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Sample records for amethyst trial substudy

  1. Steroids In caRdiac Surgery (SIRS) trial: acute kidney injury substudy protocol of an international randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit X; Vincent, Jessica; Cuerden, Meaghan; Parikh, Chirag; Devereaux, P J; Teoh, Kevin; Yusuf, Salim; Hildebrand, Ainslie; Lamy, Andre; Zuo, Yunxia; Sessler, Daniel I; Shah, Pallav; Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; Quantz, Mackenzie; Yared, Jean-Pierre; Noiseux, Nicolas; Tagarakis, Georgios; Rochon, Antoine; Pogue, Janice; Walsh, Michael; Chan, Matthew T V; Lamontagne, Francois; Salehiomran, Abbas; Whitlock, Richard

    2014-03-05

    Steroids In caRdiac Surgery trial (SIRS) is a large international randomised controlled trial of methylprednisolone or placebo in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of a cardiopulmonary bypass pump. At the time of surgery, compared with placebo, methylprednisolone divided into two intravenous doses of 250 mg each may reduce the risk of postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI). With respect to the study schedule, over 7000 substudy eligible patients from 81 centres in 18 countries were randomised in December 2013. The authors will use a logistic regression to estimate the adjusted OR of methylprednisolone versus placebo on the primary outcome of AKI in the 14 days following surgery (a postoperative increase in serum creatinine of ≥50%, or ≥26.5 μmol/L, from the preoperative value). The stage of AKI will also be considered, as will the outcome of AKI in those with and without preoperative chronic kidney disease. After receipt of grant funding, the authors began to record additional perioperative serum creatinine measurements in consecutive patients enrolled at substudy participating centres, and patients were invited to enroll in a 6-month serum creatinine collection. In these trial subpopulations, the authors will consider the outcome of AKI defined in alternate ways, and the outcome of a 6-month change in kidney function from the preoperative value. The authors were competitively awarded a grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research for this SIRS AKI substudy. Ethics approval was obtained for additional serum creatinine recordings in consecutive patients enrolled at participating centres. The additional kidney data collection first began for patients enrolled after 1 March 2012. In patients who provided consent, the last 6-month kidney outcome data will be collected in 2014. The results will be reported no later than 2015. Number NCT00427388.

  2. Safety and efficacy of re-treatments with pyronaridine-artesunate in African patients with malaria: a substudy of the WANECAM randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sagara, Issaka; Beavogui, Abdoul Habib; Zongo, Issaka; Soulama, Issiaka; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Fofana, Bakary; Camara, Daouda; Somé, Anyirékun F; Coulibaly, Aboubacar S; Traore, Oumar B; Dara, Niawanlou; Kabore, Moïse J T; Thera, Ismaila; Compaore, Yves D; Sylla, Malick Minkael

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Sparse data on the safety of pyronaridine-artesunate after repeated treatment of malaria episodes restrict its clinical use. We therefore compared the safety of pyronaridine-artesunate after treatment of the first episode of malaria versus re-treatment in a substudy analysis. Methods This planned substudy analysis of the randomised, open-label West African Network for Clinical Trials of Antimalarial Drugs (WANECAM) phase 3b/4 trial was done at six health facilities in Mali,...

  3. A new radiation shielding material: Amethyst ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkut, Turgay, E-mail: turgaykorkut@hotmail.co [Faculty of Science and Art, Department of Physics, Ibrahim Cecen University, Agri (Turkey); Korkut, Hatun [Faculty of Science and Art, Department of Physics, Ibrahim Cecen University, Agri (Turkey); Karabulut, Abdulhalik; Budak, Goekhan [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-01-15

    This paper describes a new radiation shielding material, amethyst ore. We have determined the elemental composition of amethyst using WDXRF spectroscopy technique. To see the shielding capability of amethyst for several photon energies, these results have been used in simulation process by FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Linear attenuation coefficients have been calculated according to the simulation results. Then, these values have been compared to a fine shielding concrete material. The results show that amethyst shields more gamma beams than concrete. This investigation is the first study about the radiation shielding properties of amethyst ore.

  4. Effect of Patiromer on Serum Potassium Level in Patients With Hyperkalemia and Diabetic Kidney Disease: The AMETHYST-DN Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakris, George L; Pitt, Bertram; Weir, Matthew R; Freeman, Mason W; Mayo, Martha R; Garza, Dahlia; Stasiv, Yuri; Zawadzki, Rezi; Berman, Lance; Bushinsky, David A

    2015-07-14

    Hyperkalemia is a potentially life-threatening condition predominantly seen in patients treated with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitors with stage 3 or greater chronic kidney disease (CKD) who may also have diabetes, heart failure, or both. To select starting doses for a phase 3 study and to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of a potassium-binding polymer, patiromer, in outpatients with hyperkalemia. Phase 2, multicenter, open-label, dose-ranging, randomized clinical trial (AMETHYST-DN), conducted at 48 sites in Europe from June 2011 to June 2013 evaluating patiromer in 306 outpatients with type 2 diabetes (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 15 to 5.0 mEq/L). All patients received RAAS inhibitors prior to and during study treatment. Patients were stratified by baseline serum potassium level into mild or moderate hyperkalemia groups and received 1 of 3 randomized starting doses of patiromer (4.2 g [n = 74], 8.4 g [n = 74], or 12.6 g [n = 74] twice daily [mild hyperkalemia] or 8.4 g [n = 26], 12.6 g [n = 28], or 16.8 g [n = 30] twice daily [moderate hyperkalemia]). Patiromer was titrated to achieve and maintain serum potassium level 5.0 mEq/L or lower. The primary efficacy end point was mean change in serum potassium level from baseline to week 4 or prior to initiation of dose titration. The primary safety end point was adverse events through 52 weeks. Secondary efficacy end points included mean change in serum potassium level through 52 weeks. A total of 306 patients were randomized. The least squares mean reduction from baseline in serum potassium level at week 4 or time of first dose titration in patients with mild hyperkalemia was 0.35 (95% CI, 0.22-0.48) mEq/L for the 4.2 g twice daily starting-dose group, 0.51 (95% CI, 0.38-0.64) mEq/L for the 8.4 g twice daily starting-dose group, and 0.55 (95% CI, 0.42-0.68) mEq/L for the 12.6 g twice daily starting-dose group. In those with moderate hyperkalemia, the

  5. Clinical trials update from the Heart Failure Society of America Meeting 2009: FAST, IMPROVE-HF, COACH galectin-3 substudy, HF-ACTION nuclear substudy, DAD-HF, and MARVEL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lainscak, Mitja; Coletta, Alison P; Sherwi, Nasser; Cleland, John G F

    2010-02-01

    This article presents findings and a commentary on late-breaking trials presented during the meeting of the Heart Failure Society of America in September 2009. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, since analyses may change in the final publication. The FAST trial showed somewhat better performance of intrathoracic impedance for prediction of deterioration in patients with heart failure (HF) when compared with daily weighing. The IMPROVE-HF study reported the benefits of education on the management of patients with systolic HF. Galectin-3 appeared a useful method for improving risk stratification of patients with chronic HF in a substudy of the COACH trial. A nuclear substudy of the HF-ACTION trial failed to demonstrate that resting myocardial perfusion imaging, a measure of myocardial scar and viability, was clinically useful. A small randomized controlled trial (DAD-HF) suggested that the use of low-dose dopamine in patients with acutely decompensated HF was associated with less deterioration in renal function and less hypokalaemia. The MARVEL-1 trial raises further concerns about the safety of myoblast transplantation in ischaemic HF.

  6. The Effects of Steroids on Coagulation Dysfunction Induced by Cardiopulmonary Bypass: A Steroids in Cardiac Surgery (SIRS) Trial Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparella, Domenico; Parolari, Alessandro; Rotunno, Crescenzia; Vincent, Jessica; Myasoedova, Veronica; Guida, Pietro; De Palo, Micaela; Margari, Vito; Devereaux, Philip J; Lamy, Andre; Alamanni, Francesco; Yusuf, Salim; Whitlock, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery, despite heparin administration, elicits activation of coagulation system resulting in coagulopathy. Anti-inflammatory effects of steroid treatment have been demonstrated, but its effects on coagulation system are unknown. The primary objective of this study is to assess the effects of methylprednisolone on coagulation function by evaluating thrombin generation, fibrinolysis, and platelet activation in high-risk patients undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB. The Steroids In caRdiac Surgery study is a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial performed on 7507 patients worldwide who were randomized to receive either intravenous methylprednisolone, 250 mg at anesthetic induction and 250 mg at initiation of CPB (n = 3755), or placebo (n = 3752). A substudy was conducted in 2 sites to collect blood samples perioperatively to measure prothrombin fragment 1.2 (PF1+2, thrombin generation), plasmin-antiplasmin complex (PAP, fibrinolysis), platelet factor 4 (PF4 platelet activation), and fibrinogen. Eighty-one patients were enrolled in the substudy (37 placebo vs 44 in treatment group). No difference in clinical outcome was detected, including postoperative bleeding and need for blood products transfusion. All patients showed changes of all plasma biomarkers with greater values than baseline in both groups. This reaction was attenuated significantly in the treatment group for PF1.2 (P = 0.040) and PAP (P = 0.042) values at the first intraoperative measurement. No difference between groups was detected for PF4. Methylprednisolone treatment attenuates activation of coagulation system in high-risk patients undergoing CPB surgery. Reduction of thrombin generation and fibrinolysis activation may lead to reduced blood loss after surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Adherence to antiretroviral prophylaxis for HIV prevention: a substudy cohort within a clinical trial of serodiscordant couples in East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E Haberer

    Full Text Available Randomized clinical trials of oral antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP for HIV prevention have widely divergent efficacy estimates, ranging from 0% to 75%. These discrepancies are likely due to differences in adherence. To our knowledge, no studies to date have examined the impact of improving adherence through monitoring and/or intervention, which may increase PrEP efficacy, or reported on objective behavioral measures of adherence, which can inform PrEP effectiveness and implementation.Within the Partners PrEP Study (a randomized placebo-controlled trial of oral tenofovir and emtricitabine/tenofovir among HIV-uninfected members of serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda, we collected objective measures of PrEP adherence using unannounced home-based pill counts and electronic pill bottle monitoring. Participants received individual and couples-based adherence counseling at PrEP initiation and throughout the study; counseling was intensified if unannounced pill count adherence fell to 80% adherence. Study limitations include potential shortcomings of the adherence measures and use of a convenience sample within the substudy cohort.The high PrEP adherence achieved in the setting of active adherence monitoring and counseling support was associated with a high degree of protection from HIV acquisition by the HIV-uninfected partner in heterosexual serodiscordant couples. Low PrEP adherence was associated with sexual behavior, alcohol use, younger age, and length of PrEP use. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  8. European multicentre double-blind placebo-controlled trial of Nilvadipine in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease-the substudy protocols: NILVAD frailty; NILVAD blood and genetic biomarkers; NILVAD cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers; NILVAD cerebral blood flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroek, O.V.; O'Dwyer, S.; Jong, D. de; Spijker, G.J. van; Kennelly, S.; Cregg, F.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Abdullah, L.; Wallin, A.; Walsh, C.; Coen, R.; Kenny, R.A.; Daly, L.; Segurado, R.; Borjesson-Hanson, A.; Crawford, F.; Mullan, M.; Lucca, U.; Banzi, R.; Pasquier, F.; Breuilh, L.; Riepe, M.; Kalman, J.; Molloy, W.; Tsolaki, M.; Howard, R.; Adams, J.; Gaynor, S.; Lawlor, B.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In conjunction with the NILVAD trial, a European Multicentre Double-Blind Placebo Controlled trial of Nilvadipine in Mild-to-Moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), there are four NILVAD substudies in which eligible NILVAD patients are also invited to participate. The main NILVAD protocol

  9. Steroids In caRdiac Surgery (SIRS) trial: acute kidney injury substudy protocol of an international randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garg, Amit X; Vincent, Jessica; Cuerden, Meaghan; Parikh, Chirag; Devereaux, P J; Teoh, Kevin; Yusuf, Salim; Hildebrand, Ainslie; Lamy, Andre; Zuo, Yunxia; Sessler, Daniel I; Shah, Pallav; Abbasi, Seyed Hesameddin; Quantz, Mackenzie; Yared, Jean-Pierre; Noiseux, Nicolas; Tagarakis, Georgios; Rochon, Antoine; Pogue, Janice; Walsh, Michael; Chan, Matthew T V; Lamontagne, Francois; Salehiomran, Abbas; Whitlock, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Steroids In caRdiac Surgery trial (SIRS) is a large international randomised controlled trial of methylprednisolone or placebo in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of a cardiopulmonary bypass pump...

  10. Effectiveness of compression stockings to prevent the post-thrombotic syndrome (The SOX Trial and Bio-SOX biomarker substudy: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodger Marc A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post thrombotic syndrome (PTS is a burdensome and costly complication of deep venous thrombosis (DVT that develops in 20–40% of patients within 1–2 years after symptomatic DVT. Affected patients have chronic leg pain and swelling and may develop ulcers. Venous valve disruption from the thrombus itself or thrombus-associated mediators of inflammation is considered to be a key initiating event for the development of venous hypertension that often underlies PTS. As existing treatments for PTS are extremely limited, strategies that focus on preventing the development of PTS in patients with DVT are more likely to be effective and cost-effective in reducing its burden. Elastic compression stockings (ECS could be helpful in preventing PTS; however, data on their effectiveness are scarce and conflicting. Methods/Design The SOX Trial is a randomized, allocation concealed, double-blind multicenter clinical trial. The objective of the study is to evaluate ECS to prevent PTS. A total of 800 patients with proximal DVT will be randomized to one of 2 treatment groups: ECS or placebo (inactive stockings worn on the DVT-affected leg daily for 2 years. The primary outcome is the incidence of PTS during follow-up. Secondary outcomes are severity of PTS, venous thromboembolism (VTE recurrence, death from VTE, quality of life and cost-effectiveness. Outcomes will be evaluated during 6 clinic visits and 2 telephone follow ups. At baseline, 1 and 6 months, blood samples will be obtained to evaluate the role of inflammatory mediators and genetic markers of thrombophilia in the development of PTS (Bio-SOX substudy. Discussion The SOX Trial will be the largest study and the first with a placebo control to evaluate the effectiveness of ECS to prevent PTS. It is designed to provide definitive data on the effects of ECS on the occurrence and severity of PTS, as well as DVT recurrence, cost-effectiveness and quality of life. This study will also

  11. Comparison of the acute-phase response after laparoscopic versus open aortobifemoral bypass surgery: a substudy of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krog AH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Anne H Krog,1,2 Mehdi Sahba,3 Erik M Pettersen,4 Irene Sandven,5 Per M Thorsby,1,6 Jørgen J Jørgensen,1,2 Jon O Sundhagen,2 Syed SS Kazmi2 1Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 2Department of Vascular Surgery, Division of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Diseases, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, 3Department of Vascular Surgery, Østfold Central Hospital, Fredrikstad, 4Department of Vascular Surgery, Sørlandet Hospital HF, Kristiansand, 5Oslo Center for Biostatistics and Epidemiology (OCBE, 6Hormone Laboratory, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Purpose: Minimally invasive surgical techniques have been shown to reduce the inflammatory response related to a surgical procedure. The main objective of our study was to measure the inflammatory response in patients undergoing a totally laparoscopic versus open aortobifemoral bypass surgery. This is the first randomized trial on subjects in this population.Patients and methods: This is a substudy of a larger randomized controlled multicenter trial (Norwegian Laparoscopic Aortic Surgery Trial. Thirty consecutive patients with severe aortoiliac occlusive disease eligible for aortobifemoral bypass surgery were randomized to either a totally laparoscopic (n=14 or an open surgical procedure (n=16. The inflammatory response was measured by perioperative monitoring of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-8, and C-reactive protein (CRP at six different time points.Results: The inflammatory reaction caused by the laparoscopic procedure was reduced compared with open surgery. IL-6 was significantly lower after the laparoscopic procedure, measured by comparing area under the curve (AUC, and after adjusting for the confounding effect of coronary heart disease (P=0.010. The differences in serum levels of IL-8 and CRP did not reach statistical significance.Conclusion: In this substudy of a randomized controlled trial comparing laparoscopic and open aortobifemoral bypass

  12. Immunologic Effects of Maraviroc in HIV-Infected Patients with Severe CD4 Lymphopenia Starting Antiretroviral Therapy: A Sub-Study of the CADIRIS Trial

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    Pablo Francisco Belaunzarán-Zamudio

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:  We aimed to describe the mechanisms of immunological recovery and the effects of blocking CCR5 in patients starting ART with advanced HIV-infection. Methods: Sub-study of a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial where patients starting ART with CD4 counts <100cells/uL received maraviroc or placebo. CD4 and CD8 maturation phenotypes, PD-1 and CCR5 expression, and activation indices were characterized at weeks 0, 4, 12, 24 and 48. CD4 and CD8 reactivity with peptides of CMV, MTb and with Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB was assessed by intracellular expression of IFNγ, TNFα and CD40 ligand at weeks 0, 4 and 12 of ART. Results: Forty patients were studied (Maraviroc=22; placebo=18. Sustained increases in CD8 were observed in the maraviroc arm. Significant, increases in the proportions of circulating CCR5+ CD4 and CD8; in central memory and effector memory CD8; and in the proportion of activated CD4 and CD8 were observed at week 4 in the maraviroc arm. T cell responses to CMV, MTb and SEB did not differ by treatment arms.  Conclusions: The higher increases of CCR5+ and activated CD4 and CD8 in circulation without affecting CD4 recovery or antigen-specific T-cell responses strongly suggests an increased retention in circulation of CCR5+ cells due to maraviroc.

  13. Excess pressure integral predicts cardiovascular events independent of other risk factors in the conduit artery functional evaluation substudy of Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Justin E; Lacy, Peter; Tillin, Therese; Collier, David; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Francis, Darrel P; Malaweera, Anura; Mayet, Jamil; Stanton, Alice; Williams, Bryan; Parker, Kim H; McG Thom, Simon A; Hughes, Alun D

    2014-07-01

    Excess pressure integral (XSPI), a new index of surplus work performed by the left ventricle, can be calculated from blood pressure waveforms and may indicate circulatory dysfunction. We investigated whether XSPI predicted future cardiovascular events and target organ damage in treated hypertensive individuals. Radial blood pressure waveforms were acquired by tonometry in 2069 individuals (aged, 63±8 years) in the Conduit Artery Functional Evaluation (CAFE) substudy of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT). Measurements of left ventricular mass index (n=862) and common carotid artery intima media thickness (n=923) were also performed. XSPI and the integral of reservoir pressure were lower in people treated with amlodipine±perindopril than in those treated with atenolol±bendroflumethiazide, although brachial systolic blood pressure was similar. A total of 134 cardiovascular events accrued during a median 3.4 years of follow-up; XSPI was a significant predictor of cardiovascular events after adjustment for age and sex, and this relationship was unaffected by adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors or Framingham risk score. XSPI, central systolic blood pressure, central augmentation pressure, central pulse pressure, and integral of reservoir pressure were correlated with left ventricular mass index, but only XSPI, augmentation pressure, and central pulse pressure were associated positively with carotid artery intima media thickness. Associations between left ventricular mass index, XSPI, and integral of reservoir pressure and carotid artery intima media thickness and XSPI were unaffected by multivariable adjustment for other covariates. XSPI is a novel indicator of cardiovascular dysfunction and independently predicts cardiovascular events and targets organ damage in a prospective clinical trial.

  14. ACE Inhibition and Endothelial Function: Main Findings of PERFECT, a Sub-Study of the EUROPA Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bots, M.L.; Remme, W.J.; Lüscher, T.F.; Fox, K.M.; Bertrand, M.; Ferrari, R.; Simoons, M.L.; Grobbee, D.E.; EUROPA-PERFECT Investigators

    2007-01-01

    Background: ACE inhibition results in secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD) through different mechanisms including improvement of endothelial dysfunction. The Perindopril-Function of the Endothelium in Coronary artery disease Trial (PERFECT) evaluated whether long-term administratio

  15. Photo-induced dipole relaxation current in natural Amethyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Trombini Russo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC measurements were carried out for SiO2 in the amethyst form, aiming to investigate the relationship of observed current with relaxation phenomena related to quartz impurities. In addition to TSDC conventional dark procedure, photo-induced TSDC was also carried out, where the exciting light came from an Ar+ laser, tuned either at 488 nm or at 541 nm. X-ray diffraction and optical absorption measurements were used as complement for the interpretation of TSDC data. Optical absorption data, mainly in the range 400-700 nm, allow identifying the characteristic bands of amethyst as well as to relate them with TSDC and photo-induced TSDC data, leading to a relationship between absorption bands and light irradiation with selected wavelengths. These results allow determining how the formation of a TSDC band in the range 220-260 K, is affected by the light absorption, modifying the formation and the dipole orientation distribution in the samples. Results also help the verification of defects formed by Fe3+ or Fe4+ ions in the amethyst structure, as well as suggest that these defects, besides the participation in the amethyst structure as color centers, also play a role in the formation of TSDC bands, contributing for the observed effect of monochromatic light irradiation on these bands.

  16. Patients' and clinicians' preferences for adjuvant chemotherapy in endometrial cancer: an ANZGOG substudy of the PORTEC-3 intergroup randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinman, Prunella; Mileshkin, Linda; Khaw, Pearly; Goss, Geraldine; Johnson, Carol; Capp, Anne; Brooks, Susan; Wain, Gerard; Kolodziej, Ilka; Veillard, Anne-Sophie; O'Connell, Rachel; Creutzberg, Carien L; Stockler, Martin R

    2016-11-08

    To determine the minimum survival benefits that patients, and their clinicians, judged sufficient to make adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) worthwhile, in addition to pelvic radiotherapy, for women with high risk and advanced stage endometrial cancer. Eighty-three participants in the PORTEC-3 trial completed a time trade-off questionnaire before and after adjuvant therapy; 44 of their clinicians completed it once only. The questionnaire used four hypothetical scenarios including baseline survival times without ACT of 5 and 8 years, and baseline survival rates at 5 years without ACT of 50 and 65%. Over 50% of patients judged an extra 1 year of survival time or an extra 5% in survival rate sufficient to make ACT worthwhile. Over 50% of clinicians judged an extra 1 year of survival time, or an extra 10% in survival rate, sufficient to make ACT worthwhile. Compared with patients, clinicians required similar survival time benefits (medians both 1 year, P=0.4), but larger survival rate benefits (medians 8.5% vs 5%, P=0.03), and clinicians' preferences varied less (IQR 0.5-1.5 years vs 0.4-2 years, P=0.0007; 5-10% vs 1-13%, P=0.004). Patients' preferences changed over time for the survival rate scenarios depending on whether they had ACT or not (change in median benefit - 3 months vs 2.5 months respectively, P=0.028). There were no strong predictors of patients' or clinicians' preferences. Patients and clinicians judged moderate survival benefits sufficient to make ACT worthwhile after pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer. These benefits are larger than those judged sufficient by patients with breast or colon cancers, but similar to those judged sufficient by patients with lung or ovarian cancers.

  17. Hemodynamic Consequences of Malignant Ascites in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Surgery*: A Prospective Substudy of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsicker, Oliver; Fotopoulou, Christina; Pietzner, Klaus; Koch, Mandy; Krannich, Alexander; Sehouli, Jalid; Spies, Claudia; Feldheiser, Aarne

    2015-12-01

    Malignant ascites (MA) is most commonly observed in patients scheduled for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) surgery and is supposed as a major risk factor promoting perioperative hemodynamic deterioration. We aimed to assess the hemodynamic consequences of MA on systemic circulation in patients undergoing cytoreductive EOC surgery.This study is a predefined post-hoc analysis of a randomized controlled pilot trial comparing intravenous solutions within a goal-directed algorithm to optimize hemodynamic therapy in patients undergoing cytoreductive EOC surgery. Ascites was used to stratify the EOC patients prior to randomization in the main study. We analyzed 2 groups according to the amount of ascites (NLAS: none or low ascites [500 mL]). Differences in hemodynamic variables with respect to time were analyzed using nonparametric analysis for longitudinal data and multivariate generalized estimating equation adjusting the analysis for the randomized study groups of the main study.A total of 31 patients in the NLAS and 16 patients in the HAS group were analyzed. Although cardiac output was not different between groups suggesting a similar circulatory blood flow, the HAS group revealed higher heart rates and lower stroke volumes during surgery. There were no differences in pressure-based hemodynamic variables. In the HAS group, fluid demands, reflected by the time to reindication of a fluid challenge after preload optimization, increased steadily, whereas stroke volume could not be maintained at baseline resulting in hemodynamic instability after 1.5 h of surgery. In contrast, in the NLAS group fluid demands were stable and stroke volume could be maintained during surgery. Clinically relevant associations of the type of fluid replacement with hemodynamic consequences were particularly observed in the HAS group, in which transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) was associated to an improved circulatory flow and reduced vasopressor and fluid demands, whereas the

  18. Dual role of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in stent struts endothelialisation and neointimal regrowth: A substudy of the IN-PACT CORO trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Maria, Giovanni Luigi [Institute of Cardiology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Porto, Italo, E-mail: italo.porto@gmail.com [Institute of Cardiology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Interventional Cardiology Unit, San Donato Hospital, Arezzo (Italy); Burzotta, Francesco; Brancati, Marta Francesca; Trani, Carlo; Pirozzolo, Giancarlo; Leone, Antonio Maria; Niccoli, Giampaolo [Institute of Cardiology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Prati, Francesco [Department of Interventional Cardiology, San Giovanni Hospital, Rome (Italy); Crea, Filippo [Institute of Cardiology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Background: Endothelialisation is a crucial event after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are bone marrow derived elements with reparative properties. We aimed to assess the relationship between circulating EPC levels and stent neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) using frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). Methods: Patients undergoing elective PCI to native vessels and randomised to bare metal stent (BMS) alone versus BMS plus drug coated balloon (DCB) were included. At six months, angiographic follow-up and FD-OCT were performed to measure percentage neointimal hyperplasia volume obstruction (%NIHV), and percentage of uncovered stent struts (%US). Venous blood samples were obtained before the procedure and at six months to detect CD34+CD45dimKDR + EPC levels. Results: Twenty patients were enrolled. A significant relationship was observed between baseline EPC levels and %NIHV (R: 0.63, p: 0.03) and %US (R: − 0.56, p: 0.01) at follow-up. Both EPC levels and DCB use were independently related to %NIHV (β: 0.55; p < 0.001 and β: − 0.51; p: 0.001, respectively), while only EPC levels were independently associated to %US (β: − 0.52; p: 0.01). Higher %NIHV (p: 0.004) and lower %US (p: 0.005) were observed in patients with stable or increasing EPC level. Conclusion: Our study shows a relationship between EPC levels and stent strut coverage, supporting a dual role for these cells in favouring stent endothelialisation but also NIH growth. - Highlights: • Substudy of IN-PACT CORO trial comparing, by adoption of optical coherence tomography, the amount of neointimal growth and stent struts coverage at six months of follow up, in elective patients randomised to conventional PCI with bare metal stent implantation (BMS group) or to stent implantation with pre or postdilation with a drug coated balloon (BMS + DCB group) • Lower neointimal regrowth observed in BMS + DCB group • First in vivo demonstration that

  19. Properties of sintered amethyst pellets as thermoluminescent dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, F.D.G.; Oliveira, M.L.; Cecatti, Sonia G.P.; Caldas, Linda V.E. E-mail: lcaldas@net.ipen.br

    2003-01-01

    The main dosimetric characteristics of amethyst, Brazilian natural semi-precious stone, were investigated in this work, in order to verify the possibility of its use for gamma-radiation detection using the thermoluminescent (TL) technique. The samples were tested in X- and gamma-radiation beams, and their TL glow curves, dependences of the response on the absorbed dose and radiation energy, and the response reproducibility were investigated. The preliminary results show the usefulness of this material in dosimetry for radiation processing.

  20. What Oxidation State of Iron Determines the Amethyst Colour?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dedushenko, S. K. [Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Makhina, I. B.; Mar' in, A. A.; Mukhanov, V. A. [Russian Research Institute for Synthesis of Materials (Russian Federation); Perfiliev, Yu. D. [Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation)

    2004-12-15

    A colourless quartz crystal doped with {sup 57}Fe{sup 3+} was obtained by hydrothermal synthesis in an NH{sub 4}F solution. The crystal was transformed into violet amethyst by gamma-irradiation. The change in colour was accompanied by changes in the Moessbauer spectrum that can be interpreted as the conversion of trivalent iron into the tetravalent state: Fe{sup 3+{yields}F}e{sup 4+}.

  1. Bias due to lack of patient blinding in clinical trials. A systematic review of trials randomizing patients to blind and nonblind sub-studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Emanuelsson, Frida; Skou Thomsen, Ann Sofia

    2014-01-01

    . There was a larger effect size difference in 10 acupuncture trials [-0.63 (-0.77 to -0.49)], than in the two non-acupuncture trials [-0.17 (-0.41 to 0.07)]. Lack of patient blinding also increased attrition and use of co-interventions: ratio of control group attrition risk 1.79 (1.18 to 2.70), and ratio of control...

  2. EXCESS PRESSURE INTEGRAL PREDICTS CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS INDEPENDENT OF OTHER RISK FACTORS IN THE CONDUIT ARTERY FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION (CAFE) SUB-STUDY OF ANGLO-SCANDINAVIAN CARDIAC OUTCOMES TRIAL (ASCOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Justin E; Lacy, Peter; Tillin, Therese; Collier, David; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Francis, Darrel P; Malaweera, Anura; Mayet, Jamil; Stanton, Alice; Williams, Bryan; Parker, Kim H; McG Thom, Simon A; Hughes, Alun D

    2014-01-01

    Excess pressure integral (XSPI), a new index of surplus work performed by the left ventricle, can be calculated from blood pressure (BP) waveforms and may indicate circulatory dysfunction. We investigated whether XSPI predicted future cardiovascular (CV) events and target organ damage in treated hypertensive individuals. Radial BP waveforms were acquired by tonometry in 2069 individuals (63±8y) in the Conduit Artery Functional Evaluation sub-study of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes trial. Measurements of left ventricular mass index (LVMI; n = 862) and common carotid artery intima media thickness (cIMT; n = 923) were also performed. XSPI and the integral of reservoir pressure (PRI) were lower in people treated with amlodipine ± perindopril than atenolol ± bendroflumethiazide, although brachial systolic BP was similar. A total of 134 CV events accrued over a median 3.4 years of follow-up; XSPI was a significant predictor of CV events after adjustment for age and sex and this relationship was unaffected by adjustment for conventional CV risk factors or Framingham risk score. XSPI, central systolic BP, central augmentation pressure (AP), central pulse pressure (cPP) and PRI were correlated with LVMI, but only XSPI, AP and cPP were positively associated with cIMT. Associations between LVMI and XSPI and PRI, and cIMT and XSPI were unaffected by multivariable adjustment for other covariates. XSPI is a novel indicator of CV dysfunction and independently predicts CV events and target organ damage in a prospective clinical trial. PMID:24821941

  3. The Pharmacodynamic Impact of Apremilast, an Oral Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor, on Circulating Levels of Inflammatory Biomarkers in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: Substudy Results from a Phase III, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial (PALACE 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. Schafer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, demonstrated effectiveness (versus placebo for treatment of active psoriatic arthritis in the psoriatic arthritis long-term assessment of clinical efficacy (PALACE phase III clinical trial program. Pharmacodynamic effects of apremilast on plasma biomarkers associated with inflammation were evaluated in a PALACE 1 substudy. Of 504 patients randomized in PALACE 1, 150 (placebo: n=51; apremilast 20 mg BID: n=51; apremilast 30 mg BID: n=48 provided peripheral blood plasma samples for analysis in a multiplexed cytometric bead array assay measuring 47 proteins associated with systemic inflammatory immune responses. Association between biomarker levels and achievement of 20% improvement from baseline in modified American College of Rheumatology (ACR20 response criteria was assessed by logistic regression. At Week 24, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-6, MIP-1β, MCP-1, and ferritin were significantly reduced from baseline with apremilast 20 mg BID or 30 mg BID versus placebo. ACR20 response correlated with change in TNF-α level with both apremilast doses. At Week 40, IL-17, IL-23, IL-6, and ferritin were significantly decreased and IL-10 and IL-1 receptor antagonists significantly increased with apremilast 30 mg BID versus placebo. In patients with active psoriatic arthritis, apremilast reduced circulating levels of Th1 and Th17 proinflammatory mediators and increased anti-inflammatory mediators.

  4. Genetic Variants Are Not Associated with Outcome in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease and Left Ventricular Dysfunction: Results of the Genetic Sub-study of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Arthur M.; She, Lilin; McNamara, Dennis M.; Mann, Douglas L.; Bristow, Michael R.; Maisel, Alan S.; Wagner, Daniel R.; Andersson, Bert; Chiariello, Luigi; Hayward, Christopher S.; Hendry, Paul; Parker, John D.; Racine, Normand; Selzman, Craig H.; Senni, Michele; Stepinska, Janina; Zembala, Marian; Rouleau, Jean; Velazquez, Eric J.; Lee, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives and Background We evaluated the ability of 23 genetic variants to provide prognostic information in patients enrolled in the Genotype Sub-studies of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trials. Methods Patients in STICH Hypothesis 1 were randomized to medical therapy with or without CABG (Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting). Those in STICH Hypothesis 2 were randomized to CABG or CABG with left ventricular reconstruction. Results In patients assigned to STICH Hypothesis 2 (n=714), no genetic variant met the pre-specified Bonferroni-adjusted threshold for statistical significance (p<0.002); however, several met nominal prognostic significance: variants in the β2-adrenergic receptor gene (β2-AR Gln27Glu) and in the A1-adenosine receptor gene (A1-717 T/G) were associated with an increased risk of a subject dying or being hospitalized for a cardiac problem (p=0.027 and 0.031, respectively). These relationships remained nominally significant even after multivariable adjustment for prognostic clinical variables. However, none of the 23 genetic variants influenced all-cause mortality or the combination of death or cardiovascular hospitalization in the STICH Hypothesis 1 population (n=532) by either univariate or multivariable analysis. Conclusion We were unable to identify the predictive genotypes in optimally treated patients in these two ischemic heart failure populations. PMID:25592552

  5. Assessment of brain tissue injury after moderate hypothermia in neonates with hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy: a nested substudy of a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rutherford, Mary; Ramenghi, Luca A; Edwards, A. David; Brocklehurst, Peter; Halliday, Henry; Levene, Malcolm; Strohm, Brenda; Thoresen, Marianne; Whitelaw, Andrew; Azzopardi, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Moderate hypothermia in neonates with hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy might improve survival and neurological outcomes at up to 18 months of age, although complete neurological assessment at this age is difficult. To ascertain more precisely the effect of therapeutic hypothermia on neonatal cerebral injury, we assessed cerebral lesions on MRI scans of infants who participated in the Total Body Hypothermia for Neonatal Encephalopathy (TOBY) trial. Methods In the TOBY trial ...

  6. Fracture risk and the use of a diuretic (indapamide sr ± perindopril: a substudy of the Hypertension in the Very Elderly Trial (HYVET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs Lutgarde

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hypertension in the Very Elderly Trial (HYVET is a placebo controlled double blind trial of treating hypertension with indapamide Slow Release (SR ± perindopril in subjects over the age of 80 years. The primary endpoints are stroke (fatal and non fatal. In view of the fact that thiazide diuretics and indapamide reduce urinary calcium and may increase bone mineral density, a fracture sub study was designed to investigate whether or not the trial anti-hypertensive treatment will reduce the fracture rate in very elderly hypertensive subjects. Methods In the trial considerable care is taken to ascertain any fractures and to identify risk factors for fracture, such as falls, co-morbidity, drug treatment, smoking and drinking habits, levels of activity, biochemical abnormalities, cardiac irregularities, impaired cognitive function and symptoms of orthostatic hypotension. Potential results The trial is expected to provide 10,500 patient years of follow-up. Given a fracture rate of 40/1000 patient years and a 20% difference in fracture rate, the power of the sub study is 58% to detect this difference at the 5% level of significance. The corresponding power for a reduction of 25% is 78%. Conclusion The trial is well under way, expected to complete in 2009, and on target to detect, if present, the above differences in fracture rate.

  7. Effect of salt reduction on iodine status assessed by 24 hour urinary iodine excretion in children and their families in northern China: a substudy of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng J; Ma, Yuan; Feng, Xiangxian; Zhang, Wanqi; Lin, Laixiang; Guo, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jing; Niu, Wenyi; Wu, Yangfeng; MacGregor, Graham A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of salt reduction on iodine status and to determine whether iodine consumption was still adequate after salt reduction in a population where universal salt iodisation is mandatory. Design A substudy of a cluster randomised controlled trial, with schools randomly assigned to either the intervention or the control group. Setting 28 primary schools in Changzhi, northern China. Participants 279 children in grade 5 of primary school (mean age: 10.1); 553 adults (age: 43.8). Intervention Children were educated about the harmful effects of salt and how to reduce salt intake using the schools' usual health education lessons. Children then delivered the message to their families. The duration was 1 school term (≈3.5 months). Main outcome measure Difference between the intervention and control groups in the change of iodine intake as measured by repeat 24 hour urinary iodine from baseline to the end of the trial. Results At baseline, the mean salt intake was 7.0±2.5 g/day in children and 11.7±4.4 g/day in adults and the median iodine intake was 165.1 μg/day (IQR: 122.6–216.7) and 280.7 μg/day (IQR: 205.1–380.9) in children and adults, respectively. At the end of the study, salt and iodine decreased in the intervention compared with control group. The mean effect on salt for intervention versus control was −1.9 g/day (95% CI −2.6 to −1.3) in children and −2.9 g/day (95% CI −3.7 to −2.2) in adults. The mean effect on iodine was −19.3% (95% CI −29.4% to −7.7%) in children and −11.4% (95% CI −20.3% to −1.5%) in adults. Conclusions With ≈25% reduction in salt intake, there was a significant reduction in iodine consumption in northern China where salt is iodised. Despite this, iodine intake was still adequate, and well above the estimated average requirement. Our findings indicate that reducing salt to the WHO's target—30% reduction by 2025—will not compromise iodine status. Trial registration

  8. Retrospective quality control review of FDG scans in the imaging sub-study of PALETTE EORTC 62072/VEG110727: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hristova, Ivalina [European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium); Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boellaard, Ronald [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vogel, Wouter [The Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix [Maastricht University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Marreaud, Sandrine; Collette, Sandra [European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium); Schoeffski, Patrick [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of General Medical Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, Department of Oncology, KU Leuven (Belgium); Sanfilippo, Roberta [Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano (Italy); Dewji, Raz [GlaxoSmithKline, Oncology R and D, Uxbridge (United Kingdom); Graaf, Winette van der [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Medical Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    {sup 18}F-Labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) can detect early changes in tumour metabolism and may be a useful quantitative imaging biomarker (QIB) for prediction of disease stabilization, response and duration of progression-free survival (PFS). Standardization of imaging procedures is a prerequisite, especially in multicentre clinical trials. In this study we reviewed the quality of FDG scans and compliance with the imaging guideline (IG) in a phase III clinical trial. Forty-four cancer patients were enrolled in an imaging sub-study of a randomized international multicentre trial. FDG scan had to be performed at baseline and 10-14 days after treatment start. The image transmittal forms (ITFs) and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) [1] standard headers were analysed for compliance with the IG. Mean liver standardized uptake values (LSUV{sub mean}) were measured as recommended by positron emission tomography (PET) Response Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0 (PERCIST) [2]. Of 88 scans, 81 were received (44 patients); 36 were properly anonymized; 77/81 serum glucose values submitted, all but one within the IG. In 35/44 patients both scans were of sufficient visual quality. In 22/70 ITFs the reported UT differed by >1 min from the DICOM headers (max. difference 1 h 4 min). Based on the DICOM, UT compliance for both scans was 31.4 %. LSUV{sub mean} was fairly constant for the 11 patients with UT compliance: 2.30 ± 0.33 at baseline and 2.27 ± 0.48 at follow-up (FU). Variability substantially increased for the subjects with unacceptable UT (11 patients): 2.27 ± 1.04 at baseline and 2.18 ± 0.83 at FU. The high attrition number of patients due to low compliance with the IG compromised the quantitative assessment of the predictive value for early response monitoring. This emphasizes the need for better regulated procedures in imaging departments, which may be achieved by education of involved personnel or efforts towards regulations. LSUV{sub mean} could be

  9. Effect of salt reduction on iodine status assessed by 24 hour urinary iodine excretion in children and their families in northern China: a substudy of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng J; Ma, Yuan; Feng, Xiangxian; Zhang, Wanqi; Lin, Laixiang; Guo, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jing; Niu, Wenyi; Wu, Yangfeng; MacGregor, Graham A

    2016-09-26

    To study the effect of salt reduction on iodine status and to determine whether iodine consumption was still adequate after salt reduction in a population where universal salt iodisation is mandatory. A substudy of a cluster randomised controlled trial, with schools randomly assigned to either the intervention or the control group. 28 primary schools in Changzhi, northern China. 279 children in grade 5 of primary school (mean age: 10.1); 553 adults (age: 43.8). Children were educated about the harmful effects of salt and how to reduce salt intake using the schools' usual health education lessons. Children then delivered the message to their families. The duration was 1 school term (≈3.5 months). Difference between the intervention and control groups in the change of iodine intake as measured by repeat 24 hour urinary iodine from baseline to the end of the trial. At baseline, the mean salt intake was 7.0±2.5 g/day in children and 11.7±4.4 g/day in adults and the median iodine intake was 165.1 μg/day (IQR: 122.6-216.7) and 280.7 μg/day (IQR: 205.1-380.9) in children and adults, respectively. At the end of the study, salt and iodine decreased in the intervention compared with control group. The mean effect on salt for intervention versus control was -1.9 g/day (95% CI -2.6 to -1.3) in children and -2.9 g/day (95% CI -3.7 to -2.2) in adults. The mean effect on iodine was -19.3% (95% CI -29.4% to -7.7%) in children and -11.4% (95% CI -20.3% to -1.5%) in adults. With ≈25% reduction in salt intake, there was a significant reduction in iodine consumption in northern China where salt is iodised. Despite this, iodine intake was still adequate, and well above the estimated average requirement. Our findings indicate that reducing salt to the WHO's target-30% reduction by 2025-will not compromise iodine status. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01821144. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  10. Quality of Anticoagulation Control in Preventing Adverse Events in Heart Failure Patients in Sinus Rhythm: A Warfarin Aspirin Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction Trial (WARCEF) Substudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Shunichi; Thompson, John L.P.; Qian, Min; Ye, Siqin; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Mann, Douglas L.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Levin, Bruce; Pullicino, Patrick M.; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Teerlink, John R.; Graham, Susan; Mohr, J.P.; Labovitz, Arthur J.; Buchsbaum, Richard; Estol, Conrado J.; Lok, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between time in therapeutic range (TTR) and clinical outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients in sinus rhythm (SR) treated with warfarin. Methods and Results We used data from the Warfarin vs. Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction Trial (WARCEF) to assess the relationship of TTR with the WARCEF primary outcome (ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, or death); with death alone; ischemic stroke alone; major hemorrhage alone; and net clinical benefit (primary outcome and major hemorrhage combined). Multivariable Cox models were used to examine how the event risk changed with TTR and to compare the high TTR, low TTR, and aspirin patients, with TTR being treated as a time-dependent covariate. 2,217 patients were included in the analyses, among whom 1,067 were randomized to warfarin and 1,150 were randomized to aspirin. The median (IQR) follow-up duration was 3.6 (2.0–5.0) years. Mean (±SD) age was 61±11.3 years, with 80% being men. The mean (±SD) TTR was 57% (±28.5%). Increasing TTR was significantly associated with reduction in primary outcome (adjusted p<0.001), death alone (adjusted p=0.001), and improved net clinical benefit (adjusted p<0.001). A similar trend was observed for the other two outcomes but significance was not reached (adjusted p=0.082 for ischemic stroke, adjusted p=0.109 for major hemorrhage). Conclusions In HF patients in SR, increasing TTR is associated with better outcome and improved net clinical benefit. Patients in whom good quality anticoagulation can be achieved may benefit from the use of anticoagulants. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00041938. PMID:25850425

  11. Infrared and chemical characterization of natural amethysts and prasiolites colored by irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Soares Lameiras

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The infrared bands of amethyst and prasiolite samples from different origins were correlated to the trace elements contents. Amethysts have an iron content greater than 20 ppm and a low content of sodium and potassium. Prasiolites have an aluminum content greater than 120 ppm and a higher overall trace elements content, which accounts for a strong absorption between 3200 and 3600 cm-1. Colorless samples of quartz that become amethysts and prasiolites after irradiation have infrared spectra at room temperature with a broad band at 3441 cm-1 and a sharp band at 3595 cm-1. The broad band splits in several bands at low temperatures that are related to AlSi and FeSi. The color of amethysts and prasiolites are assigned to [AlSiO4/h+]º and [FeSiO4/h+]º centers formed by the exposure to ionizing irradiation and to the influence of lattice distortions due to the content of iron as a substitute for silicon and a high content of trace elements of large ionic radius like potassium.

  12. Observer variability in the assessment of CT coronary angiography and coronary artery calcium score: substudy of the Scottish COmputed Tomography of the HEART (SCOT-HEART) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michelle C; Golay, Saroj K; Hunter, Amanda; Weir-McCall, Jonathan R; Mlynska, Lucja; Dweck, Marc R; Uren, Neal G; Reid, John H; Lewis, Steff C; Berry, Colin; van Beek, Edwin J R; Roditi, Giles; Newby, David E; Mirsadraee, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Observer variability can influence the assessment of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) and the subsequent diagnosis of angina pectoris due to coronary heart disease. We assessed 210 CTCAs from the Scottish COmputed Tomography of the HEART (SCOT-HEART) trial for intraobserver and interobserver variability. Calcium score, coronary angiography and image quality were evaluated. Coronary artery disease was defined as none (70%) luminal stenosis and classified as no (70%) coronary artery disease. Post-CTCA diagnosis of angina pectoris due to coronary heart disease was classified as yes, probable, unlikely or no. Patients had a mean body mass index of 29 (28, 30) kg/m(2), heart rate of 58 (57, 60)/min and 62% were men. Intraobserver and interobserver agreements for the presence or absence of coronary artery disease were excellent (95% agreement, κ 0.884 (0.817 to 0.951) and good (91%, 0.791 (0.703 to 0.879)). Intraobserver and interobserver agreement for the presence or absence of angina pectoris due to coronary heart disease were excellent (93%, 0.842 (0.918 to 0.755) and good (86%, 0.701 (0.799 to 0.603)), respectively. Observer variability of calcium score was excellent for calcium scores below 1000. More segments were categorised as uninterpretable with 64-multidetector compared to 320-multidetector CTCA (10.1% vs 2.6%, pcoronary heart disease. NCT01149590.

  13. An eHealth Diary and Symptom-Tracking Tool Combined With Person-Centered Care for Improving Self-Efficacy After a Diagnosis of Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Substudy of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Axel; Fors, Andreas; Ulin, Kerstin; Thorn, Jörgen; Swedberg, Karl; Ekman, Inger

    2016-02-23

    Patients with cardiovascular diseases managed by a person-centered care (PCC) approach have been observed to have better treatment outcomes and satisfaction than with traditional care. eHealth may facilitate the often slow transition to more person-centered health care by increasing patients' beliefs in their own capacities (self-efficacy) to manage their care trajectory. eHealth is being increasingly used, but most studies continue to focus on health care professionals' logic of care. Knowledge is lacking regarding the effects of an eHealth tool on self-efficacy when combined with PCC for patients with chronic heart diseases. The objective of our study was to investigate the effect of an eHealth diary and symptom-tracking tool in combination with PCC for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This was a substudy of a randomized controlled trial investigating the effects of PCC in patients hospitalized with ACS. In total, 199 patients with ACS aged eHealth tool, or both, for at least 2 months after hospital discharge. The primary end point was a composite score of changes in general self-efficacy, return to work or prior activity level, and rehospitalization or death 6 months after discharge. Of the 94 patients in the intervention arm, 37 (39%) used the eHealth tool at least once after the index hospitalization. Most of these (24/37, 65%) used the mobile app and not the Web-based app as the primary source of daily self-rating input. Patients used the eHealth tool a mean of 38 times during the first 8 weeks (range 1-118, SD 33) and 64 times over a 6-month period (range 1-597, SD 104). Patients who used the eHealth tool in combination with the PCC intervention had a 4-fold improvement in the primary end point compared with the control group (odds ratio 4.0, 95% CI 1.5-10.5; P=.005). This improvement was driven by a significant increase in general self-efficacy compared with the control group (P=.011). Patients in the PCC group who did not use the eHealth tool

  14. Soluble TNF-related apoptosis induced ligand (sTRAIL) is augmented by Post-Conditioning and correlates to infarct size and left ventricle dysfunction in STEMI patients: a substudy from a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, André; Santos, Mário; Magalhães, Rui; Oliveira, José Carlos; Pacheco, Ana; Silveira, João; Cabral, Sofia; Torres, Severo; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Carvalho, Henrique

    2017-02-01

    Low levels of Soluble TNF-related apoptosis induced ligand (sTRAIL) seem to be related to worse prognosis after an acute coronary syndrome. PostConditioning (PostCond) may protect the heart from reperfusion injury. We sought to evaluate the impact of PostCond on sTRAIL in relationship to infarct size (area under the curve of Troponin T, AUCTnT) and left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) in a series of patients undergoing primary coronary intervention for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). In a substudy of a randomized trial that tested the effects of PostCond in STEMI-patients, sTRAIL was measured 24 h after reperfusion (PostCond n = 39, Control n = 39). Correlations between sTRAIL and both AUCTnT and LVEF were studied for each study arm. At 24 h, sTRAIL was higher for PostCond vs Controls (46.4 ± 30.6 vs 32.9 ± 23.4, p = 0.031), was negatively related to AUCTnT [B = -0.09, 95 % CI (-0.15 to -0.30), p = 0.005] and was positively related to both in-hospital [B = 0.10, 95 % CI (0.02-0.17), p = 0.018], and follow-up LVEF [B = 0.21, 95 % (0.10-0.32), p = 0.001]. No significant relationship was found for Controls. On multivariate analysis, PostCond was an independent predictor for sTRAIL [B = 12.13 95 % CI (0.40-23.87), p = 0.043]. In conclusion, PostCond positively influenced sTRAIL, which was related to reduced infarct size and better LVEF. Further studies are needed to understand potential mechanisms elicited by PostCond in infarct size reduction.

  15. Intensification of the amethyst color by irradiation; Intensificacao da cor de ametista por irradiacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorski, Maria Silvia [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    Brazil is great natural quartz producer. Amethyst, variety of the violet color is very appreciated in the world and since the Antiquity it is said to have many supernatural powers. Is the most highly valued stone in the quartz group and the graduation of the color is responsible for the commercial value that varies of US$ 0.5 to US$ 25.0 for carat. As carried through studies the violet color is related with the amount of Fe{sup 4+} distributed in the crystal . The present work consists of the induction and intensification of the violet color by rays gamma of sources of Co-60 in quartz samples of diverse origins. It was used analyses by fluorescence for X-rays in samples of amethyst and citrine for the evaluation of the the iron and aluminium for the induction of the violet color. (author)

  16. Phylogeography and population genetics of the Amethyst-throated Hummingbird (Lampornis amethystinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Rodríguez, Nandadevi; Hernández-Baños, Blanca E; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G; Townsend Peterson, A; García-Moreno, Jaime

    2008-07-01

    We analyzed mitochondrial DNA sequence variation across 69 Amethyst-throated Hummingbirds (Lampornis amethystinus), comparing with samples of related taxa. Although this group shows discrete phenotypic variation in throat color among populations in Oaxaca and Guerrero (Mexico), the only phylogeographic structure observed was between phenotypically similar populations north and south of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. As such, it appears that throat color variation is of recent origin and likely based only on minor genetic differences.

  17. The Mössbauer spectra of prasiolite and amethyst crystals from Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Maria; Kądziołka-Gaweł, Mariola; Konefał, Adam; Sitko, Rafał; Teper, Ewa; Mazurak, Zbigniew; Sachanbiński, Michał

    2016-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy of green (prasiolite) and violet (amethyst) quartz crystals from the Sudety Mountains (Poland) has shown that neither Fe2+ nor Fe4+ ions are present in them. Only Fe3+ ions have been identified and only in interstitial positions in channels parallel or perpendicular to the c-axis. The valence of Fe3+ ions did not change as a result of irradiation or annealing. Instead, we believe that the Fe3+ ions move within channels or between them.

  18. Study of thermoluminescence response of purple to violet amethyst quartz from Balikesir, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nur, N., E-mail: nnur@adiyaman.edu.tr [Adiyaman University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, 02040 Adiyaman (Turkey); Yeğingil, Z.; Topaksu, M. [Cukurova University, Art and Sciences Faculty, Physics Department, 01330 Adana (Turkey); Kurt, K. [University of Mersin, Science and Art Faculty, Physics Department, 33343 Mersin (Turkey); Doğan, T. [Cukurova University, Vocational School of Imamoglu, Department of Technical Programs, 01700 Adana (Turkey); Sarıgül, N. [Institute of Nuclear Science, Hacettepe University, 06532 Ankara (Turkey); Yüksel, M.; Altunal, V.; Özdemir, A.; Güçkan, V. [Cukurova University, Art and Sciences Faculty, Physics Department, 01330 Adana (Turkey); Günay, I. [Cukurova University, Medicine Faculty, Biophysics Department, Adana (Turkey)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • We reported on dosimetric characterisation of natural amethyst quartz specimens from Turkey, using TL technique. • The thermoluminescence characterisation tests were performed under the beta radiation exposure. • The IT peaks ∼230 °C show superlinear dose response behavior (g(D) > 1) between 1 Gy and 5 kGy. The HT peaks ∼300 °C show linear behavior (g(D) = 1) at low dose levels (1 < D < 20 Gy) and superlinearity (g(D) > 1) between 20 Gy < D < 2 kGy. • Deviations were determined for recycling measurements for various dose values of 0.1, 0.5, 0.8 and 1 kGy. • Amethyst quartz has great potential to be investigated for dosimetry purpose. - Abstract: In thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry, the phosphor amethyst quartz as a thermoluminescent, appears to be one of the materials arousing the highest interest. In this study the dosimetric characteristics of natural amethyst quartz crystals collected from Balikesir–Dursunbey (Turkey) were investigated for the purpose of determination of the general properties that phosphors should have in order to be useful for thermoluminescence dosimetry. The natural thermoluminescence was drained by annealing the powder samples at 450 °C for 1.5 h. The effects of high temperature annealing, dose response curves, glow curves after a postirradiation annealing, reusability of the samples and storage of trapped electrons in dark at room temperature were clarified through irradiating the samples with the desired exposures by {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta particles. Isothermal annealing before and after irradiation was found to have a definite effect upon the TL glow curve of amethyst crystal powder. The same sample varied in sensitivity depending upon its previous thermal and radiation history. The peak heights of the glow peaks were examined with respect to dose response at dose levels between 1 Gy and 5 kGy. The intermediate temperature (IT) and high temperature (HT) peaks of 230 °C and 300 °C, respectively

  19. Single versus Serial Measurements of Neuron-Specific Enolase and Prediction of Poor Neurological Outcome in Persistently Unconscious Patients after Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - A TTM-Trial Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Sebastian; Hassager, Christian; Stammet, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    were included from sites participating in the TTM-trial biobank sub study. NSE was measured at 24, 48 and 72 hours after ROSC and follow-up was concluded after 180 days. The primary end point was poor neurological function or death defined by a cerebral performance category score (CPC-score) of 3 to 5...

  20. Hand bone loss in early rheumatoid arthritis during a methotrexate-based treat-to-target strategy with or without adalimumab-a substudy of the optimized treatment algorithm in early RA (OPERA) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, L M; Østergaard, M; Jensen, T

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate 1-year hand bone loss (HBL1-year) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with a methotrexate (MTX) and intra-articular triamcinolone treat-to-target strategy +/- adalimumab and to determine if HBL6months is associated with radiographic progression after 2...... years. In a clinical trial (OPERA) of 180 treatment-naive early RA patients, bone mineral density (BMD) was estimated from hand radiographs with digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) at baseline, after 6 (n = 90) and 12 months (n = 70) of follow-up. Baseline and 2-year radiographs were scored according...

  1. Lead isotope compositions as guides to early gold mineralization: The North Amethyst vein system, Creede district, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora K.; Ayuso, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    The North Amethyst vein system, which is hosted by approximately 27 Ma Carpenter Ridge Tuff and approximately 26 Ma Nelson Mountain Tuff, has two mineral associations separated by brecciation and sedimentation in the veins. The early association consists of quartz, rhodonite, hematite, magnetite, electrum (Au (sub 0.3-0.5) Ag (sub 0.7-0.5)) , and Mn carbonate, Au-Ag sulfide, Ag sulfosalt, and base metal sulfide minerals. The later mineral association cuts the Mn- and Au-bearing assemblages and consists of quartz, calcite, sericite, chlorite, hematite, adularia, fluorite, base metal sulfides, and Ag-bearing tetrahedrite.

  2. Hand bone loss in early rheumatoid arthritis during a methotrexate-based treat-to-target strategy with or without adalimumab-a substudy of the optimized treatment algorithm in early RA (OPERA) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørnbjerg, L M; Østergaard, M; Jensen, T; Hørslev-Petersen, K; Stengaard-Pedersen, K; Junker, P; Ellingsen, T; Ahlquist, P; Lindegaard, H; Linauskas, A; Schlemmer, A; Dam, M Y; Hansen, I; Lottenburger, T; Ammitzbøll, C G; Jørgensen, A; Krintel, S B; Raun, J; Hetland, M L; Slot, Ole; Nielsen, Lars Kjær; Skjødt, Henrik; Majgaard, Ole; Lorenzen, Tove; Horn, Hans Christian; Kowalski, Marcin; Johansen, Inger Lauge; Pedersen, Peter Mosborg; Manilo, Natalia; Bliddal, Henning

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to investigate 1-year hand bone loss (HBL1-year) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with a methotrexate (MTX) and intra-articular triamcinolone treat-to-target strategy +/- adalimumab and to determine if HBL6months is associated with radiographic progression after 2 years. In a clinical trial (OPERA) of 180 treatment-naive early RA patients, bone mineral density (BMD) was estimated from hand radiographs with digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) at baseline, after 6 (n = 90) and 12 months (n = 70) of follow-up. Baseline and 2-year radiographs were scored according to the Sharp/van der Heijde method. Baseline characteristics and HBL6months (0-6 months changes in DXR-BMD) were investigated as predictors of structural damage by univariate linear (∆ total Sharp/van der Heijde score (TSS) as dependent variable) and logistic (+/-radiographic progression (∆TSS >0) as dependent variable) regression analyses. Variables with p 0) (OR 0.96 (0.92-1.0), p = 0.10). In early RA patients treated with a methotrexate-based treat-to-target strategy, the majority of patients had increased HBL1-year, irrespective of adalimumab; HBL6months was independently associated with ∆TSS after 2 years.

  3. Arterial Stiffness and Pharmacological Interventions – The TRanscend Arterial stiffNess Substudy (TRANS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirar Topouchian

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Jirar Topouchian1, Ramzi El Feghali1, Bruno Pannier1, Shuyu Wang2, Feng Zhao3, Karel Smetana4, Koon Teo3, Roland Asmar11The CardioVascular Institute, Paris, France; 2Beijing Clinical Trial and Research Center, Beijing, China; 3Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton, Canada; 4Vojenska nemocnice Plzen, Pizen, Czech RepublicAbstract: The degree of arterial stiffness is correlated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases and it is a powerful predictor for morbidity and mortality. Studies have shown that arterial stiffness reduction is associated with an improvement in survival. Reduction of arterial stiffness by pharmacological drugs varies according to the drugs and doses used and duration of treatment. This effect on the arteries differs among the various classes of drugs and among individual drugs in the same class. Quantification of the stiffness and other properties of the arterial wall can be used to monitor the responses to therapy in individuals with hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases. These measures can then be used as surrogate markers for the risk of clinical events. Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS is associated with an important decrease in cardiovascular risk. Findings from clinical trials support the hypothesis that the protective effects of RAS inhibition are partly independent from blood pressure reduction and related to several mechanisms including vascular protective effects. The aim of the TRanscend Arterial stiffNess Substudy (TRANS is to assess the effect of an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB, telmisartan, on the arterial stiffness in a subgroup of patients from the Telmisartan Randomized Assessment Study in aCE iNtolerant subjects with cardiovascular Disease (TRANSCEND trial. The TRANSCEND trial is an international, multicenter, randomized double blind placebo controlled trial of telmisartan that enrolled patients at high risk for cardiovascular events. Some clinical baseline data of the

  4. The Impact of Tai Chi Exercise on Self-Efficacy, Social Support, and Empowerment in Heart Failure: Insights from a Qualitative Sub-Study from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Y Yeh

    Full Text Available To qualitatively explore perceived physical and psychosocial effects and overall patient experience associated with a 12-week tai chi (TC intervention and an education group in a clinical trial of patients with chronic heart failure (HF.We randomized 100 patients with chronic systolic HF (NYHA Class 1-3, ejection fraction≤40% to a 12-week group TC program or an education control. At 12-weeks, semi-structured interviews were conducted on a random subset (n = 32; n = 17 in TC, n = 15 in control, audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Two independent reviewers extracted information using grounded-theory methods for emergent themes. We explored similarities and differences in themes/sub-themes between the groups, and examined qualitative association with changes from baseline to post-intervention in previously reported quantitative measures (e.g., Minnesota Living with HF, Cardiac Exercise Self Efficacy and Profile of Mood States.The mean age (±SD of participants was 68±9 years, baseline ejection fraction 29±7%, and median New York Heart Association class 2 HF. We idenitifed themes related to the patient's experience of illness, perceptions of self, and relationship to others. Specific psychosocial and physical benefits were described. Common themes emerged from both groups including: social support and self-efficacy related to activity/exercise and diet. The tai chi group, however, also exhibited a more global empowerment and perceived control. Additional themes in TC included mindfulness/self-awareness, decreased stress reactivity, and renewed social role. These themes mirrored improvements in previously reported quantitative measures (quality-of-life, self-efficacy, and mood in TC compared to control. Patients in TC also reported physical benefits (e.g., decreased pain, improved energy, endurance, flexibility.Positive themes emerged from both groups, although there were qualitative differences in concepts of self-efficacy and perceived

  5. The Impact of Tai Chi Exercise on Self-Efficacy, Social Support, and Empowerment in Heart Failure: Insights from a Qualitative Sub-Study from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Gloria Y; Chan, Caroline W; Wayne, Peter M; Conboy, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    To qualitatively explore perceived physical and psychosocial effects and overall patient experience associated with a 12-week tai chi (TC) intervention and an education group in a clinical trial of patients with chronic heart failure (HF). We randomized 100 patients with chronic systolic HF (NYHA Class 1-3, ejection fraction≤40%) to a 12-week group TC program or an education control. At 12-weeks, semi-structured interviews were conducted on a random subset (n = 32; n = 17 in TC, n = 15 in control), audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Two independent reviewers extracted information using grounded-theory methods for emergent themes. We explored similarities and differences in themes/sub-themes between the groups, and examined qualitative association with changes from baseline to post-intervention in previously reported quantitative measures (e.g., Minnesota Living with HF, Cardiac Exercise Self Efficacy and Profile of Mood States). The mean age (±SD) of participants was 68±9 years, baseline ejection fraction 29±7%, and median New York Heart Association class 2 HF. We idenitifed themes related to the patient's experience of illness, perceptions of self, and relationship to others. Specific psychosocial and physical benefits were described. Common themes emerged from both groups including: social support and self-efficacy related to activity/exercise and diet. The tai chi group, however, also exhibited a more global empowerment and perceived control. Additional themes in TC included mindfulness/self-awareness, decreased stress reactivity, and renewed social role. These themes mirrored improvements in previously reported quantitative measures (quality-of-life, self-efficacy, and mood) in TC compared to control. Patients in TC also reported physical benefits (e.g., decreased pain, improved energy, endurance, flexibility). Positive themes emerged from both groups, although there were qualitative differences in concepts of self-efficacy and perceived control

  6. Lymphoma and Epstein-Barr virus DNA in blood during interleukin-2 therapy in antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1-infected patients: a substudy of the ANRS 119 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lastours, V; LeGoff, J; Brière, J; Agbalika, F; Boulet, T; Lévy, Y; Simon, F; Aboulker, J-P; Molina, J-M

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy increased CD4 cell counts and delayed antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in HIV-infected patients in the Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA et les Hépatites Virales (ANRS) 119 trial. However, four cases of lymphoma were reported. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication is associated with an increased risk of lymphoma in immunocompromised patients. We assessed whether IL-2 had an impact on EBV replication and the development of lymphoma. A total of 130 ART-naïve patients were randomized to receive IL-2 therapy (n = 66) or no treatment (n = 64). Clinical data for patients with lymphomas were reviewed and tumours assessed for evidence of EBV infection and CD25 (the IL-2 receptor) expression. EBV DNA levels were measured in whole blood and plasma in both arms using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), up to 48 weeks after baseline (BL). Four lymphomas occurred, a median of 61 weeks [range 40-94 weeks] after randomization at a median CD4 cell count of 396 cells/μL (IQR 234-536 cells/μL). In the IL-2 arm, two patients developed EBV-positive Hodgkin's lymphoma, and one developed EBV-negative Burkitt-type lymphoma. One patient in the control group developed EBV-positive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. CD25 was negative in all cases. Among the 41 of 55 (control arm) and 44 of 58 (IL-2 arm) patients with detectable EBV DNA in whole blood at both BL and week 48, the median change in EBV DNA between BL and week 48 was +0.04 log10 copies/ml in both arms (P = 0.7). In plasma, EBV was detected at least once in 22 of 52 controls and 21 of 54 IL-2-treated patients (P = 0.8). IL-2 therapy had no significant effect on EBV replication over 48 weeks in these ART-naïve patients. The occurrence of lymphomas did not seem to be associated with IL-2 therapy. © 2013 British HIV Association.

  7. Risk of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia during follow-up in HPV-positive women according to baseline p16-INK4A results: a prospective analysis of a nested substudy of the NTCC randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carozzi, Francesca; Gillio-Tos, Anna; Confortini, Massimo; Del Mistro, Annarosa; Sani, Cristina; De Marco, Laura; Girlando, Salvatore; Rosso, Stefano; Naldoni, Carlo; Dalla Palma, Paolo; Zorzi, Manuel; Giorgi-Rossi, Paolo; Segnan, Nereo; Cuzick, Jack; Ronco, Guglielmo

    2013-02-01

    Immunostaining for p16-INK4A (henceforth p16) is a sensitive and specific method for detection of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in women infected with human papillomavirus (HPV), but longitudinal data have not been obtained. We investigated the relation between p16 status and risk of CIN during 3 years of follow-up. Women aged 25-60 years were enrolled between June 10, 2003, and Dec 31, 2004, in a multicentre randomised trial comparing HPV testing with cytology. HPV-positive women were referred for colposcopy and, in seven of nine centres, were tested for p16 overexpression by immunostaining. If no CIN was detected, these women were followed up at yearly intervals until clearance of HPV infection. The primary endpoint was histologically confirmed CIN of grade 2 or worse (CIN of grade 2 [CIN2], CIN of grade 3 [CIN3], or invasive cervical cancer) at recruitment or during follow-up. We calculated the absolute and relative risks by p16 status at recruitment. We also calculated the longitudinal sensitivity of p16 testing. Additionally, we assessed the relative sensitivity of an alternative strategy (referral to colposcopy and follow-up of only HPV-positive, p16-positive women) versus conventional cytology in two age groups. Percentages were weighted by the inverse of the tested fraction. The trial in which this study is nested is registered, number ISRCTN81678807. Of 1042 HPV-positive women who were tested for p16 with no CIN detected during the first round of screening, 944 (91%) had further HPV tests. 793 (84%) of these 944 were followed up until detection of CIN2 or worse, HPV infection clearance, or for at least 3 years. CIN2 or worse was detected during follow-up in more p16-positive women (31 of 365, 8·8% [95% CI 5·8-11·8]) than in p16-negative women (17 of 579, 3·7% [1·9-5·4]; relative risk [RR] 2·61 [95% CI 1·49-4·59]). RR was higher in women aged 35-60 years at recruitment (3·37 [1·39-8·15]) than in those aged 25-34 years (2

  8. EPC mobilization after erythropoietin treatment in acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: the REVEAL EPC substudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povsic, Thomas J.; Najjar, Samer S.; Prather, Kristi; Zhou, Jiying; Adams, Stacie D.; Zavodni, Katherine L.; Kelly, Francine; Melton, Laura G.; Hasselblad, Vic; Heitner, John F.; Raman, Subha V.; Barsness, Gregory W.; Patel, Manesh R.; Kim, Raymond J.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Harrington, Robert A.; Rao, Sunil V.

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) was hypothesized to mitigate reperfusion injury, in part via mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The REVEAL trial found no reduction in infarct size with a single dose of EPO (60,000 U) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. In a substudy, we aimed to determine the feasibility of cryopreserving and centrally analyzing EPC levels to assess the relationship between EPC numbers, EPO administration, and infarct size. As a prespecified substudy, mononuclear cells were locally cryopreserved before as well as 24 and 48–72 h after primary percutaneous coronary intervention. EPC samples were collected in 163 of 222 enrolled patients. At least one sample was obtained from 125 patients, and all three time points were available in 83 patients. There were no significant differences in the absolute EPC numbers over time or between EPO- and placebo-treated patients; however, there was a trend toward a greater increase in EPC levels from 24 to 48–72 h postintervention in patients receiving ≥30,000 U of EPO (P = 0.099 for CD133+ cells, 0.049 for CD34+ cells, 0.099 for ALDHbr cells). EPC numbers at baseline were inversely related to infarct size (P = 0.03 for CD133+ cells, 0.006 for CD34+ cells). Local whole cell cryopreservation and central EPC analysis in the context of a multicenter randomized trial is feasible but challenging. High-dose (≥30,000 U) EPO may mobilize EPCs at 48–72 h, and baseline EPC levels may be inversely associated with infarct size. PMID:23700090

  9. Angiographic outcomes following stenting or coronary artery bypass surgery of the left main coronary artery: Fifteen-month outcomes from the synergy between PCI with TAXUS express and cardiac surgery left main angiographic substudy (SYNTAX-LE MANS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M-C. Morice (Marie-Claude); T.E. Feldman (Ted); M. Mack (Michael); E. Stahle (Elisabeth); D.R. Holmes (David); A. Colombo (Antonio); M-A.M. Morel (Marie-Angèle); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); F.W. Mohr (Friedrich); D. Carrié (Didier); G. Fournial (Gerard); S.K. James (Stefan); K. Leadly (Katrin); K.D. Dawkins (Keith); A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAims: The SYNTAX-LE MANS substudy prospectively evaluated 15-month angiographic and clinical outcomes in patients with treated left main (LM) disease. Methods and results: In the SYNTAX trial, 1,800 patients with three-vessel and/or LM disease were randomised to either CABG or PCI; of th

  10. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring after 1 year on valsartan or amlodipine-based treatment: a VALUE substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Lederballe; Mancia, Giuseppe; Pickering, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring substudy of the Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-term Use Evaluation (VALUE) trial was carried out in a subset of patients from USA, Italy and Denmark. ABP was measured after 1 year in the trial, with the aim of evaluating comparability...... of ABP levels on valsartan (VAL) and amlodipine (AML)-based regimens. METHODS: ABP was measured every 20 min during a 25-h period after morning administration of medicine; 659 patients were available for intention-to-treat analysis. RESULTS: Office blood pressure (BP) differences were smaller than...... of combined cardiovascular endpoints--superior to the relationship to office BP. CONCLUSIONS: In these elderly high-risk patients, diastolic ABP levels tended to be less predictive than systolic, and daytime less predictive than night-time for all cardiovascular endpoints. The findings underline...

  11. Quartz-Amethyst Hosted Hydrocarbon-Bearing Fluid Inclusions from the Green Ridge Breccia in the Snoqualmie Granite, North Cascades, WA, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Feely

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Green Ridge Breccia cuts the composite Miocene Snoqualmie Batholith in King County, WA, USA. The granite was emplaced at ~5 km depth between ~17 and 20 Ma and the crosscutting NW trending breccia contains large angular blocks of the host granite (<1 m in longest dimension. The brecciated granite blocks are cemented by quartz-amethyst euhedra (<10 cm in longest dimension bearing vugs. A notable feature is the presence of centimetric scale amber coloured oil inclusions within the quartz-amethyst crystals. Fluid inclusion studies using Transmitted Light Petrography, UV Microscopy, Microthermometry, Laser Raman Microspectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry record the presence and the fluid composition of three fluid inclusion types hosted by the euhedra: primary Type 1 (liquid rich two-phase (L + V aqueous inclusions and secondary Type 2 bituminous two-phase (S + L inclusions and Type 3 amber coloured oil bearing two-phase immiscible liquid inclusions. The Green Ridge Breccia was the locus for convective hydrothermal fluid flow that formed the quartz-amethyst vugs formed at T~390 °C assuming a trapping pressure of ~1.65 kb. Later, hydrocarbon fluids migrated downwards from the roof source rock (e.g., the Guye Sedimentary Member and were trapped in the euhedra. This was followed by unroofing of the batholith and exposure of the Green Ridge Breccia. This study highlights the potential for other oil migrations into the Snoqualmie Batholith in areas where it forms the basement capped by the Guye Sedimentary Member.

  12. Stratigraphy of amethyst geode-bearing lavas and fault-block structures of the Entre Rios mining district, Paraná volcanic province, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LÉO A. HARTMANN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Entre Rios mining district produces a large volume of amethyst geodes in underground mines and is part of the world class deposits in the Paraná volcanic province of South America. Two producing basalt flows are numbered 4 and 5 in the lava stratigraphy. A total of seven basalt flows and one rhyodacite flow are present in the district. At the base of the stratigraphy, beginning at the Chapecó river bed, two basalt flows are Esmeralda, low-Ti type. The third flow in the sequence is a rhyodacite, Chapecó type, Guarapuava subtype. Above the rhyodacite flow, four basalt flows are Pitanga, high-Ti type including the two mineralized flows; only the topmost basalt in the stratigraphy is a Paranapanema, intermediate-Ti type. Each individual flow is uniquely identified from its geochemical and gamma-spectrometric properties. The study of several sections in the district allowed for the identification of a fault-block structure. Blocks are elongated NW and the block on the west side of the fault was downthrown. This important structural characterization of the mining district will have significant consequences in the search for new amethyst geode deposits and in the understanding of the evolution of the Paraná volcanic province.

  13. Acute Rhinosinusitis | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available edical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Rhinosinu....2.3Trial contains a sub-study No E.3Principal inclusion criteria 1. Adult male and female outpatients aged ≥ 18 - 75 years 2. Acute

  14. “紫石英”号事件与名城镇江%The Amethyst Incident and the Famous City of Zhenjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙洪军

    2013-01-01

    1949年4月英国军舰“紫石英”号(Amethyst)误闯我人民解放军渡江部队所属镇江江面引发激烈军事冲突.事后中英在镇江进行多次谈判,镇江军政领导人为我方的主要谈判代表.衰落的大英帝国与强劲崛起的人民武装力量的谈判一波三折.“紫石英”号事件对于中英两国、对于名城镇江都具有重要的影响.

  15. Ectopic fat accumulation in patients with COPD: an ECLIPSE substudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mickaël; Almeras, Natalie; Després, Jean-Pierre; Coxson, Harvey O; Washko, George R; Vivodtzev, Isabelle; Wouters, Emiel FM; Rutten, Erica; Williams, Michelle C; Murchison, John T; MacNee, William; Sin, Don D; Maltais, François

    2017-01-01

    Background Obesity is increasingly associated with COPD, but little is known about the prevalence of ectopic fat accumulation in COPD and whether this can possibly be associated with poor clinical outcomes and comorbidities. The Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE) substudy tested the hypothesis that COPD is associated with increased ectopic fat accumulation and that this would be associated with COPD-related outcomes and comorbidities. Methods Computed tomography (CT) images of the thorax obtained in ECLIPSE were used to quantify ectopic fat accumulation at L2–L3 (eg, cross-sectional area [CSA] of visceral adipose tissue [VAT] and muscle tissue [MT] attenuation, a reflection of muscle fat infiltration) and CSA of MT. A dose–response relationship between CSA of VAT, MT attenuation and CSA of MT and COPD-related outcomes (6-minute walking distance [6MWD], exacerbation rate, quality of life, and forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] decline) was addressed with the Cochran–Armitage trend test. Regression models were used to investigate possible relationships between CT body composition indices and comorbidities. Results From the entire ECLIPSE cohort, we identified 585 subjects with valid CT images at L2–L3 to assess body composition. CSA of VAT was increased (P<0.0001) and MT attenuation was reduced (indicating more muscle fat accumulation) in patients with COPD (P<0.002). Progressively increasing CSA of VAT was not associated with adverse clinical outcomes. The probability of exhibiting low 6MWD and accelerated FEV1 decline increased with progressively decreasing MT attenuation and CSA of MT. In COPD, the probability of having diabetes (P=0.024) and gastroesophageal reflux (P=0.0048) at baseline increased in parallel with VAT accumulation, while the predicted MT attenuation increased the probability of cardiovascular comorbidities (P=0.042). Body composition parameters did not correlate with coronary

  16. Ectopic fat accumulation in patients with COPD: an ECLIPSE substudy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mickaël Martin,1 Natalie Almeras,1 Jean-Pierre Després,1 Harvey O Coxson,2 George R Washko,3 Isabelle Vivodtzev,4 Emiel FM Wouters,5 Erica Rutten,6 Michelle C Williams,7 John T Murchison,8 William MacNee,7 Don D Sin,2 François Maltais1 On behalf of the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE Study Group 1Research Centre, Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, QC, 2Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 4Hypoxia Pathophysiology Laboratory, Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble, France; 5Department of Respiratory Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, 6Research and Development, CIRO, Horn, the Netherlands; 7Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Edinburgh, 8Department of Radiology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK Background: Obesity is increasingly associated with COPD, but little is known about the prevalence of ectopic fat accumulation in COPD and whether this can possibly be associated with poor clinical outcomes and comorbidities. The Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE substudy tested the hypothesis that COPD is associated with increased ectopic fat accumulation and that this would be associated with COPD-related outcomes and comorbidities.Methods: Computed tomography (CT images of the thorax obtained in ECLIPSE were used to quantify ectopic fat accumulation at L2–L3 (eg, cross-sectional area [CSA] of visceral adipose tissue [VAT] and muscle tissue [MT] attenuation, a reflection of muscle fat infiltration and CSA of MT. A dose–response relationship between CSA of VAT, MT attenuation and CSA of MT and COPD-related outcomes (6-minute walking distance [6MWD], exacerbation rate, quality of life, and forced

  17. Acute pulmonary embolism | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute... pulmonary embolism Embolismo pulmonar agudo E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute...rial contains a sub-study No E.3Principal inclusion criteria 1) Acute symptomatic PE confirmed by multidetec

  18. Effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on malignant ventricular arrhythmias in patients with chronic heart failure and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators: A substudy of the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca (GISSI-HF) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzi, Andrea A; Latini, Roberto; Barlera, Simona; Rossi, Maria G; Ruggeri, Albarosa; Mezzani, Alessandro; Favero, Chiara; Franzosi, Maria G; Serra, Domenico; Lucci, Donata; Bianchini, Francesca; Bernasconi, Roberto; Maggioni, Aldo P; Nicolosi, Gianluigi; Porcu, Maurizio; Tognoni, Gianni; Tavazzi, Luigi; Marchioli, Roberto

    2011-02-01

    The antiarrhythmic effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3PUFA) in ischemic heart disease have been demonstrated; however, studies in patients surviving malignant ventricular arrhythmias of different etiologies treated with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) have given conflicting results. The purpose of this study was to assess the antiarrhythmic effect of n-3PUFA versus placebo in 566 patients with heart failure enrolled in the GISSI-HF trial who received an ICD for secondary or primary prevention of ventricular fibrillation (VF) or tachycardia (VT). Clinical data and arrhythmic event recordings extracted from the device memory were obtained. We tested the treatment effect by a multivariate Cox model adjusting for all clinical parameters associated with the primary end point defined as time to first appropriate ICD discharge for VT/VF. In the 566 patients with at least one recorded follow-up visit, 1363 VT and 316 VF episodes were terminated by ICD pacing or shock over a median follow-up of 928 days. The incidence of the primary end point event was 27.3% in the n-3PUFA group and 34.0% in the placebo group (adjusted hazard rate = 0.80, 95% CI 0.59-1.09, P = .152). Patients who received 1, 2 to 3, or >3 ICD discharges were 8.9%, 7.1%, and 11.1% in the n-3PUFA group, compared with slightly higher rates of 11.1%, 10.7%, and 12.1% in the placebo group (overall P = .30). Patients with the highest 3-month increase in plasma n-3PUFA had a somewhat lower incidence of arrhythmic events. The results of this study, though not statistically significant, support prior evidences of an antiarrhythmic effect of n-3PUFA in patients with ICD, although they leave open the issue of whether this effect leads to a survival benefit. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Associations Between Clinical Evidence of Inflammation and Synovitis in Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis: A Cross-Sectional Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Gemma; Cro, Suzie; Doré, Caroline; King, Leonard; Kluzek, Stefan; Price, Andrew; Roemer, Frank; Guermazi, Ali; Keen, Richard; Arden, Nigel

    2017-09-01

    Painful knee osteoarthritis (KOA) has been associated with joint inflammation. There is, however, little literature correlating signs of localized inflammation with contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of synovium. This study examined the relationship between clinical and functional markers of localized knee inflammation and CE MRI-based synovial scores. Patients with symptomatic KOA were enrolled into the randomized, double-blind, Vitamin D Evaluation in Osteoarthritis (VIDEO) trial. In this cross-sectional substudy, associations between validated MRI-based semiquantitative synovial scores of the knee and the following markers of inflammation were investigated: self-reported pain and stiffness, effusion, warmth, joint line tenderness, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, radiographic severity, and functional ability tests. A total of 107 patients satisfied the inclusion criteria of complete data and were included in the analysis. Significant associations were found between the number of regions affected by synovitis and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain, effusion, and joint line tenderness. Each additional region affected by synovitis was associated with an increase in WOMAC pain (1.82 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.05, 3.58], P = 0.04), and the association with extent of medial synovitis was particularly strong (3.21 [95% CI 0.43, 5.99], P = 0.02). Extent of synovitis was positively associated with effusion (odds ratio 1.69 [95% CI 1.37, 2.08], P < 0.01) and negatively associated with joint line tenderness (relative risk 0.87 [95% CI 0.84, 0.90], P < 0.01). There is a strong positive association between synovitis and self-reported patient pain and clinically detectable effusion. Nonoperative treatments directed at management of inflammation and future trials targeting the synovial tissue for treating KOA should consider these 2 factors as potential inclusion criteria. © 2016, American

  20. Espectroscopia infravermelha à baixa temperatura em quartzos e ametistas com altas concentrações de OH e H2O Low-temperature infrared spectroscopy of quartz and amethyst with high concentrations of OH and H2O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luiz Guzzo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse trabalho foi caracterizar os defeitos pontuais relacionados aos grupos OH e H2O em quartzos e ametistas, crescidos em cavidades do tipo geodo em basalto da Formação Serra Geral (RS, usando a espectroscopia infravermelha (IV a -175°C. Em um dos cristais, os espectros foram realizados separadamente nos setores de crescimento r{101} e z{011}. Na faixa entre 3800 e 3000 cm-1, os espectros apresentaram várias bandas de absorção superpostas a uma intensa banda larga. As bandas atribuídas ao defeito [H4O4]0 foram observadas independentemente da coloração dos cristais, enquanto que as bandas atribuídas ao centro [AlO4/H]0 ocorreram nos quartzos translúcido e levemente amarelado (citrino. Além da intensidade da banda larga, os espectros desses cristais se caracterizaram pela existência da banda a 3595 cm-1. Ao contrário do reportado por outros autores, verificou-se que a concentração de OH e H2O e a coloração violeta da ametista são maiores nos setores z do que nos setores r. Essa inversão foi discutida em função da não uniformidade das condições de crescimento, confirmada pelo tamanho das faces romboédricas do cristal. Concluiu-se que a intensidade da coloração da ametista não é afetada pelas altas concentrações de defeitos OH e H2O.The aim of this study is to characterize OH-related defects in natural quartz and amethyst grown in geodic cavities formed during basaltic flow. For this, infrared (IR spectroscopy at low temperature (-175°C was carried out in amethyst and quartz crystals taken from two deposits located in the State of Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil. For one specimen, IR spectra were recorded directly upon the growth sectors r{101} and z{011} appearing in (0001 plates. IR spectra recorded from 3800 to 3000 cm-1 showed an intense broad band superposed upon sharp bands assigned to [H4O4]0 point defects. These bands were observed in all samples and growth sectors independently from the intensity of

  1. Low Social Support Level Is Associated with Non-Adherence to Diet at 1 Year in the Family Intervention Trial for Heart Health (FIT Heart)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Brooke; Liao, Ming; Allegrante, John P.; Mosca, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the relationship between low social support (SS) and adherence to diet in a cardiovascular disease (CVD) lifestyle intervention trial. Design: Prospective substudy. Setting and Participants: Blood relatives/cohabitants of hospitalized cardiac patients in a randomized controlled trial (n = 458; 66% female, 35% nonwhite, mean age…

  2. Low Social Support Level Is Associated with Non-Adherence to Diet at 1 Year in the Family Intervention Trial for Heart Health (FIT Heart)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Brooke; Liao, Ming; Allegrante, John P.; Mosca, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the relationship between low social support (SS) and adherence to diet in a cardiovascular disease (CVD) lifestyle intervention trial. Design: Prospective substudy. Setting and Participants: Blood relatives/cohabitants of hospitalized cardiac patients in a randomized controlled trial (n = 458; 66% female, 35% nonwhite, mean age…

  3. LEUCEMIA LINFÁTICA CRÓNICA | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available a, Ciclofosfamida seguido de Rituximab como mantenimiento (R-Fc-Rm) en el tratamiento de la leucemia...2.3Trial contains a sub-study No E.3Principal inclusion criteria 1. Edad ( >18 años y ≤ 70 años)2. Pacientes afectos de leucemia...evio para la LLC2. Enfermos con LLC en transformación a formas citológicas o histológicas de mayor agresividad (leucemia

  4. Switching to nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase with molecular suboptimal response to frontline imatinib: SENSOR final results and BIM polymorphism substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamura, Koichi; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Kimura, Shinya; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Matsumura, Itaru; Hata, Tomoko; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Saito, Shigeki; Hino, Masayuki; Tadokoro, Seiji; Meguro, Kuniaki; Hyodo, Hideo; Yamamoto, Masahide; Kubo, Kohmei; Tsukada, Junichi; Kondo, Midori; Aoki, Makoto; Okada, Hikaru; Yanada, Masamitsu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2016-12-01

    Optimal management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase with suboptimal molecular response (MR) to frontline imatinib is undefined. We report final results from SENSOR, which evaluated efficacy/safety of nilotinib in this setting. A substudy assessed whether BIM polymorphisms impacted response to nilotinib. In this single-arm, multicenter study, Japanese patients with suboptimal MR per European LeukemiaNet 2009 criteria (complete cytogenetic response, but not major MR [MMR]) after ≥18 months of frontline imatinib received nilotinib 400mg twice daily for 24 months. MR, BCR-ABL1 mutations/variants, and BIM polymorphisms were evaluated in a central laboratory. Primary endpoint was the MMR rate at 12 months (null hypothesis of 40%). Of 45 patients (median exposure, 22.08 months), 39 completed the study and six discontinued. At 12 and 24 months, 51.1% (95% CI, 35.8%-66.3%) and 66.7% (95% CI, 51.0%-80.0%) achieved MMR, respectively. Cumulative MMR incidence by 24 months was 75.6%. Of 40 patients analyzed, 10 of 12 (83.3%) with and 17 of 28 (60.7%) without BIM polymorphisms achieved MMR at 24 months. The safety profile was manageable with dose reductions and interruptions. Nilotinib provided clinical benefit for patients with suboptimal response to imatinib, and BIM polymorphisms did not influence MMR achievement. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01043874.

  5. Intergenerational transfers and rosters of the extended family: a new substudy of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeni, Robert F; Bianchi, Suzanne M; Hotz, V Joseph; Seltzer, Judith A; Wiemers, Emily E

    Family members provide support to each other at critical life stages. To better understand the pervasiveness, causes, and consequences of such support, a sub-study of the United States (U.S.) Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) was created. A battery of questions on family relationships and intergenerational transfers was designed, pretested on a U.S. national telephone sample, and then administered in the 2013 wave of the PSID. These new data are available to the public. Given the extensive supporting data available on the respondents and members of their co-resident and non-co-resident family members - many of whom are interviewed themselves - the new sub-study will become a valuable resource to researchers.

  6. Hip dysplasia and osteoarthrosis: a survey of 4151 subjects from the Osteoarthrosis Substudy of the Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Søballe, K

    2005-01-01

    Acta Orthop. 2005 Apr;76(2):149-58. Related Articles, Links Hip dysplasia and osteoarthrosis: a survey of 4151 subjects from the Osteoarthrosis Substudy of the Copenhagen City Heart Study. Jacobsen S, Sonne-Holm S, Soballe K, Gebuhr P, Lund B. Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Copenhagen...... in the general population. The assumption that HD is an etiological factor in the development of hip OA was confirmed. PMID: 16097538 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]...

  7. Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Fornaro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental Retardation (MR is a developmental disability characterized by impairments in adaptive daily life skills and difficulties in social and interpersonal functioning. Since multiple causes may contribute to MR, associated clinical pictures may vary accordingly. Nevertheless, when psychiatric disorders as Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD and/or alcohol abuse co-exist, their proper detection and management is often troublesome, essentially due to a limited vocabulary MR people could use to describe their symptoms, feelings and concerns, and the lack of reliable screening tools. Furthermore, MR people are among the most medicated subjects, with (over prescription of antidepressants and/or typical antipsychotics being the rule rather than exception. Thus, treatment resistance or even worsening of depression, constitute frequent occurrences. This report describes the case of a person with MR who failed to respond to repetitive trials of antidepressant monotherapies, finally recovering using aripiprazole to fluvoxamine augmentation upon consideration of a putative bipolar diathesis for “agitated” TRD. Although further controlled investigations are needed to assess a putative bipolar diathesis in some cases of MR associated to TRD, prudence is advised in the long-term prescription of antidepressant monotherapies in such conditions.

  8. Lipodystrophy and inflammation predict later grip strength in HIV-infected men: the MACS Body Composition substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Keith W; Li, Xiuhong; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Abraham, Alison G; Dobs, Adrian S; Margolick, Joseph B; Palella, Frank J; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Witt, Mallory D; Brown, Todd T

    2013-08-01

    Body fat changes in HIV-infected persons are associated with increased systemic inflammation and increased mortality. It is unknown whether lipodystrophy is also associated with declines in physical function. Between 2001 and 2003, 33 HIV-infected men with evidence of lipodystrophy (LIPO⁺), 23 HIV-infected men without lipodystrophy (LIPO⁻), and 33 seronegative men were recruited from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) for the Body Composition substudy. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) was assessed by quantitative computed tomography. Lean body mass (LBM) and extremity fat were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Insulin resistance was estimated by Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA). Serum interleukin (IL)-6, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α receptors I and II (sTNFRI and sTNFRII), and highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations were quantified from archived serum samples. These measurements were correlated with grip strength measured in 2007 using linear regression. At the substudy visit, the LIPO⁺ group had higher HOMA, sTNFRI, sTNFRII, and IL-6 levels than the LIPO⁻ group. In 2007, the LIPO⁺ group had lower median grip strength than the LIPO⁻ group (34.4 vs. 42.7 kg, p=0.002). Multivariable analysis of HIV⁺ men showed older age, lower LBM, higher sTNFRII concentrations, and LIPO⁺ status [adjusted mean difference -4.9 kg (p=0.045)] at the substudy visit were independently associated with lower subsequent grip strength. Inflammation, lower LBM, and lipodystrophy in HIV-infected men were associated with lower subsequent grip strength. These findings suggest that inflammation may contribute to declines in functional performance, independent of age.

  9. Impact of polyphenols on physiological stress and cardiac burden in marathon runners - results from a substudy of the BeMAGIC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, Sebastian; Scherr, Johannes; Hanley, Alan; Schneider, Jens; Klier, Ina; Lackermair, Korbinian; Hoster, Eva; Vogeser, Michael; Nieman, David C; Halle, Martin; Nickel, Thomas

    2017-01-16

    Introduction Both physiologic stress and chronic heart disease are associated with increased systemic levels of chromogranin A (CGA) and NT-proBNP. Marathon running causes physiological stress and imposes a significant cardiac burden. Polyphenol-rich Mediterranean and Asian diets have been demonstrated to exert beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. In this study we investigated whether pretreatment with a polyphenol beverage could attenuate the physiological and cardiac stress associated with a marathon. Methods In the BeMaGIC trial 277 athletes were randomized into two groups in a double-blinded fashion receiving 1-1.5 L/day of the same beverages either with (study beverage) or without (placebo) polyphenol enrichment (about 400 mg of gallic acid equivalents per day of a complex mixture of polyphenols).Blood samples were taken three weeks before (V1), one day before (V2), and immediately (V3), 24 hours (V4) and 72 hours (V5) after running a marathon. In our current sub-study CGA and NT-proBNP levels were analyzed by ELISA in the fastest 18 and the slowest 22 runners. Results CGA and NT-proBNP levels increased significantly after the marathon (V3) and returned to baseline 72 hours after the marathon (V5). Neither CGA nor NT-proBNP differed significantly between athletes receiving study beverage versus placebo. Separating our cohort into fast and slow runners did not reveal any significant difference regarding CGA or NT-proBNP levels between groups. Conclusion Our study provides no evidence that polyphenol supplementation attenuates marathon running induced physiological stressor cardiac burden in fast or slow runners.

  10. Restoration of anti-tetanus toxoid responses in patients initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy with or without a boost immunization: an INITIO substudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, C T; Goodall, R L; Samri, A; Autran, B; Kelleher, A D; Poli, G; Pantaleo, G; Gotch, F M; Imami, N; Imami, N

    2008-01-01

    INITIO is an open-labelled randomized trial evaluating first-line therapeutic strategies for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection. In an immunology substudy a tetanus toxoid booster (TTB) immunization was planned for 24 weeks after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). All patients had received tetanus toxoid immunization in childhood. Generation of proliferative responses to tetanus toxoid was compared in two groups of patients, those receiving a protease inhibitor (PI)-sparing regimen (n = 21) and those receiving a PI-containing (n = 54) regimen. Fifty-two participants received a TTB immunization [PI-sparing (n = 15), PI-containing (n = 37)] and 23 participants did not [PI-sparing (n = 6) or PI-containing (n = 17)]. Cellular responses to tetanus antigen were monitored by lymphoproliferation at time of immunization and every 24 weeks to week 156. Proportions with a positive response (defined as stimulation index ≥ 3 and Δ counts per minute ≥ 3000) were compared at weeks 96 and 156. All analyses were intent-to-treat. Fifty-two participants had a TTB immunization at median 25 weeks; 23 patients did not. At weeks 96 and 156 there was no evidence of a difference in tetanus-specific responses, between those with or without TTB immunization (P = 0·2, P = 0·4). There was no difference in the proportion with response between those with PI-sparing or PI-containing regimens at both time-points (P = 0·8, P = 0·7). The proliferative response to tetanus toxoid was unaffected by initial HAART regimen. Anti-tetanus responses appear to reconstitute eventually in most patients over 156 weeks when treated successfully with HAART, irrespective of whether or not a TTB immunization has been administered. PMID:18410636

  11. Survival after withdrawal of dofetilide in patients with congestive heart failure and a short baseline QTc interval; a follow-up on the Diamond-CHF QT substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brendorp, B; Torp-Pedersen, C; Elming, H;

    2003-01-01

    withdrawal of dofetilide. METHODS: Patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) and reduced left ventricular function enrolled in the Diamond-CHF (Danish Investigations of Arrhythmia and Mortality on Dofetilide-CHF) study were eligible for our QT substudy provided they were in sinus rhythm and had...

  12. The relationship of hip joint space to self reported hip pain. A survey of 4.151 subjects of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: the Osteoarthritis Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Søballe, Kjeld;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (1) To evaluate the effect of pelvic orientation on measurements of hip joint space widths (JSW) in cadaver pelvic radiographs, thereby validating the pelvic radiographs of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: The Osteoarthritis Substudy (CCHS III) cohort of 4.152 subjects, and (2) to inv...

  13. Recruiting Dementia Caregivers Into Clinical Trials: Lessons Learnt From the Australian TRANSCENDENT Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Matthew J; Ziaian, Tahereh; Francis, Andrew; Agnew, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    The burden on those caring for a person with dementia is substantial. Although quality research assists in addressing the needs of these caregivers, recruiting caregivers into clinical studies is often problematic. This investigation explores the difficulties and successes in recruiting dementia caregivers into community-based clinical research by reporting the findings of a mixed-method substudy of a multicenter randomized controlled trial involving 40 community-dwelling dementia caregivers living in Adelaide, South Australia. Data for the substudy were derived from standardized trial monitoring documentation and structured telephone interviews. From a total of 16 distinct methods used across a 12-month recruitment campaign, the most cost-effective strategy was the distribution of flyers through a single study site. This approach generated the greatest number of enrollments of all methods used, achieving a 67% recruitment yield. The least cost-effective strategy, with a 0% recruitment yield, was the publication of a newspaper advertisement. Themes that emerged from the interviews pointed toward 5 key facilitators and 3 barriers to future trial recruitment. This study has generated new insights into the effective recruitment of dementia caregivers into clinical trials. We anticipate that these lessons learnt will assist in shaping the recruitment strategies of future studies of dementia caregivers.

  14. Impact of statins in microalbuminuric subjects with the metabolic syndrome : a substudy of the PREVEND Intervention Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geluk, CA; Asselbergs, FW; Hillege, HL; Bakker, SJL; de Jong, PE; Zijlstra, F; van Gilst, WH

    Aims Microalbuminuria frequently clusters with the metabolic syndrome and may identify subjects at increased coronary risk. Statin treatment may reduce the incidence of major adverse cardiac events in subjects with the metabolic syndrome, but evidence is limited. We evaluated the impact of

  15. Long-term prognostic value of ST-segment resolution in patients treated with fibrinolysis or primary percutaneous coronary intervention results from the DANAMI-2 (DANish trial in acute myocardial infarction-2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersten, Maria; Valeur, Nana; Grande, Peer;

    2009-01-01

    myocardial infarction; however, its prognostic significance may be limited to patients treated with fibrinolysis. METHODS: In the DANAMI-2 (DANish trial in Acute Myocardial Infarction-2) substudy, including 1,421 patients, the ST-segment elevation at baseline, pre-intervention, 90 min, and 4 h was assessed...

  16. Acceptability and feasibility of repeated mucosal specimen collection in clinical trial participants in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Omosa-Manyonyi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mucosal specimens are essential to evaluate compartmentalized immune responses to HIV vaccine candidates and other mucosally targeted investigational products. We studied the acceptability and feasibility of repeated mucosal sampling in East African clinical trial participants at low risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The Kenya AIDS Vaccine Initiative (KAVI enrolled participants into three Phase 1 trials of preventive HIV candidate vaccines in 2011-2012 at two clinical research centers in Nairobi. After informed consent to a mucosal sub-study, participants were asked to undergo collection of mucosal secretions (saliva, oral fluids, semen, cervico-vaginal and rectal, but could opt out of any collection at any visit. Specimens were collected at baseline and two additional time points. A tolerability questionnaire was administered at the final sub-study visit. Of 105 trial participants, 27 of 34 women (79% and 62 of 71 men (87% enrolled in the mucosal sub-study. Nearly all sub-study participants gave saliva and oral fluids at all visits. Semen was collected from about half the participating men (47-48% at all visits. Cervico-vaginal secretions were collected by Softcup from about two thirds of women (63% at baseline, increasing to 78% at the following visits, with similar numbers for cervical secretion collection by Merocel sponge; about half of women (52% gave cervico-vaginal samples at all visits. Rectal secretions were collected with Merocel sponge from about a quarter of both men and women (24% at all 3 visits, with 16% of men and 19% of women giving rectal samples at all visits. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated mucosal sampling in clinical trial participants in Kenya is feasible, with a good proportion of participants consenting to most sampling methods with the exception of rectal samples. Experienced staff members of both sexes and trained counselors with standardized messaging may improve

  17. Acute Ischemic Stroke | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available State ConcernedFinland - Fimea A.2EudraCT number2011-003474-86 A.3Full title of the trial Albumin in Acute ...erapy for Neuroprotection in Acute Ischemic Stroke A.3.1Title of the trial for la...y people, in easily understood, i.e. non-technical, language Albumin in Acute Stroke (ALIAS) Trial-Part 2 A....se under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Ischemic Stroke E.1.1.2Therapeutic...n, - cognition measured at 3 months by Trailmaking A and B. E.2.3Trial contains a sub-study No E.3Principal inclusion criteria - Acut

  18. Fast recruiting clinical trials--a utopian dream or logistical nightmare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L; Ellis, P; Bliss, J M

    2005-05-09

    Randomised clinical trials that exceed anticipated recruitment rates will by definition have the necessary precision to answer the research question within the expected time, thus ensuring the timely release of data that will inform future clinical practice. In addition, the national or international momentum generated brings with it a collective sense of achievement. Such trials, however, may also identify logistical and scientific problems that researchers should be aware of and for which provision needs to be made. The logistical problems relate to the rapid identification of the extra resources required to allow continued excellence in day-to-day management and monitoring of trial governance (both in participating centres and in coordinating trials units). The scientific/clinical problems include managing issues such as unexpected toxicities and suboptimal compliance, and the lack of time available in a rapidly recruiting trial to address them. A related issue concerns the lack of time available to initiate substudies (e.g. biological substudies), the relevance of which may only become apparent as the trial progresses. Many of these challenges were highlighted by recent experience with the Cancer Research UK Taxotere as Adjuvant Chemotherapy trial.

  19. Left Atrial Structure and Function in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction: A RELAX Substudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Steven E.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Semigran, Marc J.; Lewis, Gregory D.; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kim, Raymond J.; Redfield, Margaret M.; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2016-01-01

    Given the emerging recognition of left atrial structure and function as an important marker of disease in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HF-pEF), we investigated the association between left atrial volume and function with markers of disease severity and cardiac structure in HF-pEF. We studied 100 patients enrolled in the PhosphdiesteRasE-5 Inhibition to Improve CLinical Status and EXercise Capacity in Diastolic Heart Failure (RELAX) trial who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and blood collection before randomization. Maximal left atrial volume index (LAVi; N = 100), left atrial emptying fraction (LAEF; N = 99; including passive and active components (LAEFP, LAEFA; N = 80, 79, respectively) were quantified by CMR. After adjustment for multiple testing, maximal LAVi was only associated with age (ρ = 0.39), transmitral filling patterns (medial E/e’ ρ = 0.43), and N-terminal pro-BNP (NT-proBNP; ρ = 0.65; all pHFpEF. Further research to explore the relevance of left atrial structure and function in HF-pEF is warranted. PMID:27812147

  20. Primary analysis of the Mandarin-speaking sub-study within the Sydney diabetes prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taing, Cecilia Y; Gibson, Alice A; Colagiuri, Stephen; Vita, Philip; Cardona-Morrell, Magnolia; Bauman, Adrian; Moore, Michael; Williams, Mandy; Milat, Andrew; Hony, Jacky; Lin, Sophia; Gwizd, Melissa; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A

    2017-10-01

    There is strong and consistent evidence from large scale randomised controlled trials that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed through lifestyle modification which improves diet quality, increases physical activity and achieves weight loss in people at risk. Worldwide, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in individuals of Chinese descent. Culturally tailored programs are required to address the risk in the Chinese population. This paper analyses effectiveness of a culturally tailored community-based lifestyle modification program (Sydney Diabetes Prevention Program (SDPP)) targeting Mandarin speakers. The SDPP was a 12 month translational study aiming to promote increased physical activity and dietary changes. Effectiveness was assessed through the improvement of anthropometric, metabolic, physical activity and dietary outcomes and number of goals met. Seventy-eight Mandarin-speaking participants at a high risk (Australian Diabetes Risk, AUSDRISK≥15) of developing diabetes were recruited for this study. In this cohort, waist circumference, total cholesterol and fat intake significantly improved at the 12-month review. In comparison to the English-speaking stream, the Mandarin-speaking stream achieved fewer improvements in outcomes and goals. The SDPP was not effective in reducing the risk factors associated with developing type 2 diabetes in this cohort of high risk Mandarin-speaking individuals living in Sydney. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Endometrial effects of lower doses of conjugated equine estrogens and medroxyprogesterone acetate: two-year substudy results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickar, James H; Yeh, I Tien; Wheeler, James E; Cunnane, Mary F; Speroff, Leon

    2003-11-01

    To determine the endometrial safety of 2 years of treatment with lower doses of continuous combined conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter metabolic and osteoporosis substudy of the Women's Health, Osteoporosis, Progestin, Estrogen (Women's HOPE) study. Nineteen study centers across the United States. Healthy, postmenopausal women (n = 822) with an intact uterus were recruited. Patients received CEE 0.625, CEE 0.625/MPA 2.5, CEE 0.45, CEE 0.45/MPA 2.5, CEE 0.45/MPA 1.5, CEE 0.3, CEE 0.3/MPA 1.5 (all doses mg/day), or placebo for 2 years. Endometrial biopsies were evaluated at baseline and years 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 using a centralized protocol. Efficacy of lower doses of CEE/MPA in reducing the incidence of endometrial hyperplasia rates associated with unopposed estrogen (E). No cases of endometrial hyperplasia were seen in the four CEE/MPA groups. For the CEE-alone groups, a dose-related increase in incidence rates from 3.17% (CEE 0.3 mg) to 27.27% (CEE 0.625 mg) was seen at 2 years. The number of cases increased from year 1 to year 2. For the CEE-alone groups, the incidence rates and types of hyperplasia diagnosed varied among the pathologists. Two years of treatment with lower doses of CEE/MPA provided endometrial protection comparable to that seen with commonly prescribed doses. These regimens should be considered for postmenopausal women who are candidates for hormone therapy.

  2. The Tiotropium Safety and Performance in Respimat® (TIOSPIR®) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anzueto, Antonio; Wise, Robert; Calverley, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tiotropium Safety and Performance in Respimat® (TIOSPIR®) compared the safety and efficacy of tiotropium Respimat® and tiotropium HandiHaler® in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A prespecified spirometry substudy compared the lung function efficacy between...... treatment groups. METHODS: TIOSPIR® was a large-scale, long-term (2.3-year), event-driven, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial of 17,135 patients with COPD. In the spirometry substudy, trough forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were measured at baseline......: The TIOSPIR® spirometry substudy showed that tiotropium Respimat® 5 μg was noninferior to tiotropium HandiHaler® 18 μg for trough FEV1, but Respimat® 2.5 μg was not. Tiotropium Respimat® 5 μg provides similar bronchodilator efficacy to tiotropium HandiHaler® 18 μg with comparable rates of FEV1 decline...

  3. Streamlining IRB review in multisite trials through single-study IRB Cooperative Agreements: experience of the Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornquist, Mark D; Edelstein, Cim; Goodman, Gary E; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2002-02-01

    With their extensive data and specimen repositories, clinical trials are a long-term, valuable resource to health researchers. However, assuring protection of participants' rights can be challenging, particularly when such trials are conducted at multiple sites with multiple Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). One little-used mechanism that can streamline IRB review in multisite trials while maintaining participants' protections is the single-study IRB Cooperative Agreement. This agreement is entirely different from reciprocity agreements between institutions. Beginning in 1996, the Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial established single-study IRB Cooperative Agreements among its performance sites, which reduced the average time to complete IRB approval from over 6 months to 1 month for each of many substudies. We describe our experience and make recommendations for other multisite clinical trials.

  4. AMETHYST: Automation Alarm Evaluation System%AMETHYST:自动报警评估系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈双燕

    2003-01-01

    本文介绍一种预生产商业系统的开发过程,包括从样机系统实地使用中获得的教训。这一预生产系统的设计是使其比现有周界安全系统的性能更好、经济效益比更好。很多场地尽管都安装有维护完善的最新型周界入侵探测系统(PIDS),但是在恶劣气候期间会发出太多的误报警。对安装在两个政府机构的AMETHYST样机进行的评估表明,在保证达到所要求的有效探测率的情况下,两个场地的报警率下降幅度都可达80%。误报警的排除和探测性能主要取决于现有探测和闭路电视(CCTV)系统性能和报警评价算法正确配置。本文报告的生产前系统加快了处理速度并改善报警处理。

  5. The relationship of hip joint space to self reported hip pain. A survey of 4.151 subjects of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: the Osteoarthritis Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Steffen; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Søballe, Kjeld;

    2004-01-01

    degrees). At each 3 degrees increment an anteroposterior radiograph was recorded. Measurements of JSW were performed. (2) Self reported recurrent pain in or around the hip joint during 12 months prior to baseline examinations, and minimum JSW in pelvic radiographs of the cohort were registered......OBJECTIVES: (1) To evaluate the effect of pelvic orientation on measurements of hip joint space widths (JSW) in cadaver pelvic radiographs, thereby validating the pelvic radiographs of the Copenhagen City Heart Study: The Osteoarthritis Substudy (CCHS III) cohort of 4.152 subjects, and (2......) to investigate the relationship between minimal JSW and self reported hip pain of the cohort. METHODS: (1) Cadaver pelves and proximal femora of one male and one female donor were mounted in holding devices permitting independent rotation (total arc of 42 degrees), and inclination/reclination (total arc of 24...

  6. High Density Lipoprotein Structural Changes and Drug Response in Lipidomic Profiles following the Long-Term Fenofibrate Therapy in the FIELD Substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yetukuri, L.; Huopaniemi, I.; Koivuniemi, A.;

    2011-01-01

    mechanisms behind this are poorly understood. Herein we investigated HDL lipidomic profiles associated with fenofibrate treatment and the drug-induced Hcy levels in the FIELD substudy. We found that fenofibrate leads to complex HDL compositional changes including increased apoA-II, diminishment...... of lysophosphatidylcholines and increase of sphingomyelins. Ethanolamine plasmalogens were diminished only in a subgroup of fenofibrate-treated patients with elevated homocysteine levels. Finally we performed molecular dynamics simulations to qualitatively reconstitute HDL particles in silico. We found that increased number...... of apoA-II excludes neutral lipids from HDL surface and apoA-II is more deeply buried in the lipid matrix than apoA-I. In conclusion, a detailed molecular characterization of HDL may provide surrogates for predictors of drug response and thus help identify the patients who might benefit from fenofibrate...

  7. Functional status in rate- versus rhythm-control strategies for atrial fibrillation: results of the Atrial Fibrillation Follow-Up Investigation of Rhythm Management (AFFIRM) Functional Status Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Mina K; Shemanski, Lynn; Sherman, David G; Greene, H Leon; Hogan, David B; Kellen, Joyce C; Kim, Soo G; Martin, Lisa Warsinger; Rosenberg, Yves; Wyse, D George

    2005-11-15

    The Atrial Fibrillation Follow-up Investigation of Rhythm Management (AFFIRM) functional status substudy aimed to test the hypothesis that functional status is similar in rate-control and rhythm-control strategies. Randomized studies, including the AFFIRM study, have failed to demonstrate survival benefits between rate-control and rhythm-control strategies for atrial fibrillation (AF). However, AF may cause functional capacity or cognitive impairment that might justify maintenance of sinus rhythm. Investigators of the AFFIRM study enrolled 4,060 patients with AF who required long-term therapy and who were 65 years of age or older or who had another risk factor for stroke or death. New York Heart Association functional class (NYHA-FC) and Canadian Cardiovascular Society Angina Classification were assessed at initial and each follow-up visit. From 22 randomly chosen functional status substudy sites, 245 participants underwent 6-min walk tests and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) at initial, two-month, and yearly visits. Patients were assigned randomly to rate-controlling drugs, allowing AF to persist, or rhythm-controlling antiarrhythmic drugs, to maintain sinus rhythm. The NYHA-FC worsened with time in both rate-control and rhythm-control groups, with no differences between groups. Presence of AF was associated with worse NYHA-FC (p Society Angina Classification or MMSE scores. Six-minute walk distance improved over time in both study arms. On average, walk distance was 94 feet greater in the rhythm-control group (adjusted p = 0.049). Modest improvement in 6-min walk distance was noted in the rhythm-control arm. Presence of AF was associated with worse NYHA-FC. No difference in cognitive function was detected.

  8. Use of a Novel Artificial Intelligence Platform on Mobile Devices to Assess Dosing Compliance in a Phase 2 Clinical Trial in Subjects With Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Accurately monitoring and collecting drug adherence data can allow for better understanding and interpretation of the outcomes of clinical trials. Most clinical trials use a combination of pill counts and self-reported data to measure drug adherence, despite the drawbacks of relying on these types of indirect measures. It is assumed that doses are taken, but the exact timing of these events is often incomplete and imprecise. Objective The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the use of a novel artificial intelligence (AI) platform (AiCure) on mobile devices for measuring medication adherence, compared with modified directly observed therapy (mDOT) in a substudy of a Phase 2 trial of the α7 nicotinic receptor agonist (ABT-126) in subjects with schizophrenia. Methods AI platform generated adherence measures were compared with adherence inferred from drug concentration measurements. Results The mean cumulative pharmacokinetic adherence over 24 weeks was 89.7% (standard deviation [SD] 24.92) for subjects receiving ABT-126 who were monitored using the AI platform, compared with 71.9% (SD 39.81) for subjects receiving ABT-126 who were monitored by mDOT. The difference was 17.9% (95% CI -2 to 37.7; P=.08). Conclusions Using drug levels, this substudy demonstrates the potential of AI platforms to increase adherence, rapidly detect nonadherence, and predict future nonadherence. Subjects monitored using the AI platform demonstrated a percentage change in adherence of 25% over the mDOT group. Subjects were able to use the technology successfully for up to 6 months in an ambulatory setting with early termination rates that are comparable to subjects outside of the substudy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01655680 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01655680?term=NCT01655680 PMID:28223265

  9. Impact of Chronic Total Occlusions on Markers of Reperfusion, Infarct Size, and Long-Term Mortality : A Substudy from the TAPAS-Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lexis, Chris P. H.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Rahel, Braim M.; Kampinga, Marthe A.; Gu, Youlan L.; de Smet, Bart J. G. L.; Zijlstra, Felix; Lexis, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the impact of a chronic total occlusion (CTO) in a non-infarct related coronary artery (IRA) on markers of reperfusion, infarct size, and long-term cardiac mortality in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEM!). Background: A concurrent CTO in STEMI pa

  10. High-sensitivity troponin-T as a prognostic marker after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest - A targeted temperature management (TTM) trial substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilje, Patrik; Koul, Sasha; Thomsen, Jakob Hartvig

    2016-01-01

    -TnT) is a prognostic marker among survivors of OHCA with both ischemic and non-ischemic aetiologies remains to be determined. We sought to evaluate the ability of hs-TnT to prognosticate all-cause mortality, death due to cardiovascular causes or multi-organ failure and death due to cerebral causes after OHCA...... circulation (ROSC). The endpoints were 180 day all-cause mortality, death due to cardiovascular causes or multi-organ failure and death due to cerebral causes. Subgroups based on the initial ECG after ROSC (STEMI vs all other ECG presentations) were analyzed. RESULTS: Hs-TnT was independently associated...... with all-cause mortality which was driven by death due to cardiovascular causes or multi-organ failure and not cerebral causes (at 48h: OR 1.10, CI 1.01-1.20, pfailure (at 48h: OR 1.13, CI 1.01-1.26, p

  11. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Potential Prognostic Implications After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Substudy of the Target Temperature Management Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Jeppesen, John; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Wanscher, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Whole-body ischemia during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest triggers immediate activation of inflammatory systems leading to a sepsis-like syndrome. The aim was to investigate the association between level of systemic inflammation and mortality in survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac...

  12. Dual role of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in stent struts endothelialisation and neointimal regrowth: a substudy of the IN-PACT CORO trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maria, Giovanni Luigi; Porto, Italo; Burzotta, Francesco; Brancati, Marta Francesca; Trani, Carlo; Pirozzolo, Giancarlo; Leone, Antonio Maria; Niccoli, Giampaolo; Prati, Francesco; Crea, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelialisation is a crucial event after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are bone marrow derived elements with reparative properties. We aimed to assess the relationship between circulating EPC levels and stent neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) using frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). Patients undergoing elective PCI to native vessels and randomised to bare metal stent (BMS) alone versus BMS plus drug coated balloon (DCB) were included. At six months, angiographic follow-up and FD-OCT were performed to measure percentage neointimal hyperplasia volume obstruction (%NIHV), and percentage of uncovered stent struts (%US). Venous blood samples were obtained before the procedure and at six months to detect CD34+CD45dimKDR+ EPC levels. Twenty patients were enrolled. A significant relationship was observed between baseline EPC levels and %NIHV (R: 0.63, p: 0.03) and %US (R: -0.56, p: 0.01) at follow-up. Both EPC levels and DCB use were independently related to %NIHV (β: 0.55; p < 0.001 and β: -0.51; p: 0.001, respectively), while only EPC levels were independently associated to %US (β: -0.52; p: 0.01). Higher %NIHV (p: 0.004) and lower %US (p: 0.005) were observed in patients with stable or increasing EPC level. Our study shows a relationship between EPC levels and stent strut coverage, supporting a dual role for these cells in favouring stent endothelialisation but also NIH growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of Chronic Total Occlusions on Markers of Reperfusion, Infarct Size, and Long-Term Mortality : A Substudy from the TAPAS-Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lexis, Chris P. H.; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Rahel, Braim M.; Kampinga, Marthe A.; Gu, Youlan L.; de Smet, Bart J. G. L.; Zijlstra, Felix; Lexis, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the impact of a chronic total occlusion (CTO) in a non-infarct related coronary artery (IRA) on markers of reperfusion, infarct size, and long-term cardiac mortality in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEM!). Background: A concurrent CTO in STEMI pa

  14. Usage of a generic web-based self-management intervention for breast cancer survivors: substudy analysis of the BREATH trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, S.W. van den; Peters, E.J.; Kraaijeveld, J.F.; Gielissen, M.F.M.; Prins, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Generic fully automated Web-based self-management interventions are upcoming, for example, for the growing number of breast cancer survivors. It is hypothesized that the use of these interventions is more individualized and that users apply a large amount of self-tailoring. However,

  15. The prognostic utility of the SYNTAX score on 1-year outcomes after revascularization with zotarolimus- and everolimus-eluting stents: a substudy of the RESOLUTE All Comers Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garg, Scot; Serruys, Patrick W; Silber, Sigmund

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the ability of the SYNTAX score (SXscore) to stratify risk in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using zotarolimus-eluting or everolimus-eluting stents.......This study assessed the ability of the SYNTAX score (SXscore) to stratify risk in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using zotarolimus-eluting or everolimus-eluting stents....

  16. A predictive model to identify patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes at high risk of cardiac arrest or in-hospital mortality: An IMMEDIATE Trial sub-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhab Ray

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The multivariable predictive model developed identified patients with very early ACS at high risk of cardiac arrest or death. Using this model could assist treating those with greatest potential benefit from GIK.

  17. Use of a Novel Artificial Intelligence Platform on Mobile Devices to Assess Dosing Compliance in a Phase 2 Clinical Trial in Subjects With Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Earle E; Shafner, Laura; Walling, David P; Othman, Ahmed A; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Hinkle, John; Hanina, Adam

    2017-02-21

    Accurately monitoring and collecting drug adherence data can allow for better understanding and interpretation of the outcomes of clinical trials. Most clinical trials use a combination of pill counts and self-reported data to measure drug adherence, despite the drawbacks of relying on these types of indirect measures. It is assumed that doses are taken, but the exact timing of these events is often incomplete and imprecise. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the use of a novel artificial intelligence (AI) platform (AiCure) on mobile devices for measuring medication adherence, compared with modified directly observed therapy (mDOT) in a substudy of a Phase 2 trial of the α7 nicotinic receptor agonist (ABT-126) in subjects with schizophrenia. AI platform generated adherence measures were compared with adherence inferred from drug concentration measurements. The mean cumulative pharmacokinetic adherence over 24 weeks was 89.7% (standard deviation [SD] 24.92) for subjects receiving ABT-126 who were monitored using the AI platform, compared with 71.9% (SD 39.81) for subjects receiving ABT-126 who were monitored by mDOT. The difference was 17.9% (95% CI -2 to 37.7; P=.08). Using drug levels, this substudy demonstrates the potential of AI platforms to increase adherence, rapidly detect nonadherence, and predict future nonadherence. Subjects monitored using the AI platform demonstrated a percentage change in adherence of 25% over the mDOT group. Subjects were able to use the technology successfully for up to 6 months in an ambulatory setting with early termination rates that are comparable to subjects outside of the substudy. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01655680 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01655680?term=NCT01655680.

  18. High density lipoprotein structural changes and drug response in lipidomic profiles following the long-term fenofibrate therapy in the FIELD substudy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxman Yetukuri

    Full Text Available In a recent FIELD study the fenofibrate therapy surprisingly failed to achieve significant benefit over placebo in the primary endpoint of coronary heart disease events. Increased levels of atherogenic homocysteine were observed in some patients assigned to fenofibrate therapy but the molecular mechanisms behind this are poorly understood. Herein we investigated HDL lipidomic profiles associated with fenofibrate treatment and the drug-induced Hcy levels in the FIELD substudy. We found that fenofibrate leads to complex HDL compositional changes including increased apoA-II, diminishment of lysophosphatidylcholines and increase of sphingomyelins. Ethanolamine plasmalogens were diminished only in a subgroup of fenofibrate-treated patients with elevated homocysteine levels. Finally we performed molecular dynamics simulations to qualitatively reconstitute HDL particles in silico. We found that increased number of apoA-II excludes neutral lipids from HDL surface and apoA-II is more deeply buried in the lipid matrix than apoA-I. In conclusion, a detailed molecular characterization of HDL may provide surrogates for predictors of drug response and thus help identify the patients who might benefit from fenofibrate treatment.

  19. Consumer input into research: the Australian Cancer Trials website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butow Phyllis N

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Australian Cancer Trials website (ACTO was publicly launched in 2010 to help people search for cancer clinical trials recruiting in Australia, provide information about clinical trials and assist with doctor-patient communication about trials. We describe consumer involvement in the design and development of ACTO and report our preliminary patient evaluation of the website. Methods Consumers, led by Cancer Voices NSW, provided the impetus to develop the website. Consumer representative groups were consulted by the research team during the design and development of ACTO which combines a search engine, trial details, general information about trial participation and question prompt lists. Website use was analysed. A patient evaluation questionnaire was completed at one hospital, one week after exposure to the website. Results ACTO's main features and content reflect consumer input. In February 2011, it covered 1, 042 cancer trials. Since ACTO's public launch in November 2010, until the end of February 2011, the website has had 2, 549 new visits and generated 17, 833 page views. In a sub-study of 47 patient users, 89% found the website helpful for learning about clinical trials and all respondents thought patients should have access to ACTO. Conclusions The development of ACTO is an example of consumers working with doctors, researchers and policy makers to improve the information available to people whose lives are affected by cancer and to help them participate in their treatment decisions, including consideration of clinical trial enrolment. Consumer input has ensured that the website is informative, targets consumer priorities and is user-friendly. ACTO serves as a model for other health conditions.

  20. Quality of life predicts overall survival in women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer: an AURELIA substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncolato, F T; Gibbs, E; Lee, C K; Asher, R; Davies, L C; Gebski, V J; Friedlander, M; Hilpert, F; Wenzel, L; Stockler, M R; King, M; Pujade-Lauraine, E

    2017-08-01

    Women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer are a heterogeneous group whose median overall survival is 12 months. We hypothesized that their quality of life (QoL) scores would be prognostic. Data from AURELIA (n = 326), a randomized trial of chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab, were used to identify baseline QoL domains [EORTC (European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer) QLQ-C30 and OV28] that were significantly associated with overall survival in multivariable Cox regression analyses. Patients were classified as having good, medium, or poor risk. Cutpoints were validated in an independent dataset, CARTAXHY (n = 136). Multivariable analyses of significant QoL domains on survival were adjusted for clinicopathological prognostic factors. The additional QoL information was assessed using C statistic. In AURELIA, all domains, except cognitive function, predicted overall survival in univariable analyses. Physical function (P 93) risk categories for physical function, median overall survival was 11.0, 14.7, and 19.3 months, respectively (P 44), medium- (13-44), and low- (AURELIA (P < 0.001) and 10.5, 19.6, and 24.1 months in CARTAXHY (P = 0.02). Physical function (P = 0.02) and abdominal/gastrointestinal symptoms (P = 0.03) remained independent prognostic factors after adjustment for clinicopathological factors. The C statistic of the full model was 0.71. For QoL factors alone, patient factors alone and disease factors alone, the C statistics were 0.61, 0.61, and 0.67 respectively. Physical function and abdominal/gastrointestinal symptom scores improved predictions of overall survival over clinicopathological factors alone in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. This additional prognostic information could improve trial stratification, patient-doctor communication about prognosis, and clinical decision-making. NCT00976911.

  1. Antihypertensive treatment decreases arterial stiffness at night but not during the day. Results from the Hypertension in the Very Elderly Trial.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The main Hypertension in the Very Elderly Trial (HYVET) demonstrated a very marked reduction in cardiovascular events by treating hypertensive participants 80 years or older with a low dose, sustained release prescription of indapamide (indapamide SR, 1.5 mg) to which was added a low dose of an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor in two-thirds of cases (perindopril 2–4 mg). This report from the ambulatory blood pressure sub-study investigates whether changes in arterial stiffness and ambu...

  2. CNS safety at 48-week of switching to ATV/r plus 3TC or two nucleos(tides in HIV-suppressed patients on stable ART: the SALT neurocognitive sub-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Pérez Valero

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to their low CNS penetrance, there are concerns about the capacity of non-conventional PI-based ART (monotherapy and dual therapies to preserve neurocognitive performance (NP. Methods: We evaluated the NP change of aviremic participants of the SALT clinical trial (1 switching therapy to dual therapy (DT: ATV/r+3TC or triple therapy (TT: ATV/r+2NRTI who agreed to perform an NP assessment (NPZ-5 at baseline and W48. Neurocognitive impairment and NP were assessed using AAN-2007 criteria (2 and global deficit scores (GDS (3. Neurocognitive change (GDS change: W48 – baseline and the effect of DT on NP evolution crude and adjusted by significant confounders were determined using ANCOVA. Results: A total of 158 patients were included (Table 1. They had shorter times because HIV diagnosis, ART initiation and HIV-suppression and their virologic outcome at W48 by snapshot was higher (79.1% vs 72.7%; p=0.04 compared to the 128 patients not included in the sub-study. By AAN-2007 criteria, 51 patients in each ART group (68% vs 63% were neurocognitively impaired at baseline (p=0.61. Forty-seven patients were not reassessed at W48: 30 lost of follow-up (16 DT-14 TT and 17 had non-evaluable data (6 DT-11 TT. Patients retested were more likely to be men (78.9% vs 61.4% and had neurological cofounders (9.6% vs 0% than patients non-retested. At W48, 3 out of 16 (5.7% patients on DT and 6 out of 21 (10.5% on TT who were non-impaired at baseline became impaired (p=0.49 while 10 out of 37 (18.9% on DT and 7 out of 36 (12.3% on TT who were neurocognitively impaired at baseline became non-impaired (p=0.44. Mean GDS changes (95% CI were: Overall −0.2 (−0.3 to −0.04: DT −0.26 (−0.4 to −0.07 and TT −0.08 (−0.2 to 0.07. NP was similar between DT and TT (0.15. This absence of differences was also observed in all cognitive tests. Effect of DT: −0.16 [−0.38 to 0.06] (r2=0.16 on NP evolution was similar to TT (reference, even after

  3. Motivation to physical activity among adults with high risk of type 2 diabetes who participated in the Oulu substudy of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkiakangas, Eveliina; Taanila, Anja M; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes can be prevented by lifestyle changes such as sufficient level of physical activity. The number of persons at high risk of or diagnosed with type 2 diabetes is increasing all over the world. In order to prevent type 2 diabetes and develop exercise counselling, more studies on motivators and barriers to physical activity are needed. Thus, the aim of this qualitative study was to describe the motivators and barriers to physical activity among individuals with high risk of type 2 diabetes who participated in a substudy of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study in Oulu and to consider whether the motivators or barriers changed during the follow-up from 2003 to 2008. Questionnaires with open-ended questions were conducted twice: in the first follow-up in 2003 altogether 63 participants answered the questionnaire (n = 93), and in the second follow-up in 2008 altogether 71 participants answered the questionnaire (n = 82). Thus, response rate was 68% in 2003 and 87% in 2008. The study was conducted in the city of Oulu in Finland. Qualitative data were analysed by inductive content analysis using the QSR NVivo 8 software. The results of this study showed that motivators to physical activity included weight management, feelings of physical and mental well being. In addition, social relationships associated with exercise were also motivators. In conclusion, we present that regular counselling is important in order to promote exercise among older people, and that motivators to exercise are strengthened by positive experiences of exercise as one grows older.

  4. A study to evaluate the prevalence and determinants of stress coping strategies in heart failure patients in Poland (CAPS-LOCK-HF sub-study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzych, Łukasz J; Wybraniec, Maciej T; Siennicka, Agnieszka; Lees, Belinda; Gościńska-Bis, Kinga; Wójcik, Maciej; Błaszczyk, Robert; Szymański, Filip M; Orszulak, Michał; Michalski, Błażej; Kamiński, Karol; Kopeć, Grzegorz; Hrynkiewicz-Szymańska, Anna; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the prevalence and determinants of different stress coping strategies in Polish patients suffering from heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF). This manuscript is a sub-study of the CAPS-LOCK-HF multicentre psychological status assessment of patients with HFREF. Patients with > six-month history of HFREF and clinical stability for ≥ three months and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) study. Demographic and clinical variables were obtained from medical records, while a standardised Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations (CISS) was applied to all subjects. The study comprised 758 patients (599 men; 79%) with a median age of 64 years (IQR 58-71). Median LVEF was 33% (25-40). Subjects most commonly used task-oriented coping strategies (median CISS score 55 points; IQR 49-61), followed by avoidance (45 points; 39-50) and emotion-oriented coping strategies (41 points; 34-48). Distraction-based avoidance coping strategies (20 points; 16-23) were more pronounced than social diversion strategies (16 points; 14-19). Multiple regression analysis showed that higher New York Heart Association (NYHA) class and lower systolic blood pressure were independent predictors of task-oriented style. Emotion-oriented coping was more common among females and higher NYHA classes, and in patients who did not take angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. Patients who used avoidance-oriented strategies were more frequently those in sinus rhythm on assessment and those who had less history of neoplastic disease. Patients with HFREF most commonly use favourable task-oriented coping strategies. However, female patients and those with higher NYHA classes tend to use potentially detrimental emotion-oriented coping strategies.

  5. Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new medical approaches work in people. Each study answers ... prevent, screen for, diagnose, or treat a disease. Clinical trials may also compare a new treatment to a ...

  6. Maintenance of the efficacy of desvenlafaxine in menopausal vasomotor symptoms: a 1-year randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V; Archer, David F; Guico-Pabia, Christine J; Hwang, Eunhee; Cheng, Ru-Fong J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the 1-year maintenance of the efficacy of desvenlafaxine 100 mg/day (administered as desvenlafaxine succinate) established on week 12 in a 1-year, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in postmenopausal women seeking treatment of bothersome vasomotor symptoms. Primary efficacy endpoints were changes in hot flush (HF) frequency and severity on weeks 12, 26, and 52 in an efficacy substudy population (≥50 moderate and severe HFs per week at baseline). Secondary endpoints were Greene climacteric scale, patient global impression symptom rating, and patient global impression of change scores (weeks 12, 26, and 52) for the main study efficacy population. Safety was assessed throughout the trial. The mean baseline HF frequency (efficacy substudy population, n = 365) was 12 moderate and severe HFs per day; the mean baseline severity score was 2.4. At 1 year, women treated with desvenlafaxine maintained the efficacy established on week 12. Desvenlafaxine reduced HF frequency by 7.47 moderate and severe HFs per day on week 12 (adjusted mean difference from placebo, -2.48; 95% CI, -3.47 to -1.50; P Desvenlafaxine reduced the mean severity score by 0.63 on week 12 (placebo, -0.30; P desvenlafaxine than for placebo on months 3, 6, and 12 (all P desvenlafaxine and 79% for placebo (P = 0.006). Full safety results are reported separately. The treatment efficacy of desvenlafaxine 100 mg/day achieved on week 12 in postmenopausal women with vasomotor symptoms is maintained for 1 year.

  7. Effects of aliskiren- and ramipril-based treatment on central aortic blood pressure in elderly with systolic hypertension: a substudy of AGELESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baschiera F

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fabio Baschiera,1 William Chang,2 Patrick Brunel1 On behalf of the AGELESS Study Group 1Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 2Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA Background: Systolic hypertension is the most common form of hypertension in elderly patients. There is increasing evidence that measurement of central aortic pressure (CAP better accounts for cardiovascular risk than brachial blood pressure (BP. The Aliskiren for GEriatric LowEring of SyStolic hypertension (AGELESS study in elderly patients with systolic hypertension showed that aliskiren-based therapy provided greater reductions in peripheral BP than ramipril-based therapy over 12 and 36 weeks of treatment. Here, we present CAP results in a substudy of elderly patients from the AGELESS study. Methods: This was a post hoc analysis of a 36-week, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, active-controlled, optional-titration study in patients ≥65 years of age with systolic BP ≥140 mmHg. Changes in both central and peripheral BP and pulse pressure (PP and changes in systolic and PP amplification ratios from baseline to the week 36 end point with aliskiren-based versus ramipril-based therapy were analyzed. Results: Of the 901 patients randomized in the overall study, 154 patients (aliskiren, n=78; ramipril, n=76 had CAP data. Numerically comparable reductions were seen for central aortic systolic pressure (CASP in aliskiren-based therapy (baseline: 143.7±15.0; week 36: −20.3±16.2 compared with ramipril-based therapy (baseline: 147.9±11.9; week 36: −20.7±14.6. However, for the change in central aortic diastolic pressure, the least squares mean between-treatment difference (−3.6 mmHg [95% confidence interval, −6.76, −0.43; P=0.0263] was in favor of aliskiren, while the other changes were comparable between the two groups with a trend in favor of aliskiren for CASP as well (−2.6 mmHg [95% confidence interval, −7.38, 2.19; P=0

  8. The value of TOP2A gene copy number variation as a biomarker in breast cancer: Update of DBCG trial 89D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K.V.; Ejlertsen, B.; Moller, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous analyses of TOP2A and HER2 in the Danish Breast Cancer Coopererative Group (DBCG) trial 89D suggested that TOP2A amplifications and possible also deletions are predictive markers for the effect of adjuvant epirubicin in patients with primary breast cancer. We present an updated...... and extended statistical analysis, requested for IVD-labeling of TOP2A testing. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the DBCG trial 89D 980 Danish patients were randomly assigned to nine cycles of intravenous CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil) or CEF (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, and fluorouracil......). Archival tumor tissue was collected retrospectively from 806 of these patients in a prospectively designed, biological sub-study, and was successfully analyzed for TOP2A aberrations and HER2 status in 773 samples (96%). Recurrence-free survival (RFS) was the primary endpoint. RESULTS: TOP2A aberrations...

  9. The Feasibility and Effects of Acupuncture on Quality of Life Scores During Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer: Results from a Pilot, Randomized Sham-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulonis, Ursula A.; Dunn, Julie E.; Lee, Hang; Doherty-Gilman, Anne; Dean-Clower, Elizabeth; Goodman, Annekathryn; Davis, Roger B.; Buring, Julie; Wayne, Peter; Rosenthal, David S.; Penson, Richard T.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Within a pilot trial regarding chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, the secondary aim of the main study was explored. This involved measuring the effects—as shown on two key measurement scales reflecting quality of life (QoL)—of verum versus sham acupuncture on patients with ovarian cancer during chemotherapy. Objective The aim of this substudy was to determine the feasibility of determining the effects of verum acupuncture versus sham acupuncture on QoL in patients with ovarian cancer during chemotherapy. Design This was a randomized, sham-controlled trial. Setting The trial was conducted at two cancer centers. Patients Patients with ovarian cancer (N=21) who were receiving chemotherapy—primarily intravenous carboplatin and paclitaxel—participated in this substudy. Intervention The participants were given either active or sham acupuncture 1 week prior to cycle 2 of chemotherapy. There were ten sessions of acupuncture, with manual and electro-stimulation over a 4-week period. Main Outcome Measures The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality-of-Life Questionnaire-Core 30 Item (EORTC-QLQ-C30) and the Quality of Life Questionnaire–Ovarian Cancer Module-28 Item (QLQ-OV28) were administered to the patients at baseline and at the end of their acupuncture sessions. Results Of the original 21, 15 patients (71%) completed the study, and 93% of them completed the questionnaires. The EORTC-QLQ-C30 subscores were improved in the acupuncture arm, including the mean scores of social function (SF), pain, and insomnia (p=0.05). However, after adjusting for baseline differences, only the SF score was significantly higher in the active acupuncture arm, compared with the sham acupuncture arm (p=0.03). Conclusions It appears feasible to conduct a randomized sham-controlled acupuncture trial measuring QoL for patients with ovarian cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy. Acupuncture may have a role in improving QoL during

  10. Urinary proteomics predict onset of microalbuminuria in normoalbuminuric type 2 diabetic patients, a sub-study of the DIRECT-Protect 2 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Morten; Persson, Frederik; Zürbig, Petra

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early prevention of diabetic nephropathy is not successful as early interventions have shown conflicting results, partly because of a lack of early and precise indicators of disease development. Urinary proteomics has shown promise in this regard and could identify those at high risk...... who might benefit from treatment. In this study we investigate its utility in a large type 2 diabetic cohort with normoalbuminuria. METHODS: We performed a post hoc analysis in the Diabetic Retinopathy Candesartan Trials (DIRECT-Protect 2 study), a multi centric randomized clinical controlled trial...... strategies for diabetic nephropathy....

  11. Effect of verapamil on heart rate variability after an acute myocardial infarction. Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaage-Nilsen, M; Rasmussen, Verner

    1998-01-01

    with verapamil significantly reduced sudden death, the aim of the present substudy was to evaluate the effect of verapamil on heart-rate variability in the time and frequency domain, measured in two 5-minute segments during the day and night. Thirty-eight patients were examined by Holter monitoring, at 1 week......Because decreased heart rate variability measured after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been demonstrated to predict subsequent mortality and sudden death, and an efficacy analysis of the Danish Verapamil Infarction Trial II (DAVIT II) demonstrated that long-term postinfarction treatment......, that is, before randomization, and at 1 month after infarction; 22 of the patients were examined 12-16 months after infarction as well. In both treatment groups (verapamil and placebo) no significant alteration of heart rate variability during the day-time was demonstrated from before to after 1 and 12...

  12. Effects of Exenatide vs. Metformin on endothelial function in obese patients with pre-diabetes: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Aaron S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor agonist treatment may improve endothelial function via direct and indirect mechanisms. We compared the acute and chronic effects of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exenatide vs. metformin on endothelial function in patients with obesity and pre-diabetes. Methods We performed a randomized, open-label, clinical trial in 50 non-diabetic individuals (mean age 58.5 ± 10.0; 38 females with abdominal obesity and either impaired fasting glucose, elevated HbA1c, or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT who were randomized to receive 3-months of exenatide or metformin. Microvascular endothelial function, assessed by digital reactive hyperemia (reactive hyperemic index: RHI, C-reactive protein (CRP, circulating oxidized LDL (oxLDL, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 were measured at baseline and 3-months. Seven subjects with IGT participated in a sub-study comparing the effects of pre-administration of exenatide and metformin on postprandial endothelial function. Results There were no differences for the change in RHI (Δ exenatide: 0.01 ± 0.68 vs. Δ metformin: -0.17 ± 0.72, P = 0.348, CRP, oxLDL, or VCAM-1 between exenatide and metformin treatment. Triglycerides were reduced more with exenatide compared to metformin (Δ exenatide: -25.5 ± 45.7 mg/dL vs. Δ metformin: -2.9 ± 22.8 mg/dL, P = 0.032. In the sub-study, there was no difference in postprandial RHI between exenatide and metformin. Conclusions Three months of exenatide therapy had similar effects on microvascular endothelial function, markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and vascular activation, as metformin, in patients with obesity and pre-diabetes. Clinical trials registration This study is registered on http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/: NCT00546728

  13. Stroke Trials Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions Sponsors ... a clinical trial near you Welcome to the Stroke Trials Registry Our registry of clinical trials in ...

  14. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study ...

  15. Pre-discharge exercise test for evaluation of patients with complete or incomplete revascularization following primary percutaneous coronary intervention: a DANAMI-2 sub-study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valeur, N.; Clemmensen, P.; Grande, P.

    2008-01-01

    with complete revascularization. CONCLUSIONS: Exercise capacity was prognostic of reinfarction and/or death in patients with incomplete revascularization, but not in completely revascularized patients. ST segment depression alone did not predict residual coronary stenosis or dismal prognosis Udgivelsesdato......OBJECTIVES: It is unclear whether the completeness of revascularization impacts on the prognostic value of an exercise test after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). METHODS: The DANAMI-2 trial included patients with ST elevation acute myocardial infarction randomized to primary PCI...

  16. Does mass azithromycin distribution impact child growth and nutrition in Niger? A cluster-randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdou Amza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic use on animals demonstrates improved growth regardless of whether or not there is clinical evidence of infectious disease. Antibiotics used for trachoma control may play an unintended benefit of improving child growth.In this sub-study of a larger randomized controlled trial, we assess anthropometry of pre-school children in a community-randomized trial of mass oral azithromycin distributions for trachoma in Niger. We measured height, weight, and mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC in 12 communities randomized to receive annual mass azithromycin treatment of everyone versus 12 communities randomized to receive biannual mass azithromycin treatments for children, 3 years after the initial mass treatment. We collected measurements in 1,034 children aged 6-60 months of age.We found no difference in the prevalence of wasting among children in the 12 annually treated communities that received three mass azithromycin distributions compared to the 12 biannually treated communities that received six mass azithromycin distributions (odds ratio = 0.88, 95% confidence interval = 0.53 to 1.49.We were unable to demonstrate a statistically significant difference in stunting, underweight, and low MUAC of pre-school children in communities randomized to annual mass azithromycin treatment or biannual mass azithromycin treatment. The role of antibiotics on child growth and nutrition remains unclear, but larger studies and longitudinal trials may help determine any association.

  17. A randomized trial comparing concise and standard consent forms in the START trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Christine; Touloumi, Giota; Walker, A Sarah; Smolskis, Mary; Sharma, Shweta; Babiker, Abdel G; Pantazis, Nikos; Tavel, Jorge; Florence, Eric; Sanchez, Adriana; Hudson, Fleur; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Emanuel, Ezekiel; Clewett, Megan; Munroe, David; Denning, Eileen

    2017-01-01

    Improving the effectiveness and efficiency of research informed consent is a high priority. Some express concern about longer, more complex, written consent forms creating barriers to participant understanding. A recent meta-analysis concluded that randomized comparisons were needed. We conducted a cluster-randomized non-inferiority comparison of a standard versus concise consent form within a multinational trial studying the timing of starting antiretroviral therapy in HIV+ adults (START). Interested sites were randomized to standard or concise consent forms for all individuals signing START consent. Participants completed a survey measuring comprehension of study information and satisfaction with the consent process. Site personnel reported usual site consent practices. The primary outcome was comprehension of the purpose of randomization (pre-specified 7.5% non-inferiority margin). 77 sites (2429 participants) were randomly allocated to use standard consent and 77 sites (2000 participants) concise consent, for an evaluable cohort of 4229. Site and participant characteristics were similar for the two groups. The concise consent was non-inferior to the standard consent on comprehension of randomization (80.2% versus 82%, site adjusted difference: 0.75% (95% CI -3.8%, +5.2%)); and the two groups did not differ significantly on total comprehension score, satisfaction, or voluntariness (p>0.1). Certain independent factors, such as education, influenced comprehension and satisfaction but not differences between consent groups. An easier to read, more concise consent form neither hindered nor improved comprehension of study information nor satisfaction with the consent process among a large number of participants. This supports continued efforts to make consent forms more efficient. Informed consent substudy was registered as part of START study in clinicaltrials.gov #NCT00867048, and EudraCT # 2008-006439-12.

  18. Improving hypertension management through pharmacist prescribing; the rural alberta clinical trial in optimizing hypertension (Rural RxACTION: trial design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Norman RC

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with hypertension continue to have less than optimal blood pressure control, with nearly one in five Canadian adults having hypertension. Pharmacist prescribing is gaining favor as a potential clinically efficacious and cost-effective means to improve both access and quality of care. With Alberta being the first province in Canada to have independent prescribing by pharmacists, it offers a unique opportunity to evaluate outcomes in patients who are prescribed antihypertensive therapy by pharmacists. Methods The study is a randomized controlled trial of enhanced pharmacist care, with the unit of randomization being the patient. Participants will be randomized to enhanced pharmacist care (patient identification, assessment, education, close follow-up, and prescribing/titration of antihypertensive medications or usual care. Participants are patients in rural Alberta with undiagnosed/uncontrolled blood pressure, as defined by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program. The primary outcome is the change in systolic blood pressure between baseline and 24 weeks in the enhanced-care versus usual-care arms. There are also three substudies running in conjunction with the project examining different remuneration models, investigating patient knowledge, and assessing health-resource utilization amongst patients in each group. Discussion To date, one-third of the required sample size has been recruited. There are 15 communities and 17 pharmacists actively screening, recruiting, and following patients. This study will provide high-level evidence regarding pharmacist prescribing. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00878566.

  19. Impact of J-CTO score on procedural outcome and target lesion revascularisation after percutaneous coronary intervention for chronic total occlusion: a substudy of the J-CTO Registry (Multicentre CTO Registry in Japan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morino, Yoshihiro; Abe, Mitsuru; Kimura, Takeshi; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Muramatsu, Toshiya; Ochiai, Masahiko; Noguchi, Yuichi; Kato, Kenichi; Shibata, Yoshisato; Hiasa, Yoshikazu; Doi, Osamu; Yamashita, Takehiro; Morimoto, Takeshi; Hinohara, Tomoaki; Fujii, Toshiharu; Mitsudo, Kazuaki

    2016-01-22

    We investigated the impact of the J-CTO score, a pre-procedural risk score for successful guidewire crossing within 30 minutes through chronic total occlusion (CTO) lesions, on procedural and midterm clinical outcomes in terms of target lesion revascularisation (TLR) after CTO recanalisation. The primary endpoint of this substudy was midterm TLR. The net midterm success rate was calculated by multiplying the lesion success rate by the TLR-free survival rate. The initial lesion success rates according to the J-CTO score categories of 0, 1, 2, and ≥3 were 97.0%, 92.1%, 86.5%, and 73.6%, respectively (pCTO score categories of 0, 1, 2, and ≥3 were 5.3%, 11.1%, 16.7%, and 13.4%, respectively (p=0.082). The net midterm success rates according to the J-CTO score categories of 0, 1, 2, and ≥3 were 91.9%, 81.9%, 72.1%, and 63.7%, respectively (pCTO lesions with lower J-CTO scores are expected to achieve a high procedural success rate and an increased TLR-free survival rate. Patients with high J-CTO scores still remain an issue.

  20. Effect of tranexamic acid on coagulation and fibrinolysis in women with postpartum haemorrhage (WOMAN-ETAC): protocol and statistical analysis plan for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Haleema; Fawole, Bukola; Kuti, Modupe; Olayemi, Oladapo; Bello, Adenike; Ogunbode, Olayinka; Kotila, Taiwo; Aimakhu, Chris O; Huque, Sumaya; Gregg, Meghann; Roberts, Ian

    2016-12-16

    Background: Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a leading cause of maternal death. Tranexamic acid has the potential to reduce bleeding and a large randomized controlled trial of its effect on maternal health outcomes in women with PPH (The WOMAN trial) is ongoing. We will examine the effect of tranexamic acid on fibrinolysis and coagulation in a subset of WOMAN trial participants. Methods. Adult women with clinically diagnosed primary PPH after vaginal or caesarean delivery are eligible for inclusion in the WOMAN trial. In a sub-group of trial participants, blood samples will be collected at baseline and 30 minutes after the first dose of tranexamic acid or matching placebo.  Our primary objective is to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid on fibrinolysis. Fibrinolysis will be assessed by measuring D-dimers and by rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). Secondary outcomes are international normalized ratio (INR), prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, haemoglobin and platelets. We aim to include about 180 women from the University College Hospital, Ibadan in Nigeria. Discussion:  This sub-study of WOMAN trial participants should provide information on the mechanism of action of tranexamic acid in women with postpartum haemorrhage. We present the trial protocol and statistical analysis plan. The trial protocol was registered prior to the start of patient recruitment. The statistical analysis plan was completed before un-blinding. Trial registration: The trial was registered: ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier NCT00872469 https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00872469; ISRCTN registry, Identifier ISRCTN76912190 http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN76912190 (Registration date: 22/03/2012).

  1. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment, screening, diagnostic, prevention, and supportive care trials. Treatment Trials In treatment trials, researchers may gather information about experimental treatments, ...

  2. The Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jen

    2004-01-01

    Growing up in Flemington, New Jersey, put Jen Bryant in the heart of the lore behind the Lindbergh baby kidnapping. Family stories of the events of the day and extensive research led to "The Trial," a novel in verse. The first several parts of this novel are included here.

  3. Some practical issues in the design, monitoring and analysis of a sequential randomized trial in pressure sore prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J; McElvenny, D; Nixon, J; Bainbridge, J; Mason, S

    2000-12-30

    A sequential double blind (assessor and patient) triangular design was used to compare the incidence of pressure sores following elective major surgery among patients lying on a standard foam mattress with those on a dry visco-elastic polymer pad during their operation. A total of 446 patients were recruited into the trial between 1994 and 1996. Interim analyses were carried out after 181 patients were entered into the trial and then subsequently after approximately every 100 patients recruited. The trial unexpectedly reached a stopping boundary at the first interim analysis, however the Independent Data Monitoring Committee recommended continuation of the trial. They were concerned that there was a need for a larger definitive trial and about an apparent treatment by centre interaction. They required a substudy to be undertaken to further validate the subjective endpoint, and that further sensitivity analyses of the main trail endpoint should be carried out in the second interim analysis. The trial was stopped at the third interim analysis when again a stopping boundary was crossed indicating that the gel pad was associated with significantly fewer pressure sores than the standard mattress (log odds ratio -0.7, (95 per cent confidence interval (CI), -1.28, -0.11), p=0.02) (estimate CI, p-value adjusted for group sequential conduct). The design, monitoring and analysis of this trial will be presented as an example of the practical problems or non-problems encountered for the local hospitals, for the trials unit, for the data monitoring committee and for the funding committee. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. No difference in the rate of change in telomere length or telomerase activity in HIV-infected patients after three years of darunavir/ritonavir with and without nucleoside analogues in the MONET trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajantha Solomon

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether nucleos(tide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI contribute to an accelerated loss in telomere length (TL in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART. DESIGN: Substudy of randomised controlled trial. METHODS: Patients with HIV RNA <50 copies/mL on combination ART (n = 256 were randomised to darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r 800/100 mg once daily, either as monotherapy (n = 127 or with 2 NRTIs (n = 129 for up to 144 weeks. TL and telomerase activity was quantified on stored peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC; n = 124 using quantitative real time PCR. RESULTS: Patients in the sub-study had a mean age of 44 years and had received NRTI for a mean of 6.4 years (range 1-20 years. As expected, older patients have significantly shorter TL (p = 0.006, while women had significantly longer TL (p = 0.026. There was no significant association between TL and either the duration of prior NRTI treatment (p = 0.894 or the use of a PI versus NNRTI (p = 0.107. There was no significant difference between patients who continued or ceased NRTI in the mean change/year of TL or telomerase (p = 0.580 and 0.280 respectively. CONCLUSION: Continuation versus cessation of NRTI treatment was not associated with an accelerated loss in TL or telomerase activity.

  5. Gut microbiota in Malawian infants in a nutritional supplementation trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yin Bun; Xu, Ying; Mangani, Charles; Fan, Yue-Mei; Dewey, Kathryn G; Salminen, Seppo Jaakko; Maleta, Kenneth; Ashorn, Per

    2016-02-01

    To examine whether two forms of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) or a micronutrient-fortified corn-soya blend were associated with development of the gut microbiota in Malawian infants, to assess the microbiota profiles at the age of 6 and 18 months and to follow the changes during the 12-month period. This was a substudy of a 4-arm randomised controlled trial conducted in rural Malawi. Infants at the age of 6 months were randomised to receive no supplement during the primary follow-up period (control), 54 g/day of micronutrient-fortified LNS with milk protein base (milk LNS), 54 g/day of micronutrient-fortified LNS with soya protein base (soya LNS), or 71 g/day of micronutrient-fortified corn-soya blend for 12 months. Stool samples were collected at baseline (6 months) and end of trial (18 months). The 16S rRNA gene was amplified and subjected to multiplex sequencing. A total of 213 infants had paired microbiota data at 6 and 18 months of age. The Dirichlet-multinomial test showed no significant difference in microbiota profile between the four intervention groups at either age (each P > 0.10). Bifidobacterium longum was most abundant at both ages. Lactobacillus ruminis, Shigella and Salmonella were present. The abundance of Prevotella and Faecalibacterium increased with age (each P < 0.001), while Bifidobacteriaceae and Enterobacteriaceae exhibited significant decrease (each P < 0.001). Nutritional supplementation by LNS or corn-soya blend for twelve months did not affect the gut microbiota profile in the rural Malawian context. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Impact of a mHealth intervention for peer health workers on AIDS care in rural Uganda: a mixed methods evaluation of a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Larry W; Kagaayi, Joseph; Arem, Hannah; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Ssempijja, Victor; Serwadda, David; Quinn, Thomas C; Gray, Ronald H; Bollinger, Robert C; Reynolds, Steven J

    2011-11-01

    Mobile phone access in low and middle-income countries is rapidly expanding and offers an opportunity to leverage limited human resources for health. We conducted a mixed methods evaluation of a cluster-randomized trial exploratory substudy on the impact of a mHealth (mobile phone) support intervention used by community-based peer health workers (PHW) on AIDS care in rural Uganda. 29 PHWs at 10 clinics were randomized by clinic to receive the intervention or not. PHWs used phones to call and text higher level providers with patient-specific clinical information. 970 patients cared for by the PHWs were followed over a 26 month period. No significant differences were found in patients' risk of virologic failure. Qualitative analyses found improvements in patient care and logistics and broad support for the mHealth intervention among patients, clinic staff, and PHWs. Key challenges identified included variable patient phone access, privacy concerns, and phone maintenance.

  7. ST-segment deviation on the admission electrocardiogram, treatment strategy, and outcome in non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes A substudy of the Invasive versus Conservative Treatment in Unstable coronary Syndromes (ICTUS) Trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windhausen, F.; Hirsch, A.; Tijssen, J.G.P.; Cornel, J.H.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Klees, M.I.; Winter, R.J. de

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed the prognostic significance of the presence of cumulative (Sigma) ST-segment deviation on the admission electrocardiogram (ECG) in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome and an elevated troponin T randomized to a selective invasive (SI) or an early invasive

  8. Assessment of the absorption process following bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting stent implantation: Temporal changes in strain values and tissue composition using intravascular ultrasound radiofrequency data analysis A substudy of the ABSORB clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. Garcia-Garcia (Hector); N. Gonzalo (Nieves); R. Pawar (Ravindra); N. Kukreja (Neville); D. Dudek (Dariusz); L. Thuesen (Leif); J.A. Ormiston (John); E.S. Regar (Eveline); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAims: The main objective was to use IVUS-backscatter radiofrequency (IVUS-RF) to assess the degradation of a bioabsorbable stent by measuring serial changes in dense calcium (DC) and necrotic core (NC) as assessed by intravascular ultrasound-Virtual Histology™ (IVUS-VH) and in the strain

  9. A randomized trial assessing the effect of coumarins started before coronary angioplasty on restenosis: results of the 6-month angiographic substudy of the Balloon Angioplasty and Anticoagulation Study (BAAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Berg, Jurriën M; Kelder, Johannes C; Suttorp, Maarten Jan; Verheugt, Freek W A; Plokker, H W Thijs

    2003-01-01

    Thrombus formation during coronary angioplasty may play a role in the restenosis process. The effect of pretreatment with coumarins on 6-month angiographic outcome was studied. In addition, the effect of "optimal" anticoagulation, defined as an international normalized ratio >70% of the follow-up time in the target range, was studied. A total of 261 patients were assigned to aspirin alone (ASA group) and 270 patients to aspirin plus coumarins started 1 week before the procedure (coumarin group). The mean international normalized ratio was 2.7 +/- 1.2 at the start of the procedure and 3.1 +/- 0.5 during follow up. Quantitative coronary analysis was performed on 301 lesions in the ASA group and of 297 lesions in the coumarin group. At 6 months, the minimal luminal diameter was similar in the ASA and coumarin groups. Optimal anticoagulation, however, was an independent predictor of a larger minimal luminal diameter at follow up (P =.01). Overall, coumarins do not improve angiographic outcome 6 months after coronary angioplasty.

  10. Prognostic impact of plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in severe chronic congestive heart failure: a substudy of the Carvedilol Prospective Randomized Cumulative Survival (COPERNICUS) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Franz; Packer, Milton; Coats, Andrew J S; Fowler, Michael B; Krum, Henry; Mohacsi, Paul; Rouleau, Jean L; Tendera, Michal; Castaigne, Alain; Anker, Stefan D; Amann-Zalan, Ildiko; Hoersch, Silke; Katus, Hugo A

    2004-09-28

    The utility of N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP) to predict the occurrence of death and hospitalization was prospectively evaluated in the COPERNICUS study, which enrolled patients with an ejection fraction COPERNICUS study and were randomized to placebo (n=506) or carvedilol (n=505). Values of NT-proBNP were markedly increased despite the requirement that patients be euvolemic before the start of treatment (mean+/-SD, 3235+/-4392 pg/mL; median, 1767 pg/mL). By univariate Cox regression analysis, NT-proBNP was found to be a powerful predictor of subsequent all-cause mortality (relative risk [RR], 2.7; 95% CI, 1.7 to 4.3; P=0.0001 for above versus below median) and all-cause mortality or hospitalization for heart failure (RR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.8 to 3.4; P=0.0001 for above versus below median). The predictive value of NT-proBNP was similar when both placebo and carvedilol patients were analyzed separately. No significant interaction was found between NT-proBNP and treatment group (P=0.93 for above- versus below-median NT-proBNP). NT-proBNP was consistently associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality and for all-cause mortality or hospitalization for heart failure in patients with severe congestive heart failure, even in those who were clinically euvolemic. This marker therefore may be a useful tool in risk stratification of patients with severe congestive heart failure.

  11. Timing of ischemic onset estimated from the electrocardiogram is better than historical timing for predicting outcome after reperfusion therapy for acute anterior myocardial infarction: a DANish trial in Acute Myocardial Infarction 2 (DANAMI-2) substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersten, Maria; Ripa, Rasmus S; Grande, Peer

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute treatment strategy and subsequently prognosis are influenced by the duration of ischemia in patients with ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, timing of ischemia may be difficult to access by patient history (historical timing) alone. We hypothesized...... that an electrocardiographic acuteness score is better than historical timing for predicting myocardial salvage and prognosis in patients with anterior AMI treated with fibrinolysis or primary percutaneous coronary intervention. METHODS: One hundred seventy-five patients with anterior infarct without electrocardiogram (ECG...... the Aldrich score to determine the initially predicted myocardial infarct size and the Selvester score to determine the final QRS-estimated myocardial infarct size. RESULTS: The mean amount of myocardium salvage depended on ECG timing (43% [+/-38%] for "early" vs 1% [+/-56%] for "late"; P

  12. Prevalence and prognostic implications of ST-segment deviations from ambulatory Holter monitoring after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with either fibrinolysis or primary percutaneous coronary intervention (a Danish Trial in Acute Myocardial Infarction-2 Substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Lars; Høfsten, Dan Eik; Wachtell, Kristian;

    2007-01-01

    Ambulatory Holter monitoring has been shown to be useful in stratifying cardiovascular risk after acute myocardial infarction. However, it remains unclear whether ST-segment deviations might predict clinical outcomes in a population treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI......) compared with thrombolysis. Holter monitoring was initiated at discharge from ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in 958 patients followed for 2,773 patient-years, randomized to immediate revascularization with either fibrinolysis (n=474) or PCI (n=484). The primary end point was all-cause mortality...

  13. Tissue coverage of a hydrophilic polymer-coated zotarolimus-eluting stent vs. a fluoropolymer-coated everolimus-eluting stent at 13-month follow-up: an optical coherence tomography substudy from the RESOLUTE All Comers trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutiérrez-Chico, Juan Luis; van Geuns, Robert Jan; Regar, Evelyn;

    2011-01-01

    To compare the tissue coverage of a hydrophilic polymer-coated zotarolimus-eluting stent (ZES) vs. a fluoropolymer-coated everolimus-eluting stent (EES) at 13 months, using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in an 'all-comers' population of patients, in order to clarify the mechanism of eventual ...

  14. Is risk of central nervous system (CNS) relapse related to adjuvant taxane treatment in node-positive breast cancer? Results of the CNS substudy in the intergroup Phase III BIG 02-98 Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pestalozzi, B.C.; Francis, P.; Quinaux, E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breast cancer central nervous system (CNS) metastases are an increasingly important problem because of high CNS relapse rates in patients treated with trastuzumab and/or taxanes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We evaluated data from 2887 node-positive breast cancer patients randomised in the B...

  15. Long-Term Outcome of Sirolimus-Eluting and Zotarolimus-Eluting Coronary Stent Implantation in Patients With and Without Diabetes Mellitus (A Danish Organization for Randomized Trials on Clinical Outcome III Substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kevin K W; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik; Jensen, Lisette O

    2014-01-01

    We compared 5-year clinical outcomes in diabetic and nondiabetic patients treated with Endeavor zotarolimus-eluting stents (ZESs; Endeavor Sprint, Medtronic, Santa Rosa, California) or Cypher sirolimus-eluting stents (SESs; Cordis, Johnson & Johnson, Warren, New Jersey) coronary implantation. We...

  16. What Are Clinical Trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Clinical ... conducted all the time. The Different Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials related to drugs are classified into ...

  17. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical ... to treat or cure a disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based ...

  18. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Usually, trial participants must show signs of the disease or condition before they can join this type of trial. Prevention Trials Click for more information In prevention trials, ...

  19. Workshop Report on the European Bone Sarcoma Networking Meeting: Integration of Clinical Trials with Tumor Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David M; Wilhelm, Miriam; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie; Dirksen, Uta; Entz-Werlé, Natacha; Gelderblom, Hans; Hassan, Bass; Jürgens, Heribert; Koster, Jan; Kovar, Heinrich; Lankester, Arjan C; Lewis, Ian J; Myklebost, Ola; Nathrath, Michaela H M; Picci, Piero; Whelan, Jeremy S; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Bielack, Stefan S

    2011-09-01

    A key workshop was held in The Netherlands in June 2011, hosted by several European bone sarcoma networks and with a broad range of stakeholders from Europe and Australia. The purpose of the meeting was to identify the strengths and weaknesses in current clinical trials for bone sarcomas and to make recommendations as to how to accelerate progress in this field. Two areas of particular interest were discussed. First, all participants agreed upon the importance of tumor biology to understanding clinical responses for all types of bone sarcoma. Various barriers to biobanking tumor and germline specimens were canvassed and are outlined in this paper. Second, there was consideration of the particular challenges of dealing with adolescent and young adult cancers, exemplified by bone sarcomas. Participants recommended greater engagement of both pediatric and adult sarcoma trial organizations to address this issue. Specific opportunities were identified to develop biological sub-studies within osteosarcoma, focused on understanding germ line risk and pharmacogenomics defining toxicity and biological responses. In Ewing sarcoma, it was harder to define opportunities for biological insights. There was agreement that the results for insulin-like growth factor pathway inhibition in Ewing family tumors were disappointing, but represented a clear indication of the need for companion biologic studies to develop predictive biomarkers. The meeting ended with broad commitment to working together to make progress in this rare but important subgroup of cancers.

  20. NT-proBNP in severe chronic heart failure: rationale, design and preliminary results of the COPERNICUS NT-proBNP substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Franz; Packer, Milton; Coats, Andrew J S; Fowler, Michael B; Krum, Henry; Mohacsi, Paul; Rouleau, Jean L; Tendera, Michal; Castaigne, Alain; Trawinski, Jürgen; Amann-Zalan, Ildiko; Hoersch, Silke; Katus, Hugo A

    2004-03-15

    Neither profiles nor prognostic value of cardiac N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP) have been prospectively evaluated in a sufficient number of patients with severe chronic heart failure (CHF) treated with carvedilol or placebo. Baseline and follow-up plasma concentrations of NT-proBNP were measured in the European part of the COPERNICUS Trial. This study enrolled patients with an ejection fraction <25% and symptoms of CHF at rest or on minimal exertion, equally randomized to placebo or carvedilol. NT-proBNP concentrations were increased at baseline (mean+/-S.D.=579+/-822 pmol/l, median=322.5 pmol/l) with a marked decrease during follow-up in the carvedilol, but not in the placebo group. One-year mortality rates were 3.9, 12 and 27.9% in the lower, middle and upper tertiles of NT-proBNP, respectively. When mortality was calculated separately in the placebo and carvedilol group, rates were 0.8, 6.3 and 19.1% in the carvedilol treated but 6.7, 17.9 and 36.9% in the placebo treated patients. NT-proBNP was a powerful predictor of subsequent all-cause mortality in patients with severe CHF. This marker should therefore be further evaluated for risk stratification and monitoring of therapy in CHF.

  1. The Impact of Preradiation Residual Disease Volume on Time to Locoregional Failure in Cutaneous Merkel Cell Carcinoma—A TROG Substudy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnigan, Renee [Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Hruby, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sydney Cancer Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Wratten, Chris [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle (Australia); Keller, Jacqui; Tripcony, Lee; Dickie, Graeme [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Rischin, Danny [Department of Medical Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Poulsen, Michael, E-mail: michael_poulsen@health.qld.gov.au [Division of Cancer Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the impact of margin status and gross residual disease in patients treated with chemoradiation therapy for high-risk stage I and II Merkel cell cancer (MCC). Methods and Materials: Data were pooled from 3 prospective trials in which patients were treated with 50 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary lesion and draining lymph nodes and 2 schedules of carboplatin based chemotherapy. Time to locoregional failure was analyzed according to the burden of disease at the time of radiation therapy, comparing patients with negative margins, involved margins, or macroscopic disease. Results: Analysis was performed on 88 patients, of whom 9 had microscopically positive resection margins and 26 had macroscopic residual disease. The majority of gross disease was confined to nodal regions. The 5-year time to locoregional failure, time to distant failure, time to progression, and disease-specific survival rates for the whole group were 73%, 69%, 62%, and 66% respectively. The hazard ratio for macroscopic disease at the primary site or the nodes was 1.25 (95% confidence interval 0.57-2.77), P=.58. Conclusions: No statistically significant differences in time to locoregional failure were identified between patients with negative margins and those with microscopic or gross residual disease. These results must, however, be interpreted with caution because of the limited sample size.

  2. Timing and duration of myocardial ischemia on Holter monitoring following percutaneous coronary intervention and their association with clinical outcomes (a PROTECT-TIMI 30 Substudy Analysis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, C Michael; Pride, Yuri B; Buros, Jacqueline L; Ciaglo, Lauren N; Morrow, David A; Scirica, Benjamin M; Stone, Peter H

    2009-07-01

    In patients with unstable angina, evidence of myocardial ischemia on Holter monitoring is associated with an adverse prognosis. However, the association of duration and timing of ischemia on Holter monitoring with outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTEACSs) has not been systematically evaluated. PROTECT-TIMI 30 randomized 857 patients with NSTEACSs undergoing PCI to eptifibatide plus a heparin product or bivalirudin monotherapy. Patients underwent continuous Holter monitoring following PCI, and the association between ischemia and clinical outcomes was evaluated retrospectively. Forty-three patients (5.0%) had ischemia on Holter after PCI. Any ischemia was associated with a significant increase in the incidence of death or myocardial infarction (MI) within 48 hours (32.6% vs 6.1%, odds ratio 7.5, 95% confidence interval 3.70 to 15.10, p Holter monitoring is associated with an increased incidence of death or MI. Holter monitoring may be a useful surrogate end point in clinical trials.

  3. An investigation of CYP2D6 genotype and response to metoprolol CR/XL during dose titration in patients with heart failure: a MERIT-HF substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, J A; Hall, A S; White, H L; Wikstrand, J; de Boer, R A; van Veldhuisen, D J; van der Harst, P; Waagstein, F; Hjalmarson, Å; Kjekshus, J; Balmforth, A J

    2014-03-01

    To explore the pharmacogenetic effects of the cytochrome P450 (CYP)2D6 genotype in patients with systolic heart failure treated using controlled/extended-release (CR/XL) metoprolol, this study assessed the CYP2D6 locus for the nonfunctional *4 allele (1846G>A; rs3892097) in the Metoprolol CR/XL Randomised Intervention Trial in Congestive Heart Failure (MERIT-HF; n = 605). Participants were characterized as extensive, intermediate, or poor metabolizers (EMs, IMs, or PMs, respectively), based on the presence of the CYP2D6*4 allele (EM: *1*1, 60.4%; IM: *1*4, 35.8%; and PM: *4*4, 3.8%). Plasma metoprolol concentrations were 2.1-/4.6-fold greater in the IM/PM groups as compared with the EM group (P Metoprolol induced significantly lower heart rates and diastolic blood pressures during early titration, indicating a CYP2D6*4 allele dose-response effect (P metoprolol pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics during early titration; however, the MERIT-HF-defined titration schedule remains recommended for all patients, regardless of genotype.

  4. Effects of a healthy Nordic diet on gene expression changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to an oral glucose tolerance test in subjects with metabolic syndrome: a SYSDIET sub-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Lena; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Narverud, Ingunn; Dahlman, Ingrid; Myhrstad, Mari C W; de Mello, Vanessa D; Paananen, Jussi; Carlberg, Carsten; Schwab, Ursula; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Cloetens, Lieselotte; Storm, Matilda Ulmius; Hukkanen, Janne; Savolainen, Markku J; Rosqvist, Fredrik; Hermansen, Kjeld; Dragsted, Lars O; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjörg; Thorsdottir, Inga; Risérus, Ulf; Åkesson, Björn; Thoresen, Magne; Arner, Peter; Poutanen, Kaisa S; Uusitupa, Matti; Holven, Kirsten B; Ulven, Stine M

    2016-01-01

    Diet has a great impact on the risk of developing features of metabolic syndrome (MetS), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We evaluated whether a long-term healthy Nordic diet (ND) can modify the expression of inflammation and lipid metabolism-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in individuals with MetS. A Nordic multicenter randomized dietary study included subjects (n = 213) with MetS, randomized to a ND group or a control diet (CD) group applying an isocaloric study protocol. In this sub-study, we included subjects (n = 89) from three Nordic centers: Kuopio (n = 26), Lund (n = 30), and Oulu (n = 33) with a maximum weight change of ±4 kg, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration ≤10 mg L(-1), and baseline body mass index expression analysis was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We analyzed the mRNA expression changes of 44 genes before and after a 2hOGTT at the beginning and the end of the intervention. The healthy ND significantly down-regulated the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), interleukin 18 (IL18), and thrombospondin receptor (CD36) mRNA transcripts and significantly up-regulated the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD) mRNA transcript after the 2hOGTT compared to the CD. A healthy ND is able to modify the gene expression in PBMCs after a 2hOGTT. However, more studies are needed to clarify the biological and clinical relevance of these findings.

  5. n-3PUFA and Holter-derived autonomic variables in patients with heart failure: data from the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca (GISSI-HF) Holter substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Staszewsky, Lidia; Barlera, Simona; Maestri, Roberto; Mezzani, Alessandro; Midi, Paolo; Marchioli, Roberto; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tognoni, Gianni; Tavazzi, Luigi; Latini, Roberto

    2013-02-01

    n-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3PUFA) supplementation in the Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Insufficienza Cardiaca (GISSI-HF) study reduced total mortality in patients with heart failure (HF), but the mechanism of action is still debated. The hypothesis of the present GISSI-HF substudy was that n-3PUFA may have beneficial effects on cardiac autonomic control. To evaluate the effect of 1 g/day of n-3PUFA vs placebo on heart rate variability variables, deceleration capacity, and turbulence slope. The GISSI-HF study enrolled patients with HF of any cause and severity. Twenty-four-hour (range 16-24 hours) Holter recordings were performed and analyzed in 388 patients at baseline, 3 months, and 12 months. Baseline characteristics were compared by using the χ(2) test, t test, or nonparametric Wilcoxon 2-sample test. Changes over time were tested by using the analysis of covariance adjusted by baseline values. At baseline, 36% of the patients were older than 70 years, 82% were men, 92% presented a left ventricular ejection fraction<40%, and 80% were in New York Heart Association class II. An increase in mean RR interval, standard deviation of all normal-to-normal RR intervals, very low frequency power (all P<.05), and turbulence slope (P = .05) was observed after 3 months in the n-3PUFA group compared to the placebo group, independently of the frequency of dietary fish consumption or beta-blocker treatment. These differences between study groups were no longer statistically significant at 12 months. A per-protocol analysis in patients compliant with study treatment showed similar results. n-3PUFA supplementation partially restored autonomic modulation in patients with chronic HF; this effect was maximal after 3 months of treatment. Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The acute impact of high-dose lipid-lowering treatment on endothelial progenitor cells in patients with coronary artery disease—The REMEDY-EPC early substudy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Renna, Francesca Vera; Lanuti, Paola; Perfetti, Matteo; Marchisio, Marco; Briguori, Carlo; Condorelli, Gerolama; Manzoli, Lamberto

    2017-01-01

    Rationale and objective Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a role in vascular repair, while circulating endothelial cells (CECs) are biomarkers of vascular damage and regeneration. Statins may promote EPC/CEC mobilization in the peripheral blood. We evaluated whether pre-procedural exposure to different lipid-lowering drugs (statins±ezetimibe) can acutely increase levels/activity of EPCs/CECs in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods In a planned sub-analysis of the Rosuvastatin For REduction Of Myocardial DamagE During Coronary AngioplastY (REMEDY) trial, 38 patients with stable CAD on chronic low-dose statin therapy were randomized, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, into 4 groups before PCI: i. placebo (n = 11); ii. atorvastatin (80 mg+40 mg, n = 9); iii. rosuvastatin (40 mg twice, n = 9); and iv. rosuvastatin (5 mg) and ezetimibe (10 mg) twice, (n = 9). At baseline and 24 h after treatment–before PCI–, patients underwent blinded analyses of EPCs [colony forming units-endothelial cells (CFU-ECs), endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and tubulization activity] and CECs in peripheral blood. Results We found no significant treatment effects on parameters investigated such as number of CECs [Median (IQR): i. 0(0), ii. 4.5(27), iii. 1.9(2.3), iv. 1.9(2.3)], CFU-ECs [Median (IQR): i. 27(11), ii. 19(31), iii. 47(36), iv. 30(98)], and ECFCs [Median (IQR): i. 86(84), ii. 7(84), iii. 8/(42.5), iv. 5(2)], as well as tubulization activity [total tubuli (well), Median (IQR): i. 19(7), ii. 5(4), iii. 25(13), iv. 15(24)]. Conclusions In this study, we found no evidence of acute changes in levels or activity of EPCs and CECs after high-dose lipid-lowering therapy in stable CAD patients. PMID:28394933

  7. The acute impact of high-dose lipid-lowering treatment on endothelial progenitor cells in patients with coronary artery disease-The REMEDY-EPC early substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Renna, Francesca Vera; Lanuti, Paola; Perfetti, Matteo; Marchisio, Marco; Briguori, Carlo; Condorelli, Gerolama; Manzoli, Lamberto; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a role in vascular repair, while circulating endothelial cells (CECs) are biomarkers of vascular damage and regeneration. Statins may promote EPC/CEC mobilization in the peripheral blood. We evaluated whether pre-procedural exposure to different lipid-lowering drugs (statins±ezetimibe) can acutely increase levels/activity of EPCs/CECs in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). In a planned sub-analysis of the Rosuvastatin For REduction Of Myocardial DamagE During Coronary AngioplastY (REMEDY) trial, 38 patients with stable CAD on chronic low-dose statin therapy were randomized, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, into 4 groups before PCI: i. placebo (n = 11); ii. atorvastatin (80 mg+40 mg, n = 9); iii. rosuvastatin (40 mg twice, n = 9); and iv. rosuvastatin (5 mg) and ezetimibe (10 mg) twice, (n = 9). At baseline and 24 h after treatment-before PCI-, patients underwent blinded analyses of EPCs [colony forming units-endothelial cells (CFU-ECs), endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and tubulization activity] and CECs in peripheral blood. We found no significant treatment effects on parameters investigated such as number of CECs [Median (IQR): i. 0(0), ii. 4.5(27), iii. 1.9(2.3), iv. 1.9(2.3)], CFU-ECs [Median (IQR): i. 27(11), ii. 19(31), iii. 47(36), iv. 30(98)], and ECFCs [Median (IQR): i. 86(84), ii. 7(84), iii. 8/(42.5), iv. 5(2)], as well as tubulization activity [total tubuli (well), Median (IQR): i. 19(7), ii. 5(4), iii. 25(13), iv. 15(24)]. In this study, we found no evidence of acute changes in levels or activity of EPCs and CECs after high-dose lipid-lowering therapy in stable CAD patients.

  8. Pramipexole in patients with early Parkinson's disease (PROUD): a randomised delayed-start trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Anthony H V; McDermott, Michael P; Barone, Paolo; Comella, Cynthia L; Albrecht, Stefan; Hsu, Helen H; Massey, Daniel H; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Poewe, Werner; Rascol, Olivier; Marek, Kenneth

    2013-08-01

    In models of dopaminergic neuronal loss, the dopamine agonist pramipexole has exhibited neuroprotective properties. The Pramipexole On Underlying Disease (PROUD) study was designed to identify whether early versus delayed pramipexole initiation has clinical and neuroimaging benefits in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Between May 24, 2006, and April 22, 2009, at 98 centres, we recruited patients with PD diagnosed within 2 years and aged 30-79 years. We randomly assigned eligible patients (ratio 1:1), by a centralised, computerised randomisation schedule, to receive double-blind either placebo or pramipexole (1·5 mg a day) and followed them up for 15 months. At 9 months, or as early as 6 months if considered necessary, placebo recipients were assigned to pramipexole. In a neuroimaging substudy, striatal dopamine-transporter binding was assessed by SPECT. All patients, investigators, and independent raters were masked to study treatment. The primary endpoint was the 15-month change from baseline in total score on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS). This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00321854. Of 535 patients, 261 were randomly assigned to receive pramipexole and 274 to receive placebo. At 15 months (n=411), adjusted mean change in UPDRS total score showed no significant difference between early and delayed pramipexole (-0·4 points, 95% CI -2·2 to 1·4, p=0·65). 62 patients in the early pramipexole group and 61 patients in the delayed pramipexole group were included in the neuroimaging substudy, for which the adjusted mean 15-month change in striatal (123)I-FP-CIT binding was -15·1% (SE 2·1) for early and -14·6% (2·0) for delayed pramipexole (difference -0·5 percentage points, 95% CI -5·4 to 4·4, p=0·84). Overall, 180 (81%) of patients given early pramipexole and 179 (84%) patients given delayed pramipexole reported adverse events (most frequently nausea), and 22 (10%) patients in the early pramipexole

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of Solitaire Stent Retriever Thrombectomy for Acute Ischemic Stroke: Results From the SWIFT-PRIME Trial (Solitaire With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shireman, Theresa I; Wang, Kaijun; Saver, Jeffrey L; Goyal, Mayank; Bonafé, Alain; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Levy, Elad I; Pereira, Vitor M; Albers, Gregory W; Cognard, Christophe; Hacke, Werner; Jansen, Olav; Jovin, Tudor G; Mattle, Heinrich P; Nogueira, Raul G; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Yavagal, Dileep R; Devlin, Thomas G; Lopes, Demetrius K; Reddy, Vivek K; du Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard; Jahan, Reza; Vilain, Katherine A; House, John; Lee, Jin-Moo; Cohen, David J

    2017-02-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated improved 90-day outcomes for patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with stent retriever thrombectomy plus tissue-type plasminogen activator (SST+tPA) compared with tPA. Previous studies suggested that this strategy may be cost-effective, but models were derived from pooled data and older assumptions. In this prospective economic substudy conducted alongside the SWIFT-PRIME trial (Solitaire With the Intention for Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke), in-trial costs were measured for patients using detailed medical resource utilization and hospital billing data. Utility weights were assessed at 30 and 90 days using the EuroQol-5 dimension questionnaire. Post-trial costs and life-expectancy were estimated for each surviving patient using a model based on trial data and inputs derived from a contemporary cohort of ischemic stroke survivors. Index hospitalization costs were $17 183 per patient higher for SST+tPA than for tPA ($45 761 versus $28 578; Pacute ischemic stroke enrolled in the SWIFT-PRIME trial, SST increased initial treatment costs, but was projected to improve quality-adjusted life-expectancy and reduce healthcare costs over a lifetime horizon compared with tPA. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01657461. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Types of Treatment: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Information Treatment Types of Treatment Clinical Trials Clinical Trials Clinical Trials SHARE: Print Glossary Taking part in a clinical ... for cancer are based on previous clinical trials. Clinical Trial Service: LLS provides personalized clinical trial navigation when ...

  11. Patient recruitment to a randomized clinical trial of behavioral therapy for chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendricks Ann M

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient recruitment is one of the most difficult aspects of clinical trials, especially for research involving elderly subjects. In this paper, we describe our experience with patient recruitment for the behavioral intervention randomized trial, "The relaxation response intervention for chronic heart failure (RRCHF." Particularly, we identify factors that, according to patient reports, motivated study participation. Methods The RRCHF was a three-armed, randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate the efficacy and cost of a 15-week relaxation response intervention on veterans with chronic heart failure. Patients from the Veterans Affairs (VA Boston Healthcare System in the United States were recruited in the clinic and by telephone. Patients' reasons for rejecting the study participation were recorded during the screening. A qualitative sub-study in the trial consisted of telephone interviews of participating patients about their experiences in the study. The qualitative study included the first 57 patients who completed the intervention and/or the first follow-up outcome measures. Factors that distinguished patients who consented from those who refused study participation were identified using a t-test or a chi-square test. The reason for study participation was abstracted from the qualitative interview. Results We successfully consented 134 patients, slightly more than our target number, in 27 months. Ninety-five of the consented patients enrolled in the study. The enrollment rate among the patients approached was 18% through clinic and 6% through telephone recruitment. The most commonly cited reason for declining study participation given by patients recruited in the clinic was 'Lives Too Far Away'; for patients recruited by telephone it was 'Not Interested in the Study'. One factor that significantly distinguished patients who consented from patients who declined was the distance between their residence and the study

  12. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trial is to find out if an experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will ... disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based on their phase. The ...

  13. Effects of aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel and telmisartan on disability and cognitive function after recurrent stroke in patients with ischaemic stroke in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Sacco, Ralph L; Yusuf, Salim

    2008-01-01

    telmisartan were investigated in the Prevention Regimen for Effectively Avoiding Second Strokes (PRoFESS) trial. METHODS: Patients who had had an ischaemic stroke were randomly assigned in a two by two factorial design to receive either 25 mg aspirin (ASA) and 200 mg extended-release dipyridamole (ER......-DP) twice a day or 75 mg clopidogrel once a day, and either 80 mg telmisartan or placebo once per day. The predefined endpoints for this substudy were disability after a recurrent stroke, assessed with the modified Rankin scale (mRS) and Barthel index at 3 months, and cognitive function, assessed...... of 2.4 years. Recurrent strokes occurred in 916 (9%) patients randomly assigned to ASA with ER-DP and 898 (9%) patients randomly assigned to clopidogrel; 880 (9%) patients randomly assigned to telmisartan and 934 (9%) patients given placebo had recurrent strokes. mRS scores were not statistically...

  14. Validation of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants: A sub-study to the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background We determined the diagnostic accuracy of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ) in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean UK migrants as previous diagnostic questionnaires have been found to be less accurate in this population. We also determined the diagnostic accuracy of translated versions of the ECQ in 1st generation South Asian UK migrants, as this has not been investigated before. Methods Subjects were recruited from the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES) study, a community based screening survey for heart failure in minority ethnic groups. Translated versions of the ECQ were prepared following a recognised protocol. All participants attending screening between October 2007 and February 2009 were asked to complete the ECQ in the language of their choice (English, Punjabi, Bengali, Urdu, Hindi or Gujarati). Subjects answering positively to experiencing leg pain or discomfort on walking were asked to return to have Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI) measured. Results 154 out of 2831 subjects participating in E-ECHOES (5.4%) were eligible to participate in this sub-study, for which 74.3% returned for ABPI assessment. Non-responders were younger than participants (59[9] vs. 65[11] years; p = 0.015). Punjabi, English and Bengali questionnaires identified participants with Intermittent Claudication, so these questionnaires were assessed. The sensitivities (SN), specificities (SP), positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were calculated. English: SN: 50%; SP: 68%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 74%. Punjabi: SN: 50%; SP: 87%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 90%. Bengali: SN: 33%; SP: 50%; PPV: 13%; NPV: 73%. There were significant differences in diagnostic accuracy between the 3 versions (Punjabi: 83.8%; Bengali: 45%; English: 62.2%; p < 0.0001). No significant differences were found in sensitivity and specificity between illiterate and literate participants in any of the questionnaires and there was no significant different difference

  15. Validation of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants: A sub-study to the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Stanley

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We determined the diagnostic accuracy of the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire (ECQ in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean UK migrants as previous diagnostic questionnaires have been found to be less accurate in this population. We also determined the diagnostic accuracy of translated versions of the ECQ in 1st generation South Asian UK migrants, as this has not been investigated before. Methods Subjects were recruited from the Ethnic-Echocardiographic Heart of England Screening (E-ECHOES study, a community based screening survey for heart failure in minority ethnic groups. Translated versions of the ECQ were prepared following a recognised protocol. All participants attending screening between October 2007 and February 2009 were asked to complete the ECQ in the language of their choice (English, Punjabi, Bengali, Urdu, Hindi or Gujarati. Subjects answering positively to experiencing leg pain or discomfort on walking were asked to return to have Ankle Brachial Pressure Index (ABPI measured. Results 154 out of 2831 subjects participating in E-ECHOES (5.4% were eligible to participate in this sub-study, for which 74.3% returned for ABPI assessment. Non-responders were younger than participants (59[9] vs. 65[11] years; p = 0.015. Punjabi, English and Bengali questionnaires identified participants with Intermittent Claudication, so these questionnaires were assessed. The sensitivities (SN, specificities (SP, positive (PPV and negative (NPV predictive values were calculated. English: SN: 50%; SP: 68%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 74%. Punjabi: SN: 50%; SP: 87%; PPV: 43%; NPV: 90%. Bengali: SN: 33%; SP: 50%; PPV: 13%; NPV: 73%. There were significant differences in diagnostic accuracy between the 3 versions (Punjabi: 83.8%; Bengali: 45%; English: 62.2%; p Conclusions Our findings suggest that the ECQ is not as sensitive or specific a diagnostic tool in 1st generation Black African-Caribbean and South Asian UK migrants than in the Edinburgh

  16. Adding pharmacists to primary care teams increases guideline-concordant antiplatelet use in patients with type 2 diabetes: results from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Fizza; Majumdar, Sumit R; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Lewanczuk, Richard Z; Spooner, Richard; Simpson, Scot H

    2013-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is recommended as part of a strategy to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, compliance with these guideline-recommended therapies appears to be less than ideal. To assess the effect of adding pharmacists to primary care teams on initiation of guideline-concordant antiplatelet therapy in type 2 diabetic patients. Prespecified secondary analysis of randomized trial data. In the main study, the pharmacist intervention included a complete medication history, limited physical examination, provision of guideline-concordant recommendations to the physician to optimize drug therapy, and 1-year follow-up. Controls received usual care without pharmacist interactions. Patients with an indication for antiplatelet therapy, but not using an antiplatelet drug at randomization were included in this substudy. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients using an antiplatelet drug at 1 year. At randomization, 257 of 260 study patients had guideline-concordant indications for antiplatelet therapy, but less than half (121; 47%) were using an antiplatelet drug. Overall, 136 patients met inclusion criteria for the substudy (71 intervention and 65 controls): 60% were women, with mean (SD) age 58.0 (11.9) years, diabetes duration 5.3 (6.0) years, and hemoglobin A(1c) 7.6% (1.5). Sixteen (12%) had established cardiovascular disease at enrollment. At 1 year, 43 (61%) intervention patients and 15 (23%) controls were using an antiplatelet drug (38% absolute difference; number needed to treat, 3; relative increase, 2.6; 95% CI 1.5-4.7; p primary care teams significantly and substantially increased the proportion of type 2 diabetic patients using guideline-concordant antiplatelet therapy.

  17. Angiographic outcomes in the PLATO Trial (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kunadian, Vijay; James, Stefan K; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Zorkun, Cafer; Wu, Jinhui; Storey, Robert F; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Katus, Hugo; Emanuelsson, Hakan; Horrow, Jay; Maya, Juan; Wallentin, Lars; Harrington, Robert A; Gibson, C Michael

    2013-01-01

    The PLATO (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes) angiographic substudy sought to compare the efficacy of ticagrelor versus clopidogrel with respect to angiographic outcomes before and after PCI in the setting of acute coronary syndrome...

  18. Inflammatory Response After Laparoscopic Versus Open Resection of Colorectal Liver Metastases: Data From the Oslo-CoMet Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretland, Asmund Avdem; Sokolov, Andrey; Postriganova, Nadya; Kazaryan, Airazat M; Pischke, Soren E; Nilsson, Per H; Rognes, Ingrid Nygren; Bjornbeth, Bjorn Atle; Fagerland, Morten Wang; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Edwin, Bjorn

    2015-10-01

    Laparoscopic and open liver resection have not been compared in randomized trials. The aim of the current study was to compare the inflammatory response after laparoscopic and open resection of colorectal liver metastases (CLM) in a randomized controlled trial.This was a predefined exploratory substudy within the Oslo CoMet-study. Forty-five patients with CLM were randomized to laparoscopic (n = 23) or open (n = 22) resection. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-plasma samples were collected preoperatively and at defined time points during and after surgery and snap frozen at -80 C. A total of 25 markers were examined using luminex and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques: high-mobility box group 1(HMGB-1), cell-free DNA (cfDNA), cytokines, and terminal C5b-9 complement complex complement activation.Eight inflammatory markers increased significantly from baseline: HMGB-1, cfDNA, interleukin (IL)-6, C-reactive protein, macrophage inflammatory protein -1β, monocyte chemotactic protein -1, IL-10, and terminal C5b-9 complement complex. Peak levels were reached at the end of or shortly after surgery. Five markers, HMGB-1, cfDNA, IL-6, C-reactive protein, and macrophage inflammatory protein -1β, showed significantly higher levels in the open surgery group compared with the laparoscopic surgery group.Laparoscopic resection of CLM reduced the inflammatory response compared with open resection. The lower level of HMGB-1 is interesting because of the known association with oncogenesis.

  19. Memantine Improves Attentional Processes in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome: Electrophysiological Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-Chen; Rodriguez, Annette; Royston, Ashley; Niu, Yu-Qiong; Avar, Merve; Brill, Ryan; Simon, Christa; Grigsby, Jim; Hagerman, Randi J; Olichney, John M

    2016-02-22

    Progressive cognitive deficits are common in patients with fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), with no targeted treatment yet established. In this substudy of the first randomized controlled trial for FXTAS, we examined the effects of NMDA antagonist memantine on attention and working memory. Data were analyzed for patients (24 in each arm) who completed both the primary memantine trial and two EEG recordings (at baseline and follow-up) using an auditory "oddball" task. Results demonstrated significantly improved attention/working memory performance after one year only for the memantine group. The event-related potential P2 amplitude elicited by non-targets was significantly enhanced in the treated group, indicating memantine-associated improvement in attentional processes at the stimulus identification/discrimination level. P2 amplitude increase was positively correlated with improvement on the behavioral measure of attention/working memory during target detection. Analysis also revealed that memantine treatment normalized the P2 habituation effect at the follow-up visit. These findings indicate that memantine may benefit attentional processes that represent fundamental components of executive function/dysfunction, thought to comprise the core cognitive deficit in FXTAS. The results provide evidence of target engagement of memantine, as well as therapeutically relevant information that could further the development of specific cognitive or disease-modifying therapies for FXTAS.

  20. The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) Trial: Rationale, Design, and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Jean H; Jones, Andrew D; Manges, Amee; Mangwadu, Goldberg; Maluccio, John A; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Moulton, Lawrence H; Ntozini, Robert; Prendergast, Andrew J; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Tielsch, James M

    2015-12-15

    among a subgroup of infants enrolled in an EED substudy. This article describes the rationale, design, and methods underlying the SHINE trial. NCT01824940. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  1. The Rationale and Design of the Surgical Treatment for IsChemic Heart failure (STICH) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Eric J.; Lee, Kerry L.; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Oh, Jae K.; Bonow, Robert O.; Pohost, Gerald M.; Feldman, Arthur M.; Mark, Daniel B.; Panza, Julio A.; Sopko, George; Rouleau, Jean L.; Jones, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The rationale and design of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trial is described. Prior to STICH, <1000 ischemic cardiomyopathy patients had been studied in randomized comparisons of medical therapy (MED) versus coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Trial data reflect how these therapies were delivered over 20 years ago and do not indicate the relative benefits of MED versus CABG in contemporary practice. Methods Randomization of consenting patients with heart failure, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction ≤0.35, and coronary artery disease is based on whether patients are judged by attending physicians to be candidates only for CABG or for MED or CABG. Patients eligible for surgical ventricular reconstruction (SVR) due to significant anterior wall akinesis or dyskinesis, but ineligible for MED are randomly assigned to CABG with or without SVR. Patients eligible for MED are randomly assigned between MED only and MED with CABG. Patients eligible for all 3 are randomly assigned evenly to MED only, MED and CABG, or MED and CABG and SVR. Major substudies will examine quality of life, cost-effectiveness, changes in LV volumes, impact of myocardial viability, selected biomarkers, and selected polymorphisms on treatment differences Conclusions STICH is an NHLBI-funded multicenter international randomized trial addressing 2 specific primary hypotheses: 1) CABG with intensive MED improves long-term survival compared with MED alone; and 2) in patients with anterior LV dysfunction, SVR to a more normal LV size plus CABG improves survival free of subsequent hospitalization for cardiac cause when compared with CABG alone. PMID:18023680

  2. Clinical Trials in Vision Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Health Information > Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical Trials in Vision Research Clinical studies depend on people ... vision research in the United States. Basics of Clinical Trials What is a clinical trial? Clinical trials are ...

  3. How Do Clinical Trials Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites How Do Clinical Trials Work? If you take part in a clinical ... protect patients and help produce reliable study results. Clinical Trial Protocol Each clinical trial has a master plan ...

  4. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... trial. Prevention Trials Click for more information In prevention trials, researchers study ways to reduce the risk of getting a disease or a specific medical problem. These trials find out if lifestyle changes, such as exercising more, getting more sleep, ...

  5. Informed Consent (Clinical Trials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Cancer Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs ... Staging Prognosis Treatment Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer ...

  6. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  7. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Institutes of Health funds much of this basic research. Screening Trials In screening trials, researchers study ways of finding a disease before symptoms occur. These methods, often called screening tests, can include imaging tests ...

  8. ClinicalTrials.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to This Site Terms and Conditions Disclaimer ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly ... of human participants conducted around the world. ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly ...

  9. Understanding noninferiority trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokyung Hahn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Noninferiority trials test whether a new experimental treatment is not unacceptably less efficacious than an active control treatment already in use. With continuous improvements in health technologies, standard care, and clinical outcomes, the incremental benefits of newly developed treatments may be only marginal over existing treatments. Sometimes assigning patients to a placebo is unethical. In such circumstances, there has been increasing emphasis on the use of noninferiority trial designs. Noninferiority trials are more complex to design, conduct, and interpret than typical superiority trials. This paper reviews the concept of noninferiority trials and discusses some important issues related to them.

  10. Home-based exercise and support programme for people with dementia and their caregivers: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prick Anna-Eva

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dementia affects the mood of people with dementia but also of their caregivers. In the coming years, the number of people with dementia will increase worldwide and most of them will continue to live in the community as long as possible. Home-based psychosocial interventions reducing the depressive symptoms of both people with dementia and their caregivers in their own home are highly needed. Methods/Design This manuscript describes the design of a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT of the effects of a home-based exercise and support programme for people with dementia and their caregivers. The aim is to randomly assign 156 dyads (caregiver and dementia diagnosed person to an intervention group or a comparison group. The experimental group receives a home programme in which exercise and support for the people with dementia and their caregivers are combined and integrated. The comparison group receives a minimal intervention. Primary outcomes are physical health (people with dementia and mood (people with dementia and caregivers. In addition, to get more insight in the working components of the intervention and the impact of the intervention on the relationship of the dyads a qualitative sub-study is carried out. Discussion This study aims to contribute to an evidence-based treatment to reduce depressive symptoms among people with dementia and their caregivers independently living in the community. Trial Registration The study has been registered at the Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR, which is connected to the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform of the WHO. Trial number: NTR1802.

  11. Cytochrome c in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting: A post hoc analysis of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars W; Liu, Xiaowen; Montissol, Sophia; Holmberg, Mathias J; Fabian-Jessing, Bjørn K; Donnino, Michael W

    2017-08-04

    To establish whether plasma cytochrome c is detectable in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, whether cytochrome c levels are associated with lactate/inflammatory markers/cellular oxygen consumption, and whether cytochrome c levels are associated with clinical outcomes. This was an observational sub-study of a randomized trial comparing thiamine to placebo in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Patients had blood drawn before, after, and again 6h after surgery. Cytochrome c, inflammatory markers, and cellular oxygen consumption were measured. 64 patients were included. Cytochrome c was detectable in 63 (98%) patients at baseline with a median cytochrome c level of 0.18ng/mL (quartiles: 0.13, 0.55). There was no difference from baseline level to post-surgical level (0.19ng/mL [0.09, 0.51], p=0.36) or between post-surgical level and 6-hour post-surgical level (0.17ng/mL [0.10, 0.57], p=0.61). There was no difference between the thiamine and placebo groups' change in cytochrome c levels from baseline to after surgery (p=0.22). Cytochrome c levels were not associated with lactate, inflammatory markers, cellular oxygen consumption, or clinical outcomes. Cytochrome c levels did not increase after cardiac surgery and was not associated with the degree of inflammation or clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The STRIDE (Strategies to Increase confidence, InDependence and Energy) study: cognitive behavioural therapy-based intervention to reduce fear of falling in older fallers living in the community - study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Steve W; Deary, Vincent; Finch, Tracy; Bamford, Claire; Sabin, Neil; McMeekin, Peter; O'Brien, John; Caldwell, Alma; Steen, Nick; Whitney, Susan L; Macdonald, Claire; McColl, Elaine

    2014-06-06

    Around 30% to 62% of older individuals fall each year, with adverse consequences of falls being by no means limited to physical injury and escalating levels of dependence. Many older individuals suffer from a variety of adverse psychosocial difficulties related to falling including fear, anxiety, loss of confidence and subsequent increasing activity avoidance, social isolation and frailty. Such 'fear of falling' is common and disabling, but definitive studies examining the effective management of the syndrome are lacking. Cognitive behavioural therapy has been trialed with some success in a group setting, but there is no adequately powered randomised controlled study of an individually based cognitive behavioural therapy intervention, and none using non-mental health professionals to deliver the intervention. We are conducting a two-phase study examining the role of individual cognitive behavioural therapy delivered by healthcare assistants in improving fear of falling in older adults. In Phase I, the intervention was developed and taught to healthcare assistants, while Phase II is the pragmatic randomised controlled study examining the efficacy of the intervention in improving fear of falling in community-dwelling elders attending falls services. A qualitative process evaluation study informed by Normalization Process Theory is being conducted throughout to examine the potential promoters and inhibitors of introducing such an intervention into routine clinical practice, while a health economic sub-study running alongside the trial is examining the costs and benefits of such an approach to the wider health economy. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN78396615.

  13. Nurse-led intervention to improve knowledge of medications in survivors of stroke or transient ischemic attack: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muideen Olaiya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Limited evidence exists on effective interventions to improve knowledge of preventive medications in patients with chronic diseases, such as stroke. We investigated the effectiveness of a nurse-led intervention, where a component was to improve knowledge of prevention medications, in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA.Methods: Prospective sub-study of the Shared Team Approach between Nurses and Doctors For Improved Risk Factor Management (STAND FIRM, a randomized controlled trial of risk factor management. We recruited patients aged ≥18 years and hospitalized for stroke/TIA. The intervention comprised an individualized management program, involving nurse-led education, and management plan with medical specialist oversight. The outcome, participants’ knowledge of secondary prevention medications at 12 months, was assessed using questionnaires. A score of ≥5 was considered as good knowledge. Effectiveness of the intervention on knowledge of medications was determined using logistic regression. Results: Between May 2014 and January 2015, 142 consecutive participants from the main trial were included in this sub-study, 64 to usual care and 78 to the intervention (median age 68.9 years, 68% male, and 79% ischemic stroke. In multivariable analyses, we found no significant difference between intervention groups in knowledge of medications. Factors independently associated with good knowledge (score ≥5 at 12 months included higher socio-economic position (OR 4.79, 95% CI 1.76, 13.07, greater functional ability (OR 1.69, 95% CI 1.17, 2.45, being married/living with a partner (OR 3.12, 95% CI 1.10, 8.87, and using instructions on pill bottle/package as an administration aid (OR 4.82, 95% CI 1.76, 13.22. Being aged ≥65 years was associated with poorer knowledge of medications (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.08, 0.71, while knowledge was worse among those taking three medications (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.03, 0.66 or ≥4 medications

  14. The COLOFOL trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansdotter Andersson, Pernilla; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The COLOFOL trial, a prospective randomized multicenter trial comparing two follow-up regimes after curative surgical treatment for colorectal cancer, focuses on detection of asymptomatic recurrences. This paper aims to describe the design and recruitment procedure in the COLOFOL...... trial, comparing demographic characteristics between randomized patients and eligible patients not included in the study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: COLOFOL was designed as a pragmatic trial with wide inclusion criteria and few exclusion criteria, in order to obtain a sample reflecting the general patient...

  15. Beyond trial types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrholm, Mads; Vangkilde, Signe; Bundesen, Claus

    2015-05-01

    Conventional wisdom on psychological experiments has held that when one or more independent variables are manipulated it is essential that all other conditions are kept constant such that confounding factors can be assumed negligible (Woodworth, 1938). In practice, the latter assumption is often questionable because it is generally difficult to guarantee that all other conditions are constant between any two trials. Therefore, the most common way to check for confounding violations of this assumption is to split the experimental conditions in terms of "trial types" to simulate a reduction of unintended trial-by-trial variation. Here, we pose a method which is more general than the use of trial types: use of mathematical models treating measures of potentially confounding factors and manipulated variables as equals on the single-trial level. We show how the method can be applied with models that subsume under the generalized linear item response theory (GLIRT), which is the case for most of the well-known psychometric models (Mellenbergh, 1994). As an example, we provide a new analysis of a single-letter recognition experiment using a nested likelihood ratio test that treats manipulated and measured variables equally (i.e., in exactly the same way) on the single-trial level. The test detects a confounding interaction with time-on-task as a single-trial measure and yields a substantially better estimate of the effect size of the main manipulation compared with an analysis made in terms of trial types.

  16. Baseline comparison of three health utility measures and the feeling thermometer among participants in the action to control cardiovascular risk in diabetes trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisch Dennis W

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health utility (HU measures are used as overall measures of quality of life and to determine quality adjusted life years (QALYs in economic analyses. We compared baseline values of three HUs including Short Form 6 Dimensions (SF-6D, and Health Utilities Index, Mark II and Mark III (HUI2 and HUI3 and the feeling thermometer (FT among type 2 diabetes participants in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD trial. We assessed relationships between HU and FT values and patient demographics and clinical variables. Methods ACCORD was a randomized clinical trial to test if intensive controls of glucose, blood pressure and lipids can reduce the risk of major cardiovascular disease (CVD events in type 2 diabetes patients with high risk of CVD. The health-related quality of life (HRQOL sub-study includes 2,053 randomly selected participants. Interclass correlations (ICCs and agreement between measures by quartile were used to evaluate relationships between HU’s and the FT. Multivariable regression models specified relationships between patient variables and each HU and the FT. Results The ICCs were 0.245 for FT/SF-6D, 0.313 for HUI3/SF-6D, 0.437 for HUI2/SF-6D, 0.338 for FT/HUI2, 0.337 for FT/HUI3 and 0.751 for HUI2/HUI3 (P P P  Conclusions The agreements between the different HUs were poor except for the two HUI measures; therefore HU values derived different measures may not be comparable. The FT had low agreement with HUs. The relationships between HUs and demographic and clinical measures demonstrate how severity of diabetes and other clinical and demographic factors are associated with HUs and FT measures. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00000620

  17. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease or prevent a disease from returning. Supportive Care Trials In supportive care trials, researchers look for ways to make life ... groups, and various types of social interventions. Supportive care interventions are not intended to treat or cure ...

  18. Comparability of prostate trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suciu, S; Sylvester, R; Iversen, P

    1993-01-01

    The present overview of advanced prostate cancer required the identification of randomized clinical trials studying the question of maximal androgen blockade versus the classic castration therapy. The heterogeneity of the trials concerned the type of castration (surgical or chemical) and the type...

  19. Medication adherence in patients with apparent resistant hypertension: findings from the SYMPATHY trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, R L; van Maarseveen, E M; Bots, M L; Blankestijn, P J

    2017-08-17

    Hypertension is only controlled in approximately 35% of the patients, which could be partially due to non-adherence. Recently, bioanalytical assessment of adherence to blood pressure (BP) lowering drugs has gaining interest. Our aim was to explore possible determinants of non-adherence in treatment resistant hypertension, assessed by objective screening for antihypertensive agents in serum. Secondary aim was to study the effect of adherence on the change in BP. This project was a sub-study of SYMPATHY; an open-label randomized-controlled trial to assess the effect of renal denervation on BP six months after treatment compared to usual care in patients with resistant hypertension. Stored serum samples were screened for antihypertensive agents to assess adherence at baseline and six months after intervention, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Office and 24-hour BP were measured at the same day blood was sampled. Patients and physicians were unaware of adherence measurements. Ninety-eight baseline and 83 six-month samples were available for analysis. Sixty-eight percent (95%CI 59 to 78) of the patients was non-adherent (n=67). For every 1 pill more prescribed, 0.785 [95%CI 0.529 to 0.891] prescribed pill was less detected in blood. A decrease of 1 pill in adherence between baseline and six months was associated with a significant rise in office systolic BP of 4 (95%CI 0.230 to 8.932) mmHg. Objective measurement of BP lowering drugs in serum, as a tool to assess adherence, showed that non-adherence was very common in patients with apparent resistant hypertension. Furthermore, the assessment results were related to (changes in) blood pressure. Our findings provide direct and objective methodology to help the physician to understand and to improve the condition of apparent resistant hypertension. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials Insurance Coverage and Clinical Trials How to Work With Your Health Insurance Plan Federal Government Programs Patient Safety Informed Consent Children's Assent Scientific Review Ending Trials Early Deciding to Take Part ...

  1. Olmesartan reduces inflammatory biomarkers in patients with stable coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: results from the OLIVUS trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Toru; Hirohata, Atsushi; Usui, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Keizo; Murakami, Takashi; Komatsubara, Issei; Kusachi, Shozo; Ohe, Tohru; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Ito, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    The OLmesartan on the progression of coronary atherosclerosis: evaluation by IntraVascular UltraSound (OLIVUS) trial demonstrated that an angiotensin II receptor blocker, olmesartan, reduces the rate of coronary atheroma progression as evaluated by intravascular ultrasound in patients with stable angina pectoris undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. This substudy examined the impact of olmesartan on serum biomarkers and the relationship between biomarker changes and atheroma progression. Patients in the OLIVUS trial (n = 247) were randomly assigned to a control group or the olmesartan group. A subgroup of these patients (n = 135, 55 %) was analyzed at baseline and at 14 months. Patients' characteristics and blood-pressure control were identical between the control group (n = 65) and the olmesartan group (n = 70), and also between the subpopulation and total population. The change in the level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (mg/l) and adiponectin (μg/ml) was significantly greater in the olmesartan group than in the control group (between-group differences: 0.5 and -0.7; 95 % confidence interval: 0.2-0.8 and -1.3 to -0.1; P = 0.001 and 0.02, respectively). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the nominal changes in total atheroma volume and percent atheroma volume were significantly associated with the nominal change in hs-CRP in the olmesartan group but not in the control group. Olmesartan reduced hs-CRP in patients with stable angina, and this correlated with the change in coronary atheroma.

  2. Fundamentals of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Lawrence M; DeMets, David L; Reboussin, David M; Granger, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    This is the fifth edition of a very successful textbook on clinical trials methodology, written by recognized leaders who have long and extensive experience in all areas of clinical trials. The three authors of the first four editions have been joined by two others who add great expertise.  Most chapters have been revised considerably from the fourth edition.  A chapter on regulatory issues has been included and the chapter on data monitoring has been split into two and expanded.  Many contemporary clinical trial examples have been added.  There is much new material on adverse events, adherence, issues in analysis, electronic data, data sharing, and international trials.  This book is intended for the clinical researcher who is interested in designing a clinical trial and developing a protocol. It is also of value to researchers and practitioners who must critically evaluate the literature of published clinical trials and assess the merits of each trial and the implications for the care and treatment of ...

  3. A cluster-randomized, placebo-controlled, maternal vitamin a or beta-carotene supplementation trial in bangladesh: design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulze Kerry

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present the design, methods and population characteristics of a large community trial that assessed the efficacy of a weekly supplement containing vitamin A or beta-carotene, at recommended dietary levels, in reducing maternal mortality from early gestation through 12 weeks postpartum. We identify challenges faced and report solutions in implementing an intervention trial under low-resource, rural conditions, including the importance of population choice in promoting generalizability, maintaining rigorous data quality control to reduce inter- and intra- worker variation, and optimizing efficiencies in information and resources flow from and to the field. Methods This trial was a double-masked, cluster-randomized, dual intervention, placebo-controlled trial in a contiguous rural area of ~435 sq km with a population of ~650,000 in Gaibandha and Rangpur Districts of Northwestern Bangladesh. Approximately 120,000 married women of reproductive age underwent 5-weekly home surveillance, of whom ~60,000 were detected as pregnant, enrolled into the trial and gave birth to ~44,000 live-born infants. Upon enrollment, at ~ 9 weeks' gestation, pregnant women received a weekly oral supplement containing vitamin A (7000 ug retinol equivalents (RE, beta-carotene (42 mg, or ~7000 ug RE or a placebo through 12 weeks postpartum, according to prior randomized allocation of their cluster of residence. Systems described include enlistment and 5-weekly home surveillance for pregnancy based on menstrual history and urine testing, weekly supervised supplementation, periodic risk factor interviews, maternal and infant vital outcome monitoring, birth defect surveillance and clinical/biochemical substudies. Results The primary outcome was pregnancy-related mortality assessed for 3 months following parturition. Secondary outcomes included fetal loss due to miscarriage or stillbirth, infant mortality under three months of age, maternal obstetric and

  4. Comparability of prostate trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suciu, S; Sylvester, R; Iversen, P;

    1993-01-01

    The present overview of advanced prostate cancer required the identification of randomized clinical trials studying the question of maximal androgen blockade versus the classic castration therapy. The heterogeneity of the trials concerned the type of castration (surgical or chemical) and the type...... of antiandrogen (flutamide, Anandron, or cyproterone acetate) added to castration. This paper reviews the different types of heterogeneity that might exist among trials that are involved in the overview: study design, randomization procedure, treatment evaluation, statistical evaluation, and data maturity...... with a larger number of patients and a longer follow-up will contribute more to the overview's results....

  5. Inept media trials of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Ramamurthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Indian media in general, with the exception of a few domain expert journalists, have failed to comprehend the complexities involved in the clinical trial process. In the run up to the deadline-based coverage of a story, a majority of them fall short in conveying the right perspective to readers, but nevertheless they have been successful in sensationalizing an event in this arena. Possibly by unintended misrepresentation, or mostly out of ignorance of the nuances involved in the clinical trials process, the media has done more harm than good, and got away with it. On the other side, the industry has been reluctant to engage with the media in a meaningful dialog for too long now. It bears not only the consequences of damage to its professional reputation following such reportage, but also the repercussions of unnecessary clampdowns by the regulators. Science journalism in India has yet to rise as a profession.

  6. The effect of long-term homocysteine-lowering on carotid intima-media thickness and flow-mediated vasodilation in stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Daniel J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that homocysteine (tHcy may be a causal risk factor for atherosclerosis. B-vitamin supplements reduce tHcy and improve endothelial function in short term trials, but the long-term effects of the treatment on vascular structure and function are unknown. Methods We conducted a sub-study of VITATOPS, a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention trial designed to test the efficacy of long term B-vitamin supplementation (folic acid 2 mg, vitamin B6 25 mg and vitamin B12 0.5 mg in the prevention of vascular events in patients with a history of stroke. We measured carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT and flow-mediated dilation (FMD at least two years after randomisation in 162 VITATOPS participants. We also conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies designed to test the effect of B-vitamin treatment on CIMT and FMD. Results After a mean treatment period of 3.9 ± 0.9 years, the vitamin-treated group had a significantly lower mean plasma homocysteine concentration than the placebo-treated group (7.9 μmol/L, 95% CI 7.5 to 8.4 versus 11.8 μmol/L, 95% CI 10.9 to 12.8, p Conclusion Although short-term treatment with B-vitamins is associated with increased FMD, long-term homocysteine-lowering did not significantly improve FMD or CIMT in people with a history of stroke. Trial Registration Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.actr.org.au/ Trial Registration number: 12605000005651

  7. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to obtain preliminary data on whether the drug works in people who have a certain disease or condition. These trials also continue to study safety, including short-term side effects. This phase ...

  8. Participating in Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... out if an experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will help treat, find, or ... specific medical problem. These trials find out if lifestyle changes, such as exercising more, getting more sleep, ...

  9. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a disease. A clinical trial may compare experimental products or tests to those already available or may ... Institutes of Health | U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Customer Support | Accessibility | Copyright | Privacy | Viewers and Players

  10. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, J N; Losina, E; Lohmander, L S

    2015-01-01

    To highlight methodological challenges in the design and conduct of randomized trials of surgical interventions and to propose strategies for addressing these challenges. This paper focuses on three broad areas: enrollment; intervention; and assessment including implications for analysis. For eac...

  11. ClinicalTrials.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provides patients, family members, health care professionals, and members of the public easy access to information on clinical trials for a wide range of diseases...

  12. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... new tests that could identify a disease in its early stages. Usually, trial participants must show signs ... often healthy people (20 to 80), to judge its safety and side effects, and to find the ...

  13. TRIAL BY PREVIEW

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bert I. Huang

    2013-01-01

    ...—that is, the judge or the jury who will be the finder of fact at trial. Both theory and policy have focused narrowly on previewing the evidence, while barely noticing the complementary effect of previewing the audience...

  14. Polyp Prevention Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary objective of the Polyp Prevention Trial (PPT) is to determine whether a low fat, high fiber, high vegetable and fruit eating plan will decrease the recurrence of adenomatous polyps of the large bowel.

  15. Anchor Trial Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI has launched a multicenter phase III clinical trial called the ANCHOR Study -- Anal Cancer HSIL (High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) Outcomes Research Study -- to determine if treatment of HSIL in HIV-infected individuals can prevent anal canc

  16. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... experimental drug, therapy, medical device, lifestyle change, or test will help treat, find, or prevent a disease. A clinical trial may compare experimental products or tests to those already available or may compare existing ...

  17. Falsificationism and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, S J

    1991-11-01

    The relevance of the philosophy of Sir Karl Popper to the planning, conduct and analysis of clinical trials is examined. It is shown that blinding and randomization can only be regarded as valuable for the purpose of refuting universal hypotheses. The purpose of inclusion criteria is also examined. It is concluded that a misplaced belief in induction is responsible for many false notions regarding clinical trials.

  18. Similar to Those Who Are Breastfed, Infants Fed a Formula Containing 2'-Fucosyllactose Have Lower Inflammatory Cytokines in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehring, Karen C; Marriage, Barbara J; Oliver, Jeffery S; Wilder, Julie A; Barrett, Edward G; Buck, Rachael H

    2016-12-01

    Evidence suggests that human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) provide multiple benefits to infants, including prebiotic effects, gut maturation, antimicrobial activities, and immune modulation. Clinical intervention studies with HMOs are required to confirm these benefits in infants. Our objective was to investigate the effects of feeding formulas supplemented with the HMO 2'-fucosyllactose (2'-FL) on biomarkers of immune function in healthy term infants. We performed a substudy nested within a randomized, double-blind, controlled growth and tolerance study in healthy singleton infants (birth weight ≥2490 g) who were enrolled by 5 d of life and exclusively formula-fed (n = 317) or breastfed (n = 107) from enrollment to 4 mo of age. Formula-fed infants were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 3 formulas, all containing 2.4 g total oligosaccharides/L [control: galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) only; experimental formulas: GOS + 0.2 or 1.0 g 2'-FL/L], and compared with a breastfed reference group. For this substudy, blood samples were drawn from infants at 6 wk of age (n = 31-42/group). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated for cellular phenotyping and stimulated ex vivo with phytohemagglutinin for proliferation and cell cycle progression or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Cytokine concentrations were measured in plasma and in ex vivo-stimulated culture supernatants. Breastfed infants and infants fed either of the experimental formulas with 2'-FL were not different but had 29-83% lower concentrations of plasma inflammatory cytokines than did infants fed the control formula [interleukin (IL) receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)] (P ≤ 0.05). In ex vivo RSV-stimulated PBMC cultures, breastfed infants were not different than either of the groups fed formula with 2'-FL, but they had lower concentrations of TNF-α (31%) and interferon γ (IFN-γ 54%) (P ≤ 0.05) and tended to have lower IL-1ra (25%) and

  19. Malaria in HIV-Infected Children Receiving HIV Protease-Inhibitor- Compared with Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy, IMPAACT P1068s, Substudy to P1060

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Charlotte V.; Gabriel, Erin E.; Kamthunzi, Portia; Tegha, Gerald; Tauzie, Jean; Petzold, Elizabeth; Barlow-Mosha, Linda; Chi, Benjamin H.; Li, Yonghua; Ilmet, Tiina; Kirmse, Brian; Neal, Jillian; Parikh, Sunil; Deygoo, Nagamah; Jean Philippe, Patrick; Mofenson, Lynne; Prescott, William; Chen, Jingyang; Musoke, Philippa; Palumbo, Paul; Duffy, Patrick E.; Borkowsky, William

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV and malaria geographically overlap. HIV protease inhibitors kill malaria parasites in vitro and in vivo, but further evaluation in clinical studies is needed. Methods Thirty-one children from Malawi aged 4–62 months were followed every 3 months and at intercurrent illness visits for ≤47 months (September 2009-December 2011). We compared malaria parasite carriage by blood smear microscopy (BS) and confirmed clinical malaria incidence (CCM, or positive BS with malaria symptoms) in children initiated on HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) with zidovudine, lamivudine, and either nevirapine (NVP), a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, or lopinavir-ritonavir (LPV-rtv), a protease inhibitor. Results We found an association between increased time to recurrent positive BS, but not CCM, when anti-malarial treatment and LPV-rtv based ART were used concurrently and when accounting for a LPV-rtv and antimalarial treatment interaction (adjusted HR 0.39; 95% CI (0.17,0.89); p = 0.03). Conclusions LPV-rtv in combination with malaria treatment was associated with lower risk of recurrent positive BS, but not CCM, in HIV-infected children. Larger, randomized studies are needed to confirm these findings which may permit ART optimization for malaria-endemic settings. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00719602 PMID:27936233

  20. Three-month stability of the CogState brief battery in healthy older adults, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease: results from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers, and Lifestyle-rate of change substudy (AIBL-ROCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yen Ying; Jaeger, Judith; Harrington, Karra; Ashwood, Tim; Ellis, Kathryn A; Stöffler, Albrecht; Szoeke, Cassandra; Lachovitzki, Rebecca; Martins, Ralph N; Villemagne, Victor L; Bush, Ashley; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher C; Ames, David; Darby, David; Maruff, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Large prospective studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have sought to understand the pathological evolution of AD and factors that may influence the rate of disease progression. Estimates of rates of cognitive change are available for 12 or 24 months, but not for shorter time frames (e.g., 3 or 6 months). Most clinical drug trials seeking to reduce or modify AD symptoms have been conducted over 12- or 24-week periods. As such, we aimed to characterize the performance of a group of healthy older adults, adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and adults with AD on the CogState battery of tests over short test-retest intervals. This study recruited 105 healthy older adults, 48 adults with aMCI, and 42 adults with AD from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers, and Lifestyle study and administered the CogState battery monthly over 3 months. The CogState battery of tests showed high test-retest reliability and stability in all clinical groups when participants were assessed over 3 months. When considered at baseline, the CogState battery of tests was able to detect AD-related cognitive impairment. The data provide important estimates of the reliability, stability, and variability of each cognitive test in healthy older adults, adults with aMCI, and adults with AD. This may potentially be used to inform future estimates of cognitive change in clinical trials.

  1. Effect of an Early Dose of Measles Vaccine on Morbidity Between 18 Weeks and 9 Months of Age: A Randomized, Controlled Trial in Guinea-Bissau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Vu An; Biering-Sørensen, Sofie; Fisker, Ane Bærent; Balé, Carlito; Rasmussen, Stine Møller; Christensen, Lone Damkjær; Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Martins, Cesário; Aaby, Peter; Benn, Christine Stabell

    2017-04-15

    Children in Guinea-Bissau receive measles vaccine (MV) at 9 months of age, but studies have shown that an additional dose before 9 months of age might have beneficial nonspecific effects. Within a randomized trial designed to examine nonspecific effects of early MV receipt on mortality, we conducted a substudy to investigate the effect of early MV receipt on morbidity. Children were randomly assigned at a ratio of 2:1 to receive 2 doses of MV at 18 weeks and age 9 months (intervention group) or 1 dose of MV at age 9 months, in accordance with current practice (control group). Children were visited weekly from enrollment to age 9 months; the mother reported morbidity, and the field assistants examined the children. Using Cox and binomial regression models, we compared the 2 randomization groups. Among the 1592 children, early measles vaccination was not associated with a higher risk of the well-known adverse events of fever, rash, and convulsions within the first 14 days. From 15 days after randomization to age 9 months, early measles vaccination was associated with reductions in maternally reported diarrhea (hazard ratio [HR], 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], .82-.97), vomiting (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, .75-.98), and fever (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, .87-1.00). Early MV receipt was associated with reduced general morbidity in the following months, supporting that early MV receipt may improve the general health of children.

  2. Reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the Japanese version of International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group rating scale for restless legs syndrome in a clinical trial setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuichi; Oka, Yasunori; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Kuroda, Kenji; Hirata, Koichi

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to verify the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the Japanese version of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale for restless legs syndrome (J-IRLS) as a sub-study of a clinical trial of pramipexole against restless legs syndrome. After evaluating the test-retest reliability, concurrent validity and construct validity were analyzed. The responsiveness of J-IRLS was confirmed by evaluating the correlations between the changes in J-IRLS total score after treatment, Clinical Global Impression Improvement Scale (CGI-I), and Patient Global Impression. Test-retest reliability of J-IRLS was good (intra-class correlation coefficient, 0.877; 95% confidence interval, 0.802-0.925). The correlation coefficient of J-IRLS total score and CGI-S score for the first and second visit was 0.804 and 0.796, respectively (both P restless legs syndrome and for assessing drug efficacy. © 2013 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2013 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  3. Long-Term Effects of Irbesartan Treatment and Smoking on Nucleic Acid Oxidation in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria: An Irbesartan in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria (IRMA 2) substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broedbaek, Kasper; Henriksen, Trine; Weimann, Allan

    2011-01-01

    treatment-related differences were shown for albumin excretion (P = 0.0008) only, as previously reported. Important secondary findings were significant associations between changes in 8-oxodG excretion and changes in albumin excretion and glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)). During the study period, 8-oxod......OBJECTIVE We tested whether long-term treatment with the angiotensin II receptor antagonist irbesartan reduces nucleic acid oxidation in patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Irbesartan in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria (IRMA 2...... (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo). RESULTS During the 2-year trial, no significant differences in 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGuo excretions between placebo and irbesartan treatment were seen. 8-oxodG and albumin excretion decreased with time (P = 0.0004 and P

  4. Ethics and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassany, O; Duracinský, M

    1999-01-01

    The current reference guideline about ethics in clinical trials is the Declaration of Helsinki of human rights in medical research. Three major principles are emphasised: respect of the patient to accept or not to participate in a trial, the constraints and the presumed risks must be acceptable for patients included in a study, and vulnerable subjects should not participate in studies. The investigator is responsible for obtaining a free and well-informed consent from patients before their inclusion in a study. Where possible, a new drug should always first be compared to placebo in order to prove its superiority. Else, a small-sized trial comparing a new drug versus a reference treatment can lead to an erroneous conclusion of absence of difference. Moreover, good results or improvement are obtained in at least 30% of cases with placebo, whatever the disease. The use of placebo is unethical in life-threatening diseases and when an effective proved drug exists. The use of placebo is ethical in severe diseases with no efficient drug, in some severe diseases even when an active reference treatment is available, and in all moderate and functional diseases. In order to detect flawed studies, most journals now ask for any manuscript submitted and reporting results of a randomised clinical trial to join a checklist in order to verify the quality of the trial. Finally, it remains the responsibility of the doctor to decide whether or not a protocol is ethical, to participate or not and to include patients or not.

  5. The FOCUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenthøj, Louise B; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Randers, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    trial enrolling 126 patients meeting the standardised criteria of being at UHR for psychosis. Patients are recruited from psychiatric in- and outpatient facilities in the Copenhagen catchment area. Patients are randomised to one of the two treatment arms: cognitive remediation plus standard treatment...... functioning, psychosis-like symptoms, negative symptomatology, and depressive symptomatology as measured with the Personal and Social Performance Scale, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale-Expanded Version, Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms, and the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. DISCUSSION......: This is the first trial to evaluate the effects of neurocognitive and social cognitive remediation in UHR patients. The FOCUS trial results will provide evidence on the effect of targeted and comprehensive cognitive rehabilitation on cognition, daily living, and symptomatology as well as long-term outcome...

  6. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to describe requirements for inclusion of soluble biomarkers in osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials and progress toward OA-related biomarker qualification. The Guidelines for Biomarkers Working Group, representing experts in the field of OA biomarker research from...... of reasons but in particular, to determine whether biomarkers are useful in identifying those individuals most likely to receive clinically important benefits from an intervention; and to determine whether biomarkers are useful for identifying individuals at earlier stages of OA in order to institute...... both academia and industry, convened to discuss issues related to soluble biomarkers and to make recommendations for their use in OA clinical trials based on current knowledge and anticipated benefits. This document summarizes current guidance on use of biomarkers in OA clinical trials...

  7. Effectiveness of balance training exercise in people with mild to moderate severity Alzheimer's disease: protocol for a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lautenschlager Nicola T

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Balance dysfunction and falls are common problems in later stages of dementia. Exercise is a well-established intervention to reduce falls in cognitively intact older people, although there is limited randomised trial evidence of outcomes in people with dementia. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate whether a home-based balance exercise programme improves balance performance in people with mild to moderate severity Alzheimer's disease. Methods/design Two hundred and fourteen community dwelling participants with mild to moderate severity Alzheimer's disease will be recruited for the randomised controlled trial. A series of laboratory and clinical measures will be used to evaluate balance and mobility performance at baseline. Participants will then be randomized to receive either a balance training home exercise programme (intervention group from a physiotherapist, or an education, information and support programme from an occupational therapist (control group. Both groups will have six home visits in the six months following baseline assessment, as well as phone support. All participants will be re-assessed at the completion of the programme (after six months, and again in a further six months to evaluate sustainability of outcomes. The primary outcome measures will be the Limits of Stability (a force platform measure of balance and the Step Test (a clinical measure of balance. Secondary outcomes include other balance and mobility measures, number of falls and falls risk measures, cognitive and behavioural measures, and carer burden and quality of life measures. Assessors will be blind to group allocation. Longitudinal change in balance performance will be evaluated in a sub-study, in which the first 64 participants of the control group with mild to moderate severity Alzheimer's disease, and 64 age and gender matched healthy participants will be re-assessed on all measures at initial assessment, and then at 6, 12

  8. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlindon, T. E.; Driban, J. B.; Henrotin, Y.;

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct...... and index knee, describing interventions, patient-reported and physical performance measures, structural outcome measures, biochemical biomarkers, and reporting recommendations. In summary, the working group identified 25 recommendations that represent the current best practices regarding clinical trials...... that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee OA. These updated recommendations incorporate novel technologies (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) and strategies to address the heterogeneity of knee OA....

  9. The practice of 'doing' evaluation: lessons learned from nine complex intervention trials in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Joanna; DiLiberto, Deborah; Mangham-Jefferies, Lindsay; Ansah, Evelyn K; Lal, Sham; Mbakilwa, Hilda; Bruxvoort, Katia; Webster, Jayne; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Yeung, Shunmay; Leslie, Toby; Hutchinson, Eleanor; Reyburn, Hugh; Lalloo, David G; Schellenberg, David; Cundill, Bonnie; Staedke, Sarah G; Wiseman, Virginia; Goodman, Catherine; Chandler, Clare I R

    2014-06-17

    There is increasing recognition among trialists of the challenges in understanding how particular 'real-life' contexts influence the delivery and receipt of complex health interventions. Evaluations of interventions to change health worker and/or patient behaviours in health service settings exemplify these challenges. When interpreting evaluation data, deviation from intended intervention implementation is accounted for through process evaluations of fidelity, reach, and intensity. However, no such systematic approach has been proposed to account for the way evaluation activities may deviate in practice from assumptions made when data are interpreted. A collective case study was conducted to explore experiences of undertaking evaluation activities in the real-life contexts of nine complex intervention trials seeking to improve appropriate diagnosis and treatment of malaria in varied health service settings. Multiple sources of data were used, including in-depth interviews with investigators, participant-observation of studies, and rounds of discussion and reflection. From our experiences of the realities of conducting these evaluations, we identified six key 'lessons learned' about ways to become aware of and manage aspects of the fabric of trials involving the interface of researchers, fieldworkers, participants and data collection tools that may affect the intended production of data and interpretation of findings. These lessons included: foster a shared understanding across the study team of how individual practices contribute to the study goals; promote and facilitate within-team communications for ongoing reflection on the progress of the evaluation; establish processes for ongoing collaboration and dialogue between sub-study teams; the importance of a field research coordinator bridging everyday project management with scientific oversight; collect and review reflective field notes on the progress of the evaluation to aid interpretation of outcomes; and

  10. Tideglusib reduces progression of brain atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Günter U; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Andrés, María V; Belloch, Vincente; León, Teresa; Del Ser, Teodoro

    2014-04-01

    It is believed that glycogen synthase kinase-3 hyperphosphorylates tau protein in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The Tau Restoration on PSP (TAUROS) trial assessed the glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitor tideglusib as potential treatment. For the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) substudy reported here, we assessed the progression of brain atrophy. TAUROS was a multinational, phase 2, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients with mild-to-moderate PSP who were treated with oral tideglusib (600 mg or 800 mg daily) or with placebo for 1 year. A subset of patients underwent baseline and 52-week MRI. Automated, observer-independent, atlas-based, and mask-based volumetry was done on high-resolution, T1-weighted, three-dimensional data. For primary outcomes, progression of atrophy was compared both globally (brain, cerebrum) and regionally (third ventricle, midbrain, pons) between the active and placebo groups (Bonferroni correction). For secondary outcomes, 15 additional brain structures were explored (Benjamini & Yekutieli correction). In total, MRIs from 37 patient were studied (placebo group, N = 9; tideglusib 600 mg group, N = 19; tideglusib 800 mg group, N = 9). The groups compared well in their demographic characteristics. Clinical results showed no effect of tideglusib over placebo. Progression of atrophy was significantly lower in the active group than in the placebo group for the brain (mean ± standard error of the mean: -1.3% ± 1.4% vs. -3.1% ± 2.3%, respectively), cerebrum (-1.3% ± 1.5% vs. -3.2% ± 2.1%, respectively), parietal lobe (-1.6% ± 1.9% vs. -4.1% ± 3.0%, respectively), and occipital lobe (-0.3% ± 1.8% vs. -2.7% ± 3.2%, respectively). A trend toward reduced atrophy also was observed in the frontal lobe, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, midbrain, and brainstem. In patients with PSP, tideglusib reduced the progression of atrophy in the whole brain, particularly in the parietal and occipital lobes.

  11. Initiating and continuing behaviour change within a weight gain prevention trial: a qualitative investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Kozica

    Full Text Available Preventing obesity is an international health priority. In Australia, young women who live in rural communities are at high risk of unhealthy weight gain. Interventions which engage young women and support sustainable behaviour change are needed and comprehensive evaluation of such interventions generates knowledge for population scale-up. This qualitative sub-study aims to identify enablers and barriers to behaviour change initiation and continuation within a community weight gain prevention program.In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with program participants 6 months after baseline. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed independently by two investigators via thematic analysis.A total of 28 women with a mean age of 39.9±6.2years and a BMI of 28.6±5.2kg/m2 were purposively recruited from the larger cohort (n = 649 that participated in the prevention trial.Four behaviour change groups emerged were identified from participant interviews: (i no change, (ii relapse, (iii intermittent and (iv continued change. Factors influencing behaviour change initiation and continuation included realistic program expectations and the participant's ability to apply the core program elements including: setting small, achievable behaviour change goals, problem solving and using self-management techniques. Personal knowledge, skills, motivation, self-efficacy, accountability and perceived social and environmental barriers also affected behaviour change. Satisfaction with personal program progress and the perceived amount of program supports required to achieve ongoing behaviour change varied amongst participants. Women who relapsed expressed a desire for more intensive and regular support from health professionals, identified more barriers unrelated to the program, anticipated significant weight loss and had lower satisfaction with their progress.Initiating and continuing behaviour change is a complex

  12. Effects of aggressive statin therapy on patients with coronary saphenous vein bypass grafts: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sheng; Liu, Yong; Liu, Xue-bo

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness and safety of aggressive statin versus moderate statin therapy on patients with saphenous vein grafts (SVGs) in randomized, controlled trials (RCTs). We searched MEDLINE (1980-June 2012), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, Science Citation Index, and PubMed (to June 2012), and found 10 relevant RCTs, including 7 substudy analyses from a Post-CABG trial, and 1 pooled analysis of the PROVE-IT TIMI 22 trial (Pravastatin or Atorvastatin Evaluation and Infection Therapy-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 22 Investigators) and A to Z trial. Early intensive vs a delayed conservative simvastatin strategy in patients with acute coronary syndromes; phase Z of the A to Z trial. A total of 6645 of participants, ages ranging from 21 to 75 years old, were treated with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and were followed for 2 to 5 years. Eight studies showed that aggressive statin therapy had lower LDL-C levels and a decrease of 39% in graft atherosclerotic progression, 12% in new occlusions, and 19% in new lesions more than moderate statin therapy. Three reports indicated that aggressive statin therapy lowered the risk of repeated myocardial infarction more than moderate statin therapy for coronary revascularization (95% CI, 0.66-0.95; risk ratio [RR] = 0.80; and 95% CI, 0.66-0.85; RR = 0.75) and lowered the risk of cardiac death as well (95% CI, 0.64-1.08; RR = 0.83). Aggressive statin therapy had safety similar to that of moderate statin therapy except for a slight increase in myopathic events and aminotransferase levels. Seventy percent to 90% of patients took statin treatment as prescribed in long-term. Compared with moderate statin therapy, long-term aggressive statin lowered the LDL-C level significantly, further decreased the atherosclerotic progression of SVG, reduced the risks of repeated myocardial infarction and coronary revascularization after CABG, and revealed similar patient compliance

  13. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emery, C. A.; Roos, Ewa M.; Verhagen, E.;

    2015-01-01

    The risk of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) substantially increases following joint injury. Research efforts should focus on investigating the efficacy of preventative strategies in high quality randomized controlled trials (RCT). The objective of these OARSI RCT recommendations is to inform...

  14. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available skip navigation Help Search home health topics A-Z Videos A-Z about us Customer Support NIH SeniorHealth Built with You in Mind Resize Text: A A A Change Contrast print sign up Share Home > Health topics A-Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About ...

  15. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will not know if you are taking the medicine or the placebo until the clinical trial is over. How do ... can already get by prescription ) or sugar pills ( placebos ) with the new medicine may last longer than Phases I and II ...

  16. The CYTONOX trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Christina; Mikus, Gerd; Christensen, Hanne Rolighed

    2016-01-01

    will be defined by using well-tested probes; midazolam, chlorzoxazone and caffeine. Each of the probes will be administered as a single dose. Subsequently, blood and urine samples will be collected at pre-specified times. CONCLUSION: The aim of the CYTONOX trial is to investigate the in vivo activity of CYP3A4...

  17. Clinical Trial Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Am I Protected? Mark Bowden / iStock Ethical guidelines The goal of clinical research is to develop knowledge that improves human ... data and decide whether the results have medical importance. Results from clinical trials are often published in peer-reviewed scientific ...

  18. Experiencing Lifetime Domestic Violence: Associations with Mental Health and Stress among Pregnant Women in Rural Bangladesh: The MINIMat Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Amy Lynn; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte; Naved, Ruchira Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience of domestic violence has negative mental health consequences for women. The association of cumulative and specific forms of domestic violence, particularly emotional violence and controlling behavior, with common mental disorders and stress has rarely been studied in pregnant women. The aim of this study is to evaluate associations of specific and multiple forms of lifetime domestic violence and controlling behavior with distress and cortisol level during pregnancy in rural Bangladeshi women. Methods and findings In this observational sub-study of larger MINIMat trial, 3504 pregnant women were interviewed using a shortened Conflict Tactic Scale about their lifetime experience of domestic violence including physical, sexual, emotional domestic violence and controlling behavior. Women’s levels of emotional distress were assessed using the self-reported questionnaire (SRQ-20) developed by WHO, and levels of morning salivary cortisol were measured in a subsample (n = 1300) of women during week 28–32 of pregnancy. Regression analyses were used to estimate the associations of lifetime physical, sexual, emotional domestic violence and controlling behavior with levels of distress and cortisol during pregnancy. The prevalence of lifetime domestic violence was 57% and emotional distress was 35% in these pregnant women. All forms of domestic violence were associated with higher levels of emotional distress. Women who experienced either emotional violence or controlling behavior had the highest levels of emotional distress. There was a dose-response relationship between cumulative number of the different forms of domestic violence and women’s levels of emotional distress. There was no association between women’s experience of domestic violence and level of morning salivary cortisol. Conclusion Including emotional violence and controlling behavior as major types of violence in future research and health interventions is warranted. Furthermore, the

  19. The acceptability of acupuncture for low back pain: a qualitative study of patient's experiences nested within a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Hopton

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines recommend acupuncture as a clinically effective treatment for chronic back pain. However, there is insufficient knowledge of what factors contribute to patients' positive and negative experiences of acupuncture, and how those factors interact in terms of the acceptability of treatment. This study used patient interviews following acupuncture treatment for back pain to identify, understand and describe the elements that contribute or detract from acceptability of treatment. METHODS: The study used semi-structured interviews. Twelve patients were interviewed using an interview schedule as a sub-study nested within a randomised controlled trial of acupuncture for chronic back pain. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Three over-arching themes emerged from the analysis. The first entitled facilitators of acceptability contained five subthemes; experience of pain relief, improvements in physical activity, relaxation, psychological benefit, reduced reliance on medication. The second over-arching theme identified barriers to acceptability, which included needle-related discomfort and temporary worsening of symptoms, pressure to continue treatment and financial cost. The third over-arching theme comprised mediators of acceptability, which included pre-treatment mediators such as expectation and previous experience, and treatment-related mediators of time, therapeutic alliance, lifestyle advice and the patient's active involvement in recovery. These themes inform our understanding of the acceptability of acupuncture to patients with low back pain. CONCLUSION: The acceptability of acupuncture treatment for low back pain is complex and multifaceted. The therapeutic relationship between the practitioner and patient emerged as a strong driver for acceptability, and as a useful vehicle to develop the patients' self-efficacy in pain

  20. Immunological function restoration with lopinavir/ritonavir versus efavirenz containing regimens in HIV-infected patients: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Berta; Rallón, Norma I; Loncá, Montserrat; Díaz, Alba; Alós, Llucia; Martínez, Esteban; Cruceta, Anna; Arnaiz, Joan Albert; Leal, Lorna; Lucero, Constanza; León, Agathe; Sánchez, Marcelo; Negredo, Eugenia; Clotet, Bonaventura; Gatell, José M; Benito, José M; Garcia, Felipe

    2014-05-01

    CD4(+) count increase has been reported to be different with lopinavir/r (LPV/r) and efavirenz (EFV)-containing regimens. The different effect of these two regimens on other immune function parameters and the relationship with the gain of CD4(+) count have not been assessed in a randomized clinical trial. Fifty antiretroviral treatment (cART) naïve HIV-infected individuals were randomized to receive LPV/r or EFV both with tenofovir/emtricitabine for 48 weeks. A substudy of immunological function restoration was performed in 22 patients (LPV/r n=10 and EFV n=12). Activation, thymic function, apoptosis, senescence, exhaustion, Treg cells, interleukin (IL)-7-receptor/IL-7 system, thymic volume, and lymphoid tissue fibrosis were evaluated at baseline and at week 48. Both groups experienced a CD4(+) count increase that was higher in the EFV group (ΔCD4(+) 88 vs. 315 cells/μl LPV/r vs. EFV, respectively, p<0.001). Despite this difference in CD4(+) gain, the change in other immune function parameters was similar in both treatment groups. Most of parameters evaluated tended to normalize after 48 weeks of cART. A significant decrease in levels of activation, senescence, exhaustion, and apoptosis on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells (p<0.001 for all) and a significant increase in markers of thymic function, IL-7 receptor, and in the levels of central memory CD4(+) T cells and naive subsets of CD8(+) T cells (p<0.001 for all) with respect to baseline values were observed without any difference between groups. These data indicate that the differences in CD4(+) gain with different cART regimens are not immunologically meaningful and might explain the similar clinical efficacy of these regimens.

  1. Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NICHD Publications Data Sharing and Other Resources Research Clinical Trials & Clinical Research Skip sharing on social media links ... health care providers, and researchers. Find NICHD-Supported Clinical Trials Use this link to find a list of ...

  2. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about ... Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to ...

  3. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unusual Cancers of Childhood Treatment Childhood Cancer Genomics Study Findings Metastatic Cancer Metastatic Cancer Research Common Cancer ... Trials Insurance Coverage and Clinical Trials How to Work With Your Health Insurance Plan Federal Government Programs ...

  4. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trials Information A to Z List of Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about ... Types of Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Cancer Drugs Complementary & Alternative Medicine Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to ...

  5. Open, Prospective, Multi-Center, Two-Part Study of Patient Preference with Monthly Ibandronate Therapy in Women with Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Switched From Daily or Weekly Alendronate or Risendronate-BONCURE: Results of Turkish Sub-Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurten Eskiyurt

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: BONCURE (Bonviva for Current Bisphosphonate Users Regional European Trial, aimed to evaluate patient preference with monthly ibandronate in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis who previously received daily or weekly alendronate or risendronate. Materials and Methods: This prospective, open-label study consisted of two sequential stages, Part A (screening and Part B (treatment. Patients enrolled into Part A completed the Candidate Identification Questionnaire (CIQ. In Part B, after completing the Osteoporosis Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (OPSATQ, patients received monthly oral ibandronate 150 mg for 6 months. Following treatment, patients completed the OPSAT-Q and Preference Questionnaire. Results: A total of 223 patients (mean age, 63.7±9.51 years were enrolled in Part A from Turkey. Among them, 103 (46.2% answered “YES” to at least one CIQ question. The mean composite OPSAT-Q domain scores increased for convenience (mean change, 15.3±17.7 points, quality of life (10.4±20.4 points, overall satisfaction (11.9±22.7 points, and side effects (3.3±18.8 points. At month 6, 177 subjects (92.7% preferred once-monthly dosing schedule and 99.0% were compliant (≥80% with study treatment. Thirty (15.6% subjects experienced mild to moderate adverse events, mostly gastrointestinal. Conclusion: Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis prefer and are more satisfied and compliant with monthly dosing of ibandronate than daily or weekly bisphosphonate treatment. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2012;18:1-7

  6. The Trial of Katherine Harrison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Walter W.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan in which the teacher and students participate in a mock trial of Katherine Harrison, who was accused of witchcraft in the seventeenth century. Provides background information about the trial, as well as primary sources of the testimonies given by witnesses during the trial. (CMK)

  7. The Trial of Katherine Harrison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Walter W.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan in which the teacher and students participate in a mock trial of Katherine Harrison, who was accused of witchcraft in the seventeenth century. Provides background information about the trial, as well as primary sources of the testimonies given by witnesses during the trial. (CMK)

  8. A guide to clinical trials for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000823.htm A guide to clinical trials for cancer To use ... trial and where to find one. What is a Clinical Trial for Cancer? Clinical trials for cancer ...

  9. SMi's Conducting Clinical Trials in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Charlotte

    2009-12-01

    The Conducting Clinical Trials in Europe meeting, held in London, included topics covering new developments in the field of clinical trials and recommendations on how to best conduct a trial. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the state of affairs of trials in Europe, conducting trials in emerging markets, strategies for improving trials, trial design options, peri-approval and pediatric trials, and the role of key players, such as physicians. Company perspectives from Pfizer Inc and Nycomed are also included.

  10. The CHANGE trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speyer, Helene; Christian Brix Nørgaard, Hans; Birk, Merete

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy in patients with schizophrenia is reduced by 20 years for men and 15 years for women compared to the general population. About 60% of the excess mortality is due to physical illnesses, with cardiovascular disease being dominant. CHANGE was a randomized, parallel-group, superiority......, multi-centre trial with blinded outcome assessment, testing the efficacy of an intervention aimed to improve cardiovascular risk profile and hereby potentially reduce mortality. A total of 428 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and abdominal obesity were recruited and centrally randomized 1...... cardiorespiratory fitness, physical activity, weight, diet and smoking. In conclusion, the CHANGE trial did not support superiority of individual lifestyle coaching or care coordination compared to treatment as usual in reducing cardiovascular risk in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and abdominal...

  11. Ciprofloxacin for contacts of cases of meningococcal meningitis as an epidemic response: study protocol for a cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldiron, Matthew E; Alcoba, Gabriel; Ciglenecki, Iza; Hitchings, Matt; Djibo, Ali; Page, Anne-Laure; Langendorf, Celine; Grais, Rebecca F

    2017-06-24

    Epidemics of meningococcal meningitis are common in the "African meningitis belt." Current response strategies include reactive vaccination campaigns, which are often organized too late to have maximal impact. A novel strain of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C has been circulating in recent years, and vaccine supplies are limited. An evaluation of chemoprophylaxis with single-dose ciprofloxacin for household contacts of meningitis cases has therefore been recommended. A three-arm cluster-randomized trial has been designed for implementation during a meningococcal meningitis epidemic in a health district in Niger in which at least two Health Zones (HZs) have met the weekly epidemic threshold. The primary outcome is the incidence (attack rate) of meningitis during the epidemic. Villages will be randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to one of three different arms: standard care, household-level prophylaxis, or village-wide prophylaxis. After study launch, when a case of meningococcal meningitis is identified in an HZ, the first reported case from a village will trigger the inclusion and randomization of the village. Household-level prophylaxis with single-dose ciprofloxacin will be offered in the home to all household members within 24 hours of the notification of the case, and village-wide distributions will occur within 72 hours of the notification of the case. The sample size necessary to detect differences between each of the two intervention arms and the standard care arm will be set after 4 weeks of data collection, in order to quantify multiple variables that could be particular to a given area. The primary analysis will compare attack rates at the end of the epidemic in each of the three arms. A nested sub-study will assess the effects of ciprofloxacin prophylaxis on the prevalence of ciprofloxacin-resistant enterobacteriaceae. A total of 200 participants in the standard care arm and 200 in the village-wide prophylaxis arm will provide stool samples at days 0, 7

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-01-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: 4'-Thio-ara-C, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate; ABT-089, AD-237, AF-37702, alvocidib hydrochloride, apricitabine, armodafinil, atrasentan, AVE-5883, avian influenza vaccine, azimilide hydrochloride; Banoxantrone, BIBF-1120; CD34+ cells, certolizumab pegol, CHIR-258, cilansetron, CoFactor, CX-3543, cystemustine; D-003, dexloxiglumide, DMXB-anabaseine; Ecogramostim, elcometrine, elcometrine/ethinylestradiol, etravirine; Fenretinide, fingolimod hydrochloride, fospropofol disodium; Gaboxadol, gestodene, glutamine; Human insulin, hyaluronic acid; Incyclinide, indacaterol, ispronicline, istradefylline; Labradimil, lamifiban, lapatinib, L-arginine hydrochloride, liposomal cisplatin, liposome encapsulated paclitaxel, LY-517717; Manidipine hydrochloride/delapril hydrochloride, maraviroc, MBP(82-98), MD-0727, MDX-214, melanotan I, MMR vaccine; Nacystelyn, nalfurafine hydrochloride, nibentan, nilotinib, NK-105; OBI-1, oblimersen sodium, olmesartan medoxomil, olmesartan medoxomil/hydrochlorothiazide, oregovomab; Pexelizumab, PG-116800, PG-CPT, PHA-794428, prasugrel; RC-3095, rDNA insulin, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, rhEndostatin, rhenium Re-186 etidronate, rhGM-CSF, roflumilast, romidepsin; Sarcosine, SGLU1, SGN-40, succinobucol; TAU, teduglutide, telatinib, tesofensine, tipifarnib, tirapazamine, TKA-731, tolvaptan, trabectedin; Vaccimel, vatalanib succinate, velafermin, vildagliptin, vinflunine; XP-19986; YM-155.

  13. Impact of lipid-based nutrient supplements and corn-soy blend on energy and nutrient intake among moderately underweight 8-18-month-old children participating in a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakwalakwa, Chrissie M; Ashorn, Per; Phuka, John C; Cheung, Yin Bun; Briend, André; Maleta, Kenneth M

    2015-12-01

    Nutrition interventions have an effect on growth, energy and nutrient intake, and development, but there are mixed reports on the effect of supplementation of energy-dense foods on dietary intake. This substudy aimed at assessing the effect of supplementation with corn-soy blend (CSB) or lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) on energy and nutrient intake in moderately underweight children participating in a clinical trial. A total of 188 children aged 8-18 months participated and received daily either 284 kcal from CSB or 220 kcal from LNS and no supplements (control). An interactive 24-h recall method was used to estimate energy and nutrient intakes in the groups. Total mean energy intake was 548 kcal, 551 kcal and 692 kcal in the control, CSB and LNS groups, respectively (P = 0.011). The mean (95% confidence interval) intake of energy and protein were 144 (37-250; P Energy intake from non-supplement foods was significantly lower in the CSB group compared with the control group, but not in the LNS group, suggesting a lower displacement of non-supplement foods with LNS. Both CSB and LNS supplementation resulted in higher intakes of calcium, iron, zinc and vitamin C compared with controls (all P ≤ 0.001). This study indicates that LNS might be superior to CSB to supplement underweight children as it results in higher energy intake, but this requires confirmation in other settings.

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis of adding pharmacists to primary care teams to reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with Type 2 diabetes: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, S H; Lier, D A; Majumdar, S R; Tsuyuki, R T; Lewanczuk, R Z; Spooner, R; Johnson, J A

    2015-07-01

    Adding pharmacists to primary care teams significantly improved blood pressure control and reduced predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk in patients with Type 2 diabetes. This pre-specified sub-study evaluated the economic implications of this cardiovascular risk reduction strategy. One-year outcomes and healthcare utilization data from the trial were used to determine cost-effectiveness from the public payer perspective. Costs were expressed in 2014 Canadian dollars and effectiveness was based on annualized risk of cardiovascular events derived from the UKPDS Risk Engine. The 123 evaluable trial patients included in this analysis had a mean age of 62 ( ± 11) years, 38% were men, and mean diabetes duration was 6 ( ± 7) years. Pharmacists provided 3.0 ( ± 1.9) hours of additional service to each intervention patient, which cost $226 ( ± $1143) per patient. The overall one-year per-patient costs for healthcare utilization were $190 lower in the intervention group compared with usual care [95% confidence interval (CI): -$1040, $668). Intervention patients had a significant 0.3% greater reduction in the annualized risk of a cardiovascular event (95% CI: 0.08%, 0.6%) compared with usual care. In the cost-effectiveness analysis, the intervention dominated usual care in 66% of 10,000 bootstrap replications. At a societal willingness-to-pay of $4000 per 1% reduction in annual cardiovascular risk, the probability that the intervention was cost-effective compared with usual care reached 95%. A sensitivity analysis using multiple imputation to replace missing data produced similar results. Within a randomized trial, adding pharmacists to primary care teams was a cost-effective strategy for reducing cardiovascular risk in patients with Type 2 diabetes. In most circumstances, this intervention may also be cost saving. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  15. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  16. The ONTARGET trial programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unger, Thomas; Kintscher, Ulrich; Kappert, Kai;

    2009-01-01

    The ONTARGET trial programme tested the effects of the angiotensin AT1 receptor blocker (ARB), telmisartan, alone or in combination with the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, ramipril, in more than 25.000 patients at high cardiovascular risk including diabetes on a combined endpoint ....... Telmisartan thus proved to be the first and so far the only representative of the ARB class that can be used as an alternative to the "gold standard" ACE-inhibitor, ramipril, in patients at high cardiovascular risk with or without hypertension. © 2009 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd....

  17. Online gambling's moderators: how effective? Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillon, Julie; Grall-Bronnec, Marie; Hardouin, Jean-Benoit; Venisse, Jean-Luc; Challet-Bouju, Gaelle

    2015-05-30

    Online gambling has been legalized in France in 2010. Licenses are issued to gambling operators who demonstrate their ability to respect the legal framework (security, taxation, consumer protection, etc.). The preventive measures to protect vulnerable gamblers include an obligation to provide online gambling moderators. These moderators should allow gamblers to limit their bets, exclude themselves from the website for 7 days, and consult the balance of the gambler's account at any time. However, there are only a few published reports of empirical research investigating the effectiveness of Internet-based protective measures implemented by French law. Moreover, no empirical research has yet studied the impact of bonuses on gambling behaviors. This research is an experimental randomized controlled trial, risk prevention targeted. The research is divided into four sub-studies depending on the studied moderator: limiting bonuses, self-exclusion, self-limitation and information. The study sample consists of 485 volunteers. For each experimental condition and the control groups, the sample is composed of gamblers equally recruited from gamblers having preferences in each of the three major forms of games (lottery and scratch tickets, sports and horserace betting, and poker). For each form of gambling, the gamblers are recruited in order to obtain as many problem gamblers as non-problem gamblers. According to the randomization, the experimental session begins. The experimental session is a gambling situation on a computer in our research center. The gambler is invited to play on his favorite gambling site as usual, with his own gambler account and his own money. Data collected comprise sociodemographic characteristics, gambling habits, an interview about enjoyment and feeling out of control during the gambling session, moderator impact on gambling practice, statement of gambling parameters and questionnaires (BMIS, GRCS, CPGI, GACS). Moderator efficiency is assessed based

  18. [Critical reading of clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aptel, F; Cucherat, M; Blumen-Ohana, E; Denis, P

    2011-12-01

    Clinical trials are playing an increasingly crucial role in modern evidence based medicine, allowing for rigorous scientific evaluation of treatment strategies and validation of patient care. The results of clinical trials often form the rational basis from which physicians draw information used to adapt their therapeutic practices. Critical reading and analysis of trials involves the assessment of whether the available data provide enough credible evidence that the treatment will result in a clinically significant and relevant improvement. Evaluating the quality of a clinical trial is a process that draws upon sometimes complex methodological and statistical concepts, with which the reader should nonetheless be familiar in order to come to impartial conclusions regarding the raw data presented in the clinical trials. The goal of the current article is to review the methodological and statistical concepts required for the design and interpretation of clinical trials, so as to allow for a critical analysis of publications or presentations of clinical trials. The first section describes the major methodological principles of clinical trial design required for a rigorous evaluation of the treatment benefit, as well as the various pitfalls or biases that could lead to erroneous conclusions. The second section briefly describes the main statistical tests used in clinical trials, as well as certain situations that may increase the risk of false positive findings (type 1 error), such as multiple, subgroup, intermediate and non-inferiority analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Phases of Clinical Trials Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Surgery Radiation Therapy Chemotherapy Immunotherapy Targeted Therapy Hormone Therapy Stem Cell Transplant Precision ...

  20. Repeated nebulisation of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, Eric W F W; Armstrong, David K; Ashby, Deborah; Bayfield, Katie J; Bilton, Diana; Bloomfield, Emily V; Boyd, A Christopher; Brand, June; Buchan, Ruaridh; Calcedo, Roberto; Carvelli, Paula; Chan, Mario; Cheng, Seng H; Collie, D David S; Cunningham, Steve; Davidson, Heather E; Davies, Gwyneth; Davies, Jane C; Davies, Lee A; Dewar, Maria H; Doherty, Ann; Donovan, Jackie; Dwyer, Natalie S; Elgmati, Hala I; Featherstone, Rosanna F; Gavino, Jemyr; Gea-Sorli, Sabrina; Geddes, Duncan M; Gibson, James S R; Gill, Deborah R; Greening, Andrew P; Griesenbach, Uta; Hansell, David M; Harman, Katharine; Higgins, Tracy E; Hodges, Samantha L; Hyde, Stephen C; Hyndman, Laura; Innes, J Alastair; Jacob, Joseph; Jones, Nancy; Keogh, Brian F; Limberis, Maria P; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Maclean, Alan W; Manvell, Michelle C; McCormick, Dominique; McGovern, Michael; McLachlan, Gerry; Meng, Cuixiang; Montero, M Angeles; Milligan, Hazel; Moyce, Laura J; Murray, Gordon D; Nicholson, Andrew G; Osadolor, Tina; Parra-Leiton, Javier; Porteous, David J; Pringle, Ian A; Punch, Emma K; Pytel, Kamila M; Quittner, Alexandra L; Rivellini, Gina; Saunders, Clare J; Scheule, Ronald K; Sheard, Sarah; Simmonds, Nicholas J; Smith, Keith; Smith, Stephen N; Soussi, Najwa; Soussi, Samia; Spearing, Emma J; Stevenson, Barbara J; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie G; Turkkila, Minna; Ureta, Rosa P; Waller, Michael D; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Wilson, James M; Wolstenholme-Hogg, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Lung delivery of plasmid DNA encoding the CFTR gene complexed with a cationic liposome is a potential treatment option for patients with cystic fibrosis. We aimed to assess the efficacy of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis. Methods We did this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial in two cystic fibrosis centres with patients recruited from 18 sites in the UK. Patients (aged ≥12 years) with a forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 50–90% predicted and any combination of CFTR mutations, were randomly assigned, via a computer-based randomisation system, to receive 5 mL of either nebulised pGM169/GL67A gene–liposome complex or 0·9% saline (placebo) every 28 days (plus or minus 5 days) for 1 year. Randomisation was stratified by % predicted FEV1 (<70 vs ≥70%), age (<18 vs ≥18 years), inclusion in the mechanistic substudy, and dosing site (London or Edinburgh). Participants and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was the relative change in % predicted FEV1. The primary analysis was per protocol. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01621867. Findings Between June 12, 2012, and June 24, 2013, we randomly assigned 140 patients to receive placebo (n=62) or pGM169/GL67A (n=78), of whom 116 (83%) patients comprised the per-protocol population. We noted a significant, albeit modest, treatment effect in the pGM169/GL67A group versus placebo at 12 months' follow-up (3·7%, 95% CI 0·1–7·3; p=0·046). This outcome was associated with a stabilisation of lung function in the pGM169/GL67A group compared with a decline in the placebo group. We recorded no significant difference in treatment-attributable adverse events between groups. Interpretation Monthly application of the pGM169/GL67A gene therapy formulation was associated with a significant, albeit modest, benefit in FEV1 compared with placebo at 1 year, indicating a stabilisation of

  1. Randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimer, C; Lødrup, A B; Smith, G;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many reflux patients remain symptomatic on a standard dose of proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Alginates decrease the number of reflux events by forming a raft on top of the stomach content and thus offer a supplemental mechanism of action to acid suppression. AIM: To assess the efficacy...... of an alginate (Gaviscon Advance, Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, UK) on reflux symptoms in patients with persistent symptoms despite once daily PPI. METHODS: This was a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled, 7-day double-blind trial preceded by a 7-day run-in period. Reflux symptoms were assessed using......: In patients with residual reflux symptoms despite PPI treatment, adding an alginate offers additional decrease in the burden of reflux symptoms (EudraCT/IND Number: 2011-005486-21)....

  2. Trial encoding algorithms ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lipin Bill; Yeh, Ren Jye

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes trial algorithms for some basic components in cryptography and lossless bit compression. The symmetric encryption is accomplished by mixing up randomizations and scrambling with hashing of the key playing an essential role. The digital signature is adapted from the Hill cipher with the verification key matrices incorporating un-invertible parts to hide the signature matrix. The hash is a straight running summation (addition chain) of data bytes plus some randomization. One simplified version can be burst error correcting code. The lossless bit compressor is the Shannon-Fano coding that is less optimal than the later Huffman and Arithmetic coding, but can be conveniently implemented without the use of a tree structure and improvable with bytes concatenation.

  3. The CYTONOX trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Christina; Mikus, Gerd; Christensen, Hanne Rolighed;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In Denmark, it is estimated that 3-5% of children are obese. Obesity is associated with pathophysiological alterations that may lead to alterations in the pharmacokinetics of drugs. In adults, obesity was found to influence important drug-metabolising enzyme pathways. The impact......, CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 in obese and non-obese children. The results are expected to be used in the future as a basis for drug dosing recommendations in obese children. FUNDING: The study was funded by the Danish Regions' "Medicinpuljen". The funder had no role in study design, data collection and analysis...... of obesity-related alterations on drug metabolism and its consequences for drug dosing remains largely unknown in both children and adults. An altered drug metabolism may contribute significantly to therapeutic failure or toxicity. The aim of this trial is to investigate the in vivo activity of CYP3A4, CYP2E...

  4. Defendants' Rights in Criminal Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ralph C., II; Keeley, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the protections afforded by the Constitution for defendants in criminal trials. These include the right to a jury trial (in cases of possible incarceration), an impartial jury, and the requirement of a unanimous verdict. Defends the use of plea bargaining as essential to an efficient criminal justice system. (MJP)

  5. LTDNA Evidence on Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Adopting the interpretative/hermeneutical method typical of much legal scholarship, this article considers two sets of issues pertaining to LTDNA profiles as evidence in criminal proceedings. The section titled Expert Evidence as Forensic Epistemic Warrant addresses some rather large questions about the epistemic status and probative value of expert testimony in general. It sketches a theoretical model of expert evidence, highlighting five essential criteria: (1) expert competence; (2) disciplinary domain; (3) methodological validity; (4) materiality; and (5) legal admissibility. This generic model of expert authority, highlighting law's fundamentally normative character, applies to all modern forms of criminal adjudication, across Europe and farther afield. The section titled LTDNA Evidence in UK Criminal Trials then examines English and Northern Irish courts' attempts to get to grips with LTDNA evidence in recent cases. Better appreciating the ways in which UK courts have addressed the challenges of LTDNA evidence may offer some insights into parallel developments in other legal systems. Appellate court rulings follow a predictable judicial logic, which might usefully be studied and reflected upon by any forensic scientist or statistician seeking to operate effectively in criminal proceedings. Whilst each legal jurisdiction has its own unique blend of jurisprudence, institutions, cultures and historical traditions, there is considerable scope for comparative analysis and cross-jurisdictional borrowing and instruction. In the spirit of promoting more nuanced and sophisticated international interdisciplinary dialogue, this article examines UK judicial approaches to LTDNA evidence and begins to elucidate their underlying institutional logic. Legal argument and broader policy debates are not confined to considerations of scientific validity, contamination risks and evidential integrity, or associated judgments of legal admissibility or exclusion. They also crucially

  6. Neuromuscular exercise and back counselling for female nursing personnel with recurrent non-specific low back pain: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial (NURSE-RCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suni, Jaana H; Rinne, Marjo; Kankaanpää, Markku; Taulaniemi, Annika; Lusa, Sirpa; Lindholm, Harri; Parkkari, Jari

    2016-01-01

    Nursing personnel have high risk for incidence of low back pain (LBP) followed by development of chronic pain and disability. Multiple risk factors such as patient handling, night shift work and lack of supporting work culture have been identified. In subacute LBP, high-fear avoidance is prognostic for more pain, disability and not returning to work. Lack of leisure-time physical activity predicts long-term sickness absence. The purpose of this study is to compare effectiveness of 6-month neuromuscular exercise and counselling in treating back pain in female nursing personnel with recurrent non-specific LBP pain compared with either (exercise or counselling) alone and a non-treatment control group. The design is of a double-blinded four-arm randomised controlled trial with cost-effectiveness evaluation at 12 and 24 months. The study is conducted in 3 consecutive substudies. The main eligibility criteria are experience of LBP during the past 4 weeks with intensity of at least 2 (Numeric Rating Scale 0-10) and engagement in patient handling. Sample size was estimated for the primary outcome of pain intensity (visual analogue scale). Study measurements are outlined according to the model of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, which incorporates the biopsychosocial processes assessed. This study is carried out conforming to the guidelines of good scientific practice and provisions of the declaration of Helsinki. Increasing physical and mental capacity with interventions taking place immediately after working hours near the worksite may reduce development of chronic LBP and work disability in female nursing personnel with recurrent non-specific LBP. NCT04165698.

  7. Effects of total dietary polyphenols on plasma nitric oxide and blood pressure in a high cardiovascular risk cohort. The PREDIMED randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Remón, A; Tresserra-Rimbau, A; Pons, A; Tur, J A; Martorell, M; Ros, E; Buil-Cosiales, P; Sacanella, E; Covas, M I; Corella, D; Salas-Salvadó, J; Gómez-Gracia, E; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, V; Ortega-Calvo, M; García-Valdueza, M; Arós, F; Saez, G T; Serra-Majem, L; Pinto, X; Vinyoles, E; Estruch, R; Lamuela-Raventos, R M

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the main cardiovascular risk factors in the elderly. The aims of this work were to evaluate if a one-year intervention with two Mediterranean diets (Med-diet) could decrease blood pressure (BP) due to a high polyphenol consumption, and if the decrease in BP was mediated by plasma nitric oxide (NO) production. An intervention substudy of 200 participants at high cardiovascular risk was carried out within the PREDIMED trial. They were randomly assigned to a low-fat control diet or to two Med-diets, one supplemented with extra virgin olive oil (Med-EVOO) and the other with nuts (Med-nuts). Anthropometrics and clinical parameters were measured at baseline and after one year of intervention, as well as BP, plasma NO and total polyphenol excretion (TPE) in urine samples. Systolic and diastolic BP decreased significantly after a one-year dietary intervention with Med-EVOO and Med-nuts. These changes were associated with a significant increase in TPE and plasma NO. Additionally, a significant positive correlation was observed between changes in urinary TPE, a biomarker of TP intake, and in plasma NO (Beta = 4.84; 95% CI: 0.57-9.10). TPE in spot urine sample was positively correlated with plasma NO in Med-diets supplemented with either EVOO or nuts. The statistically significant increases in plasma NO were associated with a reduction in systolic and diastolic BP levels, adding to the growing evidence that polyphenols might protect the cardiovascular system by improving the endothelial function and enhancing endothelial synthesis of NO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Weight and Lean Body Mass Change with Antiretroviral Initiation and Impact on Bone Mineral Density: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5224s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, Kristine Mace; Kitch, Douglas; Tierney, Camlin; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Tebas, Pablo; Melbourne, Kathleen; Ha, Belinda; Jahed, Nasreen C.; Mccomsey, Grace A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effect initiating different antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens have on weight, body mass index (BMI), and lean body mass (LBM) and explore how changes in body composition are associated with bone mineral density (BMD). Methods A5224s was a substudy of A5202, a prospective trial of 1857 ART-naïve participants randomized to blinded abacavir-lamivudine (ABC/3TC) or tenofovir DF-emtricitabine (TDF/FTC) with open-label efavirenz (EFV) or atazanavir-ritonavir (ATV/r). All subjects underwent dual-energy absorptiometry (DXA) and abdominal CT for body composition. Analyses used 2-sample t-tests and linear regression. Results A5224s included 269 subjects: 85% male, 47% white non-Hispanic, median age 38 years, HIV-1 RNA 4.6 log10 copies/mL, and CD4 233 cells/µL. Overall, significant gains occurred in weight, BMI, and LBM at 96 weeks post randomization (all p<0.001). Assignment to ATV/r (vs EFV) resulted in significantly greater weight (mean difference 3.35 kg) and BMI gain (0.88 kg/m2; both p=0.02), but not LBM (0.67 kg; p=0.15), while ABC/3TC and TDF/FTC were not significantly different (p≥0.10). In multivariable analysis, only lower baseline CD4 count and higher HIV-1 RNA were associated with greater increase in weight, BMI, or LBM. In multivariable analyses, increased LBM was associated with an increased hip BMD. Conclusions ABC/3TC vs. TDF/FTC did not differ in change in weight, BMI, or LBM; ATV/r vs. EFV resulted in greater weight and BMI gain but not LBM. A positive association between increased LBM and increased hip BMD should be further investigated through prospective interventional studies to verify the impact of increased LBM on hip BMD. PMID:24384588

  9. Influence of alpha-1 glycoprotein acid concentrations and variants on atazanavir pharmacokinetics in HIV-infected patients included in the ANRS 107 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrail-Tran, A; Mentré, F; Cosson, C; Piketty, C; Chazallon, C; Gérard, L; Girard, P M; Taburet, A M

    2010-02-01

    Atazanavir is an HIV-1 protease inhibitor with high protein binding in human plasma. The objectives were first to determine the in vitro binding characteristics of atazanavir and second to evaluate whether plasma protein binding to albumin and alpha-1 glycoprotein acid (AAG) influences the pharmacokinetics of atazanavir in HIV-infected patients. For the in vitro study, atazanavir protein binding characteristics were determined in AAG- and albumin-containing purified solutions. Atazanavir was found to bind AAG on a high-affinity saturable site (association constant, 4.61x10(5) liters/mol) and albumin on a low-affinity nonsaturable site. For the in vivo study, blood samples from 51 patients included in trial ANRS 107--Puzzle 2 were drawn prior to drug intake at week 6. For 10 patients included in the pharmacokinetic substudy, five additional blood samples were collected during one dosing interval at week 6. Atazanavir concentrations were assayed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Albumin concentrations, AAG concentrations, and phenotypes were also measured in these patients. Concentrations of atazanavir were modeled using a population approach. A one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination best described atazanavir pharmacokinetics. Atazanavir pharmacokinetic parameters and their interindividual variabilities were as follows: absorption rate constant (ka), 0.73 h(-1) (139.3%); apparent clearance (CL/F), 13.3 liters/h (26.7%); and apparent volume of distribution (V/F), 79.7 liters (27.0%). Atazanavir CL/F decreased significantly when alanine aminotransferase and/or AAG levels increased (P<0.01). The ORM1*S phenotype also significantly increased atazanavir V/F (P<0.05). These in vivo results indicate that atazanavir pharmacokinetics is moderately influenced by its protein binding, especially to AAG, without expected clinical consequences.

  10. Baseline NT-proBNP and biomarkers of inflammation and necrosis in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: insights from the APEX-AMI trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Sean; Roe, Matthew T; Lopes, Renato D; Stebbins, Amanda; James, Stefan; Newby, L Kristin; Moliterno, David J; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Hochman, Judith S; Hamm, Christian W; Armstrong, Paul W; Theroux, Pierre; Granger, Christopher B

    2012-07-01

    Coronary plaque rupture is associated with a systemic inflammatory response. The relationship between baseline N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), a prognostic marker in patients with acute coronary syndromes, and systemic inflammatory mediators in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is not well described. Of 5,745 STEMI patients treated with primary PCI in the APEX-AMI trial, we evaluated the relationship between baseline NT-proBNP levels and baseline levels of inflammatory markers and markers of myonecrosis in a subset of 772 who were enrolled in a biomarker substudy. Spearman correlations (r (s)) were calculated between baseline NT-proBNP levels and a panel of ten systemic inflammatory biomarkers. Interleukin (IL)-6, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was significantly positively correlated with NT-proBNP (r (s) = 0.317, P < 0.001). In a sensitivity analysis excluding all heart failure patients, the correlation between baseline IL-6 and NT-proBNP remained significant (n = 651, r (s) = 0.296, P < 0.001). A positive association was also observed with high sensitivity C-reactive protein (r (s) = 0.377, P < 0.001) and there was a weak negative correlation with the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 (r (s) = -0.109, P = 0.003). No other significant correlations were observed among the other testes inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI, the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was modestly correlated with baseline NT-proBNP levels. This relationship remained significant in patients without heart failure. This finding is consistent with pre-clinical and clinical research suggesting that systemic inflammation may influence NT-proBNP expression independently of myocardial stretch.

  11. Risk compensation is not associated with male circumcision in Kisumu, Kenya: a multi-faceted assessment of men enrolled in a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L Mattson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs have confirmed that male circumcision (MC significantly reduces acquisition of HIV-1 infection among men. The objective of this study was to perform a comprehensive, prospective evaluation of risk compensation, comparing circumcised versus uncircumcised controls in a sample of RCT participants. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Between March 2004 and September 2005, we systematically recruited men enrolled in a RCT of MC in Kenya. Detailed sexual histories were taken using a modified Timeline Followback approach at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Participants provided permission to obtain circumcision status and laboratory results from the RCT. We evaluated circumcised and uncircumcised men's sexual behavior using an 18-item risk propensity score and acquisition of incident infections of gonorrhea, chlamydia, and trichomoniasis. Of 1780 eligible RCT participants, 1319 enrolled (response rate = 74%. At the baseline RCT visit, men who enrolled in the sub-study reported the same sexual behaviors as men who did not. We found a significant reduction in sexual risk behavior among both circumcised and uncircumcised men from baseline to 6 (p<0.01 and 12 (p = 0.05 months post-enrollment. Longitudinal analyses indicated no statistically significant differences between sexual risk propensity scores or in incident infections of gonorrhea, chlamydia, and trichomoniasis between circumcised and uncircumcised men. These results are based on the most comprehensive analysis of risk compensation yet done. CONCLUSION: In the context of a RCT, circumcision did not result in increased HIV risk behavior. Continued monitoring and evaluation of risk compensation associated with circumcision is needed as evidence supporting its' efficacy is disseminated and MC is widely promoted for HIV prevention.

  12. Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about actively enrolling, ongoing, and completed clinical trials of cancer prevention, early detection, and supportive care, including phase I, II, and III agent and action trials and clinical trials management. |

  13. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ... to HIV Can anyone participate in an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? It depends on the study. Some ...

  14. Frailty Intervention Trial (FIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockwood Keri

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frailty is a term commonly used to describe the condition of an older person who has chronic health problems, has lost functional abilities and is likely to deteriorate further. However, despite its common use, only a small number of studies have attempted to define the syndrome of frailty and measure its prevalence. The criteria Fried and colleagues used to define the frailty syndrome will be used in this study (i.e. weight loss, fatigue, decreased grip strength, slow gait speed, and low physical activity. Previous studies have shown that clinical outcomes for frail older people can be improved using multi-factorial interventions such as comprehensive geriatric assessment, and single interventions such as exercise programs or nutritional supplementation, but no interventions have been developed to specifically reverse the syndrome of frailty. We have developed a multidisciplinary intervention that specifically targets frailty as defined by Fried et al. We aim to establish the effects of this intervention on frailty, mobility, hospitalisation and institutionalisation in frail older people. Methods and Design A single centre randomised controlled trial comparing a multidisciplinary intervention with usual care. The intervention will target identified characteristics of frailty, functional limitations, nutritional status, falls risk, psychological issues and management of chronic health conditions. Two hundred and thirty people aged 70 and over who meet the Fried definition of frailty will be recruited from clients of the aged care service of a metropolitan hospital. Participants will be followed for a 12-month period. Discussion This research is an important step in the examination of specifically targeted frailty interventions. This project will assess whether an intervention specifically targeting frailty can be implemented, and whether it is effective when compared to usual care. If successful, the study will establish a

  15. Social media in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Social media has potential in clinical trials for pointing out trial issues, addressing barriers, educating, and engaging multiple groups involved in cancer clinical research. Social media is being used in clinical trials to highlight issues such as poor accrual and barriers; educate potential participants and physicians about clinical trial options; and is a potential indirect or direct method to improve accrual. We are moving from a passive "push" of information to patients to a "pull" of patients requesting information. Patients and advocates are often driving an otherwise reluctant health care system into communication. Online patient communities are creating new information repositories. Potential clinical trial participants are using the Twittersphere and other sources to learn about potential clinical trial options. We are seeing more organized patient-centric and patient-engaged forums with the potential to crowd source to improve clinical trial accrual and design. This is an evolving process that will meet many individual, institutional, and regulatory obstacles as we move forward in a changed research landscape.

  16. Aortic root geometry in aortic stenosis patients (a SEAS substudy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahlmann, Edda; Nienaber, Christoph A; Cramariuc, Dana

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: To report aortic root geometry by echocardiography in a large population of healthy, asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) patients in relation to current vendor-specified requirements for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). METHODS AND RESULTS: Baseline data in 1481 patients...... with asymptomatic AS (mean age 67 years, 39% women) in the Simvastatin Ezetimibe in AS study were used. The inner aortic diameter was measured at four levels: annulus, sinus of Valsalva, sinotubular junction and supracoronary, and sinus height as the annulo-junctional distance. Analyses were based on vendor......-specified requirements for the aortic root geometry for current available prostheses, CoreValve and Edwards-Sapien. The ratio of sinus of Valsalva height to sinus width was 1:2. In multivariate linear regression analysis, larger sinus of Valsalva height was associated with older age, larger sinus of Valsalva diameter...

  17. Casualty Estimation Sub-Study: Disease and Nonbattle Injury Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    visits (15.39/1000/day). Of these, 110 (10%) were defined as heat exhaustion and another 176 (16%) as heat related. Trauma accounted for 36 percent of...rates for dental and other specific conditions are shown in Table 7. The respective disease to trauma ratios were 1.5:1, 1:1.5, and 1:1 for Irwin 1...combat non-effectiveness is largely unknown. Quantitative information from historical data has been sufficient only in the area of maxilofacial injury

  18. CCR2 and coronary artery disease: a woscops substudy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Ian C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several lines of evidence support a role for CCL2 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and its receptor CCR2 in the development of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the association of the CCR2 Val64Ile polymorphism with the development of coronary artery disease in the WOSCOPS study sample set. Findings A total of 443 cases and 1003 controls from the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS were genotyped for the Val64Ile polymorphism in the CCR2 gene. Genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls. The CCR2 Val64Ile polymorphism was found not to be associated with coronary events in this study population (odds ratio 1.15, 95% CI 0.82-1.61, p = 0.41. Conclusions This case-control study does not support an association of the CCR2 Val64Ile polymorphism with coronary artery disease in the WOSCOPS sample set and does not confirm a possible protective role for CCR2 Val64Ile in the development of coronary artery disease.

  19. Acute Stroke | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n(s) being investigated Acute Stroke MedDRA Classification E.1.3Condition being s... General Information on the Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical conditio

  20. Trial analytics--a tool for clinical trial management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Anindya; Das, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged timelines and large expenses associated with clinical trials have prompted a new focus on improving the operational efficiency of clinical trials by use of Clinical Trial Management Systems (CTMS) in order to improve managerial control in trial conduct. However, current CTMS systems are not able to meet the expectations due to various shortcomings like inability of timely reporting and trend visualization within/beyond an organization. To overcome these shortcomings of CTMS, clinical researchers can apply a business intelligence (BI) framework to create Clinical Research Intelligence (CLRI) for optimization of data collection and analytics. This paper proposes the usage of an innovative and collaborative visualization tool (CTA) as CTMS "add-on" to help overwhelm these deficiencies of traditional CTMS, with suitable examples.

  1. Designing clinical trials for amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jonathan M

    2015-09-01

    Randomized clinical trial (RCT) study design leads to one of the highest levels of evidence, and is a preferred study design over cohort studies, because randomization reduces bias and maximizes the chance that even unknown confounding factors will be balanced between treatment groups. Recent randomized clinical trials and observational studies in amblyopia can be taken together to formulate an evidence-based approach to amblyopia treatment, which is presented in this review. When designing future clinical studies of amblyopia treatment, issues such as regression to the mean, sample size and trial duration must be considered, since each may impact study results and conclusions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Data fraud in clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Stephen L; Buyse, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Highly publicized cases of fabrication or falsification of data in clinical trials have occurred in recent years and it is likely that there are additional undetected or unreported cases. We review the available evidence on the incidence of data fraud in clinical trials, describe several prominent cases, present information on motivation and contributing factors and discuss cost-effective ways of early detection of data fraud as part of routine central statistical monitoring of data quality. Adoption of these clinical trial monitoring procedures can identify potential data fraud not detected by conventional on-site monitoring and can improve overall data quality. PMID:25729561

  3. Bayes' postulate for trinomial trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, M. A.; Polpo, A.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss Bayes' postulate and its interpretation. We extend the binomial trial method proposed by de Finetti [1] to trinomial trials, for which we argue that the consideration of equiprobability a priori for the possible outcomes of the trinomial trials implies that the parameter vector has Dirichlet(1,1) as prior. Based on this result, we agree with Stigler [2] in that the notion in Bayes' postulate stating "absolutely know nothing" is related to the possible outcomes of an experiment and not to "non-information" about the parameter.

  4. Registration of randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østervig, R M; Sonne, A; Rasmussen, L S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Registration of interventional studies is necessary according to the Declaration of Helsinki but implementation has been a challenge for many journals. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica (Acta) requires registration for studies conducted after January 1(st) 2010. We aimed to assess...... registered when it could be verified that patient enrolment was started after registration in a trial registry. RESULTS: We identified 200 RCTs. Dates for patient enrolment were not specified in 51 (25.5%). The proportion of correctly registered trials increased significantly from 17.1% (19/111) for trials...

  5. The Dynamo Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamo Clinical Trial evaluates long-term stellar magnetic health through periodic X-ray examinations (by the Chandra Observatory). So far, there are only three subjects enrolled in the DTC: Alpha Centauri A (a solar-like G dwarf), Alpha Cen B (an early K dwarf, more active than the Sun), and Alpha Canis Majoris A (Procyon, a mid-F subgiant similar in activity to the Sun). Of these, Procyon is a new candidate, so it is too early to judge how it will fare. Of the other two, Alpha Cen B has responded well, with a steady magnetic heartbeat of about 8 years duration. The sickest of the bunch, Alpha Cen A, was in magnetic cardiac arrest during 2005-2010, but has begun responding to treatment in recent years, and seems to be successfully cycling again, perhaps achieving a new peak of magnetic health in the 2016 time frame. If this is the case, it has been 20 years since A's last healthful peak, significantly longer than the middle-aged Sun's 11-year magnetic heartbeat, but perhaps in line with Alpha Cen A's more senescent state (in terms of "relative evolutionary age," apparently an important driver of activity). (By the way, don't miss the exciting movie of the Alpha Cen stars' 20-year X-ray dance.)

  6. GAUSS Project Trials Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fazio, Antonella; Vernucci, Antonio; Rossini, Eugenio

    2003-07-01

    the Consortium Partners. The former ones constitute the ground and space segments, the latter ones include the advanced user terminal and the applications. The assembled system was used as test-bed during the trail campaign, to validate and prove the provided services and developed applications.The GAUSS Demonstrator includes the following components:ß The Mobile User Terminal installed on a car (van) or on a boat. An innovative multi-mode user equipment was developed, consisting of the following main components:- An integrated NAV / COM digital receive front-end (DFRE), able to de-multiplex the NAV signals (the current GNSS1 band and the simulated Galileo bands), and the COM signal in the S-UMTS band;- For COM: a transmit front-end, and a baseband & control section operating in CDMA and supporting the upper protocol layers (UMTS packet transmission standard based - for short packet); a RF subsystem, including the L→S bands conversion;- For NAV: a GNSS (GPS, EGNOS) navigation receiver, the GNSS1 System (MTB - Mediterranean Test bed, ESTB / EGNOS System Test Bed) for navigation;* The Communication capacity on the INMARSAT 3F5 Satellite* The Gateway, located in LARIO Telespazio premises* The Lario07 Station* The Service Centre* The Service Provider.The GAUSS Demonstrator reflects all the main elements of a complete user platform for service provisioning: mobility assistance, safety and transport efficient management are the core of the developed applications. Applications were developed, specifically to provide reliable and effective services to the citizens: road info-mobility and fleet management, inland waterways vessel traffic management and information, port/terminals appointment monitoring & control, dangerous goods transhipment supervision, emergency assistance.A trial campaign, run into real environments, was performed in Summer 2002. GAUSS Demonstrator performances and benefits were validated with the direct involvement of an inter-modal transport user

  7. Modelling trial-by-trial changes in the mismatch negativity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falk Lieder

    Full Text Available The mismatch negativity (MMN is a differential brain response to violations of learned regularities. It has been used to demonstrate that the brain learns the statistical structure of its environment and predicts future sensory inputs. However, the algorithmic nature of these computations and the underlying neurobiological implementation remain controversial. This article introduces a mathematical framework with which competing ideas about the computational quantities indexed by MMN responses can be formalized and tested against single-trial EEG data. This framework was applied to five major theories of the MMN, comparing their ability to explain trial-by-trial changes in MMN amplitude. Three of these theories (predictive coding, model adjustment, and novelty detection were formalized by linking the MMN to different manifestations of the same computational mechanism: approximate Bayesian inference according to the free-energy principle. We thereby propose a unifying view on three distinct theories of the MMN. The relative plausibility of each theory was assessed against empirical single-trial MMN amplitudes acquired from eight healthy volunteers in a roving oddball experiment. Models based on the free-energy principle provided more plausible explanations of trial-by-trial changes in MMN amplitude than models representing the two more traditional theories (change detection and adaptation. Our results suggest that the MMN reflects approximate Bayesian learning of sensory regularities, and that the MMN-generating process adjusts a probabilistic model of the environment according to prediction errors.

  8. The lung cancer exercise training study: a randomized trial of aerobic training, resistance training, or both in postsurgical lung cancer patients: rationale and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford Jeffrey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lung Cancer Exercise Training Study (LUNGEVITY is a randomized trial to investigate the efficacy of different types of exercise training on cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak, patient-reported outcomes, and the organ components that govern VO2peak in post-operative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Methods/Design Using a single-center, randomized design, 160 subjects (40 patients/study arm with histologically confirmed stage I-IIIA NSCLC following curative-intent complete surgical resection at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC will be potentially eligible for this trial. Following baseline assessments, eligible participants will be randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (1 aerobic training alone, (2 resistance training alone, (3 the combination of aerobic and resistance training, or (4 attention-control (progressive stretching. The ultimate goal for all exercise training groups will be 3 supervised exercise sessions per week an intensity above 70% of the individually determined VO2peak for aerobic training and an intensity between 60 and 80% of one-repetition maximum for resistance training, for 30-45 minutes/session. Progressive stretching will be matched to the exercise groups in terms of program length (i.e., 16 weeks, social interaction (participants will receive one-on-one instruction, and duration (30-45 mins/session. The primary study endpoint is VO2peak. Secondary endpoints include: patient-reported outcomes (PROs (e.g., quality of life, fatigue, depression, etc. and organ components of the oxygen cascade (i.e., pulmonary function, cardiac function, skeletal muscle function. All endpoints will be assessed at baseline and postintervention (16 weeks. Substudies will include genetic studies regarding individual responses to an exercise stimulus, theoretical determinants of exercise adherence, examination of the psychological mediators of the exercise - PRO relationship, and exercise-induced changes

  9. Robustness of the healthcare utilization results from the Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial (REST evaluating the human-bovine (WC3 reassortant pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Damme Pierre

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Rotavirus Efficacy and Safety Trial was a placebo-controlled Phase III study that evaluated the safety and efficacy of a three-dose pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5 including its effect on healthcare utilization for rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE. The per-protocol (PP analyses, which counted events occurring 14 days after dose 3 among infants without protocol violations, have already been published. This paper evaluates the consistency of the healthcare utilization results based on the modified intention to treat (MITT analyses with the PP analyses. The MITT analyses include all infants receiving at least one dose of vaccine or placebo and follow-up begins after dose 1. The paper also explores the consistency of the results for different subgroups of the study population with different types of surveillance. Methods Data on healthcare utilization for acute gastroenteritis were collected via telephone interviews after administration of the first dose. Parents were either contacted every 6 weeks or every 2 weeks depending on the substudy in which they were enrolled. Those contacted every 2 weeks were also asked to complete symptom diaries. Poisson regression was used to evaluate the effect of RV5 on the rates of RVGE-associated healthcare encounters in all of the analyses. Results In the first 2 years after vaccination, RV5 reduced the combined rate of hospitalizations and emergency department (ED visits 88.9% (95% CI: 84.9, 91.9 for all RVGE regardless of serotype in the MITT analysis compared with a 94.5% (95% CI: 91.2, 96.6 reduction based on the G1-G4 PP analysis. By type of surveillance, the rate reductions for the G1-G4 PP analysis were 91.0% (95% CI: 81.7, 95.5 and 95.9% (95% CI: 92.2, 97.8 among parents contacted every 2 weeks (number evaluable = 4,451 and every 6 weeks (number evaluable = 52,683 respectively. Conclusions Our analyses demonstrated that the effect of RV5 on reducing the rate of hospitalizations

  10. Role of baseline HIV-1 DNA level in highly-experienced patients receiving raltegravir, etravirine and darunavir/ritonavir regimen (ANRS139 TRIO trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Charpentier

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In the ANRS 139 TRIO trial, the use of 3 new active drugs (raltegravir, etravirine, and darunavir/ritonavir, resulted in a potent and sustained inhibition of viral replication in multidrug-resistant treatment-experienced patients. The aim of this virological sub-study of the ANRS 139 TRIO trial was to assess: (i the evolution of HIV-1 DNA over the first year; and (ii the association between baseline HIV-1 DNA and virological outcome. METHODS: Among the 103 HIV-1-infected patients included in the ANRS-139 TRIO trial, HIV-1 DNA specimens were available for 92, 84, 88, and 83 patients at Week (W0, W12, W24, and W48, respectively. Quantification of total HIV-1 DNA was performed by using the commercial kit "Generic HIV DNA Cell" (Biocentric, Bandol, France. RESULTS: Baseline median HIV-1 DNA of patients displaying virological success (n= 61, viral blip (n= 20, and virological failure (n = 11 were 2.34 log(10 copies/10(6 PBMC (IQR= 2.15-2.66, 2.42 (IQR = 2.12-2.48, and 2.68 (IQR= 2.46-2.83, respectively. Although not statistically significant, patients exhibiting virological success or viral blip had a tendency to display lower baseline HIV-1 DNA than patients experiencing virological failure (P = 0.06. Median decrease of HIV-1 DNA between baseline and W48 was -0.13 log(10 copies/10(6 PBMC (IQR = -0.34 to +0.10, mainly explained by the evolution from W0 to W4. No more changes were observed in the W4-W48 period. CONCLUSIONS: In highly-experienced multidrug-resistant patients, HIV-1 DNA slightly decreased during the first month and then remained stable during the first year of highly potent antiretroviral regimen. In this population, baseline HIV-1 DNA might help to better predict the virological response and to tailor clinical therapeutic management as more aggressive therapeutic choices in patients with higher baseline HIV-1 DNA.

  11. MOSAIC (MOthers' Advocates In the Community: protocol and sample description of a cluster randomised trial of mentor mother support to reduce intimate partner violence among pregnant or recent mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taft Angela J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV is prevalent globally, experienced by a significant minority of women in the early childbearing years and is harmful to the mental and physical health of women and children. There are very few studies with rigorous designs which have tested the effectiveness of IPV interventions to improve the health and wellbeing of abused women. Evidence for the separate benefit to victims of social support, advocacy and non-professional mentoring suggested that a combined model may reduce the levels of violence, the associated mental health damage and may increase a woman's health, safety and connection with her children. This paper describes the development, design and implementation of a trial of mentor mother support set in primary care, including baseline characteristics of participating women. Methods/Design MOSAIC (MOtherS' Advocates In the Community was a cluster randomised trial embedded in general practice and maternal and child health (MCH nursing services in disadvantaged suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. Women who were pregnant or with infants, identified as abused or symptomatic of abuse, were referred by IPV-trained GPs and MCH nurses from 24 general practices and eight nurse teams from January 2006 to December 2007. Women in the intervention arm received up to 12 months support from trained and supported non-professional mentor mothers. Vietnamese health professionals also referred Vietnamese women to bilingual mentors in a sub-study. Baseline and follow-up surveys at 12 months measured IPV (CAS, depression (EPDS, general health (SF-36, social support (MOS-SF and attachment to children (PSI-SF. Significant development and piloting occurred prior to trial commencement. Implementation interviews with MCH nurses, GPs and mentors assisted further refinement of the intervention. In-depth interviews with participants and mentors, and follow-up surveys of MCH nurses and GPs at trial conclusion will

  12. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training ...

  13. National Lung Screening Trial (NLST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), a research study sponsored by the National Cancer Institute that used low-dose helical CT scans or chest X-ray to screen men and women at risk for lung cancer.

  14. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cancer Research and Discovery Stories of Discovery R&D Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data ... about some of NCI's major research initiatives R&D Resources Tools and data sets for researchers Research ...

  15. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer ... Therapy Chemotherapy Immunotherapy Targeted Therapy Hormone Therapy Stem Cell Transplant Precision Medicine Side Effects Clinical Trials Information ...

  16. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Report (RPPR) Grant Closeout Grant Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts ...

  17. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... Report (RPPR) Grant Closeout Grant Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts ...

  18. Frailty Intervention Trial (FIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhall, Nicola; Aggar, Christina; Kurrle, Susan E; Sherrington, Catherine; Lord, Stephen; Lockwood, Keri; Monaghan, Noeline; Cameron, Ian D

    2008-10-13

    Frailty is a term commonly used to describe the condition of an older person who has chronic health problems, has lost functional abilities and is likely to deteriorate further. However, despite its common use, only a small number of studies have attempted to define the syndrome of frailty and measure its prevalence. The criteria Fried and colleagues used to define the frailty syndrome will be used in this study (i.e. weight loss, fatigue, decreased grip strength, slow gait speed, and low physical activity). Previous studies have shown that clinical outcomes for frail older people can be improved using multi-factorial interventions such as comprehensive geriatric assessment, and single interventions such as exercise programs or nutritional supplementation, but no interventions have been developed to specifically reverse the syndrome of frailty.We have developed a multidisciplinary intervention that specifically targets frailty as defined by Fried et al. We aim to establish the effects of this intervention on frailty, mobility, hospitalisation and institutionalisation in frail older people. A single centre randomised controlled trial comparing a multidisciplinary intervention with usual care. The intervention will target identified characteristics of frailty, functional limitations, nutritional status, falls risk, psychological issues and management of chronic health conditions. Two hundred and thirty people aged 70 and over who meet the Fried definition of frailty will be recruited from clients of the aged care service of a metropolitan hospital. Participants will be followed for a 12-month period. This research is an important step in the examination of specifically targeted frailty interventions. This project will assess whether an intervention specifically targeting frailty can be implemented, and whether it is effective when compared to usual care. If successful, the study will establish a new approach to the treatment of older people at risk of further

  19. LTDNA Evidence on Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Roberts

    2016-10-01

    factfinders in criminal trials.

  20. Birth Control in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J.; Beyer, B. K.; Chadwick, K.; De Schaepdrijver, L.; Desai, M.; Enright, B.; Foster, W.; Hui, J. Y.; Moffat, G. J.; Tornesi, B.; Van Malderen, K.; Wiesner, L.; Chen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee sponsored a pharmaceutical industry survey on current industry practices for contraception use during clinical trials. The objectives of the survey were to improve our understanding of the current industry practices for contraception requirements in clinical trials, the governance processes set up to promote consistency and/or compliance with contraception requirements, and the effectiveness of current contraception practices in preventing pregnancies during clinical trials. Opportunities for improvements in current practices were also considered. The survey results from 12 pharmaceutical companies identified significant variability among companies with regard to contraception practices and governance during clinical trials. This variability was due primarily to differences in definitions, areas of scientific uncertainty or misunderstanding, and differences in company approaches to enrollment in clinical trials. The survey also revealed that few companies collected data in a manner that would allow a retrospective understanding of the reasons for failure of birth control during clinical trials. In this article, suggestions are made for topics where regulatory guidance or scientific publications could facilitate best practice. These include provisions for a pragmatic definition of women of childbearing potential, guidance on how animal data can influence the requirements for male and female birth control, evidence-based guidance on birth control and pregnancy testing regimes suitable for low- and high-risk situations, plus practical methods to ascertain the risk of drug-drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives. PMID:27042398

  1. The state of infectious diseases clinical trials: a systematic review of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Neela D; Pfeiffer, Christopher D; Horton, John R; Chiswell, Karen; Tasneem, Asba; Tsalik, Ephraim L

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of clinical trials informing specific questions faced by infectious diseases (ID) specialists. The ClinicalTrials.gov registry offers an opportunity to evaluate the ID clinical trials portfolio. We examined 40,970 interventional trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov from 2007-2010, focusing on study conditions and interventions to identify ID-related trials. Relevance to ID was manually confirmed for each programmatically identified trial, yielding 3570 ID trials and 37,400 non-ID trials for analysis. The number of ID trials was similar to the number of trials identified as belonging to cardiovascular medicine (n = 3437) or mental health (n = 3695) specialties. Slightly over half of ID trials were treatment-oriented trials (53%, vs. 77% for non-ID trials) followed by prevention (38%, vs. 8% in non-ID trials). ID trials tended to be larger than those of other specialties, with a median enrollment of 125 subjects (interquartile range [IQR], 45-400) vs. 60 (IQR, 30-160) for non-ID trials. Most ID studies are randomized (73%) but nonblinded (56%). Industry was the funding source in 51% of ID trials vs. 10% that were primarily NIH-funded. HIV-AIDS trials constitute the largest subset of ID trials (n = 815 [23%]), followed by influenza vaccine (n = 375 [11%]), and hepatitis C (n = 339 [9%]) trials. Relative to U.S. and global mortality rates, HIV-AIDS and hepatitis C virus trials are over-represented, whereas lower respiratory tract infection trials are under-represented in this large sample of ID clinical trials. This work is the first to characterize ID clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, providing a framework to discuss prioritization, methodology, and policy.

  2. Design, analysis, and presentation of crossover trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyatt Gordon H

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Although crossover trials enjoy wide use, standards for analysis and reporting have not been established. We reviewed methodological aspects and quality of reporting in a representative sample of published crossover trials. Methods We searched MEDLINE for December 2000 and identified all randomized crossover trials. We abstracted data independently, in duplicate, on 14 design criteria, 13 analysis criteria, and 14 criteria assessing the data presentation. Results We identified 526 randomized controlled trials, of which 116 were crossover trials. Trials were drug efficacy (48%, pharmacokinetic (28%, and nonpharmacologic (30%. The median sample size was 15 (interquartile range 8–38. Most (72% trials used 2 treatments and had 2 periods (64%. Few trials reported allocation concealment (17% or sequence generation (7%. Only 20% of trials reported a sample size calculation and only 31% of these considered pairing of data in the calculation. Carry-over issues were addressed in 29% of trial's methods. Most trials reported and defended a washout period (70%. Almost all trials (93% tested for treatment effects using paired data and also presented details on by-group results (95%. Only 29% presented CIs or SE so that data could be entered into a meta-analysis. Conclusion Reports of crossover trials frequently omit important methodological issues in design, analysis, and presentation. Guidelines for the conduct and reporting of crossover trials might improve the conduct and reporting of studies using this important trial design.

  3. Missed Opportunities for TB Investigation in Primary Care Clinics in South Africa: Experience from the XTEND Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violet N Chihota

    Full Text Available 40 primary health clinics (PHCs in four provinces in South Africa, June 2012 -February 2013.To determine whether health care worker (HCW practice in investigating people with TB symptoms was altered when the initial test for TB was changed from smear microscopy to Xpert MTB/RIF.Cross-sectional substudy at clinics participating in a pragmatic cluster randomised trial, Xpert for TB: Evaluating a New Diagnostic "XTEND", which evaluated the effect of Xpert MTB/RIF implementation in South Africa.Consecutive adults exiting PHCs reporting at least one TB symptom (defined as any of cough, weight loss, night sweats and fever were enrolled. The main outcome was the proportion who self-reported having sputum requested by HCW during the clinic encounter just completed.3604 adults exiting PHCs (1676 in Xpert arm, 1928 in microscopy arm were enrolled (median age 38 years, 71.4% female, 38.8% reported being HIV-positive, 70% reported cough. For 1267 participants (35.2% the main reason for attending the clinic was TB symptom(s. Overall 2130/3604 (59.1% said they reported their symptom(s to HCW. 22.7% (818/3604 reported having been asked to give sputum for TB investigation. Though participants in the Xpert vs. microscopy arm were more likely to have sputum requested by HCW, this was not significantly different: overall (26.0% [436/1676] vs 19.8% [382/1928]; adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 1.31, [95% CI 0.78-2.20] and when restricted to those presenting at clinics due to symptoms (49.1% [260/530] vs 29.9% [220/737]; aPR 1.38 [0.89-2.13] and those reporting being HIV-positive (29.4% [190/647] vs 20.8% [156/749]; aPR 1.38[0.88-2.16]. Those attending clinic due to TB symptoms, were more likely to have sputum requested if they had increasing number of symptoms; longer duration of cough, unintentional weight loss and night sweats and if they reported symptoms to HCW.A large proportion of people exiting PHCs reporting TB symptoms did not get tested. Implementation of

  4. Individual component analysis of the multi-parametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance protocol in the CE-MARC trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, David P; Motwani, Manish; Brown, Julia M; Nixon, Jane; Everett, Colin C; Bijsterveld, Petra; Maredia, Neil; Plein, Sven; Greenwood, John P

    2015-07-15

    The CE-MARC study assessed the diagnostic performance investigated the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). The study used a multi-parametric CMR protocol assessing 4 components: i) left ventricular function; ii) myocardial perfusion; iii) viability (late gadolinium enhancement (LGE)) and iv) coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). In this pre-specified CE-MARC sub-study we assessed the diagnostic accuracy of the individual CMR components and their combinations. All patients from the CE-MARC population (n = 752) were included using data from the original blinded-read. The four individual core components of the CMR protocol was determined separately and then in paired and triplet combinations. Results were then compared to the full multi-parametric protocol. CMR and X-ray angiography results were available in 676 patients. The maximum sensitivity for the detection of significant CAD by CMR was achieved when all four components were used (86.5%). Specificity of perfusion (91.8%), function (93.7%) and LGE (95.8%) on its own was significantly better than specificity of the multi-parametric protocol (83.4%) (all P parametric protocol was the optimum to rule-out significant CAD (Likelihood Ratio negative (LR-) 0.16) and the LGE component alone was the best to rue-in CAD (LR+ 9.81). Overall diagnostic accuracy was similar with the full multi-parametric protocol (85.9%) compared to paired and triplet combinations. The use of coronary MRA within the full multi-parametric protocol had no additional diagnostic benefit compared to the perfusion/function/LGE combination (overall accuracy 84.6% vs. 84.2% (P = 0.5316); LR- 0.16 vs. 0.21; LR+ 5.21 vs. 5.77). From this pre-specified sub-analysis of the CE-MARC study, the full multi-parametric protocol had the highest sensitivity and was the optimal approach to rule-out significant CAD. The LGE component alone was the optimal rule-in strategy

  5. Clinical trials. A pending subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Extremera, B; Jiménez-López, P; Mediavilla-García, J D

    2017-07-31

    Clinical trials are essential tools for the progress of clinical medicine in its diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. Since the first trial in 1948, which related tobacco use with lung cancer, there have been more than 150,000 clinical trials to date in various areas (paediatrics, cardiology, oncology, endocrinology, etc.). This article highlights the importance for all physicians to participate, over the course of their professional career, in a clinical trial, due to the inherent benefits for patients, the progress of medicine and for curricular prestige. The authors have created a synthesis of their experience with clinical trials on hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia and ischaemic heart disease over the course of almost 3 decades. Furthermore, a brief reference has been made to the characteristics of a phase I unit, as well as to a number of research studies currently underway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  6. Acute Schizophrenia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nter, Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial of Three Fixed Doses of OPC-34712 in the Treatment of Adults With Acute...2 in the Treatment of Adults With Acute Schizophrenia A.4.1Sponsor's protocol code number331-10-231 A.5.2US ... Information on the Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute...ition or disease under investigation E.1.2Version 14.1 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10001064 E.1.2Term Acute

  7. Acute Schizophrenia | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2, and 1 mg/day) in the Treatment of Adults With Acute Schizophrenia A.3.1Title ...of the trial for lay people, in easily understood, i.e. non-technical, language Efficacy Study of OPC-34712 in Adults With Acute...e Trial E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute...nder investigation E.1.2Version 14.0 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10001064 E.1.2Term Acute schizo

  8. Clinical trials on AIDS start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 6-month clinical trial in the Philippines sought to determine the efficacy of coconut oil and of "monolaurin," a coconut oil byproduct, in killing HIV by breaking down its coating. This research is based on the theory that medium-chain fatty acids, like monolaurin, can have this effect on certain viruses. The trial involves 12 women and 3 men in the early stage of HIV infection. 10 patients will take different doses of monolaurin, and 5 will consume coconut oil. It is hypothesized that the regimen will lead to higher CD4 counts and a lower viral load. The trial was almost abandoned because it received only lukewarm approval from the Health Secretary.

  9. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram;

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly...... variable. Generation of trial databases and/or biobanks originating in large randomized clinical trials has successfully increased the knowledge obtained from those trials. At the 10th Cardiovascular Trialist Workshop, possibilities and pitfalls in designing and accessing clinical trial databases were......, in particular with respect to collaboration with the trial sponsor and to analytic pitfalls. The advantages of creating screening databases in conjunction with a given clinical trial are described; and finally, the potential for posttrial database studies to become a platform for training young scientists...

  10. Data collection in pragmatic trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinecke, Anna-Katharina; Welsing, Paco; Kafatos, George; Burke, Des; Trelle, Sven; Kubin, Maria; Nachbaur, Gaelle; Egger, Matthias; Zuidgeest, Mira

    2017-07-14

    Pragmatic trials can improve our understanding of how treatments will perform in routine practice. In a series of eight papers, the GetReal Consortium has evaluated the challenges in designing and conducting pragmatic trials and their specific methodological, operational, regulatory, and ethical implications. The present final paper of the series discusses the operational and methodological challenges of data collection in pragmatic trials. A more pragmatic data collection needs to balance the delivery of highly accurate and complete data with minimizing the level of interference that data entry and verification induce with clinical practice. Furthermore, it should allow for the involvement of a representative sample of practices, physicians, and patients who prescribe/receive treatment in routine care. This paper discusses challenges that are related to the different methods of data collection and presents potential solutions where possible. No one-size-fits-all recommendation can be given for the collection of data in pragmatic trials, although in general the application of existing routinely used data-collection systems and processes seems to best suit the pragmatic approach. However, data access and privacy, the time points of data collection, the level of detail in the data, and the lack of a clear understanding of the data-collection process were identified as main challenges for the usage of routinely collected data in pragmatic trials. A first step should be to determine to what extent existing health care databases provide the necessary study data and can accommodate data collection and management. When more elaborate or detailed data collection or more structured follow-up is required, data collection in a pragmatic trial will have to be tailor-made, often using a hybrid approach using a dedicated electronic case report form (eCRF). In this case, the eCRF should be kept as simple as possible to reduce the burden for practitioners and minimize influence on

  11. [Reading a clinical trial report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, J F; Chassany, O

    2000-04-15

    To improve medical knowledge by reading clinical trial reports it is necessary to check for the respect of the methodological rules, and to analyze and criticize the results. A control group and a randomisation are always necessary. Double blind assessment, sample size calculation, intention to treat analysis, a unique primary end point are also important. The conclusions of the trial are valid only for the population included and the clinical signification of the results, depending on the control treatment, has to be evaluated. Respect of the reading rules is necessary to assess the reliability of the conclusions, in order to promote evidence-based practice.

  12. Innovations in clinical trials informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Ron; Vyas, Hiten; Dudhal, Nilesh; Doherty, Neil F; Coombs, Crispin R; Hepworth, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This paper will investigate innovations in information management for use in clinical trials. The application typifies a complex, adaptive, distributed and information-rich environment for which continuous innovation is necessary. Organisational innovation is highlighted as well as the technical innovations in workflow processes and their representation as an integrated set of web services. Benefits realization uncovers further innovations in the business strand of the work undertaken. Following the description of the development of this information management system, the semantic web is postulated as a possible solution to tame the complexity related to information management issues found within clinical trials support systems.

  13. Randomized clinical trials in HEPATOLOGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergard, L L; Nikolova, D; Gluud, C

    1999-01-01

    . Quality was assessed by means of a validated 5-point scale and separate quality components associated with empirical evidence of bias. Only 26% of all RCTs reported sample size calculations, 52% adequate generation of the allocation sequence, 34% adequate allocation concealment and 34% double......, single-center trials, and trials with no external funding. Quality did not improve with time and was not associated with country of origin. The main conclusions are that the quality of RCTs in HEPATOLOGY needs improvement and that the probability of high quality increased with the number of centers...

  14. Acute pancreatitis | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lot Trial of Indomethacin in Acute Pancreatitis Ensayo piloto controlado y aleatorizado con indometacina en ....1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute...n criteria Patients ages 18 or above admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of Acute pancreatitis (AP) based

  15. Differential Effect of Initiating Moderate Red Wine Consumption on 24-h Blood Pressure by Alcohol Dehydrogenase Genotypes: Randomized Trial in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gepner, Yftach; Henkin, Yaakov; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Golan, Rachel; Durst, Ronen; Shelef, Ilan; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Spitzen, Shosana; Witkow, Shula; Novack, Lena; Friger, Michael; Tangi-Rosental, Osnat; Sefarty, Dana; Bril, Nitzan; Rein, Michal; Cohen, Noa; Chassidim, Yoash; Sarusi, Benny; Wolak, Talia; Stampfer, Meir J; Rudich, Assaf; Shai, Iris

    2016-04-01

    Observational studies report inconsistent associations between moderate alcohol intake and blood pressure (BP). In a sub-study of a larger randomized controlled trial, we assessed the effect of initiating moderate red wine consumption on 24-h BP recordings and the effect of a common genetic variant of alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) among patients with type 2 diabetes. Fifty-four type 2 diabetes, alcohol abstainers were randomized to consume 150 ml/dinner dry red wine or mineral water. Both groups were guided to adhere to a Mediterranean diet, without caloric restriction. We measured 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) at baseline and after 6 months. Participants (age = 57 years; 85% men; mean 24-h BP = 129/77 mm Hg) had 92% 6-month retention. After 6 months of intervention, the average 24-h BP did not differ between the wine and water groups. A transient decrease in BP was observed in the red wine group at midnight (3-4 hours after wine intake: systolic BP: red wine = -10.6mm Hg vs. mineral water = +2.3 mm Hg; P = 0.031) and the following morning at 7-9 am (red wine: -6.2mm Hg vs. mineral water: +5.6mm Hg; P = 0.014). In a second post hoc sub-analysis among the red wine consumers, individuals who were homozygous for the gene encoding ADH1B*2 variant (Arg48His; rs1229984, TT, fast ethanol metabolizers), exhibited a reduction in mean 24-h systolic BP (-8.0mm Hg vs. +3.7 mm Hg; P = 0.002) and pulse pressure (-3.8 mm Hg vs. +1.2 mm Hg; P = 0.032) compared to heterozygotes and those homozygous for the ADH1B*1 variant (CC, slow metabolizers). Initiating moderate red wine consumption at dinner among type 2 diabetes patients does not have a discernable effect on mean 24-h BP. Yet, a modest temporal BP reduction could be documented, and a more pronounced BP-lowering effect is suggested among fast ethanol metabolizers. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00784433. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Prediction of cardiovascular events in statin-treated stable coronary patients of the treating to new targets randomized controlled trial by lipid and non-lipid biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit J Arsenault

    Full Text Available Several plasma non-lipid biomarkers have been shown to predict major cardiovascular events (MCVEs in population studies. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between lipid and non-lipid biomarkers levels achieved during statin therapy and the incidence of MCVEs in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD. We conducted a substudy of the TNT (Treating to New Targets study, which was a randomized trial that compared the efficacy of high (80 mg versus low (10 mg dose atorvastatin for the secondary prevention of CHD. Fasting plasma levels of standard lipids and of 18 non-lipid biomarkers were obtained after an 8-week run-in period on atorvastatin 10 mg in 157 patients who experienced MCVEs during the 4.9 years of study follow-up and in 1349 controls. MCVE was defined as CHD death, nonfatal, non-procedure-related myocardial infarction, resuscitated cardiac arrest, and fatal or nonfatal stroke. After adjusting for age, sex and treatment arm, plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, insulin, neopterin, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, lipoprotein(a [Lp(a], and the soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE were predictive of recurrent MCVEs (P ≤ 0.02 for each doubling of plasma concentration. However, no significant association was observed between the risk of recurrent MCVEs and plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, adiponectin, cystatin C, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, matrix metalloproteinase-9, myeloperoxidase, osteopontin, soluble CD40 ligand, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, or soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. After further adjustment for diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and BMI, the relationship between hsCRP, insulin and MCVE were no longer significant, while the relationship between Lp(a, neopterin, NT-proBNP and sRAGE and MCVE remained

  17. Sex-related Impact on Clinical Outcome of Everolimus-eluting Versus Bare-metal Stents in ST-segment Myocardial Infarction. Insights From the EXAMINATION Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, Ander; Fernández-Rodríguez, Diego; Brugaletta, Salvatore; Martín-Yuste, Victoria; Masotti, Monica; Freixa, Xavier; Cequier, Ángel; Íñiguez, Andrés; Serruys, Patrick W; Sabaté, Manel

    2015-05-01

    The use of second-generation drug-eluting stents compared with bare-metal stents in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction reduces the rate of major adverse cardiac events. We aimed to evaluate the impact of sex on the performance of everolimus-eluting stents vs bare-metal stents in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction at 2-year follow-up. This is a sub-study of the EXAMINATION trial that randomized 1498 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to everolimus-eluting or bare-metal stents. Primary end point was combined all-cause death, any recurrent myocardial infarction, and any revascularization. All end points were analyzed according to sex at 2-year follow-up. Of 1498 patients included in the trial, 254 (17.0%) were women. Women were older and had higher prevalence of hypertension and lower prevalence of smoking compared with men. In contrast with men, stent diameter was smaller in women. After multivariate analysis, the primary end point was similar between women and men (hazard ratio=0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.66-1.37), and among women, between those treated with bare-metal vs everolimus-eluting stents (hazard ratio=2.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-6.46). Women showed a lower rate of repeat revascularization than men (hazard ratio=0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.95) despite worse baseline characteristics. This difference was driven by better performance of the everolimus-eluting stent in women. Despite poorer baseline clinical characteristics, women with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention showed outcomes similar to men. The use of everolimus-eluting stents may represent an added value in women as it showed a reduced rate of repeated revascularization compared to men. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Emtricitabine/Tenofovir on Bone Mineral Density in HIV-Negative Persons in a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kathleen; Glidden, David V.; Anderson, Peter L.; Liu, Albert; McMahan, Vanessa; Gonzales, Pedro; Ramirez-Cardich, Maria Esther; Namwongprom, Sirianong; Chodacki, Piotr; de Mendonca, Laura Maria Carvalo; Wang, Furong; Lama, Javier R.; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Guanira, Juan Vicente; Buchbinder, Susan; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Schechter, Mauro; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Grant, Robert M.; Vargas, Lorena; Sanchez, Jorge; Mai, Chiang; Saokhieo, Pongpun; Murphy, Kerry; Gilmore, Hailey; Holland, Sally; Faber, Elizabeth; Duda, John; Bewerunge, Linda; Batist, Elizabeth; Hoskin, Christine; Brown, Ben; de Janeiro, Rio; Beppu-Yoshida, Carina; da Costa, Marcellus Dias; Assis de Jesus, Sergio Carlos; Grangeiro da Silva, Jose Roberto; Millan, Roberta; de Siqueira Hoagland, Brenda Regina; Martinez Fernandes, Nilo; da Silva Freitas, Lucilene; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Pilotto, Jose; Bushman, Lane; Zheng, Jia-Hua; Anthony Guida, Louis; Kline, Brandon; Goicochea, Pedro; Manzo, Jonathan; Hance, Robert; McConnell, Jeff; Defechereux, Patricia; Levy, Vivian; Robles, Malu; Postle, Brian; Burns, David; Rooney, James

    2015-01-01

    Background. Daily preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with oral emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) decreases the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition. Initiation of TDF decreases bone mineral density (BMD) in HIV-infected people. We report the effect of FTC/TDF on BMD in HIV-seronegative men who have sex with men and in transgender women. Methods. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed at baseline and 24-week intervals in a substudy of iPrEx, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of FTC/TDF PrEP. Plasma and intracellular tenofovir concentrations were measured in participants randomized to FTC/TDF. Results. In 498 participants (247 FTC/TDF, 251 placebo), BMD in those randomized to FTC/TDF decreased modestly but statistically significantly by 24 weeks in the spine (net difference, −0.91% [95% confidence interval {CI}, −1.44% to −.38%]; P = .001) and hip (−0.61% [95% CI, −.96% to −.27%], P = .001). Changes within each subsequent 24-week interval were not statistically significant. Changes in BMD by week 24 correlated inversely with intracellular tenofovir diphosphate (TFV-DP), which was detected in 53% of those randomized to FTC/TDF. Net BMD loss by week 24 in participants with TFV-DP levels indicative of consistent dosing averaged −1.42% ± 29% and −0.85% ± 19% in the spine and hip, respectively (P < .001 vs placebo). Spine BMD tended to rebound following discontinuation of FTC/TDF. There were no differences in fractures (P = .62) or incidence of low BMD. Conclusions. In HIV-uninfected persons, FTC/TDF PrEP was associated with small but statistically significant decreases in BMD by week 24 that inversely correlated with TFV-DP, with more stable BMD thereafter. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00458393. PMID:25908682

  19. The angiotensin II receptor antagonist telmisartan reduces urinary albumin excretion in patients with isolated systolic hypertension: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Liffert; Navis, Gerjan; Koester, Juergen; Manolis, Athanasios J.; Reid, John L.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of telmisartan or hydrochlorothiazide on the control of urinary albumin excretion (UAE) in patients with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) unselected for albuminuria in a pre-planned substudy of a large, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized

  20. The angiotensin II receptor antagonist telmisartan reduces urinary albumin excretion in patients with isolated systolic hypertension : results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Liffert; Navis, Gerjan; Koester, Juergen; Manolis, Athanasios J.; Reid, John L.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of telmisartan or hydrochlorothiazide on the control of urinary albumin excretion (UAE) in patients with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) unselected for albuminuria in a pre-planned substudy of a large, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized stu

  1. The angiotensin II receptor antagonist telmisartan reduces urinary albumin excretion in patients with isolated systolic hypertension: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Liffert; Navis, Gerjan; Koester, Juergen; Manolis, Athanasios J.; Reid, John L.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of telmisartan or hydrochlorothiazide on the control of urinary albumin excretion (UAE) in patients with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) unselected for albuminuria in a pre-planned substudy of a large, multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized stu

  2. Clinical Trials in Your Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of investigators, cancer care providers, academic institutions, and other organizations. NCORP conducts multi-site cancer clinical trials and studies in diverse populations in community-based healthcare systems across the United States and Puerto Rico.

  3. Glossary of Clinical Trials Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Institutes of Health grant numbers. (See also Secondary IDs data element on ClinicalTrials.gov.) OUTCOME MEASURE A planned ... and Secondary Outcome Measure . (See also Primary and Secondary Outcome Measures data element and Outcome Measure results data element on ...

  4. The scribe of stroke trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gijn, J

    2003-01-01

    The responsibility for reports about drug trials in medical journals should lie with the clinicians in the steering committee, not with the industrial sponsor. Examples of undue influence of sponsors on the conduct and analysis are the choice of surrogate outcome events, changes in the protocol

  5. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Coping with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting ...

  6. SARCOPENIA: DESIGNING PHASE IIB TRIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHUMLEA, WM.C.; CESARI, M.; EVANS, W.J.; FERRUCCI, L.; FIELDING, R.A.; PAHOR, M.; STUDENSKI, S.; VELLAS, B.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass and functionality that can lead to the development of disability, frailty and increased health care costs. The development of interventions aimed at preventing and/or treating sarcopenia is complex, requiring the adoption of assumptions and standards that are not well established scientifically or clinically. A number of investigators and clinicians (both from academia and industry) met in Rome (Italy) in 2009 to develop a consensus definition of sarcopenia. Subsequently, in Albuquerque (New Mexico, USA) in 2010, the same group met again to consider the complex issues necessary for designing Phase II clinical trials for sarcopenia. Current clinical trial data indicate that fat-free mass (FFM) parameters are responsive to physical activity/nutritional treatment modalities over short time periods, but pharmacological trials of sarcopenia have yet to show significant efficacy. In order to conduct a clinical trial within a reasonable time frame, groups that model or display accelerated aging and loss of FFM are necessary. Few studies have used acceptable designs for testing treatment effects, sample sizes or primary outcomes that could provide interpretable findings or effects across studies. Dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the measure of choice for assessing FFM, but sufficient time is needed for changes to be detected accurately and reliably. A tool set that would allow clinical, basic and epidemiological research on sarcopenia to advance rapidly toward diagnosis and treatment phases should be those reflecting function and strength. PMID:21623466

  7. The Best Bypass Surgery Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Christian H; Jensen, Birte Østergaard; Gluud, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Recent trials suggest that off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) reduces the risk of mortality and morbidity compared with conventional coronary artery bypass grafting (CCAB) using cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients with a moderate- to high-risk of complications after CCAB may have addit...

  8. What Are Clinical Trial Phases?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Questions to Ask about Your Diagnosis Research Cancer Treatment Types of Cancer Treatment Side Effects Clinical Trials Information A to Z ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Coping with Cancer Feelings and Cancer Adjusting ...

  9. Design and methods for the Better Resiliency Among Veterans and non-Veterans with Omega-3's (BRAVO) study: A double blind, placebo-controlled trial of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation among adult individuals at risk of suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Bernadette P; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Killeen, Therese K; Magruder, Kathryn M; Holes-Lewis, Kelly; Tolliver, Bryan K; Turner, Travis H

    2016-03-01

    Suicide remains the 10th leading cause of death among adults in the United States (U.S.). Annually, approximately 30 per 100,000 U.S. military Veterans commit suicide, compared to 14 per 100,000 U.S. civilians. Symptoms associated with suicidality can be treatment resistant and proven-effective pharmaceuticals may have adverse side-effects. Thus, a critical need remains to identify effective approaches for building psychological resiliency in at-risk individuals. Omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 HUFAs) are essential nutrients, which must be consumed in the diet. N-3 HUFAs have been demonstrated to reduce symptoms of depression, anxiety, and impulsivity - which are associated with suicide risk. Here we present the design and methods for the Better Resiliency Among Veterans and non-Veterans with Omega-3's (BRAVO) study, which is a double blind, randomized, controlled trial among individuals at risk of suicide of an n-3 HUFA versus placebo supplementation in the form of all natural fruit juice beverages. The BRAVO study seeks to determine if dietary supplementation with n-3 HUFAs reduces the risk for serious suicidal behaviors, suicidal thinking, negative emotions, and symptoms associated with suicide risk. Sub-analyses will evaluate efficacy in reducing depressive symptoms, alcohol, and nicotine use. A sub-study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate the neuropsychological and neurophysiological effects of n-3 HUFAs. We also outline selection of appropriate proxy outcome measures for detecting response to treatment and collection of ancillary data, such as diet and substance use, that are critical for interpretation of results.

  10. Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo iStock Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new ...

  11. New Eczema Drug Promising in Early Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163883.html New Eczema Drug Promising in Early Trial Nemolizumab significantly ... the appearance of moderate to severe eczema, a new, preliminary trial finds. Nemolizumab is a man-made, ...

  12. Clinical Trials.Gov: A Topical Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Vibha; Cahan, Amos; Ghosh, Soumya

    2017-01-01

    ClinicalTrials.gov was established as a web-based registry for clinical trials of human participants in 2000. Mandatory registration started in 2008. Given more than a decade of registered trials, it's important to understand the "topic" areas and their evolution over time from this resource. This information may help in identifying current knowledge gaps. We use dynamic topic model (DTM) methods to discover topics and their evolution over last 17 years. Our model suggests that there are disease or organ specific trials such as 'Cardiovascular disorders', Heart & Brain conditions', or 'Breast & Prostate cancer' as well as trials registered for general health. General health trials are less likely to be FDA regulated, but both health and pain management, as well as surgical, heart, and brain trials have upward trend in recent years while advanced cancer trials have downward trended. Our model derives unique insights from metadata associated with each topic area.

  13. Clinical trials in neurology: design, conduct, analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ravina, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    .... Clinical Trials in Neurology aims to improve the efficiency of clinical trials and the development of interventions in order to enhance the development of new treatments for neurologic diseases...

  14. Variability of Delirium Motor Subtype Scale-Defined Delirium Motor Subtypes in Elderly Adults with Hip Fracture : A Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtens, Rikie M.; van Munster, Barbara C.; Adamis, Dimitrios; de Jonghe, Annemarieke; Meagher, David J.; de Rooij, Sophia E. J. A.

    OBJECTIVES: To examine changes in motor subtype profile in individuals with delirium. DESIGN: Observational, longitudinal study; substudy of a multicenter, randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Departments of surgery and orthopedics, Academic Medical Center and Tergooi Hospital, the Netherlands.

  15. Clinical Trials Management | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials. Protocol Information Office The central clearinghouse for clinical trials management within the Division of Cancer Prevention.Read more about the Protocol Information Office. | Information for researchers about developing, reporting, and managing NCI-funded cancer prevention clinical trials.

  16. The Design of Cluster Randomized Crossover Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietbergen, Charlotte; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2011-01-01

    The inefficiency induced by between-cluster variation in cluster randomized (CR) trials can be reduced by implementing a crossover (CO) design. In a simple CO trial, each subject receives each treatment in random order. A powerful characteristic of this design is that each subject serves as its own control. In a CR CO trial, clusters of subjects…

  17. 5 CFR 316.304 - Trial period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trial period. 316.304 Section 316.304... Term Employment § 316.304 Trial period. (a) The first year of service of a term employee is a trial period regardless of the method of appointment. Prior Federal civilian service is credited toward...

  18. Varied acceptance of clinical trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R

    1989-12-01

    The subject of varied acceptance of clinical trial results is discussed in the context of review of trials with which I have been involved and my subjective evaluation of their impact on the practice of clinical medicine. My experience goes back to 1949 and a World Health Organization trial of hyperimmune gamma globulin against rabies. This was followed by a large trial of secondary prevention of poliomyelitis. I participated in the planning and initiation of the first chronic disease trial, the University Group Diabetes Program (UGDP). The latter lasted for 15 years and its ramifications continue to this day. My next trial was the Coronary Drug Project (CDP), a complex trial with more than 8,000 patients. The trials of aspirin and aspirin combined with persantine (the CDPA, AMIS, PARIS I, and PARIS II) followed. My last three trials were a trial of photocoagulation in diabetic retinopathy (DRS), a six-country trial of the antiarrhythmic drug mexiletine (IMPACT), and a study involving two diagnostic procedures for pulmonary embolism (PIOPED). When one considers, in retrospect, the plethora of trials one is struck by the uniform absence of a priori considerations of the impact on medical practice, or likely lack thereof, of possible outcomes.

  19. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly...

  20. Trial-to-Trial Fluctuations in Attentional State and Their Relation to Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Nash; McMillan, Brittany D.

    2014-01-01

    Trial-to-trial fluctuations in attentional state while performing measures of intelligence were examined in the current study. Participants performed various measures of fluid and crystallized intelligence while also providing attentional state ratings prior to each trial. It was found that pre-trial attentional state ratings strongly predicted…

  1. Acute Gout | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available E.1 Medical condition or disease under investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Gou...t E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acute Gout E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Diseases [C] - M...n the trial (if it is different from the expected normal treatment of that condition) Acute gout is a self l

  2. Portfolio of prospective clinical trials including brachytherapy: an analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov database

    OpenAIRE

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Miguelez, Cristina Gutierrez; Strnad, Vratislav; Soldatovic, Ivan; Ghadjar, Pirus; Jeremic, Branislav; Dal Pra, Alan; Aebersold, Daniel M; Lössl, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the current status of prospective interventional clinical trials that includes brachytherapy (BT) procedures. Methods The records of 175,538 (100 %) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on September 2014 and a database was established. Trials using BT as an intervention were identified for further analyses. The selected trials were manually categorized according to indication(s), BT source, applied dose rate, primary sponsor type, location, p...

  3. Portfolio of prospective clinical trials including brachytherapy: an analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov database

    OpenAIRE

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Gutierrez Miguelez, Cristina; Strnad, Vratislav; Soldatovic, Ivan; Ghadjar, Pirus; Jeremic, Branislav; Dal Pra, Alan; Aebersold, Daniel M; Lössl, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the current status of prospective interventional clinical trials that includes brachytherapy (BT) procedures. Methods The records of 175,538 (100 %) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on September 2014 and a database was established. Trials using BT as an intervention were identified for further analyses. The selected trials were manually categorized according to indication(s), BT source, applied dose rate, primary sponsor type,...

  4. Current status and perspectives of interventional clinical trials for glioblastoma - analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihoric, Nikola; Tsikkinis, Alexandros; Minniti, Giuseppe; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Mathier, Etienne; Soldatovic, Ivan; Jeremic, Branislav; Ghadjar, Pirus; Elicin, Olgun; Lössl, Kristina; Aebersold, Daniel M; Belka, Claus; Herrmann, Evelyn; Niyazi, Maximilian

    2017-01-03

    The records of 208.777 (100%) clinical trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov were downloaded on the 19th of February 2016. Phase II and III trials including patients with glioblastoma were selected for further classification and analysis. Based on the disease settings, trials were classified into three groups: newly diagnosed glioblastoma, recurrent disease and trials with no differentiation according to disease setting. Furthermore, we categorized trials according to the experimental interventions, the primary sponsor, the source of financial support and trial design elements. Trends were evaluated using the autoregressive integrated moving average model. Two hundred sixteen (0.1%) trials were selected for further analysis. Academic centers (investigator initiated trials) were recorded as primary sponsors in 56.9% of trials, followed by industry 25.9%. Industry was the leading source of monetary support for the selected trials in 44.4%, followed by 25% of trials with primarily academic financial support. The number of newly initiated trials between 2005 and 2015 shows a positive trend, mainly through an increase in phase II trials, whereas phase III trials show a negative trend. The vast majority of trials evaluate forms of different systemic treatments (91.2%). In total, one hundred different molecular entities or biologicals were identified. Of those, 60% were involving drugs specifically designed for central nervous system malignancies. Trials that specifically address radiotherapy, surgery, imaging and other therapeutic or diagnostic methods appear to be rare. Current research in glioblastoma is mainly driven or sponsored by industry, academic medical oncologists and neuro-oncologists, with the majority of trials evaluating forms of systemic therapies. Few trials reach phase III. Imaging, radiation therapy and surgical procedures are underrepresented in current trials portfolios. Optimization in research portfolio for glioblastoma is needed.

  5. Accrual to Cancer Clinical Trials

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, C

    2016-07-01

    Accrual to cancer clinical trials (CCT) is imperative to safeguard continued improvement in cancer outcomes. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients (n=140) starting a new anti-cancer agent in a north Dublin cancer centre. This review was performed over a four-month period, beginning in November 2015. Only 29% (n=41) had a CCT option. The overall accrual rate to CCT was 5% (n=7), which is comparable to internationally reported figures. The main reasons for failure to recruit to CCT included the lack of a CCT option for cancer type (n=30, 23%), stage (n=25, 19%), and line of treatment (n=23, 17%). Over the last decade, the rate of accrual to CCTs has in fact doubled and the number of trials open to recruitment has tripled. Ongoing governmental and philanthropic support is necessary to continue this trend to further expand CCT patient options with a target accrual rate of 10%.

  6. The ethics of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have prevailed over clinical judgement, case reports, and observational studies and became the gold evidential standard in medicine. Furthermore, during the same time frame, RCTs became a crucial part of the regulatory process whereby a new therapeutic can gain access to the drug market. Today, clinical trials are large and tightly regulated enterprises that have to comply with ethical requirements while maintaining high epistemic standards, a balance that becomes increasingly difficult as the research questions become more sophisticated. In this review, the author will discuss some of the most important ethical issues surrounding RCTs, with an eye to the most recent debates and the context of oncological research in particular. PMID:24482672

  7. Medical coding in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deven Babre

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data generated in all clinical trial are recorded on the data collection instrument Case report Form / Electronic Case Report Form by investigators located at various sites in various countries. In multicentric clinical trials since different investigator or medically qualified experts are from different sites / centers recording the medical term(s uniformly is a big challenge. Medical coders from clinical data management team process these terms and perform medical coding. Medical coding is performed to categorize the medical terms reported appropriately so that they can be analyzed/reviewed. This article describes process which is used for medical coding in clinical data management and two most commonly used medical dictionaries MedDRA and WHO-DDE in brief. It is expected to help medical coders to understand the process of medical coding in clinical data management. Few common issues which the medical coder faces while performing medical coding, are also highlighted.

  8. GPON FTTH trial: lessons learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Erik; Hölzl, Rainer; Breuer, Dirk; Lange, Christoph

    2009-11-01

    This paper reports on a FTTH field trial with GPON (Gigabit-capable passive optical network) technology in the network of Deutsche Telekom in the region of the cities of Berlin and Potsdam. Focus of this trial was to gain practical experience regarding GPON technology, fibre installation in existing ducts with micro duct technology, fibre cabling in customer buildings and impact on operational processes. Furthermore it is reported on an initial Deutsche Telekom FTTB deployment based on GPON technology in the city of Dresden with the main targets to obtain practical deployment and operation experiences with fibre-based access networks and to provide broadband access to a part of the city formerly not servable by DSL (digital subscriber line) technology.

  9. Practical trials in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    , limitations and future directions for this kind of research. CURRENT STATE: Practical trials have the overall aim of informing decision makers. They are carried out in real-life settings and are characterised by (i) comparison of viable alternative education strategies, (ii) broad inclusion criteria regarding...... participants across several settings and (iii) multiple outcome measures with long-term follow-up to evaluate both benefits and risks. Questions posed by practical trials may be proactive in applying theory in the development of educational innovations or reactive to educational reforms and innovations. Non......CONTEXT: Concerns have been raised over the gap between education theory and practice and how research can contribute to inform decision makers on their choices and priorities. Little is known about how educational theories and research outcomes produced under optimal conditions in highly...

  10. Effect of physical training on urinary incontinence: a randomized parallel group trial in nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinsnes AG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Anne G Vinsnes1, Jorunn L Helbostad2, Signe Nyrønning3, Gene E Harkless1,4, Randi Granbo5, Arnfinn Seim61Faculty of Nursing, Sør-Trøndelag University College, 2Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 3Søbstad Community Hospital and Teaching Nursing Home, Trondheim, Norway; 4University of New Hampshire, College of Health and Social Services, Nursing Faculty, Durham, New Hampshire, USA; 5Department of Physiotherapy, Sør-Trøndelag University College, 6Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, NorwayBackground: Residents in nursing homes (NHs are often frail older persons who have impaired physical activity. Urinary incontinence (UI is a common complaint for residents in NHs. Reduced functional ability and residence in NHs are documented to be risk factors for UI.Objective: To investigate if an individualized training program designed to improve activity of daily living (ADL and physical capacity among residents in nursing homes has any impact on UI.Materials and methods: This randomized controlled trial was a substudy of a Nordic multicenter study. Participants had to be >65 years, have stayed in the NH for more than 3 months and in need of assistance in at least one ADL. A total of 98 residents were randomly allocated to either a training group (n = 48 or a control group (n = 50 after baseline registrations. The training program lasted for 3 months and included accommodated physical activity and ADL training. Personal treatment goals were elicited for each subject. The control group received their usual care. The main outcome measure was UI as measured by a 24-hour pad-weighing test. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups on this measure at baseline (P = 0.15. Changes were calculated from baseline to 3 months after the end of the intervention.Results: Altogether, 68 participants were included in the analysis

  11. Clinical trials and gender medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarita Cassese

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Women use more medicines than men because they fall ill more often and suffer more from chronic diseases, but also because women pay more attention to their health and have more consciousness and care about themselves. Although medicines can have different effects on women and men, women still represent a small percentage in the first phases of trials (22% which are essential to verify drugs dosage, side effects, and safety. Even though women are more present in trials, studies results are not presented with a gender approach. This situation is due to educational, social, ethical and economical factors. The scientific research must increase feminine presence in clinical trials in order to be equal and correct, and all the key stakeholder should be involved in this process. We still have a long way to cover and it doesn't concern only women but also children and old people. The aim is to have a medicine not only illness-focused but patient-focused: a medicine able to take into consideration all the patient characteristics and so to produce a really personalized therapy. What above described is part of the reasons why in 2005 was founded the National Observatory for Women's Health (Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Salute della Donna, ONDa which promotes a gender health awareness and culture in Italy, at all the levels of the civil and scientific society.

  12. The DiaS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, Kate; Krogh, Jesper; Rosenbaum, Bent

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Denmark 8,000 to 10,000 people will attempt suicide each year. The Centre of Excellence in Suicide Prevention in the Capital Region of Denmark is treating patients with suicidal behavior, and a recent survey has shown that 30% of the patients are suffering from borderline personali...... measured at week 28. Other exploratory outcomes are included such as severity of symptoms, suicide intention and ideation, depression, hopelessness, self-esteem, impulsivity, anger, and duration of respective treatments. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical Trial.gov: NCT01512602....... disorder. The majority of patients (70% to 75%) with borderline personality disorder have a history of deliberate self-harm and 10% have a lifetime risk to die by suicide. The DiaS trial is comparing dialectical behavior therapy with collaborative assessment and management of suicidality......-informed supportive psychotherapy, for the risk of repetition of deliberate self-harm in patients with a recent suicide attempt and personality traits within the spectrum of borderline personality disorder. Both treatments have previously shown effects in this group of patients on suicide ideation and self...

  13. Clinical Trials in Noninfectious Uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jane S.; Knickelbein, Jared E.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Sen, H. Nida

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of noninfectious uveitis continues to remain a challenge for many ophthalmologists. Historically, clinical trials in uveitis have been sparse, and thus, most treatment decisions have largely been based on clinical experience and consensus guidelines. The current treatment paradigm favors initiation then tapering of corticosteroids with addition of steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents for persistence or recurrence of disease. Unfortunately, in spite of a multitude of highly unfavorable systemic effects, corticosteroids are still regarded as the mainstay of treatment for many patients with chronic and refractory noninfectious uveitis. However, with the success of other conventional and biologic immunomodulatory agents in treating systemic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, interest in targeted treatment strategies for uveitis has been renewed. Multiple clinical trials on steroid-sparing immunosuppressive agents, biologic agents, intraocular corticosteroid implants, and topical ophthalmic solutions have already been completed, and many more are ongoing. This review discusses the results and implications of these clinical trials investigating both alternative and novel treatment options for noninfectious uveitis. PMID:26035763

  14. Clinical trials: innovation, progress and controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin GS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Greg S MartinDepartment of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USAThe Open Access Journal of Clinical Trials began in 2009 with the goal of being an authoritative, open access source for international, peer-reviewed publications in the field of human research and clinical trials. Since then, the Open Access Journal of Clinical Trials has published approximately 30 high-quality articles on original research, innovative reviews, and critical commentaries. These articles have spanned many aspects of clinical trials wonderfully, including trial design and management; legal, ethical and regulatory issues of clinical trials; subject participation and retention in clinical trials; and data collection and data management.

  15. Bayesian adaptive methods for clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Berry, Scott M; Muller, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Already popular in the analysis of medical device trials, adaptive Bayesian designs are increasingly being used in drug development for a wide variety of diseases and conditions, from Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis to obesity, diabetes, hepatitis C, and HIV. Written by leading pioneers of Bayesian clinical trial designs, Bayesian Adaptive Methods for Clinical Trials explores the growing role of Bayesian thinking in the rapidly changing world of clinical trial analysis. The book first summarizes the current state of clinical trial design and analysis and introduces the main ideas and potential benefits of a Bayesian alternative. It then gives an overview of basic Bayesian methodological and computational tools needed for Bayesian clinical trials. With a focus on Bayesian designs that achieve good power and Type I error, the next chapters present Bayesian tools useful in early (Phase I) and middle (Phase II) clinical trials as well as two recent Bayesian adaptive Phase II studies: the BATTLE and ISP...

  16. Rehabilitation Enablement in Chronic Heart Failure—a facilitated self-care rehabilitation intervention in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (REACH-HFpEF) and their caregivers: rationale and protocol for a single-centre pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, C C; Smith, K; Jolly, K; Davis, R; Hayward, C; Wingham, J; Abraham, C; Green, C; Warren, F C; Britten, N; Greaves, C J; Doherty, P; Austin, J; Van Lingen, R; Singh, S; Buckingham, S; Paul, K; Taylor, R S; Dalal, H M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Rehabilitation EnAblement in CHronic Heart Failure in patients with Heart Failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (REACH-HFpEF) pilot trial is part of a research programme designed to develop and evaluate a facilitated, home-based, self-help rehabilitation intervention to improve self-care and quality of life (QoL) in heart failure patients and their caregivers. We will assess the feasibility of a definitive trial of the REACH-HF intervention in patients with HFpEF and their caregivers. The impact of the REACH-HF intervention on echocardiographic outcomes and bloodborne biomarkers will also be assessed. Methods and analysis A single-centre parallel two-group randomised controlled trial (RCT) with 1:1 individual allocation to the REACH-HF intervention plus usual care (intervention) or usual care alone (control) in 50 HFpEF patients and their caregivers. The REACH-HF intervention comprises a REACH-HF manual with supplementary tools, delivered by trained facilitators over 12 weeks. A mixed methods approach will be used to assess estimation of recruitment and retention rates; fidelity of REACH-HF manual delivery; identification of barriers to participation and adherence to the intervention and study protocol; feasibility of data collection and outcome burden. We will assess the variance in study outcomes to inform a definitive study sample size and assess methods for the collection of resource use and intervention delivery cost data to develop the cost-effectiveness analyses framework for any future trial. Patient outcomes collected at baseline, 4 and 6 months include QoL, psychological well-being, exercise capacity, physical activity and HF-related hospitalisation. Caregiver outcomes will also be assessed, and a substudy will evaluate impact of the REACH-HF manual on resting global cardiovascular function and bloodborne biomarkers in HFpEF patients. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the East of Scotland Research Ethics

  17. Data monitoring committees for pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberg, Susan S; Culbertson, Richard; Gillen, Daniel L; Goodman, Steven; Schrandt, Suzanne; Zirkle, Maryan

    2015-10-01

    In any clinical trial, it is essential to monitor the accumulating data to be sure that the trial continues to be safe for participants and that the trial is being conducted properly. Data monitoring committees, independent expert panels who undertake regular reviews of the data as the trial progresses, serve an important role in safeguarding the interests of research participants and ensuring trial integrity in many trials. Many pragmatic clinical trials, which aim to inform healthcare decisions by comparing alternate interventions in heterogeneous healthcare delivery settings, will warrant review by an independent data monitoring committee due to their potential impact on clinical practice. However, the very features that make a trial "pragmatic" may pose challenges in terms of which aspects of a trial to monitor and when it is appropriate for a data monitoring committee to intervene. Using the Pragmatic-Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary tool that draws distinctions between pragmatic and explanatory clinical trials, we review characteristics of pragmatic clinical trials that may have implications for data monitoring committees and interim monitoring plans. These include broad eligibility criteria, a focus on subjective patient-centered outcomes, and in some cases a lack of standardized follow-up procedures across study sites. Additionally, protocol adherence is often purposefully not addressed in pragmatic trials in order to accurately represent the clinical practice setting and maintain practicability of implementation; there are differing viewpoints as to whether adherence should be assessed and acted upon by data monitoring committees in these trials. Some other issues not specifically related to the Pragmatic-Explanatory Continuum Indicator Summary criteria may also merit special consideration in pragmatic trials. Thresholds for early termination of a pragmatic clinical trial might be controversial. The distinguishing features of pragmatic clinical

  18. Impact of a cancer clinical trials web site on discussions about trial participation: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dear, R F; Barratt, A L; Askie, L M; Butow, P N; McGeechan, K; Crossing, S; Currow, D C; Tattersall, M H N

    2012-07-01

    Cancer patients want access to reliable information about currently recruiting clinical trials. Oncologists and their patients were randomly assigned to access a consumer-friendly cancer clinical trials web site [Australian Cancer Trials (ACT), www.australiancancertrials.gov.au] or to usual care in a cluster randomized controlled trial. The primary outcome, measured from audio recordings of oncologist-patient consultations, was the proportion of patients with whom participation in any clinical trial was discussed. Analysis was by intention-to-treat accounting for clustering and stratification. Thirty medical oncologists and 493 patients were recruited. Overall, 46% of consultations in the intervention group compared with 34% in the control group contained a discussion about clinical trials (P=0.08). The mean consultation length in both groups was 29 min (P=0.69). The proportion consenting to a trial was 10% in both groups (P=0.65). Patients' knowledge about randomized trials was lower in the intervention than the control group (mean score 3.0 versus 3.3, P=0.03) but decisional conflict scores were similar (mean score 42 versus 43, P=0.83). Good communication between patients and physicians is essential. Within this context, a web site such as Australian Cancer Trials may be an important tool to encourage discussion about clinical trial participation.

  19. Clinical Trials in Peripheral Vascular Disease: Pipeline and Trial Designs: An Evaluation of the ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R.; Chiswell, Karen; Tidemann-Miller, Beth A.; Jones, W. Schuyler; Conte, Michael S.; White, Christopher J.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Laird, John R.; Hiatt, William R.; Tasneem, Asba; Califf, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tremendous advances have occurred in therapies for peripheral vascular disease (PVD); however, until recently it has not been possible to examine the entire clinical trial portfolio of studies for treatment of PVD (both arterial and venous disease). Methods and Results We examined interventional trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov from October 2007 through September 2010 (n=40,970) and identified 676 (1.7%) PVD trials (n=493 arterial only, n=170 venous only, n=13 both arterial and venous). Most arterial studies investigated lower extremity peripheral artery disease and acute stroke (35% and 24%, respectively), while most venous studies examined deep vein thrombosis/pulmonary embolus prevention (42%) or venous ulceration (25%). A placebo-controlled trial design was used in 27% of the PVD trials, and 4% of the PVD trials excluded patients aged >65 years. Enrollment in at least 1 US site decreased from 51% in 2007 to 41% of trials in 2010. Compared with non-cardiology disciplines, PVD trials were more likely to be double-blinded, investigate use of devices and procedures, and have industry sponsorship and assumed funding source, and less likely to investigate drug and behavioral therapies. Geographic access to PVD clinical trials within the United States is limited to primarily large metropolitan areas. Conclusions PVD studies represent a small group of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, despite the high prevalence of vascular disease in the general population. This low number, compounded by the decreasing number of PVD trials in the United States, is concerning and may limit the ability to inform current clinical practice of patients with PVD. PMID:25239436

  20. Sponsorship and design characteristics of trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumiantseva, Dina; Carini, Simona; Sim, Ida; Wagner, Todd H

    2013-03-01

    We examine the extent to which ClinicalTrials.gov is meeting its goal of providing oversight and transparency of clinical trials with human subjects. We analyzed the ClinicalTrials.gov database contents as of June 2011, comparing interventions, medical conditions, and trial characteristics by sponsor type. We also conducted a detailed analysis of incomplete data. Among trials with only government sponsorship (N=9252), 36% were observational and 64% interventional; in contrast, almost all (90%) industry-only sponsored trials were interventional. Industry-only sponsored interventional trials (N=30,036) were most likely to report a drug intervention (81%), followed by biologics (9%) and devices (8%). Government-only interventional trials (N=5886) were significantly more likely to test behavioral interventions (28%) and procedures (13%) than industry-only trials (pgov. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Factors predicting publication of spinal cord injury trials registered on www.ClinicalTrials. gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePasse, J Mason; Park, Sara; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-08-11

    Treatment options for spinal cord injuries are currently limited, but multiple clinical trials are underway for a variety of interventions, drugs, and devices. The Food and Drug Administration website www.ClinicalTrials.gov catalogues these trials and includes information on the status of the trial, date of initiation and completion, source of funding, and region. This investigation assesses the factors associated with publication and the publication rate of spinal cord injury trials. Retrospective analysis of publically available data on www.ClinicalTrials.gov. The www.ClinicalTrials.gov was queried for all trials on patients with spinal cord injury, and these trials were assessed for status, type of intervention, source of funding, and region. Multiple literature searches were performed on all completed trials to determine publication status. There were 626 studies identified concerning the treatment of patients with spinal cord injury, of which 250 (39.9%) were completed. Of these, only 119 (47.6%) were published. There was no significant difference in the rate of publication between regions (p> 0.16) or by study type (p> 0.29). However, trials that were funded by the NIH were more likely to be published than trials funded by industry (p= 0.01). The current publication rate of spinal cord injury trials is only 47.6%, though this rate is similar to the publication rate for trials in other fields. NIH-funded trials are significantly more likely to become published than industry-funded trials, which could indicate that some trials remain unpublished due to undesirable results. However, it is also likely that many trials on spinal cord injury yield negative results, as treatments are often ineffective.

  2. Making randomised trials more efficient: report of the first meeting to discuss the Trial Forge platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treweek, Shaun; Altman, Doug G; Bower, Peter; Campbell, Marion; Chalmers, Iain; Cotton, Seonaidh; Craig, Peter; Crosby, David; Davidson, Peter; Devane, Declan; Duley, Lelia; Dunn, Janet; Elbourne, Diana; Farrell, Barbara; Gamble, Carrol; Gillies, Katie; Hood, Kerry; Lang, Trudie; Littleford, Roberta; Loudon, Kirsty; McDonald, Alison; McPherson, Gladys; Nelson, Annmarie; Norrie, John; Ramsay, Craig; Sandercock, Peter; Shanahan, Daniel R; Summerskill, William; Sydes, Matt; Williamson, Paula; Clarke, Mike

    2015-06-05

    Randomised trials are at the heart of evidence-based healthcare, but the methods and infrastructure for conducting these sometimes complex studies are largely evidence free. Trial Forge ( www.trialforge.org ) is an initiative that aims to increase the evidence base for trial decision making and, in doing so, to improve trial efficiency.This paper summarises a one-day workshop held in Edinburgh on 10 July 2014 to discuss Trial Forge and how to advance this initiative. We first outline the problem of inefficiency in randomised trials and go on to describe Trial Forge. We present participants' views on the processes in the life of a randomised trial that should be covered by Trial Forge.General support existed at the workshop for the Trial Forge approach to increase the evidence base for making randomised trial decisions and for improving trial efficiency. Agreed upon key processes included choosing the right research question; logistical planning for delivery, training of staff, recruitment, and retention; data management and dissemination; and close down. The process of linking to existing initiatives where possible was considered crucial. Trial Forge will not be a guideline or a checklist but a 'go to' website for research on randomised trials methods, with a linked programme of applied methodology research, coupled to an effective evidence-dissemination process. Moreover, it will support an informal network of interested trialists who meet virtually (online) and occasionally in person to build capacity and knowledge in the design and conduct of efficient randomised trials.Some of the resources invested in randomised trials are wasted because of limited evidence upon which to base many aspects of design, conduct, analysis, and reporting of clinical trials. Trial Forge will help to address this lack of evidence.

  3. Microbicide clinical trial adherence: insights for introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Woodsong

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available After two decades of microbicide clinical trials it remains uncertain if vaginally- delivered products will be clearly shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection in women and girls. Furthermore, a microbicide product with demonstrated clinical efficacy must be used correctly and consistently if it is to prevent infection. Information on adherence that can be gleaned from microbicide trials is relevant for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, pre-licensure implementation trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery. Drawing primarily from data and experience that has emerged from the large-scale microbicide efficacy trials completed to-date, the paper identifies six broad areas of adherence lessons learned: (1 Adherence measurement in clinical trials, (2 Comprehension of use instructions/Instructions for use, (3 Unknown efficacy and its effect on adherence/Messages regarding effectiveness, (4 Partner influence on use, (5 Retention and continuation and (6 Generalizability of trial participants' adherence behavior. Each is discussed, with examples provided from microbicide trials. For each of these adherence topics, recommendations are provided for using trial findings to prepare for future microbicide safety and efficacy trials, Phase IV post-marketing research, and microbicide introduction and delivery programs.

  4. [Profile of clinical trials enrolling Brazilian children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Jean Mendes de Lucena; Lima, Elisangela da Costa; Land, Marcelo Gerardin Poirot; Ventura, Miriam; Coelho, Helena Lutescia Luna

    2017-06-12

    This study aimed to characterize the clinical trials with medicines enrolling Brazilian children and adolescents, registered in the databases of Clinical Trials and the Brazilian Clinical Trials Network (ReBEC) from 1994 to 2014. Only 462 clinical trials enrolled Brazilian children and adolescents. There was an increase in registrations beginning in 2003, with an important drop in 2011. Among these trials, 35.5% were hosted in Brazil. The international clinical trials were mostly conducted by North American companies. In both cases, multinational industry was the principal source of funding. The clinical trials were predominantly phase III with injectable and solid oral pharmaceutical forms of antiviral drugs. Domestic clinical trials showed wider variation in the pharmaceutical forms and higher percentage of liquid formulations, when compared to the international trials. In addition to heavy external dependence for conducting clinical trials, the study emphasized the challenge for pediatric care in Brazil, which presents epidemiological peculiarities in an environment prone to the use of unlicensed medicines for children.

  5. Gatekeepers for pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicher, Danielle M; Miller, Jennifer E; Dunham, Kelly M; Joffe, Steven

    2015-10-01

    To successfully implement a pragmatic clinical trial, investigators need access to numerous resources, including financial support, institutional infrastructure (e.g. clinics, facilities, staff), eligible patients, and patient data. Gatekeepers are people or entities who have the ability to allow or deny access to the resources required to support the conduct of clinical research. Based on this definition, gatekeepers relevant to the US clinical research enterprise include research sponsors, regulatory agencies, payers, health system and other organizational leadership, research team leadership, human research protections programs, advocacy and community groups, and clinicians. This article provides a framework to help guide gatekeepers' decision-making related to the use of resources for pragmatic clinical trials. Relevant ethical considerations for gatekeepers include (1) concern for the interests of individuals, groups, and communities affected by the gatekeepers' decisions, including protection from harm and maximization of benefits; (2) advancement of organizational mission and values; and (3) stewardship of financial, human, and other organizational resources. Separate from these ethical considerations, gatekeepers' actions will be guided by relevant federal, state, and local regulations. This framework also suggests that to further enhance the legitimacy of their decision-making, gatekeepers should adopt transparent processes that engage relevant stakeholders when feasible and appropriate. We apply this framework to the set of gatekeepers responsible for making decisions about resources necessary for pragmatic clinical trials in the United States, describing the relevance of the criteria in different situations and pointing out where conflicts among the criteria and relevant regulations may affect decision-making. Recognition of the complex set of considerations that should inform decision-making will guide gatekeepers in making justifiable choices regarding

  6. a randomized controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of Iyengar yoga in chronic neck pain by means of a randomized clinical trial. 77 with chronic neck pain who scored > 40 mm on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) were randomized to a nine week Iyengar yoga program with weekly 90-minute classes or to a self-care/exercise program. The primary outcome measure was change of mean pain at rest (VAS) from baseline to week ten. Secondary outcomes included pain at motion, functional disabilit...

  7. Juvenile Competency to Stand Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Sofia T; Sidhu, Shawn S; Bath, Eraka

    2016-01-01

    Competency to stand trial is interpreted as a protected due process right for all defendants and is defined as a defendant's fundamental knowledge and understanding of the criminal charges being filed, roles and procedures within the courtroom, and a general ability to work with the defense counsel. Questions of competency are most often raised by the judge, defense, or the prosecution, and competency evaluations are most often completed by psychiatrists or psychologists with forensic training or work experience. Mental illness, intellectual disability, developmental disorders, and developmental immaturity are the 4 main factors considered in most juvenile competency evaluations.

  8. Legislation for trial registration and data transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Tai-Xiang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Public confidence in clinical trials has been eroded by data suppression, misrepresentation and manipulation. Although various attempts have been made to achieve universal trial registration- e.g., Declaration of Helsinki, WHO clinical Trial Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors requirement- they have not succeeded, probably because they lack the enough power of enforcement. Legislation appears to be the most efficient and effective means to ensure that all researchers register their trials and disseminate their data accurately and in a timely manner. We propose that a global network be established. This could be accomplished in two steps. The first step is to legislate about trial registration and data transparency, such as USA's FDAAA Act 2007; and the second step to establish a global network to ensure uniform, international consistency in policy and enforcement of trial registration and data transparency.

  9. Some ethical implications of "adaptive" trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, C

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive trials are a new type of sequential trial, as yet not very widespread, in which each step can be modified on the basis of findings from the preceding step. In other words, the data accumulated during the study are used to modify the trial design. The potential of this type of trial is highly promising, especially for the development of therapies for rare diseases. The planning, conduct and management of data from adaptive trials are extremely complex processes and call for highly specialised skills. Without going into the merits of the experimental protocols, the aim of this article is to point out some ethical aspects that call for caution, as well as the need for ethics committees to be aware of the challenges posed by these trials.

  10. Legislation for trial registration and data transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Wu, Tai-Xiang

    2010-05-26

    Public confidence in clinical trials has been eroded by data suppression, misrepresentation and manipulation. Although various attempts have been made to achieve universal trial registration- e.g., Declaration of Helsinki, WHO clinical Trial Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP), the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors requirement- they have not succeeded, probably because they lack the enough power of enforcement.Legislation appears to be the most efficient and effective means to ensure that all researchers register their trials and disseminate their data accurately and in a timely manner. We propose that a global network be established. This could be accomplished in two steps. The first step is to legislate about trial registration and data transparency, such as USA's FDAAA Act 2007; and the second step to establish a global network to ensure uniform, international consistency in policy and enforcement of trial registration and data transparency.

  11. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials of rehabilitation interventions for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, G K; Hinman, R S; Zeni, J; Risberg, M A; Snyder-Mackler, L; Bennell, K L

    2015-05-01

    A Task Force of the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) has previously published a set of guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials in osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee. Limited material available on clinical trials of rehabilitation in people with OA has prompted OARSI to establish a separate Task Force to elaborate guidelines encompassing special issues relating to rehabilitation of OA. The Task Force identified three main categories of rehabilitation clinical trials. The categories included non-operative rehabilitation trials, post-operative rehabilitation trials, and trials examining the effectiveness of devices (e.g., assistive devices, bracing, physical agents, electrical stimulation, etc.) that are used in rehabilitation of people with OA. In addition, the Task Force identified two main categories of outcomes in rehabilitation clinical trials, which include outcomes related to symptoms and function, and outcomes related to disease modification. The guidelines for rehabilitation clinical trials provided in this report encompass these main categories. The report provides guidelines for conducting and reporting on randomized clinical trials. The topics include considerations for entering patients into trials, issues related to conducting trials, considerations for selecting outcome measures, and recommendations for statistical analyses and reporting of results. The focus of the report is on rehabilitation trials for hip, knee and hand OA, however, we believe the content is broad enough that it could be applied to rehabilitation trials for other regions as well.

  12. Trial publication after registration in ClinicalTrials.Gov: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S Ross

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: ClinicalTrials.gov is a publicly accessible, Internet-based registry of clinical trials managed by the US National Library of Medicine that has the potential to address selective trial publication. Our objectives were to examine completeness of registration within ClinicalTrials.gov and to determine the extent and correlates of selective publication. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We examined reporting of registration information among a cross-section of trials that had been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov after December 31, 1999 and updated as having been completed by June 8, 2007, excluding phase I trials. We then determined publication status among a random 10% subsample by searching MEDLINE using a systematic protocol, after excluding trials completed after December 31, 2005 to allow at least 2 y for publication following completion. Among the full sample of completed trials (n = 7,515, nearly 100% reported all data elements mandated by ClinicalTrials.gov, such as intervention and sponsorship. Optional data element reporting varied, with 53% reporting trial end date, 66% reporting primary outcome, and 87% reporting trial start date. Among the 10% subsample, less than half (311 of 677, 46% of trials were published, among which 96 (31% provided a citation within ClinicalTrials.gov of a publication describing trial results. Trials primarily sponsored by industry (40%, 144 of 357 were less likely to be published when compared with nonindustry/nongovernment sponsored trials (56%, 110 of 198; p<0.001, but there was no significant difference when compared with government sponsored trials (47%, 57 of 122; p = 0.22. Among trials that reported an end date, 75 of 123 (61% completed prior to 2004, 50 of 96 (52% completed during 2004, and 62 of 149 (42% completed during 2005 were published (p = 0.006. CONCLUSIONS: Reporting of optional data elements varied and publication rates among completed trials registered within ClinicalTrials.gov were low

  13. Pharmacogenetic Associations of β1-Adrenergic Receptor Polymorphisms With Cardiovascular Outcomes in the SPS3 Trial (Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magvanjav, Oyunbileg; McDonough, Caitrin W; Gong, Yan; McClure, Leslie A; Talbert, Robert L; Horenstein, Richard B; Shuldiner, Alan R; Benavente, Oscar R; Mitchell, Braxton D; Johnson, Julie A

    2017-05-01

    Functional polymorphisms (Ser49Gly and Arg389Gly) in ADRB1 have been associated with cardiovascular and β-blocker response outcomes. Herein we examined associations of these polymorphisms with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), with and without stratification by β-blocker treatment in patients with a history of stroke. Nine hundred and twenty-six participants of the SPS3 trial's (Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes) genetic substudy with hypertension were included. MACE included stroke, myocardial infarction, and all-cause death. Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression analyses were used. Because the primary component of MACE was ischemic stroke, we tested the association of Ser49Gly with ischemic stroke among 41 475 individuals of European and African ancestry in the NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) SiGN (Stroke Genetics Network). MACE was higher in carriers of the Gly49 allele than in those with the Ser49Ser genotype (10.5% versus 5.4%, log-rank P=0.005). Gly49 carrier status was associated with MACE (hazard ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-2.68) and ischemic stroke (hazard ratio, 1.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-3.23) in SPS3 and with small artery ischemic stroke (odds ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.26) in SiGN. In SPS3, β-blocker-treated Gly49 carriers had increased MACE versus non-β-blocker-treated individuals and noncarriers (hazard ratio, 2.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-3.45). No associations were observed with the Arg389Gly polymorphism. Among individuals with previous small artery ischemic stroke, the ADRB1 Gly49 polymorphism was associated with MACE, particularly small artery ischemic stroke, a risk that may be increased among β-blocker-treated individuals. Further research is needed to define β-blocker benefit among ischemic stroke patients by ADRB1 genotype. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00059306. © 2017 American Heart

  14. Interactions between Obesity Status and Dietary Intake of Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Oils on Human Gut Microbiome Profiles in the Canola Oil Multicenter Intervention Trial (COMIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Shuaihua; Khazanehei, Hamidreza; Jones, Peter J.; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Long-term dietary fatty acid intake is believed to induce changes in the human gut microbiome which might be associated with human health or obesity status; however, considerable debate remains regarding the most favorable ratios of fatty acids to optimize these processes. The objective of this sub-study of a double-blinded randomized crossover clinical study, the canola oil multi-center intervention trial, was to investigate effects of five different novel oil blends fed for 30 days each on the intestinal microbiota in 25 volunteers with risk of metabolic syndrome. The 60 g treatments included three MUFA-rich diets: (1) conventional canola oil (Canola); (2) DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (CanolaDHA); (3) high oleic canola oil (CanolaOleic); and two PUFA-rich diets: (4) a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75) (CornSaff); and (5) a blend of flax/safflower oil (60:40) (FlaxSaff). Stool samples were collected at the end of each period. DNA was extracted and amplified for 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. A total of 17 phyla and 187 genera were identified. While five novel oil treatments failed to alter bacterial phyla composition, obese participants resulted in a higher proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes than overweight or normal weight groups (P = 0.01). Similarly at the genus level, overall bacterial distribution was highly associated with subjects’ body mass index (BMI). Treatment effects were observed between MUFA- and PUFA-rich diets, with the three MUFA diets elevating Parabacteroides, Prevotella, Turicibacter, and Enterobacteriaceae’s populations, while the two PUFA-rich diets favored the higher abundance of Isobaculum. High MUFA content feedings also resulted in an increase of Parabacteroides and a decrease of Isobaculum in obese, but not overweight subjects. Data suggest that BMI is a predominant factor in characterization of human gut microbiota profile, and that MUFA-rich and PUFA-rich diets impact the composition of gut microbiota at lower

  15. Interactions between Obesity Status and Dietary Intake of Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Oils on Human Gut Microbiome Profiles in the Canola Oil Multicenter Intervention Trial (COMIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaihua Pu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Long-term dietary fatty acid intake is believed to induce changes in the human gut microbiome which might be associated with human health or obesity status; however, considerable debate remains regarding the most favorable ratios of fatty acids to optimize these processes. The objective of this sub-study of a double-blinded randomized crossover clinical study, the canola oil multi-center intervention trial (COMIT, was to investigate effects of five different novel oil blends fed for 30 days each on the intestinal microbiota in 25 volunteers with risk of metabolic syndrome. The 60 g treatments included three MUFA-rich diets: 1 conventional canola oil (Canola; 2 DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (CanolaDHA; 3 high oleic canola oil (CanolaOleic; and two PUFA-rich diets: 4 a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75 (CornSaff; and 5 a blend of flax/safflower oil (60:40 (FlaxSaff. Stool samples were collected at the end of each period. DNA was extracted and amplified for pyrosequencing. A total of 17 phyla and 187 genera were identified. While five novel oil treatments failed to alter bacterial phyla composition, obese participants produced a higher proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes than overweight or normal weight groups (P = 0.01. Similarly at the genus level, overall bacterial distribution was highly associated with subjects’ body mass index (BMI. Treatment effects were observed between MUFA- and PUFA-rich diets, with the three MUFA diets elevating Parabacteroides, Prevotella, Turicibacter, and Enterobacteriaceae (F’s populations, while the two PUFA-rich diets favored the abundance of Isobaculum. High MUFA content feedings also resulted in an increase of Parabacteroides and a decrease of Isobaculum in obese, but not overweight subjects. Data suggest that BMI is a predominant factor in characterization of human gut microbiota profiles, and that MUFA-rich and PUFA-rich diets impact the composition of gut microbiota at lower taxonomical levels

  16. Design, Analysis, and Presentation of Crossover Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Guyatt Gordon H; Vail Andy; Wu Ping; Chan An-Wen; Mills Edward J; Altman Douglas G

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective Although crossover trials enjoy wide use, standards for analysis and reporting have not been established. We reviewed methodological aspects and quality of reporting in a representative sample of published crossover trials. Methods We searched MEDLINE for December 2000 and identified all randomized crossover trials. We abstracted data independently, in duplicate, on 14 design criteria, 13 analysis criteria, and 14 criteria assessing the data presentation. Results We identif...

  17. Ethics, Error, and Initial Trials of Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Hey, Spencer Phillips; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about the frequency of failure in late stage drug development have prompted a series of proposals for improving the positive predictivity of trials where clinical activity is first evaluated—typically phase 2 trials. However, many proposed reforms entail ethical and social tradeoffs that might not be immediately apparent. We argue that trial reforms aimed at boosting phase 2 positive predictivity have important repercussions for human subjects, as well as the capacity of the research...

  18. Supported employment: randomised controlled trial*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Louise M.; Heslin, Margaret; Leese, Morven; McCrone, Paul; Rice, Christopher; Jarrett, Manuela; Spokes, Terry; Huxley, Peter; Thornicroft, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Background There is evidence from North American trials that supported employment using the individual placement and support (IPS) model is effective in helping individuals with severe mental illness gain competitive employment. There have been few trials in other parts of the world. Aims To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of IPS in the UK. Method Individuals with severe mental illness in South London were randomised to IPS or local traditional vocational services (treatment as usual) (ISRCTN96677673). Results Two hundred and nineteen participants were randomised, and 90% assessed 1 year later. There were no significant differences between the treatment as usual and intervention groups in obtaining competitive employment (13% in the intervention group and 7% in controls; risk ratio 1.35, 95% CI 0.95–1.93, P = 0.15), nor in secondary outcomes. Conclusions There was no evidence that IPS was of significant benefit in achieving competitive employment for individuals in South London at 1-year follow-up, which may reflect suboptimal implementation. Implementation of IPS can be challenging in the UK context where IPS is not structurally integrated with mental health services, and economic disincentives may lead to lower levels of motivation in individuals with severe mental illness and psychiatric professionals. PMID:20435968

  19. Power analysis of trials with multilevel data

    CERN Document Server

    Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2015-01-01

    Power Analysis of Trials with Multilevel Data covers using power and sample size calculations to design trials that involve nested data structures. The book gives a thorough overview of power analysis that details terminology and notation, outlines key concepts of statistical power and power analysis, and explains why they are necessary in trial design. It guides you in performing power calculations with hierarchical data, which enables more effective trial design.The authors are leading experts in the field who recognize that power analysis has attracted attention from applied statisticians i

  20. Single-Trial Inference on Visual Attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrholm, Mads; Kyllingsbæk, Søren; Vangkilde, Signe Allerup

    In this paper we take a step towards single-trial behavioral modeling within a Theory of Visual Attention (TVA). In selective attention tasks, such as the Partial Report paradigm, the subject is asked to ignore distractors and only report stimuli that belong to the target class. Nothing about...... Report trial. This result retrodicts a latent attentional state of the subject using the observed response from that particular trial and thus differs from other predictions made with TVA which are based on expected values of observed variables. We show an example of the result in single-trial analysis...

  1. Uncertainty and the ethics of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Sven Ove

    2006-01-01

    A probabilistic explication is offered of equipoise and uncertainty in clinical trials. In order to be useful in the justification of clinical trials, equipoise has to be interpreted in terms of overlapping probability distributions of possible treatment outcomes, rather than point estimates representing expectation values. Uncertainty about treatment outcomes is shown to be a necessary but insufficient condition for the ethical defensibility of clinical trials. Additional requirements are proposed for the nature of that uncertainty. The indecisiveness of our criteria for cautious decision-making under uncertainty creates the leeway that makes clinical trials defensible.

  2. How Experimental Trial Context Affects Perceptual Categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Palmeri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To understand object categorization, participants are tested in experiments often quite different from how people experience object categories in the real world. Learning and knowledge of categories is measured in discrete experimental trials, those trials may or may not provide feedback, trials appear one after another, after some fixed inter-trial interval, with hundreds of trials in a row, within experimental blocks with some structure dictated by the experimental design. In the real world, outside of certain educational and vocational contexts, opportunities to learn and use categories are intermixed over time with a whole multitude of intervening experiences. It is clear from any elementary understanding of human cognition that sequential effects matter, yet this understanding is often ignored, and categorization trials are often instead treated as independent events, immune to local trial context. In this perspective, we use some of our work to illustrate some of the consequences of the fact that categorization experiments have a particular trial structure. Experimental trial context can affect performance in category learning and categorization experiments in ways that can profoundly affect theoretical conclusions.

  3. Single-Trial Inference on Visual Attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrholm, Mads; Kyllingsbæk, Søren; Vangkilde, Signe Allerup

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we take a step towards single-trial behavioral modeling within a Theory of Visual Attention (TVA). In selective attention tasks, such as the Partial Report paradigm, the subject is asked to ignore distractors and only report stimuli that belong to the target class. Nothing about...... Report trial. This result retrodicts a latent attentional state of the subject using the observed response from that particular trial and thus differs from other predictions made with TVA which are based on expected values of observed variables. We show an example of the result in single-trial analysis...

  4. [Situation analysis for drug clinical trial institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-Ying; Wu, Ping; Wang, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Drug clinical trial is an important link in the chain of new drug research and development. The results of drug discovery and development directly depend on the extent of standardization of clinical trials. Therefore, improving the quality of drug clinical trials is of great importance, and drug clinical trial institutions play a crucial role in the quality management of drug clinical trials. After years of development, the overall level of drug clinical trials has advanced rapidly in China, and a large number of clinical trials of traditional Chinese medicine have also been carried out. However, there is still a big gap between our country and developed countries. Therefore, for the construction and management of Chinese drug clinical trial institutions, there is still a long way to go. This study aims to analyze the current development of drug clinical trial institutions in China and explore the existing problems from three aspects, including current situations of institutional organization and management, regional and professional distributions, and quality control. And some suggestions are put forward finally, including support of traditional Chinese medicine, introduction of drug-risk management system, and construction of information management.

  5. Terminating a long-term clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimt, C R

    1981-05-01

    Long-term clinical trials often include more than one active treatment group. These may be discontinued independently if found to be ineffective or possibly harmful. Certain subgroups of patients may be discovered, in the course of a clinical trial, who do not respond satisfactorily and are, therefore, excluded during the course of a trial. Yet another kind of termination comes when we have a therapeutic breakthrough or when hope has to be abandoned for demonstrating beneficial effects for one, several, or all treatments included in a trial. Examples from the authors' experience are presented, as are successful and unsuccessful techniques in managing terminations of various types.

  6. Analysis of the first field trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mesa-Lao, Bartolomé; Carl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this work package, we evaluate the CASMACAT workbench in eld trials to study the use of the workbench in a real-world environment. We will also integrate the workbench into com- munity translation platforms and collect user activity data from both eld trials and volunteer translators. This Deliverable covers Tasks 6.1 and 6.2. Task 6.1: Field trials at translation agency. Three annual eld trials to evaluate the CASMACAT workbench in a real-world professional translatio...

  7. The impact of advertising patient and public involvement on trial recruitment:embedded cluster randomisedrecruitment trial

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes-Morley, Adwoa; Hann, Robert; Fraser , Claire; Meade, Oonagh; Lovell, Karina; Young, Bridget; Roberts, Christopher; Cree, Lindsey; More, Donna; O'Leary, Neil; Callaghan, Patrick; Waheed, Waquas; Bower, Peter

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundPatient and public involvement in research (PPIR) may improve trial recruitment rates, but it is unclear how. Where trials use PPIR to improve design and conduct, many do not communicate this clearly to potential participants. Better communication of PPIR might encourage patient enrolment, as trials may be perceived as more socially valid, relevant and trustworthy. We aimed to evaluate the impact on recruitment of directly advertising PPIR to potential trial participants.MethodsThis...

  8. Identification of additional trials in prospective trial registers for Cochrane systematic reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wynanda A van Enst

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Publication and selective outcome reporting bias are a threat to the validity of systematic reviews. Extensive searching for additional trials in prospective trial registers could reduce this problem. We have evaluated how authors of Cochrane systematic reviews currently make use of trial registers as an additional source for the identification of potentially eligible trials. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We included 210 systematic Cochrane reviews of interventions published between 2008 and 2010 of which the protocol was first published in 2008. When prospective trial registers were searched we recorded the names of the register(s, the authors' motive(s and if they yielded any extra trials. In 80 reviews (38.1% the authors had searched in one or more prospective trial register(s of which 55% had searched in overlapping search portals and individual registers. Most frequently assessed were the MetaRegister (66.3% and Clinicaltrials.gov (60% which is in sharp contrast of other registers or portals like the WHO ICTRP Search Portal (20%. Reported motives to use registers were to identify ongoing trials (83.3%, to identify unpublished outcomes or trials (23.5%, to identify recently published trials (11.8%, or to identify any relevant trial (3.9%.In 28 reviews (35% the authors had selected (ongoing trials identified in trial registers as potentially eligible. DISCUSSION: Trial registers as an additional source of information are gaining acknowledgement amongst Cochrane reviewers. Nevertheless, searches seem to be inefficient as overlapping databases are frequently consulted, while the WHO ICTRP Search Portal that includes the data from all approved registers worldwide is being underused. Moreover, the emphasis is now on the identification of ongoing trials, although the prospective registers offer a broader potential. Further familiarity of registers and guidance how to search and to report will help to implement this as a common method

  9. Patient reported outcomes (PROs) in clinical trials: is 'in-trial' guidance lacking? a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Kyte, DG; Draper, H; Ives, J.; Liles, C; Gheorghe, A.; Calvert, M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly assessed in clinical trials, and guidelines are available to inform the design and reporting of such trials. However, researchers involved in PRO data collection report that specific guidance on 'in-trial' activity (recruitment, data collection and data inputting) and the management of 'concerning' PRO data (i.e., data which raises concern for the well-being of the trial participant) appears to be lacking. The purpose of this revie...

  10. Acute cough | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute cough Akuter Husten E.1.1.1Medical condition in easily understood language Acu...igation E.1.2Version 17.1 E.1.2Level LLT E.1.2Classification code 10066522 E.1.2Term Acute cough E.1.2System...igible for inclusion in this trial must fulfill all of the following criteria:1. Acute cough with symptoms l...based on medical history and physical examination7. CS score of at least 50 mm on a 100 mm VAS at V1 8. Acute...te cough Akuter Husten E.1.1.2Therapeutic area Diseases [C] - Respiratory Tract Dis

  11. Type 2 diabetes mellitus | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available .2 Objective of the trial E.2.1Main objective of the trial The purpose of this trial is to demonstrate that dextromethorphan...– IMP) before and during an OGTT- For dextromethorphan: to assess whether a dose-dependency of PD exists-To

  12. Increasing recruitment to randomised trials: a review of randomised controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgerson David J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor recruitment to randomised controlled trials (RCTs is a widespread and important problem. With poor recruitment being such an important issue with respect to the conduct of randomised trials, a systematic review of controlled trials on recruitment methods was undertaken in order to identify strategies that are effective. Methods We searched the register of trials in Cochrane library from 1996 to end of 2004. We also searched Web of Science for 2004. Additional trials were identified from personal knowledge. Included studies had to use random allocation and participants had to be allocated to different methods of recruitment to a 'real' randomised trial. Trials that randomised participants to 'mock' trials and trials of recruitment to non-randomised studies (e.g., case control studies were excluded. Information on the study design, intervention and control, and number of patients recruited was extracted by the 2 authors. Results We identified 14 papers describing 20 different interventions. Effective interventions included: telephone reminders; questionnaire inclusion; monetary incentives; using an 'open' rather than placebo design; and making trial materials culturally sensitive. Conclusion Few trials have been undertaken to test interventions to improve trial recruitment. There is an urgent need for more RCTs of recruitment strategies.

  13. Five-year outcomes of chronic total occlusion treatment with a biolimus A9-eluting biodegradable polymer stent versus a sirolimus-eluting permanent polymer stent in the LEADERS all-comers trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ghione (Matteo); J.J. Wykrzykowska (Joanna); S. Windecker (Stephan); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); P.E. Buszman (Pawel); A. Linke (Axel); H.Y. Sohn (Hae Y); R. Corti (Roberto); M.L. Antoni (Louisa); W. Wijns (William); Estevez-Loureiro, R. (Rodrigo); M-C. Morice (Marie-Claude); G.A. van Es (Gerrit Anne); R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); P. Jùni (Peter); P. Eerdmans (Pedro); T. de Vries (Ton); Konik, S. (Stéphanie); C. di Mario (Carlo)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Few data are available on long-term follow-up of drug-eluting stents in the treatment of chronic total occlusion (CTO). The LEADERS CTO sub-study compared the long-term results in CTO and non-CTO lesions of a Biolimus A9™-eluting stent (BES) with a sirolimus-eluting stent (SE

  14. Five-year outcomes of chronic total occlusion treatment with a biolimus A9-eluting biodegradable polymer stent versus a sirolimus-eluting permanent polymer stent in the LEADERS all-comers trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ghione (Matteo); J.J. Wykrzykowska (Joanna); S. Windecker (Stephan); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); P.E. Buszman (Pawel); A. Linke (Axel); H.Y. Sohn (Hae Y); R. Corti (Roberto); M.L. Antoni (Louisa); W. Wijns (William); Estevez-Loureiro, R. (Rodrigo); M-C. Morice (Marie-Claude); G.A. van Es (Gerrit Anne); R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); P. Jùni (Peter); P. Eerdmans (Pedro); T. de Vries (Ton); Konik, S. (Stéphanie); C. di Mario (Carlo)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Few data are available on long-term follow-up of drug-eluting stents in the treatment of chronic total occlusion (CTO). The LEADERS CTO sub-study compared the long-term results in CTO and non-CTO lesions of a Biolimus A9™-eluting stent (BES) with a sirolimus-eluting stent (SE

  15. A Public Trial De Novo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Jane Bjørn; Gad, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the concept of “industrial interests” and examines its role in a topical controversy about a large research grant from a private foundation, the Novo Nordisk Foundation, to the University of Copenhagen. The authors suggest that the debate took the form of a “public trial......” where the grant and close(r) intermingling between industry and public research was prosecuted and defended. First, the authors address how the grant was framed in the media. Second, they redescribe the case by introducing new “evidence” that, because of this framing, did not reach “the court.......” The article ends with a discussion of some implications of the analysis, including that policy making, academic research, and public debates might benefit from more detailed accounts of interests and stakes....

  16. Alien wavelength modeling tool and field trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sambo, N.; Sgambelluri, A.; Secondini, M.

    2015-01-01

    A modeling tool is presented for pre-FEC BER estimation of PM-QPSK alien wavelength signals. A field trial is demonstrated and used as validation of the tool's correctness. A very close correspondence between the performance of the field trial and the one predicted by the modeling tool has been...

  17. International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The mission of the WHO Intemational Clinical Trials Registry Platform is to ensure that a complete view of research is accessible to all those involved in health care decision making.This will improve research transparency and will ultimately strengthen tha validity and value of the scientific evidence base.The registration of all interventional trials is a scientific, ethical and moral responsibility.

  18. National Lung Screening Trial Results: Fast Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    On November 4, 2010, the NLST reported initial trial results, showing 20 percent fewer lung cancer deaths among trial participants screened with low-dose helical CT (also known as spiral CT) compared to those who got screened with chest X-rays.

  19. Blinded trials taken to the test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, A; Forfang, E; Haahr, M T

    2007-01-01

    Blinding can reduce bias in randomized clinical trials, but blinding procedures may be unsuccessful. Our aim was to assess how often randomized clinical trials test the success of blinding, the methods involved and how often blinding is reported as being successful....

  20. The design of cluster randomized crossover trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, C.; Moerbeek, M.

    2011-01-01

    The inefficiency induced by between-cluster variation in cluster randomized (CR) trials can be reduced by implementing a crossover (CO) design. In a simple CO trial, each subject receives each treatment in random order. A powerful characteristic of this design is that each subject serves as its own

  1. Trial Sequential Methods for Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Wood, John

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods for sequential meta-analysis have applications also for the design of new trials. Existing methods are based on group sequential methods developed for single trials and start with the calculation of a required information size. This works satisfactorily within the framework of fixed effects meta-analysis, but conceptual…

  2. Clinical Trials and the Role of the Oncology Clinical Trials Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Elizabeth A; Royce, Cheryl

    2017-03-01

    Clinical trials are paramount to improving human health. New trial designs and informed consent issues are emerging as a result of genomic profiling and the development of molecularly targeted agents. Many groups and individuals are responsible for ensuring the protection of research participants and the quality of the data produced. The specialty role of the clinical trials nurse (CTN) is critical to clinical trials. Oncology CTNs have competencies that can help guide their practice; however, not all oncology clinical trials are supervised by a nurse. Using the process of engagement, one organization has restructured oncology CTNs under a nurse-supervised model.

  3. Why are clinical trials necessary in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramani Poongothai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials are emerging as an important activity in India as it is an essential component of the drug discovery and development program to which India is committed. The only robust way to evaluate a new medicine is by doing properly designed clinical trials. In addition to advancing science, clinical trials offer myriad benefits to the participants. The recent hue that created in India about clinical trials is probably an exaggeration of facts. However, these points to the need for ensuring proper compliance with the regulatory norms and proper training of concerned personnel in good clinical practice (GCP. This will ensure that India continues to reap the benefits of clinical trials and also become a world leader in this field.

  4. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, David; Roberts, Ian; Elbourne, Diana R; Shakur, Haleema; Knight, Rosemary C; Garcia, Jo; Snowdon, Claire; Entwistle, Vikki A; McDonald, Alison M; Grant, Adrian M; Campbell, Marion K

    2007-11-20

    Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, of 12 factors that may affect the success of the marketing and sales activities associated with clinical trials. The case study demonstrates that trials need various categories of people to buy in - hence, to be successful, trialists must embrace marketing strategies to some extent. The performance of future clinical trials could be enhanced if trialists routinely considered these factors.

  5. Paperless clinical trials: Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandeep K.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to expedite the time-to-market for new drugs and to make the approval process simpler. But clinical trials are a complex process and the increased complexity leads to decreased efficiency. Hence, pharmaceutical organizations want to move toward a more technology-driven clinical trial process for recording, analyzing, reporting, archiving, etc., In recent times, the progress has certainly been made in developing paperless systems that improve data capture and management. The adaptation of paperless processes may require major changes to existing procedures. But this is in the best interests of these organizations to remain competitive because a paperless clinical trial would lead to a consistent and streamlined framework. Moreover, all major regulatory authorities also advocate adoption of paperless trial. But challenges still remain toward implementation of paperless clinical trial process. PMID:26288464

  6. Ethics of clinical trials in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick I Okonta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conduct of clinical trials for the development and licensing of drugs is a very important aspect of healthcare. Drug research, development and promotion have grown to a multi-billion dollar global business. Like all areas of human endeavour involving generation and control of huge financial resources, it could be subject to deviant behaviour, sharp business practices and unethical practices. The main objective of this review is to highlight potential ethical challenges in the conduct of clinical trials in Nigeria and outline ways in which these can be avoided. Current international and national regulatory and ethical guidelines are reviewed to illustrate the requirements for ethical conduct of clinical trials. Past experiences of unethical conduct of clinical trials especially in developing countries along with the increasing globalisation of research makes it imperative that all players should be aware of the ethical challenges in clinical trials and the benchmarks for ethical conduct of clinical research in Nigeria.

  7. Paperless clinical trials: Myth or reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep K Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to expedite the time-to-market for new drugs and to make the approval process simpler. But clinical trials are a complex process and the increased complexity leads to decreased efficiency. Hence, pharmaceutical organizations want to move toward a more technology-driven clinical trial process for recording, analyzing, reporting, archiving, etc., In recent times, the progress has certainly been made in developing paperless systems that improve data capture and management. The adaptation of paperless processes may require major changes to existing procedures. But this is in the best interests of these organizations to remain competitive because a paperless clinical trial would lead to a consistent and streamlined framework. Moreover, all major regulatory authorities also advocate adoption of paperless trial. But challenges still remain toward implementation of paperless clinical trial process.

  8. Paperless clinical trials: Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sandeep K

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to expedite the time-to-market for new drugs and to make the approval process simpler. But clinical trials are a complex process and the increased complexity leads to decreased efficiency. Hence, pharmaceutical organizations want to move toward a more technology-driven clinical trial process for recording, analyzing, reporting, archiving, etc., In recent times, the progress has certainly been made in developing paperless systems that improve data capture and management. The adaptation of paperless processes may require major changes to existing procedures. But this is in the best interests of these organizations to remain competitive because a paperless clinical trial would lead to a consistent and streamlined framework. Moreover, all major regulatory authorities also advocate adoption of paperless trial. But challenges still remain toward implementation of paperless clinical trial process.

  9. Ethics of clinical trials in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonta, Patrick I

    2014-05-01

    The conduct of clinical trials for the development and licensing of drugs is a very important aspect of healthcare. Drug research, development and promotion have grown to a multi-billion dollar global business. Like all areas of human endeavour involving generation and control of huge financial resources, it could be subject to deviant behaviour, sharp business practices and unethical practices. The main objective of this review is to highlight potential ethical challenges in the conduct of clinical trials in Nigeria and outline ways in which these can be avoided. Current international and national regulatory and ethical guidelines are reviewed to illustrate the requirements for ethical conduct of clinical trials. Past experiences of unethical conduct of clinical trials especially in developing countries along with the increasing globalisation of research makes it imperative that all players should be aware of the ethical challenges in clinical trials and the benchmarks for ethical conduct of clinical research in Nigeria.

  10. Methodological issues in negative symptom trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Stephen R; Daniel, David G; Alphs, Larry; Awad, A George; Keefe, Richard S E

    2011-03-01

    Individuals from academia, the pharmaceutical industry, and the US Food and Drug Administration used a workshop format to discuss important methodological issues in the design of trials of pharmacological agents for improving negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The issues addressed included the need for a coprimary functional measure for registration trials; the characteristics of individuals who should enter negative symptom trials; the optimal duration for a proof-of-concept or registration trial; the optimal design of a study of a broad-spectrum agent that treats both positive and negative symptoms or a co-medication that is added to an antipsychotic; the relative strengths and weaknesses of available instruments for measuring negative symptoms; the definition of clinically meaningful improvement for these trials; and whether drugs can be approved for a subdomain of negative symptoms.

  11. Automated information extraction of key trial design elements from clinical trial publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Berry; Carini, Simona; Kiritchenko, Svetlana; Martin, Joel; Sim, Ida

    2008-11-06

    Clinical trials are one of the most valuable sources of scientific evidence for improving the practice of medicine. The Trial Bank project aims to improve structured access to trial findings by including formalized trial information into a knowledge base. Manually extracting trial information from published articles is costly, but automated information extraction techniques can assist. The current study highlights a single architecture to extract a wide array of information elements from full-text publications of randomized clinical trials (RCTs). This architecture combines a text classifier with a weak regular expression matcher. We tested this two-stage architecture on 88 RCT reports from 5 leading medical journals, extracting 23 elements of key trial information such as eligibility rules, sample size, intervention, and outcome names. Results prove this to be a promising avenue to help critical appraisers, systematic reviewers, and curators quickly identify key information elements in published RCT articles.

  12. Clinical Trials: Information and Options for People with Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Clinical Trials: Information and Options for People with Mood Disorders What are clinical trials? Clinical trials are research studies involving people, which ...

  13. Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Clinical Trials Clinical Trials, A Healthier Future for All Past Issues / Fall ... in was reviewed by an IRB. Find a Clinical Trial Near You Health research takes place at hospitals, ...

  14. Biopharmaceutical industry-sponsored global clinical trials in emerging countries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alvarenga, Lenio Souza; Martins, Elisabeth Nogueira

    2010-01-01

    .... Proportions of sites in each country were compared among emerging countries. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to evaluate whether trial placement in Brazil could be predicted by trial location in other countries and/or by trial features...

  15. Characteristics of pediatric pulmonary hypertension trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awerbach, Jordan D; Krasuski, Richard A; Hill, Kevin D

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of pediatric pulmonary hypertension (PH) drugs has been identified as a high priority by the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH). Studying pediatric PH is challenging due to the rare and heterogeneous nature of the disease. We sought to define the pediatric PH clinical trials landscape, to evaluate areas of trial success or failure, and to identify potential obstacles to the study of pediatric PH drugs. Interventional pediatric (ages 0-17 years) PH trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov from June 2005 through December 2014 were analyzed. There were 45 pediatric PH trials registered during the study period. Median (IQR) projected trial enrollment was 40 (24-63), with seven trials (16%) targeting > 100 participants. Industry was the most common trial sponsor (n = 23, 50%), with only two (4.4%) NIH-sponsored trials. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors were the most frequently studied drug (n = 18, 39%). Single group study designs were used in 44% (n = 20) with an active comparator (parallel, factorial, or cross-over designs) in 25 trials, including 22 with randomization and ten that were double-blinded. Study outcomes varied markedly with inconsistent use of known surrogate and composite endpoints. One-third of trials (n = 15, 33%) were terminated, predominantly due to poor participant enrollment. Of the 17 completed trials, 11 had published results and only three efficacy trials met their primary endpoint. There are unique challenges to drug development in pediatric PH, including enrolling patients, identifying appropriate study endpoints, and conducting randomized, controlled, double-blind trials where the likelihood of meeting the study endpoint is optimized.

  16. Characteristics of clinical trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov, 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califf, Robert M; Zarin, Deborah A; Kramer, Judith M; Sherman, Rachel E; Aberle, Laura H; Tasneem, Asba

    2012-05-02

    Recent reports highlight gaps between guidelines-based treatment recommendations and evidence from clinical trials that supports those recommendations. Strengthened reporting requirements for studies registered with ClinicalTrials.gov enable a comprehensive evaluation of the national trials portfolio. To examine fundamental characteristics of interventional clinical trials registered in the ClinicalTrials.gov database. A data set comprising 96,346 clinical studies from ClinicalTrials.gov was downloaded on September 27, 2010, and entered into a relational database to analyze aggregate data. Interventional trials were identified and analyses were focused on 3 clinical specialties-cardiovascular, mental health, and oncology-that together encompass the largest number of disability-adjusted life-years lost in the United States. Characteristics of registered clinical trials as reported data elements in the trial registry; how those characteristics have changed over time; differences in characteristics as a function of clinical specialty; and factors associated with use of randomization, blinding, and data monitoring committees (DMCs). The number of registered interventional clinical trials increased from 28,881 (October 2004-September 2007) to 40,970 (October 2007-September 2010), and the number of missing data elements has generally declined. Most interventional trials registered between 2007 and 2010 were small, with 62% enrolling 100 or fewer participants. Many clinical trials were single-center (66%; 24,788/37,520) and funded by organizations other than industry or the National Institutes of Health (NIH) (47%; 17,592/37,520). Heterogeneity in the reported methods by clinical specialty; sponsor type; and the reported use of DMCs, randomization, and blinding was evident. For example, reported use of DMCs was less common in industry-sponsored vs NIH-sponsored trials (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.11; 95% CI, 0.09-0.14), earlier-phase vs phase 3 trials (adjusted OR, 0

  17. Disclosure of investigators' recruitment performance in multicenter clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal-Ré, Rafael; Moher, David; Gluud, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends.......Rafael Dal-Ré and colleagues argue that the recruitment targets and performance of all site investigators in multi-centre clinical trials should be disclosed in trial registration sites before a trial starts, and when it ends....

  18. Clinical trial registration in oral health journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaïl-Faugeron, V; Fron-Chabouis, H; Durieux, P

    2015-03-01

    Prospective registration of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) represents the best solution to reporting bias. The extent to which oral health journals have endorsed and complied with RCT registration is unknown. We identified journals publishing RCTs in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine in the Journal Citation Reports. We classified journals into 3 groups: journals requiring or recommending trial registration, journals referring indirectly to registration, and journals providing no reference to registration. For the 5 journals with the highest 2012 impact factors in each group, we assessed whether RCTs with results published in 2013 had been registered. Of 78 journals examined, 32 (41%) required or recommended trial registration, 19 (24%) referred indirectly to registration, and 27 (35%) provided no reference to registration. We identified 317 RCTs with results published in the 15 selected journals in 2013. Overall, 73 (23%) were registered in a trial registry. Among those, 91% were registered retrospectively and 32% did not report trial registration in the published article. The proportion of trials registered was not significantly associated with editorial policies: 29% with results in journals that required or recommended registration, 15% in those that referred indirectly to registration, and 21% in those providing no reference to registration (P = 0.05). Less than one-quarter of RCTs with results published in a sample of oral health journals were registered with a public registry. Improvements are needed with respect to how journals inform and require their authors to register their trials.

  19. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Grignolo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI is a public-private partnership created in 2007 between the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA and Duke University for the purpose of identifying practices that will increase the quality and efficiency of clinical trials. The initiative was generated from the realization that the clinical trials system in the United States has been suffering as a result of increasingly longer study start-up times, slowing enrollment of patients into trials, increasing clinical trial costs, and declining investigator interest in participating in clinical trials. Although CTTI was created to address a crisis for US clinical research, it seeks to identify practice improvements that can be applied internationally, and is therefore engaging international collaborators with international efforts that have similar objectives. CTTI's approach is to involve all sectors in the selection, conduct, and interpretation of its projects; to keep the dialogue open across sectors; to provide evidence that can influence regulatory guidance, and to attempt to create a "level playing field" when recommending change. The hope is that a broad and diverse data-driven discussion of the important issues in clinical trials will lead to meaningful change for the benefit of all concerned, and importantly for patients.

  20. Justifying clinical trials for porcine islet xenotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Cara E; Korbutt, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Edmonton Protocol encouraged a great deal of optimism that a cell-based cure for type I diabetes could be achieved. However, donor organ shortages prevent islet transplantation from being a widespread solution as the supply cannot possibly equal the demand. Porcine islet xenotransplantation has the potential to address these shortages, and recent preclinical and clinical trials show promising scientific support. Consequently, it is important to consider whether the current science meets the ethical requirements for moving toward clinical trials. Despite the potential risks and the scientific unknowns that remain to be investigated, there is optimism regarding the xenotransplantation of some types of tissue, and enough evidence has been gathered to ethically justify clinical trials for the most safe and advanced area of research, porcine islet transplantation. Researchers must make a concerted effort to maintain a positive image for xenotransplantation, as a few well-publicized failed trials could irrevocably damage public perception of xenotransplantation. Because all of society carries the burden of risk, it is important that the public be involved in the decision to proceed. As new information from preclinical and clinical trials develops, policy decisions should be frequently updated. If at any point evidence shows that islet xenotransplantation is unsafe, then clinical trials will no longer be justified and they should be halted. However, as of now, the expected benefit of an unlimited supply of islets, combined with adequate informed consent, justifies clinical trials for islet xenotransplantation.

  1. The clinically-integrated randomized trial: proposed novel method for conducting large trials at low cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scardino Peter T

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Randomized controlled trials provide the best method of determining which of two comparable treatments is preferable. Unfortunately, contemporary randomized trials have become increasingly expensive, complex and burdened by regulation, so much so that many trials are of doubtful feasibility. Discussion Here we present a proposal for a novel, streamlined approach to randomized trials: the "clinically-integrated randomized trial". The key aspect of our methodology is that the clinical experience of the patient and doctor is virtually indistinguishable whether or not the patient is randomized, primarily because outcome data are obtained from routine clinical data, or from short, web-based questionnaires. Integration of a randomized trial into routine clinical practice also implies that there should be an attempt to randomize every patient, a corollary of which is that eligibility criteria are minimized. The similar clinical experience of patients on- and off-study also entails that the marginal cost of putting an additional patient on trial is negligible. We propose examples of how the clinically-integrated randomized trial might be applied in four distinct areas of medicine: comparisons of surgical techniques, "me too" drugs, rare diseases and lifestyle interventions. Barriers to implementing clinically-integrated randomized trials are discussed. Conclusion The proposed clinically-integrated randomized trial may allow us to enlarge dramatically the number of clinical questions that can be addressed by randomization.

  2. Pragmatic design in randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgato, M; Barbui, C; Stroup, S; Adams, C

    2015-01-01

    At more than 10 years after the paper by Hotopf and colleagues regarding pragmatic trials in psychiatry, the field has evolved and is evolving further. There have been many developments in our understanding of what pragmatism really means, and excellent examples of truly pragmatic trials in psychiatry are currently available. Funders have helped encourage more emphasis on the need for such studies, but 'local' and trans-national regulations could help more. Consumers of the evidence should have a greater voice in generating the research agenda and, as this happens, the questions generated are more likely to be answered by a pragmatic approach to trials.

  3. Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fei-Fei; Okunieff, Paul; Bernhard, Eric J.; Stone, Helen B.; Yoo, Stephen; Coleman, C. Norman; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Brown, Martin; Buatti, John; Guha, Chandan

    2013-01-01

    A Workshop entitled “Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Trials” was held on December 7–8th, 2011 in Bethesda, MD, to present and discuss some of the recently conducted Radiation Oncology clinical trials with a focus on those that failed to refute the null hypothesis. The objectives of this Workshop were to summarize and examine the questions that these trials provoked, to assess the quality and limitations of the pre-clinical data that supported the hypotheses underlying these trials, an...

  4. Analysis of the third field trial

    OpenAIRE

    Alabau, Vicent; Carl, Michael; Martínez, García, G.; González-Rubio, Jesús; Mesa-Lao, Bartolomé; Ortiz-Martínez, Daniel; Rodrigues,Sofia; Schaeffer, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    In this work package, we evaluate the CasMaCat workbench in eld trials to study the use of the workbench in a real-world environment. We have also integrated the workbench into community translation platforms and collected user activity data from both eld trials and volunteer translators interacting with the workbench. This Deliverable covers Task 6.1 and 6.2. Task 6.1: Third eld trial at a translation agency (Celer Soluciones SL in Madrid) to evaluate the CasMaCat work...

  5. Analysis of the second Field trial

    OpenAIRE

    Iglesias, Eva Marcos; Pellegrino, Massimiliano; Carl, Michael; García-Martínez, Mercedes; Mesa-Lao, Bartolomé; Underwood, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    In this work package, we evaluate the CasMaCat workbench in eld trials to study the use of the workbench in a real-world environment. We will also integrate the workbench into com- munity translation platforms and collect user activity data from both eld trials and volunteer translators. This Deliverable covers Tasks 6.1 and 6.2. Task 6.1: Three eld trials at a translation agency (Celer Soluciones SL)to evaluate the CasMaCat workbench in a real-world professional translat...

  6. Provenance trials of larch in Siberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milyutin, L.I. [V.N. Sukachev Inst. of Forest SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Some results of provenance trials of larch in Siberia are given. These provenance trials were established in the last thirty years by efforts of V.N. Sukaczev Inst. of Forest. Provenances and species of larch were tested in some field trials distributed over Siberia between Lat. N 52 deg and 66 deg, Long. E 88 deg and 113 deg: near Krasnoyarsk, in Republic Khakasia (an altitudes of 800 and 1200 metres), in the Lower Yenisei near Turukhansk, in the west and south regions of Krasnoyarsk territory, in the Upper Lena, near Chita. 2 refs

  7. Function: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakuri Seyed Kazem

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prevention of pulmonary complications after coronary artery bypass graft is attended as a very important issue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of pulmonary rehabilitation before surgery for reducing the risk of pulmonary complications after surgery. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 60 patients undergoing heart surgery were randomly divided into two groups A and B. Chest physiotherapy was performed before and after surgery on group A patients however it was done on group B’s, only after surgery. Effects of preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation were compared between two groups, using spirometry and arterial blood gas (ABG. Results: Thirty nine males (65% and 21 females (35% with mean age of 8.10 ± 9.56 were analyzed.The mean differences were statistically significant for predicted forced vital capacity (FVC (CI95%:1.3 to 8.7 and Predicted Peak Flow indices (PEF (CI 95%: 1.9 to 9.4 of spirometry indicator,PCO2 index (of ABG parameter (CI 95%: 1.4 to 8.9 and mean oxygen saturation (mean Spo2 (CI 95%: 0.6 to 1.7 of ABG index in two groups. Conclusion: The performance of pulmonary rehabilitation program before surgery is recommended, as it may result in the reduction of complications of heart surgery.

  8. Fluid Lavage of Open Wounds (FLOW): A Multicenter, Blinded, Factorial Trial Comparing Alternative Irrigating Solutions and Pressures in Patients with Open Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    months, and 10 • patient’s illness beliefs with the Somatic Pre-Occupation and Coping ( SPOC ) questionnaire at 1 week and 6 weeks. 10a. SF-12 The SF...used in a sub-study comparing the test version to the validated version, which uses 3-level response options. 10c. SPOC The SPOC questionnaire...fractures SPOC : Somatic pre-occupation and coping questionnaire SSI: Surgical Site Infection FLOW February 19, 2013 Version: 6.0 Study Summary

  9. Recruitment to randomised trials: strategies for trial enrollment and participation study. The STEPS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M K; Snowdon, C; Francis, D; Elbourne, D; McDonald, A M; Knight, R; Entwistle, V; Garcia, J; Roberts, I; Grant, A; Grant, A

    2007-11-01

    To identify factors associated with good and poor recruitment to multicentre trials. Part A: database of trials started in or after 1994 and were due to end before 2003 held by the Medical Research Council and Health Technology Assessment Programmes. Part B: interviews with people playing a wide range of roles within four trials that their funders identified as 'exemplars'. Part C: a large multicentre trial (the CRASH trial) of treatment for head injury. The study used a number of different perspectives ('multiple lenses'), and three components. Part A: an epidemiological review of a cohort of trials. Part B: case studies of trials that appeared to have particularly interesting lessons for recruitment. Part C: a single, in-depth case study to examine the feasibility of applying a business-orientated analytical framework as a reference model in future trials. In the 114 trials found in Part A, less than one-third recruited their original target within the time originally specified, and around one-third had extensions. Factors observed more often in trials that recruited successfully were: having a dedicated trial manager, being a cancer or drug trial, and having interventions only available inside the trial. The most commonly reported strategies to improve recruitment were newsletters and mailshots, but it was not possible to assess whether they were causally linked to changes in recruitment. The analyses in Part B suggested that successful trials were those addressing clinically important questions at a timely point. The investigators were held in high esteem by the interviewees, and the trials were firmly grounded in existing clinical practices, so that the trial processes were not alien to clinical collaborators, and the results could be easily applicable to future practice. The interviewees considered that the needs of patients were well served by participation in the trials. Clinical collaborators particularly appreciated clear delineation of roles, which

  10. Population activity changes during a trial-to-trial adaptation of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Jing, Wei; Zhang, Pu-Ming; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-07-09

    A 'trial-to-trial adaptation' of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells in response to a repetitive light stimulus was investigated in the present study. Using the multielectrode recording technique, we studied the trial-to-trial adaptive properties of ganglion cells and explored the activity of population neurons during this adaptation process. It was found that the ganglion cells adapted with different degrees: their firing rates were decreased in different extents from early-adaptation to late-adaptation stage, and this was accompanied by a decrease in cross-correlation strength. In addition, adaptation behavior was different for ON-response and OFF-response, which implied that the mechanism of the trial-to-trial adaptation might involve bipolar cells and/or their synapses with other neurons and the stronger adaptation in the ganglion cells' OFF-responses might reflect the requirement to avoid possible saturation in the OFF circuit.

  11. Narrating the Mensalão trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Coming to a close in the last days of 2012, the trial of the so-called mensalão network was heralded as Brazil's trial of the century. Involving corruption in the top ranks of the business world and the former government, the process ended with an exceptional result in the sense that severe...... sentences were meted out to 25 of the 38 defendants, thereby breaking an established pattern of impunity for corrupt politicians in Brazilian courts. As a scandal potentially harmful for the governing party and the former president Luis “Lula” da Silva, the eyes and spotlights of the national media were...... fixed on the trial. However, the varying and contested ways in which the case was presented by media from the outbreak of the scandal in 2005 until the end of the trial bears witness to the fact that narratives concerning corruption scandals can potentially encompass a broad range of political...

  12. Blinding in randomized clinical trials: imposed impartiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, A; Boutron, I

    2011-01-01

    Blinding, or "masking," is a crucial method for reducing bias in randomized clinical trials. In this paper, we review important methodological aspects of blinding, emphasizing terminology, reporting, bias mechanisms, empirical evidence, and the risk of unblinding. Theoretical considerations...

  13. Monitoring clinical trials: a practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Síle F; Henley, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the processes and procedures involved in planning, conducting and reporting monitoring activities for large Clinical Trials of Investigational Medicinal Products (CTIMPs), focusing on those conducted in resource-limited settings. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. the infrastructure supporting hiv vaccine clinical trials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    networks, namely the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN - www.hvtn.org) and the International ... These include life skills education, sanitation, potable water supply ... and data management centre, central laboratories, a community advisory ...

  15. Citicoline for ischemic stroke: ICTUS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data available in the literature on the use of citicoline in an experimental model of ischemic stroke (IS and in randomized multicenter placebo-controlled trials. It analyzes the results of the ICTUS trial in which 2298 patients with IS who received randomly citicoline or placebo for 24 hours after the onset of symptoms (I000 mg intravenously every I2 hours during the first 3 days, then orally as one 500-mg tablet every 12 hours during 6 weeks. The results of the trial confirmed the safety of citicoline used in IS, but failed to show its significant advantage over placebo in reducing the degree of disability (global improvement 90 days later. However, to pool the results of the ICTUS trial with those of other randomized multicenter placebo-controlled studies demonstrates a significant decrease in the degree of disability in IS patients treated with citicoline.

  16. Nutrition Intervention Trials in Linxian, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randomized controlled trials were launched in 1985 to test the effects of multiple vitamin and mineral interventions on total mortality and total and cause-specific cancer mortality in a rural Chinese population

  17. Ebola Vaccine Appears Very Effective in Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162715.html Ebola Vaccine Appears Very Effective in Trial Drug manufacturer says ... Dec. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental Ebola vaccine was highly effective against the deadly virus in ...

  18. The New Math of Clinical Trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jennifer Couzin

    2004-01-01

    ... altering them as they run to take into account accumulating results. Although Bayesian designs are now widely used in everything from astrophysics to ecology, they've been slower to catch on in medical research, particularly clinical trials...

  19. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research.

  20. Trials of electronet fencing to exclude coyotes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the trials of using electronet fencing to exclude coyotes for the protection of black-footed ferrets in Montana. Reintroduction of black-tailed...

  1. The PACT trial: PAtient Centered Telerehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Stefan Rothgangel

    2015-01-01

    Discussion: Several questions concerning the study design that emerged during the preparation of this trial will be discussed. This will include how these questions were addressed and arguments for the choices that were made.

  2. The unintended consequences of clinical trials regulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex D McMahon

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Alex McMahon and colleagues critique the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH guidance on good clinical practice (GCP, arguing that it is having a disastrous effect on noncommerical randomized clinical trials in Europe.

  3. The unintended consequences of clinical trials regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Alex D McMahon; Conway, David I; MacDonald, Tom M; McInnes, Gordon T

    2009-01-01

    Alex McMahon and colleagues critique the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guidance on good clinical practice (GCP), arguing that it is having a disastrous effect on noncommerical randomized clinical trials in Europe.

  4. Involving South Asian patients in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain-Gambles, M; Leese, B; Atkin, K; Brown, J; Mason, S; Tovey, P

    2004-10-01

    To investigate how South Asian patients conceptualise the notion of clinical trials and to identify key processes that impact on trial participation and the extent to which communication difficulties, perceptions of risk and attitudes to authority influence these decisions. Also to identify whether 'South Asian' patients are homogeneous in these issues, and which factors differ between different South Asian subgroups and finally how professionals regard the involvement of South Asian patients and their views on strategies to increase participation. A review of the literature on minority ethnic participation in clinical trials was followed by three qualitative interview studies. Interviews were taped and transcribed (and translated if required) and subjected to framework analysis. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 25 health professionals; 60 South Asian lay people who had not taken part in a trial and 15 South Asian trial participants. Motivations for trial participation were identified as follows: to help society, to improve own health or that of family and friends, out of obligation to the doctor and to increase scientific knowledge. Deterrents were concerns about drug side-effects, busy lifestyles, language, previous bad experiences, mistrust and feelings of not belonging to British society. There was no evidence of antipathy amongst South Asians to the concept of clinical trials and, overall, the younger respondents were more knowledgeable than the older ones. Problems are more likely to be associated with service delivery. Lack of being approached was a common response. Lay-reported factors that might affect South Asian participation in clinical trials include age, language, social class, feeling of not belonging/mistrust, culture and religion. Awareness of clinical trials varied between each group. There are more similarities than differences in attitudes towards clinical trial participation between the South Asian and the general population

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Pharmacologically active: clinical trials and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-22

    Jan 22, 2008 ... Manufacturers Association, on the basis of a survey of its members ... from this information. The US database, on the other hand, clearly identifies 172 ... workforce involved in clinical trials outside the public sector. This figure ...

  6. Minority Representation in Migraine Treatment Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Nathaniel M; Bernat, James L

    2017-03-01

    Minorities have historically been underrepresented in clinical research trials despite having comparatively poor health indicators. Recognizing the dual inequalities of increased disease burden and decreased research participation, the National Institute of Health (NIH) Revitalization Act of 1993 mandated the inclusion and reporting of women and minorities in NIH-funded research. While progress has been made in the subsequent decades, this underrepresentation of minorities in research trials persists and has been documented in multiple disciplines. However, the extent of adequate representation and reporting of minority inclusion in clinical trials for migraine remains unknown. In this systematic review and study, we review the literature examining the representation of women and minorities in migraine clinical research trials METHODS: First we searched PubMed for pertinent articles examining the inclusion of women and minorities in migraine clinical research trials. Second, we identified controlled-trials for migraine published since 2011 in major neurology, headache, and general medicine journals using the terms "migraine randomized controlled trial." We then reviewed the results manually and excluded pilot studies and those with fewer than 50 participants. We next determined (a) how frequently representation of minorities and women were reported in these major trials; (b) what factors correlated with reporting; and (c) whether women and minority inclusion comprised their ratios in the general population. We identified 128 relevant clinical trials, of which 36 met our inclusion criteria. All 36 trials (100%) reported gender frequency, and 25 of 36 (69.4%) reported ethnicity or race. Among all studies, women and Whites represented 84.2 and 82.9% of participants (mean), respectively. Studies conducted in the United States and funded by a private company were more likely to report race than studies conducted exclusively outside of the U.S. or with a public sponsor

  7. Robust inference for group sequential trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, Jitendra; Lin, Yunzhi; Zhou, Kefei

    2017-03-01

    For ethical reasons, group sequential trials were introduced to allow trials to stop early in the event of extreme results. Endpoints in such trials are usually mortality or irreversible morbidity. For a given endpoint, the norm is to use a single test statistic and to use that same statistic for each analysis. This approach is risky because the test statistic has to be specified before the study is unblinded, and there is loss in power if the assumptions that ensure optimality for each analysis are not met. To minimize the risk of moderate to substantial loss in power due to a suboptimal choice of a statistic, a robust method was developed for nonsequential trials. The concept is analogous to diversification of financial investments to minimize risk. The method is based on combining P values from multiple test statistics for formal inference while controlling the type I error rate at its designated value.This article evaluates the performance of 2 P value combining methods for group sequential trials. The emphasis is on time to event trials although results from less complex trials are also included. The gain or loss in power with the combination method relative to a single statistic is asymmetric in its favor. Depending on the power of each individual test, the combination method can give more power than any single test or give power that is closer to the test with the most power. The versatility of the method is that it can combine P values from different test statistics for analysis at different times. The robustness of results suggests that inference from group sequential trials can be strengthened with the use of combined tests. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Gulf War Illness Inflammation Reduction Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0477 TITLE: Gulf War Illness Inflammation Reduction Trial PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ronald R. Bach, Ph.D...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Gulf War Illness Inflammation Reduction Trial 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0477 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...GWI). Elevated biomarkers of inflammation were observed in our pilot observational study of GWI. Thus, chronic inflammation appears to be part of

  9. The Impact of Putting Mubarak on Trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On August 3,2011,83-year-old former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak was put on trial,lying on a hospital bed an iron cage in a Cairo courtroom. Zhang Zhongxiang,Deputy Director of the Department of the West Asian and African Studies at the Shanghai Institutes for International Studies,believes that the Mubarak trial will not only aggravate conflict among Egyptian people, but also complicate the regional tensions and

  10. Therapeutic trials for systemic sclerosis: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sardana Kabir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc is complex, and the final story is yet to be elucidated. The clinical heterogeneity of the disease, its various autoimmune and antibody profiles, its long course and tendency for spontaneous cure makes the design of clinical trials difficult. The overwhelming need in this disease is to diagnose it early and identify those patients who will benefit most from early, aggressive treatment. We attempt to review data from recent clinical trials and the lessons derived.

  11. Phase 1 Trials in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Esther Yu; Muhammad Wasif Saif; Kathryn Huber

    2014-01-01

    Despite many clinical trials over the last two decades since the approval of gemcitabine, the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer has improved by a few only months. This disappointing reality underlines an urgent need to develop more effective drugs or better combinations. A variety of phase I trials were presented at the annual meeting of ASCO 2014 focusing on locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer. We summarize four abstracts (abstracts #4116, #4123, #4026, #4138).

  12. Trial geography, pharmacogenetics, and global drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, R N; Florian, J; Charlab, R; Pacanowski, M

    2015-03-01

    Drug development is increasingly global. The benefits of multiregional trials include worldwide evaluation of safety and efficacy. However, clinical practice, environmental, and genetic factors can vary across geographic regions, significantly influencing trial outcomes within a specific geographic region or the global population relative to the United States (US). Genomic technologies and research discoveries continue to advance at a remarkable pace, offering opportunities to explore intrinsic factors that could account for regional variability in drug pharmacokinetics or response.

  13. Razors versus clippers. A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tracy; Tanner, Judith

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this randomised controlled trial was to determine if patients showed a preference for preoperative hair removal with razors or clippers and to identify if one method was associated with more trauma or postoperative infections. The trial took place in a day surgery unit with patients who were having a range of surgical procedures including hernias and varicose veins. This study was sponsored by an award from the NATN/3M Clinical Fellowship.

  14. Strength of Mock-up Trial Grout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    The present report describes tests carried out on samples taken and cast during the execution of a mock-up trial placement of the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500 on January 21, 2009.......The present report describes tests carried out on samples taken and cast during the execution of a mock-up trial placement of the high performance grout MASTERFLOW 9500 on January 21, 2009....

  15. Phase 1 Trials in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Yu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite many clinical trials over the last two decades since the approval of gemcitabine, the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer has improved by a few only months. This disappointing reality underlines an urgent need to develop more effective drugs or better combinations. A variety of phase I trials were presented at the annual meeting of ASCO 2014 focusing on locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer. We summarize four abstracts (abstracts #4116, #4123, #4026, #4138.

  16. From international to zonal trials: the origins of the Nuremberg medical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weindling, P

    2000-01-01

    This article examines how plans to have a second International Military Tribunal led to the Medical Trial at Nuremberg. While the British opposed a second international trial because of their distrust of the Soviets, they supported a plan for a series of special zonal trials to be conducted by the American authorities at Nuremberg. In December 1945 the British became aware of the extent of medical war crimes committed by the Germans. Their investigation led to an eventual handover to the Americans of a group of German doctors for trial at Nuremberg. At the same time the British and French Supported an International Scientific Commission for the Investigation of Medical War Crimes.

  17. Qualitative research within trials: developing a standard operating procedure for a clinical trials unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Qualitative research methods are increasingly used within clinical trials to address broader research questions than can be addressed by quantitative methods alone. These methods enable health professionals, service users, and other stakeholders to contribute their views and experiences to evaluation of healthcare treatments, interventions, or policies, and influence the design of trials. Qualitative data often contribute information that is better able to reform policy or influence design. Methods Health services researchers, including trialists, clinicians, and qualitative researchers, worked collaboratively to develop a comprehensive portfolio of standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the West Wales Organisation for Rigorous Trials in Health (WWORTH), a clinical trials unit (CTU) at Swansea University, which has recently achieved registration with the UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC). Although the UKCRC requires a total of 25 SOPs from registered CTUs, WWORTH chose to add an additional qualitative-methods SOP (QM-SOP). Results The qualitative methods SOP (QM-SOP) defines good practice in designing and implementing qualitative components of trials, while allowing flexibility of approach and method. Its basic principles are that: qualitative researchers should be contributors from the start of trials with qualitative potential; the qualitative component should have clear aims; and the main study publication should report on the qualitative component. Conclusions We recommend that CTUs consider developing a QM-SOP to enhance the conduct of quantitative trials by adding qualitative data and analysis. We judge that this improves the value of quantitative trials, and contributes to the future development of multi-method trials. PMID:23433341

  18. Clinical trial networks in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangan, A; Jefferson, L; Baker, P; Cook, L

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to review the role of clinical trial networks in orthopaedic surgery. A total of two electronic databases (MEDLINE and EMBASE) were searched from inception to September 2013 with no language restrictions. Articles related to randomised controlled trials (RCTs), research networks and orthopaedic research, were identified and reviewed. The usefulness of trainee-led research collaborations is reported and our knowledge of current clinical trial infrastructure further supplements the review. Searching yielded 818 titles and abstracts, of which 12 were suitable for this review. Results are summarised and presented narratively under the following headings: 1) identifying clinically relevant research questions; 2) education and training; 3) conduct of multicentre RCTs and 4) dissemination and adoption of trial results. This review confirms growing international awareness of the important role research networks play in supporting trials in orthopaedic surgery. Multidisciplinary collaboration and adequate investment in trial infrastructure are crucial for successful delivery of RCTs. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:169-74. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  19. Randomized controlled trials - a matter of design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieth, Peter Markus; Kubasch, Anne Sophie; Penzlin, Ana Isabel; Illigens, Ben Min-Woo; Barlinn, Kristian; Siepmann, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the hallmark of evidence-based medicine and form the basis for translating research data into clinical practice. This review summarizes commonly applied designs and quality indicators of RCTs to provide guidance in interpreting and critically evaluating clinical research data. It further reflects on the principle of equipoise and its practical applicability to clinical science with an emphasis on critical care and neurological research. We performed a review of educational material, review articles, methodological studies, and published clinical trials using the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov. The most relevant recommendations regarding design, conduction, and reporting of RCTs may include the following: 1) clinically relevant end points should be defined a priori, and an unbiased analysis and report of the study results should be warranted, 2) both significant and nonsignificant results should be objectively reported and published, 3) structured study design and performance as indicated in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement should be employed as well as registration in a public trial database, 4) potential conflicts of interest and funding sources should be disclaimed in study report or publication, and 5) in the comparison of experimental treatment with standard care, preplanned interim analyses during an ongoing RCT can aid in maintaining clinical equipoise by assessing benefit, harm, or futility, thus allowing decision on continuation or termination of the trial.

  20. The International "Trial of the 20th Century": Nuremberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemerinsky, Erwin

    1999-01-01

    Considers the Nuremberg trials to be the "Trial of the Century." Highlights the series of 13 trials in which Nazi leaders, officials, judges, and others were tried, and most convicted, for war crimes. Relates that these trials had far-reaching effects in that they showed that moral obligations transcend national boundaries. (CMK)

  1. UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP trial (a multicentre trial of prednisolone versus ciclosporin for pyoderma gangrenosum: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Fiona F

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is a rare inflammatory skin disorder characterised by painful and rapidly progressing skin ulceration. PG can be extremely difficult to treat and patients often require systemic immunosuppression. Recurrent lesions of PG are common, but the relative rarity of this condition means that there is a lack of published evidence regarding its treatment. A systematic review published in 2005 found no randomised controlled trials (RCTs relating to the treatment of PG. Since this time, one small RCT has been published comparing infliximab to placebo, but none of the commonly used systemic treatments for PG have been formally assessed. The UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network’s STOP GAP Trial has been designed to address this lack of trial evidence. Methods The objective is to assess whether oral ciclosporin is more effective than oral prednisolone for the treatment of PG. The trial design is a two-arm, observer-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial comparing ciclosporin (4 mg/kg/day to prednisolone (0.75 mg/kg/day. A total of 140 participants are to be recruited over a period of 4 years, from up to 50 hospitals in the UK and Eire. Primary outcome of velocity of healing at 6 weeks is assessed blinded to treatment allocation (using digital images of the ulcers. Secondary outcomes include: (i time to healing; (ii global assessment of improvement; (iii PG inflammation assessment scale score; (iv self-reported pain; (v health-related quality of life; (vi time to recurrence; (vii treatment failures; (viii adverse reactions to study medications; and (ix cost effectiveness/utility. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG (excluding granulomatous PG; measurable ulceration (that is, not pustular PG; and patients aged over 18 years old who are able to give informed consent are included in the trial. Randomisation is by computer generated code using permuted blocks of randomly varying size

  2. Study of the trial subjects’ protection aspects in Phase I clinical trials and bioequivalence studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Zupanets

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Protection of rights, health and well-being of persons who are taking the drug during the trial (trial subjects is one of the basic principles of clinical trials (CT management. Aim. In order to study key aspects of volunteer protection, determine factors that influence these indicators and estimate the importance of ensuring their proper implementation on the clinical site (CS three survey of 135 trial subjects were carried out to evaluate the importance of assessing the impact of factors such as the procedure of signing the informed consent (IC at the CS and testing procedures for HIV / AIDS, hepatitis and others. Assessment of the quality of life of trial subjects as indirect indicator of the quality of clinical trials that ensures the proper protection of their life was the subject of the third survey. Methods and results. The general model of the relationship between the key aspects of the trial subjects protection and the factors which are providing them during the clinical trials of drugs management was substantiated, which included the main aspects of the trial subjects’ protection, protective factors and basic CT management procedures, the impact of the above factors on the possibility of providing protection aspects depends on their implementation quality. It was found that trial subjects’ protection improvement can be achieved during the IC signing process. It is necessary to ensure a higher level of volunteers understanding of the terms that could be used in the IC form. Regarding the procedure of compulsory testing for HIV/AIDS in the course of screening, we can conclude that the majority of the trial subjects believe that this procedure is an additional factor in their health protection and do not consider it as an excessive psychological pressure on them. Conclusion. Assessing the quality of life during the bioequivalence study at the CS makes possible to reach a conclusion on general well-being and satisfaction with those

  3. Biased safety reporting in blinded randomized clinical trials: meta-analysis of angiotensin receptor blocker trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi Takabayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cough is listed as an adverse drug reaction (ADR on the labels of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB. However, a causal association with cough has also been reported for angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI, which have frequently been used as comparator drugs in the registration clinical trials of ARBs. This prompted us to examine the possible influence of using comparator drugs with well-known ADRs on the safety reporting of investigational drugs in blinded randomized clinical trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The double-blinded, randomized clinical trials with comparator drugs were identified in the Japanese dossiers for the new drug applications of ARBs. The risk ratios (RR of reporting cough and headache in ARB arms were calculated for each ARB by comparing trials using ACEIs and trials using non-ACEIs, were then combined with a meta-analysis. 23 trials with a total of 6643 patients were identified, consisting 6 trials using an ACEI comparator including 819 ARB patients and 17 trials using a non-ACEI comparator including 5824 ARB patients. The combined RR of cough reporting was significantly elevated (20.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 7.47 to 57.76, indicating more frequent reporting of cough in clinical trials using an ACEI comparator. In contrast, the combined RR of headache, a negative control, was insignificant (1.45; 95% CI, 0.34 to 6.22. CONCLUSION: The use of comparators with well-known ADRs in blinded randomized trials produces potential bias in the reporting frequency of ADRs for investigational drugs. The selection of appropriate comparator drugs should be critical in unbiased safety assessment in double-blinded, randomized clinical trials and thus have relevance in reviewing the safety results from a regulatory point of view.

  4. An analysis of registered clinical trials in otolaryngology from 2007 to 2010: ClinicalTrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witsell, David L; Schulz, Kristine A; Lee, Walter T; Chiswell, Karen

    2013-11-01

    To describe the conditions studied, interventions used, study characteristics, and funding sources of otolaryngology clinical trials from the ClinicalTrials.gov database; compare this otolaryngology cohort of interventional studies to clinical visits in a health care system; and assess agreement between clinical trials and clinical activity. Database analysis. Trial registration data downloaded from ClinicalTrials.gov and administrative data from the Duke University Medical Center from October 1, 2007 to September 27, 2010. Data extraction from ClinicalTrials.gov was done using MeSH and non-MeSH disease condition terms. Studies were subcategorized to create the following groupings for descriptive analysis: ear, nose, allergy, voice, sleep, head and neck cancer, thyroid, and throat. Duke Health System visits were queried by using selected ICD-9 codes for otolaryngology and non-otolaryngology providers. Visits were grouped similarly to ClinicalTrials.gov for further analysis. Chi-square tests were used to explore differences between groups. A total of 1115 of 40,970 registered interventional trials were assigned to otolaryngology. Head and neck cancer trials predominated. Study models most frequently incorporated parallel design (54.6%), 2 study groups (46.6%), and randomization (69.1%). Phase 2 or 3 studies constituted 46.4% of the cohort. Comparison of the ClinicalTrials.gov database with administrative health system visit data by disease condition showed discordance between national research activity and clinical visit volume for patients with otolaryngology complaints. Analysis of otolaryngology-related clinical research as listed in ClinicalTrials.gov can inform patients, physicians, and policy makers about research focus areas. The relative burden of otolaryngology-associated conditions in our tertiary health system exceeds research activity within the field.

  5. Likely country of origin in publications on randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials during the last 60 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2007-01-01

    The number of publications on clinical trials is unknown as well as the countries publishing most trial reports. To try to examine these questions we performed an ecological study.......The number of publications on clinical trials is unknown as well as the countries publishing most trial reports. To try to examine these questions we performed an ecological study....

  6. Information on blinding in registered records of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viergever Roderik F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Information on blinding is part of the data that should be provided upon registration of a trial at a clinical trials registry. Reporting of blinding is often absent or of low quality in published articles of clinical trials. This study researched the presence and quality of information on blinding in registered records of clinical trials and highlights the important role of data-recording formats at clinical trial registries in ensuring high-quality registration.

  7. Optimizing detector trials for humanitarian demining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaal, Mate; Baer, Sylke; Bloodworth, Thomas J.; Guelle, Dieter; Lewis, Adam M.; Mueller, Christina; Scharmach, Martina

    2004-09-01

    The performance of mine detecting instruments is embedded in the behavior of a complex system. The total reliability is always composed of the intrinsic physical detection capability of the sensor, application/environmental influences and human factors. The intrinsic capability and some application factors can be investigated in laboratory measurements. Human factors, other application factors and the overall reliability, can only be evaluated in blind field trials in which the probability of detection (PoD) and false alarm rate (FAR) are measured statistically. Both of these approaches are included in CEN Workshop Agreement CWA 14747:2003, which standardizes detector testing in Humanitarian Demining. We report here the results of a study to investigate how to optimize such testing. For efficient and statistically valid field trials, the number, types and burial depths of targets, and the number of test lanes, soil types, repetitions and operators need to be carefully chosen. Laboratory results should be used to help construct field trial protocols and also to help distinguish the different contributions to the PoD and FAR, to determine where to improve insufficient performance. In this study, four models of metal detector were tested in three field trials and in the laboratory. The repeatability of the field trials is assessed, taking into account operator training and experience. Results of the laboratory tests are compared with results of the field trials and used to construct a "modular model" of the system, as used in nondestructive testing. The conclusions are, in principle, applicable to trials of other types of sensor.

  8. Acute Lung Injury | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rnedUK - MHRA A.2EudraCT number2010-021186-70 A.3Full title of the trial Keratinocyte growth factor in Acute...reviated title of the trial where available Keratinocyte Growth Factor in Acute L...nder investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Lung Injury

  9. Lung-MAP Launches: First Precision Medicine Trial From National Clinical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    A unique public-private collaboration today announced the initiation of the Lung Cancer Master Protocol (Lung-MAP) trial, a multi-drug, multi-arm, biomarker-driven clinical trial for patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer. Squamous cell carcinom

  10. The Trial of Napoleon: A Case Study for Using Mock Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Describes a course entitled "The Trial of Napoleon Bonaparte" that focuses on a fictitious mock trial of Napoleon Bonaparte to answer the question: did Napoleon pervert or preserve the gain of the French Revolution? Discusses the strengths and weaknesses of the course. (CMK)

  11. Trial-to-trial fluctuations in attentional state and their relation to intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Nash; McMillan, Brittany D

    2014-05-01

    Trial-to-trial fluctuations in attentional state while performing measures of intelligence were examined in the current study. Participants performed various measures of fluid and crystallized intelligence while also providing attentional state ratings prior to each trial. It was found that pre-trial attentional state ratings strongly predicted subsequent trial performance on the fluid intelligence measures, such that when participants rated their current attentional state as highly focused on the current task, performance tended to be high compared to when participants reported their current attentional state as being low and unfocused on the current task. Furthermore, overall attentional state ratings and variability in attentional state ratings were moderately correlated with overall levels of performance on the fluid intelligence measures. However, attentional state ratings did not predict performance on the measure of crystallized intelligence. These results suggest a strong link between variation in attention state and variation in fluid intelligence as postulated by a number of recent theories.

  12. The AIDS Clinical Trials Information Service (ACTIS): a decade of providing clinical trials information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Deborah G; Dutcher, Gale A; Toigo, Theresa A; Bates, Ruthann; Temple, Freda; Cadden, Cynthia G

    2002-01-01

    The AIDS Clinical Trials Information Service (ACTIS) is a central resource for information about federally and privately funded HIV/AIDS clinical trials. Sponsored by four components of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, ACTIS has been a key part of U.S. HIV/AIDS information and education services since 1989. ACTIS offers a toll-free telephone service, through which trained information specialists can provide callers with information about AIDS clinical trials in English or Spanish, and a website that provides access to clinical trials databases and a variety of educational resources. Future priorities include the development of new resources to target diverse and underserved populations. In addition, research needs to be conducted on the use of telephone services vs. Web-based information exchange to ensure the broadest possible dissemination of up-to-date information on HIV infection and clinical trials.

  13. Guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials for spinal cord injury as developed by the ICCP panel: clinical trial design

    OpenAIRE

    Lammertse, D; Tuszynski, MH; Steeves, JD; Curt, A; Fawcett, JW; Rask, C; Ditunno, JF; Fehlings, MG; Guest, JD; Ellaway, PH; Kleitman, N; Blight, AR; Dobkin, BH; Grossman, R.; Katoh, H.

    2006-01-01

    The International Campaign for Cures of Spinal Cord Injury Paralysis established a panel tasked with reviewing the methodology for clinical trials for spinal cord injury (SCI), and making recommendations on the conduct of future trials. This is the fourth of four papers. Here, we examine the phases of a clinical trial program, the elements, types, and protocols for valid clinical trial design. The most rigorous and valid SCI clinical trial would be a prospective double-blind randomized contro...

  14. Adding pharmacists to primary care teams reduces predicted long-term risk of cardiovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients without established cardiovascular disease: results from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhani, N N; Majumdar, S R; Johnson, J A; Tsuyuki, R T; Lewanczuk, R Z; Spooner, R; Simpson, S H

    2012-11-01

    To determine the impact of adding pharmacists to primary care teams on predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular events in patients with Type 2 diabetes without established cardiovascular disease. This was a pre-specified secondary analysis of randomized trial data. The main study found that, compared with usual care, addition of a pharmacist resulted in improvements in blood pressure, dyslipidaemia, and hyperglycaemia for primary care patients with Type 2 diabetes. In this sub-study, predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular events at baseline and 1 year were calculated for patients free of cardiovascular disease at enrolment. The primary outcome was change in UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) risk score; change in Framingham risk score was a secondary outcome. Baseline characteristics were similar between the 102 intervention patients and 93 control subjects: 59% women, median (interquartile range) age 57 (50-64) years, diabetes duration 3 (1-6.5) years, systolic blood pressure 128 (120-140) mmHg, total cholesterol 4.34 (3.75-5.04) mmol/l and HbA(1c) 54 mmol/mol (48-64 mmol/mol) [7.1% (6.5-8.0%)]. Median baseline UKPDS risk score was 10.2% (6.0-16.7%) for intervention patients and 9.5% (5.8-15.1%) for control subjects (P = 0.80). One-year post-randomization, the median absolute reduction in UKPDS risk score was 1.0% greater for intervention patients compared with control subjects (P = 0.032). Similar changes were seen with the Framingham risk score (median reduction 1.2% greater for intervention patients compared with control subjects, P = 0.048). The two risk scores were highly correlated (rho = 0.83; P primary care teams for 1 year significantly reduced the predicted 10-year risk of cardiovascular events for patients with Type 2 diabetes without established cardiovascular disease. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  15. Using e-technologies in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Carmen; Campbell, Aimee N C; Miele, Gloria M; Brunner, Meg; Winstanley, Erin L

    2015-11-01

    Clinical trials have been slow to incorporate e-technology (digital and electronic technology that utilizes mobile devices or the Internet) into the design and execution of studies. In the meantime, individuals and corporations are relying more on electronic platforms and most have incorporated such technology into their daily lives. This paper provides a general overview of the use of e-technologies in clinical trials research, specifically within the last decade, marked by rapid growth of mobile and Internet-based tools. Benefits of and challenges to the use of e-technologies in data collection, recruitment and retention, delivery of interventions, and dissemination are provided, as well as a description of the current status of regulatory oversight of e-technologies in clinical trials research. As an example of ways in which e-technologies can be used for intervention delivery, a summary of e-technologies for treatment of substance use disorders is presented. Using e-technologies to design and implement clinical trials has the potential to reach a wide audience, making trials more efficient while also reducing costs; however, researchers should be cautious when adopting these tools given the many challenges in using new technologies, as well as threats to participant privacy/confidentiality. Challenges of using e-technologies can be overcome with careful planning, useful partnerships, and forethought. The role of web- and smartphone-based applications is expanding, and the increasing use of those platforms by scientists and the public alike make them tools that cannot be ignored.

  16. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  17. Quantitative Imaging in Cancer Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Mankoff, David A; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Lieberman, Frank S; Buatti, John M; Mountz, James M; Erickson, Bradley J; Fennessy, Fiona M M; Huang, Wei; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Wahl, Richard L; Linden, Hannah M; Kinahan, Paul E; Zhao, Binsheng; Hylton, Nola M; Gillies, Robert J; Clarke, Laurence; Nordstrom, Robert; Rubin, Daniel L

    2016-01-15

    As anticancer therapies designed to target specific molecular pathways have been developed, it has become critical to develop methods to assess the response induced by such agents. Although traditional, anatomic CT, and MRI examinations are useful in many settings, increasing evidence suggests that these methods cannot answer the fundamental biologic and physiologic questions essential for assessment and, eventually, prediction of treatment response in the clinical trial setting, especially in the critical period soon after treatment is initiated. To optimally apply advances in quantitative imaging methods to trials of targeted cancer therapy, new infrastructure improvements are needed that incorporate these emerging techniques into the settings where they are most likely to have impact. In this review, we first elucidate the needs for therapeutic response assessment in the era of molecularly targeted therapy and describe how quantitative imaging can most effectively provide scientifically and clinically relevant data. We then describe the tools and methods required to apply quantitative imaging and provide concrete examples of work making these advances practically available for routine application in clinical trials. We conclude by proposing strategies to surmount barriers to wider incorporation of these quantitative imaging methods into clinical trials and, eventually, clinical practice. Our goal is to encourage and guide the oncology community to deploy standardized quantitative imaging techniques in clinical trials to further personalize care for cancer patients and to provide a more efficient path for the development of improved targeted therapies.

  18. Quality of clinical trials: A moving target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Bhatt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality of clinical trials depends on data integrity and subject protection. Globalization, outsourcing and increasing complexicity of clinical trials have made the target of achieving global quality challenging. The quality, as judged by regulatory inspections of the investigator sites, sponsors/contract research organizations and Institutional Review Board, has been of concern to the US Food and Drug Administration, as there has been hardly any change in frequency and nature of common deficiencies. To meet the regulatory expectations, the sponsors need to improve quality by developing systems with specific standards for each clinical trial process. The quality systems include: personnel roles and responsibilities, training, policies and procedures, quality assurance and auditing, document management, record retention, and reporting and corrective and preventive action. With an objective to improve quality, the FDA has planned new inspection approaches such as risk-based inspections, surveillance inspections, real-time oversight, and audit of sponsor quality systems. The FDA has partnered with Duke University for Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative, which will conduct research projects on design principles, data quality and quantity including monitoring, study start-up, and adverse event reporting. These recent initiatives will go a long way in improving quality of clinical trials.

  19. Public information about clinical trials and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plétan, Yannick; Zannad, Faïez; Jaillon, Patrice

    2003-01-01

    Be it to restore the confused image of clinical research in relation to the lay public, or to develop new ways of accruing healthy volunteers or patients for clinical trials, there is a need to draft some guidance on how best to provide information on research. Although the French legal and regulatory armamentarium in this area is essentially liberal, there is currently little-justified reluctance among study sponsors to advertise publicly. A group of academic and pharmaceutical industry researchers, assembled for a workshop, together with regulators, journalists, representatives from ethics committees, social security, patient and health consumer groups and other French institutional bodies, has suggested the following series of recommendations: there is no need for additional legal or regulatory constraints; sponsors should be aware of and make use of direct public information on trials; a 'good practice charter' on public communication about clinical trials should be developed; all professionals should be involved in this communication platform; communication in the patient's immediate vicinity should be preferred (primary-care physician, local press); clinical databases and websites accessible to professionals, but also to patients and non-professionals, should be developed; genuine instruction on clinical trials for physicians and health professionals unfamiliar with such trials should be developed and disseminated; media groups should receive at least some training in the fundamentals of clinical research.

  20. Prostate cancer vaccines in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubaroff, David M

    2012-07-01

    This review presents important information about the current state of the art for vaccine immunotherapy of prostate cancer. It includes important preclinical research for each of the important prostate cancer vaccines to have reached clinical trials. To date, the only prostate cancer vaccine that has completed Phase III trials and has been approved and licensed by the US FDA is Sipuleucel-T, which immunizes patients against the prostate-associated antigen prostatic acid phosphatase. The benefits and concerns associated with the vaccine are presented. A current Phase III trial is currently underway using the vaccinia-based prostate-specific antigen vaccine Prostvac-TRICOM. Other immunotherapeutic vaccines in trials include the Ad/prostate-specific antigen vaccine Ad5-prostate-specific antigen and the DNA/prostatic acid phosphatase vaccine. A cellular vaccine, GVAX, has been in clinical trials but has not seen continuous study. This review also delves into the multiple immune regulatory elements that must be overcome in order to obtain strong antitumor-associated antigen immune responses capable of effectively destroying prostate tumor cells.

  1. Benefits of task-shifting HIV care to nurses in terms of health-related quality of life in patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in rural district hospitals in Cameroon [Stratall Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le SIDA (ANRS) 12110/Ensemble pour une Solidarité Thérapeutique Hospitalière en Réseau (ESTHER) substudy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzan-Monti, M; Blanche, J; Boyer, S; Kouanfack, C; Delaporte, E; Bonono, R-C; Carrieri, P M; Protopopescu, C; Laurent, C; Spire, B

    2015-05-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends task-shifting HIV care to nurses in low-resource settings with limited numbers of physicians. However, the effect of such task-shifting on the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of people living with HIV (PLHIV) has seldom been evaluated. We aimed to investigate the effect of task-shifting HIV care to nurses on HRQL outcomes in PLHIV initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in rural district hospitals in Cameroon. Outcomes in PLHIV were longitudinally collected in the 2006-2010 Stratall trial. PLHIV were followed up for 24 months by nurses and/or physicians. Six HRQL dimensions were assessed during face-to-face interviews using the WHO Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-HIV BREF scale: physical health; psychological health; independence level; social relationships; environment; and spirituality/religion/personal beliefs. The degree of task-shifting was estimated using a consultant ratio (i.e. the ratio of nurse-led to physician-led visits). The effect of task-shifting and other potential correlates on HRQL dimensions was explored using a Heckman two-stage approach based on linear mixed models to adjust for the potential bias caused by missing data in the outcomes. Of 1424 visits in 440 PLHIV (70.5% female; median age 36 years; median CD4 count 188 cells/μL at enrolment), 423 (29.7%) were task-shifted to nurses. After multiple adjustment, task-shifting was associated with higher HRQL level for four dimensions: physical health [coefficient 0.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1-1.2; P = 0.01], psychological health (coefficient 0.5; 95% CI 0.0-1.0; P = 0.05), independence level (coefficient 0.6; 95% CI 0.1-1.1; P = 0.01) and environment (coefficient 0.6; 95% CI 0.1-1.0; P = 0.02). Task-shifting HIV care to nurses benefits the HRQL of PLHIV. Together with the previously demonstrated comparable clinical effectiveness of physician-based and nurse-based models of HIV care, our results support the WHO recommendation

  2. Patient reported outcomes (PROs in clinical trials: is 'in-trial' guidance lacking? a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek G Kyte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patient reported outcomes (PROs are increasingly assessed in clinical trials, and guidelines are available to inform the design and reporting of such trials. However, researchers involved in PRO data collection report that specific guidance on 'in-trial' activity (recruitment, data collection and data inputting and the management of 'concerning' PRO data (i.e., data which raises concern for the well-being of the trial participant appears to be lacking. The purpose of this review was to determine the extent and nature of published guidelines addressing these areas. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Systematic review of 1,362 articles identified 18 eligible papers containing 'in-trial' guidelines. Two independent authors undertook a qualitative content analysis of the selected papers. Guidelines presented in each of the articles were coded according to an a priori defined coding frame, which demonstrated reliability (pooled Kappa 0.86-0.97, and validity (<2% residual category coding. The majority of guidelines present were concerned with 'pre-trial' activities (72%, for example, outcome measure selection and study design issues, or 'post-trial' activities (16% such as data analysis, reporting and interpretation. 'In-trial' guidelines represented 9.2% of all guidance across the papers reviewed, with content primarily focused on compliance, quality control, proxy assessment and reporting of data collection. There were no guidelines surrounding the management of concerning PRO data. CONCLUSIONS: The findings highlight there are minimal in-trial guidelines in publication regarding PRO data collection and management in clinical trials. No guidance appears to exist for researchers involved with the handling of concerning PRO data. Guidelines are needed, which support researchers to manage all PRO data appropriately and which facilitate unbiased data collection.

  3. Patient information in phase I trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Katrine Toubro; Lassen, Ulrik; Mau-Sørensen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    influenced by the drug being tested, information procedures, physician-related factors and the patient's individual approach to decision-making. Patients have difficulties correctly repeating the purpose of a phase I trial. In several studies, the majority of the patients expressed expectations of personal......OBJECTIVE: To review what is known about cancer patients' decisions to enter a phase I trial and how they and their relatives perceive the information they receive when they are invited to participate. METHODS: This systematic review is based on the principles of "preferred reporting items...... for systematic reviews and meta-analyses" (PRISMA). A systematic search was performed in the PubMed, Embase and PsycInfo databases, supplemented by a search for unpublished literature. RESULTS: We identified 37 studies for inclusion in this review. Patients' decisions to participate in a phase I trial were...

  4. Developments in statistical evaluation of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Oud, Johan; Ghidey, Wendimagegn

    2014-01-01

    This book describes various ways of approaching and interpreting the data produced by clinical trial studies, with a special emphasis on the essential role that biostatistics plays in clinical trials. Over the past few decades the role of statistics in the evaluation and interpretation of clinical data has become of paramount importance. As a result the standards of clinical study design, conduct and interpretation have undergone substantial improvement. The book includes 18 carefully reviewed chapters on recent developments in clinical trials and their statistical evaluation, with each chapter providing one or more examples involving typical data sets, enabling readers to apply the proposed procedures. The chapters employ a uniform style to enhance comparability between the approaches.

  5. [Radiotherapy phase I trials' methodology: Features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoirard, R; Vallard, A; Langrand-Escure, J; Guy, J-B; Ben Mrad, M; Yaoxiong, X; Diao, P; Méry, B; Pigne, G; Rancoule, C; Magné, N

    2016-12-01

    In clinical research, biostatistical methods allow the rigorous analysis of data collection and should be defined from the trial design to obtain the appropriate experimental approach. Thus, if the main purpose of phase I is to determine the dose to use during phase II, methodology should be finely adjusted to experimental treatment(s). Today, the methodology for chemotherapy and targeted therapy is well known. For radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy phase I trials, the primary endpoint must reflect both effectiveness and potential treatment toxicities. Methodology should probably be complex to limit failures in the following phases. However, there are very few data about methodology design in the literature. The present study focuses on these particular trials and their characteristics. It should help to raise existing methodological patterns shortcomings in order to propose new and better-suited designs. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Perfusion Pressure Cerebral Infarct (PPCI) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Anne G.; Holmgaard, Frederik; Rasmussen, Lars Simon

    2016-01-01

    to be caused by emboli, but inadequate blood flow caused by other mechanisms may increase ischaemia in the penumbra or cause watershed infarcts. During cardiopulmonary bypass, blood pressure can be below the lower limit of cerebral autoregulation. Although much debated, the constant blood flow provided...... by the cardiopulmonary bypass system is still considered by many as appropriate to avoid cerebral ischaemia despite the low blood pressure. Methods/design: The Perfusion Pressure Cerebral Infarct trial is a single-centre superiority trial with a blinded outcome assessment. The trial is randomising 210 patients...... with coronary vessel and/or valve disease and who are undergoing cardiac surgery with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients are stratified by age and surgical procedure and are randomised 1:1 to either an increased mean arterial pressure (70–80 mmHg) or ‘usual practice’ (40–50 mmHg) during cardiopulmonary...

  7. Franz Kafka's The Trial: guilty or innocent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, E

    1996-07-01

    Through an examination of The Trial by Kafka I attempt to show that the depiction of the Court apparatus is dynamically related to the commission of unconscious crimes of the type we encounter in our patients. To provide a context for the novel, I discuss Kafka's biography and some possible unconscious motivations. My goal is to show how the concept of a particular type of superego pressure can be used to understand the subtle irony in The Trial. Although Joseph K.'s behavior frequently involves oedipal crimes, there are many preoedipal themes that help account for his experience of the Court. I contrast this psychoanalytic understanding of K.'s guilt with that of literary critics who interpret The Trial as an allegory of guilt but who minimize the psychological dimensions.

  8. [Clinical trials: principles of the method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulker, J P

    2000-04-15

    Comparative judgement, which is seminal to any kind of science performing measurements, has been applied to clinical reasoning for many centuries. The need for systematizing the observational methods used in medicine in order to draw more reliable inferences about the effects of therapies has been active all along the 19th century. This has resulted in controlled studies which yielded important advances in clinical and therapeutic knowledge, although their designs were not fully satisfactory. Clinical trials have gained their status of "hard science", methodology allowing causal inference, by the end of the 1940s after having adopted the statistical theories developed in the 1930s by Fisher for experimental design in agronomy. A long way has been run since the first controlled randomized trial. However, half a century later, modern clinical trial remains essentially a controlled randomized prospective study using methods to limit potential biases and to establish statistical significance.

  9. [Ethical implications of clinical trials in Tunisia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadly, Ali

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials are necessary for medical advancement. They must respect legal obligations. Ethical questions related to protection of the human being's rights are yielded by these trials. Joining research to medical core is problematical in consideration of patient's consent to clinical trial. Exclusion by the Tunisian law of persons under age, pregnant or breast-feeding women from medical experimentation in the aim of protecting them against clinical research adverse events or abuses is ethically questionable since it deprives them from a possible medical progress. So why not to involve them in clinical research when there is an expected benefit, after bringing them protection as vulnerable persons like we should do for instance for the elderly, handicapped persons or prisoners. Legal creation of research ethics committees is important for the respect of experimentation rules on human beings.

  10. Control groups in recent septic shock trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettilä, Ville; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Jakob, Stephan M

    2016-01-01

    , and mortality outcomes, and calculated a data completeness score to provide an overall view of quality of reporting. RESULTS: A total of 24 RCTs were included (mean n = 287 patients and 71 % of eligible patients were randomized). Of the 24 studies, 14 (58 %) presented baseline data on vasopressors and 58......PURPOSE: The interpretation of septic shock trial data is profoundly affected by patients, control intervention, co-interventions and selected outcome measures. We evaluated the reporting of control groups in recent septic shock trials. METHODS: We searched for original articles presenting...... randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in adult septic shock patients from 2006 to 2016. We included RCTs focusing on septic shock patients with at least two parallel groups and at least 50 patients in the control group. We selected and evaluated data items regarding patients, control group characteristics...

  11. Registration of clinical trials: Is it really needed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer Aslam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Withholding findings of clinical trials for publication or presentation to the regulatory authorities is a major concern. We aimed to address the importance of clinical trial registration and whether it is needed or not. Discussion: For ethical conduct of clinical trial, registration is an important but debatable issue due to proprietary interest of the pharmaceutical industry. Over the years, investigating agencies uncovered several instances of misconduct during the clinical trial. The International committee of medical journal editors requires registration of trial methodology, but does not require registration of trial results; however, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Amendments does require researchers to register results. Conclusion: Prospective registration of clinical trial is mandatory for more transparent research and sustaining the validity of evidence based practice and availability of reliable data. Clinical trials registration has the potential to contribute substantially to improve clinical trial transparency and reducing publication bias and selective reporting.

  12. 效果显著的调声附件——Fadel Art(飞谱)Amethyst Ⅱ调音底座

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    学明

    2008-01-01

    这款名为Amethyst(紫水晶)的调音底座是法国Fadel Art飞谱引以自豪的卓越产品,它应用崭新的设计理念,研发出能够消除及吸收对声音和影像重播有害谐震的双效音/视频器材辅件。其设计结合三种不同物理特性的物质:铝、不锈钢和Delrin,再以黄铜圆珠作机械耦合,巧妙的设计尽取“钉锥”与“吸震垫”的优点于一身。

  13. Discussion about the Amethystic Function of the Liquid of Lobed Kudzuvine Root P.E.%葛根提取液醒酒功能探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘以农; 余明泽; 敬明武; 郭明; 周静

    2008-01-01

    目的 观察葛根提取液对小鼠的醒酒效果以及对小鼠肝脏、胃、十二指肠的保护作用.方法 在酒前10 min经口灌胃给予葛根提取液40 ml/(kg·只),用蒸馏水作对照,再经口灌胃给予酒20 ml/(kg·只)(含乙醇7.9 g/kg)为试验1组.经口灌胃给予酒20 ml/(kg·只)(含乙醇7.9 g/kg)10 min后,再经口分别灌胃给予葛根提取液40 ml/kg或80 ml/kg,分别为试验2组与试验3组.以翻正反射消失为醉酒指标,立即观察各组动物的醉酒数、醒酒数、死亡数.在饲养7 d后,解剖小鼠,观察肝脏、胃和十二指肠的组织病理学变化.结果 无论是酒前还是酒后给予了葛根提取液的各组小鼠,其醉酒数、醒酒数、死亡数以及肝脏的脂肪变性、胃、十二指肠的充血都与对照组差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 葛根提取液具有较好的解酒和保护肝脏的作用.

  14. The Hawthorne Effect: a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Haselen Robbert

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 'Hawthorne Effect' may be an important factor affecting the generalisability of clinical research to routine practice, but has been little studied. Hawthorne Effects have been reported in previous clinical trials in dementia but to our knowledge, no attempt has been made to quantify them. Our aim was to compare minimal follow-up to intensive follow-up in participants in a placebo controlled trial of Ginkgo biloba for treating mild-moderate dementia. Methods Participants in a dementia trial were randomised to intensive follow-up (with comprehensive assessment visits at baseline and two, four and six months post randomisation or minimal follow-up (with an abbreviated assessment at baseline and a full assessment at six months. Our primary outcomes were cognitive functioning (ADAS-Cog and participant and carer-rated quality of life (QOL-AD. Results We recruited 176 participants, mainly through general practices. The main analysis was based on Intention to treat (ITT, with available data. In the ANCOVA model with baseline score as a co-variate, follow-up group had a significant effect on outcome at six months on the ADAS-Cog score (n = 140; mean difference = -2.018; 95%CI -3.914, -0.121; p = 0.037 favouring the intensive follow-up group, and on participant-rated quality of life score (n = 142; mean difference = -1.382; 95%CI -2.642, -0.122; p = 0.032 favouring minimal follow-up group. There was no significant difference on carer quality of life. Conclusion We found that more intensive follow-up of individuals in a placebo-controlled clinical trial of Ginkgo biloba for treating mild-moderate dementia resulted in a better outcome than minimal follow-up, as measured by their cognitive functioning. Trial registration Current controlled trials: ISRCTN45577048

  15. Lessons from randomised direct comparative trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achiron, Anat; Fredrikson, Sten

    2009-02-01

    For over a decade, four immunomodulatory therapies have been available for the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. However, few direct comparative data were available to facilitate the choice of treatment. This choice has been influenced by the perception that interferon-beta preparations have greater efficacy than glatiramer acetate, due to apparently more rapid and robust reduction of gadolinium-enhancing lesions seen on magnetic resonance imaging in the pivotal trials of these agents. This situation has changed in the last year, with the outcomes of three randomised clinical trials comparing the efficacy and safety of glatiramer acetate with that of a high-dose interferon-beta in relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis. These are the REGARD, BEYOND and BECOME trials. In the REGARD trial, 764 patients were randomised to treatment with either interferon-beta 1a sc 44 microg or glatiramer acetate for 96 weeks; no significant difference in the time to first relapse was observed. The largest of the three comparative studies, the BEYOND trial, compared treatment with interferon-beta 1b sc 500 microg, interferon-beta 1b sc 250 microg or glatiramer acetate for two years in 2,244 patients. The hazard ratio for multiple relapses was close to unity for comparisons between all groups, indicating equivalent efficacy in all three treatment arms. Relapse rates (around 0.3 relapses/year) in all these studies were much lower than anticipated and lower than those reported a decade previously in the pivotal trials of beta-interferons and glatiramer acetate. No unexpected safety issues were identified in any of these studies. The completion of these direct comparative studies has considerably enriched the clinical evidence database by contributing large numbers of patients. This provides an invaluable contribution for helping the physician make an informed choice about treatment. The results of the direct comparative studies provide evidence that glatiramer acetate

  16. Clinical Trials and their Impact on Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lidia Cuevas Pérez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Today there are countless examples that illustrate the nature of technoscience, including biotechnology and pharmacology. The clinical trial is the appropriate methodology used by clinical pharmacology to test the efficacy and safety of a treatment or intervention in humans. It constitutes the cornerstone of research. Once the preclinical research is completed, one of the biggest challenges currently facing the Cuban Pharmaceutical and Biotechnological Industry is precisely the clinical evaluation. Therefore, this work aims to provide a reflection on the most significant aspects of clinical trials and their impact on society.

  17. Prospective Clinical Trial for Septic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Bernstein, Anke; Feucht, Matthias J;

    2016-01-01

    clinical trial and the cytokine composition of effusions (n = 76) was analyzed. Characteristics of epidemiology and disease severity were correlated with levels of cytokines with known roles in cartilage turnover and degradation. Results. Higher synovial IL-1β concentrations were associated with clinical......-2, and BMP-7. Infections with Staphylococcus species induced higher IL-1β expression but less cartilage destruction than other bacteria. Conclusion. Articular infections have bacteria-specific implications on cartilage metabolism. Collagen type II cleavage products reliably mark destruction, which...... is associated with upregulation of typical cartilage turnover cytokines. This trial is registered with DRKS00003536, MISSinG....

  18. Analysis of opioid consumption in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus Vestergaard; Nyberg, Joakim; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Inconsistent trial design and analysis is a key reason that few advances in postoperative pain management have been made from clinical trials analyzing opioid consumption data. This study aimed to compare four different approaches to analyze opioid consumption data. A repeated time-to-event (RTTE...... of potency was obtained with a RTTE model accounting for both morphine effects and time-varying covariates on opioid consumption. An RTTE analysis approach proved better suited for demonstrating efficacy of opioid sparing analgesics than traditional statistical tests as a lower sample size was required due...

  19. Clinical Research Methodology 3: Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessler, Daniel I; Imrey, Peter B

    2015-10-01

    Randomized assignment of treatment excludes reverse causation and selection bias and, in sufficiently large studies, effectively prevents confounding. Well-implemented blinding prevents measurement bias. Studies that include these protections are called randomized, blinded clinical trials and, when conducted with sufficient numbers of patients, provide the most valid results. Although conceptually straightforward, design of clinical trials requires thoughtful trade-offs among competing approaches-all of which influence the number of patients required, enrollment time, internal and external validity, ability to evaluate interactions among treatments, and cost.

  20. Infertility trial outcomes: healthy moms and babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the primary outcome of infertility trials has been a positive pregnancy test or a clinically recognized pregnancy. However, parents desire a healthy baby that grows up to be a healthy adult, rather than a positive pregnancy test. Too often results of infertility trials are lacking in crucial obstetric details. This is problematic because treatments for infertility have the capacity to increase the risk for a variety of adverse obstetric outcomes. This review will outline important obstetric variables that should be included when reporting infertility research. The rationale for including these data, precise definitions of the variables, and cost-effective strategies for obtaining these obstetric details will be highlighted.

  1. Clinical Trials in Male Hormonal Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieschlag E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has established the principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required of which progestins are favored. Clinical trials concentrate on testosterone combined with norethisterone, desogestrel, etonogestrel or depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of testosterone undecanoate and etonogestrel in suppressing spermatogenesis in volunteers.

  2. Photovoltaic domestic field trial. Third annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    An update on a photovoltaics field trial that has been running for four years is presented. The PV Domestic Field Trial was set up to use the design, construction, performance and monitoring of PV units to generate data for utilities, builders and other current and potential users of PVs. Subjects covered were appearance of the systems, architectural integration, fixing methods, cost effectiveness, opinions of users, monitoring and results. During the past 12 months, most of the human effort has gone into collation of data from 22 of the 28 projects. The study was sponsored by Great Britain's DTI.

  3. Narrating the Mensalão trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Mads

    2015-01-01

    sentences were meted out to 25 of the 38 defendants, thereby breaking an established pattern of impunity for corrupt politicians in Brazilian courts. As a scandal potentially harmful for the governing party and the former president Luis “Lula” da Silva, the eyes and spotlights of the national media were...... fixed on the trial. However, the varying and contested ways in which the case was presented by media from the outbreak of the scandal in 2005 until the end of the trial bears witness to the fact that narratives concerning corruption scandals can potentially encompass a broad range of political...

  4. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations: Design and conduct of clinical trials for hand osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppenburg, M; Maheu, E; Kraus, V B; Cicuttini, F; Doherty, M; Dreiser, R-L; Henrotin, Y; Jiang, G-L; Mandl, L; Martel-Pelletier, J; Nelson, A E; Neogi, T; Pelletier, J-P; Punzi, L; Ramonda, R; Simon, L S; Wang, S

    2015-05-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a very frequent disease, but yet understudied. However, a lot of works have been published in the past 10 years, and much has been done to better understand its clinical course and structural progression. Despite this new knowledge, few therapeutic trials have been conducted in hand OA. The last OARSI recommendations for the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA dates back to 2006. The present recommendations aimed at updating previous recommendations, by incorporating new data. The purpose of this expert opinion, consensus driven exercise is to provide evidence-based guidance on the design, execution and analysis of clinical trials in hand OA, where published evidence is available, supplemented by expert opinion, where evidence is lacking, to perform clinical trials in hand OA, both for symptom and for structure-modification. They indicate core outcome measurement sets for studies in hand OA, and list the methods and instruments that should be used to measure symptoms or structure. For both symptom- and structure-modification, at least pain, physical function, patient global assessment, HR-QoL, joint activity and hand strength should be assessed. In addition, for structure-modification trials, structural progression should be measured by radiographic changes. We also provide a research agenda listing many unsolved issues that seem to most urgently need to be addressed from the perspective of performing "good" clinical trials in hand OA. These updated OARSI recommendations should allow for better standardizing the conduct of clinical trials in hand OA in the next future.

  5. Trial-to-trial reoptimization of motor behavior due to changes in task demands is limited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orban de Xivry J-J

    Full Text Available Each task requires a specific motor behavior that is tuned to task demands. For instance, writing requires a lot of accuracy while clapping does not. It is known that the brain adjusts the motor behavior to different task demands as predicted by optimal control theory. In this study, the mechanism of this reoptimization process is investigated by varying the accuracy demands of a reaching task. In this task, the width of the reaching target (0.5 or 8 cm was varied either on a trial-to-trial basis (random schedule or in blocks (blocked schedule. On some trials, the hand of the subjects was clamped to a rectilinear trajectory that ended 2 cm on the left or right of the target center. The rejection of this perturbation largely varied with target width in the blocked schedule but not in the random schedule. That is, subjects exhibited different motor behavior in the different schedules despite identical accuracy demands. Therefore, while reoptimization has been considered immediate and automatic, the differences in motor behavior observed across schedules suggest that the reoptimization of the motor behavior is neither happening on a trial-by-trial basis nor obligatory. The absence of trial-to-trial mechanisms, the inability of the brain to adapt to two conflicting task demands and the existence of a switching cost are discussed as possible sources of the non-optimality of motor behavior during the random schedule.

  6. Differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation among cancer patients in phase 3 clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godskesen, T M; Kihlbom, U; Nordin, K; Silén, M; Nygren, P

    2016-05-01

    While participants in clinical oncology trials are essential for the advancement of cancer therapies, factors decisive for patient participation have been described but need further investigation, particularly in the case of phase 3 studies. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in trial knowledge and motives for participation in phase 3 clinical cancer trials in relation to gender, age, education levels and former trial experience. The results of a questionnaire returned from 88 of 96 patients (92%) were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. There were small, barely relevant differences in trial knowledge among patients when stratified by gender, age or education. Participants with former trial experience were less aware about the right to withdraw. Male participants and those aged ≥65 years were significantly more motivated by a feeling of duty, or by the opinions of close ones. Men seem more motivated than women by external factors. With the awareness that elderly and single male participants might be a vulnerable group and participants with former trial experience are less likely to be sufficiently informed, the information consent process should focus more on these patients. We conclude that the informed consent process seems to work well, with good results within most subgroups.

  7. Characteristics of randomised trials on diseases in the digestive system registered in ClinicalTrials.gov: a retrospective analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Krag, Aleksander; Gluud, Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the adequacy of reporting of protocols for randomised trials on diseases of the digestive system registered in http://ClinicalTrials.gov and the consistency between primary outcomes, secondary outcomes and sample size specified in http://ClinicalTrials.gov and published...... trials. Methods Randomised phase III trials on adult patients with gastrointestinal diseases registered before January 2009 in http://ClinicalTrials.gov were eligible for inclusion. From http://ClinicalTrials.gov all data elements in the database required by the International Committee of Medical Journal...... Editors (ICMJE) member journals were extracted. The subsequent publications for registered trials were identified. For published trials, data concerning publication date, primary and secondary endpoint, sample size, and whether the journal adhered to ICMJE principles were extracted. Differences between...

  8. Drug versus placebo randomized controlled trials in neonates: A review of ClinicalTrials.gov registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselas, Emilie; Pansieri, Claudia; Leroux, Stephanie; Bonati, Maurizio; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    Despite specific initiatives and identified needs, most neonatal drugs are still used off-label, with variable dosage administrations and schedules. In high risk preterm and term neonates, drug evaluation is challenging and randomized controlled trials (RCT) are difficult to conduct and even more is the use of a placebo, required in the absence of a reference validated drug to be used as comparator. We analyzed the complete ClinicalTrials.gov registry 1) to describe neonatal RCT involving a placebo, 2) to report on the medical context and ethical aspects of placebo use. Placebo versus drug RCT (n = 146), either prevention trials (n = 57, 39%) or therapeutic interventions (n = 89, 61%), represent more than a third of neonatal trials registered in the National Institute of Health clinical trial database (USA) since 1999. They mainly concerned preterm infants, evaluating complications of prematurity. Most trials were conducted in the USA, were single centered, and funded by non-profit organizations. For the three top drug trials evaluating steroids (n = 13, 9.6%), erythropoietin (EPO, n = 10, 6.8%) and nitric oxide (NO, n = 9, 6.2%), the objectives of the trial and follow-up were analyzed in more details. Although a matter of debate, the use of placebo should be promoted in neonates to evaluate a potential new treatment, in the absence of reference drug. Analysis of the trials evaluating steroids showed that long-term follow-up of exposed patients, although required by international guidelines, is frequently missing and should be planned to collect additional information and optimize drug evaluation in these high-risk patients.

  9. Randomized Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Address Barriers to Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropol, Neal J; Wong, Yu-Ning; Albrecht, Terrance; Manne, Sharon; Miller, Suzanne M; Flamm, Anne Lederman; Benson, Al Bowen; Buzaglo, Joanne; Collins, Michael; Egleston, Brian; Fleisher, Linda; Katz, Michael; Kinzy, Tyler G; Liu, Tasnuva M; Margevicius, Seunghee; Miller, Dawn M; Poole, David; Roach, Nancy; Ross, Eric; Schluchter, Mark D

    2016-02-10

    Lack of knowledge and negative attitudes have been identified as barriers to participation in clinical trials by patients with cancer. We developed Preparatory Education About Clinical Trials (PRE-ACT), a theory-guided, Web-based, interactive computer program, to deliver tailored video educational content to patients in an effort to overcome barriers to considering clinical trials as a treatment option. A prospective, randomized clinical trial compared PRE-ACT with a control condition that provided general clinical trials information produced by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in text format. One thousand two hundred fifty-five patients with cancer were randomly allocated before their initial visit with an oncologist to PRE-ACT (n = 623) or control (n = 632). PRE-ACT had three main components: assessment of clinical trials knowledge and attitudinal barriers, values assessment with clarification back to patients, and provision of a video library tailored to address each patient's barriers. Outcomes included knowledge and attitudes and preparation for decision making about clinical trials. Both PRE-ACT and control interventions improved knowledge and attitudes (all P < .001) compared with baseline. Patients randomly allocated to PRE-ACT showed a significantly greater increase in knowledge (P < .001) and a significantly greater decrease in attitudinal barriers (P < .001) than did their control (text-only) counterparts. Participants in both arms significantly increased their preparedness to consider clinical trials (P < .001), and there was a trend favoring the PRE-ACT group (P < .09). PRE-ACT was also associated with greater patient satisfaction than was NCI text alone. These data show that patient education before the first oncologist visit improves knowledge, attitudes, and preparation for decision making about clinical trials. Both text and tailored video were effective. The PRE-ACT interactive video program was more effective than NCI text in improving

  10. Drug versus placebo randomized controlled trials in neonates: A review of ClinicalTrials.gov registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselas, Emilie; Pansieri, Claudia; Leroux, Stephanie; Bonati, Maurizio; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite specific initiatives and identified needs, most neonatal drugs are still used off-label, with variable dosage administrations and schedules. In high risk preterm and term neonates, drug evaluation is challenging and randomized controlled trials (RCT) are difficult to conduct and even more is the use of a placebo, required in the absence of a reference validated drug to be used as comparator. Methods We analyzed the complete ClinicalTrials.gov registry 1) to describe neonatal RCT involving a placebo, 2) to report on the medical context and ethical aspects of placebo use. Results Placebo versus drug RCT (n = 146), either prevention trials (n = 57, 39%) or therapeutic interventions (n = 89, 61%), represent more than a third of neonatal trials registered in the National Institute of Health clinical trial database (USA) since 1999. They mainly concerned preterm infants, evaluating complications of prematurity. Most trials were conducted in the USA, were single centered, and funded by non-profit organizations. For the three top drug trials evaluating steroids (n = 13, 9.6%), erythropoietin (EPO, n = 10, 6.8%) and nitric oxide (NO, n = 9, 6.2%), the objectives of the trial and follow-up were analyzed in more details. Conclusion Although a matter of debate, the use of placebo should be promoted in neonates to evaluate a potential new treatment, in the absence of reference drug. Analysis of the trials evaluating steroids showed that long-term follow-up of exposed patients, although required by international guidelines, is frequently missing and should be planned to collect additional information and optimize drug evaluation in these high-risk patients. PMID:28192509

  11. Subgroup analyses in randomised controlled trials: cohort study on trial protocols and journal publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasenda, Benjamin; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Sun, Xin; von Elm, Erik; You, John; Blümle, Anette; Tomonaga, Yuki; Saccilotto, Ramon; Amstutz, Alain; Bengough, Theresa; Meerpohl, Joerg J; Stegert, Mihaela; Olu, Kelechi K; Tikkinen, Kari A O; Neumann, Ignacio; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Faulhaber, Markus; Mulla, Sohail M; Mertz, Dominik; Akl, Elie A; Bassler, Dirk; Busse, Jason W; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; Lamontagne, Francois; Nordmann, Alain; Gloy, Viktoria; Raatz, Heike; Moja, Lorenzo; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ebrahim, Shanil; Vandvik, Per O; Johnston, Bradley C; Walter, Martin A; Burnand, Bernard; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Hemkens, Lars G; Bucher, Heiner C; Guyatt, Gordon H; Briel, Matthias

    2014-07-16

    To investigate the planning of subgroup analyses in protocols of randomised controlled trials and the agreement with corresponding full journal publications. Cohort of protocols of randomised controlled trial and subsequent full journal publications. Six research ethics committees in Switzerland, Germany, and Canada. 894 protocols of randomised controlled trial involving patients approved by participating research ethics committees between 2000 and 2003 and 515 subsequent full journal publications. Of 894 protocols of randomised controlled trials, 252 (28.2%) included one or more planned subgroup analyses. Of those, 17 (6.7%) provided a clear hypothesis for at least one subgroup analysis, 10 (4.0%) anticipated the direction of a subgroup effect, and 87 (34.5%) planned a statistical test for interaction. Industry sponsored trials more often planned subgroup analyses compared with investigator sponsored trials (195/551 (35.4%) v 57/343 (16.6%), P<0.001). Of 515 identified journal publications, 246 (47.8%) reported at least one subgroup analysis. In 81 (32.9%) of the 246 publications reporting subgroup analyses, authors stated that subgroup analyses were prespecified, but this was not supported by 28 (34.6%) corresponding protocols. In 86 publications, authors claimed a subgroup effect, but only 36 (41.9%) corresponding protocols reported a planned subgroup analysis. Subgroup analyses are insufficiently described in the protocols of randomised controlled trials submitted to research ethics committees, and investigators rarely specify the anticipated direction of subgroup effects. More than one third of statements in publications of randomised controlled trials about subgroup prespecification had no documentation in the corresponding protocols. Definitive judgments regarding credibility of claimed subgroup effects are not possible without access to protocols and analysis plans of randomised controlled trials. © The DISCO study group 2014.

  12. The Potential Role of Mycotoxins as a Contributor to Stunting in the SHINE Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laura E; Prendergast, Andrew J; Turner, Paul C; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Mutasa, Kuda; Kembo, George; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2015-12-15

    Children in developing countries experience multiple exposures that are harmful to their growth and development. An emerging concern is frequent exposure to mycotoxins that contaminate a wide range of staple foods, including maize and groundnuts. Three mycotoxins are suspected to contribute to poor child health and development: aflatoxin, fumonisin, and deoxynivalenol. We summarize the evidence that mycotoxin exposure is associated with stunting, and propose that the causal pathway may be through environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) and disturbance of the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) axis. The objectives of this substudy are to assess the relationship between agricultural and harvest practices and mycotoxin exposure; to evaluate associations between mycotoxin exposure and child stunting; and to investigate EED as a potential pathway linking mycotoxin exposure to child stunting, to inform potential areas for intervention.

  13. Acute Heart Failure | EU Clinical Trials Register [EU Clinical Trials Register

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available r investigation E.1.1Medical condition(s) being investigated Acute Heart Failure MedDRA Classification E.1.3...in one hour of admission to ICU.3. Signed informed consent E.4Principal exclusion criteria 1. Age less than 18 years.2. Acute...y with Trimetazidine in Acute heart failure: an open pilot randomized trial (The METTA – PRAGUE 10 Trial) A....e ConcernedCzech Republic - SUKL A.2EudraCT number2007-002893-76 A.3Full title of the trial MEtabolic Therap

  14. Placebo-Controlled Trials, Ethics of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, R; Rid, Annette

    2015-01-01

    There are often good scientific and ethical reasons for using placebo controls in clinical trials. At the same time placebo use is controversial, especially when an established effective treatment is being withheld from the control group. This article gives an overview of the key ethical positions

  15. Unit: Plants, Inspection Pack, National Trial Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Science Education Project, Toorak, Victoria.

    This is a National Trial Print of a unit on plants produced as a part of the Australian Science Education Project. The unit consists of an information booklet for students, a booklet for recording student data, and a teacher's guide. The material, designed for use with students in the upper elementary grades, takes from 15 to 20 forty-minute…

  16. Lung Cancer Clinical Trials: Advances in Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    New treatments for lung cancer and aspects of joining a clinical trial are discussed in this 30-minute Facebook Live event, hosted by NCI’s Dr. Shakun Malik, head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, and Janet Freeman-Daily, lung cancer patient activist and founding member of #LCSM.

  17. Gone fishing in a fluid trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortrup, Peter B; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To maximise the yield of existing data by assessing the effect on mortality of being born under the zodiac sign Pisces in a trial of intravenous (IV) fluids. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A retrospective observational study, with no predefined hypothesis or statistical analysis pla...

  18. International criminal trials: A normative theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasiliev, S.

    2014-01-01

    Among the numerous works on international criminal procedure, there has been no study focusing on the international criminal trial as a socio-legal phenomenon and a phase of international criminal proceedings. This book seeks to cover this gap by systematically examining and analyzing the nature and

  19. The Nuremberg Trials: Considerations and Suggestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Gerald L.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this article is: (1) to identify the problem of first importance raised by the trials: individual moral decisions in juxtaposition to the will of that individual's government; (2) to provide some guidelines for teaching; and (3) to outline broad procedures for effecting those guidelines. (Author/JB)

  20. TBCS/Chameleon Utility Trial Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    mission contexts, different mission tasks, different time pressures and different team roles . For example, the levels of detail to support planning before...predictive value of the results. • the low level of experience in the personnel who played combat team roles in the trial • a single participant at each