, Olivier; Knuhtsen, Astrid; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Constraining the conformation of flexible peptides is a proven strategy to increase potency, selectivity, and metabolic stability. The focus has mostly been on constraining the backbone dihedral angles; however, the correct orientation of the amino acid side chains (χ-space) that constitute the p...

  11. Developmental stage- and concentration-specific sodium nitroprusside application results in nitrate reductase regulation and the modification of nitrate metabolism in leaves of Medicago truncatula plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Chrystalla; Filippou, Panagiota; Mylona, Photini; Fasoula, Dionysia; Ioannides, Ioannis; Polidoros, Alexios; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2013-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a bioactive molecule involved in numerous biological events that has been reported to display both pro-oxidant and antioxidant properties in plants. Several reports exist which demonstrate the protective action of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a widely used NO donor, which acts as a signal molecule in plants responsible for the expression regulation of many antioxidant enzymes. This study attempts to provide a novel insight into the effect of application of low (100 μΜ) and high (2.5 mM) concentrations of SNP on the nitrosative status and nitrate metabolism of mature (40 d) and senescing (65 d) Medicago truncatula plants. Higher concentrations of SNP resulted in increased NO content, cellular damage levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, further induced in older tissues. Senescing M. truncatula plants demonstrated greater sensitivity to SNP-induced oxidative and nitrosative damage, suggesting a developmental stage-dependent suppression in the plant's capacity to cope with free oxygen and nitrogen radicals. In addition, measurements of the activity of nitrate reductase (NR), a key enzyme involved in the generation of NO in plants, indicated a differential regulation in a dose and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression levels of NO-responsive genes (NR, nitrate/nitrite transporters) involved in nitrogen assimilation and NO production revealed significant induction of NR and nitrate transporter during long-term 2.5 mM SNP application in mature plants and overall gene suppression in senescing plants, supporting the differential nitrosative response of M. truncatula plants treated with different concentrations of SNP.

  12. Ileal recovery of endogenous amino acids in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caine, W.

    1997-01-01

    Ileal recovery of endogenous amino acids is important for determining balanced homeostasis of protein metabolism in pigs and the true digestibility of dietary protein. In this context, the ileal recoveries of endogenous amino acids were determined in growing pigs fed guanidinated Nutrisoy protein

  13. Amino acid fermentation at the origin of the genetic code

    OpenAIRE

    de Vladar, Harold P

    2012-01-01

    Abstract There is evidence that the genetic code was established prior to the existence of proteins, when metabolism was powered by ribozymes. Also, early proto-organisms had to rely on simple anaerobic bioenergetic processes. In this work I propose that amino acid fermentation powered metabolism in the RNA world, and that this was facilitated by proto-adapters, the precursors of the tRNAs. Amino acids were used as carbon sources rather than as catalytic or structural elements. In modern bact...

  14. Culture environment regulates amino acid turnover and glucose utilisation in human ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathjen, Joy; Yeo, Christine; Yap, Charlotte; Tan, Boon Siang Nicholas; Rathjen, Peter D; Gardner, David K

    2014-06-01

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cells have been proposed as a renewable source of pluripotent cells that can be differentiated into various cell types for use in research, drug discovery and in the emerging area of regenerative medicine. Exploitation of this potential will require the development of ES cell culture conditions that promote pluripotency and a normal cell metabolism, and quality control parameters that measure these outcomes. There is, however, relatively little known about the metabolism of pluripotent cells or the impact of culture environment and differentiation on their metabolic pathways. The effect of two commonly used medium supplements and cell differentiation on metabolic indicators in human ES cells were examined. Medium modifications and differentiation were compared in a chemically defined and feeder-independent culture system. Adding serum increased glucose utilisation and altered amino acid turnover by the cells, as well as inducing a small proportion of the cells to differentiate. Cell differentiation could be mitigated by inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK activity). The addition of Knockout Serum Replacer also increased glucose uptake and changed amino acid turnover by the cells. These changes were distinct from those induced by serum and occurred in the absence of detectable differentiation. Induction of differentiation by bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), in contrast, did not alter metabolite turnover. Deviations from metabolite turnover by ES cells in fully defined medium demonstrated that culture environment can alter metabolite use. The challenge remains to understand the impact of metabolic changes on long-term cell maintenance and the functionality of derived cell populations.

  15. Experiment K-6-21. Effect of microgravity on 1) metabolic enzymes of type 1 and type 2 muscle fibers and on 2) metabolic enzymes, neutransmitter amino acids, and neurotransmitter associated enzymes in motor and somatosensory cerebral cortex. Part 1: Metabolic enzymes of individual muscle fibers; part 2: metabolic enzymes of hippocampus and spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, O.; Mcdougal, D., Jr.; Nemeth, Patti M.; Maggie, M.-Y. Chi; Pusateri, M.; Carter, J.; Manchester, J.; Norris, Beverly; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    The individual fibers of any individual muscle vary greatly in enzyme composition, a fact which is obscured when enzyme levels of a whole muscle are measured. The purpose of this study was therefore to assess the changes due to weightless on the enzyme patterns composed by the individual fibers within the flight muscles. In spite of the limitation in numbers of muscles examined, it is apparent that: (1) that the size of individual fibers (i.e., their dry weight) was reduced about a third, (2) that this loss in dry mass was accompanied by changes in the eight enzymes studied, and (3) that these changes were different for the two muscles, and different for the two enzyme groups. In the soleus muscle the absolute amounts of the three enzymes of oxidative metabolism decreased about in proportion to the dry weight loss, so that their concentration in the atrophic fibers was almost unchanged. In contrast, there was little loss among the four enzymes of glycogenolysis - glycolysis so that their concentrations were substantially increased in the atrophic fibers. In the TA muscle, these seven enzymes were affected in just the opposite direction. There appeared to be no absolute loss among the oxidative enzymes, whereas the glycogenolytic enzymes were reduced by nearly half, so that the concentrations of the first metabolic group were increased within the atrophic fibers and the concentrations of the second group were only marginally decreased. The behavior of hexokinase was exceptional in that it did not decrease in absolute terms in either type of muscle and probably increased as much as 50 percent in soleus. Thus, their was a large increase in concentration of this enzyme in the atrophied fibers of both muscles. Another clear-cut finding was the large increase in the range of activities of the glycolytic enzymes among individual fibers of TA muscles. This was due to the emergence of TA fibers with activities for enzymes of this group extending down to levels as low as

  16. Effects of controlled school-based multi-component model of nutrition and lifestyle interventions on behavior modification, anthropometry and metabolic risk profile of urban Asian Indian adolescents in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, N; Misra, A; Shah, P; Gulati, S

    2010-04-01

    To study the effectiveness of a multi-component intervention model of nutrition and lifestyle education on behavior modification, anthropometry and metabolic risk profile of urban Asian-Indian adolescents in North India. Two schools matched for student strength and middle socioeconomic strata were randomly allocated to intervention and control group. Changes in nutrition-related knowledge, attitude, lifestyle practices, food frequency and body image of eleventh-grade students (15-17 years) in both schools were tested using a validated questionnaire. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements were made using standard methods. Segmental body composition analysis was carried out using an 8-electrode multifrequency bioelectrical impedance method of body fat estimation. At 6 months follow-up, significant improvement in several domains of knowledge was observed in intervention children (n=99; males=60; females=39) as compared with control school children (n=102; males=61; females=41). In the intervention group, significantly lower proportion of children consumed aerated drinks (15.1%; Peating habits and lifestyle practices, and resulted in beneficial changes in anthropometric and biochemical profiles of the Asian Indian adolescents. This model should be applied on countrywide basis to prevent obesity and diabetes.

  17. Amino acid analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  18. Novel method for chemical modification and patterning of the SU-8 photoresist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blagoi, Gabriela; Keller, Stephan Urs; Boisen, Anja

    2007-01-01

    the wetting behaviour of SU-8. The resolution limit of the AQ photopatterning method was 20 μm when using an uncollimated light source. AQ modification followed by a reaction with amino groups of Alexa-647 cadaverine and a Biotin-amino derivative proved possible modification and patterning of polymeric...

  19. Amino Acid Prodrugs: An Approach to Improve the Absorption of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor, Lopinavir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitesh Patel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Poor systemic concentrations of lopinavir (LPV following oral administration occur due to high cellular efflux by P-glycoprotein (P-gp and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs and extensive metabolism by CYP3A4 enzymes. In this study, amino acid prodrugs of LPV were designed and investigated for their potential to circumvent efflux processes and first pass effects. Three amino acid prodrugs were synthesized by conjugating isoleucine, tryptophan and methionine to LPV. Prodrug formation was confirmed by the LCMS/MS and NMR technique. Interaction of LPV prodrugs with efflux proteins were carried out in P-gp (MDCK-MDR1 and MRP2 (MDCK-MRP2 transfected cells. Aqueous solubility studies demonstrated that prodrugs generate higher solubility relative to LPV. Prodrugs displayed higher stability under acidic conditions and degraded significantly with rise in pH. Uptake and transport data suggested that prodrugs carry significantly lower affinity towards P-gp and MRP2 relative to LPV. Moreover, prodrugs exhibited higher liver microsomal stability relative to LPV. Hence, amino acid prodrug modification might be a viable approach for enhancing LPV absorption across intestinal epithelial and brain endothelial cells which expresses high levels of P-gp and MRP2.

  20. Quantitative amino acid profiling and stable isotopically labeled amino acid tracer enrichment used for in vivo human systemic and tissue kinetics measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, Andreas; van Hall, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    An important area within clinical functional metabolomics is in vivo amino acid metabolism and protein turnover measurements for which accurate amino acid concentrations and stable isotopically labeled amino acid enrichments are mandatory not the least when tissue metabolomics is determined....../ion exchange, derivatized using a phenylisothiocyanate reagent and each amino acid was quantitated with its own stable isotopically labeled internal standard (uniformly labeled-(13)C/(15)N). The method was validated according to general recommendations for chromatographic analytical methods. The calibration...

  1. A highly enantioselective amino acid-catalyzed route to functionalized alpha-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova, Armando; Notz, Wolfgang; Zhong, Guofu; Betancort, Juan M; Barbas, Carlos F

    2002-03-06

    The development of syntheses providing enantiomerically pure alpha-amino acids has intrigued generations of chemists and been the subject of intense research. This report describes a general approach to functionalized alpha-amino acids based on catalytic asymmetric synthesis. Proline catalyzed Mannich-type reactions of N-PMP-protected alpha-imino ethyl glyoxylate with a variety of unmodified ketones to provide functionalized alpha-amino acids in high yields with excellent regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselectivities. Study of seven examples yielded six with product ee values of > or = 99%. In reactions involving ketone donors where diastereoisomeric products could be formed, two adjacent stereogenic centers were created simultaneously upon carbon-carbon bond formation with complete syn-stereocontrol. Significantly, this methodology utilizes readily available and rather inexpensive starting materials, does not require any preactivation of substrates or metal ion assistance, and can be carried out on a gram scale under operationally simple reaction conditions. The keto-functionality present in the products provides a particularly attractive site for versatile modifications. This study compliments and extends our bioorganic approach to asymmetric synthesis to a versatile synthon class. Given that we have shown that a variety of optically active amino acids can be synthesized with proline catalysis, where an L-amino acid begets other L-amino acids, our results may stimulate thoughts concerning prebiotic syntheses of optically active amino acids based on this route.

  2. Discovery and History of Amino Acid Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi

    There has been a strong demand in Japan and East Asia for L-glutamic acid as a seasoning since monosodium glutamate was found to present umami taste in 1907. The discovery of glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum in 1956 enabled abundant and low-cost production of the amino acid, creating a large market. The discovery also prompted researchers to develop fermentative production processes for other L-amino acids, such as lysine. Currently, the amino acid fermentation industry is so huge that more than 5 million metric tons of amino acids are manufactured annually all over the world, and this number continues to grow. Research on amino acid fermentation fostered the notion and skills of metabolic engineering which has been applied for the production of other compounds from renewable resources. The discovery of glutamate fermentation has had revolutionary impacts on both the industry and science. In this chapter, the history and development of glutamate fermentation, including the very early stage of fermentation of other amino acids, are reviewed.

  3. Functionalized 2′-amino-α-L-LNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, T. Santhosh; Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Østergaard, Michael

    2009-01-01

    characterization, and molecular modeling of N2′-functionalized 2′-amino-α-L-LNA is described. Chemoselective N2′-functionalization of protected amino alcohol 1 followed by phosphitylation afforded a structurally varied set of target phosphoramidites, which were incorporated into oligodeoxyribonucleotides....... Incorporation of pyrene-functionalized building blocks such as 2′-N-(pyren-1-yl)carbonyl-2′-amino-α-L-LNA (monomer X) led to extraordinary increases in thermal affinity of up to +19.5 °C per modification against DNA targets in particular. In contrast, incorporation of building blocks with small nonaromatic N2......′-functionalities such as 2′-N-acetyl-2′-amino-α-L-LNA (monomer V) had detrimental effects on thermal affinity toward DNA/RNA complements with decreases of as much as -16.5 °C per modification. Extensive thermal DNA selectivity, favorable entropic contributions upon duplex formation, hybridization...

  4. A pragmatic lifestyle modification programme reduces the incidence of predictors of cardio-metabolic disease and dysglycaemia in a young healthy urban South Asian population: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesuriya, Mahen; Fountoulakis, Nikolaos; Guess, Nicola; Banneheka, Sarath; Vasantharajah, Laksha; Gulliford, Martin; Viberti, Giancarlo; Gnudi, Luigi; Karalliedde, Janaka

    2017-08-30

    There is an increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in young urban South-Asians. We tested the effect of a pragmatic trimonthly lifestyle modification (LSM) programme (P-LSM) versus a less-intensive 12-monthly control LSM (C-LSM) intervention on a primary composite endpoint of predictors of cardio-metabolic disease (new onset T2DM, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) and markers of cardio-renal disease) in participants aged 5-40 years with risk factors for T2DM. This was a randomised controlled trial performed at the National Diabetes Centre, Sri-Lanka. We individually randomised 4672 participants at risk of T2DM, of whom 3539 (mean age 22.5 (range 6-40 years, 48% males) received either trimonthly (P-LSM n = 1726) or 12-monthly (C-LSM n = 1813) peer educator advice aimed at reducing weight, improving diet, reducing psychological stress and increasing physical activity. During a median follow-up of 3 years, the cumulative incidence of the primary endpoint was n = 479 in P-LSM (74 per 1000 person years) vs. 561 in C-LSM (96 per 1000 person years), with an incident rate ratio (IRR) of 0.89 (95% CI 0.83-0.96, P = 0.02). In post hoc analyses, new onset dysglycaemia (T2DM, IFG and IGT), was the major contributor to the composite and was significantly reduced by P-LSM (IRR 0.9, 95% CI 0.83-0.97, P = 0.01). A significant impact of P-LSM on the incidence of the composite endpoint was noted in 1725 participants (P-LSM n = 850, C-LSM n = 875) aged below 18; P-LSM n = 140 (48 per 1000 person years) versus C-LSM n = 174 (55.4 per 1000 person years), with an IRR of 0.83 (95% CI 0.73-0.94, P = 0.004). In a young at-risk South-Asian population, a pragmatic LSM programme significantly reduces the incidence of predictors of cardio-metabolic disease. Our results highlight the importance of early intervention in young at-risk subjects. World Health Organization international clinical

  5. Bioactivation of the heterocyclic aromatic amine 2-amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido [2,3-b]indole (MeA alpha C) in recombinant test systems expressing human xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glatt, H.; Pabel, U.; Meinl, W.

    2004-01-01

    2-Amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (MeAalphaC) and some metabolites were investigated for mutagenicity in mammalian cell lines and bacterial strains engineered for the expression of human enzymes. MeAalphaC induced gene mutations (studied at the hprt locus) in Chinese hamster V79-derived cel...

  6. Epigenetic Modifications and Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu A. Kowluru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy remains one of the most debilitating chronic complications, but despite extensive research in the field, the exact mechanism(s responsible for how retina is damaged in diabetes remains ambiguous. Many metabolic pathways have been implicated in its development, and genes associated with these pathways are altered. Diabetic environment also facilitates epigenetics modifications, which can alter the gene expression without permanent changes in DNA sequence. The role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy is now an emerging area, and recent work has shown that genes encoding mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (Sod2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 are epigenetically modified, activates of epigenetic modification enzymes, histone lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1, and DNA methyltransferase are increased, and the micro RNAs responsible for regulating nuclear transcriptional factor and VEGF are upregulated. With the growing evidence of epigenetic modifications in diabetic retinopathy, better understanding of these modifications has potential to identify novel targets to inhibit this devastating disease. Fortunately, the inhibitors and mimics targeted towards histone modification, DNA methylation, and miRNAs are now being tried for cancer and other chronic diseases, and better understanding of the role of epigenetics in diabetic retinopathy will open the door for their possible use in combating this blinding disease.

  7. Evolutionary systems biology of amino acid biosynthetic cost in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Barton

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Every protein has a biosynthetic cost to the cell based on the synthesis of its constituent amino acids. In order to optimise growth and reproduction, natural selection is expected, where possible, to favour the use of proteins whose constituents are cheaper to produce, as reduced biosynthetic cost may confer a fitness advantage to the organism. Quantifying the cost of amino acid biosynthesis presents challenges, since energetic requirements may change across different cellular and environmental conditions. We developed a systems biology approach to estimate the cost of amino acid synthesis based on genome-scale metabolic models and investigated the effects of the cost of amino acid synthesis on Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression and protein evolution. First, we used our two new and six previously reported measures of amino acid cost in conjunction with codon usage bias, tRNA gene number and atomic composition to identify which of these factors best predict transcript and protein levels. Second, we compared amino acid cost with rates of amino acid substitution across four species in the genus Saccharomyces. Regardless of which cost measure is used, amino acid biosynthetic cost is weakly associated with transcript and protein levels. In contrast, we find that biosynthetic cost and amino acid substitution rates show a negative correlation, but for only a subset of cost measures. In the economy of the yeast cell, we find that the cost of amino acid synthesis plays a limited role in shaping transcript and protein expression levels compared to that of translational optimisation. Biosynthetic cost does, however, appear to affect rates of amino acid evolution in Saccharomyces, suggesting that expensive amino acids may only be used when they have specific structural or functional roles in protein sequences. However, as there appears to be no single currency to compute the cost of amino acid synthesis across all cellular and environmental

  8. [Plasma amino acid concentrations in aggressive dogs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhr, Norbert-Christian; Brand, Ulrike; Riedel, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    Following the hypothesis that metabolic screens may be useful tools in the diagnosis of canine aggression we have investigated the blood plasma amino acid levels of dogs which have been found aggressive (N = 10) against dogs or men in comparison to non-aggressive dogs (N = 10). In summary, the aggressive dogs showed elevated plasma concentrations of the neurophysiological active aromatic amino acids tryptophan (46/171 micromol/l, p urea-cycle in the conversion of ornithine (17/34 micromol/l, p < 0.01) to citrulline (64/47 micromol/l). Higher levels of branched chain amino acids, especially leucine (122/150 micromol/l, p < 0.01), mainly metabolized in muscles, and isoleucin (60/71 micromol/l, p < 0.05) show a high energy potential. The acidose-stimulator methionine (48/78 micromol/l, p < 0.01) proved elevated. The results show that the changed behavior in the aggressive dogs is also reflected in their free amino acid plasma concentrations, independent of the question whether these data are the cause or the result of the aggressivity.

  9. Interactive network analysis of the plasma amino acids profile in a mouse model of hyperglycemia

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Takayuki; Mochida, Taiga; Maki, Yukihiro; Shiraki, Yasuko; Mori, Hiroko; Matsumoto, Shirou; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Ando, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Kimitoshi; Endo, Fumio; Okamoto, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Amino acids are a group of metabolites that are important substrates for protein synthesis, are important as signaling molecules and play central roles as highly connected metabolic hubs, and therefore, there are many reports that describe disease-specific abnormalities in plasma amino acids profile. However, the causes of progression from a healthy control to a manifestation of the plasma amino acid changes remain obscure. Here, we extended the plasma amino acids profile to relationships tha...

  10. Branched-Chain Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Keisuke; Tsuchisaka, Atsunari; Yukawa, Hideaki

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), viz., L-isoleucine, L-leucine, and L-valine, are essential amino acids that cannot be synthesized in higher organisms and are important nutrition for humans as well as livestock. They are also valued as synthetic intermediates for pharmaceuticals. Therefore, the demand for BCAAs in the feed and pharmaceutical industries is increasing continuously. Traditional industrial fermentative production of BCAAs was performed using microorganisms isolated by random mutagenesis. A collection of these classical strains was also scientifically useful to clarify the details of the BCAA biosynthetic pathways, which are tightly regulated by feedback inhibition and transcriptional attenuation. Based on this understanding of the metabolism of BCAAs, it is now possible for us to pursue strains with higher BCAA productivity using rational design and advanced molecular biology techniques. Additionally, systems biology approaches using augmented omics information help us to optimize carbon flux toward BCAA production. Here, we describe the biosynthetic pathways of BCAAs and their regulation and then overview the microorganisms developed for BCAA production. Other chemicals, including isobutanol, i.e., a second-generation biofuel, can be synthesized by branching the BCAA biosynthetic pathways, which are also outlined.

  11. Amino Acids and Chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  12. Amino acid racemisation dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray-Wallace, C.V.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the time-dependent amino acid racemisation reaction as a method of age assessment was first reported by Hare and Abelson (1968). They noted that in specimens of the bivalve mollusc Mercenaria sp., greater concentrations of amino acids in the D-configuration with increasing fossil age. Hare and Abelson (1968) also reported negligible racemisation in a modern specimen of Mecanaria sp. On this basis they suggested that the extent of amino acid racemisation (epimerisation in the case of isoleucine) may be used to assess the age of materials within and beyond the range of radiocarbon dating. For the past thirty years amino acid racemisation has been extensively applied in Quaternary research as a method of relative and numeric dating, and a particularly large literature has emerged on the subject

  13. Amino acid fermentation at the origin of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vladar, Harold P

    2012-02-10

    There is evidence that the genetic code was established prior to the existence of proteins, when metabolism was powered by ribozymes. Also, early proto-organisms had to rely on simple anaerobic bioenergetic processes. In this work I propose that amino acid fermentation powered metabolism in the RNA world, and that this was facilitated by proto-adapters, the precursors of the tRNAs. Amino acids were used as carbon sources rather than as catalytic or structural elements. In modern bacteria, amino acid fermentation is known as the Stickland reaction. This pathway involves two amino acids: the first undergoes oxidative deamination, and the second acts as an electron acceptor through reductive deamination. This redox reaction results in two keto acids that are employed to synthesise ATP via substrate-level phosphorylation. The Stickland reaction is the basic bioenergetic pathway of some bacteria of the genus Clostridium. Two other facts support Stickland fermentation in the RNA world. First, several Stickland amino acid pairs are synthesised in abiotic amino acid synthesis. This suggests that amino acids that could be used as an energy substrate were freely available. Second, anticodons that have complementary sequences often correspond to amino acids that form Stickland pairs. The main hypothesis of this paper is that pairs of complementary proto-adapters were assigned to Stickland amino acids pairs. There are signatures of this hypothesis in the genetic code. Furthermore, it is argued that the proto-adapters formed double strands that brought amino acid pairs into proximity to facilitate their mutual redox reaction, structurally constraining the anticodon pairs that are assigned to these amino acid pairs. Significance tests which randomise the code are performed to study the extent of the variability of the energetic (ATP) yield. Random assignments can lead to a substantial yield of ATP and maintain enough variability, thus selection can act and refine the assignments

  14. Amino acid fermentation at the origin of the genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence that the genetic code was established prior to the existence of proteins, when metabolism was powered by ribozymes. Also, early proto-organisms had to rely on simple anaerobic bioenergetic processes. In this work I propose that amino acid fermentation powered metabolism in the RNA world, and that this was facilitated by proto-adapters, the precursors of the tRNAs. Amino acids were used as carbon sources rather than as catalytic or structural elements. In modern bacteria, amino acid fermentation is known as the Stickland reaction. This pathway involves two amino acids: the first undergoes oxidative deamination, and the second acts as an electron acceptor through reductive deamination. This redox reaction results in two keto acids that are employed to synthesise ATP via substrate-level phosphorylation. The Stickland reaction is the basic bioenergetic pathway of some bacteria of the genus Clostridium. Two other facts support Stickland fermentation in the RNA world. First, several Stickland amino acid pairs are synthesised in abiotic amino acid synthesis. This suggests that amino acids that could be used as an energy substrate were freely available. Second, anticodons that have complementary sequences often correspond to amino acids that form Stickland pairs. The main hypothesis of this paper is that pairs of complementary proto-adapters were assigned to Stickland amino acids pairs. There are signatures of this hypothesis in the genetic code. Furthermore, it is argued that the proto-adapters formed double strands that brought amino acid pairs into proximity to facilitate their mutual redox reaction, structurally constraining the anticodon pairs that are assigned to these amino acid pairs. Significance tests which randomise the code are performed to study the extent of the variability of the energetic (ATP) yield. Random assignments can lead to a substantial yield of ATP and maintain enough variability, thus selection can act and refine the assignments

  15. Amino acid fermentation at the origin of the genetic code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vladar Harold P

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is evidence that the genetic code was established prior to the existence of proteins, when metabolism was powered by ribozymes. Also, early proto-organisms had to rely on simple anaerobic bioenergetic processes. In this work I propose that amino acid fermentation powered metabolism in the RNA world, and that this was facilitated by proto-adapters, the precursors of the tRNAs. Amino acids were used as carbon sources rather than as catalytic or structural elements. In modern bacteria, amino acid fermentation is known as the Stickland reaction. This pathway involves two amino acids: the first undergoes oxidative deamination, and the second acts as an electron acceptor through reductive deamination. This redox reaction results in two keto acids that are employed to synthesise ATP via substrate-level phosphorylation. The Stickland reaction is the basic bioenergetic pathway of some bacteria of the genus Clostridium. Two other facts support Stickland fermentation in the RNA world. First, several Stickland amino acid pairs are synthesised in abiotic amino acid synthesis. This suggests that amino acids that could be used as an energy substrate were freely available. Second, anticodons that have complementary sequences often correspond to amino acids that form Stickland pairs. The main hypothesis of this paper is that pairs of complementary proto-adapters were assigned to Stickland amino acids pairs. There are signatures of this hypothesis in the genetic code. Furthermore, it is argued that the proto-adapters formed double strands that brought amino acid pairs into proximity to facilitate their mutual redox reaction, structurally constraining the anticodon pairs that are assigned to these amino acid pairs. Significance tests which randomise the code are performed to study the extent of the variability of the energetic (ATP yield. Random assignments can lead to a substantial yield of ATP and maintain enough variability, thus selection can

  16. Biodegradable polymers derived from amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Wahid; Muthupandian, Saravanan; Farah, Shady; Kumar, Neeraj; Domb, Abraham J

    2011-12-08

    In the past three decades, the use of polymeric materials has increased dramatically for biomedical applications. Many α-amino acids derived biodegradable polymers have also been intensely developed with the main goal to obtain bio-mimicking functional biomaterials. Polymers derived from α-amino acids may offer many advantages, as these polymers: (a) can be modified further to introduce new functions such as imaging, molecular targeting and drugs can be conjugated chemically to these polymers, (b) can improve on better biological properties like cell migration, adhesion and biodegradability, (c) can improve on mechanical and thermal properties and (d) their degradation products are expected to be non-toxic and readily metabolized/excreted from the body. This manuscript focuses on biodegradable polymers derived from natural amino acids, their synthesis, biocompatibility and biomedical applications. It is observed that polymers derived from α-amino acids constitute a promising family of biodegradable materials. These provide innovative multifunctional polymers possessing amino acid side groups with biological activity and with innumerous potential applications. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Amino acid uptake in rust fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eStruck

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The plant pathogenic rust fungi colonize leaf tissue and feed off their host plants without killing them. Certain economically important species of different genera such as Melampsora, Phakopsora, Puccinia or Uromyces are extensively studied for resolving the mechanisms of the obligate biotrophy. As obligate parasites rust fungi only can complete their life cycle on living hosts where they grow through the leaf tissue by developing an extended network of intercellular hyphae from which intracellular haustoria are differentiated. Haustoria are involved in key functions of the obligate biotrophic lifestyle: suppressing host defense responses and acquiring nutrients. This review provides a survey of rust fungi nitrogen nutrition with special emphasis on amino acid uptake. A variety of sequences of amino acid transporter genes of rust fungi have been published; however, transport activity of only three in planta highly up-regulated amino acid permeases have been characterized. Functional and immunohistochemical investigations have shown the specificity and localization of these transporters. Sequence data of various genome projects allowed identification of numerous rust amino acid tranporter genes. An in silico analysis reveals that these genes can be classified into different transporter families. In addition, genetic and molecular data of amino acid transporters have provided new insights in the corresponding metabolic pathways.

  18. Novel diketopiperazine metabolism in a microorganism: two-step hydrolysis of cyclo(Gly-Leu) to amino acids and preliminary characterization of cyclo(Gly-Leu) hydrolase and dipeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, H; Mizuta, N; Nitoda, T; Kawazu, K

    2000-01-01

    A bacterium, strain NM 5-3, isolated from soil exhibited the highest cyclo(Gly-Leu) (CGL)-hydrolyzing activity and was identified as Agrobacterium radiobacter. The reaction products from CGL were dipeptides (Leu-Gly and Gly-Leu) and amino acids (Leu and Gly). Inhibitors for the dipeptidase of this strain did not inhibit the hydrolysis of CGL to dipeptides, indicating that two distinct enzymes, CGLase and a dipeptidase, were involved in its hydrolysis. The activities of these two enzymes were separated by anion-exchange column chromatography. The results indicated that strain NM5-3 hydrolyzed CGL via the dipeptides to the corresponding amino acids. The CGLase fraction was found to catalyze the hydrolysis of cyclo(Gly-D-Leu), cyclo(Gly-Gly), cyclo(L-Ala-Gly), and cyclo(D-Ala-Gly). On the other hand, the dipeptidase fraction exhibited L-specific substrate specificity.

  19. Anaerobic metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds by sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boopathy, R.; Kulpa, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    Ecological observations suggest that sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria might metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment, but this ability had not been demonstrated until recently. Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds used aerobic microorganisms. In most cases no mineralization of nitroaromatics occurs, and only superficial modifications of the structures are reported. However, under anaerobic sulfate-reducing conditions, the nitroaromatic compounds reportedly undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. For example, trinitrotoluene under sulfate-reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of ammonia from triaminotoluene is achieved by reductive deamination catalyzed by the enzyme reductive deaminase, with the production of ammonia and toluene. Some sulfate reducers can metabolize toluene to CO 2 . Similar metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. Many methanogenic bacteria can reduce nitroaromatic compounds to amino compounds. In this paper we review the anaerobic metabolic processes of nitroaromatic compounds under sulfate-reducing And methanogenic conditions

  20. Plant growth, metabolism and adaptation in relation to stress conditions. XXVII. Can ascorbic acid modify the adverse effects of NaCl and mannitol on amino acids, nucleic acids and protein patterns in Vicia faba seedlings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, M E; Hasaneen, M N A; Kazamel, A M S

    2009-03-01

    The adverse effects of either NaCl or mannitol on amino acids, protein patterns and nucleic acids in Vicia faba seeds were investigated. The exogenous addition of 4 mM ascorbic acid to the stressing media in which the broad bean seeds were germinated in combination with either the ionic (NaCl) or osmotic (mannitol) stressor induced significant protective changes in the total amount and in the relative composition of amino acids in general and in proline, glycine, glutamic, aspartic, alanine and serine in particular. It also induced changes in nucleic acids (RNA and DNA) content. These changes occurred throughout the entire period of the experiments (12 days). Separate administration of NaCl or mannitol enhanced the occurrence of particular novel proteins that were not detected in control bean seeds (water medium). Protein banding patterns of broad bean seedlings treated with NaCl or mannitol in combination with 4 mM ascorbic acid showed different de novo protein bands, with different molecular weights, at different stages of seedlings growth, with lower levels or a nearly complete absence of the major stress proteins. The pattern of changes for amino acids and nucleic acids and the range of protein bands extracted from the variously treated broad bean seedlings indicate a positive role of ascorbic acid in the alleviation of the damage effects induced by NaCl and mannitol. The importance of this role in the stress tolerance of broad beans is discussed.

  1. Economic aspects of amino acids production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Udo; Huebner, Susanna

    2003-01-01

    Amino acids represent basic elements of proteins, which as a main source of nutrition themselves serve as a major reserve for maintaining essential functions of humans as well as animals. Taking the recent state of scientific knowledge into account, the industrial sector of amino acids is a priori "suitable" to a specific kind of an ecologically sound way of production, which is based on biotechnology. The following article may point out characteristics of this particular industrial sector and illustrates the applicability of the latest economic methods, founded on development of the discipline of bionics in order to describe economic aspects of amino acids markets. The several biochemical and technological fields of application of amino acids lead to specific market structures in high developed and permanently evolving systems. The Harvard tradition of industrial economics explains how market structures mould the behaviour of the participants and influences market results beyond that. A global increase in intensity of competition confirms the notion that the supply-side is characterised by asymmetric information in contrast to Kantzenbachs concept of "narrow oligopoly" with symmetrical shared knowledge about market information. Departing from this point, certain strategies of companies in this market form shall be derived. The importance of Research and Development increases rapidly and leads to innovative manufacturing methods which replace more polluting manufacturing processes like acid hydrolysis. In addition to these modifications within the production processes the article deals furthermore with the pricing based on product life cycle concept and introduces specific applications of tools like activity based costing and target costing to the field of amino acid production. The authors come to the conclusion that based on a good transferability of latest findings in bionics and ecological compatibility competitors in amino acids manufacturing are well advised

  2. Interpretation of plasma amino acid profile using multiple marker approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Subbotina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the analysis of plasma amino acid profile in a group of patients with left ventricular outflow tract pathology (n = 151 increased levels of serine, alanine, arginine, and lysine has been found. These metabolic shifts can be linked with the development of circulatory deficiency and mitochondrial dysfunction. The differentiation of the reference values intervals helps in the assessment of individual amino acid profiles.

  3. Amino acids in the cultivation of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Andrew; Keusgen, Michael; von Hagen, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Amino acids are crucial for the cultivation of mammalian cells. This importance of amino acids was realized soon after the development of the first cell lines, and a solution of a mixture of amino acids has been supplied to cultured cells ever since. The importance of amino acids is further pronounced in chemically defined mammalian cell culture media, making the consideration of their biological and chemical properties necessary. Amino acids concentrations have been traditionally adjusted to their cellular consumption rates. However, since changes in the metabolic equilibrium of amino acids can be caused by changes in extracellular concentrations, metabolomics in conjunction with flux balance analysis is being used in the development of culture media. The study of amino acid transporters is also gaining importance since they control the intracellular concentrations of these molecules and are influenced by conditions in cell culture media. A better understanding of the solubility, stability, dissolution kinetics, and interactions of these molecules is needed for an exploitation of these properties in the development of dry powdered chemically defined media for mammalian cells. Due to the complexity of these mixtures however, this has proven to be challenging. Studying amino acids in mammalian cell culture media will help provide a better understanding of how mammalian cells in culture interact with their environment. It would also provide insight into the chemical behavior of these molecules in solutions of complex mixtures, which is important in the understanding of the contribution of individual amino acids to protein structure.

  4. High-level production of C-11-carboxyl-labeled amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, L.C.; Sun, T.T.; Byrd, B.L.; Hayes, R.L.; Butler, T.A.; Callahan, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    Carbon-11-labeled amino acids have significant potential as agents for positron tomographic functional imaging. We have developed a rapid, high-temperature, high-pressure modification of the Buecherer--Strecker amino acid synthesis and found it to be quite general for the production of C-11-carboxyl-labeled neutral amino acids. Production of C-11-carboxyl-labeled DL-tryptophan requires certain modifications in the procedure. Twelve different amino acids have been produced to date by this technique. Synthesis and chromatographic purification require approximately 40 min, and C-11-carboxyl-labeled amino acids have been produced in yields of up to 425 mCi. Two C-11-carboxyl-labeled amino acids are being investigated clinically for tumor scanning and two others for pancreatic imaging. Over 120 batches of the various agents have been produced for clinical use over a three-year period

  5. The metabolism of L-tryptophan by isolated rat liver cells. Effect of albumin binding and amino acid competition on oxidatin of tryptophan by tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, S A; Pogson, C I

    1980-01-01

    1. Novel methods, using L-[ring-2-14C]tryptophan, are described for the measurement of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase activity and tryptophan accumulation in isolated rat liver cells. 2. The effects of bovine serum albumin, non-esterified fatty acids and neutral amino acids on tryptophan oxidation by hepatocytes and on the partition of tryptophan between free and albumin-bound forms were investigated. 3. Oxidation of physiological concentrations (0.1 mM) of tryptophan was inhibited by approx. 50%...

  6. Azetidinic amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Bunch, Lennart; Chopin, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    A set of ten azetidinic amino acids, that can be envisioned as C-4 alkyl substituted analogues of trans-2-carboxyazetidine-3-acetic acid (t-CAA) and/or conformationally constrained analogues of (R)- or (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) have been synthesized in a diastereo- and enantiomerically pure form from...... of two diastereoisomers that were easily separated and converted in two steps into azetidinic amino acids. Azetidines 35-44 were characterized in binding studies on native ionotropic Glu receptors and in functional assays at cloned metabotropic receptors mGluR1, 2 and 4, representing group I, II and III...

  7. Plant amino acid-derived vitamins: biosynthesis and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miret, Javier A; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2014-04-01

    Vitamins are essential organic compounds for humans, having lost the ability to de novo synthesize them. Hence, they represent dietary requirements, which are covered by plants as the main dietary source of most vitamins (through food or livestock's feed). Most vitamins synthesized by plants present amino acids as precursors (B1, B2, B3, B5, B7, B9 and E) and are therefore linked to plant nitrogen metabolism. Amino acids play different roles in their biosynthesis and metabolism, either incorporated into the backbone of the vitamin or as amino, sulfur or one-carbon group donors. There is a high natural variation in vitamin contents in crops and its exploitation through breeding, metabolic engineering and agronomic practices can enhance their nutritional quality. While the underlying biochemical roles of vitamins as cosubstrates or cofactors are usually common for most eukaryotes, the impact of vitamins B and E in metabolism and physiology can be quite different on plants and animals. Here, we first aim at giving an overview of the biosynthesis of amino acid-derived vitamins in plants, with a particular focus on how this knowledge can be exploited to increase vitamin contents in crops. Second, we will focus on the functions of these vitamins in both plants and animals (and humans in particular), to unravel common and specific roles for vitamins in evolutionary distant organisms, in which these amino acid-derived vitamins play, however, an essential role.

  8. Mixed matrix membranes for process intensification in electrodialysis of amino acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kattan Readi, O.M.; Rolevink, Hendrikus H.M.; Nijmeijer, Dorothea C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Amino acids are valuable intermediates in the biobased economy for the production of chemicals. Electro-membrane processes combined with enzymatic modification have been investigated as an alternative technology for the fractionation of a mixture of amino acids with almost identical

  9. Structures of the first representatives of Pfam family PF06684 (DUF1185) reveal a novel variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold and suggest a role in amino-acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Kumar, Abhinav; Jin, Kevin K.; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Acosta, Claire; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Burra, Prasad; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Johnson, Hope A.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Murphy, Kevin D.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Trout, Christina V.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Structures of the first representatives of PF06684 (DUF1185) reveal a Bacillus chorismate mutase-like fold with a potential role in amino-acid synthesis. The crystal structures of BB2672 and SPO0826 were determined to resolutions of 1.7 and 2.1 Å by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion and multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion, respectively, using the semi-automated high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) as part of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). These proteins are the first structural representatives of the PF06684 (DUF1185) Pfam family. Structural analysis revealed that both structures adopt a variant of the Bacillus chorismate mutase fold (BCM). The biological unit of both proteins is a hexamer and analysis of homologs indicates that the oligomer interface residues are highly conserved. The conformation of the critical regions for oligomerization appears to be dependent on pH or salt concentration, suggesting that this protein might be subject to environmental regulation. Structural similarities to BCM and genome-context analysis suggest a function in amino-acid synthesis

  10. and amino acids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    (L-Trp), were obtained from Sigma Chemical Company (USA). All the metal ions Cu(II),. Ni(II) and .... respective free amino acids show characteristic band positions, shifts and intensities, which can be correlated to ..... Financial support from the University Grants Commission, New Delhi to Prof P Rabindra. Reddy is gratefully ...

  11. Behavior Modification in Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Annette Rutt; Stillman, Stephen M.

    1979-01-01

    An example of behavior modification used in athletic coaching is presented. The case study involves a member of a women's basketball team and details the use of behavior modification for both weight reduction and skill improvement. (JMF)

  12. Surface Modification for Microreactor Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladyslaw Torbicz

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, methods of surface modification of different supports, i.e. glass andpolymeric beads for enzyme immobilisation are described. The developed method ofenzyme immobilisation is based on Schiff’s base formation between the amino groups onthe enzyme surface and the aldehyde groups on the chemically modified surface of thesupports. The surface of silicon modified by APTS and GOPS with immobilised enzymewas characterised by atomic force microscopy (AFM, time-of-flight secondary ion massspectroscopy (ToF-SIMS and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The supports withimmobilised enzyme (urease were also tested in combination with microreactors fabricatedin silicon and Perspex, operating in a flow-through system. For microreactors filled withurease immobilised on glass beads (Sigma and on polymeric beads (PAN, a very high andstable signal (pH change was obtained. The developed method of urease immobilisationcan be stated to be very effective.

  13. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized with amino groups by reacting with supercritical ammonia fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Lu; Bai Yongping; Huang Xu; Gao Zhangfei; Meng Linghui; Huang Yudong; Ma Jun

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, supercritical ammonia fluid was utilized to simply functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) with amino groups. The successful amino functionalization of MWCNTs was proven and the physicochemical properties of MWCNTs before and after supercritical ammonia fluids modifications were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results also indicated that the supercritical ammonia fluids had the visible effects on the nanostructure of carbon nanotubes. Our novel modification approach provides an easy way to modify MWCNTs with amino groups, which is very useful for realizing 'carbon nanotube economy' in the near future.

  14. Modelling microbial metabolic rewiring during growth in a complex medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondi, Marco; Bosi, Emanuele; Presta, Luana; Natoli, Diletta; Fani, Renato

    2016-11-24

    In their natural environment, bacteria face a wide range of environmental conditions that change over time and that impose continuous rearrangements at all the cellular levels (e.g. gene expression, metabolism). When facing a nutritionally rich environment, for example, microbes first use the preferred compound(s) and only later start metabolizing the other one(s). A systemic re-organization of the overall microbial metabolic network in response to a variation in the composition/concentration of the surrounding nutrients has been suggested, although the range and the entity of such modifications in organisms other than a few model microbes has been scarcely described up to now. We used multi-step constraint-based metabolic modelling to simulate the growth in a complex medium over several time steps of the Antarctic model organism Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125. As each of these phases is characterized by a specific set of amino acids to be used as carbon and energy source our modelling framework describes the major consequences of nutrients switching at the system level. The model predicts that a deep metabolic reprogramming might be required to achieve optimal biomass production in different stages of growth (different medium composition), with at least half of the cellular metabolic network involved (more than 50% of the metabolic genes). Additionally, we show that our modelling framework is able to capture metabolic functional association and/or common regulatory features of the genes embedded in our reconstruction (e.g. the presence of common regulatory motifs). Finally, to explore the possibility of a sub-optimal biomass objective function (i.e. that cells use resources in alternative metabolic processes at the expense of optimal growth) we have implemented a MOMA-based approach (called nutritional-MOMA) and compared the outcomes with those obtained with Flux Balance Analysis (FBA). Growth simulations under this scenario revealed the deep impact of

  15. Splanchnic oxidation is the major metabolic fate of dietary glutamate in enterally fed preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riedijk, Maaike A.; de Gast-Bakker, Dana-Anne H.; Wattimena, Josias L. D.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2007-01-01

    The intestine is a major site of amino acid metabolism, especially in neonates. The energy needed for the metabolic processes in neonatal animals is derived from dietary glucose and amino acids. No data are available showing that dietary amino acids function as intestinal fuel source in human

  16. Nutrition and reproduction: links to epigenetics and metabolic syndrome in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelCurto, Hannah; Wu, Guoyao; Satterfield, Michael C

    2013-07-01

    Inappropriate exposure of gametes and/or products of conception to nutritional imbalance alters critical metabolic set points in the offspring and increases propensity to disease. This review will focus on recent findings highlighting clear links to epigenetic modifications in response to dietary manipulations as well as nutritional strategies with the potential to mitigate the effects of an otherwise poor nutritional environment. Maternal nutritional imbalance, either through global nutritional manipulation or deficiencies in select nutrients, predisposes the offspring to metabolic disease. Disease susceptibility is linked to global and/or specific modifications of the epigenome at key metabolic regulatory genes. Paternal nutritional imbalance also increases the likelihood of metabolic disease in offspring through similar epigenetic mechanisms. Finally, dietary intervention with select nutrients has been shown to ameliorate postnatal disease phenotypes in offspring, although the exact molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated. Select nutrients, such as amino acids and vitamins, not only serve as building blocks for growth but also mediate a myriad of physiological functions, including providing substrates for DNA synthesis. These nutrients hold great promise as intervention strategies to combat a suboptimal developmental environment.

  17. Macrocyclic polyether complexes of amino acids and amino acid salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidzilya, V.A.; Oleksenko, LP.

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with the isolation of the complexes formed between various types of amino acid derivatives and macrocyclic polyethers, and the characterisation of their physical and chemical properties. The study shows that macrocyclic polyethers form 1:1 complexes with amino acids and amino acid derivatives, and that these complexes can be isolated in pure form. Amino acids can be bound to these complexes in their anionic forms, in switterionic forms, as well as in their protonated forms. These types of complexes may be useful for the transport of amino acids or their derivatives across both synthetic and natural membranes

  18. Progress in application of branched-chain amino acids in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LYU Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The metabolism of amino acids mainly takes place in the liver, and patients with liver cirrhosis may develop metabolic disorders of proteins, carbohydrates, fats, and amino acids, which in turn causes dysfunction of multiple organs and systems, as well as complications like hepatic encephalopathy, esophageal variceal bleeding, and ascites, resulting in high mortality. This paper summarizes the metabolic characteristics of amino acids and the application of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs in the treatment of liver cirrhosis, and it points out the significance of BCAAs in regulating serum aminogram, increasing the ratio of BCAAs to aromatic amino acids, preventing complications of liver cirrhosis, and improving the quality of life for patients with the disease.

  19. Epigenetic modifications and diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marpadga A. Reddy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is a major complication associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and a leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Conventional therapeutic strategies are not fully efficacious in the treatment of DN, suggesting an incomplete understanding of the gene regulation mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis. Furthermore, evidence from clinical trials has demonstrated a “metabolic memory” of prior exposure to hyperglycemia that continues to persist despite subsequent glycemic control. This remains a major challenge in the treatment of DN and other vascular complications. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, nucleosomal histone modifications, and noncoding RNAs control gene expression through regulation of chromatin structure and function and post-transcriptional mechanisms without altering the underlying DNA sequence. Emerging evidence indicates that multiple factors involved in the etiology of diabetes can alter epigenetic mechanisms and regulate the susceptibility to diabetes complications. Recent studies have demonstrated the involvement of histone lysine methylation in the regulation of key fibrotic and inflammatory genes related to diabetes complications including DN. Interestingly, histone lysine methylation persisted in vascular cells even after withdrawal from the diabetic milieu, demonstrating a potential role of epigenetic modifications in metabolic memory. Rapid advances in high-throughput technologies in the fields of genomics and epigenomics can lead to the identification of genome-wide alterations in key epigenetic modifications in vascular and renal cells in diabetes. Altogether, these findings can lead to the identification of potential predictive biomarkers and development of novel epigenetic therapies for diabetes and its associated complications.

  20. Amino acids as regulators and components of nonproteinogenic pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.

    2003-01-01

    Amino acids are not only important precursors for the synthesis of proteins and other N-containing compounds, but also participate in the regulation of major metabolic pathways. Glutamate and aspartate, for example, are components of the malate/aspartate shuttle and their concentrations control the

  1. Probiotic modulation of symbiotic gut microbial–host metabolic interactions in a humanized microbiome mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Francois-Pierre J; Wang, Yulan; Sprenger, Norbert; Yap, Ivan K S; Lundstedt, Torbjörn; Lek, Per; Rezzi, Serge; Ramadan, Ziad; van Bladeren, Peter; Fay, Laurent B; Kochhar, Sunil; Lindon, John C; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2008-01-01

    The transgenomic metabolic effects of exposure to either Lactobacillus paracasei or Lactobacillus rhamnosus probiotics have been measured and mapped in humanized extended genome mice (germ-free mice colonized with human baby flora). Statistical analysis of the compartmental fluctuations in diverse metabolic compartments, including biofluids, tissue and cecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in relation to microbial population modulation generated a novel top-down systems biology view of the host response to probiotic intervention. Probiotic exposure exerted microbiome modification and resulted in altered hepatic lipid metabolism coupled with lowered plasma lipoprotein levels and apparent stimulated glycolysis. Probiotic treatments also altered a diverse range of pathways outcomes, including amino-acid metabolism, methylamines and SCFAs. The novel application of hierarchical-principal component analysis allowed visualization of multicompartmental transgenomic metabolic interactions that could also be resolved at the compartment and pathway level. These integrated system investigations demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling as a top-down systems biology driver for investigating the mechanistic basis of probiotic action and the therapeutic surveillance of the gut microbial activity related to dietary supplementation of probiotics. PMID:18197175

  2. c-Myc activates multiple metabolic networks to generate substrates for cell-cycle entry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrish, Fionnuala M.; Isern, Nancy; Sadilek, Martin; Jeffrey, Mark; Hockenbery, David M.

    2009-05-18

    Cell proliferation requires the coordinated activity of cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic pathways to provide ATP and building blocks for DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis. Many metabolic pathway genes are targets of the c-myc oncogene and cell cycle regulator. However, the contribution of c-Myc to the activation of cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic networks during cell cycle entry is unknown. Here, we report the metabolic fates of [U-13C] glucose in serum-stimulated myc-/- and myc+/+ fibroblasts by 13C isotopomer NMR analysis. We demonstrate that endogenous c-myc increased 13C-labeling of ribose sugars, purines, and amino acids, indicating partitioning of glucose carbons into C1/folate and pentose phosphate pathways, and increased tricarboxylic acid cycle turnover at the expense of anaplerotic flux. Myc expression also increased global O-linked GlcNAc protein modification, and inhibition of hexosamine biosynthesis selectively reduced growth of Myc-expressing cells, suggesting its importance in Myc-induced proliferation. These data reveal a central organizing role for the Myc oncogene in the metabolism of cycling cells. The pervasive deregulation of this oncogene in human cancers may be explained by its role in directing metabolic networks required for cell proliferation.

  3. Metabolic requirements for fetal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milley, J R; Simmons, M A

    1979-09-01

    Table 1 outlines a metabolic balance sheet for the sheep fetus. It is clear that maternal substrate concentrations as well as placental function are important in assuring the provision of adequate substrate to meet fetal metabolic and growth requirements. It is intriguing that the fetus appears to use substrates not usually regarded as important in extrauterine diets (lactate) and to use substrates for catabolic purposes normally thought to be primarily anabolic substrates (amino acids). This information emphasizes the hazards of extrapolating metabolic and nutritional patterns seen in extrauterine life in reaching conclusions concerning the fetus. It likewise emphasizes the importance of ongoing studies in maternal and fetal nutrition and metabolism.

  4. 4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) modified proteins in metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, José Pedro; Jung, Tobias; Grune, Tilman; Siems, Werner

    2017-10-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is one of the quantitatively most important products of lipid peroxidation. Due to its high toxicity it is quickly metabolized, however, a small share of HNE avoids enzymatic detoxification and reacts with biomolecules including proteins. The formation of HNE-protein-adducts is one of the accompanying processes in oxidative stress or redox disbalance. The modification of proteins might occur at several amino acids side chains, leading to a variety of products and having effects on the protein function and fate. This review summarizes current knowledge on the formation of HNE-modified proteins, their fate in mammalian cells and their potential role as a damaging agents during oxidative stress. Furthermore, the potential of HNE-modified proteins as biomarkers for several diseases are highlighted. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Diastereoselective Ugi reaction for the synthesis of unnatural amino esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Oliveira Rocha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Multicomponent Reactions (MCR are useful reactions to obtain complex products by the simple mixture of 3 or more reactants. The classic Ugi reaction (4-UCR involves a mixture of an amine, aldehyde, isocyanide and a carboxylic acid, giving peptoides as products. Some modifications of this reaction have been reported, among which the use of amino acids and Lewis acids, such as titanium (IV chloride, to induce stereoselectivity in good ratio. In this work we demonstrate the efficiency of different Lewis acids in the modified Ugi reaction and good levels of diastereoselectivity and yields in the synthesis of unnatural secondary amino esters.

  6. What is Nutrition & Metabolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feinman Richard D

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new Open Access journal, Nutrition & Metabolism (N&M will publish articles that integrate nutrition with biochemistry and molecular biology. The open access process is chosen to provide rapid and accessible dissemination of new results and perspectives in a field that is of great current interest. Manuscripts in all areas of nutritional biochemistry will be considered but three areas of particular interest are lipoprotein metabolism, amino acids as metabolic signals, and the effect of macronutrient composition of diet on health. The need for the journal is identified in the epidemic of obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemias and related diseases, and a sudden increase in popular diets, as well as renewed interest in intermediary metabolism.

  7. EFFECT OF TETRACYCLINES ON THE INTRACELLULAR AMINO ACIDS OF MOLDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREEMAN, B A; CIRCO, R

    1963-07-01

    Freeman, Bob A. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.) and Richard Circo. Effect of tetracyclines on the intracellular amino acids of molds. J. Bacteriol. 86:38-44. 1963.-The tetracycline antibiotics were shown to alter the amino acid metabolism of molds whose growth is not markedly affected. Eight molds were grown in the presence of these antiobiotics; four exhibited a general reduction in the concentration of the intracellular amino acids, except for glutamic acid and alanine. In most of these four cultures, the tetracyclines also caused the complete disappearance of arginine, lysine, proline, phenylalanine, and tyrosine from the intracellular amino acid pool. The significance of these observations and the usefulness of the method in the study of the mechanisms of antibiotic action are discussed.

  8. Metabolomics Reveals that Dietary Xenoestrogens Alter Cellular Metabolism Induced by Palbociclib/Letrozole Combination Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Benedikt; Raffeiner, Philipp; Granados, Ana; Huan, Tao; Fang, Mingliang; Forsberg, Erica M; Benton, H Paul; Goetz, Laura; Johnson, Caroline H; Siuzdak, Gary

    2018-03-15

    Recently, the palbociclib/letrozole combination therapy was granted accelerated US FDA approval for the treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Since the underlying metabolic effects of these drugs are yet unknown, we investigated their synergism at the metabolome level in MCF-7 cells. As xenoestrogens interact with the ER, we additionally aimed at deciphering the impact of the phytoestrogen genistein and the estrogenic mycotoxin zearalenone. A global metabolomics approach was applied to unravel metabolite and pathway modifications. The results clearly showed that the combined effects of palbociclib and letrozole on cellular metabolism were far more pronounced than that of each agent alone and potently influenced by xenoestrogens. This behavior was confirmed in proliferation experiments and functional assays. Specifically, amino acids and central carbon metabolites were attenuated, while higher abundances were observed for fatty acids and most nucleic acid-related metabolites. Interestingly, exposure to model xenoestrogens appeared to counteract these effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanisms controlling renal hemodynamics and electrolyte excretion during amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, L.L.; Mizelle, H.L.; Montani, J.P.; Hall, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the mechanisms by which increased plasma amino acids elevate renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Since transport of amino acids and Na is linked in the proximal tubule, the authors hypothesized that increased amino acids might stimulate proximal tubular Na reabsorption (PR/sub Na/) and thus increase RBF and GFR by a macula densa feedback mechanism. A solution of four amino acids (Ala, Ser, Gly, Pro) was infused intravenously into anesthetized dogs with normal kidneys (NK) and with kidneys in which the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism was blunted by lowering renal artery pressure (LPK) or blocked by making the kidneys nonfiltering (NFK). In NK, RBF and GFR increased by 35 +/- 4% and 30 +/- 7% after 90 min of amino acid infusion, while PR/sub Na/ (estimated from lithium clearance) and O2 consumption increased by 31 +/- 5% and 29 +/- 5% and distal Na delivery remained relatively constant. Autoregulation of RBF and GFR in response to step deceases in renal artery pressure was impaired during amino acids in NK. The hemodynamic responses to amino acids were abolished in LPK and NFK. Infusion of the nonmetabolized -aminoisobutyric acid into NK produced changes in renal hemodynamics that were similar to the responses observed with the four metabolizable amino acids. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that elevation of plasma amino acids increases RBF and GFR by a mechanism that requires an intact macula densa feedback. Metabolism of the amino acids does not appear to be necessary for these changes to occur.

  10. Mechanisms controlling renal hemodynamics and electrolyte excretion during amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, L.L.; Mizelle, H.L.; Montani, J.P.; Hall, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the mechanisms by which increased plasma amino acids elevate renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Since transport of amino acids and Na + is linked in the proximal tubule, the authors hypothesized that increased amino acids might stimulate proximal tubular Na + reabsorption (PR/sub Na/) and thus increase RBF and GFR by a macula densa feedback mechanism. A solution of four amino acids (Ala, Ser, Gly, Pro) was infused intravenously into anesthetized dogs with normal kidneys (NK) and with kidneys in which the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism was blunted by lowering renal artery pressure (LPK) or blocked by making the kidneys nonfiltering (NFK). In NK, RBF and GFR increased by 35 +/- 4% and 30 +/- 7% after 90 min of amino acid infusion, while PR/sub Na/ (estimated from lithium clearance) and O 2 consumption increased by 31 +/- 5% and 29 +/- 5% and distal Na + delivery remained relatively constant. Autoregulation of RBF and GFR in response to step deceases in renal artery pressure was impaired during amino acids in NK. The hemodynamic responses to amino acids were abolished in LPK and NFK. Infusion of the nonmetabolized α-aminoisobutyric acid into NK produced changes in renal hemodynamics that were similar to the responses observed with the four metabolizable amino acids. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that elevation of plasma amino acids increases RBF and GFR by a mechanism that requires an intact macula densa feedback. Metabolism of the amino acids does not appear to be necessary for these changes to occur

  11. The Complex Role of Branched Chain Amino Acids in Diabetes and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas M. O'Connell

    2013-01-01

    The obesity and diabetes epidemics are continuing to spread across the globe. There is increasing evidence that diabetes leads to a significantly higher risk for certain types of cancer. Both diabetes and cancer are characterized by severe metabolic perturbations and the branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) appear to play a significant role in both of these diseases. These essential amino acids participate in a wide variety of metabolic pathways, but it is now recognized that they are also crit...

  12. Synthetic modifications of the antibiotic peptide gramicidin S : conformational and biological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knijnenburg, Annemiek Dorien

    2011-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focuses on synthetic modifications of the antibiotic peptide gramicidin S (GS). The aim of the research is the development of non–toxic analogs of GS using conformational and amphipathic changes induced by sugar amino acids (SAAs) and/or non–proteinogenic amino

  13. Cytochrome P450 expression and metabolic activation of cooked food mutagen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in MCF10A breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ronald D; Green, Mario R; Wilson, Chantell; Weckle, Amy L; Duanmu, Zhengbo; Kocarek, Thomas A; Runge-Morris, Melissa

    2006-04-15

    The cytochrome P450 expression profile was determined in the MCF10A human breast epithelial cell line, as was the ability of this cell line to catalyze the bioactivation of the cooked food mutagen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). Using non-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), transcripts for CYP1B1, CYP2J2, CYP2R1, CYP2U1, CYP2W1, CYP4B1, CYP4F, CYP4V2, CYP4X1 and CYP4Z1 were detected in both sub-confluent and confluent MCF10A cells. By contrast, CYP1A2 mRNA was detected only in confluent MCF10A cells, while CYP1A1, CYP2S1 and CYP2F1 were detected predominantly or exclusively in sub-confluent cultures. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin treatment of confluent MCF10A cells markedly induced microsomal ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity and CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 mRNA levels, as determined by real-time RT-PCR, while treatment with 10(-4)M PhIP had little effect on these P450 transcript levels. Treatment of confluent MCF10A cells with PhIP (10(-4)M) for 24, 48 or 72 h produced time-dependent increases in the amounts of DNA adducts, as measured by (32)P-post-labeling. These results indicate that multiple P450s, including those known to catalyze PhIP N-oxidation, are expressed in MCF10A cells, and that this non-neoplastic human breast epithelial cell line contains sufficient enzymatic machinery to support PhIP bioactivation and generate DNA damage.

  14. Dammar resin, a non-mutagen, induces [corrected] oxidative stress and metabolic enzymes in the liver of gpt delta transgenic mouse which is different from a mutagen, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiao-Li; Wei, Min; Kakehashi, Anna; Yamano, Shotaro; Okabe, Kyoko; Tajiri, Masaki; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2012-10-09

    Dammar resin has long been used in foods as either a clouding or a glazing agent. In a recent study, 2% Dammar resin showed significant hepatocarcinogenicity in a rat 2-year bioassay. Therefore, for an accurate estimate of human risk, it is necessary to understand whether Dammar resin induces liver genotoxicity and the underlying mechanisms of its hepatocarcinogenicity. Modifying effects of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), a typical genotoxic carcinogen produced during cooking of protein-rich foods, was also studied in the present study. Exposure of gpt delta mice to Dammar resin at a dose of 2% for 12 weeks did not induce any obvious mutagenicity in the liver. However, the index of cell proliferation, the level of 8-OHdG, and bax, bcl-2, p53, cyp1a2, cyp2e1, gpx1 and gstm2 gene expression were all significantly increased when compared with the control group. In the IQ treatment group, at a dose of 300ppm, mutagenicity was readily detected, the index of cell proliferation increased, and p53, cyp2e1 and gpx1 gene expression was down-regulated in the liver. Down-regulation of p53, P450s, and gpx1 in the livers of IQ treated mice are consistent with its genotoxic mechanism of carcinogenicity observed in a 675-day study. In contrast, our results using gpt delta mice suggest that Dammar resin is not genotoxic. Instead, the Dammar resin-induced hepatocarcinogenicity seen in our previous 2-year study with rats may have been mediated by non-genotoxic mechanisms, including increased P450 enzyme activity, increased oxidative stress, altered gene expression, and promotion of cell proliferation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. New Functions and Potential Applications of Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneyama, Hisayuki; Kobayashi, Hisamine; Tonouchi, Naoto

    Currently, several types of amino acids are being produced and used worldwide. Nevertheless, several new functions of amino acids have been recently discovered that could result in other applications. For example, oral stimulation by glutamate triggers the cephalic phase response to prepare for food digestion. Further, the stomach and intestines have specific glutamate-recognizing systems in their epithelial mucosa. Regarding clinical applications, addition of monosodium glutamate to the medicinal diet has been shown to markedly enhance gastric secretion in a vagus-dependent manner. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are the major components of muscles, and ingestion of BCAAs has been found to be effective for decreasing muscle pain. BCAAs are expected to be a solution for the serious issue of aging. Further, ingestion of specific amino acids could be beneficial. Glycine can be ingested for good night's sleep: glycine ingestion before bedtime significantly improved subjective sleep quality. Ingestion of alanine and glutamine effectively accelerates alcohol metabolism, and ingestion of cystine and theanine effectively prevents colds. Finally, amino acids could be used in a novel clinical diagnostic method: the balance of amino acids in the blood could be an indicator of the risk of diseases such as cancer. These newly discovered functions of amino acids are expected to contribute to the resolution of various issues.

  16. Tyrosine Modifications in Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Feeney, Maria B.; Schöneich, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Significance: The understanding of physiological and pathological processes involving protein oxidation, particularly under conditions of aging and oxidative stress, can be aided by proteomic identification of proteins that accumulate oxidative post-translational modifications only if these detected modifications are connected to functional consequences. The modification of tyrosine (Tyr) residues can elicit significant changes in protein structure and function, which, in some cases, may cont...

  17. A model of proteolysis and amino acid biosynthesis for Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in whey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Enuo; Zheng, Huajun; Hao, Pei; Konno, Tomonobu; Yu, Yao; Kume, Hisae; Oda, Munehiro; Ji, Zai-Si

    2012-12-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus 2038 (L. bulgaricus 2038) is a bacterium that is used as a starter for dairy products by Meiji Co., Ltd of Japan. Culturing L. bulgaricus 2038 with whey as the sole nitrogen source results in a shorter lag phase than other milk proteins under the same conditions (carbon source, minerals, and vitamins). Microarray results of gene expression revealed characteristics of amino acid anabolism with whey as the nitrogen source and established a model of proteolysis and amino acid biosynthesis for L. bulgaricus. Whey peptides and free amino acids are readily metabolized, enabling rapid entry into the logarithmic growth phase. The oligopeptide transport system is the primary pathway for obtaining amino acids. Amino acid biosynthesis maintains the balance between amino acids required for cell growth and the amount obtained from environment. The interconversion of amino acids is also important for L. bulgaricus 2038 growth.

  18. Glucagon and Amino Acids Are Linked in a Mutual Feedback Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens J; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Pedersen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    ; neither condition is necessarily associated with disturbed glucose metabolism. In glucagonoma patients, amino acid turnover and ureagenesis are greatly accelerated, and low plasma amino acid levels are probably at least partly responsible for the necrolytic migratory erythema, which resolves after amino...... acid administration. In patients with receptor mutations (and in knockout mice), pancreatic swelling is due to α-cell hyperplasia with gross hypersecretion of glucagon, which according to recent groundbreaking research may result from elevated amino acid levels. Additionally, solid evidence indicates...... that ureagenesis, and thereby amino acid levels, is critically controlled by glucagon. Together, this constitutes a complete endocrine system; feedback regulation involving amino acids regulates α-cell function and secretion, while glucagon, in turn, regulates amino acid turnover....

  19. Characterization of N,N-dimethyl amino acids by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh Chary, V; Sudarshana Reddy, B; Kumar, Ch Dinesh; Srinivas, R; Prabhakar, S

    2015-05-01

    Methylation is an essential metabolic process for a number of critical reactions in the body. Methyl groups are involved in the healthy function of the body life processes, by conducting methylation process involving specific enzymes. In these processes, various amino acids are methylated, and the occurrence of methylated amino acids in nature is diverse. Nowadays, mass-spectrometric-based identification of small molecules as biomarkers for diseases is a growing research. Although all dimethyl amino acids are metabolically important molecules, mass spectral data are available only for a few of them in the literature. In this study, we report synthesis and characterization of all dimethyl amino acids, by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments on protonated molecules. The MS/MS spectra of all the studied dimethyl amino acids showed preliminary loss of H2O + CO to form corresponding immonium ions. The other product ions in the spectra are highly characteristic of the methyl groups on the nitrogen and side chain of the amino acids. The amino acids, which are isomeric and isobaric with the studied dimethyl amino acids, gave distinctive MS/MS spectra. The study also included MS/MS analysis of immonium ions of dimethyl amino acids that provide information on side chain structure, and it is further tested to determine the N-terminal amino acid of the peptides. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Laboratory Course on "Streptomyces" Genetics and Secondary Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siitonen, Vilja; Räty, Kaj; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    The "'Streptomyces' genetics and secondary metabolism" laboratory course gives an introduction to the versatile soil dwelling Gram-positive bacteria "Streptomyces" and their secondary metabolism. The course combines genetic modification of "Streptomyces"; growing of the strain and protoplast preparation, plasmid…

  1. Microelements and inherited metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklová, Eliska

    2002-01-01

    In addition to the main groups of inherited metabolic diseases, including mitochondrial, peroxisomal and lysosomal defects, organic acidurias, porphyrias, defects of amino acids, saccharides and fatty acids metabolism, disorders of transport and utilisation of microelements have also been recognized. Recent findings concerning hereditary hemochromatosis (iron), Wilson and Menkes diseases (copper), molybdenum cofactor deficiency (molybdenum), defects of cobalamine synthesis (cobalt) and acrodermatitis enteropathica (zinc) are reviewed.

  2. Licensing by modification Licensing by modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veneeta Dayal

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper looks at the phenomena of licensing by modification, whereby an unacceptable noun phrase is redeemed by the presence of a modifier or an unavailable reading for a noun phrase is made available with the addition of a modifier. It argues that an optimal account of such phenomena should derive these effects from the interaction of the meanings of individual expressions in the sentence rather than by positing a formal licensing relation between the modifier and the noun it modifies. The general approach is explicated by considering the distribution of bare plurals in Italian and the availability of generic readings for plural definites in English. The overall goal is a modest one. It seeks to draw attention to properties of modification that go beyond set intersection by focusing on phenomena that have not so far been closely scrutinized in the literature. It uses the particular results to draw some conclusions about questions of general interest.Licensing by modification Abstract: This paper looks at the phenomena of licensing by modification, whereby an unacceptable noun phrase is redeemed by the presence of a modifier or an unavailable reading for a noun phrase is made available with the addition of a modifier. It argues that an optimal account of such phenomena should derive these effects from the interaction of the meanings of individual expressions in the sentence rather than by positing a formal licensing relation between the modifier and the noun it modifies. The general approach is explicated by considering the distribution of bare plurals in Italian and the availability of generic readings for plural definites in English. The overall goal is a modest one. It seeks to draw attention to properties of modification that go beyond set intersection by focusing on phenomena that have not so far been closely scrutinized in the literature. It uses the particular results to draw some conclusions about questions of general

  3. Permit application modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils.

  4. Structural dynamic modification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, the direct problem of determing the new response of a system, after some modifications are introduced into the sestem, is analysed using two different databases: the modal database and the frequency response function database. The limitaions of the modal database are discussed. Structural modifications ...

  5. Permit application modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This document contains the Permit Application Modifications for the Y-12 Industrial Landfill V site on the Oak Ridge Reservation. These modifications include the assessment of stability of the proposed Landfill V under static and loading conditions. Analyses performed include the general slope stability, veneer stability of the bottom liner and cover system, and a liquefaction potential assessment of the foundation soils

  6. Role of sialic acid in synaptosomal transport of amino acid transmitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaleska, M.M.; Erecinska, M.

    1987-01-01

    Active, high-affinity, sodium-dependent uptake of [ 14 C]-aminobutyric acid and of the acidic amino acid D-[ 3 H]-aspartate was inhibited by pretreatment of synaptosomes with neuraminidase from Vibrio cholerae. Inhibition was of a noncompetitive type and was related to the amount of sialic acid released. The maximum accumulation ratios of both amino acids (intracellular [amino acid]/extracellular [amino acid]) remained largely unaltered. Treatment with neuraminidase affected neither the synaptosomal energy levels nor the concentration of internal potassium. It is suggested that the γ-aminobutyric acid and acidic amino acid transporters are glycosylated and that sialic acid is involved in the operation of the carrier proteins directly and not through modification of driving forces responsible for amino acid uptake

  7. Oxidative Modification of Cytochrome c by Tetrahydropapaveroline, an Isoquinoline-Derived Neurotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jung Hoon [Cheongju Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Tetrahyropapaveroline (THP) is compound derived from dopamine metabolism and is capable of causing dopaminergic neurodegenerative disorder, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of THP to cause oxidative damage on the structure of cytochrome c (cyt c). Our data showed that THP led to protein aggregation and the formation of carbonyl compound in protein aggregates. THP also induced the release of iron from cyt c. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers and iron specific chelator inhibited the THP-mediated cyt c modification and carbonyl compound formation. The results of this study show that ROS may play a critical role in THP-induced cyt c modification and iron releasing of cyt c. When cyt c that has been exposed to THP was subsequently analyzed by amino acid analysis, lysine, histidine and methionine residues were particularly sensitive. It is suggested that oxidative damage of cyt c by THP might induce the increase of iron content in cells and subsequently led to the deleterious condition. This mechanism is associated with the deterioration of organs under neurodegenerative disorder such as PD.

  8. 2-Amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jakob T; Andersen, Klaus E

    2016-01-01

    positive patch test reactions to the coupler 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate 2% pet. from 2005 to 2014. METHODS: Patch test results from the Allergen Bank database for eczema patients patch tested with 2-amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate 2% pet. from 2005 to 2014 were reviewed. RESULTS......: A total of 902 dermatitis patients (154 from the dermatology department and 748 from 65 practices) were patch tested with amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate 2% pet. from 2005 to 2014. Thirteen (1.4%) patients had a positive patch test reaction. Our results do not indicate irritant reactions....... CONCLUSIONS: 2-Amino-4-hydroxyethylaminoanisole sulfate is a new but rare contact allergen....

  9. A weak link in metabolism: the metabolic capacity for glycine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... may fall significantly short of the amount needed for all metabolic uses, including collagen synthesis by about 10 g per day for a 70 kg human. This result supports earlier suggestions in the literature that glycine is a semi-essential amino acid and that it should be taken as a nutritional supplement to guarantee a healthy ...

  10. tRNAs: cellular barcodes for amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Rajat; Chen, Shawn; Dare, Kiley

    2010-01-01

    The role of tRNA in translating the genetic code has received considerable attention over the last 50 years, and we now know in great detail how particular amino acids are specifically selected and brought to the ribosome in response to the corresponding mRNA codon. Over the same period, it has...... also become increasingly clear that the ribosome is not the only destination to which tRNAs deliver amino acids, with processes ranging from lipid modification to antibiotic biosynthesis all using aminoacyl-tRNAs as substrates. Here we review examples of alternative functions for tRNA beyond...... translation, which together suggest that the role of tRNA is to deliver amino acids for a variety of processes that includes, but is not limited to, protein synthesis....

  11. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyi Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc. is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  12. carcass amino acid composition and utilization of dietary amino

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maynard (1954), Fisher & Scott (1954), Forbes &. Rao (1959), Hartsook & Mitchell (1956). King (1963) showed that individual amino acids in the carcass could differ widely from the requirement by the anirnal for those particular amino acids used for purposes other than protein synthesis and subsequent retention. How-.

  13. Carbohydrates digestion and metabolism in the spiny lobster (Panulirus argus: biochemical indication for limited carbohydrate utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Rodríguez-Viera

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As other spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus is supposed to use preferentially proteins and lipids in energy metabolism, while carbohydrates are well digested but poorly utilized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary carbohydrate level on digestion and metabolism in the spiny lobster P. argus. We used complementary methodologies such as post-feeding flux of nutrients and metabolites, as well as measurements of α-amylase expression and activity in the digestive tract. Lobsters readily digested and absorbed carbohydrates with a time-course that is dependent on their content in diet. Lobster showed higher levels of free glucose and stored glycogen in different tissues as the inclusion of wheat flour increased. Modifications in intermediary metabolism revealed a decrease in amino acids catabolism coupled with a higher use of free glucose as carbohydrates rise up to 20%. However, this effect seems to be limited by the metabolic capacity of lobsters to use more than 20% of carbohydrates in diets. Lobsters were not able to tightly regulate α-amylase expression according to dietary carbohydrate level but exhibited a marked difference in secretion of this enzyme into the gut. Results are discussed to highlight the limitations to increasing carbohydrate utilization by lobsters. Further growout trials are needed to link the presented metabolic profiles with phenotypic outcomes.

  14. Artificial Metalloenzymes through Chemical Modification of Engineered Host Proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Zernickel, Anna

    2014-10-01

    With a few exceptions, all organisms are restricted to the 20 canonical amino acids for ribosomal protein biosynthesis. Addition of new amino acids to the genetic code can introduce novel functionalities to proteins, broadening the diversity of biochemical as well as chemical reactions and providing new tools to study protein structure, reactivity, dynamics and protein-protein-interactions. The site directed in vivo incorporation developed by P. G. SCHULTZ and coworkers, using an archeal orthogonal tRNA/aaRS (aminoacyl-tRNA synthase) pair, allows site-specifically insertion of a synthetic unnatural amino acid (UAA) by reprogramming the amber TAG stop codon. A variety of over 80 different UAAs can be introduced by this technique. However by now a very limited number can form kinetically stable bonds to late transition metals. This thesis aims to develop new catalytically active unnatural amino acids or strategies for a posttranslational modification of site-specific amino acids in order to achieve highly enantioselective metallorganic enzyme hybrids (MOEH). As a requirement a stable protein host has to be established, surviving the conditions for incorporation, posttranslational modification and the final catalytic reactions. mTFP* a fluorescent protein was genetically modified by excluding any exposed Cys, His and Met forming a variant mTFP*, which fulfills the required specifications. Posttranslational chemical modification of mTFP* allow the introduction of single site metal chelating moieties. For modification on exposed cysteines different maleiimid containing ligand structures were synthesized. In order to perform copper catalyzed click reactions, suitable unnatural amino acids (para-azido-(L)-phenylalanine, para-ethynyl-(L)-phenylalanine) were synthesized and a non-cytotoxic protocol was established. The triazole ring formed during this reaction may contribute as a moderate σ-donor/π-acceptor ligand to the metal binding site. Since the cell limits the

  15. Plasma free amino acid kinetics in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using a bolus injection of 15N-labeled amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jacob William; Yanke, Dan; Mirza, Jeff; Ballantyne, James Stuart

    2011-02-01

    To gain insight into the metabolic design of the amino acid carrier systems in fish, we injected a bolus of (15)N amino acids into the dorsal aorta in mature rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The plasma kinetic parameters including concentration, pool size, rate of disappearance (R(d)), half-life and turnover rate were determined for 15 amino acids. When corrected for metabolic rate, the R(d) values obtained for trout for most amino acids were largely comparable to human values, with the exception of glutamine (which was lower) and threonine (which was higher). R(d) values ranged from 0.9 μmol 100 g(-1) h(-1) (lysine) to 22.1 μmol 100 g(-1) h(-1) (threonine) with most values falling between 2 and 6 μmol 100 g(-1) h(-1). There was a significant correlation between R(d) and the molar proportion of amino acids in rainbow trout whole body protein hydrolysate. Other kinetic parameters did not correlate significantly with whole body amino acid composition. This indicates that an important design feature of the plasma-free amino acids system involves proportional delivery of amino acids to tissues for protein synthesis.

  16. Dietary protein restriction causes modification in aluminum-induced alteration in glutamate and GABA system of rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee Ajay K

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alteration of glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate system have been reported to be associated with neurodegenerative disorders and have been postulated to be involved in aluminum-induced neurotoxicity as well. Aluminum, an well known and commonly exposed neurotoxin, was found to alter glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate levels as well as activities of associated enzymes with regional specificity. Protein malnutrition also reported to alter glutamate level and some of its metabolic enzymes. Thus the region-wise study of levels of brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate system in protein adequacy and inadequacy may be worthwhile to understand the mechanism of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity. Results Protein restriction does not have any significant impact on regional aluminum and γ-aminobutyrate contents of rat brain. Significant interaction of dietary protein restriction and aluminum intoxication to alter regional brain glutamate level was observed in the tested brain regions except cerebellum. Alteration in glutamate α-decarboxylase and γ-aminobutyrate transaminase activities were found to be significantly influenced by interaction of aluminum intoxication and dietary protein restriction in all the tested brain regions. In case of regional brain succinic semialdehyde content, this interaction was significant only in cerebrum and thalamic area. Conclusion The alterations of regional brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate levels by aluminum are region specific as well as dependent on dietary protein intake. The impact of aluminum exposure on the metabolism of these amino acid neurotransmitters are also influenced by dietary protein level. Thus, modification of dietary protein level or manipulation of the brain amino acid homeostasis by any other means may be an useful tool to find out a path to restrict amino acid neurotransmitter alterations in aluminum-associated neurodisorders.

  17. First-pass uptake and oxidation of glucose by the splanchnic tissue in young goats fed soy protein-based milk diets with or without amino acid supplementation: glucose metabolism in goat kids after soy feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhusen, U; Junghans, P; Flöter, A; Steinhoff-Wagner, J; Görs, S; Schneider, F; Metges, C C; Hammon, H M

    2013-04-01

    The study was designed to examine whether feeding soy protein isolate as partial replacement of casein (CN) affects glucose metabolism in young goats and whether effects may be ameliorated by supplementation of those AA known to be lower concentrated in soy than in CN. Goat kids (d 20 of age) were fed comparable milk protein diets, in which 50% of the crude protein was either CN (control, CON), soy protein isolate (SPI), or soy protein isolate supplemented with AA (SPIA) for 43 d (n=8 per group). On d 62 of age, a single bolus dose of d-[(13)C6]glucose (10mg/kg of BW) was given with the morning diet, and simultaneously, a single bolus dose of d-[6,6-(2)H2]glucose (5mg/kg of BW) was injected into a jugular vein. Blood samples were collected between -30 and +420 min relative to the tracer administration to measure the (13)C and (2)H enrichments of plasma glucose and the (13)C enrichment of blood CO2. Glucose first-pass uptake by the splanchnic tissues was calculated from the rate of appearance of differentially labeled glucose tracer in plasma. Glucose oxidation was calculated from (13)C enrichment in blood CO2. In addition, plasma concentrations of triglycerides, nonesterified fatty acids, glucose, insulin, and glucagon were measured. On d 63 of age, kids were killed and jejunal mucosa and liver samples were collected to measure lactase mRNA levels and lactase and maltase activities in the jejunum and activities of pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in the liver. Basal plasma glucose concentration tended to be higher in the CON than the SPIA group, whereas basal insulin was higher in the CON group than the SPI and SPIA groups, and glucagon was higher in the CON than the SPIA group. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations increased during the first hour after feeding, whereas plasma glucagon increased immediately after feeding and after 1h of feeding. First-pass uptake and glucose oxidation were not affected by diet. Maltase

  18. Modifications to POISSON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harwood, L.H.

    1981-01-01

    At MSU we have used the POISSON family of programs extensively for magnetic field calculations. In the presently super-saturated computer situation, reducing the run time for the program is imperative. Thus, a series of modifications have been made to POISSON to speed up convergence. Two of the modifications aim at having the first guess solution as close as possible to the final solution. The other two aim at increasing the convergence rate. In this discussion, a working knowledge of POISSON is assumed. The amount of new code and expected time saving for each modification is discussed

  19. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F.; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins

  20. Amino acids in the rhizosphere: from plants to microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Luke A

    2013-09-01

    Often referred to as the "building blocks of proteins", the 20 canonical proteinogenic amino acids are ubiquitous in biological systems as the functional units in proteins. Sometimes overlooked are their varying additional roles that include serving as metabolic intermediaries, playing structural roles in bioactive natural products, acting as cosubstrates in enzymatic transformations, and as key regulators of cellular physiology. Amino acids can also serve as biological sources of both carbon and nitrogen and are found in the rhizosphere as a result of lysis or cellular efflux from plants and microbes and proteolysis of existing peptides. While both plants and microbes apparently prefer to take up nitrogen in its inorganic form, their ability to take up and use amino acids may confer a selective advantage in certain environments where organic nitrogen is abundant. Further, certain amino acids (e.g., glutamate and proline) and their betaines (e.g., glycine betaine) serve as compatible solutes necessary for osmoregulation in plants and microbes and can undergo rapid cellular flux. This ability is of particular importance in an ecological niche such as the rhizosphere, which is prone to significant variations in solute concentrations. Amino acids are also shown to alter key phenotypes related to plant root growth and microbial colonization, symbiotic interactions, and pathogenesis in the rhizosphere. This review will focus on the sources, transport mechanisms, and potential roles of the 20 canonical proteinogenic amino acids in the r