WorldWideScience

Sample records for americium silicides

  1. Chemistry of americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1976-01-01

    Essential features of the descriptive chemistry of americium are reviewed. Chapter titles are: discovery, atomic and nuclear properties, collateral reading, production and uses, chemistry in aqueous solution, metal, alloys, and compounds, and, recovery, separation, purification. Author and subject indexes are included. (JCB)

  2. The Biokinetic Model of Americium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    To improve in vivo measurements for detecting internal exposure from transuranium radio nuclides, such as neptunium, plutonium, americium, the bioknetic model was studied. According to ICRP report (1993, 1995, 1997) and other research, the

  3. Optical properties of beta-iron silicide, ruthenium silicide and osmium silicide: Semiconducting transition metal silicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, Anthony Glen

    2001-09-01

    Various optical techniques were used to study the semiconducting transition metal silicides of β- FeSi2, Ru2Si3, and OsSi2. The Raman spectra of ion beam synthesized (IBS) β-FeSi 2 were shown to provide evidence of a net tensile stress in these IBS materials. Possible origins of the observed stress were suggested and a simple model was proposed in order to calculate a value of the observed stress. A correlation between the tensile stress, the nature of the band gap, and the resulting light emitting properties of IBS β-FeSi2 was suggested. The photoreflectance (PR) spectra of IBS β- FeSi2 reveals a direct gap at 0.815 eV and were shown to agree with the band gap value obtained by photoluminescence (PL) once the adjustments for the temperature difference and trap related recombination effects were made. This provides very convincing evidence for intrinsic light emission from IBS β- FeSi2. Furthermore, a model was developed that helps to clarify the variety of inconsistent results obtained by optical absorption measurements. When the results of PL and PR were inserted into this model, a good agreement was obtained with our measured optical absorption results. We also obtained PR spectra of β-FeSi 2 thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. These spectra reveal the multiple direct transitions near the fundamental absorption edge of β-FeSi 2 that were predicted by theory. We suggest an order of these critical point transitions following the trends reported in the theoretical investigations. Doping these β-FeSi2 thin films with small amounts of chromium was shown to have a measurable effect on the interband optical spectra. We also report on the effects of alloying β- FeSi2 with cobalt. A decrease in the critical point transitions nearest the fundamental absorption edge was observed as the cobalt concentration increased. Finally, Raman spectroscopy was used to study the vibrational properties of β-FeSi2. The measured Raman spectra agreed very well with the

  4. Aqueous Chloride Operations Overview: Plutonium and Americium Purification/Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, David Bryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Skidmore, Bradley Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    Acqueous Chloride mission is to recover plutonium and americium from pyrochemical residues (undesirable form for utilization and storage) and generate plutonium oxide and americium oxide. Plutonium oxide is recycled into Pu metal production flowsheet. It is suitable for storage. Americium oxide is a valuable product, sold through the DOE-OS isotope sales program.

  5. Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P.; Park, Y.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.

    1998-11-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the U.S. processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive U.S. processing industries.

  6. On Silicides in High Temperature Titanium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ramachandra

    1986-04-01

    Full Text Available High temperature titanium alloys like IMI 685 contain small amounts of silicon (~ 0.25 wt. per cent to improve creep resistance. Different types of silicides, namely Ti5Si3 (TiZr5Si3(S1 and (TiZr6 Si3 (S2, have been observed to precipitate in various silicon-bearing titanium alloys depending upon their composition and heat treatment. The precipitation of silicides, their orientation relationship with the matrix in different alloys, and the beneficial influence of thermo-mechanical treatment on the distribution of silicides have been pointed out. The effect of silicides on mechanical properties and fracture of the commercial alloy IMI 685 is also indicated.

  7. 5f-Electron Delocalization in Americium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1980-01-01

    The pressure-volume relation for americium has been obtained without adjustable parameters from self-consistent, spin-polarized band calculations. Around 100 kbar we find a first-order transition to a state with low volume and no spin. This is consistent with preliminary high-pressure measurements....

  8. Monitoring silicide formation via in situ resistance measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Erik J.; Wolters, Rob A.M.; Rajasekharan, Bijoy; Salm, Cora; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2009-01-01

    Silicide formation as a result of the reaction of metals with silicon is a widely studied topic in semiconductor industry since silicides form an essential part of modern day Integrated Circuits (ICs). In most situations the fundamental kinetics of silicide formation are analyzed using elaborate tec

  9. The relative physiological and toxicological properties of americium and plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.E.; Busch, E.; Johnson, O. [and others

    1951-11-15

    The relative physiological and toxicological properties of americium and plutonium have been studied following their intravenous administration to rats. The urinary and fecal excretion of americium was similar to that of plutonium administered as Pu(N0{sub 3}){sub 4}. The deposition of americium the tissues and organs of the rat was also similar to that observed for plutonium. The liver and the skeleton were the major sites of deposition. Zirconium citrate administered 15 minutes after injection of americium increased the urinary excretion of americium and decreased the amount found in the liver and the skeleton at 4 and 16 days. LD{sub 30}{sup 50} studies showed americium was slightly less toxic when given in the acute toxic range than was plutonium. The difference was, however, too slight to be important in establishing a larger tolerance does for americium. Survival studies, hematological observations, bone marrow observations, comparison of tumor incidence and the incidence of skeletal abnormalities indicated that americium and plutonium have essentially the same chronic toxicity when given on an equal {mu}c. basis. These studies support the conclusion that the tolerance values for americium should be essentially the same as those for Plutonium.

  10. Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the U.S. processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive U.S. processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with Schuller International Inc. targeted at the area of MoSi{sub 2}-based high temperature materials and components for fiberglass melting and processing applications. The authors are also developing an interaction with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop silicides for high temperature radiant gas burner applications, for the glass and other industries. Current experimental emphasis is on the development and characterization of MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and MoSi{sub 2}-SiC composites, the plasma spraying of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, and the joining of MoSi{sub 2} materials to metals.

  11. Surface complexation modeling of americium sorption onto volcanic tuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M; Kelkar, S; Meijer, A

    2014-10-01

    Results of a surface complexation model (SCM) for americium sorption on volcanic rocks (devitrified and zeolitic tuff) are presented. The model was developed using PHREEQC and based on laboratory data for americium sorption on quartz. Available data for sorption of americium on quartz as a function of pH in dilute groundwater can be modeled with two surface reactions involving an americium sulfate and an americium carbonate complex. It was assumed in applying the model to volcanic rocks from Yucca Mountain, that the surface properties of volcanic rocks can be represented by a quartz surface. Using groundwaters compositionally representative of Yucca Mountain, americium sorption distribution coefficient (Kd, L/Kg) values were calculated as function of pH. These Kd values are close to the experimentally determined Kd values for americium sorption on volcanic rocks, decreasing with increasing pH in the pH range from 7 to 9. The surface complexation constants, derived in this study, allow prediction of sorption of americium in a natural complex system, taking into account the inherent uncertainty associated with geochemical conditions that occur along transport pathways.

  12. Microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jingjing; Wang, Han; Guo, Huaihong; Yang, Teng; Tang, Wen-Shu; Li, Da; Ma, Song; Geng, Dianyu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhidong

    2012-05-01

    The microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules prepared by an arc discharge method have been studied. The composition and the microstructure of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules were determined by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscope observations. Silicides, in the forms of SiOx and SiC, mainly exist in the shells of the nanocapsules and result in a large amount of defects at the `core/shell' interfaces as well as in the shells. The complex permittivity and microwave absorption properties of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules are improved by the doped silicides. Compared with those of Ni/C nanocapsules, the positions of maximum absorption peaks of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules exhibit large red shifts. An electric dipole model is proposed to explain this red shift phenomenon.

  13. Self-irradiation and oxidation effects on americium sesquioxide and Raman spectroscopy studies of americium oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horlait, Denis [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Caraballo, Richard [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SECM/LMPA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Lebreton, Florent [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Jégou, Christophe [CEA, DEN, DTCD/SECM/LMPA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Roussel, Pascal [Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, UMR 8012 CNRS, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Lille BP 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Delahaye, Thibaud, E-mail: thibaud.delahaye@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France)

    2014-09-15

    Americium oxides samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, with an emphasis on their structural behavior under oxidation and self-irradiation. Raman spectra of americium dioxide (AmO{sub 2}) and sesquioxide (Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were obtained for the first time. With the help of literature data on isostructural oxides, Raman signatures of Ia-3 C-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} and P-3m1 A-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} are identified. For AmO{sub 2,} a clear band is noted at 390 cm{sup −1}. Its nature is compared to that of the other actinide dioxides. Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} evolution under ambient conditions and against {sup 241}Am α self-irradiation was monitored by powder XRD. The sample, initially composed of A-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} as major phase as well as C2/m B-type and C-type structures as minor phases, progressively oxidizes to Fm-3m AmO{sub 2−δ} over a few months. On the basis of diffractogram refinements, evolutions of unit cell volumes caused by self-irradiation are also determined and discussed. - Graphical abstract: The evolution of americium oxide under ambient conditions was monitored using XRD (X-ray diffraction) and Raman spectroscopy. After a thermal treatment under reducing conditions, a polyphasic sample mainly composed of A- and C-type americium sesquioxides is evidenced by XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The sample then evolves through two processes: oxidation and self-irradiation. The first one provokes the progressive appearance of F-type americium dioxide while the initial phases disappear, whereas the main effect of the second is a structural swelling with time. - Highlights: • The first Raman spectroscopy measurements on americium oxides were performed. • Observed Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} Raman bands were identified thanks to data on analogue compounds. • AmO{sub 2} assumed T{sub 2g} band presents a shift compared to the actinide dioxide series. • Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} evolution under self-irradiation and oxidation was also

  14. Solution synthesis of metal silicide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnaney, Joshua M; Schaak, Raymond E

    2015-02-01

    Transition-metal silicides are part of an important family of intermetallic compounds, but the high-temperature reactions that are generally required to synthesize them preclude the formation of colloidal nanoparticles. Here, we show that palladium, copper, and nickel nanoparticles react with monophenylsilane in trioctylamine and squalane at 375 °C to form colloidal Pd(2)Si, Cu(3)Si, and Ni(2)Si nanoparticles, respectively. These metal silicide nanoparticles were screened as electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction, and Pd(2)Si and Ni(2)Si were identified as active catalysts that require overpotentials of -192 and -243 mV, respectively, to produce cathodic current densities of -10 mA cm(-2).

  15. Electronic properties of epitaxial erbium silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veuillen, J. Y.; Tan, T. A. Nguyen; Lollman, D. B. B.; Guerfi, N.; Cinti, R.

    1991-07-01

    The electronic properties of erbium silicide thin films epitaxially grown on Si(111) have been investigated by X-ray and UV photoemission. The crystalline quality has been checked by low-energy electron diffraction. XPS indicates very weak charge transfer and metallic bonding in the silicide phase. The Si 2p core-level and the Auger transition Si KLL present double structures revealing two types of Si sites, the first one attributed to Si atoms in normal sites in the silicide and the second one to Si atoms in the vicinity of the vacancies and (or) the Si substrate portions seen through the holes of the film. The UPS valence band of about 4 eV width and formed of Er(6s5d)-Si(3s3p) hybridized states disperses weakly in the direction perpendicular to the surface and strongly in the surface plane. This valence band is compared to the ones already measured on YSi-1.7 and GdSi-1.7 and to the calculations made for YSi2

  16. Plutonium and Americium Geochemistry at Hanford: A Site Wide Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-08-23

    This report was produced to provide a systematic review of the state-of-knowledge of plutonium and americium geochemistry at the Hanford Site. The report integrates existing knowledge of the subsurface migration behavior of plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site with available information in the scientific literature regarding the geochemistry of plutonium and americium in systems that are environmentally relevant to the Hanford Site. As a part of the report, key research needs are identified and prioritized, with the ultimate goal of developing a science-based capability to quantitatively assess risk at sites contaminated with plutonium and americium at the Hanford Site and the impact of remediation technologies and closure strategies.

  17. Americium/Curium Disposition Life Cycle Planning Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, W.N. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Krupa, J.; Stutts, P.; Nester, S.; Raimesch, R.

    1998-04-30

    At the request of the Department of Energy Savannah River Office (DOE- SR), Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) evaluated concepts to complete disposition of Americium and Curium (Am/Cm) bearing materials currently located at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  18. Higher Americium Oxidation State Research Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Goff, George S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moyer, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burns, Jon D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sinkov, Sergey I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shehee, Thomas C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hobbs, David T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-12-18

    The partitioning of hexavalent Am from dissolved nuclear fuel requires the ability to efficiently oxidize Am(III) to Am(VI) and to maintain that oxidation state for a length of time sufficient to perform the separation. Several oxidants have been, or are being developed. Chemical oxidants include Ag-catalyzed ozone, Ag-catalyzed peroxydisulfate, Cu(III) periodate, and sodium bismuthate. Hexavalent americium has also now successfully been prepared by electrolysis, using functionalized electrodes. So-called auto-reduction rates of Am(VI) are sufficiently slow to allow for separations. However, for separations based on solvent extraction or ion exchange using organic resins, the high valence state must be maintained under the reducing conditions of the organic phase contact, and a holding oxidant is probably necessary. Until now, only Cu(III) periodate and sodium bismuthate oxidation have been successfully combined with solvent extraction separations. Bismuthate oxidation provided the higher DAm, since it acts as its own holding oxidant, and a successful hot test using centrifugal contactors was performed. For the other oxidants, Ag-catalyzed peroxydisulfate will not oxidize americium in nitric acid concentrations above 0.3 M, and it is not being further investigated. Peroxydisulfate in the absence of Ag catalysis is being used to prepare Am(V) in ion exchange work, discussed below. Preliminary work with Ag-catalyzed ozone has been unsuccessful for extractions of Am(VI) from 6.5 M HNO3, and only one attempt at extraction, also from 6.5 M HNO3, using the electrolytic oxidation has been attempted. However, this high acid concentration was based on the highest Am extraction efficiency using the bismuthate oxidant; which is only sparingly soluble, and thus the oxidation yield is based on bismuthate solubility. Lower acid concentrations may be sufficient with alternative oxidants and work with Ag-ozone, Cu(III) and electrolysis is on-going. Two non

  19. Aqueous Chloride Operations Overview: Plutonium and Americium Purification/Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Kyle Shelton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimball, David Bryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Skidmore, Bradley Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-28

    These are a set of slides intended for an information session as part of recruiting activities at Brigham Young University. It gives an overview of aqueous chloride operations, specifically on plutonium and americium purification/recovery. This presentation details the steps taken perform these processes, from plutonium size reduction, dissolution, solvent extraction, oxalate precipitation, to calcination. For americium recovery, it details the CLEAR (chloride extraction and actinide recovery) Line, oxalate precipitation and calcination.

  20. Pyrochemical investigations into recovering plutonium from americium extraction salt residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fife, K.W.; West, M.H.

    1987-05-01

    Progress into developing a pyrochemical technique for separating and recovering plutonium from spent americium extraction waste salts has concentrated on selective chemical reduction with lanthanum metal and calcium metal and on the solvent extraction of americium with calcium metal. Both techniques are effective for recovering plutonium from the waste salt, although neither appears suitable as a separation technique for recycling a plutonium stream back to mainline purification processes. 17 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The growth and applications of silicides for nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yung-Chen; Chen, Yu; Huang, Yu

    2012-03-01

    Metal silicides have been used in silicon technology as contacts to achieve high device performance and desired device functions. The growth and applications of silicide materials have recently attracted increasing interest for nanoscale device applications. Nanoscale silicide materials have been demonstrated with various synthetic approaches. Solid state reaction wherein high quality silicides form through diffusion of metal atoms into silicon nano-templates and the subsequent phase transformation caught significant attention for the fabrication of nanoscale Si devices. Very interestingly, studies on the diffusion and phase transformation processes at the nanoscale have indicated possible deviations from the bulk and the thin film system. Here we present a review of fabrication, growth kinetics, electronic properties and device applications of nanoscale silicides formed through solid state reaction.

  2. Thermal Stability of Magnesium Silicide/Nickel Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boor, J.; Droste, D.; Schneider, C.; Janek, J.; Mueller, E.

    2016-10-01

    Magnesium silicide-based materials are a very promising class of thermoelectric materials with excellent potential for thermoelectric waste heat recovery. For the successful application of magnesium silicide-based thermoelectric generators, the development of long-term stable contacts with low contact resistance is as important as material optimization. We have therefore studied the suitability of Ni as a contact material for magnesium silicide. Co-sintering of magnesium silicide and Ni leads to the formation of a stable reaction layer with low electrical resistance. In this paper we show that the contacts retain their low electrical contact resistance after annealing at temperatures up to 823 K for up to 168 h. By employing scanning electron microscope analysis and time-of-flight (ToF)-secondary ion mass spectrometry, we can further show that elemental diffusion is occurring to a very limited extent. This indicates long-term stability under practical operation conditions for magnesium silicide/nickel contacts.

  3. Joule-assisted silicidation for short-channel silicon nanowire devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongillo, Massimo; Spathis, Panayotis; Katsaros, Georgios; Gentile, Pascal; Sanquer, Marc; De Franceschi, Silvano

    2011-09-27

    We report on a technique enabling electrical control of the contact silicidation process in silicon nanowire devices. Undoped silicon nanowires were contacted by pairs of nickel electrodes, and each contact was selectively silicided by means of the Joule effect. By a real-time monitoring of the nanowire electrical resistance during the contact silicidation process we were able to fabricate nickel-silicide/silicon/nickel-silicide devices with controlled silicon channel length down to 8 nm.

  4. Silicide precipitation strengthened TiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, T. [Special Steel Research Laboratory, Daido Steel Co. Ltd., 2-30 Daido-cho, Minami-ku, Nagoya 457 (Japan); Okabe, M. [Special Steel Research Laboratory, Daido Steel Co. Ltd., 2-30 Daido-cho, Minami-ku, Nagoya 457 (Japan); Isobe, S. [Special Steel Research Laboratory, Daido Steel Co. Ltd., 2-30 Daido-cho, Minami-ku, Nagoya 457 (Japan); Sayashi, M. [Materials Research Laboratory, Nissan Research Center, Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., 1 Natushima-cho, Yokosuka 237 (Japan)

    1995-02-28

    Precipitation of a titanium silicide Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} was found to be beneficial to improvement of the creep resistance of a fully lamellar Ti-48Al-1.5Cr cast alloy without the sacrifice of tensile properties. The addition of 0.26-0.65 mol% Si generates fine precipitates less than 200 nm in size during aging at 900 C for 5 h. The precipitates are effective obstacles to dislocation motion and raise the stress exponents of power law creep significantly. The specific creep strength of Si-containing alloys is better than that of a conventional Ni-base cast superalloy Inconel 713C at 800 C for 10000 h. ((orig.))

  5. Electrodeposition of americium and physicochemical behaviour of the solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becerril-Vilchis, A. (Inst. Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, CMRI-LPR, Mexico City (Mexico)); Meas, Y. (CIDETEQ, Queretaro (Mexico)); Rojas-Hernandez, A. (Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Area de Electroquimica, Mexico City (Mexico))

    1994-01-01

    A new method based on concepts of generalized species and equilibria, was applied to represent the thermodynamic distribution of americium species (including condensed phases) in an electrochemical system. Diagrams of the predominance-zone, Existence-predominance and Pourbaix-type for the americium/support electrolyte/water system were constructed. On the basis of these diagrams, the initial distribution of the species in the electrolyte and the deposition conditions were predicted when a current density was applied to a rotating disc electrode in steady-state. These results were related with the Hansen model for actinide electrodeposition. (orig.)

  6. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, R.V.; Mincher, B.J.

    2002-05-23

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65 C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% {+-} 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% {+-} 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% {+-} 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% {+-} 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95 C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil.

  7. Thermodynamic systematics of oxides of americium, curium, and neighboring elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morss, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    Recently-obtained calorimetric data on the sesquioxides and dioxides of americium and curium are summarized. These data are combined with other properties of the actinide elements to elucidate the stability relationships among these oxides and to predict the behavior of neighboring actinide oxides. 45 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  8. Rare earth silicide nanowires on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, Martina

    2008-11-10

    The growth, structure and electronic properties of rare earth silicide nanowires are investigated on planar and vicinal Si(001) und Si(111) surfaces with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). On all surfaces investigated within this work hexagonal disilicides are grown epitaxially with a lattice mismatch of -2.55% up to +0.83% along the hexagonal a-axis. Along the hexagonal c-axis the lattice mismatch is essentially larger with 6.5%. On the Si(001)2 x 1 surface two types of nanowires are grown epitaxially. The socalled broad wires show a one-dimensional metallic valence band structure with states crossing the Fermi level. Along the nanowires two strongly dispersing states at the anti J point and a strongly dispersing state at the anti {gamma} point can be observed. Along the thin nanowires dispersing states could not be observed. Merely in the direction perpendicular to the wires an intensity variation could be observed, which corresponds to the observed spacial structure of the thin nanowires. The electronic properties of the broad erbium silicide nanowires are very similar to the broad dysprosium silicide nanowires. The electronic properties of the DySi{sub 2}-monolayer and the Dy{sub 3}Si{sub 5}-multilayer on the Si(111) surface are investigated in comparison to the known ErSi{sub 2}/Si(111) and Er{sub 3}Si{sub 5}/Si(111) system. The positions and the energetic locations of the observed band in the surface Brillouin zone will be confirmed for dysprosium. The shape of the electron pockets in the (vector)k {sub parallel} space is elliptical at the anti M points, while the hole pocket at the anti {gamma} point is showing a hexagonal symmetry. On the Si(557) surface the structural and electronic properties depend strongly on the different preparation conditions likewise, in particular on the rare earth coverage. At submonolayer coverage the thin nanowires grow in wide areas

  9. Reduction Rates for Higher Americium Oxidation States in Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schmitt, Nicholas C [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The stability of hexavalent americium was measured using multiple americium concentrations and nitric acid concentrations after contact with the strong oxidant sodium bismuthate. Contrary to our hypotheses Am(VI) was not reduced faster at higher americium concentrations, and the reduction was only zero-order at short time scales. Attempts to model the reduction kinetics using zero order kinetic models showed Am(VI) reduction in nitric acid is more complex than the autoreduction processes reported by others in perchloric acid. The classical zero-order reduction of Am(VI) was found here only for short times on the order of a few hours. We did show that the rate of Am(V) production was less than the rate of Am(VI) reduction, indicating that some Am(VI) undergoes two electron-reduction to Am(IV). We also monitored the Am(VI) reduction in contact with the organic diluent dodecane. A direct comparison of these results with those in the absence of the organic diluent showed the reduction rates for Am(VI) were not statistically different for both systems. Additional americium oxidations conducted in the presence of Ce(IV)/Ce(III) ions showed that Am(VI) is reduced without the typical growth of Am(V) observed in the systems sans Ce ion. This was an interesting result which suggests a potential new reduction/oxidation pathway for Am in the presence of Ce; however, these results were very preliminary, and will require additional experiments to understand the mechanism by which this occurs. Overall, these studies have shown that hexavalent americium is fundamentally stable enough in nitric acid to run a separations process. However, the complicated nature of the reduction pathways based on the system components is far from being rigorously understood.

  10. Silicide Nanowires for Low-Resistance CMOS Transistor Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollner, Stefan

    2007-03-01

    Transition metal (TM) silicide nanowires are used as contacts for modern CMOS transistors. (Our smallest wires are ˜20 nm thick and ˜50 nm wide.) While much research on thick TM silicides was conducted long ago, materials perform differently at the nanoscale. For example, the usual phase transformation sequences (e.g., Ni, Ni2Si, NiSi, NiSi2) for the reaction of thick metal films on Si no longer apply to nanostructures, because the surface and interface energies compete with the bulk energy of a given crystal structure. Therefore, a NiSi film will agglomerate into hemispherical droplets of NiSi by annealing before it reaches the lowest-energy (NiSi2) crystalline structure. These dynamics can be tuned by addition of impurities (such as Pt in Ni). The Si surface preparation is also a more important factor for nanowires than for silicidation of thick TM films. Ni nanowires formed on Si surfaces that were cleaned and amorphized by sputtering with Ar ions have a tendency to form NiSi2 pyramids (``spikes'') even at moderate temperatures (˜400^oC), while similar Ni films formed on atomically clean or hydrogen-terminated Si form uniform NiSi nanowires. Another issue affecting TM silicides is the barrier height between the silicide contact and the silicon transistor. For most TM silicides, the Fermi level of the silicide is aligned with the center of the Si band gap. Therefore, silicide contacts experience Schottky barrier heights of around 0.5 eV for both n-type and p-type Si. The resulting contact resistance becomes a significant term for the overall resistance of modern CMOS transistors. Lowering this contact resistance is an important goal in CMOS research. New materials are under investigation (for example PtSi, which has a barrier height of only 0.3 eV to p-type Si). This talk will describe recent results, with special emphasis on characterization techniques and electrical testing useful for the development of silicide nanowires for CMOS contacts. In collaboration

  11. Evaluation of Transmission Line Model Structures for Silicide-to-Silicon Specific Contact Resistance Extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavitski, Natalie; Dal, van Mark J.H.; Lauwers, Anne; Vrancken, Christa; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Wolters, Rob A.M.

    2008-01-01

    In order to measure silicide-to-silicon specific contact resistance ρc, transmission line model (TLM) structures were proposed as attractive candidates for embedding in CMOS processes. We optimized TLM structures for nickel silicide and platinum silicide and evaluated them for various doping levels

  12. Formation of Silicide Coating layer on U-Mo Powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Min; Kim, Sunghwan; Lee, Kyu Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    High-density U-Mo alloys are regarded as promising candidates for advanced research reactor fuel as they have shown stable irradiation performance when compared to other uranium alloys and compounds. However, interaction layer formation between the U-Mo alloys and Al matrix degrades the irradiation performance of U-Mo Dispersion fuel. Therefore, the addition of Ti in U-Mo alloys, the addition of Si in a Al matrix, and silicide or nitride coating on the surface of U-Mo particles have been proposed to inhibit the interaction layer growth. In this study, U-Mo alloy powder was produced using a centrifugal atomization method. In addition, silicide coating layers were fabricated by several mixing process changes on the surface of the U-Mo particles. The coated powders were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). Decreased annealing duration did not affect the forming of silicide coating layers on the surface of U-7wt%Mo powders. The variation in the mixing ratio between U-7wt%Mo and Si powders had an effect on the quality of silicide coating on the U-7wt%Mo powders. The weight of Si powders should be smaller than that of U-7wt%Mo powders for better silicide coating when it comes to the mixing ratio.

  13. Silicide/Silicon Hetero-Junction Structure for Thermoelectric Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Dongsuk; Kim, Soojung; Choi, Wonchul; Kim, Junsoo; Zyung, Taehyoung; Jang, Moongyu

    2015-10-01

    We fabricated silicide/silicon hetero-junction structured thermoelectric device by CMOS process for the reduction of thermal conductivity with the scatterings of phonons at silicide/silicon interfaces. Electrical conductivities, Seebeck coefficients, power factors, and temperature differences are evaluated using the steady state analysis method. Platinum silicide/silicon multilayered structure showed an enhanced Seebeck coefficient and power factor characteristics, which was considered for p-leg element. Also, erbium silicide/silicon structure showed an enhanced Seebeck coefficient, which was considered for an n-leg element. Silicide/silicon multilayered structure is promising for thermoelectric applications by reducing thermal conductivity with an enhanced Seebeck coefficient. However, because of the high thermal conductivity of the silicon packing during thermal gradient is not a problem any temperature difference. Therefore, requires more testing and analysis in order to overcome this problem. Thermoelectric generators are devices that based on the Seebeck effect, convert temperature differences into electrical energy. Although thermoelectric phenomena have been used for heating and cooling applications quite extensively, it is only in recent years that interest has increased in energy generation.

  14. Submicron Features in Higher Manganese Silicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatir Sadia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The world energy crisis had increased the demand for alternative energy sources and as such is one of the topics at the forefront of research. One way for reducing energy consumption is by thermoelectricity. Thermoelectric effects enable direct conversion of thermal into electrical energy. Higher manganese silicide (HMS, MnSi1.75 is one of the promising materials for applications in the field of thermoelectricity. The abundance and low cost of the elements, combined with good thermoelectric properties and high mechanical and chemical stability at high temperatures, make it very attractive for thermoelectric applications. Recent studies have shown that Si-rich HMS has improved thermoelectric properties. The most interesting of which is the unusual reduction in thermal conductivity. In the current research, transmission (TEM and scanning (SEM electron microscopy as well as X-ray diffraction methods were applied for investigation of the govern mechanisms resulting in very low thermal conductivity values of an Si-rich HMS composition, following arc melting and hot-pressing procedures. In this paper, it is shown that there is a presence of sub-micron dislocations walls, stacking faults, and silicon and HMS precipitates inside each other apparent in the matrix, following a high temperature (0.9 Tm hot pressing for an hour. These are not just responsible for the low thermal conductivity values observed but also indicate the ability to create complicate nano-structures that will last during the production process and possibly during the application.

  15. Formation of cobalt silicide by ion beam mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ye; Burte, Edmund P.; Ryssel, Heiner

    1991-07-01

    The formation of cobalt silicides by arsenic ion implantation through a cobalt film which causes a mixing of the metal with the silicon substrate was investigated. Furthermore, cobalt suicides were formed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). Sheet resistance and silicide phases of implanted Co/Si samples depend on the As dose. Ion beam mixing at doses higher than 5 × 10 15 cm -2 and RTA at temperatures T ⩾ 900° C result in almost equal values of Rs. RBS and XRD spectra of these samples illustrate the formation of a homogeneous CoSi 2 layer. Significant lateral growth of cobalt silicide beyond the edge of patterned SiO 2 was observed in samples which were only subjected to an RTA process ( T ⩾ 900 ° C), while this lateral suicide growth could be reduced efficiently by As implantation prior to RTA.

  16. Si-Ge Nano-Structured with Tungsten Silicide Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Traditional silicon germanium high temperature thermoelectrics have potential for improvements in figure of merit via nano-structuring with a silicide phase. A second phase of nano-sized silicides can theoretically reduce the lattice component of thermal conductivity without significantly reducing the electrical conductivity. However, experimentally achieving such improvements in line with the theory is complicated by factors such as control of silicide size during sintering, dopant segregation, matrix homogeneity, and sintering kinetics. Samples are prepared using powder metallurgy techniques; including mechanochemical alloying via ball milling and spark plasma sintering for densification. In addition to microstructural development, thermal stability of thermoelectric transport properties are reported, as well as couple and device level characterization.

  17. Mo SILICIDE SYNTHISIS BY DUAL ION BEAM DEPOSITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.H. Zhang; Z.Z. Yi; X.Y. Wu; S.J. Zhang; Y.G. Wu; X. Zhang; H.X. Zhang; A.D. Liu; X.J. Zhang

    2002-01-01

    Mo silicides MosSi3 with high quality were prepared using ion beam deposition equip-ment with two Filter Metal Vacuum Arc Deposition (FMEVAD). When the numberof alternant deposition times was 198, total thickness of the coating is 40nm. Thecoatings with droplet free can be readily obtained, so the surface is smooth. TEMobservation shows that Mo and Si alternant deposition coating is conpact structure.The fine Mo silicide grains densely distributed in the coating. The coating adherenceon silicon is excellent.

  18. Research program on development of advanced treatment technology for americium-containing aqueous waste in NUCEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineo, Hideaki; Matsumura, Tatsuro; Tsubata, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-10-01

    A research program was prepared on the development of an advanced treatment process for the americium-containing concentrated aqueous waste in NUCEF, than allows americium recovery for the reuse and the reduction of TRU waste generation. A preliminary analysis was conducted on the separation requirements based on the components estimated for the waste. An R and D strategy was proposed from the view to reduce TRU waste generated in the processing that the highest priority is given on the control of TRU leakage such as americium into the effluent stream after americium recovery and the minimization of salt used in the separation over the decontamination of impurities from americium. The extraction chromatographic method was selected as a candidate technology for americium separation under the principle to use reagents that are functional in acidic conditions such as bidentate extractants of DHEDECMP, CMPO or diamides, considering the larger flexibilities in process modification and possible multi-component separation with compact equipment and the past achievements on the recovery of kg quantities of americium. Major R and D items extracted are screening and evaluation of extractants for americium and plutonium, optimization of separation conditions, selection of denitration method, equipment developments and development of solidification methods of discarded americium after reuse and of various kinds of separation residues. In order to cope these items, four steps of R and D program were proposed, i.e., fundamental experiment in beaker-scale on screening and evaluation of extractants, flowsheet study in bench-scale using simulated and small amount of americium aqueous waste solution to evaluate candidate process, americium recovery test in iron-shielded cell to be installed in NUCEF. It is objected to make recovery of 100g orders of americium used for research on fundamental TRU fuel properties. (J.P.N.)

  19. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Robert Vincent; Mincher, Bruce Jay

    2002-08-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65°C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% ± 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% ± 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% ± 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% ± 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95°C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil.

  20. Isolation of americium (5) oxalate compounds from solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubarev, V.G.; Krot, N.N.

    1982-01-01

    Certain conditions of americium (5) isolation with solutions of ammonia and KOH are studied as well as the attitude of hydroxide obtained to heating. Like neptunium (5) hydroxide americium (5) hydroxide probably has the formula AmO/sub 2/OHxxH/sub 2/O, where x is approximately equal to 2.3. It is established that during heating in the air up to 120 deg C hydroxide transforms into AmO/sub 2/. It is shown that in solutions with a high concentration of oxalate-ion americium stability in oxidation state +5 depends greatly on the pH of solution. Complex salts KAmO/sub 2/C/sub 2/O/sub 4/xxH/sub 2/O and CsAmO/sub 2/C/sub 2/O/sub 4/xxH/sub 2/O are synthesized. The identification is made according to the method of preparation and results of analysis of C/sub 2/O/sub 4//sup 2 -/: AmO/sub 2//sup +/ ratio. It is found that the salts are non-isomorphous to similar salts of pentavalent neptunium. CsAmO/sub 2/C/sub 2/O/sub 4/xxH/sub 2/O is identified in cubic crystal system with the lattice constant a=1.25 nm.

  1. Spin, Charge, and Bonding in Transition Metal Mono Silicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marel, D. van der; Damascelli, A.; Schulte, K.; Menovsky, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Published in: Physica B 244 (1998) 138-147 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: We review some of the relevant physical properties of the transition metal mono-silicides with the FeSi structure (CrSi, MnSi, FeSi, CoSi, NiSi, etc) and explore the relation between their structural

  2. Neutronic design of the RSG-GAS silicide core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sembiring, T.M.; Kuntoro, I.; Hastowo, H. [Center for Development of Research Reactor Technology National Nuclear Energy Agency BATAN, PUSPIPTEK Serpong Tangerang, 15310 (Indonesia)

    2002-07-01

    The objective of core conversion program of the RSG-GAS multipurpose reactor is to convert the fuel from oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al to silicide, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al. The aim of the program is to gain longer operation cycle by having, which is technically possible for silicide fuel, a higher density. Upon constraints of the existing reactor system and utilization, an optimal fuel density in amount of 3.55 g U/cc was found. This paper describes the neutronic parameter design of the silicide equilibrium core and the design of its transition cores as well. From reactivity control point of view, a modification of control rod system is also discussed. All calculations are carried out by means of diffusion codes, Batan-EQUIL-2D, Batan-2DIFF and -3DIFF. The silicide core shows that longer operation cycle of 32 full power days can be achieved without decreasing the safety criteria and utilization capabilities. (author)

  3. Study of nickel silicide formation by physical vapor deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancharatnam, Shanti

    Metal silicides are used as contacts to the highly n-doped emitter in photovoltaic devices. Thin films of nickel silicide (NiSi) are of particular interest for Si-based solar cells, as they form at lower temperature and consume less silicon. However, interfacial oxide limits the reduction in sheet resistance. Hence, different diffusion barriers were investigated with regard to optimizing the conductivity and thermal stability. The formation of NiSi, and if it can be doped to have good contact with the n-side of a p-n junction were studied. Reduction of the interfacial oxide by the interfacial Ti layer to allow the formation of NiSi was observed. Silicon was treated in dilute hydrofluoric acid for removing the surface oxide layer. Ni and a Ti diffusion barrier were deposited on Si by physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods - electron beam evaporation and sputtering. The annealing temperature and time were varied to observe the stability of the deposited film. The films were then etched to observe the retention of the silicide. Characterization was done using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Rutherford back scattering (RBS). Sheet resistance was measured using the four-point probe technique. Annealing temperatures from 300°C showed films began to agglomerate indicating some diffusion between Ni and Si in the Ti layer, also supported by the compositional analysis in the Auger spectra. Films obtained by evaporation and sputtering were of high quality in terms of coverage over substrate area and uniformity. Thicknesses of Ni and Ti were optimized to 20 nm and 10 nm respectively. Resistivity was low at these thicknesses, and reduced by about half post annealing at 300°C for 8 hours. Thus a low resistivity contact was obtained at optimized thicknesses of the metal layers. It was also shown that some silicide formation occurs at temperatures starting from 300°C and can thus be used to make good silicide contacts.

  4. Texture in thin film silicides and germanides: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schutter, B.; De Keyser, K.; Lavoie, C.; Detavernier, C.

    2016-09-01

    Silicides and germanides are compounds consisting of a metal and silicon or germanium. In the microelectronics industry, silicides are the material of choice for contacting silicon based devices (over the years, CoSi2, C54-TiSi2, and NiSi have been adopted), while germanides are considered as a top candidate for contacting future germanium based electronics. Since also strain engineering through the use of Si1-xGex in the source/drain/gate regions of MOSFET devices is an important technique for improving device characteristics in modern Si-based microelectronics industry, a profound understanding of the formation of silicide/germanide contacts to silicon and germanium is of utmost importance. The crystallographic texture of these films, which is defined as the statistical distribution of the orientation of the grains in the film, has been the subject of scientific studies since the 1970s. Different types of texture like epitaxy, axiotaxy, fiber, or combinations thereof have been observed in such films. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that film texture can have a profound influence on the formation and stability of silicide/germanide contacts, as it controls the type and orientation of grain boundaries (affecting diffusion and agglomeration) and the interface energy (affecting nucleation during the solid-state reaction). Furthermore, the texture also has an impact on the electrical characteristics of the contact, as the orientation and size of individual grains influences functional properties such as contact resistance and sheet resistance and will induce local variations in strain and Schottky barrier height. This review aims to give a comprehensive overview of the scientific work that has been published in the field of texture studies on thin film silicide/germanide contacts.

  5. Separation of americium and curium from complex chemical and radiochemical mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bochkarev, V.A.; Martynov, N.P.; Slivin, V.G.; Trikanov, A.E.; Fedyaeva, N.V.

    1988-11-01

    This work describes a method for separation and radiochemical purification of nanogram levels of americium and curium from complex chemical and radiochemical mixtures containing tens of milligrams of elements such as aluminum, iron, magnesium, calcium, barium, titanium, potassium, and others, microgram levels of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium, and fission products. Extraction coefficients of americium and curium from these elements are measured. The separation from the macrocomponents was carried out by extraction of americium and curium with butyric acid in the presence of sulfosalicylic acid. Uranium, neptunium, and plutonium were separated from hydrochloric acid solutions, while the rare earth elements were separated from lithium chloride solutions using a column of anion exchange resin AV-17. Alpha measurements were carried out on americium and curium deposited electrolytically on tantalum cathodes. The chemical yield of americium and curium was identical of greater than or equal to 94%, separation time approx. 8 h.

  6. Uncertainty analysis of doses from ingestion of plutonium and americium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncher, M; Harrison, J D

    2012-02-01

    Uncertainty analyses have been performed on the biokinetic model for americium currently used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and the model for plutonium recently derived by Leggett, considering acute intakes by ingestion by adult members of the public. The analyses calculated distributions of doses per unit intake. Those parameters having the greatest impact on prospective doses were identified by sensitivity analysis; the most important were the fraction absorbed from the alimentary tract, f(1), and rates of uptake from blood to bone surfaces. Probability distributions were selected based on the observed distribution of plutonium and americium in human subjects where possible; the distributions for f(1) reflected uncertainty on the average value of this parameter for non-specified plutonium and americium compounds ingested by adult members of the public. The calculated distributions of effective doses for ingested (239)Pu and (241)Am were well described by log-normal distributions, with doses varying by around a factor of 3 above and below the central values; the distributions contain the current ICRP Publication 67 dose coefficients for ingestion of (239)Pu and (241)Am by adult members of the public. Uncertainty on f(1) values had the greatest impact on doses, particularly effective dose. It is concluded that: (1) more precise data on f(1) values would have a greater effect in reducing uncertainties on doses from ingested (239)Pu and (241)Am, than reducing uncertainty on other model parameter values and (2) the results support the dose coefficients (Sv Bq(-1) intake) derived by ICRP for ingestion of (239)Pu and (241)Am by adult members of the public.

  7. Titanium-based silicide quantum dot superlattices for thermoelectrics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelli, Guillaume; Stein, Sergio Silveira; Bernard-Granger, Guillaume; Faucherand, Pascal; Montès, Laurent; Dilhaire, Stefan; Pernot, Gilles

    2015-07-10

    Ti-based silicide quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) are grown by reduced-pressure chemical vapor deposition. They are made of titanium-based silicide nanodots scattered in an n-doped SiGe matrix. This is the first time that such nanostructured materials have been grown in both monocrystalline and polycrystalline QDSLs. We studied their crystallographic structures and chemical properties, as well as the size and the density of the quantum dots. The thermoelectric properties of the QDSLs are measured and compared to equivalent SiGe thin films to evaluate the influence of the nanodots. Our studies revealed an increase in their thermoelectric properties-specifically, up to a trifold increase in the power factor, with a decrease in the thermal conductivity-making them very good candidates for further thermoelectric applications in cooling or energy-harvesting fields.

  8. Oxidation behavior of molybdenum silicides and their composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Deevi, S. C.

    2000-04-03

    A key materials issue associated with the future of high-temperature structural silicides is the resistance of these materials to oxidation at low temperatures. Oxidation tests were conducted on Mo-based silicides over a wide temperature range to evaluate the effects of alloy composition and temperature on the protective scaling characteristics and testing regime for the materials. The study included Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} alloys that contained several concentrations of B. In addition, oxidation characteristics of MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} composites that contained 20--80 vol.% Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were evaluated at 500--1,400 C.

  9. Infrared and Raman characterization of beta iron silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefki, K.; Muret, P.; Bustarret, E.; Boutarek, N.; Madar, R.; Chevrier, J.; Derrien, J.; Brunel, M.

    1991-12-01

    Samples of beta-iron silicide were prepared by three different methods : solid phase reaction on silicon (111), on a monocrystaline FeSi substrate, and from the melt. These samples have been characterized by x-ray diffraction and investigated by Infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The infrared and Raman lines are compared with theoretical predictions given by the factor group analysis of the silicide primitive cell, which yields the number and the symmetry of the different modes. We relate the red shift of the Infrared and Raman lines on samples with smaller lattice parameters to the presence of Iron vacancies in films deposited on silicon, in agreement with the sign of the thermoelectric power.

  10. Controlling nickel silicide phase formation by Si implantation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guihard, M.; Turcotte-Tremblay, P. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Gaudet, S.; Coia, C. [Departement de Genie Physique, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Roorda, S. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Desjardins, P. [Departement de Genie Physique, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Lavoie, C. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York (United States); Schiettekatte, F. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal (Canada)], E-mail: francois.schiettekatte@umontreal.ca

    2009-05-01

    In the context of fabrication process of contacts in CMOS integrated circuits, we studied the effect of implantation-induced damage on the Ni silicide phase formation sequence. The device layers of Silicon-on-insulator samples were implanted with 30 or 60 keV Si ions at several fluences up to amorphization. Next, 10 or 30 nm Ni layers were deposited. The monitoring of annealing treatments was achieved with time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and pole figure XRD were also used to characterize some intermediate phase formations. We show the existence of an implantation threshold (1 ions/nm{sup 2}) from where the silicidation behaviour changes significantly, the formation temperature of the disilicide namely shifting abruptly from 800 to 450 deg. C. It is also found that the monosilicide formation onset temperature for the thinner Ni deposits increases linearly by about 30 deg. C with the amount of damage.

  11. Stacked Metal Silicide/Silicon Far-Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    Selective doping of silicon in proposed metal silicide/silicon Schottky-barrier infrared photodetector increases maximum detectable wavelength. Stacking layers to form multiple Schottky barriers increases quantum efficiency of detector. Detectors of new type enhance capabilities of far-infrared imaging arrays. Grows by molecular-beam epitaxy on silicon waferscontaining very-large-scale integrated circuits. Imaging arrays of detectors made in monolithic units with image-preprocessing circuitry.

  12. Preparation of Magnesium Silicide from Recycled Materials for Energy Storage.

    OpenAIRE

    Bumba, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Recycling technologies help to save energy, materials and environment. This is the main reason of their popularity. The recovery of semiconductors and metals depends on recycling treatment. A new multi-step technology, which enables to obtain pure silicon and hydrogen from waste materials,is reported in this study. The only by-product is magnesium phosphate, which is a desired fertilizer. Magnesium silicide was successfully prepared from milled silicon photovoltaic (PV) panels and mill...

  13. FORMATION OF MANGANESE SILICIDE THIN FILMS BY SOLID PHASE REACTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.Q. Xie; W.W. Wang; N. Jiang; D.Y. He

    2002-01-01

    Manganese silicide MnSi2-x thin films have been prepared on n-type silicon substratesthrough solid phase reaction. The heterostructures were analyzed by X-ray diffraction,Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared transmittance spec-troscopy and the four-point probe technique. The results show that two manganese sili-cides have been formed sequentially via the reaction of thin layer Mn with Si substrateat different irradiation annealing stages, i.e., MnSi at 450℃ and MnSi1.73 at 550℃.MnSi1.73 phase exhibits preferred growth after irradiation with infrared. In situ four-point probe measurements of sheet resistance during infrared irradiation annealingshow that nucleation of MnSi and phase transformation of MnSi to MnSi1. 73 occur at410℃ and 530℃, respectively; the MnSi phase shows metallic behavior, while MnSi1.73exhibits semiconducting behavior. Characteristic phonon bands of MnSi2-x silicides,which can be used for phase identification along with conventional XRD techniques,have been observed by FTIR spectroscopy.

  14. Kilogram-scale purification of americium by ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheelwright, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Sequential anion and cation exchange processes have been used for the final purification of /sup 241/Am recovered during the reprocessing of aged plutonium metallurgical scrap. Plutonium was removed by absorption of Dowex 1, X-3.5 (30 to 50 mesh) anion exchange resin from 6.5 to 7.5 M HNO/sub 3/ feed solution. Following a water dilution to 0.75 to 1.0 M HNO/sub 3/, americium was absorbed on Dowex 50W, X-8 (50 to 100 mesh) cation exchange resion. Final purification was accomplished by elution of the absorbed band down 3 to 4 successive beds of the same resin, preloaded with Zn/sup 2 +/, with an NH/sub 4/OH buffered chelating agent. The recovery of mixed /sup 241/Am-/sup 243/Am from power reactor reprocessing waste has been demonstrated. Solvent extraction was used to recover a HNO/sub 3/ solution of mixed lanthanides and actinides from waste generated by the reprocessng of 13.5 tons of Shippingport Power Reactor blanket fuel. Sequential cation exchange band-displacement processes were then used to separate americium and curium from the lanthanides and then to separate approx. 60 g of /sup 244/Cm from 1000 g of mixed /sup 241/Am-/sup 243/Am.

  15. Fuel management strategy for the new equilibrium silicide core design of RSG GAS (MPR-30)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Liem Peng; Arbie, Bakri; Sembiring, T.M. [National Atomic Energy Agency (Batan), Center for Multipurpose Reactor, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1997-07-01

    The design procedure and fuel management strategy were proposed for converting the oxide core of RSG GAS (MPR-30) to the new equilibrium silicide core using higher uranium loading. The obtained silicide core gave significant extension of the core cycle length and thus increasing the reactor availability and utilisation. (author)

  16. Fuel management strategy for the new equilibrium silicide core design of RSG GAS (MPR-30)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Liem Peng; Arbie, Bakri; Sembiring, T.M. [National Atomic Energy Agency (Batan), Center for Multipurpose Reactor, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1997-07-01

    The design procedure and fuel management strategy were proposed for converting the oxide core of RSG GAS (MPR-30) to the new equilibrium silicide core using higher uranium loading. The obtained silicide core gave significant extension of the core cycle length and thus increasing the reactor availability and utilisation. (author) 4 figs., 1 tab., refs.

  17. Mechanoactivation of chromium silicide formation in the SiC-Cr-Si system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasova M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The processes of simultaneous grinding of the components of a SiC-Cr-Si mixture and further temperature treatment in the temperature range 1073-1793 K were studied by X-ray phase analysis, IR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and X-ray microanalysis. It was established that, during grinding of the mixture, chromium silicides form. A temperature treatment completes the process. Silicide formation proceeds within the framework of the diffusion of silicon into chromium. In the presence of SiO2 in the mixture, silicide formation occurs also as a result of the reduction of silica by silicon and silicon carbide. The sintering of synthesized composite SiC-chromium silicides powders at a high temperature under a high pressure (T = 2073 K, P = 5 GPa is accompanied by the destruction of cc-SiC particles, the cc/3 transition in silicon carbide and deformation distortions of the lattices of chromium silicides.

  18. Hexavalent Americium Recovery Using Copper(III) Periodate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, Kevin; Brigham, Derek M.; Morrison, Samuel; Braley, Jenifer C.

    2016-11-21

    Separation of americium from the lanthanides is considered one of the most difficult separation steps in closing the nuclear fuel cycle. One approach to this separation could involve oxidizing americium to the hexavalent state to form a linear dioxo cation while the lanthanides remain as trivalent ions. This work considers aqueous soluble Cu3+ periodate as an oxidant under molar nitric acid conditions to separate hexavalent Am with diamyl amylphosphonate (DAAP) in n-dodecane. Initial studies assessed the kinetics of Cu3+ periodate auto-reduction in acidic media to aid in development of the solvent extraction system. Following characterization of the Cu3+ periodate oxidant, solvent extraction studies optimized the recovery of Am from varied nitric acid media and in the presence of other fission product, or fission product surrogate, species. Short aqueous/organic contact times encouraged successful recovery of Am (distribution values as high as 2) from nitric acid media in the absence of redox active fission products. In the presence of a post-PUREX simulant aqueous feed, precipitation of tetravalent species (Ce, Ru, Zr) occurred and the distribution values of 241Am were suppressed, suggesting some oxidizing capacity of the Cu3+ periodate is significantly consumed by other redox active metals in the simulant. The manuscript demonstrates Cu3+ periodate as a potentially viable oxidant for Am oxidation and recovery and notes the consumption of oxidizing capacity observed in the presence of the post-PUREX simulant feed will need to be addressed for any approach seeking to oxidize Am for separations relevant to the nuclear fuel cycle.

  19. Oxidative Alkaline leaching of Americium from simulated high-level nuclear waste sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Wendy A.; Garnov, Alexander Yu.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Bond, Andrew H.

    2004-01-23

    Oxidative alkaline leaching has been proposed to pre-treat the high-level nuclear waste sludges to remove some of the problematic (e.g., Cr) and/or non-radioactive (e.g., Na, Al) constituents before vitrification. It is critical to understand the behavior of actinides, americium and plutonium in particular, in oxidative alkaline leaching. We have studied the leaching behavior of americium from four different sludge simulants (BiPO{sub 4}, BiPO{sub 4 modified}, Redox, PUREX) using potassium permanganate and potassium persulfate in alkaline solutions. Up to 60% of americium sorbed onto the simulants is leached from the sludges by alkaline persulfate and permanganate. The percentage of americium leached increases with [NaOH] (between 1.0 and 5.0 M). The initial rate of americium leaching by potassium persulfate increases in the order BiPO{sub 4} sludge < Redox sludge < PUREX sludge. The data are most consistent with oxidation of Am{sup 3+} in the sludge to either AmO{sub 2}{sup +} or AmO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in solution. Though neither of these species is expected to exhibit long-term stability in solution, the potential for mobilization of americium from sludge samples would have to be accommodated in the design of any oxidative leaching process for real sludge samples.

  20. The transmutation of americium: the Ecrix experiments in Phenix; Transmutation de l'americium: les experiences ecrix dans Phenix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, J.C.; Schmidt, N. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles (DEC/SESC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Croixmarie, Y.; Ottaviani, J.P. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles (DEC/SPUA), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Varaine, F.; Saint Jean, C. de [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs (DER/SPRC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1999-07-01

    The first americium transmutation experiment in a specific target in PHENIX will occur with the ECRIX-B and ECRIX-H experiments. Beside material testing, the objective is also to represent a concept of transmutation whose specificity is to enhance the kinetics of transmutation by using a moderated spectrum. The moderator materials will be {sup 11}B{sub 4}C and CaH{sub 2} for ECRIX-B and ECRIXH respectively, the irradiation conditions have been predicted for both the neutronics and thermal. The targets (MgO-AmO{sub X} pellets) are manufactured in the ATALANTE laboratory and the design is performed according to the PHENIX operating conditions. (authors)

  1. Atomic size effects studied by transport in single silicide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccoli, I.; Edler, F.; Pfnür, H.; Appelfeller, S.; Dähne, M.; Holtgrewe, K.; Sanna, S.; Schmidt, W. G.; Tegenkamp, C.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrathin metallic silicide nanowires with extremely high aspect ratios can be easily grown, e.g., by deposition of rare earth elements on semiconducting surfaces. These wires play a pivotal role in fundamental research and open intriguing perspectives for CMOS applications. However, the electronic properties of these one-dimensional systems are extremely sensitive to atomic-sized defects, which easily alter the transport characteristics. In this study, we characterized comprehensively TbSi2 wires grown on Si(100) and correlated details of the atomic structure with their electrical resistivities. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) as well as all transport experiments were performed in situ using a four-tip STM system. The measurements are complemented by local spectroscopy and density functional theory revealing that the silicide wires are electronically decoupled from the Si template. On the basis of a quasiclassical transport model, the size effect found for the resistivity is quantitatively explained in terms of bulk and surface transport channels considering details of atomic-scale roughness. Regarding future applications the full wealth of these robust nanostructures will emerge only if wires with truly atomically sharp interfaces can be reliably grown.

  2. Work function characterization of solution-processed cobalt silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihab Ullah, Syed; Robinson, Matt; Hoey, Justin; Sky Driver, M.; Caruso, A. N.; Schulz, Douglas L.

    2012-06-01

    Cobalt silicide thin films were prepared by spin-coating liquid cyclohexasilane-based inks onto silicon substrates followed by a thermal treatment. The work function of the solution-processed Co-Si was determined by both capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structures as well as by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS). Variable frequency C-V of MOS structures with silicon oxide layers of variable thickness showed that solution-processed metal silicide films exhibit a work function of 4.36 eV with one Co-Si film on Si giving a UPS-derived work function of 4.80 eV. Similar work function measurements were collected for vapor-deposited MOS capacitors where Al thin films were prepared according to standard class 100 cleanroom handling techniques. In both instances, the work function values established by the electrical measurements were lower than those measured by UPS and this difference appears to be a consequence of parasitic series resistance.

  3. Silicidation in Pd/Si thin film junction-Defect evolution and silicon surface segregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhaya, S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Amarendra, G. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)], E-mail: amar@igcar.gov.in; Venugopal Rao, G.; Rajaraman, R.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Sastry, V.S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2007-09-25

    Depth resolved positron annihilation studies on Pd/Si thin film system have been carried out to investigate silicide phase formation and vacancy defect production induced by thermal annealing. The evolution of defect sensitive S-parameter clearly indicates the presence of divacancy defects across the interface, due to enhanced Si diffusion beyond 870 K consequent to silicide formation. Corroborative glancing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) have elucidated the aspects related to silicide phase formation and Si surface segregation.

  4. Effect of americium-241 on luminous bacteria. Role of peroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrova, M., E-mail: maka-alexandrova@rambler.r [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Rozhko, T. [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Vydryakova, G. [Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Kudryasheva, N. [Siberian Federal University, Svobodny 79, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Biophysics SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15

    The effect of americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), an alpha-emitting radionuclide of high specific activity, on luminous bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum was studied. Traces of {sup 241}Am in nutrient media (0.16-6.67 kBq/L) suppressed the growth of bacteria, but enhanced luminescence intensity and quantum yield at room temperature. Lower temperature (4 {sup o}C) increased the time of bacterial luminescence and revealed a stage of bioluminescence inhibition after 150 h of bioluminescence registration start. The role of conditions of exposure the bacterial cells to the {sup 241}Am is discussed. The effect of {sup 241}Am on luminous bacteria was attributed to peroxide compounds generated in water solutions as secondary products of radioactive decay. Increase of peroxide concentration in {sup 241}Am solutions was demonstrated; and the similarity of {sup 241}Am and hydrogen peroxide effects on bacterial luminescence was revealed. The study provides a scientific basis for elaboration of bioluminescence-based assay to monitor radiotoxicity of alpha-emitting radionuclides in aquatic solutions. - Highlights: {yields} Am-241 in water solutions (A = 0.16-6.7 kBq/L) suppresses bacterial growth.{yields} Am-241 (A = 0.16-6.7 kBq/L) stimulate bacterial luminescence. {yields} Peroxides, secondary radiolysis products, cause increase of bacterial luminescence.

  5. Particulate distribution of plutonium and americium in surface waters from the Spanish Mediterranean coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molero, J.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.; Merino, J.; Vidal-Quadras, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Vives Batlle, J.; Mitchell, P.I. [University Coll., Dublin (Ireland)

    1995-12-31

    Measurements of the particulate distribution of plutonium and americium in Spanish Mediterranean coastal waters have been carried out. Plutonium-239,340 and {sup 241}Am concentrations have been measured in suspended particulate matter by filtering (< 0.22 {mu}m) large volume (200-300 litres) sea water samples. Results indicate that particulate plutonium constitutes on average 11 {+-} 4% of the total concentration in sea water. In the case of americium this percentage rises to 45 {+-} 14%. From the {sup 241}Am/{sup 239,240}Pu activity ratios it is clear that suspended particulate matter is enriched in {sup 241}Am relative to {sup 239,240}Pu by a factor 8 {+-} 4. Plutonium and americium in surface Mediterranean coastal waters appear to be fractionated as they present a different transfer rate to the particles. Our measurements allowed us to estimate sediment-water distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), which are a key parameter to interpret differences between the behaviour of plutonium and americium in sea water. Distribution coefficients K{sub d} have been estimated to be (1.4 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 5} litres kg{sup -1} for plutonium and (0.9 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 6} litres kg{sup -1} for americium in surface Mediterranean coastal waters. (author).

  6. Comparison of nickel silicide and aluminium ohmic contact metallizations for low-temperature quantum transport measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polley Craig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We examine nickel silicide as a viable ohmic contact metallization for low-temperature, low-magnetic-field transport measurements of atomic-scale devices in silicon. In particular, we compare a nickel silicide metallization with aluminium, a common ohmic contact for silicon devices. Nickel silicide can be formed at the low temperatures (<400°C required for maintaining atomic precision placement in donor-based devices, and it avoids the complications found with aluminium contacts which become superconducting at cryogenic measurement temperatures. Importantly, we show that the use of nickel silicide as an ohmic contact at low temperatures does not affect the thermal equilibration of carriers nor contribute to hysteresis in a magnetic field.

  7. Controlled assembly of graphene-capped nickel, cobalt and iron silicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkov, O.; Fedorov, A.; Usachov, D.; Yashina, L. V.; Generalov, A. V.; Borygina, K.; Verbitskiy, N. I.; Grüneis, A.; Vyalikh, D. V.

    2013-07-01

    The unique properties of graphene have raised high expectations regarding its application in carbon-based nanoscale devices that could complement or replace traditional silicon technology. This gave rise to the vast amount of researches on how to fabricate high-quality graphene and graphene nanocomposites that is currently going on. Here we show that graphene can be successfully integrated with the established metal-silicide technology. Starting from thin monocrystalline films of nickel, cobalt and iron, we were able to form metal silicides of high quality with a variety of stoichiometries under a Chemical Vapor Deposition grown graphene layer. These graphene-capped silicides are reliably protected against oxidation and can cover a wide range of electronic materials/device applications. Most importantly, the coupling between the graphene layer and the silicides is rather weak and the properties of quasi-freestanding graphene are widely preserved.

  8. Mechanical, elastic and thermodynamic properties of crystalline lithium silicides

    CERN Document Server

    Schwalbe, Sebastian; Trepte, Kai; Biedermann, Franziska; Mertens, Florian; Kortus, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We investigate crystalline thermodynamic stable lithium silicides phases (LixSiy) with density functional theory (DFT) and a force-field method based on modified embedded atoms (MEAM) and compare our results with experimental data. This work presents a fast and accurate framework to calculate thermodynamic properties of crystal structures with large unit cells with MEAM based on molecular dynamics (MD). Mechanical properties like the bulk modulus and the elastic constants are evaluated in addition to thermodynamic properties including the phonon density of states, the vibrational free energy and the isochoric/isobaric specific heat capacity for Li, Li12Si7, Li7Si3, Li13Si4, Li15Si4, Li21Si5, Li17Si4, Li22Si5 and Si. For a selected phase (Li13Si4) we study the effect of a temperature dependent phonon density of states and its effect on the isobaric heat capacity.

  9. Capping of rare earth silicide nanowires on Si(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelfeller, Stephan; Franz, Martin; Kubicki, Milan; Dähne, Mario [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Reiß, Paul; Niermann, Tore; Lehmann, Michael [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Schubert, Markus Andreas [IHP–Leibniz-Institut für innovative Mikroelektronik, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

    2016-01-04

    The capping of Tb and Dy silicide nanowires grown on Si(001) was studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Several nanometers thick amorphous Si films deposited at room temperature allow an even capping, while the nanowires maintain their original structural properties. Subsequent recrystallization by thermal annealing leads to more compact nanowire structures and to troughs in the Si layer above the nanowires, which may even reach down to the nanowires in the case of thin Si films, as well as to V-shaped stacking faults forming along (111) lattice planes. This behavior is related to strain due to the lattice mismatch between the Si overlayer and the nanowires.

  10. Status of the atomized uranium silicide fuel development at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.K.; Kim, K.H.; Park, H.D.; Kuk, I.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    While developing KMRR fuel fabrication technology an atomizing technique has been applied in order to eliminate the difficulties relating to the tough property of U{sub 3}Si and to take advantage of the rapid solidification effect of atomization. The comparison between the conventionally comminuted powder dispersion fuel and the atomized powder dispersion fuel has been made. As the result, the processes, uranium silicide powdering and heat treatment for U{sub 3}Si transformation, become simplified. The workability, the thermal conductivity and the thermal compatibility of fuel meat have been investigated and found to be improved due to the spherical shape of atomized powder. In this presentation the overall developments of atomized U{sub 3}Si dispersion fuel and the planned activities for applying the atomizing technique to the real fuel fabrication are described.

  11. Synthesis of Co-silicides and fabrication of microwavepower device using MEVVA source implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张通和; 吴瑜光; 钱卫东; 刘要东; 张旭

    2002-01-01

    Co synthesis silicides with good properties were prepared using MEVVA ion implantation with flux of 25-125 mA/cm2 to does of 5×1017/cm2. The structure of the silicides was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM analysis shows that if the ion dose is greater than 2×1017/cm2, a continuous silicide layer will be formed. The sheet resistance of Co silicide decreases with an increase in ion flux and ion dose. The formation of silicides with CoSi and CoSi2 are identified by XRD analysis. After annealing, the sheet resistance decreases further. A continuous silicide layer with a width of 90-133 nm is formed. The optimal implantation condition is that the ion flux and dose are 50 mA/cm2 and 5×1017/cm2, respectively. The optimal annealing temperature and time are 900℃ and 10 s, respectively. The ohmic contact for power microwave transistors is fabricated using Co ion implantation technique for the first time. The emitter contact resistance and noise of the transistors decrease markedly; the microwave property has been improved obviously.

  12. Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P.; Park, Y.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.

    1999-03-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the US processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive US processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with Johns Manville Corporation targeted at the area of MoSi{sub 2}-based high temperature materials and components for fiberglass melting and processing applications. The authors are also developing an interaction with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop silicides for high temperature radiant gas burner applications, for the glass and other industries. With Combustion Technology Inc., they are developing silicide-based periscope sight tubes for the direct observation of glass melts. With Accutru International Corporation, they are developing silicide-based protective sheaths for self-verifying temperature sensors which may be used in glass furnaces and other industrial applications. The progress made on the program in this period is summarized.

  13. On the size-dependent magnetism and all-optical magnetization switching of transition-metal silicide nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glushkov, G. I.; Tuchin, A. V.; Popov, S. V.; Bityutskaya, L. A., E-mail: me144@phys.vsu.ru [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Theoretical investigations of the electronic structure, synthesis, and all-optical magnetization switching of transition-metal silicide nanostructures are reported. The magnetic moment of the nanostructures is studied as a function of the silicide cluster size and configuration. The experimentally demonstrated magnetization switching of nanostructured nickel silicide by circularly polarized light makes it possible to create high-speed storage devices with high density data recording.

  14. Isotopic and elemental composition of plutonium/americium oxides influence pulmonary and extra-pulmonary distribution after inhalation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Meeren, A; Grémy, O

    2010-09-01

    The biodistribution of plutonium and americium has been studied in a rat model after inhalation of two PuO(2) powders in lungs and extra-pulmonary organs from 3 d to 3 mo. The main difference between the two powders was the content of americium (approximately 46% and 4.5% of total alpha activity). The PuO(2) with a higher proportion of americium shows an accelerated transfer of activity from lungs to blood as compared to PuO(2) with the lower americium content, illustrated by increased urinary excretion and higher bone and liver actinide retention. The total alpha activity measured reflects mostly the americium biological behavior. The activity contained in epithelial lining fluid, recovered in the acellular phase of broncho-alveolar lavages, mainly contains americium, whereas plutonium remains trapped in macrophages. Epithelial lining fluid could represent a transitional pulmonary compartment prior to translocation of actinides to the blood and subsequent deposition in extra-pulmonary retention organs. In addition, differential behaviors of plutonium and americium are also observed between the PuO(2) powders with a higher dissolution rate for both plutonium and americium being obtained for the PuO(2) with the highest americium content. Our results indicate that the biological behavior of plutonium and americium after translocation into blood differ two-fold: (1) for the two actinides for the same PuO(2) aerosol, and (2) for the same actinide from the two different aerosols. These results highlight the importance of considering the specific behavior of each contaminant after accidental pulmonary intake when assessing extra-pulmonary deposits from the level of activity excreted in urine or for therapeutic strategy decisions.

  15. National low-level waste management program radionuclide report series, Volume 14: Americium-241

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winberg, M.R.; Garcia, R.S.

    1995-09-01

    This report, Volume 14 of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of americium-241 ({sup 241}Am). This report also includes discussions about waste types and forms in which {sup 241}Am can be found and {sup 241}Am behavior in the environment and in the human body.

  16. Understanding the Chemistry of Uncommon Americium Oxidation States for Application to Actinide/Lanthanide Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh Martin; Bruce J. Mincher; Nicholas C. Schmitt

    2007-09-01

    A spectroscopic study of the stability of Am(V) and Am(VI) produced by oxidizing Am(III) with sodium bismuthate is presented, varying the initial americium concentration, temperature and length of the oxidation was seen to have profound effects on the resultant solutions.

  17. Simulated Fission Gas Behavior in Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mo, Kun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harp, Jason [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-15

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions need to be well-understood. However, existing experimental post-irradiation examination (PIE) data are limited to the research reactor conditions, which involve lower fuel temperature compared to LWR conditions. This lack of appropriate experimental data significantly affects the development of fuel performance codes that can precisely predict the microstructure evolution and property degradation at LWR conditions and therefore evaluate the qualification of U3Si2 as an AFT for LWRs. Considering the high cost, long timescale, and restrictive access of the in-pile irradiation experiments, this study aims to utilize ion irradiation to simulate the inpile behavior of the U3Si2 fuel. Both in situ TEM ion irradiation and ex situ high-energy ATLAS ion irradiation experiments were employed to simulate different types of microstructure modifications in U3Si2. Multiple PIE techniques were used or will be used to quantitatively analyze the microstructure evolution induced by ion irradiation so as to provide valuable reference for the development of fuel performance code prior to the availability of the in-pile irradiation data.

  18. High Quality Factor Platinum Silicide Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Szypryt, P; Ulbricht, G; Bumble, B; Meeker, S R; Bockstiegel, C; Walter, A B

    2016-01-01

    We report on the development of Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) using platinum silicide as the sensor material. MKIDs are an emerging superconducting detector technology, capable of measuring the arrival times of single photons to better than two microseconds and their energies to around ten percent. Previously, MKIDs have been fabricated using either sub-stoichiometric titanium nitride or aluminum, but TiN suffers from spatial inhomogeneities in the superconducting critical temperature and Al has a low kinetic inductance fraction, causing low detector sensitivity. To address these issues, we have instead fabricated PtSi microresonators with superconducting critical temperatures of 944$\\pm$12~mK and high internal quality factors ($Q_i \\gtrsim 10^6$). These devices show typical quasiparticle lifetimes of $\\tau_{qp} \\approx 30$--$40~\\mu$s and spectral resolution, $R = \\lambda / \\Delta \\lambda$, of 8 at 406.6~nm. We compare PtSi MKIDs to those fabricated with TiN and detail the substantial advanta...

  19. Simulated Fission Gas Behavior in Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mo, Kun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harp, Jason [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-15

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well-understood. However, existing experimental post-irradiation examination (PIE) data are limited to the research reactor conditions, which involve lower fuel temperature compared to LWR conditions. This lack of appropriate experimental data significantly affects the development of fuel performance codes that can precisely predict the microstructure evolution and property degradation at LWR conditions, and therefore evaluate the qualification of U3Si2 as an AFT for LWRs. Considering the high cost, long timescale, and restrictive access of the in-pile irradiation experiments, this study aims to utilize ion irradiation to simulate the inpile behavior of the U3Si2 fuel. Both in situ TEM ion irradiation and ex situ high-energy ATLAS ion irradiation experiments were employed to simulate different types of microstructure modifications in U3Si2. Multiple PIE techniques were used or will be used to quantitatively analyze the microstructure evolution induced by ion irradiation so as to provide valuable reference for the development of fuel performance code prior to the availability of the in-pile irradiation data.

  20. Attempt to produce silicide fuel elements in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soentono, S. (Nuclear Fuel Element Centre, BATAN Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong (Indonesia)); Suripto, A. (Nuclear Fuel Element Centre, BATAN Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong (Indonesia))

    1991-01-01

    After the successful experiment to produce U[sub 3]Si[sub 2] powder and U[sub 3]Si[sub 2]-Al fuel plates using depleted U and Si of semiconductor quality, silicide fuel was synthesized using <20% enriched U metal and silicon chips employing production train of UAl[sub x]-Al available at the Fuel Element Production Installation (FEPI) at Serpong, Indonesia. Two full-size U[sub 3]Si[sub 2]-Al fuel elements, having similar specifications to the ones of U[sub 3]O[sub 8]-Al for the RSG-GAS (formerly known as MPR-30), have been produced at the FEPI. All quality controls required have been imposed to the feeds, intermediate, as well as final products throughout the production processes of the two fuel elements. The current results show that these fuel elements are qualified from fabrication point of view, therefore it is expected that they will be permitted to be tested in the RSG-GAS, sometime by the end of 1989, for normal ([proportional to]50%) and above normal burn-up. (orig.)

  1. Silicidation in Ni/Si thin film system investigated by X-ray diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhaya, S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Amarendra, G. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)]. E-mail: amar@igcar.gov.in; Kalavathi, S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Gopalan, Padma [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kamruddin, M. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sastry, V.S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sundar, C.S. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2007-02-15

    Silicide formation induced by thermal annealing in Ni/Si thin film system has been investigated using glancing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Silicide formation takes place at 870 K with Ni{sub 2}Si, NiSi and NiSi{sub 2} phases co-existing with Ni. Complete conversion of intermediate silicide phases to the final NiSi{sub 2} phase takes place at 1170 K. Atomic force microscopy measurements have revealed the coalescence of pillar-like structures to ridge-like structures upon silicidation. A comparison of the experimental results in terms of the evolution of various silicide phases is presented.

  2. Role of Ti3Al/silicides on tensile properties of Timetal 834 at various temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K V Sai Srinadh; Nidhi Singh; V Singh

    2007-12-01

    Extremely fine coherent precipitates of ordered Ti3Al and relatively coarse incoherent precipitates of 2 silicide exist together in the near -titanium alloy, Timetal 834, in the dual phase matrix of primary and transformed . In order to assess the role of these precipitates, three heat treatments viz. WQ, WQ–A and WQ–OA, were given to have no precipitates, Ti3Al and silicide and only silicide precipitates in the respective conditions. Tensile properties in the above three heat treated conditions were determined at room temperature, 673 K and 873 K. It was observed that largely Ti3Al precipitates were responsible for increase in the yield strength and decrease in ductility in this alloy.

  3. Anisotropic thermal expansion of Ni, Pd and Pt germanides and silicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geenen, F. A.; Knaepen, W.; Moens, F.; Brondeel, L.; Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Detavernier, C.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon or germanium-based transistors are nowadays used in direct contact with silicide or germanide crystalline alloys for semiconductor device applications. Since these compounds are formed at elevated temperatures, accurate knowledge of the thermal expansion of both substrate and the contact is important to address temperature depending effects such as thermal stress. Here we report the linear coefficients of thermal expansion of Ni-, Pd- and Pt-based mono-germanides, mono-silicides and di-metal-silicides as determined by powder-based x-ray diffraction between 300 and 1225 K. The investigated mono-metallic compounds, all sharing the MnP crystal structure, as well as Pd2Si and Pt2Si exhibit anisotropic expansion. By consequence, this anisotropic behaviour should be taken into account for evaluating the crystal unit’s cell at elevated temperatures.

  4. SKIN DOSIMETRY IN CONDITIONS OF ITS CONSTANT SURFACE CONTAMINATION WITH SOLUTIONS OF PLUTONIUM-239 AND AMERICIUM-241

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Ershov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers, on the basis of experimental data, the issue of assessing dose burdens to the skin basal layer in conditions of its permanent contamination with solutions of plutonium-239 and americium-241 and subsequent decontamination.

  5. Use of silicide fuel in the Ford Nuclear Reactor - to lengthen fuel element lifetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Burn, R.R.; Lee, J.C. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Phoenix Memorial Lab.

    1995-12-31

    Based on economic considerations, it has been proposed to increase the lifetime of LEU fuel elements in the Ford Nuclear Reactor by raising the {sup 235}U plate loading from 9.3 grams in aluminide (UAl{sub x}) fuel to 12.5 grams in silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel. For a representative core configuration, preliminary neutronic depletion and steady state thermal hydraulic calculations have been performed to investigate core characteristics during the transition from an all-aluminide to an all-silicide core. This paper discusses motivations for this fuel element upgrade, results from the calculations, and conclusions.

  6. Self-organized growth and magnetic properties of epitaxial silicide nanoislands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Levy, R.; Camus, Y.; Dascalu, M.; Cesura, F.; Chalasani, R.; Kohn, A.; Markovich, G.; Goldfarb, I.

    2017-01-01

    Self-organized transition-metal (Ni and Fe) and rare-earth (Er) silicide nanostructures were grown on Si(1 1 1) and Si(0 0 1) surfaces under low coverage conditions, in a "solid phase" and "reactive deposition" epitaxial regimes. Island evolution was continuously monitored in-situ, using real-time scanning tunneling microscopy and surface electron diffraction. After anneal of a Ni/Si(1 1 1) surface at 700 °C, we observed small hemispherical Ni-silicide nanoislands ∼10 nm in diameter decorating surface steps in a self-ordered fashion and pinning them. Fe-silicide nanoislands formed after a 550 °C anneal of a Fe-covered surface, were also self-ordered along the surface step-bunches, however were significantly larger (∼70 × 10 nm) and exhibited well-developed three-dimensional polyhedral shapes. Ni-silicide islands were sparsely distributed, separated by about ∼100 nm from one another, on average, whereas Fe-silicide islands were more densely packed, with only ∼50 nm mean separation distance. In spite of the above differences between both types of island in size, shape, and number density, the self-ordering in both cases was close to ideal, with practically no islands nucleated on terraces. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry showed considerable superparamagnetism, in particular in Fe-silicide islands with ∼1.9 μB/Fe atom, indicating stronger ferromagnetic coupling of individual magnetic moments, contrary to Ni-silicide islands with the calculated moments of only ∼ 0.5μB /Ni atom. To elucidate the effects of the island size, shape, and lateral ordering on the measured magnetic response, we have controllably changed the island morphology by varying deposition methods and conditions and even using differently oriented Si substrates. We have also begun experimenting with rare-earth silicide islands. In the forthcoming experiments we intend to compare the magnetic response of these variously built and composed islands and correlate

  7. Optically probing the detection mechanism in a molybdenum silicide superconducting nanowire single-photon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Caloz, Misael; Timoney, Nuala; Weiss, Markus; Gariglio, Stefano; Warburton, Richard J; Schönenberger, Christian; Renema, Jelmer; Zbinden, Hugo; Bussieres, Felix

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the detection mechanism in a meandered molybdenum silicide (MoSi) superconducting nanowire single-photon detector by characterising the detection probability as a function of bias current in the wavelength range of 750 to 2050 nm. Contrary to some previous observations on niobium nitride (NbN) or tungsten silicide (WSi) detectors, we find that the energy-current relation is nonlinear in this range. Furthermore, thanks to the presence of a saturated detection efficiency over the whole range of wavelengths, we precisely quantify the shape of the curves. This allows a detailed study of their features, which are indicative of both Fano fluctuations and position-dependent effects.

  8. Radiation Re-solution Calculation in Uranium-Silicide Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-27

    The release of fission gas from nuclear fuels is of primary concern for safe operation of nuclear power plants. Although the production of fission gas atoms can be easily calculated from the fission rate in the fuel and the average yield of fission gas, the actual diffusion, behavior, and ultimate escape of fission gas from nuclear fuel depends on many other variables. As fission gas diffuses through the fuel grain, it tends to collect into intra-granular bubbles, as portrayed in Figure 1.1. These bubbles continue to grow due to absorption of single gas atoms. Simultaneously, passing fission fragments can cause collisions in the bubble that result in gas atoms being knocked back into the grain. This so called “re-solution” event results in a transient equilibrium of single gas atoms within the grain. As single gas atoms progress through the grain, they will eventually collect along grain boundaries, creating inter-granular bubbles. As the inter-granular bubbles grow over time, they will interconnect with other grain-face bubbles until a pathway is created to the outside of the fuel surface, at which point the highly pressurized inter-granular bubbles will expel their contents into the fuel plenum. This last process is the primary cause of fission gas release. From the simple description above, it is clear there are several parameters that ultimately affect fission gas release, including the diffusivity of single gas atoms, the absorption and knockout rate of single gas atoms in intra-granular bubbles, and the growth and interlinkage of intergranular bubbles. Of these, the knockout, or re-solution rate has an particularly important role in determining the transient concentration of single gas atoms in the grain. The re-solution rate will be explored in the following sections with regards to uranium-silicide fuels in order to support future models of fission gas bubble behavior.

  9. Influence of biofilms on migration of uranium, americium and europium in the environment; Einfluss von Biofilmen auf das Migrationsverhalten von Uran, Americium und Europium in der Umwelt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Nils; Zirnstein, Isabel; Arnold, Thuro

    2015-07-01

    The report on the influence of biofilms on migration of uranium, americium and europium in the environment deals with the contamination problems of uranium mines such as SDAG WISMUT in Saxonia and Thuringia. In mine waters microorganisms form a complex microbiological biocoenosis in spite of low pH values and high heavy metal concentrations including high uranium concentrations. The analyses used microbiological methods like confocal laser scanning microscopy and molecular-biological techniques. The interactions of microorganism with fluorescent radioactive heavy metal ions were performed with TRLFS (time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy).

  10. Theoretical investigation of silicide Schottky barrier detector integrated in horizontal metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal nanoplasmonic slot waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shiyang; Lo, G Q; Kwong, D L

    2011-08-15

    An ultracompact integrated silicide Schottky barrier detector (SBD) is designed and theoretically investigated to electrically detect the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) propagating along horizontal metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal nanoplasmonic slot waveguides at the telecommunication wavelength of 1550 nm. An ultrathin silicide layer inserted between the silicon core and the insulator, which can be fabricated precisely using the well-developed self-aligned silicide process, absorbs the SPP power effectively if a suitable silicide is chosen. Moreover, the Schottky barrier height in the silicide-silicon-silicide configuration can be tuned substantially by the external voltage through the Schottky effect owing to the very narrow silicon core. For a TaSi(2) detector with optimized dimensions, numerical simulation predicts responsivity of ~0.07 A/W, speed of ~60 GHz, dark current of ~66 nA at room temperature, and minimum detectable power of ~-29 dBm. The design also suggests that the device's size can be reduced and the overall performances will be further improved if a silicide with smaller permittivity is used.

  11. Standard test method for quantitative determination of americium 241 in plutonium by Gamma-Ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1994-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of americium 241 by gamma-ray spectrometry in plutonium nitrate solution samples that do not contain significant amounts of radioactive fission products or other high specific activity gamma-ray emitters. 1.2 This test method can be used to determine the americium 241 in samples of plutonium metal, oxide and other solid forms, when the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  12. Calcium and zinc DTPA administration for internal contamination with plutonium-238 and americium-241.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazzi, Ziad N; Heyl, Alexander; Ruprecht, Johann

    2012-08-01

    The accidental or intentional release of plutonium or americium can cause acute and long term adverse health effects if they enter the human body by ingestion, inhalation, or injection. These effects can be prevented by rapid removal of these radionuclides by chelators such as calcium or zinc diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (calcium or zinc DTPA). These compounds have been shown to be efficacious in enhancing the elimination of members of the actinide family particularly plutonium and americium when administered intravenously or by nebulizer. The efficacy and adverse effects profile depend on several factors that include the route of internalization of the actinide, the type, and route time of administration of the chelator, and whether the calcium or zinc salt of DTPA is used. Current and future research efforts should be directed at overcoming limitations associated with the use of these complex drugs by using innovative methods that can enhance their structural and therapeutic properties.

  13. Real-time monitoring of the silicidation process of tungsten filaments at high temperature used as catalysers for silane decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nos, O., E-mail: oriol.nos@gmail.com; Frigeri, P.A.; Bertomeu, J.

    2014-01-15

    The scope of this work is the systematic study of the silicidation process affecting tungsten filaments at high temperature (1900 °C) used for silane decomposition in the hot-wire chemical vapour deposition technique (HWCVD). The correlation between the electrical resistance evolution of the filaments, R{sub fil}(t), and the different stages of the their silicidation process is exposed. Said stages correspond to: the rapid formation of two WSi{sub 2} fronts at the cold ends of the filaments and their further propagation towards the middle of the filaments; and, regarding the hot central portion of the filaments: an initial stage of silicon dissolution into the tungsten bulk, with a random duration for as-manufactured filaments, followed by the inhomogeneous nucleation of W{sub 5}Si{sub 3} (which is later replaced by WSi{sub 2}) and its further growth towards the filaments core. An electrical model is used to obtain real-time information about the current status of the filaments silicidation process by simply monitoring their R{sub fil}(t) evolution during the HWCVD process. It is shown that implementing an annealing pre-treatment to the filaments leads to a clearly repetitive trend in the monitored R{sub fil}(t) signatures. The influence of hydrogen dilution of silane on the filaments silicidation process is also discussed. - Highlights: • The silicidation process of tungsten filaments at 1900 °C has been elucidated. • The silicidation process is correlated with the electrical resistance evolution. • Hydrogen dilution of silane delays the precipitation of silicides. • A thermal treatment of the filaments makes the silicidation process repeatable. • Raman spectroscopy and EDX analysis allow the tungsten silicides identification.

  14. Final Radiological Assessment of External Exposure for CLEAR-Line Americium Recovery Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Adam C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Belooussova, Olga N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hetrick, Lucas Duane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently planning to implement an americium recovery program. The americium, ordinarily isotopically pure 241Am, would be extracted from existing Pu materials, converted to an oxide and shipped to support fabrication of americium oxide-beryllium neutron sources. These operations would occur in the currently proposed Chloride Extraction and Actinide Recovery (CLEAR) line of glove boxes. This glove box line would be collocated with the currently-operational Experimental Chloride Extraction Line (EXCEL). The focus of this document is to provide an in-depth assessment of the currently planned radiation protection measures and to determine whether or not further design work is required to satisfy design-goal and ALARA requirements. Further, this document presents a history of americium recovery operations in the Department of Energy and high-level descriptions of the CLEAR line operations to provide a basis of comparison. Under the working assumptions adopted by this study, it was found that the evaluated design appears to mitigate doses to a level that satisfies the ALARA-in-design requirements of 10 CFR 835 as implemented by the Los Alamos National Laboratory procedure P121. The analyses indicate that extremity doses would also meet design requirements. Dose-rate calculations were performed using the radiation transport code MCNP5 and doses were estimated using a time-motion study developed in consort with the subject matter expert. A copy of this report and all supporting documentation are located on the Radiological Engineering server at Y:\\Rad Engineering\\2013 PROJECTS\\TA-55 Clear Line.

  15. On the Convergence of the Electronic Structure Properties of the FCC Americium (001) Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Da; Ray, Asok K.

    2006-01-01

    Electronic and magnetic properties of the fcc Americium (001) surface have been investigated via full-potential all-electron density-functional electronic structure calculations at both scalar and fully relativistic levels. Effects of various theoretical approximations on the fcc Am (001) surface properties have been thoroughly examined. The ground state of fcc Am (001) surface is found to be anti-ferromagnetic with spin-orbit coupling included (AFM-SO). At the ground state, the magnetic mome...

  16. High pressure studies on uranium and thorium silicide compounds: Experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagoubi, S.; Heathman, S.; Svane, A.

    2013-01-01

    The actinide silicides ThSi, USi and USi2 have been studied under high pressure using both theory and experiment. High pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments were performed on polycrystalline samples in diamond anvil cells at room temperature and for pressures up to 54, 52 and 26 GPa...

  17. Reversibility of silicidation of Ta filaments in HWCVD of thin film silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, C.H.M.; Li, H. B. T.; Verlaan, V.; Oliphant, C.J.; Bakker, R.; Houweling, Z.S.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2009-01-01

    If tantalum filaments are used for the hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) of thin film silicon, various types of tantalum silicides are formed, depending on the filament temperature. Under deposition conditions employed for device quality amorphous and microcrystalline silicon (Twire ≈ 1750

  18. Thermal Stability Study from Room Temperature to 1273 K (1000 °C) in Magnesium Silicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanaki, Eleni-Chrysanthi; Hatzikraniotis, Euripides; Vourlias, George; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Kitis, George; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M.; Polymeris, George S.

    2016-10-01

    Doped magnesium silicide has been identified as a promising and environmentally friendly advanced thermoelectric material in the temperature range between 500 K and 800 K (227 °C and 527 °C). Besides the plethora of magnesium silicide thermoelectric advantages, it is well known for its high sensitivity to oxidation. Oxidation is one of the primary instability mechanisms of degradation of high-temperature Mg2Si thermoelectric devices, as in the presence of O2, Mg2Si decomposes to form MgO and Si. In this work, commercial magnesium silicide in bulk form was used for thermal stability study from room temperature to 1273 K (1000 °C). Various techniques such as DTA-TG, PXRD, and FTIR have been applied. Moreover, the application of thermoluminescence (TL) as an effective and alternative probe for the study of oxidation and decomposition has been exploited. The latter provides qualitative but very helpful hints toward oxidation studies. The low-detection threshold of thermoluminescence, in conjunction with the chemical composition of the oxidation byproducts, consisting of MgO, Mg2SiO4, and SiO2, constitute two powerful motivations for further investigating its viable use as proxy for instability/decomposition studies of magnesium silicide. The partial oxidation reaction has been adopted due to the experimental fact that magnesium silicide is monitored throughout the heating temperature range of the present study. Finally, the role of silicon dioxide to the decomposition procedure, being in amorphous state and gradually crystallizing, has been highlighted for the first time in the literature. Mg2Si oxidation takes place in two steps, including a mild oxidation process with temperature threshold of 573 K (300 °C) and an abrupt one after 773 K (500 °C). Implications on the optimum operational temperature range for practical thermoelectric (TE) applications have also been briefly discussed.

  19. Impact of silicide layer on single photon avalanche diodes in a 130 nm CMOS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zeng; Palubiak, Darek; Zheng, Xiaoqing; Deen, M. Jamal; Peng, Hao

    2016-09-01

    Single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) is an attractive solid-state optical detector that offers ultra-high photon sensitivity (down to the single photon level), high speed (sub-nanosecond dead time) and good timing performance (less than 100 ps). In this work, the impact of the silicide layer on SPAD’s characteristics, including the breakdown voltage, dark count rate (DCR), after-pulsing probability and photon detection efficiency (PDE) is investigated. For this purpose, two sets of SPAD structures in a standard 130 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process are designed, fabricated, measured and compared. A factor of 4.5 (minimum) in DCR reduction, and 5 in PDE improvements are observed when the silicide layer is removed from the SPAD structure. However, the after-pulsing probability of the SPAD without silicide layer is two times higher than its counterpart with silicide. The reasons for these changes will be discussed.

  20. MARIOS: Irradiation of UO{sub 2} containing 15% americium at well defined temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agata, E., E-mail: elio.dagata@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy - P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Hania, P.R. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Bejaoui, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEC CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Sciolla, C.; Wyatt, T.; Hannink, M.H.C. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Herlet, N.; Jankowiak, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique DTEC CEA Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France); Klaassen, F.C. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Bonnerot, J.-M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEC CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MARIOS is designed to check the behaviour of Minor Actinide Blanket Module concept. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Main requirement of the experiment is an accurate control of the temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The swelling and the helium release will be the main output of the experiment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A complementary experiment (DIAMINO), will be performed in the next future. - Abstract: Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. The MARIOS irradiation experiment is the latest of a series of experiments on americium transmutation (e.g. EFTTRA-T4, EFTTRA-T4bis, HELIOS). MARIOS experiment is carried out in the framework of the 4-year project FAIRFUELS of the EURATOM 7th Framework Programme (FP7). During the past years of experimental work in the field of transmutation and tests of innovative nuclear fuel containing americium, the release or trapping of helium as well as swelling has shown to be the key issue for the design of such kinds of target. Therefore, the main objective of the MARIOS experiment is to study the in-pile behaviour of UO{sub 2} containing minor actinides (MAs) in order to gain knowledge on the role of the microstructure and of the temperature on the gas release and on fuel swelling. The MARIOS experiment will be conducted in the HFR (high flux reactor) in Petten (The Netherlands) and will start in the beginning of 2011. It has been planned that the experiment will last 11 cycles, corresponding to 11 months. This paper covers the description of the objective of the experiment, as well as a general description of the design of the experiment.

  1. Speciation of americium in seawater and accumulation in the marine sponge Aplysina cavernicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloubier, Melody; Michel, Hervé; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Moisy, Philippe; Tribalat, Marie-Aude; Oberhaensli, François R; Dechraoui Bottein, Marie Yasmine; Thomas, Olivier P; Monfort, Marguerite; Moulin, Christophe; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2015-12-21

    The fate of radionuclides in the environment is a cause of great concern for modern society, seen especially in 2011 after the Fukushima accident. Among the environmental compartments, seawater covers most of the earth's surface and may be directly or indirectly impacted. The interaction between radionuclides and the marine compartment is therefore essential for better understanding the transfer mechanisms from the hydrosphere to the biosphere. This information allows for the evaluation of the impact on humans via our interaction with the biotope that has been largely undocumented up to now. In this report, we attempt to make a link between the speciation of heavy elements in natural seawater and their uptake by a model marine organism. More specifically, because the interaction of actinides with marine invertebrates has been poorly studied, the accumulation in a representative member of the Mediterranean coralligenous habitat, the sponge Aplysina cavernicola, was investigated and its uptake curve exposed to a radiotracer (241)Am was estimated using a high-purity Ge gamma spectrometer. But in order to go beyond the phenomenological accumulation rate, the speciation of americium(III) in seawater must be assessed. The speciation of (241)Am (and natural europium as its chemically stable surrogate) in seawater was determined using a combination of different techniques: Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF), Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) at the LIII edge, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and the resulting data were compared with the speciation modeling. In seawater, the americium(III) complex (as well as the corresponding europium complex, although with conformational differences) was identified as a ternary sodium biscarbonato complex, whose formula can be tentatively written as NaAm(CO3)2·nH2O. It is therefore this chemical form of americium that is

  2. Study of optical and luminescence properties of silicon — semiconducting silicide — silicon multilayer nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkin, N. G.; Galkin, K. N.; Dotsenko, , S. A.; Goroshko, D. L.; Shevlyagin, A. V.; Chusovitin, E. A.; Chernev, I. M.

    2016-12-01

    By method of in situ differential spectroscopy it was established that at the formation of monolayer Fe, Cr, Ca, Mg silicide and Mg stannide islands on the atomically clean silicon surface an appearance of loss peaks characteristic for these materials in the energy range of 1.1-2.6 eV is observed. An optimization of growth processes permit to grow monolithic double nanoheterostructures (DNHS) with embedded Fe, Cr and Ca nanocrystals, and also polycrystalline DNHS with NC of Mg silicide and Mg stannide and Ca disilicide. By methods of optical spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy it was shown that embedded NC form intensive peaks in the reflectance spectra at energies up to 2.5 eV and Raman peaks. In DNS with β-FeSi2 NC a photoluminescence and electroluminescence at room temperature were firstly observed.

  3. Plutonium and americium in arctic waters, the North Sea and Scottish and Irish coastal zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallstadius, L.; Aarkrog, Asker; Dahlgaard, Henning;

    1986-01-01

    collected from the Irish coast in 1983. Fallout is found to dominate as a source of 239+240Pu north of latitude 65°N, while for 238Pu a substantial fraction originates from European nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. The 238Pu/239+240Pu isotope ratio provides clear evidence of the transport of effluent...... of the Irish Sea) to Spitsbergen. 241Am found in Arctic waters probably originates from the decay of fallout 241Pu and, like Pu, tentatively has a residence time of the order of several years. Americium from Sellafield has an estimated mean residence time of 4–6 months in Scottish waters....

  4. Influence of the initial nitrogen content in titanium films on the nitridation and silicidation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, C.; Perez-Casero, R.; Martinez-Duart, J.M. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Aplicada; Perez-Rigueiro, J. [Dpto. Ciencia de Materiales, ETSI Caminos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E-28040, Madrid (Spain); Vazquez, L.; Fernandez, M. [Instituto Ciencia de Materiales, CSIC, E-28049, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-08-15

    The rapid thermal annealing of Ti films on silicon in a nitrogen atmosphere seems to be a very promising method to obtain the Si/TiSi{sub 2}/TiN structure. We have tried to increase the final nitrogen content (i.e. TiN thickness) by incorporating nitrogen during the deposition of the initial Ti films. The influence of the nitrogen present in the titanium film on the silicidation process has been studied by comparison with the silicidation of pure titanium. The evolution of the nitrogen content with thermal treatment conditions has been established by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The nitrogen initially incorporated in the Ti film plays a passive role during the nitridation process, since its initial presence does not strongly influence the further incorporation of nitrogen from the atmosphere. The final nitrogen content of the N-doped samples is the addition of the nitrogen incorporated from the atmosphere during the thermal treatment in pure titanium samples and the nitrogen incorporated during deposition. The silicidation process has been studied using complementary techniques. The sheet resistances, Rutherford backscattering spectra and grazing X-ray diffraction (GXRD) diagrams have allowed us to establish the evolution of the reaction. Silicidation is not affected by the nitrogen incorporated during deposition. No differences have been found due to the presence of nitrogen. Nevertheless, changes in the surface morphology were found by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Ti(N{sub 2}) samples are characterized by lower root mean square (rms) surface roughness values and different features. (orig.) 14 refs.

  5. High-Temperature Compatible Nickel Silicide Thermometer And Heater For Catalytic Chemical Microreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Quaade, U.J.; Hansen, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Integration of heaters and thermometers is important for agile and accurate control and measurement of the thermal reaction conditions in microfabricated chemical reactors (microreactors). This paper describes development and operation of nickel silicide heaters and temperature sensors...... for temperatures exceeding 700 °C. The heaters and thermometers are integrated with chemical microreactors for heterogeneous catalytic conversion of gasses, and thermally activated catalytic conversion of CO to CO2 in the reactors is demonstrated. The heaters and thermometers are shown to be compatible...

  6. Low-Temperature Wet Conformal Nickel Silicide Deposition for Transistor Technology through an Organometallic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-Han; Margossian, Tigran; De Marchi, Michele; Thammasack, Maxime; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Kumar, Sudhir; Jagielski, Jakub; Zheng, Li-Qing; Shih, Chih-Jen; Zenobi, Renato; De Micheli, Giovanni; Baudouin, David; Gaillardon, Pierre-Emmanuel; Copéret, Christophe

    2017-02-08

    The race for performance of integrated circuits is nowadays facing a downscale limitation. To overpass this nanoscale limit, modern transistors with complex geometries have flourished, allowing higher performance and energy efficiency. Accompanying this breakthrough, challenges toward high-performance devices have emerged on each significant step, such as the inhomogeneous coverage issue and thermal-induced short circuit issue of metal silicide formation. In this respect, we developed a two-step organometallic approach for nickel silicide formation under near-ambient temperature. Transmission electron and atomic force microscopy show the formation of a homogeneous and conformal layer of NiSix on pristine silicon surface. Post-treatment decreases the carbon content to a level similar to what is found for the original wafer (∼6%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy also reveals an increasing ratio of Si content in the layer after annealing, which is shown to be NiSi2 according to X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation on a Si nanoparticle model. I-V characteristic fitting reveals that this NiSi2 layer exhibits a competitive Schottky barrier height of 0.41 eV and series resistance of 8.5 Ω, thus opening an alternative low-temperature route for metal silicide formation on advanced devices.

  7. Pt silicide/poly-Si Schottky diodes as temperature sensors for bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuryev, V. A.; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V. A.; Mironov, S. A.; Dubkov, V. P.; Uvarov, O. V.; Kalinushkin, V. P.; Senkov, V. M.; Nalivaiko, O. Y.; Novikau, A. G.; Gaiduk, P. I.

    2015-05-01

    Platinum silicide Schottky diodes formed on films of polycrystalline Si doped by phosphorus are demonstrated to be efficient and manufacturable CMOS-compatible temperature sensors for microbolometer detectors of radiation. Thin-film platinum silicide/poly-Si diodes have been produced by a CMOS-compatible process on artificial Si3N4/SiO2/Si(001) substrates simulating the bolometer cells. Layer structure and phase composition of the original Pt/poly-Si films and the Pt silicide/poly-Si films synthesized by a low-temperature process have been studied by means of the scanning transmission electron microscopy; they have also been explored by means of the two-wavelength X-ray structural phase analysis and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Temperature coefficient of voltage for the forward current of a single diode is shown to reach the value of about -2%/ °C in the temperature interval from 25 to 50 °C.

  8. Pt silicide/poly-Si Schottky diodes as temperature sensors for bolometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuryev, V. A., E-mail: vyuryev@kapella.gpi.ru; Chizh, K. V.; Chapnin, V. A.; Mironov, S. A.; Dubkov, V. P.; Uvarov, O. V.; Kalinushkin, V. P. [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Senkov, V. M. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 53 Leninskiy Avenue, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Nalivaiko, O. Y. [JSC “Integral” – “Integral” Holding Management Company, 121A, Kazintsa I. P. Street, Minsk 220108 (Belarus); Novikau, A. G.; Gaiduk, P. I. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Avenue, 220030 Minsk (Belarus)

    2015-05-28

    Platinum silicide Schottky diodes formed on films of polycrystalline Si doped by phosphorus are demonstrated to be efficient and manufacturable CMOS-compatible temperature sensors for microbolometer detectors of radiation. Thin-film platinum silicide/poly-Si diodes have been produced by a CMOS-compatible process on artificial Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) substrates simulating the bolometer cells. Layer structure and phase composition of the original Pt/poly-Si films and the Pt silicide/poly-Si films synthesized by a low-temperature process have been studied by means of the scanning transmission electron microscopy; they have also been explored by means of the two-wavelength X-ray structural phase analysis and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Temperature coefficient of voltage for the forward current of a single diode is shown to reach the value of about −2%/ °C in the temperature interval from 25 to 50 °C.

  9. Thermal transport across metal silicide-silicon interfaces: An experimental comparison between epitaxial and nonepitaxial interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ning; Feser, Joseph P.; Sadasivam, Sridhar; Fisher, Timothy S.; Wang, Tianshi; Ni, Chaoying; Janotti, Anderson

    2017-02-01

    Silicides are used extensively in nano- and microdevices due to their low electrical resistivity, low contact resistance to silicon, and their process compatibility. In this work, the thermal interface conductance of TiSi2, CoSi2, NiSi, and PtSi are studied using time-domain thermoreflectance. Exploiting the fact that most silicides formed on Si(111) substrates grow epitaxially, while most silicides on Si(100) do not, we study the effect of epitaxy, and show that for a wide variety of interfaces there is no dependence of interface conductance on the detailed structure of the interface. In particular, there is no difference in the thermal interface conductance between epitaxial and nonepitaxial silicide/silicon interfaces, nor between epitaxial interfaces with different interface orientations. While these silicide-based interfaces yield the highest reported interface conductances of any known interface with silicon, none of the interfaces studied are found to operate close to the phonon radiation limit, indicating that phonon transmission coefficients are nonunity in all cases and yet remain insensitive to interfacial structure. In the case of CoSi2, a comparison is made with detailed computational models using (1) full-dispersion diffuse mismatch modeling (DMM) including the effect of near-interfacial strain, and (2) an atomistic Green' function (AGF) approach that integrates near-interface changes in the interatomic force constants obtained through density functional perturbation theory. Above 100 K, the AGF approach significantly underpredicts interface conductance suggesting that energy transport does not occur purely by coherent transmission of phonons, even for epitaxial interfaces. The full-dispersion DMM closely predicts the experimentally observed interface conductances for CoSi2, NiSi, and TiSi2 interfaces, while it remains an open question whether inelastic scattering, cross-interfacial electron-phonon coupling, or other mechanisms could also account for

  10. Penetration and decontamination of americium-241 ex vivo using fresh and frozen pig skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazrart, A; Bolzinger, M A; Moureau, A; Molina, T; Coudert, S; Angulo, J F; Briancon, S; Griffiths, N M

    2017-04-01

    Skin contamination is one of the most probable risks following major nuclear or radiological incidents. However, accidents involving skin contamination with radionuclides may occur in the nuclear industry, in research laboratories and in nuclear medicine departments. This work aims to measure the penetration of the radiological contaminant Americium ((241)Am) in fresh and frozen skin and to evaluate the distribution of the contamination in the skin. Decontamination tests were performed using water, Fuller's earth and diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), which is the recommended treatment in case of skin contamination with actinides such as plutonium or americium. To assess these parameters, we used the Franz cell diffusion system with full-thickness skin obtained from pigs' ears, representative of human skin. Solutions of (241)Am were deposited on the skin samples. The radioactivity content in each compartment and skin layers was measured after 24 h by liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrophotometry. The Am cutaneous penetration to the receiver compartment is almost negligible in fresh and frozen skin. Multiple washings with water and DTPA recovered about 90% of the initial activity. The rest remains fixed mainly in the stratum corneum. Traces of activity were detected within the epidermis and dermis which is fixed and not accessible to the decontamination.

  11. Local solid phase growth of few-layer graphene on silicon carbide from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobedo-Cousin, Enrique; Vassilevski, Konstantin; Hopf, Toby; Wright, Nick; O' Neill, Anthony; Horsfall, Alton; Goss, Jonathan [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Cumpson, Peter [School of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-21

    Patterned few-layer graphene (FLG) films were obtained by local solid phase growth from nickel silicide supersaturated with carbon, following a fabrication scheme, which allows the formation of self-aligned ohmic contacts on FLG and is compatible with conventional SiC device processing methods. The process was realised by the deposition and patterning of thin Ni films on semi-insulating 6H-SiC wafers followed by annealing and the selective removal of the resulting nickel silicide by wet chemistry. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to confirm both the formation and subsequent removal of nickel silicide. The impact of process parameters such as the thickness of the initial Ni layer, annealing temperature, and cooling rates on the FLG films was assessed by Raman spectroscopy, XPS, and atomic force microscopy. The thickness of the final FLG film estimated from the Raman spectra varied from 1 to 4 monolayers for initial Ni layers between 3 and 20 nm thick. Self-aligned contacts were formed on these patterned films by contact photolithography and wet etching of nickel silicide, which enabled the fabrication of test structures to measure the carrier concentration and mobility in the FLG films. A simple model of diffusion-driven solid phase chemical reaction was used to explain formation of the FLG film at the interface between nickel silicide and silicon carbide.

  12. X-ray photoemission spectromicroscopy of titanium silicide formation in patterned microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Stoughton, WI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Titanium silicide has the lowest resistivity of all the refractory metal silicides and has good thermal stability as well as excellent compatibility with Al metallization. It is used as an intermediate buffer layer between W vias and the Si substrate to provide good electrical contact in ULSI technology, whose submicron patterned features form the basis of the integrated circuits of today and tomorrow, in the self aligned silicide (salicide) formation process. TiSi{sub 2} exists in two phases: a metastable C49 base-centered orthorhombic phase with specific resistivity of 60-90 {mu}{Omega}-cm that is formed at a lower temperature (formation anneal) and the stable 12-15 {mu}{Omega}-cm resistivity face-centered orthorhombic C54 phase into which C49 is transformed with a higher temperature (conversion anneal) step. C54 is clearly the target for low resistivity VLSI interconnects. However, it has been observed that when dimensions shrink below 1/mic (or when the Ti thickness drops below several hundred angstroms), the transformation of C49 into C54 is inhibited and agglomeration often occurs in fine lines at high temperatures. This results in a rise in resistivity due to incomplete transformation to C54 and because of discontinuities in the interconnect line resulting from agglomeration. Spectromicroscopy is an appropriate tool to study the evolution of the TiSi2 formation process because of its high resolution chemical imaging ability which can detect bonding changes even in the absence of changes in the relative amounts of species and because of the capability of studying thick {open_quotes}as is{close_quotes} industrial samples.

  13. Combustion synthesis of molybdenum silicides and borosilicides for ultrahigh-temperature structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Shafiul

    Molybdenum silicides and borosilicides are promising structural materials for gas-turbine power plants. A major challenge, however, is to simultaneously achieve high oxidation resistance and acceptable mechanical properties at high temperatures. For example, molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) has excellent oxidation resistance and poor mechanical properties, while Mo-rich silicides such as Mo5Si3 (called T 1) have much better mechanical properties but poor oxidation resistance. One approach is based on the fabrication of MoSi2-T 1 composites that combine high oxidation resistance of MoSi2 and good mechanical properties of T1. Another approach involves the addition of boron to Mo-rich silicides for improving their oxidation resistance through the formation of a borosilicate surface layer. In particular, Mo 5SiB2 (called T2) phase is considered as an attractive material. In the thesis, MoSi2-T1 composites and materials based on T2 phase are obtained by mechanically activated SHS. Use of SHS compaction (quasi-isostatic pressing) significantly improves oxidation resistance of the obtained MoSi2-T1 composites. Combustion of Mo-Si-B mixtures for the formation of T2 phase becomes possible if the composition is designed for the addition of more exothermic reactions leading to the formation of molybdenum boride. These mixtures exhibit spin combustion, the characteristics of which are in good agreement with the spin combustion theory. Oxidation resistance of the obtained Mo-Si-B materials is independent on the concentration of Mo phase in the products so that the materials with a higher Mo content are preferable because of better mechanical properties. Also, T2 phase has been obtained by the chemical oven combustion synthesis technique.

  14. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Formation of Silicides and the Surface Morphologies of PtSi Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of annealing temperature on the formation of the PtSi phase, distribution of silicides and the surface morphologies of silicides films is investigated by XPS, AFM. It is shown that the phase sequences of the films change from Pt-Pt2Si-PtSi-Si to Pt+Pt2Si+PtSi-PtSi-Si or Pt+Pt2Si+PtSi-PtSi-Si with an increase of annealing temperature and the reason for the formation of mixed layers is discussed.

  15. Synthesis of metallic silicide fullerenes and the characteristics thereof by mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Direct current arc discharge is used for the study on the synthesis of metallo-fullerenes (MFs) to discover whether there exist metallic silicide fullerenes and silicon fullerenes. The resultant components are isolated by the multistage high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and analyzed with the Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. Results show that there exist fullerenes such as SiC69, YSi2C64, YSi2C78, Y3Si2C78 as well as Y2Si2C90 which are structurally similar to (Y2C2)@C82.

  16. Synthesis of metallic silicide fullerenes and the characteristics thereof by mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN YiChi; GUO Liang; ZHU LiQun

    2007-01-01

    Direct current arc discharge is used for the study on the synthesis of metallofullerenes (MFs) to discover whether there exist metallic silicide fullerenes and silicon fullerenes. The resultant components are isolated by the multistage high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and analyzed with the Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. Results show that there exist fullerenes such as SiC69, YSi2C64, YSi2C78, Y3Si2C78 as well as Y2Si2C90 which are structurally similar to (Y2C2)@C82.

  17. Current enhancement in crystalline silicon photovoltaic by low-cost nickel silicide back contact

    KAUST Repository

    Bahabry, R. R.

    2016-11-30

    We report short circuit current (Jsc) enhancement in crystalline silicon (C-Si) photovoltaic (PV) using low-cost Ohmic contact engineering by integration of Nickel mono-silicide (NiSi) for back contact metallization as an alternative to the status quo of using expensive screen printed silver (Ag). We show 2.6 mA/cm2 enhancement in the short circuit current (Jsc) and 1.2 % increment in the efficiency by improving the current collection due to the low specific contact resistance of the NiSi on the heavily Boron (B) doped Silicon (Si) interface.

  18. Superconductivity at 3.7 K in Ternary Silicide Li2IrSi3

    OpenAIRE

    Hirai, Daigorou; Kawakami, Rui; Magdysyuk, Oxana V.; Dinnebier, Robert E; Yaresko, Alexander; Takagi, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of superconductivity at Tc = 3.7 K in the new ternary lithium silicide Li2IrSi3. The crystal structure of Li2IrSi3 consists of IrSi6 antiprisms connected by Si triangles, giving rise to a three dimensional framework of covalent Si-Si and Si-Ir bonds. Electronic specific-heat in superconducting phase suggests that Li2IrSi3 is a BCS weak-coupling superconductor.

  19. On the structural and electronic properties of Ir-silicide nanowires on Si(001) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Can Oguz, Ismail; ćakır, Deniz; Hossain, Sehtab; Mohottige, Rasika; Gulseren, Oguz; Oncel, Nuri

    2016-09-01

    Iridium (Ir) modified Silicon (Si) (001) surface is studied with Scanning Tunneling Microscopy/Spectroscopy (STM/STS) and Density Functional Theory (DFT). A model for Ir-silicide nanowires based on STM images and ab-initio calculations is proposed. According to our model, the Ir adatom is on the top of the substrate dimer row and directly binds to the dimer atoms. I-V curves measured at 77 K shows that the nanowires are metallic. DFT calculations confirm strong metallic nature of the nanowires.

  20. Magnetization reversal of ultrathin Fe film grown on Si(111) using iron silicide template

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Wei; Zhan Qing-Feng; Wang De-Yong; Chen Li-Jun; Sun Young; Cheng Zhao-Hua

    2007-01-01

    Ultrathin Fe films were epitaxially grown on Si(111) by using an ultrathin iron silicide film with p(2 × 2) surface reconstruction as a template. The surface structure and magnetic properties were investigated in situ by low energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), and surface magneto-optical effect (SMOKE). Polar SMOKE hysteresis loops demonstrate that the Fe ultrathin films with thickness t< 6 ML (monolayers) exhibit perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The characters of M-H loops with the external magnetic field at difference angles and the angular dependence of coercivity suggest that the domain-wall pinning plays a dominant role in the magnetization reversal process.

  1. Magnesium ionophore II as an extraction agent for trivalent europium and americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makrlik, Emanuel [Czech Univ. of Life Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Environmental Sciences; Vanura, Petr [Univ. of Chemistry and Technology, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2016-11-01

    Solvent extraction of microamounts of trivalent europium and americium into nitrobenzene by using a mixture of hydrogen dicarbollylcobaltate (H{sup +}B{sup -}) and magnesium ionophore II (L) was studied. The equilibrium data were explained assuming that the species HL{sup +}, HL{sup +}{sub 2}, ML{sup 3+}{sub 2}, and ML{sup 3+}{sub 3} (M{sup 3+} = Eu{sup 3+}, Am{sup 3+}; L=magnesium, ionophore II) are extracted into the nitrobenzene phase. Extraction and stability constants of the cationic complex species in nitrobenzene saturated with water were determined and discussed. From the experimental results it is evident that this effective magnesium ionophore II receptor for the Eu{sup 3+} and Am{sup 3+} cations could be considered as a potential extraction agent for nuclear waste treatment.

  2. Imitators of plutonium and americium in a mixed uranium- plutonium nitride fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, S. N.; Shornikov, D. P.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.; Burlakova, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Uranium nitride and mix uranium nitride (U-Pu)N is most popular nuclear fuel for Russian Fast Breeder Reactor. The works in hot cells associated with the radiation exposure of personnel and methodological difficulties. To know the main physical-chemical properties of uranium-plutonium nitride it necessary research to hot cells. In this paper, based on an assessment of physicochemical and thermodynamic properties of selected simulators Pu and Am. Analogues of Pu is are Ce and Y, and analogues Am - Dy. The technique of obtaining a model nitride fuel based on lanthanides nitrides and UN. Hydrogenation-dehydrogenation- nitration method of derived powders nitrides uranium, cerium, yttrium and dysprosium, held their mixing, pressing and sintering, the samples obtained model nitride fuel with plutonium and americium imitation. According to the results of structural studies have shown that all the samples are solid solution nitrides rare earth (REE) elements in UN.

  3. The Role of Colloids in the Transport of Plutonium and Americium: Implications for

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, A B

    2003-09-17

    Colloids are small particulates (ranging in size from 1 to 0.001 micron) composed of inorganic and organic material and found in all natural water. Due to their small size, they have the ability to remain suspended in water and transported. Small amounts of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) can adsorb (attach) to colloids, and/or form colloidal-sized polymers and migrate in water. At Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) sedimentation and resuspension of particulates and colloids in surface waters represent the dominant process for Pu and Am migration. The amount of Pu and Am that can be transported at RFETS has been quantified in the Pathway Analysis Report. The Pathway Analysis Report shows that the two dominant pathways for Pu and Am transport at RFETS are air and surface water. Shallow groundwater and biological pathways are minor.

  4. Standard practice for The separation of americium from plutonium by ion exchange

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This practice describes the use of an ion exchange technique to separate plutonium from solutions containing low concentrations of americium prior to measurement of the 241Am by gamma counting. 1.2 This practice covers the removal of plutonium, but not all the other radioactive isotopes that may interfere in the determination of 241Am. 1.3 This practice can be used when 241Am is to be determined in samples in which the plutonium is in the form of metal, oxide, or other solid provided that the solid is appropriately sampled and dissolved (See Test Methods C758, C759, and C1168). 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  5. Microstructure of the irradiated U 3Si 2/Al silicide dispersion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, J.; Keiser, D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Jue, J.-F.; Robinson, A. B.; Madden, J. W.; Medvedev, P. G.; Wachs, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The silicide dispersion fuel of U 3Si 2/Al is recognized as the best performance fuel for many nuclear research and test reactors with up to 4.8 gU/cm 3 fuel loading. An irradiated U 3Si 2/Al dispersion fuel ( 235U ˜ 75%) from the high-flux side of a fuel plate (U0R040) from the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR)-8 test was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fuel was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) for 105 days. The average irradiation temperature and fission density of the U 3Si 2 fuel particles for the TEM sample are estimated to be approximately 110 °C and 5.4 × 10 27 f/m 3. The characterization was performed using a 200-kV TEM. The U/Si ratio for the fuel particle and (Si + Al)/U for the fuel-matrix-interaction layer are approximately 1.1 and 4-10, respectively. The estimated average diameter, number density and volume fraction for small bubbles (fuel particle are ˜94 nm, 1.05 × 10 20 m -3 and ˜11%, respectively. The results and their implication on the performance of the U 3Si 2/Al silicide dispersion fuel are discussed.

  6. Magnesium and Manganese Silicides For Efficient And Low Cost Thermo-Electric Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Sudhir B. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Kutcher, Susan W. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Rosemeier, Cory A. [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Mayers, David [Brimrose Technology Corporation; Singh, Jogender [Pennsylvania State University

    2013-12-02

    Thermoelectric Power Generation (TEPG) is the most efficient and commercially deployable power generation technology for harvesting wasted heat from such things as automobile exhausts, industrial furnaces, and incinerators, and converting it into usable electrical power. We investigated the materials magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) and manganese silicide (MnSi) for TEG. MgSi2 and MnSi are environmentally friendly, have constituent elements that are abundant in the earth's crust, non-toxic, lighter and cheaper. In Phase I, we successfully produced Mg2Si and MnSi material with good TE properties. We developed a novel technique to synthesize Mg2Si with good crystalline quality, which is normally very difficult due to high Mg vapor pressure and its corrosive nature. We produced n-type Mg2Si and p-type MnSi nanocomposite pellets using FAST. Measurements of resistivity and voltage under a temperature gradient indicated a Seebeck coefficient of roughly 120 V/K on average per leg, which is quite respectable. Results indicated however, that issues related to bonding resulted in high resistivity contacts. Determining a bonding process and bonding material that can provide ohmic contact from room temperature to the operating temperature is an essential part of successful device fabrication. Work continues in the development of a process for reproducibly obtaining low resistance electrical contacts.

  7. "Nanoparticle-in-alloy" approach to efficient thermoelectrics: silicides in SiGe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingo, N; Hauser, D; Kobayashi, N P; Plissonnier, M; Shakouri, A

    2009-02-01

    We present a "nanoparticle-in-alloy" material approach with silicide and germanide fillers leading to a potential 5-fold increase in the thermoelectric figure of merit of SiGe alloys at room temperature and 2.5 times increase at 900 K. Strong reductions in computed thermal conductivity are obtained for 17 different types of silicide nanoparticles. We predict the existence of an optimal nanoparticle size that minimizes the nanocomposite's thermal conductivity. This thermal conductivity reduction is much stronger and strikingly less sensitive to nanoparticle size for an alloy matrix than for a single crystal one. At the same time, nanoparticles do not negatively affect the electronic conduction properties of the alloy. The proposed material can be monolithically integrated into Si technology, enabling an unprecedented potential for micro refrigeration on a chip. High figure-of-merit at high temperatures (ZT approximately 1.7 at 900 K) opens up new opportunities for thermoelectric power generation and waste heat recovery at large scale.

  8. Absorption enhancement in amorphous silicon thin films via plasmonic resonances in nickel silicide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachtel, Jordan; Shen, Xiao; Pantelides, Sokrates; Sachan, Ritesh; Gonzalez, Carlos; Dyck, Ondrej; Fu, Shaofang; Kalnayaraman, Ramki; Rack, Phillip; Duscher, Gerd

    2013-03-01

    Silicon is a near ideal material for photovoltaics due to its low cost, abundance, and well documented optical properties. The sole detriment of Si in photovoltaics is poor absorption in the infrared. Nanoparticle surface plasmon resonances are predicted to increase absorption by scattering to angles greater than the critical angle for total internal reflection (16° for a Si/air interface), trapping the light in the film. Experiments confirm that nickel silicide nanoparticles embedded in amorphous silicon increases absorption significantly in the infrared. However, it remains to be seen if electron-hole pair generation is increased in the solar cell, or whether the light is absorbed by the nanoparticles themselves. The nature of the absorption is explored by a study of the surface plasmon resonances through electron energy loss spectrometry and scanning transmission electron microscopy experiments, as well as first principles density functional theory calculations. Initial experimental results do not show strong plasmon resonances on the nanoparticle surfaces. Calculations of the optical properties of the nickel silicide particles in amorphous silicon are performed to understand why this resonance is suppressed. Work supported by NSF EPS 1004083 (TN-SCORE).

  9. Electrical characterization of strained and unstrained silicon nanowires with nickel silicide contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habicht, S; Zhao, Q T; Feste, S F; Knoll, L; Trellenkamp, S; Ghyselen, B; Mantl, S

    2010-03-12

    We present electrical characterization of nickel monosilicide (NiSi) contacts formed on strained and unstrained silicon nanowires (NWs), which were fabricated by top-down processing of initially As(+) implanted and activated strained and unstrained silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates. The resistivity of doped Si NWs and the contact resistivity of the NiSi to Si NW contacts are studied as functions of the As(+) ion implantation dose and the cross-sectional area of the wires. Strained silicon NWs show lower resistivity for all doping concentrations due to their enhanced electron mobility compared to the unstrained case. An increase in resistivity with decreasing cross section of the NWs was observed for all implantation doses. This is ascribed to the occurrence of dopant deactivation. Comparing the silicidation of uniaxially tensile strained and unstrained Si NWs shows no difference in silicidation speed and in contact resistivity between NiSi/Si NW. Contact resistivities as low as 1.2 x 10(-8) Omega cm(-2) were obtained for NiSi contacts to both strained and unstrained Si NWs. Compared to planar contacts, the NiSi/Si NW contact resistivity is two orders of magnitude lower.

  10. Design of transition cores of RSG GAS (MPR-30) with higher loading silicide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liem, Peng Hong, E-mail: liemph@nais.ne.j [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Sembiring, Tagor Malem [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Energy Agency (Batan), Puspiptek, Serpong, Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia)

    2010-06-15

    A procedure of designing transition cores to achieve the equilibrium silicide core of RSG GAS with higher fuel loading of 300 g U/fuel element (FE) (meat density of 3.55 g U/cm{sup 3}) has been proposed. In the proposed procedure, the EOC excess reactivity of each transition core is minimized in order to satisfy the safety design limit of one-stuck-rod sub-criticality margin while keeping the maximum of radial power peaking factor below the allowable value. Under the design procedure, the initial fuel loadings are increased gradually in two steps, i.e. from 250 to 275 g U/FE followed by 275-300 g U/FE. The analysis results show that all transition cores can satisfy all design requirements and safety limits. We concluded that the obtained transition core design should be adopted into the future core conversion program of RSG GAS. The targeted silicide core can be achieved practically in at least 24 transition cores.

  11. Crystal structure of the ternary silicide Gd2Re3Si5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyna, Vitaliia; Kozak, Roksolana; Gladyshevskii, Roman

    2014-12-01

    A single crystal of the title compound, the ternary silicide digadolinium trirhenium penta-silicide, Gd2Re3Si5, was isolated from an alloy of nominal composition Gd20Re30Si50 synthesized by arc melting and investigated by X-ray single-crystal diffraction. Its crystal structure belongs to the U2Mn3Si5 structure type. All atoms in the asymmetric lie on special positions. The Gd site has site symmetry m..; the two Mn atoms have site symmetries m.. and 2.22; the three Si atoms have site symmetries m.., ..2 and 4.. . The coordination polyhedra of the Gd atoms have 21 vertices, while those of the Re atoms are cubo-octa-hedra and 13-vertex polyhedra. The Si atoms are arranged as tricapped trigonal prisms, bicapped square anti-prisms, or 11-vertex polyhedra. The crystal structure of the title compound is also related to the structure types CaBe2Ge2 and W5Si3. It can be represented as a stacking of Gd-centred polyhedra of composition [GdSi9]. The Re atoms form infinite chains with an Re-Re distance of 2.78163 (5) Å and isolated squares with an Re-Re distance of 2.9683 (6) Å.

  12. Effect of annealing on magnetic properties and silicide formation at Co/Si interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shivani Agarwal; V Ganesan; A K Tyagi; I P Jain

    2006-11-01

    The interaction of Co (30 nm) thin films on Si (100) substrate in UHV using solid state mixing technique has been studied. Cobalt was deposited on silicon substrate using electron beam evaporation at a vacuum of 4 × 10-8 Torr having a deposition rate of about 0.1 Å/s. Reactivity at Co/Si interface is important for the understanding of silicide formation in thin film system. In the present paper, cobalt silicide films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) in terms of the surface and interface morphologies and depth profile, respectively. The roughness of the samples was found to increase up to temperature, 300°C and then decreased with further rise in temperature, which was due to the formation of crystalline CoSi2 phase. The effect of mixing on magnetic properties such as coercivity, remanence etc at interface has been studied using magneto optic Kerr effect (MOKE) techniques at different temperatures. The value of coercivity of pristine sample and 300°C annealed sample was found to be 66 Oe and 40 Oe, respectively, while at high temperature i.e. 748°C, the hysteresis disappears which indicates the formation of CoSi2 compound.

  13. Preliminary investigations on the use of uranium silicide targets for fission Mo-99 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cols, H.; Cristini, P.; Marques, R.

    1997-08-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentine Republic owns and operates an installation for production of molybdenum-99 from fission products since 1985, and, since 1991, covers the whole national demand of this nuclide, carrying out a program of weekly productions, achieving an average activity of 13 terabecquerel per week. At present they are finishing an enlargement of the production plant that will allow an increase in the volume of production to about one hundred of terabecquerel. Irradiation targets are uranium/aluminium alloy with 90% enriched uranium with aluminium cladding. In view of international trends held at present for replacing high enrichment uranium (HEU) for enrichment values lower than 20 % (LEU), since 1990 the authors are in contact with the RERTR program, beginning with tests to adapt their separation process to new irradiation target conditions. Uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) was chosen as the testing material, because it has an uranium mass per volume unit, so that it allows to reduce enrichment to a value of 20%. CNEA has the technology for manufacturing miniplates of uranium silicide for their purposes. In this way, equivalent amounts of Molybdenum-99 could be obtained with no substantial changes in target parameters and irradiation conditions established for the current process with Al/U alloy. This paper shows results achieved on the use of this new target.

  14. Organometallic halide perovskite/barium di-silicide thin-film double-junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vismara, R.; Isabella, O.; Zeman, M.

    2016-04-01

    Barium di-silicide (BaSi2) is an abundant and inexpensive semiconductor with appealing opto-electrical properties. In this work we show that a 2-μm thick BaSi2-based thin-film solar cell can exhibit an implied photo-current density equal to 41.1 mA/cm2, which is higher than that of a state-of-the-art wafer-based c-Si hetero-junction solar cell. This performance makes BaSi2 an attractive absorber for high-performing thin-film and multi-junction solar cells. In particular, to assess the potential of barium di-silicide, we propose a thin-film double-junction solar cell based on organometallic halide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) as top absorber and BaSi2 as bottom absorber. The resulting modelled ultra-thin double-junction CH3NH3PbI3 / BaSi2 (< 2 μm) exhibits an implied total photo-current density equal to 38.65 mA/cm2 (19.84 mA/cm2 top cell, 18.81 mA/cm2 bottom cell) and conversion efficiencies up to 28%.

  15. Separation of oxidized americium from lanthanides by use of pillared metal(IV) phosphate-phosphonate hybrid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, J.D.; Clearfield, A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Borkowski, M.; Reed, D.T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.

    2012-07-01

    Closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the US poses many challenges, one of which is found in the waste streams, which contain both trivalent lanthanides and actinides. The separation of americium from the raffinate will dramatically reduce the long-term radiotoxicity of the waste. The sorption of americium in both the tri- and pentavalent oxidation states was observed for four M(IV) phosphate-phosphonate ion exchange materials in nitric acid at pH 2. High selectivity was observed for reduced Am(III) with K{sub d} values ca. 6 x 10{sup 5} mL/g, while the K{sub d} values for Am(V) were much lower. A new method of synthesizing and stabilizing AmO{sub 2}{sup +} to yield a lifetime of at least 24 h in acidic media using a combination of sodium persulfate and calcium hypochlorite will be described.

  16. Aluminium alloyed iron-silicide/silicon solar cells: A simple approach for low cost environmental-friendly photovoltaic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Dalapati, Goutam; Masudy-Panah, Saeid; Kumar, Avishek; Cheh Tan, Cheng; Ru Tan, Hui; Chi, Dongzhi

    2015-12-01

    This work demonstrates the fabrication of silicide/silicon based solar cell towards the development of low cost and environmental friendly photovoltaic technology. A heterostructure solar cells using metallic alpha phase (α-phase) aluminum alloyed iron silicide (FeSi(Al)) on n-type silicon is fabricated with an efficiency of 0.8%. The fabricated device has an open circuit voltage and fill-factor of 240 mV and 60%, respectively. Performance of the device was improved by about 7 fold to 5.1% through the interface engineering. The α-phase FeSi(Al)/silicon solar cell devices have promising photovoltaic characteristic with an open circuit voltage, short-circuit current and a fill factor (FF) of 425 mV, 18.5 mA/cm2, and 64%, respectively. The significant improvement of α-phase FeSi(Al)/n-Si solar cells is due to the formation p+-n homojunction through the formation of re-grown crystalline silicon layer (~5-10 nm) at the silicide/silicon interface. Thickness of the regrown silicon layer is crucial for the silicide/silicon based photovoltaic devices. Performance of the α-FeSi(Al)/n-Si solar cells significantly depends on the thickness of α-FeSi(Al) layer and process temperature during the device fabrication. This study will open up new opportunities for the Si based photovoltaic technology using a simple, sustainable, and los cost method.

  17. Aluminium alloyed iron-silicide/silicon solar cells: A simple approach for low cost environmental-friendly photovoltaic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Dalapati, Goutam; Masudy-Panah, Saeid; Kumar, Avishek; Cheh Tan, Cheng; Ru Tan, Hui; Chi, Dongzhi

    2015-12-03

    This work demonstrates the fabrication of silicide/silicon based solar cell towards the development of low cost and environmental friendly photovoltaic technology. A heterostructure solar cells using metallic alpha phase (α-phase) aluminum alloyed iron silicide (FeSi(Al)) on n-type silicon is fabricated with an efficiency of 0.8%. The fabricated device has an open circuit voltage and fill-factor of 240 mV and 60%, respectively. Performance of the device was improved by about 7 fold to 5.1% through the interface engineering. The α-phase FeSi(Al)/silicon solar cell devices have promising photovoltaic characteristic with an open circuit voltage, short-circuit current and a fill factor (FF) of 425 mV, 18.5 mA/cm(2), and 64%, respectively. The significant improvement of α-phase FeSi(Al)/n-Si solar cells is due to the formation p(+-)n homojunction through the formation of re-grown crystalline silicon layer (~5-10 nm) at the silicide/silicon interface. Thickness of the regrown silicon layer is crucial for the silicide/silicon based photovoltaic devices. Performance of the α-FeSi(Al)/n-Si solar cells significantly depends on the thickness of α-FeSi(Al) layer and process temperature during the device fabrication. This study will open up new opportunities for the Si based photovoltaic technology using a simple, sustainable, and los cost method.

  18. Intercalation synthesis of graphene-capped iron silicide atop Ni(111): Evolution of electronic structure and ferromagnetic ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenyuk, G. S.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Rybkin, A. G.; Gomoyunova, M. V.; Senkovskiy, B. V.; Usachov, D. Yu.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.; Pronin, I. I.

    2017-01-01

    A new method for synthesis of graphene-protected iron silicides has been tested, which consists in formation of graphene on Ni(111) followed by two-step intercalation of the system with Fe and Si. Characterization of the samples was performed in situ by low-energy electron diffraction, angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, core-level photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation and magnetic linear dichroism in photoemission of Fe 3p electrons. It is shown, that at 400 °C the intercalation of graphene/Ni(111) with iron occurs in a range up to 14 ML. The graphene layer strongly interacts with the topmost Fe atoms and stabilizes the fcc structure of the film. The in-plane ferromagnetic ordering of the film has a threshold nature and arises after the intercalation of 5 ML Fe due to the thickness-driven spin reorientation transition. Subsequent intercalation of graphene/Fe/Ni(111) with Si leads to the formation of the inhomogeneous system consisted of intercalated and nonintercalated areas. The intercalated islands coalesce at 2 ML Si when a Fe-Si solid solution covered with the Fe3Si surface silicide is formed. The Fe3Si silicide is ferromagnetic and has an ordered (√3 × √3)R30° structure. The graphene layer is weakly electronically coupled to the silicide phase keeping its remarkable properties ready for use.

  19. Theoretical investigation of pressure-induced structural transitions in americium using GGA+U and hybrid density functional theory methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, Ashok K.; Modak, P.; Sharma, Surinder M.;

    2013-01-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed for americium (Am) metal using the generalized gradient approximation + orbital-dependent onsite Coulomb repulsion via Hubbard interaction (GGA+U) and hybrid density functional theory (HYB-DFT) methods to investigate various ground state properties...... spectrum at ambient pressure relate, for some parameter choices, well to peak positions in the calculated density of states function of Am-I....

  20. Vertical and horizontal fluxes of plutonium and americium in the western Mediterranean and the Strait of Gibraltar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Vintró, L; Mitchell, P I; Condren, O M; Downes, A B; Papucci, C; Delfanti, R

    1999-09-30

    New data on the vertical distributions of plutonium and americium in the waters of the western Mediterranean and the Strait of Gibraltar are examined in terms of the processes governing their delivery to, transport in and removal from the water column within the basin. Residence times for plutonium and americium in surface waters of approximately 15 and approximately 3 years, respectively, are deduced, and it is shown that by the mid 1990s only approximately 35% of the 239,240Pu and approximately 5% of the 241Am deposited as weapons fallout still resided in the water column. Present 239,240Pu inventories in the water column and the underlying sediments are estimated to be approximately 25 TBq and approximately 40 TBq, respectively, which reconcile well with the time-integrated fallout deposition in this zone, taken to be approximately 69 TBq. The data show that there are significant net outward fluxes of plutonium and americium from the basin through the Strait of Gibraltar at the present time. These appear to be compensated by net inward fluxes of similar magnitude through the Strait of Sicily. Thus, the time-integrated fallout deposition in the western basin can be accounted for satisfactorily in terms of present water column and sediment inventories. Enhanced scavenging on the continental shelves, as evidenced by the appreciably higher transuranic concentrations in shelf sediments, supports this contention.

  1. The behaviour under irradiation of molybdenum matrix for inert matrix fuel containing americium oxide (CerMet concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, E.; Knol, S.; Fedorov, A. V.; Fernandez, A.; Somers, J.; Klaassen, F.

    2015-10-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors or Accelerator Driven System (ADS, subcritical reactors dedicated to transmutation) of long-lived nuclides like 241Am is therefore an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity of waste packages to be stored in a repository. In order to safely burn americium in a fast reactor or ADS, it must be incorporated in a matrix that could be metallic (CerMet target) or ceramic (CerCer target). One of the most promising matrix to incorporate Am is molybdenum. In order to address the issues (swelling, stability under irradiation, gas retention and release) of using Mo as matrix to transmute Am, two irradiation experiments have been conducted recently at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten (The Netherland) namely HELIOS and BODEX. The BODEX experiment is a separate effect test, where the molybdenum behaviour is studied without the presence of fission products using 10B to "produce" helium, the HELIOS experiment included a more representative fuel target with the presence of Am and fission product. This paper covers the results of Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the two irradiation experiments mentioned above where molybdenum behaviour has been deeply investigated as possible matrix to transmute americium (CerMet fuel target). The behaviour of molybdenum looks satisfying at operating temperature but at high temperature (above 1000 °C) more investigation should be performed.

  2. HELIOS: the new design of the irradiation of U-free fuels for americium transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agata, E. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Klaassen, F.; Sciolla, C. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Dept. Life Cycle and Innovations, P.O. Box 25 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fernandez-Carretero, A. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bonnerot, J.M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEC/SESC/LC2I CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2009-06-15

    Americium is one of the radioactive elements that mostly contribute to the radiotoxicity of the nuclear spent fuel. Transmutation of long-lived nuclides like Americium is an option for the reduction of the mass, the radiotoxicity and the decay heat of nuclear waste. The HELIOS irradiation experiment is the last evolution in a series of experiments on americium transmutation. The previous experiments, EFTTRA-T4 and T4bis, have shown that the release or trapping of helium is the key issue for the design of such kind of target. In fact, the production of helium, which is characteristic of {sup 241}Am transmutation, is quite significant. The experiment is carried out in the framework of the 4-year project EUROTRANS of the EURATOM 6. Framework Programme (FP6). Therefore, the main objective of the HELIOS experiment is to study the in-pile behaviour of U-free fuels such as CerCer (Pu, Am, Zr)O{sub 2} and Am{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}+MgO or CerMet (Pu, Am)O{sub 2}+Mo in order to gain knowledge on the role of the fuel microstructure and of the temperature on the gas release and on the fuel swelling. The experiment was planned to be conducted in the HFR (High Flux Reactor) in Petten (The Netherlands) starting the first quarter of 2007. Because of the innovative aspects of the fuel, the fabrication has had some delays as well as the final safety analyses of the original design showed some unexpected deviation. Besides, the HFR reactor has been unavailable since August 2008. Due to the reasons described above, the experiment has been postponed. HELIOS should start in the first quarter of 2009 and will last 300 full power days. The paper will cover the description of the new design of the irradiation experiment HELIOS. The experiment has been split in two parts (HELIOS1 and HELIOS2) which will be irradiated together. Moreover, due to the high temperature achieved in cladding and to the high amount of helium produced during transmutation the experiment previously designed for a

  3. Understanding and Improving High-Temperature Structural Properties of Metal-Silicide Intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce S. Kang

    2005-10-10

    The objective of this project was to understand and improve high-temperature structural properties of metal-silicide intermetallic alloys. Through research collaboration between the research team at West Virginia University (WVU) and Dr. J.H. Schneibel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), molybdenum silicide alloys were developed at ORNL and evaluated at WVU through atomistic modeling analyses, thermo-mechanical tests, and metallurgical studies. In this study, molybdenum-based alloys were ductilized by dispersing MgAl2O4 or MgO spinel particles. The addition of spinel particles is hypothesized to getter impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen from the alloy matrix with the result of ductility improvement. The introduction of fine dispersions has also been postulated to improve ductility by acting as a dislocation source or reducing dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries. The spinel particles, on the other hand, can also act as local notches or crack initiation sites, which is detrimental to the alloy mechanical properties. Optimization of material processing condition is important to develop the desirable molybdenum alloys with sufficient room-temperature ductility. Atomistic analyses were conducted to further understand the mechanism of ductility improvement of the molybdenum alloys and the results showed that trace amount of residual oxygen may be responsible for the brittle behavior of the as-cast Mo alloys. For the alloys studied, uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at different loading rates, and at room and elevated temperatures. Thermal cycling effect on the mechanical properties was also studied. Tensile tests for specimens subjected to either ten or twenty thermal cycles were conducted. For each test, a follow-up detailed fractography and microstructural analysis were carried out. The test results were correlated to the size, density, distribution of the spinel particles and processing time. Thermal expansion tests were carried out using thermo

  4. Strain-promoted growth of Mn silicide nanowires on Si(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Kazushi; Liu, Hongjun; Owen, James H. G.; Renner, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    We have discovered a method to promote the growth of Mn silicide nanowires on the Si(001) at 450° C. Deposition of sub-monolayer quantities of Mn onto a Si(001) surface with a high density of Bi nanolines results in the formation of nanowires, 5-10 nm wide, and up to 600 nm long. These nanowires are never formed if the same growth procedure is followed in the absence of the Bi nanolines. The Haiku core of the Bi nanoline is known to induce short-range stress in the surrounding silicon surface, straining neighbouring dimers, and repelling step edges. We discuss the possible mechanisms for this effect, including the effect of the Bi nanolines on the surface stress tensor and alteration of the available diffusion channels on the surface. This research was partially supported by the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture, Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research, the Iketani Science and Technology Foundation.

  5. Chemical vapour deposition of tungsten and tungsten silicide layers for applications in novel silicon technology

    CERN Document Server

    Li, F X

    2002-01-01

    This work was a detailed investigation into the Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) of tungsten and tungsten silicide for potential applications in integrated circuit (IC) and other microelectronic devices. These materials may find novel applications in contact schemes for transistors in advanced ICs, buried high conductivity layers in novel Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology and in power electronic devices. The CVD techniques developed may also be used for metal coating of recessed or enclosed features which may occur in novel electronic or electromechanical devices. CVD of tungsten was investigated using the silicon reduction reaction of WF sub 6. W layers with an optimum self-limiting thickness of 100 nm and resistivity 20 mu OMEGA centre dot cm were produced self-aligned to silicon. A hydrogen passivation technique was developed as part of the wafer pre-clean schedule and proved essential in achieving optimum layer thickness. Layers produced by this approach are ideal for intimate contact to shallow junct...

  6. Comparative study of metallic silicide-germanide orthorhombic MnP systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connétable, Damien; Thomas, Olivier

    2013-09-04

    We present a comparative study of the structural, energetic, electronic and elastic properties of MX type MnP systems (where X=Si or Ge, and M=Pt, Pd or Ni) using first-principles calculations. The optimized ground state properties of these systems are in excellent agreement with the experimental values. A detailed comparative study of the elastic properties of polycrystalline structures is also presented. We analyze the relationship between the composition and the properties of the systems. Finally, we present the properties of NiSi1-xGex alloys. We show that these properties depend linearly on the Ge content of the alloy. This work has important consequences for semiconductor devices in which silicides, germanides and alloys thereof are used as contact materials.

  7. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies of cobalt silicide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naftel, S.J.; Coulthard, I.; Hu, Y.; Sham, T.K.; Zinke-Allmang, M. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-12-31

    Cobalt silicide thin films, prepared on Si(100) wafers, have been studied by X-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) at the Si K-, L{sub 2,3}- and Co K-edges utilizing both total electron (TEY) and fluorescence yield (FLY) detection as well as extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the Co K-edge. Samples made using DC sputter deposition on clean Si surfaces and MBE were studied along with a bulk CoSi{sub 2} sample. XANES and EXAFS provide information about the electronic structure and morphology of the films. It was found that the films studied have essentially the same structure as bulk CoSi{sub 2}. Both the spectroscopy and materials characterization aspects of XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structures) are discussed.

  8. Crystalline structures and misfit strain inside Er silicide nanocrystals self-assembled on Si(001) substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Tao; Wu, Yueqin; Song, Junqiang; Li, Juan; Huang, Han; Zou, Jin; Cai, Qun

    2011-06-17

    The morphology and crystalline structure of Er silicide nanocrystals self-assembled on the Si(001) substrate were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that the nanowires and nanorods formed at 630 °C has dominant hexagonal AlB(2)-type structure, while inside the nanoislands self-organized at 800 °C the tetragonal ThSi(2)-type structure is prevalent. The lattice analysis via cross-sectional high-resolution TEM demonstrated that internal misfit strain plays an important role in controlling the growth of nanocrystals. With the relaxation of strain, the nanoislands could evolve from a pyramid-like shape into a truncated-hut-like shape.

  9. Americium and plutonium in water, biota, and sediment from the central Oregon coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, R. D.

    1982-06-01

    Plutonium-239, 240 and americium-241 were measured in the mussel Mytilus californianus from the region of Coos Bay, OR. The flesh of this species has a plutonium concentration of about 90 fCi/kg, and an Am-241/Pu-239, 240 ratio that is high relative to mixed fallout, ranging between two and three. Transuranic concentrations in sediment, unfiltered water, and filterable particulates were also measured; none of these materials has an Am/Pu ratio as greatly elevated as the mussels, and there is no apparent difference in the Am/Pu ratio of terrestrial runoff and coastal water. Sediment core profiles do not allow accumulation rates or depositional histories to be identified, but it does not appear that material characterized by a high Am/Pu ratio has ever been introduced to this estuary. Other bivalves (Tresus capax and Macoma nasuta) and a polychaete (Abarenicola sp.) do not have an elevated Am/Pu ratio, although the absolute activity of plutonium in the infaunal bivalves is roughly four times that in the mussels.

  10. Development and Testing of an Americium/Lanthanide Separation Flowsheet Using Sodium Bismuthate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Law; Bruce Mincher; Troy Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh; Nicholas Schmitt; Veronica Rutledge

    2014-04-01

    The separation of Am from the lanthanides and curium is a key step in proposed advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The partitioning and transmutation of Am is desirable to minimize the long-term heat load of material interred in a future high-level waste repository. A separation process amenable to process scale-up remains elusive. Given only subtle chemistry differences within and between the ions of the trivalent actinide and lanthanide series this separation is challenging ; however, higher oxidation states of americium can be prepared using sodium bismuthate and separated via solvent extraction using diamylamylphosphonate (DAAP) extraction. Among the other trivalent metals only Ce is also oxidized and extracted. Due to the long-term instability of Am(VI) , the loaded organic phase is readily selectively stripped to partition the actinide to a new acidic aqueous phase. Batch extraction distribution ratio measurements were used to design a flowsheet to accomplish this separation. Additionally, crossflow filtration was investigated as a method to filter the bismuthate solids from the feed solution prior to extraction. Results of the filtration studies, flowsheet development work and flowsheet performance testing using a centrifugal contactor are detailed.

  11. Americium-based oxides: Dense pellet fabrication from co-converted oxalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horlait, Denis; Lebreton, Florent [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Gauthé, Aurélie [CEA, DEN, DRCP/SERA/LCAR, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Caisso, Marie [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Arab-Chapelet, Bénédicte; Picart, Sébastien [CEA, DEN, DRCP/SERA/LCAR, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Delahaye, Thibaud, E-mail: thibaud.delahaye@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France)

    2014-01-15

    Mixed oxides are used as nuclear fuels and are notably envisaged for future fuel cycles including plutonium and minor actinide recycling. In this context, processes are being developed for the fabrication of uranium–americium mixed-oxide compounds for transmutation. The purpose of these processes is not only the compliance with fuel specifications in terms of density and homogeneity, but also the simplification of the process for its industrialization as well as lowering dust generation. In this paper, the use of a U{sub 0.85}Am{sub 0.15}O{sub 2±δ} powder synthesized by oxalate co-conversion as a precursor for dense fuel fabrications is assessed. This study notably focuses on sintering, which yielded pellets up to 96% of the theoretical density, taking advantage of the high reactivity and homogeneity of the powder. As-obtained pellets were further characterized to be compared to those obtained via processes based on the UMACS (Uranium Minor Actinide Conventional Sintering) process. This comparison highlights several advantages of co-converted powder as a precursor for simplified processes that generate little dust.

  12. Experimental studies on the biokinetics of plutonium and americium in the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guary, J.C.; Fowler, S.W.

    1982-03-05

    Radiotracer experiments using the photon-emitters /sup 237/Pu and /sup 241/Am were performed to examine uptake, tissue distribution and retention of plutonium and americium in the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris Cuvier. A 2 wk exposure in contaminated sea water resulted in twice as much /sup 237/Pu being taken up by whole octopus as /sup 241/Am. Immediately following uptake approximately 41% and 73% of the /sup 237/Pu and /sup 241/Am respectively were located in the branchial hearts. Depuration rates for both radionuclides were identical; approximately 46% of both radionuclides initially incorporated were associated with a long-lived compartment which turned over very slowly (Tbsub(1/2) = 1.5 yr). Longer exposures to /sup 241/Am resulted in an increase in the size of the slowly exchanging /sup 241/Am pool in the octopus. After 2 mo depuration, the majority of the residual activity of both radionuclides was in the branchial hearts. On average 33% of the /sup 241/Am ingested with food was assimilated into tissues, primarily the hepatopancreas. Different whole-body /sup 241/Am excretion rates were observed at different times following assimilation and were related to transfer processes taking place within internal tissues, most notably between hepatopancreas and the branchial hearts. Relationships between circulatory and excretory functions of these 2 organs are discussed and a physiological mechanism is proposed to explain the observed patterns of /sup 241/Am excretion in O. vulgaris.

  13. In Vitro Dissolution Tests of Plutonium and Americium Containing Contamination Originating From ZPPR Fuel Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William F. Bauer; Brian K. Schuetz; Gary M. Huestis; Thomas B. Lints; Brian K. Harris; R. Duane Ball; Gracy Elias

    2012-09-01

    Assessing the extent of internal dose is of concern whenever workers are exposed to airborne radionuclides or other contaminants. Internal dose determinations depend upon a reasonable estimate of the expected biological half-life of the contaminants in the respiratory tract. One issue with refractory elements is determining the dissolution rate of the element. Actinides such as plutonium (Pu) and Americium (Am) tend to be very refractory and can have biological half-lives of tens of years. In the event of an exposure, the dissolution rates of the radionuclides of interest needs to be assessed in order to assign the proper internal dose estimates. During the November 2011 incident at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) involving a ZPPR fuel plate, air filters in a constant air monitor (CAM) and a giraffe filter apparatus captured airborne particulate matter. These filters were used in dissolution rate experiments to determine the apparent dissolution half-life of Pu and Am in simulated biological fluids. This report describes these experiments and the results. The dissolution rates were found to follow a three term exponential decay equation. Differences were noted depending upon the nature of the biological fluid simulant. Overall, greater than 95% of the Pu and 93% of the Am were in a very slow dissolving component with dissolution half-lives of over 10 years.

  14. Plutonium and americium monazite materials: Solid state synthesis and X-ray diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregiroux, D. [DEN/DEC/SPUA, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Laboratoire Science des Procedes Ceramiques et de Traitements de Surface, UMR CNRS-Universite no. 6638, Batiment Chimie, 123 avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France); E-mail: damien.bregiroux@ccr.jussieu.fr; Belin, R. [DEN/DEC/SPUA, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Valenza, P. [DEN/DEC/SPUA, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Audubert, F. [DEN/DEC/SPUA, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Bernache-Assollant, D. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint Etienne (France)

    2007-06-30

    High-temperature solid state syntheses of monazite powders containing plutonium (III), plutonium (IV) and americium (III) were performed. Resulting powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Pu{sup 3+}PO{sub 4} was readily obtained as a single phase by heating a Pu{sup 4+}O{sub 2}-NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} mixture under argon atmosphere. Traces of tetravalent plutonium phosphate Pu{sup 4+}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} were detected when synthesized under air atmosphere. The incorporation of (Pu{sup 4+},Ca{sup 2+}) in the monazite structure was investigated under air and argon atmosphere. We showed that Pu{sup 4+} is fully reduced in Pu{sup 3+} under argon atmosphere whereas, under air, the compound with the formula Pu{sub 0.4}{sup 3+}Pu{sub 0.3}{sup 4+}Ca{sub 0.3}{sup 2+}PO{sub 4} was obtained. Pure Am{sup 3+}PO{sub 4} was also synthesized under argon atmosphere. X-ray patterns revealed a complete amorphisation of the monazite structure at a relatively low cumulative alpha dose for {sup 241}AmPO{sub 4}.

  15. Mutual separation of americium(III) and europium(III) using glycolamic acid and thioglycolamic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suneesh, A.S.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Syamala, K.V.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.

    2012-07-01

    The extractants, bis(2-ethylhexyl)diglycolamicacid (HDEHDGA) and bis(2-ethylhexy)thiodiglycolamic acid (HDEHSDGA) were synthesized and characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, mass and IR spectroscopy. The extraction behaviour of {sup (152+154})Eu(III) and {sup 241}Am(III) from nitric acid medium by a solution of HDEHDGA (or HDEHSDGA) in n-dodecane (n-DD) was studied for the mutual separation of actinides and lanthanides. The effect of various parameters such as the pH, concentrations of HDEHDGA, HDEHSDGA, sodium nitrate, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) on the separation factor (SF) of americium(III) over europium(III) and vice versa was studied, and the conditions needed for the preferential separation were optimised. The results show that HDEHDGA exhibits higher extraction for {sup (152+154)}Eu(III) and HDEHSDGA shows the superior selectivity for {sup 241}Am(III). (orig.)

  16. Solution speciation of plutonium and Americium at an Australian legacy radioactive waste disposal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Harrison, Jennifer J; Thiruvoth, Sangeeth; Wilsher, Kerry; Wong, Henri K Y; Johansen, Mathew P; Waite, T David; Payne, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    During the 1960s, radioactive waste containing small amounts of plutonium (Pu) and americium (Am) was disposed in shallow trenches at the Little Forest Burial Ground (LFBG), located near the southern suburbs of Sydney, Australia. Because of periodic saturation and overflowing of the former disposal trenches, Pu and Am have been transferred from the buried wastes into the surrounding surface soils. The presence of readily detected amounts of Pu and Am in the trench waters provides a unique opportunity to study their aqueous speciation under environmentally relevant conditions. This study aims to comprehensively investigate the chemical speciation of Pu and Am in the trench water by combining fluoride coprecipitation, solvent extraction, particle size fractionation, and thermochemical modeling. The predominant oxidation states of dissolved Pu and Am species were found to be Pu(IV) and Am(III), and large proportions of both actinides (Pu, 97.7%; Am, 86.8%) were associated with mobile colloids in the submicron size range. On the basis of this information, possible management options are assessed.

  17. The modulation of Schott ky barrier height of NiSi/n-Si Schottky diodes by silicide as diffusion source technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Xia; Fan Chun-Hui; Huang Ru; Guo Yue; Xu Cong; Zhang Xing; Wang Yang-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports that the Schottky barrier height modulation of NiSi/n-si is experimentally investigated by adopting a novel silicide-as-diffusion-source technique. which avoids the damage to the NiSi/Si interface induced from the conventional dopant segregation method. In addition, the impact of post-BF_2 implantation after silicidation on the surface morphology of Ni silicides is also illustrated. The thermal stability of Ni silicides can be improved by sihcideas-diffusion-source technique. Besides, the electron Schottky barrier height is successfully modulated by 0.11 eV at a boron dose of 10~(15) cm~(-2) in comparison with the non. implanted samples. The change of barrier height is not attributed to the phase change of silicide films but due to the boron pile-up at the interface of NiSi and Si substrate which causes the upward bending of conducting band. The results demonstrate the feasibility of novel silicide-as-diffusion-source technique for the fabrication of Schottky source/drain Si MOS devices.

  18. Pack cementation Cr-Al coating of steels and Ge-doped silicide coating of Cr-Nb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Y.R.; Zheng, M.H.; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Carbon steels or low-alloy steels used in utility boilers, heat exchangers, petrochemical plants and coal gasification systems are subjected to high temperature corrosion attack such as oxidation, sulfidation and hot corrosion. The pack cementation coating process has proven to be an economical and effective method to enhance the corrosion resistance by modifying the surface composition of steels. With the aid of a computer program, STEPSOL, pack cementation conditions to produce a ferrite Cr-Al diffusion coating on carbon-containing steels by using elemental Cr and Al powders have been calculated and experimentally verified. The cyclic oxidation kinetics for the Cr-Al coated steels are presented. Chromium silicide can maintain high oxidation resistance up to 1100{degrees}C by forming a SiO{sub 2} protective scale. Previous studies at Ohio State University have shown that the cyclic oxidation resistance of MOSi{sub 2} and TiSi{sub 2} can be further improved by Ge addition introduced during coating growth. The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating in a single processing step for the ORNL-developed Cr-Nb advanced intermetallic alloy. The oxidation behavior of the silicide-coated Cr-Nb alloy was excellent: weight gain of about 1 mg/cm{sup 2} upon oxidation at 1100{degrees}C in air for 100 hours.

  19. Thin manganese films on Si(111)-(7 x 7): electronic structure and strain in silicide formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ashwani; Tallarida, M; Hansmann, M; Starke, U; Horn, K [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2004-04-07

    The electronic and structural properties of thin epitaxial Mn films on Si(111)-(7 x 7) and their silicide reaction are studied by means of low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and photoemission spectroscopy (PES). The deposition of Mn at room temperature initially results in the growth of islands. The metal-silicon reaction already occurs at this temperature, which is further enhanced by annealing up to 400 deg. C, leading to the formation of manganese silicide and turning islands into nearly closed films at higher coverage. A pseudo-(1 x 1) phase develops for Mn films of up to 1 monolayer (ML) thickness. For films of higher thicknesses of up to 5 ML, a ( {radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 deg. phase is observed. STM images show that then the silicide film is almost closed and exhibits a strain relief network reflecting an incommensurate interface structure. PES reveals that the (1 x 1) phase is semiconducting while the ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30 deg. phase is metallic. For both phases, Si 2p core level photoemission data indicate that the surface is probably terminated by Si atoms.

  20. Thin manganese films on Si(111)-(7 × 7): electronic structure and strain in silicide formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashwani; Tallarida, M.; Hansmann, M.; Starke, U.; Horn, K.

    2004-04-01

    The electronic and structural properties of thin epitaxial Mn films on Si(111)-(7 × 7) and their silicide reaction are studied by means of low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and photoemission spectroscopy (PES). The deposition of Mn at room temperature initially results in the growth of islands. The metal-silicon reaction already occurs at this temperature, which is further enhanced by annealing up to 400°C, leading to the formation of manganese silicide and turning islands into nearly closed films at higher coverage. A pseudo-(1 × 1) phase develops for Mn films of up to 1 monolayer (ML) thickness. For films of higher thicknesses of up to 5 ML, a ( \\sqrt{3}\\times\\sqrt{3} )R30° phase is observed. STM images show that then the silicide film is almost closed and exhibits a strain relief network reflecting an incommensurate interface structure. PES reveals that the (1 × 1) phase is semiconducting while the ( \\sqrt{3}\\times\\sqrt{3} )R30° phase is metallic. For both phases, Si 2p core level photoemission data indicate that the surface is probably terminated by Si atoms.

  1. Electrical and optical properties of sub-10 nm nickel silicide films for silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Hatem; Ravipati, Srikanth; Yarali, Milad; Shervin, Shahab; Wang, Weijie; Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Mavrokefalos, Anastassios

    2017-01-01

    Highly conductive and transparent films of ultra-thin p-type nickel silicide films have been prepared by RF magnetron sputtering of nickel on silicon substrates followed by rapid thermal annealing in an inert environment in the temperature range 400-600 °C. The films are uniform throughout the wafer with thicknesses in the range of 3-6 nm. The electrical and optical properties are presented for nickel silicide films with varying thickness. The Drude-Lorentz model and Fresnel equations were used to calculate the dielectric properties, sheet resistance, absorption and transmission of the films. These ultrathin nickel silicide films have excellent optoelectronic properties for p-type contacts with optical transparencies up to 80% and sheet resistance as low as ~0.15 µΩ cm. Furthermore, it was shown that the use of a simple anti-reflection (AR) coating can recover most of the reflected light approaching the values of a standard Si solar cell with the same AR coating. Overall, the combination of ultra-low thickness, high transmittance, low sheet resistance and ability to recover the reflected light by utilizing standard AR coating makes them ideal for utilization in silicon based photovoltaic technologies as a p-type transparent conductor.

  2. On the interdiffusion in multilayered silicide coatings for the vanadium-based alloy V-4Cr-4Ti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaia, N.; Portebois, L.; Mathieu, S.; David, N.; Vilasi, M.

    2017-02-01

    To provide protection against corrosion at high temperatures, silicide diffusion coatings were developed for the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy, which can be used as the fuel cladding in next-generation sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors. The multilayered coatings were prepared by halide-activated pack cementation using MgF2 as the transport agent and pure silicon (high activity) as the master alloy. Coated pure vanadium and coated V-4Cr-4Ti alloy were studied and compared as substrates. In both cases, the growth of the silicide layers (V3Si, V5Si3, V6Si5 and VSi2) was controlled exclusively by solid-state diffusion, and the growth kinetics followed a parabolic law. Wagner's analysis was adopted to calculate the integrated diffusion coefficients for all silicides. The estimated values of the integrated diffusion coefficients range from approximately 10-9 to 10-13 cm2 s-1. Then, a diffusion-based numerical approach was used to evaluate the growth and consumption of the layers when the coated substrates were exposed at critical temperatures. The estimated lifetimes of the upper VSi2 layer were 400 h and 280 h for pure vanadium and the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy, respectively. The result from the numeric simulation was in good agreement with the layer thicknesses measured after aging the coated samples at 1150 °C under vacuum.

  3. Americium/Lanthanide Separations in Alkaline Solutions for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, George S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Long, Kristy Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reilly, Sean D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Runde, Wolfgang H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-11

    Project goals: Can used nuclear fuel be partitioned by dissolution in alkaline aqueous solution to give a solution of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium and a filterable solid containing nearly all of the lanthanide fission products and certain other fission products? What is the chemistry of Am/Cm/Ln in oxidative carbonate solutions? Can higher oxidation states of Am be stabilized and exploited? Conclusions: Am(VI) is kinetically stable in 0.5-2.0 M carbonate solutions for hours. Aliquat 336 in toluene has been successfully shown to extract U(VI) and Pu(VI) from carbonate solutions. (Stepanov et al 2011). Higher carbonate concentration gives lower D, SF{sub U/Eu} for = 4 in 1 M K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Experiments with Am(VI) were unsuccessful due to reduction by the organics. Multiple sources of reducing organics...more optimization. Reduction experiments of Am(VI) in dodecane/octanol/Aliquat 336 show that after 5 minutes of contact, only 30-40% of the Am(VI) has been reduced. Long enough to perform an extraction. Shorter contact times, lower T, and lower Aliquat 336 concentration still did not result in any significant extraction of Am. Anion exchange experiments using a strong base anion exchanger show uptake of U(VI) with minimal uptake of Nd(III). Experiments with Am(VI) indicate Am sorption with a Kd of 9 (10 minute contact) but sorption mechanism is not yet understood. SF{sub U/Nd} for = 7 and SF{sub U/Eu} for = 19 after 24 hours in 1 M K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

  4. Concentrations of plutonium and americium in plankton from the western Mediterranean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Merino, Juan; Masque, Pere [Insitut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambiental-Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Mitchell, Peter I.; Vintro, L. Leon [Department of Experimental Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Schell, William R. [Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Cross, Lluisa; Calbet, Albert [Institut de Ciencies del Mar, Pg. Maritim Barceloneta, 37-49 08003, Barcelona (Spain)

    2003-07-20

    Understanding the transfer of radionuclides through the food chain leading to man and in particular, the uptake of transuranic nuclides by plankton, is basic to assess the potential radiological risk of the consumption of marine products by man. The main sources of transuranic elements in the Mediterranean Sea in the past were global fallout and the Palomares accident, although at present smaller amounts are released from nuclear establishments in the northwestern region. Plankton from the western Mediterranean Sea was collected and analyzed for plutonium and americium in order to study their biological uptake. The microplankton fractions accounted for approximately 50% of the total plutonium contents in particulate form. At Garrucha (Palomares area), microplankton showed much higher {sup 239,240}Pu activity, indicating the contamination with plutonium from the bottom sediments. Concentration factors were within the range of the values recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Continental shelf mesoplankton was observed to efficiently concentrate transuranics. In open seawaters, concentrations were much lower. We speculate that sediments might play a role in the transfer of transuranics to mesoplankton in coastal waters, although we cannot discard that the difference in species composition may also play a role. In Palomares, both {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am showed activities five times higher than the mean values observed in continental shelf mesoplankton. As the plutonium isotopic ratios in the contaminated sample were similar to those found in material related to the accident, the contamination was attributed to bomb debris from the Palomares accident. Concentration factors in mesoplankton were also in relatively good agreement with the ranges recommended by IAEA. In the Palomares station the highest concentration factor was observed in the sample that showed predominance of the dynoflagellate Ceratium spp. Mean values of the enrichment factors

  5. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulations of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ye, Bei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mei, Zhigang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hofman, Gerard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Uranium silicide (U3Si2) fuel has higher thermal conductivity and higher uranium density, making it a promising candidate for the accident-tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs). However, previous studies on the fuel performance of U3Si2, including both experimental and computational approaches, have been focusing on the irradiation conditions in research reactors, which usually involve low operation temperatures and high fuel burnups. Thus, it is important to examine the fuel performance of U3Si2 at typical LWR conditions so as to evaluate the feasibility of replacing conventional uranium dioxide fuel with this silicide fuel material. As in-reactor irradiation experiments involve significant time and financial cost, it is appropriate to utilize modeling tools to estimate the behavior of U3Si2 in LWRs based on all those available research reactor experimental references and state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculation capabilities at the early development stage. Hence, in this report, a comprehensive investigation of the fission gas swelling behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is introduced. The modeling efforts mentioned in this report was based on the rate theory (RT) model of fission gas bubble evolution that has been successfully applied for a variety of fuel materials at devious reactor conditions. Both existing experimental data and DFT-calculated results were used for the optimization of the parameters adopted by the RT model. Meanwhile, the fuel-cladding interaction was captured by the coupling of the RT model with simplified mechanical correlations. Therefore, the swelling behavior of U3Si2 fuel and its consequent interaction with cladding in LWRs was predicted by the rate theory modeling, providing valuable information for the development of U3Si2 fuel as an accident

  6. Characteristics of high wear resistant Ni-base materials strengthened by precipitation hardening of wolfram silicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuchi, Kiyoshi; Ide, Hisayuki; Ishiyama, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-12-31

    The practical application of Co-base Stellite and Ni base Inconel for reactor core components with high allowable stress levels is considered to be limited by the formation of radioactive cruds and the susceptibility to IASCC respectively. For this view-point, W-silicide strengthened Cr-W-Si Ni-base high wear resistant alloy so-called HWI alloy was newly developed as an alternative material. The chemical composition and the alloy making process were optimized by applying the electron beam purification process and the thermo-mechanical treatment. The mechanical strength higher than it of above commercial alloys was easily obtained by both solid solution hardening and precipitation hardening, because this alloy has the excellent cold and hot workabilities. The irradiation resistance and the corrosion resistance superior than these of above commercial alloys were verified by several laboratory tests of HWI heats. To maintain austenite phase stability at the practical temperature and to enrich oxide former alloying elements were clarified to be the most important means for this alloy development. (author)

  7. The ability of silicide coating to delay the catastrophic oxidation of vanadium under severe conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaia, N.; Mathieu, S.; Rouillard, F.; Vilasi, M.

    2015-02-01

    V-4Cr-4Ti vanadium alloy is a potential cladding material for sodium-cooled fast-neutron reactors (SFRs). However, its affinity for oxygen and the subsequent embrittlement that oxygen induces causes a need for an oxygen diffusion barrier, which can be obtained by manufacturing a multi-layered silicide coating. The present work aims to evaluate the effects of thermal cycling (using a cyclic oxidation device) and tensile and compressive stresses (using the three-point flexure test) on the coated alloy system. Tests were performed in air up to 1100 °C, which is 200 °C higher than the accidental temperature for SFR applications. The results showed that the VSi2 coating was able to protect the vanadium substrate from oxidation for more than 400 1-h cycles between 1100 °C and room temperature. The severe bending applied to the coated alloy at 950 °C using a load of 75 MPa did not lead to specimen breakage. It can be suggested that the VSi2 coating has mechanical properties compatible with the V-4Cr-4Ti alloy for SFR applications.

  8. Crystal structure of the ternary silicide Gd2Re3Si5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliia Fedyna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A single crystal of the title compound, the ternary silicide digadolinium trirhenium pentasilicide, Gd2Re3Si5, was isolated from an alloy of nominal composition Gd20Re30Si50 synthesized by arc melting and investigated by X-ray single-crystal diffraction. Its crystal structure belongs to the U2Mn3Si5 structure type. All atoms in the asymmetric lie on special positions. The Gd site has site symmetry m..; the two Mn atoms have site symmetries m.. and 2.22; the three Si atoms have site symmetries m.., ..2 and 4.. . The coordination polyhedra of the Gd atoms have 21 vertices, while those of the Re atoms are cubooctahedra and 13-vertex polyhedra. The Si atoms are arranged as tricapped trigonal prisms, bicapped square antiprisms, or 11-vertex polyhedra. The crystal structure of the title compound is also related to the structure types CaBe2Ge2 and W5Si3. It can be represented as a stacking of Gd-centred polyhedra of composition [GdSi9]. The Re atoms form infinite chains with an Re—Re distance of 2.78163 (5 Å and isolated squares with an Re—Re distance of 2.9683 (6 Å.

  9. Formation of the Thermoelectric Candidate Chromium Silicide by Use of a Pack-Cementation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathokostopoulos, D.; Chaliampalias, D.; Tarani, E.; Theodorakakos, A.; Giannoulatou, V.; Polymeris, G. S.; Pavlidou, E.; Chrissafis, K.; Hatzikraniotis, E.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.; Vourlias, G.

    2014-10-01

    Transition-metal silicides are reported to be good candidates for thermoelectric applications because of their thermal and structural stability, high electrical conductivity, and generation of thermoelectric power at elevated temperatures. Chromium disilicide (CrSi2) is a narrow-gap semiconductor and a potential p-type thermoelectric material up to 973 K with a band gap of 0.30 eV. In this work, CrSi2 was formed from Si wafers by use of a two-step, pack-cementation, chemical diffusion method. Several deposition conditions were used to investigate the effect of temperature and donor concentration on the structure of the final products. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis were performed for phase identification, and thermal stability was evaluated by means of thermogravimetric measurements. The results showed that after the first step, chromizing, the structure of the products was a mixture of several Cr-Si phases, depending on the donor (Cr) concentration during the deposition process. After the second step, siliconizing, the pure CrSi2 phase was formed as a result of Si enrichment of the initial Cr-Si phases. It was also revealed that this compound has thermoelectric properties similar to those reported elsewhere. Moreover, it was found to have exceptional chemical stability even at temperatures up to 1273 K.

  10. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between oxide and silicide nuclear fuels with water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    farahani, A.A.; Corradini, M.L. [Univ. of Wisconsi, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Given some transient power/cooling mismatch is a nuclear reactor and its inability to establish the necessary core cooling, energetic fuel-coolant interactions (FCI`s commonly called `vapor explosions`) could occur as a result of the core melting and coolant contact. Although a large number of studies have been done on energetic FCI`s, very few experiments have been performed with the actual fuel materials postulated to be produced in severe accidents. Because of the scarcity of well-characterized FCI data for uranium allows in noncommercial reactors (cermet and silicide fuels), we have conducted a series of experiments to provide a data base for the foregoing materials. An existing 1-D shock-tube facility was modified to handle depleted radioactive materials (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al, and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al). Our objectives have been to determine the effects of the initial fuel composition and temperature and the driving pressure (triggering) on the explosion work output, dynamic pressures, transient temperatures, and the hydrogen production. Experimental results indicate limited energetics, mainly thermal interactions, for these fuel materials as compared to aluminum where more chemical reactions occur between the molten aluminum and water.

  11. Status of core conversion with LEU silicide fuel in JRR-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Teruo; Ohnishi, Nobuaki; Shirai, Eiji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    Japan Research Reactor No.4 (JRR-4) is a light water moderated and cooled, 93% enriched uranium ETR-type fuel used and swimming pool type reactor with thermal output of 3.5MW. Since the first criticality was achieved on January 28, 1965, JRR-4 has been used for shielding experiments, radioisotope production, neutron activation analyses, training for reactor engineers and so on for about 30 years. Within the framework of the RERTR Program, the works for conversion to LEU fuel are now under way, and neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations emphasizing on safety and performance aspects are being carried out. The design and evaluation for the core conversion are based on the Guides for Safety Design and Evaluation of research and testing reactor facilities in Japan. These results show that the JRR-4 will be able to convert to use LEU fuel without any major design change of core and size of fuel element. LEU silicide fuel (19.75%) will be used and maximum neutron flux in irradiation hole would be slightly decreased from present neutron flux value of 7x10{sup 13}(n/cm{sup 2}/s). The conversion works are scheduled to complete in 1998, including with upgrade of the reactor building and utilization facilities.

  12. The whole-core LEU silicide fuel demonstration in the JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aso, Tomokazu; Akashi, Kazutomo; Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The JMTR was fully converted to LEU silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel with cadmium wires as burnable absorber in January, 1994. The reduced enrichment program for the JMTR was initiated in 1979, and the conversion to MEU (enrichment ; 45%) aluminide fuel was carried out in 1986 as the first step of the program. The final goal of the program was terminated by the present LEU conversion. This paper describes the results of core physics measurement through the conversion phase from MEU fuel core to LEU fuel core. Measured excess reactivities of the LEU fuel cores are mostly in good agreement with predicted values. Reactivity effect and burnup of cadmium wires, therefore, were proved to be well predicted. Control rod worth in the LEU fuel core is mostly less than that in the MEU fuel core. Shutdown margin was verified to be within the safety limit. There is no significant difference in temperature coefficient of reactivity between the MEU and LEU fuel cores. These results verified that the JMTR was successfully and safely converted to LEU fuel. Extension of the operating cycle period was achieved and reduction of spend fuel elements is expected by using the fuel with high uranium density.

  13. In situ characterization of uranium and americium oxide solid solution formation for CRMP process: first combination of in situ XRD and XANES measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caisso, Marie; Picart, Sébastien; Belin, Renaud C; Lebreton, Florent; Martin, Philippe M; Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Jörg; Neuville, Daniel R; Delahaye, Thibaud; Ayral, André

    2015-04-14

    Transmutation of americium in heterogeneous mode through the use of U1-xAmxO2±δ ceramic pellets, also known as Americium Bearing Blankets (AmBB), has become a major research axis. Nevertheless, in order to consider future large-scale deployment, the processes involved in AmBB fabrication have to minimize fine particle dissemination, due to the presence of americium, which considerably increases the risk of contamination. New synthesis routes avoiding the use of pulverulent precursors are thus currently under development, such as the Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP) process. It is based on the use of weak-acid resin (WAR) microspheres as precursors, loaded with actinide cations. After two specific calcinations under controlled atmospheres, resin microspheres are converted into oxide microspheres composed of a monophasic U1-xAmxO2±δ phase. Understanding the different mechanisms during thermal conversion, that lead to the release of organic matter and the formation of a solid solution, appear essential. By combining in situ techniques such as XRD and XAS, it has become possible to identify the key temperatures for oxide formation, and the corresponding oxidation states taken by uranium and americium during mineralization. This paper thus presents the first results on the mineralization of (U,Am) loaded resin microspheres into a solid solution, through in situ XAS analysis correlated with HT-XRD.

  14. LIBS Spectral Data for a Mixed Actinide Fuel Pellet Containing Uranium, Plutonium, Neptunium and Americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judge, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le, Loan A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Leon N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to analyze a mixed actinide fuel pellet containing 75% UO{sub 2}/20% PuO{sub 2}/3% AmO{sub 2}/2% NpO{sub 2}. The preliminary data shown here is the first report of LIBS analysis of a mixed actinide fuel pellet, to the authors knowledge. The LIBS spectral data was acquired in a plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory where the sample was contained within a glove box. The initial installation of the glove box was not intended for complete ultraviolet (UV), visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) transmission, therefore the LIBS spectrum is truncated in the UV and NIR regions due to the optical transmission of the window port and filters that were installed. The optical collection of the emission from the LIBS plasma will be optimized in the future. However, the preliminary LIBS data acquired is worth reporting due to the uniqueness of the sample and spectral data. The analysis of several actinides in the presence of each other is an important feature of this analysis since traditional methods must chemically separate uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium prior to analysis. Due to the historic nature of the sample fuel pellet analyzed, the provided sample composition of 75% UO{sub 2}/20% PuO{sub 2}/3% AmO{sub 2}/2% NpO{sub 2} cannot be confirm without further analytical processing. Uranium, plutonium, and americium emission lines were abundant and easily assigned while neptunium was more difficult to identify. There may be several reasons for this observation, other than knowing the exact sample composition of the fuel pellet. First, the atomic emission wavelength resources for neptunium are limited and such techniques as hollow cathode discharge lamp have different dynamics than the plasma used in LIBS which results in different emission spectra. Secondly, due to the complex sample of four actinide elements, which all have very dense electronic energy levels, there may be reactions and

  15. Comparing the electrical characteristics and reliabilities of BJTs and MOSFETs between Pt and Ti contact silicide processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaiping; Shang, Ling

    1999-08-01

    The sub-threshold characteristics and the reliability of BJTs, using platinum contact silicide (PtSi) or titanium contact silicide (TiSi2), are compared and analyzed. During processing, it is observed that the TiSi2 process produces higher interface state density (Dit) than the PtSi process. The increase in Dit not only leads to a higher base current in the BJTs, but also leads to a lower transconductance for the MOS transistors. The data also show that the impact on NPN and nMOS is more severe than the impact of PNP and pMOS, respectively. This can be explained by the non-symmetric interface state distribution, the re- activation of boron, and/or by substrate trap centers. The amount of interface states produced depends not only on the thickness of the titanium film deposited, but also on the temperature and duration of the titanium silicide process. The electrical data indicates that after all the Back-End- Of-The-Line processing steps, which includes a forming gas anneal, Dit is still higher on wafers with the TiSi2 transistor's base current increases at different rates between the two processes, but eventually levels off to the same final value. However, the PNP transistor's base current increases at approximately the same rate, but eventually levels off at different final values. These indicate that the TiSi2 process may have modified the silicon and oxygen dangling bond structure during its high temperature process in addition to removing the hydrogen from the passivated interface states.

  16. Orientation relationship between alpha-prime titanium and silicide S2 in alloy Ti-6Al-5Zr-0. 5Mo-0. 25Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramachandra, C.; Singh, V.

    1985-03-01

    Orientation relationships between the silicide S2 and the matrix of alpha-prime platelets are established for the titanium alloy 685 (Ti-6Al-5Zr-0.5Mo-0.25Si), a near-alpha alloy designed for the high-temperature components of jet engines. A stereogram showing the parallel planes of alpha-prime and S2 is presented for the alloy in the water-quenched and aged condition. A table is also presented which lists the parallel planes of the matrix and the silicide along with the misfit parameters. The results obtained are compared with the orientation relationships reported in the literature. 14 references.

  17. A study of nickel silicide in a conventional furnace for Ni/Cu contact monocrystalline-silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seon Kyu; Lee, Soo Hong

    2013-01-01

    High-conductivity contacts in place of screen-printed contacts are in demand for commercial solar cells. Also, simplifying the process steps is required for commercial solar cells. In addition, very expensive metals are necessary improved efficiency without using scarce. In this research, we replaced screen-printed contacts with Ni/Cu contacts in passivated emitter solar cells. A layer of nickel was used as the seed and the adhesion layer. The main contact was formed by plating with copper. Firing conditions in a conventional furnace were varied so as to form nickel silicide. The best cell showed a solar cell efficiency of 18.76%.

  18. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulation of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Ye, Bei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Hofman, Gerard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Gamble, Kyle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation; Mei, Zhi-Gang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-08-29

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions needs to be well understood. In this report, rate theory model was developed based on existing experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations so as to predict the fission gas behavior in U3Si2 at LWR conditions. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 can be divided into three temperature regimes. During steady-state operation, the majority of the fission gas stays in intragranular bubbles, whereas the dominance of intergranular bubbles and fission gas release only occurs beyond 1000 K. The steady-state rate theory model was also used as reference to establish a gaseous swelling correlation of U3Si2 for the BISON code. Meanwhile, the overpressurized bubble model was also developed so that the fission gas behavior at LOCA can be simulated. LOCA simulation showed that intragranular bubbles are still dominant after a 70 second LOCA, resulting in a controllable gaseous swelling. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is benign according to the rate theory prediction at both steady-state and LOCA conditions, which provides important references to the qualification of U3Si2 as a LWR fuel material with excellent fuel performance and enhanced accident tolerance.

  19. Rate Theory Modeling and Simulation of Silicide Fuel at LWR Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Ye, Bei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Hofman, Gerard [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Yacout, Abdellatif [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Gamble, Kyle [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation; Mei, Zhi-Gang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-08-29

    As a promising candidate for the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) used in light water reactors (LWRs), the fuel performance of uranium silicide (U3Si2) at LWR conditions need to be well-understood. In this report, rate theory model was developed based on existing experimental data and density functional theory (DFT) calculations so as to predict the fission gas behavior in U3Si2 at LWR conditions. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 can be divided into three temperature regimes. During steady-state operation, the majority of the fission gas stays in intragranular bubbles, whereas the dominance of intergranular bubbles and fission gas release only occurs beyond 1000 K. The steady-state rate theory model was also used as reference to establish a gaseous swelling correlation of U3Si2 for the BISON code. Meanwhile, the overpressurized bubble model was also developed so that the fission gas behavior at LOCA can be simulated. LOCA simulation showed that intragranular bubbles are still dominant after a 70 second LOCA, resulting in a controllable gaseous swelling. The fission gas behavior of U3Si2 at LWR conditions is benign according to the rate theory prediction at both steady-state and LOCA conditions, which provides important references to the qualification of U3Si2 as a LWR fuel material with excellent fuel performance and enhanced accident tolerance.

  20. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition: limits and opportunities of protecting the tungsten catalyzer from silicide with a cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigeri, P.A. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona-08028 (Spain); Nos, O., E-mail: oriol_nos@ub.ed [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona-08028 (Spain); Ecotecnia (ALSTOM Group) (Spain); Bengoechea, S.; Frevert, C.; Asensi, J.M.; Bertomeu, J. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona-08028 (Spain)

    2009-04-30

    Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) is one of the most promising techniques for depositing the intrinsic microcrystalline silicon layer for the production of micro-morph solar cells. However, the silicide formation at the colder ends of the tungsten wire drastically reduces the lifetime of the catalyzer, thus limiting its industrial exploitation. A simple but interesting strategy to decrease the silicide formation is to hide the electrical contacts of the catalyzer in a long narrow cavity which reduces the probability of the silane molecules to reach the colder ends of the wire. In this paper, the working mechanism of the cavity is elucidated. Measurements of the thickness profile of the silicon deposited in the internal walls of the cavity have been compared with those predicted using a simple diffusion model based on the assumption of Knudsen flow. A lifetime study of the protected and unprotected wires has been carried out. The different mechanisms which determine the deterioration of the catalyzer have been identified and discussed.

  1. Silicide induced surface defects in FePt nanoparticle fcc-to-fct thermally activated phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu; Lee, Stephen L.; André, Pascal

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MnPs) are relevant to a wide range of applications including high density information storage and magnetic resonance imaging to name but a few. Among the materials available to prepare MnPs, FePt is attracting growing attention. However, to harvest the strongest magnetic properties of FePt MnPs, a thermal annealing is often required to convert face-centered cubic as synthesized nPs into its tetragonal phase. Rarely addressed are the potential side effects of such treatments on the magnetic properties. In this study, we focus on the impact of silica shells often used in strategies aiming at overcoming MnP coalescence during the thermal annealing. While we show that this shell does prevent sintering, and that fcc-to-fct conversion does occur, we also reveal the formation of silicide, which can prevent the stronger magnetic properties of fct-FePt MnPs from being fully realised. This report therefore sheds lights on poorly investigated and understood interfacial phenomena occurring during the thermal annealing of MnPs and, by doing so, also highlights the benefits of developing new strategies to avoid silicide formation.

  2. Thermal Stability and Growth Behavior of Erbium Silicide Nanowires Self-Assembled on a Vicinal Si(001) Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Tao; SONG Jun-Qiang; LI Juan; CAI Qun

    2011-01-01

    Erbium silicide nanowires are self-assembled on vicinal Si(Ool) substrates after electron beam evaporation and post annealing at 63(fC In-situ scanning tunneling microscopy investigations manifest that the nanowires will successively shrink and transform into a nanoisland with annealing prolonged. Meanwhile, a structural transition from hexagonal AIB2 phase to tetragonal ThSi'2 phase is revealed with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It is also found that the nanowires gradually expand to embed into the substrates during the growth process, which has much influence on the shape instability of nanowires. Additionally, a multiple deposition-annealing treatment is given as a novel growth method to strengthen the controlled fabrication of nanowires.%@@ Erbium silicide nanowires are self-assembled on vicinal Si(001) substrates after electron beam evaporation and post annealing at 630℃ In-situ scanning tunneling microscopy investigations manifest that the nanowires will successively shrink and transform into a nanoisland with annealing prolonged.Meanwhile, a structural transition from hexagonal AlB phase to tetragonal ThSi phase is revealed with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.It is also found that the nanowires gradually expand to embed into the substrates during the growth process, which has much influence on the shape instability of nanowires.Additionally, a multiple deposition- annealing treatment is given as a novel growth method to strengthen the controlled fabrication of nanowires.

  3. Effects of nitrogen annealing on surface structure, silicide formation and magnetic properties of ultrathin films of Co on Si(100)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ganesh K Rajan; Shivaraman Ramaswamy; C Gopalakrishnan; D John Thiruvadigal

    2012-02-01

    Effects of nitrogen annealing on structural and magnetic properties of Co/Si (100) up to 700°C has been studied in this paper. Ultrathin Co films having a constant thickness of 50 Å were grown on Si (100) substrates using electron-beam evaporation under very high vacuum conditions at room temperature. Subsequently, the samples were annealed at temperatures ranging from 100–700°C in a nitrogen environment at atmospheric pressure. Sample quality and surface morphology were examined using atomic force microscopy. Silicide formation and the resultant variation in crystallographic arrangement were studied using X-ray diffractometer. The magnetization measurements done using a vibrating sample magnetometer indicate a decrease in coercivity and retentivity values with increase in annealing temperature. Resistivity of the samples measured using a four-point probe set up shows a decrease in resistivity with increase in annealing temperature. Formation of various silicide phases at different annealing temperatures and the resultant variation in the magnetic susceptibility has been thoroughly studied and quantified in this work.

  4. The role of composition and microstructure in Ni-W silicide formation and low temperature epitaxial NiSi2 growth by premixing Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauwen, A.; Van Stiphout, K.; Demeulemeester, J.; De Schutter, B.; Devulder, W.; Comrie, C. M.; Detavernier, C.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.

    2017-02-01

    We report on an extensive and detailed study of the silicide reaction of Ni-W alloys on Si(1 0 0). The solid phase reaction when studied over the full composition range reveals the substantial impact of composition and microstructure on the silicide reaction properties, such as the phase formation sequence and formation temperatures. It was found that the microstructure of the as-deposited film depends crucially on the alloy composition, being polycrystalline below 45 at.% W and amorphous above 45 at.% W. The microstructure affects the elemental mobility substantially, resulting in a drastic increase in the silicide reaction temperature in the case of an amorphous thin film. To further investigate the effect of elemental mobility, Si was premixed in the as-deposited alloy, thereby excluding the need for long-range diffusion. As a result, the silicide reaction temperatures were lowered. However, what was more striking was the observation of a bilayer structure for epitaxial NiSi2 in contact with the Si substrate and a W-rich layer residing at the outermost layer at a temperature of only 300 °C. The results stress the importance of the composition and crystalline nature of the as-deposited film, with these being decisive for the reaction sequence.

  5. Influence of layout parameters on snapback characteristic for a gate-grounded NMOS device in 0.13-μm silicide CMOS technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Yuxi; Li Jiao; Ran Feng; Cao Jialin; Yang Dianxiong

    2009-01-01

    r of the GGNMOS devices under high ESD current stress, and design area-efficient ESD protection circuits to sustain the required ESD level.Optimized layout rules for ESD protection in 0.13-μm silicide CMOS technology are also presented.

  6. Neutronic Study of Burnup, Radiotoxicity, Decay Heat and Basic Safety Parameters of Mono-Recycling of Americium in French Pressurised Water Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bright Mawuko Sogbadji

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The reprocessing of actinides with long half-life has been non-existent except for plutonium (Pu. This work looks at reducing the actinides inventory nuclear fuel waste meant for permanent disposal. The uranium oxide fuel (UOX assembly, as in the open cycle system, was designed to reach a burnup of 46GWd/T and 68GWd/T using the MURE code. The MURE code is based on the coupling of a static Monte Carlo code and the calculation of the evolution of the fuel during irradiation and cooling periods. The MURE code has been used to address two different questions concerning the mono-recycling of americium (Am in present French pressurised water reactors (PWR. These are reduction of americium in the clear fuel cycle and the safe quantity of americium that can be introduced into mixed oxide (MOX as fuel. The spent UOX was reprocessed to fabricate MOX assemblies, by the extraction of plutonium and addition of depleted uranium to reach burnups of 46GWd/T and 68GWd/T, taking into account various cooling times of the spent UOX assembly in the repository. The effect of cooling time on burnup and radiotoxicity was then ascertained. After 30 years of cooling in the repository, the spent UOX fuel required a higher concentration of Pu to be reprocessed into MOX fuel due to the decay of Pu-241. Americium, with a mean half-life of 432 years, has a high radiotoxicity level, high mid-term residual heat and is a precursor for other long-lived isotopes. An innovative strategy would be to reprocess not only the plutonium from the UOX spent fuel but also the americium isotopes, which presently dominate the radiotoxicity of waste. The mono-recycling of Am is not a definitive solution because the once-through MOX cycle transmutation of Am in a PWR is not enough to destroy all americium. The main objective is to propose a ‘waiting strategy’ for both Am and Pu in the spent fuel so that they can be made available for further transmutation strategies. The MOX and

  7. THE FIRST ISOLATION OF AMERICIUM IN THE FORM OF PURE COMPOUNDS - THE SPECIFIC ALPHA-ACTIVITY AND HALF-LIFE OF Am241

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, B.B.; Asprey, L.B.

    1950-07-20

    The microgram scale isolation and preparation of pure compounds of americium is described. Data are presented to show that the alpha-half-life of the isotope Am{sup 241} is 490 {+-} 14 years. The absorption spectrum of Am(III) in 1M nitric acid in the range 3500-8000 mu is given. The wave lengths of 10 of the most prominent lines in the copper spark emission spectrum of americium are given to the nearest 0.01 {angstrom}. Evidence is presented to show that the potential for the Am(III)-Am(IV) couple in acid solution is more negative than -2v and that the potential for the Am(II)-Am(III) couple is more positive than +0.9v.

  8. High-temperature thermochemistry of transition metal borides, silicides and related compounds. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemppa, Ole J.

    2000-10-01

    Earlier this year in collaboration with Dr. Susan V. Meschel we prepared a major review paper which gives a comprehensive summary of what our laboratory has accomplished with support from DOE. This paper is No.43 in the List of Publications provided. It was presented to TMS at its National Meeting in Nashville, TN last March. A copy of the manuscript of this paper was recently mailed to DOE. It has been submitted for publication in Journal of Alloys and Compounds. This review paper summarizes our observed trends in the enthalpies of formation of TR-X and RE-X compounds (where X is a IIIB or IVB element) in their dependence of the atomic number of the transition metal (TR) and the lanthanide metal (RE). In this paper our measured enthalpies of formation for each alloy family are compared for the 3d, 4d and 5d transition metal elements. We also compare our experimental results with predicted values based on Miedema's semi-empirical model. Data are presented for the carbides, silicides, germanides and stannides in Group IVB, and for the borides and aluminides in Group IIIB. During the past year (1999-2000) we have extended our work to compounds of the 3d, 4d and 5d elements with gallium (see papers No.40, No.41, and No.45 in the List of Publications). Fig. 1 (taken from No.45) presents a systematic picture of our experimental values for the most exothermic gallide compounds formed with the transition elements. This figure is characteristic of the other systematic pictures which we have found for the two other IIIB elements which we have studied and for the four IVB elements. These figures are all presented in Ref. No.43. This paper also illustrates how the enthalpy of formation of compounds of the IIIB and IVB elements with the lanthanide elements (with the exception of Pm, Eu and Yb) depend on the atomic number of RE. Finally our results for the RE-X compounds are compared with the predictions of Gschneidner (K.A. Gschneidner, Jr., J. Less Common Metals 17, 1

  9. Physical, Mechanical, and Structural Properties of Highly Efficient Nanostructured n- and p-Silicides for Practical Thermoelectric Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbstein, Yaniv; Tunbridge, Jonathan; Dixon, Richard; Reece, Mike J.; Ning, Huanpo; Gilchrist, Robert; Summers, Richard; Agote, Iñigo; Lagos, Miguel A.; Simpson, Kevin; Rouaud, Cedric; Feulner, Peter; Rivera, Sergio; Torrecillas, Ramon; Husband, Mark; Crossley, Julian; Robinson, Ivan

    2014-06-01

    Cost-effective highly efficient nanostructured n-type Mg2Si1- x Sn x and p-type higher manganese silicide (HMS) compositions were prepared for the development of practical waste heat generators for automotive and marine thermoelectric applications, in the frame of the European Commission (EC)-funded PowerDriver project. The physical, mechanical, and structural properties were fully characterized as part of a database-generation exercise required for the thermoelectric converter design. A combination of high maximal ZT values of ˜0.6 and ˜1.1 for the HMS and Mg2Si1- x Sn x compositions, respectively, and adequate mechanical properties was obtained.

  10. Reaction path and crystallograpy of cobalt silicide formation on silicon(001) by reaction deposition epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chong Wee

    CaF2-structure CoSi2 layers were formed on Si(001) by reactive deposition epitaxy (RDE) and compared with CoSi2 layers obtained by conventional solid phase growth (SPG). In the case of RDE, CoSi 2 formation occurred during Co deposition at elevated temperature while for SPG, Co was deposited at 25°C and silicidation took place during subsequent annealing. My results demonstrate that RDE CoSi2 layers are epitaxial with a cube-on-cube relationship, 001CoSi2 ‖001Si and 100CoSi2 ‖100 Si . In contrast, SPG films are polycrystalline with a mixed 111/002/022/112 orientation. I attribute the striking difference to rapid Co diffusion during RDE for which the high Co/Si reactivity gives rise to a flux-limited reaction resulting in the direct formation of the disilicide phase. Initial formation of CoSi2(001) follows the Volmer-Weber mode with two families of island shapes: inverse pyramids and platelets. The rectangular-based pyramidal islands extend along orthogonal directions, bounded by four {111} CoSi2/Si interfaces, and grow with a cube-on-cube orientation with respect to Si(001). Platelet-shaped islands are bounded across their long directions by {111} twin planes and their narrow directions by 511CoSi2 ‖111Si interfaces. The top and bottom surfaces are {22¯1}, with 22¯1 CoSi2‖001 Si , and {1¯1¯1}, with 1¯1¯ 1CoSi2‖ 11¯1Si , respectively. The early stages of film growth (tCo ≤ 13 A) are dominated by the twinned platelets due to a combination of higher nucleation rates and rapid elongation along preferred directions. However, at tCo ≥ 13 A, island coalescence becomes significant as orthogonal platelets intersect and block elongation along fast growth directions. Further island growth becomes dominated by the untwinned islands. I show that high-flux low-energy Ar+ ion irradiation during RDE growth dramatically increases the area fraction of untwinned regions from 0.17 in films grown under standard magnetically balanced conditions in which the ratio

  11. Intramolecular sensitization of americium luminescence in solution: shining light on short-lived forbidden 5f transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturzbecher-Hoehne, M; Yang, P; D'Aléo, A; Abergel, R J

    2016-06-14

    The photophysical properties and solution thermodynamics of water soluble trivalent americium (Am(III)) complexes formed with multidentate chromophore-bearing ligands, 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO), Enterobactin, and 5-LIO(Me-3,2-HOPO), were investigated. The three chelators were shown to act as antenna chromophores for Am(III), generating sensitized luminescence emission from the metal upon complexation, with very short lifetimes ranging from 33 to 42 ns and low luminescence quantum yields (10(-3) to 10(-2)%), characteristic of Near Infra-Red emitters in similar systems. The specific emission peak of Am(III) assigned to the (5)D1 → (7)F1 f-f transition was exploited to characterize the high proton-independent stability of the complex formed with the most efficient sensitizer 3,4,3-LI(1,2-HOPO), with a log β110 = 20.4 ± 0.2 value. In addition, the optical and solution thermodynamic features of these Am(III) complexes, combined with density functional theory calculations, were used to probe the influence of electronic structure on coordination properties across the f-element series and to gain insight into ligand field effects.

  12. Response of avalanche photo-diodes of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter to neutrons from an Americium-Beryllium source.

    CERN Document Server

    Deiters, Konrad; Renker, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    The response of avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) used in the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter to low energy neutrons from an Americium-Beryllium source is reported. Signals due to recoil protons from neutron interactions with the hydrogen nuclei in the protective epoxy layer, mainly close to the silicon surface of the APD, have been identified. These signals increase in size with the applied bias voltage more slowly than the nominal gain of the APDs, and appear to have a substantially lower effective gain at the operating voltage. The signals originating from interactions in the epoxy are mostly equivalent to signals of a few GeV in CMS, but range up to a few tens of GeV equivalent. There are also signals not attributed to reactions in the epoxy extending up to the end of the range of these measurements, a few hundreds of GeV equivalent. Signals from the x-rays from the source can also be in the GeV equivalent scale in CMS. Simulations used to describe events due to particle interactions in the APDs need to take ...

  13. Nano-cerium vanadate: a novel inorganic ion exchanger for removal of americium and uranium from simulated aqueous nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Chayan; Dudwadkar, Nilesh; Tripathi, Subhash Chandra; Gandhi, Pritam Maniklal; Grover, Vinita; Kaushik, Chetan Prakash; Tyagi, Avesh Kumar

    2014-09-15

    Cerium vanadate nanopowders were synthesized by a facile low temperature co-precipitation method. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and found to consist of ∼25 nm spherical nanoparticles. The efficiency of these nanopowders for uptake of alpha-emitting radionuclides (233)U (4.82 MeV α) and (241)Am (5.49 MeV α, 60 keV γ) has been investigated. Thermodynamically and kinetically favorable uptake of these radionuclides resulted in their complete removal within 3h from aqueous acidic feed solutions. The uptake capacity was observed to increase with increase in pH as the zeta potential value decreased with the increase in pH but effect of ionic strength was insignificant. Little influence of the ions like Sr(2+), Ru(3+), Fe(3+), etc., in the uptake process indicated CeVO4 nanopowders to be amenable for practical applications. The isotherms indicated predominant uptake of the radioactive metal ions in the solid phase of the exchanger at lower feed concentrations and linear Kielland plots with positive slopes indicated favorable exchange of the metal ions with the nanopowder. Performance comparison with the other sorbents reported indicated excellent potential of nano-cerium vanadate for removing americium and uranium from large volumes of aqueous acidic solutions.

  14. Vertically grown multiwalled carbon nanotube anode and nickel silicide integrated high performance microsized (1.25 μl) microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2012-02-08

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are an environmentally friendly method for water purification and self-sustained electricity generation using microorganisms. Microsized MFCs can also be a useful power source for lab-on-a-chip and similar integrated devices. We fabricated a 1.25 μL microsized MFC containing an anode of vertically aligned, forest type multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with a nickel silicide (NiSi) contact area that produced 197 mA/m 2 of current density and 392 mW/m 3 of power density. The MWCNTs increased the anode surface-to-volume ratio, which improved the ability of the microorganisms to couple and transfer electrons to the anode. The use of nickel silicide also helped to boost the output current by providing a low resistance contact area to more efficiently shuttle electrons from the anode out of the device. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  15. Behavior of silicon in nitric media. Application to uranium silicides fuels reprocessing; Comportement du silicium en milieu nitrique. Application au retraitement des combustibles siliciures d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheroux, L

    2001-07-01

    Uranium silicides are used in some research reactors. Reprocessing them is a solution for their cycle end. A list of reprocessing scenarios has been set the most realistic being a nitric dissolution close to the classic spent fuel reprocessing. This uranium silicide fuel contains a lot of silicon and few things are known about polymerization of silicic acid in concentrated nitric acid. The study of this polymerization allows to point out the main parameters: acidity, temperature, silicon concentration. The presence of aluminum seems to speed up heavily the polymerization. It has been impossible to find an analytical technique smart and fast enough to characterize the first steps of silicic acid polymerization. However the action of silicic species on emulsions stabilization formed by mixing them with an organic phase containing TBP has been studied, Silicon slows down the phase separation by means of oligomeric species forming complex with TBP. The existence of these intermediate species is short and heating can avoid any stabilization. When non irradiated uranium silicide fuel is attacked by a nitric solution, aluminum and uranium are quickly dissolved whereas silicon mainly stands in solid state. That builds a gangue of hydrated silica around the uranium silicide particulates without preventing uranium dissolution. A small part of silicon passes into the solution and polymerize towards the highly poly-condensed forms, just 2% of initial silicon is still in molecular form at the end of the dissolution. A thermal treatment of the fuel element, by forming inter-metallic phases U-Al-Si, allows the whole silicon to pass into the solution and next to precipitate. The behavior of silicon in spent fuels should be between these two situations. (author)

  16. Characteristics of a nickel thin film and formation of nickel silicide by using remote plasma atomic layer deposition with Ni( i Pr-DAD)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinho; Jang, Woochool; Park, Jingyu; Jeon, Heeyoung; Kim, Hyunjung; Yuh, Junhan; Jeon, Hyeongtag

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the characteristics of nickel thin film deposited by remote plasma atomic layer deposition (RPALD) on p-type Si substrate and formation of nickel silicide using rapid thermal annealing were determined. Bis(1,4-di-isopropyl-1,3-diazabutadienyl)nickel, Ni(iPr-DAD)2, was used as a Ni precursor and ammonia plasma was used as a reactant. This was the first attempt to deposit Ni thin film using Ni(iPr-DAD)2 as a precursor for the ALD process. The RPALD Ni film was deposited with a growth rate of around 2.2{\\AA}/cycle at 250 {\\deg}C and showed significant low resistivity of 33 {\\mu}{\\Omega}cm with a total impurity concentration of around 10 at. %.The impurities of the thin film, carbon and nitrogen, were existent by the forms of C-C and C-N in a bonding state. The impurities removal tendency was investigated by comparing of experimental conditions, namely process temperature and pressure. Nitrogen impurity was removed by thermal desorption during each ALD cycle and carbon impurity was reduced by the optimizing of the process pressure which is directly related with a mean free path of NH3 plasma. After Ni deposition, nickel silicide was formed by RTA in a vacuum ambient for 1 minute. A nickel silicide layer from ALD Ni and PVD Ni was compared at the annealing temperature from 500 to 900 {\\deg}C. NiSi from ALD Ni showed better thermal stability due to the contribution of small amounts of carbon and nitrogen in the asdeposited Ni thin film. Degradation of the silicide layer was effectively suppressed with a use of ALD Ni.

  17. Simultaneous aluminizing and chromizing of steels to form (Fe,Cr){sub 3}Al coatings and Ge-doped silicide coatings of Cr-Zr base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, M.; He, Y.R.; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    A halide-activated cementation pack involving elemental Al and Cr powders has been used to achieve surface compositions of approximately Fe{sub 3}Al plus several percent Cr for low alloy steels (T11, T2 and T22) and medium carbon steel (1045 steel). A two-step treatment at 925 C and 1150 C yields the codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium to form dense and uniform ferrite coatings of about 400 {micro}m thickness, while preventing the formation of a blocking chromium carbide at the substrate surfaces. Upon cyclic oxidation in air at 700 C, the coated steel exhibits a negligible 0.085 mg/cm{sup 2} weight gain for 1900 one-hour cycles. Virtually no attack was observed on coated steels tested at ABB in simulated boiler atmospheres at 500 C for 500 hours. But coatings with a surface composition of only 8 wt% Al and 6 wt% Cr suffered some sulfidation attack in simulated boiler atmospheres at temperatures higher than 500 C for 1000 hours. Two developmental Cr-Zr based Laves phase alloys (CN129-2 and CN117(Z)) were silicide/germanide coated. The cross-sections of the Ge-doped silicide coatings closely mimicked the microstructure of the substrate alloys. Cyclic oxidation in air at 1100 C showed that the Ge-doped silicide coating greatly improved the oxidation resistance of the Cr-Zr based alloys.

  18. Determination by gamma-ray spectrometry of the plutonium and americium content of the Pu/Am separation scraps. Application to molten salts; Determination par spectrometrie gamma de la teneur en plutonium et en americium de produits issus de separation Pu/Am. Application aux bains de sels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godot, A. [CEA Valduc, Dept. de Traitement des Materiaux Nucleaires, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Perot, B. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Technologie Nucleaire, Service de Modelisation des Transferts et Mesures Nucleaires, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2005-07-01

    Within the framework of plutonium recycling operations in CEA Valduc (France), americium is extracted from molten plutonium metal into a molten salt during an electrolysis process. The scraps (spent salt, cathode, and crucible) contain extracted americium and a part of plutonium. Nuclear material management requires a very accurate determination of the plutonium content. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is performed on Molten Salt Extraction (MSE) scraps located inside the glove box, in order to assess the plutonium and americium contents. The measurement accuracy is influenced by the device geometry, nuclear instrumentation, screens located between the sample and the detector, counting statistics and matrix attenuation, self-absorption within the spent salt being very important. The purpose of this study is to validate the 'infinite energy extrapolation' method employed to correct for self-attenuation, and to detect any potential bias. We present a numerical study performed with the MCNP computer code to identify the most influential parameters and some suggestions to improve the measurement accuracy. A final uncertainty of approximately 40% is achieved on the plutonium mass. (authors)

  19. Transfer across the human gut of environmental plutonium, americium, cobalt, caesium and technetium: studies with cockles (Cerastoderma edule) from the Irish Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, G J

    1998-06-01

    Our previous studies have indicated lower values of the gut transfer factor ('f1 values') for plutonium and americium in winkles (Littorina littorea) than adopted by ICRP. The present study was undertaken primarily to investigate whether this observation extends to other species. Samples of cockles (Carastoderma edule) from Ravenglass, Cumbria were eaten by volunteers who provided 24 h samples of urine and faeces. Urine samples indicated f1 values for cockles which were higher than for winkles; for plutonium these ranged overall up to 7 x 10(-4) with an arithmetic mean in the range (2-3) x 10(-4), and for americium up to 2.6 x 10(-4) with an arithmetic mean of 1.2 x 10(-4). Limited data based on volunteers eating cockles from the Solway suggest that f1 values for americium may be greater at distance from Sellafield. The measured values compare with 5 x 10(-4) used by the ICRP for environmental forms of both elements, which would appear to provide adequate protection when calculating doses from Cumbrian cockles. Data for other nuclides were obtained by analysing faecal samples from the volunteers who ate the Ravenglass cockles. Cobalt-60 showed an f1 value in the region of 0.2, twice the value currently used by ICRP. For 137Cs, variabilities were indicated in the range 0.08 to 0.43, within the ICRP value of f1 = 1.0. Technetium-99 gave f1 values up to about 0.6, in reasonable conformity with the ICRP value of 0.5.

  20. Transfer across the human gut of environmental plutonium, americium, cobalt, caesium and technetium: studies with cockles (Cerastoderma edule) from the Irish Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.J. [CEFAS Laboratory, Lowestoft, Suffolk NR33 0HT (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Our previous studies have indicated lower values of the gut transfer factor ('f{sub L} values') for plutonium and americium in winkles (Littorina littorea) than adopted by ICRP. The present study was undertaken primarily to investigate whether this observation extends to other species. Samples of cockles (Cerastoderma edule) from Ravenglass, Cumbria were eaten by volunteers who provided 24 samples of urine and faeces. Urine samples indicated f{sub L} values for cockles which were higher than for winkles; for plutonium these ranged overall up to 7x10{sup -4} with an arithmetic mean in the range (2-3)x10{sup -4}, and for americium up to 2.6x10{sup -4} with an arithmetic mean of 1.2x10{sup -4}. Limited data based on volunteers eating cockles from the Solway suggest that f{sub L} values for americium may be greater at distance from Sellafield. The measured values compare with 5x10{sup -4} used by the ICRP for environmental forms of both elements, which would appear to provide adequate protection when calculating doses from Cumbrian cockles. Data for other nuclides were obtained by analysing faecal samples from the volunteers who ate the Ravenglass cockles. Cobalt-60 showed an f{sub L} value in the region of 0.2, twice the value currently used by ICRP. For {sup 137}Cs, variabilities were indicated in the range 0.08 to 0.43, within the ICRP value of f{sub L}=1.0. Technetium-99 gave f{sub L} values up to about 0.6, in reasonable conformity with the ICRP value of 0.5. (author)

  1. Atomically precise self-organization of perfectly ordered gadolinium–silicide nanomeshes controlled by anisotropic electromigration-induced growth on Si(1 1 0)-16 × 2 surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Ie-Hong, E-mail: ihhong@mail.ncyu.edu.tw [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan (China); Institute of Optoelectronics and Solid State Electronics, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan (China); Chen, Tsung-Ming; Tsai, Yung-Feng [Institute of Optoelectronics and Solid State Electronics, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60004, Taiwan (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • This work provides a clear understanding of the template-directed self-organization mechanism of a perfectly ordered Gd-silicide nanomesh on a double-domain Si(1 1 0)-16 × 2 and identifies that the anisotropic electromigration is the driving force governing the two-dimensional self-ordering of the atomically precise silicide nanomesh. • The ability to self-organize a variety of the perfectly ordered silicide nanomeshes on Si(1 1 0) with atomic precision represents a promising route for the optimal bottom-up fabrication of well-defined crossbar nanocircuits, which opens the possibility for their utilizations in crossbar nanoarchitectures and Si-based magnetoelectronic nanodevices. - Abstract: Detailed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS) studies for the effects of thermal migration and electromigration on the growth of gadolinium–silicide nanomeshes on double-domain Si(1 1 0)-16 × 2 surfaces are presented to identify the driving force for the self-organization of a perfectly ordered silicide nanomesh on Si(1 1 0). STM results clearly show that the anisotropic electromigration effect is crucial for the control of the spatial uniformity of a self-ordered silicide nanomesh on Si(1 1 0). This two-dimensional self-ordering driven by the anisotropic-electromigration-induced growth allows the sizes and positions of crossed nanowires to be precisely controlled within a variation of ±0.2 nm over a mesoscopic area, and it can be straightforwardly applied to other metals (e.g., Au and Ce) to grow a variety of highly regular silicide nanomeshes for the applications as nanoscale interconnects. Moreover, the STS results show that the anisotropic electromigration-induced growth causes the metallic horizontal nanowires to cross over the semiconducting oblique nanowires, which opens the possibility for the atomically precise bottom-up fabrication of well-defined crossbar nanoarchitectures.

  2. Nano-cerium vanadate: A novel inorganic ion exchanger for removal of americium and uranium from simulated aqueous nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Chayan; Dudwadkar, Nilesh [Fuel Reprocessing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tripathi, Subhash Chandra, E-mail: sctri001@gmail.com [Fuel Reprocessing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gandhi, Pritam Maniklal [Fuel Reprocessing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Grover, Vinita [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kaushik, Chetan Prakash [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tyagi, Avesh Kumar, E-mail: aktyagi@barc.gov.in [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Template free, low temperature synthesis of CeVO{sub 4} nanopowders. • Thermodynamically and kinetically favourable uptake of Am(III) and U(VI) exhibited. • K{sub d} and ΔG° values for Am(III) and U(VI) uptake in pH 1–6 are reported. • Interdiffusion coefficients and zeta potential values in pH 1–6 are reported. • Possible application in low level aqueous nuclear waste remediation. - Abstract: Cerium vanadate nanopowders were synthesized by a facile low temperature co-precipitation method. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and found to consist of ∼25 nm spherical nanoparticles. The efficiency of these nanopowders for uptake of alpha-emitting radionuclides {sup 233}U (4.82 MeV α) and {sup 241}Am (5.49 MeV α, 60 keV γ) has been investigated. Thermodynamically and kinetically favorable uptake of these radionuclides resulted in their complete removal within 3 h from aqueous acidic feed solutions. The uptake capacity was observed to increase with increase in pH as the zeta potential value decreased with the increase in pH but effect of ionic strength was insignificant. Little influence of the ions like Sr{sup 2+}, Ru{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, etc., in the uptake process indicated CeVO{sub 4} nanopowders to be amenable for practical applications. The isotherms indicated predominant uptake of the radioactive metal ions in the solid phase of the exchanger at lower feed concentrations and linear Kielland plots with positive slopes indicated favorable exchange of the metal ions with the nanopowder. Performance comparison with the other sorbents reported indicated excellent potential of nano-cerium vanadate for removing americium and uranium from large volumes of aqueous acidic solutions.

  3. Plutonium, americium and radiocaesium in the marine environment close to the Vandellos I nuclear power plant before decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A. E-mail: joanalbert.sanchez@uab.es; Molero, J

    2000-11-01

    The Vandellos nuclear power plant (NPP), releasing low-level radioactive liquid waste to the Mediterranean Sea, is the first to be decommissioned in Spain, after an incident which occurred in 1989. The presence, distribution and uptake of various artificial radionuclides (radiocaesium, plutonium and americium) in the environment close to the plant were studied in seawater, bottom sediments and biota, including Posidonia oceanica, fish, crustaceans and molluscs. Seawater, sediments and Posidonia oceanica showed enhanced levels in the close vicinity of the NPP, although the effect was restricted to its near environment. Maximum concentrations in seawater were 11.6{+-}0.5 Bq m{sup -3} and 16.9{+-}1.2 mBq m{sup -3} for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 239,240}Pu, respectively. When sediment concentrations were normalized to excess {sup 210}Pb, they showed both the short-distance transport of artificial radionuclides from the Vandellos plant and the long-distance transport of {sup 137}Cs from the Asco NPP. Posidonia oceanica showed the presence of various gamma-emitters attributed to the impact of the Chernobyl accident, on which the effect of the NPP was superimposed. Seawater, sediment and Posidonia oceanica collected near the plant also showed an enhancement of the plutonium isotopic ratio above the fallout value. The uptake of these radionuclides by marine organisms was detectable but limited. Pelagic fish showed relatively higher {sup 137}Cs concentrations and only in the case of demersal fish was the plutonium isotopic ratio increased. The reported levels constitute a set of baseline values against which the impact of the decommissioning operations of the Vandellos I NPP can be studied.

  4. Production Cycle for Large Scale Fission Mo-99 Separation by the Processing of Irradiated LEU Uranium Silicide Fuel Element Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Hadi Ali Sameh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uranium silicide fuels proved over decades their exceptional qualification for the operation of higher flux material testing reactors with LEU elements. The application of such fuels as target materials, particularly for the large scale fission Mo-99 producers, offers an efficient and economical solution for the related facilities. The realization of such aim demands the introduction of a suitable dissolution process for the applied U3Si2 compound. Excellent results are achieved by the oxidizing dissolution of the fuel meat in hydrofluoric acid at room temperature. The resulting solution is directly behind added to an over stoichiometric amount of potassium hydroxide solution. Uranium and the bulk of fission products are precipitated together with the transuranium compounds. The filtrate contains the molybdenum and the soluble fission product species. It is further treated similar to the in-full scale proven process. The generated off gas stream is handled also as experienced before after passing through KOH washing solution. The generated alkaline fluoride containing waste solution is noncorrosive. Nevertheless fluoride can be selectively bonded as in soluble CaF2 by addition of a mixture of solid calcium hydroxide calcium carbonate to the sand cement mixture used for waste solidification. The generated elevated amounts of LEU remnants can be recycled and retargeted. The related technology permits the minimization of the generated fuel waste, saving environment, and improving processing economy.

  5. Crystal Structure and Thermoelectric Properties of Lightly Vanadium-Substituted Higher Manganese Silicides (Mn1-x V x )Si γ )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yuzuru; Hamada, Haruki; Hayashi, Kei; Yubuta, Kunio

    2016-09-01

    To further enhance the thermoelectric (TE) properties of higher manganese silicides (HMSs), dissipation of layered precipitates of MnSi phase as well as optimization of hole carrier concentration are critical. We have prepared a lightly vanadium-substituted solid solution of HMS, (Mn1-x V x )Si γ , by a melt growth method. A 2% substitution of manganese with vanadium is found to dissipate MnSi precipitates effectively, resulting in a substantial increase in the electrical conductivity from 280 S/cm to 706 S/cm at 800 K. The resulting TE power factor reaches 2.4 mW/K2-m at 800 K, more than twice that of the V-free sample. The total thermal conductivity did not change significantly with increasing x owing to a reduction of the lattice contribution. As a consequence, the dimensionless figure of merit zT of the melt-grown samples increased from 0.26 ± 0.01 for x = 0 to 0.59 ± 0.01 for x = 0.02 at around 800 K.

  6. Structural, elastic, electronic properties and stability trends of 1111-like silicide arsenides and germanide arsenides MCuXAs (M = Ti, Zr, Hf; X = Si, Ge) from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannikov, V.V.; Shein, I.R. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Ivanovskii, A.L., E-mail: ivanovskii@ihim.uran.ru [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-08-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silicide arsenides and germanide arsenides of Ti, Zr, Hf are probed from first principles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural, elastic, electronic properties and stability trends are evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bulk moduli of HfCuSiAs and HfCuGeAs are the largest among all 1111-like phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical bonding is analyzed. - Abstract: The tetragonal (s.g. I4/nmm; no. 129) silicide arsenide ZrCuSiAs is well known as a structural type of the broad family of so-called 1111-like quaternary phases which includes now more than 150 representatives. These materials demonstrate a rich variety of outstanding physical properties (from p-type transparent semiconductors to high-temperature Fe-based superconductors) and attracted a great interest as promising candidates for a broad range of applications. At the same time, the data about the electronic and elastic properties of the ZrCuSiAs phase itself, as well as of related silicide arsenides and germanide arsenides are still very limited. Here for a series of six isostructural and isoelectronic 1111-like phases which includes both synthesized (ZrCuSiAs, HfCuSiAs, ZrCuGeAs, and HfCuGeAs) and hypothetical (TiCuSiAs and TiCuGeAs) materials, systematical studies of their structural, elastic, electronic properties and stability trends are performed by means of first-principles calculations.

  7. Effect of Chemistry and Particle Size on the Performance of Calcium Disilicide Primers. Part 1 - Synthesis of Calcium Silicide (CaSi2) by Rotary Atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    refs. 8 and 9); electrolysis (refs. 10 and 11); calcium hydride (CaH2) and Si (ref. 12); SiC and CaO (ref. 13); and combustion synthesis (ref. 14...obtained using a goiniometer (Phillips Model PW 3040, Phillips, Eindhoven, the Netherlands) using copper (Cu) K„ radiation (X - 1.54183 A) with a graphite...34 Electrolysis of Molten Alkali and Alkaline Earth Silicates." Bull. Soc. Chim., 6,206, 1939. 12. Louis, V. and Franck, H. H., "Silicide of Calcium," Z. Anorq

  8. The structures of CyMe4-BTBP complexes of americium(iii) and europium(iii) in solvents used in solvent extraction, explaining their separation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Christian; Löfström-Engdahl, Elin; Aneheim, Emma; Foreman, Mark R StJ; Geist, Andreas; Lundberg, Daniel; Denecke, Melissa; Persson, Ingmar

    2015-11-14

    Separation of trivalent actinoid (An(iii)) and lanthanoid (Ln(iii)) ions is extremely challenging due to their similar ionic radii and chemical properties. Poly-aromatic nitrogen compounds acting as tetradentate chelating ligands to the metal ions in the extraction, have the ability to sufficiently separate An(iii) from Ln(iii). One of these compounds, 6,6'-bis(5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-benzol[1,2,4]triazin-3-yl)[2,2]bipyridine, CyMe4-BTBP, has proven to be resistant towards acidic environments and strong radiation from radioactive decomposition. EXAFS studies of the dicomplexes of CyMe4-BTBP with americium(iii) and europium(iii) in nitrobenzene, cyclohexanone, 1-hexanol, 1-octanol and malonamide (DMDOHEMA) in 1-octanol have been carried out to get a deeper understanding of the parameters responsible for the separation. The predominating complexes independent of solvent used are [Am(CyMe4-BTBP)2(NO3)](2+) and [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+), respectively, which are present as outer-sphere ion-pairs with nitrate ions in the studied solvents with low relative permittivity. The presence of a nitrate ion in the first coordination sphere of the americium(iii) complex compensates the charge density of the complex considerably in comparison when only outer-sphere ion-pairs are formed as for the [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+) complex. The stability and solubility of a complex in a solvent with low relative permittivity increase with decreasing charge density. The [Am(CyMe4-BTBP)2(NO3)](2+) complex will therefore be increasingly soluble and stabilized over the [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+) complex in solvents with decreasing relative permittivity of the solvent. The separation of americium(iii) from europium(iii) with CyMe4-BTBP as extraction agent will increase with decreasing relative permittivity of the solvent, and thereby also with decreasing solubility of CyMe4-BTBP. The choice of solvent is therefore a balance of a high separation factor and sufficient solubility of the CyMe4-BTBP

  9. Determination of Atto- to Femtogram Levels of Americium and Curium Isotopes in Large-Volume Urine Samples by Compact Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiongxin; Christl, Marcus; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2016-03-01

    Ultralow level analysis of actinides in urine samples may be required for dose assessment in the event of internal exposures to these radionuclides at nuclear facilities and nuclear power plants. A new bioassay method for analysis of sub-femtogram levels of Am and Cm in large-volume urine samples was developed. Americium and curium were co-precipitated with hydrous titanium oxide from the urine matrix and purified by column chromatography separation. After target preparation using mixed titanium/iron oxides, the final sample was measured by compact accelerator mass spectrometry. Urine samples spiked with known quantities of Am and Cm isotopes in the range of attogram to femtogram levels were measured for method evaluation. The results are in good agreement with the expected values, demonstrating the feasibility of compact accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for the determination of minor actinides at the levels of attogram/liter in urine samples to meet stringent sensitivity requirements for internal dosimetry assessment.

  10. Artificial radionuclides in the Northern European Marine Environment. Distribution of radiocaesium, plutonium and americium in sea water and sediments in 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groettheim, Siri

    2000-07-01

    This study considers the distribution of radiocaesium, plutonium and americium in the northern marine environment. The highest radiocaesium activity in sea water was observed in Skagerrak, 26 Bq/m{sub 3}, and in surface sediments in the Norwegian Sea, 60 Bq/kg. These enhanced levels were related to Chernobyl. The highest 239,240Pu activity in surface water was measured in the western North Sea, 66 mBq/m{sub 3}. In sea water, sub-surface maxima were observed at several locations with an 239,240Pu activity up to 160 mBq/m{sub 3}, and were related to Sellafield. With the exception to the North Sea, surface sediments reflected Pu from global fallout from weapons tests only. (author)

  11. Development of an automatic method for americium and plutonium separation and preconcentration using an multisyringe flow injection analysis-multipumping flow system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Yamila; Ferrer, Laura; Gómez, Enrique; Garcias, Francesca; Casas, Monserrat; Cerdà, Víctor

    2008-01-01

    A new procedure for automatic separation and preconcentration of 241Am and 239+240Pu from interfering matrixes using transuranide (TRU)-resin is proposed. Combination of the multisyringe flow injection analysis and multipumping flow system techniques with the TRU-resin allows carrying out the sampling treatment and separation in a short time using large sample volumes. Americium is eluted from the column with 4 mol L(-1) hydrochloric acid, and then plutonium is separated via on-column Pu(IV) reduction to Pu(III) with titanium(III) chloride. The corresponding alpha activities are measured off-line, with a relative standard deviation of 3% and a lower limit of detection of 0.004 Bq mL(-1), by using a multiplanchet low-background proportional counter.

  12. Recovery of Americium-241 from lightning rod by the method of chemical treatment; Recuperacion del Americio-241 provenientes de los pararrayos por el metodo de tratamiento quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, W.H., E-mail: wcruz@ipen.gob.pe [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (GRRA/IPEN), Lima (Peru). Division de Gestion de Residuos Radiactivos

    2013-07-01

    About 95% of the lightning rods installed in the Peruvian territory have set in their structures, pose small amounts of radioactive sources such as Americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), fewer and Radium 226 ({sup 226}Ra) these are alpha emitters and have a half life of 432 years and 1600 years respectively. In this paper describes the recovery of radioactive sources of {sup 241}Am radioactive lightning rods using the conventional chemical treatment method using agents and acids to break down the slides. The {sup 241}Am recovered was as excitation source and alpha particle generator for analysing samples by X Ray Fluorescence, for fixing the stainless steel {sup 241}Am technique was used electrodeposition. (author)

  13. Americium-241 Decorporation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    sources when combined with beryllium. Radioactive sources are used for a number of industrial applications that range from oil well logging devices...is any exposure resulting in a 50-year whole-body committed effective dose greater than 200 mSv (Rojas- Palma 2009). Therefore, the model can also...Tracheobronchial geometry: Human, dog, rat, hamster (Report LF-53). Lovelace Foundation, Albuquerque, NM Rojas- Palma C, et al. 2009. TMT Handbook

  14. Self-organised silicide nanodot patterning by medium-energy ion beam sputtering of Si(100): local correlation between the morphology and metal content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Cubero, A; Galiana, B; Lorenz, K; Palomares, F J; Bahena, D; Ballesteros, C; Hernandez-Calderón, I; Vázquez, L

    2016-11-01

    We have produced self-organised silicide nanodot patterns by medium-energy ion beam sputtering (IBS) of silicon targets with a simultaneous and isotropic molybdenum supply. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies show that these patterns are qualitatively similar to those produced thus far at low ion energies. We have determined the relevance of the ion species on the pattern ordering and properties. For the higher ordered patterns produced by Xe(+) ions, the pattern wavelength depends linearly on the ion energy. The dot nanostructures are silicide-rich as assessed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and emerge in height due to their lower sputtering yield, as observed by electron microscopy. Remarkably, a long wavelength corrugation is observed on the surface which is correlated with both the Mo content and the dot pattern properties. Thus, as assessed by electron microscopy, the protrusions are Mo-rich with higher and more spaced dots on their surface whereas the valleys are Mo-poor with smaller dots that are closer to each other. These findings indicate that there is a correlation between the local metal content of the surface and the nanodot pattern properties both at the nanodot and the large corrugation scales. These results contribute to advancing the understanding of this interesting nanofabrication method and aid in developing a comprehensive theory of nanodot pattern formation and evolution.

  15. Self-organised silicide nanodot patterning by medium-energy ion beam sputtering of Si(100): local correlation between the morphology and metal content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Cubero, A.; Galiana, B.; Lorenz, K.; Palomares, FJ; Bahena, D.; Ballesteros, C.; Hernandez-Calderón, I.; Vázquez, L.

    2016-11-01

    We have produced self-organised silicide nanodot patterns by medium-energy ion beam sputtering (IBS) of silicon targets with a simultaneous and isotropic molybdenum supply. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies show that these patterns are qualitatively similar to those produced thus far at low ion energies. We have determined the relevance of the ion species on the pattern ordering and properties. For the higher ordered patterns produced by Xe+ ions, the pattern wavelength depends linearly on the ion energy. The dot nanostructures are silicide-rich as assessed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and emerge in height due to their lower sputtering yield, as observed by electron microscopy. Remarkably, a long wavelength corrugation is observed on the surface which is correlated with both the Mo content and the dot pattern properties. Thus, as assessed by electron microscopy, the protrusions are Mo-rich with higher and more spaced dots on their surface whereas the valleys are Mo-poor with smaller dots that are closer to each other. These findings indicate that there is a correlation between the local metal content of the surface and the nanodot pattern properties both at the nanodot and the large corrugation scales. These results contribute to advancing the understanding of this interesting nanofabrication method and aid in developing a comprehensive theory of nanodot pattern formation and evolution.

  16. Carrier-transport mechanism of Er-silicide Schottky contacts to strained-silicon-on-insulator and silicon-on-insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothi, I; Janardhanam, V; Kang, Min-Sung; Yun, Hyung-Joong; Lee, Jouhahn; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2014-11-01

    The current-voltage characteristics and the carrier-transport mechanism of the Er-silicide (ErSi1.7) Schottky contacts to strained-silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) were investigated. Barrier heights of 0.74 eV and 0.82 eV were obtained for the sSOI and SOI structures, respectively. The barrier height of the sSOI structure was observed to be lower than that of the SoI structure despite the formation of a Schottky contact using the same metal silicide. The sSOI structure exhibited better rectification and higher current level than the SOI structure, which could be associated with a reduction in the band gap of Si caused by strain. The generation-recombination mechanism was found to be dominant in the forward bias for both structures. Carrier generation along with the Poole-Frenkel mechanism dominated the reverse-biased current in the SOI structure. The saturation tendency of the reverse leakage current in the sSOI structure could be attributed to strain-induced defects at the interface in non-lattice-matched structures.

  17. Characterization of complex carbide–silicide precipitates in a Ni–Cr–Mo–Fe–Si alloy modified by welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, D., E-mail: dhb@ansto.gov.au; Davis, J.; Drew, M.; Harrison, R.P.; Edwards, L.

    2015-07-15

    Nickel based alloys of the type Hastelloy-N™ are ideal candidate materials for molten salt reactors, as well as for applications such as pressure vessels, due to their excellent resistance to creep, oxidation and corrosion. In this work, the authors have attempted to understand the effects of welding on the morphology, chemistry and crystal structure of the precipitates in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the weld zone of a Ni–Cr–Mo–Fe–Si alloy similar to Hastelloy-N™ in composition, by using characterization techniques such as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Two plates of a Ni–Cr–Mo–Fe–Si alloy GH-3535 were welded together using a TiG welding process without filler material to achieve a joint with a curved molten zone with dendritic structure. It is evident that the primary precipitates have melted in the HAZ and re-solidified in a eutectic-like morphology, with a chemistry and crystal structure only slightly different from the pre-existing precipitates, while the surrounding matrix grains remained unmelted, except for the zones immediately adjacent to the precipitates. In the molten zone, the primary precipitates were fully melted and dissolved in the matrix, and there was enrichment of Mo and Si in the dendrite boundaries after solidification, and re-precipitation of the complex carbides/silicides at some grain boundaries and triple points. The nature of the precipitates in the molten zone varied according to the local chemical composition. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Ni-based alloy with Cr, Mo, Si, Fe and C was welded, examined with SEM, EBSD, and TEM. • Original Ni{sub 2}(Mo,Cr){sub 4}(Si,C) carbides changed from equiaxed to lamellar shape in HAZ. • Composition and crystal structure remained almost unchanged in HAZ. • Original carbides changed to lamellar Ni{sub 3}(Mo,Cr){sub 3}(Si,C) in some cases in weld metal. • Precipitates were mostly incoherent, but semi-coherent in some cases in weld

  18. Actinide Oxidation State and O/M Ratio in Hypostoichiometric Uranium-Plutonium-Americium U0.750Pu0.246Am0.004O2-x Mixed Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauchy, Romain; Belin, Renaud C; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Lebreton, Florent; Aufore, Laurence; Scheinost, Andreas C; Martin, Philippe M

    2016-03-07

    Innovative americium-bearing uranium-plutonium mixed oxides U1-yPuyO2-x are envisioned as nuclear fuel for sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors (SFRs). The oxygen-to-metal (O/M) ratio, directly related to the oxidation state of cations, affects many of the fuel properties. Thus, a thorough knowledge of its variation with the sintering conditions is essential. The aim of this work is to follow the oxidation state of uranium, plutonium, and americium, and so the O/M ratio, in U0.750Pu0.246Am0.004O2-x samples sintered for 4 h at 2023 K in various Ar + 5% H2 + z vpm H2O (z = ∼ 15, ∼ 90, and ∼ 200) gas mixtures. The O/M ratios were determined by gravimetry, XAS, and XRD and evidenced a partial oxidation of the samples at room temperature. Finally, by comparing XANES and EXAFS results to that of a previous study, we demonstrate that the presence of uranium does not influence the interactions between americium and plutonium and that the differences in the O/M ratio between the investigated conditions is controlled by the reduction of plutonium. We also discuss the role of the homogeneity of cation distribution, as determined by EPMA, on the mechanisms involved in the reduction process.

  19. Study of the phase composition of silicide coatings, based on layered Nb-Mo structures, obtained by vacuum-arc deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovan, A. A.; Betsofen, S. Ya; Lenkovets, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    A multilayer composite ∼1000 μm in thickness, formed by niobium and molybdenum layers (number of layers n = 230), is obtained by vacuum-arc deposition with subsequent siliconization of the surface layers at a temperature of 1200 °C. Layer-by-layer phase analysis is performed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that in the surface layers ∼130 μm in thickness, single-phase silicides (Nb x Mo1- x )Si2 are formed with the hexagonal C40 structure (Strukturbericht designations). Alternating layers of solid solutions based on niobium and molybdenum with a body-centered cubic (BCC) lattice are observed within the composite. The formation of solid solutions caused by heating of the coating leads to convergence of the values of the linear thermal expansion coefficient and Young's modulus at the interface between the layers.

  20. Si-rich W silicide films composed of W-atom-encapsulated Si clusters deposited using gas-phase reactions of WF6 with SiH4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Naoya; Uchida, Noriyuki; Kanayama, Toshihiko

    2016-02-28

    We formed Si-rich W silicide films composed of Sin clusters, each of which encapsulates a W atom (WSi(n) clusters with 8 composed of WSi(n) clusters with a uniform n, which was determined by the gas temperature. The formed films were amorphous semiconductors with an optical gap of ∼0.8-1.5 eV and an electrical mobility gap of ∼0.05-0.12 eV, both of which increased as n increased from 8 to 12. We attribute this dependence to the reduction of randomness in the Si network as n increased, which decreased the densities of band tail states and localized states.

  1. Structural, elastic, and electronic properties of recently discovered ternary silicide superconductor Li2IrSi3:An ab-initio study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. A. Hadi; M. A. Alam; M. Roknuzzaman; M. T. Nasir; A. K. M. A. Islam; S. H. Naqib

    2015-01-01

    The structural, elastic, and electronic properties of the very recently discovered ternary silicide superconductor, Li2IrSi3, are calculated using an ab-initio technique. We adopt the plane-wave pseudopotential approach within the frame-work of the first-principles density functional theory (DFT) implemented by the CASTEP code. The calculated structural parameters show reasonable agreement with the experimental results. The elastic moduli of this interesting material are calculated for the first time. The electronic band structure and electronic energy density of states indicate the strong cova-lent Ir–Si and Si–Si bonding, which leads to the formation of the rigid structure of Li2IrSi3. Strong covalency gives rise to a high Debye temperature in this system. We discuss the theoretical results in detail in this paper.

  2. Silicides for VLSI applications

    CERN Document Server

    Murarka, Shyam P

    1983-01-01

    Most of the subject matter of this book has previously been available only in the form of research papers and review articles. I have not attempted to refer to all the published papers. The reader may find it advantageous to refer to the references listed.

  3. Study of biosorbents application on the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes with americium-241; Estudo da aplicacao de biossorventes no tratamento de rejeitos radioativos liquidos contendo americio-241

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borba, Tania Regina de

    2010-07-01

    The use of nuclear energy for many different purposes has been intensified and highlighted by the benefits that it provides. Medical diagnosis and therapy, agriculture, industry and electricity generation are examples of its application. However, nuclear energy generates radioactive wastes that require suitable treatment ensuring life and environmental safety. Biosorption and bioaccumulation represent an emergent alternative for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes, providing volume reduction and physical state change. This work aimed to study biosorbents for the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes contaminated with americium-241 in order to reduce the volume and change the physical state from liquid to solid. The biosorbents evaluated were Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilized in calcium alginate beads, inactivated and free cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, calcium alginate beads, Bacillus subtilis, Cupriavidus metallidurans and Ochrobactrum anthropi. The results were quite satisfactory, achieving 100% in some cases. The technique presented in this work may be useful and viable for implementing at the Waste Management Laboratory of IPEN - CNEN/SP in short term, since it is an easy and low cost method. (author)

  4. Human bones obtained from routine joint replacement surgery as a tool for studies of plutonium, americium and {sup 90}Sr body-burden in general public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mietelski, Jerzy W., E-mail: jerzy.mietelski@ifj.edu.pl [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Golec, Edward B. [Traumatology and Orthopaedic Clinic, 5th Military Clinical Hospital and Polyclinic, Independent Public Healthcare Facility, Wroclawska 1-3, 30-901 Cracow (Poland); Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Department, Chair of Clinical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Motor of the Bronislaw Czech' s Academy of Physical Education, Cracow (Poland); Department of Physical Therapy Basics, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Administration College, Bielsko-Biala (Poland); Tomankiewicz, Ewa [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Golec, Joanna [Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Department, Chair of Clinical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Motor of the Bronislaw Czech' s Academy of Physical Education, Cracow (Poland); Physical Therapy Department, Institute of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Heath Science, Jagiellonian University, Medical College, Cracow (Poland); Nowak, Sebastian [Traumatology and Orthopaedic Clinic, 5th Military Clinical Hospital and Polyclinic, Independent Public Healthcare Facility, Wroclawska 1-3, 30-901 Cracow (Poland); Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Department, Chair of Clinical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Motor of the Bronislaw Czech' s Academy of Physical Education, Cracow (Poland); Szczygiel, Elzbieta [Physical Therapy Department, Institute of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Heath Science, Jagiellonian University, Medical College, Cracow (Poland); Brudecki, Kamil [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland)

    2011-06-15

    The paper presents a new sampling method for studying in-body radioactive contamination by bone-seeking radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 241}Am and selected gamma-emitters, in human bones. The presented results were obtained for samples retrieved from routine surgeries, namely knee or hip joints replacements with implants, performed on individuals from Southern Poland. This allowed to collect representative sets of general public samples. The applied analytical radiochemical procedure for bone matrix is described in details. Due to low concentrations of {sup 238}Pu the ratio of Pu isotopes which might be used for Pu source identification is obtained only as upper limits other then global fallout (for example Chernobyl) origin of Pu. Calculated concentrations of radioisotopes are comparable to the existing data from post-mortem studies on human bones retrieved from autopsy or exhumations. Human bones removed during knee or hip joint surgery provide a simple and ethical way for obtaining samples for plutonium, americium and {sup 90}Sr in-body contamination studies in general public. - Highlights: > Surgery for joint replacement as novel sampling method for studying in-body radioactive contamination. > Proposed way of sampling is not causing ethic doubts. > It is a convenient way of collecting human bone samples from global population. > The applied analytical radiochemical procedure for bone matrix is described in details. > The opposite patient age correlations trends were found for 90Sr (negative) and Pu, Am (positive).

  5. The construction of TRIGA-TRAP and direct high-precision Penning trap mass measurements on rare-earth elements and americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelaer, Jens

    2010-06-14

    The construction of TRIGA-TRAP and direct high-precision Penning trap mass measurements on rare-earth elements and americium: Nuclear masses are an important quantity to study nuclear structure since they reflect the sum of all nucleonic interactions. Many experimental possibilities exist to precisely measure masses, out of which the Penning trap is the tool to reach the highest precision. Moreover, absolute mass measurements can be performed using carbon, the atomic-mass standard, as a reference. The new double-Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP has been installed and commissioned within this thesis work, which is the very first experimental setup of this kind located at a nuclear reactor. New technical developments have been carried out such as a reliable non-resonant laser ablation ion source for the production of carbon cluster ions and are still continued, like a non-destructive ion detection technique for single-ion measurements. Neutron-rich fission products will be available by the reactor that are important for nuclear astrophysics, especially the r-process. Prior to the on-line coupling to the reactor, TRIGA-TRAP already performed off-line mass measurements on stable and long-lived isotopes and will continue this program. The main focus within this thesis was on certain rare-earth nuclides in the well-established region of deformation around N {proportional_to} 90. Another field of interest are mass measurements on actinoids to test mass models and to provide direct links to the mass standard. Within this thesis, the mass of {sup 241}Am could be measured directly for the first time. (orig.)

  6. Progress of p-channel bottom-gate poly-Si thin-film transistor by nickel silicide seed-induced lateral crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sol Kyu; Seok, Ki Hwan; Park, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hyung Yoon; Chae, Hee Jae; Jang, Gil Su; Lee, Yong Hee; Han, Ji Su; Joo, Seung Ki

    2016-06-01

    Excimer laser annealing (ELA) is known to be the most common crystallization technology for the fabrication of low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistors (TFTs) in the mass production industry. This technology, however, cannot be applied to bottom-gate (BG) TFTs, which are well developed for the liquid-crystal display (LCD) back-planes, because strong laser energy of ELA can seriously damage the other layers. Here, we propose a novel high-performance BG poly-Si TFT using Ni silicide seed-induced lateral crystallization (SILC). The SILC technology renders it possible to ensure low damage in the layers, smooth surface, and longitudinal large grains in the channel. It was observed that the electrical properties exhibited a steep subthreshold slope of 110 mV/dec, high field-effect mobility of 304 cm2/Vsec, high I on/ I off ratio of 5.9 × 107, and a low threshold voltage of -3.9 V.

  7. Development of new ORIGEN2 data library sets for research reactors with light water cooled oxide and silicide LEU (20 w/o) fuels based on JENDL-3.3 nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liem, Peng Hong, E-mail: liemph@nais.ne.jp [Nippon Advanced Information Service (NAIS Co., Inc.), 416 Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1112 (Japan); Sembiring, Tagor Malem [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety Indonesian National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Puspiptek Complex, Building No. 80, Serpong, Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We developed new ORIGEN2 data library sets for research reactors based on JENDL-3.3. • The sets cover oxide and silicide LEU fuels with meat density up to 4.74 g U/cm{sup 3}. • Two kinds of data library sets are available: fuel region and non-fuel regions. • We verified the new data library sets with other codes. • We validated the new data library against a non-destructive test. -- Abstract: New sets of ORIGEN2 data library dedicated to research/testing reactors with light water cooled oxide and silicide LEU fuel plates based on JENDL-3.3 nuclear data were developed, verified and validated. The new sets are considered to be an extension of the most recent release of ORIGEN2.2UPJ code, i.e. the ORLIBJ33 library sets. The newly generated ORIGEN2 data library sets cover both oxide and silicide LEU fuels with fuel meat density range from 2.96 to 4.74 g U/cm{sup 3} used in the present and future operation of the Indonesian 30 MWth RSG GAS research reactor. The new sets are expected applicable also for other research/testing reactors which utilize similar fuels or have similar neutron spectral indices. In addition to the traditional ORIGEN2 library sets for fuel depletion analyses in fuel regions, in the new data library sets, new ORIGEN2 library sets for irradiation/activation analyses were also prepared which cover all representative non-fuel regions of RSG GAS such as reflector elements, irradiation facilities, etc. whose neutron spectra are significantly softer than fuel regions. Verification with other codes as well as validation with a non-destructive test result showed promising results where a good agreement was confirmed.

  8. M5Si3(M=Ti, Nb, Mo) Based Transition-Metal Silicides for High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhihong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Transition metal silicides are being considered for future engine turbine components at temperatures up to 1600 C. Although significant improvement in high temperature strength, room temperature fracture toughness has been realized in the past decade, further improvement in oxidation resistance is needed. Oxidation mechanism of Ti5Si3-based alloys was investigated. Oxidation behavior of Ti5Si3-based alloy strongly depends on the atmosphere. Presence of Nitrogen alters the oxidation behavior of Ti5Si3 by nucleation and growth of nitride subscale. Ti5Si3.2and Ti5Si3C0.5 alloys exhibited an excellent oxidation resistance in nitrogen bearing atmosphere due to limited dissolution of nitrogen and increased Si/Ti activity ratio. MoSi2 coating developed by pack cementation to protect Mo-based Mo-Si-B composites was found to be effective up to 1500 C. Shifting coating composition to T1+T2+Mo3Si region showed the possibility to extend the coating lifetime above 1500 C by more than ten times via formation of slow growing Mo3Si or T2 interlayer without sacrificing the oxidation resistance of the coating. The phase equilibria in the Nb-rich portion of Nb-B system has been evaluated experimentally using metallographic analysis and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). It was shown that Nbss (solid solution) and NbB are the only two primary phases in the 0-40 at.% B composition range, and the eutectic reaction L {leftrightarrow} NbSS + NbB was determined to occur at 2104 ± 5 C by DTA.

  9. EURADOS action for determination of americium in skull measures in vivo and Monte Carlo simulation; Accion EURADOS para la determinacion de americio en craneo mediante medidas in-vivo y simulacion Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Ponte, M. A.; Navarro Amaro, J. F.; Perez Lopez, B.; Navarro Bravo, T.; Nogueira, P.; Vrba, T.

    2013-07-01

    From the Group of WG7 internal dosimetry of the EURADOS Organization (European Radiation Dosimetry group, e.V.) which It coordinates CIEMAT, international action for the vivo measurement of americium has been conducted in three mannequins type skull with detectors of Germanium by gamma spectrometry and simulation by Monte Carlo methods. Such action has been raised as two separate exercises, with the participation of institutions in Europe, America and Asia. Other actions similar precede this vivo intercomparison of measurement and modeling Monte Carlo1. The preliminary results and associated findings are presented in this work. The laboratory of the body radioactivity (CRC) of service counter of dosimetry staff internal (DPI) of the CIEMAT, it has been one of the participants in vivo measures exercise. On the other hand part, the Group of numerical dosimetry of CIEMAT is participant of the Monte Carlo2 simulation exercise. (Author)

  10. Accelerations of {epsilon}+{alpha}{yields}{beta} transformation and sintering of iron silicide by addition of Pd; Pd tenka ni yoru keikatetsu no {epsilon}+{alpha}{yields}{beta} hentai to shoketsu no sokushin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, M.; Yamamoto, N.; Takeda, T. [Isuzu Advanced Engineering Center Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan); Hayashi, K. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science

    1996-12-15

    FeSi2 ({beta} phase) semiconducting iron silicide, which is expected to be widely used as a thermoelectric material in high temperature environment, is formed below 1259K by the peritectoid reaction of FeSi ({epsilon}) and Fe2Si5 ({alpha}) two metallic phases. Because the transformation of {epsilon} + {alpha} {yields} {beta} caused by this peritectoid reaction occurs considerably slowly, the iron silicide material which is produced by sintering of the powder at temperatures above 1259K has to be isothermally heat-treated for at least 180ks at about 1120K after the sintering so that the transformation occurs completely. We have found that the transformation was drastically accelerated by the addition of a small amount of Pd in the same way as Cu; the isothermal heat-treatment time necessary for the completion of the transformation was reduced to about 1/60. The sintering time needed for the almost full densification of the powder by pressure DCL sintering (DCL; direct current loading) was also reduced. A hypothesis for the mechanisms was proposed. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Idoeta, R., E-mail: raquel.idoeta@ehu.e [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Abelairas, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    The adsorption of {sup 241}Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of {sup 241}Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of {sup 241}Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification.

  12. Construction of a four tip scanning tunneling microscope/scanning electron microscope combination and conductivity measurements of silicide nanowires; Aufbau einer Vierspitzen-Rastertunnelmikroskop/Rasterelektronenmikroskop-Kombination und Leitfaehigkeitsmessungen an Silizid Nanodraehten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubkov, Evgeniy

    2013-09-01

    In this work the combination of a four-tip scanning tunneling microscope with a scanning electron microscope is presented. By means of this apparatus it is possible to perform the conductivity measurements on the in-situ prepared nanostructures in ultra-high vacuum. With the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), it becomes possible to position the tunneling tips of the four-tip scanning tunneling microscope (STM), so that an arrangement for a four-point probe measurement on nanostructures can be obtained. The STM head was built according to the novel coaxial Beetle concept. This concept allows on the one hand, a very compact arrangement of the components of the STM and on the other hand, the new-built STM head has a good mechanical stability, in order to achieve atomic resolution with all four STM units. The atomic resolution of the STM units was confirmed by scanning a Si(111)-7 x 7 surface. The thermal drift during the STM operation, as well as the resonant frequencies of the mechanical structure of the STM head, were determined. The scanning electron microscope allows the precise and safe navigation of the tunneling tips on the sample surface. Multi tip spectroscopy with up to four STM units can be performed synchronously. To demonstrate the capabilities of the new-built apparatus the conductivity measurements were carried out on metallic yttrium silicide nanowires. The nanowires were prepared by the in-situ deposition of yttrium on a heated Si(110) sample surface. Current-voltage curves were recorded on the nanowires and on the wetting layer in-between. The curves indicate an existence of the Schottky barrier between the yttrium silicide nanowires and the silicon bulk. By means of the two-tip measurements with a gate, the insulating property of the Schottky barrier has been confirmed. Using this Schottky barrier, it is possible to limit the current to the nanowire and to prevent it from flowing through the silicon bulk. A four-tip resistance measurement

  13. Oxidation behaviours of Nb–22Ti–15Si–2Al–2Hf–2V–(2, 14Cr alloys with Al and Y modified silicide coatings prepared by pack cementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songming Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Al and Y modified silicide coatings on the Nb–15Si–22Ti–(2,14Cr–2Al–2Hf–2V alloys (where the alloy with 2 at% Cr or 14 at% Cr is hereafter referred to as 2Cr and 14Cr alloy, respectively was prepared by pack cementation. The microstructural evolution and the oxidation behaviours of the coating 2Cr and 14Cr samples at 1250 °C were studied. The 2Cr alloy consists of Nb solid solution (NbSS and α-Nb5Si3 silicide, while the Laves C15–Cr2Nb phase arised in the 14Cr alloy. The coating structure of the coating 2Cr sample contained the outer (Nb, XSi2+(Nb, X5Si3 layer, the middle (Nb, X5Si3 layer and the inner undeveloped intermetallic (Nb,Ti3(Al,X layer; the structure of the coating 14Cr sample consisted of the outer single (Nb, XSi2 layer, the middle (Nb, X5Si3 layer, the transition (Nb,Ti (Cr,Al layer and the inner (Cr, Al2(Nb,Ti layer. The coating 14Cr sample exhibited better oxidation resistance than the coating 2Cr sample. With an outer single (Nb, XSi2 layer, a compact oxide scale consisting of SiO2 and TiO2 formed on the coating 14Cr sample, which can efficiently prevent the substrate from oxidising. For the coating 2Cr sample with an outer (Nb, XSi2+(Nb, X5Si3 layer, the oxide scale of the SiO2, TiO2, Nb2O5 and CrNbO4 mixture generated, and the scale spalled out from the surface of the sample, resulting in disastrous failure.

  14. Studies of valence of selected rare earth silicides determined using Si K and Pd/Rh L{sub 2,3} XANES and LAPW numerical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zajdel, P., E-mail: pawel.zajdel@us.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, ul. Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Kisiel, A., E-mail: andrzej.kisiel@uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Lojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Szytuła, A., E-mail: andrzej.szytula@uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Lojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Goraus, J., E-mail: jerzy.goraus@us.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, ul. Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Balerna, A., E-mail: antonella.balerna@lnf.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Lab DAPHINE-Light, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Banaś, A., E-mail: slsba@nus.edu.sg [Singapore Synchrotron Light Source, National University of Singapore, 5 Research Link, Singapore 117603 (Singapore); Starowicz, P., E-mail: pawel.starowicz@uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Lojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Konior, J., E-mail: jerzy.konior@uj.edu.pl [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Lojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Cinque, G., E-mail: gianfelice.cinque@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Campus, OX11 0DE Chilton-Didcot (United Kingdom); Grilli, A., E-mail: antonio.grilli@lnf.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Lab DAPHINE-Light, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The Si K and Pd L{sub 3} edges of R{sub 2}PdSi{sub 3} (R = Ce, Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) and HoRh{sub 2−x}Pd{sub x}Si{sub 2} are reported. • The R–Si bonds possess polar and 4d5s bands of Pd and Rh metallic characters. • There is no indication of Ce having a different valence than the other rare earths. • The positions and features of the calculated edges exhibit a fair agreement up to ≈10 eV. • The supercell used for Ho{sub 2}PdSi{sub 3} is good enough to reproduce the Si K edge. - Abstract: We report on the investigation of Si and Pd/Rh chemical environments using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy in two different families of rare earth silicides R{sub 2}PdSi{sub 3} (R = Ce, Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) and HoRh{sub 2−x}Pd{sub x}Si{sub 2} (x = 0, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, 1.8, 2.0). The Si K, Pd L{sub 3} and Rh L{sub 3} absorption edges were recorded in order to follow their changes upon the variation of 4f and 4d5s electron numbers. In both cases it was found that the Si K edge was shifted ≈0.5 eV toward lower energies, relative to pure silicon. In the first family, the shift decreases with increasing number of f-electrons, while the Si K edge remains constant upon rhodium–palladium substitution. In all cases the Pd L{sub 3} edge was shifted to higher energies relative to metallic Pd. No visible change in the Pd L{sub 3} position was observed either with a varying 4f electron count or upon Pd/Rh substitution. Also, the Rh L{sub 3} edge did not change. For two selected members, Ho{sub 2}PdSi{sub 3} and HoPd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, the Wien2K’09 (LDA + U) package was used to calculate the electronic structure and the absorption edges. Si K edges were reproduced well for both compounds, while Pd L{sub 3} only exhibited a fair agreement for the second compound. This discrepancy between the Pd L{sub 3} theory and experiment for the Ho{sub 2}PdSi{sub 3} sample can be attributed to the specific ordered superstructure used in the numerical calculations

  15. Selectivity of bis-triazinyl bipyridine ligands for americium(III) in Am/Eu separation by solvent extraction. Part 1. Quantum mechanical study on the structures of BTBP complexes and on the energy of the separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narbutt, Jerzy; Oziminski, Wojciech P

    2012-12-21

    Theoretical studies were carried out on two pairs of americium and europium complexes formed by tetra-N-dentate lipophilic BTBP ligands, neutral [ML(NO(3))(3)] and cationic [ML(2)](3+) where M = Am(III) or Eu(III), and L = 6,6'-bis-(5,6-diethyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)-2,2'-bipyridine (C2-BTBP). Molecular structures of the complexes have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level and total energies of the complexes in various media were estimated using single point calculations performed at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) and MP2/6-311G(d,p) levels of theory. In the calculations americium and europium ions were treated using pseudo-relativistic Stuttgart-Dresden effective core potentials and the accompanying basis sets. Selectivity in solvent extraction separation of two metal ions is a co-operative function of contributions from all extractable metal complexes, which depend on physico-chemical properties of each individual complex and on its relative amount in the system. Semi-quantitative analysis of BTBP selectivity in the Am/Eu separation process, based on the contributions from the two pairs of Am(III) and Eu(III) complexes, has been carried out. To calculate the energy of Am/Eu separation, a model of the extraction process was used, consisting of complex formation in water and transfer of the formed complex to the organic phase. Under the assumptions discussed in the paper, this simple two-step model results in reliable values of the calculated differences in the energy changes for each pair of the Am/Eu complexes in both steps of the process. The greater thermodynamic stability (in water) of the Am-BTBP complexes, as compared with the analogous Eu species, caused by greater covalency of the Am-N than Eu-N bonds, is most likely the main reason for BTBP selectivity in the separation of the two metal ions. The other potential reason, i.e. differences in lipophilic properties of the analogous complexes of Am and Eu, is less important with regard to this selectivity.

  16. Use of radioanalytical methods for determination of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium isotopes in radioactive wastes; Utilizacao de metodos radioanaliticos para a determinacao de isotopos de uranio, plutonio, americio e curio em rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldo, Bianca

    2012-07-01

    Activated charcoal is a common type of radioactive waste that contains high concentrations of fission and activation products. The management of this waste includes its characterization aiming the determination and quantification of the specific radionuclides including those known as Difficult-to-Measure Radionuclides (RDM). The analysis of the RDM's generally involves complex radiochemical analysis for purification and separation of the radionuclides, which are expensive and time-consuming. The objective of this work was to define a methodology for sequential analysis of the isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium present in a type of radioactive waste, evaluating chemical yield, analysis of time spent, amount of secondary waste generated and cost. Three methodologies were compared and validated that employ ion exchange (TI + EC), extraction chromatography (EC) and extraction with polymers (ECP). The waste chosen was the activated charcoal from the purification system of primary circuit water cooling the reactor IEA-R1. The charcoal samples were dissolved by acid digestion followed by purification and separation of isotopes with ion exchange resins, extraction and chromatographic extraction polymers. Isotopes were analyzed on an alpha spectrometer, equipped with surface barrier detectors. The chemical yields were satisfactory for the methods TI + EC and EC. ECP method was comparable with those methods only for uranium. Statistical analysis as well the analysis of time spent, amount of secondary waste generated and cost revealed that EC method is the most effective for identifying and quantifying U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm present in charcoal. (author)

  17. Ternary silicides ScIr{sub 4}Si{sub 2} and RERh{sub 4}Si{sub 2} (RE = Sc, Y, Tb-Lu) and quaternary derivatives RERh{sub 4}Si{sub 2-x}Sn{sub x} (RE = Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Lu) - structure, chemical bonding, and solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vosswinkel, Daniel; Benndorf, Christopher; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Eckert, Hellmut [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie; Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos (Brazil). Inst. of Physics; Matar, Samir F. [Bordeaux Univ., CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, Pessac (France)

    2016-11-01

    The silicides ScIr{sub 4}Si{sub 2} and RERh{sub 4}Si{sub 2} (RE = Sc, Y, Tb-Lu) and silicide stannides RERh{sub 4}Si{sub 2-x}Sn{sub x}(RE = Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Lu) were synthesized from the elements by arc-melting and subsequent annealing. The new compounds crystallize with the orthorhombic YRh{sub 4}Ge{sub 2} type structure, space group Pnma. They were characterized by X-ray powder patterns and several structures were refined from single crystal X-ray diffractometer data. The main structural motifs of this series of silicides are tricapped trigonal prisms formed by the transition metal and rare earth atoms. One of the two crystallographically independent silicon sites allows for formation of solid solutions with tin, exemplarily studied for ErRh{sub 4}Si{sub 2-x}Sn{sub x}. Electronic structure calculations reveal strong covalent Rh-Si bonding as the main stability factor. Multinuclear ({sup 29}Si, {sup 45}Sc, and {sup 89}Y) magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of the structure representatives with diamagnetic rare-earth elements (Sc, Y, Lu) are found to be consistent with the crystallographic data and specifically confirm the selective substitution of Sn in the Si2 sites in the quaternary compounds YRh{sub 4}SiSn and LuRh{sub 4}SiSn.

  18. CeO2对铌硅基超高温合金硅化物渗层组织及抗氧化性能的影响%Effect of CeO2 on microstructure and oxidation resistance of silicide coatings prepared on Nb­silicide­based ultrahigh temperature alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艺; 郭喜平

    2013-01-01

      采用Si­CeO2包埋共渗工艺于1150℃在铌硅基超高温合金表面制备Si­Ce共渗层,分析渗剂中CeO2粉含量对共渗层组织、相组成及高温抗氧化性能的影响。结果表明:Si­Ce 共渗层的组织、结构与单独渗硅层的相似,由(Nb, X)Si2(X表示Ti、Hf和Cr)外层、(Ti, Nb)5Si4过渡层和富Al扩散层组成。EDS分析结果表明,Ce在共渗层中的分布不均匀,而在由原基体合金中的(Nb, X)5Si3块转变而成的富Hf (Nb, X)Si2相中含量较高。渗剂中添加CeO2不仅起到了细化渗层组织的作用,而且起到了明显的催渗作用,当渗剂中CeO2粉含量为3%(质量分数)时催渗效果更显著。Si­Ce共渗层及单独渗硅层经1250℃氧化50 h后的氧化膜均主要由TiO2与SiO2组成。但Si­Ce共渗层试样的氧化膜中TiO2棒更细小,并且在SiO2基体中的分布也更均匀,因而能显著改善氧化膜的粘附性与致密性,进而提高Si­Ce共渗层的高温抗氧化性能。%Si­Ce co­deposition coatings were prepared on an Nb­silicide­based ultrahigh temperature alloy by pack cementation processes at 1 150℃for 8 h. The effects of CeO2 content in pack mixtures on the microstructure, constituent phases and high temperature oxidation resistance of the coatings were studied. The results show that all coatings prepared with different contents of CeO2 in the pack mixtures are mainly composed of a (Nb, X)Si2 (X represents Ti, Hf and Cr) outer layer, a (Ti, Nb)5Si4 transitional layer and an Al­rich diffusion zone, which are similar to that of purely siliconized coatings. EDS analysis reveals that the distribution of Ce in the co­deposition coatings is not uniform. The content of Ce in the Hf­rich (Nb, X)Si2 phase transferred from (Nb, X)5Si3 in the base alloy is higher than that in other phases. The addition of CeO2 in the pack mixtures not only refines the microstructure of the coatings, but also obviously catalyzes the coating growth

  19. The silicides YT{sub 2}Si{sub 2} (T = Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd). A systematic study by {sup 89}Y solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeting, Christoph; Rodewald, Ute C.; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Eckert, Hellmut [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie; Matar, Samir F. [CNRS Bordeaux Univ., Pessac (France). ICMCB

    2014-03-15

    The ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type silicides YT{sub 2}Si{sub 2} (T = Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd) were synthesized from the elements by arc-melting. They were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, and the structures were refined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffractometer data. The course of the lattice parameters shows a distinct anomaly for YRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} which has by far the smallest c/a ratio along with elongated Y-Si distances. Systematic {sup 89}Y solid-state NMR spectra show large Knight shifts arising from unpaired conduction electron spin density near the Fermi edge. The Knight shift decreases with increasing valence electron count (VEC), reflecting the sensitivity of this parameter to electronic properties. The particularly strong structural distortion observed in YRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} manifests itself in a sizeable magnetic shielding anisotropy. Electronic structure calculations for YRu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and YRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} reveal similar projected density of states (PDOS) shapes with an energy upshift of the Fermi level in YRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} due to the extra electron brought in by Rh. As a consequence, the PDOS at the Fermi energy is twice as large in the Ru compound as in the Rh compound. While both compounds show the major bonding interaction within the T{sub 2}Si{sub 2} layers, YRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2} exhibits significantly stronger Y-Si bonding. (orig.)

  20. Delocalization and new phase in Americium: theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soderlind, P

    1999-04-23

    Density-functional electronic structure calculations have been used to investigate the high pressure behavior of Am. At about 80 kbar (8 GPa) calculations reveal a monoclinic phase similar to the ground state structure of plutonium ({alpha}-Pu). The experimentally suggested {alpha}-U structure is found to be substantially higher in energy. The phase transition from fcc to the low symmetry structure is shown to originate from a drastic change in the nature of the electronic structure induced by the elevated pressure. A calculated volume collapse of about 25% is associated with the transition. For the low density phase, an orbital polarization correction to the local spin density (LSD) theory was applied. Gradient terms of the electron density were included in the calculation of the exchange/correlation energy and potential, according to the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The results are consistent with a Mott transition; the 5f electrons are delocalized and bonding on the high density side of the transition and chemically inert and non-bonding (localized) on the other. Theory compares rather well with recent experimental data which implies that electron correlation effects are reasonably modeled in our orbital polarization scheme.

  1. The proliferation potential of neptunium and americium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, J. S.; Shin, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Kwack, E. H.; Kim, B. K

    2000-05-01

    It is recognized that some trans-uranic elements other than plutonium, in particular Np and Am, if will be available in sufficient quantities, could be used for nuclear explosive devices. The spent fuel has been accumulating in number of nuclear power plant and operation of large scale commercial reprocessing plants. However, these materials are not covered by the definition of special fissionable material in the Agency Statute. At the time when the Statute was adopted, the availability of meaningful quantities of separated Np and Am was remote and they were not included in the definition of special fissionable material. Then, IAEA Board decided a measure for control of Np and Am on September 1999. This report contains the control method and the characteristic of Np and Am for using domestic nuclear industries, and it can be useful for understanding how to report and account of Np and Am. (author)

  2. Evaluation of neutron data for americium-241

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, V.M.; Sukhovitskij, E.Sh.; Porodzinskij, Yu.V.; Klepatskij, A.B.; Morogovskij, G.B. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk-Sosny (Belarus)

    1997-03-01

    The evaluation of neutron data for {sup 241}Am is made in the energy region from 10{sup -5} eV up to 20 MeV. The results of the evaluation are compiled in the ENDF/B-VI format. This work is performed under the Project Agreement CIS-03-95 with the International Science and Technology Center (Moscow). The Financing Party for the Project is Japan. The evaluation was requested by Y. Kikuchi (JAERI). (author). 60 refs.

  3. Dual fuel gradients in uranium silicide plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, B.W. [Babock and Wilcox, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Babcock & Wilcox has been able to achieve dual gradient plates with good repeatability in small lots of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} plates. Improvements in homogeneity and other processing parameters and techniques have allowed the development of contoured fuel within the cladding. The most difficult obstacles to overcome have been the ability to evaluate the bidirectional fuel loadings in comparison to the perfect loading model and the different methods of instilling the gradients in the early compact stage. The overriding conclusion is that to control the contour of the fuel, a known relationship between the compact, the frames and final core gradient must exist. Therefore, further development in the creation and control of dual gradients in fuel plates will involve arriving at a plausible gradient requirement and building the correct model between the compact configuration and the final contoured loading requirements.

  4. Study of the electrochemical oxidation of Am with lacunary heteropolyanions and silver nitrate; Etude de l'oxydation electrochimique de l'americium en presence d'heteropolyanions lacunaires et de nitrate d'argent en milieu aqueux acide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartier, D

    1999-07-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of Am(III) with certain lacunary heteropolyanions (LHPA {alpha}{sub 2}-P{sub 2}W{sub 17}O{sub 61}{sup 10-} or {alpha}SiW{sub 11}O{sub 39}{sup 8-}) and silver nitrate is an efficient way to prepare Am(VI). This document presents bibliographic data and an experimental study of the process. Thus, it has been established that Am(IV) is an intermediate species in the reaction and occurs in 1:1 (Amt{sup IV}LHPA) or 1:2 (Am {sup IV}(LHAP){sub 2}) complexes with the relevant LHPA. These 1:1 complexes of Am(IV) have been identified and isolated in this work whereas 1:2 complexes were known from previous studies. The reactivity of these complexes in oxidation shows that 1:1 complexes of Am(IV) are oxidised much more quickly than 1:2 complexes. Apparent stability constants of Am(III) and Am(IV) complexes with the relevant LHPA have been measured for a 1 M nitric acid medium. Thermodynamic data of the reaction are then assessed: redox potentials of Am pairs are computed for a 1 M nitric acid medium containing various amount of LHPA ligands. Those results show that the role of LHPA is to stabilize the intermediate species Am(IV) by lowering the Am(IV)/Am(III) pair potential of about 1 Volt. Nevertheless, if this stabilisation is too strong (i.e. of tungsto-silicate), the oxidation of Am(IV) requires high anodic potential (more than 2 V/ENH). Then, the faradic yield of the oxidation of americium is poor because of water oxidation. This study has also shown that the main role of silver is to catalyze the electrochemical oxidation of Am{sup IV}(LHPA){sub X} complexes. Indeed, these oxidations without silver are extremely slow. An oxygen tracer experiment has been performed during the oxidation of Am(III) in Am(VI). It has been shown that the oxygen atoms of Am(VI) (AMO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) come from water molecules of the solvent and not from the complexing oxygen atoms of the ligands. (author)

  5. Fabrication of targets for transmutation of americium : synthesis of inertial matrix by sol-gel method. Procedure study on the infiltration of a radioactive solutions; Fabricacion de blancos para la transmutacion de americio: sintesis de matrices inertes por el metodo sol-gel. Estudio del procedimiento de infiltracion de disoluciones radiactivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Carretero, A. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    made. In addition a new and unexpected phase formed by the reaction of americium with spinel during the high temperature synthesis process has been identified. This new phase could provide a unique menas to stabilise Am in one particular oxidation state. (Author)

  6. 241镅跟骨骨密度测定在骨质疏松症中的初步应用 ——与腰椎骨密度测定的对比研究%Preliminary application of 241-Americium calcaneus bone mineral density measurement in osteoporosis ——comparison with double X-ray densitometry of the lumber spine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管梁; 朱承谟; 李培勇; 王辉; 濮鸣芳; 仇季高

    2001-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) of calcaneus in 54 normals, 45 Osteoporosis, 25 suspected osteoporosis and 16 other non-osteoporosis patients, a total of 140 cases were measured by HUAKE (HK-1) 241-Americium BMD absorpmetry, among them 43 were compared with that of lumber spine (L2—L4) measured by Lunar Corporation's Expert-XL absorpmeter. BMD of normal group of calcaneus was (409.8±79.4)mg/cm2. The BMD were decreased slowly with the increased age. The BMD of osteoporosis, suspected osteoporosis and non-osteoporosis group were 230.3±62.3, 395.7±57.4 and 363.3±51.9mg/cm2 respectively. The BMD of osteoporosis group was much lower than that of normal group, and also lower than that of the other two groups, among 26 patients (57.78%) had bone fracture, all was in accordance with the clinical diagnosis of osteoporosis. The BMD of suspected ospteoporosis and non-osteoporosis had no significant difference with normal group. The coefficient variation (CV) of BMD in repeated measurement in calcaneus of 4 pariticipants was less than 1.2%. The correlative coefficient (r) between BMD of calcaneus and lumber spine (L2—L4) group was 0.6824. The correlative coefficient of normal young adult-matched percentage and T value in 2 groups were 0.6863 and 0.6755 respectively, whereas aged-matched percentage, Z value were 0.4614 and 0.5009 respectively. In conclusion 241-Americium calcaneus BMD absorpmetry has the advantage of low price, easy to operate, reliable and valuable in diagnosis osteoporosis. The correlations of calcaneus and lumber spine BMD, normal young adult-matched percentagy and T value were rather good.%为评价跟骨骨密度测定在骨质疏松症中的初步临床应用及与腰椎测定结果的相关性,用国产华科(HK-1型)241镅骨密度仪测定了140例跟骨骨密度(BMD)。其中正常人组54例,骨质疏松确诊组45例,骨质疏松可疑组25例和其他非骨质疏松组16例。其中43例与美国Luner 公司的Expert-XL图像骨密度仪腰

  7. Americium separation from nuclear fuel dissolution using higher oxidation states.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J. Mincher

    2009-09-01

    Much of the complexity in current AFCI proposals is driven by the need to separate the minor actinides from the lanthanides. Partitioning and recycling Am, but not Cm, would allow for significant simplification because Am has redox chemistry that may be exploited while Cm does not. Here, we have explored methods based on higher oxidation states of Am (AmV and AmVI) to partition Am from the lanthanides. In a separate but related approach we have also initiated an investigation of the utility of TRUEX Am extraction from thiocyanate solution. The stripping of loaded TRUEX by Am oxidation or SCN- has not yet proved successful; however, the partitioning of inextractable AmV by TRUEX shows promise.

  8. Further Studies of Plutonium and Americium at Thule, Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarkrog, Asker; Dahlgaard, Henning; Nilsson, Karen Kristina;

    1984-01-01

    further away from the impact point and at some locations the vertical distribution indicated a downward displacement of Pu in the sediment column since 1974. Seawater and seaplants showed no evidence of the presence of Pu from sources other than fallout; but Pu in benthos varied nearly proportionally......, but in benthos 241Am/239,240Pu were two times higher than in sediments. Seaplants showed the same value of Am/Pu as seawater. There was no indication of any biomagnification of Pu or Am through the marine food chains at Thule....

  9. Property Data for Simulated Americium/Curium Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, B.J.; Smith, D.E.; Peeler, D.K.; Reamer, I.A.; Vienna, J.D.; Schweiger, M.J.

    1999-10-20

    The authors studied the properties of mixed lanthanide-alumino-borosilicate glasses. Fifty-five glasses were designed to augment a previous, Phase I, study by systematically varying the composition of Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the concentrations of Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and SrO in glass. These glasses were designed and fabricated at the Savannah River Technology Center and tested at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The properties measured include the high-temperature viscosity ({eta}) as a function of temperature (T) and the liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) of Phase II test glasses.

  10. Plutonium and americium contamination in Rocky Flats soil, 1973

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krey, P.; Hardy, E.; Volchok, H.; Toonkel, L.; Knuth, R.; Coppes, M.; Tamura, T.

    1976-03-01

    The plutonium mass isotopic analysis and the Am-241 analysis of soil samples from Rocky Flats identify the contamination as Pu which was processed in 1958. The Am-241 activity in the soil will reach its maximum in 2033 and represent 18 percent of the Pu-239-240 activity. Nuclide ratios indicate that current operations at Rocky Flats contribute little to the airborne Pu concentrations which are due to resuspension of the contaminated soil. Root uptake of Pu or Am by vegetation is slight or shows no discrimination among the isotopes and nuclides studied. The relationship between Pu deposition contour and the area enclosed by that contour has been verified for contour values extending over 7 orders of magnitude. This gives confidence to our calculations of the quantities of Pu released on and off the Rocky Flats plant site. (auth)

  11. Biosorption of americium-241 by immobilized Rhizopus arrihizus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao Jiali E-mail: liaojiali@163.com; Yang Yuanyou; Luo Shunzhong; Liu Ning; Jin Jiannan; Zhang Taiming; Zhao Pengji

    2004-01-01

    Rhizopus arrihizus (R. arrihizus), a fungus, which in previous experiments had shown encouraging ability to remove {sup 241}Am from solutions, was immobilized by calcium alginate and other reagents. The various factors affecting {sup 241}Am biosorption by the immobilized R. arrihizus were investigated. The results showed that not only can immobilized R. arrihizus adsorb {sup 241}Am as efficiently as free R. arrihizus, but that also can be used repeatedly or continuously. The biosorption equilibrium was achieved within 2 h, and more than 94% of {sup 241}Am was removed from {sup 241}Am solutions of 1.08 MBq/l by immobilized R. arrihizu in the pH range 1-7. Temperature did not affect the adsorption on immobilized R. arrihizus in the range 15-45 deg. C. After repeated adsorption for 8 times, the immobilized R. arrihizus still adsorbed more than 97% of {sup 241}Am. At this time, the total adsorption of {sup 241}Am was more than 88.6 KBq/g, and had not yet reached saturation. Ninety-five percent of the adsorbed {sup 241}Am was desorbed by saturated EDTA solution and 98% by 2 mol/l HNO{sub 3}.

  12. Electrochemical behaviour of metal silicides in acidic and alkaline media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shein; A.; B.; Rakityanskaya; I.; L.; Ivanova; O.; S.

    2005-01-01

    The elaboration of new materials with high corrosion resistance is one of the actual problems of modern corrosion science. One of the most interesting objects is intermetallic compounds and metallides. These materials are widely used as the basis for new resistive alloys.……

  13. Milestone report on MD potential development for uranium silicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jianguo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.; Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.

    2016-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress on the interatomic potential development of triuranium-disilicide (U3Si2) for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The development is based on the Tersoff type potentials for single element U and Si. The Si potential is taken from the literature and a Tersoff type U potential is developed in this project. With the primary focus on the U3Si2 phase, some other U-Si systems such as U3Si are also included as a test of the transferability of the potentials for binary U-Si phases. Based on the potentials for unary U and Si, two sets of parameters for the binary U-Si system are developed using the Tersoff mixing rules and the cross-term fitting, respectively. The cross-term potential is found to give better results on the enthalpy of formation, lattice constants and elastic constants than those produced by the Tersoff mixing potential, with the reference data taken from either experiments or density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In particular, the results on the formation enthalpy and lattice constants for the U3Si2 phase and lattice constants for the high temperature U3Si (h-U3Si) phase generated by the cross-term potential agree well with experimental data. Reasonable agreements are also reached on the elastic constants of U3Si2, on the formation enthalpy for the low temperature U3Si (m-U3Si) and h-U3Si phases, and on the lattice constants of m-U3Si phase. All these phases are predicted to be mechanically stable. The unary U potential is tested for three metallic U phases (α, β, γ). The potential is found capable to predict the cohesive energies well against experimental data for all three phases. It matches reasonably with previous experiments on the lattice constants and elastic constants of αU.

  14. Americium and plutonium separation by extraction chromatography for determination by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Zakir H; Cornett, Jack R; Zhao, Xaiolei; Kieser, Liam

    2014-06-04

    A simple method was developed to separate Pu and Am using single column extraction chromatography employing N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide (DGA) resin. Isotope dilution measurements of Am and Pu were performed using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and alpha spectrometry. For maximum adsorption Pu was stabilized in the tetra valent oxidation state in 8M HNO3 with 0.05 M NaNO2 before loading the sample onto the resin. Am(III) was adsorbed also onto the resin from concentrated HNO3, and desorbed with 0.1 M HCl while keeping the Pu adsorbed. The on-column reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) with 0.02 M TiCl3 facilitated the complete desorption of Pu. Interferences (e.g. Ca(2+), Fe(3+)) were washed off from the resin bed with excess HNO3. Using NdF3, micro-precipitates of the separated isotopes were prepared for analysis by both AMS and alpha spectrometry. The recovery was 97.7±5.3% and 95.5±4.6% for (241)Am and (242)Pu respectively in reagents without a matrix. The recoveries of the same isotopes were 99.1±6.0 and 96.8±5.3% respectively in garden soil. The robustness of the method was validated using certified reference materials (IAEA 384 and IAEA 385). The measurements agree with the certified values over a range of about 1-100 Bq kg(-1). The single column separation of Pu and Am saves reagents, separation time, and cost.

  15. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Fowler, M. M.; Becker, J. A.; Bond, E. M.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Haslett, R. J.; Henderson, R. A.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for 241Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for 243Am for neutron energies between 10 eV and 250 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on 242mAm will be presented where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, a Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in the center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,γ) events from (n,f) events. The first direct observation of neutron capture on 242mAm in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.

  16. Evaluation of the readsorption of plutonium and americium in dynamic fractionations of environmental solid samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Roongrat; Hou, Xiaolin; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2008-01-01

    A dynamic extraction system exploiting sequential injection (SI) for sequential extractions incorporating a specially designed extraction column is developed to fractionate radionuclides in environmental solid samples such as soils and sediments. The extraction column can contain a large amount...... of the two radionuclides. However, the dynamic system is fully automated, eliminates manual separations, significantly reduces the operational time required, and offers detailed kinetic information....

  17. Effect of solvent on in vitro dissolution: Summary of results for uranium, americium, and cobalt aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilmette, R.A.; Hoover, M.D.

    1995-12-01

    The revised 10 CFR Part 20 has adopted the ICRP Publication 30 method for calculating the committed effective dose equivalent from intakes of radionuclides. This dosimetry scheme requires knowledge or assumptions about the chemical form of the radionuclide, its particle size, and its known or assumed solubility. The solubility is classified as being either D (relatively soluble), W, or Y (relatively insoluble), depending on whether the material dissolves over periods of days, weeks, or years. Although Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensees may wish to take advantage of material-specific knowledge in order to adjust annual limits on intake and derived air concentrations, relatively few radioactive materials to which workers and the general population may be exposed have been adequately characterized either in terms of physicochemical form or solubility. Experimental measurement of solubility using some type of in vitro dissolution measurement system is therefore needed. However, there is currently no clear consensus regarding the appropriate design of in vitro dissolution systems, particularly when considering the range of different radionuclides to be studied, and the complexity of the biological mechanisms involved in the retention and clearance of inhaled deposited radioactive particles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the several solvents on the dissolution of four test aerosols ({sup 57}Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, {sup 241}AmO{sub 2}, ammonium diuranate [ADU], and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) selected to encompass a variety of chemical and biochemical properties in vivo. The results of this study provide some guidance on the usefulness of in vitro dissolution tests for estimating the solubility of unknown radionuclide particles within the context of a simple model such as the class D, W, and Y formulation of ICRP 30.

  18. Rapid selective separation of americium/curium from simulated nuclear forensic matrices using triazine ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, Matthew A.; Livens, Francis R.; Heath, Sarah L. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Centre for Radiochemistry Research; Thompson, Paul; Marsden, Olivia J. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading (United Kingdom); Harwood, Laurence M.; Hudson, Michael J. [Reading Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Lewis, Frank W. [Reading Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Northumbria Univ., Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical and Forensic Sciences

    2015-07-01

    In analysis of complex nuclear forensic samples containing lanthanides, actinides and matrix elements, rapid selective extraction of Am/Cm for quantification is challenging, in particular due the difficult separation of Am/Cm from lanthanides. Here we present a separation process for Am/Cm(III) which is achieved using a combination of AG1-X8 chromatography followed by Am/Cm extraction with a triazine ligand. The ligands tested in our process were CyMe{sub 4}-BTPhen, CyMe{sub 4}-BTBP, CA-BTP and CA-BTPhen. Our process allows for purification and quantification of Am and Cm (recoveries 80% - 100%) and other major actinides in < 2 d without the use of multiple columns or thiocyanate. The process is unaffected by high level Ca(II)/Fe(III)/Al(III) (10 mg mL{sup -1}) and thus requires little pre-treatment of samples.

  19. Americium-Curium Stabilization - 5'' Cylindrical Induction Melter System Design Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, D.C.

    1999-11-08

    Approximately 11,000 liters (3,600) gallons of solution containing isotopes of Am and Cm are currently stored in F-Canyon Tank 17.1. These isotopes were recovered during plutonium-242 production campaigns in the mid- and late-1970s. Experimental work for the project began in 1995 by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). Details of the process are given in the various sections of this document.

  20. Concordant plutonium-241-americium-241 dating of environmental samples: results from forest fire ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Steven J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oldham, Warren J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murrell, Michael T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Katzman, Danny [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-07

    We have measured the Pu, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 151}Sm isotopic systematics for a set of forest fire ash samples from various locations in the western U.S. including Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and New Mexico. The goal of this study is to develop a concordant {sup 241}Pu (t{sub 1/2} = 14.4 y)-{sup 241}Am dating method for environmental collections. Environmental samples often contain mixtures of components including global fallout. There are a number of approaches for subtracting the global fallout component for such samples. One approach is to use {sup 242}/{sup 239}Pu as a normalizing isotope ratio in a three-isotope plot, where this ratio for the nonglobal fallout component can be estimated or assumed to be small. This study investigates a new, complementary method of normalization using the long-lived fission product, {sup 151}Sm (t{sub 1/2} = 90 y). We find that forest fire ash concentrates actinides and fission products with {approx}1E10 atoms {sup 239}Pu/g and {approx}1E8 atoms {sup 151}Sm/g, allowing us to measure these nuclides by mass spectrometric (MIC-TIMS) and radiometric (liquid scintillation counting) methods. The forest fire ash samples are characterized by a western U.S. regional isotopic signature representing varying mixtures of global fallout with a local component from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Our results also show that {sup 151}Sm is well correlated with the Pu nuclides in the forest fire ash, suggesting that these nuclides have similar geochemical behavior in the environment. Results of this correlation indicate that the {sup 151}Sm/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio for global fallout is {approx}0.164, in agreement with an independent estimate of 0.165 based on {sup 137}Cs fission yields for atmospheric weapons tests at the NTS. {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am dating of the non-global fallout component in the forest fire ash samples yield ages in the late 1950's-early 1960's, consistent with a peak in NTS weapons testing at that time. The age results for this component are in agreement using both {sup 242}Pu and {sup 151}Sm normalizations, although the errors for the {sup 151}Sm correction are currently larger due to the greater uncertainty of their measurements. Additional efforts to develop a concordant {sup 241}Pu-{sup 241}Am dating method for environmental collections are underway with emphasis on soil cores.

  1. Functional sorbents for selective capture of plutonium, americium, uranium, and thorium in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantasee, Wassana; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Creim, Jeffery A; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Wiacek, Robert J; Fryxell, Glen E; Addleman, R Shane; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-09-01

    Self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMS) are hybrid materials created from attachment of organic moieties onto very high surface area mesoporous silica. SAMMS with surface chemistries including three isomers of hydroxypyridinone, diphosphonic acid, acetamide phosphonic acid, glycinyl urea, and diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) analog were evaluated for chelation of actinides ((239)Pu, (241)Am, uranium, thorium) from blood. Direct blood decorporation using sorbents does not have the toxicity or renal challenges associated with traditional chelation therapy and may have potential applications for critical exposure cases, reduction of nonspecific dose during actinide radiotherapy, and for sorbent hemoperfusion in renal insufficient patients, whose kidneys clear radionuclides at a very slow rate. Sorption affinity (K(d)), sorption rate, selectivity, and stability of SAMMS were measured in batch contact experiments. An isomer of hydroxypyridinone (3,4-HOPO) on SAMMS demonstrated the highest affinity for all four actinides from blood and plasma and greatly outperformed the DTPA analog on SAMMS and commercial resins. In batch contact, a fifty percent reduction of actinides in blood was achieved within minutes, and there was no evidence of protein fouling or material leaching in blood after 24 h. The engineered form of SAMMS (bead format) was further evaluated in a 100-fold scaled-down hemoperfusion device and showed no blood clotting after 2 h. A 0.2 g quantity of SAMMS could reduce 50 wt.% of 100 ppb uranium in 50 mL of plasma in 18 min and that of 500 dpm mL(-1) in 24 min. 3,4-HOPO-SAMMS has a long shelf-life in air and at room temperature for at least 8 y, indicating its feasibility for stockpiling in preparedness for an emergency. The excellent efficacy and stability of SAMMS materials in complex biological matrices suggest that SAMMS can also be used as orally administered drugs and for wound decontamination. By changing the organic groups of SAMMS, they can be used not only for actinides but also for other radionuclides. By using the mixture of these SAMMS materials, broad spectrum decorporation of radionuclides is very feasible.

  2. Subsurface Behavior of Plutonium and Americium at Non-Hanford Sites and Relevance to Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Riley, Robert G.

    2008-02-01

    Seven sites where Pu release to the environment has raised significant environmental concerns have been reviewed. A summary of the most significant hydrologic and geochemical features, contaminant release events and transport processes relevant to Pu migration at the seven sites is presented.

  3. New Synthetic Methods and Structure-Property Relationships in Neptunium, Plutonium, and Americium Borates. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas Edward

    2013-09-14

    The past three years of support by the Heavy Elements Chemistry Program have been highly productive in terms of advanced degrees awarded, currently supported graduate students, peer-reviewed publications, and presentations made at universities, national laboratories, and at international conferences. Ph.D. degrees were granted to Shuao Wang and Juan Diwu, who both went on to post-doctoral appointments at the Glenn T. Seaborg Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory with Jeff Long and Ken Raymond, respectively. Pius Adelani completed his Ph.D. with me and is now a post-doc with Peter C. Burns. Andrea Alsobrook finished her Ph.D. and is now a post-doc at Savannah River with Dave Hobbs. Anna Nelson completed her Ph.D. and is now a post-doc with Rod Ewing at the University of Michigan. As can be gleaned from this list, students supported by the Heavy Elements Chemistry grant have remained interested in actinide science after leaving my program. This follows in line with previous graduates in this program such as Richard E. Sykora, who did his post-doctoral work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with R. G. Haire, and Amanda C. Bean, who is a staff scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Philip M. Almond and Thomas C. Shehee, who are both staff scientists at Savannah River National Laboratory, Gengbang Jin who is a staff scientist at Argonne National Lab, and Travis Bray who has been a post-doc at both LBNL and ANL. Clearly this program is serving as a pipe-line for students to enter into careers in the national laboratories. About half of my students depart the DOE complex for academia or industry. My undergraduate researchers also remain active in actinide chemistry after leaving my group. Dan Wells was a productive undergraduate of mine, and went on to pursue a Ph.D. on uranium and neptunium chalcogenides with Jim Ibers at Northwestern. After earning his Ph.D., he went directly into the nuclear industry.

  4. Americium-241 and plutonium-237 turnover in mussels ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) living in field enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guary, J. C.; Fowler, S. W.

    1981-02-01

    Loss of 241Am and 237Pu from contaminated mussels ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) living in situ in the Mediterranean Sea is described as the sum of three exponential functions. In the case of 241Am, two short-lived compartments representing a total of 80% of the incorporated radionuclide turned over rapidly with biological half-lives of 2 and 3 weeks. The remaining fraction of 241Am, associated with a long-lived compartment, was lost at an extremely slow rate ( Tb1/2=1·3 years). Plutonium-237 turnover in the two short-lived compartments (containing 70% of the Pu) was more rapid ( Tb1/2=1-2 days and 2 weeks) than that of 241Am; however, there was some indication that subsequent loss rates of the two radionuclides in long-lived compartments may be similar if determined over comparable periods of time. Loss rates of 241Am differed for the various tissues, with the most rapid rates occurring in gill, viscera and shell. Abrupt changes in loss observed in muscle and mantle suggested a translocation of 241Am to muscle and mantle during depuration. Whole shell contained by far the largest fraction (˜90%) of both 241Am and 237Pu taken up; in addition, these radionuclides are not irreversibly bound to mussel shell but readily leach into the water. These observations suggest that mollusc shell may influence the biogeochemistry of transuranic elements in littoral zones.

  5. Plutonium and americium inventories in atmospheric fallout and sediment cores from Blelham Tarn, Cumbria (UK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, H. E-mail: herve.michel@unice.fr; Barci-Funel, G.; Dalmasso, J.; Ardisson, G.; Appleby, P.G.; Haworth, E.; El-Daoushy, F

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to report on the results of a study of {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am inventories onto Blelham Tarn in Cumbria (UK). The atmospheric fallout inventory was obtained by analysing soil cores and the results are in good agreement with the literature: 101 Bq m{sup -2} for {sup 239+240}Pu; 4.5 Bq m{sup -2} for {sup 238}Pu and 37 Bq m{sup -2} for {sup 241}Am. The sediment core inventory for the whole lake is compared to the atmospheric fallout inventory. The sediment activity is 60-80% higher than the estimated fallout activity, showing a catchment area contribution and in particular the stream input.

  6. Plutonium and americium inventories in atmospheric fallout and sediment cores from Blelham Tarn, Cumbria (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, H; Barci-Funel, G; Dalmasso, J; Ardisson, G; Appleby, P G; Haworth, E; El-Daoushy, F

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to report on the results of a study of 238Pu, 239 + 240Pu and 241Am inventories onto Blelham Tarn in Cumbria (UK). The atmospheric fallout inventory was obtained by analysing soil cores and the results are in good agreement with the literature: 101 Bq m(-2) for 239 + 240Pu; 4.5 Bq m(-2) for 238Pu and 37 Bq m(-2) for 241Am. The sediment core inventory for the whole lake is compared to the atmospheric fallout inventory. The sediment activity is 60-80% higher than the estimated fallout activity, showing a catchment area contribution and in particular the stream input.

  7. Assessment of Neptunium, Americium, and Curium in the Savannah River Site Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-12-17

    A series of documents has been published in which the impact of various radionuclides released to the environment by Savannah River Site (SRS) operations has been assessed. The quantity released, the disposition of the radionuclides in the environment, and the dose to offsite individuals has been presented for activation products, carbon cesium, iodine, plutonium, selected fission products, strontium, technetium, tritium, uranium, and the noble gases. An assessment of the impact of nonradioactive mercury also has been published.This document assesses the impact of radioactive transuranics released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are 239Np, 241Am, and 244Cm.

  8. Fundamental chemistry and materials science of americium in selected immobilization glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haire, R.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stump, N.A. [Winston-Salem State Univ., NC (United States). Dept. of Physical Sciences

    1996-12-01

    We have pursued some of the fundamental chemistry and materials science of Am in 3 glass matrices, two being high-temperature (850 and 1400 C mp) silicate-based glasses and the third a sol-gel glass. Optical spectroscopy was the principal tool. One aspect of this work was to determine the oxidation state exhibited by Am in these matrices, as well as factors that control or may alter this state. A correlation was noted between the oxidation state of the f-elements in the two high-temperature glasses with their high-temperature oxide chemistries. One exception was Am: although AmO{sub 2} is the stable oxide encountered in air, when this dioxide was incorporated into the high-temperature glasses, only trivalent Am was found in the products. When Am(III) was used to prepare the sol-gel glasses at ambient temperature, and after these products were heated in air to 800 C, only Am(III) was observed. Potential explanations for the unexpected Am behavior is offered in the context of its basic chemistry. Experimental spectra, spectroscopic assignments, etc. are discussed.

  9. Americium, curium and neodymium analysis in ECRIX-H irradiated pellet. Sample preparation for TIMS measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esbelin, E.; Buravand, E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France). Centre de Marcoule; Bejaoui, S.; Lamontagne, J.; Bonnerot, J.M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France). Centre de Cadarache

    2013-08-01

    This paper concerns quantitative isotopic analysis of Am, Cm and Nd contained in an irradiated AmO{sub 1.62}/MgO pellet. The complete analysis protocol is described, from dissolution of the pellets in a shielded line to the laboratory glove separation processes box for TIMS analysis. Emphasis is placed on the separation processes: by ion exchange resin in a hot cell and by HPLC in the laboratory. Intermediate measurements by X-ray fluorescence, alpha spectrometry, and ICP-AES are described. (orig.)

  10. Optimization of TRPO Process Parameters for Americium Extraction from High Level Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jing; WANG Jianchen; SONG Chongli

    2001-01-01

    The numerical calculations for Am multistage fractional extraction by trialkyl phosphine oxide (TRPO) were verified by a hot test.1750 L/t-U high level waste (HLW) was used as the feed to the TRPO process.The analysis used the simple objective function to minimize the total waste content in the TRPO process streams.Some process parameters were optimized after other parameters were selected.The optimal process parameters for Am extraction by TRPO are:10 stages for extraction and 2 stages for scrubbing;a flow rate ratio of 0.931 for extraction and 4.42 for scrubbing;nitric acid concentration of 1.35 mol/L for the feed and 0.5 mol/L for the scrubbing solution.Finally,the nitric acid and Am concentration profiles in the optimal TRPO extraction process are given.

  11. Vertical distribution of radiocaesium, plutonium and americium in the Catalan Sea (northwestern Mediterranean)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molero, J.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.; Merino, J.; Pujol, Ll.; Vidal-Quadras, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Facultad de Ciencias; Mitchell, P.I. [University Coll., Dublin (Ireland). Lab. of Radiation Physics

    1995-07-01

    Caesium-137, {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am concentration profiles (0-1000 m) have been determined in unfiltered large volume water samples collected from the Catalan Sea (northwestern Mediterranean). Results showed that radiocaesium concentration decreases quickly through the water column while the transuranic concentration increases with depth, showing a faster migration to the bottom layers. Comparing our results with those reported by other authors (1975-1980), radiocaesium input from Chernobyl releases has been identified through the profile. In addition, transuranic concentrations have decreased considerably in the different layers of the profile. (Author).

  12. Americium and plutonium separation by extraction chromatography for determination by accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi, Zakir H. [Department of Earth Science, University of Ottawa, 140 Louis Pasteur Avenue, Ottawa K1N 6N5 (Canada); Cornett, Jack R., E-mail: jack.cornett@uottawa.ca [Department of Earth Science, University of Ottawa, 140 Louis Pasteur Avenue, Ottawa K1N 6N5 (Canada); Zhao, Xaiolei; Kieser, Liam [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 140 Louis Pasteur Avenue, Ottawa K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Am and Pu were adsorbed and separated using a single extraction chromatography DGA column. • Pu was eluted from the column completely using on-column reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III). • ²⁴¹Am and 239,240Pu measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) agree with the certified values in two SRMs. Abstract: A simple method was developed to separate Pu and Am using single column extraction chromatography employing N,N,N',N'-tetra-n-octyldiglycolamide (DGA) resin. Isotope dilution measurements of Am and Pu were performed using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and alpha spectrometry. For maximum adsorption Pu was stabilized in the tetra valent oxidation state in 8 M HNO₃ with 0.05 M NaNO₂ before loading the sample onto the resin. Am(III) was adsorbed also onto the resin from concentrated HNO₃, and desorbed with 0.1 M HCl while keeping the Pu adsorbed. The on-column reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) with 0.02 M TiCl₃ facilitated the complete desorption of Pu. Interferences (e.g. Ca²⁺, Fe³⁺) were washed off from the resin bed with excess HNO₃. Using NdF₃, micro-precipitates of the separated isotopes were prepared for analysis by both AMS and alpha spectrometry. The recovery was 97.7 ± 5.3% and 95.5 ± 4.6% for ²⁴¹Am and ²⁴²Pu respectively in reagents without a matrix. The recoveries of the same isotopes were 99.1 ± 6.0 and 96.8 ± 5.3% respectively in garden soil. The robustness of the method was validated using certified reference materials (IAEA 384 and IAEA 385). The measurements agree with the certified values over a range of about 1–100 Bq kg⁻¹. The single column separation of Pu and Am saves reagents, separation time, and cost.

  13. Criteria Considered in Selecting Feed Items for Americium-241 Oxide Production Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Louis D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-30

    The analysis in this document serves the purpose of defining a number of attributes in selection of feed items to be utilized in recovery/recycle of Pu and also production operations of 241AmO2 material intended to meet specification requirements. This document was written in response to a specific request on the part of the 2014 annual program review which took place over the dates of October 28-29, 2014. A number of feed attributes are noted including: (1) Non-interference with existing Pu recovery operations; (2) Content of sufficient 241Am to allow process efficiency in recovery operations; (3) Absence of indications that 243Am might be mixed in with the Pu/241Am material; (4) Absence of indications that Cm might be mixed in with the Pu/241Am material; (5) Absence of indications of other chemical elements that would present difficulty in chemical separation from 241Am; (6) Feed material not expected to present difficulty in dissolution; (7) Dose issues; (8) Process efficiency; (9) Size; (10) Hazard associated with items and package configuration in the vault; (11) Within existing NEPA documentation. The analysis in this document provides a baseline of attributes considered for feed materials, but does not presume to replace the need for technical expertise and judgment on the part of individuals responsible for selecting the material feed to be processed. This document is not comprehensive as regards all attributes that could prove to be important. The value of placing a formal QA hold point on accepting feed items versus more informal management of feed items is discussed in the summation of this analysis. The existing planned QA hold points on 241AmO2 products produced and packaged may be adequate as the entire project is based on QA of the product rather than QA of the process. The probability of introduction of items that would inherently cause the241AmO2 products produced to be outside of specification requirements appears to be rather small.

  14. Nickel Silicide Metallization for Passivated Tunneling Contacts for Silicon Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Alexander; Florent, Karine; Tapriya, Astha; Lee, Benjamin G.; Kurinec, Santosh K.; Young, David L.

    2016-11-21

    Passivated tunneling contacts offer promise for applications in Interdigitated Back Passivated Contact (IBPC) high efficiency silicon solar cells. Metallization of these contacts remains a key research topic. This paper investigates NiSi/poly-Si/SiO2/c-Si passivated contacts using photoluminescence and contact resistivity measurements. An amorphous Si interlayer between the NiSi and poly-Si is observed to improve passivation, decreasing recombination. The overall recombination loss has a linear trend with the NiSi thickness. Implied Voc values close to 700 mV and contact resistivities below 10 mohm-cm2 have been achieved in NiSi/poly-Si:P/SiO2/c-Si contacts.

  15. Soft-x-ray fluorescence study of buried silicides in antiferromagnetically coupled Fe/Si multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, J.A.; Chaiken, A.; Michel, R.P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Multilayer films made by alternate deposition of two materials play an important role in electronic and optical devices such as quantum-well lasers and x-ray mirrors. In addition, novel phenomena like giant magnetoresistance and dimensional crossover in superconductors have emerged from studies of multilayers. While sophisticated x-ray techniques are widely used to study the morphology of multilayer films, progress in studying the electronic structure has been slower. The short mean-free path of low-energy electrons severely limits the usefulness of photoemission and related electron free path of low-energy electrons severely limit spectroscopies for multilayer studies. Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) is a bulk-sensitive photon-in, photon-out method to study valence band electronic states. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) measured with partial photon yield can give complementary bulk-sensitive information about unoccupied states. Both these methods are element-specific since the incident x-ray photons excite electrons from core levels. By combining NEXAFS and SXF measurements on buried layers in multilayers and comparing these spectra to data on appropriate reference compounds, it is possible to obtain a detailed picture of the electronic structure. Results are presented for a study of a Fe/Si multilayer system.

  16. Assessment of thermodynamic functions of formation for rare earth silicides, germanides, stannides and plumbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witusiewicz, V.T. [Nat. Acad. of Sci. of the Ukraine, Kyyiv (Ukraine). Physico-Technological Inst. of Metals and Alloys; Sidorko, V.R. [Frantsevich Institute of Materials Science, National Academy of Sciences of the Ukraine, 3 Krzhizhanovsky St., 252180, Kyyiv (Ukraine); Bulanova, M.V. [Frantsevich Institute of Materials Science, National Academy of Sciences of the Ukraine, 3 Krzhizhanovsky St., 252180, Kyyiv (Ukraine)

    1997-02-15

    A critical assessment has been made of the available data on thermodynamic properties of binary compounds of lanthanide metals, scandium and yttrium (R) with IV group p elements (X{identical_to}Si, Ge, Sn and Pb), obtained mainly through the direct e.m.f and calorimetric methods. On the basis of the most reliable data the following empirical relation was derived which allows the estimation of entropies of formation for the intermetallics ({Delta}{sub f}S) by using the enthalpies of formation per mole of A{sub m/(m+n)}B{sub n/(m+n)} compound ({Delta}{sub f}H) together with the melting (T{sub m,I}) and boiling temperatures (T{sub b,I}) of the components I (I element of A,B):{Delta}fSm=aRmn(m+n)23TmTb(m+n)2mn+bTb{Delta}f?Hm,where {Delta}fSm={Delta}fS-(m{Delta}mSA+n{Delta}mSB)m+n; {Delta}fHm={Delta}fH-(m{Delta}mHA+n{Delta}mHB)m+n;T and macr;m=(Tm,A+Tm,B)/2 and T{sub b}=(T{sub b,A}+T{sub b,B})/2; {Delta}{sub m}S{sub A} and {Delta}{sub m}H{sub A} are the entropy and enthalpy of melting of the components, respectively; m and n are stoichiometric coefficients of a binary A{sub m}B{sub n} compound; a and b are empirical coefficients, and R is the gas constant.The calculated entropy values for the R-X intermetallics are in agreement with experimental data available. (orig.)

  17. Epitaxial gamma-iron silicide grown on single-crystal Si. A summary of Moessbauer results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desimoni, J.; Sanchez, F.H

    1998-08-15

    Metastable {gamma}-FeSi{sub 2} grown on or into single-crystals of silicon can be produced by different techniques as molecular beam epitaxy, and ion implantation followed by ion beam induced epitaxial crystallisation. In these investigations, Moessbauer effect has been used to provide short range order information about the system. We present here a summary of these results, which will be compared and discussed.

  18. Reactivity insertion transient analysis for KUR low-enriched uranium silicide fuel core

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Xiuzhong; Nakajima, Ken; Unesaki, Hironobu; Mishima, Kaichiro

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to realize the full core conversion from the use of High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuels to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuels in Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR). Although the conversion of nuclear energy sources is required to keep the safety margins and reactor reliability based on KUR HEU core, the uranium density (3.2 gU/cm3) and enrichment (20%) of LEU fuel (U3Si2–AL) are quite different from the uranium density (0.58 gU/cm3) and enrichment (93%...

  19. Study of Nickel Silicide as a Copper Diffusion Barrier in Monocrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kale, Abhijit; Beese, Emily; Saenz, Theresa; Warren, Emily; Nemeth, William; Young, David; Marshall, Alexander; Florent, Karine; Kurinec, Santosh K.; Agarwal, Sumit; Stradins, Pauls

    2016-11-21

    NiSi as a conductive diffusion barrier to silicon has been studied. We demonstrate that the NiSi films formed using the single step annealing process are as good as the two step process using XRD and Raman. Quality of NiSi films formed using e-beam Ni and electroless Ni process has been compared. Incomplete surface coverage and presence of constituents other than Ni are the main challenges with electroless Ni. We also demonstrate that Cu reduces the thermal stability of NiSi films. The detection of Cu has proven to be difficult due to temperature limitations.

  20. Iridium/Iridium Silicide as an Oxidation Resistant Capping Layer for Soft X-ray Mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prisbrey, S; Vernon, S

    2004-04-05

    Rust on a sword, tarnish on the silverware, and a loss in reflectivity for soft x-ray mirrors are all caused by oxidation that changes the desired characteristics of a material. Methods to prevent the oxidation have varied over the centuries with the default method of a protective coating being the most common. The protective coating for x-ray mirrors is usually a self-limiting oxidized layer on the surface of the material that stops further oxidation of the material by limiting the diffusion of oxygen to the material underneath.

  1. Superconductivity at 3.1 K in the orthorhombic ternary silicide ScRuSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Bin-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Chuan; Yu, Jia; Pan, Bo-Jin; Mu, Qing-Ge; Liu, Tong; Chen, Gen-Fu; Ren, Zhi-An

    2017-02-01

    We report the synthesis, crystal structure, superconductivity and physical property characterizations of the ternary equiatomic compound ScRuSi. Polycrystalline samples of ScRuSi were prepared by an arc-melting method. The as-prepared samples were identified as the orthorhombic Co2P-type o-ScRuSi by powder x-ray diffraction analysis. Electrical resistivity measurements show o-ScRuSi to be a metal which superconducts below a T c of 3.1 K; the upper critical field μ 0 H c2(0) is estimated to be 0.87 T. The magnetization and specific heat measurements confirm the bulk type-II superconductivity in o-ScRuSi, with a specific heat jump within the BCS weak coupling limit. o-ScRuSi is the first Co2P-type superconductor to contain scandium. After annealing at 1273 K for a week, o-ScRuSi transforms into hexagonal Fe2P-type h-ScRuSi, which is a Pauli-paramagnetic metal with no superconductivity observed above 1.8 K.

  2. Electrical characterization of strained and unstrained silicon nanowires with nickel silicide contacts

    OpenAIRE

    Habicht, S.; Zhao, Q. T.; Feste, S. F.; Knoll, L.; Trellenkamp, S.; Ghyselen, B.; Mantl, S

    2010-01-01

    We present electrical characterization of nickel monosilicide (NiSi) contacts formed on strained and unstrained silicon nanowires (NWs), which were fabricated by top-down processing of initially As(+) implanted and activated strained and unstrained silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates. The resistivity of doped Si NWs and the contact resistivity of the NiSi to Si NW contacts are studied as functions of the As(+) ion implantation dose and the cross-sectional area of the wires. Strained silicon...

  3. Comparison of the Thermal Expansion Behavior of Several Intermetallic Silicide Alloys Between 293 and 1523 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Sai V.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal expansion measurements were conducted on hot-pressed CrSi(sub 2), TiSi(sub 2), W Si(sub 2) and a two-phase Cr-Mo-Si intermetallic alloy between 293 and 1523 K during three heat-cool cycles. The corrected thermal expansion, (L/L(sub 0)(sub thermal), varied with the absolute temperature, T, as (deltaL/L(sub 0)(sub thermal) = A(T-293)(sup 3) + B(T-293)(sup 2) + C(T-293) + D, where A, B, C and D are regression constants. Excellent reproducibility was observed for most of the materials after the first heat-up cycle. In some cases, the data from the first heatup cycle deviated from those determined in the subsequent cycles. This deviation was attributed to the presence of residual stresses developed during processing, which are relieved after the first heat-up cycle.

  4. Electrophoretic deposition of magnesium silicates on titanium implants: Ion migration and silicide interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Mohajer, M. [Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Yaghoubi, A., E-mail: yaghoubi@siswa.um.edu.my [Center for High Impact Research, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Ramesh, S., E-mail: ramesh79@um.edu.my [Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Bushroa, A.R.; Chin, K.M.C.; Tin, C.C. [Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Chiu, W.S. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Center, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2014-07-01

    Magnesium silicates (Mg{sub x}SiO{sub y}) and in particular forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) owing to their low thermal expansion mismatch with metals are promising materials for bioactive coating of implants. Here, we report the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of forsterite onto titanium substrates using different precursors. Unlike bulk samples which achieve full stoichiometry only beyond 1400 °C, non-stoichiometric magnesium silicate rapidly decomposes into magnesium oxide nanowires during sintering. Elemental mapping and X-ray diffraction suggest that oxygen diffusion followed by ion exchange near the substrate leads to formation of an interfacial Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} layer. Pre-annealed forsterite powder on the other hand shows a comparatively lower diffusion rate. Overall, magnesium silicate coatings do not exhibit thermally induced microcracks upon sintering as opposed to calcium phosphate bioceramics which are currently in use.

  5. Thermal evaluation of uranium silicide miniplates irradiated at high heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post Guillen, Donna, E-mail: Donna.Guillen@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3710 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Best estimate of thermal conditions during irradiation experiment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal evaluation of 25% enriched, high-density U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}/Al dispersion fuel miniplates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Predictions of heat flux and temperature for as-run, high heat flux conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finite-element analysis uses measured values of hydroxide layer thickness. - Abstract: The Gas Test Loop (GTL)-1 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to assess corrosion performance of proposed booster fuel at heat flux levels {approx}30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density (4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}) U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 to 593 W/cm{sup 2}. No adverse impacts to the miniplates were observed at these high heat flux levels. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective ATR south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant-hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average hydroxide thickness on each miniplate measured during post-irradiation examination. The purpose of this study was to obtain a best estimate of the as-run experiment temperatures to aid in establishing acceptable heat flux levels and designing fuel qualification experiments for this fuel type.

  6. Development of Low-Noise High Value Chromium Silicide Resistors for Cryogenic Detector Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Babu, Sachi; Monroy, Carlos; Darren, C.; Krebs, Carolyn A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extremely high sensitivity detectors, such as silicon bolometers are required in many NASA missions for detection of photons from the x-ray to the far infrared regions. Typically, these detectors are cooled to well below the liquid helium (LHe) temperature (4.2 K) to achieve the maximum detection performance. As photoconductors, they are generally operated with a load resistor and a pre-set bias voltage, which is then coupled to the input gate of a source-follower Field Effect Transistor (FET) circuit. It is imperative that the detector system signal to noise performance be limited by the noise of the detector and not by the noise of the external components. The load resistor value is selected to optimize the detector performance. These two criteria tend to be contradictory in that these detectors require load resistors in the hundreds of megaohms, which leads to a higher Johnson noise. Additionally, the physical size of the resistor must be small for device integration as required by such missions as the NASA High Resolution Airborne Wide-Band Camera (HAWC) instrument and the Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera (SHARC) for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). We have designed, fabricated and characterized thin film resistors using a CrSi/TiW/Al metal system on optical quality quartz substrates. The resistor values range from 100 megaohms to over 650 megaohms and are Johnson noise limited at LHe temperatures. The resistor film is sputtered with a sheet resistance ranging from 300 ohms to 1600 ohms and the processing sequence developed for these devices allows for chemically fine tuning the sheet resistance in-situ. The wafer fabrication process was of sufficiently high yield (>80%) providing clusters of good resistors for integrated multiple detector channels, a very important feature in the assembly of these two instruments.

  7. A Review of Subsurface Behavior of Plutonium and Americium at the 200-PW-1/3/6 Operable Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Riley, Robert G.

    2008-01-31

    This report begins with a brief summary of the history and current status of 200-PW-1/3/6 OUs in section 2.0. This is followed by a description of our concentual model of Pu/Am migration at the 200-PW-1/3/6 OUs, during both past artificial recharge conditions and current natural recharge condictions (section 3.0). Section 4.0 discusses data gaps and information needs. The final section (section 5.0) provides recommendations for futher work to address the data gaps and information needs identified in section 4.0.

  8. Input contribution and vertical migration of plutonium, americium and cesium in lake sediments (Belham Tarn, Cumbria, UK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, H.; Barci-Funel, G.; Barci, V.; Ardisson, G. [Lab. de Radiochimie et de Radioecologie, Univ. de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France)

    2002-07-01

    The record of the global atmospheric fallout could be found in the lake sediments. A mass balance for fallout radionuclides in Blelham Tarn and its catchment is established. The sediment activity contribution is coming from direct atmospheric fallout and from indirect atmospheric fallout via the catchment. The catchement activity is conveyed to the sediment by the rivers and the direct streaming. A comparison of the fallout and the sediment inventory allows the activity estimation of these different contributions and to understand the mobility of these elements on the catchment and in the sediments. The study of activity profile in sediment core allows to characterise the different radioactive events occurred in the past. For the lake Blelham, the results show two cesium activity peaks and only one peak for transuranic activities. The deepest peaks correspond to the atmospheric nuclear test fallout in the sixties (1963) and the second peak to the Chernobyl accident (1986). The activity ratio {sup 239-240}Pu/{sup 137}Cs allows estimating the ratio between cesium activities in sediments coming from these two events. Plutonium and cesium diffusion coefficients are calculated with a simple analytical model. (orig.)

  9. Analysis of cascade impactor and EPA method 29 data from the americium/curium pilot melter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J.R.

    1997-11-01

    The offgas system of the Am/Cm pilot melter at TNX was characterized by measuring the particulate evolution using a cascade impactor and EPA Method 29. This sampling work was performed by John Harden of the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory, under SCUREF Task SC0056. Elemental analyses were performed by the SRTC Mobile Laboratory.Operation of the Am/Cm melter with B2000 frit has resulted in deposition of PbO and boron compounds in the offgas system that has contributed to pluggage of the High Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Sampling of the offgas system was performed to quantify the amount of particulate in the offgas system under several sets of conditions. Particulate concentration and particle size distribution were measured just downstream of the melter pressure control air addition port and at the HEME inlet. At both locations, the particulate was measured with and without steam to the film cooler while the melter was idled at about 1450 degrees Celsius. Additional determinations were made at the melter location during feeding and during idling at 1150 degrees Celsius rather than 1450 degrees Celsius (both with no steam to the film cooler). Deposition of particulates upstream of the melter sample point may have, and most likely did occur in each run, so the particulate concentrations measured do no necessarily reflect the total particulate emission at the melt surface. However, the data may be used in a relative sense to judge the system performance.

  10. Rapid selective separation of americium/curium\\ud from simulated nuclear forensic matrices using\\ud triazine ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Higginson, Matthew A.; Thompson, Paul; Marsden, Olivia J.; Livens, Francis R.; Harwood, Laurence M.; Lewis, Frank W.; Hudson, Michael J.; Heath, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    In analysis of complex nuclear forensic samples\\ud containing lanthanides, actinides and matrix elements,\\ud rapid selective extraction of Am/Cm for quantification\\ud is challenging, in particular due the difficult separation\\ud of Am/Cm from lanthanides. Here we present\\ud a separation process for Am/Cm(III) which is achieved\\ud using a combination of AG1-X8 chromatography followed\\ud by Am/Cm extraction with a triazine ligand. The ligands\\ud tested in our process were CyMe4-BTPhen, CyMe4-\\u...

  11. LITERATURE REVIEW ON THE SORPTION OF PLUTONIUM, URANIUM, NEPTUNIUM, AMERICIUM AND TECHNETIUM TO CORROSION PRODUCTS ON WASTE TANK LINERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Kaplan, D.

    2012-02-29

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has conducted performance assessment (PA) calculations to determine the risk associated with closing liquid waste tanks. The PA estimates the risk associated with a number of scenarios, making various assumptions. Throughout all of these scenarios, it is assumed that the carbon-steel tank liners holding the liquid waste do not sorb the radionuclides. Tank liners have been shown to form corrosion products, such as Fe-oxyhydroxides (Wiersma and Subramanian 2002). Many corrosion products, including Fe-oxyhydroxides, at the high pH values of tank effluent, take on a very strong negative charge. Given that many radionuclides may have net positive charges, either as free ions or complexed species, it is expected that many radionuclides will sorb to corrosion products associated with tank liners. The objective of this report was to conduct a literature review to investigate whether Pu, U, Np, Am and Tc would sorb to corrosion products on tank liners after they were filled with reducing grout (cementitious material containing slag to promote reducing conditions). The approach was to evaluate radionuclides sorption literature with iron oxyhydroxide phases, such as hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and ferrihydrite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.5H{sub 2}O). The primary interest was the sorption behavior under tank closure conditions where the tanks will be filled with reducing cementitious materials. Because there were no laboratory studies conducted using site specific experimental conditions, (e.g., high pH and HLW tank aqueous and solid phase chemical conditions), it was necessary to extend the literature review to lower pH studies and noncementitious conditions. Consequently, this report relied on existing lower pH trends, existing geochemical modeling, and experimental spectroscopic evidence conducted at lower pH levels. The scope did not include evaluating the appropriateness of K{sub d} values for the Fe-oxyhydroxides, but instead to evaluate whether it is a conservative assumption to exclude this sorption process of radionuclides onto tank liner corrosion products in the PA model. This may identify another source for PA conservatism since the modeling did not consider any sorption by the tank liner.

  12. The Fabrication, Microstructural Characterization, and Internal Photoresponse of Platinum Silicide/P-Type Silicon and Iridium Silicide/P-Type Silicon Schottky Barrier Photodetectors for Infrared Focal Plane Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    34)H(hv-20)X (r(I)+J/~+/ ~ jh ) D ~ ~ k/ (d Id______jrh+ X si /Y Po(X cos(fTtx’)dX (3.46) sin rd) 0 Poe where Pog represents the total number of carriers...that Cd/D o 1, so that Ym will be well estimated by the formula jhv -2\\ 2d I(Crh)] 2 H(hv-20) (3.47) In contrast to the normal photoyield expressions, Eq

  13. High Temperature Silicides and Refractory Alloys Symposium Held in Boston, Massachusetts on November 29 -December 2, 1993. Volume 322

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-02

    fatigue in air. (b) Schematic of concentrator coil. Test specimens were positioned in the coil by placing it on a machined Inconel 718 support rod. By...grains. The reaction is thought to occur by the dissolution of Mo into Si and the subsequent precipitation of MoSi 2 at the Mo5Si3/Si interface. The...stress of 110 MPa for a 10 hour rupture life at 1204°C [12]. In 1965, as one of the final actions prior to its dissolution , the RMSRP recommended no

  14. Program for in-pile qualification of high density silicide dispersion fuel at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jose E.R. da; Silva, Antonio T. e; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Durazzo, Michelangelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: jersilva@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    The development of high density nuclear fuel (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al) with 4,8 gU/cm{sup 3} is on going at IPEN, at this time. This fuel has been considered to be utilized at the new Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), planned to be constructed up to 2014. As Brazil does not have hot-cell facilities available for post-irradiation analysis, an alternative qualifying program for this fuel is proposed based on the same procedures used at IPEN since 1988 for qualifying its own U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al (1,9 and 2,3 gU/cm{sup 3}) and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al (3,0 gU/cm{sup 3}) dispersion fuels. The fuel miniplates and full-size fuel elements irradiations should be tested at IEA-R1 core. The fuel characterization along the irradiation time should be made by means of non-destructive methods, including periodical visual inspections with an underwater video camera system, sipping tests for fuel elements suspected of leakage, and underwater dimensional measurements for swelling evaluation, performed inside the reactor pool. This work presents the program description for the qualification of the high density nuclear fuel (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al) with 4,8 gU/cm{sup 3}, and describes the IPEN fuel fabrication infrastructure and some basic features of the available systems for non-destructive tests at IEA-R1 research reactor. (author)

  15. Modification of Structure and Properties of Titanium Surfaces During Formation of Silicides and Borides Initiated by High-Energy Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potekaev, A. I.; Klopotov, A. A.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Volokitin, O. G.

    2013-12-01

    An analysis of binary (Ti-Si, Ti-В, Si-B) and ternary (Ti-Si-B) phase states is made, their diagrams are presented, and a possibility for formation of a large number of metastable compounds is revealed. The latter are found to form as a result of application of non-equilibrium conditions in the course of material treatment with concentrated high-energy flows. Using an x-ray diffraction analysis and electron-diffraction microscopy, the phase composition of the surface layer of technical-grade titanium (VT1-0) treated by concentrated energy flows (irradiation with plasma from electrical wire explosion and high-intensity pulsed electron beam) is investigated.

  16. Thermodynamic features and an experimental study of the extraction of phosphorus from ferrophosphorus in the presence of iron silicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevko, V. M.; Serzhanov, G. M.; Karataeva, G. E.; Lavrov, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The displacement of phosphorus from ferrophosphorus (24.89% P, 67.82% Fe) by FeSi2 is studied by thermodynamic simulation. The melting of electrothermic ferrophosphorus with FS65 ferrosilicium with the extraction of gaseous phosphorus and the formation of a complex ferroalloy containing 42.8-44.3% Si, 50-52.4% Fe, 1.8-2.0% Mn, and 1.4-1.6% P is experimentally investigated.

  17. The mechanism behind the calcium aluminum silicide ternary structural preference and the origin of its semimetal behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semi, Torey Elizabeth

    CaAl2Si2 is the prototype of the CaAl 2Si2 class of Zintl structures established to be useful as thermoelectrics. We propose that CaAl2Si2 be interpreted as an ordinary covalently bonded, tetrahedrally coordinated quasi-semiconductor consisting of a large distortion of the wurtzite structure with the almost fully ionized Ca inserted at an interstitial site. We support this interpretation via a structural mapping and calculations for both a charged binary primitive cell and a Si4primitive cell. Our intent is to explain the unusual structure of the CaAl2Si 2 class of semiconductors, the origin of its semimetallic behavior, the basis for its stability and the effect of substituting other column II atoms for Ca on these properties. To be clear, this work does not examine the nature of the true band gap, or the transport coefficients of CaAl 2Si2. GW corrections are not discussed, in view of the focus on the origins of stability of this peculiar structure.

  18. Investigation of the chemical explosion of an ion exchange resin column and resulting americium contamination of personnel in the 242-Z building, August 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-10-19

    As a result of an explosion in the Waste Treatment Facility, 242-Z Building, 200 West Area of the Hanford Reservation on August 30, 1976, the Manager of the Richland Operations Office (RL), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), appointed an ERDA Committee to conduct a formal investigation and to prepare a report on their findings of this occurrence. The Committee was instructed to conduct the investigation in accordance with ERDAMC 0502, insofar as circumstances would permit, to cover and explain technical elements of the casual sequence(s) of the occurrence, and to describe management systems which should have or could have prevented the occurrence. This report is the result of the investigation and presents the conclusions of the review.

  19. Aqueous complexation of citrate with neodymium(III) and americium(III): a study by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, microcalorimetry, and XAFS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M Alex; Kropf, A Jeremy; Paulenova, Alena; Gelis, Artem V

    2014-05-07

    The aqueous complexation of Nd(III) and Am(III) with anions of citrate was studied by potentiometry, absorption spectrophotometry, microcalorimetry, and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). Using potentiometric titration data fitting the metal-ligand (L) complexes that were identified for Nd(III) were NdHL, NdL, NdHL2, and NdL2; a review of trivalent metal-citrate complexes is also included. Stability constants for these complexes were calculated from potentiometric and spectrophotometric titrations. Microcalorimetric results concluded that the entropy term of complex formation is much more dominant than the enthalpy. XAFS results showed a dependence in the Debye-Waller factor that indicated Nd(iii)-citrate complexation over the pH range of 1.56-6.12.

  20. Americium(III) oxidation by copper(III) periodate in nitric acid solution as compared with the action of Bi(V) compounds of sodium, lithium, and potassium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Radiochemical Processing Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The oxidative action of a Cu(III) periodate compound toward Am(III) in nitric acid was studied. The extent of oxidation of Am(III) to Am(VI) was investigated using a constant initial Cu(III)-to-Am(III) molar ratio of 10:1 and varying nitric acid concentrations from 0.25 to 3.5 mol/L. From 0.25 to 3 mol/L HNO3, more than 98% of the Am(III) was oxidized to Am(VI); however, at 3.5 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, the conversion to Am(VI) was only 80%. Increasing the Cu(III)-to-Am(III) molar ratio to 20:1 in 3.5 mol/L HNO{sub 3} resulted in 98% conversion to Am(VI). For comparison, oxidation of Am(III) with NaBiO{sub 3} was studied at 3.5 mol/L HNO{sub 3} and the same stoichiometric excess of Bi(V) oxidant over Am(III) (stoichiometric ratio of 3.33:1). With NaBiO{sub 3}, the extent of Am(III) conversion to Am(VI) was only 19%, while with the Cu(III) compound this value was found to be about 4 times higher under otherwise identical conditions. Similar results were obtained with other Bi(V) salts. These results show that the Cu(III) periodate compound is a superior oxidant to NaBiO{sub 3}, yielding rapid conversion to Am(VI) in a homogeneous acidic solution, and is, therefore, an excellent candidate for further development of Am separation systems.

  1. Chemical speciation of strontium, americium, and curium in high level waste: Predictive modeling of phase partitioning during tank processing. Annual progress report, October 1996--September 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felmy, A.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US); Choppin, G. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (US)

    1997-12-31

    'The program at Florida State University was funded to collaborate with Dr. A. Felmy (PNNL) on speciation in high level wastes and with Dr. D. Rai (PNNL) on redox of Pu under high level waste conditions. The funding provided support for 3 research associates (postdoctoral researchers) under Professor G. R. Choppin as P.I. Dr. Kath Morris from U. Manchester (Great Britain), Dr. Dean Peterman and Dr. Amy Irwin (both from U. Cincinnati) joined the laboratory in the latter part of 1996. After an initial training period to become familiar with basic actinide chemistry and radiochemical techniques, they began their research. Dr. Peterman was assigned the task of measuring Th-EDTA complexation prior to measuring Pu(IV)-EDTA complexation. These studies are associated with the speciation program with Dr. Felmy. Drs. Morris and Irwin initiated research on redox of plutonium with agents present in the Hanford Tanks as a result of radiolysis or from use in separations. The preliminary results obtained thus far are described in this report. It is expected that the rate of progress will continue to increase significantly as the researchers gain more experience with plutonium chemistry.'

  2. Studies on the feasibility of using completely incinerable reagents for the single-cycle separation of americium(III) from simulated high-level liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, P.K.; Kumaresan, R.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Subramanian, G.G.S.; Prathibha, T.; Syamala, K.V.; Selvan, B. Robert; Rajeswari, S.; Antony, M.P.; Rao, P.R. Vasudeva [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Fuel Chemistry Div.; Chaurasia, Shivkumar; Bhanage, B.M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai (India)

    2015-06-01

    The extraction and stripping behavior of various metal ions present in the fast reactor simulated high-level liquid waste (FR-SHLLW) was studied using a solvent phase composed of a neutral extractant, N,N,-didodecyl-N',N'-dioctyl-3-oxapentane-1,5-diamide (D{sup 3}DODGA) and an acidic extractant, di-2-ethylhexyl diglycolamic acid (HDEHDGA) in n-dodecane (n-DD). The third phase formation behavior of the solvent formulation D{sup 3}DODGA + HDEHDGA/n-DD, was studied when it was contacted with FR-SHLLW, and the concentration of neutral and acidic extractant needed to avoid the third phase formation was optimized. The distribution ratio of various metal ions present in FR-SHLLW was measured in a solution of 0.1 M D{sup 3}DODGA + 0.2 M HDEHDGA/n-DD. The extraction of Am(III) was accompanied by the co-extraction of lanthanides and unwanted metal ions such as Zr(IV), Y(III), and Pd(II). A procedure was developed to minimize the extraction of unwanted metal ions by using aqueous soluble complexing agents in FR-SHLLW. Based on those results, the counter-current mixer-settler run was performed in a 20-stage mixer-settler. Quantitative extraction of Am(III), Ln(III), Y(III), and Sr(II) in 0.1 M D{sup 3}DODGA + 0.2 M HDEHDGA/n-DD was observed. The recovery of Am(III) from the loaded organic phase was carried out by the optimized aqueous formulation composed of 0.01 M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) + 0.5 M citric acid (CA) at pH 1.5. The stripping of Am(III) was accompanied by co-stripping of some early lanthanides. However the later lanthanides (Eu(III) and beyond) were not back extracted to Am(III) product. Therefore, the studies foresee the possibility of intra-lanthanides as well as lanthanide-actinide separation in a single-processing cycle.

  3. Proceedings of the specialists' meeting on nuclear data of plutonium and americium isotopes for reactor applications. [BNL, Nov. 20-21, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrien, R E [ed.

    1979-05-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 17 of the papers in these Proceedings. The remaining six have already been cited in ERA, and can be located by referring to the entry CONF-781174-- in the Report Number Index. (RWR)

  4. Determination of Neptunium, Americium and Curium in Spent Nuclear Fuel Samples by Alpha Spectrometry Using {sup 239}Np and {sup 243}Am as a Spike and a Tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeo, Kih-Soo; Song, Byung-Chul; Kim, Young-Bok; Han, Sun-Ho; Jeon, Young-Shin; Jung, Euo-Chang; Jee, Kwang-Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Determination of actinide elements and fission products in spent nuclear fuels is of importance for a burnup determination and source term evaluation. Especially, the amounts of uranium and plutonium isotopes are used for the evaluation of a burnup credit in spent nuclear fuels. Additionally, other actinides such as Np, Am and Cm in spent nuclear fuel samples is also required for the purposes mentioned above. In this study, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am and {sup 244}Cm were determined by an alpha spectrometry for the source term data for high burnup spent nuclear fuels ranging from 37 to 62.9 GWD/MtU as a burnup. Generally, mass spectrometry has been known as the most powerful method for isotope determinations such as high concentrations of uranium and plutonium. However, in the case of minor actinides such as Np, Am and Cm, alpha spectrometry would be recommended instead. Determination of the transuranic elements in spent nuclear fuel samples is different from that for environmental samples because the amount of each nuclide in the spent fuel samples is higher and the relative ratios between each nuclide are also different from those for environmental samples. So, it is important to select an appropriate tracer and an optimum sample size depending on the nuclides and analytical method. In this study {sup 237}Np was determined by an isotope dilution alpha(gamma) spectrometry using {sup 239}Np as a spike, and {sup 241}Am and curium isotopes were determined by alpha spectrometry using {sup 243}Am as a tracer. The content of each nuclide was compared with that by the Origen-2 code.

  5. Iron silicide formation at different layers of (Fe/Si){sub 3} multilayered structures determined by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badía-Romano, L., E-mail: lbadia@unizar.es; Bartolomé, J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Rubín, J. [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales y Fluidos, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Magén, C. [Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Bürgler, D. E. [Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-6), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-07-14

    The morphology and the quantitative composition of the Fe-Si interface layer forming at each Fe layer of a (Fe/Si){sub 3} multilayer have been determined by means of conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). For the CEMS measurements, each layer was selected by depositing the Mössbauer active {sup 57}Fe isotope with 95% enrichment. Samples with Fe layers of nominal thickness d{sub Fe} = 2.6 nm and Si spacers of d{sub Si} = 1.5 nm were prepared by thermal evaporation onto a GaAs(001) substrate with an intermediate Ag(001) buffer layer. HRTEM images showed that Si layers grow amorphous and the epitaxial growth of the Fe is good only for the first deposited layer. The CEMS spectra show that at all Fe/Si and Si/Fe interfaces a paramagnetic c-Fe{sub 1−x}Si phase is formed, which contains 16% of the nominal Fe deposited in the Fe layer. The bottom Fe layer, which is in contact with the Ag buffer, also contains α-Fe and an Fe{sub 1−x}Si{sub x} alloy that cannot be attributed to a single phase. In contrast, the other two layers only comprise an Fe{sub 1−x}Si{sub x} alloy with a Si concentration of ≃0.15, but no α-Fe.

  6. 用于FEA场发射微尖表面的硅化物薄膜%The Silicide Film on the Surface of FEA‘s Emission Tips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季旭东

    2000-01-01

    一些硅的化合物具有良好的场发射特性,如果用作FEA发射微尖表面的薄膜,将能较好地提高FEA的发射特性.本文对这一类硅化物的制作、测量与性能作了说明.

  7. A core-shell phenomenon maintain the magnetocaloric properties of the ternary silicide Gd6Co1.67Si3 during water flux ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Chennabasappa, Madhu; Chevalier, Bernard; Lahaye, Michel; Labrugère, Christine; Toulemonde, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Ageing effect phenomenon is artificially stimulated on room temperature magnetocaloric material Gd6Co1.67Si3 by using constant flux of water up to time interval of 3 months. A core-shell model of oxide layer formation (SiOx-Gd2O3) on surface of Gd6Co1.67Si3 due to corrosion is justified using spontaneous single metal electrochemical reactions. The model is first proposed by a detailed microstructure study using Electron Probe Micro-Analysis, X-ray diffraction experimen...

  8. Study on Preparation of Monosilane from Magnesium Silicide%硅化镁制备单硅烷的工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李群; 顾克军; 吴沙

    2013-01-01

    提供一种硅化镁制备单硅烷的方法,并对制备工艺进行了研究,得到的优化工艺条件为:氯化铵和硅化镁的摩尔比为8∶1,液氨含水量<10-5,氯化铵液氨溶液浓度为20%,反应时间3h,反应温度-20℃,单硅烷的收率大于95%.

  9. Bottom-gate poly-Si thin-film transistors by nickel silicide seed-induced lateral crystallization with self-aligned lightly doped layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sol Kyu; Seok, Ki Hwan; Chae, Hee Jae; Lee, Yong Hee; Han, Ji Su; Jo, Hyeon Ah; Joo, Seung Ki

    2017-03-01

    We report a novel method to reduce source and drain (S/D) resistances, and to form a lightly doped layer (LDL) of bottom-gate polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistors (TFTs). For application in driving TFTs, which operate under high drain voltage condition, poly-Si TFTs are needed in order to attain reliability against hot-carriers as well as high field-effect mobility (μFE). With an additional doping on the p+ Si layer, sheet resistance on S/D was reduced by 37.5% and an LDL was introduced between the channel and drain. These results contributed to not only a lower leakage current and gate-induced drain leakage, but also high immunity of kink-effect and hot-carrier stress. Furthermore, the measured electrical characteristics exhibited a steep subthreshold slope of 190 mV/dec and high μFE of 263 cm2/Vs.

  10. Interaction mechanism between niobium-silicide-based alloy melt and Y2O3 refractory crucible in vacuum induction melting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Ming

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Y2O3 crucibles were introduced in the study as an alternative to the traditional ceramic ones in vacuum induction melting of multi-component Nb-16Si-22Ti-2Al-2Hf-17Cr (at.% alloys, to reveal the possible interactions between the alloy melt and the refractory crucible. Multiple melting time lengths and two cooling schemes were designed and used for the experiments. The chemical composition and microstructure of the tested alloy and the melt-crucible interaction were investigated and evaluated. In the experiments, Y2O3 crucible displays good physical-chemical compatibility. The results indicate that the increment of O element in the as-cast ingot is 0.03at.%-0.04at.% (72-97 ppm and the increment of Y element is very insignificant. The key features of the alloy melt interacting with Y2O3 ceramics are analyzed and concluded in the paper. As a result of the dissolution reaction xY2O3 (in molten alloy + (1-xHfO2 (impurity →Hf1-xY2xO2-x, a continuous double-layer solid film consisted of HfO2 solid solution (~2 μm and pure HfO2 (~5 μm is formed on the surface of the test ingot after cooled down in the crucible. The experimental results show that the Y2O3 crucible is applicable to the vacuum induction melting of Nb-Si based alloys.

  11. Doping-Spike PtSi Schottky Infrared Detectors with Extended Cutoff Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. L.; Park, J. S.; Gunapala, S. D.; Jones, E. W.; Castillo, H. M. Del

    1994-01-01

    A technique incorporating a p+ doping spike at the silicide/Si interface to reduce the effective Schottky barrier of the silicide infrared detectors and thus extend the cutoff wavelength has been developed.

  12. Interaction and transport of actinides in natural clay rock with consideration of humic substances and clay organics. Characterization and quantification of the influence of clay organics on the interaction and diffusion of uranium and americium in the clay. Joint project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhard, Gert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany). Inst. of Radiochemistry; Schmeide, Katja; Joseph, Claudia; Sachs, Susanne; Steudtner, Robin; Raditzky, Bianca; Guenther, Alix

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this project was the study of basic interaction processes in the systems actinide - clay organics - aquifer and actinide - natural clay - clay organics - aquifer. Thus, complexation, redox, sorption and diffusion studies were performed. To evaluate the influence of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur containing functional groups of humic acid (HA) on the complexation of actinides in comparison to carboxylic groups, the Am(III) and U(VI) complexation by model ligands was studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TRLFS. The results show that Am(III) is mainly coordinated via carboxylic groups, however, probably stabilized by nitrogen groups. The U(VI) complexation is dominated by carboxylic groups, whereas nitrogen and sulfur containing groups play a minor role. Phosphorus containing groups may contribute to the U(VI) complexation by HA, however, due to their low concentration in HA they play only a subordinate role compared to carboxylic groups. Applying synthetic HA with varying sulfur contents (0 to 6.9 wt.%), the role of sulfur functionalities of HA for the U(VI) complexation and Np(V) reduction was studied. The results have shown that sulfur functionalities can be involved in U(VI) humate complexation and act as redox-active sites in HA for the Np(V) reduction. However, due to the low content of sulfur in natural HA, its influence is less pronounced. In the presence of carbonate, the U(VI) complexation by HA was studied in the alkaline pH range by means of cryo-TRLFS (-120 C) and ATR FT-IR spectroscopy. The formation of the ternary UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}HA(II){sup 4-} complex was detected. The complex formation constant was determined with log {beta}{sub 0.1} M = 24.57 {+-} 0.17. For aqueous U(VI) citrate and oxalate species, luminescence emission properties were determined by cryo-TRLFS and used to determine stability constants. The existing data base could be validated. The U(VI) complexation by lactate, studied in the temperature range 7 to 65 C, was found to be endothermic and entropy-driven. In contrast, the complex stability constants determined for U(VI) humate complexation at 20 and 40 C are comparable, however, decrease at 60 C. For aqueous U(IV) citrate, succinate, mandelate and glycolate species stability constants were determined. These ligands, especially citrate, increase solubility and mobility of U(IV) in solution due to complexation. The U(VI) sorption onto crushed Opalinus Clay (OPA, Mont Terri, Switzerland) was studied in the absence and presence of HA or low molecular weight organic acids, in dependence on temperature and CO2 presence using OPA pore water as background electrolyte. Distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) were determined for the sorption of U(VI) and HA onto OPA with (0.0222 {+-} 0.0004) m{sup 3}/kg and (0.129 {+-} 0.006) m{sup 3}/kg, respectively. The U(VI) sorption is not influenced by HA ({<=}50 mg/L), however, decreased by low molecular weight organic acids ({>=} 1 x 10{sup -5} M), especially by citrate and tartrate. With increasing temperature, the U(VI) sorption increases both in the absence and in the presence of clay organics. The U(VI) diffusion in compacted OPA is not influenced by HA at 25 and 60 C. Predictions of the U(VI) diffusion show that an increase of the temperature to 60 C does not accelerate the migration of U(VI). With regard to uranium-containing waste, it is concluded that OPA is suitable as host rock for a future nuclear waste repository since OPA has a good retardation potential for U(VI). (orig.)

  13. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants in Ground Water Volume 3 Assessment for Radionuclides IncludingTritium, Radon, Strontium, Technetium, Uranium, Iodine, Radium, Thorium, Cesium, and Plutonium-Americium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current document represents the third volume of a set of three volumes that address the technical basis and requirements for assessing the potential applicability of MNA as part of a ground-water remedy for plumes with nonradionuclide and/or radionuclide inorganic contamina...

  14. Study of plutonium and americium contamination in agricultural area, radiological impact caused by consumption of vegetables of this area; Estudio de la contaminacion de plutonio y americio en un area agricola, impacto radiologico ocasionado por consumo de vegetales contaminados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, Assuncion; Aragon, Antonio; Cruz, Berta de la; Gutierrez, Jose [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia

    2001-07-01

    The transuranide concentration has been studied for 30 years in vegetable production, crops in wide extensions and in private-owned farms, all of them situated within the Pu-contaminated area of Palomares due to an air accident in 1966. Based on these studies, a preliminary estimation of the radiological risk caused by the consumption of these products by the inhabitants was possible. The results show that most of the fruits present a surface contamination, which disappears or is significantly reduced when they are washed. The contamination present in edible parts of the vegetables, as well as the contamination of other products included in the diet, has facilitated the estimation of the effective dose for ingestion and the committed effective dose for 50 years for the inhabitants. The main conclusions are: those plants, whose cultivation period is less than a year, present a low level of contamination; the green parts of the plants have a higher contamination than the fruits; the Pu soil to plant transfer factor is very low. In general, those plants that have remained in the contaminated land for several years present a high contamination level; the ingestion of products from Palomares does not represent an important risk for the population, even in the case that the products were totally consumed by a critical group.( author)

  15. Supported liquid inorganic membranes for nuclear waste separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhave, Ramesh R; DeBusk, Melanie M; DelCul, Guillermo D; Delmau, Laetitia H; Narula, Chaitanya K

    2015-04-07

    A system and method for the extraction of americium from radioactive waste solutions. The method includes the transfer of highly oxidized americium from an acidic aqueous feed solution through an immobilized liquid membrane to an organic receiving solvent, for example tributyl phosphate. The immobilized liquid membrane includes porous support and separating layers loaded with tributyl phosphate. The extracted solution is subsequently stripped of americium and recycled at the immobilized liquid membrane as neat tributyl phosphate for the continuous extraction of americium. The sequestered americium can be used as a nuclear fuel, a nuclear fuel component or a radiation source, and the remaining constituent elements in the aqueous feed solution can be stored in glassified waste forms substantially free of americium.

  16. TiAl合金激光熔覆金属硅化物复合材料涂层组织研究%Study on the Microstructure of Laser Clad Metallic Silicide Composite Coatings on TiAl Intermetallic Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘秀波; 王华明

    2005-01-01

    利用预涂NiC-Si复合粉末对TiAl合金进行激光熔覆处理,分析了涂层的显微组织及其形成机理,并讨论了显微组织与预涂合金粉末成分的关系.结果表明:涂层的显微组织由初生块状Ti5Si3相及点状γ-NiCrAl/TiSi共晶组织组成,随着预涂合金粉末中Si含量的增加,涂层中初生Ti5Si3块状相的体积分数增大,显微硬度提高,涂层与基体之间为良好的冶金结合.

  17. FY 1998 annual report on the improvement of toughness of silicide-based intermetallic compounds by controlling their composite structures; 1998 nendo fukugo soshikika ni yoru shirisaidokei kinzokukan kagobutsu no kyojinsei kaizen chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Intermetallic compounds, although attracting much attention as most promising materials serviceable at superhigh temperature, are very fragile at normal temperature, which is one of their major disadvantages. Structures of these compounds prepared by the melting method are controlled to improve their toughness by, e.g., changing phase ratio of the initial crystal for the Mo-Si-Nb system to prevent cracking during the melting and casting stages, addition of a third element (e.g., Zr, Ti or Hf) or a mixed component of Nb and Zr to control the structure of Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} considered to be a cause for the cracking, and controlling melting and solidification rates for the FZ melting method. The three-phase microstructures with added Hf or Zr show improved toughness, but need additional procedures for controlling solidification and cooling conditions. For the powder method, the MA conditions are investigated with a two-element system, and the effects of Al or Zr as the third element added to the base composition on the composite microstructures and constituent phases are also investigated. Unlike the melting method, the powder method causes no cracking problems during the stock preparation stage and hence is expected to be applicable to production of larger stocks. However, the products by this method are found to be insufficient both in toughness and high-temperature strength. It is necessary to develop methods for cutting down and controlling oxides in the grain boundaries, in order to prevent deterioration of their strength at high temperature. (NEDO)

  18. Industrial research for transmutation scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarcat, Noel; Garzenne, Claude; Le Mer, Joël; Leroyer, Hadrien; Desroches, Estelle; Delbecq, Jean-Michel

    2011-04-01

    This article presents the results of research scenarios for americium transmutation in a 22nd century French nuclear fleet, using sodium fast breeder reactors. We benchmark the americium transmutation benefits and drawbacks with a reference case consisting of a hypothetical 60 GWe fleet of pure plutonium breeders. The fluxes in the various parts of the cycle (reactors, fabrication plants, reprocessing plants and underground disposals) are calculated using EDF's suite of codes, comparable in capabilities to those of other research facilities. We study underground thermal heat load reduction due to americium partitioning and repository area minimization. We endeavor to estimate the increased technical complexity of surface facilities to handle the americium fluxes in special fuel fabrication plants, americium fast burners, special reprocessing shops, handling equipments and transport casks between those facilities.

  19. Chemistry research and development progress report, May-October, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, F. J.

    1979-08-30

    Work in progress includes: calorimetry and thermodynamics of nuclear materials; americium recovery and purification; optimization of the cation exchange process for recovering americium and plutonium from molten salt extraction residues, photochemical separations of actinides; advanced ion exchange materials and techniques; secondary actinide recovery; removal of plutonium from lathe coolant oil; evaluation of tributyl phosphate-impregnated sorbent for plutonium-uranium separations; plutonium recovery in advance size reduction facility; plutonium peroxide precipitation; decontamination of Rocky Flats soil; soil decontamination at other Department of Energy sites; recovery of actinides from combustible wastes; induction-heated, tilt-pour furnace; vacuum melting; determination of plutonium and americium in salts and alloys by calorimetry; plutonium peroxide precipitation process; silica removal study; a comparative study of annular and Raschig ring-filled tanks; recovery of plutonium and americium from a salt cleanup alloy; and process development for recovery of americium from vacuum melt furnace crucibles.

  20. The behaviour of Eu, Pu, Am radionuclide at burning radioactive graphite in an oxygen atmosphere. Computer experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolbin T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Be means of the method of computer thermodynamic simulation we studied the behaviour of the europium, plutonium and americium from the combustion of radioactive graphite in oxygen. Europe is in the form of condensed EuOCl, Eu2O3 and vapour EuO. Pluto is in the form of condensed vapour PuO2 and PuO2. Americium is a condensed AmO2, Am2O3 and vapour Am. The basic reactions occurring compounds with europium, plutonium and americium. Equilibrium constants of the reactions have been determined.

  1. Rubbia proposes a speedier voyage to Mars and back

    CERN Multimedia

    Abbott, A

    1999-01-01

    Carlo Rubbia has designed a propulsion engine that uses fission fragments of americium to directly heat a propulsion gas. He estimates it would allow a manned trip to Mars and back in around a year (8 paragraphs).

  2. Filgrastim (Neupogen)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CRC) Simulation Tools Isotopes Americium-241 (Am-241) Cesium-137 (Cs-137) Radioisotope Brief Toxicology FAQs Cobalt- ... a drug that has been used successfully for cancer patients to stimulate the growth of the white ...

  3. Literatuuronderzoek plutoniumanalyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glastra P; Kwakman PJM; LSO

    1997-01-01

    Dit rapport beschrijft de laatste ontwikkelingen in de radiochemische bepaling van plutonium in monstermatrices zoals luchtstoffilters, regenwater, gras en bodem. De radiochemische scheiding van plutonium van storende alfastralers, zoals americium en curium, is door de recente ontwikkeling van spec

  4. Study of the properties of the Am-O system in view of the transmutation of Am 241 in fast reactors; Etude des proprietes du systeme Am-O en vue de la transmutation de l`americium 241 en reacteur a neutrons rapides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casalta, S.

    1996-04-01

    To reduce the long term toxicity of Am 241 it was considered to transmute this isotope in fast reactor. The first part of this thesis is an introduction at this problem. In the second part we give the experimental techniques used for the realisation of an AmO{sub 2}-MgO target (powder metallurgy under inert, oxidizing or reducing atmosphere). The properties of the Am-O system has been analyzed by X diffraction, thermodynamic and ceramography, in the Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}-AmO{sub 2} field. In the third part we study the external exposure risk created by the manufacturing of this target and in the last part the behavior of this target in a fast reactor. 66 refs., 28 figs., 25 tabs., 1 append.

  5. Methodology for the Inventory and Assessment of Americium Contamination Level in 1987 in an Area of Palomares Contaminated with Plutonium Weapon Grade; Estimacion del Contenido de Americio Existente en el Ano 1987 en una Zona de Palomares Contaminada en 1966 por Material de Plutonio Grado Bomba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, A.; Aragon, A.; Cruz de la, B.

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology applied for the assessment of the ''241 Am coming from the decay of ''241 Pu isotope content in a contaminated area of Palomares, where the clean-up work done in 1966, given the negligible agricultural importance of such area at the time and its geographical characteristics, was not of the same magnitude as for the rest of the region. (Author) 4 refs.

  6. AM(VI) partitioning studies. FY14 final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The use of higher oxidation states of americium in partitioning from the lanthanides is under continued investigation by the sigma team. This is based on the hypothesis that Am(VI) can be produced and remain stable in irradiated first cycle raffinate solution long enough to perform solvent extraction for separations. The stability of Am(VI) to autoreduction was measured using millimolar americium concentrations in a 1-cm cell with a Cary 6000 UV/Vis spectrophotometer for data acquisition. At millimolar americium concentrations, Am(VI) is stable enough against its own autoreduction for separations purposes. A second major accomplishment during FY14 was the hot test. Americium oxidation and extraction was performed using a centrifugal contactor-based test bed consisting of an extraction stage and two stripping stages. Sixty-three percent americium extraction was obtained in one extraction stage, in agreement with batch contacts. Promising electrochemical oxidation results have also been obtained, using terpyridine ligand derivatized electrodes for binding of Am(III). Approximately 50 % of the Am(III) was oxidized to Am(V) over the course of 1 hour. It is believed that this is the first demonstration of the electrolytic oxidation of americium in a non-complexing solution. Finally, an initial investigation of Am(VI) extraction using diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA) was performed.

  7. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers, Phase II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicided niobium alloy (C103) combustion chambers have been used extensively in both NASA and DoD liquid rocket propulsion systems. Niobium alloys offer a good...

  8. Control of interfacial layers for high-performance porous Si lithium-ion battery anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyungmin; Lee, Sungjun; Yoo, Seungmin; Shin, Myoungsoo; Kim, Jieun; Chun, Myungjin; Choi, Nam-Soon; Park, Soojin

    2014-09-24

    We demonstrate a facile synthesis of micrometer-sized porous Si particles via copper-assisted chemical etching process. Subsequently, metal and/or metal silicide layers are introduced on the surface of porous Si particles using a simple chemical reduction process. Macroporous Si and metal/metal silicide-coated Si electrodes exhibit a high initial Coulombic efficiency of ∼90%. Reversible capacity of carbon-coated porous Si gradually decays after 80 cycles, while metal/metal silicide-coated porous Si electrodes show significantly improved cycling performance even after 100 cycles with a reversible capacity of >1500 mAh g(-1). We confirm that a stable solid-electrolyte interface layer is formed on metal/metal silicide-coated porous Si electrodes during cycling, leading to a highly stable cycling performance.

  9. Lightweight Ultrahigh Temperature CMC-Lined C/C Combustion Chambers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA and DoD are seeking economical and high-performance bipropellant thrusters for various applications. These goals cannot be achieved using the silicided C103...

  10. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicided niobium alloy (C103) combustion chambers have been used extensively in both NASA and DoD liquid rocket propulsion systems. Niobium alloys offer a good...

  11. Ion-beam mixed ultra-thin cobalt suicide (CoSi2) films by cobalt sputtering and rapid thermal annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, S.; Kasko, I.; Ryssel, H.

    1995-10-01

    The influence of ion-beam mixing on ultra-thin cobalt silicide (CoSi2) formation was investigated by characterizing the ion-beam mixed and unmixed CoSi2 films. A Ge+ ion-implantation through the Co film prior to silicidation causes an interface mixing of the cobalt film with the silicon substrate and results in improved silicide-to-silicon interface roughness. Rapid thermal annealing was used to form Ge+ ion mixed and unmixed thin CoSi2 layer from 10 nm sputter deposited Co film. The silicide films were characterized by secondary neutral mass spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, tunneling electron microscopy (TEM), Rutherford backscattering, and sheet resistance measurements. The experi-mental results indicate that the final rapid thermal annealing temperature should not exceed 800°C for thin (<50 nm) CoSi2 preparation. A comparison of the plan-view and cross-section TEM micrographs of the ion-beam mixed and unmixed CoSi2 films reveals that Ge+ ion mixing (45 keV, 1 × 1015 cm-2) produces homogeneous silicide with smooth silicide-to-silicon interface.

  12. 铌硅化物基超高温合金与石墨坩埚氧化物涂层反应的热力学分析%Thermodynamic Analysis of the Reaction of the Nb Silicide-based Superalloys with Oxide Coatings for the Graphite Crucibles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴梅柏; 郭喜平

    2007-01-01

    利用热力学计算,分析了几种氧化物涂层Y2O3、ZrO2、Al2O3、MgO、CaO、Ce2O3和BeO等在高温下与新型铌硅化物基超高温合金中的几种主要元素Nb、Si、Ti和Hf之间反应的可能性,得到了这些反应的ΔG(θ)与温度T的关系图.通过比较这几种氧化物对合金熔体在高温下的化学稳定性,发现Y2O3和BeO对这些合金元素的化学稳定性较好,且Y2O3为熔炼铌硅化物基超高温合金用石墨坩埚的理想涂层材料.

  13. On the transmutation of Am in a fast lead-cooled system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P Kochurov; V N Konev; A Yu Kwaretzkheli

    2007-02-01

    Characteristics of the equilibrium fuel cycle for the core or a blanket of ADS having the structure of the core of a fast lead-cooled reactor of type BREST (Russian abbreviation for `Bystryy Reaktor so Svintsovym Teplonositelem') in a mode of americium transmutation are calculated. Americium loading was taken 5% of heavy atoms. Keeping the average multiplication factor the same as in a standard equilibrium cycle, reactivity swing over 1 year's microcycle is about 1%, that demands partial fuel reloading with a periodicity of about one month. For one year of operation, 61 kg of americium is destroyed, and due to increased 238Pu content, americium is mainly converted to fission products. Thus in a system of 1 GWt (thermal), 87 kg of americium can be transmuted yearly. The estimate of the reactivity void effect has shown that it increases to 0.6% almost linearly with the void fraction increasing up to 25% and reaches its maximum of 0.7% at a void fraction of about 50%. Application of similar strategy for ADS with a sub-criticality level ≈ 0.96–0.98 can essentially relax safety problems related to positive void effects.

  14. Porous metal oxide microspheres from ion exchange resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picart, S.; Parant, P.; Caisso, M.; Remy, E.; Mokhtari, H.; Jobelin, I.; Bayle, J. P.; Martin, C. L.; Blanchart, P.; Ayral, A.; Delahaye, T.

    2015-07-01

    This study is devoted to the synthesis and the characterization of porous metal oxide microsphere from metal loaded ion exchange resin. Their application concerns the fabrication of uranium-americium oxide pellets using the powder-free process called Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP). Those mixed oxide ceramics are one of the materials envisaged for americium transmutation in sodium fast neutron reactors. The advantage of such microsphere precursor compared to classical oxide powder is the diminution of the risk of fine dissemination which can be critical for the handling of highly radioactive powders such as americium based oxides and the improvement of flowability for the filling of compaction chamber. Those millimetric oxide microspheres incorporating uranium and americium were synthesized and characterizations showed a very porous microstructure very brittle in nature which occurred to be adapted to shaping by compaction. Studies allowed to determine an optimal heat treatment with calcination temperature comprised between 700-800 °C and temperature rate lower than 2 °C/min. Oxide Precursors were die-pressed into pellets and then sintered under air to form regular ceramic pellets of 95% of theoretical density (TD) and of homogeneous microstructure. This study validated thus the scientific feasibility of the CRMP process to prepare bearing americium target in a powder free manner.

  15. Reaction phases and diffusion paths in SiC/metal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naka, M.; Fukai, T. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Schuster, J.C. [Vienna Univ., Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    The interface structures between SiC and metal are reviewed at SiC/metal systems. Metal groups are divided to carbide forming metals and non-carbide forming metals. Carbide forming metals form metal carbide granular or zone at metal side, and metal silicide zone at SiC side. The further diffusion of Si and C from SiC causes the formation of T ternary phase depending metal. Non-carbide forming metals form silicide zone containing graphite or the layered structure of metal silicide and metal silicide containing graphite. The diffusion path between SiC and metal are formed along tie-lines connecting SiC and metal on the corresponding ternary Si-C-M system. The reactivity of metals is dominated by the forming ability of carbide or silicide. Te reactivity tendency of elements are discussed on the periodical table of elements, and Ti among elements shows the highest reactivity among carbide forming metals. For non-carbide forming metals the reactivity sequence of metals is Fe>Ni>Co. (orig.)

  16. Analysis of quadrupole splitting of multiple Fe sites intermixed in Si(111) with Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawauchi, Taizo; Zhang, Xiaowei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-12-01

    The iron silicide has various interesting phases both fundamentally and technologically, which have acquired much attention to date. Iron silicides are often fabricated on a Si substrate by a solid phase epitaxy method, and the initial stage of intermixing of iron atoms with substrate Si is of crucial importance for silicide fabrication, which remains to be clarified. Here, we have investigated the initial stage of the iron-silicide formation before crystallization with Mössbauer spectroscopy suited to characterization of magnetic and chemical properties of 57Fe atoms in materials. The sample was prepared by deposition of 57Fe of 1 nm on a Si(111) surface at 450 K. Conventional Mössbauer spectroscopy in the energy domain revealed presence of two iron sites with similar quadrupole splits and isomer shifts, which hampered complete analysis of this system. By combining the time-domain spectroscopy using polarized synchrotron radiation, we have separately analyzed the quadrupole splits and isomer shifts for the two iron sites. By using the theoretical simulation, furthermore, we successfully reproduced the experimentally observed time spectrum of the nuclear resonant scattering on the assumption that iron atoms randomly occupy the substitutional sites for Si at the initial stage of intermixing before crystallization of an iron silicide.

  17. Facilities for preparing actinide or fission product-based targets

    CERN Document Server

    Sors, M

    1999-01-01

    Research and development work is currently in progress in France on the feasibility of transmutation of very long-lived radionuclides such as americium, blended with an inert medium such as magnesium oxide and pelletized for irradiation in a fast neutron reactor. The process is primarily designed to produce ceramics for nuclear reactors, but could also be used to produce targets for accelerators. The Actinide Development Laboratory is part of the ATALANTE complex at Marcoule, where the CEA investigates reprocessing, liquid and solid waste treatment and vitrification processes. The laboratory produces radioactive sources; after use, their constituents are recycled, notably through R and D programs requiring such materials. Recovered americium is purified, characterized and transformed for an experiment known as ECRIX, designed to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating americium-based ceramics and to determine the reactor transmutation coefficients.

  18. Recovery of trans-plutonium elements; Recuperation des elements transplutoniens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espie, J.Y.; Poncet, B.; Simon, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    The object of this work is to study the recovery of americium and curium from the fission-product solution obtained from the processing of irradiated fuel elements made of natural metallic uranium alloyed with aluminium, iron and silicon; these elements have been subjected to an average irradiation of 4000 MW days/ton in a gas-graphite type reactor having a thermal power of 3.7 MW/ton of uranium. The process used consists of 3 extraction cycles and one americium-curium separation: - 1) extraction cycle in 40 per cent TBP: extraction of actinides and lanthanides; elimination of fission products; - 2) extraction cycle in 8 per cent D2EHPA: decontamination from the fission products, decontamination of actinides from lanthanides; - 3) extraction cycle in 40 per cent TBP: separation of the complexing agent and concentration of the actinides; - 4) americium-curium separation by precipitation. (authors) [French] Cette etude a pour objet, la recuperation de l'americium et du curium de la solution de produits de fission provenant du traitement de combustibles irradies a base d'uranium naturel metallique allie a l'aluminium, le fer, et le silicium, et ayant subi une irradiation moyenne de 4000 MWj/t dans une pile du type graphite-gaz, dont la puissance thermique est de 3.7 MW/t d'uranium. Le procede utilise comprend 3 cycles d'extraction et une separation americium-curium: - 1. cycle d'extraction dans le TBP a 40 pour cent: extraction des actinides et des lanthanides, elimination des produits de fission; - 2. cycle d'extraction dans le D2EHPA a 8 pour cent: decontamination en produits de fission, decontamination des actinides en lanthanides; - 3. cycle d'extraction dans le TBP a 40 pour cent: separation du complexant et concentration des actinides; - 4. separation americium-curium par precipitation. (auteurs)

  19. Colloid formation during waste form reaction: implications for nuclear waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, J. K.; Bradley, J.; Teetsov, A.; Bradley, C. R.; ten Brink, Marilyn Buchholtz

    1992-01-01

    Insoluble plutonium- and americium-bearing colloidal particles formed during simulated weathering of a high-level nuclear waste glass. Nearly 100 percent of the total plutonium and americium in test ground water was concentrated in these submicrometer particles. These results indicate that models of actinide mobility and repository integrity, which assume complete solubility of actinides in ground water, underestimate the potential for radionuclide release into the environment. A colloid-trapping mechanism may be necessary for a waste repository to meet long-term performance specifications.

  20. WSi2 in Si(1-x)Ge(x) Composites: Processing and Thermoelectric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jonathan A.; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Traditional SiGe thermoelectrics have potential for enhanced figure of merit (ZT) via nano-structuring with a silicide phase, such as WSi2. A second phase of nano-sized silicides can theoretically reduce the lattice component of thermal conductivity without significantly reducing the electrical conductivity. However, experimentally achieving such improvements in line with the theory is complicated by factors such as control of silicide size during sintering, dopant segregation, matrix homogeneity, and sintering kinetics. Samples were prepared using powder metallurgy techniques; including mechano-chemical alloying, via ball milling, and spark plasma sintering for densification. Processing, micro-structural development, and thermoelectric properties will be discussed. Additionally, couple and device level characterization will be introduced.

  1. Oxidation Behavior and Chlorination Treatment to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrani, Vikas [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This thesis is written in an alternate format. The thesis is composed of a general introduction, two original manuscripts, and a general conclusion. References cited within each chapter are given at the end of each chapter. The general introduction starts with the driving force behind this research, and gives an overview of previous work on boron doped molybdenum silicides, Nb/Nb5Si3 composites, boron modified niobium silicides and molybdenum niobium silicides. Chapter 2 focuses on the oxidation behavior of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 3 contains studies on a novel chlorination technique to improve the oxidation resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 4 summarizes the important results in this study.

  2. Structural and electrical properties of swift heavy ion beam irradiated Co/Si interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Garima Agarwal; Ankur Jain; Shivani Agarwal; D Kabiraj; I P Jain

    2006-04-01

    Synthesis of swift heavy ion induced metal silicide is a new advancement in materials science research. We have investigated the mixing at Co/Si interface by swift heavy ion beam induced irradiation in the electronic stopping power regime. Irradiations were undertaken at room temperature using 120 MeV Au ions at the Co/Si interface for investigation of ion beam mixing at various doses: 8 × 1012, 5 × 1013 and 1 × 1014 cm-2. Formation of different phases of cobalt silicide is identified by the grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) technique, which shows enhancement of intermixing and silicide formation as a result of irradiation. – characteristics at Co/Si interface were undertaken to understand the irradiation effect on conduction mechanism at the interface.

  3. Characteristics of TaSi/sub 2//Poly-Si films oxidized in steam for VLSI applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBlasi, J.M.; Razouk, R.R.; Thomas, M.E.

    1983-12-01

    The oxidation kinetics of tantalum disilicide/polycrystalline silicon composite structures in pyrogenic steam over the temperature range of 800/sup 0/-1000/sup 0/C have been investigated. The oxide formation over the tantalum silicide film has been found to proceed in a linear-parabolic manner similar to that observed for oxide formation over single crystal silicon. The parabolic rate constant is similar to that observed for single crystal silicon, while the linear rate constant is higher than that of lightly doped single crystal and polycrystalline silicon. The electrical properties of oxides formed over the silicide as well as oxides under the silicide/polycrystalline silicon composite layer (gate oxides) have been investigated. Gate oxide integrity has been found to degrade dramatically when, due to oxidation, the average remaining underlying polysilicon thickness is reduced to less than 2000A at the gate electrode.

  4. Ledge-flow-controlled catalyst interface dynamics during Si nanowire growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, S; Sharma, R; Wirth, CT;

    2008-01-01

    and the overall mechanism is largely unresolved. Here, we present a video-rate environmental transmission electron microscopy study of Si nanowire formation from Pd silicide crystals under disilane exposure. A Si crystal nucleus forms by phase separation, as observed for the liquid Au–Si system, which we use...... as a comparative benchmark. The dominant coherent Pd silicide/Si growth interface subsequently advances by lateral propagation of ledges, driven by catalytic dissociation of disilane and coupled Pd and Si diffusion. Our results establish an atomistic framework for nanowire assembly from solid catalysts, relevant...

  5. Basic factors controlling pest in high temperature systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz-Mattuck, J.; Rossetti, M.

    1971-01-01

    The catastrophic disintegration in air at intermediate temperatures of refractory materials which are very resistant to oxidation at high temperatures is known as pest. A study was undertaken to determine whether the mechanism proposed for pest failure in silicides might also be responsible for pest failure in NbAl3. The aim was to correlate oxidation kinetics in the range where disintegration of NbAl3 is observed with delayed failure data obtained under similar conditions. Studies were also undertaken to develop some understanding of deformation mechanisms in both silicides and aluminides.

  6. Rapid Solid-State Metathesis Routes to Nanostructured Silicon-Germainum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaner, Richard B. (Inventor); Bux, Sabah K. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Rodriguez, Marc (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods for producing nanostructured silicon and silicon-germanium via solid state metathesis (SSM). The method of forming nanostructured silicon comprises the steps of combining a stoichiometric mixture of silicon tetraiodide (SiI4) and an alkaline earth metal silicide into a homogeneous powder, and initating the reaction between the silicon tetraiodide (SiI4) with the alkaline earth metal silicide. The method of forming nanostructured silicon-germanium comprises the steps of combining a stoichiometric mixture of silicon tetraiodide (SiI4) and a germanium based precursor into a homogeneous powder, and initiating the reaction between the silicon tetraiodide (SiI4) with the germanium based precursors.

  7. Radiological analysis of materials sampled on the old nuclear test site of In Ekker (Algeria); Analyses radiologiques de materiaux preleves sur l'ancien site d'essais nucleaires d'In Ekker (Algerie)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chareyron, Bruno

    2010-02-11

    After having recalled the context of the French nuclear test campaign in Algeria between 1961 and 1966, this document reports and comments radiological measurements performed on the site of In Ekker, and also results of analysis performed in laboratory (contamination by cesium 137, americium 241, plutonium); recommendations are given

  8. Historical Review of Californium-252 Discovery and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the discovery and history of californium 252. This isotope may be synthesized by irradiating plutonium 239, plutonium 242, americium 243, or curium 244 with neutrons in a nuclear reactor. Various experiments and inventions involving Cf conducted at the Savannah River Plant are discussed. The evolution of radiotherapy using californium 252 is reviewed. (PLG)

  9. Determination of Am-241 in lung and bone by gamma spectrometry with semiconductor detectors LEGe; Determinacion de Am- 241 en pulmon y hueso por espectrometria gamma con detectores de semiconductor LEGe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Lopez, B.

    2014-07-01

    Americium is produced from neutron absorption plutonium atoms within nuclear reactors. The work of dismantling and decontamination of the installations and radioactive waste management makes workers exposed acquire risk of internal exposure and therefore can incorporate Am-241 in his body. (Author)

  10. Experimental findings on actinide recovery utilizing oxidation by peroxydisulfate followed by ion exchange: Fuel cycle research & development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shehee, T. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-31

    Our research seeks to determine if inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective minor actinide (Am, Cm) separation from lanthanides. Previous work has established that a number of inorganic and UMOF ion-exchange materials exhibit varying affinities for actinides and lanthanides, which may be exploited for effective separations. During FY15, experimental work focused on investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric and perchloric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium in dilute nitric acid. Ion-exchange materials tested included a variety of alkali titanates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of AmIII. Experimental findings indicated that CeIII, NpV, and RuII are oxidized by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of CeIII, NpV, and RuII affected the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used.

  11. 10 CFR Appendix E to Part 20 - Nationally Tracked Source Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Category 1(TBq) Category 1(Ci) Category 2(TBq) Category 2(Ci) Actinium-227 20 540 0.2 5.4 Americium-241 60... 2 54 Strontium-90 1,000 27,000 10 270 Thorium-228 20 540 0.2 5.4 Thorium-229 20 540 0.2 5.4...

  12. Literatuuronderzoek plutoniumanalyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glastra P; Kwakman PJM; LSO

    1997-01-01

    This report describes recent developments in the radiochemical determination of plutonium in samples from the environment such as aerosols, rainwater, grass and soil. The radiochemical separation of plutonium from interfering alpha emitters, such as americium and curium, was found to be simplified b

  13. Discovery of Isotopes of the Transuranium Elements with 93 <= Z <= 98

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, C

    2012-01-01

    One hundred and five isotopes of the transuranium elements neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, berkelium and californium have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  14. Presence and Character of the 5f Electrons in the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Mårtensson, N.;

    1980-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Image level binding energy to the occupation of the 5f orbital is pointed out and used to demonstrate the presence of 5f electrons in the uranium metal. It is suggested that the valence band spectrum of uranium might contain satellites originating from excitations to locali...... and the critical separation is found to take place between plutonium and americium....

  15. Experimental findings on actinide recovery utilizing oxidation by peroxydisulfate followed by ion exchange: Fuel cycle research & development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shehee, T. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-31

    Our research seeks to determine if inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective minor actinide (Am, Cm) separation from lanthanides. Previous work has established that a number of inorganic and UMOF ion-exchange materials exhibit varying affinities for actinides and lanthanides, which may be exploited for effective separations. During FY15, experimental work focused on investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric and perchloric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium in dilute nitric acid. Ion-exchange materials tested included a variety of alkali titanates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of AmIII. Experimental findings indicated that CeIII, NpV, and RuII are oxidized by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of CeIII, NpV, and RuII affected the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used.

  16. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syarifah, Ratna Dewi; Suud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better.

  17. Quantitative strain analysis for advanced CMOS technology by Nano Beam Diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Qingxiao

    2010-07-01

    Nano Beam Diffraction has been used to analyze the local strain distribution in MOS transistors. The influence of wafer process on the channel strain has been systematically analyzed in this paper. The source/drain implantation can cause a little strain loss but the silicidation step is the key process in which dramatic strain loss has been found. © 2010 IEEE.

  18. Novel test structures for dedicated temperature budget determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Erik J.; Wolters, Rob A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel method for determining the temperature budget of the process side of silicon substrates and chips, based on well-known silicide formation reactions of metal–Si systems and (four-point probe) resistance measurements. In this paper, we focus on the Pd–Si system that is most temperat

  19. CVD Delta-Doped Boron Surface Layers for Ultra-Shallow Junction Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarubbi, F.; Nanver, L.K.; Scholtes, T.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    A new doping technique is presented that uses a pure boron atmospheric/low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP/LPCVD) in a commercially available epitaxial reactor to form less than 2-nm-thick δ-doped boron-silicide (BxSi) layers on the silicon surface. For long exposure B segregates at the surfa

  20. Utilizing Interfaces for Nano- and Micro-scale Control of Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    efficient way to decrease the grain size because of contamination of Si3N4. In contrast “YxAlyB14 via Y0 56B14” samples were successfully synthesized...Takao Mori, Gordon Research Conference in Solid State Chemistry, “Development of nov el borides, silicides, sulfides, and nitrides as effective

  1. Reconfigurable field effect transistor for advanced CMOS: Advantages and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, C.; Barraud, S.; Martinie, S.; Lacord, J.; Jaud, M.-A.; Vinet, M.

    2017-02-01

    Reconfigurable FETs (RFETs) are optimized in planar Fully Depleted (FD) SOI. Their basics, electrostatics and performance are studied and compared with standard 28 nm FDSOI and other RFETs results in the literature. The main challenge for future broad adoption is analyzed and commented. Finally, some tips to improve the performance such as the asymmetric silicidation at source/drain are discussed.

  2. Dependence of Y sub 2 O sub 3 film growth on the state of the Si surface

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, M H; Jeong, K H; Whang, C N Y; Ko, D H; Choi, S C; Cho, S J

    1999-01-01

    Y sub 2 O sub 3 films were grown on Si substrates with various surface conditions by using ionized cluster beam deposition. The interface and the surface characteristics was investigated by reflection high energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The dependence of the crystallinities of the films on the surface conditions was investigated using X-ray diffraction. The investigation showed that control of the silicide layer played a crucial role in the growth of Y sub 2 O sub 3 films during the initial stage of growth. The Y sub 2 O sub 3 film grown on a silicide layer formed on a clean Si surface was a polycrystal with a monoclinic structure. However, the film grown on a silicide layer formed on a SiO sub 2 -terminated surface turned out to be a single crystalline Y sub 2 O sub 3 with a cubic structure. A high-quality film in terms of crystallinity and stochiometry was obtained when the growth of the silicide layer was controlled by a SiO sub 2 layer which had...

  3. A process for the production of a scale-proof and corrosion-resistant coating on graphite and carbon bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzer, E.

    1981-01-01

    A process for the production of a corrosion resistant coating on graphite and carbon bodies is described. The carbon or graphite body is coated or impregnated with titanium silicide under the addition of a metal containing wetting agent in a nitrogen free atmosphere, so that a tight coating is formed.

  4. Historical Perspective and Contribution of U.S. Researchers Into the Field of Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis (SHS)/Combustion Synthesis (CS): Personal Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Use of zirconium in thermal batteries. ............................................................................3 Figure 2. Combustion front...and (b) TEM images of Al and Ni nanoreactants, (c) reaction chamber, (d) SEM image of nanosize nickel aluminide-alumina composite prepared by...silicides, sulfides, phosphides, hydrides, and oxides of many elements as well as intermetallics, composites, nonstoichiometric compounds, and solid

  5. Formation of aligned nanosilicide structures in a MBE-grown Au/Si(110) system: a real-time temperature-dependent TEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Umananda M; Dash, J K; Roy, Anupam; Rath, A; Satyam, P V

    2009-05-20

    Thin Au films (∼2 nm) were deposited on an Si(110) substrate epitaxially under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system. Real-time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements were carried out at various temperatures (from room temperature to 700 °C), which shows the formation and growth of aligned gold silicide nanorod-like structures. The real-time selected-area electron diffraction patterns show the presence of silicon and unreacted gold at lower temperatures (up to 363 °C), while at higher temperatures only the signature of silicon has been observed. The diffraction analysis from room temperature cooled systems show the presence of gold silicide structures. Around 700 °C, 97% of the nanostructures were found to be aligned nanosilicide-rod-like structures with a longer side of ≈37 nm and aspect ratio of 1.38. For a high temperature annealed system (at 600 °C), selected-area diffraction (SAD) and high resolution lattice (after cooling down to room temperature) confirmed the formation of nano- Au(5)Si(2) structures. The alignment of gold silicide structures has been explained on the basis of lattice matching between the substrate silicon and silicide structures.

  6. Friction Sensitivity of Primary Explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan none tetrazene 407913 tetrazene 7902454 The mixes which were tested are: NOL 130 (basic lead styphnate , barium nitrate, lead...azide, tetrazene, and antimony sulfide); PA 100 (normal lead styphnate , barium nitrate, tetrazene, lead dioxide, calcium silicide, and antimony...styuhnate, basic lead styphnate , potassium dinitrobenzofuroxan, and tetrazene were tested to determine the- 10% and 50% probability of friction

  7. Silicon-based electrically driven microcavity LED

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    A silicon pn-diode was embedded into a microcavity composed of a buried metal silicide as bottom reflector and a Si/SiO2 Bragg mirror as top reflector. Spectral narrowing and an increased intensity of the Si bandgap electroluminescence was observed.

  8. Characterization of electroless nickel as a seed layer for silicon solar cell metallization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehul C Raval; Chetan S Solanki

    2015-02-01

    Electroless nickel plating is a suitable method for seed layer deposition in Ni–Cu-based solar cell metallization. Nickel silicide formation and hence contact resistivity of the interface is largely influenced by the plating process and annealing conditions. In the present work, a thin seed layer is deposited from neutral pH and alkaline electroless nickel baths which are annealed in the range of 400–420°C for silicide morphology and contact resistivity studies. A minimum contact resistivity of 7 m cm2 is obtained for seed layer deposited from alkaline bath. Silicide formation for Pd-activated samples leads to uniform surface morphology as compared with unactivated samples due to non-homogeneous migration of nickel atoms at the interface. Formation of nickel phosphides during annealing and the presence of SiO2 at Ni–Si interface creates isolated Ni2Si–Si interface with limited supply of silicon. Such an interface leads to the formation of high resistivity metal-rich Ni3Si silicide phase which limits the reduction in contact resistivity.

  9. Experimental Findings On Minor Actinide And Lanthanide Separations Using Ion Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D. T.; Shehee, T. C.; Clearfield, A.

    2013-09-17

    This project seeks to determine if inorganic or hybrid inorganic ion-exchange materials can be exploited to provide effective americium and curium separations. Specifically, we seek to understand the fundamental structural and chemical factors responsible for the selectivity of the tested ion-exchange materials for actinide and lanthanide ions. During FY13, experimental work focused in the following areas: (1) investigating methods to oxidize americium in dilute nitric acid with subsequent ion-exchange performance measurements of ion exchangers with the oxidized americium and (2) synthesis, characterization and testing of ion-exchange materials. Ion-exchange materials tested included alkali titanates, alkali titanosilicates, carbon nanotubes and group(IV) metal phosphonates. Americium oxidation testing sought to determine the influence that other redox active components may have on the oxidation of Am(III). Experimental findings indicated that Pu(IV) is oxidized to Pu(VI) by peroxydisulfate, but there are no indications that the presence of plutonium affects the rate or extent of americium oxidation at the concentrations of peroxydisulfate being used. Tests also explored the influence of nitrite on the oxidation of Am(III). Given the formation of Am(V) and Am(VI) in the presence of nitrite, it appears that nitrite is not a strong deterrent to the oxidation of Am(III), but may be limiting Am(VI) by quickly reducing Am(VI) to Am(V). Interestingly, additional absorbance peaks were observed in the UV-Vis spectra at 524 and 544 nm in both nitric acid and perchloric acid solutions when the peroxydisulfate was added as a solution. These peaks have not been previously observed and do not correspond to the expected peak locations for oxidized americium in solution. Additional studies are in progress to identify these unknown peaks. Three titanosilicate ion exchangers were synthesized using a microwave-accelerated reaction system (MARS) and determined to have high affinities

  10. Synthesis and characterization of the structural and magnetic properties of new uranium and copper-based silicides and germanides: study of the physical and hydridation properties of some compounds belonging to the Gd-Ni-X systems, where X = Ga, Al, Sn; Synthese et caracterisation des proprietes structurales et magnetiques de nouveaux siliciures et germaniures a base d'uranium et de cuivre: etude des proprietes physiques et d'hydruration de quelques composes appartenant aux systemes Gd-Ni-X ou X = Ga, Al, Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pechev, St

    1998-07-01

    Three novel phases, U{sub 3}Cu{sub 4}Si{sub 4}, U{sub 3}Cu{sub 4}Ge{sub 4} and UCuGe{sub 1,77}, were prepared in the U - Cu - X (X = Si or Ge) ternary system. Their structural and magnetic properties were investigated. The magnetic structures of the first two compounds were determined by neutron diffraction. Structural and magnetic behaviour transitions occur as copper substitutes silicon atoms in the UCu{sub x}Si{sub 2-x} (0,28 {<=} x {<=} 0,96) solid solution. Thus, the structure of the compositions changes in the {alpha}-ThSi{sub 2}(tetragonal) {yields} AlB{sub 2}(hexagonal) {yields} Ni{sub 2}In(hexagonal) sequence while a transition from a nonmagnetic to ferromagnetic then antiferromagnetic behaviour is observed. The magnetic properties of the different compositions are governed by a Kondo - RKKY -type interactions competition. Crystallographic disorder and magnetic frustrations are at the origin of a spin glass state between the ferro- and antiferromagnetic areas. The investigations of the GdNi{sub 3}X{sub 2} (X =Ga, Al, Sn) compounds revealed that their structural and magnetic properties are strongly dependent on the nature of the X element as well as the on thermal treatment. A CaCu{sub 5} {yields} HoNi{sub 2,6}Ga{sub 2,4} - type structure transition and a ferro - to antiferromagnetic behaviour evolution are favoured by the increase of the X - atom size. A commensurate modulated crystal structure (described also as a a{sub HoNi{sub 2,6}}{sub Ga{sub 2,4}} x a{sub HoNi{sub 2,6}}{sub Ga{sub 2,4}} x 2c{sub HoNi{sub 2,6}}{sub Ga{sub 2,4}}-type superstructure) has been observed for GdNi{sub 3}Al{sub 2}. Hydrogen absorption in Gd{sub 3}Ni{sub 6}Al{sub 2} and GdNi{sub 3}Al{sub 2} weakens the strength of the magnetic interactions. (author)

  11. TRUEX Radiolysis Testing Using the INL Radiolysis Test Loop: FY-2012 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean R. Peterman; Lonnie G. Olson; Richard D. Tillotson; Rocklan G. McDowell; Jack D. Law

    2012-09-01

    The INL radiolysis test loop has been used to evaluate the affect of radiolytic degradation upon the efficacy of the strip section of the TRUEX flowsheet for the recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from acidic solution. The nominal composition of the TRUEX solvent used in this study is 0.2 M CMPO and 1.4 M TBP dissolved in n-dodecane and the nominal composition of the TRUEX strip solution is 1.5 M lactic acid and 0.050 M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Gamma irradiation of a mixture of TRUEX process solvent and stripping solution in the test loop does not adversely impact flowsheet performance as measured by stripping americium ratios. The observed increase in americium stripping distribution ratios with increasing absorbed dose indicates the radiolytic production of organic soluble degradation compounds.

  12. 2014 AFCI Glovebox Event Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Joseph Lenard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary INL missions is to support development of advanced fuels with the goal of creating reactor fuels that produce less waste and are easier to store. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Glovebox in the Fuel Manufacturing Facility (FMF) is used for several fuel fabrication steps that involve transuranic elements, including americium. The AFCI glove box contains equipment used for fuel fabrication, including an arc melter – a small, laboratory-scale version of an electric arc furnace used to make new metal alloys for research – and an americium distillation apparatus. This overview summarizes key findings related to the investigation into the releases of airborne radioactivity that occurred in the AFCI glovebox room in late August and early September 2014. The full report (AFCI Glovebox Radiological Release – Evaluation, Corrective Actions and Testing, INL/INL-15-36996) provides details of the identified issues, corrective actions taken as well as lessons learned

  13. Technical Improvements to an Absorbing Supergel for Radiological Decontamination in Tropical Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Michael D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mertz, Carol J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kivenas, Nadia [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); demmer, Rick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) developed a superabsorbing gel-based process (SuperGel) for the decontamination of cesium from concrete and other porous building materials. Here, we report on results that tested the gel decontamination technology on specific concrete and ceramic formulations from a coastal city in Southeast Asia, which may differ significantly from some U.S. sources. Results are given for the evaluation of americium and cesium sequestering agents that are commercially available at a reasonable cost; the evaluation of a new SuperGel formulation that combines the decontamination properties of cesium and americium; the variation of the contamination concentration to determine the effects on the decontamination factors with concrete, tile, and brick samples; and pilot-scale testing (0.02–0.09 m2 or 6–12 in. square coupons).

  14. Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2012-06-01

    The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

  15. Determination of the first ionization potential of actinides by resonance ionization mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, S. [Institut fuer Kernchemie Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Albus, F. [Institu fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Dibenberger, R.; Erdmann, N.; Funk, H. [Institut fuer Kernchemiess Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Hasse, H. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Herrmann, G. [Institut fuer Kernchemiess Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Huber, G.; Kluge, H.; Nunnemann, M.; Passler, G. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Rao, P.M. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Bombay (India); Riegel, J.; Trautmann, N. [Institut fuer Kernchemie Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Urban, F. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany)

    1995-04-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) is used for the precise determination of the first ionization potential of transuranium elements. The first ionization potentials (IP) of americium and curium have been measured for the first time to IP{sub {ital Am}}=5.9738(2) and IP{sub {ital Cm}}=5.9913(8) eV, respectively, using only 10{sup 12} atoms of {sup 243}Am and {sup 248}Cm. The same technique was applied to thorium, neptunium, and plutonium yielding IP{sub T{sub H}}=6.3067(2), IP{sub N{sub P}}=6.2655(2), and IP{sub {ital Pu}}=6.0257(8) eV. The good agreement of our results with the literature data proves the precision of the method which was additionally confirmed by the analysis of Rydberg seris of americium measured by RIMS. {copyright}American Institute of Physics 1995

  16. Incineration by accelerator; Incineration par accelerateur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cribier, M.; FIoni, G.; Legrain, R.; Lelievre, F.; Leray, S.; Pluquet, A.; Safa, H.; Spiro, M.; Terrien, Y.; Veyssiere, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    The use MOX fuel allows to hope a stabilization of plutonium production around 500 tons for the French park. In return, the flow of minor actinides is increased to several tons. INCA (INCineration by Accelerator), dedicated instrument, would allow to transmute several tons of americium, curium and neptunium. It could be able to reduce nuclear waste in the case of stopping nuclear energy use. This project needs: a protons accelerator of 1 GeV at high intensity ( 50 m A), a window separating the accelerator vacuum from the reactor, a spallation target able to produce 30 neutrons by incident proton, an incineration volume where a part of fast neutrons around the target are recovered, and a thermal part in periphery with flows at 2.10 {sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}.s; a chemical separation of elements burning in thermal (americium) from the elements needing a flow of fast neutrons. (N.C.). 28 refs.

  17. Electrochemical oxidation of 243Am(III) in nitric acid by a terpyridyl-derivatized electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dares, C. J.; Lapides, A. M.; Mincher, B. J.; Meyer, T. J.

    2015-11-05

    A high surface area, tin-doped indium oxide electrode surface-derivatized with a terpyridine ligand has been applied to the oxidation of trivalent americium to Am(V) and Am(VI) in nitric acid. Potentials as low as 1.8 V vs. the saturated calomel electrode are used, 0.7 V lower than the 2.6 V potential for one-electron oxidation of Am(III) to Am(IV) in 1 M acid. This simple electrochemical procedure provides, for the first time, a method for accessing the higher oxidation states of Am in non-complexing media for developing the coordination chemistries of Am(V) and Am(VI) and, more importantly, for separation of americium from nuclear waste streams.

  18. Translations from the Soviet Journal of Atomic Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-02-15

    brain and nervous system tumors is accomplished through the use of radio- active isotopes of radon, xenon, and iodine. External irradiation techniques...production of toxic chemicals. The radioactive technique cf obtaining bexachliorane has a number of advantages over the photochemical techni- 1 13 qu. Nuclear...nuclear fuels and contains results of studies on the chemistry of ruth- enium, thorium , uranium, plutoniuin and americium. Also treated are the problems

  19. Extractant Design by Covalency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, Andrew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Olson, Angela Christine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kozimor, Stosh Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cross, Justin Neil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Batista, Enrique Ricardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Macor, Joe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Peterman, Dean R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Grimes, Travis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-21

    This project aims to provide an electronic structure-to-function understanding of extractants for actinide selective separation processes. The research entails a multi-disciplinary approach that integrates chemical syntheses, structural determination, K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. In FY15, the project reached the final stage of testing the extraction performance of a new ligand design and preparing an americium-extractant complex for analysis.

  20. Gas-phase energies of actinide oxides -- an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-08-10

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  1. Bibliography of PNL publications in management of radioactive wastes, subject-indexed (alphabetically) and listed chronologically (latest issues first)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, J.A. (ed.)

    1976-07-01

    The citations are arranged under: actinides, alpha particles, americium, beta particles, calcination, cements, ceramics, cesium, containers, decontamination, evaporation, fluidized bed, glass, ground release, high-level wastes, incinerators, liquid wastes, marine disposal, melting, nonradioactive waste disposal, Pu, radiation doses, radiation protection, disposal, processing, radionuclide migration, Ru, safety, separation processes, soils, solidification, solid wastes, stack disposal, temperature, thermal conductivity, transmutation, tritium, underground disposal, U, volatility, and waste disposal/management/processing/storage/transportation. (DLC)

  2. Actinide partitioning and transmutation program. Progress report, July 1--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedder, D.W.; Blomeke, J.O. (comps.)

    1978-02-01

    In Purex process modifications, two cold runs with mixer-settlers were made on the extraction and stripping of ruthenium and zirconium without the presence of uranium. Efforts in actinide recovery from solids were directed toward the determination of dissolution parameters in various reagents for /sup 241/Am and /sup 239/Pu oxide mixtures, /sup 233/U oxide, /sup 237/Np oxide, /sup 244/Cm oxide, /sup 232/Th oxide, and PuO/sub 2/. Studies in americium-curium recovery with OPIX (oxalate precipitation and ion exchange), Talspeak, and cation exchange chromatography focused on the feasibility of forming oxalate precipitates in continuous systems, the effects of zirconium on Talspeak, and methods for removing solvent degradation products of the Talspeak system. In studies of americium-curium recovery using bidentate extractants, additional distribution coefficients for actinides and other key elements between reduced synthetic LWR waste solution and 30 percent dihexyl-N, N-diethyl-carbamylmethylene phosphonate in diisopropylbenzene were measured. Studies in the americium-curium recovery using inorganic ion exchange media to determine the pH dependence of lanthanide ion affinity for niobate, titanate, and zirconate ion exchange materials have been completed. A modified flowsheet for the extraction of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium from high-level liquid waste is presented. Evaluation of methods for measuring actinides from incinerator ash is continuing. A preliminary evaluation of methods for treatment of salt waste and waste waters was completed. In thermal reactor transmutation studies, waste actinides from an LWR lattice containing mixed uranium-plutonium assemblies were recycled in separate target assemblies. (LK)

  3. Research in radiobiology. Annual report of work in progress in the internal irradiation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-31

    The toxicity, retention, biological effects, distribution, decorporation and measuring techniques of radionuclides are discussed. Calculations of trabecular bone formation rates from tetracycline labeling is included. The characteristics of trabecular bone in the Rhesus monkey are discussed. Studies on the early retention and distribution of radium 224 in beagles are included. Studies on the decorporation of plutonium and americium in dogs by DTPA and salicylic acid are presented.

  4. Evaluation of the neutral comet assay for detection of alpha-particle induced DNA-double-strand-breaks; Evaluation des Comet Assays bei neutralem pH zur Detektion von α-Partikel induzierten DNA-Doppelstrangbruechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofbauer, Daniela

    2010-10-20

    Aim of this study was to differentiate DNA-double-strand-breaks from DNA-single-strand-breaks on a single cell level, using the comet assay after α- and γ-irradiation. Americium-241 was used as a alpha-irradiation-source, Caesium-137 was used for γ-irradiation. Because of technical problems with both the neutral and alkaline comet assay after irradiation of gastric cancer cells and human lymphocytes, no definite differentiation of DNA-damage was possible.

  5. Theoretical and experimental evaluation of waste transport in selected rocks: 1977 annual report of LBL Contract No. 45901AK. Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program: collection and generation of transport data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apps, J.A.; Benson, L.V.; Lucas, J.; Mathur, A.K.; Tsao, L.

    1977-09-01

    During fiscal year 1977, the following subtasks were performed. (1) Thermodynamic data were tabulated for those aqueous complexes and solid phases of plutonium, neptunium, americium, and curium likely to form in the environment. (2) Eh-pH diagrams were computed and drafted for plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium at 25/sup 0/C and one atmosphere. (3) The literature on distribution coefficients of plutonium, neptunium, americium, and curium was reviewed. (4) Preliminary considerations were determined for an experimental method of measuring radionuclide transport in water-saturated rocks. (5) The transport mechanisms of radionuclides in water-saturated rocks were reviewed. (6) A computer simulation was attempted of mass transfer involving actinides in water-saturated rocks. Progress in these tasks is reported. Subtasks 1, 2, 3, and 4 are complete. The progress made in subtask 5 is represented by an initial theoretical survey to define the conditions needed to characterize the transport of radionuclides in rocks. Subtask 6 has begun but is not complete.

  6. In situ radiological surveying at the Double Tracks site, Nellis Air Force Range, Tonopah, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedhauser, S.R.; Tipton, W.J.

    1996-04-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted a series of in situ radiological measurements at the Double Tracks site on the Nellis Air Force Range just east of Goldfield, Nevada, during the periods of April 10-13 and June 5-9, 1995. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This site includes the areas covered by previous surveys conducted from 1962 through 1993. The main purpose of the first expedition was to assess several new techniques for characterizing sites with dispersed plutonium. The two purposes of the second expedition were to characterize the distribution of transuranic contamination (primarily plutonium) at the site by measuring the gamma rays from americium-241 and to assess the performance of the two new detector platforms. Both of the new platforms performed well, and the characterization of the americium-241 activity at the site was completed. Several plots compare these ground-based system measurements and the 1993 aerial data. The agreement is good considering the systems are characterized and calibrated through independent means. During the April expedition, several methods for measuring the depth distribution of americium-241 in the field were conducted as a way of quickly and reliably obtaining depth profiles without the need to wait for laboratory analysis. Two of the methods were not very effective, but the results of the third method appear very promising.

  7. Alkali Treatment of Acidic Solution from Hanford K Basin Sludge Dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AA Bessonov; AB Yusov; AM Fedoseev; AV Gelis; AY Garnov; CH Delegard; GM Plavnik; LN Astafurova; MS Grigoriev; NA Budantseva; NN Krot; SI Nikitenko; TP Puraeva; VP Perminov; VP Shilov

    1998-12-22

    Nitric acid solutions will be created from the dissolution of Hanford K Basin sludge. These acidic dissolver solutions must be made alkaline by treatment with NaOH solution before they are disposed to ~ the Tank Waste Remediation System on the Hanford Site. During the alkali treatments, sodium diuranate, hydroxides of iron and aluminum, and radioelements (uranium, plutonium, and americium) will precipitate from the dissolver solution. Laboratory tests, discussed here, were pefiormed to provide information on these precipitates and their precipitation behavior that is important in designing the engineering flowsheet for the treatment process. Specifically, experiments were conducted to determine the optimum precipitation conditions; the completeness of uranium, plutonium, and americium precipitation; the rate of sedimentation; and the physico-chemical characteristics of the solids formed by alkali treatment of simulated acidic dissolver solutions. These experiments also determined the redistribution of uranium, plutonium, and americium flom the sodium di~ate and iron and al&inurn hydroxide precipitates upon contact with carbonate- and EDTA-bearing simulated waste solutions. Note: EDTA is the tetrasodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetate.

  8. An approach to growth of Fe-Si multilayers with controlled composition profile-a way to exchange coupled thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouralnik, A S; Pustovalov, E V; Lin, K-W; Chuvilin, A L; Chusovitina, S V; Dotsenko, S A; Cherednichenko, A I; Plotnikov, V S; Ivanov, V A; Belokon, V I; Tkachenko, I A; Galkin, N G

    2017-03-17

    The growth, composition and structure of sandwich structures (Fe-rich layer/Si-rich layer/Fe-rich silicide layer) grown on a Si(111) surface were studied by a few complementary microscopic and spectroscopic techniques with high spatial resolution. Intermixing at the Fe/Si and Si/Fe interfaces is demonstrated. Fe-rich layers grown directly on the Si(111) surface are crystalline and have abrupt but rough interfaces at both sides. The succeeding layers are disordered and their interfaces are fuzzy. The distributions of Fe and Si within the layers are laterally non-uniform. The reproducible fabrication of thin non-magnetic silicide spacers of predetermined thickness is demonstrated. Sandwich structures with such spacers exhibit exchange coupling between ferromagnetic Fe-rich layers.

  9. Enhanced Thermoelectric Properties of W- and Fe-Substituted MnSi γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodke, Swapnil; Hiroishi, Naoya; Yamamoto, Akio; Ikuta, Hiroshi; Matsunami, Masaharu; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated the effect of heavy-element (W) substitution on the thermoelectric properties of higher manganese silicide (HMS). Samples were prepared by arc melting followed by liquid quenching, where the latter assisted in achieving higher solubility for tungsten. We observed that Mn34.6W1.8Si63.6 was a p-type material, whereas simultaneous substitution of 12 at.% Fe made the higher manganese silicide an n-type material. The optimal carrier concentration was obtained by simultaneous substitution of Fe and W for Mn atoms. Although the samples were metastable, we successfully obtained bulk samples by a low-temperature (970 K), high-pressure (>100 MPa), long-duration sintering process. The lattice thermal conductivity was effectively reduced by W substitution, and the ZT value was improved to above 0.5 for both n- and p-type samples.

  10. Atomic structure and electronic states of extended defects in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Riedel, F; Schröter, W

    2002-01-01

    Defects in silicon like dislocations, grain boundaries, silicide precipitates, etc. are spatially extended and associated with a large number of electronic states in the band gap. Our knowledge on the relation between atomic structure and electronic states of these extended defects presently starts to grow by applying high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) in combination with numerical simulations. While by means of HRTEM details of structure can be studied, DLTS has been shown to allow for a classification of extended defect states into bandlike and localized. Moreover, this method opens the perspective to distinguish between trap-like and recombination-like electrical activity. In this paper, we emphasize the particular role of nickel and copper silicide precipitates, since in their cases structural features could be successfully related to specific DLTS line characteristics. Rapid quenching from high diffusion temperatures prevents decoration of platelet-sh...

  11. Effects of Ti, Al and Hf on niobium silcides formation in the Nb-Si in situ composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The effects of alloying elements Ti, Al and Hf on niobium silicides formation in the Nb-Si in situ composites have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The binary, ternary and multicomponent alloys have been fabricated by vacuum non-consumable arc melting method. The results show that Ti tends to stabilize Nb3Si phase, while Al promotes the direct formation of β-Nb5Si3 phase with a tetrahedral D8m structure. Exceptionally, it seems that Hf is beneficial to the formation of γ-Nb5Si3 phase with a hexangular D88 structure. For the multicomponent Nb-Si in situ composites, the cooperative effects of different elements on niobium silicides formation basically maintain the character of ternary system.

  12. Twisting phonons in complex crystals with quasi-one-dimensional substructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Weathers, Annie; Carrete, Jesús; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Delaire, Olivier; Stewart, Derek A; Mingo, Natalio; Girard, Steven N; Ma, Jie; Abernathy, Douglas L; Yan, Jiaqiang; Sheshka, Raman; Sellan, Daniel P; Meng, Fei; Jin, Song; Zhou, Jianshi; Shi, Li

    2015-04-15

    A variety of crystals contain quasi-one-dimensional substructures, which yield distinctive electronic, spintronic, optical and thermoelectric properties. There is a lack of understanding of the lattice dynamics that influences the properties of such complex crystals. Here we employ inelastic neutron scatting measurements and density functional theory calculations to show that numerous low-energy optical vibrational modes exist in higher manganese silicides, an example of such crystals. These optical modes, including unusually low-frequency twisting motions of the Si ladders inside the Mn chimneys, provide a large phase space for scattering acoustic phonons. A hybrid phonon and diffuson model is proposed to explain the low and anisotropic thermal conductivity of higher manganese silicides and to evaluate nanostructuring as an approach to further suppress the thermal conductivity and enhance the thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency. This discovery offers new insights into the structure-property relationships of a broad class of materials with quasi-one-dimensional substructures for various applications.

  13. Nanoamorphous carbon-based photonic crystal infrared emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norwood, Robert A. (Tucson, AZ); Skotheim, Terje (Tucson, AZ)

    2011-12-13

    Provided is a tunable radiation emitting structure comprising: a nanoamorphous carbon structure having a plurality of relief features provided in a periodic spatial configuration, wherein the relief features are separated from each other by adjacent recessed features, and wherein the nanoamorphous carbon comprises a total of from 0 to 60 atomic percent of one or more dopants of the dopant group consisting of: transition metals, lanthanoids, electro-conductive carbides, silicides and nitrides. In one embodiment, a dopant is selected from the group consisting of: Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, La and other lanthanides, Hf, Ta, W, Rh, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, and Hg. In one embodiment, a dopant is selected from the group consisting of: electro-conductive carbides (like Mo.sub.2C), silicides (like MoSi.sub.2) and nitrides (like TiN).

  14. Microelectronic image sensors: A report from the Charge Transfer Device (CTD) team at FOA 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstroem, O.; Persson, S. T.; Pettersson, H.; Ryden, K. H.

    1985-05-01

    Three concepts of microelectronic image sensors where the photo effects are based on the properties of interfaces between silicon and metal silicides or insulators were investigated. An infrared sensitive image sensor for the 3 to 5 micron wavelength range was prepared. The photosensitive elements, patterned as a 4 x 4 matrix, consist of palladium silicide Schottky-diodes. Addressing of the different picture elements is made from shift registers placed on the same silicon chip. A concept for the storage of optical information was created. The basic principle relies on the possibilities to store electrons in deep lying energy levels in an insulator layer grown on silicon. A metal-insulator-semiconductor device, where the possibility of interaction between two images at the insulator-semiconductor interface is utilized for image recognition, was derived.

  15. Controlling Nickel Sillicide Phase by Si Implantation Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillard, M.; Turcotte-Tremblay, P; Gaudet, S; Coia, C; Roorda, S; Desjardins, P; Lavoie, C; Schiettekatte, F

    2009-01-01

    In the context of fabrication process of contacts in CMOS integrated circuits, we studied the effect of implantation-induced damage on the Ni silicide phase formation sequence. The device layers of Silicon-on-insulator samples were implanted with 30 or 60 keV Si ions at several fluences up to amorphization. Next, 10 or 30 nm Ni layers were deposited. The monitoring of annealing treatments was achieved with time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and pole figure XRD were also used to characterize some intermediate phase formations. We show the existence of an implantation threshold (1 ions/nm{sup 2}) from where the silicidation behaviour changes significantly, the formation temperature of the disilicide namely shifting abruptly from 800 to 450 C. It is also found that the monosilicide formation onset temperature for the thinner Ni deposits increases linearly by about 30 C with the amount of damage.

  16. Growth studies of Ta-based films on Si with STM and XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, W.; Fuelle, A.; Hildebrand, D. [University of Applied Science Zwickau, Dr.-Friedrichs-Ring 2A, 08056 Zwickau (Germany); Oswald, S.; Zier, M.; Wetzig, K. [IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, 01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The aim of the experiments was the characterization of the first stages of film growth on silicon substrates with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS). Thin Ta films were deposited in situ by magnetron sputtering onto Si in the thickness range from less than one monolayer up to 10 nm. The results of the experiments show a formation of tantalum silicide at the interface to the substrate. The local current-voltage characteristics obtained by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements show that the first stages of tantalum silicide growth are characterized by island formation. The in situ STM results are in good agreement with those of the ARXPS investigations. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Growth of Cu Films on Si(111)-7 × 7 Surfaces at Low Temperature: A Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Quan-Tong; SUN Guo-Feng; LI Wen-Juan; DONG Guo-Cai; HAN Tie-Zhu; MA Da-Yan; SUN Yu-Jie; JIA Jin-Feng; XUE Qi-Kun

    2007-01-01

    Morphologies of Cu(111) Rims on Si(111)-7×7 surfaces prepared at low temperature are investigated by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). At the initial growth stage, Cu 61ms are Bat due to the formation of silicide at the interface that decreases the mismatch between Cu films and the Si substrate. Different from the usual multilayer growth of Cu/Cu(111), on the silicide layer a layer-by-layer growth is observed. The two dimensional (2D) growth is explained by the enhanced high island density at low deposition temperature. Increasing deposition rate produces films with different morphologies, which is the result of Ostwald ripening.

  18. On the microstructure and interfacial properties of sputtered nickel thin film on Si (1 0 0)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Geetha Priyadarshini; S Aich; M Chakraborty

    2014-10-01

    Ni films of thickness ranging from 150 to 250 nm were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on to Si (100) substrates maintained at room temperature and followed by post-annealing at 300 and 500 °C for 30 min. Other set of Ni films were deposited on to Si (1 0 0) substrates held at annealing temperature of 300 and 500 °C for 30 min. Microstructural investigation by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) revealed columnar morphology with voided boundaries for films deposited at room temperature and was retained after post-deposition annealing at higher temperatures. Nickel silicide formation with isosceles triangle diffusion front was confirmed by cross-sectional highresolution transmission electron microscopy (X-HRTEM) for post-annealed Ni films. Thin film deposited at high substrate temperatures having near-equiaxed structure found to be the best route to fabricate thin films without silicide formation.

  19. Interface behaviour and electrical performance of ruthenium Schottky contact on 4H-SiC after argon annealing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kinnock V munthali; Chris Theron; F Danie Auret; Sergio M M Coelho

    2015-06-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) analysis, carried out at various annealing temperatures, of a thin film of ruthenium on n-type four-hexagonal silicon carbide (4H-SiC) showed the evidence of ruthenium oxidation, ruthenium silicide formation and diffusion of ruthenium into silicon carbide starting from an annealing temperature of 400° C. Ruthenium oxidation was more pronounced, and ruthenium and silicon interdiffusion was very deep after annealing at 800° C. Raman analysis of some samples also showed ruthenium silicide formation and oxidation. The Schottky barrier diodes showed very good linear capacitance–voltage characteristics and excellent forward current–voltage characteristics, despite the occurrence of the chemical reactions and interdiffusion of ruthenium and silicon at ruthenium–silicon–carbide interface, up to an annealing temperature of 800° C.

  20. Vacuum Electron-Beam Evaporation of Fe Nanocrystals on Si3N4 Buffer Layer for carbon Nanotube Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万青; 王太宏; 林成鲁

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum electron-beam evaporated iron nanocrystal is used for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Atomic force microscopy and Raman scattering studies reveal the formation of beta-iron silicide islands on bare silicon substrate after annealing at 700°C in N2 ambient. In order to eliminate the influence of iron-silicon interaction, Si3N4 buffer layer with the thickness of 80 nm is used. This technical route prevents effectively the formation of iron silicide and improves the quality of the iron nanocrystals. Using these iron nanocrystals with high density (about 7 × 1010/cm2) as catalyst, high-density multiwall carbon nanotubes are synthesized on Si3N4/Si substrate.

  1. Understanding Solidification Based Grain Refinement in Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    interatomic spacing along [uvw]s, and 0 = the angle between the [uvwjjand [uvw]n.^’ Work on the grain refinement of aluminum and magnesium alloys has found...chemistry ternary plot from ASPEX system. The author found some evidence of reactions occurring with some rare earth oxide or sulfide inclusions and... sulfide .^^"^^ Another approach would be to react a sample of misch metal or rare earth silicide at elevated temperatures to form the desired oxide or

  2. Investigation of the {Fe}/{Si} interface and its phase transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanciulli, M.; Degroote, S.; Weyer, G.; Langouche, G.

    1997-04-01

    Thin 57Fe films (3-10 Å) have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on (7 × 7) reconstructed Si(111) and (2 × 1) reconstructed Si(001) surfaces and by e-gun evaporation on an H-terminated Si(111) surface. Conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) with high statistical accuracy and resolution allowed a detailed microscopic investigation of the silicide formation mechanism and of the structural phase transformations upon annealing.

  3. Bibliography of Soviet Laser Developments, Number 76, March - April 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    S.N. 0. Problems of image holography of jewelry . Prikladnaya golografiya. CRSPGolo, L’vov, Dec 1984. Tezisy dokladov. IFANUk. Kiyev, Naukova dumka...Michel, P.; Weber, B.; Goetz, G. 0. Formation of % platinum silicides by a millisecond laser pulse. PSSAB, v. A85, no. 1, 1984, Kl-K4. (RZFZA, 85... Frictional breakdown in glass under the effect of subthreshold high-intensity radiation. ZPSBA, vol. 42, no. 4, 1985, 472-475. 981. Zelikin, N.V.; Kask

  4. Military Handbook: Electrostatic Discharge Control Handbook for Protection of Electrical and Electronic Parts, Assemblies and Equipment (Excluding Electrically Initiated Explosive Devices (Metric)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    dispersive X- ray analysis of two of the oxide rupture sites showed aluminum (alloyed gate 46 MIL-HDBK-263B APPENDIX C metallization) in one case and...device is very effective for various CMOS processes ranging from 2 um abrupt junctions to 1 Am lightly doped drain ( LDD ) junctions with silicided...the ease of evenly dispersing the active ingredients across the surfaces being treated. Surfactants, for static electricity control, consist of

  5. Plasma Processing of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-22

    Manchester, N.H. 1983. Private communication. 5. Camacho , S. L. 1983. Plasma melting experience with the PEC transferred arc torch. Paper presented...Electrotechnology. Ann Arbor: Ann Arbor Science Publishers, Butterworth Group. 18. Camacho , B. 1983. Plasma arc torches fog industrial applications. Paper presented...Oxidizing (e.g., by plasma anodization), nitriding, carbiding, and siliciding of metal or semiconductor surfaces are examples [2). a Etching--Atom-rby-atom

  6. Advances in Rare Earth Application to Semiconductor Materials and Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屠海令

    2004-01-01

    The development of rare earths (RE) applications to semiconductor materials and devices is reviewed. The recent advances in RE doped silicon light emitting diodes (LED) and display materials are described. The various technologies of incorporating RE into semiconductor materials and devices are presented. The RE high dielectric materials, RE silicides and the phase transition of RE materials are also discussed. Finally, the paper describes the prospects of the RE application to semiconductor industry.

  7. Sensitization of High Density Silver Azide to Stab Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-01

    minimise differential effects of pressing load between compositions, and to study 20:1 admixtures. The grit action of aluminium oxide was also studied, this...and 20:1 silver azide- aluminium oxide readily pressed at 240 MPa then re-pressed at 560 MPa. The effect of grit concentration was investigated for...silicide (entry 3) performs significantly better than aluminium oxide (entry 8) at 20:1 by weight pressed at 560 MPa, despite the much greater hardness

  8. Columnar growth of CoSi2 on Si(111), Si(100) and Si(110) by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Nieh, C. W.; Xiao, Q. F.; Hashimoto, Shin

    1990-01-01

    Codeposition of silicon and cobalt on heated silicon substrates in ratios several times the silicide stoichiometry is found to result in epitaxial columns of CoSi2 surrounded by a matrix of epitaxial silicon. For (111)-oriented wafers, nearly cylindrical columns are formed, where both columns and surrounding silicon are defect free, as deduced from transmission electron microscopy. Independent control of the column diameter and separation is possible, and diameters of 27-135 nm have been demonstrated.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy study on silicon nitride/stainless steel bonded interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poza, P. [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de los Materiales, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Miranzo, P. [Institute of Ceramics and Glass, CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Osendi, M.I. [Institute of Ceramics and Glass, CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: miosendi@icv.csic.es

    2008-11-28

    The reaction zone of a diffusion bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/stainlees steel (ss) interface formed at 1100 deg. C was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Besides the formation of various iron silicides, iron nitride and chromium nitride phases detected by XRD, Cr{sub 3}Ni{sub 5}Si{sub 2} crystals were identified at the interface by TEM.

  10. Cobalt alloy ion sources for focused ion beam implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehle, R.; Doebeli, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zimmermann, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Cobalt alloy ion sources have been developed for silicide formation by focused ion beam implantation. Four eutectic alloys AuCo, CoGe, CoY and AuCoGe were produced by electron beam welding. The AuCo liquid alloy ion source was investigated in detail. We have measured the emission current stability, the current-voltage characteristics, and the mass spectrum as a function of the mission current. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  11. Thin films and buried interfaces characterization with X-ray standing waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagomarsino, S. [CNR, Rome (Italy). Istituto Elettronica Stato Solido

    1996-09-01

    The X-ray standing wave techniques is a powerful, non destructive method to study interfaces at the atomic level. Its basic features are described here together with the peculiarities of its applications to epitaxial films and buried interfaces. As examples of applications, experiments carried out on Si/silicide interfaces, on GaAs/InAs/GaAs buried interfaces and on Si/Ge superlattices are shown.

  12. Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Hee; Natesan, Krishnamurti; Rink, David L.

    2010-03-16

    An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

  13. Influence of Powder Metallurgical Processing Routes on Phase Formations in a Multicomponent NbSi-Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemüller, C.; Hartwig, T.; Mulser, M.; Adkins, N.; Wickins, M.; Heilmaier, M.

    2014-09-01

    Refractory metal silicide composites on the basis of Nbss-Nb5Si3 have been investigated as potential alternatives for nickel-base superalloys for years because of their low densities and good high-temperature strengths. NbSi-based composites are typically produced by arc-melting or casting. Samples in this study, however, were produced by powder metallurgy because of the potential for near net-shape component fabrication with very homogeneous microstructures. Either gas atomized powder or high-energy mechanically alloyed elemental powders were compacted by powder injection molding or hot isostatic pressing. Heat treatments were applied for phase stability evaluation. Slight compositional changes (oxygen, nitrogen, or iron) introduced by the processing route, i.e., powder production and consolidation, can affect phase formations and phase transitions during the process. Special focus is put on the distinction between different silicides (Nb5Si3 and Nb3Si) and silicide modifications (α-, β-, and γ-Nb5Si3), respectively. These were evaluated by x-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy measurements with the additional inclusion of thermodynamic calculations using the calculated phase diagram method.

  14. A novel nanoscaled Schottky barrier based transmission gate and its digital circuit applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Loan, Sajad A.; Alamoud, Abdulrahman M.

    2017-04-01

    In this work we propose and simulate a compact nanoscaled transmission gate (TG) employing a single Schottky barrier based transistor in the transmission path and a single transistor based Sajad-Sunil-Schottky (SSS) device as an inverter. Therefore, just two transistors are employed to realize a complete transmission gate which normally consumes four transistors in the conventional technology. The transistors used to realize the transmission path and the SSS inverter in the proposed TG are the double gate Schottky barrier devices, employing stacks of two metal silicides, platinum silicide (PtSi) and erbium silicide (ErSi). It has been observed that the realization of the TG gate by the proposed technology has resulted into a compact structure, with reduced component count, junctions, interconnections and regions in comparison to the conventional technology. The further focus of this work is on the application part of the proposed technology. So for the first time, the proposed technology has been used to realize various combinational circuits, like a two input AND gate, a 2:1 multiplexer and a two input XOR circuits. It has been observed that the transistor count has got reduced by half in a TG, two input AND gate, 2:1 multiplexer and in a two input XOR gate. Therefore, a significant reduction in transistor count and area requirement can be achieved by using the proposed technology. The proposed technology can be also used to perform the compact realization of other combinational and sequential circuitry in future.

  15. Studies on layer growth and interfaces on Ta-base thin layers by means of XPS; Untersuchungen zu Schichtwachstum und Grenzflaechen an Ta-basierten Duennschichten mittels XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zier, M.

    2007-11-02

    In this thesis studies on the growth and on the formation of the interfaces of Ta and TaN layers on Si and SiO{sub 2} were performed. In the system TaN on SiO{sub 2} no reaction on the interface could be found. As the system with the mostly disturbed interface Ta on SiO{sub 2} was proved. Here a reduction of the SiO{sub 2} at simultaneous oxidation of the Ta was to be observed. Additionally tantalum silicide was formed to be considered concerning the bonding state as Ta{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, from which a double layer of a tantalum silicide and a tantalum suboxide resulted. A whole thickness of the double layer of above 1 nm resulted. In the system Ta on Si at the deposition of the film on the interface a tantalum silicide was formed to be characterized concerning the bonding state as TaSi{sub 2}. The thickness of the interlayer growed thereby up to 0.8 nm in form of islands. Finally in the system TaN on Si a silicon nitride formation during the deposition was observed, which was attributed to the insertion of adsorbed nitrogen from the sputtering atmosphere by recoil implantation of the sputtered Ta atoms. The silicon nitride interlayer growed thereby up to a thickness of 0.8 nm.

  16. A study on the change in the phase transition temperature of TiSi sub 2 by adding the Zr element on different Si substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, S H

    1999-01-01

    The stabilization of C49 TiSi sub 2 at high temperature was investigated by adding Zr element to Ti-silicide both on single crystalline Si(100) and amorphous Si substrates. This stabilization of the C49 TiSi sub 2 phase, which exhibits lower surface and interface energies than those of the C54 TiSi sub 2 phase, was expected to suppress the problems of Ti-silicide, such as the phase transition and the agglomeration. Ti and Zr films of 40 nm were co-deposited on Si substrates in a dual e-beam evaporation system equipped with an ion pump and at a base pressure of approx 5x10 sup - sup 9 Torr. The amounts of Zr contents added to the Ti-silicide were 5, 10 and 20 atomic %, and the thicknesses were monitored by in-situ quartz-crystal thickness monitors. After the deposition, films were annealed by using an ex-situ vacuum furnace at temperatures between 600 .deg. C and 900 .deg. C in 100 .deg. C increments. The phase identification and the chemical compositions were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Auger ...

  17. Photoemission study of the initial stage of Er/Si(100) interface formation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Gang; Li Zhe Shen; Wang Xun

    2002-01-01

    The initial stage of Er/Si(100) interface formation has been investigated by using synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy combined with low-energy electron diffraction. Both the valence band and the core level peaks of the Si photoemission spectra shift rigidly with increasing Er coverage in the submonolayer region. Upon depositing 0.6 monolayers of Er on the Si(100) surface at room temperature, the surface Fermi level is ultimately pinned at 0.29 eV above its initial value, which is equivalent to a Schottky barrier height of 0.67 eV. No evidence is found for the formation of Er silicides at the as-deposited surfaces. Annealing of the Er-covered Si(100) surfaces at 600 deg. C results in the appearance of a new peak located 1.2 eV below the Si 2p peak, indicating the presence of some sort of Er silicide. Meanwhile, the Er 4f spectrum measured for samples upon annealing exhibits a well-resolved fine structure, implying that only monospecies of Er silicide may exist on the surface.

  18. Interfacial stability of CoSi2/Si structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, T.; Fathauer, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    The stability of CoSi2/Si interfaces was examined in this study using columnar silicide structures grown on (111) Si substrates. In the first set of experiments, Co and Si were codeposited using MBE at 800 C and the resulting columnar silicide layer was capped by epitaxial Si. Deposition of Co on the surface of the Si capping layer at 800 C results in the growth of the buried silicide columns. The buried columns grow by subsurface diffusion of the deposited Co, suppressing the formation of surface islands of CoSi2. The column sidewalls appear to be less stable than the top and bottom interfaces, resulting in preferential lateral growth and ultimately in the coalescence of the columns to form a continuous buried CoSi2 layer. In the second set of experiments, annealing of a 250 nm-thick buried columnar layer at 1000 C under a 100 nm-thick Si capping layer results in the formation of a surface layer of CoSi2 with a reduction in the sizes of the CoSi2 columns. For a sample having a thicker Si capping layer the annealing leads to Ostwald ripening producing buried equiaxed columns. The high CoSi2/Si interfacial strain could provide the driving force for the observed behavior of the buried columns under high-temperature annealing.

  19. A study on improving the performance of a research reactor's equilibrium core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Atta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing low enriched uranium silicide fuel (U3Si2-Al of existing uranium density (3.285 g/cm3, different core configurations have been studied in search of an equilibrium core with an improved performance for the Pakistan Research Reactor-1. Furthermore, we have extended our analysis to the performance of higher density silicide fuels with a uranium density of 4.0 and 4.8 U g/cm3. The criterion used in selecting the best performing core was that of “unit flux time cycle length per 235U mass per cycle”. In order to analyze core performance by improving neutron moderation, utilizing higher-density fuel, the effect of the coolant channel width was also studied by reducing the number of plates in the standard/control fuel element. Calculations employing computer codes WIMSD/4 and CITATION were performed. A ten energy group structure for fission neutrons was used for the generation of microscopic cross-sections through WIMSD/4. To search the equilibrium core, two-dimensional core modelling was performed in CITATION. Performance indicators have shown that the higher-density uranium silicide-fuelled core (U density 4.8 g/cm3 without any changes in standard/control fuel elements, comprising of 15 standard and 4 control fuel elements, is the best performing of all analyzed cores.

  20. Effect of thermal exposure on microstructure and tensile properties of laser deposited Ti60A alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ali [Engineering Research Center of Ministry of Education on Laser Direct Manufacturing for Large Metallic Components, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Liu, Dong, E-mail: liudong.buaa@gmail.com [Engineering Research Center of Ministry of Education on Laser Direct Manufacturing for Large Metallic Components, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Huaming [Engineering Research Center of Ministry of Education on Laser Direct Manufacturing for Large Metallic Components, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, 37 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2013-02-01

    A near {alpha} high-temperature titanium alloy Ti60A (Ti5.54Al3.38Sn3.34Zr0.37Mo0.46Si) was fabricated by laser melting deposition (LMD) manufacturing process. Room-temperature tensile properties before and after 600 Degree-Sign C/100 h thermal exposure were evaluated. Microstructural changes and tensile fracture characteristics were examined by OM, SEM and TEM equipped with EDX. Results indicate that {alpha} lamellae coarsening and the precipitation of incoherent silicides and coherent Ti{sub 3}Al in the alloys after thermal exposure cause the degradation of tensile properties. The silicides are confirmed to be hexagonal quasi-S{sub 2} type (TiZr{sub 0.3}){sub 6}Si{sub 3}, with a=0.71 nm and c=0.37 nm by electron diffraction analysis. Compared to wrought Ti60A alloy with coarse Widmanstatten microstructure, laser deposited Ti60A alloy with fine basket-weave microstructure exhibits slightly higher strength and ductility after thermal exposure. The effect of thermal exposure on tensile properties related to the precipitation of Ti{sub 3}Al and silicides is discussed.

  1. Fabrication of Duplex Coated U-Mo-Ti Atomized Powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Min; Kim, Woo Jeong; Lee, Kyu Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ho Jin [Korea Advanced Institue of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The results of an annealing test showed that the coating layers inhibit the formation of interaction layers. The results of duplex coating showed that nitride coating layers inhibit the formation of other coating layers. High-density U-Mo alloys are regarded as promising candidates for advanced research reactor fuel as they have shown stable irradiation performance when compared to other uranium alloys and compounds. However, interaction layer formation between the U-Mo alloys and Al matrix degrades the irradiation performance of U-Mo dispersion fuel. Therefore, the addition of Ti in U-Mo alloys, the addition of Si in a Al matrix, and silicide or nitride coating on the surface of U-Mo particles have been proposed to inhibit the interaction layer growth. In this study, U-Mo-Ti alloy powder was produced using a centrifugal atomization method. In addition, nitride and silicide duplex coating layers were fabricated on the surface of the U-Mo-Ti particles. The coated powders were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, SEM, and EDX. Silicide and nitride single coating layers were fabricated on the surface of U-7wt%Mo-1wt%Ti alloys with a thickness of about 10.20 micrometers.

  2. Status report on the indonesian multipurpose reactor, RSG-GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbie, B.; Supadi, S. (Badan Tenaga Atom National (BATAN), Jakarta (Indonesia))

    1994-01-01

    RSG-GAS, a 30 MW multipurpose reactor, and located at Serpong Atomic Energy Research Center, went to its first criticality on July 29, 1987. Its nominal power was just achieved in March, 1992 by operating the full core configuration (core-VI) after successive five transition core commissioning operation. By then, the reactor performed as expected to produce thermal neutron flux in the order of 10[sup 14] n/(cm[sup 2].sec) safely to support research, radioisotope production as well as material testing including man power development. The long commissioning activities and experiences are outlined in the paper. Main characteristics of the reactor is also presented. Nowadays, the reactor is operating at core no. 9, in weekly modes, mainly for radioisotope production. Some facilities for neutronic experiment, material and fuel testing are being commissioned. Study of silicide fuels to replace the oxide ones is in progress. Several silicide fuel elements with similar specification to the existing oxide fuels have been inserted in the core since 1989. In five years, the RSG-GAS is expected to operate with the silicide fuel. (author).

  3. Thermophysical properties of USi to 1673 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J. T.; Nelson, A. T.; Dunwoody, J. T.; Byler, D. D.; McClellan, K. J.

    2016-04-01

    Consideration of uranium silicide compounds as candidate nuclear reactor fuels requires the accurate knowledge of their thermophysical properties as a function of temperature. Stoichiometric USi has received little attention in the literature with regard to property characterization. This absence of data prevents modeling and simulation communities from predicting performance of uranium silicide fuels that are either nominally USi itself, or are designed with other uranium silicide phases but may include appreciable fractions of USi introduced as a result of the fuel synthesis or fabrication process. This study was undertaken to quantify the thermal expansion coefficient, specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity of USi from ambient conditions to just below the peritectic decomposition of the compound. Stoichiometric samples that were prepared by arc melting and powder metallurgical routes for thermophysical property measurements exhibited 94% USi phase, with the balance being U3Si5 phase that likely formed during the solidification process. An energetic phase transformation was observed at 723 K, which is attributed to the inclusion of the secondary U3Si5 phase.

  4. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian E.; Arrieta, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    A document describes the low-cost manufacturing of C103 niobium alloy combustion chambers, and the use of a high-temperature, oxidation-resistant coating that is superior to the standard silicide coating. The manufacturing process involved low-temperature spray deposition of C103 on removable plastic mandrels produced by rapid prototyping. Thin, vapor-deposited platinum-indium coatings were shown to substantially improve oxidation resistance relative to the standard silicide coating. Development of different low-cost plastic thrust chamber mandrel materials and prototyping processes (selective laser sintering and stereolithography) yielded mandrels with good dimensional accuracy (within a couple of mils) for this stage of development. The feasibility of using the kinetic metallization cold-spray process for fabrication of free-standing C1O3 thrusters on removable plastic mandrels was also demonstrated. The ambient and elevated temperature mechanical properties of the material were shown to be reasonably good relative to conventionally processed C103, but the greatest potential benefit is that coldsprayed chambers require minimal post-process machining, resulting in substantially lower machining and material costs. The platinum-iridium coating was shown to provide greatly increased oxidation resistance over the silicide when evaluated through oxyacetylene torch testing to as high as 300 F (= 150 C). The iridium component minimizes reaction with the niobium alloy chamber at high temperatures, and provides the high-temperature oxidation resistance needed at the throat.

  5. Morphology of the asymmetric iron–silicon interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badía-Romano, L., E-mail: lbadia@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Rubín, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Bartolomé, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Magén, C. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Laboratorio de Microscopías Avanzadas (LMA), Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Fundación ARAID, E-50004 Zaragoza (Spain); Bartolomé, J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); and others

    2015-04-05

    Highlights: • Exhaustive study of the Fe silicide formation at interfaces of (Fe/Si) multilayers. • Thickness = 1.4 nm and roughness = 0.6 nm are found for the Si-on-Fe interface. • First time that the Fe 1s HAXPES spectra of a multilayered system is recorded. • The c-Fe{sub 1−x}Si sublayer is identical in both Si-on-Fe and Fe-on-Si interfaces. • The asymmetry is caused only by the ferromagnetic silicide Fe{sub 1−x}Si{sub x} sublayer. - Abstract: A systematic study of the iron–silicon interfaces formed upon preparation of (Fe/Si) multilayers has been performed by combination of modern and powerful techniques. Samples were prepared by thermal evaporation under ultrahigh vacuum onto a Si(1 0 0) substrate. The morphology of these films and their interfaces was studied by a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray reflectivity, angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Si-on-Fe interface thickness and roughness were determined to be 1.4(1) nm and 0.6(1) nm, respectively. Moreover, determination of the stable phases formed at both Fe-on-Si and Si-on-Fe interfaces was performed using conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy on multilayers with well separated Si-on-Fe and Fe-on-Si interfaces. It is shown that while a fraction of Fe remains as α-Fe, the rest has reacted with Si, forming the paramagnetic c-Fe{sub 1−x}Si phase and a ferromagnetic Fe rich silicide (DO{sub 3} type phase). We conclude that the paramagnetic c-Fe{sub 1−x}Si silicide sublayer is identical in both Si-on-Fe and Fe-on-Si interfaces, whereas an asymmetry is revealed in the composition of the ferromagnetic silicide sublayer.

  6. Scenarios for the transmutation of actinides in CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyland, Bronwyn, E-mail: hylandb@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada); Gihm, Brian, E-mail: gihmb@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    With world stockpiles of used nuclear fuel increasing, the need to address the long-term utilization of this resource is being studied. Many of the transuranic (TRU) actinides in nuclear spent fuel produce decay heat for long durations, resulting in significant nuclear waste management challenges. These actinides can be transmuted to shorter-lived isotopes to reduce the decay heat period or consumed as fuel in a CANDU(R) reactor. Many of the design features of the CANDU reactor make it uniquely adaptable to actinide transmutation. The small, simple fuel bundle simplifies the fabrication and handling of active fuels. Online refuelling allows precise management of core reactivity and separate insertion of the actinides and fuel bundles into the core. The high neutron economy of the CANDU reactor results in high TRU destruction to fissile-loading ratio. This paper provides a summary of actinide transmutation schemes that have been studied in CANDU reactors at AECL, including the works performed in the past. The schemes studied include homogeneous scenarios in which actinides are uniformly distributed in all fuel bundles in the reactor, as well as heterogeneous scenarios in which dedicated channels in the reactor are loaded with actinide targets and the rest of the reactor is loaded with fuel. The transmutation schemes that are presented reflect several different partitioning schemes. Separation of americium, often with curium, from the other actinides enables targeted destruction of americium, which is a main contributor to the decay heat 100-1000 years after discharge from the reactor. Another scheme is group-extracted transuranic elements, in which all of the transuranic elements, plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) are extracted together and then transmuted. This paper also addresses ways of utilizing the recycled uranium, another stream from the separation of spent nuclear fuel, in order to drive the transmutation of other actinides.

  7. Cleaning up the Legacy of the Cold War: Plutonium Oxides and the Role of Synchrotron Radiation Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, David Lewis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The deceptively simple binary formula of AnO2 belies an incredibly complex structural nature, and propensity to form mixed-valent, nonstoichiometric phases of composition AnO2±x. For plutonium, the very formation of PuO2+x has challenged a long-established dogma, and raised fundamental questions for long-term storage and environmental migration. This presentation covers two aspects of Los Alamos synchrotron radiation studies of plutonium oxides: (1) the structural chemistry of laboratory-prepared AnO2+x systems (An = U, Pu; 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.25) determined through a combination of x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) and x-ray scattering of laboratory prepared samples; and (2) the application of synchrotron radiation towards the decontamination and decommissioning of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Making the case for particle transport mechanisms as the basis of plutonium and americium mobility, rather than aqueous sorption-desorption processes, established a successful scientific basis for the dominance of physical transport processes by wind and water. The scientific basis was successful because it was in agreement with general theory on insolubility of PuO2 in oxidation state IV, results of ultrafiltration analyses of field water/sediment samples, XAFS analyses of soil, sediment, and concrete samples, and was also in general agreement with on-site monitoring data. This understanding allowed Site contractors to rapidly move to application of soil erosion and sediment transport models as the means of predicting plutonium and americium transport, which led to design and application of site-wide soil erosion control technology to help control downstream concentrations of plutonium and americium in streamflow.

  8. Fabrication of uranium-based ceramics using internal gelation for the conversion of trivalent actinides; Herstellung uranbasierter Keramiken mittel interner Gelierung zur Konversion trivalenter Actinoiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Alternative to today's direct final waste disposal strategy of long-lived radionuclides, for example the minor actinides neptunium, americium, curium and californium, is their selective separation from the radioactive wastestream with subsequent transmutation by neutron irradiation. Hereby it is possible to obtain nuclides with a lower risk-potential concerning their radiotoxicity. 1 neutron irradiation can be carried out either with neutron sources or in the next generation of nuclear reactors. Before the treatment, the minor actinides need to be converted in a suitable chemical and physical form. Internal gelation offers a route through which amorphous gel-spheres can be obtained directly from a metal-salt solution. Due to the presence of different types of metal ions as well as changing pH-values in a stock solution, a complex hydrolysis behaviour of these elements before and during gelation occurs. Therefore, investigations with uranium and neodymium as a minor actinide surrogate were carried out. As a result of suitable gelation-parameters, uraniumneodymium gel-spheres were successfully synthesised. The spheres also stayed intact during the subsequent thermal treatment. Based upon these findings, uranium-plutonium and uranium-americium gels were successfully created. For theses systems, the determined parameters for the uraniumneodymium gelation could also be applied. Additionally, investigations to reduce the acidity of uranium-based stock solutions for internal gelation were carried out. The necessary amount of urea and hexamethylenetetramine to induce gelation could hereby be decreased. This lead to a general increase of the gel quality and made it possible to carry out uranium-americium gelation in the first place. To investigate the stability of urea and hexamethylenetetramine, solutions of these chemicals were irradiated with different radiation doses. These chemicals showed a high stability against radiolysis in aqueous solutions.

  9. TRUEX process solvent cleanup with solid sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tse, Pui-Kwan; Reichley-Yinger, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    Solid sorbents, alumina, silica gel, and Amberlyst A-26 have been tested for the cleanup of degraded TRUEX-NPH solvent. A sodium carbonate scrub alone does not completely remove acidic degradation products from highly degraded solvent and cannot restore the stripping performance of the solvent. By following the carbonate scrub with either neutral alumina or Amberlyst A-26 anion exchange resin, the performance of the TRUEX-NPH is substantially restored. The degraded TRUEX-NPH was characterized before and after treatment by supercritical fluid chromatography. Its performance was evaluated by americium distribution ratios, phase-separation times, and lauric acid distribution coefficients. 17 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Radionuclide concentrations in honey bees from Area G at TA-54 during 1997. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haarmann, T.K.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1998-07-01

    Honey bees were collected from two colonies located at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Area G, Technical Area 54, and from one control (background) colony located near Jamez Springs, NM. Samples were analyzed for the following: cesium ({sup 137}Cs), americium ({sup 241}Am), plutonium ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 239,240}Pu), tritium ({sup 3}H), total uranium, and gross gamma activity. Area G sample results from both colonies were higher than the upper (95%) level background concentration for {sup 238}Pu and {sup 3}H.

  11. Measurement of the K X-ray absorption jump ratio of erbium by attenuation of a Compton peak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, A.P.; Mainardi, R.T. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina). Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica

    1996-02-01

    The X-ray absorption jump ratio of erbium was measured with a high resolution intrinsic germanium detector by attenuation, with an erbium foi, of a Compton peak produced by the scattering of the 60 keV americium 241 X-rays. Data analysis consists of a deconvolution to find the true Compton peak shape and an integration of a parameterized expression of the attenuation coefficient adjusted by least squares. Our result has an error of 1.5% and compared with calculated data shows a difference of less than 5%. PACS number(s): 32.80 Fb, 32.80 Cy. (author).

  12. The extraction behaviors of transuranic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byeon, Kee Hoh; Lee, Eil Hee; Kwon, Seon Gil; Kim, Kwang Wook; Yang, Han Beom; Chung, Dong Yong; Lim, Jae Kwan; Shin, Hyun Kyoo; Kim, Soo Ho

    1999-10-01

    We have studied the distribution data between organic and aqueous phases and the related reaction data in the state of extraction equilibrium for neptunium, americium and curium of transuranic elements, and also studied the chemical properties for these chemical elements. In the results of study, distribution coefficients of transuranic elements such as Np(IV), Np(V), Np(VI) Am(III), CM(III) and the redox reactions of neptunium were rearranged numerically with the data in the published literatures. (author)

  13. 2F Evaporator CP class instrumentation uncertainties evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, E.

    1994-01-28

    There are two instrumentation systems in the 2F Evaporator facilities (bldg. 242-16F) that are classified as the Critical Protection (CP). They are the Evaporator Pot Temperature instrumentations and Steam Condensate Gamma Monitor. The pot instrumentation consists of two interrelated circuits sharing the same temperature sensor and transducer. They are the high alarm and interlock circuit and the recorder circuit. The gamma monitor instrumentation consists of four interrelated circuits sharing the same scintillation detector. They are the gamma alarm and interlock circuit, failure alarm and interlock circuit, condensate cesium activity recorder circuit, and condensate americium activity recorder circuit. The resulting uncertainties for the instrument circuits are tabulated. (GHH)

  14. Bidentate organophosphorus extractants: purification, properties and applications to removal of actinides from acidic waste solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.W.; McIsaac, L.D.

    1977-05-01

    At both Hanford and Idaho, DHDECMP (dihexyl-N, N-diethylcarbamylmethylene phosphonate) continuous counter-current solvent extraction processes are being developed for removal of americium, plutonium, and, in some cases, other actinides from acidic wastes generated at these locations. Bench and, eventually, pilot and plant-scale testing and application of these processes have been substantially enhanced by the discovery of suitable chemical and physical methods of removing deleterious impurities from technical-grade DHDECMP. Flowsheet details, as well as various properties of purified DHDECMP extractants, are enumerated.

  15. Features of manufacturing Cd1–xZnxTe ionizing radiation detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomashik Z. F.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a newly-developed method of manufacturing of an operating element of the Cd1–xZnxTe-detector of ionizing radiation with high sensitivity to low-energy gamma radiation of the americium 241Am radioactive isotope. The proposed two-step method of chemical surface treatment with the use of new bromine releasing polishing etchants significantly improves the quality of the detector material and increases its specific sensitivity to ionizing radiation. This allows to use smaller Cd1–xZnxTe plates, which results in lowering of the cost of detectors.

  16. Comparison of destructive and nondestructive assay of heterogeneous salt residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleissner, J.G.; Hume, M.W.

    1986-03-29

    To study problems associated with nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of molten salt residues, a joint study was conducted by the Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, CO and Mound Laboratories, Miamisburg, OH. Extensive NDA measurements were made on nine containers of molten salt residues by both Rocky Flats and Mound followed by dissolution and solution quantification at Rocky Flats. Results of this study verify that plutonium and americium can be measured in such salt residues by a new gamma-ray spectral analysis technique coupled with calorimetry. Biases with respect to the segmented gamma-scan technique were noted.

  17. An in situ survey of Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range, Central Nevada. Date of survey: September--November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    A ground-based in situ radiological survey was conducted downwind of the Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3 nuclear safety test sites at the Tonopah Test Range in central Nevada from September through November 1993. The purpose of the study was to corroborate the americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) soil concentrations that were derived from the aerial radiological survey of the Clean Slate areas, which was conducted from August through October 1993. The presence of {sup 241}Am was detected at 140 of the 190 locations, with unrecoverable or lost data accounting for fifteen (15) of the sampling points. Good agreement was obtained between the aerial and in situ results.

  18. Calculated Bulk Properties of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Self-consistent relativistic calculations of the electronic properties for seven actinides (Ac-Am) have been performed using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the atomic-sphere approximation. Exchange and correlation were included in the local spin-density scheme. The theory explains...... the variation of the atomic volume and the bulk modulus through the 5f series in terms of an increasing 5f binding up to plutonium followed by a sudden localisation (through complete spin polarisation) in americium...

  19. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, Christopher G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  20. Dissolution of spent nuclear fuel in carbonate-peroxide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Chuck; Hanson, Brady

    2010-01-01

    This study shows that spent UO2 fuel can be completely dissolved in a room temperature carbonate-peroxide solution apparently without attacking the metallic Mo-Tc-Ru-Rh-Pd fission product phase. In parallel tests, identical samples of spent nuclear fuel were dissolved in nitric acid and in an ammonium carbonate, hydrogen peroxide solution. The resulting solutions were analyzed for strontium-90, technetium-99, cesium-137, europium-154, plutonium, and americium-241. The results were identical for all analytes except technetium, where the carbonate-peroxide dissolution had only about 25% of the technetium that the nitric acid dissolution had.

  1. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  2. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

  3. Radiotoxicological analyses of {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am in biological samples by anion-exchange and extraction chromatography: a preliminary study for internal contamination evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridone, S.; Arginelli, D.; Bortoluzzi, S.; Canuto, G.; Montalto, M.; Nocente, M.; Vegro, M. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment (ENEA), Research Centre of Saluggia, Radiation Protection Institute, Saluggia, VC (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Many biological samples (urines and faeces) have been analysed by means of chromatographic extraction columns, utilising two different resins (AG 1-X2 resin chloride and T.R.U.), in order to detect the possible internal contamination of {sup 239{sup +}}{sup 240}Pu and {sup 241}Am, for some workers of a reprocessing nuclear plant in the decommissioning phase. The results obtained show on one hand the great suitability of the first resin for the determination of plutonium, and on the other the great selectivity of the second one for the determination of americium.

  4. Nitrogen macrocyclic molecules for sequestering of heavy metals; Molecules macrocycliques azotees pour la sequestration de metaux lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chollet, H. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France); Denat, F.; Guilard, R. [Universite de Bourgogne, LIMSAG, 21 - Dijon (France)

    2006-05-15

    The tetra-aza-macrocycles and their derivatives have interesting properties in many fields, in particular for heavy metal extraction. Indeed, these ligands are able to complex many metals like uranium, plutonium, americium, cadmium, lead, etc. We describe the evolutions of design of these molecules since a score of years: simplifications of the synthesis leading to the improvement of the outputs, use of intermediate compounds facilitating the transposition at an industrial scale of the production of such molecules. The physicochemical behaviour of these ligands with respect to lanthanides and actinides, and their use within various processes of treatment are evoked. (authors)

  5. Neutron Nuclear Data Evaluation of Actinoid Nuclei for CENDL-3.1

    CERN Document Server

    Guo-Chang, Chen; Bao-Sheng, Yu; Guo-You, Tang; Zhao-Min, Shi; Xi, Tao

    2011-01-01

    New evaluations for several actinoids of the third version of China Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (CENDL-3.1) have been completed during the period between 2000 and 2005. The evaluations are for all neutron induced reactions with Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium and Americium in the mass range A=232-241, 236-239, 236-246 and 240-244, respectively, and cover the incident neutron energy up to 20 MeV. In present evaluation, much more efforts were devoted to improve reliability of nuclide for available new measured data, especially scarce experimental data. A general description for the evaluation of several actinoids data were presented.

  6. Suitability Measurement and Analysis for El Centro Naval Air Facility OLS. Opportune Landing Site Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    radioactive source at the end of the rod and the detector at the rear of the machine housing. The source rod is extended at 50-mm (2-in.) increments...Systems Workshop Phoenix, AZ, 21–24 April 2008. Stolf, R., R. Klaus, and C. Vaz, 2005, Response to “Comments on ‘Simultaneous Measurement of Soil...americium beryllium radiation source to emit neutrons from the base of the instru- ment. The neutrons collide with water hydrogen atoms and slow. The

  7. Synthesis and design of intermetallic materials - molybdenum disilicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based composite materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation resistance for applications of importance to the U.S. processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature composite materials and important applications in major energy-intensive U.S. processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with the advanced materials company Advanced Refractory Technologies Inc. and interactions targeted at developing industrial gas burner and metal and glass melting/processing applications. Current experimental emphasis is on the development and characterization of SiC reinforced-MoSi{sub 2} matrix composites, plasma sprayed MoSi{sub 2}-based materials and microlaminate composites, and MoSi{sub 2} reinforced-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix composites. We are developing processing methods for MoSi{sub 2{minus}}based materials and microlaminate composites, and MoSi{sub 2} reinforced-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix composites. We are developing processing methods for MoSi{sub 2{minus}} based materials, such as plasma spraying/spray forming and electrophoretic deposition. We are also pursuing the fabrication of prototype industrial gas burner and injection tube components of these materials, as well as prototype components for glass processing.

  8. Electron beam joining of structural ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Helmich, D.R.; Loehman, R.E.

    1995-04-01

    Feasibility of ceramic joining using a high energy (10 MeV) electron beam. The experiments used refractory metals as bonding materials in buried interfaces between Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} pieces. Because the heat capacity of the metal bonding layer is much lower than the ceramic, the metal reaches much higher temperatures than the adjoining ceramic. Using the right combination of beam parameters allows the metal to be melted without causing the adjoining ceramics to melt or decompose. Beam energy deposition and thermal simulations were performed to guide the experiments. Joints were shear tested and interfaces between the metal and the ceramic were examined to identify the bonding mechanism. Specimens joined by electron beams were compared to specimens produced by hot-pressing. Similar reactions occurred using both processes. Reactions between the metal and ceramic produced silicides that bond the metal to the ceramic. The molybdenum silicide reaction products appeared to be more brittle than the platinum silicides. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was also joined to Si{sub 3} N{sub 4} directly. The bonding appears to have been produced by the flow of intergranular glass into the interface. Shear strength was similar to the metal bonded specimens. Bend specimens Of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were exposed to electron beams with similar parameters to those used in joining experiments to determine how beam exposure degrades the strength. Damage was macroscopic in nature with craters being tonned by material ablation, and cracking occurring due to excessive thermal stresses. Si was also observed on the surface indicating the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was decomposing. Bend strength after exposure was 62% of the asreceived strength. No obvious microstructural differences were observed in the material close to the damaged region compared to material in regions far away from the damage.

  9. Solid State Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    b) gate stack lithography, (c) gate etch and thin oxide spacer formation, and (d) Pt-silicide source drain formation. No implants are used in this...Reactor Thickness variation 2% ə% Stacked for InGaAs/InP 200 arc sec 25 arc sec PL wavelength variation for InGaAs >6 nm ə nm A related factor in...French, R. C. Wheland, W. Qiu, M. F. Lemon , E. Zhang, J. Gordon, V. A. Petrov, V. F. Cherstkov, and N. I. Delaygina, J. Fluorine Chem. 122, 63 (2003

  10. Dry etching for microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, RA

    1984-01-01

    This volume collects together for the first time a series of in-depth, critical reviews of important topics in dry etching, such as dry processing of III-V compound semiconductors, dry etching of refractory metal silicides and dry etching aluminium and aluminium alloys. This topical format provides the reader with more specialised information and references than found in a general review article. In addition, it presents a broad perspective which would otherwise have to be gained by reading a large number of individual research papers. An additional important and unique feature of this book

  11. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  12. Experimental determination of plume properties in full-scale hydrogen-oxygen rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. G.; Limbaugh, C. C.; Zaccardi, V. A.; Eskridge, R.

    1989-01-01

    An IR emission/absorption technique for determining radial profiles of static temperature and species partial pressure for cylindrically symmetric combustion gases typical of the effluent of turbine engines and liquid-propellant rockets is described. In the technique, the IR plume radiance and absorption is measured using a 1 x 256-element platinum silicide detector array which is filtered to obtain plume emission measurements in the H2O band near 3.0 microns. A minicomputer is employed to control data acquisition and reduction.

  13. Preparation and crystal structure of the Er sub 1 Si sub 2-x (vacancy) sub x compound, derivative of the AlB sub 2 type structure. Preparation et structure cristalline du compose Er sub 1 Si sub 2-x (lacune) sub x , derivee de la structure type AlB sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghetta, V.; Houssay, E.; Rouault, A.; Madar, R. (Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, 38 - Saint-Martin-d' Heres (FR)); Lambert, B. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 38 - Grenoble (FR))

    1989-09-01

    The rare earth silicides are of great interest in applications to semiconductor technolgy and form the subject of studies aiming at a better understanding of their physical properties in relation with their structure and composition. A systematic study of the RSi{sub 2-x} compounds, which crystallize in three main structure types ThSi{sub 2}, GdSi{sub 2}, AlB{sub 2} led us to find an orthorhombic superstructure of the hexagonal ErSi{sub 2-x} (AlB{sub 2}-type) structure. This superstructure is caused by a particular arrangement of the vacancies in the silicon sub-lattice.

  14. Reinventing the PN Junction: Dimensionality Effects on Tunneling Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Transistors," Physical Review Letters , vol. 93, p. 196805, 2004. [10] R. Gandhi , et al., "CMOS-Compatible Vertical-Silicon-Nanowire Gate-All-Around... Letters , vol. 28, pp. 743-745, Aug 2007. [5] K. Jeon, et al., "Si tunnel transistors with a novel silicided source and 46mV/dec swing," presented at...p- Type Tunneling FETs With <= 50-mV/decade Subthreshold Swing," Ieee Electron Device Letters , vol. 32, pp. 1504-1506, Nov 2011. [11] G. Dewey, et

  15. Phase formation during the carbothermic reduction of eudialyte concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikov, S. A.; Upolovnikova, A. G.; Sitnikova, O. A.; Ponomarenko, A. A.; Agafonov, S. N.; Zhidovinova, S. V.; Maiorov, D. V.

    2013-07-01

    The phase transformations of eudialyte concentrate during the carbothermic reduction in the temperature range 25-2000°C are studied by thermodynamic simulation, differential thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. As the temperature increases to 1500°C, the following phases are found to form sequentially: iron and manganese carbides, free iron, niobium carbide, iron silicides, silicon and titanium carbides, and free silicon. Strontium, yttrium, and uranium in the temperature range under study are not reduced and are retained in an oxide form, and insignificant reduction of zirconium oxides with the formation of carbide ZrC is possible only at temperatures above 1500°C.

  16. Alternative Gate Dielectrics on Semiconductors for MOSFET Device Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, D.P.; Budai, J.D.; Chisholm, M.F.; Pennycook, S.J.; McKee, R.; Walker, F.; Lee, Y.; Park, C.

    1999-12-06

    We have investigated the synthesis and properties of deposited oxides on Si and Ge for use as alternative gate dielectrics in MOSFET applications. The capacitance and leakage current behavior of polycrystalline Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films synthesized by pulsed-laser deposition is reported. In addition, we also discuss the growth of epitaxial oxide structures. In particular, we have investigated the use of silicide termination for oxide growth on (001) Si using laser-molecular beam epitaxy. In addition, we discuss a novel approach involving the use of hydrogen to eliminate native oxide during initial dielectric oxide nucleation on (001) Ge.

  17. Morphology, structure, and magnetism of FeCo thin films electrodeposited on hydrogen-terminated Si(111) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarpellon, J; Jurca, H F; Mattoso, N; Klein, J J; Schreiner, W H; Ardisson, J D; Macedo, W A A; Mosca, D H

    2007-12-15

    In this work we describe the fabrication of FeCo alloy (less than 10 at% Co) thin films from aqueous ammonium sulfate solutions onto n-type Si(111) substrates using potentiostatic electrodeposition at room temperature. The incorporation of Co into the deposits tends to inhibit Fe silicide formation and to protect deposits against oxidation under air exposure. As the incorporation of Co was progressively increased, the sizes of nuclei consisting of FeCo alloy increased, leading to films with a highly oriented body-centered cubic structure with crystalline texture, where (110) planes remain preferentially oriented parallel to the film surface.

  18. Rapid thermal processing science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Fair, Richard B

    1993-01-01

    This is the first definitive book on rapid thermal processing (RTP), an essential namufacturing technology for single-wafer processing in highly controlled environments. Written and edited by nine experts in the field, this book covers a range of topics for academics and engineers alike, moving from basic theory to advanced technology for wafer manufacturing. The book also provides new information on the suitability or RTP for thin film deposition, junction formation, silicides, epitaxy, and in situ processing. Complete discussions on equipment designs and comparisons between RTP and other

  19. Synthesis of lithium silicates by the modified method of combustion. XRD and IR; Sintesis de silicatos de litio por el metodo modificado de combustion. DRX e IR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, D.; Bulbulian, S. [Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    The combustion method is fixed in exothermic reactions for producing ceramic compounds. The precursor solutions are mixtures of metal nitrates and the fuels. This method was modified using non-oxidant compounds as lithium hydroxide and silicide acid and urea as fuel. The precursors were heated during 5 minutes at temperatures between 250 C and 550 C allowing so the mixture combustion. The obtained ceramics were characterized by X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The sample pollution with carbonates was evaluated and it was found that the presence of these diminish according as increase the calcination temperature. (Author)

  20. Analysis of the High Conversion Efficiencies β-FeSi2 and BaSi2 n-i-p Thin Film Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jung-Sheng Huang; Kuan-Wei Lee; Yu-Hsiang Tseng

    2014-01-01

    Both β-FeSi2 and BaSi2 are silicides and have large absorption coefficients; thus they are very promising Si-based new materials for solar cell applications. In this paper, the dc I-V characteristics of n-Si/i-βFeSi2/p-Si and n-Si/i-BaSi2/p-Si thin film solar cells are investigated by solving the charge transport equations with optical generations. The diffusion current densities of free electron and hole are calculated first. Then the drift current density in the depletion regions is obtaine...

  1. SiC reinforced-MoSi sub 2 based matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    SiC reinforced-MoSi{sub 2} based matrix composites possess very significant potential as high temperature structural materials for temperatures above 1200{degree}C in oxidizing environments, due to their combination of oxidation resistance, thermodynamic stability, machinability, elevated temperature ductility and strength, and ability to alloy the MoSi{sub 2} matrix with other silicides. The fabrication, microstructures, oxidation, and mechanical properties of these materials are described, and their current properties are compared to high temperature metals and structural ceramics. 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Enhanced relaxation of strained Ge{sub x}Si{sub 1-x} layers induced by Co/Ge{sub x}Si{sub 1-x} thermal reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgway, M.C.; Elliman, R.G.; Rao, M.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); Baribeau, J.M. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    Enhanced relaxation of strained Ge{sub x}Si{sub l-x} layers during the formation of CoSi{sub 2} by Co/Ge{sub x}Si{sub 1-x} thermal reaction has been observed. Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to monitor the extent of relaxation. Possible mechanisms responsible for the enhanced relaxation, including metal-induced dislocation nucleation, chemical and/or structural inhomogeneities at the reacted layer/Ge{sub x}Si{sub 1-x} interface and point defect injection due to silicide formation will be discussed. Also, methodologies for inhibiting relaxation will be presented. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Co-Ordination Compounds as Sensitizers for Percussion Cap Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-01-01

    Lead styphnate , unfortunately, makes the finished caps liable to explode en-masse, while barium nitrate promotes muzzle flash in certain guns. V...based on dinitro- diazophenol (D.D.N.P.). Type (a) contains lead styphnate , tetrazene, barium nitrate, calcium silicide, lead peroxide (with or...oxide 16 8 4 3 Sodium dinitrobonzfurazan oxide 16 8 4 3 Barium Styphnate 16 8 4 3 2 1 45. < 3 1 » ; I 5I 5^ I ’s 1 • •o t o

  4. Peculiarities of the electron structure of nanosized ion-implanted layers in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysbaev, A. S.; Khuzhaniyazov, Zh. B.; Normuradov, M. T.; Rakhimov, A. M.; Bekpulatov, I. R.

    2014-11-01

    The effect of implantation of Ba, P, B, and alkali element ions with a low energy ( E 0 narrowing of the band gap in silicon, which can be explained by overlapping of the wavefunctions of electrons of impurity atoms and the formation of the impurity subband overlapping with the allowed band. After implantation thermal annealing, SiP, BaSi, and SiB3 films of nano-sized thickness are obtained for the first time. Optimal regimes of ion implantation and subsequent annealing for the formation of silicide films are determined, and their electron structure is investigated.

  5. Nano integrated circuit process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yung Sup

    2004-02-15

    This book contains nine chapters, which are introduction of manufacture of semiconductor chip, oxidation such as Dry-oxidation, wet oxidation, oxidation model and oxide film, diffusion like diffusion process, diffusion equation, diffusion coefficient and diffusion system, ion implantation, including ion distribution, channeling, multiimplantation and masking and its system, sputtering such as CVD and PVD, lithography, wet etch and dry etch, interconnection and flattening like metal-silicon connection, silicide, multiple layer metal process and flattening, an integrated circuit process, including MOSFET and CMOS.

  6. Silicon clathrates and carbon analogs: high pressure synthesis, structure, and superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Shoji

    2010-02-28

    Compounds with cage-like structures of elemental silicon and carbon are comparatively reviewed. Barium containing silicon clathrate compounds isomorphous with type I gas hydrates were prepared using high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions, and found to become superconductors. The application of HPHT conditions to Zintl binary silicides have produced a number of silicon-rich cage-like structures including new clathrate structures; most of them are superconductors. Carbon analogs of silicon clathrates can be prepared by 3D polymerization of C(60) under HPHT conditions, which are new allotropes of carbon with expanded framework structures. The crystal chemistry and characteristic properties of some related compounds are also reviewed.

  7. Features of Mg2Si Layer Growth in Si/Mg2Si Multilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.E. Konotopskyi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Features of magnesium siliced layer growth in Si/Mg2Si multilayers in initial state and after thermal annealing were studied by methods of transmission electron microscopy and X-Ray scattering. As-deposited magnesium silicide layers are amorphous with nanocrystal inclusions of metastable h-Mg2Si. Formation of Mg2Si in hexagonal modification occurs under the influence of stress produced by silicon layers. At T = 723 К Mg2Si layers finished crystallizes in hexagonal modification, with some coarsening of grains. That is accompanied with 7.3 % reduction in period of the Si/Mg2Si multilayer.

  8. Fuel management strategy for the compact core design of RSG GAS (MPR-30)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sembiring, T.M.; Liem, P.H.; Tukiran, S. [National Nuclear Energy Agency (Batan), PUSPIPTEK-Serpong Tangerang (Indonesia)

    2000-07-01

    The rearrangement of the core configuration of the RSG GAS reactor to obtain a compact core is in progress. A fuel management strategy is proposed for the equilibrium compact core of this reactor by reducing the number of in-core irradiation positions. The reduced irradiation positions are based on the activities during 12 years operation. The obtained compact core gives significant extension of the operation cycle length so that the reactor availability and utilization can be enhanced. The equilibrium compact silicide core obtained met the imposed design constraints and safety requirements. (author)

  9. Solid state NMR and pair distribution function studies of silicon electrodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Baris

    The universally used negative electrode material in a LIB is carbon, because of its moderate capacity (372 mAhg-1 for graphite), cyclability and high rate capability. However, new, low cost, safe electrode materials with higher capacities are still urgently required for both portable and transportation applications. Silicon anodes are particularly attractive alternatives to carbon with extremely high gravimetric energy densities (3572 mAhg-1). Compared to graphite, silicon has a massive volumetric capacity of 8322 mAhcm-3 (calculated based on the original volume of silicon) which is approximately ten times that graphite. At room temperature, upon electrochemical lithiation, silicon undergoes a crystalline to amorphous phase transition forming a lithiated amorphous silicide phase. Unfortunately, due to the amorphous nature of the lithiated silicides, it is not possible to monitor all the structural changes that occur during lithium insertion/removal with conventional methods such as diffraction. The short range order of the amorphous materials remains unknown, preventing attempts to optimize performance based on electrochemical-structure correlations. In this work, a combination of local structure probes, ex-situ 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of X-ray data was applied to investigate the changes in short range order that occur during the initial charge and discharge cycles. The distinct electrochemical profiles observed subsequent to the 1 st discharge have been shown to be associated with the formation of distinct amorphous lithiated silicide structures. A (de)lithiation model consisting of four different mechanisms, each being valid for regions of the charge or discharge process is proposed to explain the hysteresis and the steps in the electrochemical profile observed during lithiation and delithiation of Si. A spontaneous reaction of the fully lithiated lithium silicide with the electrolyte is directly

  10. Disorder in the composite crystal structure of the manganese `disilicide' MnSi1.73 from powder X-ray diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akselrud, L; Cardoso Gil, R; Wagner-Reetz, M; Grin, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The crystal structure of the higher manganese silicide MnSi1.7 (known in the literature as HMS) is investigated in samples with different compositions obtained by different techniques at temperatures not higher than 1273 K. Powder X-ray diffraction was applied. The crystal structure is described as incommensurate composite. In addition to the ordered model already known in the literature, the partial disorder in the silicon substructure was detected and described introducing an additional atomic site with a different modulation function.

  11. Role of metal/silicon semiconductor contact engineering for enhanced output current in micro-sized microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mink, Justine E.

    2013-11-25

    We show that contact engineering plays an important role to extract the maximum performance from energy harvesters like microbial fuel cells (MFCs). We experimented with Schottky and Ohmic methods of fabricating contact areas on silicon in an MFC contact material study. We utilized the industry standard contact material, aluminum, as well as a metal, whose silicide has recently been recognized for its improved performance in smallest scale integration requirements, cobalt. Our study shows that improvements in contact engineering are not only important for device engineering but also for microsystems. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Low-parasitic ESD protection strategy for RF ICs in 0.35μm CMOS process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yuan; Jia Song; Chen Zhong-Jian; Ji Li-Jiu

    2006-01-01

    A systemic and comprehensive ESD-induced parasitic model is presented in this paper, which is used to analyse the parasitic influences of electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection circuits on the performance of radio frequency applications. A novel low-parasitic ESD protection structure is made in a 0.35μm 1P3M silicide CMOS process. The measured results show that this novel structure has a low parasitic capacitance about 310fF and a low leakage current about 12.2nA with a suitable ESD robustness target about 5kV human body model.

  13. Structural characterization of Ni and Ni/Ti ohmic contact on n-type 4H-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siad, M., E-mail: siadmenouar@yahoo.fr [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 02 Bd Frantz Fanon (Algeria); Abdesselam, M. [USTHB, Faculte de Physique, BP 32, El Alia, Bab Ezzouar (Algeria); Souami, N. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 02 Bd Frantz Fanon (Algeria); Chami, A.C. [USTHB, Faculte de Physique, BP 32, El Alia, Bab Ezzouar (Algeria)

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we report on the structural characterization of Ni layer and Ni/Ti bilayer contacts on n-type 4H-SiC. The resulting Ni-silicides and the redistribution of carbon, after annealing at 950 deg. C, in the Ni/SiC and the Ni/Ti/SiC contacts are particularly studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) at E{sub {alpha}} = 3.2 MeV, nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) at E{sub d} = 1 MeV, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) techniques.

  14. Properties of Ultra-Thin Hafnium Oxide and Interfacial Layer Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taeho Lee; Young-Bae Kim; Kyung-Il Hong; Duck-Kyun Choi; Jinho Ahn

    2004-01-01

    Ultra-thin hafnium-oxide gate dielectric films deposited by atomic layer deposition technique using HfCl4 and H2O precursor on a hydrogen-terminated Si substrate were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the interface layer is Hf-silicate rather than phase separated Hf-silicide and silicon oxide structure. The Hf-silicate interfacial layer partially changes into SiOx after high temperature annealing, resulting in a complex HfO2-silicate-SiOx dielectric structure. Electrical measurements confirms that HfO2 on Si is stable up to 700 ℃ for 30 s under N2 ambient.

  15. Immobilization of AM-241, Formed Under Plutonium Metal Conversion into Monazite-Type Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aloy, A S; Kovarskaya, E N; Koltsova, T I; Samoylov, S E; Rovnyi, S I; Medvedev, G M; Jardine, L J

    2001-06-06

    Lanthanum orthophosphate with the monazite structure was proposed on examinations as a suitable matrix for immobilization of future americium-containing liquid wastes, which could be formed in conversion of metallic plutonium into oxide at PA ''Mayak.'' Specimens of monazite non-active ceramics were fabricated from LaPOA powders obtained using a thin-film evaporator by either hot-pressing or cold-pressing and sintering at 900-1300 C. According to electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), which were used for characterization of produced samples, all specimens did not contain any phase other than the monoclinic monazite phase. Ceramics having the specific activity of Am-241 2.13 {center_dot}10{sup 7} Bq/g were prepared by only cold-pressing with subsequent sintering at 1300 C during 1 hour. The normalized leach rates of lanthanum and americium in distilled water at 90 C were less than 1.2. 10{sup 4} and 2.3 10{sup -4} g/m{sup 2} {center_dot} day, respectively.

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salt Decontamination Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Demmer; Stephen Reese

    2014-09-01

    On February 14, 2014, americium and plutonium contamination was released in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) salt caverns. At the request of WIPP’s operations contractor, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) personnel developed several methods of decontaminating WIPP salt, using surrogate contaminants and also americium (241Am). The effectiveness of the methods is evaluated qualitatively, and to the extent possible, quantitatively. One of the requirements of this effort was delivering initial results and recommendations within a few weeks. That requirement, in combination with the limited scope of the project, made in-depth analysis impractical in some instances. Of the methods tested (dry brushing, vacuum cleaning, water washing, strippable coatings, and mechanical grinding), the most practical seems to be water washing. Effectiveness is very high, and it is very easy and rapid to deploy. The amount of wastewater produced (2 L/m2) would be substantial and may not be easy to manage, but the method is the clear winner from a usability perspective. Removable surface contamination levels (smear results) from the strippable coating and water washing coupons found no residual removable contamination. Thus, whatever is left is likely adhered to (or trapped within) the salt. The other option that shows promise is the use of a fixative barrier. Bartlett Nuclear, Inc.’s Polymeric Barrier System (PBS) proved the most durable of the coatings tested. The coatings were not tested for contaminant entrapment, only for coating integrity and durability.

  17. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salt Decontamination Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, Ricky Lynn [Idaho National Laboratory; Reese, Stephen Joseph [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-03-01

    On February 14, 2014, americium and plutonium contamination was released in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) salt caverns. Several practical, easily deployable methods of decontaminating WIPP salt, using a surrogate contaminant and americium (241Am), were developed and tested. The effectiveness of the methods is evaluated qualitatively, and to the extent practical, quantitatively. Of the methods tested (dry brushing, vacuum cleaning, water washing, mechanical grinding, strippable coatings, and fixative barriers), the most practical seems to be water washing. Effectiveness is very high, and water washing is easy and rapid to deploy. The amount of wastewater produced (~2 L/m2) would be substantial and may not be easy to manage, but the method is the clear winner from a usability perspective. Removable surface contamination levels (smear results) from water washed coupons found no residual removable contamination. Thus, whatever contamination is left is likely adhered to (or trapped within) the salt. The other option that shows promise is the use of a fixative barrier. Bartlett Nuclear, Inc.’s Polymeric Barrier System proved the most durable of the coatings tested. The coatings were not tested for contaminant entrapment, only for coating integrity and durability.

  18. Characterization of radiolytically generated degradation products in the strip section of a TRUEX flowsheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean R. Peterman; Lonnie G. Olson; Gary S. Groenewold; Rocklan G. McDowell; Richard D. Tillotson; Jack D. Law

    2013-08-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet the FCRD level 2 milestone M3FT-13IN0302053, “Identification of TRUEX Strip Degradation.” The INL radiolysis test loop has been used to identify radiolytically generated degradation products in the strip section of the TRUEX flowsheet. These data were used to evaluate impact of the formation of radiolytic degradation products in the strip section upon the efficacy of the TRUEX flowsheet for the recovery of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from acidic solution. The nominal composition of the TRUEX solvent used in this study is 0.2 M CMPO and 1.4 M TBP dissolved in n-dodecane and the nominal composition of the TRUEX strip solution is 1.5 M lactic acid and 0.050 M diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Gamma irradiation of a mixture of TRUEX process solvent and stripping solution in the test loop does not adversely impact flowsheet performance as measured by stripping americium ratios. The observed increase in americium stripping distribution ratios with increasing absorbed dose indicates the radiolytic production of organic soluble degradation compounds.

  19. A radiochemical procedure for a low-level measurement of ''241Am in environmental samples using a supported functional organo phosphorus extractant; Metodo analitico para la determinacion de ''241Am en muestras biologicas y sedimentos marinos mediante uso de una columna con extractante organico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco, C.; Anton, M. P.; Alvarez, A.; Navarro, N.; Salvador, S.

    1994-07-01

    The transuranides analysis in environmental samples is carried out by CIEMAT using standardized methods based on sequential separation with ionic-exchange resins. The americium fraction is purified through a two-layer ion exchange column and lately in an anion-exchange column in nitric acid methanol medium. The technique is time consuming and the results are not completely satisfactory (low recovery and loss of a-resolution) for some samples. The chemical compound CMPO (octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutyl carbomoylmethyiphosphine oxide) dissolved in TPB (tributyl phosphate) and supported on an inert substrate has been tested directly for ''241Am analysis by a large number of laboratories. A new method that combines both procedures has been developed. The details of the improved procedure are described in this paper. The advantages of its application to environmental samples (urine, faeces and sediments) are discussed. The utilization of standard samples, with americium certified concentrations confirms the reliability of our measurements. (Author) 8 refs.

  20. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily.

  1. Performance of a corona ion source for measurement of sulfuric acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kürten

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The performance of an ion source based on corona discharge has been studied. This source is used for the detection of gaseous sulfuric acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS through the reaction of NO3 ions with H2SO4. The ion source is operated under atmospheric pressure and its design is similar to the one of a radioactive (Americium 241 ion source which has been used previously. Our results show that the detection limit for the corona ion source is sufficiently good for most applications. For an integration time of one minute it is ~6 × 104 molecules of H2SO4 per cm3. In addition, only a small cross-sensitivity to SO2 has been observed for concentrations as high as 1 ppmv in the sample gas. This low sensitivity to SO2 is achieved even without the addition of an OH scavenger. When comparing the new corona ion source with the americium ion source for the same provided H2SO4 concentration, both ion sources yield almost identical values. These features make the corona ion source investigated here favorable over the more commonly used radioactive ion sources for most applications where H2SO4 is measured by CIMS.

  2. Performance of a corona ion source for measurement of sulfuric acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kürten

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance of an ion source based on corona discharge has been studied. This source is used for the detection of gaseous sulfuric acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS through the reaction of NO3 ions with H2SO4. The ion source is operated under atmospheric pressure and its design is similar to the one of a radioactive (americium-241 ion source which has been used previously. The results show that the detection limit for the corona ion source is sufficiently good for most applications. For an integration time of 1 min it is ~6 × 104 molecule cm−3 of H2SO4. In addition, only a small cross-sensitivity to SO2 has been observed for concentrations as high as 1 ppmv in the sample gas. This low sensitivity to SO2 is achieved even without the addition of an OH scavenger. When comparing the new corona ion source with the americium ion source for the same provided H2SO4 concentration, both ion sources yield almost identical values. These features make the corona ion source investigated here favorable over the more commonly used radioactive ion sources for most applications where H2SO4 is measured by CIMS.

  3. An Ion Exchange Study of Possible Hydridized 5f Bonding in theActinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.M.; Street, Jr., K.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1951-08-28

    A study has been made of the elution behavior of curium(III), americium(III), plutonium(III), actinium(III), plutonium(IV), neptunium(IV), uraniuM(IV), thorium(IV), neptunium(V), plutonium (VI), uranium (VI), lanthanum(III), cerium(III), europium(III), ytterbium(III), ytterium(III), strontium(II), barium(II), radium(II), cesium(I) with 3.2 M, 6.2 M, 9.3 M, and 12.2 M HCl solutions from Dowex-50 cation exchange resin columns. These elutions show that in high concentrations of hydrochloric acid the actinides form complex ions with chloride ion to a much greater extent than the lanthanides. The strengths of the tripositive actinide complex ions apparently go in the order plutonium > americium> curium, although their ionic radii also decrease in this same order. To explain these results, a partial covalent character may be ascribed to the bonding in the transuranium complex ions. It is shown that a reasonable structure for such covalent bonding involves hybridization of the 5f orbitals in the actinide elements.

  4. The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. J. Carmack; M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; H. Tsai

    2008-01-01

    The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR II as part of the Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few MA bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide, and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MAs. Of primary interest are the effect of the MAs on fuel cladding chemical interaction and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995–1996 and, currently, represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This report provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

  5. The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Revision 1, [Annual] report, October 1, 1990--April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathren, R.L.

    1992-09-01

    This paper describes the history, organization, activities and recent scientific accomplishments of the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries. Through voluntary donations of tissue obtained at autopsies, the Registries carry out studies of the concentration, distribution and biokinetics of plutonium in occupationally exposed persons. Findings from tissue analyses from more than 200 autopsies include the following: a greater proportion of the americium intake, as compared with plutonium, was found in the skeleton; the half-time of americium in liver is significantly shorter than that of plutonium; the concentration of actinide in the skeleton is inversely proportional to the calcium and ash content of the bone; only a small percentage of the total skeletal deposition of plutonium is found in the marrow, implying a smaller risk from irradiation of the marrow relative to the bone surfaces; estimates of plutonium body burden made from urinalysis typically exceed those made from autopsy data; pathologists were unable to discriminate between a group of uranium workers and persons without known occupational exposure on the basis of evaluation of microscopic kidney slides; the skeleton is an important long term depot for uranium, and that the fractional uptake by both skeleton and kidney may be greater than indicated by current models. These and other findings and current studies are discussed in depth.

  6. Magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process: Preparation and optimization of particles for removal of transuranic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.; Bradley, C.; Buchholz, B.A.; Aase, S.B.; Tuazon, H.E.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Landsberger, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The Magnetically Assisted Chemical Separation (MACS) process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractants with magnetic separation by using specially coated magnetic particles to provide a more efficient chemical separation of transuranic (TRU) elements, other radionuclides, and heavy metals from waste streams. Development of the MACS process uses chemical and physical techniques to elucidate the properties of particle coatings and the extent of radiolytic and chemical damage to the particles, and to optimize the stages of loading, extraction, and particle regeneration. This report describes the development of a separation process for TRU elements from various high-level waste streams. Polymer-coated ferromagnetic particles with an adsorbed layer of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) diluted with tributyl phosphate (TBP) were evaluated for use in the separation and recovery of americium and plutonium from nuclear waste solutions. Due to their chemical nature, these extractants selectively complex americium and plutonium contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the solution by using a magnet. The partition coefficients were larger than those expected based on liquid[liquid extractions, and the extraction proceeded with rapid kinetics. Extractants were stripped from the particles with alcohols and 400-fold volume reductions were achieved. Particles were more sensitive to acid hydrolysis than to radiolysis. Overall, the optimization of a suitable NMCS particle for TRU separation was achieved under simulant conditions, and a MACS unit is currently being designed for an in-lab demonstration.

  7. Waste management in NUCEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y.; Maeda, A.; Sugikawa, S.; Takeshita, I. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Dept. of Safety Research Technical Support, Tokai-Mura, Naka-Gun, Ibaraki-Ken (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    In the NUCEF, the researches on criticality safety have been performed at two critical experiment facilities, STACY and TRACY in addition to the researches on fuel cycle such as advanced reprocessing and partitioning in alpha-gamma concrete cells and glove boxes. Many kinds of radioactive wastes have been generated through the research activities. Furthermore, the waste treatment itself may produce some secondary wastes. In addition, the separation and purification of plutonium of several tens-kg from MOX powder are scheduled in order to supply plutonium nitrate solution fuel for critical experiments at STACY. A large amount of wastes containing plutonium and americium will be generated from the plutonium fuel treatment. From the viewpoint of safety, the proper waste management is one of important works in NUCEF. Many efforts, therefore, have been made for the development of advanced waste treatment techniques to improve the waste management in NUCEF. Especially the reduction of alpha-contaminated wastes is a major interest. For example, the separation of americium is planned from the liquid waste evolved alter plutonium purification by application of tannin gel as an adsorbent of actinide elements. The waste management and the relating technological development in NUCEF are briefly described in this paper. (authors)

  8. Radioecology of transuranics: characterization and behaviour of nuclear fuels particulates in soil of Palomares (Almeria); Radiecologia de transuranidos: Caracterizacion y comportamiento de particulas de combustible nuclear en suelos afectados por el accidente de Palomares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragon del Valle, A.

    2003-07-01

    The framework of this work is within Radioecology. Its objective is to improve our knowledge on the environmental impact of transuranic elements (plutonium and americium principally) in a Mediterranean ecosystem in SE Spain. The studies concerning the transuranide behavior in the affected area include solubility tests with contaminated soils (in physiological and aqueous solutions)and control of the evolution and effects caused by the agricultural activities. The interaction degree between plutonium and soil constituents has been studied by adapting and applying a sequential extraction procedure, based on the specificity of the reagents in the solubilization of the different mineralogical phases. The level of plutonium and americium has been determined in gastropods collected in the surroundings of Palomares, thus proving the presence of transuranides in the food chain. Autoradiographic studies show that the radioactive contamination present in soils, affected by a nuclear accident that occurred in 1966, is in particle form. In order to characterize the contamination, isolation, description and destructive and nondestructive analyses of radioactive particles have been performed and the results appear in this work. All these studies have been carried out by standard metrological procedures (field and laboratory), and by performing a huge number of radiochemical analysis and alpha and gamma spectrometric measurements. Therefore, the research work of this doctoral. Thesis will contribute to the obtention of an adequate scientific basis for the assessment of the radiological situation in radioactively-contaminates sites, as well as to the development of methods and criteria for restoration. (Author)

  9. NIST Calibration of a Neutron Spectrometer ROSPEC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbach, Craig

    2006-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer was acquired for use in the measurement of National Institute of Standards and Technology neutron fields. The spectrometer included options for the measurement of low and high energy neutrons, for a total measurement range from 0.01 eV up to 17 MeV. The spectrometer was evaluated in calibration fields and was used to determine the neutron spectrum of an Americium-Beryllium neutron source. The calibration fields used included bare and moderated (252)Cf, monoenergetic neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and a thermal-neutron beam. Using the calibration values determined in this exercise, the spectrometer gives a good approximation of the neutron spectrum, and excellent values for neutron fluence, for all NIST calibration fields. The spectrometer also measured an Americium-Beryllium neutron field in a NIST exposure facility and determined the field quite well. The spectrometer measured scattering effects in neutron spectra which previously could be determined only by calculation or integral measurements.

  10. Effects of soluble organic complexants and their degradation products on the removal of selected radionuclides from high-level waste. Part II: Distributions of Sr, Cs, Tc, and Am onto 32 absorbers from four variations of Hanford tank 101-SY simulant solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Many of the radioactive waste storage tanks at U.S. Department of Energy facilities contain organic compounds that have been degraded by radiolysis and chemical reactions during decades of storage. In this second part of our three-part investigation of the effects of soluble organic complexants and their degradation products, we measured the sorption of strontium, cesium, technetium, and americium onto 32 absorbers that offer high sorption of these elements in the absence of organic complexants. The four solutions tested were (1) a simulant for a 3:1 dilution of Hanford Tank 101-SY contents that initially contained ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), (2) this simulant after gamma-irradiation to 34 Mrads, (3) the unirradiated simulant after treatment with a hydrothermal organic-destruction process, and (4) the irradiated simulant after hydrothermal processing. For each of 512 element/absorber/solution combinations, we measured distribution coefficients (Kds) twice for each period for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of our 3,072 measured Kd values, the sorption of strontium and americium is significantly decreased by the organic components of the simulant solutions, whereas the sorption of cesium and technetium appears unaffected by the organic components of the simulant solutions.

  11. Dosimetry studies on prototype 241Am sources for brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, R; Gray, L

    1987-06-01

    Sealed sources of 241Am emit primarily 60 keV photons which, because of multiple Compton scattering, produce dose distributions in water that are comparable to those from 226Ra or 137Cs. However, americium gamma rays can be shielded by thin layers of high atomic number materials since the half value layer thickness is only 1/8th of a mm of lead for americium gamma rays as compared to a value of 12 mm for 226Ra gamma rays. This may allow effective in vivo shielding of critical organs, for example; the bladder can be partially shielded by hypaque solution, and the rectum and sigmoid colon by barium sulfate. In addition, the exposure to medical personnel involved in intracavitary application and patient care may be reduced substantially by the use of relatively thin lead aprons and light weight, portable shields. To investigate the feasibility of 241Am sources for intracavitary irradiation, dosimetry studies on prototype 241Am sources have been performed and a computer model for the determination of dose distributions around encapsulated cylindrical sources of 241Am has been developed and tested. Results of dosimetry measurements using ionization chambers, lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters, a scanning scintillation probe, and film dosimetry, confirm theoretical predictions that these sources can deliver dose rates adequate for intracavitary irradiation. Further dosimetry measurements in simulated clinical situations using lead foils and test tubes filled with hypaque or barium sulfate, confirm the predicted effectiveness of in vivo shielding which can be readily achieved with 241Am sources.

  12. Ambient air sampling for radioactive air contaminants at Los Alamos National Laboratory: A large research and development facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhart, C.F.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes the ambient air sampling program for collection, analysis, and reporting of radioactive air contaminants in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Particulate matter and water vapor are sampled continuously at more than 50 sites. These samples are collected every two weeks and then analyzed for tritium, and gross alpha, gross beta, and gamma ray radiation. The alpha, beta, and gamma measurements are used to detect unexpected radionuclide releases. Quarterly composites are analyzed for isotopes of uranium ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U), plutonium ({sup 238}Pu, {sup 239/249}Pu), and americium ({sup 241}Am). All of the data is stored in a relational database with hard copies as the official records. Data used to determine environmental concentrations are validated and verified before being used in any calculations. This evaluation demonstrates that the sampling and analysis process can detect tritium, uranium, plutonium, and americium at levels much less than one percent of the public dose limit of 10 millirems. The isotopic results also indicate that, except for tritium, off-site concentrations of radionuclides potentially released from LANL are similar to typical background measurements.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of hybrid silicon based complexing materials: extraction of transuranic elements from high level liquid waste; Synthese et caracterisation de gels hybrides de silice a proprietes complexantes: applications a l'extraction des transuraniens des effluents aqueux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conocar, O

    1999-07-01

    Hybrid organic/inorganic silica compounds with extractive properties have been developed under an enhanced decontamination program for radioactive aqueous nitric acid waste in nuclear facilities. The materials were obtained by the sol-gel process through hydrolysis and poly-condensation of complexing organo-tri-alkoxy-silanes with the corresponding tetra-alkoxy-silane. Hybrid silica compounds were initially synthesized and characterized from mono- and bis-silyl precursors with malonamide or ethylenediamine patterns. Solids with different specific areas and pore diameters were obtained depending on the nature of the precursor, its functionality and its concentration in the tetra-alkoxy-silane. These compounds were then considered and assessed for use in plutonium and americium extraction. Excellent results-partitioning coefficients and capacities have been obtained with malonamide hybrid silica. The comparison with silica compounds impregnated or grafted with the same type of organic group is significant in this respect. Much of the improved performance obtained with hybrid silica may be attributed to the large quantity of complexing groups that can be incorporated in these materials. The effect of the solid texture on the extraction performance was also studied. Although the capacity increased with the specific area, little effect was observed on the distribution coefficients -notably for americium- indicating that the most favorable complexation sites are found on the outer surface. Macroporous malonamide hybrid silica compounds were synthesized to study the effects of the pore diameter, but the results have been inconclusive to date because of the unexpected molecular composition of the materials. (author)

  14. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2004-11-22

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  15. Use of Electro-spray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) for the characterization of complexes 'ligand - metallic cations' in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthon, Laurence; Zorz, Nicole; Lagrave, Stephanie; Gannaz, Benoit; Hill, Clement [CEA-Marcoule DEN-DRCP-SCPS-LCSE, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    In the framework of nuclear waste reprocessing, separation processes of minor actinides from fission products are developed by Cea. In order to understand the mechanisms involved in the extraction processes, the 'ligand/metallic cation' complexes, formed in the organic phases are characterized by electro-spray-mass-spectrometry (ESI-MS). This paper deals with the extraction of lanthanides (III) and americium (III) cations by an organic phase composed of a malonamide or / and a dialkyl phosphoric acid, diluted in an aliphatic diluent. For the dialkyl phosphoric acid, Ln(DEHP){sub 3}(HDEHP){sub 3} complexes are observed and in the presence of a large excess of Ln(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, dinuclear species are also observed. For the malonamide extractant, it appears that the complexes formed in the organic phase are of the Nd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}D{sub x} type, with 2 {<=} x {<=} 4: their distributions depend on the ratio [Ln]/[DMDOHEMA]. When the two extractants are present in the organic phase, mixed 'Ln-malonamide-dialkyl phosphoric acid' species are observed. The influence of several parameters, such as extractant concentration, solute concentration, aqueous acidity and the nature of the cations (lanthanides or americium) are studied. (authors)

  16. Isotope ratio analysis of individual sub-micrometer plutonium particles with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Lee, Chi-Gyu; Kimura, Takaumi

    2010-12-15

    Information on plutonium isotope ratios in individual particles is of great importance for nuclear safeguards, nuclear forensics and so on. Although secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is successfully utilized for the analysis of individual uranium particles, the isobaric interference of americium-241 to plutonium-241 makes difficult to obtain accurate isotope ratios in individual plutonium particles. In the present work, an analytical technique by a combination of chemical separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is developed and applied to isotope ratio analysis of individual sub-micrometer plutonium particles. The ICP-MS results for individual plutonium particles prepared from a standard reference material (NBL SRM-947) indicate that the use of a desolvation system for sample introduction improves the precision of isotope ratios. In addition, the accuracy of the (241)Pu/(239)Pu isotope ratio is much improved, owing to the chemical separation of plutonium and americium. In conclusion, the performance of the proposed ICP-MS technique is sufficient for the analysis of individual plutonium particles.

  17. Synthesis of actinide nitrides, phosphides, sulfides and oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Sluys, William G.; Burns, Carol J.; Smith, David C.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing an actinide compound of the formula An.sub.x Z.sub.y wherein An is an actinide metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, x is selected from the group consisting of one, two or three, Z is a main group element atom selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen and sulfur and y is selected from the group consisting of one, two, three or four, by admixing an actinide organometallic precursor wherein said actinide is selected from the group consisting of thorium, uranium, plutonium, neptunium, and americium, a suitable solvent and a protic Lewis base selected from the group consisting of ammonia, phosphine, hydrogen sulfide and water, at temperatures and for time sufficient to form an intermediate actinide complex, heating said intermediate actinide complex at temperatures and for time sufficient to form the actinide compound, and a process of depositing a thin film of such an actinide compound, e.g., uranium mononitride, by subliming an actinide organometallic precursor, e.g., a uranium amide precursor, in the presence of an effectgive amount of a protic Lewis base, e.g., ammonia, within a reactor at temperatures and for time sufficient to form a thin film of the actinide compound, are disclosed.

  18. Thin film reactions on silicon surfaces and the quality of metal-semiconductor interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgen, P.; Jørgensen, B.; Rasmussen, J.; Labunov, V. A.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.

    1986-03-01

    We have studied the formation of thin silicide layers on silicon surfaces by thermal treatments of thin evaporated metal films. Examples are given for Pt/Si, V/Si, and Ti/Si. The treatments studied were vacuum furnace annealing, electron-beam annealing, and xenon lamp illumination. The compositional depth profiles of the resulting structures were analyzed with RBS and Auger/ sputter profiling. Impurities, oxygen and carbon, are present in Ti and V before annealing, and may also become incorporated during the treatment. Thus the quality of the annealing procedures depends strongly on the thermodynamics of the ternary or quarternary mixtures of metal, silicon and impurities. Best results, in terms of silicide homogeneity, purity, and interface sharpness (epitaxy) were obtained for PtSi, xenon lamp annealed for very short times. Also for V and Ti, rapid thermal annealing was found to produce much better structures than vacuum furnace annealing. The influence of oxygen in the systems studied is discussed in terms of ternary phase diagrams.

  19. RBS study of the reactions in the Si/Co/Ta/Co system after isothermal annealings between 360 and 650 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklyn, C. E-mail: franklyn@aec.co.za; Aspeling, J.; Strydom, W.; Malunga, R

    2002-05-01

    Epitaxial cobalt silicide is one of the promising silicides for the future development of new metal-semiconductor devices. In an attempt to understand the effect of Ta on the diffusion mechanism, layered structures of Si(1 0 0)/Co/Ta/Co with 7 and 30 A Ta thickness respectively were prepared. Reactions after isothermal vacuum annealings between 360 and 650 deg. C were investigated by RBS, using a 2 Mev He{sup 2+}ion beam and analyzed with the RUMP program. The Co below the Ta reacted to form either Co{sub 2}Si and CoSi or, CoSi and CoSi{sub 2}, depending on the annealing temperature. After 180 min at 360 deg. C the Co above the Ta, starts with indiffusion only after considerable outdiffusion of Ta (7 A layer). Mass transport of Co occurs after 420 min at 360 deg. C. For the 30 A Ta, outdiffusion was delayed until after 70 min at 530 deg. C, but longer anneals confirm the 7 A results. After annealing for 30 min at 650 deg. C, nearly all the Co above and below the 30 A Ta had converted to CoSi{sub 2}. These results are discussed in terms of the barrier properties of Ta, as well as impurities in the system.

  20. Nanostructured multilayered thin film barriers for Mg2Si thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, S.; Boldrini, S.; Fiameni, S.; Agresti, F.; Famengo, A.; Fabrizio, M.; Barison, S.

    2012-06-01

    The Mg2Si-based alloys are promising candidates for thermoelectric energy conversion in the middle-high temperature range in order to replace lead compounds. The main advantages of silicide-based thermoelectrics are the nontoxicity and the abundance of their constituent elements in the earth crust. The drawback of such kind of materials is their oxygen sensitivity at high temperature that entails their use under vacuum or inert atmosphere. In order to limit the corrosion phenomena, nanostructured multilayered molybdenum silicide-based materials were deposited via RF magnetron sputtering onto stainless steel, alumina and silicon (100) to set up the deposition process and then onto Mg2Si pellets. XRD, EDS, FE-SEM and electrical measurements at high temperature were carried out in order to obtain, respectively, the structural, compositional, morphological and electrical characterization of the deposited coatings. At the end, the mechanical behavior of the system thin film/Mg2Si-substrate as a function of temperature and the barrier properties for oxygen protection after thermal treatment in air at high temperature were qualitatively evaluated by FE-SEM.