WorldWideScience

Sample records for american nuclear society

  1. American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Nuclear Cardiology Official publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Clinical Guidelines Procedures, Appropriate Use Criteria, Information Statements and Joint Society Statements Member Login Enter Forgot your password? Meetings & ...

  2. American Nuclear Society exchanges of information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many are familiar with the technical journals and other publications that American Nuclear Society (ANS) members receive. However, there is a whole series of documents that is helpful to any nuclear society group for a modest fee or no fee. The author is referring to documents such as the ANS Bylaws and Rules, which have been made available to almost every existing nuclear society in the world. He remembers working with groups from Russia, Europe, China, Japan, Brazil, France, Germany, and others when they sought the experience of ANS in establishing a society. Financial planning guides are available for meetings, international conferences, technical expositions, and teacher workshops. Periodically, the ANS publishes position papers on the uses and handling of fuel materials and other publications helpful to public relations and teacher training courses. A few have had distributions in the hundreds of thousands, and one went as high as 750,000. Some of these have been translated in part into Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Japanese. Nuclear Standards are developed by a series of ANS committees consisting of about 1000 experts--the largest technical operation of ANS. Buyers guides and directories are very helpful in promoting the commerce in the nuclear industry. The Utility Directory covers utilities all over the globe. Radwaste Solutions, the new name for the former Radwaste Magazine, covers the efforts made by all sectors--private, government, and utility--to deal with radioactive waste. In the author's opinion, the one area in which all societies are weak is in interfacing with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Since his retirement 9 yr ago, he has become much more aware of the IAEA as a news and technical information source. The ANS is trying to be more aware of what the IAEA is doing for everyone

  3. American Nuclear Society 1994 student conference eastern region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains abstracts from the 1994 American Nuclear Society Student Conference. The areas covered by these abstracts are: fusion and plasma physics; nuclear chemistry; radiation detection; reactor physics; thermal hydraulics; and corrosion science and waste issues.

  4. American Nuclear Society 1994 student conference eastern region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains abstracts from the 1994 American Nuclear Society Student Conference. The areas covered by these abstracts are: fusion and plasma physics; nuclear chemistry; radiation detection; reactor physics; thermal hydraulics; and corrosion science and waste issues

  5. Overview of space nuclear technologies and the American Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) has seen an aspect of the universe where nuclear technology is the best energy source available for power, transportation, etc. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been exploiting this aspect of the universe by sending machines and humans into it and exploring, colonizing, industrializing, developing, inhabiting, etc. Space is the final frontier, and nuclear technology is the best suited for today's or the next century's space exploration and development. Many aspects of nuclear technology and its uses in space will be needed. ANS encompasses these and many more aspects of nuclear technology, and all have some role to play in the exploration and development of space. It should be ANS's intent to be an advisory body to NASA on the nuclear aspects of space exploration

  6. Brief overview of American Nuclear Society's research reactor standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) established the research reactor standards group in 1968. The standards group, known as ANS-15, was established for the purpose of developing, preparing, and maintaining standards for the design, construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of nuclear reactors intended for research and training

  7. Development of radiation shielding standards in the American Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) is a standards-writing organization-member of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The ANS Standards Committee has a subcommittee denoted ANS-6, Shielding, whose charge is to establish standards in connection with radiation protection and shielding, to provide shielding information to other standards writing groups, and to prepare recommended sets of shielding data and test problems. This paper is a progress report of this subcommittee

  8. American Nuclear Society standards for TRIGA reactors and their use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society established a committee (ANS-15) with the expressed charter to develop standards for research reactors. These standards were to cover all aspects of research reactor operations, maintenance and administration. Standards have been written in every area of research reactor operations that the research reactor community has deemed important. One of the uppermost goals of the Standards Committee work is to produce standards that provide guidance and help to the research reactor community in a timely manner. To make the standards meaningful requires a great deal of cooperation between all segments of the reactor community. The research reactors - whether they are private, university or government owned - have a mission to perform. At the same time, the regulatory agencies also have a mission to perform, and with a spirit of mutual respect and cooperation, both can accomplish their goals. In the last five years this spirit has been present, and a number of very good standards have resulted. These standards should be a part of every research reactor library. In particular ANS-15.16 and ANS-15.1 have been endorsed by the regulatory agencies and are being used to evaluate submittals

  9. American Headache Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us American Migraine Foundation Login THE AMERICAN Headache Society is a professional society of health care providers dedicated to the study ... MIGRAINE MOMENT” FILM CONTEST WINNERS The American Headache Society and American Migraine Foundation, the AHS’s charitable division, ...

  10. American Society of Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Society of Echocardiography Join Ase Member Portal Log In Membership Member Portal Log In Join ASE Renew Benefits Rates FASE – Fellow of the American Society of Echocardiography Member Referral Program FAQs Initiatives Advocacy ...

  11. American Urogynecologic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Site » PFD Registry » Contact Us American Urogynecologic Society 1100 Wayne Avenue, Suite 670 Silver Spring, MD ... Us | Privacy Policy | HONcode Accredited © 2016 American Urogynecologic Society. All rights reserved.

  12. North American Spine Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coverage Recommendations SpineLine Renew Membership NORTH AMERICAN SPINE SOCIETY BURR RIDGE, IL 7075 Veterans Blvd. Burr Ridge, ... NASS Contact Us © Copyright 2016 North American Spine Society | Terms Of Use | Privacy Statement

  13. American Epilepsy Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Doctor | Donate main search Search American Epilepsy Society CLINICAL RESOURCES FAQs GUIDELINES IOM EPILEPSY MEDICAL MARIJUANA ... RENEW VOLUNTEER FAES: FELLOW OF THE AMERICAN EPILEPSY SOCIETY MAILING LIST PURCHASE FOR PATIENTS EPILEPSY BENEFIT INTERNATIONAL ...

  14. American Society of Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trials in Transplantation September 13, 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and its Transplantation & Immunology Research Network ... Learn More Donate Donate Donate to the American Society of Transplantation Advertisement member spotlight View all Joanna ...

  15. American Cancer Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved Find Local ACS How the American Cancer Society Fights Childhood Cancer Advances in treatment have improved ... long lasting consequences. Learn how the American Cancer Society is working to save more lives from cancer ...

  16. Overview of the ANS [American Nuclear Society] mathematics and computation software standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mathematics and Computations Division of the American Nuclear Society sponsors the ANS-10 Standards Subcommittee. This subcommittee, which is part of the ANS Standards Committee, currently maintains four ANSI/ANS software standards. These standards are: Recommended Programming Practices to Facilitate the Portability of Scientific Computer Programs, ANS-10.2; Guidelines for the Documentation of Computer Software, ANS-10.3; Guidelines for the Verification and Validation of Scientific and Engineering Computer Programs for the Nuclear Industry, ANS-10.4; and Guidelines for Accommodating User Needs in Computer Program Development, ANS-10.5. 5 refs

  17. American Society of Neuroradiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to announce Mary Beth Hepp, MBA, as the society’s next executive director, replacing James B. Gantenberg, FACHE ... Contact Search form Search 2005-2015 Copyright American Society of Neuroradiology OM Base Theme 2016 | V7.x- ...

  18. American Society of Hematology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main Navigation Account Navigation Main Content American Society of Hematology ASH Store ASH Job Center ASH Apps Share Your Idea Donate My Account Search Show Main Menu + About Awards Membership ASH ...

  19. American Society of Nephrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... co/8cdJ2oSFjH – @ASNKidney on Twitter ASN News Feed Society Events Interact With ASN rss Facebook Twitter YouTube ... Podcast ASN Communities Share ASN User Login © American Society of Nephrology top Text Size + - Translate Sitemap Terms ...

  20. Emerging non-nuclear energy technologies for electric power generation: a policy statement of the American Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing electricity demand is accompanied by concerns about the availability and price of fossil fuels and about the environmental impacts of electric power generation. Emerging non-nuclear energy technologies and systems can offer several potential advantages to complement conventional sources of energy to meet future needs. The advantages of the alternative technologies, however, must be balanced against the inherent limitations associated with some of the technologies. The technologies closest to, or having reached, small-scale production status include small wind systems, dry-steam geothermal, and biomass processes. Fuel cells, grid-connected photovoltaics, solar thermal, water-dominated geothermal, advanced coal systems, and energy storage systems require more development before they can contribute effectively. The American Nuclear Society recognizes that many renewable and emerging energy technology systems can contribute to the overall reliability of the electric grid. That contribution is limited, however, by the location-specific nature of many sources and requires major technological development. (author)

  1. Highlights of the American Nuclear Society topical meeting on the treatment and handling of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society Topical Meeting on the Treatment and Handling of Radioactive Wastes was held in Richland, Washington, from 19-22 April 1982. The object of the meeting was to provide a thorough assessment of the status of technology. The response to the meeting was excellent: 123 papers were presented. There were 505 registrations; 83 were from outside the USA, representing 13 countries. The large and diverse attendance provided a broad technological view and perspective. The following major points emerged from the conference: (1) In an extensive world-wide effort, techniques are being developed to cover all phases of radioactive waste management. (2) A broad and deep technological base has been developed. (3) Many adequate processes are ready for actual application while others are ready for demonstration of applicability. These demonstrations are important to further public acceptance of nuclear energy. (4) At the present level of maturity, systematic analyses should be performed to determine actual requirements for the treatment and handling of radioactive wastes. These analyses can be used to focus our research and development, and demonstration activities to achieve treatment and conditioning systems which are both appropriate and cost-effective. (author)

  2. Report by a special panel of the American Nuclear Society: Protection and management of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) established an independent and prestigious panel several months ago to take the matter up where the US National Academy of Science (NAS) left off. The challenge was to look at the broader issue of what to do with civil plutonium, as well as excess weapons material. In terms of approach, the report focused on several short- and long-term issues. The short-term focus was on the disposition of excess weapons plutonium, while the longer-range issue concerned the disposition of the plutonium being produced in the civil nuclear fuel cycle. For the short term, the ANS panel strongly endorsed the concept that all plutonium scheduled for release from the US and Russian weapons stocks should be converted to a form that is intensively radioactive in order to protect the plutonium from theft of seizure (the spent fuel standard). However, since the conversion will at best take several years to complete, the panel has concluded that immediate emphasis should be placed on the assurance that all unconverted materials are protected as securely as when they were part of the active weapon stockpiles. More importantly, the panel also recommended prompt implementation of the so-called reactor option for disposing of surplus US and Russian weapons plutonium. The longer-term issues covered by the panel were those posed by the growing stocks of both separated plutonium and spent fuel generated in the world's civil nuclear power programs. These issues included what fuel cycle policies should be prudently pursued in light of proliferation risks and likely future energy needs, what steps should be taken in regard to the increase in the demand for nuclear power in the future, and how civil plutonium in its various forms should be protected and managed to minimize proliferation. Overall, the panel concluded that plutonium is an energy resource that should be used and not a waste material to be disposed of

  3. American Society for Dermatologic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ASDS: Log In Forgot your password? ASDS — American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Expertise for the life of ... with new skin cancer screening recommendation The American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) is expressing its disappointment ...

  4. American Society of Human Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Awards August 9, 2016 Media Advisory: American Society of Human Genetics 2016 Annual Meeting July 26, ... McKusick Leadership Award June 30, 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics, Incorporated 9650 Rockville Pike • Bethesda, ...

  5. American Society of Hand Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ago Follow Us Who we are The American Society of Hand Therapists (ASHT) is a professional organization ... a chartered accredited association management company. © 2016 American Society of Hand Therapists. All Rights Reserved. Advertisement

  6. American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor who is a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS®), you can rest assured ... ASPS The Plastic Surgery Foundation Copyright © 2016 American Society of Plastic Surgeons | Privacy Policy | Sitemap | Terms and ...

  7. American Head and Neck Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education American Head & Neck Society | AHNS Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS ... and Announcements Copyright ©2016 · American Head and Neck Society · Privacy and Return Policy Managed by BSC Management, ...

  8. American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Give Testimonials Planned Giving Circle of Light Society Corporate Partners Program Crystal Awards Board of Trustees ... Us Association for Bariatric Endoscopy Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy 3300 Woodcreek Dr. • Downers Grove, ...

  9. American Society for Radiation Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PAC Become an Advocate Log In SNIPEND American Society for Radiation Oncology Plan your time at the ... oncology practices. RO-ILS The only medical specialty society-sponsored incident learning system for radiation oncology. RO ...

  10. American Society of Clinical Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media Policy Sponsor Policy Terms of Use American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium Call for ... or cosponsored by ASCO View Event 13th Asian Society for Neuro-Oncology (ASNO) Meeting/9th COGNO Annual ...

  11. Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses - 1958 to 1982. Volume 2. Summaries. Complilation of papers from the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

    1982-10-21

    This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains-in chronological order-the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41.

  12. Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses - 1958 to 1982. Volume 2. Summaries. Complilation of papers from the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains-in chronological order-the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41

  13. American Society of Anesthesiologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ASA Newsroom Our Mission Governance and Committees Component Societies Related Organizations Office of General Counsel Employment at ... About ASA Our Mission Governance and Committees Component Societies Related Organizations Employment at ASA Contact Us Support ...

  14. Nuclear technology and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This special issue of Journal of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan deals with the relation between nuclear technology and society, and is composed of four papers: (1) Nuclear energy and international politics - sociotechnics around plutonium utilization; (2) Risk recognition and benefit recognition of nuclear facilities and social acceptance; (3) Environmental risk management and radioactive waste problem; and, (4) Public administration around the relation between nuclear energy and society. (1) describes the historical development of nuclear energy since its birth, focusing on how the leading countries tried to control nuclear proliferation. Peaceful utilization of nuclear energy is closely connected with the Non-proliferation problem. (1) also discusses the relation of plutonium utilization of Japan with international society. (2) discusses how nuclear facilities can be accepted by society, analyzing the background of risk recognition, in particular, of psychological character of mass society. (3) introduces an new approach (risk-based or risk-informed regulation) of environmental risk management for radioactive waste disposal problem, focusing on HLW (high-level waste). (4) explains the approach from public administration to nuclear energy and general energy policy and introduces PPA (participatory policy analysis) as a means for policy making. (M.M.)

  15. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With the National Cancer Institute for Inaugural Global Pathology Conference March 2016 OneLab Memo ASCP Action Alert - ... 2016 Copyright © 2016 by American Society for Clinical Pathology. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use About ASCP ...

  16. North American Menopause Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advertisements NAMS in the News Press Room Assistance Society Overview Top 10 reasons why NAMS is your ... fully updated and referenced 5th edition of the Society’s leading professional resource, featuring the latest comprehensive clinical ...

  17. ANS [American Nuclear Society] topical meeting on radiological accidents: Perspectives and emergency planning: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing use of radioactive materials and the increasing public concern about possible accidents involving these materials has led to greater emphasis on preparing for such emergencies. The ANS Topical Meeting on Radiological Accidents - Perspectives and Emergency Planning provided a review of experiences with radiological accidents. The meeting covered some of the most important aspects of radiological accidents. Papers were presented which dealt with radiological accident experience. Technical response to accidents is of primary interest to many in the nuclear community; most of the papers submitted fell into this area. So many of these papers dealt with the use of computers in response that a session on that topic was arranged. A very significant impact of most radiological accidents is the cost, especially the cost of cleanup. There were papers on what is known about costs and associated current topics, such as modification and extension of the Price-Anderson Act. At least as important as the technical response to accidents is how society attempts to deal with them. A session on institutional issues was included to discuss how governments and other organizations respond to and deal with accidents. Medical effects of accidents are of great concern to the public. Invited papers to review the effects of high doses of radiation as well as very low doses were included in that session. Although the nuclear industry has an excellent safety record, this fact often does not agree with the public perception of the industry. The final session explored the public response to and perception of radiological emergencies and accidents. This subject will ultimately determine the future use of radioactive materials in this country

  18. Nuclear energy and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy has a strong relation to a society. However, due to accidents and scandals having occurred in recent years, people's reliability to nuclear energy has significantly swayed and is becoming existence of a worry. Analyzing such a situation and grasping the problem contained are serious problems for people engaging in nuclear field. In order that nuclear energy is properly used in society, communication with general public and in nuclear power plant site area are increasingly getting important as well as grasping the situation and surveying measures for overcoming the problems. On the basis of such an analysis, various activities for betterment of public acceptance of nuclear energy by nuclear industry workers, researchers and the government are proposed. (J.P.N.)

  19. American Society for Surgery of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Welcome to ASSH.org Home of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand. The American Society for Surgery of the Hand is the oldest and most prestigious medical society dedicated to the hand and upper extremity. Our ...

  20. Western Region American Nuclear Society regional student conference, April 12-14, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of papers presented at the conference are contained in this proceedings. Topics of technical sessions included fusion and space reactors, numerical and computer modeling, nuclear medicine and radiation effects, and general nuclear technology

  1. Western Region American Nuclear Society regional student conference, April 12-14, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at the conference are contained in this proceedings. Topics of technical sessions included fusion and space reactors, numerical and computer modeling, nuclear medicine and radiation effects, and general nuclear technology. (GHT)

  2. Support for the American Chemical Society's Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantica, Paul F. [Michigan State University

    2013-06-20

    The ACS Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry were held at San Jose State University (SJSU) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Summer Schools offer undergraduate students with U.S. citizenship an opportunity to complete coursework through ACS accredited chemistry degree programs at SJSU or the State University of New York at Stony Brook (SBU). The courses include lecture and laboratory work on the fundamentals and applications of nuclear and radiochemistry. The number of students participating at each site is limited to 12, and the low student-to-instructor ratio is needed due to the intense nature of the six-week program. To broaden the students’ perspectives on nuclear science, prominent research scientists active in nuclear and/or radiochemical research participate in a Guest Lecture Series. Symposia emphasizing environmental chemistry, nuclear medicine, and career opportunities are conducted as a part of the program.

  3. Transactions of the 1982 Eastern Regional American Nuclear Society student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1982 Eastern Region ANS Student Conference of the ANS Student Branch and the School of Nuclear Engineering and Health Physics was held at Georgia Tech., April 16-17, 1982. Almost all the papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA

  4. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society. Patients Visit the official patient education site of ...

  5. Closing remarks at the American Nuclear Society-Atomic Energy Commission sponsored Symposium on engineering with nuclear explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All 112 papers have been presented, at the 17 technical sessions. The technical highlights are divided into three parts: the highlights of the data from nuclear events, highlights from the broader research papers, and a discussion of some of the application papers

  6. Nuclear Research and Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1998, SCK-CEN took the initiative to include social sciences and humanities into its research programme. Within this context, four projects were defined, respectively on sustainability and nuclear development; transgenerational ethics related to the disposal of long-lived radioactive waste; legal aspects and liability; emergency communication and risk perception. Two reflection groups were established, on expert culture and ethical choices respectively, in order to deepen insight while creating exchange of disciplinary approaches of the committed SCK-CEN researchers and social scientists. Within the context of SCK-CEN's social sciences and humanities programme, collaborations with various universities were initiated, teams consisting of young doctorate and post-doctorate researchers and university promotors with experience in interaction processes of technology with society were established and steering committees with actors and external experts were set up for each project. The objectives and main achievements in the four projects are summarised

  7. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan, Grace; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M; Brindis, Ralph G; Kramer, Christopher M; Shaw, Leslee J; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Chen, Jersey; Dean, Larry S; Fazel, Reza; Hundley, W Gregory; Itchhaporia, Dipti; Kligfield, Paul; Lockwood, Richard; Marine, Joseph Edward; McCully, Robert Benjamin; Messer, Joseph V; O'Gara, Patrick T; Shemin, Richard J; Wann, L Samuel; Wong, John B; Patel, Manesh R; Kramer, Christopher M; Bailey, Steven R; Brown, Alan S; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Lindsay, Bruce D; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Wann, L Samuel; Wolk, Michael J; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-02-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD) to consider use of stress testing and anatomic diagnostic procedures. This document reflects an updating of the prior Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) published for radionuclide imaging (RNI), stress echocardiography (Echo), calcium scoring, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), stress cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), and invasive coronary angiography for SIHD. This is in keeping with the commitment to revise and refine the AUC on a frequent basis. A major innovation in this document is the rating of tests side by side for the same indication. The side-by-side rating removes any concerns about differences in indication or interpretation stemming from prior use of separate documents for each test. However, the ratings were explicitly not competitive rankings due to the limited availability of comparative evidence, patient variability, and range of capabilities available in any given local setting. The indications for this review are limited to the detection and risk assessment of SIHD and were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Eighty clinical scenarios were developed by a writing committee and scored by a separate rating panel on a scale of 1-9, to designate Appropriate, May Be Appropriate, or Rarely Appropriate use following a modified Delphi process following the recently updated AUC development methodology. The use of some modalities of testing in the initial evaluation of patients with symptoms representing ischemic equivalents, newly diagnosed heart failure, arrhythmias, and syncope was generally found to be Appropriate or May Be Appropriate, except in cases where low pre-test probability or low risk limited the benefit of most testing except exercise electrocardiogram (ECG

  8. XIX Congress of the Latin-American Association of Societies of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (ALASBIMN), Cancun, Mexico, May, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From May 25 to 30, 2003 the beautiful city of Cancun, located in the heart of the ancient Maya Empire in Mexico, hosted the XIX ALASBIMN CONGRESS. More than 300 attendees and 80 lecturers from the American continent and Europe had the opportunity to share their knowledge and enjoy an outstanding scientific, cultural and social program. The Scientific program included reviews and original scientific papers on basic and clinical sciences as well as on new developments in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Cardio-vascular, neuropsychiatric, oncology, skeletal and paediatric procedures were comprehensively analysed by several experts. Introduction of new cyclotrons and modern PET and PET/CT systems in Latin America has opened new horizons for the nuclear medicine community in this sub-continent. New radiopharmaceuticals based on different peptides, receptors and gene expression dominated the scene. Reporter gene imaging of gene expression has become the first and best example of what is achievable by modern molecular imaging. Of particular interest was the presentation of novel and potential agents for radio-metabolic therapy. Additionally, in connection with the congress the IAEA organised a very successful Regional Training Course on Paediatric Nuclear Medicine with 23 participants from 11 countries. The Agency also hosted the first national project coordinators meeting of the IAEA Regional Project aimed at establishing a regional tele-nuclear medicine network in the Latin American Region in conjunction with the ALASBIMN meeting. Once again the major companies representing the nuclear medicine industry participated in the Congress and contributed to the success of the ALASBIMN meeting. In summary, attending the XIX ALASBIMN meeting was a very rewarding experience in every aspect. We are most grateful to the organisers for hosting such a nice congress. Congratulations! Now we are looking forward to participate in the next ALASBIMN Congress to be held in the

  9. American acceptance of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristic adventurous spirit that built American technology will eventually lead to American acceptance of nuclear power unless an overpowering loss of nerve causes us to reject both nuclear technology and world leadership. The acceptance of new technology by society has always been accompanied by activist opposition to industralization. To resolve the debate between environmental and exploitive extremists, we must accept with humility the basic premise that human accomplishment is a finite part of nature

  10. American acceptance of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, W.

    The characteristic adventurous spirit that built American technology will eventually lead to American acceptance of nuclear power unless an overpowering loss of nerve causes us to reject both nuclear technology and world leadership. The acceptance of new technology by society has always been accompanied by activist opposition to industralization. To resolve the debate between environmental and exploitive extremists, we must accept with humility the basic premise that human accomplishment is a finite part of nature. (DCK)

  11. Nuclear energy and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual reports are given by CNA subcommittees on codes, standards and practices, economic development, education and manpower, international affairs, nuclear insurance, nuclear safety and environment, public affairs, and technology. (E.C.B.)

  12. American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016 Engage with ASPHO and benefit from the Society’s professional development, education, and networking resources! Read More » ... Career Center Mentoring Funding Compensation Survey © The American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology 8735 W. Higgins Road, ...

  13. Judy Riffle named American Chemical Society Fellow

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Judy S. Riffle, professor of chemistry and director of Virginia Tech's interdisciplinary Macromolecular Science and Engineering Ph.D. education program, has been named a Fellow of the American Chemical Society.

  14. Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... U SAGES.TV iMAGES Wiki MyCME HealthySooner SAGES Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons Home SAGES ... and Co-Chairs Officers and Representatives of the Society SAGES Past Presidents Awards George Berci Award Pioneer ...

  15. Patrick Phipps named American Phytopathological Society Fellow

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    Patrick Phipps of Suffolk, Va., professor of plant pathology, physiology, and weed science in Virginia Tech's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, was elected into the American Phytopathological Society College of Fellows. He is based at the Tidewater Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Suffolk, Va.

  16. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advertisement Careers Drug Information Foundation Connect ASHP Consulting Service AJHP Login/Register | Cart About Us What We ... Wisconsin Avenue Bethesda, Maryland 20814 YouTube LinkedIn Twitter Facebook ASHP Connect ©2016 American Society of Health-System ...

  17. Approximate calculational techniques for radiation protection applications (collection of papers presented at the November 1985 American Nuclear Society meeting)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although radiation protection principles are, on the whole, well understood and a whole series of computer codes exist for their solution, it is felt that there is a need for practical, approximate techniques to be used by the practicing nuclear engineer for a variety of applications. Within the context of approximate techniques, the papers presented cover a broad overview of specific problems, for example, skyshine and penetration analysis, with applications extending from general nuclear reactor design to spent fuel storage and fusion. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers

  18. Latin American and Caribbean Federation of Radiation Protection Societies (FRALC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea of a Federation of Radiation Protection Societies in Latin America came up at the First Regional Congress on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety that was held in Buenos Aires (Argentina), in October 1991. At the Second Regional Congress, in Zacatecas (Mexico), in 1993, the Latin American and Caribbean Federation of Radiation Protection Societies (FRALC) was officially launched. The founder members were the Argentine Radiation Protection Society (SAR), the Brazilian Radiation Protection Society (SBPR), the Mexican Radiation Safety Society (SMSR) and the Peruvian Radiation Protection Society (SPR). Now, the FRALC has accepted as members the Radiation Protection Section of the Cuban Physics Society (SPRC) and the Uruguayan Radiation Protection Association (AUR). The basic objectives of the FRALC are: to promote the safe use of radiation and radioactive sources in Latin America and the Caribbean; to promote the foundation of new Radiation Protection Societies within the region, as mean of associating radiation protection professionals, and then, to promote of affiliation of this new societies to IRPA; to encourage the cooperation and mutual aid in the study, research and use of resources, in order to promote the radiation protection development in Latin America and the Caribbean

  19. Nuclear Research and Society: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout the last decades, the ever growing use of technology in our society has brought along the need to reflect on the related impact on the ecosystem and on society as such. There is growing evidence that the complexity of issues of risk governance and ethics coming with applications of nuclear technology, fossil fuels, human cloning and genetically modified crops cannot be tackled by pure rational technological and economical reasoning alone. In order to provide an answer to the concerns of civil society, this complexity needs a transdisciplinary approach, taking into account social and ethical aspects. Starting from the insight that a full understanding of the benefits and risks of applications of radioactivity and nuclear technology requires also an understanding of the context of application and a sense for the social and ethical aspects of the situation, SCK-CEN started in 1999 with its PISA research programme (Programme of Integration of Social Aspects into nuclear research). The aim of the research was (and still is) to give the nuclear researchers more insight into the complex social and ethical aspects of nuclear applications and to shed at the same time new lights on how to organise in a more effective way the dialogue and interaction with civil society. Originally, the programme was set up along thematic research tracks, involving nuclear scientists, engineers, philosophers and social scientists, and focussing on specific projects carried out by way of PhD- or post-doc research in cooperation with universities. The research tracks focussed on themes such as Sustainability and nuclear development, Transgenerational ethics of radioactive waste management, Legal aspects and liability, Risk governance and Expert culture. In addition to this thematic research, PISA organised reflection groups in interaction with universities, authorities and private actors. These interdisciplinary discussion sessions aimed to exchange knowledge and views on typical

  20. Society response to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy demand in the world is growing increasingly, among other factors due to economic development. Every way of producing electricity has got their own drawbacks and has implicit environmental impact. Among all the energy sources, nuclear energy is the most polemic because of the way it is presented by the mass media. This aspect provokes controversy to occidental societies which reject this kind of energy with arguments normally based on a wrong and insufficient knowledge of the matter. The antinuclear discourse, promoted late in the seventies, has gone deeply into the collective social unconscious and has undermined public acceptance of nuclear energy due to the fact, deeply exploited by antinuclear groups, of linking nuclear energy with the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In this sense, it is important to mention that in Japan there was a profound resentment and opposition to nuclear energy, because the memory of the nuclear bombings was permanently alive. However when the Japanese government told its people that this energy was necessary to boost their industrial development, Japanese citizens in an unprecedented attitude of patriotism overcame their most antagonist feelings, in order to contribute to the industrial development of their country. The result was that most of them voted in favour. Presently Japan gets 30% of its energy by means of 56 nuclear power plants and 1 more is under construction. Antinuclear groups took as their best emblem the accident of Chernobyl to justify their opposition to the nuclear power plants. The manipulation of this accident has been one of the most shameful in the nuclear history. It is widely known among the experts that the reactor used in Chernobyl was a type of military plutonium converter with a positive temperature reactivity coefficient, which made very dangerous its functioning. Any nuclear regulatory commission in democratic and responsible countries would have never authorized the use of this reactor

  1. The Second Journey: Impressions of American Society

    OpenAIRE

    Manlio Rossi-Doria

    2010-01-01

    Travelling from the Usa to Italy, Rossi-Doria describes the impressions of his second visit to America. Rossi-Doria writes that he had this time a deeper and surer understanding of this big Country. On this occasion, in fact, he came into contact with American society, with the everyday life, the greatness and the contradictions of the United States. His judgment is of a Country that is continually and very rapidly modified, in which there is also «an ugly side», such as the poverty and the s...

  2. Sino-American seminar on nuclear liability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sino-American Seminar on Nuclear Liability was held in Beijing, People's Republic of China from April 26-27, 2000, and co-sponsored by Chinese Nuclear Society and U.S. Nuclear Energy Institute. The topics of the meeting were the follows: 1. Current U.S. Nuclear Liability Regime; 2. Current Chinese Nuclear Liability Regime; 3. Comparison of U.S. and Other Nuclear Liability Regime; International Nuclear Liability Conventions; 4. Role of Nuclear Insurance in U.S.; 5. Chinese Nuclear Insurance and Chinese Nuclear Insurance Pool; 6. How nuclear Liability Practices Have Been Implemented in U.S.; U.S. Nuclear Claims Experience; 7. Liability for On-Site Nuclear Property Damage

  3. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slatore, Christopher G; Horeweg, Nanda; Jett, James R;

    2015-01-01

    development of registries that link demographic and nodule characteristics with patient-level outcomes. Methods to share data from registries are also necessary. CONCLUSIONS: This statement may help researchers to develop impactful and innovative research projects and enable funders to better judge research......BACKGROUND: Pulmonary nodules are frequently detected during diagnostic chest imaging and as a result of lung cancer screening. Current guidelines for their evaluation are largely based on low-quality evidence, and patients and clinicians could benefit from more research in this area. METHODS: In...... this research statement from the American Thoracic Society, a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates reviewed available evidence for pulmonary nodule evaluation, characterized six focus areas to direct future research efforts, and identified fundamental gaps in...

  4. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  5. Nuclear Society and non-proliferation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the USSR Nuclear Society in 1991 the special working group on the problems of nuclear weapons non-proliferation and nuclear materials control, uniting the experts of different types (nuclear physicists, lawyers, teachers), was created. This group became the mechanism of the practical Nuclear Society activity realization in this sphere. Three milestones of the innovative activity can be specified. First Milestone. In January 1992 the Central Nuclear Society Board (of the International Public Nuclear Society Association) published a special appeal to the First Leaders of all countries - former USSR republics. This address paid a special attention to the unity of the USSR power-industrial complex, and numerous problems arisen while separating this complex, including nuclear weapons non-proliferation problems, were indicated as well. Second Milestone. In 1992 and 1993 the Nuclear Society experts issued two selection 'Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control Problems' including reviewing basic papers. In addition, materials on non-proliferation and control are published regularly in the organs. Third Milestone.In 1993 - 1997 some special scientific and technical events (conferences, workshops, meetings) allowing to analyze the joint international projects and contracts outcomes, and establish new contacts between the specialists of NIS, Baltic states and others, have been hold

  6. Nuclear, energy, environment, wastes, society - NEEDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents the seven projects based on partnerships between several bodies, companies and agencies (CNRS, CEA, Areva, EDF, IRSN, ANDRA, BRGM) on research programmes on nuclear systems and scenarios, on resources (mines, processes, economy), on the processing and packaging of radioactive wastes, on the behaviour of materials for storage, on the impact of nuclear activities on the environment, on the relationship between nuclear, risks and society, and on materials for nuclear energy

  7. Czechoslovakia: nuclear power in a socialist society

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, F. W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is an evaluation of the impact nuclear power planning policies have had on Czechoslovakia's socialist society, particularly for the post-Chernobyl era. Poor indigenous energy resources and the leading role that nuclear power has played in the COMECON's energy-intensive manufacturing sector has made nuclear power into an attractive proposition from the 1960s onwards. Discussion in this paper centres around nuclear-power plant siting and operation, and media coverage of the industry ...

  8. Nuclear data and human society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Necessity and significance of nuclear data activities are discussed with background of the world typical aspects at the end of the 20th century. We have to overcome the worldwide adverse wind to nuclear power production with a view to preserving global environment including natural resources and climate. The nuclear data activities should be promoted further to achieve more and more wide comprehension and integrity of evaluated nuclear databases. The comprehensive evaluated nuclear databases which link microscopic world to macroscopic world may be of use to link science and technology with perception of the public, and to link science and technology with the other fields of learning, hence of use to coordinate and integrate natural, human, and social sciences. (author)

  9. Nuclear power, society and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This rubric reports on 12 short notes about sociological and environmental aspects of nuclear power in France and other countries: the epidemiological inquiry widened to all French nuclear sites; the sanitary and radioecological effects of nuclear activities in Northern Cotentin (France); the WONUC (World National Council of Nuclear Workers) anger with the French government about the shutdown of Superphenix reactor; the new more informative promotional campaign of Electricite de France (EdF) for nuclear power; the scientific and research prices attributed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) to its searchers; the creation of a committee of inquiry in the French senate for the careful examination of the economical, social and financial consequences of the shutdown of Superphenix; the 31.2% increase of CEA-Industrie benefits for 1997; the decrease of nuclear contestation in Germany; the French-German communication efficiency during the Fessenheim accident simulation in October 7, 1997; the 3.5% increase of CO2 emissions in the USA; the decommissioning of 3 Russian reactors for military plutonium production; Greenpeace condemnation for abusive purposes against British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) and its activities at Sellafield (UK). (J.S.)

  10. A nuclear engineer's ethical responsibility to society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernobyl notwithstanding, this paper seeks to illustrate why, on numerous fronts, nuclear technology provides the safest, cleanest and most effective method of base-load power generation. In particular it seeks to demonstrate that, despite the strident rhetoric and media exposure given to the anti-nuclear lobby, the technology is fundamental to the quality of life and the equitable sharing of energy by the year 2000. Therefore, the safety and technological superiority of the nuclear fuel cycle together with its high technology peripheral benefits both societal and fiscal are viewed as an ever increasing challenge and motivation which constitutes a major part of the nuclear engineer's ethical responsibility to society

  11. Centennial Calendar- 100 Years of the American Phytopathological Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    I edited a 40-page publication (calendar) that covered 18 chapters written by members of our society. This covered pioneering researchers, departments, and epidemics of the last 100 years of plant pathology in the U. S. This was given to all members of the American Phytopathological Society who att...

  12. American Astronomical Society Honors NRAO Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The American Astronomical Society (AAS) has awarded its prestigious George Van Biesbroeck Prize to Dr. Eric Greisen of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico. The society cited Greisen's quarter-century as "principal architect and tireless custodian" of the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS), a massive software package used by astronomers around the world, as "an invaluable service to astronomy." Dr. Eric Greisen Dr. Eric Greisen CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) The Van Biesbroeck Prize "honors a living individual for long-term extraordinary or unselfish service to astronomy, often beyond the requirements of his or her paid position." The AAS, with about 7,000 members, is the major organization of professional astronomers in North America. " The Very Large Array (VLA) is the most productive ground-based telescope in the history of astronomy, and most of the more than 10,000 observing projects on the VLA have depended upon the AIPS software to produce their scientific results," said Dr. James Ulvestad, NRAO's Director of New Mexico Operations. "This same software package also has been the principal tool for scientists using the Very Long Baseline Array and numerous other radio telescopes around the world," Ulvestad added. Greisen, who received a Ph.D in astronomy from the California Institute of Technology, joined the NRAO in 1972. He moved from the observatory's headquarters in Charlottesville, Virginia, to its Array Operations Center in Socorro in 2000. Greisen, who learned of the award in a telephone call from the AAS President, Dr. Robert Kirschner of Harvard University, said, "I'm pleased for the recognition of AIPS and also for the recognition of the contributions of radio astronomy to astronomy as a whole." He added that "it wasn't just me who did AIPS. There were many others." The AIPS software package grew out of the need for an efficient tool for producing images with the VLA, which was being

  13. Nuclear wastes: society problem or technical question?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During this conference day organized by the French society of nuclear energy (SFEN), several aspects of nuclear wastes were discussed and are summarized in this short paper: the dialectics of nuclear wastes; the point of view of the 'Robin des Bois' ecologist association; the safety of wastes; the French law from December 30, 1991 (separation-transmutation, deep underground disposal, packaging and storage); three examples of natural confinement analogues (uranium mines and Oklo 'reactor'); the point of view of the national commission of evaluation; the hidden aspects of communication in the domain of nuclear wastes; the other projects and studies in OECD countries; the management of wastes at the end of the fuel cycle; the main highlights of 1999 relative to the image of nuclear power in the media. (J.S.)

  14. Democratization in the Gulf Monarchies and American Civil Society

    OpenAIRE

    Azam, M. Nazrul Islam and Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the efforts made by American private sector and civil society actors after 2000 to popularize democratic values and norms in the six Gulf states, namely Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. The study is focused on areas including politics, education, culture, media, human rights, and women empowerment. The paper also deals with approaches adopted, goals and objectives set and strategies devised and employed by the American NGOs regardi...

  15. Symposium for Alfred Wolf's 75th birthday at American Chemical Society meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains abstracts from the symposium presented by the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society. Sessions covered the following topics: Therapeutic radionuclides--Making the right choice; Aspects of nuclear science; Nuclear structure with large gamma-ray detector arrays and their auxiliary devices; Thirty years of research in nuclear dynamics--From fission to the quark-gluon plasma; Chelated metal ions for diagnosis and therapy; Radiochemistry--Basic and applied; and Applications of small accelerators in science and industry

  16. Symposium for Alfred Wolf's 75th birthday at American Chemical Society meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-02

    This report contains abstracts from the symposium presented by the Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society. Sessions covered the following topics: Therapeutic radionuclides--Making the right choice; Aspects of nuclear science; Nuclear structure with large gamma-ray detector arrays and their auxiliary devices; Thirty years of research in nuclear dynamics--From fission to the quark-gluon plasma; Chelated metal ions for diagnosis and therapy; Radiochemistry--Basic and applied; and Applications of small accelerators in science and industry.

  17. Society for melanoma research and american heart association scientific sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Among the featured topics: oncolytic immunotherapy, BRAF/MEK inhibition, and a programmed death-1 inhibitor at the Society for Melanoma Research; and anticoagulation therapy, an alternative to statins, and endocarditis in the absence of dental antibiotic prophylaxis at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. PMID:25628510

  18. Crime and Violence in American Society: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Edith Elisabeth; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Six articles focus on various aspects on violence in American society. Titles are "Evolving a Science of Violence,""Violence by Youth; Violence Against Youth,""Victims and Aggressors in Marital Violence,""Television Violence, Victimization, and Power," and "Violence in Business Settings." (DB)

  19. American nuclear insurers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear liability insurance covers liability for damages directly caused by the nuclear energy hazard. This coverage includes offsite bodily injury and property damage sustained by members of the general public, and bodily injury to onsite third party personnel. Recent nuclear liability claims allege bodily injury and property damage resulting from releases or radioactive materials to the environmental and occupational radiation worker exposures. Routine reactor operations involving radioactive waste have the potential to result in such claims. The nuclear insurance Pools believe that one way such claims can be minimized is through the implementation of an effective radioactive waste management program

  20. Informing future societies about nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1990 a working group of the NKS (the Nordic nuclear safety program) was formed and give the task of established a basis for a common Nordic view of the need for information conservation for nuclear waste repositories. The Group investigated what tipy of information should be conserved; in what form the information should be kept; the quality of the information; and the problems of future retrieval of information, including retrieval after very long periods of time. Topics covered include the following: scientific aspects including social context of scientific solutions; information management; systems for conservation and retrieval of information including the problems of prediction; archives, markers, archives vs. markers, and continuing processes in society; Archive media including paper documents, microfilm, digital media, media lifetimes; and finally conclusions and recommendations

  1. Transactions of the nuclear societies of Israel joint meeting 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 18th convention of the Israel nuclear societies transactions book contains presentations in the following topics: reactor physics, health physics, radiation protection, nuclear medicine and general reviews about the status of nuclear energy in Israel

  2. [American Nuclear Society regional student conferences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference transactions include abstracts of presentation in the following sessions: mathematics and computer applications, radioisotopes and applications, criticality and safety, reactor physics, fusion energy, thermal hydraulics, health and medical physics, fuel cycle and waste management, reactor operations, and space remote and material technology

  3. Is Soviet society fit for the nuclear age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author argues that the Kremlin's handling of the Chernobyl crisis is a far greater indictment of Soviet ethos, society and ideology than their technology. The Soviet nuclear plan is seen to be to press on regardless of safety standards. Australia's government and society, through poor education, foreign disinformation and media orchestration, are unable to participate effectively in the responsibilities of a global nuclear society

  4. A Glimpse of American Society through the American TV Drama Series"the Desperate Housewives"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-wei

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical study on the American society through a popular American drama series"the Desper-ate House Wives". Typical American values can be found everywhere on the show as they have been ingrained in the soul of the American people. As a nation with not very long history but great achievements, its people are the one that should be highlight-ed. Unlike China, the nation of which have formed since thousands of years ago, so has its culture, America ’s history is an immi-gration history. People started migrating from other parts of the world since the 17th century and gathered at the land of America to build up their new homes and realize their dreams. They influence each other and fuse with each other. America is one of the countries in the world that plural cultures successfully mix together.The paper focuses on the American people ’s daily life to explain to the readers the American traits and values prevailing in their society. Except the Foreword which is the general intro-duction to the paper, this paper is presented in five parts. The first part to the forth part are the emphasis of the paper which re-spectively analyze the American traits and values. A series of vivid examples are provided with a wide range of study objects, man and woman, kids to elders, in hope of making the paper understandable and persuasive. It is expected that the study can offer a general idea to the people who are interested in the American society and its people.

  5. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:27002678

  6. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Glomerular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomback, Andrew S; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the annual Kidney Week meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories, along with single-best-answer questions, were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of United States nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using their cell phones with a special app with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology readers. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions. PMID:26847362

  7. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Michelle A; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of US nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using their cell phones with a special application with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology readers. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions. PMID:26915914

  8. American Geriatrics Society care of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults position statement: American Geriatrics Society Ethics Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    There is ample evidence that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals face discrimination in the healthcare setting. Providing high-quality health care for older LGBT adults will require active steps by organizations, institutions, advocacy groups, and health professionals that create an environment that is free from discrimination. This position statement that the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Ethics Committee developed addresses the vision of the AGS for the care of LGBT older adults and specific steps that can be taken to ensure that they receive the care that they need. PMID:25803784

  9. Consideration on the interaction between society and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A social conflict over nuclear technology arises from the different interactions between society and nuclear technology. The purpose of this review is to grasp the essential points of this social conflict from a social viewpoint. These essential points can be discerned by interpreting results of polls about nuclear technology and the future of society in general. As a result, attitudes towards nuclear technology can be explained in terms of differences of general views on society such as social order or social progress. The attitudes of people toward nuclear technology were divided into strong agreement, weak agreement, weak objection and strong objection in order to obtain useful information for clarification of social conflict on this issue. Results of polls of people who have weak agreement for nuclear technology reveal their ambivalence about nuclear technology. This raises concern that further implementation of nuclear technology might cause these people to shift their views to objection. (author)

  10. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society 12. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the seventeen Technical Sessions from the Twelfth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society held in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, June 9 to 12, 1991. As in previous years, the Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society was held in conjunction with the Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. The major topics of discussion included: reactor physics; thermal hydraulics; industrial irradiation; computer applications; fuel channel analysis; small reactors; severe accidents; fuel behaviour under accident conditions; reactor components; safety related computer software; nuclear fuel management; nuclear waste management; and, uranium mining processing

  11. From American Dreams to American Tragedies — Theodore Dreiser’s Ponderation on American Society and Ruination of Morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Zhang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser is one of America's greatest naturalist writers. He believed that human beings are helpless in the grip of instincts and social forces beyond their control, and he judged human society as an unequal contest between the strong and the weak. Both of his masterpieces Sister Carrie (1900 and An American Tragedy (1925, which were mostly based on his personal experience, expanded and clarified those themes. By comparing Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie and An American Tragedy, this thesis analyzes the author’s exploration of the possibilities of 20th century American life with its material profusion and spiritual doubt of the life value.

  12. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society sixth annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the Sixth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society comprise 103 papers on the following subjects: fuel technology, nuclear plant safety, instrumentation, public and regulatory matters, fusion, fuel behaviour under normal and accident conditions, nuclear plant design and operations, thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, accelerators, waste management, new reactor concepts

  13. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Autumn Meeting 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proceedings contains articles of 2002 autumn meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on November 15-16, 2002 in Seoul, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 5 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: Cancer, Physics of nuclear medicine, Neurology, Radiopharmacy and biology, General nuclear medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  14. What can nuclear energy do for society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    The utilization of nuclear energy and the predicted impact of future uses of nuclear energy are discussed. Areas of application in electric power production and transportation methods are described. It is concluded that the need for many forms of nuclear energy will become critical as the requirements for power to supply an increasing population are met.

  15. What can nuclear energy do for society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    It is pointed out that the earth's crust holds 30,000 times as much energy in the form of fissionable atoms as fossil fuel. Moreover, nuclear fuel costs less per unit of energy than fossil fuel. Capital equipment used to release nuclear energy, on the other hand, is expensive. For commercial electric-power production and marine propulsion, advantages of nuclear power have outweighed disadvantages. As to nuclear submarines, applications other than military may prove feasible. The industry has proposed cargo submarines to haul oil from the Alaskan North Slope beneath the Arctic ice. Other possible applications for nuclear power are in air-cushion-vehicles, aircraft, and rockets.-

  16. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: research questions in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolome R. Celli

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and resource use worldwide. The goal of this official American Thoracic Society (ATS/European Respiratory Society (ERS Research Statement is to describe evidence related to diagnosis, assessment, and management; identify gaps in knowledge; and make recommendations for future research. It is not intended to provide clinical practice recommendations on COPD diagnosis and management. Clinicians, researchers and patient advocates with expertise in COPD were invited to participate. A literature search of Medline was performed, and studies deemed relevant were selected. The search was not a systematic review of the evidence. Existing evidence was appraised and summarised, and then salient knowledge gaps were identified. Recommendations for research that addresses important gaps in the evidence in all areas of COPD were formulated via discussion and consensus. Great strides have been made in the diagnosis, assessment and management of COPD, as well as understanding its pathogenesis. Despite this, many important questions remain unanswered. This ATS/ERS research statement highlights the types of research that leading clinicians, researchers and patient advocates believe will have the greatest impact on patient-centred outcomes.

  17. Uses of Nuclear Technology in the Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the programme of activities aimed at secondary school teachers, the President of the Spanish Nuclear Forum and General Manager of Empresarios Agrupados inaugurated the 16th Conference on Energy and Education with a description of nuclear technology applications and expectations of future developments in the area of the structure of matter, including sources of life. Dr. Hernan Vera Ruiz, Head of Industrial and Chemical Applications, IAEA, gave the opening speech and answered questions from the participants in the colloquium at the end which was moderated by the President of the Spanish Nuclear forum. (Author)

  18. Half life: nuclear power and future society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A definitive critique of nuclear power in Canada is delivered. Also analyzed are reprocessing and waste disposal hazards and the conventional wisdom of energy source mix and energy demand growth. (E.C.B.)

  19. Proceedings of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Spring Meeting 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proceedings contains articles of 1999 spring meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on May 21, 1999 in Chonju, Korea. The subject title of proceedings is radioisotope therapy using Re-188. Radiopharmaceuticals have been used for the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases, mostly for the diagnostic purposes in nuclear medicine. (Yi, J. H.)

  20. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society 15. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the 15. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society cover a wide range of nuclear topics, but the emphasis is on CANDU reactors and Canadian experience. The 89 papers are arranged in 17 sessions dealing with the following subjects: thermalhydraulics, fuel channels, operations, reactor physics, fuel, new technology, safety, training, waste management. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  1. Proceedings of the seventeenth annual Canadian Nuclear Society conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventeenth annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society, presented in Fredericton, New Brunswick. The conference includes papers on general topics of interest on the nuclear community, waste management and the environment, instrumentation and design of Candu reactors, safety analysis, thermal hydraulics, fuel channels, plant operations and in-core instrumentation

  2. Current problems of the nuclear power - society relationship in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work tries to make an analysis of the current aspects of the interaction between the nuclear field, environment and society. One starts from the general conception of sustainable development. The analysis focusses mainly the social side of the sustainable development and the environmental protection issues. As prominent appears the sensitive problem of radioactive waste management. The papers analyses the current public perception, the mutations expected in the public opinion as well as the problems which the nuclear industry and decision makers confront to harmonize the requirements in the nuclear power sector and those imposed by society. Particularly focused is the situation in Romania

  3. Ukrainian Nuclear Society International Conference 'Strategy of the nuclear power development: The choice of Ukraine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of the papers presented at the International Conference of the Ukrainian Nuclear Society 'Strategy of the nuclear power development'. The following problems are considered: present situation with the nuclear power and its safety; nuclear fuel cycle development; waste and spent nuclear fuel management; reactors' decommissioning issues; modernization of the NPP with WWER reactors; future reactors; economics of nuclear power; safety culture; legal and regulatory framework, state nuclear regulatory control; PR in nuclear power industry; staff training

  4. Nomad Cities : Investigating spatial practices within the fluid network societies of the American RV community

    OpenAIRE

    Landin, Karl

    2015-01-01

    A new nomad society is colonizing the desert landscape of the American Southwest. It is a leaderless seasonal swarm, dispersed but densely connected socially, able to form and disband agile urban communities the size of large American cities. It consists of highway bound leisure hunters driving extremely wasteful vehicles that while parked are able form a dense and resilient pioneer society. They are predominantly retired and constructing a new American dream, an informal utopia created from ...

  5. American Meteor Society Fireball reporting system and mobile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, M.

    2014-07-01

    The American Meteor Society (AMS) founded in 1911 pioneered the visual study of meteors and has collected data relating to meteor observations and bright fireballs for over 100 years. In December 2010, the online fireball reporting system was upgraded to an interactive application that utilizes Google Maps and other programmatic methods to pinpoint the observer's location, azimuth and elevation values with a high degree of precision. The AMS has collected 10s of 1000s of witness reports relating to 100s of events each year since the new application was released. Three dimensional triangulation methods that average the data collected from witnesses have been developed that can determine the start and end points of the meteor with an accuracy of mobile application, the AMS is able to collect more precise elevation angles than through the web application. Users can file a new report directly on the phone or update the values submitted through a web report. After web users complete their fireball report online, they are prompted to download the app and update their observation with the more precise data provided by the sensors in the mobile device. The mobile app also provides an accurate means for the witness to report the elapsed time of the fireball. To log this value, the user drags the device across the sky where they saw the fireball. This process is designed to require no button click or user interaction to start and stop the time recording. A count down initiates the process and once the user's phone crosses the plane of azimuth for the end point of the fireball the velocity timer automatically stops. Users are asked to log the recording three times in an effort to minimize error. The three values are then averaged into a final score. Once enough witnesses have filed reports, elapsed time data collected from the mobile phone can be used to determine the velocity of the fireball. With the velocity, trajectory solution and RA/DEC the AMS can plot orbital

  6. Conference summaries. Canadian Nuclear Association 29. annual conference; Canadian Nuclear Society 10. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 papers from the twenty-ninth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association. Abstracts were also prepared for the 102 papers from the tenth Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society

  7. Current Status of The Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the application of nuclear medicine to clinics became generalized and it held an important position, the Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine was founded in 1961, and today it has become known as one of the oldest nuclear medicine societies not only to Asian nations but also to other advanced countries all over the world. Now it has 100 or so regular members composed of students of each medicine filed unlike other medical societies. Only nuclear medicine research workers are eligible for its membership. The Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine holds its regular general meeting and symposium twice per annom respectively in addition to occasional group gatherings and provincial lectures on nuclear medicine. With an eye to exchanging information on symposium, research and know-how, KSNM issued its initial magazine in 1967. Every year two editions are published. Year after year the contents of treatises are getting elevated with researches on each field including the early study on morphology-greatly improved both in quality and quantity. Of late, a minute and fixed quantity of various matters by dynamical research and radioimmunoassay of every kind has become visibly active. In particular, since KSNM, unlike other local societies, keeps close and frequent contact with the nuclear medicine researchers of world-wide fame, monographs by eminent scholars of the world are carried in its magazine now internationally and well received in foreign countries. Now the magazine has been improved to such an extent that foreign authors quote its contents. KSNM invited many a foreign scholar with a view to exchanging the knowledge of nuclear medicine. Sponsored by nuclear energy institute, the nuclear medicine symposium held in Seoul in October of 1966 was a success with Dr. Wagner participating, a great scholar of world wide fame: It was the first international symposium ever held in Korea, and the Korea Japan symposium held in Seoul 1971 was attended by all distinguished nuclear

  8. Climatic changes and nuclear energetics. Declaration of the Academic Council of the Slovak Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Academic Council of the Slovak Nuclear Society (SNUS), in accordance with the standpoint of the High Scientific Council of the European Nuclear Society (ENS), considers as necessary to retain the nuclear energetics as a constituent of the future complex of energy sources in the world and markedly to increase installed capacity for electricity production from nuclear energy, if the ambitious aims for reduction of emissions of carbon dioxide with present covering of predicted demand for energy should be fulfilled. (authors)

  9. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 2, Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ''Science, Society and America's Nuclear Waste'' is a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  10. The Pan-American Federation of Neurological Societies (PAFNS): A New Regional Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Marco T; Román, Gustavo C

    2016-07-15

    The Pan-American Federation of Neurological Societies (PAFNS) was created on 15 November 2011 during the 20th World Congress of Neurology in Marrakech by virtue of the "Declaration of Morocco" signed by the WFN Latin American delegates and ratified on 5 March 2012 by delegates attending the 13th Pan-American Congress of Neurology in La Paz, Bolivia. On 20 March 2013 delegates attending the 65th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology in San Diego, California, USA, gave formal approval to the PAFNS Constitution. The neurological societies from the following countries have approved and signed the constitution as founding members and active ordinary members: Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Uruguay, and Venezuela. The Ibero-American Stroke Society (SIECV), the Commission on Latin American Affairs of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) and the World Sleep Society have requested the status of Associate Members. The WFN and the American Academy of Neurology provided seed grants for the creation of the Pan-American Federation of Neurological Societies. PAFNS represents a major step for the improvement of regional neurological care, education and research. PMID:27288805

  11. American Foundations: Their Roles and Contributions in Society

    OpenAIRE

    Helmut K. Anheier

    2011-01-01

    Foundations play an essential part in the philanthropic activity that defines so much of American life. No other nation provides its foundations with so much autonomy and freedom of action as does the United States. Liberated both from the daily discipline of the market and from direct control by government, American foundations understandably attract great attention. As David Hammack and Helmut Anheier note in this volume, “Americans have criticized foundations for . . . their alleged conser...

  12. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 1, Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is unit 1 in a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  13. The American Physical Society's Defense of Human Rights

    CERN Document Server

    Gerjuoy, Edward

    2015-01-01

    The history of APS involvement in the defense of human rights, a history of which the Society can be proud, will be summarized. The summary will include illustrative specific Society human rights defense actions in illustrative specific cases. As will be emphasized, the aforesaid involvement has been primarily through the activities of the APS Committee on International Freedom of Scientists. It is noteworthy, and one of the reasons the Society can be proud, that this Committee is charged with monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists, not solely for physicists.

  14. American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES) Programs: Outreach to Native Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourse, S.

    2003-12-01

    AISES is a national non-profit organization which nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. Through its educational programs, AISES provides opportunities for American Indians and Native Alaskans to pursue studies in science, engineering, and technology arenas. The trained professionals then become technologically informed leaders within the Indian community. AISES' ultimate goal is to be a catalyst for the advancement of American Indians and Native Alaskans as they seek to become self-reliant and self-determined members of society. AISES' Higher Education Program consists of scholarships, college relations, leadership development, and internships. This session will focus on the value and impact of AISES internships for AISES students, including hands-on experience in the student's field of study, co-op opportunities, and entrance into graduate school. AISES currently offers internship placements with NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, the U.S. State Department, the Departments of Commerce and Veterans Affairs, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2004, AISES will also be offering placements at the Central Intelligence Agency.

  15. Symposium introduction: the first joint American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division (AGFD) and the ACS International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand (ICSCT) worked together to stage the “1st Joint ACS AGFD - ACS ICSCT Symposium on Agricultural and Food Chemistry,” which was held in Bangkok, Thailand ...

  16. Maintaining Life-saving Testing for Patients With Infectious Diseases: Infectious Diseases Society of America, American Society for Microbiology, and Pan American Society for Clinical Virology Recommendations on the Regulation of Laboratory-developed Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliendo, Angela M; Couturier, Marc R; Ginocchio, Christine C; Hanson, Kimberly E; Miller, Melissa B; Walker, Kimberly E; Frank, Gregory M

    2016-07-15

    In 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed to regulate laboratory-developed tests (LDTs)-diagnostics designed, manufactured, and used within a single laboratory. The Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American Society for Microbiology, and the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology recognize that the FDA is committed to protecting patients. However, our societies are concerned that the proposed regulations will limit access to testing and negatively impact infectious diseases (ID) LDTs. In this joint commentary, our societies discuss why LDTs are critical for ID patient care, hospital infection control, and public health responses. We also highlight how the FDA's proposed regulation of LDTs could impair patient access to life-saving tests and stifle innovation in ID diagnostics. Finally, our societies make specific recommendations for the FDA's consideration to reduce the burden of the proposed new rules on clinical laboratories and protect patients' access to state-of-the art, quality LDTs. PMID:27118790

  17. Reconstruction of nuclear science and engineering harmonized with human society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the beginning of the 21th century, the use of nuclear power has assumed very serious dimensions, because there are many problems not only safety technologies but also action of technical expert. The situation and problems of nuclear power are explained. It consists of six chapter as followings; introduction, history and R and D of nuclear power, paradigm change of nuclear science and engineering, energy science, investigation of micro world, how to research and development and education and training of special talent. The improvement plans and five proposals are stated as followings; 1) a scholar and engineer related to nuclear power have to understand ethics and build up closer connection with person in the various fields. 2) Nuclear power generation and nuclear fuel cycle are important in future, so that they have to be accepted by the society by means of opening to the public. Safety science, anti-pollution measurements, treatment and disposal of radioactive waste and development of new reactor and fusion reactor should be carried out. 3) It is necessary that the original researches of quantum beam and isotope have to step up. 4) The education of nuclear science and technology and upbringing special talent has to be reconstructed. New educational system such as 'nuclear engineering course crossing with many universities' is established. 5) Cooperation among industry, academic world and government. (S.Y.)

  18. Comparison of British Thoracic Society and American Thoracic Society reintroduction guidelines for anti-tuberculous therapy induced liver injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of British Thoracic Society and American Thoracic Society guidelines for re-introduction of anti-tuberculous therapy after drug-induced liver injury, and to assess the ease of administration of each guideline on a scale of 1-10. Methods: The randomised prospective interventional study was conducted at the Department of Medicine and Pulmonology, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from December 2011 to November 2013. Patients with anti-tuberculous therapy drug-induced liver injury were selected. Hepatotoxic anti-tuberculous therapy was stopped and modified anti-tuberculous therapy was started. Patients were followed weekly till clinical and biochemical parameters got stabilised. After stabilisation, the patients were randomised to one of the two groups to receive re-introduction of anti-tuberculous therapy under the guidelines of British Thoracic Society (Group I) or those of American Thoracic Society (Group II). Means of the groups were analysed by Student's t test and proportions were compared by chi-square test. Multivariate analysis was done for age, body mass index and serum albumin for recurrence of drug-induced liver injury after the re-introduction. P value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: Of the total 325 patients, 163(50.15%) were in Group I, while 162(49.84%) were in Group II. The frequency of recurrence of drug-induced liver injury in Group I was 16 (9.8%) and in Group II it was 18 (11.1%). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p<0.7). Age was positively related with drug-induced liver injury, while body mass index and serum albumin were negatively associated. Conclusion: There was no significant difference between the two major guidelines though the American Thoracic Society guideline was easier to follow. (author)

  19. American nuclear theatre, 1946-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation examines the American nuclear theatre - works that directly explore nuclear technology (weapons and energy). Background chapters describe the history of nuclear development, discourse, and strategy; the response of the arts; and the history of the American nuclear theatre, which began in 1946 and burgeoned after 1980. Five recent, representative productions - four stage dramas and one nonviolent symbolic action - are examined as theatrical strategies: Dead End Kids: a History of Nuclear Power (1980), by JoAnne Akalaitis/Mabour Mines; the Story of One Who Set Out to Study Fear (1981), by Peter Schumann/Bread and Puppet Theater; Factwino vs. Armageddonman (1982), by the San Francisco Mime Troupe ; Ashes, Ashes, We All Fall Down (1982), by Martha Beosing/At the Foot of the Mountain; and the Plowshares 8 events (1980-1984). All five productions were created collaboratively. All assaulted the boundaries between art and life. All were dialectical and tried to create a fundamental shift in consciousness about nuclear weapons. All suggested that the nuclear age is a new historical situation: war and business are interconnected with a new technology which makes possible the end of the world. Three productions employed historical images of mass death to provide emotional and moral comparisons. All finally called for each audience member to take responsibility for the current nuclear situation

  20. The American Teacher and the Restoration of Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Christopher D.

    This master's thesis assumes that the argument presented in "The American Paradox: Spiritual Hunger in an Age of Plenty" (D. G. Myers) is correct. The United States presently suffers from a social recession arising from the impoverishment of the human spirit. The thesis diagnoses four underlying causes of U.S. social ills: (1) science; (2) regime;…

  1. The Impact of The Autobiography by Benjamin Franklin on American Soci-ety and Literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ai-ping

    2015-01-01

    Franklin is an earliest writer in American history and he is the most important writers during American colonial period. The most important works of him are Poor Richard's Almanac and his Autobiography. His works have a tremendous impact on American literature later. What more important is that in his Autobiography he wrote out American dream, the spirit of business and good qualities, and some others. Franklin explained that everyone can get rich by hard work and thrift, and he called on people to come to America to make money. The American dream then became an important theme in American literature. It occurred in many works of many writers in his later time. Since Franklin was such a successful person in many areas, world-renowned inventor, writer, diplomat and one of the leaders of the American war of independence, he brought a tremendous im⁃pact on American society. And because of his success, many Americans later took him as an example and his works were popular and read widely. Both Franklin and his works affected American society deeply.

  2. Society of Nuclear Medicine--57th annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Ben

    2010-08-01

    The 57th Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine, held in Salt Lake City, UT, USA, included topics covering new developments in imaging agents and radiopharmaceutical therapies in the field of nuclear medicine. This conference report highlights selected presentations related to imaging of the brain, the prediction of heart disease, and the detection and treatment of various cancers. Investigational drugs discussed include TF-2 plus [68Ga]IMP-288 and TF-2 plus [111In]IMP-288 (both Immunomedics Inc), [11C]PBR-170 (Royal Prince Alfred Hospital/Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organization), [11C]LY-2795050 (Eli Lilly & Co), yttrium (90Y) clivatuzumab tetraxetan (Garden State Cancer Center/Immunomedics Inc), [18F]LMI-1195 (Lantheus Medical Imaging Inc), fluciclovine (18F) (GE Healthcare/Nihon Medi-Physics Co Ltd), [99mTc]MIP-1340 and [99mTc]MIP-1407 (both Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals Inc). PMID:20721816

  3. The standpoint of the Slovak Nuclear Society to the education in nuclear physics, technology and energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Slovak Nuclear Society and its consultative body Academic Council of the SNUS warns on: (a) necessity of preservation of knowledge and skills in nuclear physics, technology and energetics; (b) necessity and significance of development projects and research in given areas; (c) necessity of qualitative, expertly certificated lifelong education on competent domestics place of works. (authors)

  4. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: Nuclear Waste, Unit 1. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 1 of the four-part series Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to help students establish the relevance of the topic of nuclear waste to their everyday lives and activities. Particular attention is…

  5. Synopsis of History of American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology 1958-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide a synopsis of the history of the association of radiation oncologists in the United States, currently known as the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO), with the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the organization. Methods and Materials: The history of ASTRO, from its beginning as the American Club of Therapeutic Radiologists, is the subject of a book that is to be released with the occasion of the 50th Annual Meeting of the Society in 2008. This book was prepared by members of ASTRO's History Committee and History Working Subcommittee. The source material for the book was the archives of the Society and recorded interviews, conducted by members of the subcommittee, of members of the Society and of the past and present Society staff. The book was also based on previously published material. This article used the source material used for the Society anniversary book. Results: This synopsis of the history of the Society will provide a source of reference for anyone interested in the history of the Society from its foundation in 1958 to the present, 2008

  6. Recommendations for Content from the American Chemical Society for the Subject of Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, George; Tinnesand, Michael

    This document concerns recommendations for the chemistry content needed for preservice science teachers as determined by the American Chemical Society (ACS). Topics include: (1) process description; (2) relationship to National Science Education Standards; (3) recommendations for content; and (4) contributors to the project. (KHR)

  7. Political advocacy by the American Society for Cell Biology and its partners

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    I trace how the American Society for Cell Biology became a strong political advocate for the scientific community. I celebrate how good leadership and an effective staff enabled its energetic volunteer organization to have an impact, but I also ask how the effort can be made more successful.

  8. Proceedings of the frst joint american chemical society agricultural and food chemistry division – american chemical society international chemical sciences chapter in Thailand symposium on agricultural and food chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Proceedings is a compilation of papers from contributed oral and poster presentations presented at the first joint symposium organized by the American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand ...

  9. Nuclear Society of Russia: Ten years in the world nuclear community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear society, which is a nongovernmental organization of nuclear professionals, appeared in the Soviet Union at the end of the 1980s--when social conditions for such a society had matured. Deep changes in the entire country's social consciousness had promoted the specialists understanding of the need to unite in order to overcome the nuclear community's dissociation, the monopoly of the nuclear ministry, and the secrecy syndrome of all nuclear issues. The new public association announced the guiding principles of its activities to be openness and glasnost and completeness and truthfulness of information supplied to decision makers and to the society as a whole. Important to the information system of the NSR are topical meetings and seminars on quite varied but always actual problems of nuclear energy use, often with foreign participation. The variety of these NSR meeting subjects is illustrated by the titles of several meetings of the last 2 yr: Safety Culture in Nuclear Power, Youth and the Plutonium Challenge, Nuclear Fuel for Mankind, Nuclear Power in Space, Radiation Legacy of the Former-USSR, the Murmansk International Forum Nuclear Fleet and Ecology, and many others. A special place among NSR seminars belongs to the annual meeting, Nuclear Energy and Public Opinion, the Russian analog of the European PIME conference. Starting from distribution of ENS periodicals--the Nuclear Europe Worldscan magazine and Nucleus information sheet--among its members, the NSR soon began publishing its own Informational Bulletin (since 1989). Note that in the first years of the Nuclear Society's existence, it has been possible to publish periodicals, conference proceedings, and even books in English. Unfortunately, financial difficulties of the last years have frozen this most useful activity, which the NSR, however, hopes to resume. In the last period, the materials of the international information agency NucNet, which provides both regular information for the analysis of

  10. 77 FR 56650 - Food and Drug Administration/American Glaucoma Society Workshop on the Validity, Reliability, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/American Glaucoma Society... announcing a ] public workshop entitled ``FDA/American Glaucoma Society (AGS) Workshop on the Validity... nerve head, ganglion cell layer) using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT, time domain and...

  11. American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society Classification of the Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias: Advances in Knowledge since 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverzellati, Nicola; Lynch, David A; Hansell, David M; Johkoh, Takeshi; King, Talmadge E; Travis, William D

    2015-01-01

    In the updated American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs), the major entities have been preserved and grouped into (a) "chronic fibrosing IIPs" (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia), (b) "smoking-related IIPs" (respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease and desquamative interstitial pneumonia), (c) "acute or subacute IIPs" (cryptogenic organizing pneumonia and acute interstitial pneumonia), and (d) "rare IIPs" (lymphoid interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis). Furthermore, it has been acknowledged that a final diagnosis is not always achievable, and the category "unclassifiable IIP" has been proposed. The diagnostic interpretation of the IIPs is often challenging because other diseases with a known etiology (most notably, connective tissue disease and hypersensitivity pneumonitis) may show similar morphologic patterns. Indeed, more emphasis has been given to the integration of clinical, computed tomographic (CT), and pathologic findings for multidisciplinary diagnosis. Typical CT-based morphologic patterns are associated with the IIPs, and radiologists play an important role in diagnosis and characterization. Optimal CT quality and a systematic approach are both pivotal for evaluation of IIP. Interobserver variation for the various patterns encountered in the IIPs is an issue. It is important for radiologists to understand the longitudinal behavior of IIPs at serial CT examinations, especially for providing a framework for cases that are unclassifiable or in which a histologic diagnosis cannot be obtained. PMID:26452110

  12. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Bypass—Temperature Management during Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Richard; Baker, Robert A.; Likosky, Donald S.; Grigore, Alina; Dickinson, Timothy A.; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Hammon, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: To improve our understanding of the evidence-based literature supporting temperature management during adult cardiopulmonary bypass, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology tasked the authors to conduct a review of the peer-reviewed literature, including 1) optimal site for temperature monitoring, 2) avoidance of hyperthermia, 3) peak cooling temperature gradient and cooling rate, and 4) peak warming temperature gradient and rewarming rate. Authors adopted the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association method for development clinical practice guidelines, and arrived at the following recommendation. PMID:26543248

  13. Kokes Award for the 24th North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioux, Robert M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2016-05-02

    The objective of the Richard. J. Kokes Travel Award program is to encourage the participation of students in the biennial North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Meetings. The Kokes Award covers a significant portion of the transportation, lodging, and conference registration costs. Eligible students must be enrolled at a North American university and need to present a paper at the meeting. The Kokes awardee will be required to contribute some time to the organizing committee to assist in meeting operations and to be present at the meeting during the entire time. Similar to the 23rd Kokes Award program, undergraduate students are also eligible for the 24th Kokes Award program.

  14. Bulgarian Nuclear Society in defense of nuclear energy in Bulgaria and Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bulgarian Nuclear Society (BgNS) was founded in 1991. The priorities of the BgNS activities were clearly outlined during its more than ten years of experience. Organizing conferences, seminars, scientific sessions where discussions are freely deployed the BgNS assists the professionals and lays out its stand on particular matters, related to the nuclear energy development, radiobiology and radiation protection. The BgNS events are always open to the public. Journalists and representatives of governmental and non-governmental organizations are involved. The information policy of the society is focused on extending the knowledge and culture of the population about nuclear power and radiology issues. A wide range of communication approaches is used, such as publications, meetings, discussions, exhibitions, media events and Internet. The BgNS experts provide competent assistance to the state authorities and non-governmental organizations for finding optimal solutions in nuclear technologies and atomic energy. The 'BgNS Transactions' has an authority among the specialists connected with that sector of industry. The BgNS carries out constructive co-operation with national nuclear societies in Romania, Ukraine, the Czech Republic and Russia. Since its foundation the BgNS is a regular member to the European Nuclear Society. Contributing to the development of nuclear science and nuclear energy in Bulgaria, the BgNS keeps its priorities for extending the information exchange between professionals on national and international level and for providing the Bulgarian population with information about the up-to-date nuclear technologies in the variety of their aspects. The BgNS is a non-governmental organization aimed at multilateral development of science, technology and practice for safe use of atomic energy for peaceful purposes. It contributes for creating of attitudes and right climate of opinion about nuclear power matters. BgNS incorporates prominent scientists

  15. Fourth American Physical Society Topical Conference on Shock Waves in Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Shock Waves in Condensed Matter

    1986-01-01

    The Fourth American Physical Society Topical Conference on Shock Waves in Condensed Matter was held in Spokane, Washington, July 22-25, 1985. Two hundred and fifty scientists and engineers representing thirteen countries registered at the conference. The countries represented included the United States of America, Australia, Canada, The People's Repub­ lic of China, France, India, Israel, Japan, Republic of China (Taiwan), United Kingdom, U. S. S. R, Switzerland and West Germany. One hundred and sixty-two technical papers, cov­ ering recent developments in shock wave and high pressure physics, were presented. All of the abstracts have been published in the September 1985 issue of the Bulletin of the American Physical Society. The topical conferences, held every two years since 1979, have become the principal forum for shock wave studies in condensed materials. Both formal and informal technical discussions regarding recent developments conveyed a sense of excitement. Consistent with the past conferences, th...

  16. The impact of the railroad on American society: a communication perspective of technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matusitz, Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript examines the railroad system as a combination of humans and machines that form a symbiosis, and explains how the railroad exerted a huge effect on American life when it made irrelevant the organic – following nature – time system that existed in cities and countries where clocks were set according to weather conditions. The author makes the point that the railroad is an organ of society, that it will evolve to serve the functions we demand, that it has molded and altered – but never replaced – contact between humans, and that it will continue to enhance and facilitate it. This manuscript analyzes the social, cross-cultural, psychological, and financial impact of the railroad on American society in the past two hundred years. The measure of progress in the United States is tantamount to the mass of things that had to be sacrificed to it.

  17. Management of Hyperthyroidism in Pregnancy: Comparison of Recommendations of American Thyroid Association and Endocrine Society

    OpenAIRE

    Shahram Alamdari; Fereidoun Azizi; Hossein Delshad; Farzaneh Sarvghadi; Atieh Amouzegar; Ladan Mehran

    2013-01-01

    Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of hyperthyroidism during pregnancy are of outmost importance, because hyperthyroidism has major adverse impact on both mother and fetus. Since data on the management of thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy is rapidly evolving, two guidelines have been developed by the American Thyroid Association and the Endocrine society in the last 2 years. We compare here the recommendations of these two guidelines regarding management of hyperthyroidism during pregnanc...

  18. Evolution and revolution: the formation of today's American Thoracic Society, part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John F; Du Melle, Fran; Hopewell, Philip C

    2012-11-15

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS), the preeminent professional organization in the field of respiratory, critical care, and sleep medicine, is now 107 years old. For the most part, the Society's administrative and medical-scientific interests evolved in an orderly fashion, but two "revolutions" took place that should be remembered. What ultimately metamorphosed into the ATS in 1960 began in 1905 as the 34-member American Sanatorium Association, which in 1915 became the medical section of the National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis (NASPT). In 1918, the NASPT became the National Tuberculosis Association and in 1939, the ASA became the American Trudeau Society, cosmetic revisions having no effect on either the medical section-parent relationship or the one-disease orientation of both organizations. After World War II, the narrow focus of the ATS on tuberculosis was progressively enlarged through coalescence of several factors that transformed the practice of pulmonary medicine: the growth of intensive care units and pulmonary function laboratories and the advent of fiberoptic bronchoscopy; the rise of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer coincident with the withering of tuberculosis; and the arrival of pulmonary physician-scientists who sought enrichment through a professional society. The newcomers found a home in the ATS, but it was slow to fulfill their needs for scientific communication and administrative responsibility. The first revolution, the formation of Scientific Assemblies, got the job done quickly and well, as described in Part 1 of this perspective. The second revolution, separation from the American Lung Association, is described in Part 2. PMID:22822021

  19. The First International Residency Program Accredited by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Qadheeb, Nada S.; Alissa, Dema A.; Al-Jedai, Ahmed; Ajlan, Aziza; Al-Jazairi, Abdulrazaq S.

    2012-01-01

    The processes by which the pharmacy residency program at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre-Riyadh, Saudi Arabia became the first American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) accredited program outside the United States is described. This article provides key points for a successful program for other pharmacy residency programs around the world. Additionally, it points out the need for establishing international standards for pharmacy residency programs.

  20. Kokes Awards for the 23rd North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Gary [University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2014-01-31

    The Tri-State Catalysis Society awarded 107 Kokes Travel Awards. The program was very successful and to date this was the most Kokes Travel Awards ever awarded at a North American Catalysis Society Meeting. It provided students who merited an award the opportunity to attend the meeting, present a paper in the form of either an oral presentation or a poster presentation, and to serve the North American Catalysis Society by participating in the organization of the meeting. Students worked very hard during the week of the meeting to make it a success. Financial support for the Kokes awards was provided by DOE, NSF, NACS, as well as the Tri-State Catalysis Society, the latter through fund raising activities, and other donations. AT the meeting, each student received over $1050 in kind to offset the costs of registration fees ($260), hotel accommodations ($295.7), transportation ($400 travel allowance), as well as T-shirts ($20), and banquet tickets ($95 provided by donations from society members). In addition, for the first time, students received certificates that were signed by the President of NACS, Professor Enrique Iglesia, and by the Kokes Awards Chair, Gary Jacobs (see last page). A list of meeting co-chairs (i.e., Uschi M. Graham, Umit S. Ozkan, and Madan Bhassin) and the honorary chair (Burtron H. Davis) was also included on the certificate, along with the name of the recipient. The awardees were chosen on a merit-based guideline which also included the requirements of having a presentation accepted at the meeting and being a student at a North American University. The Richard J. Kokes Student Travel Award Committee (Gary Jacobs, Rodney Andrews, and Peter Smirniotis) with help from the Organizing Committee were able to secure money from four sources as detailed in Table 1. As detailed by our Treasurer, Dr. Helge Toufar of Clariant, the total amount spent was $105,000.

  1. Safety culture in nuclear installations. A society-driven issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever since safety culture was first named by INSAG as an assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organisations and individuals that establish an overriding priority of nuclearpowerplant safety issues, there has been a continuous process of elaborating the terminology, its meaningfulness and applicability in different cases. There have been a number of attempts to analyse the etymology of the expression safety culture but the one offered here gives the possibility to make several very interesting conclusions. In most of the important dictionaries' safety has been described as a state of being free from danger or as a condition of being safe from causing or suffering hurt injury or loss. There are different approaches in determining culture, but two of them may be very useful for this case: culture can be looked upon as the expression of the intellectual development in the society or the socially transmitted pattern of human behaviour that includes thought, speech, action, institutions and man-made objects. If we try to apply this type of approach when assesing the operation of the nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe and former Soviet Union, many interesting conclusions can be drawn, which may somewhat differ from the initially made statements, as they started to appear in 1991 and later on, after caring out the first safety review missions by IAEA and others. On the other hand one can also find a reasonable explanation of the deterioration of safety again applying this type of approach. In the paper, these problems are discussed on the example of the Kozloduy nuclear power plant and the situation in Bulgaria. (author)

  2. American Nuclear Society eastern regional student conference. Transactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-eight abstracts are presented under the following headings: computer applications, safety and economics, fusion, thermal hydraulics, radiation studies, environmental analysis, and reactor design and applications. (DLC)

  3. American Nuclear Society eastern regional student conference. Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-eight abstracts are presented under the following headings: computer applications, safety and economics, fusion, thermal hydraulics, radiation studies, environmental analysis, and reactor design and applications

  4. Ethno-Religiosity in Orthodox Christianity: A Source of Solidarity & Multiculturalism in American Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Durante

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study will analyze the processes of community organization implemented by Eastern Orthodox Christian ethno-religious groups, and Greek Orthodox Christian communities in particular, to establish themselves in American civil society. It will be argued that the symbiotic relationship formed between ethnicity and religion in this tradition, as well as the democratized grassroots mode of community organization that American civil society fosters, contributes to a strong sense of belonging amongst members of the ethno-religious Orthodox Christian congregations. In turn, this sense of belonging has produced a multi-layered mechanism for solidarity-building in these communities. It will then be suggested that in addition to contributing to America’s religious diversity, the preservation of ethno-linguistic heritage by the various Orthodox Christian churches simultaneously contributes to America’s poly-ethnicity and linguistic diversity as well. Last, it will be argued that the continued survival of ethno-religiosity in American Orthodoxy can either lead to further isolation amongst the separate ethnic congregations, or it can alternatively open avenues for the cultivation of a form of Orthodox Christian multiculturalism that supports neither homogeneity nor isolationism.

  5. American Physicists, Nuclear Weapons in World War II, and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badash, Lawrence

    2005-06-01

    Social responsibility in science has a centuries-long history, but it was such a minor thread that most scientists were unaware of the concept. Even toward the conclusion of the Manhattan Project, which produced the first nuclear weapons, only a handful of its participants had some reservations about use of a weapon of mass destruction. But the explosions over Hiroshima and Nagasaki not only made society more aware of the importance of science, they made scientists more aware of their responsibility to society. I describe the development of the concept of social responsibility and its appearance among American scientists both before and after the end of World War II.

  6. Recognition of American Physiological Society Members Whose Research Publications Had a Significant Impact on the Discipline of Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Society members whose research publication during the past 125 yr had an important impact on the discipline of physiology were featured at the American Physiological Society (APS)'s 125th Anniversary symposium. The daunting and challenging task of identifying and selecting significant publications was assumed by the Steering Committee of the…

  7. Insurrections, Bank and Private Contracts: How Society shaped the Constitutional Order during the American Revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Battistini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Looking at the revolutionary context of Pennsylvania, the essay analyzes the continuous movement of rebellions during the American Revolution in order to highlight the process of institutionalization of the constitutional order, namely the changeable power relationship that shaped society. The essay reconstructs: 1 the battle for free trade and freedom of property and the resulting rising of the mercantile class as a national elite; 2 the mercantile political project of ordering society by creating a national system of public credit based upon the institution of the public debt and the foundation of the first national bank; 3 the vicissitudes of the bank by analyzing Dissertations of Government, the Affairs of the Bank and Paper Money (1786, one of the most underrated pamphlets of Thomas Paine. By this way, the essay shows how the principle of popular sovereignty and the language of rebellion were intended to be institutionalized as part of the constitutional order that was formalized in 1787-88.

  8. American Society for Microbiology resources in support of an evidence-based approach to teaching microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Susan M

    2016-08-01

    Numerous national reports have addressed the need for changing how science courses in higher education are taught, so that students develop a deeper understanding of critical concepts and the analytical and cognitive skills needed to address future challenges. This review presents some evidence-based approaches to curriculum development and teaching. Results from discipline-based education research indicate that it is critically important for educators to formulate learning goals, provide frequent and authentic assessments and actively engage students in their learning. Professional societies can play a role in helping to put these changes into practice. To this end, the American Society for Microbiology has developed a number of educational programs and resources, which are described here to encourage the implementation of student-centered learning in microbiology education. PMID:27412169

  9. American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Howard H; Chuang, Linus T; duPont, Nefertiti C; Eng, Cathy; Foxhall, Lewis E; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Blanke, Charles D

    2016-05-20

    American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the leading medical professional oncology society, is committed to lessening the burden of cancer and as such will promote underused interventions that have the potential to save millions of lives through cancer prevention. As the main providers of cancer care worldwide, our patients, their families, and our communities look to us for guidance regarding all things cancer related, including cancer prevention. Through this statement and accompanying recommendations, ASCO hopes to increase awareness of the tremendous global impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) -caused cancers, refocus the discussion of HPV vaccination on its likely ability to prevent millions of cancer deaths, and increase HPV vaccination uptake via greater involvement of oncology professionals in ensuring accurate public discourse about HPV vaccination and calling for the implementation of concrete strategies to address barriers to vaccine access and acceptance. PMID:27069078

  10. Are plastic surgery advertisements conforming to the ethical codes of the american society of plastic surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilson, Sandra V; Chung, Kevin C; Greenfield, Mary Lou V H; Walters, Madonna

    2002-03-01

    Cosmetic surgeons have increasingly come under fire for using advertisements that may be deceptive or intended for the solicitation of vulnerable consumers. However, aesthetic surgery is a growing business that relies heavily on advertising to survive. To prevent the use of deceptive advertisements, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons has developed a code of ethics for its physician members. We conducted a study to determine the prevalence of cosmetic surgery advertisements considered objectionable by the lay public. These advertisements were published in the Yellow Pages of the 10 largest U.S. cities. Because all of the advertisements in this study contained the American Society of Plastic Surgeons logo, we also determined whether its members are upholding the ethical code of advertising. We asked a convenience sample of 50 participants to rate 104 advertisements using four yes/no questions derived from the code of ethics and one overall yes/no question regarding whether the advertisement was objectionable. We obtained the mean percentage of "yes" responses for each advertisement, from the total sample, for each question. We found that the study participants felt that 25 percent of the advertisements used images of persons or facsimiles that falsely and deceptively created unjustified expectations of favorable results. The participants responded that 22 percent of the advertisements appealed primarily to the layperson's fears, anxieties, or emotional vulnerabilities. In addition, 18 percent of the advertisements were considered to be objectionable. Discretion is currently left up to physicians as to the ethical nature of their advertisements. Although the majority of American Society of Plastic Surgeons members uphold the ethical code of advertising, there are still a substantial number of published advertisements that the average consumer considers to be in violation of this code. PMID:11884856

  11. Early Women Sociologist and the American Sociological Society: the Patterns of Exclusion and Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jo Deegan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available American sociology owes a significant debt to early women professionals. Although discriminatedagainst as full colleagues, they nonetheless contributed to sociological thoughtand participated in professional activities. Evidence of both the barriers and opportunitiesaffecting these early female leaders is found in the records of the American SociologicalSociety during its founding years; i.e., from 1906-1931. Analysis of this information, aswell as personal documents of sociologists working during this period, reveals that womendid participate within a restricted range of “expertise”, often associated with traditionalsex roles. Jane Addams was a significant figure in these early years and was a leader withinthe separate, more institutionally limited female sociologist’s network.

  12. Proceedings of 2nd Korea-China Congress of Nuclear Medicine and the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine Spring Meeting 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proceedings contains articles of 2nd Korea-China Congress of Nuclear Medicine and 2000 spring meeting of the Korean Society Nuclear Medicine. It was held on May 17-19, 2000 in Seoul, Korean. This proceedings is comprised of 6 sessions. The subject titles of session are as follows: general nuclear medicine, neurology, oncology, radiopharmacy and biology, nuclear cardiology, nuclear cardiology: physics and instrumentation and so on. (Yi, J. H.)

  13. Nuclear Energy In Switzerland: It's going ahead. Challenges For The Swiss Nuclear Society Young Generation Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiss energy policy is focused on generating domestic electric power without combusting fossil fuels for already four decades. Roughly 60% of the electricity is generated in hydroelectric plants, which is possible due to the country's favourable topography; the remaining 40% are produced by the country's five nuclear power plants (NPPs). As in any other country nuclear power has its enemies in Switzerland. Due to the direct democracy system in Switzerland the nuclear opposition has a lot of possibilities to disturb the energy policy. Since 1969, when the first Swiss nuclear power plant went online, four plebiscites were held on the issue of civil use of nuclear energy. Four times Swiss citizens voted in favour of further operation of the existing plants also in the latest battle for nuclear energy, which was won in 2003. In 2005 and 2006 several Swiss studies about the future energy situation, especially the electricity situation, have been published. All off them show clearly that there will be a big gab around the year 2020 when the oldest three nuclear power plants will fade out. A public debate was started, how to solve the problem. Beside others, building new nuclear power plants was mentioned and discussed rationally. In 2007 the energy police of the Swiss government changed into a more nuclear friendly position and at the end of the same year some electricity companies lunched a new build program. Hosting the International Youth Nuclear Congress 2008 (IYNC 2008) in Switzerland seems to be just the right moment for the nuclear industry in our country. The slightly changed surroundings effected the organization of Swiss Nuclear Society (SNS) and SNS Young Generation Group (SNSYG) and enlarged the fields of activities for SNSYG. Those activities mentioned in the previous chapters will be developed in the future. The discussion about new builds in Switzerland has started and because of that more nuclear activities in Switzerland will occur. And surely there will

  14. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, Unit 3. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 3 of the four-part series, Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to identify the key elements of the United States' nuclear waste dilemma and introduce the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and the role of the…

  15. 27. Conference of the Nuclear Societies in Israel. Program and Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The file contains the presentations of the 27 annual conference of the nuclear societies in Israel. The subjects of the conference are: aspects of nuclear energy and nuclear technology, applications of radioisotopes and radiation, radiation measurements, issues in radiation protection and radiation in medicine, the consequences of the Fukushima accident. During the conference awards will be given for outstanding student works

  16. Tales from the hundred year history of the American Physical Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustig, H.

    1999-05-01

    The tale to be told on this occasion - a tale only slightly out of school - is that of the punctuated evolution of the APS in pursuing its hundred years old mission, "the advancement and diffusion of the knowledge of physics". For long periods this goal was pursued, singlemindedly and impressively, through scientfic meetings and the Society's journals. However, within a year of its founding, the APS,in concert with other scientific societies, had already "lobbied" successfully for the establishment of the Bureau of Standards. But then all was quiet on the public front until after World War II. Since that time there have been three waves of forays into the public arena. The first, which spanned the "McCarthy period", was in defense of the freedom of scientists to practice their profession across national boundaries; of the right to announce the results of their research even if they trod on powerful toes (the Astin case); and of individual physicists, such as E.U. Condon and J.Robert Oppenheimer,who had been unfairly accused and badly treated. The second wave occurred in the late sixties and early seventies when, initially much pushed by activist members, the Society's leadership came to grips with broad social issues, such as segregation in the South, the Equal Rights Amendment, and, eventually, arms control and nuclear weapons. The third immersion in public affairs, which is still very much in progress, can be characterized as worrying and speaking out on what physics can do for the country (provide authoritative studies on nuclear energy, renewables, directed energy weapons, etc.) and what the country can do for physics (provide more money). Although lobbying for better funding is still a relatively minor occupation of the Society, it raises the question how physics -an elitist pursuit -can be truthfully and effectively "sold" in a democratic and egalitarian society.

  17. The nuclear societies of Israel 1990 joint meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main issues discussed in this meeting are: 1) reactor physics. 2) radiochemistry. 3) nuclear instrumentation and dosimetry. 4) HTGR gas reactors. 5) reactor technology and safety. 6) health physics and radiation protection 7) artificial intelligence. 8) nuclear medicine

  18. Fourth congress of the South African Society of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This seminar contains 68 papers. Sixty three papers were indexed. Five papers were considered out of scope for INIS. The implementation of nuclear medicine in the following fields were discussed: neurology, cardiology, monoclonal antibodies, endocrinology, nuclear medicine physics, and radiopharmacy

  19. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society ninth annual conference, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 74 papers presented at this conference covered the following topics: operational enhancements of existing nuclear power plants; design of small reactors; accident behaviour in CANDU reactor fuel channels; fuel storage and waste management; reactor commissioning and decommissioning; nuclear safety experiments and modelling; the next generation of CANDU reactors; advances in nuclear engineering education in Canada; safety of small reactors; current position and improvements of fuel channels; current issues in nuclear safety; and, medical and industrial radiation applications

  20. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Electrolytes and Acid-Base Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Mitchell H; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the annual Kidney Week meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. During the 2015 meeting the conference hall was once again overflowing with eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the experts included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, end-stage renal disease and dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories together with single-best-answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows in the United States answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on the same series of case-oriented questions in a quiz. The audience compared their answers in real time using a cell-phone app containing the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The results of the online questionnaire were displayed, and then the quiz answers were discussed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces selected content of educational value for theClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrologyreaders. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions. PMID:26825098

  1. Early history of electroencephalography and establishment of the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James L; Hughes, John R

    2013-02-01

    The field of electroencephalography (EEG) had its origin with the discovery of recordable electrical potentials from activated nerves and muscles of animals and in the last quarter of the 19th century from the cerebral cortex of animals. By the 1920s, Hans Berger, a neuropsychiatrist from Germany, recorded potentials from the scalp of patients with skull defects and, a few years later, with more sensitive equipment from intact subjects. Concurrently, the introduction of electronic vacuum tube amplification and the cathode ray oscilloscope was made by American physiologists or "axonologists," interested in peripheral nerve recordings. Berger's findings were independently confirmed in early 1934 by Lord Adrian in England and by Hallowell Davis at Harvard, in the United States. In the United States, the earliest contributions to human EEG were made by Hallowell Davis, Herbert H. Jasper, Frederic A. Gibbs, William Lennox, and Alfred L. Loomis. Remarkable progress in the development of EEG as a useful clinical tool followed the 1935 report by the Harvard group on the electrographic and clinical correlations in patients with absence (petit mal) seizures and altered states of consciousness. Technical aspects of the EEG and additional clinical EEG correlations were elucidated by the above investigators and a number of others. Further study led to gatherings of the EEG pioneers at Loomis' laboratory in New York (1935-1939), Regional EEG society formation, and the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society in 1946. PMID:23377440

  2. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: ESRD/RRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Charmaine E; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-07-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. During the 2015 meeting, the conference hall was once again overflowing with eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the experts included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD and dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories together with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows in the United States answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on the same series of case-oriented questions in a quiz. The audience compared their answers in real time using a cellphone application containing the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The results of the online questionnaire were displayed, and then, the quiz answers were discussed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces selected content of educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions. PMID:27094608

  3. IAEA Perspectives on Future of Nuclear Energy, 11 March 2013, Mumbai, India, Indian Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a great pleasure for me to address the Indian Nuclear Society once again. When I last spoke to you, in January 2011, the nuclear world looked somewhat different from today. There was still talk of a global nuclear renaissance. Dozens of countries were thinking about introducing nuclear power. Many of the 30 or so existing users planned to build additional plants. Then came the Fukushima Daiichi accident, two years ago today. It caused profound public anxiety and damaged confidence in nuclear power. Some people predicted that nuclear power would go into decline. However, the evidence suggests that this will not be the case. Some European countries announced plans to move away from nuclear power. But, globally, nuclear power looks set to continue to grow steadily, although more slowly than we expected before the Fukushima Daiichi accident. There are 437 operating nuclear power reactors in the world today. The latest IAEA projections, which are based on what Member States tell us, suggest that number could increase by 80 or 90 in the next 20 years. It could even double. At the moment, there are 66 new reactors under construction. Seven of them are in India. I understand your country plans continued expansion in the coming decades. Other major users of nuclear power such as China and Russia also have significant expansion plans. A number of countries have taken the decision to introduce nuclear power, including Bangladesh, Egypt, Jordan, Nigeria, Poland, Turkey and Vietnam. The United Arab Emirates has started building a nuclear power plant, the first new country to do so for 27 years. I visited the site in January and was impressed by the progress being made. Ladies and Gentlemen, This audience understands better than most the many benefits which nuclear power offers. Nuclear power can help to improve energy security. It can reduce the impact of volatile fossil fuel prices and mitigate the effects of climate change. For a rapidly developing economy such as India

  4. The American Society for Radiation Oncology’s 2010 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In 2004, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) published its first physics education curriculum for residents, which was updated in 2007. A committee composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions was reconvened again to update the curriculum in 2009. Methods and Materials: Members of this committee have associations with ASTRO, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology. Members reviewed and updated assigned subjects from the last curriculum. The updated curriculum was carefully reviewed by a representative from the ABR and other physics and clinical experts. Results: The new curriculum resulted in a recommended 56-h course, excluding initial orientation. Learning objectives are provided for each subject area, and a detailed outline of material to be covered is given for each lecture hour. Some recent changes in the curriculum include the addition of Radiation Incidents and Bioterrorism Response Training as a subject and updates that reflect new treatment techniques and modalities in a number of core subjects. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in April 2010. We anticipate that physicists will use this curriculum for structuring their teaching programs, and subsequently the ABR will adopt this educational program for its written examination. Currently, the American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee updated suggested references and the glossary. Conclusions: The ASTRO physics education curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, the subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

  5. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  6. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review

  7. A fully electrified society powered by light water nuclear stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to stress that recent developments around the world favor nuclear power as the most effective countermeasure against global warming. All other means have severe limitations. Solar power and wind power are both much higher in generating cost than nuclear. Only nuclear can greatly reduce world CO2 emission at a cost comparable to fossil fuels. The biggest and probably the only obstacle to expanded use of nuclear power is public opinion or zeitgeist against nuclear power. It can, however, be overcome by a powerful national leadership. (author)

  8. Proceedings of the 5th Yugoslav Nuclear Society Conference (YUNSC-2004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fifth International Conference of the Yugoslav Nuclear Society (YUNSC-2004) was held in Belgrade from Monday, September 27, to Thursday, September 30, 2004. YUNSC-2004 is the fifth in the established series of conferences to be devoted to the promotion of scientific and technical co-operation of nuclear societies, especially of the countries in the Balkan region, and exchange of information and ideas between professionals in the nuclear field. One of the main goals, besides the good quality of the presented papers and the attendance of well-known experts, was the ambition of the Organising Committee to establish a traditional Yugoslav Nuclear Society conference that would gather nuclear experts from our country, Serbia and Montenegro experts currently working abroad and experts from neighboring and regional countries. The conference was organized by the Yugoslav Nuclear Society (YuNS) and coorganized by the VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro. As an introduction to the conference, the future project 'Vinca Institute Nuclear Decommissioning Program' was promoted by Dr. Milan Pesic, program manager. At the conference, out of 100 papers (55 papers by foreign authors) , 23 were presented in 9 Oral Sessions, while 77 contributions were presented in the Poster Session. The Fifth International Yugoslav Nuclear Society Conference 2004 (YUNSC 2004) are grouped into 13 chapters: Future of nuclear energy (5 papers), Numerical Methods in nuclear reactor analysis and design (6), Nuclear power plants and reactor safety (9), Fuel cycle and waste management (10), Research Reactors and Reactor Physics (8), ADS and Accelerators (1), Nuclear methods in science and technology (26), Radiation Protection (5), Depleted uranium (3), Nuclear medicine (4), Radiation Medicine (7), Environment (4). Proceedings were printed in 200 copies on CD October 2005. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers.

  9. Report of the International Society of Nephrology: North American Renal Disaster Response Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Peter G; Parker, Thomas F

    2003-04-01

    This article comprises a report from the North American Renal Disaster Response Task Force (RDRTF) set up in 2001 by the International Society of Nephrology Acute Renal Failure Commission. The conclusions of the report are (1) given the rarity of renal disasters in the Americas the North American and Latin American RDRTF's should be merged; (2) for the same reason, a single RDRFT Coordination Center for the whole world should be established and it is suggested that this be in Ghent, Belgium; (3) the collaborative group set up in Europe and involving the European RDRTF and Medecins Sans Frontiers be asked to extend their rapid response service to cover acute renal disasters in the Americas south of the United States-Mexico border; (4) the combined RDRTF for the Americas should establish a list of nephrologists, nurses, and technicians who are available to assist in the acute response to renal disasters; (5) the combined RDRTF of the Americas establish an inventory of equipment, machines, and methods for their transport that would be available in the event of a disaster; and (6) the RDRTF of the Americas should undertake a large-scale educational initiative on management of renal disasters. PMID:12879370

  10. Advancement on safety management system of nuclear power for safety and non-anxiety of society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advancement on safety management system is investigated to improve safety and non-anxiety of society for nuclear power, from the standpoint of human machine system research. First, the recent progress of R and D works of human machine interface technologies since 1980 s are reviewed and then the necessity of introducing a new approach to promote technical risk communication activity to foster safety culture in nuclear industries. Finally, a new concept of Offsite Operation and Maintenance Support Center (OMSC) is proposed as the core facility to assemble human resources and their expertise in all organizations of nuclear power, for enhancing safety and non-anxiety of society for nuclear power. (author)

  11. European Society of Nuclear Methods in Agriculture. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference proceedings reported include papers on the Czechoslovak nuclear programme in the field of agriculture and food industry, the application of stable isotopes in agriculture, the applications of radioanalytical methods in agriculture, the use of waste heat from nuclear power plants, food irradiation, waste processing by irradiation, radiation-induced stimulation effects in plants, tracer techniques in animal science, radiation analysis, the use of nuclear techniques in the study of soil-plant relationships, applied mutagenesis, environmental pollution, genetic methods of pest control, the applications of radioisotopes in insect ecology, and the application of nuclear methods in plant physiology. (J.B.)

  12. First Meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia, Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is the collection of the 38 articles from Slovenia and surrounding countries presented at the title meeting. Topics are: neutronics, thermal-hydraulic safety analysis, nuclear science and technology, probabilistic safety analysis, radioactive waste, nuclear methods and structural analysis

  13. Environmental racism: the US nuclear industry and native Americans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtinen, Ulla [Organization of the Fourth World - First Peoples (Finland)

    1997-03-01

    The author argues that the United States nuclear industry has acted in a discriminatory fashion towards Native American peoples and the land they hold as reservations. Both uranium mining and nuclear weapons testing is commonplace and plans now exist to locate a low-level radioactive waste dump in the Mojave desert in California, a sacred site for many native people. Opposition to such plans is growing among the Native Americans, sharpened by their existing commitment to conservation of the environment, but on their own, they are not a lobby powerful enough to oppose the might of the nuclear industry. (UK).

  14. Environmental racism: the US nuclear industry and native Americans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author argues that the United States nuclear industry has acted in a discriminatory fashion towards Native American peoples and the land they hold as reservations. Both uranium mining and nuclear weapons testing is commonplace and plans now exist to locate a low-level radioactive waste dump in the Mojave desert in California, a sacred site for many native people. Opposition to such plans is growing among the Native Americans, sharpened by their existing commitment to conservation of the environment, but on their own, they are not a lobby powerful enough to oppose the might of the nuclear industry. (UK)

  15. Conference summaries of the Canadian Nuclear Association 30. annual conference, and the Canadian Nuclear Society 11. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains conference summaries for the 30. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association, and the 11. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. Topics of discussion include: energy needs and challenges facing the Canadian nuclear industry; the environment and nuclear power; the problems of maintaining and developing industrial capacity; the challenges of the 1990's; programmes and issues for the 1990's; thermalhydraulics; reactor physics and fuel management; nuclear safety; small reactors; fuel behaviour; energy production and the environment; computer applications; nuclear systems; fusion; materials handling; and, reactor components

  16. Normal mediastinal lymph nodes: number and size according to American Thoracic Society Mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT was used to investigate the number and size of normal mediastinal lymph nodes at 11 intrathoracic nodal stations defined by the American Thoracic Society lymph-node mapping scheme. Nodal size was measured both as short- and long-axis diameters in the transverse plane. Findings for 56 patients show the largest normal mediastinal nodes to be in the subcarinal and right tracheobronchial regions. Upper paratracheal nodes were smaller than lower paratracheal or tracheobronchial nodes, and right-sided tracheobronchial nodes were larger than left-sided ones. From the distributions of node sizes, thresholds were set above which nodes in any region might be considered enlarged. These thresholds, in agreement with a prior investigation of patients with lung cancer, suggest 1.0 cm as the upper limit of normal for the short axis of a mediastinal node in the transverse plane

  17. An examination of gender differences in the American Fisheries Society peer-review process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Grace; Frantz, Cynthia M; Kocovsky, Patrick; DeVries, Dennis R.; Cooke, Steven J.; Claussen, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the possibility of gender differences in outcomes throughout the peer review process of American Fisheries Society (AFS) journals. For each manuscript submitted to four AFS journals between January 2003 and December 2010, we collated information regarding the gender and nationality of authors, gender of associate editor, gender of reviewers, reviewer recommendations, associate editor's decision, and publication status of the manuscript. We used hierarchical linear modeling to test for differences in manuscript decision outcomes associated with author, reviewer, and associate editor gender. Gender differences were present at some but not every stage of the review process and were not equal among the four journals. Although there was a small gender difference in decision outcomes, we found no evidence of bias in editors’ and reviewers’ recommendations. Our results support the conclusion that the current single-blind review system does not result in bias against female authors within AFS journals.

  18. Minutes of the 45. meeting of the American society of therapeutic radiology and oncology (Astro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The forty fifth meeting of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) held at the center of congress in Salt Lake city in october 2003. 542 scientific works have been presented, whom 221 orally. Escalation of radiation doses in prostate cancers have been studied. Fractionation and hormones therapy in prostate cancers are reported. The bladder cancers made the object of information, the bronchi cancer ( non at small cells and at small cells) have been analysed. Cancers of the ORL sphere, mammary gland and brain metastases were presented. The radiotherapy as a palliative treatment of bone metastases made the object of a report. The receptors of the epidermoid growth factor has been shown as an important factor to predict the tumor response to irradiation. (N.C.)

  19. Does diversity of papers affect their citations? Evidence from American Physical Society Journals

    CERN Document Server

    Enduri, Murali Krishna; Jolad, Shivakumar

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study the correlation between interdisciplinarity of papers within physical sciences and their citations by using meta data of articles published in American Physical Society's Physical Review journals between 1985 to 2012. We use the Weitzman diversity index to measure the diversity of papers and authors, exploiting the hierarchical structure of PACS (Physics and Astronomy Classification Scheme) codes. We find that the fraction of authors with high diversity is increasing with time, where as the fraction of least diversity are decreasing, and moderate diversity authors have higher tendency to switch over to other diversity groups. The diversity index of papers is correlated with the citations they received in a given time period from their publication year. Papers with lower and higher end of diversity index receive lesser citations than the moderate diversity papers.

  20. Atopic dermatitis guideline. Position paper from the Latin American Society of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Jorge; Páez, Bruno; Macías, A; Olmos, C; de Falco, A

    2014-01-01

    As in other regions, the incidence of atopic dermatitis in Latin America has been increasing in recent years. Although there are several clinical guidelines, many of their recommendations cannot be universal since they depend on the characteristics of each region. Thus, we decided to create a consensus guideline on atopic dermatitis applicable in Latin America and other tropical regions, taking into account socio-economic, geographical, cultural and health care system characteristics. The Latin American Society of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (SLAAI) conducted a systematic search for articles related to the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of dermatitis using various electronic resources such as Google, Pubmed, EMBASE (Ovid) and Cochrane data base. We have also looked for all published articles in Latin America on the subject using LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences) database. Each section was reviewed by at least two members of the committee, and the final version was subsequently approved by all of them, using the Delphi methodology for consensus building. Afterward, the final document was shared for external evaluation with physicians, specialists (allergists, dermatologists and pediatricians), patients and academic institutions such as universities and scientific societies related to the topic. All recommendations made by these groups were taken into account for the final drafting of the document. There are few original studies conducted in Latin America about dermatitis; however, we were able to create a practical guideline for Latin America taking into account the particularities of the region. Moreover, the integral management was highlighted including many of the recommendations from different participants in the health care of this disease (patients, families, primary care physicians and specialists). This practical guide presents a concise approach to the diagnosis and management of atopic dermatitis that can be

  1. Attitudes of Polish society to nuclear energetics, applications of ionizing radiation and radioactive wastes storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attitudes of Polish society to nuclear energetics, applications of ionizing radiation and radioactive waste storage have been examined through polling the population in 1991, 1994, 1996 and 1998. The inquiry for broad representative of Poles shows that less than half of the population do not accept the nuclear power and applications of radiation in economy and everyday life

  2. Has the civil society a real place in the governance of the nuclear and chemical activities?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This colloquium, organized in three sessions discusses the following topics: the historical aspects of the transparency in the nuclear domain, the AZF accident, the nuclear wastes specific case, the access of the society to the knowledge, the democratic participation to the management of the risk activities and the conditions of this sustainable participation, the international situation and the public trust. (A.L.B.)

  3. Word from Chairman of Slovak Nuclear Society, ECED 2013 Programme Committee Chair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this invitation Mr. Vladimir Slugen (Chairman of the Conference and Chairman of the Slovak Nuclear Society) gives a short review of nuclear reactors as well as reactor decommissioning and which are shut down in the worldwide and in the European Union.

  4. Role of American Society of Clinical Oncology in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jyoti D; Galsky, Matthew D; Chagpar, Anees B; Pyle, Doug; Loehrer, Patrick J

    2011-08-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is a global community of health care professionals whose stated purpose is to "make a world of difference" by improving cancer care around the world. Unfortunately, cancer survival rates vary significantly among countries with differing financial and infrastructural resources. Because ASCO is a professional oncology society committed to conquering cancer through research, education, prevention, and delivery of high-quality patient care, it is ideally suited to address this issue. ASCO could bring together oncology professionals and other necessary stakeholders from around the world to improve cancer care and lessen suffering for patients worldwide. As part of the ongoing commitment of ASCO to the future of cancer care, the Leadership Development Program was created to foster the leadership skills of early and midcareer oncologists and provide these participants with a working knowledge of the depth and breadth of the organization. As participants in the inaugural class of the ASCO Leadership Development Program, we were charged with investigating how ASCO might favorably affect cancer prevention and treatment in resource-poor countries in a cost-effective, scalable, and sustainable fashion. ASCO can significantly influence cancer care in low- and middle-income countries through a comprehensive approach that promotes cancer awareness and education, improves clinical practice by identifying and removing barriers to delivery of quality cancer care, and fosters innovation to initiate novel solutions to complex problems. PMID:21709190

  5. The Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) Geoscience Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, A. A.; Lopez, R. E.; Zavala, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) focuses on encouraging undergraduate and graduate minority students to pursue higher degrees. For over 29 years, SACNAS has provided strong national leadership in improving science and math education, as well as expanding opportunities for minorities in the scientific workforce and academia. SACNAS' Annual National Conference and Teacher Workshops, summer research opportunities, E-mentoring program, and online internship/job placement resources are tools that help a diverse community of students, professors, administrators, and K-12 educators achieve expertise within their disciplines. The SACNAS Annual National Conference is the centerpiece of our programs. The conferences feature career advancement workshops, scientific symposia, exhibits, student presentations and guest speakers designed to provide the resources Chicano/Latino, Native American, and other postdoctoral, graduate and undergraduate science and engineering students need to pursue a advanced degrees in the sciences. Guest speakers are chosen for their excellence in scientific research and their ability to convey the wonder and importance of science through the presentation of their research results. SACNAS has recently included a geological science emphasis to its existing programs to address the need to diversify the field. This talk will outline our approach, and outline how SACNAS has been able to grow over the past 30 years.

  6. Evaluation of American Indian Science and Engineering Society Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AISES, None

    2013-09-25

    The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) has been funded under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant (Grant Award No. DE-SC0004058) to host an Intertribal Middle-School Science and Math Bowl (IMSSMB) comprised of teams made up of a majority of American Indian students from Bureau of Indian Education-funded schools and public schools. The intent of the AISES middle school science and math bowl is to increase participation of American Indian students at the DOE-sponsored National Science Bowl. Although national in its recruitment scope, the AISES Intertribal Science and Math Bowl is considered a “regional” science bowl, equivalent to the other 50 regional science bowls which are geographically limited to states. Most regional bowls do not have American Indian student teams competing, hence the AISES bowl is meant to encourage American Indian student teams to increase their science knowledge in order to participate at the national level. The AISES competition brings together teams from various American Indian communities across the nation. Each team is provided with funds for travel to and from the event, as well as for lodging and meals. In 2011 and 2012, there were 10 teams participating; in 2013, the number of teams participating doubled to 20. Each Science and Math Bowl team is comprised of four middle school — grades 6 through 8 — students, one alternate, and a teacher who serves as advisor and coach — although in at least two cases, the coach was not a teacher, but was the Indian Education Coordinator. Each team member must have at least a 3.0 GPA. Furthermore, the majority of students in each team must be comprised of American Indian, Alaska Native or Native Hawaiian students. Under the current DOE grant, AISES sponsored three annual middle school science bowl competitions over the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. The science and math bowls have been held in late March concurrently with the National American Indian Science and

  7. Proceedings of the 11th Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the proceedings of the thirteen technical sessions at the 11. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. The 68 papers presented at this conference cover the areas of programmes and issues for the 90's; thermalhydraulics; reactor physics and fuel management; nuclear safety; small reactors; fuel behaviour; energy production and the environment; computer applications; nuclear systems; fusion; reactor decommissioning, irradiated fuel and materials handling; and reactor components, (L.L.)

  8. 26. Conference of the Nuclear Societies in Israel, Program and Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cd contains the presentations of the 26 annual conference of the nuclear societies in Israel. The subjects of the Conference are aspects of nuclear energy and nuclear technology, applications of radioisotopes and radiation, radiation measurements, issues in radiation protection and radiation in medicine. The consequences of the Fukushima accident are due to be between the main issues. During the conference awards will be given for outstanding student works

  9. Public opinion survey on the relationship between society and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The social research group of the 21st century COE program 'Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems for Sustainable Development of the World' has studied under the theme coevolution of nuclear technology and society. As part of this study, this group conducted a questionnaire survey of 2,500 adults (collection rate of 22.0%; 551 replies) who live in the Tokyo metropolitan area. The purpose of this survey asking opinion about the relationship between attitude toward nuclear technology utilization and social awareness is to determine their request, exception and concern about nuclear technology utilization. The survey reveals that the differences of attitudes towards nuclear technology utilization can be explained in terms of differences of general views on the society, such as the directionality of social progress. Thus, it is necessary to argue with citizens about the strategy on nuclear technology utilization from the viewpoint of the directionality of the future society. The social decision-making process on nuclear technology utilization has to be renovated through dialogue among citizens as the partner taking on the achievement and contribution toward the directionality of the future society. (author)

  10. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society 8. annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference contains papers under the major topics of plant life extension, safety and the environment, reactor physics, thermohydraulics I, development and deployment, thermohydraulics II, operations I, safety r and d post chernobyl, fuel channels, operations II, and nuclear technology developments

  11. Proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society fifth annual conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The twenty papers presented at this conference covered the areas of: modeling and analysis, emphasizing thermalhydraulics in CANDU primary heat transport systems; Nuclear technologies in general, particularly relating to the operation and performance of CANDU reactors; and tailings and reactor waste disposal

  12. Proceedings of the 19. Canadian Nuclear Society simulation symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A majority of the 31 papers in this symposium on nuclear simulation deal with CANDU reactors. The sessions were organized according to the following subjects: reactor physics, hydrogen behaviour, thermalhydraulics, reactor safety and operation. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  13. Best power mix under nuclear-decreasing society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    East Japan Great Earthquake and the subsequent failures of nuclear power plants compel Japanese to consider a new paradigm of national energy policy. In this study, we discuss the future power mix scenario considering a variety of power options; nuclear, coal fire, LNG fire, oil fire, LNG combined cycle, hydro, hydropump, battery, photovoltaic, wind, and geothermal. Future developments of installed capacity, properties such as efficiency, etc. are discussed for each type of power option. Seven sets of daily demand profile are used. Power generation mix model developed in preceding studies is used to estimate the installation and operation of each power option for representative years of 2010, 2020, 2030, 2040, and 2050. Future power mix is discussed on the basis of results from power generation mix model. (author)

  14. Nuclear power generation in a newly industrialized society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiwan is considered one of the newly-industrialized countries of the Pacific Basin, having enjoyed rapid economic growth since the end of the 1940's. The power system has grown with the economy, having a capacity of 11,869 MW in 1983. Labour wages have increased, so in order to maintain its economic advantage, Taiwan must keep energy costs low. Nuclear power is becoming increasingly important, since fuel costs are only one third of those for coal. In 1983 there were four reactors in operation, with two more scheduled to come into commercial operation in 1984 and six units planned. By 2000 it is expected that nuclear will contribute 53 percent of Taiwan's expected 110,000 GWH of electricity generation

  15. Nuclear fuel: sustainable source of energy or burden on society?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, the question concerning the sustainability of a resource primarily addressed its finite nature. Accordingly, electricity production using renewable energies was clearly sustainable. Contrasting this are systems based on oil, gas, coal or uranium. However, from the perspective of 'neo-sustainability' being analyzed today, this assessment appears less clear-cut, especially in light of the definition of sustainability as provided by the Brundtland report. Nowadays, the depletion time of fuel resources is thus not the only significant aspect, but factors such as efficiency, ecofriendliness and social responsibility also figure in. The nuclear fuel supply is analyzed from a sustainability perspective. After a short description of the supply chain, each of the most important aspects of sustainability are related to the individual stages of the supply chain and evaluated. This method aims at answering the question concerning to what extent nuclear fuel is a sustainable source of energy. Although the recycling of fissile materials from reprocessing and the deployment of advanced reactors are key factors as regards the issue of sustainability, these topics are deliberately only touched on. The main focus lies on the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle as it is currently utilized in light water reactors, without discussing the subject of reprocessing. (orig.)

  16. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Ebeling, Peter R;

    2010-01-01

    Reports linking long-term use of bisphosphonates (BPs) with atypical fractures of the femur led the leadership of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) to appoint a task force to address key questions related to this problem. A multidisciplinary expert group reviewed pertinent...

  17. Position of the American Dietetic Association, School Nutrition Association, and Society for Nutrition Education: Comprehensive School Nutrition Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Marilyn; Mueller, Constance G.; Fleischhacker, Sheila

    2010-01-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), School Nutrition Association (SNA), and Society for Nutrition Education (SNE) that comprehensive, integrated nutrition services in schools, kindergarten through grade 12, are an essential component of coordinated school health programs and will improve the nutritional status, health,…

  18. Abstracts and program proceedings of the 1994 meeting of the International Society for Ecological Modelling North American Chapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercher, J.R.

    1994-06-01

    This document contains information about the 1994 meeting of the International Society for Ecological Modelling North American Chapter. The topics discussed include: extinction risk assessment modelling, ecological risk analysis of uranium mining, impacts of pesticides, demography, habitats, atmospheric deposition, and climate change.

  19. 77 FR 3073 - American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Codes and New and Revised ASME Code Cases...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... Register on June 21, 2011 (76 FR 36232). The final rule amended the NRC's regulations to incorporate by... INFORMATION: The NRC published a final rule in the Federal Register on June 21, 2011 (76 FR 36232), amending... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 RIN 3150-AI35 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Codes and New...

  20. The Big Chill: Changes in American Politics and Society from the Late 1960s to the Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, David S.

    This essay looks at three kinds of changes in American society over the period from the late 1960s to the mid-1990s. First, data from the Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) are used to measure trends in college freshmen's political identification, materialism, concern for law and order, and concern for helping others. In all these…

  1. 25 years of the Czechoslovak Society for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities are surveyed of the Czechoslovak Society for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Hygiene over the past 25 years of its existence. Its beginnings are described, growth of its membership and its international standing since 1955 when it was founded. Tables listing important home and international events in which the Society participated or which it organized underline its aim, i.e., health protection and environmental control from the effects of ionizing radiation and increased care of patients. (L.O.)

  2. The role of informing society and international cooperation in improving the nuclear 'image'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    lt is well known that there is a negative relationship between Russian society and modem nuclear energy. Upon analysing this situation we may come to the conclusion that most people have a one-sided point of view. Due to the pressure of the 'Greens', the mass media depicts only the negative sides of the nuclear industry such as nuclear weapons testing and nuclear industry accidents. Without a doubt, accidents at the chemical production plant 'Mayak' in 1957 , the tragedy of Chernobyl's NPP, and fear of potential nuclear war, still prevent people from seeing the positive side of the atomic industry. lt is very hard to ease society's fear of atomic energy. Specialists, administrators of plants, and local administrations are all combining their efforts to reach this goal. (authors)

  3. ANI [American Nuclear Insurers] support and research facility nuclear liability insurance inspection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    American Nuclear Insurers (ANI), a voluntary association of insurance companies, provides property and nuclear liability insurance protection to the nuclear industry. It generally offers insurance coverage to nuclear facilities, suppliers, and transporters for the following: (1) their liability for damages because of bodily injury and/or property damage caused by the nuclear energy hazard, and (2) all-risk damage to nuclear facilities. Among the range of facilities and suppliers insured by ANI are (a) operators of nuclear power plants that supply electricity for the general public, (b) operators of nuclear testing and research reactors, (c) fuel fabricators that manufacture fuel for use in reactors, (d) operators of facilities that dispose of nuclear waste that cannot be salvaged, (e) facilities that maintain and repair equipment used at nuclear facilities, (f) nuclear laundries, and (g) low-level-waste processors. The fundamental goal of the ANI nuclear engineering inspection program is to provide protection to pool members' assets by reducing insurance risk

  4. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.8--nuclear agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the eighth one, the content is about radiation study, radiation technology, isotope and nuclear agriculture

  5. Training of nuclear medicine technical staff by the Brazilian Society of Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear medicine was introduced in Brazil in 1949, at the University of Sao Paulo. Despite being a pioneer in South America and the existence of about 280 clinics of this medical specialty in the whole country serving around 185 million inhabitants, there is not any dedicated course forming its technical staff. Another shortcoming lies in the fact that there are not any basic requirements established for these professionals by an official medical or nuclear entity. As result, one can find persons ranging from university graduates (biomedics, radiology technologists, biologists, pharmacists, chemists, physicists, etc.) to secondary school graduates or radiology technicians working in nuclear medicine centres, preparing patients, labelling and injecting radiopharmaceuticals, obtaining images and processing studies. Due to the high heterogeneity of the technical staff and lack of a formal preparation, the Brazilian Society of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (SBBMN) organized during 2004 and 2005 short courses conducted in different regions of Brazil in order to supply organized basic knowledge and practice on: 1. Quality control of 99Mo-99mTc eluates and labelling and checking of dose calibrators 2. Fundamentals of radiation protection, area monitoring and decontamination 3. Quality control of scintillation cameras. Six courses were given during these two years in four cities in the South Eastern region and two in the North Eastern region. The first two topics were delivered during one weekend and the participants were presented with a lecture in the morning and, in the afternoon, a hands-on practice on the same subject. As QC of eluates and labelling and checking of dose calibrators were less practised in most clinics, this was the first time that the majority of the participants performed these activities. In one course, offered during a national congress, all three topics were included and the practical part was replaced by many examples from routine

  6. European Society of Nuclear Methods in Agriculture. XXIst annual meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication contains 148 submitted abstracts of contributions to be presented at the meeting in the following working groups: 1. food irradiation; 2. radiation-induced stimulation, effects in living organisms; 3/4. tracer techniques in animal sciences, physical methods; 5. soil-plant relationship; 6. applied mutagenesis; 7. environmental pollution; 8. energy in agriculture; 9/10. genetic methods in pest control, radionuclides in insect ecology; 11. nuclear methods in plant physiology; 12. waste irradiation. A list of participants is also included. (P.A.)

  7. What do societies expect from innovative nuclear technologies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: There are no universal views on nuclear power, nor universal expectations about its future progresses. Therefore, this paper presents only one view, mostly based on European experience. There are misconceptions and misrepresentations about the present status of nuclear technology : a majority of people believe that nuclear power contributes significantly to global warming and climate change, and many are convinced that radioactivity has insidious and mysterious ways to percolate through matter and contaminate the environment. For many people, the longer the 'life' of a radioactive element, the more dangerous it must be (without any extrapolation to the eternal life of stable elements). It is very hard to convey the notion that the health effects of radiations depend only from dose and dose rate, irrespective of whether it is 'natural' or 'artificial' radiation. In that context, the perceived risks associated with radioactive wastes management are generally overblown. It would therefore appear that the first expectation from innovative reactors is the guarantee of no significant release of radioactivity in the environment under any circumstances. 'No severe accident', 'no meltdown' are often the formulations used, but the actual demand is: 'no radioactivity'. The second expectation concerns almost unanimously the radioactive wastes : less waste, less long-lived wastes, and no waste at all if possible. The Frenchman in the street does not know what is a radioactive waste, has no idea that there are different categories of wastes with different management practices, and is convinced that this constitutes an important problem without solution (it certainly appears that the Finn and the Swede have a better knowledge). This request for 'no waste' has been exacerbated by some exaggerated claims by the proponents of such or such reactor design. Expectations about non-proliferation vary vastly from place to place: in some countries it is high in the public agenda

  8. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2012 Workforce Study: The Radiation Oncologists' and Residents' Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conducted the 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce Survey to obtain an up-to-date picture of the workforce, assess its needs and concerns, and identify quality and safety improvement opportunities. The results pertaining to radiation oncologists (ROs) and residents (RORs) are presented here. Methods: The ASTRO Workforce Subcommittee, in collaboration with allied radiation oncology professional societies, conducted a survey study in early 2012. An online survey questionnaire was sent to all segments of the radiation oncology workforce. Respondents who were actively working were included in the analysis. This manuscript describes the data for ROs and RORs. Results: A total of 3618 ROs and 568 RORs were surveyed. The response rate for both groups was 29%, with 1047 RO and 165 ROR responses. Among ROs, the 2 most common racial groups were white (80%) and Asian (15%), and the male-to-female ratio was 2.85 (74% male). The median age of ROs was 51. ROs averaged 253.4 new patient consults in a year and 22.9 on-treatment patients. More than 86% of ROs reported being satisfied or very satisfied overall with their career. Close to half of ROs reported having burnout feelings. There was a trend toward more frequent burnout feelings with increasing numbers of new patient consults. ROs' top concerns were related to documentation, reimbursement, and patients' health insurance coverage. Ninety-five percent of ROs felt confident when implementing new technology. Fifty-one percent of ROs thought that the supply of ROs was balanced with demand, and 33% perceived an oversupply. Conclusions: This study provides a current snapshot of the 2012 radiation oncology physician workforce. There was a predominance of whites and men. Job satisfaction level was high. However a substantial fraction of ROs reported burnout feelings. Perceptions about supply and demand balance were mixed. ROs top concerns reflect areas of attention for the

  9. 20th annual convention of Philippines Society of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 20th Annual Convention of the PSNM took place in Manila and was attended by more than 100 registered participants, including nuclear medicine physicians, clinicians, residents, technologists, representative of the Atomic Energy Commission of Philippines and pioneers of nuclear medicine in the Philippines. The scientific program consisted of a series of review lectures covering a range of currently available radionuclide treatments and was carried out by three experts attending. The convention started with a brief opening ceremony presided over by the President of the PSNM. The whole day program was started in the morning and lasted till late afternoon. The proceedings started with an overview lecture, entitled 'Radionuclide Therapy from Palliation to Cure', which described the favorable characteristics of radionuclide therapy to serve as a palliative therapy and the current trend to move this treatment modality forward in the management protocol of several tumors to become part of a strategy with curative intent. This was followed by a number of lectures by the three speakers on a variety of topics, e.g., 'Radioimmunotherapy of Lymphoma', 'Radionuclide Therapy of Neuroendocrine Tumors', 'Palliation of Painful Bone Metastases palliative or curative?', 'Radionuclide Therapy of Hepatocellular Cancer', 'Radionuclide Therapy in Children' and 'Management of Problematic Thyroid Cancer'

  10. Kokes Awards for the 22nd North American Catalysis Society Meeting, June 5-10, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabio H. Ribeiro

    2011-06-05

    The biennial North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Meetings are the premiere conferences in the area of catalysis, surface science, and reaction engineering. The 22nd meeting will be held the week of June 5-10, 2011 in Detroit, Michigan. The objective of the Meetings is to bring together leading researchers for intensive scientific exchange and interactions. Financial support that offsets some of the associated costs (specifically, registration fee, airline tickets, and hotel accommodations) would encourage graduate students, and for the first time undergraduate students, to attend and participate meaningfully in this conference. The funds sought in this proposal will help support the Richard J. Kokes Travel Award program. Graduate students eligible for these merit-based Awards are those who study at a North American university and who will present at the Meeting. We have currently 209 applications and we expect to be able to fund about half of them. The NACS has traditionally sought to encourage graduate student, and this year for the first time undergraduate studies, participation at the National Meetings and providing financial support is the most effective means to do so. Their attendance would contribute significantly to their scientific training and communication and presentation skills. They would be exposed to the leading researchers from the US and abroad; they would meet their peers from other universities; they would learn about cutting-edge results that could benefit their research projects; and they may become interested in becoming active participants in the catalysis community. These young investigators represent the next generation of scientists and engineers, and their proper training will lead to future scientific breakthroughs and technological innovations that benefit the US economy. Advances in catalysis can come in the form of more energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly chemical processes, improved fuel cell performance, efficient

  11. A Survey of the American Society of Anesthesiologists Regarding Environmental Attitudes, Knowledge, and Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ard, John L; Tobin, Katherine; Huncke, Tessa; Kline, Richard; Ryan, Susan M; Bell, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    Our planet is in the midst of an environmental crisis. Government and international agencies such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change urge radical and transformative change at every level of how we conduct our personal and professional lives. The health care industry contributes to climate change. According to a study from the University of Chicago, the health care sector accounts for 8% of the United States' total greenhouse gas emissions. In an effort to understand the current state of environmental practice, attitudes, and knowledge among anesthesiologists in the United States, we conducted a survey of American anesthesiologists regarding environmental sustainability. The environmental survey was sent out by e-mail to a random sampling of 5200 members of the American Society of Anesthesiologists. This process was repeated a second time. A total of 2189 anesthesiologists of 5200 responded to the survey, a 42% response rate. Of the survey respondents, 80.1% (confidence interval, 78.2%-81.9%) were interested in recycling. Respondents reported recycling in 27.7% of operating rooms where they work. The majority of respondents (67%; confidence interval, 64%-69%) reported there was insufficient information on how to recycle intraoperatively. Respondents supported sustainability practices such as reprocessing equipment, using prefilled syringes, and donating unused equipment and supplies. The affirmative response rate was 48.4% for reprocessing equipment, 56.6% for using prefilled syringes, and 65.1% for donating equipment and supplies to medical missions. Questions about hospital-wide organization of sustainability programs elicited many "I don't know" responses. Eighteen percent of responders indicated the presence of a sustainability or "green" task force. A total of 12.6% of responders indicated the presence of a mandate from hospital leadership to promote sustainability programs. Two important conclusions drawn from the survey data are a lack of

  12. 25 years of the Czechoslovak Society of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundation is described of the Czechoslovak Society for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Hygiene, its development and step-by-step specialization over the past 25 years of its existence. The list is included of all prominent home and international events held in the past quarter of a century. Tables show radiobiological, nuclear medical, and radiation hygiene sections' undertakings and their main subjects. In conclusion, the author expresses his wish for all the Society's activities to serve the cause of health protection and environmental control, particularly as regards the effects of ionizing radiation, and the cause of care for patients. (author)

  13. Materials from seminar session of the 3.general assembly of Polish Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication edited as a scientific report of the Institute of Atomic Energy contains papers presented on the seminar session accompanying the 3rd General Assembly of Polish Nuclear Society. Five of these are dealing with the present situation in Poland in the framework of the following subjects: foreseeing electricity demand as a significant factor of development of electricity generation sector and nuclear option choice; present state and development trends of nuclear technique applications in industry, agriculture, health and environment protection; radioactive waste management especially related to the storage of spent fuel from EWA and MARIA research reactors; present educational problems in nuclear science and technology. The problems of nuclear power could not be excluded from the session, although it does not exist in Poland and no plans foresee it currently. The paper on nuclear power contains an extensive summary of nuclear power development worldwide, its safety problems, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. The so called ''Sellafield phenomenon'' considering the growth of leukaemia deaths of children living near that reprocessing plant in England has been commented in mass media criticizing nuclear energy application. The paper on this problem present the results of investigations and hypotheses on reasons having caused this phenomenon. The declaration of the International Council of Nuclear Societies on the role of nuclear science and technology in supporting the development is also included in the report

  14. Imagined Modernity. Nuclear Power and West German Society in the 1960s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1969 the first commercial nuclear power plant went into operation in West Germany, making the country a latecomer (compared to other Western countries) in the civilian use of nuclear energy. Yet, in the late 1950s and 1960s, nuclear energy played a major part in public debates on energy supply, on science and technology policy, and the relationship between state and the economy. The civilian use of atomic energy also served as a source of national identity and a projection of modernity. The paper seeks to connect analyses of technical, economic, political, and cultural developments, in order to assess the overall impact of nuclear power on West German society. (author)

  15. Christianity and Eugenics: The Place of Religion in the British Eugenics Education Society and the American Eugenics Society, c.1907-1940.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Graham J

    2014-05-01

    Historians have regularly acknowledged the significance of religious faith to the eugenics movement in Britain and the USA. However, much of this scholarship suggests a polarised relationship of either conflict or consensus. Where Christian believers participated in the eugenics movement this has been represented as an abandonment of 'orthodox' theology, and the impression has been created that eugenics was a secularising force. In contrast, this article explores the impact of religious values on two eugenics organisations: the British Eugenics Education Society, and the American Eugenics Society. It is demonstrated that concerns over religion resulted in both these organisations modifying and tempering the public work that they undertook. This act of concealing and minimising the visibly controversial aspects of eugenics is offered as an addition to the debate over 'mainline' versus 'reform' eugenics. PMID:24778464

  16. Christianity and Eugenics: The Place of Religion in the British Eugenics Education Society and the American Eugenics Society, c.1907–1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Graham J.

    2014-01-01

    Historians have regularly acknowledged the significance of religious faith to the eugenics movement in Britain and the USA. However, much of this scholarship suggests a polarised relationship of either conflict or consensus. Where Christian believers participated in the eugenics movement this has been represented as an abandonment of ‘orthodox’ theology, and the impression has been created that eugenics was a secularising force. In contrast, this article explores the impact of religious values on two eugenics organisations: the British Eugenics Education Society, and the American Eugenics Society. It is demonstrated that concerns over religion resulted in both these organisations modifying and tempering the public work that they undertook. This act of concealing and minimising the visibly controversial aspects of eugenics is offered as an addition to the debate over ‘mainline’ versus ‘reform’ eugenics. PMID:24778464

  17. Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: a radiology-pathology correlation based on the revised 2013 American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoch, Michael A; Cham, Matthew D; Beasley, Mary B; Ward, Thomas J; Jacobi, Adam H; Eber, Corey D; Padilla, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) are a group of diffuse lung diseases that share many similar radiologic and pathologic features. According to the revised 2013 American Thoracic Society-European Respiratory Society classification system, these entities are now divided into major IIPs (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, and acute interstitial pneumonia), rare IIPs (idiopathic lymphoid interstitial pneumonia, idiopathic pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis), and unclassifiable idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. Some of the encountered radiologic and histologic patterns can also be seen in the setting of other disorders, which makes them a diagnostic challenge. As such, the accurate classification of IIPs remains complex and is best approached through a collaboration among clinicians, radiologists, and pathologists, as the treatment and prognosis of these conditions vary greatly. PMID:25512168

  18. The acute treatment of migraine in adults: the american headache society evidence assessment of migraine pharmacotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmura, Michael J; Silberstein, Stephen D; Schwedt, Todd J

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to provide an updated assessment of the evidence for individual pharmacological therapies for acute migraine treatment. Pharmacological therapy is frequently required for acutely treating migraine attacks. The American Academy of Neurology Guidelines published in 2000 summarized the available evidence relating to the efficacy of acute migraine medications. This review, conducted by the members of the Guidelines Section of the American Headache Society, is an updated assessment of evidence for the migraine acute medications. A standardized literature search was performed to identify articles related to acute migraine treatment that were published between 1998 and 2013. The American Academy of Neurology Guidelines Development procedures were followed. Two authors reviewed each abstract resulting from the search and determined whether the full manuscript qualified for review. Two reviewers studied each qualifying full manuscript for its level of evidence. Level A evidence requires at least 2 Class I studies, and Level B evidence requires 1 Class I or 2 Class II studies. The specific medications - triptans (almotriptan, eletriptan, frovatriptan, naratriptan, rizatriptan, sumatriptan [oral, nasal spray, injectable, transcutaneous patch], zolmitriptan [oral and nasal spray]) and dihydroergotamine (nasal spray, inhaler) are effective (Level A). Ergotamine and other forms of dihydroergotamine are probably effective (Level B). Effective nonspecific medications include acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aspirin, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and naproxen), opioids (butorphanol nasal spray), sumatriptan/naproxen, and the combination of acetaminophen/aspirin/caffeine (Level A). Ketoprofen, intravenous and intramuscular ketorolac, flurbiprofen, intravenous magnesium (in migraine with aura), and the combination of isometheptene compounds, codeine/acetaminophen and tramadol/acetaminophen are probably effective (Level B). The antiemetics prochlorperazine

  19. Nuclear at Niagara. 32nd Annual Canadian Nuclear Society conference and 35th CNS/CNA student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 32nd Annual Canadian Nuclear Society Conference and 35th CNS/CNA Student Conference was held in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada on June 5-8, 2011. The theme of the conference, 'Nuclear at Niagara', brought together scientists, engineers, technologists, senior management, government officials, and students interested in all aspects of nuclear science and technology and its applications, including nuclear power generation, fuel production, uranium mining and refining, management of radioactive wastes and used fuel. Other topics include medical and industrial uses of radionuclides, occupational and environmental radiation protection, the science and technology of nuclear fusion, and associated activities in research and development. and applications of energy from the atom. The central objective of this conference was to exchange views on how nuclear science and technology can best serve the needs of humanity, now and in the future. Over 400 delegates from across Canada and other nuclear countries were in attendance.

  20. Executive Summary: Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  1. A 10-Year Analysis of American Society for Radiation Oncology Junior Faculty Career Development Awards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Between 2000 and 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) awarded 22 Junior Faculty Career Development Awards (JFA) totaling $4.4 million. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these awards on the grantees' career development, including current position, publications, and subsequent independent grant funding. Methods: Each awardee was requested via email and telephone to provide an updated curriculum vitae, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biosketch, and information regarding current position of employment. Twenty-one of the 22 JFA recipients complied. Reported grant funding was extracted from each candidate's CV, and the amounts of NIH grants obtained were confirmed via NIH REPORTER. Reported publications were confirmed via PubMed. Results: All survey respondents (21 of 21) have remained in academic positions. Subsequent aggregate grant funding totaled more than $25 million (range, $0-$4.1 million), 5.9 times the initial investment. NIH grant funding totaled almost $15 million, 3 times the initial investment. Awardees have published an average of 34.6 publications (range, 0-123) for an overall rate of 4.5 papers/year (range, 1-11). Conclusions: ASTRO JFAs over the past decade have been strongly associated with grantees remaining in academic positions, success in attracting private and NIH grants, and publication productivity. In an era of dwindling federal research funding, the support provided by the ASTRO JFA may be especially helpful to support the research careers of promising junior faculty members

  2. Reporting of Uncertainty at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W. Robert, E-mail: w.robert.lee@duke.edu

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: The annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is designed to disseminate new scientific findings and technical advances to professionals. Best practices of scientific dissemination require that some level of uncertainty (or imprecision) is provided. Methods and Materials: A total of 279 scientific abstracts were selected for oral presentation in a clinical session at the 2013 ASTRO Annual Meeting. A random sample of these abstracts was reviewed to determine whether a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) or analogous measure of precision was provided for time-to-event analyses. Results: A sample of 140 abstracts was reviewed. Of the 65 abstracts with Kaplan-Meier or cumulative incidence analyses, 6 included some measure of precision (6 of 65 = 9%; 95% CI, 2-16). Of the 43 abstracts reporting ratios for time-to-event analyses (eg, hazard ratio, risk ratio), 22 included some measure of precision (22 of 43 = 51%; 95% CI, 36-66). Conclusions: Measures of precision are not provided in a significant percentage of abstracts selected for oral presentation at the Annual Meeting of ASTRO.

  3. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services. PMID:26324357

  4. Reporting of Uncertainty at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is designed to disseminate new scientific findings and technical advances to professionals. Best practices of scientific dissemination require that some level of uncertainty (or imprecision) is provided. Methods and Materials: A total of 279 scientific abstracts were selected for oral presentation in a clinical session at the 2013 ASTRO Annual Meeting. A random sample of these abstracts was reviewed to determine whether a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) or analogous measure of precision was provided for time-to-event analyses. Results: A sample of 140 abstracts was reviewed. Of the 65 abstracts with Kaplan-Meier or cumulative incidence analyses, 6 included some measure of precision (6 of 65 = 9%; 95% CI, 2-16). Of the 43 abstracts reporting ratios for time-to-event analyses (eg, hazard ratio, risk ratio), 22 included some measure of precision (22 of 43 = 51%; 95% CI, 36-66). Conclusions: Measures of precision are not provided in a significant percentage of abstracts selected for oral presentation at the Annual Meeting of ASTRO

  5. Studying Gender in Conference Talks -- data from the 223rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society

    CERN Document Server

    Davenport, James R A; Grand, Erin; Hagen, Alex; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Watkins, Laura L

    2014-01-01

    We present a study on the gender balance, in speakers and attendees, at the recent major astronomical conference, the American Astronomical Society meeting 223, in Washington, DC. We conducted an informal survey, yielding over 300 responses by volunteers at the meeting. Each response included gender data about a single talk given at the meeting, recording the gender of the speaker and all question-askers. In total, 225 individual AAS talks were sampled. We analyze basic statistical properties of this sample. We find that the gender ratio of the speakers closely matched the gender ratio of the conference attendees. The audience asked an average of 2.8 questions per talk. Talks given by women had a slightly higher number of questions asked (3.2$\\pm$0.2) than talks given by men (2.6$\\pm$0.1). The most significant result from this study is that while the gender ratio of speakers very closely mirrors that of conference attendees, women are under-represented in the question-asker category. We interpret this to be a...

  6. A 10-Year Analysis of American Society for Radiation Oncology Junior Faculty Career Development Awards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimple, Randall J., E-mail: rkimple@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Kao, Gary D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Between 2000 and 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) awarded 22 Junior Faculty Career Development Awards (JFA) totaling $4.4 million. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these awards on the grantees' career development, including current position, publications, and subsequent independent grant funding. Methods: Each awardee was requested via email and telephone to provide an updated curriculum vitae, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biosketch, and information regarding current position of employment. Twenty-one of the 22 JFA recipients complied. Reported grant funding was extracted from each candidate's CV, and the amounts of NIH grants obtained were confirmed via NIH REPORTER. Reported publications were confirmed via PubMed. Results: All survey respondents (21 of 21) have remained in academic positions. Subsequent aggregate grant funding totaled more than $25 million (range, $0-$4.1 million), 5.9 times the initial investment. NIH grant funding totaled almost $15 million, 3 times the initial investment. Awardees have published an average of 34.6 publications (range, 0-123) for an overall rate of 4.5 papers/year (range, 1-11). Conclusions: ASTRO JFAs over the past decade have been strongly associated with grantees remaining in academic positions, success in attracting private and NIH grants, and publication productivity. In an era of dwindling federal research funding, the support provided by the ASTRO JFA may be especially helpful to support the research careers of promising junior faculty members.

  7. Proceedings of the 13. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 2 of the proceedings of the 13. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society includes sessions on the following topics: compliance and licensing, fusion science and technology, Darlington assessment, plant aging and life assessment, thermalhydraulic modelling and analysis, diagnostics and data management, operator training and certification. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  8. Proceedings of the 13. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 1 of the proceedings of the 13. annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society includes sessions on the following topics: reactor physics, new concepts and technology, fuel behaviour, reactor design, safety analysis, fuel channel behaviour, equipment and design qualification. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  9. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: Ionizing Radiation, Unit 2. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 2 of the four-part series, Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to convey factual information relevant to radioactivity and radiation and relate that information both to the personal lives of students…

  10. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: The Waste Management System, Unit 4. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 4 of the four-part series, Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to explain how transportation, a geologic repository, and the multi-purpose canister will work together to provide short-term and long-term…

  11. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: assessment and palliative management of dyspnea crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mularski, Richard A; Reinke, Lynn F; Carrieri-Kohlman, Virginia; Fischer, Mark D; Campbell, Margaret L; Rocker, Graeme; Schneidman, Ann; Jacobs, Susan S; Arnold, Robert; Benditt, Joshua O; Booth, Sara; Byock, Ira; Chan, Garrett K; Curtis, J Randall; Donesky, Doranne; Hansen-Flaschen, John; Heffner, John; Klein, Russell; Limberg, Trina M; Manning, Harold L; Morrison, R Sean; Ries, Andrew L; Schmidt, Gregory A; Selecky, Paul A; Truog, Robert D; Wang, Angela C C; White, Douglas B

    2013-10-01

    In 2009, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) funded an assembly project, Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis, to focus on identification, management, and optimal resource utilization for effective palliation of acute episodes of dyspnea. We conducted a comprehensive search of the medical literature and evaluated available evidence from systematic evidence-based reviews (SEBRs) using a modified AMSTAR approach and then summarized the palliative management knowledge base for participants to use in discourse at a 2009 ATS workshop. We used an informal consensus process to develop a working definition of this novel entity and established an Ad Hoc Committee on Palliative Management of Dyspnea Crisis to further develop an official ATS document on the topic. The Ad Hoc Committee members defined dyspnea crisis as "sustained and severe resting breathing discomfort that occurs in patients with advanced, often life-limiting illness and overwhelms the patient and caregivers' ability to achieve symptom relief." Dyspnea crisis can occur suddenly and is characteristically without a reversible etiology. The workshop participants focused on dyspnea crisis management for patients in whom the goals of care are focused on palliation and for whom endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are not consistent with articulated preferences. However, approaches to dyspnea crisis may also be appropriate for patients electing life-sustaining treatment. The Ad Hoc Committee developed a Workshop Report concerning assessment of dyspnea crisis; ethical and professional considerations; efficient utilization, communication, and care coordination; clinical management of dyspnea crisis; development of patient education and provider aid products; and enhancing implementation with audit and quality improvement. PMID:24161068

  12. American Cancer Society guideline for the early detection of prostate cancer: update 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andrew M D; Wender, Richard C; Etzioni, Ruth B; Thompson, Ian M; D'Amico, Anthony V; Volk, Robert J; Brooks, Durado D; Dash, Chiranjeev; Guessous, Idris; Andrews, Kimberly; DeSantis, Carol; Smith, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, the American Cancer Society (ACS) Prostate Cancer Advisory Committee began the process of a complete update of recommendations for early prostate cancer detection. A series of systematic evidence reviews was conducted focusing on evidence related to the early detection of prostate cancer, test performance, harms of therapy for localized prostate cancer, and shared and informed decision making in prostate cancer screening. The results of the systematic reviews were evaluated by the ACS Prostate Cancer Advisory Committee, and deliberations about the evidence occurred at committee meetings and during conference calls. On the basis of the evidence and a consensus process, the Prostate Cancer Advisory Committee developed the guideline, and a writing committee drafted a guideline document that was circulated to the entire committee for review and revision. The document was then circulated to peer reviewers for feedback, and finally to the ACS Mission Outcomes Committee and the ACS Board of Directors for approval. The ACS recommends that asymptomatic men who have at least a 10-year life expectancy have an opportunity to make an informed decision with their health care provider about screening for prostate cancer after they receive information about the uncertainties, risks, and potential benefits associated with prostate cancer screening. Prostate cancer screening should not occur without an informed decision-making process. Men at average risk should receive this information beginning at age 50 years. Men in higher risk groups should receive this information before age 50 years. Men should either receive this information directly from their health care providers or be referred to reliable and culturally appropriate sources. Patient decision aids are helpful in preparing men to make a decision whether to be tested. PMID:20200110

  13. American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendations for transperineal permanent brachytherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose/Objective: To develop and disseminate the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendations for the clinical quality assurance and guidelines of permanent transperineal prostate brachytherapy with 125I or 103Pd. Methods and Materials: The ABS formed a committee of experts in prostate brachytherapy to develop consensus guidelines through a critical analysis of published data supplemented by their clinical experience. The recommendations of the panels were reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors of the ABS. Results: Patients with high probability of organ-confined disease are appropriately treated with brachytherapy alone. Brachytherapy candidates with a significant risk of extraprostatic extension should be treated with supplemental external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Patient selection guidelines were developed. Dosimetric planning of the implant should be carried out for all patients before seed insertion. A modified peripheral loading is preferred. The AAPM TG-43 recommendations requiring a change in prescription dose for 125I sources should be universally implemented. The recommended prescription doses for monotherapy are 145 Gy for 125I and 115-120 Gy for 103Pd. The corresponding boost doses (after 40-50 Gy EBRT) are 100-110 Gy and 80-90 Gy, respectively. Clinical evidence to guide selection of radionuclide (103Pd or 125I) is lacking. Post implant dosimetry and evaluation must be performed on all patients. It is suggested that the dose that covers 90% (D90) and 100% (D100) of the prostate volume and the percentage of the prostate volume receiving the prescribed dose (V100) be obtained from a dose-volume histogram (DVH) and reported. Conclusion: Guidelines for appropriate patient selection, dose reporting, and improved quality of permanent prostate brachytherapy are presented. These broad recommendations are intended to be technical and advisory in nature, but the ultimate responsibility for the medical decisions rests with the treating

  14. Fractionation for Whole Breast Irradiation: An American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Evidence-Based Guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery, randomized trials have found little difference in local control and survival outcomes between patients treated with conventionally fractionated (CF-) whole breast irradiation (WBI) and those receiving hypofractionated (HF)-WBI. However, it remains controversial whether these results apply to all subgroups of patients. We therefore developed an evidence-based guideline to provide direction for clinical practice. Methods and Materials: A task force authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology weighed evidence from a systematic literature review and produced the recommendations contained herein. Results: The majority of patients in randomized trials were aged 50 years or older, had disease Stage pT1-2 pN0, did not receive chemotherapy, and were treated with a radiation dose homogeneity within ±7% in the central axis plane. Such patients experienced equivalent outcomes with either HF-WBI or CF-WBI. Patients not meeting these criteria were relatively underrepresented, and few of the trials reported subgroup analyses. For patients not receiving a radiation boost, the task force favored a dose schedule of 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions when HF-WBI is planned. The task force also recommended that the heart should be excluded from the primary treatment fields (when HF-WBI is used) due to lingering uncertainty regarding late effects of HF-WBI on cardiac function. The task force could not agree on the appropriateness of a tumor bed boost in patients treated with HF-WBI. Conclusion: Data were sufficient to support the use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer who met all the aforementioned criteria. For other patients, the task force could not reach agreement either for or against the use of HF-WBI, which nevertheless should not be interpreted as a contraindication to its use.

  15. Nuclear energy: a world of service to humanity. 27th annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society and 30th Canadian Nuclear Society/Canadian Nuclear Association student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 27th Annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society was held on June 11-14, 2006 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The conference gathered close to 400 scientists, engineers, technologists and students interested in all aspects and applications of energy from the atom. The central objective of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of views on how this technical enterprise can best serve the needs of humanity, now and in the future. The plenary sessions addressed broad industrial and commercial developments in the field. Over eighty papers were presented in 15 technical sessions on the following topics: safety analysis; plant refurbishment; control room operation; nuclear chemistry and materials; advanced reactor design; plant operation; reactor physics; safety analysis; nuclear instrumentation; and, nuclear general topics. Embedded in the conference was the 30th student conference, sponsored by the Canadian Nuclear Society and the Canadian Nuclear Association. Over thirty-five papers were presented in five sessions on the following topics: corrosion processes; control systems / physics / modelling; and, chemistry / chemical engineering

  16. Societies' response to the nuclear power plant accident in Fukushima. Cooperation is essential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gigantic earthquake (M 9.0) and resulting tsunami hit the Japanese islands on March 11, 2011. Besides direct disaster caused by earthquake and tsunami, equally serious accident happened at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company. By this accident, nuclear power reactors couldn't be controlled properly and eventually radioactive materials were released from the building to house nuclear power reactors and dispersed over rather wide area. Consequently, agricultural materials, drinking water and food were contaminated with radioactive nuclides. It is urgent to figure out how radioactive materials were spread not only in the area close to the nuclear reactors but also over surrounding, rather wide district. Such information must release the uneasiness for public people and objectively predict the possible influence caused by radioactive material over agricultural products for people engaging in agriculture. To grapple with this task promptly as well as effectively, scientists belonging to the Geochemical Society of Japan, the Japan Society for Nuclear and Radiochemical Sciences and the atmospheric and oceanic section of the Japan Geoscience Union were allied and presented a proposal to MEXT for comprehensive and systematic survey of radioactive materials in the environment. In this project, samples are to be collected for atmosphere, rain, soils and underground water as systematically as possible and as wide as possible for the sampling area. As for soil samples, we decided to work together with volunteer people of nuclear physics, who also took similar actions to ours. After sampling, samples were subjected to precise measurement of radioactivity under controlled counting protocol and data thus obtained are to be opened to the governmental sector as well as public promptly. At the same time, scientific meaning and information derived from such data are to be reported openly to appropriate academic societies as well as to the public

  17. Challenges in DCIS Risk Communication and Decision-Making: Report from an American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Partridge, Ann H.; Elmore, Joann G.; Saslow, Debbie; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Schnitt, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    In September 2010, the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute convened a conference to review current issues in DCIS risk communication and decision-making and to identify directions for future research. Specific topics included patient and healthcare provider knowledge and attitudes about DCIS and its treatment, how to explain DCIS to patients given the heterogeneity of the disease, consideration of nomenclature changes, and the utility of decision tools/aids. This report desc...

  18. Nuclear energy and Indian society: Public engagement, risk assessment and legal frameworks - Summary of the proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Law Association (NLA) has organised its 3. Annual Meeting with the specific aim to deliberate on public engagement, consultation and acceptance of nuclear energy projects. The meeting further aimed to seek a better understanding of the necessary legal framework for a safe nuclear energy program in India. The themes covered by the conference were: Public engagement, consultation and acceptance; Nuclear energy safety and public discourse; Case studies from India on public engagement; Land acquisition and EIA in India; Safety regulations and its enforcement; Nuclear regulatory institutions; Siting, consent and project execution; Nuclear liability and compensation. The meeting was organised in 3 sessions dealing with: 1 - Public engagement, consultation and acceptance of nuclear projects: - Sociological context of public engagement and consultation, - Current state of affairs and new approaches to public consultation, - Case studies from new green field nuclear project sites, - Public opinion and acceptability for nuclear energy projects, - Role of State, NGOs and Public; 2 - Vales, Attitudes and Acceptability - Lessons from other countries: - Fukushima and nuclear energy choices, - Social dimensions of nuclear power, - Public engagement, acceptance and regulatory process, - Management of HLW. 3 - Legal Framework for a Safe and Secure Nuclear Energy Program: - Safety regulations and its enforcement, - Nuclear regulatory institutions, - Siting, consent and project execution, - Environmental impact assessments and plans, - Nuclear liability and compensation. Several of the papers presented will be published in the Journal of Risk Research in early 2015 as part of the Special Issue on Nuclear Energy and Indian Society: Public Engagement, Risk Assessment and Legal Frameworks. This article is the summary of the proceedings

  19. Comparison of current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran with American Society of Extracorporeal Technology’s standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faravan, Amir; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Alizadeh Ghavidel, Alireza; Toutounchi, Mohammad Zia; Ghanbari, Ameneh; Mazloomi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Standards have a significant role in showing the minimum level of optimal optimum and the expected performance. Since the perfusion technology staffs play an the leading role in providing the quality services to the patients undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass machine, this study aimed to assess the standards on how Iranian perfusion technology staffs evaluate and manage the patients during the cardiopulmonary bypass process and compare their practice with the recommended standards by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Methods: In this descriptive study, data was collected from 48 Iranian public hospitals and educational health centers through a researcher-created questionnaire. The data collection questionnaire assessed the standards which are recommended by American Society of Extracorporeal Technology. Results: Findings showed that appropriate measurements were carried out by the perfusion technology staffs to prevent the hemodilution and avoid the blood transfusion and unnecessary blood products, determine the initial dose of heparin based on one of the proposed methods, monitor the anticoagulants based on ACT measurement, and determine the additional doses of heparin during the cardiopulmonary bypass based on ACT or protamine titration. It was done only in 4.2% of hospitals and health centers. Conclusion: Current practices of cardiopulmonary perfusion technology in Iran are inappropriate based on the standards of American Society of Cardiovascular Perfusion. This represents the necessity of authorities’ attention to the validation programs and development of the caring standards on one hand and continuous assessment of using these standards on the other hand. PMID:27489600

  20. A review of American nuclear emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared on behalf of H.M. Nuclear Installations Inspectorate of the United Kingdom's Health and Safety Executive. it summarizes the results of a review of the technical basis for the size of the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) in the United States, including a critique of the underlying technical analyses, an analysis of projected doses and the probability of exceeding specific doses as a function of distance with different exposure conditions for a range of accidents at the proposed Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) at the Hinkley Point C station, using site-specific meteorological data, and provides a summary of severe accident source terms (i.e., releases to the environment under accident conditions) with some indications of the possible reductions in offsite exposures, owing to reductions in PWR source terms in recent analyses. The report is organized into three volumes; Volume I - Introduction and Summary; Volume II - Review of the Basis for Emergency Planning Zone Size in the U.S. and Recent Developments with Possible Implications for Change and Volume III -Analyses of Offsite Radiation Exposure for Potential Accidents at Hinkley Point C and Summary of Recent Analyses of PWR Accident of PWR Accident source Terms. These are available as separate volumes or, as in this publication, bound together. (Author)

  1. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report 2015. Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Darcy E; Cardoso, Wellington V; Gilpin, Sarah E; Majka, Susan; Ott, Harald; Randell, Scott H; Thébaud, Bernard; Waddell, Thomas; Weiss, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine, in collaboration with the NHLBI, Alpha-1 Foundation, American Thoracic Society, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, European Respiratory Society, International Society for Cellular Therapy, and the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, convened a workshop, "Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases," held July 27 to 30, 2015, at the University of Vermont. The conference objectives were to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are all rapidly expanding areas of study that both provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, discuss and debate current controversies, and identify future research directions and opportunities for both basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. This 10th anniversary conference was a follow up to five previous biennial conferences held at the University of Vermont in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, and 2013. Each of those conferences, also sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, American Thoracic Society, and respiratory disease foundations, has been important in helping guide research and funding priorities. The major conference recommendations are summarized at the end of the report and highlight both the significant progress and major challenges in these rapidly progressing fields. PMID:27509163

  2. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giralt, Sergio; Garderet, Laurent; Durie, Brian;

    2015-01-01

    not been extensively studied in MM patients relapsing after primary therapy. The International Myeloma Working Group together with the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation...

  3. For sustainable participation by civil society in Europe in the oversight of nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Aarhus Convention on access to information, public participation in decision-making and access to justice in environmental matters, was signed in 1998 by the European Community and European countries including the 27 Member States of the European Union (EU). That same year, the Committee of the Regions adopted a resolution on nuclear safety and local and regional democracy. These two texts indicate strong political and legal recognition of access to information and participation in the nuclear field. Ten years later, it would seem to be important to observe how these principles are actually implemented. As of 2009, the ANCCLI and the European Commission opened an 18-month European dialogue on the practical application of the Aarhus Convention in the nuclear field. The principle of this approach, called ACN for Aarhus Convention and Nuclear, is to promote feedback about practical application of the Aarhus Convention in the nuclear field in the various European countries, and to share this feedback in order to identify both difficulties and good practices and to initiate progress jointly with the various stakeholders concerned (authorities, civil society, operators, experts, local authorities, etc.). It is also an opportunity to look at the conditions for sustainable participation by civil society in monitoring nuclear issues. (author)

  4. The Role of the Scientist in Society ―A Look at the American Eugenics Movement―

    OpenAIRE

    Karen J. Schaffner; K. J. シャフナー

    2009-01-01

    It goes without saying that scientists live and work in society. The theories they propose and the applications of those theories influence and are influenced by their society. From the theories of Copernicus and Galileo to the atomic bombs of Oppenheimer and the Manhattan Project, science has brought and continues to bring changes to society. After World War Ⅱ physicists themselves initiated discussions about their social responsibilities. Nazi eugenic policies also added to the debate about...

  5. The American Brachytherapy Society recommendations for low-dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This report presents guidelines for using low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in the management of patients with cervical cancer. Methods: Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in LDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer performed a literature review, supplemented by their clinical experience, to formulate guidelines for LDR brachytherapy of cervical cancer. Results: The ABS strongly recommends that radiation treatment for cervical carcinoma (with or without chemotherapy) should include brachytherapy as a component. Precise applicator placement is essential for improved local control and reduced morbidity. The outcome of brachytherapy depends, in part, on the skill of the brachytherapist. Doses given by external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy depend upon the initial volume of disease, the ability to displace the bladder and rectum, the degree of tumor regression during pelvic irradiation, and institutional practice. The ABS recognizes that intracavitary brachytherapy is the standard technique for brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. Interstitial brachytherapy should be considered for patients with disease that cannot be optimally encompassed by intracavitary brachytherapy. The ABS recommends completion of treatment within 8 weeks, when possible. Prolonging total treatment duration can adversely affect local control and survival. Recommendations are made for definitive and postoperative therapy after hysterectomy. Although recognizing that many efficacious LDR dose schedules exist, the ABS presents suggested dose and fractionation schemes for combining external beam radiotherapy with LDR brachytherapy for each stage of disease. The dose prescription point (point A) is defined for intracavitary insertions. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.65 Gy/h are suggested for intracavitary brachytherapy. Dose rates of 0.50 to 0.70 Gy/h to the periphery of the implant are suggested for interstitial implant. Use of differential source activity or

  6. Position of radiation protection associations and co-operation with civil society regarding nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Romanian Society of Radiation Protection (RSRP), founded in May 1990, is an associate society to the International Radiation Protection Association since June 15, 1992. The main task of RSRP is to supply the Romanian public and the governmental organizations, promptly and competently, with information concerning the following three currently debated issues: 1. Long-term health effects of Chernobyl nuclear accident on population of this country; 2. Potential radioactive pollution impact on the environment and population of Romania from Kozloduy NPP (Bulgaria); 3. Development prospects of the nuclear power program based on CANDU type reactors at Cernavoda NPP. The public opinion is often exposed to panic-generating, unfounded 'information' launched by some sensational segments of the mass media and hence the role of professional and qualified bodies like RSRP to create by scientific arguments a sound opinion from a correctly informed public, a prerequisite of democratic debates and decisions

  7. Supplying the nuclear arsenal: American production reactors, 1942--1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the history of commercial-power nuclear reactors is well known, the story of the government reactors that produce weapons-grade plutonium and tritium has been shrouded in secrecy. In the first detailed look at the origin and development of these production reactors, the authors describe a fifty-year government effort no less complex, expensive, and technologically demanding than the Polaris or Apollo programs--yet one about which most Americans know virtually nothing. The book describes the evolution of the early reactors, the atomic weapons establishment that surrounded them, and the sometimes bitter struggles between business and political constituencies for their share of 'nuclear pork.' They show how, since the 1980s, aging production reactors have increased the risk of radioactive contamination of the atmosphere and water table. And they describe how the Department of Energy mounted a massive effort to find the right design for a new generation of reactors, only to abandon that effort with the end of the Cold War. Today, all American production reactors remain closed. Due to short half-life, the nation's supply of tritium, crucial to modern weapons, is rapidly dwindling. As countries like Iraq and North Korea threaten to join the nuclear club, the authors contend, the United States needs to revitalize tritium production capacity in order to maintain a viable nuclear deterrent. Meanwhile, as slowly decaying artifacts of the Cold War, the closed production reactors at Hanford, Washington, and Savannah River, South Carolina, loom ominously over the landscape

  8. Civil society involvement in informing population on potential risks of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1977 the town Cernavoda, Romania has been selected for the construction of the first Romanian Nuclear Power Plant provided with five CANDU type reactors, planned, at that time, to cover one third of the country power demand. The first Cernavoda Unit has been commissioned on December 2, 1996. The paper presents the preoccupation of different non-governmental organizations with respect to the impact of the nuclear plant operation on the environment and public health and, more generally, of the Uranium mining, heavy water production plants and radioactive waste disposal problems. Such issues, concerning the the energy efficiency and the nuclear power problems in Romania were not exposed so far to the public debate and little, if any, reliable information was provided to the population. The paper stresses the role of civil society in informing population on the risks implied by the nuclear power projects. 2 refs

  9. Papers of the Third Annual Congress of the Mexican Nuclear Society, C.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Once again the Sociedad Nuclear Mexicana fulfill its annual Congress being this time the installations of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas the place for the event with a collection of forty documents in the following areas: modelling of nuclear systems, expert systems, dosimetry, experimentation and fuel cycle among others. This significant number of papers is a sample of the great interest of the nuclear community in the participation in this forum presenting its more recent works. The participants belongs to the main institutions in the country dedicated to the technological development of the nuclear area in its different branches. Our best wishes are that this event allows not only the exchange of ideas and the knowledge of the type of works that other colleagues are developing, but also to present the opportunity to live together in a pleasant environment where the main ingredient be the surmounting spirit. We welcome all the participants to the Third Congress of our Society. (Author)

  10. Declaration from the French society of nuclear energy at the national debate on energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the opinion of the French society of nuclear energy (SFEN) about the role the nuclear energy has to play in the fulfillment of the requirements of the sustainable development policy: economic competitiveness, important uranium resources, no greenhouse gases production, radioactive waste management techniques already implemented, very low impact on public health with respect to fossil energies, increase of the French energy independence, low cost of the electricity of nuclear origin, development of advanced technologies etc.. The article ends with 5 proposals expressed by the SFEN: acknowledging the nuclear energy as a contribution to the sustainable development, starting the realization of an EPR-type reactor as future replacement of the existing reactors, reinforcing the R and D programs of all energy and energy saving domains, establishing a consistent and stable regulatory framework for all energy actors, giving reliable informations to the public. (J.S.)

  11. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 3, The Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This teachers guide is unit 3, the nuclear waste policy act, in a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear power plants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  12. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 3, The Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the 3rd unit, (The Nuclear Waste Policy Act) a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  13. Proceedings of the 29th annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association and 10th annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society. V. 1-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The symposium was designed to highlight how the technical information for nuclear energy came to Canada, the effect this information had in Canada in the fields of Physics, Chemistry, Medicine and Nuclear Power. Volume 1 is the combined proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Association twenty-ninth annual conference and the Canadian Nuclear Society tenth annual conference. Volume 2 is the proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Association twenty-ninth annual conference, and volume 3 is the proceedings of the Canadian Nuclear Society tenth annual conference

  14. "The Great Contest": The American Philosophical Society Education Prize of 1795 and the Problem of American Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    In 1795 America's preeminent scholarly organization sponsored a contest for the best essay on education. The two winners have been canonized in the scholarship on early American educational thought. This essay refocuses attention on the great contest itself, not only seeking understanding of the works that it produced but also analyzing its…

  15. Opting out or denying discrimination? How the framework of free choice in American society influences perceptions of gender inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Nicole M; Levine, Cynthia S

    2011-10-01

    American women still confront workplace barriers (e.g., bias against mothers, inflexible policies) that hinder their advancement at the upper levels of organizations. However, most Americans fail to recognize that such gender barriers still exist. Focusing on mothers who have left the workforce, we propose that the prevalent American assumption that actions are a product of choice conceals workplace barriers by communicating that opportunities are equal and that behavior is free from contextual influence. Study 1 reveals that stay-at-home mothers who view their own workplace departure as an individual choice experience greater well-being but less often recognize workplace barriers and discrimination as a source of inequality than do mothers who do not view their workplace departure as an individual choice. Study 2 shows that merely exposing participants to a message that frames actions in terms of individual choice increases participants' belief that society provides equal opportunities and that gender discrimination no longer exists. By concealing the barriers that women still face in the workplace, this choice framework may hinder women's long-term advancement in society. PMID:21934136

  16. ANI (American Nuclear Insurers) support and research facility nuclear liability insurance inspection program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, B.

    1988-01-01

    American Nuclear Insurers (ANI), a voluntary association of insurance companies, provides property and nuclear liability insurance protection to the nuclear industry. It generally offers insurance coverage to nuclear facilities, suppliers, and transporters for the following: (1) their liability for damages because of bodily injury and/or property damage caused by the nuclear energy hazard, and (2) all-risk damage to nuclear facilities. Among the range of facilities and suppliers insured by ANI are (a) operators of nuclear power plants that supply electricity for the general public, (b) operators of nuclear testing and research reactors, (c) fuel fabricators that manufacture fuel for use in reactors, (d) operators of facilities that dispose of nuclear waste that cannot be salvaged, (e) facilities that maintain and repair equipment used at nuclear facilities, (f) nuclear laundries, and (g) low-level-waste processors. The fundamental goal of the ANI nuclear engineering inspection program is to provide protection to pool members' assets by reducing insurance risk.

  17. Proceedings of the 21 conference of the nuclear societies in Israel. Final program and book of summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the occasion of the 50 anniversary of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission, there was held the 21 conference of the Nuclear Societies in Israel. The presentations addressed various aspects in the fields of nuclear industry, radiation protection and nuclear medicine

  18. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Transperineal Permanent Brachytherapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachtherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

  19. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  20. One hundred years of American botany: a short history of the Botanical Society of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smocovitis, Vassiliki Betty

    2006-07-01

    This paper offers highlights from the 100 (plus) years of the Botanical Society of America (BSA) and draws extensively on the archives of the BSA. In addition to examining the founding of the society and the attempt to "professionalize" botany in late 19th century America, the paper also explores the complex relations between the BSA and a number of related societies in the United States, the Society's struggle to create a coherent identity for itself, the place of botany as a whole in the context of the burgeoning biological sciences in the 20th century, and the changing role of the BSA in an international context. The paper assesses both the achievements and the challenges facing the BSA. It closes by offering some historical reflections on the status of "botany" as a science and the historical significance of terms like "plant biology" and "plant science." PMID:21642158

  1. Social responsibility (SR) of nuclear research and its practice for pursuing integrity and sustainability of nuclear research with society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), which includes compliance, engineering and business ethics, safety and security, and corporate governance, is being widely applied not only in the field of business administrations but also in academia and research communities. The basic 3 ideals of CSR are sustainability, stakeholder dialogue (stakeholder include consumers, suppliers, employees, investors and local communities) and triple basic constraints (be environment-friendly, competitive and beneficial for the society as a whole). A typical aspect of this trend is that most electric power company publishes documents such as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) reports which are the improved version of social-environmental reports. CSR reflects the very expectations from the society that how far the corporations and organizations including universities can resolve the issues in which the society is necessarily involved. The nuclear power generations and related facilities are sorts of societal systems and not merely technological systems. This paper describes the concept of CSR, its basic prerequisites and the framework of the civic forum that is a part of the practices of Nuclear CSR

  2. Social responsibility (SR) of nuclear research and its practice for pursuing integrity and sustainability of nuclear research with society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetsuo, Sawada; Naoki, Yamano; Yoshiko, Aoyama; Akiko, Shioda; Junichi, Mizuo; Yasuhiko, Fujii [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), which includes compliance, engineering and business ethics, safety and security, and corporate governance, is being widely applied not only in the field of business administrations but also in academia and research communities. The basic 3 ideals of CSR are sustainability, stakeholder dialogue (stakeholder include consumers, suppliers, employees, investors and local communities) and triple basic constraints (be environment-friendly, competitive and beneficial for the society as a whole). A typical aspect of this trend is that most electric power company publishes documents such as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) reports which are the improved version of social-environmental reports. CSR reflects the very expectations from the society that how far the corporations and organizations including universities can resolve the issues in which the society is necessarily involved. The nuclear power generations and related facilities are sorts of societal systems and not merely technological systems. This paper describes the concept of CSR, its basic prerequisites and the framework of the civic forum that is a part of the practices of Nuclear CSR.

  3. Nuclear safety: economic analysis of American, French and Japanese regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While discussing and comparing the American, Japanese and French approaches and practices, and identifying the strengths and weaknesses of each of them, the author discusses why self-regulation and civil responsibility cannot guarantee a sufficient nuclear safety level, why the safety regulation authority must be independent from industry and government, whether a figure must be put to the safety objective (for example with a risk threshold), whether it is better to define detailed standards to be applied by manufacturers and operators or to define general performance criteria to be reached

  4. Open Access and its impact on the Knowledge Society: Latin American Case Studies Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Soledad RAMÍREZ MONTOYA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In a changing society, open access may represent an alternative growth and resources to the educational community, from the opportunities given to students, to teachers, researchers and administrators of educational institutions. The aim of this paper is to analyze the opportunities and challenges that gives open access to the educational community, through the presentation of a conceptual vision and practical cases in Latin America, on the issue of open educational resources, repositories, journals and open access policies –from universities and government agencies or financing– and its link to a knowledge society. The findings are presented on three key elements: opportunities, challenges and opportunities open to access the knowledge society.

  5. Nuclear Energy In Switzerland: It's going ahead. Challenges For The Swiss Nuclear Society Young Generation Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, Marco [Aare-Tessin Ltd for Electricity, Bahnhofquai 12, CH-4601 Olten (Switzerland); Bichsel, Thomas [BKW FMB Energie AG, NPP Muehleberg, CH-3203 Muehleberg (Switzerland); Fassbender, Andre [NPP Goesgen-Daeniken AG, CH-4658 Daeniken (Switzerland); Horvath, Matthias [National Emergency Operations Centre, CH-8044 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    Swiss energy policy is focused on generating domestic electric power without combusting fossil fuels for already four decades. Roughly 60% of the electricity is generated in hydroelectric plants, which is possible due to the country's favourable topography; the remaining 40% are produced by the country's five nuclear power plants (NPPs). As in any other country nuclear power has its enemies in Switzerland. Due to the direct democracy system in Switzerland the nuclear opposition has a lot of possibilities to disturb the energy policy. Since 1969, when the first Swiss nuclear power plant went online, four plebiscites were held on the issue of civil use of nuclear energy. Four times Swiss citizens voted in favour of further operation of the existing plants also in the latest battle for nuclear energy, which was won in 2003. In 2005 and 2006 several Swiss studies about the future energy situation, especially the electricity situation, have been published. All off them show clearly that there will be a big gab around the year 2020 when the oldest three nuclear power plants will fade out. A public debate was started, how to solve the problem. Beside others, building new nuclear power plants was mentioned and discussed rationally. In 2007 the energy police of the Swiss government changed into a more nuclear friendly position and at the end of the same year some electricity companies lunched a new build program. Hosting the International Youth Nuclear Congress 2008 (IYNC 2008) in Switzerland seems to be just the right moment for the nuclear industry in our country. The slightly changed surroundings effected the organization of Swiss Nuclear Society (SNS) and SNS Young Generation Group (SNSYG) and enlarged the fields of activities for SNSYG. Those activities mentioned in the previous chapters will be developed in the future. The discussion about new builds in Switzerland has started and because of that more nuclear activities in Switzerland will occur. And surely

  6. ETRAN 2002: Society for Electronics,Telecommunications, Computers, Automation and Nuclear Engineering. Section for Nuclear Techniques and Technology. Proceedings of the XLVI Conference. Vol IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The XLVI ETRAN Conference of the Society for Electronic, Telecommunications, Computers, Automation and Nuclear Engineering was held on 4-7 June, 2002. In the Proceedings of the Conference The Commission of the Nuclear Technique and Technology has 14 papers presented in three following sessions: 1. Actual problems in nuclear technologies; 2. Accelerator and reactor systems; and 3. Radiation protection and ionizing radiation uses

  7. Living in Two Worlds: The Development and Transition of Mormon Education in American Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplin, Scott C.; Randall, E. Vance

    2014-01-01

    Religious organisations have long relied on education to transmit cherished values, working within society to preserve their worldview. Therefore, when a religious education system is restructured, it can act as a barometer of change, revealing societal values and reflecting negotiated roles. Like other faiths, the Church of Jesus Christ of…

  8. Ukrainian Nuclear Society International Conference 'Modernization of the NPP with VVER reactor' (abstracts)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstracts of the papers presented at International conference of the Ukrainian Nuclear Society 'Modernization of the NPP with VVER reactor'. The following problems are considered: improving the NPP's safety and reliability; reactor modernization, the lifetime prolongation; increasing of the reactor operating characteristics; methods of capacity factor increasing: refueling control, maintenance control; technical and economical aspects of NPP modernization; modernization of the automated control system of the fuel process at the NPP's; technical features and methods for the continued radiation and technology control at the NPP's; training, increasing the staff qualification and NPP modernization

  9. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement update: genetic testing for cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-15

    As the leading organization representing cancer specialists involved in patient care and clinical research, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reaffirms its commitment to integrating cancer risk assessment and management, including molecular analysis of cancer predisposition genes, into the practice of oncology and preventive medicine. The primary goal of this effort is to foster expanded access to, and continued advances in, medical care provided to patients and families affected by hereditary cancer syndromes. The 1996 ASCO Statement on Genetic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility set forth specific recommendations relating to clinical practice, research needs, educational opportunities, requirement for informed consent, indications for genetic testing, regulation of laboratories, and protection from discrimination, as well as access to and reimbursement for cancer genetics services. In updating this Statement, ASCO endorses the following principles: Indications for Genetic Testing: ASCO recommends that genetic testing be offered when 1) the individual has personal or family history features suggestive of a genetic cancer susceptibility condition, 2) the test can be adequately interpreted, and 3) the results will aid in diagnosis or influence the medical or surgical management of the patient or family members at hereditary risk of cancer. ASCO recommends that genetic testing only be done in the setting of pre- and post-test counseling, which should include discussion of possible risks and benefits of cancer early detection and prevention modalities. Special Issues in Testing Children for Cancer Susceptibility: ASCO recommends that the decision to offer testing to potentially affected children should take into account the availability of evidence-based risk-reduction strategies and the probability of developing a malignancy during childhood. Where risk-reduction strategies are available or cancer predominantly develops in childhood, ASCO believes that

  10. Insights from the early experience of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons/American College of Cardiology Transcatheter Valve Therapy Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsfeld, John S; Holmes, David R; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Edwards, Fred H; Jacques, Louis B; Mack, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    The current system for postmarket surveillance of medical devices in the United States is limited. To help change this paradigm for transcatheter valve therapies (TVTs), starting with transcatheter aortic valve replacement, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the American College of Cardiology partnered to form the TVT Registry program in close collaboration with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The goal of the TVT Registry is to measure and improve quality of care and patient outcomes in clinical practice and to have a pivotal role in the scientific evidence and surveillance for medical devices. Challenges were faced in the early experience of the registry included developing multistakeholder partnerships, data collection requirements, and the use of the registry for pre- and post-market device evaluations. In addressing these challenges, the TVT Registry demonstrates that it is feasible for professional societies to assume a pivotal role in pre- and/or post-market studies, leveraging a clinical registry infrastructure. Sharing the TVT Registry experience may help other professional societies and stakeholders better anticipate and plan for these challenges. PMID:25703888

  11. The Mexican Nuclear Medicine Society and the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation contains an analysis of the work make by the medical and radiological personnel and its recommendations inside the nuclear medicine installations as well as the appropriate safety measures for the patients and its families protection as well as the environment. (Author)

  12. Frederic Joliot, science and society: an itinerary from nuclear physics to nuclear policy (1900-1958)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederic Joliot, called Joliot-Curie, got the Nobel prize of chemistry with his wife Irene Curie in 1935 for the discovery of artificial radioactivity. This French physicist belongs to a circle of ambitious scientists influenced by Marie Curie, Paul Langevin and Jean Perrin's outstanding personalities. His fame - with the Nobel prize - plus the outcoming of a government led by the Front Populaire, including a ministry of Scientific Research, favoured Joliot's plans to build laboratories equipped with particle accelerators, among which a cyclotron. Although he had been thinking of radiobiology, Joliot started to study chain nuclear reactions, in 1939, at the College de France, in order to achieve the liberation of nuclear energy. After the armistice, the laboratories' young manager stayed in France as one of the leaders of the scientific community and got involved in the Resistance. At the Liberation, having joined the communist party, he became head of the CNRS and founded the Atomic Energy Committee (CEA). His aim was to use science for the reconstruction and modernization of France. His ambitious policy cut short. In June 1946 he stated that he would refuse to take part in any military nuclear program. The failure of the negotiations about atomic energy at the United Nations, in which he represented France, as well as the increasing threat of the Cold War, brought Joliot-Curie to the head of the World Peace Council. He appealed for the atom bomb ban (Appel de Stockholm in march 1950). He was dismissed from the CEA by the Government and then tried to rally the scientific community to react against all nuclear atmospheric tests. As chairman of the World Scientific Workers Federation, he took part in the Einstein-Russell Appeal (July 1955) an in the Pugwash movement. In 1956 he was in charge of the new university - equipped with particle accelerators - in Orsay. That was meant to favor a fresh start for French nuclear physics. (author)

  13. American Geriatrics Society/Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs curricular milestones for graduating geriatric fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Susan M; Harper, G Michael; Fernandez, Helen; Sauvigne, Karen; Leipzig, Rosanne M

    2014-05-01

    This article describes the curricular milestones for geriatric fellows and the process used to develop them. The curricular milestones were developed to determine what every graduating geriatric fellow should be able to demonstrate to ensure that they will be able to practice effectively and safely in all care settings and with different older adult populations. Three major domains were identified: Caring for the Elderly Patient, Systems-Based Care for Elder Patients, and Geriatric Syndromes. Six hundred thirty-five geriatricians each reviewed and commented on one domain. These geriatricians represented important stakeholder groups: geriatric fellowship program directors; Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs (ADGAP) members, who are primarily geriatric program and fellowship directors; the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and ADGAP Education Committee; the AGS Teacher's Section; Geriatric Academic Career Award awardees; and through the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Family Medicine, board-certified geriatricians who spend more than 50% of their time in clinical practice. The AGS and ADGAP boards approved the final set of 76 Geriatric Curricular Milestones, which were posted on the Portal of Geriatric Online Education in December 2012. These curricular milestones are intended to assist geriatric fellowship directors as they develop curricula and assessments to inform program director reporting to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education in the Next Accreditation System, which begins in July 2014. PMID:24749808

  14. Society of Reproductive Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Society of Reproductive Surgeons Home About Us About SRS Mission Statement Officers The Role of Reproductive Surgeons For ... Fact Sheets and Booklets SRS is an affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below ...

  15. American College of Nuclear Physics 1991 DOE day symposium: Aids and nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    Since first described in 1981, the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has become the medical dilemma of the century. AIDS retrovirus, and the economic consequences of this exposure are staggering. AIDS has been the topic of conferences and symposia worldwide. This symposium, to be held on January 25, 1991, at the 17th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the American College of Nuclear Physicians, will expose the Nuclear Medicine Physicians/Radiologists to their role in the diagnosis of AIDS, and will educate them on the socio-economic and ethical issues related to this problem. In addition, the Nuclear Medicine Physicians/Radiologists must be aware of their role in the management of their departments in order to adequately protect the health care professionals working in their laboratories. Strategies are currently being developed to control the spread of bloodborne diseases within the health care setting, and it is incumbent upon the Nuclear Medicine community to be aware of such strategies.

  16. The European Nuclear Society Young Generation Network: Five years of networking experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1995, Mr Jan Runermark (Sweden), aware of a need for an exchange of knowledge from the older to the younger generation, came up with the idea of starting a European Nuclear Society Young Generation Network. A first network was formed with Sweden, the Netherlands, Spain, Finland, Germany and Belgium. The ENSYGN is now affiliated to the European Nuclear Society and brings together young students and professionals from 21 member countries Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, and United Kingdom, The ENSYGN Core group meets (at least) twice a year and elects its own chair and co chair for a term of two years. The ENSYGN chair has a seat in the ENS Steering Committee and in the ENS Board. The ENSYGN works closely together with other young generation networks from the US, Australia, Japan and South America. ENSYGN organises workshops and courses on European level, takes part in international meetings (fl. UNFCCC, OECD) and stimulates networking on national level

  17. Activity of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan for compiling the consensus standard on nuclear criticality safety control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activity of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan for compiling the consensus standard on nuclear criticality safety control is presented. The standard recommends an enhancement of nuclear criticality safety throughout a life cycle of facility in terms of a concept of 'barriers against criticality'. (author)

  18. 3. Congress of the SA Society of nuclear medicine: Technetium-99m technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Corporation of SA Limited have been engaged in the manufacture of radioisotopes since 1967, shortly after the SAFARI-1 reactor at Pelindaba was commissioned. Since then the use of radioisotopes in South Africa has grown rapidly and at present 95% of the in vivo diagnostic radioisotopes (radiopharmaceuticals) utilized in nuclear medicine are manufactured locally. Because radioisotopes are applied mainly in sophisticated chemically or mechanically processed forms, production requires not only a skilled production team, but also the appropriate facilities for the manufacture of high-quality products which comply with the necessary safety standards. Compliance with such standards is especially important for the routine production of radiopharmaceuticals for use in nuclear medicine. Over the past 20 years technetium-99m has achieved a dominant position among the diagnostic tools in modern nuclear medicine.The scope of nuclear medicine is expanding continuously and its future lies primarily in the development of new organspecific technetium-99m radiodiagnostic agents. Many improvements and changes have been made to Tc-99m generators, the major source of Tc-99m, since they were introduced to nuclear medicine in the late 1950's. The new Peltek-F sterile Tc-99m generator developed by the Isotope Production Centre is a symbol of progress made. In order to commemorate the launching of the new Peltek-F technetium-99m generator during August 1988 it was decided to publish six papers that were presented at the Third Congress of the Society of Nuclear Medicine held at Bloemfontein during the period 15 - 17 August 1988 by members of the Isotope Production Centre. This will serve as a useful reference on various aspects of technetium-99m technology and will stimulate the use of this product as well as new research in this field

  19. Contribution to the human society from the nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All of us living on this planet feel a hearty gratitude for our being endowed with natural blessings like sunshine, atmosphere, water, green of the mountains and blue of the ocean, etc. From the same point of view nuclear power and radiation are also precious blessings from the nature. To begin with, sunshine originates from the thermonuclear reactions in the sun, and a considerable portion of geothermal energy is assumed to be from natural radioactivity. The effects of natural radiation onto the evolution of life are considered as immeasurably great. The creation of this universe is, in the first place, thought to owe to certain nuclear reactions. The process of the nuclear reaction or radiation itself cannot be perceived by human senses and feeling such as eyesight or hearing. In order to recognize them we must possess powers of understanding, or intelligence, as well as detectors of the specific purpose. However, this may have caused among people the feelings of alienation and fear. Some can be said for cases of bacteria, virus, electricity, and many others. There seems to be good grounds to say that the greatest characteristic of the modern civilization is that it has evolved, so far, the quality of human life adopting what man can recognize by means of intelligence and detectors' combination, in addition to his senses and feelings. Typical examples of this are radioactivity and radiation both of which were discovered in the end of the 19th century and, provoked by this, the nuclear physics achieved an immense progress in consequence. Based on these, the nuclear science and technology have been developed with a giant step and exerted their powerful influence on all over the world in this century. This characteristic is supposed to permeate into the human society of the 21st century more widely and deeply. The nuclear science and technology have become to play a significant role in science research, as an energy source and in industry and medicine. In the

  20. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Workshop Report: Evaluation of Respiratory Mechanics and Function in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson-Carmichael, Stacey; Seddon, Paul C; Cheifetz, Ira M; Frerichs, Inéz; Hall, Graham L; Hammer, Jürg; Hantos, Zoltán; van Kaam, Anton H; McEvoy, Cindy T; Newth, Christopher J L; Pillow, J Jane; Rafferty, Gerrard F; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Stocks, Janet; Ranganathan, Sarath C

    2016-02-01

    Ready access to physiologic measures, including respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, and ventilation/perfusion inhomogeneity, could optimize the clinical management of the critically ill pediatric or neonatal patient and minimize lung injury. There are many techniques for measuring respiratory function in infants and children but very limited information on the technical ease and applicability of these tests in the pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit (PICU, NICU) environments. This report summarizes the proceedings of a 2011 American Thoracic Society Workshop critically reviewing techniques available for ventilated and spontaneously breathing infants and children in the ICU. It outlines for each test how readily it is performed at the bedside and how it may impact patient management as well as indicating future areas of potential research collaboration. From expert panel discussions and literature reviews, we conclude that many of the techniques can aid in optimizing respiratory support in the PICU and NICU, quantifying the effect of therapeutic interventions, and guiding ventilator weaning and extubation. Most techniques now have commercially available equipment for the PICU and NICU, and many can generate continuous data points to help with ventilator weaning and other interventions. Technical and validation studies in the PICU and NICU are published for the majority of techniques; some have been used as outcome measures in clinical trials, but few have been assessed specifically for their ability to improve clinical outcomes. Although they show considerable promise, these techniques still require further study in the PICU and NICU together with increased availability of commercial equipment before wider incorporation into daily clinical practice. PMID:26848609

  1. The Educational and Moral Significance of the American Chemical Society's The Chemist's Code of Conduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Samuel V.

    2003-05-01

    While the usefulness of the case study method in teaching research ethics is frequently emphasized, less often noted is the educational value of professional codes of ethics. Much can be gained by having students examine codes and reflect on their significance. This paper argues that codes such as the American Chemical Society‘s The Chemist‘s Code of Conduct are an important supplement to the use of cases and describes one way in which they can be integrated profitably into a class discussion of research ethics.

  2. Experience in the United States with a secondary resource curriculum on ''Science, society and America's nuclear waste''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power and nuclear waste situation in the Usa, is first reviewed. In order to enhance information concerning these topics among pupils and teachers, a resource curriculum, 'Science, society, and America's Nuclear Waste', was developed by teachers for teachers; it consists of four units: nuclear waste, ionizing radiation, the nuclear waste policy act, and the waste management system. It has been well received by teachers. Within nine months after its national introduction, 350000 teacher and student curriculum documents were requested by teachers from all 50 states. Requests have been also received from 250 foreign colleges and universities

  3. American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Prescribing and Administering Opioid Doses Based Solely on Pain Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasero, Chris; Quinlan-Colwell, Ann; Rae, Diana; Broglio, Kathleen; Drew, Debra

    2016-06-01

    The foundation of safe and effective pain management is an individualized, comprehensive pain assessment, which includes, but is not limited to, determining the intensity of pain if the patient is able to report it. An unforeseen consequence of the widespread use of pain intensity rating scales is the practice of prescribing specific doses of opioid analgesics based solely on specific pain intensity. Many factors in addition to pain intensity influence opioid requirements, and there is no research showing that a specific opioid dose will relieve pain of a specific intensity in all patients. The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) holds the position that the practice of prescribing doses of opioid analgesics based solely on a patient's pain intensity should be prohibited because it disregards the relevance of other essential elements of assessment and may contribute to untoward patient outcomes. PMID:27108082

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The basic objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. The final reports on the research projects are presented. This volume, 2, contains sections 15 through 30

  5. Teaching skeletal muscle adaptations to aerobic exercise using an American Physiological Society classic paper by Dr. Philip Gollnick and colleagues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory A

    2006-09-01

    The use of primary research in the classroom enhances the critical thinking abilities of students. The present article describes a strategy for using the American Physiological Society classic paper "Enzyme activity and fiber composition in skeletal muscle of untrained and trained men" by Dr. Philip D. Gollnick and colleagues to enhance the students' ability to understand research, increase their knowledge of the adaptations to exercise, and learn computer skills in data analysis and presentation. By having students read, study, prepare graphs, and discuss the data from a classic paper, they gain an improved understanding of the factors that influence aerobic exercise ability. This study is especially useful for illuminating the exercise-specific differences in bioenergetic enzymes, muscle fiber type, and fitness characteristics that exist between untrained and trained individuals. PMID:16912145

  6. 78 FR 37721 - Approval of American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Code Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ... Engineers' Code Cases AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guides; request for... regulatory guides (DG), DG-1230, ``Design, Fabrication and Materials Code Case Acceptability, ASME Section III''; DG-1231, ``Inservice Inspection Code Case Acceptability, ASME Section XI, Division 1''; and...

  7. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy: the evidence. A consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society, endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review summarises the evidence for the role of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It is the product of a consensus conference organised by the British Cardiac Society, the British Nuclear Cardiology Society and the British Nuclear Medicine Society and is endorsed by the Royal College of Physicians of London and the Royal College of Radiologists. It was used to inform the UK National Institute of Clinical Excellence in their appraisal of MPS in patients with chest pain and myocardial infarction. MPS is a well-established, non-invasive imaging technique with a large body of evidence to support its effectiveness in the diagnosis and management of angina and myocardial infarction. It is more accurate than the exercise ECG in detecting myocardial ischaemia and it is the single most powerful technique for predicting future coronary events. The high diagnostic accuracy of MPS allows reliable risk stratification and guides the selection of patients for further interventions, such as revascularisation. This in turn allows more appropriate utilisation of resources, with the potential for both improved clinical outcomes and greater cost-effectiveness. Evidence from modelling and observational studies supports the enhanced cost-effectiveness associated with MPS use. In patients presenting with stable or acute chest pain, strategies of investigation involving MPS are more cost-effective than those not using the technique. MPS also has particular advantages over alternative techniques in the management of a number of patient subgroups, including women, the elderly and those with diabetes, and its use will have a favourable impact on cost-effectiveness in these groups. MPS is already an integral part of many clinical guidelines for the investigation and management of angina and myocardial infarction. However, the technique is underutilised in the UK, as judged by the inappropriately long waiting times and by

  8. The American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists' consensus statement on rehabilitation following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thigpen, Charles A; Shaffer, Michael A; Gaunt, Bryce W; Leggin, Brian G; Williams, Gerald R; Wilcox, Reg B

    2016-04-01

    This is a consensus statement on rehabilitation developed by the American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists. The purpose of this statement is to aid clinical decision making during the rehabilitation of patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The overarching philosophy of rehabilitation is centered on the principle of the gradual application of controlled stresses to the healing rotator cuff repair with consideration of rotator cuff tear size, tissue quality, and patient variables. This statement describes a rehabilitation framework that includes a 2-week period of strict immobilization and a staged introduction of protected, passive range of motion during weeks 2-6 postoperatively, followed by restoration of active range of motion, and then progressive strengthening beginning at postoperative week 12. When appropriate, rehabilitation continues with a functional progression for return to athletic or demanding work activities. This document represents the first consensus rehabilitation statement developed by a multidisciplinary society of international rehabilitation professionals specifically for the postoperative care of patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. PMID:26995456

  9. Draft fracture mechanics code case for American Society of Mechanical Engineers NUPACK rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The containment boundaries of most spent-fuel casks certified for use in the United States by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are constructed with stainless steel, a material that is ductile in an engineering sense at all temperatures and for which, therefore, fracture mechanics principles are not relevant for the containment application. Ferritic materials may fail in a nonductile manner at sufficiently low temperatures, so fracture mechanics principles may be applied to preclude nonductile fracture. Because of the need to transport and store spent nuclear fuel safely in all types of climatic conditions, these vessels have regulatory lowest service temperatures that range down to -40 C (-40 F) for transport application. Such low service temperatures represent a severe challenge in terms of fracture toughness to many ferritic materials. Linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics principles provide a methodology for evaluating ferritic materials under such conditions

  10. The Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native American/span>s in Science (SACNAS) Geoscience Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, A. A.

    2005-12-01

    The declining number of geoscience students, especially US citizens, threatens the country's future preparedness in natural hazards mitigation, resource development, national security, and education. Furthermore, the geosciences suffer from poor representation among underrepresented groups, even by comparison to other sciences and engineering. Several organizations have been successful in mentoring and recruiting minorities into science. The Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) focuses on encouraging undergraduate and graduate Hispanic and American Indian students to pursue higher degrees. For over 30 years, SACNAS has provided strong national leadership in improving science and math education, as well as expanding opportunities for minorities in the scientific workforce and academia. SACNAS has added a geological science emphasis to its existing programs to address the need to diversify the field, with funding from the National Science Foundation Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences (OEDG) program. The goals of this initiative are to: (1) recruit 50 Native American and Chicano/Latino undergraduate and graduate students that are performing research in geoscience disciplines each year for the next five years to attend the annual SACNAS Conference; (2) provide students with early mentoring opportunities designed to assist them with their plans for higher education and employment as researchers and educators in the geosciences; (3) sponsor scientific symposia sessions focusing on advances in the geosciences and opportunities available in related fields; (4) Serve as an information resource through the SACNAS web site and monthly e-nouncements for geoscience research opportunities, and disseminate results of initiative; (5) Offer a workshop for K-12 teachers focusing on geosciences and provide mentoring support throughout the year. We are evaluating the effectiveness of the mentoring initiative by tracking

  11. Risk perspective on final disposal of nuclear waste. Individuals, society and communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report tries to evaluate the importance of the risk perspective in connection with final storage of nuclear waste. The concept 'risk' has different importance for experts and general public, within different research directions and among stakeholders in the nuclear waste issue. The report has been published in order to give an interdisciplinary scientific perspective on the risk concept. The authors have their background in different disciplines: radiation physics, psychology, media- and communications-science. The report treats four different themes: The first theme concerns perspectives on the risk concept and describes various principles for how risks can be handled in the society. The next theme is about comparing various risks. This section shows that risk comparisons can to be done within the framework of a scientific attitude and during certain given conditions. The third theme elucidates results from research about subjective risk, and shows that a large number of factors influence how risks are considered by individuals, and can influence his risk behavior and also how the individual means that the society will make decisions in risk-related questions. The fourth and last theme is about risk communication. Since the risk concept contains many different aspects it is clear that risk should not only be informed about, but also communicated. If a purely mathematical definition of risk was the only valid form, such information, from experts to the citizens, would possibly be sufficient. But since there are other relevant factors to take into consideration (t.ex the individual's own values), a communicative process must take place, i.e. the citizens should have influence on how risks are compared and managed. In the final theme, the authors have chosen to reflect around the themes above, i.e. different perspectives on the risk concept, risk comparisons, subjective risk view and risk communication are discussed

  12. Meskhetian Turks in Fourth Land: Identity and Socio-economic Integration into American Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa YAVUZ ALPTEKIN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the socio-cultural life in the new land and integration processes into the host community of the 75 Meskhetian Turkish households resettled in Denver, Colorado. The traditional homeland of the Meskhetian Turks, as one of the dozens, if not hundreds, immigrant communities living the U.S.A., is Akhaltsikhe, a district in the region Samtskhe-Javakheti within the borders of the modern-day Georgia. In 1944, the Meskhetian Turks were forcibly removed from their homeland and exiled en masse to various countries in Central Asia by the Soviet Union. A significant part of those resettled in Uzbekistan were transferred to the city of Krasnodar in Russia, after the Ferghana Events of 1989. In 2004, due to the conditions of resettlement, 12,500 Meskhetian Turks immigrated to the U.S, under a refugee program, and dispersed throughout 26 states. Using the methods such as surveys, in-depth interviews and participant observation with an integrated approach, this study examined the family and community social structure of the Meskhetian Turks currently living intensively in Denver, Colorado. The study illustrated their cultural aspects, and tried to identify the present day of the process of integration into the U.S. society, as well as to envisage the probable future of this integration.

  13. Coming Home? The Integration of Hmong Refugees from Wat Tham Krabok, Thailand into American Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grit Grigoleit

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In December 2003, the U.S. State Department officially announced the acceptance of roughly 15,000 Hmong refugees from Wat Tham Krabok, Thailand, into the United States of America. The Hmong refugees were scheduled to be resettled for family reunification in established Hmong communities. As social science research on migration indicates, the existence of ethnic communities is crucial for a successful adaptation to a host society for newcomers. Ethnic communities thereby serve as a buffer zone and provide initial assistance,which is especially important when governmental integration measures are not sufficient. In the case of the Hmong refugee resettlement, the U.S. economic and social incorporation efforts were inefficient, due to cutbacks in U.S. Federal funding and welfare reforms, causinga greater reliance on the receiving Hmong communities. This raises a number of questions about how much an ethnic community can absorb and is able to bear in order to fulfill the newcomers’ needs. What are the limits and how does this affect the initial integration of thenewcomers?

  14. Analysis on Jewish Distinctiveness Through Integration into American Society%犹太移民在美国社会中的特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高帆; 曹文皓

    2008-01-01

    The history of American Jews is the history of immigration and integration. This thesis mainly depicts the distinctiveness of American Jewish after the immigrant history from 1880 to 1924 through the integration and assimilation of Jews to American society.%犹太人的历史就是移民的历史.此论文主要阐述1880年到1924年期间犹太人移民美国后融入美国社会并确立美国犹太人在教育、经济和宗教方面的独特性.

  15. A Multidisciplinary Paradigm and Approach to Protecting Human Health and the Environment, Society, and Stakeholders at Nuclear Facilities - 12244

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the Department of Energy (DOE) continues to remediate its lands, and to consider moving toward long-term stewardship and the development of energy parks on its industrial, remediated land, it is essential to adequately characterize the environment around such facilities to protect society, human health, and the environment. While DOE sites re considering several different land-use scenarios, all of them require adequate protection of the environment. Even if DOE lands are developed for energy parks that are mainly for industrializes sections of DOE lands that will not be remediated to residential standards, there is still the need to consider the protection of human health and the environment. We present an approach to characterization and establishment of teams that will gather the information, and integrate that information for a full range of stakeholders from technical personnel, to public policy makers, and that public. Such information is needed to establish baselines, site new energy facilities in energy parks, protect existing nuclear facilities and nuclear wastes, improve the basis for emergency planning, devise suitable monitoring schemes to ensure continued protection, provide data to track local and regional response changes, and for mitigation, remediation and decommissioning planning. We suggest that there are five categories of information or data needs, including 1) geophysical, sources, fate and transport, 2) biological systems, 3) human health, 4) stakeholder and environmental justice, and 5) societal, economic, and political. These informational needs are more expansive than the traditional site characterization, but encompass a suite of physical, biological, and societal needs to protect all aspects of human health and the environment, not just physical health. We suggest a Site Committee be established that oversees technical teams for each of the major informational categories, with appropriate representation among teams and with a broad

  16. Scientific basis for nuclear waste management XXIX. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings, Vol. 932

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 29th International Symposium on the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management (Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings Volume 932) was held in Ghent (Belgium), September 12-16, 2005. About 190 attendees from 20 countries heard 58 presentations and viewed 89 posters during the four days of scientific sessions. The symposium offered an overview of the international status of the research on the geological disposal of radioactive waste. The conference covered the usual topics: spent fuel, glass, ceramics, container materials, radionuclide behavior, and performance assessment/safety case. Additional topics were analogs, integrated testing and intermediate level waste forms such as cement and bitumen. Key-note lectures provided critical assessments of the state-of-the-art of the major topics. Special posters highlighted activities of the NEA (Nulear Energy Agency) and some of the new EC Integrated Projects (NF-PRO and FUNMIG) and new EC Network of Excellence (ACTINET). Technical visits on the fifth day led participants to the Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany) and the nuclear site in Mol (Belgium), with the underground research 'HADES' laboratory in Boom Clay and the Belgian conditioning facility Belgoprocess

  17. Cultural Strengths as Moderators of the Relationship between Acculturation to the Mainstream U.S. Society and Eating- and Body-Related Concerns among Mexican American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettendorf, Sonya K.; Fischer, Ann R.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored whether 3 culturally relevant variables (i.e., ethnic identity, familism, and enculturation) operated as sources of strength for 209 Mexican American women by buffering the relationship between their acculturation to the mainstream U.S. society and eating- and body-related concerns. In an effort to capture the underlying…

  18. Ethics and nuclear arms: European and American perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, R.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on the ethical and moral aspects of nuclear weapons. Topics considered include the development of a nuclear policy, war and peace in the nuclear age, the viewpoint of the German churches, the US Catholic bishops and nuclear arms, nuclear pacifism, NATO and ''first use,'' and Christian morality with regard to nuclear arms.

  19. Youth, Gener & TIC: Imaginaries in the Construction of Information Society in Latin American

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonder, Gloria

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects upon the social imaginary that sustains the dissemination of new information and communication technologies (ICTs as a condition for them to be accepted and granted social and subjective meaning. Based on applied research on digital literacy programs for Latin American youth, the paper delves into the construction of youth both as a category and as a social group. It analyzes the main characteristics and problems of youth in current environments, especially in Latin America, providing data on their access to ICTs. Based on a typology of the programs reviewed and a comparative analysis of adults and youth representations and assessment of ICTs, the article examines the dominant educational discourses and practices that encourage access to technology of excluded or at-risk youth population. It also discusses the ways in which these programs characterize and implement a gender equity approach.A partir de una investigación aplicada sobre programas de alfabetización digital de jóvenes latinoamericanas/os, el artículo ofrece una reflexión sobre los imaginarios sociales que sostienen la difusión de las nuevas tecnologías de información y comunicación (TIC como condición para su aceptación y asignación de sentido social y subjetivo. Incursiona en el proceso de construcción de la juventud como concepto y como grupo social, presentando las principales características y problemáticas que experimentan las y los jóvenes en los contextos actuales, especialmente en América Latina, y brinda datos sobre su acceso a las TIC. A través de una tipología de los programas estudiados y de un análisis comparado de las representaciones y valoraciones de las TIC por parte de adultos y jóvenes, interroga sobre los discursos y las prácticas educativas dominantes que incentivan el acceso de la juventud excluida o en riesgo al mundo tecnológico y sobre las formas en que caracterizan y aplican al enfoque de equidad de género.

  20. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of the Older Adult Population: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-05-24

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults ≥75 years of age; however, despite the large impact of cardiovascular disease on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, patients aged ≥75 years have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older patients with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in a nursing home or assisted living facility. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older patients typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a detailed review of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and American Stroke Association guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older patients. We found that there is a pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision making in older patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as a paucity of data on the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on key outcomes that are particularly important to older patients, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older patients representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older patients in the study design. The

  1. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2012 Workforce Study: The Radiation Oncologists' and Residents' Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohar, Surjeet, E-mail: spohar@iuhealth.org [Indiana University Health East, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Fung, Claire Y. [Commonwealth Newburyport Cancer Center, Newburyport, Massachusetts (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Miller, Robert [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Azawi, Samar [VA Veteran Hospital/University of California Irvine, Newport Beach, California (United States); Arnone, Anna; Patton, Caroline [ASTRO, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conducted the 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce Survey to obtain an up-to-date picture of the workforce, assess its needs and concerns, and identify quality and safety improvement opportunities. The results pertaining to radiation oncologists (ROs) and residents (RORs) are presented here. Methods: The ASTRO Workforce Subcommittee, in collaboration with allied radiation oncology professional societies, conducted a survey study in early 2012. An online survey questionnaire was sent to all segments of the radiation oncology workforce. Respondents who were actively working were included in the analysis. This manuscript describes the data for ROs and RORs. Results: A total of 3618 ROs and 568 RORs were surveyed. The response rate for both groups was 29%, with 1047 RO and 165 ROR responses. Among ROs, the 2 most common racial groups were white (80%) and Asian (15%), and the male-to-female ratio was 2.85 (74% male). The median age of ROs was 51. ROs averaged 253.4 new patient consults in a year and 22.9 on-treatment patients. More than 86% of ROs reported being satisfied or very satisfied overall with their career. Close to half of ROs reported having burnout feelings. There was a trend toward more frequent burnout feelings with increasing numbers of new patient consults. ROs' top concerns were related to documentation, reimbursement, and patients' health insurance coverage. Ninety-five percent of ROs felt confident when implementing new technology. Fifty-one percent of ROs thought that the supply of ROs was balanced with demand, and 33% perceived an oversupply. Conclusions: This study provides a current snapshot of the 2012 radiation oncology physician workforce. There was a predominance of whites and men. Job satisfaction level was high. However a substantial fraction of ROs reported burnout feelings. Perceptions about supply and demand balance were mixed. ROs top concerns reflect areas of attention

  2. The evolution of American nuclear doctrine 1945-1980: from massive retaliation to limited nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis attempts to demonstrate the evolutionary character of American nuclear doctrine from the beginning of the nuclear age in 1945 until 1980. It also aims at disclosing some of the most important factors that contributed to the doctrine's evolution, namely, technological progress and developments in weaponry and the shifts that were taking place in the correlation of forces between the two superpowers, the Soviet Union and the United States. The thesis tries to establish the relation, if any, between these two variables (technology and balance of forces) and the evolution of the doctrine from Massive Retaliation to limited nuclear war. There are certainly many other factors which influenced military doctrine, but this thesis focuses on the above mentioned factors. touching on others when it was thought essential.The thesis concludes by trying to answer the question of whether the purpose of the limited nuclear war doctrine is to keep the initiative in US hands, that is putting itself on the side with the positive purpose, or not. Refs

  3. Report on the second Congress of the Russian nuclear medicine society and on International conference Current problems of nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the work of Second Congress of Russian Nuclear Medicine Society and International Conference - Current problems of nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceuticals, - held in Obninsk in October, 2000, is adduced. Reports presented in the conference are dedicated to various aspects of application of radionuclide methods to cardiology, angiology, oncology, surgery, hematology, endocrinology, pediatrics and neurology. Problems in the development of radiopharmaceutical, training and skill advancement of experts, dosimetry and radiation safety in nuclear medicine were discussed. Congress considered the organizational problems in Russian nuclear medicine

  4. Recent advances in nephrology: highlights from the 35th annual meeting of the American society of nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cases, Aleix

    2002-12-01

    The 35th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology, held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States (October 30 to November 4, 2002) presented the newest advances in basic and clinical nephrology science. Several presentations and symposia discussed the effects of various interventions and risk factors in clinical outcomes in dialysis patients. The recent evidences of pure red cell aplasia secondary to neutralizing antibodies against erythropoietin were also extensively discussed in a special symposium. Recent advances in the management of calcium phosphorus metabolism and secondary hyperparathyroidism, such as the clinical efficacy and safety of AMG-073, a new calcimimetic agent in the control of hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease patients, or the use of sevelamer or lanthanum carbonate as phosphate binders, were presented. The results in animal models on improved sparing of renal function with rapamycin versus cyclosporin A represent a promising advance in renal transplantation. Finally, the recent discoveries with the newly identified disease gene PKHD1, which causes autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, were also presented at the meeting. PMID:12582469

  5. Recent advances in gastrointestinal oncology - updates and insights from the 2009 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh Chung-Tsen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have reviewed the pivotal presentations related to gastrointestinal malignancies from 2009 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology with the theme of "personalizing cancer care". We have discussed the scientific findings and the impact on practice guidelines and ongoing clinical trials. Adding trastuzumab to chemotherapy improved the survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Gemcitabine plus cisplatin has become a new standard for first-line treatment of advanced biliary cancer. Octreotide LAR significantly lengthened median time to tumor progression compared with placebo in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors of the midgut. Addition of oxaliplatin to fluoropyrimidines for preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage II or III rectal cancer did not improve local tumor response but increased toxicities. Bevacizumab did not provide additional benefit to chemotherapy in adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II or III colon cancer. In patients with resected stage II colon cancer, recurrence score estimated by multigene RT-PCR assay has been shown to provide additional risk stratification. In stage IV colorectal cancer, data have supported the routine use of prophylactic skin treatment in patients receiving antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor, and the use of upfront chemotherapy as initial management in patients with synchronous metastasis without obstruction or bleeding from the primary site.

  6. Highlights in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia from the 2014 meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molica, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    The latest Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology, held in San Francisco, included data on novel-targeted agents active in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). MABTENANCE and PROLONG study suggest that either rituximab or ofatumumab improves progression-free survival in CLL. According to final analysis of CLL-10 trial, rituximab and bendamustine may have a role in the upfront treatment of fit elderly patients. Further insight into the use of ibrutinib, a first-in-class covalent Bruton’s tyrosine kinase-inhibitor that is currently approved for patients with relapsed/refractory CLL and with del(17p), was also presented. Idelalisib, a selective inhibitor of PI3K delta, demonstrated its activity with manageable toxicity in previously untreated patients ≥65 years with CLL or small lymphocytic lymphoma. Finally, a series Phase I/II studies of BCL-2 inhibitor (i.e., venetoclax, GDC-0199) used alone or in combination provide promising results in patients with relapsed/refractory CLL. PMID:25804936

  7. Position of the American Dietetic Association, School Nutrition Association, and Society for Nutrition Education: comprehensive school nutrition services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Marilyn; Mueller, Constance G; Fleischhacker, Sheila

    2010-11-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA), School Nutrition Association (SNA), and Society for Nutrition Education (SNE) that comprehensive, integrated nutrition services in schools, kindergarten through grade 12, are an essential component of coordinated school health programs and will improve the nutritional status, health, and academic performance of our nation's children. Local school wellness policies may strengthen comprehensive nutrition services by encouraging multidisciplinary wellness teams, composed of school and community members, to work together in identifying local school needs, developing feasible strategies to address priority areas, and integrating comprehensive nutrition services with a coordinated school health program. This joint position paper affirms schools as an important partner in health promotion. To maximize the impact of school wellness policies on strengthening comprehensive, integrated nutrition services in schools nationwide, ADA, SNA, and SNE recommend specific strategies in the following key areas: nutrition education and promotion, food and nutrition programs available on the school campus, school-home-community partnerships, and nutrition-related health services. PMID:21061737

  8. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.9--nuclear medicine sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the ninth one, the content is about nuclear medicine

  9. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.1). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2009, No.10--nuclear technology economy and management modernization sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 1) includes 889 articles which are communicated on the first national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the tenth one, the content is about nuclear technology economy and management modernization

  10. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.10--nuclear Information sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the tenth one, the content is about nuclear Information and computer applications

  11. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.5--nuclear chemical engineering sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which were presented on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the fifth one, the content is about nuclear chemical engineering.

  12. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.10--nuclear technology economy and management modernization sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the tenth one, the content is about nuclear technology economy and management modernization

  13. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.4--nuclear material sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the fourth one, the content is about nuclear material.

  14. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.2--nuclear power sub-volume (Pt.1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the second one, the content is about nuclear power (Pt.1)

  15. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement update: tobacco control--reducing cancer incidence and saving lives. 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-15

    As an international medical society dedicated to cancer prevention, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) advocates a fundamental reform of United States and international policy toward addictive tobacco products. ASCO's goal is the immediate reduction of tobacco use and ultimate achievement of a tobacco-free world. The centerpiece of ASCO's policy is the recommendation for an independent commission to study the tobacco problem in all of its dimensions: social, medical, legal, and economic (both domestically and globally). The commission membership should include broad-based representation and expertise on tobacco issues. In ASCO's view, tobacco control efforts to date have been less than successful because they are too fragmented and incremental, leaving many important issues unaddressed. A more comprehensive solution could flow from this study, including input from a variety of government agencies involved with public health, agriculture, First Amendment and other legal considerations, and international trade. The study, within defined time limits, should culminate in a report that outlines a strategy for achieving immediate reduction of tobacco use and ultimate achievement of a tobacco-free world, including explicit plans and a timetable for implementation. Although this comprehensive approach to tobacco control will take many years to implement even under the best of circumstances, there are certain measures that could be undertaken immediately with meaningful impact on tobacco usage. These include: Increasing efforts to discourage tobacco use, particularly among the young Raising federal excise taxes by at least $2 per pack and encouraging states to consider tobacco taxes as a first resort in revenue enhancement Ensuring that tobacco settlement funds be devoted only to health-related projects, including medical treatment, biomedical research, and tobacco prevention efforts Requiring disclosure of all ingredients in tobacco products Comprehensively

  16. Status of industry standards for decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses how several professional societies are preparing industry standards on nuclear facility decommissioning: ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials), Nuclear Technology Committee, Decommissioning Subcommittee, E10.03; ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), Nuclear Quality Assurance (NQA) Committee's Working Group on Decommissioning and the Reactor Services Committee's Subcommittee on Decommissioning; and Health Physics Society Standards Committee (HPSSC) working under the auspices of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). According to the author, the standards of these diverse groups mesh to form a cohesive body of guidance for planning a nuclear facility decommissioning

  17. American Pain Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adjuvant Analgesic for Cancer Pain Drug Treatments for Heroin Addiction Heighten Pain Sensitivity Genetic Alteration Predicts Pain Recovery After Sexual Assault Health Care Reforms Will Change How Pain Is Assessed ...

  18. American Thoracic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Services Research Clinical Problems Critical Care Environmental, Occupational & Population Health Microbiology, Tuberculosis & Pulmonary Infections Nursing Pediatrics Pulmonary Circulation Pulmonary Rehabilitation Respiratory Cell & Molecular ...

  19. The American Meteorological Society and Second Nature: Working Together to Increase Climate Literacy at Minority Serving Institutions Nationwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Mills, E. W.; Kauffman, C.; Nugnes, K. A.; Naik, A.

    2013-12-01

    To raise climate literacy, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) developed AMS Climate Studies, an innovative, undergraduate-level climate science course. With a focus on real-world climate data, the course is a primer for responsible, scientifically-literate participation in the discussion of climate change. Designed to be adaptable to traditional, hybrid, or online instructional settings, AMS Climate Studies has already been adopted by more than 80 institutions since fall 2010. Course materials include a hardcover textbook, an investigations manual, and an online lab component, Current Climate Studies, which is created weekly throughout the semester utilizing resources from the IPCC, the US Global Change Research Program, NASA, and NOAA. AMS Climate Studies is mutually beneficial because AMS enhances coursework with real-world data while NASA, NOAA, and other government agencies reach a much larger audience with the results of their work. With support from NSF and NASA and in partnership with Second Nature, AMS offers the AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project with the goal of training 100 minority-serving institution (MSI) faculty members to implement the climate course on their campus. The Diversity Project consists of an expenses-paid weeklong workshop for MSI faculty members and a follow-up workshop at the next year's AMS Annual Meeting. The initial workshop covers fundamental understandings within AMS Climate Studies and implementation procedures. Highlights of this workshop are presentations from NOAA, NASA, and other government and university climate scientists as well as field trips to science laboratories. In the year following workshop attendance, faculty work within their MSI to implement AMS Climate Studies. Participants are then invited to a second workshop at the AMS Annual Meeting to report back the results of their work. Currently in its second year, the Project has trained 50 MSI faculty members with subsequent workshops to be held throughout

  20. American Brachytherapy Society survey regarding practice patterns of postoperative irradiation for endometrial cancer: Current status of vaginal brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To survey the current postoperative recommendations for radiotherapy (RT) in patients with endometrial cancer, with an emphasis on vaginal brachytherapy (VBT). Methods and Materials: In August 2003, a 32-item questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 2396 members of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and the American Brachytherapy Society. The sample excluded members-in-training, physicists, and non-U.S. members. A follow-up mailing was conducted in November 2003. Those who had not treated any patient in the previous year for endometrial carcinoma were instructed to indicate so at the beginning of the questionnaire and return it without responding to any other item. Responses were tabulated to determine the relative frequency distribution. Results: of the 2396 surveys sent out, 757 were returned, for a response rate of 31.6%. Of those who responded, 551 (72.8%) had performed postoperative irradiation for endometrial cancer and were included in this study. Of the 551 respondents, 99.8% had delivered external beam RT to some endometrial cancer patients. An increasing trend was found toward referrals for VBT; 91.5% of those who treated endometrial cancer performed VBT. The vaginal target most often irradiated was the upper vagina in 40.7%, upper 4-5 cm in 54.5%, and the entire vagina in 4.9%; 21.3% placed clips at the vaginal apex for applicator verification. The maximal dose to the bladder and rectum was recorded in 78.3% and 80.2% of patients, respectively. Of the respondents, 40% did not use low-dose-rate (LDR) VBT. The two most common LDR applicators were Delclos cylinders (29.7%) and Fletcher colpostats (29.3%). The mean boost dose delivered with LDR VBT when prescribed to the surface was 29.9 Gy and when prescribed to 0.5 cm was 23.8 Gy. When LDR therapy was used without external beam RT, the mean dose when prescribed to the surface was 56.8 Gy and when prescribed to 0.5 cm was 47.9 Gy. In 2002, 69.1% of respondents treated

  1. Italian translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the "American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society's (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigheb, Massimiliano; Janicka, Paulina; Andorno, Silvano; Marcuzzi, Augusto; Magnani, Corrado; Grassi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim of the workAnkle and hindfoot injuries are common and may lead to functional impairment, disability, exclusion from occupational and daily activities. It's necessary a standardized method for assessing treatment outcomes in people with same condition and disease.American-Orthopaedics-Foot-and-Ankle-Society's-Ankle-Hindfoot-Evaluation-Scale (AOFAS-AHES) is specific to estimate clinical problems of the ankle-hindfoot.Outcome evaluation scales should be translated and culturally adapted into the language of the investigated patient.Our purpose was to translate and culturally adapt into Italian AOFAS-AHES, and to check its reproducibility and validity.MethodsAn Italian translation of the AOFAS-scale was retranslated into English by a native English and compared to the original to define a second correct Italian-version, that was submitted to 50 randomized patients operated at their ankle or hindfoot with a minimum follow-up of 6 months for cultural adaptation, and to 10 healthcare professionals to check comprehension of the medical part.To check intra and inter-observer reproducibility each patient underwent 2 interviews by interviewer-A and 1 by B. ShortForm(SF)-36-questionnaire for quality of life and Visual-Analogue-Scale (VAS) for pain were also compared for validation. The Pearson's-Correlation-Coefficient and the Intra-Class-Correlation coefficient were calculated to check inter and intra-observer reproducibility for validation.ResultsCultural adaptation revealed to be good. We obtained a good correlation of the inter and intra-observer reproducibility. Further validation of the Italian-AOFAS-AHES was obtained comparing AOFAS results to SF-36.ConclusionsItalian translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the AOFAS-AHES has been performed successfully and could be useful to improve assistance quality in care practice. PMID:27163894

  2. Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer (Cancer Care Ontario Guideline): American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, RC; Rumble, RB; Loblaw, DA; Finelli, A.; Ehdaie, B; Cooperberg, MR; Morgan, SC; Tyldesley, S; Haluschak, JJ; Tan, W.; Justman, S; Jain, S

    2016-01-01

    To endorse Cancer Care Ontario's guideline on Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines developed by other professional organizations.The Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The ASCO Endorsement Panel then reviewed the content and the recommenda...

  3. First International Conference on Lysophospholipids and Related Bioactive Lipids in Biology and Disease Sponsored by the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Goetzl, Edward J.; Tigyi, Gabor J.; Timothy Hla

    2001-01-01

    The First International Conference on “Lysophospholipids and Related Bioactive Lipids in Biology and Diseases” was held in Tucson, AZ on June 10�14, 2001, under the sponsorship of the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology (FASEB). More than 100 scientists from 11 countries discussed the recent results of basic and clinical research in the broad biology of this emerging field. Immense progress was reported in defining the biochemistry of generation and biology of cellular ef...

  4. ASCO 2007: “Translating Research into Practice”. Report from the 34th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camillo Porta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This year, for the 34th time in its history, the mastodontic machinery of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO once again welcomed thousand of members and participants from all over the world to the Society’s annual meeting, which, this year, took place in the ample and well-appointed, McCormick’s Convention Center in Chicago, Illinois...

  5. Analisis Tingkat Relevansi E-Journal Pada Database American Society Of Civil Engineer ( Asce ) Dalam Memenuhi Kebutuhan Informasi Mahasiswa Magister Teknik Sipil Di Universitas Sumatera Utara

    OpenAIRE

    Laoli, Feriaman

    2010-01-01

    Database ASCE merupakan koleksi e-journal yang dilanggan oleh Perpustakaan Universitas Sumatera Utara ( USU ) untuk bidang ilmu teknik sipil. Koleksi ini diharapkan dapat menunjang proses belajar-mengajar dan bahan acuan dalam penelitian, pembuatan skripsi, tesis dan sebagainya bagi dosen, mahasiswa, karyawan di lingkungan universitas khususnya Universitas Sumatera Utara ( USU ). Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui tingkat relevansi e-journal pada Database American Society of Civil E...

  6. The USCG[United States Coast Guard]/Environment Canada/ASTM[American Society for Testing and Materials] standards development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Coast Guard and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Committee F-20, in cooperation with Environment Canada, have embarked on an ambitious program of standards development in the area of marine oil spills. Standards development will proceed in the areas of barriers, skimmers, pumps, beach cleanup, sorbents, bioremediation, in-situ burning, temporary storage devices, communications, and remote sensing. The methodology of standards development and the progress to date are reported

  7. Review of international radioactive waste management based on a report of the International Nuclear Societies Council (INSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INSC is an international group of 42 nuclear societies with the aim of promoting the peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. It has a number of working groups addressing important issues and publishes the reports of these groups. The latest report of the working group on radioactive waste management was published in August 2002. The main aim of the report is to provide the latest information on radioactive waste management among the member societies and particularly to provide access to internet resources on this topic including access to the radioactive waste management organisations in the several countries.The major topics addressed in the report are: what is radioactive waste management?; where does radioactive waste come from?; principles and objectives; management strategies - options and ethics; current worldwide status; international cooperation; and international instruments, including treaties and legislation

  8. The 11th Australian Conference on Nuclear Techniques of Analysis and the 5th Vacuum Society of Australia Congress. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication contains summaries submitted by the participants at the joint AINSE Conference on Nuclear Techniques of Analysis and the Vacuum Society of Australia Congress. Topics covered include: ion beam analysis and its applications; structural chemical analysis of various materials and thin films, environmental studies, accelerator mass spectrometry, ion implantation. The programme of the meeting and list of participants are also included in this volume. Each of the presentations was separately indexed

  9. Canadian--American relations and the nuclear weapons controversy, 1958--1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study attempts to explain the nuclear weapons controversy as it developed between 1958 and 1963. The nuclear controversy centered around Canada's acceptance of a nuclear role, within the American alliance system, for the Canadian armed forces. In the period 1958-1959, when the critical weapons decisions were being taken, Canadian political authorities lost control of the policy-making process, permitting the Canadian and American military bureacracies to initiate nuclear plans suited to their common needs and objectives. Prime Minister Diefenbaker's reluctance to arm the systems acquired by transborder bureaucratic coalition is also re-examined. Previous analysts have regarded the government's hesitations over nuclear weapons as the product of Diefenbaker's personal antagonism towards President Kennedy or as a futile attempt to reverse the process of continental integration. The opening of the Kennedy papers reveals the degree to which Diefenbaker was committed to close Canadian-American cooperation and the effort he made to overcome the president's hostility towards him. This study emphasizes the importance of Diefenbaker's sensitivity to public, parliamentary, and cabinet opposition to nuclear arms. The secret U.S. demand for nuclear bases in Labrador and Newfoundland is revealed. Thus the question of nuclear storage in Canada for Canadian forces was complicated by U.S. insistence that Canada simultaneously provide nuclear storage for the strategic forces of the U.S. Finally, the extent of American responsibility for Diefenbaker's demise is re-assessed, and the conclusion is reached that the U.S., through Canadian-American military interaction and the initiative of the ambassador in Ottawa, did in fact help to bring down the government of Canada

  10. Interaction of science and diplomacy: Latin American, the United States and nuclear energy, 1945-1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, R.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear programs in Argentina and Brazil can be traced to August 1945 when their scientific communities articulated responses to the atomic bombings of Japan. They culminated in attempts to develop independent nuclear programs, sharply opposed by the United States, during the nationalist governments of Juan Peron and Getulio Vargas. This dissertation, based on primary sources from the three nations, analyzes these programs and the American responses. Latin America entered the nuclear age attempting to control natural resources, to improve scientific establishments, and to appraise Latin American-United States relations. Despite some clear warnings about nuclear dangers, the new form of energy was seen as the solution to industrial problems, poverty, and outside political interference. International opposition, which may have included nuclear threats from the United States, blocked Argentina's first attempt in 1947. After 1948, Peron wanted a nuclear program for cheap energy and prestige. The qualifications of the Brazilian scientists gave more substance to their program. The program originated in August, 1945, but assumed national proportion with the government of Vargas in 1951. Lack of American cooperation forced Vargas to establish a secret program with Germany. American troops intervened taking over the German equipment already completed. The final collapse came about with Vargas' suicide in August, 1954.

  11. Interaction of science and diplomacy: Latin American, the United States and nuclear energy, 1945-1955

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear programs in Argentina and Brazil can be traced to August 1945 when their scientific communities articulated responses to the atomic bombings of Japan. They culminated in attempts to develop independent nuclear programs, sharply opposed by the United States, during the nationalist governments of Juan Peron and Getulio Vargas. This dissertation, based on primary sources from the three nations, analyzes these programs and the American responses. Latin America entered the nuclear age attempting to control natural resources, to improve scientific establishments, and to appraise Latin American-United States relations. Despite some clear warnings about nuclear dangers, the new form of energy was seen as the solution to industrial problems, poverty, and outside political interference. International opposition, which may have included nuclear threats from the United States, blocked Argentina's first attempt in 1947. After 1948, Peron wanted a nuclear program for cheap energy and prestige. The qualifications of the Brazilian scientists gave more substance to their program. The program originated in August, 1945, but assumed national proportion with the government of Vargas in 1951. Lack of American cooperation forced Vargas to establish a secret program with Germany. American troops intervened taking over the German equipment already completed. The final collapse came about with Vargas' suicide in August, 1954

  12. Proceedings of American Nuclear Society topical meeting on light water reactor fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts are included for 32 of the 39 papers presented concerning fuel performance; fuel performance under transient and off-normal operations; fuel-cladding interactions; and fission product release. Seven papers have previously been input into the data base

  13. Proceedings of the 1984 American Nuclear Society Midwest Student Conference. Our energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sixty-seven abstracts are included, grouped under the following session headings: systems analysis, industrial development, and economics; miscellaneous; reactor safety; thermohydraulics, gas dynamics, and MHD; fusion technology and plasma physics; radiation dosimetry, data reduction, and medical imaging; instrumentation; and neutronics

  14. Proceedings of the 1984 American Nuclear Society Midwest Student Conference. Our energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Sixty-seven abstracts are included, grouped under the following session headings: systems analysis, industrial development, and economics; miscellaneous; reactor safety; thermohydraulics, gas dynamics, and MHD; fusion technology and plasma physics; radiation dosimetry, data reduction, and medical imaging; instrumentation; and neutronics. (DLC)

  15. Proceedings of the 24th annual American Nuclear Society: Midwest student conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    This document is a program given to participants at a conference stressing student research. Containing only abstracts, the document includes topics such as computer applications, space power, thermal hydraulics, radiation theory and technology, reactor theory, public relations, and public information. (TEM)

  16. Proceedings of the 24th annual American Nuclear Society: Midwest student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a program given to participants at a conference stressing student research. Containing only abstracts, the document includes topics such as computer applications, space power, thermal hydraulics, radiation theory and technology, reactor theory, public relations, and public information

  17. Embracing the future: Canada's nuclear renewal and growth. 28th annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society and 31st CNS/CNA student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 28th Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society and 31st CNS/CNA Student Conference was held on June 3-6, 2007 in Saint John, New Brunswick. The central objective of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of views on how this technical enterprise can best serve the needs of humanity, now and in the future. 'Embracing the Future: Canada's Nuclear Renewal and Growth' was the theme for this year's gathering of nuclear industry experts from across Canada and around the world. This theme reflects the global renaissance of interest in nuclear technology, strongly evident here in Canada through plant refurbishments (underway and planned), new-build planning, renewal and expansion of the nuclear workforce, and growth in public support for environmentally sustainable technology. Topics for discussion at this conference include: the nuclear renaissance in Canada and around the world, recent developments at Canadian utilities, status of plant refurbishment and new build plans, and uranium supply issues. For business, energy, and science reporters this conference offers an insight into major nuclear projects and an opportunity to meet leaders in the nuclear sector. Over 100 technical papers were presented, as well as over 20 student papers, in the following sessions: control room operation; safety analyses; environment and waste management; plant life management and refurbishment; reactor physics; advanced reactor design; instrumentation control; general nuclear topics and standards; chemistry and materials; probabilistic safety assessment; and, performance improvement

  18. American Society for Pain Management Nursing guidelines on monitoring for opioid-induced sedation and respiratory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzyna, Donna; Jungquist, Carla R; Pasero, Chris; Willens, Joyce S; Nisbet, Allison; Oakes, Linda; Dempsey, Susan J; Santangelo, Diane; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2011-09-01

    result, there are considerable variations in screening for risk and monitoring practices. All of these factors prompted the American Society for Pain Management Nursing to approve the formation of an expert consensus panel to examine the scientific basis and state of practice for assessment and monitoring practices for adult hospitalized patients receiving opioid analgesics for pain control and to propose recommendations for patient care, education, and systems-level changes that promote quality care and patient safety. PMID:21893302

  19. Potential benefits of the increase in nuclear cooperation between Latin and North American countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic problems of Latin American countries are increasing the pressure on the world's environmental health. Therefore, it is necessary to create efficient means to support fast and environmentally safe development efforts in the region. The objective of this work is to stress the importance of nuclear technology cooperation between American countries as an important means to foster economic and social growth. Scientific production in Brazil and other Latin American countries has not increased significantly in the last decades, and modern technology is only available to a small fraction of the population. To ameliorate this problem it is necessary to improve technological cooperation throughout the american continent, which will be facilitated by the existing scientific capacity available in some Latin American universities and laboratories. Small and big countries alike need to establish their share in the cooperative effort to reduce present day technology hazards. (author)

  20. International Conference of Ukrainian Nuclear Society ''NPP's safety and protection''(annotations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abstracts of reports submitted to the Conference include: - New developments of the safe nuclear installations; - NPP ecological safety; - Methods of personnel and population protection; - Waste management safety (at transportation, processing and storage); - Spent nuclear fuel management; - NPP life extension and decommissioning; - Public opinion as an element of NPP safety; - Training of personnel, scientific support and safety culture; - Forecasting of nuclear power and industry safe development; - Development of international cooperation in nuclear power

  1. Participation of CIEMAT in the 29 Annual meeting of the Spanish Nuclear Society. Zaragoza 1,2 y 3 October 2003; Participacion del CIEMAT en la 29 Reunion Anual de la Sociedad Nuclear Espanola

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The book assembles the paper of researches of CIEMAT during the 29th annual meeting of Spanish Nuclear Society. The paper were presented during the following sessions : 1. Nuclear fuel. 2. R and D materials. 3.Operation and maintenance. Lifetime. 4.- R and D and T participation and transmutation.5. Environment. 6. Radioactive wastes and dismantling. 7. Nuclear safety. 8. Nuclear law.

  2. American society of clinical oncology update on the role of bisphosphonates and bone health issues in women with breast cancer Part II. Bisphosphonates in the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Vysotskaya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available American society of clinical oncology update on the roleof bisphosphonates and bone health issues in women with breast cancer Part II. Bisphosphonates in the adjuvant therapy of breast cancer

  3. Present aspects of the nuclear power development in the frame of the modern society requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper analyzes the development of the nuclear power sector from economic, social and environment protection points of view. In Romania, the contribution of nuclear power to the total production of electric power was about 10% in 2001. The development of the nuclear field in Romania meets the requirements of sustainable development. The advantages of nuclear energy are the following: low annual fuel consumption, comparatively with the fossil fuel plants, decreased releases of greenhouse gases and reduced mining activity, transportation and storage of wastes. The nuclear energy and the renewable energy sources are able to sustain the economic growth and the objectives of sustainable development. The nuclear field development is affected by decisional risks of political or social nature. The public was deeply concerned by issues such as environmental impacts of testing of nuclear weapons, major accidents (Chernobyl and TMI), nuclear power plant safety and nuclear waste storage. At present, there is a low interest for the nuclear field at the university level. Therefore, there are legitimate concerns about the transmission of the nuclear expertise to the next generations and currently large and sustainable efforts are undertaken towards adequate management of preserving and fostering the nuclear knowledge on one side and better information and education of public even from school time on the other side

  4. Annual report 1993 by the Rossendorf Society of Nuclear Engineering and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second annual report contains, apart from the business report and the organigram, priorities and results achieved in the special fields of nuclear installations (decommissioning and disposal), nuclear waste management (radioactive wastes), nuclear analyses and rehabilitation, radiopharmaceuticals, and safety and radiation protection. (HP)

  5. American National Standard administrative practices for nuclear criticality safety, ANSI/ANS-8.19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    American National Standard Administrative Practices for Nuclear Criticality Safety, ANSI/ANS-8.19, provides guidance for the administration of an effective program to control the risk of nuclear criticality in operations with fissile material outside reactors. The several sections of the standard address the responsibilities of management, supervisory personnel, and the criticality safety staff, as well as requirements and suggestions for the content of operating procedures, process evaluations, material control procedures, and emergency procedures

  6. A "Nuclear Integration" : Constructing Supranationality in the South American Southern Cone

    OpenAIRE

    Milanese, Juan Pablo

    2007-01-01

    The agreements for the peaceful use of nuclear energy reached by Argentina and Brazil are not like the traditional South American integration schemes. Historically, the latter were characterized by their interpresidential structure, which showed progress but produced a precarious level of institutionalization. Although the beginning of the "nuclear cooperation" can also be characterized by its interpresidential nature, later the course of the development turned towards supranationality, with ...

  7. X Latin American Symposium on Nuclear Physics and Applications. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 10th Latin American Symposium on Nuclear Physics and Applications will be held on December 1-6, 2013 in Montevideo, Uruguay. The symposium will be preceded by a School on Medical Physics, on November 29-30, 2013. The symposium is organized by the Universidad de la Repùblica, Montevideo, by the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan, USA, and by the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Virginia, USA. This is the tenth event in a series which were previously held in Venezuela, Colombia, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Peru, Chile and Ecuador. Traditionally, the purpose of these symposia is the dissemination of major theoretical and experimental advances in nuclear science, with emphasis on research topics carried out by Latin American groups or in collaborations involving institutions from Latin America. The topics of the symposium include: Nuclear and Hadron Structure and Interactions Nuclear Reactions and Phases of Nuclear Matter Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics Tests of Fundamental Symmetries and Properties of Neutrinos Nuclear Applications New Facilities and Instrumentation.The 10th Latin American Symposium on Nuclear Physics and Applications will be held on December 1-6, 2013 in Montevideo, Uruguay. The symposium will be preceded by a School on Medical Physics, on November 29-30, 2013. The symposium is organized by the Universidad de la República, Montevideo, by the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan, USA, and by the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Virginia, USA. This is the tenth event in a series which were previously held in Venezuela, Colombia, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Peru, Chile and Ecuador. Traditionally, the purpose of these symposia is the dissemination of major theoretical and experimental advances in nuclear science, with emphasis on research topics carried out by Latin American groups or in collaborations involving institutions from Latin America. The topics of the symposium include

  8. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 4, The waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is unit 4 (The Waste Management System) in a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  9. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 4, The waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the teachers guide to unit 4, (The Waste Management System), of a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  10. Society and health effects of aspects an overview of nuclear energy

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Soykenar; Sabahat Coskun

    2015-01-01

    Today along with developing technology and rapid population growth, energy needs have been increasing in the worldwide. In order to supply rising energy demands, the countries have been tending to nuclear power plants which have high productivitiy. As all kinds of energy sources, there are negative effects to public health in the stages of production and consumption also for nuclear energy. For nuclear power plants established by using high tecnology, required precautions are adopted by asses...

  11. Proceedings of the 17th conference of the Nuclear Societies of Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference presentations discuss various aspects of operating a nuclear reactor. The main aspects are: reactor physics, operation control and safety. Isotope applications and instrumentations were also discussed

  12. Papers of the First Annual Congress of the Mexican Nuclear Society, C.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fulfillment of the First Annual Congress of the Sociedad Nuclear Mexicana is the culmination of a longing for a long time expected for every one of the professionals in the different branches of the nuclear field; to have a forum for the discussion and communication of the achievements of the different institutions in any way involved with nuclear sciences. The reply attained on behalf of community (51 papers) is an indicative of the interest of our members in the event, we are not doubtful that in its consolidation, will be an important forum for the exchange of ideas and the approach among the members of the nuclear community. (Author)

  13. 6. Regional Congress on Radiation Protection and Safety; 3. Iberian and Latin American Congress on Radiological Protection Societies; Regional IRPA Congress. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 6th Regional Congress on Radiation Protection and Safety was organized by the Peruvian Radiation Protection Society and the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy, held in Lima, Peru, between 9 and 13 of november of 2003. In this event, were presented 227 papers that were articulated in the following sessions: radiation natural exposure, biological effects of ionizing radiation, instruments and dosimetry, radiological emergency and accidents, occupational radiation protection, radiological protection in medical exposure, radiological environmental protection, legal aspects, standards and regulations, training, education and communication, radioactive waste management, radioactive material transport, nuclear safety and biological effects of non-ionizing radiation. (APC)

  14. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Sweden: The evolving role for KASAM when society is preparing for important decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KASAM, the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste, is an independent scientific council attached to the Ministry of Sustainable Development. The members of KASAM are independent scientists within a wide range of areas of importance for the final disposal of radioactive waste, not only within technology and natural sciences but also within areas such as ethics and social sciences. Swedish nuclear waste management policy and implementation is currently in a protracted phase of planning and decisions. Starting in 2006 , the Swedish Nuclear Waste Management Co (SKB) is expected to submit the necessary applications for permits to construct an encapsulation facility and a disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel (in crystalline bedrock about 500 meters below the ground). According to Swedish legislation, basic permits have to be granted by the Government, but the Government will not grant such permits unless the concerned host municipality accepts the proposal. The Government decision will form the basis for detailed licensing decisions by the regulatory authorities. KASAM has an important role as an independent advisory body to the Ministry of Sustainable Development. Also, KASAM will continue its function of creating forums for dialogue that could contribute to increase knowledge and understanding and improve the knowledge base for decision-making. There are a number of questions that are relevant. Examples are: Will society have a satisfactory basis for decision-making? What happens if society is not capable of making necessary decisions? Does the decision-making process enable society to postpone important decisions if more time is needed, to avoid obstacles if they appear, and - if needed - reverse decisions? Considering issues like this, KASAM has set up a plan for its activities in the next few years. These activities are meant to contribute to the ability of society as a whole to arrive at a well-founded decision that is widely accepted. Based on facts

  15. Collection of articles of the 5-th Conference of the Ukrainian Nuclear Society 'Youth to nuclear power'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large scope of problems is presented. Operation of nuclear power enterprises, introduction of safety culture principles in them, situation with the training of specialists, role of youth in nuclear fuel complex and others are discussed. Reports of participants which were submitted at the conference are presented

  16. Nuclear energy remains a subject of discord in society and economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reports on opinions and viewpoints expressed on the economic consequences of the German energy policy during the Annual Nuclear Technology Conference, on the development of quick breeders and the application of nuclear energy in the heat market of the Federal Republic and finally on the prospects for reactors with low and medium outputs. (orig./UA)

  17. 1993 International conference on nuclear waste management and environmental remediation, Prague, Czech Republic, September 5--11, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the trip was to attend the 1993 International Conference on Nuclear Waste Management and Environmental Remediation. The principal objective of this conference was to facilitate a truly international exchange of information on the management of nuclear wastes as well as contaminated facilities and sites emanating from nuclear operations. The conference was sponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Czech and Slovak Mechanical Engineering Societies, and the Czech and Slovak Nuclear Societies in cooperation with the Commission of the European Communities, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the OECD Nuclear Agency. The conference was cosponsored by the American Nuclear Society, the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, the Canadian Nuclear Society, the (former USSR) Nuclear Society, and the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers. This was the fourth in a series of biennial conferences, which started in Hong Kong, in 1987. This report summarizes shared aspects of the trip; however, each traveler's observations and recommendations are reported separately

  18. The role of the American media in covering nuclear power: where is the balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides some conclusions on media coverage of the nuclear power industry that we, at the Media Institute, have reached in the course of exhaustive study of the subject. I will focus on the American media - why it covers this industry in the manner it does, what this means to our political policymaking process and what the American nuclear industry should be doing, but is not doing, to ensure that the public is receiving accurate and unbiased information. The Media Institute is an independent research organization which monitors and analyses media coverage of business and economic issues. It is supported by a wide range of corporations, foundations and individuals. It does not take a position for or against nuclear power, but it has published several thorough analyses of television evening news coverage of the nuclear industry in America. While techniques of content analysis were used in these studies to quantify the subject matter being presented to the viewer, no attempt was made to analyse or comment upon the merits of the issue itself. If asked to summarize American television coverage of the nuclear industry, I would say that it tends to be superficial, inadequate and, perhaps worst of all, biased and sensational. (author)

  19. Society and health effects of aspects an overview of nuclear energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Soykenar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Today along with developing technology and rapid population growth, energy needs have been increasing in the worldwide. In order to supply rising energy demands, the countries have been tending to nuclear power plants which have high productivitiy. As all kinds of energy sources, there are negative effects to public health in the stages of production and consumption also for nuclear energy. For nuclear power plants established by using high tecnology, required precautions are adopted by assessing all negative effects that can harm environmental health. So as to provide our country to be the leading position in the global trade and tecnological progress competition, it is required to make the investments by evaluating the pros and cons of nuclear energy, regarded as a qualified and sustainable energy source. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(1.000: 65-70

  20. CLI and ANCCLI, civil society players for the common good: nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beside each nuclear installation stands a CLI (Local Information Commission) whose purpose is to both inform the public and assure an ongoing monitoring of the impact on the environment. 37 CLI have been created and dispatched on the French territory, they are composed of 4 panels: local elected people, representatives from environmental protection associations, representatives from nuclear industry trade unions and experts. CLIs question plant operators, the ASN (Nuclear Safety Authority) or the IRSN (Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety), organize public discussions, take part in inspections, mandate experts on specific points, and organize the radiation monitoring of the environment around the plant. CLIs listen to the requests of the citizens. CLIs are grouped in a confederation called ANCCLI (National Association of CLIs) whose main mission is to represent CLIs in national or international bodies. (A.C.)

  1. Assessment of GHG emission reduction pathways in a society without carbon capture and nuclear technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Every possible technology is pursued in order to achieve strict radiative forcing targets. Nuclear energy and Carbon Capture Storage (CCS) are regarded as important mitigation options. However, harsh criticisms have been directed at Japanese nuclear energy policy after the Fukushima nuclear accident, and the Japanese government will be required to re-evaluate not only its energy policy, but also the GHG reduction target itself. Like nuclear energy, CCS might not be regarded as a suitable option for GHG mitigation because its long-term safety has not been revealed. In this paper we analyze the energy policy response to an absence of nuclear energy and CCS, especially focusing on Japan, China and India. We find that the appropriate energy strategies against the unproven technologies differ between regions due to the uneven pre-existing nuclear energy, CCS potential and renewable energy potential, and the resource endowments and the levels of economic development. We also find that the strict mitigation target can be achieved even if nuclear energy and CCS are not available. In such a case, however, significant enhancement of renewable energy is needed, as well as particular fossil fuel alternatives based on region-specific availabilities and costs. - Highlights: ► We used a recursive-dynamic CGE model in which many advanced technologies are considered. ► We simulated radiative forcing targets assuming no availability of nuclear and CCS. ► The appropriate energy strategies against the unproven technologies differ between regions. ► The significant enhancement of renewable energy is needed, as well as particular fossil fuel alternatives.

  2. International round table meeting of the Nuclear Technology Dept. of the Economy Management Society (ETE). [Training course on the utilization of research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szondi, E.J. (Budapesti Mueszaki Egyetem (Hungary). Egyetemi Reaktor)

    1984-09-01

    Experiences with the utilization possibilities of training reactors were discussed by the participants of an advanced training course organized by the IAEA at the Technical University, Budapest. Fields of activities of the Nuclear Technology Dept. of Energy Management Society of Hungary, and the national nuclear power programs of the Republic of Korea, Spain, Iran and Jamaica were reviewed in the course of short lectures.

  3. Meeting the information needs of lower income cancer survivors: results of a randomized control trial evaluating the american cancer society's "I can cope".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michelle Y; Evans, Mary B; Kratt, Polly; Pollack, Lori A; Smith, Judith Lee; Oster, Robert; Dignan, Mark; Prayor-Patterson, Heather; Watson, Christopher; Houston, Peter; Andrews, Shiquina; Liwo, Amandiy; Tseng, Tung Sung; Hullett, Sandral; Oliver, Joann; Pisu, Maria

    2014-04-01

    The American Cancer Society is a leader in the development of cancer survivorship resources. One resource of the American Cancer Society is the I Can Cope program, an educational program for cancer survivors and their families. Evaluations of this program indicate that cancer patients highly rate its objectives. Yet, there are gaps in the understanding of the full impact of the program on diverse cancer survivors. In this study, the authors used a randomized trial to evaluate the program. Participants included 140 low-income survivors (79% Black; 38% breast cancer) from community hospitals who were randomized to 4 sessions of I Can Cope (learning about cancer; understanding cancer treatments; relieving cancer pain; and keeping well in mind and body) or 4 sessions of a wellness intervention (humor, meditation, relaxation, and music therapy). The authors' primary outcome was "met information needs." After controlling for covariates, their analysis indicated that I Can Cope was no more effective than the wellness intervention in addressing survivor information needs relative to the learning objectives. Participants provided high overall ratings for both interventions. Self-efficacy for obtaining advice about cancer, age, education, and income were associated with information needs. Educational programs tailored to levels of self-efficacy and patient demographics may be needed. PMID:24433231

  4. 75 FR 80730 - Francis Slakey on Behalf of the American Physical Society; Receipt of Petition for Rulemaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... organization of research physicists with members in academia, national laboratories, and industry. The... report entitled ``Technical Steps to Support Nuclear Arsenal Downsizing.'' In the report, APS/POPA...

  5. ARM AND LEG IDIOMS IN THE BNC AND COCA CORPORA: VIEWS ON THE CULTURAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN BRITISH AND AMERICAN SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevena Tanasić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Phraseological units, primarily idioms are those types of linguistic units which reveal to a great extent how certain linguistic community copes with its surroundings. The aim of the paper is to demonstrate how idioms in English language are actually differently used across different genres in British and American linguistic communities, and try to explain those results in light of the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis. The study was conducted on the basis of the idioms that have the same body part, namely arm and/or leg, and those idioms were then compared in two corpora – the BNC (British National Corpus and COCA (Corpus of Contemporary American English.

  6. 76 FR 27351 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... October 13, 2004 (69 FR 60895). The last notification was filed with the Department on January 10, 2011. A... FR 6497). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement, Antitrust Division. BILLING CODE 4410-11... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on April 12, 2011, pursuant to Section...

  7. 75 FR 45156 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; American Society...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on October 13, 2004 (69 FR 60895). The last notification was... to Section 6(b) of the Act on March 24, 2010 (75 FR 14191). Patricia A. Brink, Deputy Director of... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on June 28, 2010, pursuant to Section 6(a)...

  8. 77 FR 31041 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... notice in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on October 13, 2004 (69 FR 60895). The... Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on December 23, 2011 (76 FR 80406). Patricia A. Brink... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on April 27, 2012, pursuant to Section...

  9. 78 FR 58558 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... Section 6(b) of the Act on October 13, 2004 (69 FR 60895). The last notification was filed with the... Act on April 3, 2013 (78 FR 20141). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement, Antitrust... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on August 20, 2013, pursuant to Section...

  10. 76 FR 52014 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... October 13, 2004 (69 FR 60895). The last notification was filed with the Department on April 12, 2011. A notice was published in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on May 11, 2011 (76 FR... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on July 25, 2011, pursuant to section 6(a)...

  11. 77 FR 58412 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993; American Society...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... notice in the Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on October 13, 2004 (69 FR 60895). The... Federal Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on May 24, 2012 (77 FR 31041). Patricia A. Brink... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on August 27, 2012, pursuant to Section...

  12. 76 FR 80406 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Register pursuant to Section 6(b) of the Act on October 13, 2004 (69 FR 60895). The last notification was... Section 6(b) of the Act on August 19, 2011 (76 FR 52014). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on December 6, 2011, pursuant to Section...

  13. 76 FR 6497 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ... Section 6(b) of the Act on October 13, 2004 (69 FR 60895). The last notification was filed with the... the Act on November 16, 2010 (75 FR 70031). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on January 10, 2011, pursuant to Section...

  14. 75 FR 14191 - Notice Pursuant to The National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ...) of the Act on October 13, 2004 (69 FR 60895). The last notification was filed with the Department on... December 9, 2009 (74 FR 65156). Patricia A. Brink, Deputy Director of Operations, Antitrust Division... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on February 25, 2010, pursuant to Section...

  15. 75 FR 70031 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-American Society...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... Section 6(b) of the Act on October 13, 2004 (69 FR 60895). The last notification was filed with the... Act on August 2, 2010 (75 FR 45156). Patricia A. Brink, Deputy Director of Operations, Antitrust... Society of Mechanical Engineers Notice is hereby given that, on October 14, 2010, pursuant to Section...

  16. International cooperation in nuclear fuel services: European and American approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US and Europe now are further apart on fuel cycle policies than was the case several years ago. Current US policy is now aimed at once-through fuel use (throwaway fuel cycle) and at making US supplies of nuclear materials and services to others dependent on their abstention from sensitive activities; the Europeans reject this policy. This document reviews the evaluation of US views and proposals and the experiences of European multinational fuel ventures. The reviews indicates fundamental differences and potential compatibilities. The conclusion is made that multinational fuel enterprise schemes offer no promise for resolving the dispute over countries rights to sensitive facilities

  17. Sustainable development through nuclear technology : 29th annual conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society and 32nd CNS/CNA student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 29th Annual Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Society and 32nd CNS/CNA Student Conference on Sustainable Development through Nuclear Technology was held on June 1-4, 2008 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The theme of the conference was 'Nuclear Sustainability'. The central objective of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of views on how this technical enterprise can best serve the needs of humanity, now and in the future. The renewed global interest in nuclear technology is based on a recognition of its potential to meet economic and environmental targets more favourably than competing technologies. Although many of these attractions are short-term in nature, they stem from a broader potential of nuclear technology to drive all aspects of development (social, environmental, economic) in a sustainable in this area. (author) a terial in support of fuel resources themselves. The conference drew a record attendance of over 450 delegates. Over 100 technical papers were presented within 15 technical sessions, as well as over 30 student papers in 5 sessions. The following list of session titles indicates the diversity of the technical papers: advanced reactors; plant and components; process systems; thermalhydraulics; safety and licensing; hydrogen; human factors; physics; instrumentation and control; environment and waste management; and plant operation. (author)

  18. Plutonium and liberty. Some possible consequences of nuclear reprocessing for an open society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence presented by JUSTICE at the public inquiry to hear objections to the planning application by British Nuclear Fuels Limited for the construction of an oxide fuel reprocessing plant at their Windscale works is made available, expanded in some places and summarised in others. The report falls under the following headings: background; legal implications of the discharges of radioactive substances; legal aspects of nuclear terrorism; physical guarding; surveillance; human feasibility; response to terrorist threats; interrogation of suspects; some counter-arguments; security and civil liberties. (U.K.)

  19. Why Americans support nuclear energy. Development and characteristics of public opinion in the U.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisconti, A.S. [Bisconti Research, Washington, DC (United States)

    2003-07-01

    A convergence of factors in the past few years has boosted public support for nuclear energy, including good performance, energy/electricity supply concerns in 2001, more outspoken support by leaders in government and industry, and media attention to a Nuclear Renaissance. In the latest national poll, May 2-4, 2003, two-thirds of the public said they favoured the use of nuclear energy. The gap between those who favor (64%) and oppose (31%) nuclear energy is much greater now than it was 20 years ago. There is near consensus support among Americans for license renewal for nuclear power plants that continue to meet federal safety standards (80%). A solid majority (65%) also agrees that we should keep the option to build more nuclear power plants. But the public is divided on the question of whether we should definitely build them - 50% of the public agreed with this proposition, 44% disagreed, and 6% were unsure. The percentages agreeing that we should definitely build more nuclear power plants in the future peaked in 2001, when electricity shortages in California and elsewhere were widely reported. There is a good possibility of maintaining the positive public opinion climate and even increasing perceptions of the need to build more plants. The industry can maintain this momentum through performance, communications, and projecting a positive attitude. Research indicates that communicating about the clean air benefits of nuclear energy significantly increases favorable attitudes toward nuclear energy. (orig.)

  20. Why Americans support nuclear energy. Development and characteristics of public opinion in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A convergence of factors in the past few years has boosted public support for nuclear energy, including good performance, energy/electricity supply concerns in 2001, more outspoken support by leaders in government and industry, and media attention to a Nuclear Renaissance. In the latest national poll, May 2-4, 2003, two-thirds of the public said they favoured the use of nuclear energy. The gap between those who favor (64%) and oppose (31%) nuclear energy is much greater now than it was 20 years ago. There is near consensus support among Americans for license renewal for nuclear power plants that continue to meet federal safety standards (80%). A solid majority (65%) also agrees that we should keep the option to build more nuclear power plants. But the public is divided on the question of whether we should definitely build them - 50% of the public agreed with this proposition, 44% disagreed, and 6% were unsure. The percentages agreeing that we should definitely build more nuclear power plants in the future peaked in 2001, when electricity shortages in California and elsewhere were widely reported. There is a good possibility of maintaining the positive public opinion climate and even increasing perceptions of the need to build more plants. The industry can maintain this momentum through performance, communications, and projecting a positive attitude. Research indicates that communicating about the clean air benefits of nuclear energy significantly increases favorable attitudes toward nuclear energy. (orig.)

  1. Structures of public opinion and the nuclear debate in French contemporary society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the nuclear debate is seen as a ''theme of expression'', a symbolic means of exchange that serves as an indication of how one stands in relation to others on the social scene. The theme and its development trends are viewed from the stand-point of communication media which reflect and produce ''the social man''

  2. Abstracts of the 4. Congress of the Brazilian Society of Biology and Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All the activities about the congress are reported. The whole abstracts of 74 free-topics were presented. The subjects of the free-topics were:quality control in Nuclear Medicine, radiopharmacy and diagnostic techniques (scintiscanning, tomography, incorporation and extraction of radioisotopes and labelled compounds, radioimmunoassay) among other things. (M.A.C.)

  3. Risk and safety in the nuclear industry and conventional norms of society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study the societal acceptance of various risks is analyzed and rules of risk acceptance as a function of different parameters are spelled out. The monetary value of a human life is estimated, based on investments in safety of different human activities. The acceptable risks and safety investments in different human activities are then compared with risks and safety investments of the nuclear industry. Safety investments required to reduce the radioactivity releases and risks from nuclear power stations to ALAP levels are taken as a study case. It is found that risks in the nuclear industry are several orders of magnitude lower and safety investments per human life saved are several orders of magnitude higher, as compared with risks and safety investments in other human activities. It is also shown that the incremental safety investments needed to further reduce the radiation doses in the environment during normal and continuous operation of nuclear plants are extravagantly high as compared to safety investments in other human activities and in other facets of human life. Considering that there is a limit to the economic means available, societal expenditures for reducing risks should by spread, as much as possible, over all human activities to get the maximum return from investments. (B.G.)

  4. Physicians confront the apocalypse: the American medical profession and the threat of nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physicians figured prominently in the resurgence of nuclear weapons activism and cultural awareness that swept the US in the early 1980s. This discussion seeks to place this activism in historical context. It explores the American medical profession's shifting engagement with the issue of nuclear war. Attention is focused on the period 1945 to 1954, with a brief evaluation of the period 1954 to 1963, the years to which the activism of the 1980s may be traced. Radiation studies are reviewed including Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors. Radiological studies were begun within days of Japan's surrender. The delayed effects of radiation exposure on some 14,000 persons in Hiroshima and Nagasaki include hemorrhage, leukocyte destruction, bone marrow damage, anemia, sterility, and the suppression of menstruation. In contrast, the American medical profession in the late 1940s focused much attention on the atom's potential medical benefits, especially the diagnostic and treatment value of radioisotopes. 90 references

  5. II. congress of Czechoslovak Society of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain 165 abstracts of papers covering all areas of the application of nuclear medicine, such as osteology, cardiology, immunology, neurology, oncology, etc. The topics include the examination of the skeleton with radioisotopes, various immunology methods, scintiscanning of body organs, tumor monitoring, radiopharmacology aspects, biological radiation effects, cytogenetic changes following irradiation, and studies of radiation effects on DNA repair. Separate volumes are devoted to education of technicians, processing of radioisotope examination data, radiation protection and decontamination. (M.D.)

  6. Society of Critical Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are encouraged to participate in the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition’s (ASPEN) fifth annual ... the 46th Critical Care Congress Register for the Society of Critical Care Medicine's (SCCM) 46th Critical Care ...

  7. Infectious Diseases Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Public Comment Period Panel Response 2016 Nominations Society Awards Nominate A Colleague Previous Winners IDSA Elections ... LDTs (PDF) IDSA, ASM and the Pan-American Society for Clinical Virology urge FDA to consider the ...

  8. Reflecting the Changing Face of American Society: How 1970’s Sitcoms and Spin-Offs Helped Redefine American Identity

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis TREDY

    2016-01-01

    When looking back at the popular American situation comedies of the 1970’s, one notices a vast network of programs aimed at framing social discourse and at helping America come to term with its own, changing image. This was done through a restaging of the political and social ills of the generation as comedic teleplays, thereby using laughter as a vehicle towards social awareness and unwitting change or personal growth, and by recycling popular (and unpopular) clichés and stereotypes (the big...

  9. Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [ed.] [National Inst. of Radiation Protection, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    Two main strategies exist for long-term information transfer, one which links information through successive transfers of archived material and other forms of knowledge in society, and one - such as marking the site with a monument - relying upon a direct link from the present to the distant future. Digital methods are not recommended for long-term storage, but digital processing may be a valuable tool to structure information summaries, and in the creation of better long-lasting records. Advances in archive management should also be pursued to widen the choice of information carriers of high durability. In the Nordic countries, during the first few thousand years, and perhaps up to the next period of glaciation, monuments at a repository site may be used to warn the public of the presence of dangerous waste. But messages from such markers may pose interpretation problems as we have today for messages left by earlier societies such as rune inscriptions. Since the national borders may change in the time scale relevant for nuclear waste, the creation of an international archive for all radioactive wastes would represent an improvement as regards conservation and retrieval of information. (EG).

  10. Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two main strategies exist for long-term information transfer, one which links information through successive transfers of archived material and other forms of knowledge in society, and one - such as marking the site with a monument - relying upon a direct link from the present to the distant future. Digital methods are not recommended for long-term storage, but digital processing may be a valuable tool to structure information summaries, and in the creation of better long-lasting records. Advances in archive management should also be pursued to widen the choice of information carriers of high durability. In the Nordic countries, during the first few thousand years, and perhaps up to the next period of glaciation, monuments at a repository site may be used to warn the public of the presence of dangerous waste. But messages from such markers may pose interpretation problems as we have today for messages left by earlier societies such as rune inscriptions. Since the national borders may change in the time scale relevant for nuclear waste, the creation of an international archive for all radioactive wastes would represent an improvement as regards conservation and retrieval of information. (EG)

  11. The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. How has the Geochemical Society of Japan been grappling with it?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 11 in 2011, a great earthquake hit the eastern part of mainland Japan and triggered several gigantic tsunami waves, which destroyed the coastal areas in Tohoku and north Kanto districts facing the Pacific Ocean. The earthquake and a tsunami fatally damaged the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) and took over the nuclear reactors. Eventually a large amount of radioactive materials was released into the environment. Radioactive nuclides were detected in a wide area including remote areas such as the Kanto district and metropolitan Tokyo. Some radioactive nuclides were detected in the United States and in some European countries, implying that radioactive materials released into the atmosphere and oceans were carried by global atmospheric and oceanic circulations all over the world. The Geochemical Society of Japan (GSJ) initiated several actions soon after the earthquake and the FDNPP accident. For instance, in response to the society's appeal, many GSJ members joined the project to map the distribution of several radioactive nuclides in soil samples in the Fukushima Prefecture. The members' contributions led to the creation of several distribution maps of radioactive nuclides, such as 134,137Cs, 131I, and 132Te, trapped in soils in Fukushima. Another approach was to set the occasion for presenting the members' activities related to the FDNPP accident. For instance, the GSJ proposed to organize special sessions on research activities related to the FDNPP accident on the occasions of the 2011 Goldschmidt Conference and 2011 Annual Meeting of the GSJ. In this article, how the GSJ have been grappling with the PDNPP accident was chronologically described, especially from a viewpoint of an alliance with other organizations. (author)

  12. Nuclear-electrica experience related to the public information about nuclear energy and its benefits for development of society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All target audience is important in building the confidence, but some categories deserve special attention, considering the today priorities of the company: Local public, including local authorities - as far the anti-nuclear NGOs started a strong campaign against Cernavoda 2 and further development of the site. Mass-media representatives, increasing the co-operation with local newspapers, as well as with the national ones. Politicians, considering this year elections, and the re-drafting process of the political strategies of different parties. Improving the internal communication developing INTRANET and EXTRANET channels, and extending social events inside the company. A better social acceptability of nuclear energy may be obtained through a sustained effort to improve the public trust, using tools as diversified as possible; The public information and public participation are the two main components of the communication process, the accent following to be changed from information to participation; Public communication must be professionalized and planned so that each target group be treated in a specific manner; According to our experience, at this moment the target groups are local communities, mass media representatives and decision makers, but we can not neglect the internal communication which is important for local public involvement; Company has enough flexibility to re-define the target audience, considering possible future reallocation of priorities. (author)

  13. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement: opportunities in the patient protection and affordable care act to reduce cancer care disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Beverly; Polite, Blase N; Halpern, Michael T; Stranne, Steven K; Winer, Eric P; Wollins, Dana S; Newman, Lisa A

    2011-10-01

    Patients in specific vulnerable population groups suffer disproportionately from cancer. The elimination of cancer disparities is critically important for lessening the burden of cancer. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provides both opportunities and challenges for addressing cancer care disparities and access to care. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) advocates for policies that ensure access to cancer care for the underserved. Such policies include insurance reform and the reduction of economic barriers to quality health care. Building on ASCO's prior statement on disparities in cancer care (2009), this article summarizes elements of the health care law that are relevant to cancer disparities and provides recommendations for addressing major provisions in the law. It outlines specific strategies to address insurance reform, access to care, quality of care, prevention and wellness, research on health care disparities, and diversity in the health care workforce. ASCO is committed to leading efforts toward the improvement of cancer care among the most vulnerable patients. PMID:21810680

  14. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report. A Framework for Addressing Multimorbidity in Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pulmonary Disease, Critical Illness, and Sleep Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kevin C; Gould, Michael K; Krishnan, Jerry A; Boyd, Cynthia M; Brozek, Jan L; Cooke, Colin R; Douglas, Ivor S; Goodman, Richard A; Joo, Min J; Lareau, Suzanne; Mularski, Richard A; Patel, Minal R; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Shanawani, Hasan; Slatore, Christopher; Sockrider, Marianna; Sufian, Beth; Thomson, Carey C; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2016-03-01

    Coexistence of multiple chronic conditions (i.e., multimorbidity) is the most common chronic health problem in adults. However, clinical practice guidelines have primarily focused on patients with a single disease, resulting in uncertainty about the care of patients with multimorbidity. The American Thoracic Society convened a workshop with the goal of establishing a strategy to address multimorbidity within clinical practice guidelines. In this Workshop Report, we describe a framework that addresses multimorbidity in each of the key steps of guideline development: topic selection, panel composition, identifying clinical questions, searching for and synthesizing evidence, rating the quality of that evidence, summarizing benefits and harms, formulating recommendations, and rating the strength of the recommendations. For the consideration of multimorbidity in guidelines to be successful and sustainable, the process must be both feasible and pragmatic. It is likely that this will be achieved best by the step-wise addition and refinement of the various components of the framework. PMID:26963362

  15. Risk and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book brings together the communications presented at the colloquium 'risk and society' held in Paris (France) on November 1998. During this colloquium, the various aspects of risk and of its management were discussed by medical specialists, historians, industrialists, engineers, philosophers, lawyers, politicians and administration representatives. The first theme concerns the controversies generated by the development of some activities (genetics, bio-technologies, nuclear and radiations use). The second theme concerns the management of risks and the way to conciliate the point of view of authorities and citizens (confidence of the public with respect to experts, scientists, industrialists, government and administrative representatives, role played by the media). The debates that took place during the colloquium have shown that the public opinion concerning the nuclear activities or the new technologies greatly depends on the ideological attitudes and on the public's likes and dislikes with respect to some categories of actors (distrust with respect to public decisions, fears with respect to changes and future, nostalgia of the past). The following aspects are reviewed: Notions of risk and hazard (risk and health, risk in today's society, medicine and society, the point of view of the industrialists and of the scientific and technical specialists); from the psychological aspects of the risk to its social aspects (survey of the risk assessment battlefield, social attenuation and amplification of risk, the feeling of risks in Europe, insecurity and delinquency, controversies around radioactivity and health); the negotiation and communication about risks (risk and public health, negotiation around risks, risks and information dissemination about the public debate, communication and crisis, evolution of risk communication, comparison between American and European approaches, the Seveso directive); the public debate and the evolution of risks management (the

  16. Materials from seminar session of the 3.general assembly of Polish Nuclear Society; 3.Walny Zjazd Polskiego Towarzystwa Nukleonicznego. Materialy sesji seminaryjnej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This publication edited as a scientific report of the Institute of Atomic Energy contains papers presented on the seminar session accompanying the 3rd General Assembly of Polish Nuclear Society. Five of these are dealing with the present situation in Poland in the framework of the following subjects: foreseeing electricity demand as a significant factor of development of electricity generation sector and nuclear option choice; present state and development trends of nuclear technique applications in industry, agriculture, health and environment protection; radioactive waste management especially related to the storage of spent fuel from EWA and MARIA research reactors; present educational problems in nuclear science and technology. The problems of nuclear power could not be excluded from the session, although it does not exist in Poland and no plans foresee it currently. The paper on nuclear power contains an extensive summary of nuclear power development worldwide, its safety problems, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. The so called ``Sellafield phenomenon`` considering the growth of leukaemia deaths of children living near that reprocessing plant in England has been commented in mass media criticizing nuclear energy application. The paper on this problem present the results of investigations and hypotheses on reasons having caused this phenomenon. The declaration of the International Council of Nuclear Societies on the role of nuclear science and technology in supporting the development is also included in the report.

  17. Proceedings of the 5. Regional congress on radiation protection and safety; 2. Iberian and Latin American Congress on Radiological Protection Societies; Regional IRPA Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fifth Regional Congress on Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety has been held in Recife (Brazil), from 29th April to 4th May 2001. The congress was hosted by the Brazilian Radiation Protection Society, under the joint sponsorship of FRALC and UFPE-DEN Department of Nuclear Energy. Its designation as a Regional IRPA Congress has been requested. The main purpose of the meeting was to bring together professionals from the industry, universities and research laboratories to present and discuss the latest research results, and to review the state of the art on applied and fundamental aspects of the radiation protection. These specialists have talked about nuclear safety and radiological protection, radiation natural exposure, biological effect of radiation, radiotherapy and medical radiological safety, radiological safety in industry and research. In their discussions, also were included subjects related to radiological safety of nuclear and radioactive facilities, radioactive waste management, radioactive material transport, environmental radiological monitoring program, radiological emergency and accidents, instruments and dosimetry, basic safety standards of protection against radiation

  18. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.1--Uranium Geology sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the first one, the content is about Uranium Geology

  19. Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol.2). Proceedings of academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society in 2011, No.6--computational physics sub-volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress report on nuclear science and technology in China (Vol. 2) includes 698 articles which are communicated on the second national academic annual meeting of China Nuclear Society. There are 10 books totally. This is the sixth one, the content is about computational physics

  20. Intravitreal Fluorinated Gas Preference and Occurrence of Rare Ischemic Postoperative Complications after Pars Plana Vitrectomy: A Survey of the American Society of Retina Specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Sigler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To perform a survey of the American Society of Retina Specialists (ASRS regarding the use of vitreous cavity fluorinated gas as an adjunct to pars plana vitrectomy for retinal detachment or macular hole repair. Methods. A multiple-choice online questionnaire was administered to members of ASRS. Physician experience, gas preference for vitrectomy, and categorical estimate of observation of blinding postoperative ischemic events were recorded. Results. 282 questionnaires were completed. Mean years in vitreoretinal practice were 15±10. A decrease in yearly vitrectomy volume was associated with increased number of years in practice (P=0.011. Greater than 95% of respondents preferred fluorinated gas to air alone for both retinal detachment and macular hole repair. 38% of respondents reported at least one observation of a blinding ischemic postoperative event. Overall estimated incidence of blinding postoperative ischemic event was 0.06 events/year in practice. Conclusions. Currently, C3F8 and SF6 are the postoperative gas preference for ASRS respondents, in contrast to previous North American surveys. The occurrence of blinding ischemic events appears unrelated to number of years in practice, was reported by less than half of those surveyed, and has occurred at an infrequent rate of approximately once for every ten years of practice for those observing the phenomena.

  1. Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility SREI Members-only Forum Home About Us About SREI Vision and Mission ... Fact Sheets and Booklets SREI is an affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below ...

  2. The web-enabled ODIN portal - useful databases for the European Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materials databases (MDBs) are powerful tools to store, retrieve and present experimental materials data of various categories adapted to specific needs of users. In combination with analysis tools experimental data are necessary for e.g. mechanical design, construction and lifetime predictions of complex components. The effective and efficient handling of large amounts of generic and detailed materials properties data related to e.g. fabrication processes is one of the basic elements of data administration within ongoing European research projects and networks. Over the last 20 years, the JRC/Institute of Energy of the European Commission at Petten has developed and continuously improved a database for experimental materials properties data (Mat-DB). The Mat-DB database structure is oriented to international material standards and recommendations. The database and associated analysis routines are accessible through a web-enabled interface on the On-line Data Information Network (ODIN: http://odin.jrc.nl). ODIN provides controlled access to Mat-DB and other related databases (e.g. the document database DoMa) and thus allows European R and D projects to securely manage and disseminate their experimental test data as well as any type of supporting documentation (e.g. unfiltered raw data, reports, minutes, etc). Using the Internet project partners can instantly access and evaluate data sets entered and validated by one of the members. This paper describes the structure and functionality of Mat-DB and gives examples how these tools can be used for the benefit of European nuclear R and D community. (author)

  3. Nuclear industry will be short of engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses the potential shortage of nuclear engineers due to reduction of educational and training facilities and difficulty in attracting minorities into nuclear engineering. The article reports on recommendations from the National Research Council Nuclear Education Study Committee on attracting minorities to nuclear engineering, increasing DOE fellowships, funding for research and development, involvement of utilities and vendors, and support of the American Nuclear Society's advocacy of nuclear engineering education

  4. Atomic-powered democracy: Policy against politics in the quest for American nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.W.

    1993-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the relationship of American nuclear energy to democracy. It examines whether the nuclear policy processes have furthered the legitimacy-government accountability and citizen participation-which the democratic institutes are based. Nuclear policy and its institutions have placed severe limitations on democratic practices. Contravened democracy is seen most clearly in the decoupling of policy from politics. Decoupling refers to the weakening of institutional linkages between citizens and government, and to the erosion of the norms that ground liberal democracy. Decoupling is manifested in policy centralization, procedural biases, technical rationality, and the spatial displacement of conflict. Decoupling has normative implications: While federal accountability was limited and citizen participation was shackled, other major groups enjoyed privileged access to policy making. The decoupling of nuclear policy from politics arose within the context of US liberal-democratic capitalism. The federal government pursued its own goals of defense and world leadership. Yet, it was not structurally autonomous from the hegemony of the political-economic context. Economically, the Atomic Energy Act did not permit federal agencies to directly invest in power plant construction, and did not authorize them to commercially generate electricity. Private industry was structurally placed to domesticate the atom. Politically, the liberal-democratic system hampered an unquestioning pursuit of atomic energy. Federal institutions have been forced to heed some of the anti-nuclear concerns. The pervasive influence of the US political economy on nuclear policy has come to transgress democracy. Nuclear power's growth faltered during the 1970s. The political and economic constraints on federal actions have limited the means available to revive a becalmed nuclear industry; this has exerted strong pressure on federal institutions to decouple policy from

  5. Atomic-powered democracy: Policy against politics in the quest for American nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation focuses on the relationship of American nuclear energy to democracy. It examines whether the nuclear policy processes have furthered the legitimacy-government accountability and citizen participation-which the democratic institutes are based. Nuclear policy and its institutions have placed severe limitations on democratic practices. Contravened democracy is seen most clearly in the decoupling of policy from politics. Decoupling refers to the weakening of institutional linkages between citizens and government, and to the erosion of the norms that ground liberal democracy. Decoupling is manifested in policy centralization, procedural biases, technical rationality, and the spatial displacement of conflict. Decoupling has normative implications: While federal accountability was limited and citizen participation was shackled, other major groups enjoyed privileged access to policy making. The decoupling of nuclear policy from politics arose within the context of US liberal-democratic capitalism. The federal government pursued its own goals of defense and world leadership. Yet, it was not structurally autonomous from the hegemony of the political-economic context. Economically, the Atomic Energy Act did not permit federal agencies to directly invest in power plant construction, and did not authorize them to commercially generate electricity. Private industry was structurally placed to domesticate the atom. Politically, the liberal-democratic system hampered an unquestioning pursuit of atomic energy. Federal institutions have been forced to heed some of the anti-nuclear concerns. The pervasive influence of the US political economy on nuclear policy has come to transgress democracy. Nuclear power's growth faltered during the 1970s. The political and economic constraints on federal actions have limited the means available to revive a becalmed nuclear industry; this has exerted strong pressure on federal institutions to decouple policy from participation

  6. Nuclear security in major public events: the XV Pan American Games and the III Para-Pan American Games in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of a major public event involving large numbers of spectators and participants, presents important security challenges. Taking this into consideration, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) has been requested, by the National Secretary of Public Security/ Ministry of Justice (SENASP/MJ), by the end of 2006, to participate on the security actions to be implemented in both the XV Pan American Games and III Para Pan American Games. The XV Pan American Games 2007 and the III Para Pan American Games were held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 13 to 29 July 2007 and from 12 to 19 August 2007, respectively. Those events had 8700 participants between athletes, coaches and referees from 42 countries. More than 300 competition events were held at 17 different venues and were covered by 4910 professionals from TV, radio and written press. Around 2 million tickets have been sold or distributed and 18,000 volunteers participated on the organization. The participation of CNEN was concentrated on the implementation of specific nuclear and radiological security measures to be applied at those events. This was part of a multi-institutional plan for the security of the Games, coordinated by the National Secretary of Public Security of the Ministry of Justice (SENASP/MJ). The support provided by IAEA under a Cooperation Arrangement with the Brazilian authorities was a key factor for the success of the whole operation. The actions taken and the lessons identified by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission related to nuclear and radiological security for the Pan American Games and for the Para Pan American Games are presented. (author)

  7. Nuclear security in major public events: The XV Pan-American games and the III Para Pan American games in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of a major public event involving large numbers of spectators and participants, presents important security challenges. Taking this into consideration, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) has been requested, by the National Secretary of Public Security/ Ministry of Justice (SENASP/MJ), by the end of 2006, to participate on the security actions to be implemented in both the XV Pan-American Games and III Para Pan American Games. The XV Pan American Games 2007 and the III Para Pan American Games were held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 13 to 29 July 2007 and from 12 to 19 August 2007, respectively. Those events had 8700 participants between athletes, coaches and referees from 42 countries. More than 300 competition events were held at 17 different venues and were covered by 4910 professionals from TV, radio and Mitten press. Around 2 million tickets have been sold or distributed and 18,000 volunteers participated on the organization. The participation of CNEN was concentrated on the implementation of specific nuclear and radiological security measures to be applied at those events. This was part of a multi institutional plan for the security of the Games, coordinated by the National Secretary of Public Security of the Ministry of Justice (SENASP/MJ). The support provided by IAEA under a Cooperation Arrangement with the Brazilian authorities was a key factor for the success of the whole operation. The actions taken and the lessons identified by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission related to nuclear and radiological security for the Pan American Games and for the Para Pan American Games are presented. (author)

  8. Nuclear security in major public events: the XV Pan American Games and the III Para-Pan American Games in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Luiz A. de; Monteiro Filho, Joselio S.; Belem, Lilia M.J.; Torres, Luiz F.B. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Radioprotecao e Segurania Nuclear. Coordenacao de Salvaguardas e Protecao Fisica], e-mail: gpf@cnen.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    The organization of a major public event involving large numbers of spectators and participants, presents important security challenges. Taking this into consideration, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) has been requested, by the National Secretary of Public Security/ Ministry of Justice (SENASP/MJ), by the end of 2006, to participate on the security actions to be implemented in both the XV Pan American Games and III Para Pan American Games. The XV Pan American Games 2007 and the III Para Pan American Games were held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 13 to 29 July 2007 and from 12 to 19 August 2007, respectively. Those events had 8700 participants between athletes, coaches and referees from 42 countries. More than 300 competition events were held at 17 different venues and were covered by 4910 professionals from TV, radio and written press. Around 2 million tickets have been sold or distributed and 18,000 volunteers participated on the organization. The participation of CNEN was concentrated on the implementation of specific nuclear and radiological security measures to be applied at those events. This was part of a multi-institutional plan for the security of the Games, coordinated by the National Secretary of Public Security of the Ministry of Justice (SENASP/MJ). The support provided by IAEA under a Cooperation Arrangement with the Brazilian authorities was a key factor for the success of the whole operation. The actions taken and the lessons identified by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission related to nuclear and radiological security for the Pan American Games and for the Para Pan American Games are presented. (author)

  9. The American Society's Constructed Image of Deaf People as Drawn from Discursive Constructions of Deaf People in Major U.S. Newspaper Articles on Cochlear Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Flavia Samella

    2011-01-01

    This study will explore the constructed image of deaf people in the American society as drawn through analyses of discursive structures in articles on cochlear implantation in major U.S. newspapers published between 2006-2009. To analyze discursive structures of newspaper articles, the approach of Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) will be…

  10. The comparative costs of nuclear and fossil fuelled power plants in an American electricity utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter compares the current and historic operating performances of twelve large nuclear and coal-fired units now operated by Commonwealth Edison Company, and provides specific comparison of bus-bar costs of electricity generated by those units in recent years. It also provides cost comparisons for future nuclear and coal-fired units and attempts to deal realistically with the effect of future inflation upon these comparisons. The chapter attempts to deal responsibly with the problem of uncertainty - how present-day comparisons may be affected by future developments and how my own published comparisons have varied over the past four or five years. The conclusion is reached that, given the uncertain world in which we live, no electric power supplier can afford to put all its eggs in one basket. Utility managers have a strong incentive to diversify their sources of power generation, and society as a whole would do well to encourage such diversification. (author)

  11. Timeline for emergency response to a nuclear criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the development of the draft American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS) Standard 8.23, open-quotes Nuclear Criticality Emergency Planning and Response,close quotes the writing group found it useful to develop a timeline of the sequence of the major activities. This paper describes that timeline

  12. Public Outreach of the South Texas Health Physic Society and Texas A and M University Nuclear Engineering Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a cooperative effort of the members of the South Texas Chapter of the Heath Physics Society (STC-HPS) and the Texas A and M University Nuclear Engineering Department, great efforts have been made to reach out and provide educational opportunities to members of the general public, school age children, and specifically teachers. These efforts have taken the form of Science Teacher Workshops (STW), visits to schools all over the state of Texas, public forums, and many other educational arenas. A major motivational factor for these most recent efforts can be directly tied to the attempt of the State of Texas to site a low-level radioactive waste facility near Sierra Blanca in West Texas. When the State of Texas first proposed to site a low level radioactive waste site after the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 was passed, many years of political struggle ensued. Finally, a site at Sierra Blanca in far West Texas was selected for study and characterization for a disposal site for waste generated in the Texas Compact states of Maine, Vermont and Texas. During this process, the outreach to and education of the local public became a paramount issue

  13. Fourth joint meeting of the American Urological Association and the Japanese Urological Association Specialty Society program at the 104th annual meeting of the American Urological Association at Chicago 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperberg, Matthew R; Hinotsu, Shiro; Chancellor, Michael B; Homma, Yukio; Nelson, Peter S; Matsuyama, Hideyasu; Menon, Mani; Kucuk, Omer; Hara, Isao; Egawa, Shin; Uzzo, Robert G; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Okuyama, Akihiko; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2009-08-01

    We are heartily grateful for the warm support of all of the people concerned, including the moderators and panelists of both societies for giving us the opportunity to hold the 4th American Urological Association/Japanese Urological Association (AUA/JUA) Joint Meeting, held once again at the 104th Annual Meeting of the American Urological Association (25-30 April 2009, Chicago, Illinois, USA). 2009 is a memorable year, being the start of new collaborations between AUA and JUA. The JUA in collaboration with AUA is promoting an academic exchange program whereby outstanding and promising Japanese and American junior faculty members will be given the opportunity to work in the USA and Japan for one month. The program not only allows the sharing of knowledge and experience, but is designed to foster a closer alliance between the AUA and JUA, and assists in identifying future leaders within both organizations. The JUA will have an exhibit booth at the AUA annual meeting, promoting our new joint activities. The Journal of Urology and International Journal of Urology will share reviewers. The JUA will participate in developing AUA guidelines. With all of these activities, the JUA hopes it will provide greater opportunities to young Japanese urologists to participate in educational projects in the US. We would like to thank Professor Robert C. Flanigan, the Secretary General of AUA, Professor Glenn M. Preminger, the Chairman of the AUA Office of Education and the staff of AUA and JUA for supporting our program. We hope to keep holding the joint meeting and have plenty of ideas on themes and forums. We believe that this international program helps to establish a closer relationship between JUA and AUA in the scientific field. PMID:19682110

  14. American commercial nuclear power industry programs, work processes, and organizational changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American electric utility industry is undergoing a continuing series of regulatory and commercial changes unprecedented in the recent history of the industry. The changes are resulting in an industrywide examination of all facets of the business including the arena of operations and maintenance costs in conjunction with the nuclear facilities. The very viability of most nuclear facilities to a large extent depends on the effective implementation of program, process, and organizational reviews. These reviews, in one form or another, are under way at a number of facilities sometimes as a open-quotes stand-alone activityclose quotes and as often as not as a portion of a corporate and firmwide initiative. The impetus is coming from the marketplace, and both major challenges and opportunities are encompassed by the changes

  15. An Assessment of the Current US Radiation Oncology Workforce: Methodology and Global Results of the American Society for Radiation Oncology 2012 Workforce Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vichare, Anushree; Washington, Raynard; Patton, Caroline; Arnone, Anna [ASTRO, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, (United States); Fung, Claire Y. [Commonwealth Newburyport Cancer Center, Newburyport, Massachusetts (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Pohar, Surjeet, E-mail: spohar@netzero.net [Indiana University Health Cancer Center East, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the characteristics, needs, and concerns of the current radiation oncology workforce, evaluate best practices and opportunities for improving quality and safety, and assess what we can predict about the future workforce. Methods and Materials: An online survey was distributed to 35,204 respondents from all segments of the radiation oncology workforce, including radiation oncologists, residents, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, medical physicists, nurse practitioners, nurses, physician assistants, and practice managers/administrators. The survey was disseminated by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) together with specialty societies representing other workforce segments. An overview of the methods and global results is presented in this paper. Results: A total of 6765 completed surveys were received, a response rate of 19%, and the final analysis included 5257 respondents. Three-quarters of the radiation oncologists, residents, and physicists who responded were male, in contrast to the other segments in which two-thirds or more were female. The majority of respondents (58%) indicated they were hospital-based, whereas 40% practiced in a free-standing/satellite clinic and 2% in another setting. Among the practices represented in the survey, 21.5% were academic, 25.2% were hospital, and 53.3% were private. A perceived oversupply of professionals relative to demand was reported by the physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist segments. An undersupply was perceived by physician's assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses. The supply of radiation oncologists and residents was considered balanced. Conclusions: This survey was unique as it attempted to comprehensively assess the radiation oncology workforce by directly surveying each segment. The results suggest there is potential to improve the diversity of the workforce and optimize the supply of the workforce segments. The survey also provides a benchmark for

  16. An Assessment of the Current US Radiation Oncology Workforce: Methodology and Global Results of the American Society for Radiation Oncology 2012 Workforce Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the characteristics, needs, and concerns of the current radiation oncology workforce, evaluate best practices and opportunities for improving quality and safety, and assess what we can predict about the future workforce. Methods and Materials: An online survey was distributed to 35,204 respondents from all segments of the radiation oncology workforce, including radiation oncologists, residents, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, medical physicists, nurse practitioners, nurses, physician assistants, and practice managers/administrators. The survey was disseminated by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) together with specialty societies representing other workforce segments. An overview of the methods and global results is presented in this paper. Results: A total of 6765 completed surveys were received, a response rate of 19%, and the final analysis included 5257 respondents. Three-quarters of the radiation oncologists, residents, and physicists who responded were male, in contrast to the other segments in which two-thirds or more were female. The majority of respondents (58%) indicated they were hospital-based, whereas 40% practiced in a free-standing/satellite clinic and 2% in another setting. Among the practices represented in the survey, 21.5% were academic, 25.2% were hospital, and 53.3% were private. A perceived oversupply of professionals relative to demand was reported by the physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist segments. An undersupply was perceived by physician's assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses. The supply of radiation oncologists and residents was considered balanced. Conclusions: This survey was unique as it attempted to comprehensively assess the radiation oncology workforce by directly surveying each segment. The results suggest there is potential to improve the diversity of the workforce and optimize the supply of the workforce segments. The survey also provides a benchmark for

  17. A Comparison of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery post-myopic LASIK/PRK Intraocular Lens (IOL calculator and the Ocular MD IOL calculator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available David L DeMill1, Majid Moshirfar1, Marcus C Neuffer1, Maylon Hsu1, Shameema Sikder21John A Moran Eye Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USABackground: To compare the average values of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (ASCRS and Ocular MD intraocular lens (IOL calculators to assess their accuracy in predicting IOL power in patients with prior laser-in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK or photorefractive keratectomy.Methods: In this retrospective study, data from 21 eyes with previous LASIK or photorefractive keratectomy for myopia and subsequent cataract surgery was used in an IOL calculator comparison. The predicted IOL powers of the Ocular MD SRK/T, Ocular MD Haigis, and ASCRS averages were compared. The Ocular MD average (composed of an average of Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis and the all calculator average (composed of an average of Ocular MD SRK/T, Ocular MD Haigis, and ASCRS were also compared. Primary outcome measures were mean arithmetic and absolute IOL prediction error, variance in mean arithmetic IOL prediction error, and the percentage of eyes within ±0.50 and ±1.00 D.Results: The Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis averages produced mean arithmetic IOL prediction errors of 0.57 and –0.61 diopters (D, respectively, which were significantly larger than errors from the ASCRS, Ocular MD, and all calculator averages (0.11, –0.02, and 0.02 D, respectively, all P < 0.05. There was no statistically significant difference between the methods in absolute IOL prediction error, variance, or the percentage of eyes with outcomes within ±0.50 and ±1.00 D.Conclusion: The ASCRS average was more accurate in predicting IOL power than the Ocular MD SRK/T and Ocular MD Haigis averages alone. Our methods using combinations of these averages which, when compared with the individual averages, showed a trend of decreased mean arithmetic IOL

  18. ERA—European Radiochemists Association: Report on the activities of the Working Party for Nuclear and Radiochemistry of the Federation of European Chemical Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Z. I.; Ware, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    The European Radiochemists Association started almost simultaneously with the appearance of the first issue of the Radiochemistry in Europe newsletter in August 1995. The objective of the European Radiochemists Association (ERA) is to extend and improve communication between radiochemists in Europe through a newsletter. Liaison persons within each country or group exchange details of their activities, set up a diary of relevant international events and exchange details of specialist equipment, facilities and technology. In the year 2000 the Federation of European Chemical Societies decided to form a working party on nuclear and radiochemistry. It is a formalisation of the European Radiochemists Association. Each chemical society is allowed to nominate a member to the Working Party on Nuclear and Radiochemistry. Currently we have 12 nominated members plus two invited and one observer. In addition to the ERA aims and objectives it proposes to put together a syllabus of radiochemistry for undergraduate and post-graduate students—this aspect has been a part of our support of the International Atomic Energy Agency initiative. Also the aim of the working party is to support other working parties and divisions, to press the Federation of the European Chemical Societies for financial structure. To this end an Expression of Interest has been tabled with the Framework 6 Programme for networking within radiochemistry in Europe. The WP will liaise with the International Isotope Society and the International Society on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry and Biology to seek to communicate and to consider ways of working together.

  19. Recruiting the Future Workforce in the Geosciences And the Role of the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native American/span>s in Science (SACNAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, A. A.

    2004-12-01

    The declining interest in the physical sciences among U.S. students has been recognized as a vital issue for the continued health of science. In particular, the declining number of geoscience students, especially US citizens, threatens the country's future preparedness in natural hazards mitigation, resource development, national security, and education. Furthermore, the geosciences suffer from poor representation among underrepresented groups, even by comparison to other sciences and engineering. Thus, exciting young scientists from all backgrounds into the geosciences must remain a high priority for all geoscientists, educational institutes, national laboratories, and industry. Exciting young scientists into the geosciences must remain a high priority for all geoscientists, educational institutes, national laboratories, and industry. I identify some key factors that may be contributing to the decline in the science workforce as well as the geoscience workforce, including generational and cultural attitudes, and the changing demographics in the U.S. I propose that the workforce and diversity issues are intertwined and both must be addressed for the survival of geoscience. To address diversity specifically, several organizations have been successful in mentoring and recruiting minorities into science. The Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) focuses on encouraging undergraduate and graduate Hispanic and American Indian students to pursue higher degrees. For over 30 years, SACNAS has provided strong national leadership in improving science and math education, as well as expanding opportunities for minorities in the scientific workforce and academia. Currently, SACNAS has added a geological science emphasis to its existing programs to address the need to diversify the field. This presentation will also outline this approach, and outline how SACNAS has been able to grow over the past 30 years.

  20. Report on the 31st annual meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM), June 4-8, 1984, Los Angeles, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine ''SNM '84'' in Los Angeles made clear, the future of nuclear medicine lies in regional functional diagnostics in vivo, and biochemistry will in future play a dominating past in nuclear medicine, the more since all life is based on biochemical process which it is not so far possible to investigate in vivo except by means of nuclear medicine. The hopes for wider PET uses seem unrealistic. But at the PET principle is increasingly being transterred to SPECT - 'not looking for cold spots, but for function' - nuclear medicine will perhaps gain a new independent significance and nuclear medicine is badly in need of a new upswing. To achieve this goal it must emerge from its (self-inflicted) isolation and seek interdisciplinary cooperation again. For other fields can learn from nuclear medicine, and nuclear medicine can learn a lot from other fields. Following quite an impetuous development at the beginning of the 70s, nuclear medicine has now entered its 'period of maturity'. It is characterized by perfect apparatuses and a wide range of differentiated substances for radiodiagnosis offering many new possibilities of examination. The new methods are by no means 'mature' yet. If the position of nuclear medicine as a young diagnostical discipline is to be strengthened it must be repared to jettison methods that have become obsolete or for which alternative processes have been found and break interesting new ground. (orig./MG)

  1. American perspectives on security : energy, environment, nuclear weapons, and terrorism : 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herron, Kerry Gale (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Jenkins-Smith, Hank C. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Silva, Carol L. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK)

    2011-03-01

    We report findings from an Internet survey and a subset of questions administered by telephone among the American public in mid-2010 on US energy and environmental security. Key areas of investigation include public perceptions shaping the context for debate about a comprehensive national energy policy, and what levels of importance are assigned to various prospective energy technologies. Additionally, we investigate how public views on global climate change are evolving, how the public assesses the risks and benefits of nuclear energy, preferences for managing used nuclear fuel, and public trust in sources of scientific and technical information. We also report findings from a national Internet survey and a subset of questions administered by telephone in mid-2010 on public views of the relevance of US nuclear weapons today, support for strategic arms control, and assessments of the potential for nuclear abolition. Additionally, we analyze evolving public views of the threat of terrorism, assessments of progress in the struggle against terrorism, and tolerance for intrusive antiterror policies. Where possible, findings from each survey are compared with previous surveys in this series for analyses of trends.

  2. Physicians confront the apocalypse: the American medical profession and the threat of nuclear war

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, P.

    1985-08-02

    Physicians figured prominently in the resurgence of nuclear weapons activism and cultural awareness that swept the US in the early 1980s. This discussion seeks to place this activism in historical context. It explores the American medical profession's shifting engagement with the issue of nuclear war. Attention is focused on the period 1945 to 1954, with a brief evaluation of the period 1954 to 1963, the years to which the activism of the 1980s may be traced. Radiation studies are reviewed including Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors. Radiological studies were begun within days of Japan's surrender. The delayed effects of radiation exposure on some 14,000 persons in Hiroshima and Nagasaki include hemorrhage, leukocyte destruction, bone marrow damage, anemia, sterility, and the suppression of menstruation. In contrast, the American medical profession in the late 1940s focused much attention on the atom's potential medical benefits, especially the diagnostic and treatment value of radioisotopes. 90 references.

  3. Report from the Biennial Scientific Meeting of the Australasian Section of the American Oil Chemists Society (AAOCS Held in Adelaide, November 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Miller

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Australasian section of the American Oil Chemists Society (AAOCS held their biennial meeting in Adelaide, Australia on 8–11 November 2011. Over 70 scientists, researchers and industry representatives gathered for three days of talks and discussions on lipid related topics. A highlight was the hot topic symposium on the new olive oil standard being introduced in Australia. Paul Miller, Australian Olives Association, gave a compelling address on why the standard was needed. He demonstrated that the increase in price and demand for high quality olive oils has led to products falsely or misleadingly labelled. Furthermore, the genetic and seasonal variation in minor components of olive oil has led to misclassifications. An extensive scientific and political process in Australia and overseas led to development of this new standard. Dr. Leandro Ravetti, Mordern Olives, demonstrated the development of two new methods, for analysis of pyropheophytins and diacylglycerols, are good indicators of modification by deodorisation of oils and show excellent correlation with organoleptic assessment with aging/degradation of extra virgin olive oils. Professor Rod Mailer finished this session with studies of actual adulteration cases in Australia and overseas, further highlighting the need for this new standard. [...

  4. Prevalence of symptom control and palliative care abstracts presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Forty percent of all patients referred for radiotherapy are treated with palliative intent. The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) has recently emphasized the importance of radiation oncologists being skilled in the field of symptom control and palliative care (SCPC). The purpose of this study was to determine the number of abstracts relating to SCPC presented at the annual ASTRO meetings. Methods and Materials: The number of SCPC abstracts presented at ASTRO meetings between 1993 and 2000 was counted. Abstracts were included if they described populations with advanced or metastatic cancer for whom the goal of treatment was symptom palliation. The treatment sites and symptoms palliated were recorded. Results: Of 3511 abstracts presented at ASTRO between 1993 and 2000, an average of 47 (1.3%, range 0.9-2.2%/y) were related to SCPC. The most common treatment sites were bone, brain, and lung. Pain, bleeding, and neurologic and pulmonary symptoms were the ones most commonly palliated. Thirty-two percent of the SCPC abstracts involved randomized controlled trials, 47% had palliation of symptoms as a secondary treatment outcome, and in 21%, the symptomatic treatment outcome was not specifically stated. Conclusion: SCPC research has been poorly represented at the annual ASTRO meetings. Education and research in this field needs to be actively encouraged, because SCPC is an important component of a radiation oncologist's role in comprehensive patient care

  5. Success of an International Learning Health Care System in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation Clinical Case Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Pere; Burns, Linda J; Litzow, Mark R; Juckett, Mark B; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lee, Stephanie J; Devlin, Sean M; Costa, Luciano J; Khan, Shakila; King, Andrea; Klein, Andreas; Krishnan, Amrita; Malone, Adriana; Mir, Muhammad A; Moravec, Carina; Selby, George; Roy, Vivek; Cochran, Melissa; Stricherz, Melisa K; Westmoreland, Michael D; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Wood, William A

    2016-03-01

    The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) Clinical Case Forum (CCF) was launched in 2014 as an online secure tool to enhance interaction and communication among hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) professionals worldwide through the discussion of challenging clinical care issues. After 14 months, we reviewed clinical and demographical data of cases posted in the CCF from January 29, 2014 to March 18, 2015. A total of 137 cases were posted during the study period. Ninety-two cases (67%) were allogeneic HCT, 29 (21%) were autologous HCT, and in 16 (12%), the type of transplantation (autologous versus allogeneic) was still under consideration. The diseases most frequently discussed included non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL; n = 30, 22%), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 23, 17%), and multiple myeloma (MM; n = 20, 15%). When compared with the US transplantation activity reported by the US Department of Health and Human Services, NHL and acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases were over-represented in the CCF, whereas MM was under-represented (P community worldwide and may allow identification of areas of controversy or unmet need from clinical, educational and research perspectives. PMID:26718665

  6. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Survey of Radiation Biology Educators in U.S. and Canadian Radiation Oncology Residency Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To obtain, in a survey-based study, detailed information on the faculty currently responsible for teaching radiation biology courses to radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada. Methods and Materials: In March-December 2007 a survey questionnaire was sent to faculty having primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to residents in 93 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States and Canada. Results: The responses to this survey document the aging of the faculty who have primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to radiation oncology residents. The survey found a dramatic decline with time in the percentage of educators whose graduate training was in radiation biology. A significant number of the educators responsible for teaching radiation biology were not fully acquainted with the radiation sciences, either through training or practical application. In addition, many were unfamiliar with some of the organizations setting policies and requirements for resident education. Freely available tools, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Radiation and Cancer Biology Practice Examination and Study Guides, were widely used by residents and educators. Consolidation of resident courses or use of a national radiation biology review course was viewed as unlikely by most programs. Conclusions: A high priority should be given to the development of comprehensive teaching tools to assist those individuals who have responsibility for teaching radiation biology courses but who do not have an extensive background in critical areas of radiobiology related to radiation oncology. These findings also suggest a need for new graduate programs in radiobiology.

  7. Trends on nuclear power generation and industry in European and American nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In European and American nations, competitive principle was also recently introduced to electric industry allowed its local exclusion as a public business before today by liberalization of electric power market due to regulative relaxation, and then the existing electric power companies are now under serious competition with the other companies, of course with IPP which is its new comer. And, as nuclear power generation has already established there its position for an important source essential for electric power supply, by liberalization of electric power economy has also been severely required to the nuclear power generation. Then, the electric power companies intend to carry out cost-down by various means such as contraction of periodical inspection, and so on. Especially, in U.S.A., not only rationalization effort at a pace of every company but also various cost-down procedures ranging to reorganization of business such as purchase of other company power station, establishment of operation company integrally carrying out operation management of some companies, and so on, As a result, the nuclear power generation has come to obtain an evaluation to be an electric source sufficiently capable of competing with the other sources even at competitive market. On the other hand, its new construction continues at difficult condition. By adding to traditional objection against nuclear energy, in general, by recently entering of environmental protection party to the regime in some nations of western Europe, political environment around nuclear energy becomes unstable. And, liberalization of electric power also forms an investment environment advantageous for natural gas burning thermal power plants capable of carrying out short term capital recovery, in general. Therefore, the electric companies tend strongly to correspond to rather life elongation of the present plant than new plan construction. (G.K.)

  8. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giralt, Sergio; Garderet, Laurent; Durie, Brian; Cook, Gordon; Gahrton, Gosta; Bruno, Benedetto; Hari, Paremesweran; Lokhorst, Henk; McCarthy, Phillip; Krishnan, Amrita; Sonneveld, Pieter; Goldschmidt, Harmut; Jagannath, Sundar; Barlogie, Bart; Mateos, Maria; Gimsing, Peter; Sezer, Orhan; Mikhael, Joseph; Lu, Jin; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Mazumder, Amitabha; Palumbo, Antonio; Abonour, Rafat; Anderson, Kenneth; Attal, Michel; Blade, Joan; Bird, Jenny; Cavo, Michele; Comenzo, Raymond; de la Rubia, Javier; Einsele, Hermann; Garcia-Sanz, Ramon; Hillengass, Jens; Holstein, Sarah; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Joshua, Douglas; Koehne, Guenther; Kumar, Shaji; Kyle, Robert; Leleu, Xavier; Lonial, Sagar; Ludwig, Heinz; Nahi, Hareth; Nooka, Anil; Orlowski, Robert; Rajkumar, Vincent; Reiman, Anthony; Richardson, Paul; Riva, Eloisa; Miguel, Jesus San; Turreson, Ingemar; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David; Bensinger, William; Qazilbash, Muzaffer; Efebera, Yvonne; Mohty, Mohamed; Gasparreto, Christina; Gajewski, James; LeMaistre, Charles F.; Bredeson, Chris; Moreau, Phillipe; Pasquini, Marcelo; Kroeger, Nicolaus; Stadtmauer, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the upfront setting in which the role of high-dose therapy with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as consolidation of a first remission in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) is well established, the role of high-dose therapy with autologous or allogeneic HCT has not been extensively studied in MM patients relapsing after primary therapy. The International Myeloma Working Group together with the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation convened a meeting of MM experts to: (1) summarize current knowledge regarding the role of autologous or allogeneic HCT in MM patients progressing after primary therapy, (2) propose guidelines for the use of salvage HCT in MM, (3) identify knowledge gaps, (4) propose a research agenda, and (5) develop a collaborative initiative to move the research agenda forward. After reviewing the available data, the expert committee came to the following consensus statement for salvage autologous HCT: (1) In transplantation-eligible patients relapsing after primary therapy that did NOT include an autologous HCT, high-dose therapy with HCT as part of salvage therapy should be considered standard; (2) High-dose therapy and autologous HCT should be considered appropriate therapy for any patients relapsing after primary therapy that includes an autologous HCT with initial remission duration of more than 18 months; (3) High-dose therapy and autologous HCT can be used as a bridging strategy to allogeneic HCT; (4) The role of postsalvage HCT maintenance needs to be explored in the context of well-designed prospective trials that should include new agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, immune-modulating agents, and oral proteasome inhibitors; (5) Autologous HCT consolidation should be explored as a strategy to develop novel conditioning regimens or post-HCT strategies in patients with short

  9. Peaceful uses of nuclear energy: Meeting societal needs. 15 November 2004, Mumbai, India. 15th Annual Conference of the Indian Nuclear Society (INSAC-2004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of issues facing the international nuclear community and the IAEA discussed are concerned with Nuclear Power, including Global Growth and Current Status of Nuclear Power, Nuclear Safety Performance and Reliability, Factors That Will Shape Future Growth, Carbon Emissions and the Growth in Demand, security of energy supply, Public Perceptions and Misconceptions, Innovation in Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technology, Nuclear Security, Non-power nuclear applications, Nuclear Verification - The final aspect of the IAEA activity

  10. Clinical cancer advances 2007: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralow, Julie; Ozols, Robert F; Bajorin, Dean F; Cheson, Bruce D; Sandler, Howard M; Winer, Eric P; Bonner, James; Demetri, George D; Curran, Walter; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Davidson, Nancy E; Schilsky, Richard L; Lichter, Allen S

    2008-01-10

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT: For the third year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO publishes this report to demonstrate the important progress being made on the front lines of clinical cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and organizations, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening, the association between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer incidence, the link between human papillomavirus and head and neck cancers, and the use of radiation therapy to prevent lung cancer from spreading. They also report on effective new targeted therapies for cancers that have been historically difficult to treat, such as liver cancer and kidney cancer, among many others. A total of 24 advances are featured in this year's report. These advances and many more over the past several years show that the nation's long-term investment in cancer research is paying off. But there are disturbing signs that progress could slow. We are now in the midst of the longest sustained period of flat government funding for cancer research in history. The budgets for the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have been unchanged for four years. When adjusted for inflation, cancer research funding has actually declined 12% since 2004. These budget constraints limit the NCI's ability to fund promising cancer research. In the past several years the number of grants that the NCI has been able to fund has significantly decreased; this year, in response to just the

  11. The assessment of radiation exposures in native American communities from nuclear weapons testing in Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Native Americans residing in a broad region downwind from the Nevada Test Site during the 1950s and 1960s received significant radiation exposures from nuclear weapons testing. Because of differences in diet, activities, and housing, their radiation exposures are only very imperfectly represented in the Department of Energy dose reconstructions. There are important missing pathways, including exposures to radioactive iodine from eating small game. The dose reconstruction model assumptions about cattle feeding practices across a year are unlikely to apply to the native communities as are other model assumptions about diet. Thus exposures from drinking milk and eating vegetables have not yet been properly estimated for these communities. Through consultations with members of the affected communities, these deficiencies could be corrected and the dose reconstruction extended to Native Americans. An illustration of the feasibility of extending the dose reconstruction is provided by a sample calculation to estimate radiation exposures to the thyroid from eating radio-iodine-contaminated rabbit thyroids after the Dedan test. The illustration is continued with a discussion of how the calculation results may be used to make estimates for other tests and other locations

  12. First International Conference on Lysophospholipids and Related Bioactive Lipids in Biology and Disease Sponsored by the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Goetzl

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The First International Conference on “Lysophospholipids and Related Bioactive Lipids in Biology and Diseases” was held in Tucson, AZ on June 10�14, 2001, under the sponsorship of the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology (FASEB. More than 100 scientists from 11 countries discussed the recent results of basic and clinical research in the broad biology of this emerging field. Immense progress was reported in defining the biochemistry of generation and biology of cellular effects of the bioactive lysophospholipids (LPLs. These aspects of LPLs described at the conference parallel in many ways those of the eicosanoid mediators, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. As for eicosanoids, the LPLs termed lysophosphatidic acid (LPA and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P are produced enzymatically from phospholipid precursors in cell membranes and act on cells at nanomolar concentrations through subfamilies of receptors of the G protein–coupled superfamily. The rate-limiting steps in production of LPLs were reported to be controlled by specific phospholipases for LPA and sphingosine kinases for S1P. The receptor subfamilies formerly were designated endothelial differentiation gene-encoded receptors or Edg Rs for their original discovery in endothelial cells. A currently active nomenclature committee at this conference suggested the ligand-based names: S1P1 = Edg-1, S1P2 = Edg-5, S1P3 = Edg-3, S1P4 = Edg-6, and S1P5 = Edg-8; LPA1 = Edg-2, LPA2 = Edg-4, and LPA3 = Edg-7 receptors. Several families of lysophospholipid phosphatases (LPPs have been characterized, which biodegrade LPA, whereas S1P is inactivated with similar rapidity by both a lyase and S1P phosphatases.

  13. Timing of Chemotherapy After MammoSite Radiation Therapy System Breast Brachytherapy: Analysis of the American Society of Breast Surgeons MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate cosmetic outcome and radiation recall in the American Society of Breast Surgeons registry trial, as a function of the interval between accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and initiation of chemotherapy (CTX). Methods and Materials: A total of 1440 patients at 97 institutions participated in this trial. After lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer, patients received APBI (34 Gy in 10 fractions) with MammoSite RTS brachytherapy. A total of 148 patients received CTX within 90 days of APBI. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated at each follow-up visit and dichotomized as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results: Chemotherapy was initiated at a mean of 3.9 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure and was administered ≤3 weeks after APBI in 54 patients (36%) and >3 weeks after APBI in 94 patients (64%). The early and delayed groups were well balanced with respect to multiple factors that may impact on cosmetic outcome. There was a superior cosmetic outcome in those receiving chemotherapy >3 weeks after APBI (excellent/good in 72.2% at ≤3 weeks vs. excellent/good in 93.8% at >3 weeks; p = 0.01). Radiation recall in those receiving CTX at ≤3 weeks was 9 of 50 (18%), compared with 6 of 81(7.4%) in those receiving chemotherapy at >3 weeks (p = 0.09). Conclusion: The majority of patients receiving CTX after APBI have excellent/good cosmetic outcomes, with a low rate of radiation recall. Chemotherapy initiated >3 weeks after the final MammoSite procedure seems to be associated with a better cosmetic outcome and lower rate of radiation recall. An excellent/good cosmetic outcome in patients receiving CTX after 3 weeks was similar to the cosmetic outcome of the overall patient population who did not receive CTX

  14. Systemic Therapy in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K.; Carducci, Michael; Chen, Ronald C.; Frame, James N.; Garrels, Kristina; Hotte, Sebastien; Kattan, Michael W.; Raghavan, Derek; Saad, Fred; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Walker-Dilks, Cindy; Williams, James; Winquist, Eric; Bennett, Charles L.; Wootton, Ted; Rumble, R. Bryan; Dusetzina, Stacie B.; Virgo, Katherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide treatment recommendations for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. Results When added to androgen deprivation, therapies demonstrating improved survival, improved quality of life (QOL), and favorable benefit-harm balance include abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 (223Ra; for men with predominantly bone metastases). Improved survival and QOL with moderate toxicity risk are associated with docetaxel/prednisone. For asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men, improved survival with unclear QOL impact and low toxicity are associated with sipuleucel-T. For men who previously received docetaxel, improved survival, unclear QOL impact, and moderate to high toxicity risk are associated with cabazitaxel/prednisone. Modest QOL benefit (without survival benefit) and high toxicity risk are associated with mitoxantrone/prednisone after docetaxel. No benefit and excess toxicity are observed with bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib. Recommendations Continue androgen deprivation (pharmaceutical or surgical) indefinitely. Abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, or 223Ra should be offered; docetaxel/prednisone should also be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Sipuleucel-T may be offered to asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men. For men who have experienced progression with docetaxel, cabazitaxel may be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Mitoxantrone may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited clinical benefit and toxicity risk. Ketoconazole or antiandrogens (eg, bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide) may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited known clinical benefit. Bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib should not be offered. There is insufficient evidence to

  15. The Path to Deep Nuclear Reductions. Dealing with American Conventional Superiority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    essential for abolition to happen - might ever wish to proceed toward such a post-nuclear world that would be dominated militarily by American conventional military capabilities and what might be needed to allay legitimate concerns in this regard. At the very least, it will become increasingly important to separate fact from fiction in regard to the state of various conventional offensive and defensive counter-proliferation capabilities and begin the challenge of addressing what kind of concrete steps are needed to alleviate Russian or Chinese concerns. It is precisely that objective to which this paper is addressed. The paper is organized along the following lines. It first addresses the origins of U.S. interests and improvements in conventional strike capabilities, and then explores the emergence of counter-proliferation as a chief mission for conventional offensive and defensive forces. It next examines the extent to which new conventional capabilities can perform three key missions previously the exclusive domain of nuclear weapons. Armed with this background, the paper then examines Russian perceptions of U.S. advances in conventional war-fighting and evaluates the extent to which these perceptions are real or exaggerated. Finally, in light of Russia's concerns, the paper closes with a set of policy options designed to help allay these concerns on the path toward deep reductions in nuclear arsenals. (author)

  16. Righteous realists: Perceptions of American power and responsibility in the nuclear age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    This is a study of the moral and ethical dimensions of political realism in post-World War II America, especially in relation to realist thought on nuclear weapons issues. Emphasis is placed on evolving notions of power and responsibility as they form the basis for a realist philosophy of power in the nuclear age. It is argued that the realists developed a concept of responsible power which was a hybrid of traditional American ideals and European Realpolitik. Included are chapters on the personal and intellectual background of five noteworthy realists, the realist position on some basic dilemmas in political ethics, the problem of usable and unusable force, the realists' view on deterrence and arms control, the question of democracy versus guardianship, and the realists as cultural critics. This study highlights the coherence of realist thought while pointing out the paradoxes upon which it is based. It situates realism in its historical context and reveals realism's relationship to explicit political and cultural values. It concludes that at their core, the realists were moralists; and realism was the entity through which they reconciled morality and power.

  17. Papers of Scientific Session on Prospects of Atomistic Application in Poland. 5. Assembly of Polish Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The broad review of nuclear techniques application in industry, environmental protection, medicine and science in Poland has been done. Also the future prospects and development possibilities have been discussed on that base. Nuclear options for future energy generation development in Poland have been discussed taking into account economic analysis and new technical solutions in nuclear reactor construction and safety assurance

  18. 变动和多元的美国社会与文化——解读《移民国家与大众社会》%The Mobility and Diversity of American Society and Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡浩

    2011-01-01

    文章从文化学和社会学的视角,通过追溯美国移民历史,解读了《当代美国——一个超级大国的成长》一书的第五编《移民国家与大众社会》的主要观点,揭示了移民给美国社会造成的变动和多元的大众文化特色。文章认为,多元文化和价值观的碰撞并没有造成美国文化的分裂,相反,它促进了美国文化的内部整合,丰富了美国社会文化的内涵。%From cultural and sociological perspective and by looking back on the history of American Immigration, the paper analyzed the main ideas of Immigrants Country and Moss Society and disclosed the mobile and diverse cultural characteristics of American society as a result of immigration. The paper considers that the collisions of diverse Cultural values did not cause a split of American culture, on the contrary, promoted the inner integration, and enriched cultural connotations of American social culture.

  19. The institutionalisation of ecological standpoint in modern societies: Responses of collective actors to the ecological challenge in the debate on nuclear energy. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developped a concept for the analysis of the institutionalisation of ecological standpoints in modern societies in order to apply a content analysis on the discourse on nuclear energy over the last 20 years (1973-1993). The world-views concerning the relationship between nature and society of collective actors in the Federal Republic of Germany were the focus. Starting out from the hypothesis that social movements are ''forces of definition'' in modern society, we analysed the BBU (Federal Association of Citizen Action Groups for Environmental Protection) and the Green Party. These groups have had a strong impact on established environmental organisations in Germany. There is also a clear impact of the ecology movement on parts of the Social Democrats (SPD) and trade unions. The impact on the Liberal and Conservative parties is much weaker. However, these actors as well, integrated ecological world-views into their productionist outlooks. With the help of the Greens, the ecological discourse entered into parliament where it was later supported by factions of the SPD. In the area of the productionist sector of society, trade unions challenged employer associations on the grounds of environmental issues. Yet, the German unification retarded the institutionalisation of ecological standpoints. This concerns the ecological movement as well as established actors. However, it needs to be mentioned that this decay started already in the late 1980s. (orig.)

  20. Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2003: State of the Art 2003, Published by the American Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collection of all papers presented and submitted at the IFSA2003 conference. Topics included target design and performance, fast ignition, plasma instabilities, laser technology, fusion reactor technology

  1. Inertial Fusion Sciences and Applications 2003: State of the Art 2003, Published by the American Nuclear Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editors: B. A. Hammel; D. D. Meyerhofer; J. Meyer-ter-Vehn; H. Azechi. Organizing Chair: W. J. Hogan

    2004-06-01

    Collection of all papers presented and submitted at the IFSA2003 conference. Topics included target design and performance, fast ignition, plasma instabilities, laser technology, fusion reactor technology

  2. Nuclear Engineering at Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, Dick

    1973-01-01

    Presents five statistical tables relating to nuclear engineering education, namely, course offerings by U.S. and Canadian schools; degrees and enrollment; enrollment, courses, and staff by schools; degrees granted by schools; and research contributions to the American Nuclear Society meetings. (CC)

  3. Areva and Energy Constellation create a commune society to launch the EPR in Usa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Group Areva and Constellation energy have announced the creation of a society, Unistar Nuclear to launch the first park of new generation type reactor. The american group Bechtel Power Company will help their union by bringing its expertise in building. (N.C.)

  4. Local Control, Toxicity, and Cosmesis in Women >70 Years Enrolled in the American Society of Breast Surgeons Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Registry Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The American Society of Breast Surgeons enrolled women in a registry trial to prospectively study patients treated with the MammoSite Radiation Therapy System breast brachytherapy device. The present report examined the outcomes in women aged >70 years enrolled in the trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,449 primary early stage breast cancers were treated in 1,440 women. Of these, 537 occurred in women >70 years old. Fisher’s exact test was performed to correlate age (≤70 vs. >70 years) with toxicity and with cosmesis. The association of age with local recurrence (LR) failure times was investigated by fitting a parametric model. Results: Older women were less likely to develop telangiectasias than younger women (7.9% vs. 12.4%, p = 0.0083). The incidence of other toxicities was similar. Cosmesis was good or excellent in 92% of the women >70 years old. No significant difference was found in LR as a function of age. The 5-year actuarial LR rate with invasive disease for the older vs. younger population was 2.79% and 2.92%, respectively (p = 0.5780). In women >70 years with hormone-sensitive tumors ≤2 cm who received hormonal therapy (n = 195), the 5-year actuarial rate of LR, overall survival, disease-free survival, and cause-specific survival was 2.06%, 89.3%, 87%, and 97.5%, respectively. These outcomes were similar in women who did not receive hormonal therapy. Women with small, estrogen receptor-negative disease had worse LR, overall survival, and disease-free survival compared with receptor-positive patients. Conclusions: Accelerated partial breast irradiation with the MammoSite radiation therapy system resulted in low toxicity and produced similar cosmesis and local control at 5 years in women >70 years compared with younger women. This treatment should be considered as an alternative to omitting adjuvant radiotherapy for older women with small-volume, early-stage breast cancer.

  5. Local Control, Toxicity, and Cosmesis in Women >70 Years Enrolled in the American Society of Breast Surgeons Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Registry Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Atif J., E-mail: atif_khan@rwjuh.edu [Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Vicini, Frank A.; Beitsch, Peter [American Society of Breast Surgeons, Columbia, MD (United States); Goyal, Sharad [Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Kuerer, Henry M.; Keisch, Martin; Quiet, Coral; Zannis, Victor; Keleher, Angela; Snyder, Howard; Gittleman, Mark; Whitworth, Pat; Fine, Richard [American Society of Breast Surgeons, Columbia, MD (United States); Lyden, Maureen [BioStat International, Inc., Tampa, FL (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); American Society of Breast Surgeons, Columbia, MD (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The American Society of Breast Surgeons enrolled women in a registry trial to prospectively study patients treated with the MammoSite Radiation Therapy System breast brachytherapy device. The present report examined the outcomes in women aged >70 years enrolled in the trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,449 primary early stage breast cancers were treated in 1,440 women. Of these, 537 occurred in women >70 years old. Fisher's exact test was performed to correlate age ({<=}70 vs. >70 years) with toxicity and with cosmesis. The association of age with local recurrence (LR) failure times was investigated by fitting a parametric model. Results: Older women were less likely to develop telangiectasias than younger women (7.9% vs. 12.4%, p = 0.0083). The incidence of other toxicities was similar. Cosmesis was good or excellent in 92% of the women >70 years old. No significant difference was found in LR as a function of age. The 5-year actuarial LR rate with invasive disease for the older vs. younger population was 2.79% and 2.92%, respectively (p = 0.5780). In women >70 years with hormone-sensitive tumors {<=}2 cm who received hormonal therapy (n = 195), the 5-year actuarial rate of LR, overall survival, disease-free survival, and cause-specific survival was 2.06%, 89.3%, 87%, and 97.5%, respectively. These outcomes were similar in women who did not receive hormonal therapy. Women with small, estrogen receptor-negative disease had worse LR, overall survival, and disease-free survival compared with receptor-positive patients. Conclusions: Accelerated partial breast irradiation with the MammoSite radiation therapy system resulted in low toxicity and produced similar cosmesis and local control at 5 years in women >70 years compared with younger women. This treatment should be considered as an alternative to omitting adjuvant radiotherapy for older women with small-volume, early-stage breast cancer.

  6. The care of patients with varicose veins and associated chronic venous diseases: clinical practice guidelines of the Society for Vascular Surgery and the American Venous Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloviczki, Peter; Comerota, Anthony J; Dalsing, Michael C; Eklof, Bo G; Gillespie, David L; Gloviczki, Monika L; Lohr, Joann M; McLafferty, Robert B; Meissner, Mark H; Murad, M Hassan; Padberg, Frank T; Pappas, Peter J; Passman, Marc A; Raffetto, Joseph D; Vasquez, Michael A; Wakefield, Thomas W

    2011-05-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and the American Venous Forum (AVF) have developed clinical practice guidelines for the care of patients with varicose veins of the lower limbs and pelvis. The document also includes recommendations on the management of superficial and perforating vein incompetence in patients with associated, more advanced chronic venous diseases (CVDs), including edema, skin changes, or venous ulcers. Recommendations of the Venous Guideline Committee are based on the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system as strong (GRADE 1) if the benefits clearly outweigh the risks, burden, and costs. The suggestions are weak (GRADE 2) if the benefits are closely balanced with risks and burden. The level of available evidence to support the evaluation or treatment can be of high (A), medium (B), or low or very low (C) quality. The key recommendations of these guidelines are: We recommend that in patients with varicose veins or more severe CVD, a complete history and detailed physical examination are complemented by duplex ultrasound scanning of the deep and superficial veins (GRADE 1A). We recommend that the CEAP classification is used for patients with CVD (GRADE 1A) and that the revised Venous Clinical Severity Score is used to assess treatment outcome (GRADE 1B). We suggest compression therapy for patients with symptomatic varicose veins (GRADE 2C) but recommend against compression therapy as the primary treatment if the patient is a candidate for saphenous vein ablation (GRADE 1B). We recommend compression therapy as the primary treatment to aid healing of venous ulceration (GRADE 1B). To decrease the recurrence of venous ulcers, we recommend ablation of the incompetent superficial veins in addition to compression therapy (GRADE 1A). For treatment of the incompetent great saphenous vein (GSV), we recommend endovenous thermal ablation (radiofrequency or laser) rather than high ligation and inversion stripping

  7. The 2014 FIFA World Cup: communicable disease risks and advice for visitors to Brazil--a review from the Latin American Society for Travel Medicine (SLAMVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Viviana; Berberian, Griselda; Lloveras, Susana; Verbanaz, Sergio; Chaves, Tania S S; Orduna, Tomas; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2014-01-01

    The next FIFA World Cup will be held in Brazil in June-July 2014. Around 600,000 international visitors and participants (as well over 3 million domestic travelers) are expected. This event will take place in twelve cities. This event poses specific challenges, given its size and the diversity of attendees, including the potential for the transmission of imported or endemic communicable diseases, especially those that have an increased transmission rate as a result of close human proximity, eg, seasonal influenza, measles but also tropical endemic diseases. In anticipation of increased travel, a panel of experts from the Latin American Society for Travel Medicine (SLAMVI) developed the current recommendations regarding the epidemiology and risks of the main communicable diseases in the major potential destinations, recommended immunizations and other preventives measures to be used as a basis for advice for travelers and travel medicine practitioners. Mosquito-borne infections also pose a challenge. Dengue poses a significant risk in all states, including the host cities. Vaccination against yellow fever is recommended except for travelers who will only visit coastal areas. Travelers visiting high-risk areas for malaria (Amazon) should be assessed regarding the need for chemoprophylaxis. Chikunguya fever may be a threat for Brazil, given the presence of Aedes aegypti, vector of dengue, and the possibility of travelers bringing the virus with them when attending the event. Advice on the correct timing and use of repellents and other personal protection measures is key to preventing these vector-borne infections. Other important recommendations for travelers should focus on preventing water and food-borne diseases such as hepatitis A, typhoid fever, giardiasis and traveler's diarrhea. Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) should be also mentioned and the use of condoms advocated. This review addresses pre-travel, preventive strategies to reduce the risk of acquiring

  8. Canada's imminent decision on nuclear fuel management: decision making at the intersection of science, politics, and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the science, politics and the decision making process in implementing a nuclear fuel management program. It discusses the issues in the light of Canada's imminent decision on nuclear fuel management. The paper discusses the technical as well as the institutional challenge in nuclear waste management. It discusses some of the key elements of the Canadian approach and concludes with some key recommendation in the way forward

  9. The Changing Role of Native Americans and Stakeholders in Decisions Concerning Nuclear Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For 15 years the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) has been involved in providing technical and policy assistance to several Department of Energy Sites in the area of Environmental Management. CRESP is an independent consortium of Universities that includes the author's affiliations, as well as Oregon State University, Howard University, University of Pittsburgh, and New York University. Over this period of time, the role of a Native Americans and a range of stakeholders (including government, private and commercial interests) has changed from the provision of information to inclusion of different entities in both the development and the execution of the research that has led to closure of sites (Amchitka Island) or to facilitate the necessary steps to reach Records of Decision (RODs). Several models developed by CRESP have shown success, including 1) combining the assessment of perceptions and consumption patterns of fisher-folk with examination of mercury loads in fish to provide site-specific information that could lead to risk reduction and the creation of a fish fact sheet that informed those most at risk (Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge), 2) assessing perceptions of appropriate land use and recreational rates to address future land use (Savannah River Site, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory), 3) examining and evaluating perceptions of the communication process involved in remedial investigations, feasibility studies, and contaminant analysis during the process leading to development of RODs (Hanford), and 4) the development and execution of a science plan and a bio-monitoring plan that led to closure of an underground nuclear testing site (Amchitka). In the latter case a wide range of stakeholders were actively involved in the development of ideas at each stage, including Aleut Native Americans who participated in the scientific expedition to collect specimens for

  10. Experience in the United States with introducing a resource curriculum ''science, society and America's Nuclear waste'' through satellite teleconferencing: an evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To inform educators and pupils, the US DOE Office of civilian radioactive waste management (OCRWM) has produced a resource curriculum entitled 'Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste' to assist future decision makers by providing relevant information about the US high level radioactive waste program to the classroom. To reach the largest possible audience in the most cost effective manner and assist educators with the use and integration of the curriculum, OCRWM now utilizes interactive satellite teleconference workshops for this educational outreach. Experience gained with two of these broadcastings is discussed

  11. Ninth annual conference of Indian Nuclear Society on public perception on benefits of nuclear energy in health care, industry and agriculture: conference brochure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains a few papers dealing with the applications and the resulting benefits of nuclear energy in health care, industry and agriculture. Nuclear techniques in crime detection, neutron activation analysis, dosimetry, personnel monitoring, radiation protection, applications of nuclear energy in health care, industry and agriculture etc. are some of the main topics dealt with. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. [Living in a Temporary Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Warren G.

    Society is in the process of accelerated change and the institutionalization of this change through research and technology. Other factors affecting American society are an increase in affluence, an elevation of the educational level of the population, and a growing interdependence of institutions. The fact that this country is currently going…

  13. Hybrid cardiac imaging: SPECT/CT and PET/CT. A joint position statement by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flotats, Albert; Gutberlet, Matthias; Knuuti, Juhani;

    2011-01-01

    . However, hybrid cardiac imaging has also generated controversy with regard to which patients should undergo such integrated examination for clinical effectiveness and minimization of costs and radiation dose, and if software-based fusion of images obtained separately would be a useful alternative....... The European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC) in this paper want to present a position statement of the institutions on the current roles of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid cardiac imaging in patients...

  14. Education of energy and environment engineers in Hokkaido University. Education for nuclear and energy utilization for low-carbon society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Division of Energy and Environmental Systems in Hokkaido University is chasing energy systems contributing to sustain the global environment, such as next-generation nuclear reactor systems, nuclear safety, nuclear fuel cycles, nuclear wastes management, hydrogen fuel cells, advanced engine systems, and fluid energy systems. In these technologies, there exists common science and technology field, that is to say the multiphase flow. The filed of energy and environmental systems are very important not only for human beings but also for all the life on this planet, the Erath. Education and study of nuclear and energy engineering in this division has proved to be quite attractive for students and researchers on the view point of multiphase flow. (author)

  15. Abroad with Translators: Annotated Bibliographies with Introductory Essays on Latin American Literature and Society for the English Language Reader and Student; Bibliographical Essay on Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Robert N.; MacCameron, Robert

    This publication provides an introduction to selected works of Latin American literature that are available in English. Following an introduction that presents an overview of Latin American literature, a brief section lists and annotates relevant works of description, analysis, and criticism. The major section of the publication provides annotated…

  16. The Brazilian experience in the implementation of nuclear security activities for the 2007 Pan-American Games

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actions taken by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) related to nuclear and radiological security for the Pan-American Games and for the Para Pan- American Games, held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 2007, are presented. This was part of a multi-institutional plan for the security of the games, coordinated by the National Secretary of Public Security of the Ministry of Justice (SENASP/MJ). The support provided by the IAEA under a cooperation arrangement with the Brazilian authorities was a key factor for the success of the whole operation. The organization and concept of operations adopted are described, and the results of the survey of venues before the start of the games and of the access control are presented. (author)

  17. A comparison of American and German methods in strength calculation for nuclear facilities. 2nd technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American ASME-BPVC code is the prominent code in the field of nuclear technology. A comparable German code (KTA-Code) is in preparation. The existing codes (AD, TRD, etc.) do not meet the increased safety requirements. The comparison refers to various loading cases and maximum admissible stresses, (design, normal and off-normal operation, emergencies, accidents) and to the limitation of stresses in specific cases (pressure test). Other loadings (fatique, additional forces, brittle fracture) are also considered. (DG)

  18. Radiation doses for pediatric nuclear medicine studies: comparing the North American consensus guidelines and the pediatric dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimated radiation dose is important for assessing and communicating the risks and benefits of pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Radiation dose depends on the radiopharmaceutical, the administered activity, and patient factors such as age and size. Most radiation dose estimates for pediatric nuclear medicine have not been based on administered activities of radiopharmaceuticals recommended by established practice guidelines. The dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the North American consensus guidelines each provide recommendations of administered activities of radiopharmaceuticals in children, but there are substantial differences between these two guidelines. For 12 commonly performed pediatric nuclear medicine studies, two established pediatric radiopharmaceutical administration guidelines were used to calculate updated radiation dose estimates and to compare the radiation exposure resulting from the recommendations of each of the guidelines. Estimated radiation doses were calculated for 12 common procedures in pediatric nuclear medicine using administered activities recommended by the dosage card of the EANM (version 1.5.2008) and the 2010 North American consensus guidelines for radiopharmaceutical administered activities in pediatrics. Based on standard models and nominal age-based weights, radiation dose was estimated for typical patients at ages 1, 5, 10 and 15 years and adult. The resulting effective doses were compared, with differences greater than 20% considered significant. Following either the EANM dosage card or the 2010 North American guidelines, the highest effective doses occur with radiopharmaceuticals labeled with fluorine-18 and iodine-123. In 24% of cases, following the North American consensus guidelines would result in a substantially higher radiation dose. The guidelines of the EANM dosage card would lead to a substantially higher radiation dose in 39% of all cases, and in 62% of cases in which patients

  19. Radiation doses for pediatric nuclear medicine studies: comparing the North American consensus guidelines and the pediatric dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Frederick D.; Drubach, Laura A.; Treves, S. Ted; Fahey, Frederic H. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Joint Program in Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Gelfand, Michael J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Section of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Estimated radiation dose is important for assessing and communicating the risks and benefits of pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Radiation dose depends on the radiopharmaceutical, the administered activity, and patient factors such as age and size. Most radiation dose estimates for pediatric nuclear medicine have not been based on administered activities of radiopharmaceuticals recommended by established practice guidelines. The dosage card of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the North American consensus guidelines each provide recommendations of administered activities of radiopharmaceuticals in children, but there are substantial differences between these two guidelines. For 12 commonly performed pediatric nuclear medicine studies, two established pediatric radiopharmaceutical administration guidelines were used to calculate updated radiation dose estimates and to compare the radiation exposure resulting from the recommendations of each of the guidelines. Estimated radiation doses were calculated for 12 common procedures in pediatric nuclear medicine using administered activities recommended by the dosage card of the EANM (version 1.5.2008) and the 2010 North American consensus guidelines for radiopharmaceutical administered activities in pediatrics. Based on standard models and nominal age-based weights, radiation dose was estimated for typical patients at ages 1, 5, 10 and 15 years and adult. The resulting effective doses were compared, with differences greater than 20% considered significant. Following either the EANM dosage card or the 2010 North American guidelines, the highest effective doses occur with radiopharmaceuticals labeled with fluorine-18 and iodine-123. In 24% of cases, following the North American consensus guidelines would result in a substantially higher radiation dose. The guidelines of the EANM dosage card would lead to a substantially higher radiation dose in 39% of all cases, and in 62% of cases in which patients

  20. Polish society attitudes towards nuclear power, ionizing radiation applications and radioactive waste management (Report on public opinion polls)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Poland, during parliamentary debate on Foundations for the 'Polish energy policies up to 2010', the importance of public attitudes toward nuclear power has been recalled repeatedly in the context of the future development of nuclear power in Poland. In the governmental document, accepted by Polish Parliament on 1 January 1996, it has been stated that nuclear power plant construction is not foreseen up to the year 2010; nevertheless it has been assumed that the appraisals of the economic feasibility and of the public acceptance level for such investments will be conducted. Thus, the need for such assessments of public opinions and attitudes toward nuclear power has been recognized and accepted by the highest legislative power organ in Poland

  1. Has the civil society a real place in the governance of the nuclear and chemical activities?; La societe civile a-t-elle 'vraiment' une place dans la gouvernance des activites nucleaires et chimiques?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This colloquium, organized in three sessions discusses the following topics: the historical aspects of the transparency in the nuclear domain, the AZF accident, the nuclear wastes specific case, the access of the society to the knowledge, the democratic participation to the management of the risk activities and the conditions of this sustainable participation, the international situation and the public trust. (A.L.B.)

  2. Multimodality imaging in Europe: a survey by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Society of Radiology (ESR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multimodality imaging represents an area of rapid growth with important professional implication for both nuclear medicine physicians and radiologists throughout Europe. As a preliminary step for future action aimed at improving the quality and accessibility of PET/SPECT/CT multimodality imaging practice in Europe, the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) and the European Society of Radiology (ESR) performed a survey among the individual membership of both societies to obtain information on the status of multimodality imaging in their facilities and their future visions on training for combined modalities. A questionnaire was forwarded to all individual members of the EANM and ESR. The main subject matter of the questionnaire related to: (1) study performance, current procedures, current equipment including its supervisory personnel at respondents' individual facilities and (2) vision of future practice, performance and the potential for combined interdisciplinary viewing and training for future professionals. The reporting and the billing procedures of multimodality imaging studies are very heterogeneous in European countries. The majority of the members of both societies believe that the proportion of PET/CT conducted as a full diagnostic CT with contrast enhancement will increase over time. As expected, 18F-FDG is the most commonly used PET tracer for clinical applications. The large majority of respondents were in favour of an interdisciplinary training programme being developed on a European level together by the EANM and the ESR and the respective sections of the European Union of Medical Specialists. The results of this survey show that there is wide heterogeneity in the current practice of multimodality imaging in Europe. This situation may limit the full potential and integration of multimodality imaging within the clinical arena. There is a strong desire within both specialties for the development of interdisciplinary training to address some

  3. Building on our past... building for the future. 33rd Annual Canadian Nuclear Society conference and 36th CNS/CNA student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 33rd Annual Canadian Nuclear Society Conference and 36th CNS/CNA Student Conference was held in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada on June 10-13, 2012. With the theme of the conference, 'Building on our Past... Building for the Future', the conference specifically noted the 50th anniversary of the first-nuclear-produced electricity in Canada by the small Nuclear Power Demonstration (NPD) plant on June 4, 1962 and the 60th anniversary of the creation of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited in April 1952. The conference brought together over 360 delegates for the technical sessions with very broad subject matter of: physics, environment and waste management, safety and licensing, life extension, fusion technology, fuel and advanced reactors, reactor materials, uranium mining, I and C process, and, thermalhydraulics. Two plenary sessions focussed on: Small Modular Reactors; and, radioisotopes primarily for medical applications. The student conference was well attended with plenary sessions focussing on: Nuclear Industry Power Developments: The Renaissance; and a panel discussion on the overview of the proposed refurbishment of the Darlington four-unit station.

  4. Can nuclear energy support civilized society in the 21st century? From a civilization based on chemical reactions to a civilization based on nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United Nations passed and adopted 'Principles of Sustainable Development' in 1992, as a resolution on the sustainable development of mankind. It advocates maintaining the ecological system to support the earth, while presenting the ethical issue of 'impartiality within a generation', the reduction of absolute poverty and also 'impartiality between generations', in particular 'not leaving a negative legacy to the next generation'. The issue of the appropriate handling of waste is by nature an issue of safety and resources, but is also an ethical issue. Nuclear power generation is more likely to conserve the environment, if the comparison between radioactive waste and carbon dioxide is considered. The creation of hydrogen by nuclear energy resembles the ecological relationship between the sun and the earth in that it consists of the conversion of nuclear energy into chemical energy. Nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, particle acceleration and lasers can all be found in the universe. It will be possible to find a future for nuclear energy by learning from and imitating nature. If the future of nuclear energy is seen from the viewpoint of sustainability, it can be expected that energy resources will be secured and the environment will be conserved by a system of nuclear energy, which will hopefully grow into a comprehensive nuclear science and technology that supports the civilization at its roots. (orig.)

  5. Radioactive nuclear beams and the North American IsoSpin Laboratory (ISL) initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive nuclear beams (RNBs) offer exciting new research opportunities in fields as diverse as nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, astrophysics atomic, materials, and applied science. Their realization in new accelerator complexes also offers important technical challenges. Some of the nuclear physics possibilities afforded by RNBs, with emphasis on low spin nuclear structure, are discussed, accompanied by an outline of the ISL initiative and its status

  6. Science and Society Colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    Randi, J

    1991-01-01

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  7. Planetary Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  8. Ninth annual conference of Indian Nuclear Society on public perception on benefits of nuclear energy in health care, industry and agriculture: book of preprints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the contributed papers dealing with beneficial aspects of nuclear energy in health care, industry and agriculture. Nuclear techniques in crime detection, neutron activation analysis, dosimetry, personnel monitoring, radiation safety, environmental aspects, application radiation techniques in medicine, industry, agriculture etc. are some of the main topics covered in the conference. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  9. The American College of nuclear physicians 18th annual meeting and scientific sessions DOE day: Substance abuse and nuclear medicine abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    Despite the enormous personal and social cost Of substance abuse, there is very little knowledge with respect to the mechanisms by which these drugs produce addiction as well as to the mechanisms of toxicity. Similarly, there is a lack of effective therapeutic intervention to treat the drug abusers. In this respect, nuclear medicine could contribute significantly by helping to gather information using brain imaging techniques about mechanisms of drug addiction which, in turn, could help design better therapeutic interventions, and by helping in the evaluation and diagnosis of organ toxicity from the use of drugs of abuse. This volume contains six short descriptions of presentations made at the 18th Meeting of the American College of Nuclear Physicians -- DOE Day: Substance Abuse and Nuclear Medicine.

  10. The American College of nuclear physicians 18th annual meeting and scientific sessions DOE day: Substance abuse and nuclear medicine abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the enormous personal and social cost Of substance abuse, there is very little knowledge with respect to the mechanisms by which these drugs produce addiction as well as to the mechanisms of toxicity. Similarly, there is a lack of effective therapeutic intervention to treat the drug abusers. In this respect, nuclear medicine could contribute significantly by helping to gather information using brain imaging techniques about mechanisms of drug addiction which, in turn, could help design better therapeutic interventions, and by helping in the evaluation and diagnosis of organ toxicity from the use of drugs of abuse. This volume contains six short descriptions of presentations made at the 18th Meeting of the American College of Nuclear Physicians -- DOE Day: Substance Abuse and Nuclear Medicine

  11. SBBN 2010: 7. Congress of the Brazilian Society of Nuclear Biosciences. Radiations in biosciences: advances and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advance and new perspectives related to the use of ionizing and no ionizing radiations in nuclear biosciences are presented. Multidisciplinary approach, including radiopharmacy, radioprotection and dosimetry, cytogenetic, biosafety, radioecology, environmental toxicology are studied. Topics of Nuclear medicine, radiotherapy and image diagnosis, such as computerized tomography, PET scan, phantoms, biomedical radiography, are reported. Use of radioisotopes, evaluation of radiation dose rates, radiation dose distribution, radiation monitoring is considered. Environmental impact of radiation are also in human beings, animals and for several purposes are analyzed. (MAC)

  12. Partisan amplification of risk: American perceptions of nuclear energy risk in the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi disaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: This study examines risk perceptions toward nuclear power before and after the Fukushima Daiichi disaster using nationally representative survey samples of American adults. Scope: On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 8.4 earthquake, the largest in the nation's history, occurred off the coast of Japan. The earthquake produced a devastating tsunami that flooded areas of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant and resulted in a loss of power to the plant's cooling system. In the weeks that followed, the world watched as Japanese and international nuclear power safety experts scrambled to contain the damage and prevent a full meltdown. Although the Fukushima Daiichi disaster was heavily covered in media, there is little empirical research on how this coverage impacted audience risk perceptions. Our analysis goes beyond examining aggregate risk perceptions, instead focusing on how specific sub-populations responded to the disaster. Conclusion: We found that ideological groups responded differently to the events in Japan. In particular, risk perceptions among conservatives decreased following the incident. Moreover, we found that media use exacerbated these effects. We discuss possible explanations for these findings. - Highlights: • We explored American risk perceptions of nuclear energy pre- and post-Fukushima. • Impacts of the disaster endured, likely due to relatively high media coverage. • Conservatives who paid more attention to media perceived less risk post-Fukushima. • Media coverage can serve to polarize opinions instead of mainstreaming them

  13. 2007 DAtf Winter meeting: nuclear power in a relationship of tension between politics, society, and the economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Content: Effects of energy policy on middle classes and economy; the role of nuclear power in the European Parliament and on south-eastern member states of the European Union; perspectives of British energy policy; energy strategies for future - energy policy in Europe; energy policy and social responsibility. (GL)

  14. Addressing Obsolescence in Operating Power Stations by Implementation of Safety Related Digital Upgrades Paper for Spanish Nuclear Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legrand, R.

    2014-07-01

    Obsolescence of Instrumentation and Controls is a major problem facing operating Nuclear Power Stations globally. AREVA is the only supplier that has supported the successful licensing, engineering, procurement, installation and commissioning of a full-scope digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) Protection System in the United States. (Author)

  15. Time for final disposal of nuclear waste - society, technology and nature; Tid foer slutfoervaring. Samhaelle, teknik och natur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsling, Willis; Andersson-Skog, Lena; Haenninen, Hannu; Knutsson, Gert; Ma ttsson, Soeren; Stigh, Jimmy; Soederberg, Olof; Bolin, Bert; Nordlund, Erling

    2007-05-15

    This report consists of a number of independent contribution that treat different aspects of the nuclear waste complex, with the time perspective as a common starting point. The review does not pretend to cover the entire area, but the selected issues addressed are those of large general interest. First a general overview is given of how the nuclear waste issue has been treated in Sweden since the plans to use nuclear power begun be planned in the middle of the 1940s. The complex of problem around the nuclear waste issue is linked to our natural aversion against the development of nuclear weapons during they last 60-70 years, but also to the controversies around the peaceful use of the nuclear power that has happened during the latest 30-40 years. In chapters 3 the time perspective is considerably shorter, approximately 20 years. Here, construction and operation of an underground repository for nuclear waste is discussed. Such an undertaking has many resemblances with establishing an underground mine and there is much experience to learn from. In chapters 4 questions about the technical barriers are treated, the copper container, bentonite buffer and the backfilling. The copper container and bentonite buffer both have key roles to prevent ground water to come in contact with the spent fuel and that radioactivity is transported out into the environment. They must both fulfil their functions during the period when the fuel is dangerous, i.e. over 100,000 years. Different processes affects the repository, some during short periods, some during several 10,000 years. Specific intervals (from 10 years and up to 100,000 years) are indicated for the different processes, almost all with the starting point at the deposition of the waste. The possibility to gain experiences from natural analogies is treated in chapters 5. They can be seen as a prolonged experiment in natural systems where one reactor zone has been active for more than 100,000 years. The time perspective

  16. The INIS and the Spanish American Cooperation in the field of the nuclear documentation and information field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INIS system is described in its subjects covered, its functioning and outputs produced. It is stated that due to similar necesities that hispano-american countries, belonging to INIS system, have; an harmonic and associated work in the scientific and technological information area is convenient. The importance of a cooperation program as well as a regional mutual assistance in disseminating, servicing, training, technical supporting, designing, organizing and putting into service Nuclear Information Centers is remarked. The outstanding characteristics of INIS system are pointed out like being descentralized and cooperating as well as the profitable utilization of important experience from previous systems like ENDS (European Nuclear Documentation System) and Nuclear Science Abstracts from USA. Also other important characteristics of INIS system are evaluated like the permanent challenge to National Centers in order to improve their services, that implying a common task for librarians, new information specialists and users. (E.A.C.)

  17. Contributions of radiochemistry and nuclear analytical techniques to society and technology: some examples of 35 years’ experience in Delft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budget cuts and the oscillating public debates on the benefits of nuclear research reactor facilities are a continuous threat to many nuclear institutions. University affiliated institutions often face additional problems if their facilities offer sufficient scientific challenge and if an education in nuclear sciences provide students a sound outlook for a professional career. Such discussions may be an excuse for non-fulfilment of vacancies and reduced priority in the academic curriculum. Universities tend to reallocate their funds to more contemporary sciences such as molecular biology and nanotechnology. Their choices are based on relevance, quality viability and productivity. Relevance is often measured on the basis of external funding of research programs as well as on career opportunities for students. However, the areas with opportunities for external funding are largely determined by socio-economic developments, sometimes even at the (inter)national political level. The thematic areas in the scientific Framework Programs of the European Union illustrate this. The relevance and viability of an expensive facility like a nuclear reactor centre can also be demonstrated by making the facilities available to provide measurements on request by outsiders. Ideally, such services should be sustainable, but even the existence may lead to consider the centre being of regional or national importance. Nuclear reactor centres have various options for such services, like production of radionuclides; neutron transmutation doping; neutron activation analysis; neutron radiography and others. This contribution gives examples of the typical analytical services provided by the Interuniversity Reactor Institute of the Delft University of Technology. This institute houses the only university research reactor in the Netherlands, a 2 MW swimming pool reactor, with associated facilities for neutron research, neutron activation and radiochemistry. Within the services provided by the

  18. Call for NDT leadership role in assuring safety of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondestructive Testing and its potential role in assuring the safety of nuclear power were given emphasis at a conference on Nondestructive Testing in the Nuclear Industry sponsored by the American Society for Metals Dec. 1--3 in Denver, Colo. Excerpts from two major addresses challenging the NDT community to assume leadership in solving nuclear safety problems are presented

  19. Accreditation of nuclear engineering programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Professional Development and Accreditation Committee (PDAC) has the responsibility for accreditation of engineering and technology programs for nuclear and similarly named programs. This committee provides society liaison with the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), is responsible for the appointment and training of accreditation visitors, nomination of members for the ABET Board and Accreditation Commissions, and review of the criteria for accreditation of nuclear-related programs. The committee is composed of 21 members representing academia and industry. The ABET consists of 19 participating bodies, primarily professional societies, and 4 affiliate bodies. Representation on ABET is determined by the size of the professional society and the number of programs accredited. The ANS, as a participating body, has one member on the ABET board, two members on the Engineering Accreditation Commission, and one on the Technology Accreditation Commission. The ABET board sets ABET policy and the commissions are responsible for accreditation visits

  20. Recommendations for 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging for cardiac sarcoidosis. Japanese society of nuclear cardiology recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease and generally the prognosis is good. However the prognosis of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is extremely poor and careful management is required. Guidelines for the diagnosis of CS were published in 1992 and modified in 2006 in Japan. Because the capability to diagnose CS has been improved through the use of 18F-FDG PET, The Japan Society of Sarcoidosis and other Granulomatous Diseases is currently updating its guidelines for the diagnosis of CS and positive 18F-FDG PET findings would be added for one of the criteria for the diagnosis. FDG PET Guidelines about preparation, scan protocol, image processing and image interpretation are described dealing with recommendations about dietary modification and fasting time before imaging, heparin preadministration, 18F-FDG administration dose, cardiac spot imaging, attenuation collection, use of bull's-eye map display, use of systemic MIP imaging and use of standardized uptake value. (K.S.)

  1. Papers of the Fourth Annual Congress of the Mexican Nuclear Society, C.A., 2. Regional Congress of Radiological and Nuclear Safety. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fulfillment of the Fourth Annual Congress of the Sociedad Nuclear Mexicana, this time inside the frame of the Second Regional Congress of Radiological and Nuclear Safety, is no doubt an event that approach us to make of this forum the most important for the exchange of ideas and the approaching among the members of our nuclear community. This time, the beautiful colonial city of Zacatecas, welcome us for this event, gathering fifty works in the areas of fuel cycle, power reactor operation, reactor physics, research reactors, transient analysis and instrumentation and experimental techniques. This significant number of work reaffirm the great interest of the nuclear community in to take part, presenting its most recent developments. The reporting belongs to seven of the main institutions of the country who dedicate, or are related with the technological development of the nuclear and its different branches. With regard to participants of foreign countries, papers representing to Argentina, Brazil, Chile,United States of North America and Peru are included. The efforts of all the members of the Sociedad Nuclear Mexicana has been addressed to do of the event a mean to make easy the exchange of ideas and to get acquainted with the work of other colleagues, in an ambient of warmth and surmounting. (Author)

  2. Restart of the Armenia-2 Nuclear Power Station: Radiological emergency preparedness considerations for the nearby American community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Armenia Nuclear Power Station is located at Metsamor, approximately 30 km NW of the capital, Yerevan. The station, a two-unit, first-generation Soviet-designed VVER-440/270 pressurized water reactor plant was closed following the 1988 earthquake near Spitak. Because of a severe energy shortage the Government of Armenia has undertaken a program to recommission Unit 2. The plant design and circumstances surrounding its closure caused members of the U.S. Embassy staff and the American community in Armenia to express concerns for their safety in the event of a radiological emergency. In response, two representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program traveled to Armenia to review the Status of radiological emergency preparedness, meet with the American community, and make protective action recommendations. In this presentation we examine the major issues associated with recommissioning of Armenia-2, the challenges involved with developing a radiological emergency preparedness program for the American community, and our recommendations for protective actions in the absence of a strong communications and radiological monitoring infrastructure

  3. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy joint committee recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sites, Brian D; Chan, Vincent W; Neal, Joseph M;

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) is a growing area of both clinical and research interest. The following document contains the work produced by a joint committee from ASRA and the European Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Therapy. This joint committee was established to recommend...... to members and institutions the scope of practice, the teaching curriculum, and the options for implementing the medical practice of UGRA.This document specifically defines the following:1. 10 common tasks used when performing an ultrasound-guided nerve block,2. The core competencies and skill sets...... associated with UGRA,3. A training practice pathway for postgraduate anesthesiologists, and4. A residency-based training pathway.In both the residency and postgraduate pathways, training, competency, and proficiency requirements include both didactic and experiential components. The Joint Committee...

  4. Development of The Students' Learning Process and Meta cognitive Strategies in Science on Nuclear Energy through Science, Technology and Society (STS) approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This research aimed to develop 48 Grade 10 students' learning process and meta cognitive strategies in the 'Nuclear Energy' topic through the Science, Technology and Society (STS) approach, which consists of five teaching stages: identification of social issues; identification of potential solutions; need for knowledge; decision-making; and socialization. The data were analyzed through rubric score of learning process and meta cognitive strategies, which consists of five strategies: recalling, planning, monitoring and maintaining, evaluating, and relating. The findings revealed that most students used learning process in a high level. However, they performed a very low level in almost all of the meta cognitive strategies. The factors potentially impeded their development of awareness about learning process and meta cognitive strategies were characteristics of content and students, learning processes, and student habit

  5. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ANDROGEN EXCESS AND PCOS SOCIETY DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: GUIDE TO THE BEST PRACTICES IN THE EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME--PART 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Neil F; Cobin, Rhoda H; Futterweit, Walter; Glueck, Jennifer S; Legro, Richard S; Carmina, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is recognized as the most common endocrine disorder of reproductive-aged women around the world. This document, produced by the collaboration of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) and the Androgen Excess and PCOS Society (AES) aims to highlight the most important clinical issues confronting physicians and their patients with PCOS. It is a summary of current best practices in 2015. PCOS has been defined using various criteria, including menstrual irregularity, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovary morphology (PCOM). General agreement exists among specialty society guidelines that the diagnosis of PCOS must be based on the presence of at least two of the following three criteria: chronic anovulation, hyperandrogenism (clinical or biological) and polycystic ovaries. There is need for careful clinical assessment of women's history, physical examination, and laboratory evaluation, emphasizing the accuracy and validity of the methodology used for both biochemical measurements and ovarian imaging. Free testosterone (T) levels are more sensitive than the measurement of total T for establishing the existence of androgen excess and should be ideally determined through equilibrium dialysis techniques. Value of measuring levels of androgens other than T in patients with PCOS is relatively low. New ultrasound machines allow diagnosis of PCOM in patients having at least 25 small follicles (2 to 9 mm) in the whole ovary. Ovarian size at 10 mL remains the threshold between normal and increased ovary size. Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone and anti-Müllerian hormone are useful for determining a diagnosis of PCOS. Correct diagnosis of PCOS impacts on the likelihood of associated metabolic and cardiovascular risks and leads to appropriate intervention, depending upon the woman's age, reproductive status, and her own concerns. The management of women with PCOS should include reproductive function, as well as the care of hirsutism

  6. Latin American Literatures and Cultures: Self and Society. Papers from the National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute (La Jolla, California, August 1996).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabrook, John H., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This special issue contains the following articles: (1) "Critiquing the Center: Rigoberta Menchu and Enrique Dussel" (Joseph R. Hoff); (2) "Caroline Maria De Jesus: A Testimonial Voice in the Wilderness" (Eva Bueno); (3) "Latin American Women's Voices: La Malinche to Rigoberta Menchu" (Ana Maria Romo de Mease); (4) "China in Borges''The Garden of…

  7. Risk perspective on final disposal of nuclear waste. Individuals, society and communication; Riskperspektiv paa slutfoervaring av kaernavfall. Individ, samhaelle och kommunikation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindblad, Inga-Britt (ed.)

    2007-09-29

    This report tries to evaluate the importance of the risk perspective in connection with final storage of nuclear waste. The concept 'risk' has different importance for experts and general public, within different research directions and among stakeholders in the nuclear waste issue. The report has been published in order to give an interdisciplinary scientific perspective on the risk concept. The authors have their background in different disciplines: radiation physics, psychology, media- and communications-science. The report treats four different themes: The first theme concerns perspectives on the risk concept and describes various principles for how risks can be handled in the society. The next theme is about comparing various risks. This section shows that risk comparisons can to be done within the framework of a scientific attitude and during certain given conditions. The third theme elucidates results from research about subjective risk, and shows that a large number of factors influence how risks are considered by individuals, and can influence his risk behavior and also how the individual means that the society will make decisions in risk-related questions. The fourth and last theme is about risk communication. Since the risk concept contains many different aspects it is clear that risk should not only be informed about, but also communicated. If a purely mathematical definition of risk was the only valid form, such information, from experts to the citizens, would possibly be sufficient. But since there are other relevant factors to take into consideration (t.ex the individual's own values), a communicative process must take place, i.e. the citizens should have influence on how risks are compared and managed. In the final theme, the authors have chosen to reflect around the themes above, i.e. different perspectives on the risk concept, risk comparisons, subjective risk view and risk communication are discussed.

  8. A simplified study of public perception in the nuclear field: suggestions for educational campaign for different segments of society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last years the need for the increase in the electricity energy production as much as in Brazil as in the rest of the world, has raised the tone o the debate about the environmental impacts as a result of these debates, the government and the Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO's) have requested several opinion researches aiming at measuring and evaluating the knowledge and perception of the public in relation to the best non-polluting energy sources. Prior to 2001 these researches would not make any sense in Brazil as the majority of its power grid is made of hydroelectric plants, a renewable energy source. However, when in that year it occurred a drought, the competent authorities have faced the necessity of developing a plan, the National Energy Plan (PNE2030) which recommends, among other objectives, finalizing the construction of the Angra 3 plant and the implementation Df new nuclear plants in places still to be determined. Even considering the complexity of the subject, this paper presents a field research realized from September 28th, 2010 to October 28th, 2010 of the current level of perception of the Brazilian population, specifically the residents of three cities of Rio de Janeiro, about the nuclear area. As a result of this work, it is suggested how the competent authorities should proceed to reach in an efficient manner, by means of communication campaigns both informative and educational, a greater understanding of the population about the proposed subject. (author)

  9. The American atom: A documentary history of nuclear policies from the discovery of fission to the present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In selecting these historical documents the authors have applied three general tests: first, does the document help tell the story of the development of American nuclear policy in a nontechnical way; second, is the source primary rather than secondary, written by an actor in the drama rather than by a member of the audience; third, does the document provide coverage of the major chapters in the story? The Manhattan Project was America's $2 billion secret project to build an atomic bomb. Many documents associated with the project have come to light only in recent years. In Section II they use the letters of J. Robert Oppenheimer and the recently declassified minutes of policy committees to tell the story of how the bomb was designed and built and how the decision was made to drop the first uranium and plutonium devices on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. How did a weapon of war become the key to a peacetime industry? In considering atomic energy after World War II, they focus in Section III on the legislative enabling acts that established the Atomic Energy Commission, the short-lived dream of international control of nuclear weapons under the Baruch Plan, and the ''atoms for peace'' program of President Dwight D. Eisenhower. By 1954 the highly classified work on nuclear weapons paralleled a new development of nuclear energy and power reactors. Knowledge was shared with both private industry and other countries. The fruits of this program are considered in the later section on nuclear power

  10. Linking East with West: Websites as a Public Relations Tool for American and Chinese Banks Operating in a Culturally-Evolving Chinese Society

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Jing

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, three websites are explored in-depth and serve as a case study for an intercultural comparison of websites as public relations tools. The websites of Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC), Shanghai Pudong Development Bank (SPDB), and Citibank were evaluated for this specific study because they represent three models of current banks operating in a culturally-evolving Chinese society. The two-way symmetrical model of public relations and the personal influence model ha...

  11. ETRAN '98: Society for Electronics,Telecommunications, Computers, Automation and Nuclear Engineering. Section for Nuclear Techniques and Technology. Proceedings of the XLII Conference. Vol IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume 4, includes 29 papers presented at the Sessions on Nuclear science and technology of the ETRAN '98 conference. The topics covered were related to solving the problems of the spent fuels storage at the RA reactor, fuel management calculations, computation of neutron and photon spectra at the RA and RB reactors, applications of radiation sources in medicine and industry, radiation protection issues

  12. Native Americans and cultural impact analysis: The proposed nuclear waste repository at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beneath a surface patterning of legal, political, economic and other formal structures, Native American reservations and their tribes possess many culturally distinctive values and patterns of life. Generally it is this ancient underlying culture that Native American leaders wish to preserve and nourish. Their primary objective is tribal survival, and socioeconomic and cultural impact assessment theories and methods must reflect this objective. Conventional impact analysis rarely meets the needs of tribal leadership. Current, fragmented approaches must be replaced by integrative, holistic alternatives

  13. The nuclear research in Mexico (1986-1994). Bibliometrics of papers published in journals outside of the Latin American region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mexican research in nuclear science during 1986-1994 has been studied through the bibliometric analysis of the output of scientific papers published by Mexican institutions in non Latin American journals of international circulation. Bibliographic references were compiled from the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) database as well as from proceedings and annual reports of Mexican research institutions within the field of interest. After careful normalization, data from the 920 detected papers were keyboarded and checked in a database used for the evaluation of the number of papers by discipline, source institutions and departments, authors, coauthors, publication year as well as publishing journals and their geographic origin, language of publication and the interactions of all these parameters. Results were expressed in reports, and summarized in tables and figures to visualize the state of this research field in Mexico. (Author)

  14. IAEA Syllabus for the Education and Training of Radiation Oncologists. Endorsed by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    making radiotherapy accessible to cancer patients. To ensure a uniformity and consistency in the training that could be undertaken by the various medical institutions running their postgraduate programmes in radiation oncology the IAEA's intent in formulating a syllabus for the education and training of radiation oncologists is to provide guidance for all professionals and administrators involved in the training of this discipline. The syllabus seeks to address the training requirements in developing countries in order to establish a common and consistent framework. It provides both a structure for the organization of the training and a core curriculum. The guidelines outlined in the core curriculum could be adopted by the various Member States as a baseline for national curricula. These guidelines have been framed via consultations with representatives of the Member States - both from developed and developing countries at a Consultants' Meeting held at IAEA headquarters in Vienna on 14-17 August 2006 and were commented on by major national and regional societies of radiation oncology. The IAEA recognizes the variability in the prevalence and spectrum of diseases as well as the variation in the availability of different technologies in the countries and regions. National and regional societies should prioritize the subjects presented in the core curriculum and adapt them to the disease profiles observed in their own countries/regions. Countries with a limited number of radiation oncologists should recognize the fact that cancer care is becoming ever more specialized and other aspects of cancer care such as medical oncology and palliative care should act in collaboration with the radiation oncologists to cover these other partially overlapping disciplines. The IAEA promotes a policy of multidisciplinary decision-making regarding the management of the individual patient, where the radiation oncologist interacts with other disciplines as a competent and independent

  15. IAEA Syllabus for the Education and Training of Radiation Oncologists. Endorsed by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    making radiotherapy accessible to cancer patients. To ensure a uniformity and consistency in the training that could be undertaken by the various medical institutions running their postgraduate programmes in radiation oncology the IAEA's intent in formulating a syllabus for the education and training of radiation oncologists is to provide guidance for all professionals and administrators involved in the training of this discipline. The syllabus seeks to address the training requirements in developing countries in order to establish a common and consistent framework. It provides both a structure for the organization of the training and a core curriculum. The guidelines outlined in the core curriculum could be adopted by the various Member States as a baseline for national curricula. These guidelines have been framed via consultations with representatives of the Member States - both from developed and developing countries at a Consultants' Meeting held at IAEA headquarters in Vienna on 14-17 August 2006 and were commented on by major national and regional societies of radiation oncology. The IAEA recognizes the variability in the prevalence and spectrum of diseases as well as the variation in the availability of different technologies in the countries and regions. National and regional societies should prioritize the subjects presented in the core curriculum and adapt them to the disease profiles observed in their own countries/regions. Countries with a limited number of radiation oncologists should recognize the fact that cancer care is becoming ever more specialized and other aspects of cancer care such as medical oncology and palliative care should act in collaboration with the radiation oncologists to cover these other partially overlapping disciplines. The IAEA promotes a policy of multidisciplinary decision-making regarding the management of the individual patient, where the radiation oncologist interacts with other disciplines as a competent and independent

  16. IAEA Syllabus for the Education and Training of Radiation Oncologists. Endorsed by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    obstacle to making radiotherapy accessible to cancer patients. To ensure a uniformity and consistency in the training that could be undertaken by the various medical institutions running their postgraduate programmes in radiation oncology the IAEA's intent in formulating a syllabus for the education and training of radiation oncologists is to provide guidance for all professionals and administrators involved in the training of this discipline. The syllabus seeks to address the training requirements in developing countries in order to establish a common and consistent framework. It provides both a structure for the organization of the training and a core curriculum. The guidelines outlined in the core curriculum could be adopted by the various Member States as a baseline for national curricula. These guidelines have been framed via consultations with representatives of the Member States - both from developed and developing countries at a Consultants' Meeting held at IAEA headquarters in Vienna on 14-17 August 2006 and were commented on by major national and regional societies of radiation oncology. The IAEA recognizes the variability in the prevalence and spectrum of diseases as well as the variation in the availability of different technologies in the countries and regions. National and regional societies should prioritize the subjects presented in the core curriculum and adapt them to the disease profiles observed in their own countries/regions. Countries with a limited number of radiation oncologists should recognize the fact that cancer care is becoming ever more specialized and other aspects of cancer care such as medical oncology and palliative care should act in collaboration with the radiation oncologists to cover these other partially overlapping disciplines. The IAEA promotes a policy of multidisciplinary decision-making regarding the management of the individual patient, where the radiation oncologist interacts with other disciplines as a competent and

  17. IAEA Syllabus for the Education and Training of Radiation Oncologists. Endorsed by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    making radiotherapy accessible to cancer patients. To ensure a uniformity and consistency in the training that could be undertaken by the various medical institutions running their postgraduate programmes in radiation oncology the IAEA's intent in formulating a syllabus for the education and training of radiation oncologists is to provide guidance for all professionals and administrators involved in the training of this discipline. The syllabus seeks to address the training requirements in developing countries in order to establish a common and consistent framework. It provides both a structure for the organization of the training and a core curriculum. The guidelines outlined in the core curriculum could be adopted by the various Member States as a baseline for national curricula. These guidelines have been framed via consultations with representatives of the Member States - both from developed and developing countries at a Consultants' Meeting held at IAEA headquarters in Vienna on 14-17 August 2006 and were commented on by major national and regional societies of radiation oncology. The IAEA recognizes the variability in the prevalence and spectrum of diseases as well as the variation in the availability of different technologies in the countries and regions. National and regional societies should prioritize the subjects presented in the core curriculum and adapt them to the disease profiles observed in their own countries/regions. Countries with a limited number of radiation oncologists should recognize the fact that cancer care is becoming ever more specialized and other aspects of cancer care such as medical oncology and palliative care should act in collaboration with the radiation oncologists to cover these other partially overlapping disciplines. The IAEA promotes a policy of multidisciplinary decision-making regarding the management of the individual patient, where the radiation oncologist interacts with other disciplines as a competent and independent

  18. IAEA Syllabus for the Education and Training of Radiation Oncologists. Endorsed by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    making radiotherapy accessible to cancer patients. To ensure a uniformity and consistency in the training that could be undertaken by the various medical institutions running their postgraduate programmes in radiation oncology the IAEA's intent in formulating a syllabus for the education and training of radiation oncologists is to provide guidance for all professionals and administrators involved in the training of this discipline. The syllabus seeks to address the training requirements in developing countries in order to establish a common and consistent framework. It provides both a structure for the organization of the training and a core curriculum. The guidelines outlined in the core curriculum could be adopted by the various Member States as a baseline for national curricula. These guidelines have been framed via consultations with representatives of the Member States - both from developed and developing countries at a Consultants' Meeting held at IAEA headquarters in Vienna on 14-17 August 2006 and were commented on by major national and regional societies of radiation oncology. The IAEA recognizes the variability in the prevalence and spectrum of diseases as well as the variation in the availability of different technologies in the countries and regions. National and regional societies should prioritize the subjects presented in the core curriculum and adapt them to the disease profiles observed in their own countries/regions. Countries with a limited number of radiation oncologists should recognize the fact that cancer care is becoming ever more specialized and other aspects of cancer care such as medical oncology and palliative care should act in collaboration with the radiation oncologists to cover these other partially overlapping disciplines. The IAEA promotes a policy of multidisciplinary decision-making regarding the management of the individual patient, where the radiation oncologist interacts with other disciplines as a competent and independent

  19. IAEA Syllabus for the Education and Training of Radiation Oncologists. Endorsed by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    making radiotherapy accessible to cancer patients. To ensure a uniformity and consistency in the training that could be undertaken by the various medical institutions running their postgraduate programmes in radiation oncology the IAEA's intent in formulating a syllabus for the education and training of radiation oncologists is to provide guidance for all professionals and administrators involved in the training of this discipline. The syllabus seeks to address the training requirements in developing countries in order to establish a common and consistent framework. It provides both a structure for the organization of the training and a core curriculum. The guidelines outlined in the core curriculum could be adopted by the various Member States as a baseline for national curricula. These guidelines have been framed via consultations with representatives of the Member States - both from developed and developing countries at a Consultants' Meeting held at IAEA headquarters in Vienna on 14-17 August 2006 and were commented on by major national and regional societies of radiation oncology. The IAEA recognizes the variability in the prevalence and spectrum of diseases as well as the variation in the availability of different technologies in the countries and regions. National and regional societies should prioritize the subjects presented in the core curriculum and adapt them to the disease profiles observed in their own countries/regions. Countries with a limited number of radiation oncologists should recognize the fact that cancer care is becoming ever more specialized and other aspects of cancer care such as medical oncology and palliative care should act in collaboration with the radiation oncologists to cover these other partially overlapping disciplines. The IAEA promotes a policy of multidisciplinary decision-making regarding the management of the individual patient, where the radiation oncologist interacts with other disciplines as a competent and independent

  20. The nuclear industry and the young generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Nuclear Society was founded in 1975. It is a federation of 25 nuclear societies from 24 countries-stretching from the Atlantic to the Urals and on across Russia to the Pacific. Through Russia's membership in the Pacific Nuclear Council. ENS is directly linked to that area, too. ENS comprises more than 20 000 professionals from industry, power stations, research centers and authorities, working to advance nuclear energy. ENS has three Member Societies in Australia, Israel and Morocco. Also it has collaboration agreements with the American Nuclear Society, the Argentinean Nuclear Energy Association, the Canadian and the Chinese Nuclear Societies. ENS is doing pioneering work with its Young Generation Network, standing for positive measures to recruit and educate young people as engineers, technicians and skilled staff ion the nuclear field: from school to university and in industry. The goals of the YGN are: to promote the establishment of national Young Generation networks; to promote the exchange of knowledge between older and younger generation cross-linked all over Europe; to encourage young people in nuclear technology to provide a resource for the future; to communicate nuclear issues to the public (general public, media, politicians). (N.C.)